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Sample records for giant stark effect

  1. Semiconductor-metal transition induced by giant Stark effect in blue phosphorene nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Peng-Yu; Chen, Shi-Zhang; Zhou, Wu-Xing; Chen, Ke-Qiu, E-mail: keqiuchen@hnu.edu.cn

    2017-06-28

    The electronic structures and transport properties in monolayer blue phosphorene nanoribbons (BPNRs) with transverse electric field have been studied by using density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's functions method. The results show that the band gaps of BPNRs with both armchair and zigzag edges are linearly decreased with the increasing of the strength of transverse electric field. A semiconductor-metal transition occurs when the electric field strength reaches to 5 V/nm. The Stark coefficient presents a linear dependency on BPNRs widths, and the slopes of both zBPNRs and aBPNRs are 0.41 and 0.54, respectively, which shows a giant Stark effect occurs. Our studies show that the semiconductor-metal transition originates from the giant Stark effect. - Highlights: • The electronic transport in blue phosphorene nanoribbons. • Semiconductor-metal transition can be observed. • The semiconductor-metal transition originates from the giant Stark effect.

  2. The giant Stark effect in armchair-edge phosphorene nanoribbons under a transverse electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Benliang; Zhou, Benhu; Liu, Pu; Zhou, Guanghui

    2018-01-01

    We study the variation of electronic properties for armchair-edge phosphorene nanoribbons (APNRs) modulated by a transverse electric field. Within the tight-binding model Hamiltonian, and by solving the differential Schrödinger equation, we find that a band gap closure appears at the critical field due to the giant Stark effect for an APNR. The gap closure has no field polarity, and the gap varies quadratically for small fields but becomes linear for larger ones. We attribute the giant Stark effect to the broken edge degeneracy, i.e., the charge redistributions of the conduction band minimum and valence band maximum states localized at opposite edges induced by the field. By combined with the Green's function approach, it is shown that in the presence of the critical field a gap of density of states (DOS) disappears and a high value DOS turns up at the energy position of the band gap closure. Finally, as the field increases, we find the band gap decreases more rapidly and the gap closure occurs at smaller fields for wider ribbons. Both the band gap and DOS variations with the field show an insulator-metal transition induced by a transverse electric field for the APNR. Our results show that wider APNRs are more appreciable to design field-effect transistors.

  3. Atomic Models for Motional Stark Effects Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, M F; Holcomb, C; Jayakuma, J; Allen, S; Pablant, N A; Burrell, K

    2007-07-26

    We present detailed atomic physics models for motional Stark effects (MSE) diagnostic on magnetic fusion devices. Excitation and ionization cross sections of the hydrogen or deuterium beam traveling in a magnetic field in collisions with electrons, ions, and neutral gas are calculated in the first Born approximation. The density matrices and polarization states of individual Stark-Zeeman components of the Balmer {alpha} line are obtained for both beam into plasma and beam into gas models. A detailed comparison of the model calculations and the MSE polarimetry and spectral intensity measurements obtained at the DIII-D tokamak is carried out. Although our beam into gas models provide a qualitative explanation for the larger {pi}/{sigma} intensity ratios and represent significant improvements over the statistical population models, empirical adjustment factors ranging from 1.0-2.0 must still be applied to individual line intensities to bring the calculations into full agreement with the observations. Nevertheless, we demonstrate that beam into gas measurements can be used successfully as calibration procedures for measuring the magnetic pitch angle through {pi}/{sigma} intensity ratios. The analyses of the filter-scan polarization spectra from the DIII-D MSE polarimetry system indicate unknown channel and time dependent light contaminations in the beam into gas measurements. Such contaminations may be the main reason for the failure of beam into gas calibration on MSE polarimetry systems.

  4. Quantitative calibration of radiofrequency NMR Stark effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasek, Matthew R; Kempf, James G

    2011-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) Stark responses can occur in quadrupolar nuclei for an electric field oscillating at twice the usual NMR frequency (2ω(0)). Calibration of responses to an applied E field is needed to establish nuclear spins as probes of native E fields within material and molecular systems. We present an improved approach and apparatus for accurate measurement of quadrupolar Stark effects. Updated values of C(14) (the response parameter in cubic crystals) were obtained for both (69)Ga and (75)As in GaAs. Keys to improvement include a modified implementation of voltage dividers to assess the 2ω(0) amplitude, |E|, and the stabilization of divider response by reduction of stray couplings in 2ω(0) circuitry. Finally, accuracy was enhanced by filtering sets of |E| through a linear response function that we established for the radiofrequency amplifier. Our approach is verified by two types of spectral results. Steady-state 2ω(0) excitation to presaturate NMR spectra yielded C(14) = (2.59 ± 0.06) × 10(12) m(-1) for (69)Ga at room-temperature and 14.1 T. For (75)As, we obtained (3.1 ± 0.1) × 10(12) m(-1). Both values reconcile with earlier results from 77 K and below 1 T, whereas current experiments are at room temperature and 14.1 T. Finally, we present results where few-microsecond pulses of the 2ω(0) field induced small (tens of Hz) changes in high-resolution NMR line shapes. There too, spectra collected vs |E| agree with the model for response, further establishing the validity of our protocols to specify |E|.

  5. Variable scaling method and Stark effect in hydrogen atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhury, R.K.R.; Ghosh, B.

    1983-09-01

    By relating the Stark effect problem in hydrogen-like atoms to that of the spherical anharmonic oscillator we have found simple formulas for energy eigenvalues for the Stark effect. Matrix elements have been calculated using 0(2,1) algebra technique after Armstrong and then the variable scaling method has been used to find optimal solutions. Our numerical results are compared with those of Hioe and Yoo and also with the results obtained by Lanczos. (author)

  6. Valley-selective optical Stark effect probed by Kerr rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMountain, Trevor; Bergeron, Hadallia; Balla, Itamar; Stanev, Teodor K.; Hersam, Mark C.; Stern, Nathaniel P.

    2018-01-01

    The ability to monitor and control distinct states is at the heart of emerging quantum technologies. The valley pseudospin in transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) monolayers is a promising degree of freedom for such control, with the optical Stark effect allowing for valley-selective manipulation of energy levels in WS2 and WSe2 using ultrafast optical pulses. Despite these advances, understanding of valley-sensitive optical Stark shifts in TMDCs has been limited by reflectance-based detection methods where the signal is small and prone to background effects. More sensitive polarization-based spectroscopy is required to better probe ultrafast Stark shifts for all-optical manipulation of valley energy levels. Here, we show time-resolved Kerr rotation to be a more sensitive probe of the valley-selective optical Stark effect in monolayer TMDCs. Compared to the established time-resolved reflectance methods, Kerr rotation is less sensitive to background effects. Kerr rotation provides a fivefold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the Stark effect optical signal and a more precise estimate of the energy shift. This increased sensitivity allows for observation of an optical Stark shift in monolayer MoS2 that exhibits both valley and energy selectivity, demonstrating the promise of this method for investigating this effect in other layered materials and heterostructures.

  7. The σ-stark effect of rotational transitions : Part II: The microwave spectrum of methyl alcohol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkerman, H.A.; Dymanus, A.

    1962-01-01

    The method described in Part I is applied to absorption lines of methyl alcohol in the microwave region. Recorded ΔM = ± 1 Stark patterns of absorption lines with linear Stark effect are compared with calculated patterns. The ΔM = ± 1 Stark patterns of 7 absorption lines with second order Stark

  8. Stark Effect of Alkali Atoms by Laser Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Masayuki; Jin, Wei-Guo; Minowa, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2009-03-01

    Stark effect of alkali atoms has been studied by means of high-resolution atomic-beam laser spectroscopy. A compact electrode apparatus has been developed in order to produce a stable and strong electric field. The Stark shifts and splittings of the D lines have been measured for K, Rb and Cs atoms. The scalar polarizabilities of the K and Rb D1 lines and the scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the K and Cs D2 lines have been determined, providing a crosscheck of the previously reported values.

  9. THz quantum-confined Stark effect in semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil A.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate an instantaneous all-optical manipulation of optical absorption at the ground state of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) via a quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) induced by the electric field of incident THz pulses with peak electric fields reaching 200 kV/cm in the free space...

  10. Stark effect, polarizability, and electroabsorption in silicon nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulutay, Ceyhun; Kulakci, Mustafa; Turan, Raşit

    2010-03-01

    Demonstrating the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) in silicon nanocrystals (NCs) embedded in oxide has been rather elusive, unlike the other materials. Here, the recent experimental data from ion-implanted Si NCs is unambiguously explained within the context of QCSE using an atomistic pseudopotential theory. This further reveals that the majority of the Stark shift comes from the valence states which undergo a level crossing that leads to a nonmonotonic radiative recombination behavior with respect to the applied field. The polarizability of embedded Si NCs including the excitonic effects is extracted over a diameter range of 2.5-6.5 nm, which displays a cubic scaling, α=cDNC3 , with c=2.436×10-11C/(Vm) , where DNC is the NC diameter. Finally, based on intraband electroabsorption analysis, it is predicted that p -doped Si NCs will show substantial voltage tunability, whereas n -doped samples should be almost insensitive. Given the fact that bulk silicon lacks the linear electro-optic effect as being a centrosymmetric crystal, this may offer a viable alternative for electrical modulation using p -doped Si NCs.

  11. The multichannel motional Stark effect diagnostic on TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levinton, F.M.

    1992-07-01

    Although the q profile plays a key role in theories of instabilities and plasma equilibrium, it has been quite difficult to measure until the recent development of the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. A multichannel motional Stark effect polarimeter system has recently been installed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The diagnostic can measure the magnetic field pitch angle (γ p = tan -1 (B T )/(B p )) at ten radial locations. The doppler shifted D alpha radiation from a TFTR heating beam is viewed near tangential to the toroidal magnetic field via a re-entrant front surface reflecting mirror. The field of view covers from inboard of the magnetic axis to near the outboard edge of the plasma with a radial spatial resolution of 3--5 cm. A high throughput f/2 optics system results in an uncertainty for γ p of ∼0.1 degrees--0.2 degrees with a time resolution of ∼5--10 ms. Initial pinch angle profiles from TFTR have been obtained. The MSE data is consistent with the estimated magnetic axis position from external magnetic measurements and the q=1 radius is in good agreement with the inversion radius from the electron cyclotron emission temperature measurements

  12. The multichannel motional Stark effect diagnostic on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinton, F.M.

    1992-07-01

    Although the q profile plays a key role in theories of instabilities and plasma equilibrium, it has been quite difficult to measure until the recent development of the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. A multichannel motional Stark effect polarimeter system has recently been installed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The diagnostic can measure the magnetic field pitch angle ({gamma}{sub p} = tan{sup {minus}1} (B{sub T})/(B{sup p})) at ten radial locations. The doppler shifted D{sub alpha} radiation from a TFTR heating beam is viewed near tangential to the toroidal magnetic field via a re-entrant front surface reflecting mirror. The field of view covers from inboard of the magnetic axis to near the outboard edge of the plasma with a radial spatial resolution of 3--5 cm. A high throughput f/2 optics system results in an uncertainty for {gamma}{sub p} of {approximately}0.1{degrees}--0.2{degrees} with a time resolution of {approximately}5--10 ms. Initial pinch angle profiles from TFTR have been obtained. The MSE data is consistent with the estimated magnetic axis position from external magnetic measurements and the q=1 radius is in good agreement with the inversion radius from the electron cyclotron emission temperature measurements.

  13. Valley-selective optical Stark effect in monolayer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedik, Nuh

    Monolayer semiconducting transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have a pair of valleys that, by time-reversal symmetry, are energetically degenerate. Lifting the valley degeneracy in these materials is of great interest because it would allow for valley specific band engineering and offer additional control in valleytronic applications. In this talk, I will show that circularly polarized light, which breaks time-reversal symmetry, can be used to lift the valley degeneracy by means of the optical Stark effect. We demonstrate that this effect is capable of raising the exciton level in monolayer TMD WS2 by as much as 18 meV in a controllable valley-selective manner. The resulting energy shift is extremely large, comparable to the shift that would be obtained using a very high magnetic field (approximately 100 Tesla). These results offer a novel way to control valley degree of freedom, and may provide a means to realize new valley-selective Floquet topological state of matter.

  14. Dynamics and maintenance of bipartite entanglement via the Stark shift effect inside dissipative reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkar, S.; Tavassoly, M. K.

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the exact entanglement dynamics are obtained of two two-level atoms with two-photon transitions accompanied by the Stark shift, where each atom is independently coupled to a dissipative reservoir at zero temperature. The results show that, in the presence of Stark shift, entanglement can be preserved for a long time and the decoherence process of entanglement slows down. In particular, we find that while the Stark shift has a constructive effect on entanglement protection for both Markovian and non-Markovian reservoirs, this positive effect can be more visible in the non-Markovian reservoir even with low Stark shift parameter values.

  15. Isotopic effect giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buenerd, M.; Lebrun, D.; Martin, P.; Perrin, G.; Saintignon, P. de; Chauvin, J.; Duhamel, G.

    1981-10-01

    The systematics of the excitation energy of the giant dipole, monopole, and quadrupole resonances are shown to exhibit an isotopic effect. For a given element, the excitation energy of the transition decreases faster with the increasing neutron number than the empirical laws fitting the overall data. This effect is discussed in terms of the available models

  16. Real-time motional Stark effect in jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, D.; Stephen, A.; Hawkes, N.; Dalley, S.; Goodyear, A.; Felton, R.; Joffrin, E.; Fernandes, H.

    2004-01-01

    The increasing importance of real-time measurements and control systems in JET experiments, regarding e.g. Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) and q-profile control, has motivated the development of a real-time motional Stark effect (MSE) system. The MSE diagnostic allows the measurement of local magnetic fields in different locations along the neutral beam path providing, therefore, local measurement of the current and q-profiles. Recently in JET, an upgrade of the MSE diagnostic has been implemented, incorporating a totally new system which allows the use of this diagnostic as a real-time control tool as well as an extended data source for off-line analysis. This paper will briefly describe the technical features of the real-time diagnostic with main focus on the system architecture, which consists of a VME crate hosting three PowerPC processor boards and a fast ADC, all connected via Front Panel Data Port (FPDP). The DSP algorithm implements a lockin-amplifier required to demodulate the JET MSE signals. Some applications for the system will be covered such as: feeding the real-time equilibrium reconstruction code (EQUINOX) and allowing the full coverage analysis of the Neutral Beam time window. A brief comparison between the real-time MSE analysis and the off-line analysis will also be presented

  17. Stark effect and polarizability of graphene quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2017-01-01

    The properties of graphene quantum dots can be manipulated via lateral electric fields. Treating electrons in such structures as confined massless Dirac fermions, we derive an analytical expression for the quadratic Stark shift valid for arbitrary angular momentum and quantum dot size. Moreover, we...

  18. Stark effect in finite-barrier quantum wells, wires, and dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2017-01-01

    The properties of confined carriers in low-dimensional nanostructures can be controlled by external electric fields and an important manifestation is the Stark shift of quantized energy levels. Here, a unifying analytic theory for the Stark effect in arbitrary dimensional nanostructures is presented. The crucial role of finite potential barriers is stressed, in particular, for three-dimensional confinement. Applying the theory to CdSe quantum dots, finite barriers are shown to improve significantly the agreement with experiments. (paper)

  19. Quantum confined Stark effect in Gaussian quantum wells: A tight-binding study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramírez-Morales, A.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I. [Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad Esquina Con Paseo La Bufa S/N, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico)

    2014-05-15

    The main characteristics of the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) are studied theoretically in quantum wells of Gaussian profile. The semi-empirical tight-binding model and the Green function formalism are applied in the numerical calculations. A comparison of the QCSE in quantum wells with different kinds of confining potential is presented.

  20. Safety factor profiles from spectral motional Stark effect for ITER applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jinseok; Chung, Jinil; Wi, Han Min

    2017-10-01

    Depositions on the first mirror and multiple reflections on the other mirrors in the labyrinth of the optical system in the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic for ITER are regarded as one of the main obstacles to overcome. One of the alternatives to the present-day conventional photoelastic-modulation-based MSE principles is the spectroscopic analyses on the motional Stark emissions where either the ratios among individual Stark multiplets or the amount of the Stark split are measured based on precise and accurate atomic data and models to ultimately provide the critical internal constraints in the magnetic equilibrium reconstruction. Equipped with the PEM-based conventional MSE hardware since 2015, the KSTAR MSE diagnostic system is capable of investigating the feasibility of the spectroscopic MSE approach particularly via comparative studies with the PEM approach. Available atomic data and models are used to analyze the beam emission spectra with a high-spectral-resolution spectrometer with a patent-pending dispersion calibration technology. Experimental validation on the atomic data and models is discussed in association with the effect of the existence of mirrors, the Faraday rotation in the relay optics media, and the background polarized light on the measured spectra. Work supported by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, Korea.

  1. Spectral-Kinetic Coupling and Effect of Microfield Rotation on Stark Broadening in Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Demura

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The study deals with two conceptual problems in the theory of Stark broadening by plasmas. One problem is the assumption of the density matrix diagonality in the calculation of spectral line profiles. This assumption is closely related to the definition of zero wave functions basis within which the density matrix is assumed to be diagonal, and obviously violated under the basis change. A consistent use of density matrix in the theoretical scheme inevitably leads to interdependence of atomic kinetics, describing the population of atomic states with the Stark profiles of spectral lines, i.e., to spectral-kinetic coupling. The other problem is connected with the study of the influence of microfield fluctuations on Stark profiles. Here the main results of the perturbative approach to ion dynamics, called the theory of thermal corrections (TTC, are presented, within which the main contribution to effects of ion dynamics is due to microfield fluctuations caused by rotations. In the present study the qualitative behavior of the Stark profiles in the line center within predictions of TTC is confirmed, using non-perturbative computer simulations.

  2. Electroreflectance investigations of quantum confined Stark effect in GaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabinska, A; Pakula, K; Baranowski, J M; Wysmolek, A

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present room temperature electroreflectance studies of GaN quantum wells (QWs) with different well width. The electroreflectance measurements were performed with external voltage applied to the structure therefore it was possible to tune the electric field inside QW up to its completely screening and furthermore even reversing it. The analysis of QW spectral lines showed the Stark shift dependence on applied voltage and well width reaching about 35 meV for highest voltage and widest well width. It was possible to obtain the condition of zero electric field in QW. Both broadening and amplitude of QW lines are minimal for zero electric field and increases for increasing electric field in QW. The energy transition is maximum for zero electric field and for increasing electric field it decreases due to Stark effect. Neither amplitude and broadening parameter nor energy transition does not depend on the direction of electric field. Only parameter that depends on the direction of electric field in QW is phase of the signal. The analysis of Franz-Keldysh oscillations (FKOs) from AlGaN barriers allowed to calculate the real electric field dependence on applied voltage and therefore to obtain the Stark shift dependence on electric field. The Stark shift reached from -12 meV to -35 meV for 450 kV/cm depending on the well width. This conditions were established for highest forward voltages therefore this is the value of electric field and Stark shift caused only by the intrinsic polarization of nitrides.

  3. Time Ordering Effects on Hydrogen Zeeman-Stark Line Profiles in Low-Density Magnetized Plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Rosato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark broadening of hydrogen lines is investigated in low-density magnetized plasmas, at typical conditions of magnetic fusion experiments. The role of time ordering is assessed numerically, by using a simulation code accounting for the evolution of the microscopic electric field generated by the charged particles moving at the vicinity of the atom. The Zeeman effect due to the magnetic field is also retained. Lyman lines with a low principal quantum number n are first investigated, for an application to opacity calculations; next Balmer lines with successively low and high principal quantum numbers are considered for diagnostic purposes. It is shown that neglecting time ordering results in a dramatic underestimation of the Stark effect on the low-n lines. Another conclusion is that time ordering becomes negligible only when ion dynamics effects vanish, as shown in the case of high-n lines.

  4. Motional Stark Effect measurements of the local magnetic field in high temperature fusion plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, R. C.; Bock, A.; Ford, O. P.; Reimer, R.; Burckhart, A.; Dinklage, A.; Hobirk, J.; Howard, J.; Reich, M.; Stober, J.

    2015-10-01

    The utilization of the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) experienced by the neutral hydrogen or deuterium injected into magnetically confined high temperature plasmas is a well established technique to infer the internal magnetic field distribution of fusion experiments. In their rest frame, the neutral atoms experience a Lorentz electric field, EL = v × B, which results in a characteristic line splitting and polarized line emission. The different properties of the Stark multiplet allow inferring, both the magnetic field strength and the orientation of the magnetic field vector. Besides recording the full MSE spectrum, several types of polarimeters have been developed to measure the polarization direction of the Stark line emission. To test physics models of the magnetic field distribution and dynamics, the accuracy requirements are quite demanding. In view of these requirements, the capabilities and issues of the different techniques are discussed, including the influence of the Zeeman Effect and the sensitivity to radial electric fields. A newly developed Imaging MSE system, which has been tested on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, is presented. The sensitivity allows to resolve sawtooth oscillations. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  5. Motional stark effect upgrades on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, B.W.; Nilson, D.G.; Wroblewski, D.

    1994-04-01

    The measurement and control of the plasma current density profile (or q profile) is critical to the advanced tokamak program on DIII-D. A complete understanding of the stability and transport properties of advanced operating regimes requires detail poloidal field measurements over the entire plasma radius from the core to the edge. In support of this effort, the authors have recently completed an upgrade of the existing MSE diagnostic, increasing the number of channels from 8 to 16. A new viewing geometry has been added to the outer edge of the plasma which improves the radial resolution in this region from 10 cm to < 4 cm. This view requires the use of a reflector that has been designed to minimize polarization amplitude and phase effects. Vacuum-compatible polarizers have also been added to the instrument for in-situ calibration. Future use of the MSE diagnostic for feedback control of the q profile will also be discussed.

  6. Stark effect of excitons in corrugated lateral surface superlattices: effect of centre-of-mass quantization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Sun

    1998-11-01

    The quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) of excitons in GaAs/AlAs corrugated lateral surface superlattices (CLSSLs) is calculated. Blue and red shifts in the exciton energies are predicted for the heavy- and light-excitons in the CLSSLs, respectively, comparing with those in the unmodulated quantum well due to the different effective hole masses in the parallel direction. Sensitive dependence of the QCSE on the hole effective mass in the parallel direction is expected because of the ''centre-of-mass'' quantization (CMQ) induced by the periodic corrugated interfaces of the CLSSLs. The effect of the CMQ on the exciton mini-bands and the localization of the excitons in the CLSSLs is discussed. (author)

  7. K-shell spectroscopy in hot plasmas: Stark effect, Breit interaction and QED corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, J.-C.; Gilleron, F.; Comet, M.; Gilles, D.

    2017-03-01

    The broadening of lines by Stark effect is widely used for inferring electron density and temperature in plasmas. Stark-effect calculations often rely on atomic data (transition rates, energy levels,…) not always exhaustive and/or valid only for isolated atoms. In this work, we first present a recent development in the detailed opacity code SCO-RCG for K-shell spectroscopy. The approach is adapted from the work of Gilles and Peyrusse. Neglecting non-diagonal terms in dipolar and collision operators, the line profile is expressed as a sum of Voigt functions associated to the Stark components. The formalism relies on the use of parabolic coordinates and the relativistic fine structure of Lyman lines is included by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian matrix associated to quantum states having the same principal quantum number n. The SCO-RCG code enables one to investigate plasma environment effects, the impact of the microfield distribution, the decoupling between electron and ion temperatures and the role of satellite lines (such as Li-like 1snℓn'ℓ' - 1s2nℓ, Be-like, etc.). Atomic structure calculations have reached levels of accuracy which require evaluation of Breit interaction and many-electron quantum electro-dynamics (QED) contributions. Although much work was done for QED effects (self-energy and vacuum polarization) in hydrogenic atoms, the case of an arbitrary number of electrons is more complicated. Since exact analytic solutions do not exist, a number of heuristic methods have been used to approximate the screening of additional electrons in the self-energy part. We compare different ways of including such effects in atomic-structure codes (Slater-Condon, Multi-Configuration Dirac-Fock, etc.).

  8. Cross-sectional nanophotoluminescence studies of Stark effects in self-assembled quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Htoon, H.; Keto, J. W.; Baklenov, O.; Holmes, A. L. Jr.; Shih, C. K.

    2000-01-01

    By using a cross-sectional geometry, we show the capability to perform single-dot spectroscopy in self-assembled quantum dots using far-field optics. By using this method, we study the quantum-confined Stark effect in self-assembled quantum dots. For single-stack quantum dots (QDs), we find that the spectra are redshifted with an increase in electric field. For vertically coupled double-stack quantum dots, while most of the QDs are redshifted, some QDs show blueshifted spectra, which can be interpreted as an evidence of coupled QD molecules. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  9. Development of signal analysis method for the motional Stark effect diagnostic on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jia; Lyu, Bo; Liu, Haiqing; Li, Yingying; Liu, Dongmei; Wei, Yongqing; Fan, Chao; Shi, Yuejiang; Wu, Zhenwei; Wan, Baonian

    2017-10-01

    A pilot single-channel Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic has been developed on EAST since 2015. The dual photo-elastic modulators (PEM) were employed to encode the polarization angle into a time-varying signal. The pitch angle was related to the ratio of modulation amplitude at the second harmonic frequency. A digital harmonic analyzer (DHA) technique was developed for extracting the second harmonic amplitude. The results were validated with a hardware phase lock-in amplifier, and is also consistent with the software dual phase-locking algorithm.

  10. Laser control of the radiationless decay in pyrazine using the dynamic Stark effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Matthieu; Saab, Mohamad; Lasorne, Benjamin; Gatti, Fabien; Guérin, Stéphane

    2014-05-01

    The laser control of the radiationless decay between the B3u(nπ*) and B2u(ππ*) states of pyrazine using the dynamic Stark effect has been investigated. A vibronic coupling model Hamiltonian in diabatic representation, including potential energy, transition dipole, and static polarizability surfaces as a function of the four most important vibrational modes of the molecule has been parametrized using multi-reference electronic structure calculations. The interaction of the molecule with a strong non-resonant laser pulse has been analyzed in terms of dressed potential energy surfaces. Because of the large polarizability difference between the vibronically coupled B3u(nπ*) and B2u(ππ*) states, the Stark effect induced by the non-resonant laser pulse shifts the conical intersection away from the Franck-Condon region. We have shown, by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the molecule interacting with a relatively weak pump pulse driving the electronic excitation from the ground state to the B2u(ππ*) state, and a strong non-resonant control pulse, that this control mechanism can be used to trap the wavepacket on the B2u(ππ*) potential energy surface for a much longer time than the natural B2u(ππ*) lifetime.

  11. The Stark effect of the Hydrogen Balmer-lines as a versatile tool for plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helbig, V.

    2005-01-01

    The Stark effect offers the possibility to use the shift and the broadening of spectral lines to determine the strength of the electric field surrounding the radiating atoms. Depending on the plasma investigated the electric field may arise from the moving charged particles of the plasma itself or from the applied voltage of a power supply used to drive the discharge creating the plasma. In either case the Stark effect will be useful to deduce the plasma parameters desired. In the talk the results of experiments carried out in our research group at Kiel University will be discussed. Various plasma sources have been used for the investigations that cover a wide range of electron densities. In a second part electric field strength results will be communicated that were obtained in the cathode fall of a low density gas discharge. Plasma sources: Electron densities spanning a range of more than ten orders of magnitude were obtained in essentially five different gas discharges. Starting at low densities the Stark effect of the fine structure of Hydrogen was investigated in low pressure gas discharges. Intermediate densities could be obtained in hollow cathode arcs at low pressure. With constricted arcs at low and high pressure we were able to span the the region between several times 10 14 to 10 17 cm -3 . The highest electron densities were observed in laser produced plasmas and capillary discharges. Calibration: The shift and the broadening of the Balmer lines due to Stark effect can be used as diagnostic tool for determining the electron density of plasma with high accuracy. In order to do that you have either to rely on theoretical calculations of the Stark effect or you have to come up with a reliable and independent experimental way to calibrate your spectra. As experimentalists we were very much concerned with the second approach. However, it turns out that the different regions of the electron density require different experimental methods to measure the plasma

  12. A New Analysis of Stark and Zeeman Effects on Hydrogen Lines in Magnetized DA White Dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ny Kieu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available White dwarfs with magnetic field strengths larger than 10 T are understood to represent more than 10% of the total population of white dwarfs. The presence of such strong magnetic fields is clearly indicated by the Zeeman triplet structure visible on absorption lines. In this work, we discuss the line broadening mechanisms and focus on the sensitivity of hydrogen lines on the magnetic field. We perform new calculations in conditions relevant to magnetized DA stellar atmospheres using models inspired from magnetic fusion plasma spectroscopy. A white dwarf spectrum from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS database is analyzed. An effective temperature is provided by an adjustment of the background radiation with a Planck function, and the magnetic field is inferred from absorption lines presenting a Zeeman triplet structure. An order-of-magnitude estimate for the electron density is also performed from Stark broadening analysis.

  13. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the Stark effect for manipulating cold molecules: Application to nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bichsel, Bryan J.; Morrison, Michael A.; Shafer-Ray, Neil; Abraham, E. R. I.

    2007-01-01

    As part of an ongoing investigation of cold-molecule collisions involving nitric oxide (NO), we here theoretically assess the first- and second-order perturbation-theory approximations to the Stark shifts; such approximations have been used almost exclusively in previous published research on NO in external electric fields. We perform this assessment by comparison to Stark shifts from the corresponding nonperturbative two-state model, considering field strengths from zero to values typical of current experimental studies of cold molecules. To facilitate the future use of this model, we give expressions for the Stark energies in a generic form that can trivially be applied to any molecules in the class under consideration. To provide insight into the validity of the two-state model, we also experimentally assess the two-state Stark shifts for NO

  14. The Stark effect of 1H and 4He+ in the beam foil source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doobov, M.H.; Hay, H.J.; Sofield, C.J.; Newton, C.S.

    1974-01-01

    The appearance of Stark patterns obtained with a beam-foil source differed from those characteristically obtained from gas discharge sources. In the former source excitation of the hydrogenic ions occurred in a brief time interval ( 14 s) during the passage of a high velocity unidirectional beam of ions which produces non-statistical population distributions for the Stark perturbed states. The relative intensities of Stark perturbed components of the Hsub(β) hydrogen line and the Fsub(α) ionized helium line have been measured in a beam-foil source. In each case an initial population of states of principal quantum number n = 4 due to radiative decay and Stark mixing, and comparing the resultant patterns with the observed patterns. The inferred population distributions indicate that the states of low orbital angular momentum (L) are preferentially populated, and alignment referred to the beam axis is produced such that states with lower z component of L are preferentially populated. (author)

  15. Strong quantum-confined stark effect in germanium quantum-well structures on silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, Y.; Lee, Y. K.; Gei, Y.; Ren, S; Roth, J. E.; Miller, D. A.; Harris, J. S.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon is the dominant semiconductor for electronics, but there is now a growing need to integrate such component with optoelectronics for telecommunications and computer interconnections. Silicon-based optical modulators have recently been successfully demonstrated but because the light modulation mechanisms in silicon are relatively weak, long (for example, several millimeters) devices or sophisticated high-quality-factor resonators have been necessary. Thin quantum-well structures made from III-V semiconductors such as GaAs, InP and their alloys exhibit the much stronger Quantum-Confined Stark Effect (QCSE) mechanism, which allows modulator structures with only micrometers of optical path length. Such III-V materials are unfortunately difficult to integrate with silicon electronic devices. Germanium is routinely integrated with silicon in electronics, but previous silicon-germanium structures have also not shown strong modulation effects. Here we report the discovery of the QCSE, at room temperature, in thin germanium quantum-well structures grown on silicon. The QCSE here has strengths comparable to that in III-V materials. Its clarity and strength are particularly surprising because germanium is an indirect gap semiconductor, such semiconductors often display much weak optical effects than direct gap materials (such as the III-V materials typically used for optoelectronics). This discovery is very promising for small, high-speed, low-power optical output devices fully compatible with silicon electronics manufacture. (author)

  16. Stark shift and g-factor tuning in nanowires with Rashba effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhaddad, Iman; Habanjar, Khulud; Sakr, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the Stark shift of the energy subbands and the possibility of tuning the g-factor of electrons in nanowires subjected to external magnetic field. The electric field is applied along the direction of quantum confinement. Our analysis is based on numerical and perturbation calculations in the weak Rashba regime. For in-plane magnetic fields, the Stark shift is rigid and depends on the square of the electric field. Such rigid shift results in a field independent g-factor. Perpendicular magnetic fields induce a similar Stark shift accompanied by a lateral displacement of the energy spectra that is linear in the electric field. In this case, the g-factor shows square dependence on weak electric fields that varies with the subband index. However, in strong electric fields, the g-factor becomes subband independent and varies linearly with the field. - Highlights: • Energy spectra of electrons in nanowires are calculated in the weak Rashba regime. • For in-plane magnetic field, the Stark shift is rigid and the g-factor cannot be tuned. • Perpendicular magnetic fields add lateral displacement to the Stark shift. • The g-factor can be tuned by external electric field in this case. • The tuning of the g-factor is linear and unique for all subbands at high fields

  17. Vibrational Stark Effect to Probe the Electric-Double Layer of the Ionic Liquid-Metal Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Rey, Natalia; Moore, Alexander Knight; Toyouchi, Shuichi; Dlott, Dana

    2017-06-01

    Vibrational sum frequency generation (VSFG) spectroscopy is used to study the effect of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) in situ at the electrical double layer (EDL). RTILs have been recognized as electrolytes without solvent for applications in batteries, supercapacitors and electrodeposition^{1}. The molecular response of the RTIL in the EDL affects the performance of these devices. We use the vibrational Stark effect on CO as a probe to detect the changes in the electric field affected by the RTIL across the EDL on metal electrodes. The Stark effect is a shift in the frequency in response to an externally applied electric field and also influenced by the surrounding electrolyte and electrode^{2}. The CO Stark shift is monitored by the CO-VSFG spectra on Pt or Ag in a range of different imidazolium-based RTILs electrolytes, where their composition is tuned by exchanging the anion, the cation or the imidazolium functional group. We study the free induction decay (FID)^{3} of the CO to monitor how the RTIL structure and composition affect the vibrational relaxation of the CO. Combining the CO vibrational Stark effect and the FID allow us to understand how the RTIL electrochemical response, molecular orientation response and collective relaxation affect the potential drop of the electric field across the EDL, and, in turn, how determines the electrical capacitance or reactivity of the electrolyte/electrode interface. ^{1}Fedorov, M. V.; Kornyshev, A. A., Ionic Liquids at Electrified Interfaces. Chem. Rev. 2014, 114, 2978-3036. ^{2} (a) Lambert, D. K., Vibrational Stark Effect of Adsorbates at Electrochemical Interfaces. Electrochim. Acta 1996, 41, 623-630. (b) Oklejas, V.; Sjostrom, C.; Harris, J. M., SERS Detection of the Vibrational Stark Effect from Nitrile-Terminated SAMs to Probe Electric Fields in the Diffuse Double-Layer. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2002, 124, 2408-2409. ^{3}Symonds, J. P. R.; Arnolds, H.; Zhang, V. L.; Fukutani, K.; King, D. A

  18. Quantum-confined Stark effect in GaN/AlN quantum dots in nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Julien; Songmuang, R.; Tourbot, G.; Bougerol, C.; Daudin, B.; Gayral, B.

    2010-03-01

    GaN/AlGaN heterostructures have attracted much interest in the past few years due to their potential for optoelectronic applications such as UV light emission or telecommunication wavelength intersubband devices. More recently, many studies focused on nanowire heterostructures, because such geometry is very likely to lead to a dramatic reduction of the defect density thanks to the free surface in comparison with two dimensional (2D) structures. This reduction is indeed very appealing for light emission application. It is well known that the quantum confined Stark effect strongly influences the optical properties of 2D heterostructures. In contrast, the strain reduction and the presence of the surface could potentially lead to a very different picture for nanowire heterostructures. In InGaN/GaN nanowire heterostructures, it has been shown that the QCSE is strongly reduced [1] as a consequence of the decrease of the piezoelectric polarization. We addressed this issue for GaN/AlN nanowire heterostructures and evidenced the presence of a strong QCSE [2]. This demonstrates the importance of the spontaneous polarization in nanowire heterostructures. [1] Y. Kawakami et al, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 163124 (2006) [2] J. Renard et al, Phys. Rev. B 80, 121305 (R) (2009)

  19. Identification of Ion-Pair Structures in Solution by Vibrational Stark Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, John; Grills, David C; Miller, John R; Mani, Tomoyasu

    2016-02-18

    Ion pairing is a fundamental consideration in many areas of chemistry and has implications in a wide range of sciences and technologies that include batteries and organic photovoltaics. Ions in solution are known to inhabit multiple possible states, including free ions (FI), contact ion pairs (CIP), and solvent-separated ion pairs (SSIP). However, in solutions of organic radicals and nonmetal electrolytes, it is often difficult to distinguish between these states. In the first part of this work, we report evidence for the formation of SSIPs in low-polarity solvents and distinct measurements of CIP, SSIP, and FI, by using the ν(C≡N) infrared (IR) band of a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion. Use of time-resolved IR detection following pulse radiolysis allowed us to unambiguously assign the peak of the FI. In the presence of nonmetal electrolytes, two distinct red-shifted peaks were observed and assigned to the CIP and SSIP. The assignments are interpreted in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect (VSE) and are supported by (1) the solvent dependence of ion-pair populations, (2) the observation of a cryptand-separated sodium ion pair that mimics the formation of SSIPs, and (3) electronic structure calculations. In the second part of this work, we show that a blue-shift of the ν(C≡N) IR band due to the VSE can be induced in a nitrile-substituted fluorene radical anion by covalently tethering it to a metal-chelating ligand that forms an intramolecular ion pair upon reduction and complexation with sodium ion. This adds support to the conclusion that the shift in IR absorptions by ion pairing originates from the VSE. These results combined show that we can identify ion-pair structures by using the VSE, including the existence of SSIPs in a low-polarity solvent.

  20. Giant thermoelectric effect in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoman, D.; Dragoman, M.

    2007-11-01

    The paper predicts a giant thermoelectric coefficient in a nanostructure consisting of metallic electrodes periodically patterned over graphene, which is deposited on a silicon dioxide substrate. The Seebeck coefficient in this device attains 30mV/K, this value being among the largest reported ever. The calculations are based on a transfer matrix approach that takes a particular form for graphene-based devices. The results are important for future nanogenerators with applications in the area of sensors, energy harvesting, and scavenging.

  1. Giant flexoelectric effect through interfacial strain relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daesu; Noh, Tae Won

    2012-10-28

    Interfacial strain gradients in oxide epitaxial thin films provide an interesting opportunity to study flexoelectric effects and their potential applications. Oxide epitaxial thin films can exhibit giant and tunable flexoelectric effects, which are six or seven orders of magnitude larger than those in conventional bulk solids. The strain gradient in an oxide epitaxial thin film can generate an electric field above 1 MV m(-1) by flexoelectricity, large enough to affect the physical properties of the film. Giant flexoelectric effects on ferroelectric properties are discussed in this overview of recent experimental observations.

  2. Robust giant magnetoresistive effect type multilayer sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenssen, K.M.H.; Kuiper, A.E.T.; Roozeboom, F.

    2002-01-01

    A robust Giant Magneto Resistive effect type multilayer sensor comprising a free and a pinned ferromagnetic layer, which can withstand high temperatures and strong magnetic fields as required in automotive applications. The GMR multi-layer has an asymmetric magneto-resistive curve and enables

  3. Dynamic-Stark-effect-induced coherent mixture of virtual paths in laser-dressed helium: energetic electron impact excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agueny, Hicham; Makhoute, Abdelkader; Dubois, Alain

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically investigate quantum virtual path interference caused by the dynamic Stark effect in bound-bound electronic transitions. The effect is studied in an intermediate resonant region and in connection with the energetic electron impact excitation of a helium atom embedded in a weak low-frequency laser field. The process under investigation is dealt with via a Born-Floquet approach. Numerical calculations show a resonant feature in laser-assisted cross sections. The latter is found to be sensitive to the intensity of the laser field dressing. We show that this feature is a signature of quantum beats which result from the coherent mixture of different quantum virtual pathways, and that excitation may follow in order to end up with a common final channel. This mixture arises from the dynamic Stark effect, which produces a set of avoided crossings in laser-dressed states. The effect allows one to coherently control quantum virtual path interference by varying the intensity of the laser field dressing. Our findings suggest that the combination of an energetic electron and a weak laser field is a useful tool for the coherent control of nonadiabatic transitions in an intermediate resonant region.

  4. Stark resonances in disordered systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecchi, V.; Maioli, M.; Modena Univ.; Sacchetti, A.

    1992-01-01

    By slightly restricting the conditions given by Herbst and Howland, we prove the existence of resonances in the Stark effect of disordered systems (and atomic crystals) for large atomic mean distance. In the crystal case the ladders of resonances have the Wannier behavior for small complex field. (orig.)

  5. Overview of equilibrium reconstruction on DIII-D using new measurements from an expanded motional Stark effect diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcomb, C; Makowski, M; Allen, S; Meyer, W; Van Zeeland, M

    2008-01-01

    Motional Stark effect (MSE) measurements constrain equilibrium reconstruction of DIII-D tokamak plasmas using the equilibrium code EFIT. In 2007, two new MSE arrays were brought online, bringing the system to three core arrays, two edge arrays, and 64 total channels. We present the first EFIT reconstructions using this expanded system. Safety factor and E R profiles produced by fitting to data from the two new arrays and one of the other three agree well with independent measurements. Comparison of the data from the three arrays that view the core shows that one of the older arrays is inconsistent with the other two unless the measured calibration factors for this array are adjusted. The required adjustments depend on toroidal field and plasma current direction, and on still other uncertain factors that change as the plasma evolves. We discuss possible sources of calibration error for this array

  6. Vibrational Stark effect of the electric-field reporter 4-mercaptobenzonitrile as a tool for investigating electrostatics at electrode/SAM/solution interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schkolnik, G.; Salewski, J.; Millo, D.; Zebger, I.; Franzen, S.; Hildebrandt, P.

    2012-01-01

    4-mercaptobenzonitrile (MBN) in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au and Ag electrodes was studied by surface enhanced infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy, to correlate the nitrile stretching frequency with the local electric field exploiting the vibrational Stark effect (VSE). Using MBN

  7. Giant Photogalvanic Effect in Noncentrosymmetric Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Evlyukhin, Andrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectric properties of noncentrosymmetric, similarly oriented metallic nanoparticles embedded in a homogeneous semiconductor matrix are theoretically studied. Because of the asymmetric shape of the nanoparticle boundary, photoelectron emission acquires a preferred direction, resulting......, but is several orders of magnitude stronger. Termed the giant plasmonic photogalvanic effect, the reported phenomenon is valuable for characterizing photoemission and photoconductive properties of plasmonic nanostructures and can find many uses for photodetection and photovoltaic applications....... in a photocurrent flow in that direction when nanoparticles are uniformly illuminated by a homogeneous plane wave. This effect is a direct analogy of the photogalvanic (or bulk photovoltaic) effect known to exist in media with noncentrosymmetric crystal structure, such as doped lithium niobate or bismuth ferrite...

  8. Giant Photogalvanic Effect in Noncentrosymmetric Plasmonic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergei V. Zhukovsky

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Photoelectric properties of noncentrosymmetric, similarly oriented metallic nanoparticles embedded in a homogeneous semiconductor matrix are theoretically studied. Because of the asymmetric shape of the nanoparticle boundary, photoelectron emission acquires a preferred direction, resulting in a photocurrent flow in that direction when nanoparticles are uniformly illuminated by a homogeneous plane wave. This effect is a direct analogy of the photogalvanic (or bulk photovoltaic effect known to exist in media with noncentrosymmetric crystal structure, such as doped lithium niobate or bismuth ferrite, but is several orders of magnitude stronger. Termed the giant plasmonic photogalvanic effect, the reported phenomenon is valuable for characterizing photoemission and photoconductive properties of plasmonic nanostructures and can find many uses for photodetection and photovoltaic applications.

  9. Hydrogen Stark Broadened Brackett lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stehlé

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Stark-broadened lines of the hydrogen Brackett series are computed for the conditions of stellar atmospheres and circumstellar envelopes. The computation is performed within the Model Microfield Method, which includes the ion dynamic effects and makes the bridge between the impact limit at low density and the static limit at high density and in the line wings. The computation gives the area normalized line shape, from the line core up to the static line wings.

  10. Tunable room-temperature spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed layered halide perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovanni, David; Chong, Wee Kiang; Dewi, Herlina Arianita; Thirumal, Krishnamoorthy; Neogi, Ishita; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Mathews, Nripan; Sum, Tze Chien

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast spin manipulation for opto-spin logic applications requires material systems that have strong spin-selective light-matter interaction. Conventional inorganic semiconductor nanostructures [for example, epitaxial II to VI quantum dots and III to V multiple quantum wells (MQWs)] are considered forerunners but encounter challenges such as lattice matching and cryogenic cooling requirements. Two-dimensional halide perovskite semiconductors, combining intrinsic tunable MQW structures and large oscillator strengths with facile solution processability, can offer breakthroughs in this area. We demonstrate novel room-temperature, strong ultrafast spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed (C6H4FC2H4NH3)2PbI4 perovskite thin films. Exciton spin states are selectively tuned by ~6.3 meV using circularly polarized optical pulses without any external photonic cavity (that is, corresponding to a Rabi energy of ~55 meV and equivalent to applying a 70 T magnetic field), which is much larger than any conventional system. The facile halide and organic replacement in these perovskites affords control of the dielectric confinement and thus presents a straightforward strategy for tuning light-matter coupling strength.

  11. Estimation of the blackbody-radiation shift due to the Stark effect for the microwave +113Cd ion clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan-mei; Sahoo, B. K.

    2017-11-01

    The microwave clock frequency of the |5 s 2S1 /2,F =0 ,mF=0 〉↔|5 s 2S1 /2,F =1 ,mF=0 〉 transition in the +113Cd ion has been reported as 15 199 862 855.0192(10) Hz [Opt. Lett. 40, 4249 (2015), 10.1364/OL.40.004249]. Fractional systematic shift (β ) due to the black-body radiation (BBR) arising from the Stark effect in the above, the clock transition was used as -1.1 ×10-16 from our unpublished preliminary estimation. We present here a precise value of β =-1.815 (77 ) ×10-16 by carrying out rigorous calculations of third-order polarizabilities of the hyperfine levels associated with the clock transition. This is determined by evaluating the matrix elements of the magnetic dipole hyperfine interaction Hamiltonian, electric dipole operator, and energies between many low-lying states of +113Cd. We employ all-order relativistic many-body theories in the frameworks of Fock-space coupled-cluster and relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock methods.

  12. The effects of ultrasonic pretreatment and structural changes during the osmotic dehydration of the 'Starking' apple (Malus domestica Borkh)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa-Mendoza, M. E.; Fernandez-Munoz, J. L.; Arjona-Roman, J. L.

    2012-11-01

    During the osmotic dehydration (OD) of fruit, the cell membrane displays a high resistance to mass transfer, thereby reducing the dehydration rate. To reduce thermal damage to cell membranes, alternative methods have recently been introduced to reduce the initial moisture content and/or modify the structure of fruit tissue. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effects of an ultrasound (US) pretreatment for OD on the effective diffusion coefficients and to observe the changes in the molecular structure of 'Starking' apple cubes by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) during a 3 h process using a 45 dregee Bx sucrose solution at 60 degree centigrade. In the pretreatment step, apple samples were immersed in an ultrasonic bath at 45 kHz for 20 min. The effective diffusion coefficients for water (Dew) and solids (Des) were calculated from the observed osmotic kinetics according to Fick's second law for the transient state. The solids coefficients were higher than the water coefficients in both processes due to the concentration difference (De = 7.7 × 10{sup -}9 and 9.7 × 10{sup -}9 m{sup 2} s{sup -}1 for ODUS). The structural changes were determined by FTIR by measuring the molecular vibration frequency for sucrose. The 1,500-900 cm{sup -}1 region of the infrared spectra was used to monitor the effect of sucrose concentration on fruit structure. We observed that the first bonds formed were C-H and C-O-C stretching (at 920 and 1,129 cm{sup -}1, respectively) in the sucrose skeleton and glycoside bonds among sucrose molecules. The water concentration affected the diffusion coefficient significantly due to its dependence on the physical structure of the food. (Author) 27 refs.

  13. Influence of the dynamic Stark effect on long-term frequency stability of a self-oscillating magnetometer with laser-pumped alkali atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. A.; Ermak, S. V.; Kulachenkov, N. K.; Petrenko, M. V.; Sagitov, E. A.; Semenov, V. V.

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents the results of investigation Stark shift effect influence on the long-term stability of a dual scheme of quantum magnetometers. Such scheme allows suppressing Stark shift components when a certain pumping light polarization is applied. As a result, long-term stability of a quantum sensor increases. However, when low-frequency (LF) and microwave fields are attached to a single vapor cell a coherence circulation in hyperfine structure of alkali atoms takes place. Physical origin of this effect is associated with the so called “dressed” atom theory, when atom is “dressed” by LF field. It yields in multiphoton absorption and resonance frequency shift. First estimates for this shift based on density matrix evolution formalism are provided in the paper.

  14. Roles of the quadrupole interaction and of the quadratic stark effect in spectral lines from plasmas interacting with a strong quasimonochromatic electric field

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sauvan, P.; Dalimier, E.; Riconda, C.; Oks, E.; Renner, Oldřich; Weber, S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 2 (2010), s. 123-128 ISSN 2229-3159 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC528 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser-plasma interaction * PIC plasma model ing * strong quasimonochromatic electric fields * x-ray line broadening * stark effect * floquet theory Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers http://www.auburn.edu/academic/cosam/departments/physics/iramp/1_2/sauvan_et_al.pdf

  15. Anisotropic spin–orbit stark effect in cubic semiconductors without an inversion center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, P. S.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of external electric and magnetic fields on shallow donor levels in a semiconductor of the T d crystallographic class is analyzed. Application of an electric field eliminates the symmetry of the donor potential with respect to space inversion; as a result, corrections from the momentum-odd spin–orbit Dresselhaus term appear in the donor levels. In a strong electric field, such corrections determine the anisotropy of spin splitting of the donor levels relative to the directions of the external fields in the crystallographic coordinate system. Analytic expressions are derived for the spin splitting anisotropy for various relations between the magnitudes of the magnetic and electric fields. The results of this study can be used to determine the Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction constant by a new method (in experiments on spin splitting of donor levels)

  16. Anisotropic spin–orbit stark effect in cubic semiconductors without an inversion center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, P. S., E-mail: pavel.alekseev@mail.ioffe.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    The effect of external electric and magnetic fields on shallow donor levels in a semiconductor of the T{sub d} crystallographic class is analyzed. Application of an electric field eliminates the symmetry of the donor potential with respect to space inversion; as a result, corrections from the momentum-odd spin–orbit Dresselhaus term appear in the donor levels. In a strong electric field, such corrections determine the anisotropy of spin splitting of the donor levels relative to the directions of the external fields in the crystallographic coordinate system. Analytic expressions are derived for the spin splitting anisotropy for various relations between the magnitudes of the magnetic and electric fields. The results of this study can be used to determine the Dresselhaus spin–orbit interaction constant by a new method (in experiments on spin splitting of donor levels)

  17. Experimental methods in cryogenic spectroscopy: Stark effect measurements in substituted myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Bradley M.

    Dawning from well-defined tertiary structure, the active regions of enzymatic proteins exist as specifically tailored electrostatic microenvironments capable of facilitating chemical interaction. The specific influence these charge distributions have on ligand binding dynamics, and their impact on specificity, reactivity, and biological functionality, have yet to be fully understood. A quantitative determination of these intrinsic fields would offer insight towards the mechanistic aspects of protein functionality. This work seeks to investigate the internal molecular electric fields that are present at the oxygen binding site of myoglobin. Experiments are performed at 1 K on samples located within a glassy matrix, using the high-resolution technique spectral hole-burning. The internal electric field distributions can be explored by implementing a unique mathematical treatment for analyzing the effect that externally applied electric fields have on the spectral hole profiles. Precise control of the light field, the temperature, and the externally applied electric field at the site of the sample is crucial. Experimentally, the functionality of custom cryogenic temperature confocal scanning microscope was extended to allow for collection of imaging and spectral data with the ability to modulate the polarization of the light at the sample. Operation of the instrumentation was integrated into a platform allowing for seamless execution of input commands with high temporal inter-instrument resolution for collection of data streams. For the regulated control and cycling of the sample temperature. the thermal characteristics of the research Dewar were theoretically modeled to systematically predict heat flows throughout the system. A high voltage feedthrough for delivering voltages of up to 5000 V to the sample as positioned within the Dewar was developed. The burning of spectral holes with this particular experimental setup is highly repeatable. The quantum mechanical

  18. Orthogonal Electric Field Measurements near the Green Fluorescent Protein Fluorophore through Stark Effect Spectroscopy and pKa Shifts Provide a Unique Benchmark for Electrostatics Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Joshua D; First, Jeremy T; Webb, Lauren J

    2017-07-20

    Measurement of the magnitude, direction, and functional importance of electric fields in biomolecules has been a long-standing experimental challenge. pK a shifts of titratable residues have been the most widely implemented measurements of the local electrostatic environment around the labile proton, and experimental data sets of pK a shifts in a variety of systems have been used to test and refine computational prediction capabilities of protein electrostatic fields. A more direct and increasingly popular technique to measure electric fields in proteins is Stark effect spectroscopy, where the change in absorption energy of a chromophore relative to a reference state is related to the change in electric field felt by the chromophore. While there are merits to both of these methods and they are both reporters of local electrostatic environment, they are fundamentally different measurements, and to our knowledge there has been no direct comparison of these two approaches in a single protein. We have recently demonstrated that green fluorescent protein (GFP) is an ideal model system for measuring changes in electric fields in a protein interior caused by amino acid mutations using both electronic and vibrational Stark effect chromophores. Here we report the changes in pK a of the GFP fluorophore in response to the same mutations and show that they are in excellent agreement with Stark effect measurements. This agreement in the results of orthogonal experiments reinforces our confidence in the experimental results of both Stark effect and pK a measurements and provides an excellent target data set to benchmark diverse protein electrostatics calculations. We used this experimental data set to test the pK a prediction ability of the adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann solver (APBS) and found that a simple continuum dielectric model of the GFP interior is insufficient to accurately capture the measured pK a and Stark effect shifts. We discuss some of the limitations of this

  19. Air pollution effects on giant sequoia ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.R. Miller; Nancy Grulke; K.W. Stolte

    1994-01-01

    Giant sequoia [Sequoiadendron giganteum (Lindl.) Buchholz] groves are found entirely within the Sierra Nevada mixed-conifer type. Several of its companion tree species, mainly ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) and Jeffrey pine (P. jeffreyi Grev. & Balf.), show foliar injury after...

  20. Stark resonances: asymptotics and distributional Borel sum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliceti, E.; Grecchi, V.; Maioli, M.

    1993-01-01

    We prove that the Stark effect perturbation theory of a class of bound states uniquely determines the position and the width of the resonances by Distributional Borel Sum. In particular the small field asymptotics of the width is uniquely related to the large order asymptotics of the perturbation coefficients. Similar results apply to all the ''resonances'' of the anharmonic and double well oscillators. (orig.)

  1. Wannier–Stark electro-optical effect, quasi-guided and photonic modes in 2D macroporous silicon structures with SiO{sub 2} coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karachevtseva, L., E-mail: lakar@isp.kiev.ua [Ningbo University of Technology, No. 55-155 Cui Bai Road, Ningbo 315016 (China); V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics NAS of Ukraine, 41 Nauky Pr., 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Goltviansky, Yu., E-mail: ecoflam@voliacable.com [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics NAS of Ukraine, 41 Nauky Pr., 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Sapelnikova, O., E-mail: e_kolesnik84@mail.ru [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics NAS of Ukraine, 41 Nauky Pr., 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Lytvynenko, O., E-mail: lytvole@gmail.com [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics NAS of Ukraine, 41 Nauky Pr., 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Stronska, O., E-mail: yaschichek@ukr.net [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics NAS of Ukraine, 41 Nauky Pr., 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Bo, Wang, E-mail: bo305@hotmail.com [Ningbo University of Technology, No. 55-155 Cui Bai Road, Ningbo 315016 (China); Kartel, M., E-mail: nikar@kartel.kiev.ua [Ningbo University of Technology, No. 55-155 Cui Bai Road, Ningbo 315016 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The IR absorption spectra of oxidized macroporous silicon were studied. • The Wannier–Stark electro-optical effect on Si-SiO{sub 2} boundary was confirmed. • An additional electric field of quasi-guided optical modes was evaluated. • The photonic modes and band gaps were measured as peculiarities in absorption spectra. - Abstract: Opportunities to enhance the properties of structured surfaces were demonstrated on 2D macroporous silicon structures with SiO{sub 2} coatings. We investigated the IR light absorption oscillations in macroporous silicon structures with SiO2 coatings 0–800 nm thick. The Wannier–Stark electro-optical effect due to strong electric field on Si-SiO{sub 2}boundary and an additional electric field of quasi-guided optical modes were taken into account. The photonic modes and band gaps were also considered as peculiarities in absorbance spectra of macroporous silicon structures with a thick SiO{sub 2} coating. The photonic modes do not coincide with the quasi-guided modes in the silicon matrix and do not appear in absorption spectra of 2D macroporous silicon structures with surface nanocrystals.

  2. Scattering theory for Stark Hamiltonians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, Arne

    1994-01-01

    An introduction to the spectral and scattering theory for Schroedinger operators is given. An abstract short range scattering theory is developed. It is applied to perturbations of the Laplacian. Particular attention is paid to the study of Stark Hamiltonians. The main result is an explanation of the discrepancy between the classical and the quantum scattering theory for one-dimensional Stark Hamiltonians. (author). 47 refs

  3. Photoconductive metamaterials with giant plasmonic photogalvanic effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhukovsky, Sergei; Babicheva, Viktoriia; Evlyuknin, Andrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Photoelectric properties of metamaterials comprising oriented noncentrosymmetric metallic nanoparticle arrays in a homogeneous semiconductor matrix are theoretically studied. When uniformly illuminated by a plane wave, the asymmetric shape of the nanoparticles results in electro-motive force...... and photocurrent without any external potential. This is the direct analogue of the photogalvanic effect existing in ferroelectric or piezoelectric crystals, e.g., bismuth ferrite. The reported plasmonic photogalvanic effect is valuable for characterizing photoconductive properties of plasmonic nanostructures...

  4. Magnetic quantum phase transition in Cr-doped Bi2(SexTe1-x)3 driven by the Stark effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zuocheng; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Jing; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Jinsong; Chang, Cuizu; Guo, Minghua; Ou, Yunbo; Feng, Yang; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; He, Ke; Ma, Xucun; Xue, Qi-Kun; Wang, Yayu

    2017-10-01

    The recent experimental observation of the quantum anomalous Hall effect has cast significant attention on magnetic topological insulators. In these magnetic counterparts of conventional topological insulators such as Bi2Te3, a long-range ferromagnetic state can be established by chemical doping with transition-metal elements. However, a much richer electronic phase diagram can emerge and, in the specific case of Cr-doped Bi2(SexTe1-x)3, a magnetic quantum phase transition tuned by the actual chemical composition has been reported. From an application-oriented perspective, the relevance of these results hinges on the possibility to manipulate magnetism and electronic band topology by external perturbations such as an electric field generated by gate electrodes—similar to what has been achieved in conventional diluted magnetic semiconductors. Here, we investigate the magneto-transport properties of Cr-doped Bi2(SexTe1-x)3 with different compositions under the effect of a gate voltage. The electric field has a negligible effect on magnetic order for all investigated compositions, with the remarkable exception of the sample close to the topological quantum critical point, where the gate voltage reversibly drives a ferromagnetic-to-paramagnetic phase transition. Theoretical calculations show that a perpendicular electric field causes a shift in the electronic energy levels due to the Stark effect, which induces a topological quantum phase transition and, in turn, a magnetic phase transition.

  5. Materials for giant spin Hall effect devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayanthinarasimham, Avyaya

    Studies presented in this thesis are an effort to control the growth of beta W and explore the in-plane current induced effects in a beta W and CoFeB bilayer. Physical vapor deposited W films beyond 5 nm transform from beta to the stable bulk alpha phase. beta W films with 5 nm thickness when integrated with the other films for large scale fabrication presents a small process window for etch and deposition errors. Also, CoFeB on W does not generate perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) even when it is capped with MgOjTa(Capping) layers. The beta W with larger thickness process window and a CoFeB with PMA deposited on top of W is necessary for an ideal functioning spin Hall effect (SHE) device. This thesis will focus on overcoming the above mentioned challenges. 2 sccm of O2 gas was introduced during the growth of beta W, this resulted in thicker films with beta W. If a large amount of O2 was introduced, it resulted in complete oxidation and loss of crystallinity. Thus an optimum amount of oxygen is necessary. However, introducing O2 during the deposition can effect other metals present on the wafer, which is not ideal. N2 was utilized to achieve thicker beta W films. Upon introducing N with similar concentration of O, it lead to amorphization of W, thus revealing a kinetic control. A pulsed N2 of 1 sccm at 2-second period was used to kinetically control the growth of beta W. Both the techniques were able to grow beta W from 5 nm up to 20 nm thick films. Films with N-assisted growth exhibited lower resistance and higher metallic character. 1 nm Ta, Mo and CoFe were used as insert layers between beta W and CoFeB to induce PMA. 1 nm Mo insert layer and 5 nm Mo under layer have largely different interfaces with CoFeB even when annealed in ultra high vacuum (UHV) environment. Thus, 1 nm Mo layer does not show any PMA. The CoFe insert layer adds to the bulk anisotropy and dominates the interface anisotropy, and does not lead to any PMA. The 1 nm Ta insert exhibits

  6. Electric field determination in the plasma-antenna boundary of a lower-hybrid wave launcher in Tore Supra through dynamic Stark-effect spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, E. H.; Goniche, M.; Klepper, C. C.; Hillairet, J.; Isler, R. C.; Bottereau, C.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Panayotis, S.; Pegourie, B.; Lotte, Ph; Colledani, G.; Caughman, J. B.; Harris, J. H.; Hillis, D. L.; Shannon, S. C.; Clairet, F.; Litaudon, X.

    2015-06-01

    Interaction of radio-frequency (RF) waves with the plasma in the near-field of a high-power wave launcher is now seen to be an important topic, both in understanding the channeling of these waves through the plasma boundary and in avoiding power losses in the edge. In a recent Letter, a direct non-intrusive measurement of a near antenna RF electric field in the range of lower hybrid (LH) frequencies (ELH) was announced (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 215005). This measurement was achieved through the fitting of Balmer series deuterium spectral lines utilizing a time dependent (dynamic) Stark effect model. In this article, the analysis of the spectral data is discussed in detail and applied to a larger range of measurements and the accuracy and limitations of the experimental technique are investigated. It was found through an analysis of numerous Tore Supra discharges that good quantitative agreement exists between the measured and full-wave modeled ELH when the launched power exceeds 0.5 MW. For low power the measurement becomes inaccurate utilizing the implemented passive spectroscopic technique because the spectral noise overwhelms the effect of the RF electric field on the line profile. Additionally, effects of the ponderomotive force are suspected at sufficiently high power.

  7. Quantum confined Stark effects of single dopant in polarized hemispherical quantum dot: Two-dimensional finite difference approach and Ritz-Hassé variation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Harouny, El Hassan; Nakra Mohajer, Soukaina; Ibral, Asmaa; El Khamkhami, Jamal; Assaid, El Mahdi

    2018-05-01

    Eigenvalues equation of hydrogen-like off-center single donor impurity confined in polarized homogeneous hemispherical quantum dot deposited on a wetting layer, capped by insulated matrix and submitted to external uniform electric field is solved in the framework of the effective mass approximation. An infinitely deep potential is used to describe effects of quantum confinement due to conduction band offsets at surfaces where quantum dot and surrounding materials meet. Single donor ground state total and binding energies in presence of electric field are determined via two-dimensional finite difference approach and Ritz-Hassé variation principle. For the latter method, attractive coulomb correlation between electron and ionized single donor is taken into account in the expression of trial wave function. It appears that off-center single dopant binding energy, spatial extension and radial probability density are strongly dependent on hemisphere radius and single dopant position inside quantum dot. Influence of a uniform electric field is also investigated. It shows that Stark effect appears even for very small size dots and that single dopant energy shift is more significant when the single donor is near hemispherical surface.

  8. Finite-size effects from giant magnons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arutyunov, Gleb [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)]. E-mail: g.arutyunov@phys.uu.nl; Frolov, Sergey [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: frolovs@aei.mpg.de; Zamaklar, Marija [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany)]. E-mail: marzam@aei.mpg.de

    2007-08-27

    In order to analyze finite-size effects for the gauge-fixed string sigma model on AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}, we construct one-soliton solutions carrying finite angular momentum J. In the infinite J limit the solutions reduce to the recently constructed one-magnon configuration of Hofman and Maldacena. The solutions do not satisfy the level-matching condition and hence exhibit a dependence on the gauge choice, which however disappears as the size J is taken to infinity. Interestingly, the solutions do not conserve all the global charges of the psu(2,2-vertical bar4) algebra of the sigma model, implying that the symmetry algebra of the gauge-fixed string sigma model is different from psu(2,2-vertical bar4) for finite J, once one gives up the level-matching condition. The magnon dispersion relation exhibits exponential corrections with respect to the infinite J solution. We also find a generalisation of our one-magnon configuration to a solution carrying two charges on the sphere. We comment on the possible implications of our findings for the existence of the Bethe ansatz describing the spectrum of strings carrying finite charges.

  9. Vibrational Stark Effect of the Electric-Field Reporter 4-Mercaptobenzonitrile as a Tool for Investigating Electrostatics at Electrode/SAM/Solution Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hildebrandt

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available 4-mercaptobenzonitrile (MBN in self-assembled monolayers (SAMs on Au and Ag electrodes was studied by surface enhanced infrared absorption and Raman spectroscopy, to correlate the nitrile stretching frequency with the local electric field exploiting the vibrational Stark effect (VSE. Using MBN SAMs in different metal/SAM interfaces, we sorted out the main factors controlling the nitrile stretching frequency, which comprise, in addition to external electric fields, the metal-MBN bond, the surface potential, and hydrogen bond interactions. On the basis of the linear relationships between the nitrile stretching and the electrode potential, an electrostatic description of the interfacial potential distribution is presented that allows for determining the electric field strengths on the SAM surface, as well as the effective potential of zero-charge of the SAM-coated metal. Comparing this latter quantity with calculated values derived from literature data, we note a very good agreement for Au/MBN but distinct deviations for Ag/MBN which may reflect either the approximations and simplifications of the model or the uncertainty in reported structural parameters for Ag/MBN. The present electrostatic model consistently explains the electric field strengths for MBN SAMs on Ag and Au as well as for thiophenol and mercaptohexanoic acid SAMs with MBN incorporated as a VSE reporter.

  10. Giant flexoelectric effect in ferroelectric epitaxial thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D; Yoon, A; Jang, S Y; Yoon, J-G; Chung, J-S; Kim, M; Scott, J F; Noh, T W

    2011-07-29

    We report on nanoscale strain gradients in ferroelectric HoMnO(3) epitaxial thin films, resulting in a giant flexoelectric effect. Using grazing-incidence in-plane x-ray diffraction, we measured strain gradients in the films, which were 6 or 7 orders of magnitude larger than typical values reported for bulk oxides. The combination of transmission electron microscopy, electrical measurements, and electrostatic calculations showed that flexoelectricity provides a means of tuning the physical properties of ferroelectric epitaxial thin films, such as domain configurations and hysteresis curves. © 2011 American Physical Society

  11. Rabi oscillations and rapid-passage effects in the molecular-beam CO2-laser Stark spectroscopy of CH3F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, A.G.; Gough, T.E.; Isenor, N.R.; Scoles, G.

    1985-01-01

    sub-Doppler molecular-beam laser Stark spectroscopy has been employed to produce high-contrast Rabi oscillations in the ν 3 band of CH 3 F. By varying the intensity of the cw CO 2 laser, up to five complete oscillations were observed before the phenomenon was washed out by rapid-passage effects and damping mechanisms. Besides being useful in clarifying key features of coherent ir molecular-beam spectroscopy, the observation of Rabi oscillations provides one of the most accurate means of directly measuring transition dipole moments. Analysis of the present data on three rovibrational transitions, Q(1,1) -1reverse arrow0, P(1,0) 0reverse arrow0, and R(1,1) 0reverse arrow1, has yielded a rotationless transition dipole moment of 0.21 +- 0.01 D for the ν 3 = 1reverse arrow0 vibration. This result is in agreement with values estimated from both band-intensity and absorption-coefficient data in the literature

  12. Effects of Deep Convective Mixing on the Ice Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderlund, Krista M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2007-10-01

    Cloud layer observations show that the surface winds on the Ice Giants, Uranus and Neptune, are dominated by zonal motions. The winds are retrograde near the equator and are prograde at high latitudes. Measurements of outward heat flux show that Neptune emits more than twice the heat it receives via solar insolation. This indicates a significant internal heat source. In contrast, the ratio of outward thermal emission to insolation is no greater than 1.1 for Uranus. Although this ratio is likely to be only slightly greater than unity, if the internal heat flow exceeds the interior adiabat, it may still be dynamically important. Here we present numerical simulations of Boussinesq convection in a rotating spherical shell that show that strong convection in the molecular envelopes of these planets can generate large-scale zonal winds similar to the planetary observations. The deep zonal flows in the simulated molecular envelopes of our model result from convectively-driven angular momentum mixing. Using our present modeling results, we will derive an asymptotic heat transfer scaling law for this regime in order to determine if the observed interior heat fluxes on the Ice Giants can drive vigorous deep convection. We will also examine what controls the regime transition to an Ice Giant style of zonal flow. In particular, we test the effects of rotation. Our simulations indicate that the zonal flows do not depend on the planetary rotation rate once a critical value of the Ekman number, the ratio of viscous to Coriolis forces, is reached. Finally, we will predict convective heat flow patterns of Uranus and Neptune, assuming that deep convection is a dominant heat transfer process on these planets. The authors thank NASA's PATM Program for research funding (Grant NNG06GD12G). Computational resources were provided by the San Diego Supercomputing Center.

  13. Effect of holding period prior to storage on the chemical attributes of Starking Delicious apples during refrigerated storage Efeito do período que antecede o armazenamento nos atributos químicos de maças Starking Delicious durante o armazenamento refrigerado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aynur Batkan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effects of three different holding periods (6, 12 and 24 hours prior to storage on the quality attributes of Starking Delicious apples were investigated during storage of 8 months at 0.5 ± 1.0 ºC. Changes in weight loss, flesh firmness, pH values, soluble dry matter amount, titratable acidity values, ascorbic acid contents, and total and reducing sugar content were determined. According to the results, the holding period showed statistically significant changes in the quality attributes of the apples (p Neste trabalho, os efeitos de três diferentes tempos de espera (6, 12 e 24 horas antes do armazenamento sobre os atributos de qualidade de maçãs tipo Starking Delicious foram investigados durante o armazenamento de 8 meses a 0,5 ± 1,0 ºC. Alterações na perda de peso, firmeza da polpa, valores de pH, quantidade de matéria seca solúvel, valores de acidez titulável, teor de ácido ascórbico e teor de açúcar redutor e total das amostras foram determinadas. De acordo com os resultados da análise, o tempo de espera causou alterações estatisticamente significativas sobre as nos atributos de qualidade das maçãs (p < 0,05.

  14. Giant Edelstein effect in topological-insulator-graphene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Vega, M.; Schwiete, G.; Sinova, J.; Rossi, E.

    2017-12-01

    The control of a ferromagnet's magnetization via only electric currents requires the efficient generation of current-driven spin torques. In magnetic structures based on topological insulators (TIs) current-induced spin-orbit torques can be generated. Here we show that the addition of graphene, or bilayer graphene, to a TI-based magnetic structure greatly enhances the current-induced spin-density accumulation and significantly reduces the amount of power dissipated. We find that this enhancement can be as high as a factor of 100, giving rise to a giant Edelstein effect. Such a large enhancement is due to the high mobility of graphene (bilayer graphene) and to the fact that the graphene (bilayer graphene) sheet very effectively screens charge impurities, the dominant source of disorder in topological insulators. Our results show that the integration of graphene in spintronics devices can greatly enhance their performance and functionalities.

  15. Giant magnetoelectric effect in pure manganite-manganite heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Sanjukta; Pankaj, Ravindra; Yarlagadda, Sudhakar; Majumdar, Pinaki; Littlewood, Peter B.

    2017-11-01

    Obtaining strong magnetoelectric couplings in bulk materials and heterostructures is an ongoing challenge. We demonstrate that manganite heterostructures of the form (Insulator) /(LaMnO3)(n)/Interface/(CaMnO3)(n)/(Insulator) show strong multiferroicity in magnetic manganites where ferroelectric polarization is realized by charges leaking from LaMnO3 to CaMnO3 due to repulsion. Here, an effective nearest-neighbor electron-electron (electron-hole) repulsion (attraction) is generated by cooperative electron-phonon interaction. Double exchange, when a particle virtually hops to its unoccupied neighboring site and back, produces magnetic polarons that polarize antiferromagnetic regions. Thus a striking giant magnetoelectric effect ensues when an external electrical field enhances the electron leakage across the interface.

  16. The perturbation theory model of a spherical oscillator in electric field and the vibrational stark effect in polyatomic molecular species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petreska, Irina; Ivanovski, Gjorgji; Pejov, Ljupčo

    2007-04-01

    The effect of external electrostatic fields on the spherical oscillator energy states was studied using stationary perturbation theory. Besides the spherical oscillator with ideal symmetry, also a variety of the deformed systems were considered in which the deformations may be induced by the external fields, but also by the short-range crystal lattice forces. The perturbation theory analysis was carried out using the field-dependent basis functions. Predicted spectral appearances and band splittings due to the deformations and external field influences were shown to be helpful in interpreting the experimental spectra of molecular oscillator possessing subsets of mutually orthogonal triply degenerate normal modes (such as, e.g. tetrahedral species). To verify the results of the perturbation theory treatments, as well as to provide a further illustration of the usefulness of the employed technique, a numerical HF/aug-cc-pVTZ study of the vibrational states of methane molecule in external electrostatic field was performed.

  17. Stark shifting two-electron quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dineykhan, M.; Zhaugasheva, S.A.; Duysebaeva, K.S.

    2003-01-01

    Advances in modern technology make it possible to create semiconducting nano-structures (quantum dot) in which a finite number of electrons are 'captured' in a bounded volume. A quantum dot is associated with a quantum well formed at the interface, between two finite-size semiconductors owing to different positions of the forbidden gaps on the energy scale in these semiconductors. The possibility of monitoring and controlling the properties of quantum dots attracts considerable attention to these objects, as a new elemental basis for future generations of computers. The quantum-mechanical effects and image potential play a significant role in the description of the formation mechanism quantum dot, and determined the confinement potential in a two-electron quantum dot only for the spherical symmetric case. In the present talk, we considered the formation dynamics of two-electron quantum dot with violation of spherical symmetry. So, we have standard Stark potential. The energy spectrum two-electron quantum dot were calculated. Usually Stark interactions determined the tunneling phenomena between quantum dots

  18. Direct and indirect effects of giant kelp determine benthic community structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkema, Katie K; Reed, Daniel C; Schroeter, Stephen C

    2009-11-01

    Indirect facilitation can occur when a species positively affects another via the suppression of a shared competitor. In giant kelp forests, shade from the canopy of the giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, negatively affects understory algae, which compete with sessile invertebrates for space. This raises the possibility that giant kelp indirectly facilitates sessile invertebrates, via suppression of understory algae. We evaluated the effect of giant kelp on the relative abundance of algae and invertebrates by experimentally manipulating kelp abundance on large artificial reefs located off San Clemente, California, USA. The experiments revealed a negative effect of giant kelp on both light availability and understory algal abundance and a positive effect on the abundance of sessile invertebrates, which was consistent with an indirect effect mediated by shade from the kelp canopy. The importance of these processes to temporal variability in benthic community structure was evaluated at 16 locations on natural reefs off Santa Barbara, California, over an eight-year period. Interannual variability in the abundance of understory algae and in the abundance of sessile invertebrates was significantly and positively related to interannual variability in the abundance of giant kelp. Analysis of these observational data using Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) indicated that the magnitude of the indirect effect of giant kelp on invertebrates was six times larger than the direct effect on invertebrates. Results suggest that the dynamics of this system are driven by variability in the abundance of a single structure-forming species that has indirect positive, as well as direct negative, effects on associated species.

  19. Effect of Counter Electrode in Electroformation of Giant Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuuhei Oana

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Electroformation of cell-sized lipid membrane vesicles (giant vesicles, GVs, from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine, was examined varying the shape of the counter electrode. Instead of a planar ITO (indium tin oxide electrode commonly used, platinum wire mesh was employed as a counter electrode facing lipid deposit on a planar formation electrode. The modification did not significantly alter GV formation, and many GVs of 30–50 µm, some as large as 100 µm, formed as with the standard setup, indicating that a counter electrode does not have to be a complete plane. When the counter electrode was reduced to a set of two parallel platinum wires, GV formation deteriorated. Some GVs formed, but only in close proximity to the counter electrode. Lower electric voltage with this setup no longer yielded GVs. Instead, a large onion-like multilamellar structure was observed. The deteriorated GV formation and the formation of a multilamellar structure seemed to indicate the weakened effect of the electric field on lipid deposit due to insufficient coverage with a small counter electrode. Irregular membranous objects formed by spontaneous swelling of lipid without electric voltage gradually turned into multilamellar structure upon following application of voltage. No particular enhancement of GV formation was observed when lipid deposit on a wire formation electrode was used in combination with a large planar counter electrode.

  20. Isoscalar giant resonances and Landau parameters with density-dependent effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohno, Michio; Ando, Kazuhiko

    1979-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relations between the Landau parameters and the isoscalar giant (quadrupole- and monopole-) resonance energies by using general density-dependent interactions. In the limit of infinite nuclear matter, the isoscalar giant quadrupole energy is shown to depend not only on the effective mass but also on the Landau parameter F 2 . Collective energies of the isoscalar giant resonances are calculated for 16 O and 40 Ca with four different effective interactions, G-0, B1, SII and SV, by using the scaling- and constrained Hartree-Fock-methods. It is shown that the dependence of the collective energies on the effective interactions is essentially determined by the Landau parameters. The G-0 force is found to be most successful in reproducing the giant resonance energies. Validity of the RPA-moment theorems is examined for the case of local density-dependent interactions. (author)

  1. BBR-induced Stark shifts and level broadening in a helium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalialiutdinov, T.; Solovyev, D.; Labzowsky, L.

    2018-01-01

    The precise calculations of blackbody radiation (BBR)-induced Stark shifts and depopulation rates for low-lying states of a helium atom with the use of the variational approach are presented. An effect of the BBR-induced Stark-mixing of energy levels is considered. It is shown that this effect leads to a significant reduction in the lifetimes of helium-excited states. As a consequence, the influence of the Stark-mixing effect on the decay rates of metastable states in helium is discussed in the context of formation processes of the cosmic microwave background.

  2. The comparative effect of FUV, EUV and X-ray disc photoevaporation on gas giant separations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Jeff; Ercolano, Barbara; Rosotti, Giovanni P.

    2018-04-01

    Gas giants' early (≲ 5 Myr) orbital evolution occurs in a disc losing mass in part to photoevaporation driven by high energy irradiance from the host star. This process may ultimately overcome viscous accretion to disperse the disc and halt migrating giants by starving their orbits of gas, imprinting on giant planet separations in evolved systems. Inversion of this distribution could then give insight into whether stellar FUV, EUV or X-ray flux dominates photoevaporation, constraining planet formation and disc evolution models. We use a 1D hydrodynamic code in population syntheses for gas giants undergoing Type II migration in a viscously evolving disc subject to either a primarily FUV, EUV or X-ray flux from a pre-solar T Tauri star. The photoevaporative mass loss profile's unique peak location and width in each energetic regime produces characteristic features in the distribution of giant separations: a severe dearth of ≲ 2 MJ planets interior to 5 AU in the FUV scenario, a sharp concentration of ≲ 3 MJ planets between ≈1.5 - 2 AU in the EUV case, and a relative abundance of ≈2 - 3.5 MJ giants interior to 0.5 AU in the X-ray model. These features do not resemble the observational sample of gas giants with mass constraints, though our results do show some weaker qualitative similarities. We thus assess how the differing photoevaporative profiles interact with migrating giants and address the effects of large model uncertainties as a step to better connect disc models with trends in the exoplanet population.

  3. DC Stark addressing for quantum memory in Tm:YAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We observed a linear DC Stark effect for 3H6 – 3H4 optical transition of Tm3+ ions in Y3Al5O12. We observed that application of electric field pulse suppresses the two-pulse photon echo signal. If we then apply a second electric pulse of opposite polarity the echo signal is restored again, which indicates the linear nature of the observed effect. The effect is present despite the D2 symmetry of the Tm3+ sites that prohibits a linear Stark effect. Experimental data analysis shows that the observed electric field influence can be attributed to defects that break the local crystal field symmetry near Tm3+ ions. Using this effect we demonstrate selective retrieval of light pulses in two-pulse photon echo.

  4. Comparing the plant diversity between artificial forest and nature growth forest in a giant panda habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongwei; Wang, Xiaorong; Li, Shuang; Li, Junqing

    2017-06-15

    Artificial restoration is an important way to restore forests, but little is known about its effect on the habitat restoration of the giant panda. In the present study, we investigated the characteristics of artificial forest in the Wanglang Nature Reserve to determine whether through succession it has formed a suitable habitat for the giant panda. We compared artificial forest characteristics with those of natural habitat used by the giant panda. We found that the dominant tree species in artificial forest differed from those in the natural habitat. The artificial forest had lower plant species richness and diversity in the tree and shrub layers than did the latter, and its community structure was characterized by smaller tree and bamboo sizes, and fewer and lower bamboo clumps, but more trees and larger shrub sizes. The typical community collocation of artificial forest was a "Picea asperata + no-bamboo" model, which differs starkly from the giant panda's natural habitat. After several years of restoration, the artificial forest has failed to become a suitable habitat for the giant panda. Therefore, a simple way of planting individual trees cannot restore giant panda habitat; instead, habitat restoration should be based on the habitat requirements of the giant panda.

  5. Giant tunneling electroresistance effect driven by an electrically controlled spin valve at a complex oxide interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, J D; Tsymbal, E Y

    2011-04-15

    A giant tunneling electroresistance effect may be achieved in a ferroelectric tunnel junction by exploiting the magnetoelectric effect at the interface between the ferroelectric barrier and a magnetic La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO3 electrode. Using first-principles density-functional theory we demonstrate that a few magnetic monolayers of La(1-x)Sr(x)MnO3 near the interface act, in response to ferroelectric polarization reversal, as an atomic-scale spin valve by filtering spin-dependent current. This produces more than an order of magnitude change in conductance, and thus constitutes a giant resistive switching effect.

  6. Giant Electrocaloric Effect in Ferroelectrics with Tailored Polaw-Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Qiming [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2015-06-24

    systems with nano- and meso-scale disorders. Through the efforts of this DoE program, we have developed understandings for many questions and materials approaches for many hypotheses listed above. The major accomplishments include: (i) The first one to show that a giant ECE can be obtained in bulk materials of ferroelectric P(VDF-TrFE) copolymer, which has a large ß coefficient and high polarization, near FE-PE transition.[1,3,12] (ii) The first who developed the theoretical analyses on the upper bound of dipolar entropy change in polar-materials and the general approach to maximize the coexisting phases with vanishingly small switching fields among the coexisting phases[10,23] Experimental results confirm these theoretical predictions.[24] (iii) The first to show that the relaxor ferroelectrics, due to built-in defects structures at nano- and meso scale, exhibit a giant ECE over a broad temperature range.[1,3,7,14] (iv) The first to show that a large ECE can be obtained near order-disorder transition in dielectric fluids such as liquid crystals with large dielectric anisotropy. Also the study developed a general approach for developing dielectric fluids to achieve a large electric field induced entropy change.[26] (v) We are starting to explore the multi-field effect (multiferroic effect) in nanocomposites in which there exist large dielectric contrasts between the matrix and nanofilelrs and showed that a significantly enhanced ECE compared with polymer matrix.[36] (vi) By facially tuning the nano- and meso-scale dipolar coupling, we are the first to show that an anomalous ECE can be obtained in a relaxor/normal ferroelectric blend.[39] (vii) Introduced and demonstrated that the internal bias field approach can be effective in enhancing the EC response at low electric field. The result is significant since for practical applications, a low applied field is highly desired. (viii) A high sensitivity ECE characterization system has been developed. This program has made

  7. Production of H(2s) fast metastable atoms (0.25-3 keV) on a Cs target. Detection of the α Lyman radiation induced by Stark effect: polarisation. Destruction of H(2s) atoms on an IH target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valance, Antoine.

    1974-01-01

    The production, detection and destruction of the 2S1/2 metastable state of the hydrogen atom were studied. The quasi-resonant charge exchange processes between fast protons and cesium target, in the total cross sections for production of metastable H(2s) atoms and radiative H(2p) atoms showed structures hitherto unobserved. The theoretical study is based on calculation of the adiabatic molecular potential terms of the ionic quasi-molecule (CsH) + , taking a Helmann type pseudopotential to describe the electron with respect to the core of the cesium ion. The probabilities of transition towards the output channels are calculated using a stationary state perturbation method. From the data obtained the interferece phenomena of excited quasi-molecular states can be interpreted coherently in slow collision. The probability of transition along the inelastic output channels displays characteristics of a harmonic oscillatory function inversely proportional to the speed of approach of the particles. The frequency of these oscillations depends very slightly on the impact parameter. The theory proposed involves three Σ states. During detection of the metastable ions the Lyman-α radiation induced in the de-excitation electric field by Stark effect present anisotropic features. The degree of polarization measured as a function of the field strength oscillates around a slow decay toward a limit-1 at strong electric field. A theory not accounting for the hyperfine structure of states mixed by Stark effect showed a double oscillatory structure containing the two frequencies correlated to the 2P1/2 and 2P3/2 states from the 2S1/2 state. Finally the results on the electron detachment reaction between fast metastable atoms and hydroiodic acid target have contributed towards research on polarized proton sources [fr

  8. Giant Planar Hall Effect in the Dirac Semimetal ZrTe5

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Peng

    2018-03-03

    Exploration and understanding of exotic topics in quantum physics such as Dirac and Weyl semimetals have become highly popular in the area of condensed matter. It has recently been predicted that a theoretical giant planar Hall effect can be induced by a chiral anomaly in Dirac and Weyl semimetals. ZrTe5 is considered an intriguing Dirac semimetal at the boundary of weak and strong topological insulators, though this claim is still controversial. In this study, we report the observation in ZrTe5 of giant planar Hall resistivity. We have also noted three different dependences of this resistivity on the magnetic field, as predicted by theory, maximum planar Hall resistivity occurs at the Lifshitz transition temperature. In addition, we have discovered a nontrivial Berry phase, as well as a chiral-anomaly-induced negative longitudinal and a giant in-plane anisotropic magnetoresistance. All these experimental observations coherently demonstrate that ZrTe5 is a Dirac semimetal.

  9. The paramagnetic Meissner effect resulting from the persistence of the giant vortex state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moshchalkov, V.V.; Bruyndoncx, V.; Qiu, X.G.

    1996-01-01

    The paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME), recently observed in high-T c materials and also in Nb, can be successfully explained by the persistence of the giant vortex state with the fixed orbital quantum number L. This state is formed in superconductors in the field cooled regime at the third critical field. The self-consistent numerical solution of the Ginzburg-Landau equations clearly shows that the compression of the flux trapped inside the giant vortex state results in the PME. The PME is suppressed, and the normal diamagnetic response is recovered, by increasing the applied field

  10. Giant magneto-optical Kerr effect and universal Faraday effect in thin-film topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Wang-Kong; MacDonald, A H

    2010-07-30

    Topological insulators can exhibit strong magneto-electric effects when their time-reversal symmetry is broken. In this Letter we consider the magneto-optical Kerr and Faraday effects of a topological insulator thin film weakly exchange coupled to a ferromagnet. We find that its Faraday rotation has a universal value at low frequencies θF=tan(-1)α, where α is the vacuum fine structure constant, and that it has a giant Kerr rotation θK=π/2. These properties follow from a delicate interplay between thin-film cavity confinement and the surface Hall conductivity of a topological insulator's helical quasiparticles.

  11. Investigation of surface effect on giant magnetoimpedance in microwires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tousignant, M.; Zabeida, O.; Rudkowska, G.; Yelon, A.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work from our group suggested that the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) response of soft ferromagnetic microwires could be improved by removing a hypothetical hard magnetic shell on the surface of the cylindrical conductors. Therefore, we have been trying to increase the sensitivity of our samples by exposing them to a mild plasma etching treatment. Although we measured a reduction in diameter of the microwires and ensured that their bulk magnetic properties remained unchanged, it was found that the surface treatment did not improve the GMI behavior of the samples. We thus conclude that the sensitivity of ferromagnetic microwires must be limited by bulk inhomogeneities, yet to be investigated. - Highlights: • We have been trying to increase the sensitivity of our samples by exposing them to a mild plasma etching treatment. • Surface treatment did not improve the GMI behavior of the samples

  12. Effect of feed on the growth rate of African giant land snail ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of three feed combinations on the growth rate of the African Giant snail, Archachatina marginata, were investigated at the snailery unit of Forestry and Wildlife Department of University of Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria. Growth parameters measured included; changes in snail weight, shell length and shell height.

  13. Effect of giant rat's tail grass ( Sporobolus pyramidalis p.beauv ) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of giant rat's tail grass ( Sporobolus pyramidalis p.beauv ) on Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon (TPH) and Heavy metals content of crude oil polluted soils” ... Abstract. Soil contamination by crude oil has been an issue within the oil producing areas of the Niger Delta Nigeria and so, many remediation methods; including ...

  14. The effect of a giant wind farm on precipitation in a regional climate model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiedler, B H; Bukovsky, M S

    2011-01-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is employed as a nested regional climate model to study the effect of a giant wind farm on warm-season precipitation in the eastern two-thirds of the USA. The boundary conditions for WRF are supplied by 62 years of NCEP/NCAR (National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research) global reanalysis. In the model, the presence of a mid-west wind farm, either giant or small, can have an enormous impact on the weather and the amount of precipitation for one season, which is consistent with the known sensitivity of long-term weather forecasts to initial conditions. The effect on climate is less strong. In the average precipitation of 62 warm seasons, there is a statistically significant 1.0% enhancement of precipitation in a multi-state area surrounding and to the south-east of the wind farm.

  15. Ion association at discretely-charged dielectric interfaces: Giant charge inversion [Dielectric response controlled ion association at physically heterogeneous surfaces: Giant charge reversal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhi -Yong [Chongqing Univ. of Technology, Chongqing (China); Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Wu, Jianzhong [Univ. of California, Riverside, CA (United States)

    2017-07-11

    Giant charge reversal has been identified for the first time by Monte Carlo simulation for a discretely charged surface in contact with a trivalent electrolyte solution. It takes place regardless of the surface charge density under study and the monovalent salt. In stark contrast to earlier predictions based on the 2-dimensional Wigner crystal model to describe strong correlation of counterions at the macroion surface, we find that giant charge reversal reflects an intricate interplay of ionic volume effects, electrostatic correlations, surface charge heterogeneity, and the dielectric response of the confined fluids. While the novel phenomenon is yet to be confirmed with experiment, the simulation results appear in excellent agreement with a wide range of existing observations in the subregime of charge inversion. Lastly, our findings may have far-reaching implications to understanding complex electrochemical phenomena entailing ionic fluids under dielectric confinements.

  16. A Mathematical Model with Pulse Effect for Three Populations of the Giant Panda and Two Kinds of Bamboo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-yun Shi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model for the relationship between the populations of giant pandas and two kinds of bamboo is established. We use the impulsive perturbations to take into account the effect of a sudden collapse of bamboo as a food source. We show that this system is uniformly bounded. Using the Floquet theory and comparison techniques of impulsive equations, we find conditions for the local and global stabilities of the giant panda-free periodic solution. Moreover, we obtain sufficient conditions for the system to be permanent. The results provide a theoretical basis for giant panda habitat protection.

  17. Effect of denosumab on recurrent giant cell reparative granuloma of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeda, Koji; Kasai, Yuichi; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Matsumine, Akihiko; Takegami, Norihiko; Yamada, Junichi; Sudo, Akihiro

    2015-05-15

    A case of recurrent giant cell reparative granuloma (GCRG) of the lumbar spine successfully treated with denosumab is reported; a fully human monoclonal antibody against the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (RANK) ligand (RANKL). To report the first case of recurrent GCRG of the lumbar spine treated with denosumab. GCRG is a non-neoplastic osteofibrous lesion usually found in the maxilla and mandible but rarely in the spine. It is clinically distinct from giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB), although common histological characteristics such as the proliferation of spindle-shaped stromal cells and multinucleated giant cells are shared. Denosumab has recently been reported to be effective for unresectable GCTB; however, there is only one report of its effect on GCRG. Moreover, the effect of denosumab on GCRG of the spine is unknown. The clinical course, radiological features, pathology, and treatment outcome of a patient with recurrent GCRG of the lumbar spine treated with denosumab are documented. Denosumab treatment was used for this patient with unresectable recurrent GCRG of the lumbar spine. Follow-up lumbar radiography showed significant bone formations in the tumor lesion after 3 months of treatment. On follow-up computerized tomography scans of the L2 and L3 vertebral lesions, the replacement of osoteolytic lesions by the formation of cortical-like bone tissue was clearly identified. We report the first case of recurrent GCRG of the spine successfully treated with denosumab. Treatment with denosumab induced significant bone formation in the unresectable lumbar lesion with stable clinical improvement during the 12-month follow-up period without apparent complications. Denosumab shows promise as a new alternative treatment option for osteoclastic giant cell-rich tumors, such as GCRG, especially for unresectable lesions of the spine. 4.

  18. Glue embolization of the giant aneurysm by reducing thrombosis-induced volume expansion effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeom, Yoo Kyung; Suh, Dae Chul

    2015-01-01

    A giant aneurysm due to a large intra-aneurysmal volume can be complicated by a delayed massive volume expansion caused by thrombus formation. To prevent such a severe mass effect, we obliterated the aneurysmal lumen by gluing and prevented further development of thrombosis. A 52-year-old female with a giant aneurysm at the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery presented with tinnitus and intermittent diplopia. After confirming with a negative occlusion test, the right internal carotid artery was trapped by coiling and with further obliteration of the aneurysmal lumen by gluing. She developed a mild diplopia after the procedure and recovered without any deficit. The magnetic resonance angiography showed a stable occlusion of the aneurysm and good collateral filling of the cerebral vessel 15 months later.

  19. Glue embolization of the giant aneurysm by reducing thrombosis-induced volume expansion effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Yoo Kyung; Suh, Dae Chul [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    A giant aneurysm due to a large intra-aneurysmal volume can be complicated by a delayed massive volume expansion caused by thrombus formation. To prevent such a severe mass effect, we obliterated the aneurysmal lumen by gluing and prevented further development of thrombosis. A 52-year-old female with a giant aneurysm at the cavernous segment of the internal carotid artery presented with tinnitus and intermittent diplopia. After confirming with a negative occlusion test, the right internal carotid artery was trapped by coiling and with further obliteration of the aneurysmal lumen by gluing. She developed a mild diplopia after the procedure and recovered without any deficit. The magnetic resonance angiography showed a stable occlusion of the aneurysm and good collateral filling of the cerebral vessel 15 months later.

  20. Primary angiitis of the central nervous system with diffuse cerebral mass effect and giant cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kinsella, J A

    2012-02-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system (PACNS), also called primary CNS vasculitis, is an idiopathic inflammatory condition affecting only intracranial and spinal cord vessels, particularly medium-sized and smaller arteries and arterioles. Angiography and histopathology typically do not reveal evidence of systemic vasculitis.(1,2) Histopathology usually reveals granulomatous inflammation affecting arterioles and small arteries of the parenchyma and\\/or leptomeninges, similar to that seen in Takayasu\\'s or giant cell arteritis.(1-3) We report a patient with biopsy-proven PACNS with giant cells and cerebral mass effect on MRI. Magnetic resonance angiography and cerebral angiography appeared normal and there was no evidence of extracranial vasculitis.

  1. Inherent Tumor Characteristics That Limit Effective and Safe Resection of Giant Nonfunctioning Pituitary Adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishioka, Hiroshi; Hara, Takayuki; Nagata, Yuichi; Fukuhara, Noriaki; Yamaguchi-Okada, Mitsuo; Yamada, Shozo

    2017-10-01

    Surgical treatment of giant pituitary adenomas is sometimes challenging. We present our surgical series of giant nonfunctioning adenomas to shed light on the limitations of effective and safe tumor resection. The preoperative tumor characteristics, surgical approaches, outcome, and histology of giant nonfunctioning adenoma (>40 mm) in 128 consecutive surgical patients are reviewed. The follow-up period ranged from 19 to 113 months (mean 62.2 months). A transsphenoidal approach was used in the treatment of 109 patients and a combined transsphenoidal transcranial approach in 19 patients. A total of 93 patients (72.7%) underwent total resection or subtotal resection apart from the cavernous sinus (CS). The degree of tumor resection, excluding the marked CS invasion, was lower in tumors that were larger (P = 0.0107), showed massive intracranial extension (P = 0.0352), and had an irregular configuration (P = 0.0016). Permanent surgical complications developed in 28 patients (22.0%). Long-term tumor control was achieved in all patients by single surgery, including 43 patients with adjuvant radiotherapy. Most tumors were histologically benign, with a low MIB-1 index (inherent factors that independently limit effective resection. These high-risk tumors require an individualized therapeutic strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. EFFECT OF CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTATION ON GIANT FRESHWATER PRAWN (Macrobrachium rosenbergii MOULTING AND EGG QUALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhsan Khasani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A breeding program for giant freshwater prawn has been developed in Indonesia to supply good quality prawn seed to industry. To achieve the goal of the program, optimum conditions of both environment and nutrition must be provided. Calcium is the main compound of the prawn carapace, influencing moulting processes, especially during the premating moult. The effect of calcium supplementation in the prawn feed on moulting process and egg quality of giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii, was investigated. Experimental units consisted of 300 L plastic tanks stocked with 4 adult prawns comprising 3 female and 1 male. A standard prawn feed containing 30.39% crude protein; 0.82% Ca and 0.47% P was used as the experimental diet. A complete randomized design was‘applied in the study with 5 dosage levels of dicalcium phosphate i.e. 0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, and 8% with 4 replicates. Prawns were reared over 45 days. There were significant differences (P0.05. Egg hatching rate increased liniearly from 26.5%±9.9% to 50.8%±10.3% as calcium dosage increased from 0% to 8%. The number of eggs per spawn was not significantly different (P>0.05, ranging from 40,096 to 46,131 for females weighing 30.19 to 32.94 g. The results of this study suggest that giant freshwater prawns require dietary calcium supplementation to support moulting process and egg quality when reared in soft water.

  3. The effect of close-in giant planets' evolution on tidal-induced migration of exomoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Montes, J. A.; Zuluaga, Jorge I.; Sucerquia, Mario

    2017-11-01

    Hypothetical exomoons around close-in giant planets may migrate inwards and/or outwards in virtue of the interplay of the star, planet and moon tidal interactions. These processes could be responsible for the disruption of lunar systems, the collision of moons with planets or could provide a mechanism for the formation of exorings. Several models have been developed to determine the fate of exomoons when subjected to the tidal effects of their host planets. None of them has taken into account the key role that planetary evolution could play in this process. In this paper, we put together numerical models of exomoon's tidal-induced orbital evolution, results of planetary evolution and interior structure models to study the final fate of exomoons around evolving close-in gas giants. We have found that planetary evolution significantly affects not only the time-scale of exomoon migration but also its final fate. Thus, if any change in planetary radius, internal mass distribution and rotation occurs in time-scales lower or comparable to orbital evolution, exomoon may only migrate outwards and prevent tidal disruption or a collision with the planet. If exomoons are discovered in the future around close-in giant planets, our results may contribute to constrain planetary evolution and internal structure models.

  4. Giant piezoelectric response in piezoelectric/dielectric superlattices due to flexoelectric effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Wu, Huaping; Wang, Jie

    2016-11-01

    Flexoelectricity describes the linear response of electrical polarization to a strain gradient, which can be used to enhance the piezoelectric effect of piezoelectric material or realize the piezoelectric effect in nonpiezoelectric materials. Here, we demonstrate from thermodynamics theory that a giant piezoelectric effect exists in piezoelectric/dielectric superlattices due to flexoelectric effect. The apparent piezoelectric coefficient is calculated from the closed-form of analytical expression of the polarization distribution in the piezoelectric/dielectric superlattice subjected to a normal stress, in which the flexoelectric effect is included. It is found that there exists a strong nonlinear coupling between the flexoelectric and piezoelectric effects, which significantly enhances the apparent piezoelectric coefficient in the piezoelectric/dielectric superlattice. For a specific thickness ratio of the piezoelectric and dielectric layers, the enhanced apparent piezoelectric coefficient in the superlattice is ten times larger than that of its pure piezoelectric counterpart. The present work suggests an effective way to obtain giant apparent piezoelectric effect in piezoelectric/dielectric superlattices through flexoelectric effect.

  5. Surface and temperature effects in isovector giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipparini, E.; Stringari, S.

    1988-01-01

    Using the liquid droplet model (LDM) we investigate three different sum rules for the isovector dipole and monopole excitations. Analytical formulae are derived for the excitation energies of these resonances and the predictions are compared with experiments. The role of the surface and the effects of temperature are explicitly discussed. (orig.)

  6. Effect of carbamate molluscicide on African giant land snail ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400 and 500mg/ml of carbamate molluscicide on the behavioural and macroscopic changes of Limicolaria aurora were investigated in the laboratory using Carica papaya as bait for 120h. The data showed that 48h after dosing the organism with furadan, 60% mortality was recorded.

  7. Nanodielectrics with giant permittivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Following the prediction, during the last couple of years we have investigated the effect of giant permittivity in one-dimensional systems of conventional metals and conjugated polymer chains. In this article, we have tried to summarize the works on giant permittivity and finally the fabrication of nanocapacitor using metal ...

  8. Giant Nernst effect in heavy-electron metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behnia, K.; Bel, R.; Pourret, A.; Izawa, K.; Flouquet, J.; Nakajima, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Kikuchi, D.; Aoki, Y.; Sugawara, H.; Sato, H.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies of the Nernst effect in a number of heavy-fermion systems have led to a previously unsuspected result. In some circumstances, the Nernst signal of quasi-particles becomes very large and can easily overwhelm the well-known Nernst effect produced by the movement of the superconducting vortices under the influence of a thermal gradient. In particular, the Nernst coefficient attains an exceptionally large magnitude in the ordered states of URu 2 Si 2 and PrFe 4 P 12 . In all these cases, the order of magnitude of the Nernst signal appears compatible with the Boltzmann picture which links the Nernst coefficient to the energy-dependence of the Hall angle

  9. Giant magneto-impedance and skin effect in CuBe/CoNiP composite wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.P.; Zhao, Z.J.; Zhang, J.C.; Wu, Z.M.; Ruan, J.Z.; Wang, Q.J.; Yang, X.L.

    2006-01-01

    The giant magneto-impedance and skin effect in electroless deposited CuBe/CoNiP composite wires with different diameter of CuBe core are presented, and involves a theoretical approach of the current density distributions in layers. Results show that the strong eddy current in the magnetic CoNiP coating will be induced due to the electromagnetic interactions with the CuBe core. It makes the skin effect strong in the magnetic coating even at very low frequency, and at this, large MI changes can also be observed

  10. Measurement of Stark Shift of Potassium D Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Masayuki; Jin, Wei-Guo; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Minowa, Tatsuya

    2009-03-01

    High-resolution atomic-beam laser spectroscopy has been performed to study the Stark effect of K atoms. A compact electrode apparatus has been developed to produce a stable and strong electric field. The Stark shifts of the D1 and D2 lines as well as the splitting of the D2 line have been measured and found to be proportional to the square of the electric field. The scalar polarizability of the D1 line and the scalar and tensor polarizabilities of the D2 line have been determined to be αs (4 p{2}P1/2) -αs (4s{2}S1/2)=81.3± 2.4 kHz/(kV/cm)2, αs (4 p{2}P3/2) -αs (4s{2}S1/2)=93.0± 2.5 kHz/(kV/cm)2, and αt (4 p{2}P3/2)=-27.6± 0.7 kHz/(kV/cm)2, respectively, providing a crosscheck of the previously reported values.

  11. Stark Broadening of Cr III Spectral Lines: DO White Dwarfs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan S. Dimitrijević

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Using the modified semiempirical method of Dimitrijević and Konjević, Stark widths have been calculated for six Cr III transitions, for an electron density of 10 17 cm ‒ 3 and for temperatures from 5000–80,000 K. Results have been used for the investigation of the influence of Stark broadening on spectral lines in cool DO white dwarf atmospheres. Calculated Stark widths will be implemented in the STARK-B database, which is also a part of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center (VAMDC.

  12. Giant magneto-photoelectric effect in suspended graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Jens; Kurzmann, Annika; Geller, Martin; Queisser, Friedemann; Lorke, Axel; Schützhold, Ralf

    2017-06-01

    We study the optical response of a suspended, monolayer graphene field-effect transistor structure in magnetic fields of up to 9 T (quantum Hall regime). With an illumination power of only 3 μW, we measure a photocurrent of up to 400 nA (without an applied bias) corresponding to a photo-responsivity of 0.13 A W-1, which we believe to be one of the highest values ever measured in single-layer graphene. We discuss possible mechanisms for generating this strong photo-response (17 electron-hole pairs per 100 incident photons). Based on our experimental findings, we believe that the most likely scenario is a ballistic two-stage process including carrier multiplication via Auger-type inelastic Coulomb scattering at the graphene edge.

  13. Role of quantum-confined stark effect on bias dependent photoluminescence of N-polar GaN/InGaN multi-quantum disk amber light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangi, Malleswararao; Mishra, Pawan; Janjua, Bilal; Prabaswara, Aditya; Zhao, Chao; Priante, Davide; Min, Jung-Wook; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2018-03-01

    We study the impact of quantum-confined stark effect (QCSE) on bias dependent micro-photoluminescence emission of the quantum disk (Q-disk) based nanowires light emitting diodes (NWs-LED) exhibiting the amber colored emission. The NWs are found to be nitrogen polar (N-polar) verified using KOH wet chemical etching and valence band spectrum analysis of high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The crystal structure and quality of the NWs were investigated by high-angle annular dark field - scanning transmission electron microscopy. The LEDs were fabricated to acquire the bias dependent micro-photoluminescence spectra. We observe a redshift and a blueshift of the μPL peak in the forward and reverse bias conditions, respectively, with reference to zero bias, which is in contrast to the metal-polar InGaN well-based LEDs in the literature. Such opposite shifts of μPL peak emission observed for N-polar NWs-LEDs, in our study, are due to the change in the direction of the internal piezoelectric field. The quenching of PL intensity, under the reverse bias conditions, is ascribed to the reduction of electron-hole overlap. Furthermore, the blueshift of μPL emission with increasing excitation power reveals the suppression of QCSE resulting from the photo-generated carriers. Thereby, our study confirms the presence of QCSE for NWs-LEDs from both bias and power dependent μPL measurements. Thus, this study serves to understand the QCSE in N-polar InGaN Q-disk NWs-LEDs and other related wide-bandgap nitride nanowires, in general.

  14. Role of quantum-confined stark effect on bias dependent photoluminescence of N-polar GaN/InGaN multi-quantum disk amber light emitting diodes

    KAUST Repository

    Tangi, Malleswararao

    2018-03-09

    We study the impact of quantum-confined stark effect (QCSE) on bias dependent micro-photoluminescence emission of the quantum disk (Q-disk) based nanowires light emitting diodes (NWs-LED) exhibiting the amber colored emission. The NWs are found to be nitrogen polar (N-polar) verified using KOH wet chemical etching and valence band spectrum analysis of high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The crystal structure and quality of the NWs were investigated by high-angle annular dark field - scanning transmission electron microscopy. The LEDs were fabricated to acquire the bias dependent micro-photoluminescence spectra. We observe a redshift and a blueshift of the μPL peak in the forward and reverse bias conditions, respectively, with reference to zero bias, which is in contrast to the metal-polar InGaN well-based LEDs in the literature. Such opposite shifts of μPL peak emission observed for N-polar NWs-LEDs, in our study, are due to the change in the direction of the internal piezoelectric field. The quenching of PL intensity, under the reverse bias conditions, is ascribed to the reduction of electron-hole overlap. Furthermore, the blueshift of μPL emission with increasing excitation power reveals the suppression of QCSE resulting from the photo-generated carriers. Thereby, our study confirms the presence of QCSE for NWs-LEDs from both bias and power dependent μPL measurements. Thus, this study serves to understand the QCSE in N-polar InGaN Q-disk NWs-LEDs and other related wide-bandgap nitride nanowires, in general.

  15. Spin-torque switching of a nano-magnet using giant spin hall effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish V. Penumatcha

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Giant Spin Hall Effect(GSHE in metals with high spin-orbit coupling is an efficient way to convert charge currents to spin currents, making it well-suited for writing information into magnets in non-volatile magnetic memory as well as spin-logic devices. We demonstrate the switching of an in-plane CoFeB magnet using a combination of GSHE and an external magnetic field. The magnetic field dependence of the critical current is used to estimate the spin hall angle with the help of a thermal activation model for spin-transfer torque switching of a nanomagnet.

  16. Landau theory and giant room-temperature barocaloric effect in M F3 metal trifluorides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales-Salazar, A.; Brierley, R. T.; Littlewood, P. B.; Guzmán-Verri, G. G.

    2017-10-01

    The structural phase transitions of M F3 (M = Al, Cr, V, Fe, Ti, Sc) metal trifluorides are studied within a simple Landau theory consisting of tilts of rigid M F6 octahedra associated with soft antiferrodistortive optic modes that are coupled to long-wavelength strain generating acoustic phonons. We calculate the temperature and pressure dependence of several quantities such as the spontaneous distortions, volume expansion, and shear strains as well as T -P phase diagrams. By contrasting our model to experiments we quantify the deviations from mean-field behavior and find that the tilt fluctuations of the M F6 octahedra increase with metal cation size. We apply our model to predict giant barocaloric effects in Sc-substituted TiF3 of up to about 15 JK -1kg-1 for modest hydrostatic compressions of 0.2 GPa . The effect extends over a wide temperature range of over 140 K (including room temperature) due to a large predicted rate, d Tc/d P =723 K GPa-1 , which exceeds those of typical barocaloric materials. Our results suggest that open lattice frameworks such as the trifluorides are an attractive platform to search for giant barocaloric effects.

  17. Stark Widths of Spectral Lines of Neutral Neon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    be included in the STARK-B database, which is a part of the Virtual. Atomic and Molecular Data Center – VAMDC. Key words. Stark broadening—atomic ...... astrophysical plasma line shapes” supported by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of Serbia. It has also been supported by the Paris.

  18. Stark-like electron transfer between quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubovis, S.A.; Voronko, A.N.; Basharov, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Stark-like mechanism of electron transfer between two energy subband localized in remote quantum wells is examined theoretically. Estimations of major parameters of the problem in case of delta-function-wells model are adduced. Schematic model allowing experimental study of Stark-like transfer is proposed

  19. Stark spectroscopy of the light-harvesting complex II in different oligomerisation states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palacios, M.A.; Frese, R.N.; Gradinaru, C.C.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Premvardhan, L.L.; Horton, P.; Ruban, A.V.; Grondelle, van R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    The electric field-induced absorption changes (Stark effect) of light-harvesting complex 11 (LHCII) in different oligomerisation states-monomeric, trimeric and aggregated-have been probed at 77 K. All the chlorophyll (Chl) a molecules exhibit electro-optic properties in the Q(y) absorption region

  20. Giant Clams and Rising CO2: Light May Ameliorate Effects of Ocean Acidification on a Solar-Powered Animal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sue-Ann Watson

    Full Text Available Global climate change and ocean acidification pose a serious threat to marine life. Marine invertebrates are particularly susceptible to ocean acidification, especially highly calcareous taxa such as molluscs, echinoderms and corals. The largest of all bivalve molluscs, giant clams, are already threatened by a variety of local pressures, including overharvesting, and are in decline worldwide. Several giant clam species are listed as 'Vulnerable' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and now climate change and ocean acidification pose an additional threat to their conservation. Unlike most other molluscs, giant clams are 'solar-powered' animals containing photosynthetic algal symbionts suggesting that light could influence the effects of ocean acidification on these vulnerable animals. In this study, juvenile fluted giant clams Tridacna squamosa were exposed to three levels of carbon dioxide (CO2 (control ~400, mid ~650 and high ~950 μatm and light (photosynthetically active radiation 35, 65 and 304 μmol photons m-2 s-1. Elevated CO2 projected for the end of this century (~650 and ~950 μatm reduced giant clam survival and growth at mid-light levels. However, effects of CO2 on survival were absent at high-light, with 100% survival across all CO2 levels. Effects of CO2 on growth of surviving clams were lessened, but not removed, at high-light levels. Shell growth and total animal mass gain were still reduced at high-CO2. This study demonstrates the potential for light to alleviate effects of ocean acidification on survival and growth in a threatened calcareous marine invertebrate. Managing water quality (e.g. turbidity and sedimentation in coastal areas to maintain water clarity may help ameliorate some negative effects of ocean acidification on giant clams and potentially other solar-powered calcifiers, such as hard corals.

  1. Giant Clams and Rising CO2: Light May Ameliorate Effects of Ocean Acidification on a Solar-Powered Animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Sue-Ann

    2015-01-01

    Global climate change and ocean acidification pose a serious threat to marine life. Marine invertebrates are particularly susceptible to ocean acidification, especially highly calcareous taxa such as molluscs, echinoderms and corals. The largest of all bivalve molluscs, giant clams, are already threatened by a variety of local pressures, including overharvesting, and are in decline worldwide. Several giant clam species are listed as 'Vulnerable' on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and now climate change and ocean acidification pose an additional threat to their conservation. Unlike most other molluscs, giant clams are 'solar-powered' animals containing photosynthetic algal symbionts suggesting that light could influence the effects of ocean acidification on these vulnerable animals. In this study, juvenile fluted giant clams Tridacna squamosa were exposed to three levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) (control ~400, mid ~650 and high ~950 μatm) and light (photosynthetically active radiation 35, 65 and 304 μmol photons m-2 s-1). Elevated CO2 projected for the end of this century (~650 and ~950 μatm) reduced giant clam survival and growth at mid-light levels. However, effects of CO2 on survival were absent at high-light, with 100% survival across all CO2 levels. Effects of CO2 on growth of surviving clams were lessened, but not removed, at high-light levels. Shell growth and total animal mass gain were still reduced at high-CO2. This study demonstrates the potential for light to alleviate effects of ocean acidification on survival and growth in a threatened calcareous marine invertebrate. Managing water quality (e.g. turbidity and sedimentation) in coastal areas to maintain water clarity may help ameliorate some negative effects of ocean acidification on giant clams and potentially other solar-powered calcifiers, such as hard corals.

  2. Stark shift of impurity doped quantum dots: Role of noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arif, Sk. Md.; Bera, Aindrila; Ghosh, Anuja; Ghosh, Manas

    2018-02-01

    Present study makes a punctilious investigation of the profiles of Stark shift (SS) of doped GaAs quantum dot (QD) under the supervision of Gaussian white noise. A few physical parameters have been varied and the consequent variations in the SS profiles have been monitored. The said physical parameters comprise of magnetic field, confinement potential, dopant location, dopant potential, noise strength, aluminium concentration (only for AlxGa1-x As alloy QD), position-dependent effective mass (PDEM), position-dependent dielectric screening function (PDDSF), anisotropy, hydrostatic pressure (HP) and temperature. The SS profiles unfurl interesting features that heavily depend upon the particular physical quantity concerned, presence/absence of noise and the manner (additive/multiplicative) noise enters the system. The study highlights feasible means of maximizing SS of doped QD in presence of noise by suitable adjustment of several control parameters. The study deems importance in view of technological applications of QD devices where noise plays some prominent role.

  3. Giant grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitch-Devlin, M.A.; Millar, T.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    Infrared observations of the Orion nebula have been interpreted by Rowan-Robinson (1975) to imply the existence of 'giant' grains, radius approximately 10 -2 cm, throughout a volume about a parsec in diameter. Although Rowan-Robinson's model of the nebula has been criticized and the presence of such grains in Orion is disputed, the proposition is accepted, that they exist, and in this paper situations in which giant grains could arise are examined. It is found that, while a giant-grain component to the interstellar grain density may exist, it is difficult to understand how giant grains arise to the extent apparently required by the Orion nebula model. (Auth.)

  4. Metallicity effect on stellar granulation detected from oscillating red giants in open clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsaro, E.; Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Gaulme, P.; Pinsonneault, M.; Stassun, K.; Stello, D.; Tayar, J.; Trampedach, R.; Jiang, C.; Nitschelm, C.; Salabert, D.

    2017-08-01

    Context. The effect of metallicity on the granulation activity in stars, and hence on the convective motions in general, is still poorly understood. Available spectroscopic parameters from the updated APOGEE-Kepler catalog, coupled with high-precision photometric observations from NASA's Kepler mission spanning more than four years of observation, make oscillating red giant stars in open clusters crucial testbeds. Aims: We aim to determine the role of metallicity on the stellar granulation activity by discriminating its effect from that of different stellar properties such as surface gravity, mass, and temperature. We analyze 60 known red giant stars belonging to the open clusters NGC 6791, NGC 6819, and NGC 6811, spanning a metallicity range from [Fe/H] ≃ - 0.09 to 0.32. The parameters describing the granulation activity of these stars and their frequency of maximum oscillation power, νmax, are studied while taking into account different masses, metallicities, and stellar evolutionary stages. We derive new scaling relations for the granulation activity, re-calibrate existing ones, and identify the best scaling relations from the available set of observations. Methods: We adopted the Bayesian code Diamonds for the analysis of the background signal in the Fourier spectra of the stars. We performed a Bayesian parameter estimation and model comparison to test the different model hypotheses proposed in this work and in the literature. Results: Metallicity causes a statistically significant change in the amplitude of the granulation activity, with a dependency stronger than that induced by both stellar mass and surface gravity. We also find that the metallicity has a significant impact on the corresponding time scales of the phenomenon. The effect of metallicity on the time scale is stronger than that of mass. Conclusions: A higher metallicity increases the amplitude of granulation and meso-granulation signals and slows down their characteristic time scales toward

  5. Multifunctional phenomena in rare-earth intermetallic compounds with a laves phase structure: giant magnetostriction and magnetocaloric effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tereshina, I.; Cwik, J.; Tereshina, Evgeniya; Politova, G.; Burkhanov, G.; Chzhan, V.; Ilyushin, A.; Miller, M.; Zaleski, A.; Nenkov, K.; Schultz, L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 11 (2014), s. 2504604 ISSN 0018-9464 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : giant magnetostriction * Laves phase structure * magnetic anisotropy * magnetocaloric effect * rare-earth intermetallic Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.386, year: 2014

  6. Effect of the attachment of ferromagnetic contacts on the conductivity and giant magnetoresistance of graphene nanoribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krompiewski, S

    2012-01-01

    Carbon-based nanostructures and graphene, in particular, evoke a lot of interest as new promising materials for nanoelectronics and spintronics. One of the most important issues in this context is the impact of external electrodes on the electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). The present theoretical method is based on the tight-binding model and a modified recursive procedure for Green’s functions. The results show that within the ballistic transport regime, the so-called end-contacted geometry (of minimal GNR/electrode interface area), is usually more advantageous for practical applications than its side-contacted counterpart (with a larger coverage area), as far as the electrical conductivity is concerned. As regards the giant magnetoresistance coefficient, however, the situation is exactly the opposite, since spin-splitting effects are more pronounced in the lower conductive side-contacted setups. (paper)

  7. Giant magnetocaloric effect, magnetization plateaux and jumps of the regular Ising polyhedra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strečka, Jozef; Karľová, Katarína; Madaras, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Magnetization process and adiabatic demagnetization of the antiferromagnetic Ising spin clusters with the shape of regular polyhedra (Platonic solids) are exactly examined within the framework of a simple graph-theoretical approach. While the Ising cube as the only unfrustrated (bipartite) spin cluster shows just one trivial plateau at zero magnetization, the other regular Ising polyhedra (tetrahedron, octahedron, icosahedron and dodecahedron) additionally display either one or two intermediate plateaux at fractional values of the saturation magnetization. The nature of highly degenerate ground states emergent at intermediate plateaux owing to a geometric frustration is clarified. It is evidenced that the regular Ising polyhedra exhibit a giant magnetocaloric effect in a vicinity of magnetization jumps, whereas the Ising octahedron and dodecahedron belong to the most prominent geometrically frustrated spin clusters that enable an efficient low-temperature refrigeration by the process of adiabatic demagnetization

  8. Giant magneto-impedance effect on nanocrystalline microwires with conductive layer deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, R.L.; Zhao, Z.J.; Liu, L.P.; Yuan, W.Z.; Yang, X.L.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the giant magneto-impedance effect on Fe-based glass-coated nanocrystalline microwires with and without an additional outer copper layer was investigated. Experiment results showed that the magneto-impedance ratio of the wires with a layer of deposited copper is higher at low frequencies and lower at high frequencies (above 50 MHz), as compared to that of the microwires without an outer copper layer. The peak MI magnetic field, corresponding to the maximum of the magneto-impedance ratio shifts towards higher field values with increasing coating thickness of copper layer. The results are explained in terms of electro-magnetic interactions between the conductive layer and the ferromagnetic core

  9. Giant magnetocaloric effect, magnetization plateaux and jumps of the regular Ising polyhedra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strečka, Jozef, E-mail: jozef.strecka@upjs.sk [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Karľová, Katarína [Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Madaras, Tomáš [Institute of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Jesenná 5, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia)

    2015-06-15

    Magnetization process and adiabatic demagnetization of the antiferromagnetic Ising spin clusters with the shape of regular polyhedra (Platonic solids) are exactly examined within the framework of a simple graph-theoretical approach. While the Ising cube as the only unfrustrated (bipartite) spin cluster shows just one trivial plateau at zero magnetization, the other regular Ising polyhedra (tetrahedron, octahedron, icosahedron and dodecahedron) additionally display either one or two intermediate plateaux at fractional values of the saturation magnetization. The nature of highly degenerate ground states emergent at intermediate plateaux owing to a geometric frustration is clarified. It is evidenced that the regular Ising polyhedra exhibit a giant magnetocaloric effect in a vicinity of magnetization jumps, whereas the Ising octahedron and dodecahedron belong to the most prominent geometrically frustrated spin clusters that enable an efficient low-temperature refrigeration by the process of adiabatic demagnetization.

  10. Giant magnetocaloric effect, magnetization plateaux and jumps of the regular Ising polyhedra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strečka, Jozef; Karľová, Katarína; Madaras, Tomáš

    2015-06-01

    Magnetization process and adiabatic demagnetization of the antiferromagnetic Ising spin clusters with the shape of regular polyhedra (Platonic solids) are exactly examined within the framework of a simple graph-theoretical approach. While the Ising cube as the only unfrustrated (bipartite) spin cluster shows just one trivial plateau at zero magnetization, the other regular Ising polyhedra (tetrahedron, octahedron, icosahedron and dodecahedron) additionally display either one or two intermediate plateaux at fractional values of the saturation magnetization. The nature of highly degenerate ground states emergent at intermediate plateaux owing to a geometric frustration is clarified. It is evidenced that the regular Ising polyhedra exhibit a giant magnetocaloric effect in a vicinity of magnetization jumps, whereas the Ising octahedron and dodecahedron belong to the most prominent geometrically frustrated spin clusters that enable an efficient low-temperature refrigeration by the process of adiabatic demagnetization.

  11. Photoresist-buffer-enhanced antiferromagnetic coupling and the giant magnetoresistance effect of Co/Cu multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yuanfu; Mei Yongfeng; Malachias, Angelo; Ingolf Moench, Jens; Kaltofen, Rainer; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2008-01-01

    By introducing a photoresist buffer layer, the enhancement of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) values of Co/Cu multilayers deposited on oxidized Si substrates is up to around 365%. X-ray reflectivity measurements indicate that the interfacial roughness of Co/Cu bilayer stacks buffered with a photoresist layer is lower than that on bare oxidized Si substrates, although their surface roughnesses are similar. Magneto-optical Kerr effect hysteresis loops of (Co/Cu) N multilayers show that the antiferromagnetic coupling strength and fraction were significantly improved after photoresist buffering for all samples with N ranging from 8 to 50. The interface smoothening of photoresist-buffered multilayers may therefore contribute to such an enhancement, which in turn increases the corresponding GMR values. (fast track communication)

  12. Are there nuclear structure effects on the isoscalar giant monopole resonance near A = 90?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Yogesh; Garg, Umesh; Howard, K.; Senyigit, M.; Itoh, M.; Ando, S.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Iwamoto, C.; Adachi, S.; Tamii, A.; Fujiwara, M.; Kadono, C.; Akimune, H.; Matsuda, Y.; Nakahara, T.; Kawabata, T.; Tsumura, M.; Furuno, T.; Harakeh, M.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.

    2015-10-01

    The excitation energy of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) exhibits, in general, a very smooth behavior (Ex ~A 1 / 3) over the periodic Table. In recent work the Texas A&M group has reported that ISGMR energies for 92Zr and 92Mo are appreciably higher than that for 90Zr, suggesting significant nuclear structure effects on ISGMR and, hence, on the nuclear compressibility. We have measured inelastic scattering of 385-MeV a particles on 90,92Zr, 92Mo at extremely forward angles, including 0°, using the ``Grand Raiden'' spectrometer at RCNP, Japan. Results of detailed multipole decomposition analyses to extract the ISGMR strength distributions in the three nuclei will be presented. Supported in part by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. PHY1419765).

  13. Temporal and maternal effects on reproductive ecology of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.; Coates, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    We used mixed-effects models to examine relationships of reproductive characteristics of the giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) to improve population modeling and conservation planning for this species. Neonates from larger litters had lower mass, and mass of neonates also was affected by random variation among mothers. Length of mother did not affect relative mass of litters; however, our data suggest that longer mothers expended less reproductive effort per offspring than shorter mothers. We detected random variation in length of neonates among mothers, but these lengths were not related to length of mother or size of litter. Mean size of litter varied among years, but little evidence existed for a relationship between size of litter or mass of litter and length of mother. Sex ratios of neonates did not differ from 1:1.

  14. Giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla Linnaeus, 1758 of the brazilian cerrado: hematology and storage effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Giant Anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla is a vulnerable species because of progressive habitat destruction, mostly affected by wildfires and car accidents. The increasing number of animals that are attended by wildlife rescue centres reinforces the need of knowledge about haematological parameters, especially for those that inhabit Brazilian cerrado biome. For this purpose and in order to establish reference values for this species and also to compare them with previous studies, haematological analysis of captive giant anteaters from Brazilian cerrado were performed. Moreover, the alterations of blood samples after 24 and 48 hours of storage at refrigeration temperatures (4oC and preserved with two different EDTA concentrations (5% and 10% were studied. Means and standard deviations of haematological parameters analysed immediately after collection were: RBC: 2,07 x106/μL ± 0,40; hematocrit: 38,08%± 5,93; haemoglobin: 11.33g/dL±2.15; MCV:186.52 fL±21.72; MCHC: 29.68g/dL±2.56; MCH: 55.08pcg±5,94; total leucocytes: 8.142/μL±2.441; neutrophils: 5.913/μL±2.168; lymphocytes: 1.460/μL±740; eosinophil: 522/μL±385; monocytes: 247/μL±176; thrombocytes: 123.458/μL±31.362 and total plasma protein: 6.23g/dL±0.49. This data shows evidence of the existence of important differences between these values and others from other areas, either from Brazil or from other South American countries. Those variations might be connected to environment, genetic, nutritional and/or management factors. Regarding the storage effect analysis, it can be concluded that in giant anteaters, haematological analysis can be performed until 24h after collection without any significant alterations on the haematological parameters, except for thrombocytes. Concerning the different EDTA concentrations, it can be concluded that there are no quantitative differences in haematological variables. Nevertheless, relevant morphologic alterations in blood cells can

  15. Runaway greenhouse effect on exomoons due to irradiation from hot, young giant planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, R.; Barnes, R.

    2015-04-01

    The Kepler space telescope has proven capable of detecting transits of objects almost as small as the Earth's Moon. Some studies suggest that moons as small as 0.2 Earth masses can be detected in the Kepler data by transit timing variations and transit duration variations of their host planets. If such massive moons exist around giant planets in the stellar habitable zone (HZ), then they could serve as habitats for extraterrestrial life. While earlier studies on exomoon habitability assumed the host planet to be in thermal equilibrium with the absorbed stellar flux, we here extend this concept by including the planetary luminosity from evolutionary shrinking. Our aim is to assess the danger of exomoons to be in a runaway greenhouse state due to extensive heating from the planet. We apply pre-computed evolution tracks for giant planets to calculate the incident planetary radiation on the moon as a function of time. Added to the stellar flux, the total illumination yields constraints on a moon's habitability. Ultimately, we include tidal heating to evaluate a moon's energy budget. We use a semi-analytical formula to parameterize the critical flux for the moon to experience a runaway greenhouse effect. Planetary illumination from a 13-Jupiter-mass planet onto an Earth-sized moon at a distance of ten Jupiter radii can drive a runaway greenhouse state on the moon for about 200 million years (Myr). When stellar illumination equivalent to that received by Earth from the Sun is added, then the runaway greenhouse holds for about 500 Myr. After 1000 Myr, the planet's habitable edge has moved inward to about six Jupiter radii. Exomoons in orbits with eccentricities of 0.1 experience strong tidal heating; they must orbit a 13-Jupiter-mass host beyond 29 or 18 Jupiter radii after 100 Myr (at the inner and outer boundaries of the stellar HZ, respectively), and beyond 13 Jupiter radii (in both cases) after 1000 Myr to be habitable. If a roughly Earth-sized, Earth-mass moon would

  16. Multiphoton Rabi oscillations between highly excited Stark states of potassium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yonglin

    2011-01-01

    We have applied a nonperturbative resonant theory to study the Rabi frequency of microwave multiphoton transitions between two Rydberg states of potassium in a static electric field. The Stark electric dipole moments used to calculate the Rabi frequency are determined by the Stark states' wave functions, which are obtained by the diagonalization method. The frequencies of the Rabi oscillations are in good agreement with either experimental ones or ones calculated by the time-dependent close-coupling method and the Floquet theory. Furthermore, we are able to show that the size of avoided crossings between the (n+2)s and (n,3) states can be predicted from the Stark electric dipole moment and the difference of the two Stark states' energy at a given resonance.

  17. Giant CP stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loden, L.O.; Sundman, A.

    1989-01-01

    This study is part of an investigation of the possibility of using chemically peculiar (CP) stars to map local galactic structure. Correct luminosities of these stars are therefore crucial. CP stars are generally regarded as main-sequence or near-main-sequence objects. However, some CP stars have been classified as giants. A selection of stars, classified in literature as CP giants, are compared to normal stars in the same effective temperature interval and to ordinary 'non giant' CP stars. There is no clear confirmation of a higher luminosity for 'CP giants', than for CP stars in general. In addition, CP characteristics seem to be individual properties not repeated in a component star or other cluster members. (author). 50 refs., 5 tabs., 3 figs

  18. Stark laws and fair market value exceptions: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebrasse, Paul B

    2007-01-01

    This article will focus on one aspect of complexity in modern healthcare, namely the implications of Stark laws and other fraud and abuse provisions, including anti-kickback statutes and HIPAA. Also, this article explores the prevalence of fair market value as an exception in the Stark laws and discusses the meanings of those exceptions. Finally, the article explores basic approaches to assessing fair market value, including cost, income, and marketing approaches.

  19. Effect of digital template in the assistant of a giant condylar osteochondroma resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Guo; He, Dongmei; Yang, Chi; Lu, Chuan; Huang, Dong; Chen, Minjie; Yuan, Jianbing

    2014-05-01

    Exostosis osteochondroma is usually resected with the whole condyle even part of it is not involved. This study was to report the effect of using digital template in the assistant of resection while protecting the uninvolved condyle. We used computer-aided design technique in the assistant of making preoperative plan of a patient with giant condylar osteochondroma of exogenous type, including determining the boundary between the tumor and the articular surface of condyle, and designing the virtual tumor resection plane, surgical approach, and remove-out path of the tumor. The digital osteotomy template was made by rapid prototyping technique based on the preoperative plan. Postoperative CT scan was performed and merged with the preoperative CT by the Proplan 1.3 system to evaluate the accuracy of surgical resection with the guide of digital template. The osteotomy template was attached to the lateral surface of condyle accurately, and the tumor was removed totally by the guide of the template without injuries to adjacent nerves and vessels. Postoperative CT showed that the osteochondroma was removed completely and the unaffected articular surface of condyle was preserved well. The merging of postoperative and preoperative CT by Proplan 1.3 system showed the outcome of the operation matched with the preoperative planning quite well with an error of 0.92 mm. There was no sign of recurrence after 6 months of follow-up. The application of digital template could improve the accuracy of the giant condylar tumor resection and help to preserve the uninvolved condyle. The use of digital template could reduce injuries to the nerves and vessels as well as save time for the operation.

  20. Stark widths regularities within spectral series of sodium isoelectronic sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trklja, Nora; Tapalaga, Irinel; Dojčinović, Ivan P.; Purić, Jagoš

    2018-02-01

    Stark widths within spectral series of sodium isoelectronic sequence have been studied. This is a unique approach that includes both neutrals and ions. Two levels of problem are considered: if the required atomic parameters are known, Stark widths can be calculated by some of the known methods (in present paper modified semiempirical formula has been used), but if there is a lack of parameters, regularities enable determination of Stark broadening data. In the framework of regularity research, Stark broadening dependence on environmental conditions and certain atomic parameters has been investigated. The aim of this work is to give a simple model, with minimum of required parameters, which can be used for calculation of Stark broadening data for any chosen transitions within sodium like emitters. Obtained relations were used for predictions of Stark widths for transitions that have not been measured or calculated yet. This system enables fast data processing by using of proposed theoretical model and it provides quality control and verification of obtained results.

  1. Giant oilfields and civil conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Hsiang Lei; Guy Michaels

    2012-01-01

    We use new data to examine the effects of giant oilfield discoveries around the world since 1946. On average, these discoveries increase per capita oil production and oil exports by up to 50 percent. But these giant oilfield discoveries also have a dark side: they increase the incidence of internal armed conflict by about 5-8 percentage points. This increased incidence of conflict due to giant oilfield discoveries is especially high for countries that had already experienced armed conflicts o...

  2. Three dimensional simulation of giant magneto-impedance effect in thin film structures

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Bodong

    2011-04-04

    In this paper, a three dimensional model for the giant magneto-impedance (GMI) effect in thin film structures is developed using the finite element method(FEM) with a GMI permeability model embedded. One-layer, three-layer, and five-layer thin film structures are simulated. The GMI effect and the sensitivity are calculated as a function of the external magnetic field, driving frequency, and the thickness of the magnetic layers. The results show that the five-layer structure has the best performance, which is in accordance with experimental results. The GMI ratio and the sensitivity first improve with the increasing thickness of the magnetic layer but reach saturation at a certain value of the thickness. In a five-layer structure,saturation of the GMI effect becomes effective at about 3 μm thickness of the magnetic layers, where a GMI ratio of 1125% was obtained, with a corresponding sensitivity of 0.37%/A/m (29.6%/Oe).

  3. Giant magneto-optical faraday effect in HgTe thin films in the terahertz spectral range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuvaev, A M; Astakhov, G V; Pimenov, A; Brüne, C; Buhmann, H; Molenkamp, L W

    2011-03-11

    We report the observation of a giant Faraday effect, using terahertz (THz) spectroscopy on epitaxial HgTe thin films at room temperature. The effect is caused by the combination of the unique band structure and the very high electron mobility of HgTe. Our observations suggest that HgTe is a high-potential material for applications as optical isolator and modulator in the THz spectral range.

  4. Giant reed growth and effects on soil biological fertility in assisted phytoremediation of an industrial polluted soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, N; Ventorino, V; Rocco, C; Cenvinzo, V; Agrelli, D; Gioia, L; Di Mola, I; Adamo, P; Pepe, O; Fagnano, M

    2017-01-01

    Phytoremediation is a cost-effective "green technology" that uses plants to improve the soil properties of polluted sites, preventing the dispersion of pollutants and reducing the mobility of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) through their adsorption and accumulation by roots or precipitation within the root zone. Being highly tolerant to pollutants and other abiotic stresses, giant reed (Arundo donax L.) is a suitable biomass crop for phytoremediation of contaminated soils. We report the results of a two-year open-air lysimeter study aimed at assessing the adaptability of giant reed to grow on industrial substrates polluted by Pb and Zn and at testing commercial humic acids from leonardite as improvers of plant performance. We evaluated giant reed potential for: 1) biomass production for energy or biomaterial recovery; 2) PTE phytoextraction and 3) soil fertility restoration. Chemical fertility was monitored by measuring soil C while soil biological fertility was estimated by quantifying the abundance of bacterial functional genes regulating nitrogen fixation (nifH) and nitrification (amoA). Giant reed above-ground growth on the polluted soils was slightly lower (-16%) than on a non-polluted soil, with a preferential storage of biomass in the rhizome acting as a survival strategy in limiting growing conditions. Humic acids improved plant stress tolerance and production levels. As aerial biomass (shoots) did not accumulate PTEs, the plant in question can be used for bioenergy or biopolymer production. In contrast, below-ground biomass (rhizomes) accumulated PTEs, and can thus be harvested and removed from soil to improve phytoremediation protocols and also used as industrial biofuel. Giant reed growth increased the abundance of N-cycling bacteria and soil C in the rhizospheric soil, as well as reduced soil Pb and Zn EDTA extractable fraction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Ambient Environmental Factors on the Stereotypic Behaviors of Giant Pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, He; Duan, Hejun; Wang, Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Stereotypies are commonly observed in zoo animals, and it is necessary to better understand whether ambient environmental factors contribute to stereotypy and how to affect animal welfare in zoo settings. This study investigated the relationships between stereotypic behaviors and environmental factors including ambient temperatures, humidity, light intensity, sound intensity and number of visitors. Seven giant pandas were observed in three indoor enclosures and three outdoor enclosures. Environmental factors were measured for both indoor and outdoor enclosures and the effect they had on stereotypical behaviors was investigated. Our research found that light intensity significantly correlated with all stereotypies behaviors. Higher environmental temperature reduced the duration of pacing but increased the frequency of pacing, the duration and frequency of door-directed, meanwhile the duration of head-toss. However, we found no noticeable effect of humidity on stereotypic behaviors except for the frequency of head-toss. We also found that sound intensity was not correlated with stereotypies. Finally, the growth of visitors was negatively associated with the duration of door-directed. These results demonstrated that various environmental factors can have significant effects on stereotypic behaviors causing the expression of various stereotypies. Thus, stereotypies in zoo animals may not simply represent suboptimal welfare, but rather might be adopted as a means of coping with an aversive environment.

  6. Effects of Ambient Environmental Factors on the Stereotypic Behaviors of Giant Pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Liu

    Full Text Available Stereotypies are commonly observed in zoo animals, and it is necessary to better understand whether ambient environmental factors contribute to stereotypy and how to affect animal welfare in zoo settings. This study investigated the relationships between stereotypic behaviors and environmental factors including ambient temperatures, humidity, light intensity, sound intensity and number of visitors. Seven giant pandas were observed in three indoor enclosures and three outdoor enclosures. Environmental factors were measured for both indoor and outdoor enclosures and the effect they had on stereotypical behaviors was investigated. Our research found that light intensity significantly correlated with all stereotypies behaviors. Higher environmental temperature reduced the duration of pacing but increased the frequency of pacing, the duration and frequency of door-directed, meanwhile the duration of head-toss. However, we found no noticeable effect of humidity on stereotypic behaviors except for the frequency of head-toss. We also found that sound intensity was not correlated with stereotypies. Finally, the growth of visitors was negatively associated with the duration of door-directed. These results demonstrated that various environmental factors can have significant effects on stereotypic behaviors causing the expression of various stereotypies. Thus, stereotypies in zoo animals may not simply represent suboptimal welfare, but rather might be adopted as a means of coping with an aversive environment.

  7. Giant barocaloric effect in hexagonal Ni2In-type Mn-Co-Ge-In compounds around room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Rong-Rong; Bao, Li-Fu; Hu, Feng-Xia; Wu, Hui; Huang, Qing-Zhen; Wang, Jing; Dong, Xiao-Li; Li, Guan-Nan; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Fei-Ran; Zhao, Tong-Yun; Zheng, Xin-Qi; Wang, Li-Chen; Liu, Yao; Zuo, Wen-Liang; Zhao, Ying-Ying; Zhang, Ming; Wang, Xian-Cheng; Jin, Chang-Qing; Rao, Guang-Hui; Han, Xiu-Feng; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2015-12-01

    The most widespread cooling techniques based on gas compression/expansion encounter environmental problems. Thus, tremendous effort has been dedicated to develop alternative cooling technique and search for solid state materials that show large caloric effects. An application of pressure to a material can cause a change in temperature, which is called the barocaloric effect. Here we report the giant barocaloric effect in a hexagonal Ni2In-type MnCoGe0.99In0.01 compound involving magnetostructural transformation, Tmstr, which is accompanied with a big difference in the internal energy due to a great negative lattice expansion(ΔV/V ~ 3.9%). High resolution neutron diffraction experiments reveal that the hydrostatic pressure can push the Tmstr to a lower temperature at a rate of 7.7 K/kbar, resulting in a giant barocaloric effect. The entropy change under a moderate pressure of 3 kbar reaches 52 Jkg-1K-1, which exceeds that of most materials, including the reported giant magnetocaloric effect driven by 5 T magnetic field that is available only by superconducting magnets.

  8. A current sensor based on the giant magnetoresistance effect: design and potential smart grid applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Yong; He, Jinliang; Hu, Jun; Wang, Shan X

    2012-11-09

    Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A(-1), linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C(-1) with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids.

  9. FAST TRACK COMMUNICATION: Reproducible room temperature giant magnetocaloric effect in Fe-Rh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manekar, Meghmalhar; Roy, S. B.

    2008-10-01

    We present the results of magnetocaloric effect (MCE) studies in polycrystalline Fe-Rh alloy over a temperature range of 250-345 K across the first order antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic transition. By measuring the MCE under various thermomagnetic histories, contrary to the long held belief, we show here explicitly that the giant MCE in Fe-Rh near room temperature does not vanish after the first field cycle. In spite of the fact that the virgin magnetization curve is lost after the first field cycle near room temperature, reproducibility in the MCE under multiple field cycles can be achieved by properly choosing a combination of isothermal and adiabatic field variation cycles in the field-temperature phase space. This reproducible MCE leads to a large effective refrigerant capacity of 324.42 J kg-1, which is larger than that of the well-known magnetocaloric material Gd5Si2Ge2. This information could be important as Fe-Rh has the advantage of having a working temperature of around 300 K, which can be used for room temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  10. A Current Sensor Based on the Giant Magnetoresistance Effect: Design and Potential Smart Grid Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan X. Wang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Advanced sensing and measurement techniques are key technologies to realize a smart grid. The giant magnetoresistance (GMR effect has revolutionized the fields of data storage and magnetic measurement. In this work, a design of a GMR current sensor based on a commercial analog GMR chip for applications in a smart grid is presented and discussed. Static, dynamic and thermal properties of the sensor were characterized. The characterizations showed that in the operation range from 0 to ±5 A, the sensor had a sensitivity of 28 mV·A−1, linearity of 99.97%, maximum deviation of 2.717%, frequency response of −1.5 dB at 10 kHz current measurement, and maximum change of the amplitude response of 0.0335%·°C−1 with thermal compensation. In the distributed real-time measurement and monitoring of a smart grid system, the GMR current sensor shows excellent performance and is cost effective, making it suitable for applications such as steady-state and transient-state monitoring. With the advantages of having a high sensitivity, high linearity, small volume, low cost, and simple structure, the GMR current sensor is promising for the measurement and monitoring of smart grids.

  11. Effects of Human-Nature Interactions on Wildlife Habitat Dynamics: The Case of Wolong Nature Reserve for Giant Pandas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vina, A.; Tuanmu, M.; Yang, W.; Liu, J.

    2012-12-01

    Human activities continue to induce the degradation of natural ecosystems, thus threatening not only the long-term survival of many wildlife species around the world, but also the resilience of natural ecosystems to global environmental changes. In response, many conservation efforts are emerging as adaptive strategies for coping with the degradation of natural ecosystems. Among them, the establishment of nature reserves is considered to be the most effective. However the effectiveness of nature reserves depends on the type and intensity of human activities occurring within their boundaries. But many of these activities constitute important livelihood systems for local human populations. Therefore, to enhance the effectiveness of conservation actions without significantly affecting local livelihood systems, it is essential to understand the complexity of human-nature interactions and their effects on the spatio-temporal dynamics of natural ecosystems. In this study, we evaluated the relation between giant panda habitat dynamics, conservation efforts and human activities in Wolong Nature Reserve for Giant Pandas, Sichuan Province, China. This reserve supports ca. 10% of the entire wild giant panda population but is also home to ca. 4,900 local residents. The spatio-temporal dynamics of giant panda habitat over the last four decades were analyzed using a time series of remotely sensed imagery acquired by different satellite sensor systems, including the Landsat Multi-Spectral Scanner, the Landsat Thematic Mapper and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Our assessment suggests that when local residents were actively involved in conservation efforts (through a payment for ecosystem services scheme established since around 2000) panda habitat started to recover, thus enhancing the resilience capacity of natural ecosystems in the Reserve. This reversed a long-term (> 30 years) trend of panda habitat degradation. The study not only has direct

  12. Stark broadening of the Hα line of hydrogen at low densities: quantal and semiclassical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehle, C.; Feautrier, N.

    1984-01-01

    Stark profiles of the Hα lines of hydrogen are computed at low densities in the 'impact' theory. By a comparison with quantal results, it is shown that a simple semiclassical perturbational approach with appropriate cutoffs is sufficient to give accurate profiles in the line centre. Neglecting the natural broadening and the fine-structure effects, the authors prove that the electronic broadening is negligible and that the profile has a Lorentzian shape. An analytical expression of the half width is given. (author)

  13. The influence of interlayer exchange coupling in giant-magnetoresistive devices on spin diode effect in wide frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziętek, Sławomir, E-mail: zietek@agh.edu.pl; Skowroński, Witold; Wiśniowski, Piotr; Czapkiewicz, Maciej; Stobiecki, Tomasz [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Ogrodnik, Piotr [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Koszykowa 75, 00-662 Warszawa (Poland); Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Barnaś, Józef [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Smoluchowskiego 17, 60-179 Poznań (Poland); Faculty of Physics, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-09-21

    Spin diode effect in a giant magnetoresistive strip is measured in a broad frequency range, including resonance and off-resonance frequencies. The off-resonance dc signal is relatively strong and also significantly dependent on the exchange coupling between magnetic films through the spacer layer. The measured dc signal is described theoretically by taking into account magnetic dynamics induced by Oersted field created by an ac current flowing through the system.

  14. Ion-beam irradiation of Co/Cu nanostructures: Effects on giant magnetoresistance and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, M.; Veres, T.; Schiettekatte, F.; Roorda, S.; Cochrane, R.W.

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the effects of ion irradiation at low doses ( 14 ions/cm 2 ) on the structural properties, giant magnetoresistance (GMR), and interlayer magnetic coupling in Co/Cu multilayers. X-ray analysis combined with magnetic and resistivity measurements reveal that intermixing is promoted by ion irradiation while the periodic structure and crystallographic properties of the multilayers are not significantly altered. The GMR ratio of a multilayer decreases monotonically with ion dose. However, thermal annealing on an irradiated multilayer results in sharp recovery of the reduced GMR, and can be associated with a backdiffusion process in metastably intermixed regions. Hence, using ion irradiation and subsequent annealing, the GMR of a single multilayer can be altered reversibly over a wide range. The variation of GMR upon irradiation (or annealing) is accompanied by significant suppression (or improvement) of the antiferromagnetic interlayer coupling. The correlation between GMR and AF coupling, as well as the role of enhanced electron scattering at interfaces during these processes are discussed

  15. Giant magnetoimpedance effect in a thin-film multilayer meander-like sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, G. L. S.; Monsalve, J. G.; Rodrigues, A. R.; Azevedo, A.; Machado, F. L. A.

    2017-03-01

    A meander-like magnetic sensing element based on the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect was prepared by using optical lithography and sputtering deposition techniques. The structure of the sensing element consists of layers of Permalloy (Py = Ni81Fe19), titanium (Ti), and copper (Cu) with composition [Py(100 nm)/Ti(6 nm)]4/Cu(400 nm)/[Py(100 nm)/Ti(6 nm)]4. The GMI was investigated at room temperature under applied magnetic fields (H) varying in the range of ±4.0 kOe in both longitudinal and transversal geometries. The amplitude Iac and frequency f of the ac electrical current were varied in the range of 0.35-6.50 mA and 0.1-20 MHz, respectively. The overall dc electrical resistance of the sensing element was found to be 45.6 Ω. The sensing element yielded a GMI of 53.5% for H ≃ 5.0 Oe and f = 7.0 MHz, and the corresponding maximum average sensitivity of about 5 Ω/Oe. The sensing element was used for measuring the local Earth magnetic field ( H l o c a l = 0.26 ± 0.03 Oe) yielding a value close to the one measured by using a Hall sensor probe ( = 0.23 ± 0.01 Oe). GMI sensors are being used in applications such as accelerometers, magnetometers, biomagnetism, magnetic compasses, traffic control, non-destructive analysis, and virus and cancer cell detection.

  16. Effects of channel blocking on information transmission and energy efficiency in squid giant axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yujiang; Yue, Yuan; Yu, Yuguo; Liu, Liwei; Yu, Lianchun

    2018-04-01

    Action potentials are the information carriers of neural systems. The generation of action potentials involves the cooperative opening and closing of sodium and potassium channels. This process is metabolically expensive because the ions flowing through open channels need to be restored to maintain concentration gradients of these ions. Toxins like tetraethylammonium can block working ion channels, thus affecting the function and energy cost of neurons. In this paper, by computer simulation of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model, we studied the effects of channel blocking with toxins on the information transmission and energy efficiency in squid giant axons. We found that gradually blocking sodium channels will sequentially maximize the information transmission and energy efficiency of the axons, whereas moderate blocking of potassium channels will have little impact on the information transmission and will decrease the energy efficiency. Heavy blocking of potassium channels will cause self-sustained oscillation of membrane potentials. Simultaneously blocking sodium and potassium channels with the same ratio increases both information transmission and energy efficiency. Our results are in line with previous studies suggesting that information processing capacity and energy efficiency can be maximized by regulating the number of active ion channels, and this indicates a viable avenue for future experimentation.

  17. A controlled ac Stark echo for quantum memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham, Byoung S

    2017-08-09

    A quantum memory protocol of controlled ac Stark echoes (CASE) based on a double rephasing photon echo scheme via controlled Rabi flopping is proposed. The double rephasing scheme of photon echoes inherently satisfies the no-population inversion requirement for quantum memories, but the resultant absorptive echo remains a fundamental problem. Herein, it is reported that the first echo in the double rephasing scheme can be dynamically controlled so that it does not affect the second echo, which is accomplished by using unbalanced ac Stark shifts. Then, the second echo is coherently controlled to be emissive via controlled coherence conversion. Finally a near perfect ultralong CASE is presented using a backward echo scheme. Compared with other methods such as dc Stark echoes, the present protocol is all-optical with advantages of wavelength-selective dynamic control of quantum processing for erasing, buffering, and channel multiplexing.

  18. Simple Analytic Formula for the Stark Recurrence Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Rueda, Heric; Jensen, R. V.; Wright, J. D.; Morgan, T. J.

    2001-05-01

    Characterization of the structure of the recurrence spectrum in a strong electric field has attracted recent experimental and theoretical attention [1, 2]. Theoretical approaches have included a purely quantum mechanical explanation based on the regularities in the Stark photoabsorption spectrum, a semiquantal approach focusing on quantized energy levels and semiclassical ideas using closed orbit theory. In the present work we have used the results of our previous study [2] to find simple analytic formula that can be used to obtain the structure of the Stark recurrence spectrum. Both peak locations and amplitudes for Stark recurrences are found to be in good agreement when compared with experimental data for Rydberg Helium m = 1 states. Work supported by the National Science Foundation. [1] V. Kondratovich and J. Delos, Phys. Rev. A 57, 4604 (1998) [2] R. V. Jensen, H. Flores-Rueda, J. D. Wright, M. L. Keeler and T. J. Morgan, Phys. Rev. A 62, 53410 (2000)

  19. Stark broadening parameters and transition probabilities of persistent lines of Tl II

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrés-García, I.; Colón, C.; Fernández-Martínez, F.

    2018-05-01

    The presence of singly ionized thallium in the stellar atmosphere of the chemically peculiar star χ Lupi was reported by Leckrone et al. in 1999 by analysis of its stellar spectrum obtained with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Atomic data about the spectral line of 1307.50 Å and about the hyperfine components of the spectral lines of 1321.71 Å and 1908.64 Å were taken from different sources and used to analyse the isotopic abundance of thallium II in the star χ Lupi. From their results the authors concluded that the photosphere of the star presents an anomalous isotopic composition of Tl II. A study of the atomic parameters of Tl II and of the broadening by the Stark effect of its spectral lines (and therefore of the possible overlaps of these lines) can help to clarify the conclusions about the spectral abundance of Tl II in different stars. In this paper we present calculated values of the atomic transition probabilities and Stark broadening parameters for 49 spectral lines of Tl II obtained by using the Cowan code including core polarization effects and the Griem semiempirical approach. Theoretical values of radiative lifetimes for 11 levels (eight with experimental values in the bibliography) are calculated and compared with the experimental values in order to test the quality of our results. Theoretical trends of the Stark width and shift parameters versus the temperature for spectral lines of astrophysical interest are displayed. Trends of our calculated Stark width for the isoelectronic sequence Tl II-Pb III-Bi IV are also displayed.

  20. Giant Magnetoresistance

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 4. Giant Magnetoresistance - Nobel Prize in Physics 2007. Debakanta Samal P S Anil Kumar. General Article Volume 13 Issue 4 April 2008 pp 343-354. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. On the Stark Broadening of Lu III Spectral Lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Rijeka, 51000 Rijeka, Croatia. 2Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade, Serbia. 3LERMA ..... and complete atomic data needed for the inclusion of Stark broadening mechanism in modeling of CP star and white dwarf atmospheres and synthesis of ...

  2. Rydberg-Stark states of Positronium for atom optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, A M; Cooper, B S; Deller, A; Hogan, S D; Wall, T E; Cassidy, D B

    2015-01-01

    Positronium atoms were produced in Rydberg states by means of a two-step optical excitation process (1s→2p→nd/ns). The n = 11 Rydberg-Stark manifold has been studied using different laser polarizations providing greater control over the electric dipole moment. (paper)

  3. Stark Widths of Spectral Lines of Neutral Neon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The obtained data will be included in the STARK-B database, which is a part of the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center – VAMDC. ... University of Kosovska Mitrovica, Faculty of Natural Science and Mathematics, Department of Geography, Ive Lole Ribara 29, 38220 Kosovska Mitrovica, Serbia.

  4. Stark Broadening Parameters for Neutral Oxygen Spectral Lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The atomic data have been taken from the TOPbase and NIST atomic databases. The electron and proton Stark widths and shifts ... Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, P. O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia. LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, PSL Research ...

  5. Existence of the Stark-Wannier quantum resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchetti, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.sacchetti@unimore.it [Department of Physics, Computer Sciences and Mathematics, University of Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy)

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we prove the existence of the Stark-Wannier quantum resonances for one-dimensional Schrödinger operators with smooth periodic potential and small external homogeneous electric field. Such a result extends the existence result previously obtained in the case of periodic potentials with a finite number of open gaps.

  6. Effect of Giant Rat's Tail Grass (Sporobolus pyramidalis p.beauv) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Keywords: Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon, Heavy Metals, Phytoremediation, giant rat's tail, crude oil contamination. The Niger-Delta region of Nigeria face serious soil contamination problem. As a result of human economic activity, large quantities of soil have been contaminated with petroleum products (Kaimiet al.,. 2006).

  7. Effects and toxicity of phthalate esters to hemocytes of giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, H.-H.; Kao, W.-Y.; Su, Y.-J

    2003-06-19

    Phthalate esters (PAEs) have been considered as environmental pollutants and have been subject to control in the United States of America and Japan. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects and toxicity of eight PAEs to hemocytes and the defense functions of giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii), including hemocytic adhesion, pseudopodia formation, phenoloxidase (PO) activity, and superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup -}) production, by means of in vitro exposure experiments. After hemocytes were treated separately with eight PAEs at concentrations of 100 {mu}g/ml, the results showed that two PAEs (dipropyl phthalate, DPrP and diethyl phthalate, DEP) increased cells with pseudopodia formation, but decreased adhesive cells; reduction in the percentages of both pseudopodia formation and adhesive cells were detected in the dihexyl phthalate (DHP) and diphenyl phthalate (DPP) experiment groups; and di-(2-ethyl hexyl) phthalate (DEHP) decreased pseudopodia formation, but did not affect the adhesion. In addition, both PO activity and O{sub 2}{sup -} production were decreased after hemocytes were treated with five PAEs (benzyl butyl phthalate (BBP), di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP), DEP, DHP and DPrP), respectively. At the same time, microscopy showed that both DPrP and DHP altered morphology of the cell nucleus and led to the presence of vacuoles in cytosol of hemocytes. Using the annexin assay, and after analysis of DNA fragmentation and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it was found that hemocytes exposed to DHP and DPrP for more than 10 min would primarily die via apoptosis, the fatality correlates with increasing treatment time; and hemocytes treated with either BBP, dicyclohexyl phthalate (DCP), DEP or DPP would primarily die via necrosis. According to these results, we suggest that all eight PAEs examined could damage hemocytes and further influence the defense mechanism of prawns. This study reveals an important precaution for prawn cultivation.

  8. On the Application of Stark Broadening Data Determined with a Semiclassical Perturbation Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan S. Dimitrijević

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The significance of Stark broadening data for problems in astrophysics, physics, as well as for technological plasmas is discussed and applications of Stark broadening parameters calculated using a semiclassical perturbation method are analyzed.

  9. Steroid-sparing effect and toxicity of dapsone treatment in giant cell arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Kim Heang; Dalmay, François; Gondran, Guillaume; Palat, Sylvain; Bezanahary, Holy; Cypierre, Anne; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Liozon, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although a glucocorticoid (GC)-sparing strategy is needed for patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) suffering from refractory disease or serious treatment-related complications, evidence of efficacy in this setting of immunosuppressive drugs and biotherapies is lacking. Herein, we evaluated the GC-sparing effects and tolerability of addition of dapsone (DDS) to prednisone therapy in patients with GCA. We retrospectively assessed data on 18 GCA patients who received DDS as a first-line treatment (DDS-1 group) and 52 patients who received it as a second- or third-line treatment for refractory GCA, with or without excessive GC-related toxicity (DDS-2 group). Of these 70 patients, 63 belonged to an inception cohort of 478 patients, whereas the remaining 7 were referred to our department for resistant GCA. In all, 52 patients were assessable for DDS efficacy. The baseline characteristics of the DDS-1 patients were similar to those of 395 GCA patients (control group) who received prednisone alone. DDS-1 patients had a more sustained decrease in GC dose with a lower mean prednisone dose at 12 months, and they comprised higher proportions who achieved GC withdrawal within the first year, who stopped prednisone treatment, and who recovered from GCA (P < 0.001 for each variable). Patients in the DDS-2 group achieved a mean rate of prednisone reduction of 65% and a prednisone dose reduction of 16.9 ± 13.3 mg/d. The monthly decreases in the prednisone dose were 2.4 and 1.25 mg in DDS-1 and DDS-2 patients, respectively. DDS-induced side effects were recorded in 44 (64%) assessable patients. These side effects led to lowering of the DDS dose by 25 mg/d in 11 (16%) patients and permanent cessation of DDS in 14 patients (20%), due to allergic skin rash in 7, agranulocytosis in 2, icteric hepatitis in 2, and excessive hemolysis in 2 patients. DDS is a potent GC-sparing agent in GCA that should be evaluated in prospective studies. However, DDS use should

  10. Giant electrocaloric effect in ferroelectric ultrathin films at room temperature mediated by flexoelectric effect and work function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ye; Wu, Huaping; Wang, Jie; Lou, Jia; Zhang, Zheng; Liu, Aiping; Kitamura, Takayuki; Chai, Guozhong

    2017-07-01

    In ferroelectric ultrathin films, built-in electric fields are often present due to the flexoelectric effect and the difference of work functions at asymmetric electrodes, which may change the properties of the materials. In this paper, the influence of build-in electric fields induced by flexoelectric effect and/or work function difference on the misfit strain-temperature phase diagrams, and the electrocaloric properties of epitaxial BaTiO3 ultrathin films are investigated by using an extended nonlinear thermodynamic theory. It is found that the flexoelectric effect, i.e., the coupling of polarization and strain gradient, changes the misfit strain-temperature phase diagrams notably, in which the phases with out-of-plane polarizations increase due to the presence of a built-in field. The electrocaloric properties are remarkably enhanced when the built-in fields induced by both the flexoelectric effect and work function difference are considered. In particular, a giant adiabatic temperature change of 7.89 K in ultrathin Pt/BaTiO3/SrRuO3 capacitors at 460 K is predicted. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the peak of adiabatic temperature change versus working temperature is shifted from a high temperature to room temperature, suggesting that ferroelectric ultrathin films with asymmetric electrodes and strain gradient are promising candidates for room temperature refrigeration.

  11. Spin-flip measurements in the proton inelastic scattering on 12C and giant resonance effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leo, R.; D'Erasmo, G.; Ferrero, F.; Pantaleo, A.; Pignanelli, M.

    1975-01-01

    Differential cross sections and spin-flip probabilities (SFP) for the inelastic scattering of protons, exciting the 2 + state at 4.43 MeV in 12 C, have been measured at several incident energies between 15.9 and 37.6 MeV. The changes in the shape of the SFP angular distributions are rather limited, while the absolute values show a pronounced increase, resonant like, in two energy regions centered at about 20 and 29 MeV. The second resonance reproduces very closely the energy dependence of the E2 giant quadrupole strength found in a previous experiment. The resonance at 20 MeV should correspond to a substructure of the E1 giant dipole resonance. (Auth.)

  12. Thermal and rotational effect on giant dipole resonances in rotating nuclei at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara-Tanabe, Kazuko; Tanabe, Kosai.

    1986-01-01

    Microscopic calculations are carried out for the giant dipole resonances excited on the thermal high spin states in 162 Er and 166 Er based on the thermal linear response theory with realistic forces and large single-particle space. The dynamical strength function is compared with the experimental γ-ray absorption cross section. The general trend that the resonance energy decreases and the resonance width increases with increasing angular momentum and temperature is well reproduced by the calculations. (author)

  13. Effects of agitation on particle-size distribution and enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated spruce and giant reed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Mixing is an energy demanding process which has been previously shown to affect enzymatic hydrolysis. Concentrated biomass slurries are associated with high and non-Newtonian viscosities and mixing in these systems is a complex task. Poor mixing can lead to mass and/or heat transfer problems as well as inhomogeneous enzyme distribution, both of which can cause possible yield reduction. Furthermore the stirring energy dissipation may impact the particle size which in turn may affect the enzymatic hydrolysis. The objective of the current work was to specifically quantify the effects of mixing on particle-size distribution (PSD) and relate this to changes in the enzymatic hydrolysis. Two rather different materials were investigated, namely pretreated Norway spruce and giant reed. Results Changes in glucan hydrolysis and PSD were measured as a function of agitation during enzymatic hydrolysis at fiber loadings of 7 or 13% water-insoluble solids (WIS). Enzymatic conversion of pretreated spruce was strongly affected by agitation rates at the higher WIS content. However, at low WIS content the agitation had almost no effect on hydrolysis. There was some effect of agitation on the hydrolysis of giant reed at high WIS loading, but it was smaller than that for spruce, and there was no measurable effect at low WIS loading. In the case of spruce, intense agitation clearly affected the PSD and resulted in a reduced mean particle size, whereas for giant reed the decrease in particle size was mainly driven by enzymatic action. However, the rate of enzymatic hydrolysis was not increased after size reduction by agitation. Conclusions The impact of agitation on the enzymatic hydrolysis clearly depends not only on feedstock but also on the solids loading. Agitation was found to affect the PSD differently for the examined pretreated materials spruce and giant reed. The fact that the reduced mean particle diameter could not explain the enhanced hydrolysis rates found for

  14. A controlled ac Stark echo for quantum memories

    OpenAIRE

    Ham, Byoung S.

    2017-01-01

    A quantum memory protocol of controlled ac Stark echoes (CASE) based on a double rephasing photon echo scheme via controlled Rabi flopping is proposed. The double rephasing scheme of photon echoes inherently satisfies the no-population inversion requirement for quantum memories, but the resultant absorptive echo remains a fundamental problem. Herein, it is reported that the first echo in the double rephasing scheme can be dynamically controlled so that it does not affect the second echo, whic...

  15. Exceptions to the Stark law: practical considerations for surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satiani, Bhagwan

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide an understanding of the applicable legislative exceptions to prohibitions under the Stark law, which governs common legitimate business relationships in surgical practice. Stark I and II prohibits all referrals (and claims) for the provision of designated health services for federal reimbursement if a physician or immediate family member has any financial relationship with the entity. Regardless of intent (unlike the antikickback statute), any financial relationship is illegal unless specifically excepted by statute. These exceptions are relevant to ownership, compensation arrangements, or both. The most important ones relevant to surgeons are as follows: physician service exception (services rendered in an intragroup referral); in-office ancillary services exception (office-based vascular laboratory); the whole hospital exception (ownership interest in a hospital or department); lease exception (conditions that must be met for a lease not to be considered illegal); bona fide employment exception (important to academic medical centers); personal services arrangement exception (vascular laboratory medical directorship); physician incentive plans exception (if volume or value of referrals are an issue); hospital-affiliated group practice exception (physician services billed by a hospital); recruitment arrangement exception (inducements by hospitals to relocate); items/services exception (transcription services purchased from a hospital); fair market value exception (covers services provided to health care entities); indirect compensation arrangements (dealings between a hospital and entity owned by physicians); and academic medical centers exception (new phase II rules broaden the definition of academic medical centers and ease the requirement that practice plans be tax-exempt organizations, among other changes. Although expert legal advice is required for navigation through the maze of Stark laws, it is incumbent on surgeons

  16. Population effects on the red giant clump absolute magnitude, and distance determinations to nearby galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Léo; Salaris, Maurizio

    2001-05-01

    The red giant clump has been recently argued to be a reliable distance indicator for the galaxies in the Local Group. The accuracy of distance determinations based on this method, however, depends on the possible presence of systematic magnitude differences (ΔMIRC) between the local clump revealed by the Hipparcos colour-magnitude diagram (CMD), and the clump stars observed in distant galaxies. In this paper, we re-address the problem of these systematic `population' effects. First, we present tables with the theoretically predicted I-band clump magnitude as a function of age and metallicity. Simple equations, taken from basic population synthesis theory, are provided for the easy computation of the mean clump magnitude for any given galaxy model. We use our models to explain in some detail what determines the distribution of masses, ages and metallicities of clump stars in a galaxy. Such an approach has so far been neglected in the analysis of clump data related with distance determinations. We point out that, in galaxies with recent/ongoing star formation (e.g. the discs of spirals), the age distribution of clump stars is strongly biased towards younger (~1-3Gyr) ages, and hence towards higher metallicities. Obviously, this does not happen in galaxies with predominantly old stellar populations (e.g. ellipticals and bulges). We construct detailed models for the clump population in the local (Hipparcos) sample, the bulge, Magellanic Clouds and Carina dSph galaxy. In all cases, star formation rates and chemical enrichment histories are taken from the literature. The Hipparcos model is shown to produce distributions of metallicities, colours, and magnitudes, that are similar to those derived from spectroscopic and Hipparcos data. The bulge, Magellanic Clouds, and Carina dSph models are used to analyse the values of ΔMIRC for these different stellar systems. We show how the clump-RR Lyrae data from Udalski are well reproduced by the models. However, despite the

  17. Giant spin hall effect of light in an exotic optical system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, A.; Chandel, S.; Banerjee, C.; Saha, D.; Pal, M.; Banerjee, A.; Ghosh, N.

    2014-05-01

    We report a giant enhancement of Spin Hall (SH) shift even for normal incidence in an exotic optical system, an inhomogeneous anisotropic medium having complex spatially varying birefringent structure. The spatial variation of birefringence is obtained by changing the three dimensional orientation of liquid crystal by modulating the pixels with user-controlled greyscale value. This polarization dependent spatial variation (in a plane transverse to the direction of propagation of light) of the transmitted light beam (for incident fundamental Gaussian beam lacking any intrinsic angular momentum) through such inhomogeneous anisotropic medium was recorded using an Eigenvalue calibrated Stokes- Mueller imaging system. Giant SH shift was manifested as distinctly different spatial distribution of the recorded output Stokes vector elements for two orthogonal (left and right) input circular polarization states. We unravel the reason for such large enhancement of SH shift by performing rigorous three dimensional analysis of polarization evolution in such complex anisotropic medium. The theoretical analysis revealed that generation of large magnitude of transverse energy flow (quantified via the Poynting vector evolution inside the medium) originating from Spin Orbit Interaction (SOI) in the inhomogeneous birefringent medium leads to the observation of such a large spin dependent deflection of the trajectory of light beam.

  18. On the Stark broadening in the Au I and Au II spectra from a helium plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeniže, S.

    2009-03-01

    The Stark FWHM (Full-Width at Half of the Maximal line intensity, W) of 5 neutral and 26 singly ionized gold (Au I and Au II, respectively) spectral lines have been measured in laboratory helium plasma at approximately 16,600 K electron temperature and 7.4 × 10 22 m - 3 electron density. Five Au I and ten Au II W values are reported for the first time. The Au II W values are compared with recent theoretical data, calculated based on a modified semi-empirical approach, and also with existing experimental W values. Our normalized Stark widths are six times higher than those measured in a laser-produced plasma. Possible explanation of this is recommended here. An agreement (within the accuracy of the experiment and uncertainties of the theoretical approach used) with the recently calculated W data was found in the 6p-7s Au II transition. The calculated hyperfine splitting for the five Au II lines in the 6s-6p transition is also presented. At the stated helium plasma conditions, Stark broadening has been found to be the dominant mechanism in the Au I and Au II line shape formation. A modified version of the linear low-pressure pulsed arc was used as a plasma source operated in helium, with gold atoms as impurities evaporated from the thin gold cylindrical plates located in the homogeneous part of the discharge, providing conditions free of self-absorption. This plasma source ensures good conditions for generation of excited gold ions due to Penning and charge exchange effects.

  19. Giant magnetoimpedance effect in sputtered single layered NiFe film and meander NiFe/Cu/NiFe film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.; Zhou, Y.; Lei, C.; Zhou, Z.M.; Ding, W.

    2010-01-01

    Giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect on NiFe thin film is very promising due to its application in developing the magnetic field sensors with highly sensitivity and low cost. In this paper, the single layered NiFe thin film and NiFe/Cu/NiFe thin film with a meander structure are prepared by the MEMS technology. The influences of sputtering parameters, film structure and conductor layer width on GMI effect in NiFe single layer and meander NiFe/Cu/NiFe film are investigated. Maximum of the GMI ratio in single layer and sandwich film is 5% and 64%, respectively. The results obtained are useful for developing the high-performance magnetic sensors based on NiFe thin film.

  20. Giant magnetocaloric effect in isostructural MnNiGe-CoNiGe system by establishing a Curie-temperature window

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, E. K.

    2013-03-28

    An effective scheme of isostructural alloying was applied to establish a Curie-temperature window in isostructural MnNiGe-CoNiGe system. With the simultaneous accomplishment of decreasing structural-transition temperature and converting antiferromagnetic martensite to ferromagnetic state, a 200 K Curie-temperature window was established between Curie temperatures of austenite and martensite phases. In the window, a first-order magnetostructural transition between paramagnetic austenite and ferromagnetic martensite occurs with a sharp jump in magnetization, showing a magnetic entropy change as large as −40 J kg−1 K−1 in a 50 kOe field change. This giant magnetocaloric effect enables Mn1− x Co x NiGe to become a potential magnetic refrigerant.

  1. Effect of Bovine Plasma Protein on Autolysis and Gelation of Protein Extracted from Giant Squid (Dosidicus gigas Mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Raquel Marquez-Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bovine plasma protein (BPP on the inhibition of autolytic activity and its effect on the gelling properties of a protein concentrate (PC obtained from jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas mantle were investigated. Sols and gels were prepared from the PC by adding different amounts of BPP (0, 1, and 2%. Dynamic oscillatory measurements indicated that systems with 1% BPP had a higher elastic modulus (G′, in which hydrophobic interactions were favored. Concerning the technological and textural quality of the gels, BPP caused a greater water holding capacity (WHC, force, cohesiveness, and elasticity, probably due to improvement of the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions during gel formation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM allowed visualization of the formation of more rigid and ordered gels with less porosity when BPP was added. Therefore, the addition of BPP improved the gelling capacity of proteins extracted from giant squid.

  2. The effect of shape anisotropy in giant magnetostrictive fiber Bragg grating sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, C J; Bruno, A C

    2010-01-01

    We study the role of shape anisotropy on the strain response of magnetic field sensors based on square cuboids with giant magnetostriction and fiber Bragg gratings. We measured a maximum sensitivity of 18 µε mT −1 when a biasing uniform field of 15 mT was applied to a Tb 0.3 Dy 0.7 Fe 1.92 cuboid with an aspect ratio of 5.0. When gradient fields were applied, we were able to measure a significant change in the magnetostrictive response at different positions, attaching fiber Bragg gratings along the cuboid face containing the main magnetostrictive axis. Depending on the magnitude of the applied gradient, the magnetostrictive response was reduced by up to 34%

  3. State-labeling Wannier-Stark atomic interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelle, B.; Hilico, A.; Tackmann, G.; Beaufils, Q.; Pereira dos Santos, F.

    2013-02-01

    Using cold 87Rb atoms trapped in a one-dimensional (1D)-optical lattice, atomic interferometers involving coherent superpositions between different Wannier-Stark atomic states are realized. Two different kinds of trapped interferometer schemes are presented: a Ramsey-type interferometer sensitive both to clock frequency and external forces, and a symmetric accordion-type interferometer, sensitive to external forces only. We evaluate the limits in terms of sensitivity and accuracy of those schemes and discuss their application as force sensors. As a first step, we apply these interferometers to the measurement of the Bloch frequency and the demonstration of a compact gravimeter.

  4. Stark shift and photoionization cross section of on-center and off-center donor impurity in a core/shell ellipsoidal quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L.; Yan, Z. W.

    2018-04-01

    Within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and by using a variational method, the Stark shift of on-center and off-center donor impurity binding energies and photoionization cross section under a z-direction electric field in a prolate (oblate) core/shell ellipsoidal quantum dot has been studied. We have calculated the Stark shift as a function of the core and shell sizes and shapes, electric field, and impurity position. We also discuss the photoionization cross section as a function of photon energy with different core and shell sizes and shapes, electric field strengths, and impurity positions. The results show that the Stark shift depends strongly on the impurity position, it could be positive or negative. The core and shell sizes and shapes also have a pronounce influence on the Stark shift, and the Stark shift changes with them is non-monotonic, especially when the impurity is located at the -z-axis, the situation will become complicated. In addition, the core and shell sizes and shapes, impurity position, and electric field also have an important influence on the photoionization cross section. In particular, the photoionization cross section will vanish when the impurity is located at center of spherical core with spherical or prolate shell case at zero field.

  5. The Effect of Field Dodder (Cuscuta campestris Yunck. on Morphological and Fluorescence Parameters of Giant Ragweed (Ambrosia trifida L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sava Vrbničanin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the parasitic flowering plant known as field dodder (Cuscuta campestrisYunck. on morphological and fluorescence parameters of infested giant ragweed(Ambrosia trifida L. plants was examined under controlled conditions. The parameters ofchlorophyll fluorescence (Fo, Fv/Fm, ΦPSII, Fv, Fm, ETR and IF were measured on infested (Iand non-infested (N A. trifida plants over a period of seven days, beginning with the day ofinfestation. Morphological parameters (plant height, dry and fresh weight were measuredon the last day of fluorescence measurements. C. campestris was found to affect the height,fresh and dry weight of the infested A. trifida plants, causing significant reduction in plantheight and dry weight. Field dodder also affected several parameters of chlorophyll fluorescence(Fo, Fv/Fm, ΦPSII and Fv in infested A. trifida plants.

  6. Giant dipole resonance in hot nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mau, N.V.

    1993-01-01

    Giant resonances built on an excited state of the nucleus at a finite temperature T are studied. The following questions are investigated: how long such collective effects occur in a nucleus when T increases. How the properties of the giant resonances vary when the temperature increases. How the study of giant resonances in hot nuclei can give information on the structure of the nucleus in a highly excited state. The special case of the giant dipole resonance is studied. Some of the experimental results are reviewed and in their theoretical interpretation is discussed. (K.A.). 56 refs., 20 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Hot bottom burning in asymptotic giant branch stars and its effect on oxygen isotopic abundances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothroyd, Arnold I.; Sackmann, I.-JULIANA; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    A self-consistent calculation of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) evolution was carried out, including nucleosynthesis at the base of the convective envelope (hot bottom burning). Hot bottom burning was found to occur for stars between approximately 4.5 and approximately 7 solar mass, producing envelopes with O-18/O-16 less than or equal to 10(exp -6) and 10(exp -3) approximately less than or equal O-17/O-16 approximately less than or equal to 10(exp -1). The O-17 abundance depends sensitively on the nuclear O-17-destruction rate; this rate is only loosely constrained by the requirement that first and second dredge-up models match O-isotope observations of red giant branch (RGB) stars (Boothroyd, Sackmann, & Wasserburg 1994). In some cases, high mass-loss rates can terminate hot bottom burning before further O-17 enrichment takes place or even before all O-18 is destroyed. These predictions are in accord with the very limited stellar observations of J type carbon stars on the AGB and with some of the circumstellar Al2O3 grains from meteorites. In contrast, precise data from a number of grains and data from most low-mass S and C AGB stars (approximately less than 1.7 solar mass) lie in a region of the O-18/O-16 versus O-17/O-16 diagram that is not accessible by first and second dredge-up or by hot bottom burning. We conclude that for AGB stars, the standard models of stellar evolution are not in accord with these observations. We surmise that an additional mixing mechanism must exist that transports material from the cool bottom of the stellar convective envelope to a depth at which O-18 is destroyed. This 'cool bottom processing' mechanism on the AGB is similar to extra mixing mechanisms proposed to explain the excess C-13 (and depleted C-12) observed in the earlier RGB stage of evolution and the large Li-7 depletion observed in low-mass main-sequence stars.

  8. Study on theta-pinch turbulent plasma parameters by Stark broadenning of hydrogen-like helium ion spectral lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardinov, A.A.; Berezin, A.B.; Burtsev, V.A.; Lyublin, B.V.; Ratkevich, V.K.; Smirnov, V.G.; Solnyshkov, D.A.; Yasevich, V.Yu.

    1986-01-01

    A method for studying parameters of turbulent fields excited in a high-temperature plasma based on the analysis of a hydrogen-like helium ion He 2 having the ionization potential 4 times greater than that of a hydrogen atom is proposed. If turbulent oscillations are excited in plasma, their electric fields also broaden the spectral lines due to the Stark effect that can be used for studying characteristics of these fields. The method is used for studying parameters of the θ-pinch turbulent plasma, when the θ-pinch discharge is initiated in a quartz discharge chamber 6 cm in diameter. The experiments have permitted to find the θ-pinch plasma parameters. They have shown the prospecs of using the Stark broadening of hydrogen-like ions for studying characteristics of instabilities excited in a hot plasma

  9. Molecular quantum mechanical gradients within the polarizable embedding approach—Application to the internal vibrational Stark shift of acetophenone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Beerepoot, Maarten; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard

    2015-01-01

    We present an implementation of analytical quantum mechanical molecular gradients within the polarizable embedding (PE) model to allow for efficient geometry optimizations and vibrational analysis of molecules embedded in large, geometrically frozen environments. We consider a variational ansatz...... for the quantum region, covering (multiconfigurational) self-consistent-field and Kohn–Sham density functional theory. As the first application of the implementation, we consider the internal vibrational Stark effect of the C=O group of acetophenone in different solvents and derive its vibrational linear Stark...... and water is essential in order to capture the structural modifications and the associated frequency shifts observed in water. For more apolar solvents, a proper description of dispersion and exchange–repulsion becomes increasingly important, and the quality of the optimized structures relies to a larger...

  10. The effects of thermal treatments on protein profiles of Macrobrachium rosenbergii (giant river prawn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Komathi; Misnan, Rosmilah; Yadzir, Zailatul Hani Mohd

    2017-05-01

    Prawn allergy is certainly the most frequent cause of allergic reactions in countries where this crustacean is a popular dish of seafood. The aim of this study was to determine the protein profiles of giant river prawn which scientifically known as Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Raw and cooked extracts (boiled, steamed and fried) of prawn samples were prepared and then resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). 27 protein bands between 6 to 207 kDa were detected in the SDS-PAGE gel of raw extracts while boiled, steamed and fried extracts revealed fewer protein bands. Steamed and boiled prawns presented higher numbers of protein bands compared to fried prawn. A prominent heat-resistant band between 32 to 38 kDa was seen in all extracts, might hypothesized to be tropomyosin. Other prominent bands between 17 to 20 kDa were also seen in all treated prawn extracts while bands of 24 to 27 kDa were seen in steamed and boiled prawn extracts. These positions are consistent with the known shellfish allergens myosin light chain, sacroplasmic calcium binding protein and troponin C respectively. Several other heat-sensitive protein bands at various molecular weights were also not detected in boiled, steamed and fried extracts of this prawn. This study showed that M. rosenbergii contains numerous heat-sensitive and heat-resistant proteins, which may play an important role in prawn allergy.

  11. POPULATION EFFECTS ON THE METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTION DERIVED FROM THE RED GIANT BRANCH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordoñez, Antonio J.; Sarajedini, Ata

    2015-01-01

    We have tested the reliability of the red giant branch (RGB) as a metallicity indicator accounting for observational errors as well as the complexity of star formation histories and chemical evolution histories observed in various stellar systems. We generate model color–magnitude diagrams (CMDs) produced with a variety of evolutionary histories and compare the resultant metallicity estimates from the colors and magnitudes of RGB stars to the true input metallicities. We include realistic models for photometric errors and completeness in our synthetic CMDs. As expected, for simple simple stellar populations dominated by old stars, the RGB provides a very accurate estimate of the modular metallicity value for a population. An error in the age of a system targeted for this type of study may produce metallicity errors of a few tenths of a dex. The size of this metallicity error depends linearly on the age error, and we find this dependence to be stronger with more precise photometry. If the population has experienced any significant star formation within the last ∼6 Gyr, the metallicity estimates, [M/H], derived from the RGB may be in error by up to ∼0.5 dex. Perhaps the most important consideration for this technique is an accurate, independent estimate of the average age for the target stellar system, especially if it is probable that a significant fraction of the population formed less than ∼6 Gyr ago

  12. Passive wireless strain measurement based upon the Villari effect and giant magnetoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windl, Roman; Bruckner, Florian; Abert, Claas; Huber, Christian; Vogler, Christoph; Huber, Thomas; Oezelt, Harald; Suess, Dieter

    2016-12-01

    A passive wireless radio frequency-identification (RFID) stress/strain sensor is presented. Stress is transformed into a change of magnetic field by utilizing an amorphous metal ribbon. This magnetic field change is measured by a giant magnetoresistance magnetic field sensor and converted into a digital value with a RFID chip for wireless access. Standard metal foil strain gauges have a gauge factor GF from around 2 to 5 and suffer from the disadvantage of a physically connected power supply and measurement equipment. For the presented sensor, a strain range of -10 μm/m to 190 μm/m results in a linear sensor response, a gauge factor of GF ≈ 245, and a detectivity of 4.10 nm/m 1/√{Hz } . The detectivity of the presented sensor is similar to the detectivity of a reference metal foil strain gauge. Due to low power consumption and easy signal analysis, this sensor is well suited for long term strain measurement inside closed spaces. RFID adds features like multiple tag detection, wireless passive operation and a user data storage.

  13. Measurement of the giant magnetoresistance effect in cobalt-silver magnetic nanostructures: nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Torres, Jose; Vallés, Elisa; Gómez, Elvira

    2012-10-01

    Cobalt-silver (Co-Ag) core-shell nanoparticles with different silver thicknesses were prepared by the microemulsion method in a two-step reduction process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization revealed the almost monodispersity and nanometric size (in the range 3-5 nm depending on the shell thickness) of the synthesized nanoparticles. However, it was the use of high-resolution TEM that revealed the correct core-shell formation of the nanometric material. The selected area electron diffraction pattern indicated the fcc (face-centered cubic) and hcp (hexagonal close packed) nature for silver and cobalt, respectively. Cyclic voltammetry also allowed the correct core-shell formation to be assured. The magnetic properties revealed the presence of both superparamagnetic and ferromagnetic contributions. Because of the lack of methodology, it was necessary to develop a method to measure the magnetotransport properties of the prepared nanoparticles. The strategy which followed was successful as it was possible to measure these properties: giant magnetoresistance values of 0.1% at room temperature were obtained. The numerical analysis of magnetic and magnetoresistance data indicated the presence of superparamagnetic particles showing interaction among the magnetic moments.

  14. Transforming giants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2008-01-01

    Large corporations have long been seen as lumbering, inflexible, bureaucratic--and clueless about global developments. But recently some multinationals seem to be transforming themselves: They're engaging employees, moving quickly, and introducing innovations that show true connection with the world. Harvard Business School's Kanter ventured with a research team inside a dozen global giants--including IBM, Procter & Gamble, Omron, CEMEX, Cisco, and Banco Real--to discover what has been driving the change. After conducting more than 350 interviews on five continents, she and her colleagues came away with a strong sense that we are witnessing the dawn of a new model of corporate power: The coordination of actions and decisions on the front lines now appears to stem from widely shared values and a sturdy platform of common processes and technology, not from top-down decrees. In particular, the values that engage the passions of far-flung workforces stress openness, inclusion, and making the world a better place. Through this shift in what might be called their guidance systems, the companies have become as creative and nimble as much smaller ones, even while taking on social and environmental challenges of a scale that only large enterprises could attempt. IBM, for instance, has created a nonprofit partnership, World Community Grid, through which any organization or individual can donate unused computing power to research projects and see what is being done with the donation in real time. IBM has gained an inspiring showcase for its new technology, helped business partners connect with the company in a positive way, and offered individuals all over the globe the chance to contribute to something big.

  15. Giant Cell Arteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giant cell arteritis is a disorder that causes inflammation of your arteries, usually in the scalp, neck, and arms. ... arteries, which keeps blood from flowing well. Giant cell arteritis often occurs with another disorder called polymyalgia ...

  16. Giant congenital nevus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nevus; Giant hairy nevus; Giant pigmented nevus; Bathing trunk nevus; Congenital melanocytic nevus - large ... the spine) Involvement of the membranes of the brain and spinal cord when the nevus affects a ...

  17. Nutritional evaluation of the giant grassropper (Zonocerus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biological value of giant grasshopper protein (Zonocerus variegatus) was evaluated by comparing the weight gained, food efficiency ratio (FER), protein efficiency ratio (PER) of rats fed standard laboratory chow with that of rats fed giant grasshopper, Soyabean(Glycine max) and crayfish. The effect of high fibre content ...

  18. Giant magnetoresistance effect in CoZr/Cu/Co spin-valve films (abstract)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Youssef, J. [CNRS-LMIMS, 92195 Meudon-Bellevue (France)]|[LPM Universite Mohammed V, Rabat (Morocco); Koshkina, O.; Le Gall, H. [CNRS-LMIMS, 92195 Meudon-Bellevue (France); Harfaoui, M.E. [LPMC Universite Ibn Tofail Kenitra (Morocco); Bouziane, K. [CNRS-LMIMS, 92195 Meudon-Bellevue (France); Yamani, M.E. [LPM Universite Mohammed V, Rabat (Morocco); Desvignes, J.M. [CNRS-LMIMS, 92195 Meudon-Bellevue (France)

    1997-04-01

    A high sensitivity of giant magnetoresistance (GMR) has been observed recently from soft magnetic layers such as NiFe, NiFeCo, and FeCoB. Amorphous CoZr alloys present ultrasoft properties compared to NiFe. GMR has been investigated for amorphous CoZr/Cu/Co thin films grown by rf diode sputtering using a target consisting of a Co disk partially covered with a Zr foil. The influence of the argon pressure on Cu layer deposition, Cu thickness, and Zr content on magnetic and transport properties was analyzed. The highest value of transverse GMR obtained along the easy axis is 3.6{percent} and the MR curve was saturated in a magnetic field of 100 Oe at room temperature. GMR shows scaling behavior with the sample composition. Very high sensitivity, around 1{endash}2{percent}/Oe was observed in a CoZr (3 nm)/Cu (3 nm)/Co (2 nm) sandwich. This study shows a large dependence of GMR on Cu thickness and the maximum of magnetoresistance strongly depending on the Ar pressure which modifies the interface roughness. The Zr content also influences the magnetotransport properties ({Delta}R/R and {Delta}R/R{Delta}H). The difference in coercivity between soft magnetic CoZr and hard magnetic Co layers induces antiferromagnetic alignment. Therefore a high MR ratio and field sensitivity are achieved by improving the magnetic properties of the CoZr layer.{copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Raman-laser spectroscopy of Wannier-Stark states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tackmann, G.; Pelle, B.; Hilico, A.; Beaufils, Q.; Pereira dos Santos, F.

    2011-01-01

    Raman lasers are used as a spectroscopic probe of the state of atoms confined in a shallow one-dimensional (1D) vertical lattice. For sufficiently long laser pulses, resolved transitions in the bottom band of the lattice between Wannier Stark states corresponding to neighboring wells are observed. Couplings between such states are measured as a function of the lattice laser intensity and compared to theoretical predictions, from which the lattice depth can be extracted. Limits to the linewidth of these transitions are investigated. Transitions to higher bands can also be induced, as well as between transverse states for tilted Raman beams. All these features allow for a precise characterization of the trapping potential and for an efficient control of the atomic external degrees of freedom.

  20. Ionization spectra of highly Stark-shifted rubidium Rydberg states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimmel, Jens; Stecker, Markus; Kaiser, Manuel; Karlewski, Florian; Torralbo-Campo, Lara; Günther, Andreas; Fortágh, József

    2017-07-01

    We report on the observation and numerical calculation of ionization spectra of highly Stark-shifted Rydberg states of rubidium beyond the classical ionization threshold. In the numerical calculations, a complex absorbing potential (CAP) allows us to predict the energy levels and ionization rates of Rydberg states in this regime. Our approach of adjusting the CAP to the external electric field reduces the number of free parameters from one per resonance to a single one. Furthermore, we have measured the ionization spectra of magneto-optically trapped rubidium atoms which are excited to principal quantum numbers of 43 and 70 at various electric fields. The emerging ions are detected using an ion optics. We find good agreement between the numerically and experimentally obtained spectra.

  1. Raman-laser spectroscopy of Wannier-Stark states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackmann, G.; Pelle, B.; Hilico, A.; Beaufils, Q.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.

    2011-12-01

    Raman lasers are used as a spectroscopic probe of the state of atoms confined in a shallow one-dimensional (1D) vertical lattice. For sufficiently long laser pulses, resolved transitions in the bottom band of the lattice between Wannier Stark states corresponding to neighboring wells are observed. Couplings between such states are measured as a function of the lattice laser intensity and compared to theoretical predictions, from which the lattice depth can be extracted. Limits to the linewidth of these transitions are investigated. Transitions to higher bands can also be induced, as well as between transverse states for tilted Raman beams. All these features allow for a precise characterization of the trapping potential and for an efficient control of the atomic external degrees of freedom.

  2. Raman-laser spectroscopy of Wannier-Stark states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tackmann, G.; Pelle, B.; Hilico, A.; Beaufils, Q.; Pereira dos Santos, F. [LNE-SYRTE, UMR 8630 CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, UPMC, 61 avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2011-12-15

    Raman lasers are used as a spectroscopic probe of the state of atoms confined in a shallow one-dimensional (1D) vertical lattice. For sufficiently long laser pulses, resolved transitions in the bottom band of the lattice between Wannier Stark states corresponding to neighboring wells are observed. Couplings between such states are measured as a function of the lattice laser intensity and compared to theoretical predictions, from which the lattice depth can be extracted. Limits to the linewidth of these transitions are investigated. Transitions to higher bands can also be induced, as well as between transverse states for tilted Raman beams. All these features allow for a precise characterization of the trapping potential and for an efficient control of the atomic external degrees of freedom.

  3. Stark-state resonances induced by low-frequency elliptically polarized fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, D.

    1997-09-01

    We analyse the effect of a low-frequency elliptically polarized electric field on an excited hydrogen atom using classical dynamics. It is shown that at particular frequencies the ionization probability is a non-monotonic function of the field strength and that at these frequencies the classical ionization probabilities agree well with those of experiment. We show that this unusual behaviour is produced by resonance between Stark states and the driving field near the circularly polarized limit. By averaging over the fast motion, to produce a mean-motion approximation, we show how the resonance affects the motion and that the effect is different according to whether the electron is initially rotating in the same or in the opposite direction to the field.

  4. Formation of Close-in Super-Earths by Giant Impacts: Effects of Initial Eccentricities and Inclinations of Protoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Yuji [Planetary Exploration Research Center, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba, 275-0016 (Japan); Kokubo, Eiichiro, E-mail: ymatsumoto@cfca.nao.ac.jp [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8588 (Japan)

    2017-07-01

    Recent observations have revealed the eccentricity and inclination distributions of close-in super-Earths. These distributions have the potential to constrain their formation processes. In the in situ formation scenario, the eccentricities and inclinations of planets are determined by gravitational scattering and collisions between protoplanets on the giant impact stage. We investigate the effect of the initial eccentricities and inclinations of protoplanets on the formation of close-in super-Earths. We perform N -body simulations of protoplanets in gas-free disks, changing the initial eccentricities and inclinations systematically. We find that while the eccentricities of protoplanets are well relaxed through their evolution, the inclinations are not. When the initial inclinations are small, they are not generally pumped up since scattering is less effective and collisions occur immediately after orbital crossing. On the other hand, when the initial inclinations are large, they tend to be kept large since collisional damping is less effective. Not only the resultant inclinations of planets, but also their number, eccentricities, angular momentum deficit, and orbital separations are affected by the initial inclinations of protoplanets.

  5. From red giants to planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, S.

    1982-01-01

    The transition from red giants to planetary nebulae is studied by comparing the spectral characteristics of red giant envelopes and planetary nebulae. Observational and theoretical evidence both suggest that remnants of red giant envelopes may still be present in planetary nebula systems and should have significant effects on their formation. The dynamical effects of the interaction of stellar winds from central stars of planetary nebulae with the remnant red giant envelopes are evaluated and the mechanism found to be capable of producing the observed masses and momenta of planetary nebulae. The observed mass-radii relation of planetary nebulae may also be best explained by the interacting winds model. The possibility that red giant mass loss, and therefore the production of planetary nebulae, is different between Population I and II systems is also discussed

  6. Effects of a giant exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity among nursing home residents: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouton, Alexandre; Gillet, Nicolas; Mouton, Flore; Van Kann, Dave; Bruyère, Olivier; Cloes, Marc; Buckinx, Fanny

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the effects of a giant (4×3 m) exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA) and a broader array of physical and psychological outcomes among nursing home residents. A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was carried out in two comparable nursing homes. Ten participants (aged 82.5±6.3 and comprising 6 women) meeting the inclusion criteria took part in the 1-month intervention in one nursing home, whereas 11 participants (aged 89.9±3.1 with 8 women) were assigned to the control group in the other nursing home. The giant exercising board game required participants to per-form strength, flexibility, balance and endurance activities. The assistance provided by an exercising specialist decreased gradually during the intervention in an autonomy-oriented approach based on the self-determination theory. The following were assessed at baseline, after the intervention and after a follow-up period of 3 months: PA (steps/day and energy expenditure/day with ActiGraph), cognitive status (mini mental state examination), quality of life (EuroQol 5-dimensions), motivation for PA (Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2), gait and balance (Tinetti and Short Physical Performance Battery), functional mobility (timed up and go), and the muscular isometric strength of the lower limb muscles. In the intervention group, PA increased from 2,921 steps/day at baseline to 3,358 steps/day after the intervention (+14.9%, P =0.04) and 4,083 steps/day (+39.8%, P =0.03) after 3 months. Energy expenditure/day also increased after the intervention (+110 kcal/day, +6.3%, P =0.01) and after 3 months (+219 kcal/day, +12.3%, P =0.02). Quality of life ( P <0.05), balance and gait ( P <0.05), and strength of the ankle ( P <0.05) were also improved after 3 months. Such improvements were not observed in the control group. The preliminary results are promising but further investigation is required to confirm and evaluate the long-term effectiveness

  7. EFFECT OF INBREEDING ON MORPHOLOGICAL TRAITS OF POPULATIONS OF GIANT FRESH WATER PRAWN, Macrobrachium rosenbergii: IMPLICATIONS FOR SELECTIVE BREEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imron Imron

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic improvement through selective breeding relies on the genetically-controlled phenotypic variability in the character of interest. Therefore, the extent of phenotypic variability in the population to be selected is an important parameter, as it potentially influences the population’s response to selection. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of inbreeding on the survivability, growth, and phenotypic variability of giant freshwater prawn (GFP, Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Two GFP populations of different inbreeding levels, namely 25% and 0%, respectively, were formed by mating of individual broodstock with known pedigree. Study was conducted for two months starting from newly hatched larvae up to nursery stage (30 day-old post larva. Phenotypic variability profile, expressed in the morphometric mean and coefficient of variation (CV of twenty one morphometric characters were measured and evaluated. Results showed that in general, the inbred populations had lower values in the mean of all characters (100%, indicating that they suffered from inbreeding depression. Similarly, a lower CV values were observed in sixteen (75% of the morphometric characters measured, indicating a potential reduced of genetic gain when they are used in selective breeding program. These results suggest the importance of controlling inbreeding level in breeding population that adverse effects resulted resulted from inbreeding can be minimized.

  8. Quality Of Starking Apples After Exposure To Gamma Radiation As A Quarantine Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansour, M.; Mohamad, F.; Al-Bachir, M.

    2004-01-01

    Starking apples approaching physiological maturity were exposed, immediately after harvest, to gamma radiation doses ranging from 100 to 400 Gy. The irradiated fruit were stored for six months in a cold storage facility at 1±1 deg. C and 90±5 % RH. Effects of gamma radiation on weight loss, fruit firmness, pH of fruit juice, fruit taste, color and visible injuries were evaluated. The results showed that gamma irradiation increased weight loss, particularly in the first 45 days of storage. Doses higher than 200 Gy, on the other hand, reduced apple firmness after 45 days of storage while a 400 Gy dose decreased fruit pH immediately after irradiation. (Authors)

  9. Effect of increasing taurine and methionine supplementation on urinary taurine excretion in a model insectivore, the giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofs, S A; Dierenfeld, E S; Backus, R C

    2018-02-01

    The giant anteater (Mymercophaga tridactyla) is a highly specialized insectivore for which nutrient requirements are not clearly established, making diet formulation challenging for this species. Multiple clinical reports suggest anteaters have an obligate dietary taurine (TAU) requirement. Sulphur amino acid (SAA) metabolism in adult anteaters was evaluated using noninvasive methods to measure TAU synthesis potential from dietary methionine (MET) and a basal diet containing on a dry matter (DM) basis 1.7 mg TAU/kg DM and 6.9 g MET/kg DM. Urinary equilibrium times for TAU excretion were determined by feeding the basal diet with or without 1.5 g/kg DM supplemental TAU (crossover design; n = 4). Effects of supplemental dietary TAU (1.7, 2.0, 2.4, 2.7, 3.0, 3.3 g/kg DM) or MET (6.9, 9.0, 11.2 g/kg DM) on urinary TAU were evaluated (randomized block trials; n = 5 or 4 respectively). All urinary values (TAU, MET, unbound inorganic sulphate) were normalized to creatinine (CRT). Results indicate urinary TAU equilibrium in anteaters requires at least 2 weeks of feeding. Urinary ratio of TAU to CRT (TAU:CRT) increased as dietary TAU content increased from 1.7 to 3.0 g/kg DM, consistent with renal homoeostatic modulation of TAU excretion. Our data indicate that TAU needs were met by TAU in the basal diet or by de novo synthesis. Supplemental MET resulted in ~five- to eightfold increases in urinary TAU:CRT excretion, further supporting existence of mechanisms for TAU synthesis from dietary SAA in anteaters. Adult anteaters appear able to synthesize TAU when diets contain adequate SAA, but dietary TAU may be critical if protein intakes are low or of poor quality. This study may provide guidance on choice of domestic canids vs. felids as suitable physiologic models for improved nutrition in giant anteaters, and also outlines a noninvasive method for assessing TAU status/metabolism that may be useful across species. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Giant flexoelectricity in polyvinylidene fluoride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baskaran, Sivapalan; Ramachandran, Narayanan; He Xiangtong; Thiruvannamalai, Sankar; Lee, Ho Joon; Heo, Hyun [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States); Chen Qin [GE Global Research Center, 1 Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY 12309 (United States); Fu, John Y., E-mail: youweifu@buffalo.ed [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14260 (United States)

    2011-05-16

    Recent studies have shown that giant flexoelectricity may exist in certain elastomers with bent-core molecular structures, which contradicts the previous theoretical estimation that the flexoelectric coupling is small in those materials. In this Letter, we report an analogous phenomenon, i.e., the giant direct flexoelectric effect, observed in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. Our experimental studies indicate that such an enhanced flexoelectric effect might be induced by the interaction between the energy couplings of the apolar and the polar molecular structures of the polymer film under elastic deformation. - Highlights: Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film with not fully crystallized {alpha}- and {beta}-phases. Flexoelectric measurement. Giant direct flexoelectric effect in PVDF.

  11. Effects of (60)Co gamma irradiation on behavior and gill histoarchitecture of giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (DE MAN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalin, A; Broos, K V; Sadiq Bukhari, A; Syed Mohamed, H E; Singhal, R K; Venu-babu, P

    2013-06-01

    Present study was designed to observe the effects of (60)Co gamma radiation in behavioral and histological changes in the gills of giant fresh water prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. The adult prawns were irradiated with four different dose levels (3mGy, 30mGy, 300mGy and 3000mGy) and the control group (without irradiation) was maintained separately. Behavioral changes like hyperactivity, loss of balance, reduced swimming rate, slower rate of food intake and convulsions were observed in higher dose levels of 300mGy and 3000mGy. The histological alterations such as accumulated haemocytes in haemocoelic spaces, abnormal gill tips, lifted lamellar epithelium, swollen and fused lamellae, hyperplasic, necrotic, clavate-globate and complete disorganization of lamellae were observed in (60)Co gamma irradiated prawns. Significantly more considerable histological alterations were observed in the highest dose level of 3000mGy, but no mortality was evidenced. This study serves as biomonitoring tool to assess the radiation pollution in the aquatic environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of selection for fast growth on survival rate during grow-out phase in giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Nguyen Thanh; Trong, Trinh Quoc; Nguyen, Nguyen Hong

    2017-06-21

    Correlated genetic response in survival to selection for high growth has not been reported in giant freshwater prawn (GFP) (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). The main aim of this study was to measure genetic changes and estimate heritability for this character (survival rate) and its genetic associations with body traits in a GFP population selected over eight generations from 2008 to 2015. Statistical analyses were conducted on 106,696 data records, using threshold logistic mixed model. The estimated heritability for survival was 0.14 ± 0.04 and significant. Genetic associations of survival with body traits (weight, length and width) were weak, with the estimates of genetic correlations between the traits close to zero. Realised genetic changes in survival, calculated as the difference in estimated breeding values between the selection line and control group within the same generation, was in positive direction but the estimates were not significantly different from zero regardless of the expression unit used either in actual unit of measurement or genetic standard deviation unit. On the other hand, communal testing of stocks in the latest generation, namely G7 (2015), showed that the selection line had 18% higher survival rate than progeny of the wild prawns originated from Mekong river. This result suggests that inadvertent changes in survival occurred during domestication-selection. It is concluded that selection for high growth had no significant effect on survival in the present population of M. rosenbergii.

  13. Stark Widths of Ar II Spectral Lines in the Atmospheres of Subdwarf B Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Hamdi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Stark broadening parameters are of interest for many problems in astrophysics and laboratory plasmas investigation. Ar II spectral lines are observed in many kinds of stellar atmospheres such as the atmospheres of B-Type stars and subdwarf B stars. In this work, we present theoretical Stark widths for Ar II spectral lines. We use the impact semiclassical perturbation approach. Our results are compared with the available experimental values. Finally, the importance of the Stark broadening mechanism is studied in atmospheric conditions of subdwarf B stars.

  14. Assisted phytoextraction of heavy metals: compost and Trichoderma effects on giant reed (Arundo donax L. uptake and soil N-cycle microflora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Fiorentino

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Little information is available as to the real effectiveness of the phytoextraction remediation technique, since laboratory experiments are still the most common way in which this is measured. Given this, an experiment on a cadmium-polluted soil was carried out in open field conditions in Southern Italy with the aim of assessing the growth and the phytoextraction potential of giant reed (Arundo donax L. Compost fertilisation and Trichoderma harzianum A6 inoculations were used to verify the possibility of increasing the metal uptake of the crop. Biomass yield of giant reed in the first growth season (average 12.8 Mg ha–1 was not affected by the Cd concentration in the soil and this increased significantly with compost fertilisation (13.8 Mg ha–1. Both compost fertilisation and T. harzianum inoculation increased cadmium uptake and translocation in leaves. Nitrifying bacteria was shown to be a useful tool to biomonitor soil quality. These results proved the suitability of the giant reed for assisted-phytoremedation with the use of compost fertilisation and T. harzianum.

  15. Dye Giant Absorption and Light Confinement Effects in Porous Bragg Microcavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliva-Ramírez, Manuel; Gil-Rostra, Jorge; Simonsen, Adam C.

    2018-01-01

    This work presents a simple experimental procedure to probe light confinement effects in photonic structures. Two types of porous 1D Bragg microcavities with two resonant peaks in the reflection gap were prepared by physical vapor deposition at oblique angle configurations and then infiltrated...... with dye solutions of increasing concentrations. The unusual position shift and intensity drop of the transmitted resonant peak observed when it was scanned through the dye absorption band have been accounted for by the effect of the light trapped at their optical defect layer. An experimentally observed...... and simple methodology to experimentally assess light trapping effects in porous photonic structures....

  16. Investigation of ΔE Effect on Vibrational Behavior of Giant Magnetostrictive Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sheykholeslami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Resonant magnetostrictive transducers are used for generating vibrations in the sonic and ultrasonic range of frequency. As the mechanical properties of magnetostrictive materials change according to different operating conditions (i.e., temperature, mechanical prestress, and magnetic bias, the vibrational behavior of the transducer changes too. ΔE effect is the change in the Young modulus of the ferromagnetic material and it has to be considered as it leads to changes in the dynamics of the transducer. This paper deals with the study of such effect from both theoretical and experimental point of view. ΔE effect on behavior of the transducer based on Terfenol-D is analytically described as a function of different operating conditions focusing on effects on resonance frequency, mode shape, and moreover experimentally the quality factor. Results of resonance frequency prediction have been validated with experiments and good agreement has been seen.

  17. Effects of a giant exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity among nursing home residents: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mouton A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Alexandre Mouton,1 Nicolas Gillet,1 Flore Mouton,1 Dave Van Kann,2,3 Olivier Bruyère,1,4 Marc Cloes,1 Fanny Buckinx41Department of Sport and Rehabilitation Sciences, Multidisciplinary Research Unit on Health and Society, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium; 2Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University Medical Center (MUMC+, Maastricht, 3School of Sport Studies, Fontys University of Applied Sciences, Eindhoven, the Netherlands; 4Department of Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics, University of Liège Teaching Hospital (CHU, Liège, BelgiumPurpose: This study examined the effects of a giant (4×3 m exercising board game intervention on ambulatory physical activity (PA and a broader array of physical and psychological outcomes among nursing home residents.Materials and methods: A quasi-experimental longitudinal study was carried out in two comparable nursing homes. Ten participants (aged 82.5±6.3 and comprising 6 women meeting the inclusion criteria took part in the 1-month intervention in one nursing home, whereas 11 participants (aged 89.9±3.1 with 8 women were assigned to the control group in the other nursing home. The giant exercising board game required participants to perform strength, flexibility, balance and endurance activities. The assistance provided by an exercising specialist decreased gradually during the intervention in an autonomy-oriented approach based on the self-determination theory. The following were assessed at baseline, after the intervention and after a follow-up period of 3 months: PA (steps/day and energy expenditure/day with ActiGraph, cognitive status (mini mental state examination, quality of life (EuroQol 5-dimensions, motivation for PA (Behavioral Regulation in Exercise Questionnaire-2, gait and balance (Tinetti and Short Physical Performance Battery, functional mobility (timed up and go, and the muscular isometric strength of the lower limb muscles.Results and conclusion: In the

  18. The effects of age on red giant metallicities derived from the near-infrared CaII triplet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cole, AA; Smecker-Hane, TA; Tolstoy, E; Bosler, TL; Gallagher, JS

    2004-01-01

    We have obtained spectra with a resolution of similar to2.5 Angstrom in the region of approximate to7500-9500 Angstrom for 116 red giants in five galactic globular clusters and six old open clusters (five with published metallicities and one previously unmeasured). The signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio

  19. Surface Acoustic Analog of Bloch Oscillations, Wannier-Stark Ladders and Landau-Zener Tunneling

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, M. M.; Kosevich, Yu. A.; Santos, P. V.; Cantarero, A.

    2011-12-01

    In this contribution, we discuss the recent experimental demonstration of Wannier-Stark ladders, Bloch Oscillations and Landau Zener tunneling in a solid by means of surface acoustic waves propagating through perturbed grating structures.

  20. Stark width regularities within spectral series of the lithium isoelectronic sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapalaga, Irinel; Trklja, Nora; Dojčinović, Ivan P.; Purić, Jagoš

    2018-03-01

    Stark width regularities within spectral series of the lithium isoelectronic sequence have been studied in an approach that includes both neutrals and ions. The influence of environmental conditions and certain atomic parameters on the Stark widths of spectral lines has been investigated. This study gives a simple model for the calculation of Stark broadening data for spectral lines within the lithium isoelectronic sequence. The proposed model requires fewer parameters than any other model. The obtained relations were used for predictions of Stark widths for transitions that have not yet been measured or calculated. In the framework of the present research, three algorithms for fast data processing have been made and they enable quality control and provide verification of the theoretically calculated results.

  1. Giant acoustoelectric effect in GaAs/LiNbO3 hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotter, M.; Wixforth, A.; Ruile, W.; Bernklau, D.; Riechert, H.

    1998-10-01

    The acoustoelectric effect in a hybrid of a strong piezoelectric material and a semiconductor layer containing a two-dimensional electron system is investigated. Caused by the very strong interaction between a surface acoustic wave and the mobile carriers in the semiconductor, the acoustoelectric effect is very large as compared to other materials, which might be interesting for device applications. Moreover, the tunability of the sheet conductivity of the electron system enables us to tune the magnitude of the acoustoelectric effect over a wide range. We present experimental results for a GaAs/LiNbO3 layered hybrid system at room temperature and describe our experimental findings quantitatively using a recently developed model calculation.

  2. Electrets in soft materials: nonlinearity, size effects, and giant electromechanical coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qian; Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2014-07-01

    Development of soft electromechanical materials is critical for several tantalizing applications such as soft robots and stretchable electronics, among others. Soft nonpiezoelectric materials can be coaxed to behave like piezoelectrics by merely embedding charges and dipoles in their interior and assuring some elastic heterogeneity. Such so-called electret materials have been experimentally shown to exhibit very large electromechanical coupling. In this work, we derive rigorous nonlinear expressions that relate effective electromechanical coupling to the creation of electret materials. In contrast to the existing models, we are able to both qualitatively and quantitatively capture the known experimental results on the nonlinear response of electret materials. Furthermore, we show that the presence of another form of electromechanical coupling, flexoelectricity, leads to size effects that dramatically alter the electromechanical response at submicron feature sizes. One of our key conclusions is that nonlinear deformation (prevalent in soft materials) significantly enhances the flexoelectric response and hence the aforementioned size effects.

  3. Electrets in soft materials: Nonlinearity, size effects, and giant electromechanical coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qian; Liu, Liping; Sharma, Pradeep

    2014-07-01

    Development of soft electromechanical materials is critical for several tantalizing applications such as soft robots and stretchable electronics, among others. Soft nonpiezoelectric materials can be coaxed to behave like piezoelectrics by merely embedding charges and dipoles in their interior and assuring some elastic heterogeneity. Such so-called electret materials have been experimentally shown to exhibit very large electromechanical coupling. In this work, we derive rigorous nonlinear expressions that relate effective electromechanical coupling to the creation of electret materials. In contrast to the existing models, we are able to both qualitatively and quantitatively capture the known experimental results on the nonlinear response of electret materials. Furthermore, we show that the presence of another form of electromechanical coupling, flexoelectricity, leads to size effects that dramatically alter the electromechanical response at submicron feature sizes. One of our key conclusions is that nonlinear deformation (prevalent in soft materials) significantly enhances the flexoelectric response and hence the aforementioned size effects.

  4. Limited evidence for allelopathic effects of giant hogweed on germination af native herbs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wille, Wibke; Thiele, Jan; Walker, Emer A.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive alien plants often occur in monospecific stands with high density in the invaded range. Production of bioactive secondary metabolites in such stands could have allelopathic effects on germination of native species. We tested this component of the novel weapon hypothesis for Heracleum...... on invaded soil, in Poa trivialis with H. mantegazzianum seed extract, and negative effects of the essential oil bergapten were found in three species. In P. trivialis the results of the seed extract were not supported by the experiment with added seeds of the invasive plant. Thus, there is limited evidence...... mantegazzianum, a prominent invader in Europe, using seeds of 11 native herbs exposed to soil or soil extracts from invaded stands, moist seeds or seed extracts of H. mantegazzianum. There was no effect of the various treatments on germination of most species, while germination was reduced in Urtica dioica...

  5. A High Power CH3OH Laser System Using Stark Stabilized CO2 Pump Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, D. P.; Bennett, C. A.; Lee, J.; Fl etcher, L. K.; Ma, C. H.; Vander Sluis, K. L.

    1988-11-01

    A dual channel, 119μm wavelength laser system has been constructed for the ATF experiment at Oak Ridge. The pump lasers utilize external Stark cells for locking the CO2 laser to the absorption frequency of the CH3OH lasers. Stark plates have also been attached to the dielectric waveguide resonators of the FIR lasers to affect precise tuning of the 119 μm lasers.

  6. Effects of feeding un-extruded floating feed to African giant catfish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the effects of feeding two types of un-extruded floating fish feeds (HM1 and HM2 –38% CP, produced manually using available feedstuffs) and a commercial imported fish feed (Coppens – 40% CP) on growth performance and body composition of Heterobranchus longifilis over 56 days. Commercial ...

  7. Giant quadratic electro-optical effect during polarization switching in ultrathin ferroelectric polymer films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blinov, L. M., E-mail: lev39blinov@gmail.com; Lazarev, V. V.; Palto, S. P.; Yudin, S. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2012-04-15

    The low-frequency quadratic electro-optical effect with a maximum electro-optical coefficient of g = 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -19} m{sup 2}/V{sup 2} (i.e., four orders of magnitude greater than the standard high-frequency value) has been studied in thin films of ferroelectric polymer PVDF(70%)-TrFE(30%). The observed effect is related to the process of spontaneous polarization switching, during which the electron oscillators of C-F and C-H dipole groups rotate to become parallel to the applied field. As a result, the ellipsoid of the refractive index exhibits narrowing in the direction perpendicular to the field. The field dependence of the electro-optical coefficient g correlates with that of the apparent dielectric permittivity, which can be introduced under the condition of ferroelectric polarization switching. The observed electro-optical effect strongly decreases when the frequency increases up to several hundred hertz. The temperature dependence of the effect exhibits clearly pronounced hysteresis in the region of the ferroelectric phase transition.

  8. Giant bulk photovoltaic effect and spontaneous polarization of single-layer monochalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Tonatiuh; Fregoso, Benjamin M.; Mendoza, Bernardo S.; Morimoto, Takahiro; Moore, Joel E.; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    We implement and use a first-principles density functional theory approach to calculate the shift current response of monolayer group-IV monochalcogenides. We find a larger effective three- dimensional effective polarization ( 1.9 C/m2) and shift current ( 200 μA/V2) than have been previously observed in common ferroelectrics. By using a one-dimensional Rice-Mele tight-binding model we investigate the shift-current tensor along the polarization axis, its relation with polarization, and the conditions under which shift-current reaches a maximum. Importantly, our calculations predict that shift current can be largest in the UV visible range, indicating the potential of these materials for optoelectronic applications. BMF and TR share equal contributions. We acknowledge AFOSR MURI, Conacyt, NERSC, the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the DOE.

  9. Pressure effects in the giant magnetocaloric compounds Gd5(SixGe1-x)4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morellon, L; Arnold, Z; Algarabel, P A; Magen, C; Ibarra, M R; Skorokhod, Y

    2004-01-01

    We report a study of the effect of hydrostatic pressure up to 9 kbar on selected compounds of the Gd 5 (Si x Ge 1-x ) 4 series (x = 0.8, 0.45, 0.1) by means of ac magnetic susceptibility, compressibility, and linear thermal expansion measurements. The pressure-induced increase of the transition temperatures at the second-order boundaries of the phase diagram is rather moderate: dT C /dP ∼ +0.3Kk-bar -1 (x = 0.8) and dT N /P ∼+0.7Kkbar -1 (x = 0.1). This effect is stronger in the 0 C /dP ∼ +3 Kk-bar -1 (x = 0.45,0.1), indicating that the ferromagnetic ordering can be simultaneously driven through a pressure-induced structural transformation. The values of d lnT C /d lnV calculated with the use of the measured value of compressibility (k ∼1.8 M-bar -1 ) are significantly lower than those estimated from the concentration dependence of the lattice cell volume, thus demonstrating that the dependence of the transition temperatures upon changing the Si/Ge ratio across the series cannot be explained by a pure volume effect

  10. Giant magnetoimpedance effect of Co68.15 Fe4.35 Si12.5 B15 amorphous wire in the presence of magnetite ferrofluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirabadizadeh, A.; Lotfollahi, Z.; Zelati, A.

    2016-10-01

    Giant magnetoimpedance effect (GMI) in Co68.15 Fe4.35 Si12.5 B15 amorphous wire was studied in the presence of magnetite ferrofluid and without it. Magnetite nanoparticles for ferrofluid were prepared by the traditional wet chemistry co-precipitation method. GMI was measured in the frequency range of 2 to 6 MHz. The maximum value of GMI value of the ferrofluid covered amorphous wire was increased in all frequency intervals in comparison with GMI response of the wire non-covered by ferrofluid. These results open a new way of increasing magnetoimpedance effect value useful for sensor applications.

  11. Giant Faraday effect due to Pauli exclusion principle in 3D topological insulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Hari P; Leuenberger, Michael N

    2014-02-26

    Experiments using ARPES, which is based on the photoelectric effect, show that the surface states in 3D topological insulators (TI) are helical. Here we consider Weyl interface fermions due to band inversion in narrow-bandgap semiconductors, such as Pb1-xSnxTe. The positive and negative energy solutions can be identified by means of opposite helicity in terms of the spin helicity operator in 3D TI as ĥ(TI) = (1/ |p|_ |) β (σ|_ x p|_ ) · z^, where β is a Dirac matrix and z^ points perpendicular to the interface. Using the 3D Dirac equation and bandstructure calculations we show that the transitions between positive and negative energy solutions, giving rise to electron-hole pairs, obey strict optical selection rules. In order to demonstrate the consequences of these selection rules, we consider the Faraday effect due to the Pauli exclusion principle in a pump-probe setup using a 3D TI double interface of a PbTe/Pb₀.₃₁Sn₀.₆₉Te/PbTe heterostructure. For that we calculate the optical conductivity tensor of this heterostructure, which we use to solve Maxwell's equations. The Faraday rotation angle exhibits oscillations as a function of probe wavelength and thickness of the heterostructure. The maxima in the Faraday rotation angle are of the order of mrds.

  12. Giant magnetocaloric effect in Gd5(Si2Ge2 alloy with low purity Gd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleber Santiago Alves

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Gd5(Ge1-xSi x, x < 4 based alloys are potential candidates for magnetic refrigeration in the range ~20 - ~290 K. However, one of the greatest obstacles for the use of that technology in large scale is the utilization of high pure Gd metal (99.99 wt. (% to produce the GdGeSi alloys, since the impurity elements decrease the intensity of the magnetocaloric effect (EMC¹. In this work, we prove that annealing of the Gd5Ge2Si2 can promote remarkable values for the EMC in comparison to those obtained for the alloy with high pure Gd. Also, the as cast alloy and the annealed alloy are not monophasic, but have at least two crystalline phases in their microstructure. Results for X-ray analysis, optical and electronic microscopy and magnetization measurements are reported.

  13. Effect of steam activation of biochar produced from a giant Miscanthus on copper sorption and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Taeyong; Yoo, Jisu; Ryu, Changkook; Park, Yong-Kwon; Jung, Jinho

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the physiochemical properties, sorption characteristics, and toxicity effects of biochar (BC) produced from Miscanthus sacchariflorus via slow pyrolysis at 500°C and its steam activation product (ABC). Although BC has a much lower surface area than ABC (181 and 322m(2)g(-1), respectively), the Cu sorption capacities of BC and ABC are not significantly different (p>0.05). A two-compartment model successfully explains the sorption of BC and ABC as being dominated by fast and slow sorption processes, respectively. In addition, both BC and ABC efficiently eliminate the toxicity of Cu towards Daphnia magna. However, ABC itself induced acute toxicity to D. magna, which is possibly due to increased aromaticity upon steam activation. These findings suggest that activation of BC produced from M. sacchariflorus at a pyrolytic temperature of 500°C may not be appropriate in terms of Cu sorption and toxicity reduction. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic strain-induced giant electroresistance and erasing effect in ultrathin ferroelectric tunnel-junction memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, Hei-Man; Xi, Zhongnan; Chen, Xinxin; Wen, Zheng; Wu, Ge; Dai, Ji-Yan

    2017-06-01

    Strain engineering plays a critical role in ferroelectric memories. In this work, we demonstrate dynamic strain modulation on tunneling electroresistance in a four-unit-cell ultrathin BaTi O3 metal/ferroelectric/semiconductor tunnel junction by applying mechanical stress to the device. With an extra compressive strain induced by mechanical stress, which is dynamically applied beyond the lattice mismatch between the BaTi O3 layer and the Nb :SrTi O3 substrate, the ON/OFF current ratio increases significantly up to a record high value of 107, whereas a mechanical erasing effect can be observed when a tensile stress is applied. This dynamic strain engineering gives rise to an efficient modulation of ON/OFF ratio due to the variation of BaTi O3 polarization. This result sheds light on the mechanism of electroresistance in the ferroelectric tunnel junctions by providing direct evidence for polarization-induced resistive switching, and also provides another stimulus for memory state operation.

  15. The giant piezoelectric effect: electric field induced monoclinic phase or piezoelectric distortion of the rhombohedral parent?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisi, E H; Piltz, R O; Forrester, J S; Howard, C J

    2003-01-01

    Lead zinc niobate-lead titanate (PZN-PT) single crystals show very large piezoelectric strains for electric fields applied along the unit cell edges e.g. [001] R . It has been widely reported that this effect is caused by an electric field induced phase transition from rhombohedral (R3m) to monoclinic (Cm or Pm) symmetry in an essentially continuous manner. Group theoretical analysis using the computer program ISOTROPY indicates phase transitions between R3m and Cm (or Pm) must be discontinuous under Landau theory. An analysis of the symmetry of a strained unit cell in R3m and a simple expansion of the piezoelectric strain equation indicate that the piezoelectric distortion due to an electric field along a cell edge in rhombohedral perovskite-based ferroelectrics is intrinsically monoclinic (Cm), even for infinitesimal electric fields. PZN-PT crystals have up to nine times the elastic compliance of other piezoelectric perovskites and it might be expected that the piezoelectric strains are also very large. A field induced phase transition is therefore indistinguishable from the piezoelectric distortion and is neither sufficient nor necessary to understand the large piezoelectric response of PZN-PT

  16. The giant piezoelectric effect: electric field induced monoclinic phase or piezoelectric distortion of the rhombohedral parent?

    CERN Document Server

    Kisi, E H; Forrester, J S; Howard, C J

    2003-01-01

    Lead zinc niobate-lead titanate (PZN-PT) single crystals show very large piezoelectric strains for electric fields applied along the unit cell edges e.g. [001] sub R. It has been widely reported that this effect is caused by an electric field induced phase transition from rhombohedral (R3m) to monoclinic (Cm or Pm) symmetry in an essentially continuous manner. Group theoretical analysis using the computer program ISOTROPY indicates phase transitions between R3m and Cm (or Pm) must be discontinuous under Landau theory. An analysis of the symmetry of a strained unit cell in R3m and a simple expansion of the piezoelectric strain equation indicate that the piezoelectric distortion due to an electric field along a cell edge in rhombohedral perovskite-based ferroelectrics is intrinsically monoclinic (Cm), even for infinitesimal electric fields. PZN-PT crystals have up to nine times the elastic compliance of other piezoelectric perovskites and it might be expected that the piezoelectric strains are also very large. ...

  17. Effect of salinity on survival and growth of giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii (de Man

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K. Chand

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Two independent experiments were performed to determine the effects of salinity on survival and growth of juvenile Macrobrachium rosenbergii, first one was to determine the median lethal salinity (MLS-5096 h and second one was to assess the survival and growth at different sub-lethal salinities under field condition. In MLS-5096 h study 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 ppt salinities were used to initially find out the salinity tolerance range. Accordingly, a definitive salinity tolerance test was done in next phase to find out exact median lethal salinity by directly transferring the test species to 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26 and 27 ppt salinity for 96 h. The median lethal salinity of M. rosenbergii was estimated at 24.6 ppt. In the second experiment, survival and growth performances of the prawn were recorded at different sub-lethal salinities viz., 5, 10, 15 and 20 ppt along with 0 ppt as control during 60 days culture period. The prawn exhibited lowest final average weight at 20 ppt salinity and significantly highest at 10 ppt salinity. Highest SGR and weight gain were obtained at 10 ppt followed by 5 ppt, 15 ppt and 0 ppt salinity but differences among treatment were not significant (P > 0.05. Survival rate of prawn varied between 91% (at 0 ppt and 78% (at 20 ppt. The prawn grew and survived satisfactorily at 0–15 ppt salinities, implying that the species can be cultured commercially at wide salinity range. M. rosenbergii can be considered as an ideal species to promote, in view of current and future climate variables as more and more coastal areas of India are going to be vulnerable to saline water inundation.

  18. Effects of Dynamical Evolution of Giant Planets on the Delivery of Atmophile Elements During Terrestrial Planet Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Matsumura, Soko; Brasser, Ramon; Ida, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar discs and planets beyond the Solar System. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected by dynamical evolution of giant planets. We estimate the initial compositions of building blocks of these rocky planets by using a simple condensation model, and numerically study the compositions of planets formed in a few different formation models of the Solar System. We find that the abundances ...

  19. The effect of magnetic ordering on the giant magnetoresistance of Cr-Fe-V and Cr-Fe-Mn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somsen, Ch.; Acet, M.; Nepecks, G.; Wassermann, E.F.

    2000-01-01

    Cr-rich Cr 1-x Fe x alloys with compositions in the vicinity of mixed ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange (x=0.18) exhibit giant magnetoresistance. In order to understand the influence of the antiferromagnetism of Cr on the giant magnetoresistance one can manipulate the antiferromagnetic exchange either by adding vanadium, which destroys the antiferromagnetism of Cr, or by adding manganese, which enhances it. Cr-Fe-V and Cr-Fe-Mn alloys also have Curie temperatures that lie between low temperatures and room temperature in the concentration region where giant magnetoresistance is observed. Therefore, they are also used as samples to study the magnetoresistance as a function of the strength of FM exchange. We discuss these points in the light of temperature and concentration-dependent magnetoresistance experiments on Cr 0.99-x Fe x V 0.01 , Cr 0.96-x Fe x V 0.04 , Cr 0.90-x Fe x Mn 0.10 and Cr 0.55 Fe x Mn 0.45-x alloys. Results indicate that the most favorable condition for a large magnetoresistance in these alloys occurs at temperatures near the Curie temperature

  20. Ecological Effects of the Invasive Giant Madagascar Day Gecko on Endemic Mauritian Geckos: Applications of Binomial-Mixture and Species Distribution Models

    OpenAIRE

    Buckland, S.; Cole, N.C.; Aguirre-Gutiérrez, J.; Gallagher, L.E.; Henshaw, S.M.; Besnard, A.; Tucker, R.M.; Bachraz, V.; Ruhomaun, K.; Harris, S.

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of the giant Madagascar day gecko Phelsuma grandis has increased the threats to the four endemic Mauritian day geckos (Phelsuma spp.) that have survived on mainland Mauritius. We had two main aims: (i) to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos at a landscape level; and (ii) to investigate the effects of P. grandis on the abundance and risks of extinction of the endemic geckos at a local scale. An ensemble forecasting approach was used to...

  1. Effective half-lives of 137Cs in giant butterbur and field horsetail, and the distribution differences of potassium and 137Cs in aboveground tissue parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of 137 Cs and 40 K in different tissues of edible wild herbaceous plants, that is, leaf blade and petiole for giant butterbur (Petasites japonicas (Siebold et Zucc.) Maxim.), and leaf, stem and strobilus for fertile shoot of field horsetail (Equisetum arvense L.) were measured in 2012–2014 to clarify the effect in Japan from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The concentrations of 137 Cs decreased with time with effective half-lives of ca. 450 d and 360 d for giant butterbur and field horsetail, respectively. The ANOVA test revealed that 40 K and 137 Cs distributions in leaf blade and petiole for giant butterbur and leaf and stem for field horsetail were different. Therefore, other plants, leaf and stem for Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica (Houtt.) Ronse Decr.) and Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis L.), and leaf blade and petiole for gingko (Ginkgo biloba L.) and Someiyoshino cherry (Cerasus × yedoensis (Matsum.) A.V.Vassil. ‘Somei-yoshino’) were collected from the same sampling field and their 137 Cs and 40 K concentrations were compared to those in the giant butterbur and field horsetail parts. For 137 Cs, concentrations in leaf blade and leaf parts were 1.1–6.0 times higher than those in petiole and stem parts for all six plants. On the other hand, 40 K concentrations in leaf blade and leaf parts were 0.40–0.97 of those observed in petiole and stem parts. Discrimination ratios of 40 K/ 137 Cs of leaf blade to petiole or leaf to stem were then calculated and they ranged from 0.09 to 0.57. These results suggested that Cs and K did not behave similarly in these plants. Thus, to understand the radiocesium fate in plants, K measurement results should not be used as an analog for Cs behavior although Cs is known to have a similar chemical reactivity to that of K. - Highlights: • 137 Cs amounts in leaf blade and leaf were higher than those in petiole and stem in plants. • 40 K amounts in leaf blade and leaf

  2. Giant first-forbidden resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krmpotic, F.; Nakayama, K.; Sao Paulo Univ.; Pio Galeao, A.; Sao Paulo Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Recent experimental data on first-forbidden charge-exchange resonances are discussed in the framework of a schematic model. We also evaluate the screening of the weak coupling constants induced by both the giant resonances and the δ-isobar. It is shown that the last effect does not depend on the multipolarity of the one-particle moment. Due to the same reason, the fraction of the reaction strength pushed up into the δ-resonance region is always the same regardless of the quantum numbers carried by the excitation. Simple expressions are derived for the dependence of the excitation energies of the first-forbidden giant resonances on the mass number and isospin of the target. The model reproduces consistently both the Gamow-Teller and the first-forbidden resonances. (orig.)

  3. Periodicity of resonant tunneling current induced by the Stark resonances in semiconductor nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wołoszyn, M.; Adamowski, J.; Wójcik, P.; Spisak, B. J.

    2013-10-01

    The modification of the electronic current resulting from Stark resonances has been studied for the semiconductor nanowire with the double-barrier structure. Based on the calculated current-voltage characteristics, we have shown that the resonant tunneling current is a periodic function of the width of the spacer layer. We have also demonstrated that the simultaneous change of the source-drain voltage and the voltage applied to the gate located near the nanowire leads to almost periodic changes of the resonant tunneling current as a function of the source-drain and gate voltages. The periodic properties of the resonant tunneling current result from the formation of the Stark resonance states. If we change the electric field acting in the nanowire, the Stark states periodically acquire the energies from the transport window and enhance the tunneling current in a periodic manner. We have found that the separations between the resonant current peaks on the source-drain voltage scale can be described by a slowly increasing linear function of the Stark state quantum number. This allows us to identify the quantum states that are responsible for the enhancement of the resonant tunneling. We have proposed a method of the experimental observation of the Stark resonances in semiconductor double-barrier heterostructures.

  4. Silvics of Giant Sequoia

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Phillip Weatherspoon

    1986-01-01

    Ecological relationships-including habitat and life history---of giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] Buchholz) in natural stands are summarized. Such silvical information provides an important foundation for sound management of the species.

  5. Giant Earlobe Epidermoid Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Guisado, Joaquín; Scilletta, Alessandra; Cabrera-Sánchez, Emilio; Rioja, Luis F; Perrotta, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    Epidermoid cysts represent the most common cutaneous cysts. They are usually small and benign; however, sometimes they can grow to giant epidermoid cists, and occasionally malignancies develop. Giant epidermoid cysts at the earlobe have never been described but in other locations. We describe a case of a giant epidermoid cyst at the earlobe, a location where such a large cyst has never been reported before. The mass was completely resected and the wound of the pedunculated base was sutured with four stitches of nylon 5/0. Histopathology confirmed the presumptive diagnosis of an epidermoid cyst. Six months after the resection, the patient did not have any relapse of the epidermoid cyst. The earlobe is a potential location for giant epidermoid cysts. Although the clinical diagnosis could be enough, due to the possibility of malignancy and to ensure appropriate diagnosis, we consider that all cysts should be sent to the anatomic pathology laboratory for histological evaluation. PMID:22557855

  6. Giant earlobe epidermoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Pérez-Guisado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidermoid cysts represent the most common cutaneous cysts. They are usually small and benign; however, sometimes they can grow to giant epidermoid cists, and occasionally malignancies develop. Giant epidermoid cysts at the earlobe have never been described but in other locations. We describe a case of a giant epidermoid cyst at the earlobe, a location where such a large cyst has never been reported before. The mass was completely resected and the wound of the pedunculated base was sutured with four stitches of nylon 5/0. Histopathology confirmed the presumptive diagnosis of an epidermoid cyst. Six months after the resection, the patient did not have any relapse of the epidermoid cyst. The earlobe is a potential location for giant epidermoid cysts. Although the clinical diagnosis could be enough, due to the possibility of malignancy and to ensure appropriate diagnosis, we consider that all cysts should be sent to the anatomic pathology laboratory for histological evaluation.

  7. Giant distal humeral geode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maher, M.M.; Kennedy, J.; Hynes, D.; Murray, J.G.; O'Connell, D.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the imaging features of a giant geode of the distal humerus in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis, which presented initially as a pathological fracture. The value of magnetic resonance imaging in establishing this diagnosis is emphasized. (orig.)

  8. Do giant oilfield discoveries fuel internal armed conflicts?

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Hsiang Lei; Guy Michaels

    2011-01-01

    We use new data to examine the effects of giant oilfield discoveries around the world since 1946. On average, these discoveries increase per capita oil production and oil exports by up to 50 percent. But these giant oilfield discoveries also have a dark side: they increase the incidence of internal armed conflict by about 5-8 percentage points. This increased incidence of conflict due to giant oilfield discoveries is especially high for countries that had already experienced armed conflicts o...

  9. Macroscopic description of isoscalar giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nix, J.R.; Sierk, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    On the basis of a simple macroscopic model, we calculate the isoscalar giant-resonance energy as a function of mass number and multipole degree. The restoring force is determined from the distortion of the Fermi surface, and the inertia is determined for the incompressible, irrotational flow of nucleons with unit effective mass. With no adjustable parameters, the resulting closed expression reproduces correctly the available experimental data, namely the magnitude and dependence upon mass number of the giant quadrupole energy and the magnitude of the giant octupole energy for 208 Pb. We also calculate the isoscalar giant-resonance width as a function of mass number and multipole degree for various macroscopic damping mechanisms, including two-body viscosity, one-body dissipation, and modified one-body dissipation. None of these damping mechanisms reproduces correctly all features of the available experimental data, namely the magnitude and dependence upon mass number of the giant quadrupole width and the magnitude of the giant octupole width for 208 Pb

  10. EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE DELIVERY OF ATMOPHILE ELEMENTS DURING TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumura, Soko [School of Engineering, Physics, and Mathematics, University of Dundee, DD1 4HN, Scotland (United Kingdom); Brasser, Ramon; Ida, Shigeru, E-mail: s.matsumura@dundee.ac.uk [Earth-Life Science Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo, 152-8550 (Japan)

    2016-02-10

    Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar disks and planets beyond the solar system. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected by the dynamical evolution of giant planets. We estimate the initial compositions of the building blocks of these rocky planets by using a simple condensation model, and numerically study the compositions of planets formed in a few different formation models of the solar system. We find that the abundances of refractory and moderately volatile elements are nearly independent of formation models, and that all the models could reproduce the abundances of these elements of the Earth. The abundances of atmophile elements, on the other hand, depend on the scattering rate of icy planetesimals into the inner disk, as well as the mixing rate of the inner planetesimal disk. For the classical formation model, neither of these mechanisms are efficient and the accretion of atmophile elements during the final assembly of terrestrial planets appears to be difficult. For the Grand Tack model, both of these mechanisms are efficient, which leads to a relatively uniform accretion of atmophile elements in the inner disk. It is also possible to have a “hybrid” scenario where the mixing is not very efficient but the scattering is efficient. The abundances of atmophile elements in this case increase with orbital radii. Such a scenario may occur in some of the extrasolar planetary systems, which are not accompanied by giant planets or those without strong perturbations from giants. We also confirm that the Grand Tack scenario leads to the distribution of asteroid analogues where rocky planetesimals tend to exist interior to icy ones, and show that their overall compositions are consistent with S-type and C-type chondrites, respectively.

  11. EFFECTS OF DYNAMICAL EVOLUTION OF GIANT PLANETS ON THE DELIVERY OF ATMOPHILE ELEMENTS DURING TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Soko; Brasser, Ramon; Ida, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations started revealing the compositions of protostellar disks and planets beyond the solar system. In this paper, we explore how the compositions of terrestrial planets are affected by the dynamical evolution of giant planets. We estimate the initial compositions of the building blocks of these rocky planets by using a simple condensation model, and numerically study the compositions of planets formed in a few different formation models of the solar system. We find that the abundances of refractory and moderately volatile elements are nearly independent of formation models, and that all the models could reproduce the abundances of these elements of the Earth. The abundances of atmophile elements, on the other hand, depend on the scattering rate of icy planetesimals into the inner disk, as well as the mixing rate of the inner planetesimal disk. For the classical formation model, neither of these mechanisms are efficient and the accretion of atmophile elements during the final assembly of terrestrial planets appears to be difficult. For the Grand Tack model, both of these mechanisms are efficient, which leads to a relatively uniform accretion of atmophile elements in the inner disk. It is also possible to have a “hybrid” scenario where the mixing is not very efficient but the scattering is efficient. The abundances of atmophile elements in this case increase with orbital radii. Such a scenario may occur in some of the extrasolar planetary systems, which are not accompanied by giant planets or those without strong perturbations from giants. We also confirm that the Grand Tack scenario leads to the distribution of asteroid analogues where rocky planetesimals tend to exist interior to icy ones, and show that their overall compositions are consistent with S-type and C-type chondrites, respectively

  12. Giant magnetorefractive effect in La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granovskii, A. B., E-mail: granov@magn.ru [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Sukhorukov, Yu. P., E-mail: suhorukov@imp.uran.ru; Telegin, A. V.; Bessonov, V. D. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Gan' shina, E. A.; Kaul' , A. R.; Korsakov, I. E.; Gorbenko, O. Yu. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Gonzalez, J. [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Departamento Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Quimica (Spain)

    2011-01-15

    Complex experimental investigations of the structural, optical, and magneto-optical properties (magnetotransmission, magnetoreflection, and transversal Kerr effect, as well as the magnetoresistance, of La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} epitaxial films indicate that magnetoreflection and magnetotransmission in manganite films can reach giant values and depend strongly on the magnetic and charge homogeneity of the films, their thickness, and spectral range under investigation. It has been shown that the optical enhancement of the magnetorefractive effect occurs in thin films as compared to manganite crystals. In the region of the minimum of the reflectance near the first phonon band, the resonance-like magnetorefractive effect has been observed, which is accompanied by change of the sign of the magnetoreflection. A model based on the theory of the magnetorefractive effect has been proposed to qualitatively explain this behavior.

  13. Effect of giant plasmon excitations in single and double ionization of C60 in fast heavy-ion collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadhane, Umesh; Kelkar, A.; Misra, D.; Kumar, Ajay; Tribedi, Lokesh C.

    2007-04-01

    Single and multiple ionization of C60 in collisions with highly charged fast oxygen ions have been studied using the recoil-ion time-of-flight technique. The dependence of multiple-ionization cross sections on projectile charge state (qp) was found to be drastically different from those for an atomic target, such as Ne. A model based on the giant dipole plasmon resonance explains quite well the observed qp dependence for the single- and-double-ionization cross sections. But the same model deviates for triple and quadruple ionizations.

  14. Wave-function analysis of dynamic cancellation of ac Stark shifts in optical lattice clocks by use of pulsed Raman and electromagnetically-induced-transparency techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2007-01-01

    We study analytically the dynamic cancellation of ac Stark shift in the recently proposed pulsed electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT-)Raman optical lattice clock based on the wave-function formalism. An explicit expression for the time evolution operator corresponding to the effective two-level interaction Hamiltonian has been obtained in order to explain the atomic phase shift cancellation due to the ac Stark shift induced by the time-separated laser pulses. We present how to determine an optimum value of the common detuning of the driving fields at which the atomic phase shift cancels completely with the parameters for the practical realization of the EIT-Raman optical lattice clock with alkaline-earth-metal atoms

  15. Experimental evidence in favour of the Stark mixing of atomic L-subshell states in the boron impact of Au and Bi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhi, H.C.; Dhal, B.B.; Nandi, T.; Trautmann, D.

    1995-01-01

    L-subshell ionization of Au and Bi induced by boron impact has been investigated for impact energies ranging from 0.48 to 0.88 MeV/μ. The energy dependence of the measured ionization cross section shows, for the first time, a plateau structure for all three subshells. The plateau structure revealed by previous data for proton and helium impact was for the L 1 subshell only and this had been attributed to the bimodal nature of the 2s electron density. The observed plateau structure for all the three subshells and its occurrence at a somewhat lower energy signifies a considerable amount of Stark mixing of target 2s and 2p atomic wavefunctions. Fresh calculations incorporating the Stark mixing effect in target atomic wavefunctions are necessary to improve agreement with the present data. The existing theories, however, are found to be inadequate. (author)

  16. Stark Broadening of Se IV, Sn IV, Sb IV and Te IV Spectral Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan S. Dimitrijević

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Stark broadening parameters, line width and shift, are needed for investigations, analysis and modelling of astrophysical, laboratory, laser produced and technological plasmas. Especially in astrophysics, due to constantly increasing resolution of satellite borne spectrographs, and large terrestrial telescopes, data on trace elements, which were previously insignificant, now have increasing importance. Using the modified semiempirical method of Dimitrijević and Konjević, here, Stark widths have been calculated for 2 Se IV, 6 Sn IV, 2 Sb IV and 1 Te IV transitions. Results have been compared with existing theoretical data for Sn IV. Obtained results will be implemented in the STARK-B database, which is also a part of Virtual atomic and molecular data center (VAMDC.

  17. The effects of green tea extract additive feeds on the growth performance and survival rate of the giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimpimol, T.

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine the effects of green tea extract (GTE additive feeds on the growth performance in the giant freshwater prawn. Two separate trials were determined by using two different stages of prawn for initial stocking, one was the small post larva (PL10, the other was 5.6 g prawn. A Completely Randomized Design was applied in this study. The small post larva (PL10 were raised in cement tanks(1x1.5 m2. Three treatments with three replications each were performed applied as following: treatment 1 (control was the commercial pellet feed; treatment 2 and 3 were feeds with 1% and 2% green tea extract, respectively. This assay was run for 8 weeks. The prawns were randomly selected for weight determination every week. The result showed there was no significant difference in the specific growth rate and survival (P > 0.05 but the feed conversion ratio was reduced in prawn fed with green tea extracts (P 0.05. Therefore, green tea extract has potential as growth enhancer in giant freshwater prawn culture.

  18. Effect of Climate Change on Invasion Risk of Giant African Snail (Achatina fulica Férussac, 1821: Achatinidae) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Roshmi Rekha; Munsi, Madhushree; Ananthram, Aravind Neelavara

    2015-01-01

    The Giant African Snail (Achatina fulica) is considered to be one the world's 100 worst invasive alien species. The snail has an impact on native biodiversity, and on agricultural and horticultural crops. In India, it is known to feed on more than fifty species of native plants and agricultural crops and also outcompetes the native snails. It was introduced into India in 1847 and since then it has spread all across the country. In this paper, we use ecological niche modeling (ENM) to assess the distribution pattern of Giant African Snail (GAS) under different climate change scenarios. The niche modeling results indicate that under the current climate scenario, Eastern India, peninsular India and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands are at high risk of invasion. The three different future climate scenarios show that there is no significant change in the geographical distribution of invasion prone areas. However, certain currently invaded areas will be more prone to invasion in the future. These regions include parts of Bihar, Southern Karnataka, parts of Gujarat and Assam. The Andaman and Nicobar and Lakshadweep Islands are highly vulnerable to invasion under changed climate. The Central Indian region is at low risk due to high temperature and low rainfall. An understanding of the invasion pattern can help in better management of this invasive species and also in formulating policies for its control.

  19. Thermal spin filtering effect and giant magnetoresistance of half-metallic graphene nanoribbon co-doped with non-metallic Nitrogen and Boron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hai; Zheng, Anmin; Gao, Guoying; Yao, Kailun

    2018-03-01

    Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory and non-equilibrium Green's function are performed to investigate the thermal spin transport properties of single-hydrogen-saturated zigzag graphene nanoribbon co-doped with non-metallic Nitrogen and Boron in parallel and anti-parallel spin configurations. The results show that the doped graphene nanoribbon is a full half-metal. The two-probe system based on the doped graphene nanoribbon exhibits various excellent spin transport properties, including the spin-filtering effect, the spin Seebeck effect, the single-spin negative differential thermal resistance effect and the sign-reversible giant magnetoresistance feature. Excellently, the spin-filtering efficiency can reach nearly 100% in the parallel configuration and the magnetoresistance ratio can be up to -1.5 × 1010% by modulating the electrode temperature and temperature gradient. Our findings indicate that the metal-free doped graphene nanoribbon would be a promising candidate for spin caloritronic applications.

  20. Giant magneto-resistance devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hirota, Eiichi; Inomata, Koichiro

    2002-01-01

    This book deals with the application of giant magneto-resistance (GMR) effects to electronic devices. It will appeal to engineers and graduate students in the fields of electronic devices and materials. The main subjects are magnetic sensors with high resolution and magnetic read heads with high sensitivity, required for hard-disk drives with recording densities of several gigabytes. Another important subject is novel magnetic random-access memories (MRAM) with non-volatile non-destructive and radiation-resistant characteristics. Other topics include future GMR devices based on bipolar spin transistors, spin field-effect transistors (FETs) and double-tunnel junctions.

  1. Four-state memory based on a giant and non-volatile converse magnetoelectric effect in FeAl/PIN-PMN-PT structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yanping; Gao, Cunxu; Chen, Zhendong; Xi, Shibo; Shao, Weixia; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Guilin; Li, Jiangong

    2016-07-15

    We report a stable, tunable and non-volatile converse magnetoelectric effect (ME) in a new type of FeAl/PIN-PMN-PT heterostructure at room temperature, with a giant electrical modulation of magnetization for which the maximum relative magnetization change (ΔM/M) is up to 66%. The 109° ferroelastic domain switching in the PIN-PMN-PT and coupling with the ferromagnetic (FM) film via uniaxial anisotropy originating from the PIN-PMN-PT (011) surface are the key roles in converse ME effect. We also propose here a new, four-state memory through which it is possible to modify the remanent magnetism state by adjusting the electric field. This work represents a helpful approach to securing electric-writing magnetic-reading with low energy consumption for future high-density information storage applications.

  2. Giant flexoelectricity in polyvinylidene fluoride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baskaran, Sivapalan; Ramachandran, Narayanan; He Xiangtong; Thiruvannamalai, Sankar; Lee, Ho Joon; Heo, Hyun; Chen Qin; Fu, John Y.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that giant flexoelectricity may exist in certain elastomers with bent-core molecular structures, which contradicts the previous theoretical estimation that the flexoelectric coupling is small in those materials. In this Letter, we report an analogous phenomenon, i.e., the giant direct flexoelectric effect, observed in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film. Our experimental studies indicate that such an enhanced flexoelectric effect might be induced by the interaction between the energy couplings of the apolar and the polar molecular structures of the polymer film under elastic deformation. - Highlights: → Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) film with not fully crystallized α- and β-phases. → Flexoelectric measurement. → Giant direct flexoelectric effect in PVDF.

  3. [Short term effect of multiple stents parallel placement and reconstruction technique for the treatment of giant fusiform vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baomin; Liang, Yongping; Liu, Xinfeng; Wang, Jun; Li, Sheng; Cao, Xiangyu; Ge, Aili; Feng, Huimin

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the feasibility,safety and follow-up results of multiple stents parallel placement and reconstruction technique for treating giant vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysms. Five consecutive patients with giant fusiform vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysms in Department of Neurology,Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital were retrospectively reviewed from April 2011 to October 2013. All patients were diagnosed vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysms by MRI and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), the aneurysm size ranged 8.2-15.0 mm. All patients were treated by multiple stents parallel placement and reconstruction technique under general anesthesia. In the endovascular treatment process, 2-3 Solitaire or Neuroform self-expandable stents were parallel implanted in the maximum extension segment of the aneurysms to reconstruct the cavity of the aneurysm and solved the problem that the diameter of the intracranial stent is less than the diameter of the aneurysms. Multiple stents parallel placement can keep the stents stable in the cavity. The parallel stent can close the dissection as well as strengthen the aneurysm walls to alleviate the vessel pulsative compression of the brain stem. Furthermore, one of the parallel stents was selected for the main blood flow channel. Based on the main channel, telescope technique was used to completely covering the dissection. It can not only prevent the progress of dissection to normal regions, but also be helpful for blood flow channel reconstruction to reduce the hemodynamic disorders. All Patients received routine antiplatelet therapy before and after endovascular treatment. The operative procedures were succeeded in all patients. Five patients were implanted 18 stents (3 stents in 3 patients; 4 stents in 1 patient; 5 stents in 1 patient; parallel 3 stents in 2 patients; parallel 2 stents in 3 patients). The signs and symptoms of brain stem and posterior group of cranial nerves improved significantly. All

  4. Measured Stark widths and shifts of the neutral argon spectral lines in 4s-4p and 4s-4p' transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosavljevic, V.; Ellingboe, A.R.; Djenize, S.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the Stark widths (W) and the shift (d), of the seven neutral argon (Ar I) spectral lines from the 4s-4p and 4s-4p' transitions. The line shapes are measured in a linear, low-pressure, optically thin pulsed arc discharge at about 16 000 K electron temperature (T) and about 7.0 x 10 22 m -3 electron density (N). The new data separates the electron width (W e ) and ion width W i from the total Stark width (W t ), as well the separation of electron total Stark shift (d t ) on electron (d e ) and ion (d i ) parts. There are no theoretical predictions for these lines. Comparison to theoretical predictions for other lines within the same multiplets finds that the experimental data exhibits stronger influence by the ion contribution to the measured Ar I line shape. We have also deduced the ion broadening parameters which describe the influence of the ion static (A) and the ion-dynamical (D and E) effect on the width and the shift of the line shape. Applying the line deconvolution procedure, the basic plasma parameters i.e. electron temperature (T) and electron density (N) are recovered. The plasma parameters (T and N) are measured using independent diagnostics techniques as well. Good agreement is found among two sets of the N and T plasma parameters obtained from deconvolution procedure and independent diagnostics techniques

  5. Half-metallicity and giant magneto-optical Kerr effect in N-doped NaTaO3

    KAUST Repository

    Saeed, Yasir

    2012-09-01

    We use density functional theory and the modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) approach to analyze the electronic and magneto-optical properties of N-doped NaTaO 3. The mBJ results show a half-metallic nature of NaTaO 2N, in contrast to the generalized gradient approximation. We find a giant polar Kerr rotation of 2.16°at 725 nm wave length (visible region), much higher than in other half-metallic perovskites and the prototypical half-metal PtMnSb. We explain the physical origin of this unexpected property. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Giant magnetic anisotropy and robust quantum anomalous Hall effect in boron-doped graphene with Re-adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai-Cheng; Li, Yong-Feng; Liu, Yong; Zhu, Yan

    2018-04-01

    Recently topological materials have attracted much attention due to their quantization transports as well as edge states. It will be excellent to realize the robust quantum anomalous Hall transports in graphene-based devices. Using density-functional theory and tight-binding method, we investigated the structural, magnetic and topological properties for the boron-doped graphene with Re-adsorption. A large band-gap of 32.5 meV is opened by the Rashba spin-orbital coupling, and the band-gap is robust against the shape deformation of  ± 4% along the zigzag direction. Giant magnetic anisotropy emerges in this adsorption system together with the Fermi level lying in the band gap. Both the magnetic anisotropy and the band gap can be tuned by a moderate electric field. Calculations reveal that the system exhibits the quantization transports with the Chern number C=2 .

  7. Giant Calculus In The Mouth Of Partially Edentulous Woman, (Case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This case report is to create awareness of the presence of giant calculus in the mouth, the possible causes and its prevention. Report: This describes the oral condition of a partially edentulous woman with a giant calculus in the mouth. It highlights the effect of such an enormous calculus in the oral cavity.

  8. Strong-field ionization of polar molecules: Stark-shift-corrected strong-field approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dimitrovski, Darko; Martiny, Christian P. J.; Madsen, Lars Bojer

    2010-01-01

    We extend the molecular strong-field approximation for ionization, in the tunneling limit, to include systematically the linear and quadratic static Stark shifts of the ionizing molecular orbital. This approach, simple to implement, is capable of describing the essential physics of the process of...

  9. Congenital giant melanocytic nevi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Khan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Nevi are common skin tumors caused by abnormal overgrowth of cells from the epidermal and dermal layers of the skin. Most nevi are benign, but some pre-cancerous nevi must be monitored or removed. The giant congenital nevus is greater than 10 cm in size, pigmented and often hairy. Between 4% and 6% of these lesions will develop into a malignant melanoma. Since approximately 50% of the melanoma develop by the age of two, and 80% by the age of seven, early removal is recommended. The objective of this paper is to present a unique case of giant nevi and their surgical management.

  10. Probing giant magnetoresistance with THz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zuanming; Tkach, Alexander; Casper, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA.......We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA....

  11. Effect of Localized Spin Concentration on Giant Magnetoresistance in Molecular Conductor TPP[FexCo1-x(Pc)(CN)2]2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Mitsuo; Kanda, Akinori; Murakawa, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Masaki; Inabe, Tamotsu; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Hanasaki, Noriaki

    2016-02-01

    We studied the effect of the localized spin concentration on the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and the charge order (CO) in the phthalocyanine (Pc) molecular conductors TPP[FexCo1-x(Pc)(CN)2]2 (TPP = tetraphenylphosphonium), in which the localized spin concentration can be controlled by adjusting the Fe concentration x. Resistivity studies indicated that the CO state was stabilized by localized spins. The negative magnetoresistance was observed even in the region of a localized spin concentration of as low as about 5%. In the high-concentration region, the negative magnetoresistance changed into a positive one at low temperatures. This result shows that a magnetic field stabilizes the CO state, unless the magnetic field is sufficiently strong to break the antiferromagnetic order of the localized spins.

  12. Effects of thermal and particle-number fluctuations on the giant isovector dipole modes for the 58Ni nucleus in the finite-temperature random-phase approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Dinhdang; Nguyen Zuythang

    1988-01-01

    Using the realistic single-particle energy spectrum obtained in the Woods-Saxon nucleon mean-field potential, we calculate the BCS pairing gap for 58 Ni as a function of temperature taking into account the thermal and particle-number fluctuations. The strength distributions of the electric dipole transitions and the centroids of the isovector giant dipole resonance (IV-GDR) are computed in the framework of the finite-temperature random-phase approximation (RPA) based on the Hamiltonian of the quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model with separate dipole forces. It is shown that the change of the pairing gap at finite temperature can noticeably influence the IV-GDR localisation in realistic nuclei. By taking both thermal and quasiparticle fluctuations in the pairing gap into account the effect of the phase transition from superfluid to normal in the temperature dependence of the IV-GDR centroid is completely smeared out. (author)

  13. Giant optical anisotropy in M-plane GaN/AlGaN quantum wells due to crystal-field effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-N.; Su, W.-L.; Chang, K.-C.; Chang, S.-H.; Chiang, J.-C.; Lo Ikai; Wang, W.-T.; Kao, H.-F.; Lee, M.-E.

    2008-01-01

    The optical polarization of GaN/AlGaN wurtzite quantum wells in various orientations is studied using an arbitrarily-oriented [hkil] Hamiltonian potential matrix. The optical matrix elements in the wurtzite quantum wells are calculated using the k.p finite difference scheme. The results reveal the presence of giant in-plane optical anisotropy (polarized normal to [0001]) in the M-plane (i.e., the (101-bar0)-oriented layer plane) GaN/Al 0.2 Ga 0.8 N quantum well, due to the positive crystal-field split energy effect (Δ CR >0). The present theoretical results are consistent with the photoluminescence measurements presented in the literature [B. Rau, et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 77 (2000) 3343

  14. Three-peak behavior in giant magnetoimpedance effect in Fe73.5-x Cr x Nb3Cu1Si13.5B9 amorphous ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales-Rivera, A.; Valencia, V.H.; Pineda-Gomez, P.

    2007-01-01

    A systematic study of the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect in Fe 73.5- x Cr x Nb 3 Cu 1 Si 13.5 B 9 amorphous ribbons with x=0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 is presented. The complex impedance in these compounds was measured for applied fields from -80 to 80 Oe at room temperature, via the so-called four-probe technique. Depending on the frequency, the experimentally observed GMI curves usually exhibit two types of behavior, namely single-peak (SP), and two-peak (TP). In this work, we emphasize the presence of a 'three-peak behavior' in GMI curves. It occurs between SP and TP behaviors. The mechanisms leading to the three-peak behavior are discussed

  15. Giant resonances in the deformed continuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsukasa, T.; Yabana, K.

    2004-01-01

    Giant resonances in the continuum for deformed nuclei are studied with the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory in real time and real space. The continuum effect is effectively taken into account by introducing a complex Absorbing Boundary Condition (ABC). (orig.)

  16. Giant dipole resonance by many levels theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondaini, R.P.

    1977-01-01

    The many levels theory is applied to photonuclear effect, in particular, in giant dipole resonance. A review about photonuclear dipole absorption, comparing with atomic case is done. The derivation of sum rules; their modifications by introduction of the concepts of effective charges and mass and the Siegert theorem. The experimental distributions are compared with results obtained by curve adjustment. (M.C.K.) [pt

  17. Effect of Intravenous Zoledronic Acid on Histopathology and Recurrence after Extended Curettage in Giant Cell Tumors of Bone: A Comparative Prospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Zile Singh; Sen, Rajeev; Dhiman, Ankur; Sharma, Pankaj; Siwach, Ramchander; Rana, Parveen

    2018-01-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the bone is known for its locally aggressive behavior and tendency to recur. It is an admixture of rounded or spindle-shaped mononuclear neoplastic stromal cells and multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells with their proportionate dispersion among the former. Zoledronic acid (a bisphosphonate) is being used in various cancers such as myelomas and metastasis, for osteoporosis with an aim to reduce the resorption of bone, and as an adjuvant treatment for the management of GCT of bone for reduction of local recurrence. We have carried out a prospective comparative study to assess the effect of intravenous infusion of zoledronic acid on histopathology and recurrence of GCT of bone. The study was carried out in the biopsy proven GCTs in 37 patients; 15 males and 22 females, in the age range from 17 to 55 years. They were treated with extended curettage. Of these 37 patients, 18 were given three doses of 4 mg zoledronic acid infusion at 3-week intervals and extended curettage was performed 2 weeks after the last infusion whereas the other 19 were treated with extended curettage without zoledronic infusion. The post infusion histopathology of the curetted material was compared with the histopathology of initial biopsy. All the patients were evaluated at 3-month intervals for the first 2 years and then six monthly thereafter, for local recurrence and functional outcome of limb using the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score. In postzoledronic infusion cases, the histopathology of samples showed abnormal stromal cells secreting matrix leading to fibrosis and calcification. The type of fibrosis and calcification was different from pathological calcification and fibrosis what is usually observed. There was a good marginalization and solidification of tumors which made surgical curettage easier in six cases in the study group. There was noticeable reduction in the number of giant cells and alteration in morphology of stromal cells to the

  18. Effect of Different Rearing Density on Survival Rate and Growth of Giant Gouramy Osphronemus gouramy Lac. Fry at Size of 2 cm in Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Effendi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Giant gouramy Osphronemus gouramy Lac is one of the fish for food that has high economic value, but its production is not  met with the market demand yet.  The effort is needed to be done in order to increase production of giant gouramy fry by an intensive hatchery system through high rearing density.  This study was performed to determine the effect of rearing density on survival rate and growth of fry.  Fry were reared in aquaria 60x29x33 cm filled with 35 liters water, and fed by Tubifex at satiation as much as  0.23-0.28 g/fry/day with feeding frequency  2 times a day.   Collected  data were survival rate, growth, feed consumption, feed efficiency, and water quality.  The result of study showed that survival rate and feed efficiency did not affected by rearing density, while growth and feed quantity were did.  Survival rate of fish was high; 90.14-99.52%.  Growth and feed consumption were decreased by increasing of  rearing density. Keywords: giant gouramy, Osphronemus gouramy, rearing density, growth   ABSTRAK Ikan gurame, Osphronemus gouramy Lac. merupakan salah satu jenis ikan konsumsi yang memiliki nilai ekonomi yang cukup tinggi, tetapi hasil produksinya masih belum dapat memenuhi permintaan pasar. Upaya perlu dilakukan untuk meningkatkan produksi benih ikan gurame dengan pembenihan secara intensif melalui peningkatan padat penebaran. Penelitian ini dilakukan untuk mengetahui pengaruh padat penebaran terhadap kelangsungan hidup dan pertumbuhan benih ikan gurami. Benih ikan gurami dipelihara pada akuarium berukuran 60×29×33 cm3 yang diisi air sebanyak 35 liter. Pakan berupa cacing sutera diberikan secara at satiation sebanyak 0,23 - 0,28 g/ekor/hari dengan frekuensi 2 kali/hari. Data yang diambil meliputi kelangsungan hidup, pertumbuhan, jumlah pakan yang dikonsumsi, efisiensi pakan dan kualitas air.  Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa padat penebaran tidak mempengaruhi kelangsungan hidup dan efisiensi pakan, namun

  19. An expanded genetic code for probing the role of electrostatics in enzyme catalysis by vibrational Stark spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Völler, Jan-Stefan; Biava, Hernan; Hildebrandt, Peter; Budisa, Nediljko

    2017-11-01

    To find experimental validation for electrostatic interactions essential for catalytic reactions represents a challenge due to practical limitations in assessing electric fields within protein structures. This review examines the applications of non-canonical amino acids (ncAAs) as genetically encoded probes for studying the role of electrostatic interactions in enzyme catalysis. ncAAs constitute sensitive spectroscopic probes to detect local electric fields by exploiting the vibrational Stark effect (VSE) and thus have the potential to map the protein electrostatics. Mapping the electrostatics in proteins will improve our understanding of natural catalytic processes and, in beyond, will be helpful for biocatalyst engineering. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Biochemistry of Synthetic Biology - Recent Developments" Guest Editor: Dr. Ilka Heinemann and Dr. Patrick O'Donoghue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Waking the Sleeping Giant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ollenburger, Mary H.; Descheemaeker, Katrien; Crane, Todd A.; Sanogo, Ousmane M.; Giller, Ken E.

    2016-01-01

    The World Bank argued that West Africa's Guinea Savannah zone forms part of “Africa's Sleeping Giant,” where increases in agricultural production could be an engine of economic growth, through expansion of cultivated land in sparsely populated areas. The district of Bougouni, in southern Mali,

  1. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipul Yagnik

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Fibroadenomas are benign solid tumor associated with aberration of normal lobular development. Juvenile giant fibroadenoma is usually single and >5 cm in size /or >500 gms in weight. Important differential diagnoses are: phyllodes tumor and juvenile gigantomastia. Simple excision is the treatment of choice.

  2. from the Giant Panda

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    Jun 3, 2009 ... RPS28 is a component of the 40S small ribosomal subunit encoded by RPS28 gene, which is specific to eukaryotes. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS28 were cloned successfully from the Giant. Panda using RT-PCR technology and Touchdown-PCR, respectively. Both sequences were ...

  3. Nanodielectrics with giant permittivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    But the main limitation of the composite materials is its use in nanodevices. Therefore, few efforts have been ... an enormously high permittivity value of a sufficiently minute metal particle having discrete energy levels ... the present article is to assemble works on nanodielectrics with giant permittivity value, which have been ...

  4. Giant vesical calculus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Giant vesical calculus. A case report. H. H. LAUBSCHER. Summary. An exceptional case of bladder stone is presented. The case is unusual as regards the size of the stone and the fact that the patient did··not seek medical assistance much earlier, as this was readily avail- able. Furthermore, recovery after removal of the.

  5. Graphenes–Aromatic Giants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Graphenes - Aromatic Giants. Ivan Gutman Boris Furtula. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1238-1245. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/12/1238-1245. Keywords. Graphenes; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; polyphenyls; condensed benzenes.

  6. Giant peritoneal loose bodies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-27

    Mar 27, 2015 ... Giant peritoneal loose bodies are rare lesions, originating from auto-amputated appendices epiploicae. They may cause urinary or gastrointestinal obstruction and, should the radiologist not be familiar with the entity, can potentially be confused with malignant or parasitic lesions. Familiarity with their ...

  7. Giant resonances in nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohigas, O.

    1980-01-01

    The giant resonances: electric dipolar E1, T=1, isoscalar electric quadrupolar E2, T=0 and isoscalar electric monopolar E0, T=0 are presented. The experimental facts are reviewed and some examples are given of the kind of information supplied by experimental data [fr

  8. The effect of everolimus on renal angiomyolipoma in pediatric patients with tuberous sclerosis being treated for subependymal giant cell astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissler, John J; Franz, David N; Frost, Michael D; Belousova, Elena; Bebin, E Martina; Sparagana, Steven; Berkowitz, Noah; Ridolfi, Antonia; Kingswood, J Christopher

    2018-01-01

    Patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) often have multiple TSC-associated hamartomas, particularly in the brain and kidney. This was a post hoc analysis of pediatric patients being treated for subependymal giant cell astrocytomas (SEGAs) during the phase 3, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled EXIST-1 trial. Patients were initially randomly assigned to receive everolimus 4.5 mg/m 2 /day (target blood trough 5-15 mg/dl) or placebo and could continue in an open-label extension phase. Angiomyolipoma response rates were analyzed in patients aged 20% increase in kidney volume from nadir, and angiomyolipoma-related bleeding ≥ grade 2. Tolerability was also assessed. Overall, this analysis included 33 patients. Renal angiomyolipoma response was achieved by 75.8% of patients (95% confidence interval, 57.7-88.9%), with sustained mean reductions in renal angiomyolipoma volume over nearly 4 years of treatment. In addition, most (≥80%) achieved clinically relevant reductions in angiomyolipoma volume (≥50%), beginning at week 24 and continuing for the remainder of the study. Everolimus was generally well tolerated in this subgroup, with most adverse events being grade 1 or 2 in severity. Although everolimus is currently not indicated for this use, this analysis from EXIST-1 demonstrates its long-term efficacy and safety for the treatment of renal angiomyolipoma in pediatric patients undergoing treatment for TSC-associated SEGA.

  9. Effects of mesh size and escape gaps on discarding in an Australian giant mud crab (Scylla serrata trap fishery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt K Broadhurst

    Full Text Available In response to concerns over excessive discarding from Australian recreational round traps (with four funnel entrances used to target giant mud crabs, Scylla serrata, an experiment was done to assess the independent and cumulative utility of paired, bottom-located horizontal escape gaps (46×120 mm and increasing mesh size (from 51 to 101 mm. Compared to conventional traps comprising 51-mm mesh throughout, those with the same mesh size and escape gaps caught significantly fewer (by 95% undersize (<85 mm carapace length--CL crabs while maintaining legal catches. Traps made from 101-mm mesh (but with the same funnel entrances as conventional designs and with and without escape gaps similarly retained fewer undersize crabs and also yellowfin bream Acanthopagrus australis (the key bycatch species by up to 94%, but there were concomitant reductions in fishing power for legal sizes of S. serrata. Although there were no immediate mortalities among any discarded crabs, there was a greater bias towards wounding among post molts than late inter-molts and less damage to individuals in the 101-mm conventional than 51-mm conventional traps (without escape gaps. The results support retrospectively fitting escape gaps in conventional S. serrata traps as a means for reducing discarding, but additional work is required to determine appropriate mesh sizes/configurations that maximize species and size selectivity.

  10. Giant Planets Can Act as Stabilizing Agents on Debris Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muñoz-Gutiérrez, M. A.; Pichardo, B.; Peimbert, A., E-mail: mmunoz.astro@gmail.com [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. postal 70-264 Ciudad Universitaria, México (Mexico)

    2017-07-01

    We have explored the evolution of a cold debris disk under the gravitational influence of dwarf-planet-sized objects (DPs), both in the presence and absence of an interior giant planet. Through detailed long-term numerical simulations, we demonstrate that when the giant planet is not present, DPs can stir the eccentricities and inclinations of disk particles, in linear proportion to the total mass of the DPs; on the other hand, when the giant planet is included in the simulations, the stirring is approximately proportional to the mass squared. This creates two regimes: below a disk mass threshold (defined by the total mass of DPs), the giant planet acts as a stabilizing agent of the orbits of cometary nuclei, diminishing the effect of the scatterers; above the threshold, the giant contributes to the dispersion of the particles.

  11. Experimental determination of the Stark broadening of Cu I spectral lines in a plasma of a capillary discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandolache, G.; Zoita, V.; Bauchire, M.; Le Menn, E.; Gentils, F.; Fleurier, C.

    2001-01-01

    Copper lines are frequently observed in various types of plasma device and industrial plasmas and then it is desirable to develop methods of plasma diagnostics using the emission spectrum of copper lines. The aim of this work is to create a database for the neutral copper spectral lines directly usable for the diagnostic of plasmas with metal vapors. An experimental device has been developed to create a metal plasma having the required metrological properties to facilitate the spectroscopic measurements. A capillary discharge technique has been used to create a plasma jet representing a radially symmetric light source. The copper-hydrogen plasma jet was produced by the ablation of the capillary wall consisting of a copper-embedded elastomer. The plasma jet was observed side-on using the high-resolution spectrometers equipped with ICCD detectors. The 2D square matrix ICCD detectors have permitted the observation of cross sections of the plasma jet. The high-speed time resolved camera equipped with interference filters has been used to check the cylindrical shape and the homogeneity of the plasma jet. The electron density of the plasma jet was obtained by using the H α spectral line of the hydrogen component plasma. The temperature was determined by applying the relative intensity method to the measured intensities of the neutral copper spectral lines emitted by the plasma jet. The hydrogen and copper lines were broadened principally by the Stark effect. The measured temperatures were about 15,000 K and the electron density of about 2x10 17 cm -3 . The results of the Stark broadening of the neutral cooper concerned particularly the lines 453.9 nm, 465.1 nm, 515.3 nm and 529.2 nm. (authors)

  12. Probing giant magnetoresistance with THz spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Zuanming; Tkach, Alexander; Casper, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    We observe a giant magnetoresistance effect in CoFe/Cu-based multistack using THz time-domain spectroscopy. The magnetic field-dependent dc conductivity, electron scattering time, as well as spin-asymmetry parameter of the structure are successfully determined. © 2014 OSA....

  13. Giant light enhancement in atomic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadomsky, O. N.; Gadomskaya, I. V.; Altunin, K. K.

    2009-01-01

    We show that the polarizing effect of the atoms in an atomic cluster can lead to full compensation of the radiative damping of excited atomic states, a change in the sign of the dispersion of the atomic polarizability, and giant light enhancement by the atomic cluster.

  14. Effect of water-soluble P-chitosan and S-chitosan on human primary osteoblasts and giant cell tumor of bone stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, T; Zhang, G; PY Lau, Carol; Zheng, L Z; Xie, X H; Wang, X L; Patrick, Y; Qin, L; Kumta, Shekhar M [Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Chinese University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Wang, X H; He, K, E-mail: kumta@cuhk.edu.hk [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Institute of Bio-manufacturing Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2011-02-15

    Water-soluble phosphorylated chitosan (P-chitosan) and disodium (1 {yields} 4)-2-deoxy-2-sulfoamino-{beta}-D-glucopyranuronan (S-chitosan) are two chemically modified chitosans. In this study, we found that P-chitosan significantly promotes cell proliferation of both human primary osteoblasts (OBs) and the OB like stromal cell component of the giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) cells at the concentration from 125 to 1000 {mu}g ml{sup -1} at all time points of 1, 3, 5 and 7 days after treatment. Further investigation of the osteogenic effect of the P-chitosan suggested that it regulates the levels of osteoclastogenic factors, receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand and osteoprotegerin expression. An interesting finding is that S-chitosan at lower concentration (100 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) stimulates cell proliferation while a higher dose (1000 {mu}g ml{sup -1}) of S-chitosan inhibits it. The inhibitory effect of S-chitosan on human primary GCT stromal cells was greater than that of OBs (p < 0.05). Taken together, our findings elucidated the osteogenic effect of P-chitosan and the varying effects of S-chitosan on the proliferation of human primary OBs and GCT stromal cells and provided us the rationale for the construction of novel bone repair biomaterials with the dual properties of bone induction and bone tumor inhibition.

  15. Method to estimate the effective temperatures of late-type giants using line-depth ratios in the wavelength range 0.97-1.32 μm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Daisuke; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Naoto; Fukue, Kei; Hamano, Satoshi; Ikeda, Yuji; Kawakita, Hideyo; Kondo, Sohei; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Yasui, Chikako

    2018-02-01

    The effective temperature, one of the most fundamental atmospheric parameters of a star, can be estimated using various methods; here, we focus on a method using line-depth ratios (LDRs). This method combines low- and high-excitation lines and makes use of relations between LDRs of these line pairs and the effective temperature. It has an advantage, for example, of being minimally affected by interstellar reddening, which changes stellar colours. We report 81 relations between LDRs and effective temperature established with high-resolution, λ/Δλ ∼ 28 000, spectra of nine G- to M-type giants in the Y and J bands. Our analysis gives the first comprehensive set of LDR relations for this wavelength range. The combination of all these relations can be used to determine the effective temperatures of stars that have 3700 < Teff < 5400 K and -0.5 < [Fe/H] < +0.3 dex, to a precision of ±10 K in the best cases.

  16. Development of a wavy Stark velocity filter for studying interstellar chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kunihiro; Takada, Yusuke; Kimura, Naoki; Wada, Michiharu; Schuessler, Hans A.

    2017-08-01

    Cold polar molecules are key to both the understanding of fundamental physics and the characterization of the chemical evolution of interstellar clouds. To facilitate such studies over a wide range of temperatures, we developed a new type of Stark velocity filter for changing the translational and rotational temperatures of velocity-selected polar molecules without changing the output beam position. The translational temperature of guided polar molecules can be significantly varied by exchanging the wavy deflection section with one having a different radius of the curvature and a different deflection angle. Combining in addition a temperature variable gas cell with the wavy Stark velocity filter enables to observe the translational and rotational temperature dependence of the reaction-rate constants of cold ion-polar molecule reactions over the interesting temperature range of 10-100 K.

  17. Can the Stark-Einstein law resolve the measurement problem from an animate perspective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaheld, Fred H

    2015-09-01

    Analysis of the Stark-Einstein law as it applies to the retinal molecule, which is part of the rhodopsin molecule within the rod cells of the retina, reveals that it may provide the solution to the measurement problem from an animate perspective. That it represents a natural boundary where the Schrödinger equation or wave function automatically goes from linear to nonlinear while remaining in a deterministic state. It will be possible in the near future to subject this theory to empirical tests as has been previously proposed. This analysis provides a contrast to the many decades well studied and debated inanimate measurement problem and would represent an addition to the Stark-Einstein law involving information carried by the photon. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a wavy Stark velocity filter for studying interstellar chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Kunihiro; Takada, Yusuke; Kimura, Naoki; Wada, Michiharu; Schuessler, Hans A

    2017-08-01

    Cold polar molecules are key to both the understanding of fundamental physics and the characterization of the chemical evolution of interstellar clouds. To facilitate such studies over a wide range of temperatures, we developed a new type of Stark velocity filter for changing the translational and rotational temperatures of velocity-selected polar molecules without changing the output beam position. The translational temperature of guided polar molecules can be significantly varied by exchanging the wavy deflection section with one having a different radius of the curvature and a different deflection angle. Combining in addition a temperature variable gas cell with the wavy Stark velocity filter enables to observe the translational and rotational temperature dependence of the reaction-rate constants of cold ion-polar molecule reactions over the interesting temperature range of 10-100 K.

  19. Giant Otters in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk C.; Staib E.

    1992-01-01

    We are in the second year of fieldwork surveying for Giant Otters in the southeastern rainforest of Peru, in three areas with differing levels of legal protection. While there is some illegal hunting still happening outside the protected areas, the main threat to the otters is badly-conducted tourism. Well-organised tourism can be a promising argument for establishing protected areas like national parks.

  20. Intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta R

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available A case of intraoral giant condyloma acuminatum is reported in a 50- year- old Indian. He did not respond to topical application of podophyllin 20% but responded partially to electric cauterisation. Surgical excision was done to get rid of the warty growh completely. Since there were no skin or genital lesions and no history of marital or extramarital sexual contact the lesion was probably acquired from environmental sources. Nonsexual transmission should be considered especially when the lesions are extragenital.

  1. Observation of asymmetric Stark profiles from plasmas created by a picosecond KrF laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, C.H.; Tighe, W.; Suckewer, S.; Seely, J.F.; Feldman, U.; Woltz, L.A.

    1987-10-01

    High-resolution extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectra from solid targets irradiated by a picosecond KrF* laser focused to 10 16 W/cm 2 have been recorded. The line profiles of transitions in Li-like fluorine and oxygen are asymmetric and up to 2 A in width. Calculations indicate the presence of transitions of the type 2p-3p and other forbidden Stark components. 11 refs., 6 figs

  2. AC Stark cooling of C 2 - ion in penning trap using Simbuca

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Hao

    2016-01-01

    This article is going to summarize work I did in my 2 month project on AC Stark cooling simulation, and the object is to help my colleague carry on it and make further progress. In this article, I will meanly explain the formula I used, the content and flowchart of my c++ code, some conclusion and knowledge we obtained about cooling efficiency from our simulation, and some important tips we noticed before.

  3. Giant prolactinomas in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delgrange, Etienne; Raverot, Gerald; Bex, Marie

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterise distinctive clinical features of giant prolactinomas in women. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective case series and literature review. METHODS: We collected data from 15 female patients with a pituitary tumour larger than 4 cm and prolactin levels above 1000 μg/l and id......OBJECTIVE: To characterise distinctive clinical features of giant prolactinomas in women. DESIGN: A multicentre, retrospective case series and literature review. METHODS: We collected data from 15 female patients with a pituitary tumour larger than 4 cm and prolactin levels above 1000 μg....../l and identified 19 similar cases from the literature; a gender-based comparison of the frequency and age distribution was obtained from a literature review. RESULTS: The initial PubMed search using the term 'giant prolactinomas' identified 125 patients (13 women) responding to the inclusion criteria. The female......:male ratio was 1:9. Another six female patients were found by extending the literature search, while our own series added 15 patients. The median age at diagnosis was 44 years in women compared with 35 years in men (Pwomen (n=34), we...

  4. Reframing violence against women as a human rights violation: Evan Stark's Coercive Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libal, Kathryn; Parekh, Serena

    2009-12-01

    Evan Stark claims that partner-perpetrated physical abuse and other forms of violence against women ought to be understood as a human rights violation. The authors engage Stark's rhetorically powerful political and analytical innovation by outlining one theoretical and one practical challenge to shifting the paradigm that researchers, advocates, and policy makers use to describe, explain, and remedy the harms of coercive control from misdemeanor assault to human rights violation. The theoretical challenge involves overcoming the public/ private dichotomy that underpins liberal conceptions of human rights.The practical challenge involves using the human rights framework in the United States, given public indifference to human rights rhetoric or law, reluctance of U.S. policy makers to submit to scrutiny or justice-oriented processes under international law on issues of human rights and especially war crimes, and the consequent U.S. legacy of refusal to participate meaningfully in the international human rights process. The authors conclude that employing a human rights framework holds potential in the United States, but the paradigm shift Stark advocates will not materialize without widespread mobilization of interest in and understanding of human rights among domestic violence advocates and the society in general.

  5. A Plasma Edge Electron Density Diagnostic Based on a Doppler-free Measurement of Stark Broadening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Abdullah; Martin, Elijah; Shannon, Steve

    2017-10-01

    Passive spectroscopic measurements of Stark broadening have been reliably used to determine electron density for decades. A low-density limit of 1e19 m-3 exists using these passive techniques due to Doppler and instrument broadening. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a novel diagnostic approach for measuring electron density using Stark broadening is currently under development and is capable of extending the low-density limit to 1e16 m-3 . The diagnostic is based on measuring the spectral line profile of a Balmer series transition using Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy, a laser-based absorption technique. The spectrum is then fit to a quantum mechanical model using the Explicit Zeeman Stark Spectral Simulator (EZSSS) code to extract the electron density. The increased sensitivity to the electron density is realized because Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy (DFSS) can greatly reduce the Doppler broadening and essentially eliminate the instrument broadening. DFSS has been successfully employed to measure spectral data in a magnetized (500-800 G), low temperature (5 eV), low density (1e17-1e18 m-3), He/H2 and He/CH4 plasma in the mTorr pressure range. Experimentally measured pi and sigma H-alpha spectra, fit using the EZSSS code, will be presented. A quantitative model to accurately predict crossover peaks and dips will also be given. This work was supported by the US. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  6. Effects of the toxic dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium catenatum on hydrolytic and antioxidant enzymes, in tissues of the giant lions-paw scallop Nodipecten subnodosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Norma; de Jesús Romero, Maria; Campa-Córdova, Angel; Luna, Antonio; Ascencio, Felipe

    2007-11-01

    This study documents effects of the toxic dinoflagellate Gymnodinium catenatum, a producer of paralytic shellfish poison, on juvenile farmed (5.9+/-0.39 cm) giant lions-paw scallop Nodipecten subnodosus. Scallops were fed bloom concentrations of toxic dinoflagellate G. catenatum for 7 h. The effect of the toxic dinoflagellate in different tissues was determined by analysis of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, gluthathione peroxidase), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (lipid peroxidation), and hydrolytic enzymes (proteases, glycosidases, phosphatases, lipases, and esterases). Histopathological photos record the effects of the toxic dinoflagellate in various tissues. The results show that juvenile lions-paw scallops produce pseudo-feces, partially close their shell, increase melanization, and aggregate hemocytes. Several enzymes were affected and could serve as biological markers. In general, the adductor muscle was not affected. In the digestive gland, some enzymes could be the result of defensive and digestive processes. Gills and mantle tissue were markedly affected because these sites respond first to toxic dinoflagellates, leading to the idea that proteolytic cascades could be involved.

  7. From Gauss graphs to giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Koch, Robert; Nkumane, Lwazi

    2018-02-01

    We identify the operators in N = 4 super Yang-Mills theory that correspond to 1/8 -BPS giant gravitons in AdS5 × S 5. Our evidence for the identification comes from (1) counting these operators and showing agreement with independent counts of the number of giant graviton states, and (2) by demonstrating a correspondence between correlation functions of the super Yang-Mills operators and overlaps of the giant graviton wave functions.

  8. Stark broadening of potassium ns-4p and nd-4p lines in a wall-stabilized arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohimer, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Stark-width measurements are reported for lines in the ns-4p (n = 7--10) and nd-4p (n = 5--8) series in neutral potassium (K I). These measurements were made by observing the end-on emission from a low pressure (20 Torr) potassium-argon wall-stabilized arc source. The on-axis electron density and temperature in the 20-A arc were (2.0 +- 0.2) x 10 15 cm -3 and 2955 +- 100 K, respectively. The experimentally determined Stark widths were compared with the theoretical values calculated by Griem. The measured Stark widths agreed with theory to within 30% for lines in the ns-4p series; while the measured Stark widths of the nd-4p series lines were only one-third of the theoretical values

  9. External versus self-induced ac Stark shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, L.; Lippi, G. L.

    2015-07-01

    An oscillating electromagnetic (e.m.) field driving a dipole transition induces a well-known energy level shift, commonly described in a dressed state representation [1]. Experimentally, the effect arises when irradiating a sample (atomic, molecular, etc.) with an e.m. field which is resonant (or quasi-resonant) with a transition between energy levels. The source of the e.m. field is, in such a case, unaffected by the interaction and the field's amplitude (or intensity) is used by the experimenter as a control parameter to vary the level shift. Even in those situations where one (or multiple) pump field(s) and one (or multiple) probe field(s) are employed, the picture remains the same, regardless of the more complex mathematical description of the levels involved: the e.m. field amplitude remains an independent control parameter. This is by far the most common situation encountered in spectroscopy when studying an energy level shift.

  10. The ac stark shift and space-borne rubidium atomic clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formichella, V.; Camparo, J.; Sesia, I.; Signorile, G.; Galleani, L.; Huang, M.; Tavella, P.

    2016-11-01

    Due to its small size, low weight, and low power consumption, the Rb atomic frequency standard (RAFS) is routinely the first choice for atomic timekeeping in space. Consequently, though the device has very good frequency stability (rivaling passive hydrogen masers), there is interest in uncovering the fundamental processes limiting its long-term performance, with the goal of improving the device for future space systems and missions. The ac Stark shift (i.e., light shift) is one of the more likely processes limiting the RAFS' long-term timekeeping ability, yet its manifestation in the RAFS remains poorly understood. In part, this comes from the fact that light-shift induced frequency fluctuations must be quantified in terms of the RAFS' light-shift coefficient and the output variations in the RAFS' rf-discharge lamp, which is a nonlinear inductively-couple plasma (ICP). Here, we analyze the light-shift effect for a family of 10 on-orbit Block-IIR GPS RAFS, examining decade-long records of their on-orbit frequency and rf-discharge lamp fluctuations. We find that the ICP's light intensity variations can take several forms: deterministic aging, jumps, ramps, and non-stationary noise, each of which affects the RAFS' frequency via the light shift. Correlating these light intensity changes with RAFS frequency changes, we estimate the light-shift coefficient, κLS, for the family of RAFS: κLS = -(1.9 ± 0.3) × 10-12/%. The 16% family-wide variation in κLS indicates that while each RAFS may have its own individual κLS, the variance of κLS among similarly designed RAFS can be relatively small. Combining κLS with our estimate of the ICP light intensity's non-stationary noise, we find evidence that random-walk frequency noise in high-quality space-borne RAFS is strongly influenced by the RAFS' rf-discharge lamp via the light shift effect.

  11. Charting the Giants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-06-01

    .g. the WMAP satellite). In fact, the new REFLEX study is very complementary to the above-mentioned methods. The REFLEX team concludes that the mean density of the Universe is in the range 0.27 to 0.43 times the "critical density", providing the strongest constraint on this value up to now. When combined with the latest supernovae study, the REFLEX result implies that, whatever the nature of the dark energy is, it closely mimics a Universe with Einstein's cosmological constant. A giant puzzle The REFLEX catalogue will also serve many other useful purposes. With it, astronomers will be able to better understand the detailed processes that contribute to the heating of the gas in these clusters. It will also be possible to study the effect of the environment of the cluster on each individual galaxy. Moreover, the catalogue is a good starting point to look for giant gravitational lenses, in which a cluster acts as a giant magnifying lens, effectively allowing observations of the faintest and remotest objects that would otherwise escape detection with present-day telescopes. But, as Hans Böhringer says: "Perhaps the most important advantage of this catalogue is that the properties of each single cluster can be compared to the entire sample. This is the main goal of surveys: assembling the pieces of a gigantic puzzle to build the grander view, where every single piece then gains a new, more comprehensive meaning." More information The results presented in this Press Release will appear in the research journal Astronomy and Astrophysics ("The ROSAT-ESO Flux Limited X-ray (REFLEX) Galaxy Cluster Survey. V. The cluster catalogue" by H. Böhringer et al.; astro-ph/0405546). See also the REFLEX website.

  12. Measured, calculated and predicted stark widths along a beryllium isoelectronic sequence in the 3s-3p transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djeniže S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of the observed satisfactory agreement between recent experimental and calculated Stark width values with our earlier predicted ones along the beryllium isoelectronic sequence (BeI, BII, CIII, NIV, OV FVI, NeVII,.. new Stark width values have been predicted for high ionized emitters (NaVIII, MgIX, AlX, SiXI and PXII in the 3s-3p transition interesting for astrophysical investigations.

  13. I am Iron Man:Tony Stark as a mythical and modern hero in Marvel cinematic universe

    OpenAIRE

    Kalliokoski, E. (Eleonoora)

    2013-01-01

    Abstract In this study I analyze the character of Tony Stark as both a mythical hero and a modern heroic figure in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. My primary materials for this analysis are the movies Iron Man, Iron Man 2, and Marvel’s The Avengers. I chose these movies for the study because they all feature Tony Stark in a significant role and are part of one continuous story arc. ...

  14. Role of nature reserves in giant panda protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongwei; Li, Junqing

    2018-02-01

    Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is a flagship species in nature conservation of the world; to protect this species, 67 nature reserves have been established in China. To evaluate the protection effect of giant panda nature reserves, we analyzed the variation of giant panda number and habitat area of 23 giant panda nature reserves of Sichuan province based on the national survey data released by State Forestry Administration and Sichuan Forestry Department. Results showed that from the third national survey to the fourth, giant panda number and habitat area of 23 giant panda nature reserves of Sichuan province failed to realize the significant increase. Furthermore, we found that the total population growth rate of 23 nature reserves in the last 12 years was lower than those of the province total of Sichuan and the national total of China, and the total habitat area of the 23 nature reserves was decreasing in the last 12 years, but the province total and national total were all increasing. We propose that giant panda protection should pay more attention to how to improve the protective effects of nature reserves.

  15. Investigation on a giant magnetoelectric effect compound Ba1-xSrxMg2Fe12O22 via neutron scattering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Cao, Huibo; Zhai, Kun; Sun, Young; Wang, Fangwei

    Y-type hexaferrite Ba2Mg2Fe12O22 has a giant magnetoelectric effect (ME). The magnetic structure consists of two groups of L- (large moment) and S- (small moment) blocks stacking along the c-axis. The moments align ferrimagnetically in the same block. At zero field, it displays a proper screw magnetic structure with an incommensurate wavevector k along the c-axis below a ferrimagnetic-antiferromagnetic (FM-AFM) transition (195 K) and then transforms to a longitudinal conical phase below 50 K. Applying a small magnetic field, the material displays polarization in the conical phase. When doped with Sr, the material keeps its sensitivity to field while the ME coefficient is greatly enhanced. The transition temperatures are largely elevated and FM-AFM transition goes above room T. Meanwhile, temperature dependent neutron diffraction investigation shows new commensurate AFM peaks emerging at heavy Sr doped sample. However, size effect is not sufficient to explain the changes upon Sr doping. Comparison study of the crystal and magnetic structure of the doped samples is performed to identify the exquisite atomic position changes and the moment interaction picture differences with doping.

  16. Molecular analysis of dispersal in giant pandas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, X J; Zhang, Z J; Wu, H; Goossens, B; Li, M; Jiang, S W; Bruford, M W; Wei, F W

    2007-09-01

    Although dispersal in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is a demographic mechanism which can potentially counteract the negative effect of habitat fragmentation, little is known about dispersal in this species because of difficulties in observing individuals. Using data from faecal microsatellite genotyping, we compared the spatial distribution of giant pandas in two populations and the proximity of relatives in one key population to infer their dispersal pattern. We conclude that giant pandas exhibit female-biased dispersal because: (i) vAIc (variance of assignment index) for females was significantly larger than for males, suggesting that females comprise both 'local' and 'foreign' genotypes; (ii) the average spatial distance of related female dyads was significantly larger than that of males; (iii) larger r (relatedness), F(ST) (genetic variance among populations) and mAIc (mean of assignment index) values were found in males using the software FSTAT, although the differences were not significant; (iv) males set up territories neighbouring to their birth place; (v) significant population structure using microsatellites with a concomitant lack of mitochondrial structure was found in a previous study, possibly indicating more extensive female dispersal; and (vi) female-biased dispersal was strongly supported by evidence from concomitant ecological studies. Considering previous ecological data and life-history characteristics of the giant panda, female-biased dispersal is most likely to be due to competition for birth dens among females, inbreeding avoidance and enhancing inclusive fitness among related males.

  17. Giant Rectal Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Dickhoff

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs of the rectum are rare and often difficult to remove surgically. At the time metastases are found, GISTs are considered to be incurable and until recently no adequate therapy was of any value for these patients. Recently, imatinib was introduced: a signal transducing inhibitor acting specifically on the KIT-tyrosine kinase, which can be used to downsize giant GIST (neo-adjuvant before surgery or induce stable disease in case of metastases with few minor side-effects. Two patients with giant rectal GIST are presented, one of which was treated before the imatinib era, the other when imatinib was available.

  18. Toward shrimp consumption without chemicals: Combined effects of freezing and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) on some quality characteristics of Giant Red Shrimp (Aristaeomorpha foliacea) during storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Gioacchino; Okpala, Charles Odilichukwu R; Alberio, Giuseppina R A; Messina, Concetta M; Santulli, Andrea; Giacalone, Gabriele; Spagna, Giovanni

    2016-04-15

    The combined effects of freezing and modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) (100% N2 and 50% N2+50% CO2) on some quality characteristics of Giant Red Shrimp (GRS) (Aristaeomorpha foliacea) was studied during 12-month storage. In particular, the quality characteristics determined proximal and gas compositions, melanosis scores, pH, total volatile basic-nitrogen (TVB-N), thiobarbituric acid (TBA) as well as free amino acid (FAA). In addition, the emergent data were compared to those subject to vacuum packaging as well as conventional preservative method of sulphite treatment (SUL). Most determined qualities exhibited quantitative differences with storage. By comparisons, while pH and TVB-N statistically varied between treatments (P<0.05) and TBA that ranged between ∼0.15 and 0.30 mg MDA/kg appeared least at end of storage for 100% N2 treated-group, the latter having decreased melanosis scores showed such treatments with high promise to keep the colour of GRS sample hence, potential replacement for SUL group. By comparisons also, while some individual FAA values showed increases especially at the 100% N2-treated group, the total FAAs statistically differed with storage (P<0.05). The combination of freezing and MAP treatments as preservative treatment method shows high promise to influence some quality characteristics of GRS samples of this study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of extender type, sperm volume, cryoprotectant concentration, cryopreservation and time duration on motility, survival and fertilisation rates of Mekong giant catfish sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kriangsak Mengumphan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effects of some basic factors, namely extender type, sperm volume, cryoprotectant concentration, cryopreservation and storage time, on the quality of Mekong giant catfish (MGC sperm. The following results are obtained from conducted experiments. The sperm kept in Hanks balanced salt solution (HBSS extender consistently produced good results in terms of motility. The highest motility grade (4.0 was observed after 12 hours of examination and still a very satisfactory grade (3.3 was observed after 48 hours. The percentage of live cells of the sperm kept in HBSS was also highest (45.3%. The optimal amount of cryoprotectant (DMSO prior to cryopreservation was 8%, which gave the best motility grade (4.0 up to the first 72 hours of observation while at 120 hours the motility grade was 3.3. The fertilisation rate of MGC fresh sperm in HBSS (2 ml and 1 gram eggs was 47.1% while that of cryopreserved sperm under the same conditions was 36.2%. When crossed with P. hypophthalmus, the fertilisation rates of a 2-week- and a 1-year-cryopreserved sperm sample were 36.2% and 30.9% respectively.

  20. Giant paraganglioma in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Gupta

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Paraganglioma is a rare neuroendocrine catecholamine producing tumour in childhood which arises outside the adrenal medulla. We present a 12 year old girl with giant paraganglioma with severe hypertension and end organ damage. Diagnosis was confirmed with 24 h urinary Vanillymandelic Acid (VMA and CT scan. Preoperative blood pressure was controlled with intravenous nitroprusside, and oral prazosin, amlodepine, labetalol and metoprolol. General anaesthesia with epidural analgesia was given. Intra operative blood pressure rise was managed with infusion of nitriglycerine (NTG, esmolol, nitroprusside and propofol.

  1. GIANT INTRACANALICULAR FIBROADENOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clyn; Parsons, Robert J.; Bogart, William M.

    1951-01-01

    Five cases of giant intracanalicular fibroadenoma (“cystosarcoma phylloides”) were observed at one hospital in a period of three years. In a search of the literature, additional reports of breast tumors of this kind, not included in previous reviews, were noted. As there is record of 229 cases, it would appear that this rapidly growing benign tumor should be kept in mind in the diagnosis of masses in the breast. If removal is incomplete, there may be recurrence. Simple mastectomy is the treatment of choice. Radical mastectomy should be avoided. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2.Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:14848732

  2. Giant Ulcerative Dermatofibroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgut Karlidag

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatofibroma is a slowly growing common benign cutaneous tumor characterized by hard papules and nodules. The rarely seen erosions and ulcerations may cause difficulties in the diagnosis. Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, which is clinically and histopathologically of malignant character, displays difficulties in the diagnosis since it has similarities with basal cell carcinoma, epidermoid carcinoma, and sarcomas. Head and neck involvement is very rare. In this study, a giant dermatofibroma case, which is histopathologically, ulcerative dermatofibroma, the biggest lesion of the head and neck region and seen rarely in the literature that has characteristics similar to dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans, has been presented.

  3. GIANT PROSTHETIC VALVE THROMBUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical prosthetic valves are predisposed to bleeding, thrombosis & thromboembolic complications. Overall incidence of thromboembolic complications is 1% per year who are on oral anticoagulants, whereas bleeding complications incidence is 0.5% to 6.6% per year. 1, 2 Minimization of Scylla of thromboembolic & Charybdis of bleeding complication needs a balancing act of optimal antithrombotic therapy. We are reporting a case of middle aged male patient with prosthetic mitral valve presenting in heart failure. Patient had discontinued anticoagulants, as he had subdural hematoma in the past. He presented to our institute with a giant prosthetic valve thrombus.

  4. A Giant Urethral Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigdel, G; Agarwal, A; Keshaw, B W

    2014-01-01

    Urethral calculi are rare forms of urolithiasis. Majority of the calculi are migratory from urinary bladder or upper urinary tract. Primary urethral calculi usually occur in presence of urethral stricture or diverticulum. In this article we report a case of a giant posterior urethral calculus measuring 7x3x2 cm in a 47 years old male. Patient presented with acute retention of urine which was preceded by burning micturition and dribbling of urine for one week. The calculus was pushed in to the bladder through the cystoscope and was removed by suprapubic cystolithotomy.

  5. Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bo Sonnich; Henriksen, Trine Foged; Kølle, Stig-Frederik Trojahn

    2015-01-01

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (GCMN) occur in 1:20,000 livebirths and are associated with increased risk of malignant transformation. The treatment of GCMN from 1981 to 2010 in a tertiary referral center was reviewed evaluating the modalities used, cosmetic results, associated complications......% versus 44% required unplanned additional surgery, respectively. Complications were noted in 25% and 67% of the patients, respectively. Cosmetic result was satisfying in 76% of patients without difference between the groups. No malignant transformation was found during a mean follow-up of 11 years....... Curettage is a gentle alternative to excision with a lower complication rate and good cosmetic outcome....

  6. Effective half-lives of ¹³⁷Cs in giant butterbur and field horsetail, and the distribution differences of potassium and ¹³⁷Cs in aboveground tissue parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2015-03-01

    Concentrations of (137)Cs and (40)K in different tissues of edible wild herbaceous plants, that is, leaf blade and petiole for giant butterbur (Petasites japonicas (Siebold et Zucc.) Maxim.), and leaf, stem and strobilus for fertile shoot of field horsetail (Equisetum arvense L.) were measured in 2012-2014 to clarify the effect in Japan from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. The concentrations of (137)Cs decreased with time with effective half-lives of ca. 450 d and 360 d for giant butterbur and field horsetail, respectively. The ANOVA test revealed that (40)K and (137)Cs distributions in leaf blade and petiole for giant butterbur and leaf and stem for field horsetail were different. Therefore, other plants, leaf and stem for Japanese knotweed (Fallopia japonica (Houtt.) Ronse Decr.) and Canada goldenrod (Solidago canadensis L.), and leaf blade and petiole for gingko (Ginkgo biloba L.) and Someiyoshino cherry (Cerasus × yedoensis (Matsum.) A.V.Vassil. 'Somei-yoshino') were collected from the same sampling field and their (137)Cs and (40)K concentrations were compared to those in the giant butterbur and field horsetail parts. For (137)Cs, concentrations in leaf blade and leaf parts were 1.1-6.0 times higher than those in petiole and stem parts for all six plants. On the other hand, (40)K concentrations in leaf blade and leaf parts were 0.40-0.97 of those observed in petiole and stem parts. Discrimination ratios of (40)K/(137)Cs of leaf blade to petiole or leaf to stem were then calculated and they ranged from 0.09 to 0.57. These results suggested that Cs and K did not behave similarly in these plants. Thus, to understand the radiocesium fate in plants, K measurement results should not be used as an analog for Cs behavior although Cs is known to have a similar chemical reactivity to that of K. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor enhances the modulatory effect of cytokines on monocyte-derived multinucleated giant cell formation and fungicidal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Paula Pereira do Nascimento

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleated giant cells (MGC are cells present in characteristic granulomatous inflammation induced by intracellular infectious agents or foreign materials. The present study evaluated the modulatory effect of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF in association with other cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL-10 or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1 on the formation of MGC from human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen (PbAg. The generation of MGC was determined by fusion index (FI and the fungicidal activity of these cells was evaluated after 4 h of MGC co-cultured with viable yeast cells of P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18. The results showed that monocytes incubated with PbAg and GM-CSF plus IFN-γ had a significantly higher FI than in all the other cultures, while the addition of IL-10 or TGF-β1 had a suppressive effect on MGC generation. Monocytes incubated with both pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines had a higher induction of foreign body-type MGC rather than Langhans-type MGC. MGC stimulated with PbAg and GM-CSF in association with the other cytokines had increased fungicidal activity and the presence of GM-CSF also partially inhibited the suppressive effects of IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these results suggest that GM-CSF is a positive modulator of PbAg-stimulated MGC generation and on the fungicidal activity against Pb18.

  8. Phonon-assisted hopping of an electron on a Wannier-Stark ladder in a strong electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.; Hart, C.F.

    1987-01-01

    With the application of a spatially constant electric field, the degeneracy of electronic energy levels of geometrically equivalent sites of a crystal is generally lifted. As a result, the electric field causes the electronic eigenstates of a one-dimensional periodic chain to become localized. In particular, they are Wannier-Stark states. With sufficiently large electric-field strengths these states become sufficiently well localized that it becomes appropriate to consider electronic transport to occur via a succession of phonon-assisted hops between the localized Wannier-Stark states. In this paper, we present calculations of the drift velocity arising from acoustic- and optical-phonon-assisted hopping motion between Wannier-Stark states. When the intersite electronic transfer energy is sufficiently small so that the Wannier-Stark states are essentially each confined to a single atomic site, the transport reduces to that of a small polaron. In this regime, while the drift velocity initially rises with increasing electric field strength, the drift velocity ultimately falls with increasing electric-field strength at extremely large electric fields. More generally, for common values of the electronic bandwidth and electric field strength, the Wannier-Stark states span many sites. At sufficiently large electric fields, the energy separation between Wannier-Stark states exceeds the energy uncertainty associated with the carrier's interaction with phonons. Then, it is appropriate to treat the electronic transport in terms of phonon-assisted hopping between Wannier-Stark states. The resulting high-field drift velocity falls with increasing field strength in a series of steps. Thus, we find a structured negative differential mobility at large electric fields

  9. Comparison of three Stark problem solution techniques for the bounded case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatten, Noble; Russell, Ryan P.

    2015-01-01

    Three methods of obtaining solutions to the Stark problem—one developed by Lantoine and Russell using Jacobi elliptic and related functions, one developed by Biscani and Izzo using Weierstrass elliptic and related functions, and one developed by Pellegrini, Russell, and Vittaldev using and Taylor series extended to the Stark problem—are compared qualitatively and quantitatively for the bounded motion case. For consistency with existing available code for the series solution, Fortran routines of the Lantoine method and Biscani method are newly implemented and made available. For these implementations, the Lantoine formulation is found to be more efficient than the Biscani formulation in the propagation of a single trajectory segment. However, for applications for which acceptable accuracy may be achieved by orders up to 16, the Pellegrini series solution is shown to be more efficient than either analytical method. The three methods are also compared in the propagation of sequentially connected trajectory segments in a low-thrust orbital transfer maneuver. Separate tests are conducted for discretizations between 8 and 96 segments per orbit. For the series solution, the interaction between order and step size leads to computation times that are nearly invariable to discretization for a given truncation error tolerance over the tested range of discretizations. This finding makes the series solution particularly attractive for mission design applications where problems may require both coarse and fine discretizations. Example applications include the modeling of low-thrust propulsion and time-varying perturbations—problems for which the efficient propagation of relatively short Stark segments is paramount because the disturbing acceleration generally varies continuously.

  10. ac Stark shift and dephasing of a superconducting qubit strongly coupled to a cavity field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, D I; Wallraff, A; Blais, A; Frunzio, L; Huang, R-S; Majer, J; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2005-04-01

    We have performed spectroscopy of a superconducting charge qubit coupled nonresonantly to a single mode of an on-chip resonator. The strong coupling induces a large ac Stark shift in the energy levels of both the qubit and the resonator. The dispersive shift of the resonator frequency is used to nondestructively determine the qubit state. Photon shot noise in the measurement field induces qubit level fluctuations leading to dephasing which is characteristic for the measurement backaction. A crossover in line shape with measurement power is observed and theoretically explained. For weak measurement a long intrinsic dephasing time of T2>200 ns of the qubit is found.

  11. Extremely short pulses via stark modulation of the atomic transition frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radeonychev, Y V; Polovinkin, V A; Kocharovskaya, Olga

    2010-10-29

    We propose a universal method to produce extremely short pulses of electromagnetic radiation in various spectral ranges. The essence of the method is a resonant interaction of radiation with atoms under the conditions of adiabatic periodic modulation of atomic transition frequencies by a far-off-resonant control laser field via dynamic Stark shift of the atomic levels and proper adjustment of the control field intensity and frequency, as well as the optical depth of the medium. The potential of the method is illustrated by an example in a hydrogenlike atomic system.

  12. Effect of vanadate on glucose transporter (GLUT4) intrinsic activity in skeletal muscle plasma membrane giant vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, S; Youn, J; Richter, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Maximally effective concentrations of vanadate (a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor) increase glucose transport in muscle less than maximal insulin stimulation. This might be due to vanadate-induced decreased intrinsic activity of GLUT4 accompanying GLUT4 translocation. Thus, the effect of va...

  13. Giant osteoblastoma of temporal bone: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FIGUEIREDO EBERVAL GADELHA

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign osteoblastoma is an uncommon bone tumor accounting for approximately 1% of all bone tumors. There are only 35 cases of skull osteoblastoma reported in the literature. We describe the case of a 23 year old male with a giant osteoblastoma of temporal bone submitted to a total removal of the tumor after an effective embolization of all external carotid branches. The authors discuss diagnostic and management aspects of this uncommon skull tumor.

  14. Recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn S. King

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast masses in children, though rare, present a difficult clinical challenge as they can represent a wide variety of entities from benign fibroadenomas to phyllodes tumors. Rapidly growing or recurrent masses can be particularly concerning to patients, families and physicians alike. Clinical examination and conventional imaging modalities are not efficacious in distinguishing between different tumor types and surgical excision is often recommended for both final diagnosis and for treatment of large or rapidly growing masses. While surgical excision can result in significant long-term deformity of the breast there are some surgical techniques that can be used to limit deformity and/or aid in future reconstruction. Here we present a case of recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenoma with a review of the clinical presentation, diagnostic tools and treatment options.

  15. A giant testicular teratoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangana, Abdulqadir M.; Razak, Awodan B.

    2007-01-01

    We report a giant testicular in a 36-year-old farmer man, of 18-month duration admitted to the Surgical Department Erbil Teaching Hospital, Iraq. The tumor was invading the penis and lower part of abdominal wall including bilateral groin lymph nodes. Histological examination revealed mature and immature teratoma. Further investigations showed no evidence of any metastatic lesions apart from a solitary pulmonary nodule on the right side of the chest which proved by ultra sonic guide fine needle aspiration biopsy. Radical excisions of the tumor including the shaft of the penis, combined with bilateral block dissection of the inguinal nodes and resection of the lower anterior abdominal wall was performed. Six weeks later after a course of chemotherapy and radiotherapy, the patient underwent resection of metastatic lung lesion. (author)

  16. Ecological Effects of the Invasive Giant Madagascar Day Gecko on Endemic Mauritian Geckos: Applications of Binomial-Mixture and Species Distribution Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buckland, S.; Cole, N.C.; Aguirre-Gutiérrez, J.; Gallagher, L.E.; Henshaw, S.M.; Besnard, A.; Tucker, R.M.; Bachraz, V.; Ruhomaun, K.; Harris, S.

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of the giant Madagascar day gecko Phelsuma grandis has increased the threats to the four endemic Mauritian day geckos (Phelsuma spp.) that have survived on mainland Mauritius. We had two main aims: (i) to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos

  17. Stark broadening in the laser-induced Cu I and Cu II spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skočić, M; Burger, M; Nikolić, Z; Bukvić, S; Djeniže, S

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present the Stark widths (W) of 22 neutral (Cu I) and 100 singly ionized (Cu II) copper spectral lines that have been measured at 18 400 K and 19 300 K electron temperatures and 6.3 × 10  22 m −3 and 2.1 × 10  23 m −3 electron densities, respectively. The experiment is conducted in the laser-induced plasma—the Nd:YAG laser, operating at 532 nm, was used to produce plasma from the copper sample in the residual air atmosphere at a pressure of 8 Pa. The electron temperature and density were estimated by the Boltzmann-plot method and from the Saha equation. The investigated Cu I lines belong to the 4s–4p′, 4s  2 –4p″ and 4p′–4d′ transitions while Cu II spectral lines belong to the 4s–4p, 4p–5s, 4p–4d, 4p–4s  2 , 4d–4f and 4d–v transitions. Comparison with existing experimental data was possible only in the case of 17 Cu II lines due to a lack of experimental and theoretical values. The rest of the data, Stark widths of 22 Cu I and 83 Cu II lines are published for the first time. (paper)

  18. Plasma density characterization at SPARC-LAB through Stark broadening of Hydrogen spectral lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, F., E-mail: francesco.filippi@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria (SBAI), ‘Sapienza’ Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Roma (Italy); Anania, M.P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Biagioni, A.; Chiadroni, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Cianchi, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universitá di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria (SBAI), ‘Sapienza’ Università di Roma, Via A. Scarpa 14-16, 00161 Roma (Italy); INFN-Roma1, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 2 00161 Roma (Italy); Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, INFN, Via E. Fermi, Frascati (Italy); Zigler, A. [Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2016-09-01

    Plasma-based acceleration techniques are of great interest for future, compact accelerators due to their high accelerating gradient. Both particle-driven and laser-driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration experiments are foreseen at the SPARC-LAB Test Facility (INFN National Laboratories of Frascati, Italy), with the aim to accelerate high-brightness electron beams. In order to optimize the efficiency of the acceleration in the plasma and preserve the quality of the accelerated beam, the knowledge of the plasma electron density is mandatory. The Stark broadening of the Hydrogen spectral lines is one of the candidates used to characterize plasma density. The implementation of this diagnostic for plasma-based experiments at SPARC-LAB is presented. - Highlights: • Stark broadening of Hydrogen lines has been measured to determine plasma density. • Plasma density diagnostic tool for plasma-based experiments at SPARC-LAB is presented. • Plasma density in tapered laser triggered ablative capillary discharge was measured. • Results of plasma density measurements in ablative capillaries are shown.

  19. EFFECT OF METALLICITY ON THE EVOLUTION OF THE HABITABLE ZONE FROM THE PRE-MAIN SEQUENCE TO THE ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH AND THE SEARCH FOR LIFE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danchi, William C.; Lopez, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    During the course of stellar evolution, the location and width of the habitable zone changes as the luminosity and radius of the star evolves. The duration of habitability for a planet located at a given distance from a star is greatly affected by the characteristics of the host star. A quantification of these effects can be used observationally in the search for life around nearby stars. The longer the duration of habitability, the more likely it is that life has evolved. The preparation of observational techniques aimed at detecting life would benefit from the scientific requirements deduced from the evolution of the habitable zone. We present a study of the evolution of the habitable zone around stars of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 M ☉ for metallicities ranging from Z = 0.0001 to Z = 0.070. We also consider the evolution of the habitable zone from the pre-main sequence until the asymptotic giant branch is reached. We find that metallicity strongly affects the duration of the habitable zone for a planet as well as the distance from the host star where the duration is maximized. For a 1.0 M ☉ star with near solar metallicity, Z = 0.017, the duration of the habitable zone is >10 Gyr at distances 1.2-2.0 AU from the star, whereas the duration is >20 Gyr for high-metallicity stars (Z = 0.070) at distances of 0.7-1.8 AU, and ∼4 Gyr at distances of 1.8-3.3 AU for low-metallicity stars (Z = 0.0001). Corresponding results have been obtained for stars of 1.5 and 2.0 solar masses.

  20. Ecological effects of the invasive giant madagascar day gecko on endemic mauritian geckos: applications of binomial-mixture and species distribution models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steeves Buckland

    Full Text Available The invasion of the giant Madagascar day gecko Phelsuma grandis has increased the threats to the four endemic Mauritian day geckos (Phelsuma spp. that have survived on mainland Mauritius. We had two main aims: (i to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos at a landscape level; and (ii to investigate the effects of P. grandis on the abundance and risks of extinction of the endemic geckos at a local scale. An ensemble forecasting approach was used to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos. We used hierarchical binomial mixture models and repeated visual estimate surveys to calculate the abundance of the endemic geckos in sites with and without P. grandis. The predicted range of each species varied from 85 km2 to 376 km2. Sixty percent of the predicted range of P. grandis overlapped with the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos; 15% of the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos overlapped with P. grandis. Levin's niche breadth varied from 0.140 to 0.652 between P. grandis and the four endemic geckos. The abundance of endemic geckos was 89% lower in sites with P. grandis compared to sites without P. grandis, and the endemic geckos had been extirpated at four of ten sites we surveyed with P. grandis. Species Distribution Modelling, together with the breadth metrics, predicted that P. grandis can partly share the equivalent niche with endemic species and survive in a range of environmental conditions. We provide strong evidence that smaller endemic geckos are unlikely to survive in sympatry with P. grandis. This is a cause of concern in both Mauritius and other countries with endemic species of Phelsuma.

  1. Ecological effects of the invasive giant madagascar day gecko on endemic mauritian geckos: applications of binomial-mixture and species distribution models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Steeves; Cole, Nik C; Aguirre-Gutiérrez, Jesús; Gallagher, Laura E; Henshaw, Sion M; Besnard, Aurélien; Tucker, Rachel M; Bachraz, Vishnu; Ruhomaun, Kevin; Harris, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of the giant Madagascar day gecko Phelsuma grandis has increased the threats to the four endemic Mauritian day geckos (Phelsuma spp.) that have survived on mainland Mauritius. We had two main aims: (i) to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos at a landscape level; and (ii) to investigate the effects of P. grandis on the abundance and risks of extinction of the endemic geckos at a local scale. An ensemble forecasting approach was used to predict the spatial distribution and overlap of P. grandis and the endemic geckos. We used hierarchical binomial mixture models and repeated visual estimate surveys to calculate the abundance of the endemic geckos in sites with and without P. grandis. The predicted range of each species varied from 85 km2 to 376 km2. Sixty percent of the predicted range of P. grandis overlapped with the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos; 15% of the combined predicted ranges of the four endemic geckos overlapped with P. grandis. Levin's niche breadth varied from 0.140 to 0.652 between P. grandis and the four endemic geckos. The abundance of endemic geckos was 89% lower in sites with P. grandis compared to sites without P. grandis, and the endemic geckos had been extirpated at four of ten sites we surveyed with P. grandis. Species Distribution Modelling, together with the breadth metrics, predicted that P. grandis can partly share the equivalent niche with endemic species and survive in a range of environmental conditions. We provide strong evidence that smaller endemic geckos are unlikely to survive in sympatry with P. grandis. This is a cause of concern in both Mauritius and other countries with endemic species of Phelsuma.

  2. Effect of interface intermixing on giant magnetoresistance in NiFe/Cu and Co/NiFe/Co/Cu multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagamine, L.C.C.M.; Biondo, A.; Pereira, L.G.; Mello, A.; Schmidt, J.E.; Chimendes, T.W.; Cunha, J.B.M.; Saitovitch, E.B.

    2003-01-01

    This article reports on the important influence of the spontaneously built-in paramagnetic interfacial layers on the magnetic and magnetoresistive properties of NiFe/Cu and Co/NiFe/Co/Cu multilayers grown by magnetron sputtering. A computational simulation, based on a semiclassical model, has been used to reproduce the variations of the resistivity and of the magnetoresistance (MR) amplitude with the thickness of the NiFe, Cu, and Co layers. We showed that the compositionally intermixed layers at NiFe/Cu interfaces, which are paramagnetic, reduce the flow of polarized electrons and produce a masking on the estimated mean-free path of both types of electrons due to the reduction of their effective values, mainly for small NiFe thickness. Moreover, the transmission coefficients for the electrons decrease when Fe buffer layers are replaced by NiFe ones. This result is interpreted in terms of the variations of the interfacial intermixing and roughness at the interfaces, leading to an increase of the paramagnetic interfacial layer thickness. The effect provoked by Co deposition at the NiFe 16 A/Cu interfaces has also been investigated. The maximum of the MR amplitudes was found at 5 A of Co, resulting in the quadruplication of the MR amplitude. This result is partially attributed to the interfacial spin-dependent scattering due to the increase of the magnetic order at interfaces. Another effect observed here was the increase of the spin-dependent scattering events in the bulk NiFe due to a larger effective NiFe thickness, since the paramagnetic interfacial layer thickness is decreased

  3. Physiological and morphological effects of high water tables on early growth of giant reed (Arundo donax), elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum), energycane and sugarcane (Saccharum spp.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennewein, Stephen Peter [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Here, an increasing demand for renewable energy sources has spurred interest in high-biomass crops used for energy production. Species potentially well-suited for biofuel production in the seasonally wet organic Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA) of Florida include giant reed (Arundo donax), elephant grass (Pennisetum Purpureum), energycane (Saccharum spp.), and sugarcane (Saccharum spp.). The objectives in this study were to evaluate the role of fluctuating water tables on the morphology, physiology, and early season growth of these four genotypes. The candidate genotypes were grown in a greenhouse under three water table depths, defined by distance of the water table from the soil surface: two constant water tables (-16 cm and -40 cm) along with a flood cycle (2 weeks of flood to the soil level followed by 2 weeks at -40 cm from the soil level). The genotypes included CP 89-2143 (sugarcane), L 79-1002 (energycane), Merkeron (elephant grass), and wild type (giant reed). The experiment was repeated for plant cane, first ratoon, and successive plant cane crop cycles. Reductions in dry matter yield were observed among genotypes subjected to the -40 cm drained, periodically flooded (40F) water table relative to the -40 cm constant (40C) or -16 cm constant (16C). Plant cane dry weights were reduced by 37% in giant reed, 52% in elephant grass, 42% in energycane, and 34% in sugarcane in the 40F compared to 40C water table treatments. Similarly, in the first ratoon crop dry weights were reduced by 29% in giant reed, 42% in elephant grass, 27% in energycane, and 62% in sugarcane. In plant cane and successive plant cane, average total dry weight was greatest for elephant grass whereas ratoon total dry weight was greatest for energycane. Genotype had more pronounced effects on physiological attributes than water table including the highest stomatal conductance and SPAD values in giant reed, and the highest stalk populations in elephant grass and

  4. Surface Acoustic Bloch Oscillations, the Wannier-Stark Ladder, and Landau-Zener Tunneling in a Solid

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, M. M., Jr.; Kosevich, Yu. A.; Santos, P. V.; Cantarero, A.

    2010-04-01

    We present the experimental observation of Bloch oscillations, the Wannier-Stark ladder, and Landau-Zener tunneling of surface acoustic waves in perturbed grating structures on a solid substrate. A model providing a quantitative description of our experimental observations, including multiple Landau-Zener transitions of the anticrossed surface acoustic Wannier-Stark states, is developed. The use of a planar geometry for the realization of the Bloch oscillations and Landau-Zener tunneling allows a direct access to the elastic field distribution. The vertical surface displacement has been measured by interferometry.

  5. POP Experiment of Laser Stripping via a Broad Stark State Using BNL 200MeV H- Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, I.; Mimashi, T.; Nakayama, H.; Suzuki, T.; Takayama, K.; Tawada, M.; Satoh, K.; Raparia, D.; Alessi, J.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Cameron, P.; Connoly, R.; Hershcovitch, A.; Lee, Y.Y.; LoDestro, V.; Ritter, J.; Wei, J.

    2005-01-01

    Present status of the project of the POP (proof of principle) experiment of laser stripping using BNL 200MeV H- is presented. First, the principle of the laser stripping via a broad Stark state and the role of the broad Stark state are introduced. Then, the scheme of the POP experiment using 200MeV H- is given. Then, the concrete plan of experimental setup in the REF beam line of the BNL 200MeV H- Linac and present status of construction are given

  6. Steroid-sparing effect and toxicity of dapsone treatment in giant cell arteritis: A single-center, retrospective study of 70 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Kim Heang; Dalmay, François; Gondran, Guillaume; Palat, Sylvain; Bezanahary, Holy; Cypierre, Anne; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Liozon, Eric

    2016-10-01

    Although a glucocorticoid (GC)-sparing strategy is needed for patients with giant cell arteritis (GCA) suffering from refractory disease or serious treatment-related complications, evidence of efficacy in this setting of immunosuppressive drugs and biotherapies is lacking. Herein, we evaluated the GC-sparing effects and tolerability of addition of dapsone (DDS) to prednisone therapy in patients with GCA. We retrospectively assessed data on 18 GCA patients who received DDS as a first-line treatment (DDS-1 group) and 52 patients who received it as a second- or third-line treatment for refractory GCA, with or without excessive GC-related toxicity (DDS-2 group). Of these 70 patients, 63 belonged to an inception cohort of 478 patients, whereas the remaining 7 were referred to our department for resistant GCA. In all, 52 patients were assessable for DDS efficacy. The baseline characteristics of the DDS-1 patients were similar to those of 395 GCA patients (control group) who received prednisone alone. DDS-1 patients had a more sustained decrease in GC dose with a lower mean prednisone dose at 12 months, and they comprised higher proportions who achieved GC withdrawal within the first year, who stopped prednisone treatment, and who recovered from GCA (P < 0.001 for each variable). Patients in the DDS-2 group achieved a mean rate of prednisone reduction of 65% and a prednisone dose reduction of 16.9 ± 13.3 mg/d. The monthly decreases in the prednisone dose were 2.4 and 1.25 mg in DDS-1 and DDS-2 patients, respectively. DDS-induced side effects were recorded in 44 (64%) assessable patients. These side effects led to lowering of the DDS dose by 25 mg/d in 11 (16%) patients and permanent cessation of DDS in 14 patients (20%), due to allergic skin rash in 7, agranulocytosis in 2, icteric hepatitis in 2, and excessive hemolysis in 2 patients. DDS is a potent GC-sparing agent in GCA that should be evaluated in prospective studies. However, DDS use should be

  7. A microscopic model beyond mean-fields: from giant resonances properties to the fit of new effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenna, M.; Colo, G.; Roca-Maza, X.; Bortignon, P.F.; Moghrabi, K.; Grasso, M.

    2014-01-01

    A completely microscopic beyond mean-field approach has been elaborated to overcome some intrinsic limitations of self-consistent mean-field schemes applied to nuclear systems, such as the incapability to produce some properties of single-particle states (e.g. spectroscopic factors), as well as of collective states (e.g. their damping width and their gamma decay to the ground state or to low lying states). Since commonly used effective interactions are fitted at the mean-field level, one should aim at refitting them including the desired beyond mean-field contributions in the refitting procedure. If zero-range interactions are used, divergences arise. We present some steps towards the refitting of Skyrme interactions, for its application in finite nuclei. (authors)

  8. A microscopic model beyond mean-field: from giant resonance properties to the fit of new effective interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenna, M; Colò, G; Roca-Maza, X; Bortignon, P F; Moghrabi, K; Grasso, M

    2014-01-01

    Self-consistent mean-field models are able to reproduce well the overall properties of nuclei for a wide range of masses. Nevertheless, they are intrinsically unsuitable for the description of some important observables like the single-particle strength distribution or, in connection with collective states, their damping width and their gamma decay to the ground state or to low lying states. For this reason, a completely microscopic approach beyond mean- field has been implemented recently, based on the Skyrme functional. When beyond mean-field theories are handled, the mean-field-fitted effective interaction should be refitted at the desired level of approximation. If zero-range interactions are used, divergences arise. We present some steps towards the refitting of Skyrme interactions, for its application in finite nuclei.

  9. Effect of nonylphenol on giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) via oral treatment: toxicity and messenger RNA expression of hemocyte genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Hung-Hung; Ye, Yu-Zhi

    2009-02-19

    A previous in vitro study has indicated that two alkylphenol ethoxylates (APEs) could potentially damage hemocytes and influence cellular immunity of prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of nonylphenol (NP) on susceptibility to a pathogen and on the mRNA expression of hemocyte genes, including four immune-related genes. NP at different concentrations was fed continuously to prawn (M. rosenbergii) for 1, 3, 6, and 9 days. Challenging prawns with Lactobacillus garvieae resulted in 44-50%, 20-24% and 10-12% mortality were detected after prawns were fed with 100, 10 and 1microNP/prawn for 6 days, respectively. In comparison with control prawns fed with phosphate-buffered solution (PBS), the increase of mRNA levels of four immune-related genes, alpha-2 microglobulin (alpha-2m), antimicrobial peptides (amp), peroxinectin (pon), and prophenoloxidase (propo), was detected on days 1, 3 and 6 after feeding with 100microg/prawn; on day 9, only the mRNA level of amp of the NP-treated group was significantly increased, while that of the remaining groups was not different from that of the control. In addition, two other hemocyte genes were also studied, including a respiration-related gene, cytochrome oxidase subunit (cos), and an unknown gene, L12X3. The mRNA level of cos was elevated during the experimental period, but an increase of L12X3 expression was detected only on day 1 after treatment. Regarding sensitivity of these genes to NP, the results from NP-treated prawns on day 1 after treatment revealed (1) that mRNA expression of the six genes in the 100-microg-NP-treated group was significantly different from that of control group, (2) that the mRNA levels of three immune-related genes (amp, pon and propo) in 10-microg-treated group were significantly higher than that of control group, and (3) that a significant change of propo was detected in 1-microg-treated group. These results suggest that NP may enhance the immune

  10. Effect of cryoprotectants and cooling rates on fertility potential of sperm in the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentina Claudet, P; Narasimman, Selvakumar; Natesan, Munuswamy

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluates freezing protocol with suitable cryoprotectants and their effects on the fertility potential of sperm in the cryopreserved spermatophores of Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Spermatophores, collected using electroejaculation, were suspended in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG), methanol, glycerol and ethylene glycol (EG) at different concentrations (10, 15 & 20% v/v), prepared in sterile-filtered pond water. Based on the cryoprotectant toxicity assay, DMSO and PG were used individually as well as in combination with three freezing protocols (i.e. -1.5, -3 and -5°C/min and to final temperature of -39°C) and plunged into liquid nitrogen at -196°C. After 90 days of storage (-196°C) thawing was done at 35°C in a water bath for 1min. Results showed that fresh and cryopreserved spermatophores held for 90 days registered sperm viability of 91.4±2.9% and 50.4±1.9% respectively. Further, fertility potential of sperm was assessed based on acrosome reactivity using calcium ionophore (A23187). Observations indicated that cryopreserved sperm registered 28.3±2.2% of acrosome reactivity compared to freshly collected spermatophores (85.3±2.5%). Thus, one-step slow cooling rate of -1.5°C/min between 27°C and -39°C stored in liquid nitrogen at -196°C with DMSO (10%)+PG (10%) seems to be amenable for cryopreservation of spermatophores, compared to other cooling rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation in maturation diet on female reproductive performance and larval quality of giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangpanich, Chanpim; Pratoomyot, Jarunan; Siranonthana, Nisa; Senanan, Wansuk

    2016-01-01

    The giant river prawn ( Macrobrachium rosenbergii ) is one of the most farmed freshwater crustaceans in the world. Its global production has been stalling in the past decade due to the inconsistent quality of broodstock and hatchery-produced seeds. A better understanding of the role of nutrition in maturation diets will help overcome some of the production challenges. Arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6, ARA) is a fatty acid precursor of signaling molecules important for crustacean reproduction, prostaglandins E and F of the series II (PGE2 and PGF2 α ), and is often lacking in maturation diets of shrimp and prawns. We examined the effects of ARA in a combination of different fish oil (FO) and soybean oil (SO) blends on females' reproductive performance and larval quality. Adult females (15.22 ± 0.13 g and 11.12 ± 0.09 cm) were fed six isonitrogenous and isolipidic diets containing one of two different base compositions (A or B), supplemented with one of three levels of Mortierella alpine -derived ARA (containing 40% active ARA): 0, 1 or 2% by ingredient weight. The two base diets differed in the percentages of (FO and SO with diet A containing 2% SO and 2% FO and diet B containing 2.5% SO and 1.5% FO, resulting in differences in proportional contents of dietary linoleic acid (18:2n-6, LOA) and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA)). After the eight-week experiment, prawns fed diet B with 1 and 2% ARA supplement (B1 and B2) exhibited the highest gonadosomatic index (GSI), hepatosomatic index (HSI), egg clutch weight, fecundity, hatching rate, number of larvae, and reproductive effort compared to those fed other diets ( p  ≤ 0.05). Larvae from these two dietary treatments also had higher tolerance to low salinity (2 ppt). The maturation period was not significantly different among most treatments ( p  ≥ 0.05). ARA supplementation, regardless of the base diet, significantly improved GSI, HSI, egg clutch weight and fecundity. However, the diets with an enhanced ARA

  12. Effects of arachidonic acid supplementation in maturation diet on female reproductive performance and larval quality of giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanpim Kangpanich

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The giant river prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii is one of the most farmed freshwater crustaceans in the world. Its global production has been stalling in the past decade due to the inconsistent quality of broodstock and hatchery-produced seeds. A better understanding of the role of nutrition in maturation diets will help overcome some of the production challenges. Arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6, ARA is a fatty acid precursor of signaling molecules important for crustacean reproduction, prostaglandins E and F of the series II (PGE2 and PGF2α, and is often lacking in maturation diets of shrimp and prawns. We examined the effects of ARA in a combination of different fish oil (FO and soybean oil (SO blends on females’ reproductive performance and larval quality. Adult females (15.22 ± 0.13 g and 11.12 ± 0.09 cm were fed six isonitrogenous and isolipidic diets containing one of two different base compositions (A or B, supplemented with one of three levels of Mortierella alpine-derived ARA (containing 40% active ARA: 0, 1 or 2% by ingredient weight. The two base diets differed in the percentages of (FO and SO with diet A containing 2% SO and 2% FO and diet B containing 2.5% SO and 1.5% FO, resulting in differences in proportional contents of dietary linoleic acid (18:2n-6, LOA and docosahexaenoic acid (22:6n-3, DHA. After the eight-week experiment, prawns fed diet B with 1 and 2% ARA supplement (B1 and B2 exhibited the highest gonadosomatic index (GSI, hepatosomatic index (HSI, egg clutch weight, fecundity, hatching rate, number of larvae, and reproductive effort compared to those fed other diets (p ≤ 0.05. Larvae from these two dietary treatments also had higher tolerance to low salinity (2 ppt. The maturation period was not significantly different among most treatments (p ≥ 0.05. ARA supplementation, regardless of the base diet, significantly improved GSI, HSI, egg clutch weight and fecundity. However, the diets with an enhanced ARA and

  13. Giant high occipital encephalocele

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Amit

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Encephaloceles are rare embryological mesenchymal developmental anomalies resulting from inappropriate ossification in skull through with herniation of intracranial contents of the sac. Encephaloceles are classified based on location of the osseous defect and contents of sac. Convexity encephalocele with osseous defect in occipital bone is called occipital encephalocele. Giant occipital encephaloceles can be sometimes larger than the size of baby skull itself and they pose a great surgical challenge. Occipital encephaloceles (OE are further classified as high OE when defect is only in occipital bone above the foramen magnum, low OE when involving occipital bone and foramen magnum and occipito-cervical when there involvement of occipital bone, foramen magnum and posterior upper neural arches. Chiari III malformation can be associated with high or low occipital encephaloceles. Pre-operatively, it is essential to know the size of the sac, contents of the sac, relation to the adjacent structures, presence or absence of venous sinuses/vascular structures and osseous defect size. Sometimes it becomes imperative to perform both CT and MRI for the necessary information. Volume rendered CT images can depict the relation of osseous defect to foramen magnum and provide information about upper neural arches which is necessary in classifying these lesions.

  14. Bringing Low the Giants

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Their work goes on unseen, because they a hundred metres beneath your feet. But while the race against the clock to build the LHC has begun on the surface, teams underground are feverishly engaged to dismantle LEP and its experiments. Four months after the start of dismantling, the technical coordinators of the different experiments discuss the progress of work. Little men attack the giant ALEPH. The barrel and its two endcaps have been removed to the end of the cavern and stripped of their cables. The breaking up of the detector can now begin. At ALEPH, counting rooms removed all in one go Jean-Paul Fabre, technical coordinator at ALEPH:'After making safe the structure, the first step was to remove the wiring and cables. Some 210 cubic metres were brought out. Then the counting rooms all round the detector were taken out. They were brought up from the cavern all in one go, up through the shaft, which is 10 metres wide and 150 metres deep. They made it with 15 centimetres to spare. They have been emptied of...

  15. Giant necrotic pituitary apoplexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanous, Andrew A; Quigley, Edward P; Chin, Steven S; Couldwell, William T

    2013-10-01

    Apoplexy of the pituitary gland is a rare complication of pituitary adenomas, involving hemorrhage with or without necrosis within the tumor. This condition may be either asymptomatic or may present with severe headache, visual impairment, ophthalmoplegia, and pituitary failure. Transsphenoidal surgery is the treatment of choice, and early intervention is usually required to ensure reversal of visual impairment. Reports of pituitary apoplectic lesions exceeding 60.0mm in diameter are very rare. A 39-year-old man with long-standing history of nasal congestion, decreased libido and infertility presented with a sudden onset of severe headache and diplopia. MRI of the head demonstrated a massive skull base lesion of 70.0 × 60.0 × 25.0mm, compatible with a giant pituitary macroadenoma. The lesion failed to enhance after administration of a contrast agent, suggesting complete necrotic apoplexy. Urgent surgical decompression was performed, and the lesion was resected via a transnasal transsphenoidal approach. Pathological analysis revealed evidence of necrotic pituitary apoplexy. At the 2 month follow-up, the patient had near-complete to complete resolution of his visual impairment. To the authors' knowledge, this report is unique as the patient demonstrated complete necrotic apoplexy and it underlines the diagnostic dilemma in such a case. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Docetaxel-Loaded Nanoparticles Assembled from β-Cyclodextrin/Calixarene Giant Surfactants: Physicochemical Properties and Cytotoxic Effect in Prostate Cancer and Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gallego-Yerga

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Giant amphiphiles encompassing a hydrophilic β-cyclodextrin (βCD component and a hydrophobic calix[4]arene (CA4 module undergo self-assembly in aqueous media to afford core-shell nanospheres or nanocapsules, depending on the nanoprecipitation protocol, with high docetaxel (DTX loading capacity. The blank and loaded nanoparticles have been fully characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS, ζ-potential measurements and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM. The data are compatible with the distribution of the drug between the nanoparticle core and the shell, where it is probably anchored by inclusion of the DTX aromatic moieties in βCD cavities. Indeed, the release kinetics profiles evidenced an initial fast release of the drug, which likely accounts for the fraction hosted on the surface, followed by a slow and sustained release rate, corresponding to diffusion of DTX in the core, which can be finely tuned by modification of the giant amphiphile chemical structure. The ability of the docetaxel-loaded nanoparticles to induce cellular death in different prostate (human LnCap and PC3 and glioblastoma (human U87 and rat C6 cells was also explored. Giant amphiphile-based DTX formulations surpassing or matching the antitumoral activity of the free DTX formulation were identified in all cases with no need to employ any organic co-solvent, thus overcoming the DTX water solubility problems. Moreover, the presence of the βCD shell at the surface of the assemblies is intended to impart stealth properties against serum proteins while permitting nanoparticle surface decoration by supramolecular approaches, paving the way for a new generation of molecularly well-defined antitumoral drug delivery systems with improved specificity and efficiency. Altogether, the results provide a proof of concept of the suitability of the approach based on βCD-CA4 giant amphiphiles to access DTX carriers with tunable properties.

  17. Formation of the giant planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lissauer, Jack J.

    2006-01-01

    The observed properties of giant planets, models of their evolution and observations of protoplanetary disks provide constraints on the formation of gas giant planets. The four largest planets in our Solar System contain considerable quantities of hydrogen and helium, which could not have condensed into solid planetesimals within the protoplanetary disk. All three (transiting) extrasolar giant planets with well determined masses and radii also must contain substantial amounts of these light gases. Jupiter and Saturn are mostly hydrogen and helium, but have larger abundances of heavier elements than does the Sun. Neptune and Uranus are primarily composed of heavier elements. HD 149026 b, which is slightly more massive than is Saturn, appears to have comparable quantities of light gases and heavy elements. HD 209458 b and TrES-1 are primarily hydrogen and helium, but may contain supersolar abundances of heavy elements. Spacecraft flybys and observations of satellite orbits provide estimates of the gravitational moments of the giant planets in our Solar System, which in turn provide information on the internal distribution of matter within Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Atmospheric thermal structure and heat flow measurements constrain the interior temperatures of planets. Internal processes may cause giant planets to become more compositionally differentiated or alternatively more homogeneous; high-pressure laboratory .experiments provide data useful for modeling these processes. The preponderance of evidence supports the core nucleated gas accretion model. According to this model, giant planets begin their growth by the accumulation of small solid bodies, as do terrestrial planets. However, unlike terrestrial planets, the growing giant planet cores become massive enough that they are able to accumulate substantial amounts of gas before the protoplanetary disk dissipates. The primary questions regarding the core nucleated growth model is under what conditions

  18. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., Io, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  19. The Giant Planet Satellite Exospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Exospheres are relatively common in the outer solar system among the moons of the gas giant planets. They span the range from very tenuous, surface-bounded exospheres (e.g., Rhea, Dione) to quite robust exospheres with exobase above the surface (e.g., lo, Triton), and include many intermediate cases (e.g., Europa, Ganymede, Enceladus). The exospheres of these moons exhibit an interesting variety of sources, from surface sputtering, to frost sublimation, to active plumes, and also well illustrate another common characteristic of the outer planet satellite exospheres, namely, that the primary species often exists both as a gas in atmosphere, and a condensate (frost or ice) on the surface. As described by Yelle et al. (1995) for Triton, "The interchange of matter between gas and solid phases on these bodies has profound effects on the physical state of the surface and the structure of the atmosphere." A brief overview of the exospheres of the outer planet satellites will be presented, including an inter-comparison of these satellites exospheres with each other, and with the exospheres of the Moon and Mercury.

  20. Estimate of the Stark shift by penetrating ions within the nearest perturber approximation for hydrogenlike spectral lines in plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, P.; Oks, E.

    2017-12-01

    Red shifts of spectral lines (hereafter, SL) play an important role in astrophysics. For inferring the relativistic red shifts from the observed red shifts it is required to allow for the Stark shift of SL. In laboratory plasmas, measurements of the Stark shift can supplement measurements of the Stark width and thus enhance plasma diagnostics—specifically the determination of the electron density. In the present paper we describe a new source of the Stark shift of hydrogenlike SL. It originates from configurations where the nearest perturbing ion is within the radiating atom/ion (‘penetrating configurations’). As an example, we compare the results with the experimental shift of the Balmer-alpha SL of He II 1640 A measured in a laboratory plasma by Pittman and Fleurier (1986 Phys. Rev. A 33 1291). We show that the allowance for this new additional red shift leads to a good agreement with the measured shift for the entire range of the electron density employed in that experiment, while without this new shift the previously known shifts underestimated the measured shift by factors between two and five.

  1. Formation of giant planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perri, F.

    1975-01-01

    When a planetary core composed of condensed matter is accumulated in the primitive solar nebula, the gas of the nebula becomes gravitationally concentrated as an envelope surrounding the planetary core. Models of such gaseous envelopes have been constructed subject to the assumption that the gas everywhere is on the same adiabat as that in the surrounding nebula. The gaseous envelope extends from the surface of the core to the distance at which the gravitational attraction of core plus envelope becomes equal to the gradient of the gravitational potential in the solar nebula; at this point the pressure and temperature of the gas in the envelope are required to attain the background values characteristic of the solar nebula. In general, as the mass of the condensed core increases, increasing amounts of gas became concentrated in the envelope, and these envelopes are stable against hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the core mass then goes through a maximum and starts to decrease. In most of the models tested the envelopes were hydrodynamically unstable beyond the peak in the core mass. An unstable situation was always created if it was insisted that the core mass contain a larger amount of matter than given by these solutions. For an initial adiabat characterized by a temperature of 450 0 K and a pressure of 5 x 10 -6 atmospheres, the maximum core mass at which instability occurs is approximately 115 earth masses. It is concluded that the giant planets obtained their large amounts of hydrogen and helium by a hydrodynamic collapse process in the solar nebula only after the nebula had been subjected to a considerable period of cooling

  2. Landau theory and giant room-temperature barocaloric effect in MF3 metal trifluorides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrales-Salazar, A. [Univ. of Costa Rica, San Jose (Costa Rica); Brierley, R. T. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Littlewood, P. B. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Guzmán-Verri, G. G. [Univ. of Costa Rica, San Jose (Costa Rica); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-10-17

    The structural phase transitions of MF3 (M = Al, Cr, V, Fe, Ti, Sc) metal trifluorides are studied within a simple Landau theory consisting of tilts of rigid MF6 octahedra associated with soft antiferrodistortive optic modes that are coupled to long-wavelength strain generating acoustic phonons. We calculate the temperature and pressure dependence of several quantities such as the spontaneous distortions, volume expansion, and shear strains as well as T - P phase diagrams. By contrasting our model to experiments we quantify the deviations from mean-field behavior and find that the tilt fluctuations of the MF6 octahedra increase with metal cation size. We apply our model to predict giant barocaloric effects in Sc-substituted TiF3 of up to about 15 JK-1 kg-1 for modest hydrostatic compressions of 0.2GPa. The effect extends over a wide temperature range of over 140K (including room temperature) due to a large predicted rate, dTc/dP = 723K GPa-1, which exceeds those of typical barocaloric materials. Our results suggest that open lattice frameworks such as the trifluorides are an attractive platform to search for giant barocaloric effects.

  3. Guiding the Giant

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-01

    New ESO Survey Provides Targets for the VLT Giant astronomical telescopes like the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) must be used efficiently. Observing time is expensive and there are long waiting lines of excellent research programmes. Thus the work at the telescope must be very well prepared and optimized as much as possible - mistakes should be avoided and no time lost! Astronomers working with the new 8-m class optical/infrared telescopes must base their observations on detailed lists of suitable target objects if they want to perform cutting-edge science. This is particularly true for research programmes that depend on observations of large samples of comparatively rare, distant objects. This type of work requires that extensive catalogues of such objects must be prepared in advance. One such major catalogue - that will serve as a very useful basis for future VLT observations - has just become available from the new ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). The Need for Sky Surveys Astronomers have since long recognized the need to carry out preparatory observations with other telescopes in order to "guide" large telescopes. To this end, surveys of smaller or larger parts of the sky have been performed by wide-field telescopes, paving the way for subsequent work at the limits of the largest available ground-based telescopes. For instance, a complete photographic survey of the sourthern sky (declination project is known as the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS). It is supervised by a Working Group with members from the European astronomical community ( [1]) that has been responsible for defining the survey strategy and for monitoring the progress. It has been a major challenge to carry out such a public survey in the very short time available. The work by the EIS Team has involved the survey observations at the NTT, development of a pipeline to process the raw data, advanced data reduction, identification of large samples of astronomically "interesting" targets and, not least, the

  4. Giant lobelias exemplify convergent evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Givnish Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Giant lobeliads on tropical mountains in East Africa and Hawaii have highly unusual, giant-rosette growth forms that appear to be convergent on each other and on those of several independently evolved groups of Asteraceae and other families. A recent phylogenetic analysis by Antonelli, based on sequencing the widest selection of lobeliads to date, raises doubts about this paradigmatic example of convergent evolution. Here I address the kinds of evidence needed to test for convergent evolution and argue that the analysis by Antonelli fails on four points. Antonelli's analysis makes several important contributions to our understanding of lobeliad evolution and geographic spread, but his claim regarding convergence appears to be invalid. Giant lobeliads in Hawaii and Africa represent paradigmatic examples of convergent evolution.

  5. Restricted access Giant kelp, Macrocystis pyrifera, increases faunal diversity through physical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert J.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Lamy, Thomas; Kui, Li; Rassweiler, Andrew; Reed, Daniel C.

    2018-01-01

    Foundation species define the ecosystems they live in, but ecologists have often characterized dominant plants as foundational without supporting evidence. Giant kelp has long been considered a marine foundation species due to its complex structure and high productivity; however, there is little quantitative evidence to evaluate this. Here, we apply structural equation modelling to a 15-year time series of reef community data to evaluate how giant kelp affects the reef community. Although species richness was positively associated with giant kelp biomass, most direct paths did not involve giant kelp. Instead, the foundational qualities of giant kelp were driven mostly by indirect effects attributed to its dominant physical structure and associated engineering influence on the ecosystem, rather than by its use as food by invertebrates and fishes. Giant kelp structure has indirect effects because it shades out understorey algae that compete with sessile invertebrates. When released from competition, sessile species in turn increase the diversity of mobile predators. Sea urchin grazing effects could have been misinterpreted as kelp effects, because sea urchins can overgraze giant kelp, understorey algae and sessile invertebrates alike. Our results confirm the high diversity and biomass associated with kelp forests, but highlight how species interactions and habitat attributes can be misconstrued as direct consequences of a foundation species like giant kelp.

  6. Mapping and modelling the habitat of giant pandas in Foping Nature Reserve, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.

    2001-01-01

    The fact that only about 1000 giant pandas and 29500 km2 of panda habitat are left in the west part of China makes it an urgent issue to save this endangered animal species and protect its habitat. For effective conservation of the giant panda and its habitat, a thorough evaluation of panda habitat

  7. Giant fields in southwest Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-20

    According to Petroleos Mexicanos southeastern Mexico's Isthmus Saline basin holds five new giant fields - Tonala-El Burro, El Plan, Cinco Presidentes, Oraggio, and Magallanes - producing oil and gas from Tertiary sandstones. Numerous normal faults resulting from salt intrusion have given rise to multiple blocks, each with its own reservoir conditions. Previously discovered basins in the area include the Macuspana, which holds three giant gas- and condensate-producing fields: Jose Colomo, Chilapilla, and Hormiquero. The 3100-mi/sup 2/ Campeche marine platform, extending offshore nearby, contains the Cantarell complex, Mexico's most productive hydrocarbon province.

  8. Percolation with multiple giant clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Naim, E; Krapivsky, P L

    2005-01-01

    We study mean-field percolation with freezing. Specifically, we consider cluster formation via two competing processes: irreversible aggregation and freezing. We find that when the freezing rate exceeds a certain threshold, the percolation transition is suppressed. Below this threshold, the system undergoes a series of percolation transitions with multiple giant clusters ('gels') formed. Giant clusters are not self-averaging as their total number and their sizes fluctuate from realization to realization. The size distribution F k , of frozen clusters of size k, has a universal tail, F k ∼ k -3 . We propose freezing as a practical mechanism for controlling the gel size. (letter to the editor)

  9. Giant resonances: reaction theory approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo Piza, A.F.R. de; Foglia, G.A.

    1989-09-01

    The study of giant resonances through the use of reaction theory approach is presented and discussed. Measurements of cross-sections to the many available decay channels following excitation of giant multipole resonances (GMR) led one to view these phenomena as complicated dynamical syndromes so that theoretical requirements for their study must be extended beyond the traditional bounds of nuclear structure models. The spectra of decay products following GMR excitation in heavy nuclei are well described by statistical model (Hauser-Feshback, HF) predictions indicated that spreading of the collective modes plays a major role in shaping exclusive cross-sections. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  10. Awakening a sleeping coal giant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, B.

    2007-08-15

    Botswana, a southern African country that in the 1980s could not economically land a tonne of coal at the closest export terminal and even today mines no more than 1 million tpa, is to increase production to beyond 30 million tpa. A first ever coal conference in Gaborone called it the awakening of a coal giant. The alarm call for the coal giant is the realisation that without more generating capacity than its power utility Eskom can itself build in time, South Africa will in four to five years face a severe shortage of power. 1 ref., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. News Shocks in Open Economies: Evidence from Giant Oil Discoveries

    OpenAIRE

    Rabah Arezki; Valerie A. Ramey; Liugang Sheng

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the effect of news shocks on the current account and other macroeconomic variables using worldwide giant oil discoveries as a directly observable measure of news shocks about future output - the delay between a discovery and production is on average 4 to 6 years. We first present a two-sector small open economy model in order to predict the responses of macroeconomic aggregates to news of an oil discovery. We then estimate the effects of giant oil discoveries on a large pa...

  12. Construction and analysis of a giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) population projection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jonathan P.; Ersan, Julia S. M.; Wylie, Glenn D.; Casazza, Michael L.; Halstead, Brian J.

    2018-03-19

    The giant gartersnake (Thamnophis gigas) is a state and federally threatened species precinctive to California. The range of the giant gartersnake has contracted in the last century because its wetland habitat has been drained for agriculture and development. As a result of this habitat alteration, giant gartersnakes now largely persist in and near rice agriculture in the Sacramento Valley, because the system of canals that conveys water for rice growing approximates historical wetland habitat. Many aspects of the demography of giant gartersnakes are unknown, including how individuals grow throughout their life, how size influences reproduction, and how survival varies over time and among populations. We studied giant gartersnakes throughout the Sacramento Valley of California from 1995 to 2016 using capture-mark-recapture to study the growth, reproduction, and survival of this threatened species. We then use these data to construct an Integral Projection Model, and analyze this demographic model to understand which vital rates contribute most to the growth rate of giant gartersnake populations. We find that giant gartersnakes exhibit indeterminate growth; growth slows as individuals’ age. Fecundity, probability of reproduction, and survival all increase with size, although survival may decline for the largest female giant gartersnakes. The population growth rate of giant gartersnakes is most influenced by the survival and growth of large adult females, and the size at which 1 year old recruits enter the population. Our results indicate that management actions benefitting these influential demographic parameters will have the greatest positive effect on giant gartersnake population growth rates, and therefore population persistence. This study informs the conservation and management of giant gartersnakes and their habitat, and illustrates the effectiveness of hierarchical Bayesian models for the study of rare and elusive species.

  13. Giant Magnetoresistance: Basic Concepts, Microstructure, Magnetic Interactions and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennen, Inga; Kappe, Daniel; Rempel, Thomas; Glenske, Claudia; Hütten, Andreas

    2016-06-17

    The giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect is a very basic phenomenon that occurs in magnetic materials ranging from nanoparticles over multilayered thin films to permanent magnets. In this contribution, we first focus on the links between effect characteristic and underlying microstructure. Thereafter, we discuss design criteria for GMR-sensor applications covering automotive, biosensors as well as nanoparticular sensors.

  14. Temperature dependence of giant dipole resonance width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vdovin, A.I.; Storozhenko, A.N.

    2005-01-01

    The quasiparticle-phonon nuclear model extended to finite temperature within the framework of the thermo field dynamics is applied to calculate a temperature dependence of the spreading width Γ d own of a giant dipole resonance. Numerical calculations are made for 12S n and 208 Pb nuclei. It is found that the width Γ d own increases with T. The reason of this effect is discussed as well as a relation of the present approach to other ones existing in the literature

  15. The Lushan earthquake and the giant panda: impacts and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zejun; Yuan, Shibin; Qi, Dunwu; Zhang, Mingchun

    2014-06-01

    Earthquakes not only result in a great loss of human life and property, but also have profound effects on the Earth's biodiversity. The Lushan earthquake occurred on 20 Apr 2013, with a magnitude of 7.0 and an intensity of 9.0 degrees. A distance of 17.0 km from its epicenter to the nearest distribution site of giant pandas recorded in the Third National Survey was determined. Making use of research on the Wenchuan earthquake (with a magnitude of 8.0), which occurred approximately 5 years ago, we briefly analyze the impacts of the Lushan earthquake on giant pandas and their habitat. An earthquake may interrupt ongoing behaviors of giant pandas and may also cause injury or death. In addition, an earthquake can damage conservation facilities for pandas, and result in further habitat fragmentation and degradation. However, from a historical point of view, the impacts of human activities on giant pandas and their habitat may, in fact, far outweigh those of natural disasters such as earthquakes. Measures taken to promote habitat restoration and conservation network reconstruction in earthquake-affected areas should be based on requirements of giant pandas, not those of humans. © 2013 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  16. Giant elves: Lightning-generated electromagnetic pulses in giant planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque Estepa, Alejandro; Dubrovin, Daria; José Gordillo-Vázquez, Francisco; Ebert, Ute; Parra-Rojas, Francisco Carlos; Yair, Yoav; Price, Colin

    2015-04-01

    We currently have direct optical observations of atmospheric electricity in the two giant gaseous planets of our Solar System [1-5] as well as radio signatures that are possibly generated by lightning from the two icy planets Uranus and Neptune [6,7]. On Earth, the electrical activity of the troposphere is associated with secondary electrical phenomena called Transient Luminous Events (TLEs) that occur in the mesosphere and lower ionosphere. This led some researchers to ask if similar processes may also exist in other planets, focusing first on the quasi-static coupling mechanism [8], which on Earth is responsible for halos and sprites and then including also the induction field, which is negligible in our planet but dominant in Saturn [9]. However, one can show that, according to the best available estimation for lightning parameters, in giant planets such as Saturn and Jupiter the effect of the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) dominates the effect that a lightning discharge has on the lower ionosphere above it. Using a Finite-Differences, Time-Domain (FDTD) solver for the EMP we found [10] that electrically active storms may create a localized but long-lasting layer of enhanced ionization of up to 103 cm-3 free electrons below the ionosphere, thus extending the ionosphere downward. We also estimate that the electromagnetic pulse transports 107 J to 1010 J toward the ionosphere. There emissions of light of up to 108 J would create a transient luminous event analogous to a terrestrial elve. Although these emissions are about 10 times fainter than the emissions coming from the lightning itself, it may be possible to target them for detection by filtering the appropiate wavelengths. [1] Cook, A. F., II, T. C. Duxbury, and G. E. Hunt (1979), First results on Jovian lightning, Nature, 280, 794, doi:10.1038/280794a0. [2] Little, B., C. D. Anger, A. P. Ingersoll, A. R. Vasavada, D. A. Senske, H. H. Breneman, W. J. Borucki, and The Galileo SSI Team (1999), Galileo images of

  17. The effect of different growth media, carbon source and pgrs on dendrobium broga giant orchid's protocorm-like bodies (plbs) proliferation supported with sem and tem analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uddain, J.; Gnasekaran, P.; Zakaria, L.

    2015-01-01

    Dendrobium Broga Giant (Dendrobium Bobby Messina * Dendrobium Superbiens) is a new orchid hybrid in Malaysia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different growth media, carbon sources and PGRs on Dendrobium Broga Giant orchid's protocorm-like bodies (PLBs) proliferation supported with SEM and TEM analysis. The PLBs were cultured on different strength of semi-solid and liquid MS medium and the proliferation rate was recorded based on the fresh weight basis. The maximum PLBs proliferation (12.31% 0.57) was obtained in MS semi-solid medium. PLBs were cultured on MS semi-solid media supplemented with different sucrose concentrations (0, 10, 20, 30 and 40 g L-1). The highest proliferation rate of PLBs (15.48% 1.20) was recorded from MS supplemented with 20 g L-1 sucrose. Different concentrations of BAP (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mg.L-1) and NAA (0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mgL-1) were added to MS semi-solid medium. Combinations of 1.0 mg L-1 BAP and 0.5 mg.L-1 NAA produced higher PLBs proliferation. Micromorphological studies by SEM and TEM displayed trichome, leaf primordial, stomata, various sizes of mitochondria, vacuoles, different shapes of chloroplast were found in PLBs which ameliorated the slow proliferation nature of plantlets. (author)

  18. Central hypogonadism due to a giant, "silent" FSH-secreting, atypical pituitary adenoma: effects of adenoma dissection and short-term Leydig cell stimulation by luteinizing hormone (LH) and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, Daniele; Spaggiari, Giorgia; Casarini, Livio; Fanelli, Flaminia; Mezzullo, Marco; Pagotto, Uberto; Granata, Antonio R M; Carani, Cesare; Simoni, Manuela

    2017-06-01

    We present a case report of an atypical giant pituitary adenoma secreting follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH). A 55-year-old patient presented for erectile dysfunction, loss of libido and fatigue. The biochemical evaluation showed very high FSH serum levels in the presence of central hypogonadism. Neither testicular enlargement nor increased sperm count was observed, thus a secretion of FSH with reduced biological activity was supposed. The histological examination after neuro-surgery showed an atypical pituitary adenoma with FSH-positive cells. Hypogonadism persisted and semen analyses impaired until azoospermia in conjunction with the reduction in FSH levels suggesting that, at least in part, this gonadotropin should be biologically active. Thus, we hypothesized a concomitant primary testicular insufficiency. The patient underwent short-term treatment trials with low doses of either recombinant luteinizing hormone (LH) or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in three consecutive treatment schemes, showing an equal efficacy in stimulating testosterone (T) increase. This is the first case of atypical, giant FSH-secreting pituitary adenoma with high FSH serum levels without signs of testicular hyperstimulation, in presence of hypogonadism with plausible combined primary and secondary etiology. Hypophysectomized patients may represent a good model to assess both pharmacodynamics and effective dose of LH and hCG in the male.

  19. Giant gravitons-with strings attached (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Smolic, Jelena; Smolic, Milena

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the free field theory limit of operators dual to giant gravitons with open strings attached, are studied. We introduce a graphical notation, which employs Young diagrams, for these operators. The computation of two point correlation functions is reduced to the application of three simple rules, written as graphical operations performed on the Young diagram labels of the operators. Using this technology, we have studied gravitational radiation by giant gravitons and bound states of giant gravitons, transitions between excited giant graviton states and joining of open strings attached to the giant

  20. Pathogenesis of giant colonic diverticula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhletaler, C.A.; Berger, J.L.; Robinette, C.L. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic, and pathologic findings of 3 patients with giant colonic diverticula are presented. Although several theories have been proposed for the formation of these diverticula, they have not been fully documented. One of our cases illustrates the evolution of this disorder following typical colonic diverticulitis. The pathogenesis and differential diagnosis of this unusual entity are discussed. (orig.)

  1. Giant resonances on excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besold, W.; Reinhard, P.G.; Toepffer, C.

    1984-01-01

    We derive modified RPA equations for small vibrations about excited states. The temperature dependence of collective excitations is examined. The formalism is applied to the ground state and the first excited state of 90 Zr in order to confirm a hypothesis which states that not only the ground state but every excited state of a nucleus has a giant resonance built upon it. (orig.)

  2. Determination of giant resonance strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serr, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Using theoretical strength functions to describe the different giant resonances expected at excitation energies of the order of (60-85)/Asup(1/3) MeV, we calculate the double differential cross sections d 2 sigma/dΩ dE associated with the reactions 208 Pb(α, α') and 90 Zr(α, α') (Esub(α) = 152 MeV). The angular distributions for the giant quadrupole and giant monopole resonances obtained from fits to these spectra, making simple, commonly used assumptions for the peak shapes and background, are compared to the original angular distributions. The differences between them are an indication of some of the uncertainties affecting the giant resonance strengths extracted from hadron inelastic scattering data. Fits to limited angular regions lead to errors of up to 50% in the value of the energy-weighted sum rule, depending on the angles examined. While it seems possible to extract the correct EWSR for the GMR by carrying out the analyses at 0 0 , no single privileged angle seems to exist in the case of the GQR. (orig.)

  3. Michigan has a sleeping giant

    CERN Multimedia

    Brock, Raymond; Nichols, Sue

    2007-01-01

    "That giant is 750 miles of fiber optic cable that lassoes its three biggest research universities and Van Andel Institute to the future. Its mission: to uncover the nature of the Big Bang by connecton U.S. physicists to their huge experiment ATLAS in Geneva.." (4 pages)

  4. A Giant or a Dwarf?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmid, Herman

    2005-01-01

    EU may appear to be a giant when it can act on behalf of a united Europe, but usually it is hampered by conflicting member state interests. The EU economic and administrative resources for foreign and trade policy are quite small (on level with one of its major member states) and the hopes in man...

  5. Giant lipomas of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokce Yildiran

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: Giant lipomas of the hand are very rare and may cause compressions and other complications. Thus, they require a careful preoperative evaluation in order to make a proper differential diagnosis. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(1.000: 8-11

  6. Giant magnetoimpedance effect of Co{sub 68.15} Fe{sub 4.35} Si{sub 12.5} B{sub 15} amorphous wire in the presence of magnetite ferrofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amirabadizadeh, A. [Department of Physics, University of Birjand, P. O. Box 97175-615, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Lotfollahi, Z., E-mail: lotfollahi@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Birjand, P. O. Box 97175-615, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zelati, A. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technical Faculty of Ferdows, University of Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-01

    Giant magnetoimpedance effect (GMI) in Co{sub 68.15} Fe{sub 4.35} Si{sub 12.5} B{sub 15} amorphous wire was studied in the presence of magnetite ferrofluid and without it. Magnetite nanoparticles for ferrofluid were prepared by the traditional wet chemistry co-precipitation method. GMI was measured in the frequency range of 2 to 6 MHz. The maximum value of GMI value of the ferrofluid covered amorphous wire was increased in all frequency intervals in comparison with GMI response of the wire non-covered by ferrofluid. These results open a new way of increasing magnetoimpedance effect value useful for sensor applications. - Highlights: • Amorphous Co-based wires display GMI effect and this feature is of potential interest for developing small magnetic field sensors and biosensors. • This manuscript is dealing with the improvement of the GMI response of an amorphous Co-based wire/magnetite ferrofluid. • The effect of ferrofluid presence in the sensing element is also analyzed. • The results show that GMI maximum increases in a 100% at 4.5 MHz and the sensitivity also does about a 150%. • Amorphous Co-based wires display giant magneto impedance effect (GMI) and this intrinsic feature is of potential interest for developing small magnetic field sensors and biosensors. • This manuscript is dealing with the improvement of the GMI response of an amorphous Co{sub 68.15}Fe{sub 4.35}Si{sub 12.5}B{sub 15} wire/magnetite ferrofluid. • The effect of ferrofluid presence in the sensing element is also analyzed. • The results show that GMI maximum increases in a 100% at 4.5 MHz and the sensitivity also does about a 150%.

  7. Analyzing the spatial positioning of nuclei in polynuclear giant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stange, Maike; Hintsche, Marius; Sachse, Kirsten; Gerhardt, Matthias; Beta, Carsten; Valleriani, Angelo

    2017-01-01

    How cells establish and maintain a well-defined size is a fundamental question of cell biology. Here we investigated to what extent the microtubule cytoskeleton can set a predefined cell size, independent of an enclosing cell membrane. We used electropulse-induced cell fusion to form giant multinuclear cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum . Based on dual-color confocal imaging of cells that expressed fluorescent markers for the cell nucleus and the microtubules, we determined the subcellular distributions of nuclei and centrosomes in the giant cells. Our two- and three-dimensional imaging results showed that the positions of nuclei in giant cells do not fall onto a regular lattice. However, a comparison with model predictions for random positioning showed that the subcellular arrangement of nuclei maintains a low but still detectable degree of ordering. This can be explained by the steric requirements of the microtubule cytoskeleton, as confirmed by the effect of a microtubule degrading drug. (paper)

  8. Analyzing the spatial positioning of nuclei in polynuclear giant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Maike; Hintsche, Marius; Sachse, Kirsten; Gerhardt, Matthias; Valleriani, Angelo; Beta, Carsten

    2017-11-01

    How cells establish and maintain a well-defined size is a fundamental question of cell biology. Here we investigated to what extent the microtubule cytoskeleton can set a predefined cell size, independent of an enclosing cell membrane. We used electropulse-induced cell fusion to form giant multinuclear cells of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Based on dual-color confocal imaging of cells that expressed fluorescent markers for the cell nucleus and the microtubules, we determined the subcellular distributions of nuclei and centrosomes in the giant cells. Our two- and three-dimensional imaging results showed that the positions of nuclei in giant cells do not fall onto a regular lattice. However, a comparison with model predictions for random positioning showed that the subcellular arrangement of nuclei maintains a low but still detectable degree of ordering. This can be explained by the steric requirements of the microtubule cytoskeleton, as confirmed by the effect of a microtubule degrading drug.

  9. Dynamically hot Super-Earths from outer giant planet scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Chelsea X.; Petrovich, Cristobal; Deibert, Emily

    2016-01-01

    The hundreds of multiple planetary systems discovered by the \\textit{Kepler} mission are typically observed to reside in close-in ($\\lesssim0.5$ AU), low-eccentricity, and low-inclination orbits. We run N-body experiments to study the effect that unstable outer ($\\gtrsim1$ AU) giant planets, whose end orbital configurations resemble those in the Radial Velocity population, have on these close-in multiple super-Earth systems. Our experiments show that the giant planets greatly reduce the multi...

  10. Giant arachnoid granulation: differential diagnosis of acute headache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, S.A.; Heyer, C.M.; Frombach, E.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: We present a case of intense, rapidly evolving headache clinically mimicking meningitis, subarachnoid haemorrhage or venous sinus thrombosis. Clinical examination, standard blood work and central nervous system studies were non-contributory and effectively ruled out these diagnoses. Cranial multidetector CT studies before and after application of intravenous contrast medium performed prior to lumbar tap disclosed a non-enhancing ovoid mass filling the superior sagittal sinus. This lesion posed a differential to venous sinus thrombosis, but ultimately fulfilled the criteria of a giant arachnoid granulation. The imaging characteristics and differential diagnosis of giant arachnoid granulations are discussed

  11. Sizing Up Red Giants Using Bayes’ Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufdenberg, Jason P.; Parsotan, Tyler

    2014-06-01

    Using the general-purpose stellar atmosphere code PHOENIX, we have constructed a grid of spherical stellar atmosphere models for comparison to cool giant star spectral energy distributions(SEDs). The models are not only parametrized by effective temperature (3500 Kto 3700 K) and surface gravity (log(g) = -0.5 to 1.0), but also by mass (7 Msun to 21 Msun), a required parameter for spherical model atmospheres. The shapes of the synthetic spectral energy distributions are sensitive to a change in mass at fixed values for the effective temperature and surface gravity. At our lowest surface gravity, differences in mass of a factor of two can yield up to 20% flux differences in the shape of the SED between 400 nm and 900 nm.Also, for a fixed mass, differences in the surface gravity of a factor of 10 can yield up to 100% flux differences in the shape of the SED below 450 nm. We are investigating whether the mass-dependence of the model SED shape may be used to constrain single star masses. One of our target stars is the supergiant Betelgeuse which has a poorly constrained mass: published estimates differ by a factor of two. To aid in our analysis, we have developed a method to extract Bayesian posterior distributions for four model parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, mass, and angular size) from thecomparison of the synthetic SED grid to individual observed SEDs of red giants.

  12. Electron Stark Broadening Database for Atomic N, O, and C Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yen; Yao, Winifred M.; Wray, Alan A.; Carbon, Duane F.

    2012-01-01

    A database for efficiently computing the electron Stark broadening line widths for atomic N, O, and C lines is constructed. The line width is expressed in terms of the electron number density and electronatom scattering cross sections based on the Baranger impact theory. The state-to-state cross sections are computed using the semiclassical approximation, in which the atom is treated quantum mechanically whereas the motion of the free electron follows a classical trajectory. These state-to-state cross sections are calculated based on newly compiled line lists. Each atomic line list consists of a careful merger of NIST, Vanderbilt, and TOPbase line datasets from wavelength 50 nm to 50 micrometers covering the VUV to IR spectral regions. There are over 10,000 lines in each atomic line list. The widths for each line are computed at 13 electron temperatures between 1,000 K 50,000 K. A linear least squares method using a four-term fractional power series is then employed to obtain an analytical fit for each line-width variation as a function of the electron temperature. The maximum L2 error of the analytic fits for all lines in our line lists is about 5%.

  13. Determination of ground and excited state dipole moments via electronic Stark spectroscopy: 5-methoxyindole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Josefin; Wilke, Martin; Schmitt, Michael, E-mail: mschmitt@uni-duesseldorf.de [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, D-40225 Düsseldorf (Germany); Meerts, W. Leo, E-mail: leo.meerts@science.ru.nl [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, NL-6525 AS Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-28

    The dipole moments of the ground and lowest electronically excited singlet state of 5-methoxyindole have been determined by means of optical Stark spectroscopy in a molecular beam. The resulting spectra arise from a superposition of different field configurations, one with the static electric field almost parallel to the polarization of the exciting laser radiation, the other nearly perpendicular. Each field configuration leads to different intensities in the rovibronic spectrum. With an automated evolutionary algorithm approach, the spectra can be fit and the ratio of both field configurations can be determined. A simultaneous fit of two spectra with both field configurations improved the precision of the dipole moment determination by a factor of two. We find a reduction of the absolute dipole moment from 1.59(3) D to 1.14(6) D upon electronic excitation to the lowest electronically excited singlet state. At the same time, the dipole moment orientation rotates by 54{sup ∘} showing the importance of the determination of the dipole moment components. The dipole moment in the electronic ground state can approximately be obtained from a vector addition of the indole and the methoxy group dipole moments. However, in the electronically excited state, vector addition completely fails to describe the observed dipole moment. Several reasons for this behavior are discussed.

  14. DO GIANT PLANETS SURVIVE TYPE II MIGRATION?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ida, Shigeru

    2013-01-01

    Planetary migration is one of the most serious problems to systematically understand the observations of exoplanets. We clarify that the theoretically predicted type II, migration (like type I migration) is too fast, by developing detailed analytical arguments in which the timescale of type II migration is compared with the disk lifetime. In the disk-dominated regime, the type II migration timescale is characterized by a local viscous diffusion timescale, while the disk lifetime is characterized by a global diffusion timescale that is much longer than the local one. Even in the planet-dominated regime where the inertia of the planet mass reduces the migration speed, the timescale is still shorter than the disk lifetime except in the final disk evolution stage where the total disk mass decays below the planet mass. This suggests that most giant planets plunge into the central stars within the disk lifetime, and it contradicts the exoplanet observations that gas giants are piled up at r ∼> 1 AU. We examine additional processes that may arise in protoplanetary disks: dead zones, photoevaporation of gas, and gas flow across a gap formed by a type II migrator. Although they make the type II migration timescale closer to the disk lifetime, we show that none of them can act as an effective barrier for rapid type II migration with the current knowledge of these processes. We point out that gas flow across a gap and the fraction of the flow accreted onto the planets are uncertain and they may have the potential to solve the problem. Much more detailed investigation for each process may be needed to explain the observed distribution of gas giants in extrasolar planetary systems

  15. Photoionization of lanthanum and its ions in the region of the 'giant' resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amusia, M.Ya.

    1989-01-01

    The photoionization cross sections of outer and intermediate shells including 4d of La and its ions are calculated in the region of the 'giant' resonance. The prominent effects of both intershell correlational effects and rearrangement are demonstrated. (orig.)

  16. Assessing vulnerability of giant pandas to climate change in the Qinling Mountains of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia; Liu, Fang; Xue, Yadong; Zhang, Yu; Li, Diqiang

    2017-06-01

    Climate change might pose an additional threat to the already vulnerable giant panda ( Ailuropoda melanoleuca ). Effective conservation efforts require projections of vulnerability of the giant panda in facing climate change and proactive strategies to reduce emerging climate-related threats. We used the maximum entropy model to assess the vulnerability of giant panda to climate change in the Qinling Mountains of China. The results of modeling included the following findings: (1) the area of suitable habitat for giant pandas was projected to decrease by 281 km 2 from climate change by the 2050s; (2) the mean elevation of suitable habitat of giant panda was predicted to shift 30 m higher due to climate change over this period; (3) the network of nature reserves protect 61.73% of current suitable habitat for the species, and 59.23% of future suitable habitat; (4) current suitable habitat mainly located in Chenggu, Taibai, and Yangxian counties (with a total area of 987 km 2 ) was predicted to be vulnerable. Assessing the vulnerability of giant panda provided adaptive strategies for conservation programs and national park construction. We proposed adaptation strategies to ameliorate the predicted impacts of climate change on giant panda, including establishing and adjusting reserves, establishing habitat corridors, improving adaptive capacity to climate change, and strengthening monitoring of giant panda.

  17. Dokumentation der Fachtagung "Resilienz - Was Kinder aus armen Familien stark macht" am 13. September 2005 in Frankfurt am Main

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    "Die Dokumentation ist das Ergebnis der Fachtagung 'Resilienz: Was Kinder aus armen Familien stark macht', die das ISS-Frankfurt a.M. am 13. September 2005 durchgeführt hat. Ziel der Fachtagung war es, notwendige Brücken zwischen den fachlichen Diskursen zu bauen. Es sollten Informationen zur aktuellen Kinderarmutsforschung und Resilienzforschung gegeben, Herausforderungen für das professionelle sozialpädagogische Handeln identifiziert sowie Erfahrungen praktische Handlungsansätze reflektiert...

  18. Bloch oscillations and Wannier-Stark localization in a tight-binding lattice with increasing intersite coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longhi, S.

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Bloch oscillations in an exactly solvable one-dimensional tight-binding lattice model with increasing hopping rates between adjacent sites is theoretically investigated. In particular, it is shown that Wannier-Stark localization is attained at a finite value of the applied dc field. An optical realization of the lattice model, based on light transport in engineered waveguide arrays, is also proposed.

  19. Condensed matter view of giant resonance phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zangwill, A.

    1987-01-01

    The intent of this article is to present a view of giant resonance phenomena (an essentially atomic phenomenon) from the perspective of a condensed matter physicist with an interest in the optical properties of matter. As we shall see, this amounts to a particular prejudice about how one should think about many-body effects in a system of interacting electrons. Some of these effects are special to condensed matter systems and will be dealt with in the second half of this paper. However, it turns out that the authors view of the main ingredient to a giant resonance differs significantly from that normally taken by scientists trained in the traditional methods of atomic physics. Therefore, in the first section the author will take advantage of the fact that his contribution to this volume was composed and delivered to the publishers somewhat after the conclusion of the School (rather than before as requested by the organizers) and try to clearly distinguish the differences of opinion presented by the lecturers from the unalterable experimental facts. 46 references, 9 figures

  20. Giant elastocaloric effect and its irreversibility in [001]-oriented Ni45Mn36.5In13.5Co5 meta-magnetic shape memory alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dewei; Liu, Jian; Feng, Yan; Sun, Wen; Yan, Aru

    2017-01-01

    In this letter, we investigate the elastocaloric reversibility in Ni-Mn-In-Co meta-magnetic shape memory alloys. A highly [001] textured Ni45Mn36.5In13.5Co5 polycrystalline alloy was grown by using the liquid-metal-cooling directional solidification technique. We have observed a giant adiabatic temperature change (ΔT) of +8.6 K caused by the stress-driven complete martensitic transformation. The asymmetry of the maximum ΔT between loading and unloading strongly depends on the magnitude of superelastic strain. Such an irreversible behavior is ascribed to the friction energy dissipation as well as the variation of the elastocaloric entropy change by shifting initial temperatures.

  1. Effect of pond water depth on snail populations and fish-borne zoonotic trematode transmission in juvenile giant gourami (Osphronemus goramy) aquaculture nurseries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thien, P. C.; Madsen, Henry; Nga, H. T. N.

    2015-01-01

    . Here we report results from a cross-sectional study to look at the association between pond depth and infection with FZT in giant gourami nursery ponds. Density of intermediate host snails was positively associated with pond depth (count ratio associated with a 1m increase in pond depth was 10.4 (95% C.......L.: 1.61-67.1, pstocking density (>200frym(-3)) was associated with lower host snail density (count ratio=0.15) than low stocking density (stocked with 100-200frym(-3......) had snail counts 0.76 (95% C.L.: 0.33-1.75, p n.s.) of those in ponds stocked with fry density of stocking the fry, but focus should also...

  2. Giant Panda movement patterns in the Foping Nature Reserve, China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Skidmore, A.K.; Wang, T.; Yong, Y.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2002-01-01

    Observing the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in the remote mountains of Foping Nature Reserve (NR), China, is difficult due to the dense vegetation and steep terrain. Radiotracking is an effective way to study this animal and understand its behavior and habitat use. We used radiotracking data

  3. Mean Field Approach to the Giant Wormhole Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, A.; Kolokolov, I.; Martellini, M.

    We introduce a gaussian probability density for the space-time distribution of worm-holes, thus taking effectively into account wormhole interaction. Using a mean-field approximation for the free energy, we show that giant wormholes are probabilistically suppressed in a homogenous isotropic “large” universe.

  4. Thermalization time-scale of the giant quadrupole resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigorescu, M.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of temperature and dissipation on the quantum transition rates are investigated using a Heisenberg-Langevin equation for the density matrix. This approach is applied to described the isothermal and adiabatic evolution towards thermalization of the nuclear giant quadrupole shape vibration within a collective two state model. (author)

  5. Structure of the giant dipole resonance in 208Pb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naggar, N.M.

    1977-01-01

    A new scheme is devised to study the giant resonance in the heavy magic nucleus 208 Pb. The effect of the 4 + and 5 - collective excitations of the nucleus core is demonstrated. The calculated cross section is compared with the experimental data. (author)

  6. Study of Stark broadening of Li I 460 and 497 nm spectral lines with independent plasma diagnostics by Thomson scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierżȩga, Krzysztof; Piȩta, Tomasz; Zawadzki, Witold; Stambulchik, Evgeny; Gavrilović-Božović, Marijana; Jovićević, Sonja; Pokrzywka, Bartłomiej

    2018-02-01

    We present results of experimental and theoretical studies of the Stark broadening of the Li I 460 nm spectral line with forbidden components and of the isolated 497 nm line. Plasma was induced by Nd:YAG laser radiation at 1064 nm with pulse duration ∼4.5 ns. Laser-induced plasma was generated in front of the alumina pellet, with some content of Li2CO3, placed in a vacuum chamber filled with argon under reduced pressure. Plasma diagnostics was performed using the laser Thomson scattering technique, free from assumptions about the plasma equilibrium state and its composition and so independently of plasma emission spectra. Spatially resolved spectra with Li lines were obtained from the measured, laterally integrated ones applying the inverse Abel transform. The Stark profiles were calculated by computer simulation method assuming a plasma in the local thermodynamic equilibrium. Calculations were performed for experimentally-inferred electron densities and temperatures, from 1.422 × 1023 to 3.55 × 1022 m‑3 and from 1.96 eV to 1.04 eV, respectively. Our studies show very good agreement between experimental Stark profiles and those computer simulated.

  7. WATER TEMPERATURE and other data from STARK in the NW Atlantic from 1992-04-28 to 1992-04-30 (NODC Accession 9200106)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data in this accession were collected in NW Atlantic (limit-40 W) from ship STARK between April 28, 1992 and April 30, 1992. The real time data of water...

  8. Measured, calculated and predicted Stark widths of the singly ionized C, N, O, F, Ne, Si, P, S, Cl and Ar spectral lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djeniže S.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to find reliable Stark width data, needed in plasma spectroscopy comparision between the existing measured, calculated and predicted Stark width values was performed for ten singly ionized emitters: C, N, O, F, Ne Si, P, S, Cl and Ar in the lower lying 3s - 3p, 3p - 3d and 4s - 4p transitions. These emitters are present in many cosmic light sources. On the basis of the agreement between mentioned values 17 spectral lines from six singly ionized spectra have been recommended, for the first time, for plasma spectroscopy as spectral lines with reliable Stark width data. Critical analysis of the existing Stark width data is also given.

  9. Turbidity, SOLAR RADIATION - ATMOSPHERIC and other data from STARK in the NW Atlantic from 1991-01-01 to 1991-12-31 (NODC Accession 9600031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean Station Data from 17 stations; and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) data from 49 casts were collected using ship Stark during cruises # 688-711....

  10. Spinal cord giant arteriovenous fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymard, A.; Reizine, D.; Marciano, S.; Cervigon, E.G.; Gelbert, F.; Merland, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Giant extramedullary arteriovenous fistulas fed by spinal arteries are a rare type of spinal cord arteriovenous malformation. Among 11 patient (mean age, 20 years) with spinal hemorrhage in childhood, progressive paraplegia, and myelographic and angiographic diagnosis, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the precised extramedulary location and complications (thrombosis 1). Angiography showed dilated spinal arteries feeding giant, high flow fistulas with much venous drainage. Endovascular treatment was performed in 11 cases, with balloons in seven, particulate embolization in three, and polymerizing agents in one. Complete closures of the shunt with clinical improvement was achieved in seven cases and partial closure with partial clinical recovery in two; there was one case each of paraplegia due to involuntary venous blockage by the balloon, and fatal bulbomedullary stroke in particulate embolization of cervical location. Careful endovascular techniques represent a valuable treatment in this severe pathology

  11. Giant condyloma acuminatum of vulva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Ramiz Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, A 23 year old married woman who was diagnosed as a case of giant condyloma acuminatum of vulva measuring about 15 x 8 x 3 cm, irregular surface with multiple projections, oval in shape, firm to hard in consistency, mildly tender, exophytic, cauliflower like growth involving the whole vulva (lower part of mons pubis, labia, vestibule, clitoris, around vaginal opening. Another multiple small lesions were present at perineal region but there was no inguinal lymphadenopathy. She underwent a combined electro cauterization and cryotherapy for small to moderate size multiple primary and recurrent warty lesions and wide surgical excision with fasciocutaneous advancement flaps procedure for a giant lesions in the vulva. Excisional biopsies were performed to detect potential malignancy but malignancy was not found histologically. The patient was advised to first follow-up 1 month after operation when multiple small warty lesions were developed and treated and the subsequent follow-ups for 3 months.

  12. Giant Spin Hall Effect and Switching Induced by Spin-Transfer Torque in a W /Co40Fe40B20/MgO Structure with Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiang; Xiao, Gang

    2015-03-01

    We obtain robust perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in a β -W /Co40Fe40B20/MgO structure without the need of any insertion layer between W and Co40Fe40B20 . This is achieved within a broad range of W thicknesses (3.0-9.0 nm), using a simple fabrication technique. We determine the spin Hall angle (0.40) and spin-diffusion length for the bulk β form of tungsten with a large spin-orbit coupling. As a result of the giant spin Hall effect in β -W and careful magnetic annealing, we significantly reduce the critical current density for the spin-transfer-torque-induced magnetic switching in Co40Fe40B20 . The elemental β -W is a superior candidate for magnetic memory and spin-logic applications.

  13. Giant Magnetoresistance in Nanogranular Magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Glatz, A.; Beloborodov, I. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2007-01-01

    We study the giant magnetoresistance of nanogranular magnets in the presence of an external magnetic field and finite temperature. We show that the magnetization of arrays of nanogranular magnets has hysteretic behaviour at low temperatures leading to a double peak in the magnetoresistance which coalesces at high temperatures into a single peak. We numerically calculate the magnetization of magnetic domains and the motion of domain walls in this system using a combined mean-field approach and...

  14. Post-Flare Giant Arches - Unanswered Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, M. J.; Seaton, D. B.; Dennis, B. R.; Palmerio, E.; Savage, S. L.

    2017-12-01

    Recent observations from the SWAP EUV imager on-board PROBA2 and SXI X-ray observations from the GOES satellite have shown that post-flare giant arches and regular post-flare loops are one and the same thing. However, it is still not clear how certain loop systems are able to sustain prolonged growth to heights greater than half a solar-radii. In this presentation we further explore the energy deposition rate above post-flare loop systems through high-energy RHESSI observations. We also explore the difference between the growth of different loop systems through an epoch analysis. The epoch analysis is initially performed over the period when the STEREO satellites were in quadrature with PROBA2 allowing us to assess the difference between their on-disk and on-limb signatures. Giant arches are generally characterised by their height of growth when observed close to the solar limb, but due to the optically thin nature of the EUV solar atmosphere, projection effects and the scarcity of events occurring within 5 degrees of the limb it is not understood how common these events are. Using the analysis during the quadrature period we gain a better understanding of how rare these events are, and by determining characteristic on disk signatures we can combine our data set with magnetogram observations to better understand their magnetic evolution.

  15. Giant pediatric cervicofacial lymphatic malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazzou, Salma; Boulaadas, Malik; Essakalli, Leila

    2013-07-01

    Lymphatic malformations (LMs) are benign lesions. Most of them are found in head and neck regions as asymptomatic mass, but giant lymphangiomas may affect breathing or swallowing and constitute a major therapeutic challenge. A retrospective analysis of giant head and neck LMs with impairment of respiration or swallow for the past 11 years was performed in the Department of Maxillofacial Surgery and ENT of the Avicenne Medical University Center. Seven patients with large and extensive LMs of the head and neck were identified. There were 3 males and 4 females with a mean age of 6 years. The predominant reason for referral was airway compromise necessitating tracheostomy (57%) and dysphagia (43%). Three patients had macrocystic lesions; others were considered mixed or microcystic. All the patients underwent surgical excision as a primary treatment modality. Complete surgical resection was realized in 4 patients, and subtotal resection in 3 patients. Of 7 patients, 4 patients had complications including nerve damage and recurrence of the disease. The majority of the patients underwent only a single surgical procedure. Cervicofacial LMs in children should be managed in multidisciplinary setting. Surgery remains the first treatment for managing giant, life-threatening lesions.

  16. Anomalous giant piezoresistance in AlAs 2D electron systems with antidot lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawan, O; Gokmen, T; Shkolnikov, Y P; De Poortere, E P; Shayegan, M

    2008-01-25

    An AlAs two-dimensional electron system patterned with an antidot lattice exhibits a giant piezoresistance effect at low temperatures, with a sign opposite to the piezoresistance observed in the unpatterned region. We suggest that the origin of this anomalous giant piezoresistance is the nonuniform strain in the antidot lattice and the exclusion of electrons occupying the two conduction-band valleys from different regions of the sample. This is analogous to the well-known giant magnetoresistance effect, with valley playing the role of spin and strain the role of magnetic field.

  17. Giant Planets: Good Neighbors for Habitable Worlds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakarakos, Nikolaos; Eggl, Siegfried; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    2018-04-01

    The presence of giant planets influences potentially habitable worlds in numerous ways. Massive celestial neighbors can facilitate the formation of planetary cores and modify the influx of asteroids and comets toward Earth analogs later on. Furthermore, giant planets can indirectly change the climate of terrestrial worlds by gravitationally altering their orbits. Investigating 147 well-characterized exoplanetary systems known to date that host a main-sequence star and a giant planet, we show that the presence of “giant neighbors” can reduce a terrestrial planet’s chances to remain habitable, even if both planets have stable orbits. In a small fraction of systems, however, giant planets slightly increase the extent of habitable zones provided that the terrestrial world has a high climate inertia. In providing constraints on where giant planets cease to affect the habitable zone size in a detrimental fashion, we identify prime targets in the search for habitable worlds.

  18. Solitary ulcerated congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yuen Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-month-old female patient with a giant ulcerated nodule over the back since birth was diagnosed as congenital giant juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG based on clinical and histopathological examination. Congenital giant JXG with ulceration at birth is a rare presentation of JXG and commonly misdiagnosed. This case emphasizes the importance of being aware of the myriad presentations of JXG in order to make a correct diagnosis and avoid unnecessary investigations or treatment.

  19. Band Structure and Quantum Confined Stark Effect in InN/GaN superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorczyca, I.; Suski, T.; Christensen, Niels Egede

    2012-01-01

    N/GaN(0001) superlattices are investigated, and the variation of the band gap with the thicknesses of the well and the barrier is discussed. Superlattices of the form mInN/nGaN with n ≥ m are simulated using band structure calculations in the Local Density Approximation with a semiempirical correction...... for the gap error. The calculated band gap shows a strong decrease with the thickness (m) of the InN well. In superlattices containing a single layer of InN (m = 1) the band gap increases weakly with the GaN barrier thickness n, reaching a saturation value around 2 eV. In superlattices with n = m and n > 5...

  20. Ac Stark effect for short-range potentials with intense electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bardsley, J.N.; Comella, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The energy spectrum of a charged particle bound by a short-range potential and subjected to an intense ac electromagnetic field is computed by using complex coordinates within the Floquet formalism. As the field strength is raised, additional discrete states appear and the lifetime of the states increase. The adequacy of a high-frequency model of the strong-field spectra is assessed

  1. Magma ocean formation due to giant impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, W. B.; Melosh, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    The thermal effects of giant impacts are studied by estimating the melt volume generated by the initial shock wave and corresponding magma ocean depths. Additionally, the effects of the planet's initial temperature on the generated melt volume are examined. The shock pressure required to completely melt the material is determined using the Hugoniot curve plotted in pressure-entropy space. Once the melting pressure is known, an impact melting model is used to estimate the radial distance melting occurred from the impact site. The melt region's geometry then determines the associated melt volume. The model is also used to estimate the partial melt volume. Magma ocean depths resulting from both excavated and retained melt are calculated, and the melt fraction not excavated during the formation of the crater is estimated. The fraction of a planet melted by the initial shock wave is also estimated using the model.

  2. Giant pulsar glitches in full general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourie, A.; Chamel, N.; Novak, J.; Oertel, M.

    2017-12-01

    We present recent numerical simulations of giant pulsar glitches, as observed in the emblematic Vela pulsar, based on a two-fluid model, including for the first time all general-relativistic effects and realistic equations of state. In particular, we focus on modelling the vortex-mediated transfer of angular momentum that takes place during the spin-up stage from the neutron superfluid to the charged particles through dissipative mutual friction forces. Taking general relativity into account does not only modify the structure of the star but also leads to a new coupling between the fluids arising from frame-dragging effects. As a consequence, general relativity can strongly affect the global dynamics of pulsar glitches : the errors on the value of the characteristic rise time incurred by using Newtonian gravity are thus found to be as large as ˜ 40 % for the models considered.

  3. Evaluating landscape options for corridor restoration between giant panda reserves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Wang

    Full Text Available The establishment of corridors can offset the negative effects of habitat fragmentation by connecting isolated habitat patches. However, the practical value of corridor planning is minimal if corridor identification is not based on reliable quantitative information about species-environment relationships. An example of this need for quantitative information is planning for giant panda conservation. Although the species has been the focus of intense conservation efforts for decades, most corridor projects remain hypothetical due to the lack of reliable quantitative researches at an appropriate spatial scale. In this paper, we evaluated a framework for giant panda forest corridor planning. We linked our field survey data with satellite imagery, and conducted species occupancy modelling to examine the habitat use of giant panda within the potential corridor area. We then conducted least-cost and circuit models to identify potential paths of dispersal across the landscape, and compared the predicted cost under current conditions and alternative conservation management options considered during corridor planning. We found that due to giant panda's association with areas of low elevation and flat terrain, human infrastructures in the same area have resulted in corridor fragmentation. We then identified areas with high potential to function as movement corridors, and our analysis of alternative conservation scenarios showed that both forest/bamboo restoration and automobile tunnel construction would significantly improve the effectiveness of corridor, while residence relocation would not significantly improve corridor effectiveness in comparison with the current condition. The framework has general value in any conservation activities that anticipate improving habitat connectivity in human modified landscapes. Specifically, our study suggested that, in this landscape, automobile tunnels are the best means to remove current barriers to giant panda

  4. Factors affecting genotyping success in giant panda fecal samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fecal samples play an important role in giant panda conservation studies. Optimal preservation conditions and choice of microsatellites for giant panda fecal samples have not been established. In this study, we evaluated the effect of four factors (namely, storage type (ethanol (EtOH, EtOH −20 °C, 2-step storage medium, DMSO/EDTA/Tris/salt buffer (DETs and frozen at −20 °C, storage time (one, three and six months, fragment length, and repeat motif of microsatellite loci on the success rate of microsatellite amplification, allelic dropout (ADO and false allele (FA rates from giant panda fecal samples. Amplification success and ADO rates differed between the storage types. Freezing was inferior to the other four storage methods based on the lowest average amplification success and the highest ADO rates (P < 0.05. The highest microsatellite amplification success was obtained from either EtOH or the 2-step storage medium at three storage time points. Storage time had a negative effect on the average amplification of microsatellites and samples stored in EtOH and the 2-step storage medium were more stable than the other three storage types. We only detected the effect of repeat motif on ADO and FA rates. The lower ADO and FA rates were obtained from tri- and tetra-nucleotide loci. We suggest that freezing should not be used for giant panda fecal preservation in microsatellite studies, and EtOH and the 2-step storage medium should be chosen on priority for long-term storage. We recommend candidate microsatellite loci with longer repeat motif to ensure greater genotyping success for giant panda fecal studies.

  5. Effect of annealing on the second harmonic amplitude of Giant Magneto-Impedance (GMI) voltage of a Co-Fe-Si-B amorphous wire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, S.K. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)], E-mail: skp@nmlindia.org; Panda, A.K.; Mitra, A. [National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur 831007 (India)

    2008-02-15

    Second harmonic amplitude (V{sub 2f}) of Giant Magneto-Impedance (GMI) voltage of (Fe{sub 6}Co{sub 94}){sub 72.5}Si{sub 12.5}B{sub 15} amorphous wires has been studied systematically for as-cast and Joule-heated states. Joule heating was carried out at current densities (J) of 20-40 A/mm{sup 2} for a period of 1-300 min. The amplitude of the second harmonic voltage (V{sub 2f}) initially increased with J, attained maximum and then decreased. The maximum amplitude of V{sub 2f} was observed for the sample annealed at J=25 A/mm{sup 2} for 5 min. The second harmonic peak shifted towards the higher field side with the increase of annealing current density and annealing period (t{sub p}). Few-fold increase in the amplitude of the second harmonic voltage (V{sub 2f}) was observed due to the presence of a small dc bias current (I{sub b}) of amplitude 1 mA. The asymmetry in V{sub 2f} was also observed in a Joule-heated sample. The observed asymmetry has been correlated with the bias field generated between the surface crystallized layer and the amorphous core. A small bias current of amplitude of 1 mA was applied along the direction of the applied field to minimize the asymmetry.

  6. Effect of annealing on the second harmonic amplitude of Giant Magneto-Impedance (GMI) voltage of a Co-Fe-Si-B amorphous wire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, S.K.; Panda, A.K.; Mitra, A.

    2008-01-01

    Second harmonic amplitude (V 2f ) of Giant Magneto-Impedance (GMI) voltage of (Fe 6 Co 94 ) 72.5 Si 12.5 B 15 amorphous wires has been studied systematically for as-cast and Joule-heated states. Joule heating was carried out at current densities (J) of 20-40 A/mm 2 for a period of 1-300 min. The amplitude of the second harmonic voltage (V 2f ) initially increased with J, attained maximum and then decreased. The maximum amplitude of V 2f was observed for the sample annealed at J=25 A/mm 2 for 5 min. The second harmonic peak shifted towards the higher field side with the increase of annealing current density and annealing period (t p ). Few-fold increase in the amplitude of the second harmonic voltage (V 2f ) was observed due to the presence of a small dc bias current (I b ) of amplitude 1 mA. The asymmetry in V 2f was also observed in a Joule-heated sample. The observed asymmetry has been correlated with the bias field generated between the surface crystallized layer and the amorphous core. A small bias current of amplitude of 1 mA was applied along the direction of the applied field to minimize the asymmetry

  7. The stable K0 giant star β Gem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, David F., E-mail: dfgray@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    A nine-season spectroscopic study of the photosphere of β Gem (K0 III) shows this low-luminosity giant to be stable, with no effective temperature variations above ∼2 K, and no secular temperature variations over the 2002-2010 time span above 0.2 K per year. The radial-velocity variations are consistent with an orbital variation of ∼40 m s{sup –1}. The projected rotation rate is found to be 1.70 ± 0.20 km s{sup –1} with a macroturbulence dispersion of 4.53 ± 0.10 km s{sup –1}. The third-signature plot is also invariant and shows a granulation velocity gradient 20% smaller than the solar gradient. The absolute shift of the third-signature plot gives a blueshift-corrected radial velocity of 3385 ± 70 m s{sup –1}. Bisector mapping of the Fe I λ6253 line yields a flux deficit of 12% ± 1% in area, somewhat smaller than for other giants, but the shape and the position of the peak at 4.8 km s{sup –1} is consistent with other giants. All of the investigated photospheric parameters are consistent with β Gem being a low-luminosity giant in agreement with its absolute magnitude.

  8. Factors affecting genotyping success in giant panda fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Liu, Hong-Yi; Yang, Hai-Qiong; Li, Yu-Dong; Zhang, He-Min

    2017-01-01

    Fecal samples play an important role in giant panda conservation studies. Optimal preservation conditions and choice of microsatellites for giant panda fecal samples have not been established. In this study, we evaluated the effect of four factors (namely, storage type (ethanol (EtOH), EtOH -20 °C, 2-step storage medium, DMSO/EDTA/Tris/salt buffer (DETs) and frozen at -20 °C), storage time (one, three and six months), fragment length, and repeat motif of microsatellite loci) on the success rate of microsatellite amplification, allelic dropout (ADO) and false allele (FA) rates from giant panda fecal samples. Amplification success and ADO rates differed between the storage types. Freezing was inferior to the other four storage methods based on the lowest average amplification success and the highest ADO rates ( P panda fecal preservation in microsatellite studies, and EtOH and the 2-step storage medium should be chosen on priority for long-term storage. We recommend candidate microsatellite loci with longer repeat motif to ensure greater genotyping success for giant panda fecal studies.

  9. A preliminary investigation of the variables affecting the distribution of giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) in the Sacramento Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Brian J.; Skalos, Shannon M.; Casazza, Michael L.; Wylie, Glenn D.

    2015-09-30

    Giant gartersnakes (Thamnophis gigas) comprise a species of rare, semi-aquatic snake precinctive to the Central Valley of California. Because of the loss of more than 90% of their natural habitat, giant gartersnakes are listed as Threatened by the United States and California endangered species acts. Little is known, however, about the distribution of giant gartersnakes in the Sacramento Valley, which is where most extant populations occur. We conducted detection-nondetection surveys for giant gartersnakes throughout the rice-growing regions of the Sacramento Valley, and used occupancy models to examine evidence for the effects of landscape-scale GIS-derived variables, local habitat and vegetation composition, and prey communities on patterns of giant gartersnake occurrence. Although our results are based on a relatively small sample of sites, we found that distance to historic marsh, relative fish count, and an interaction of distance to historic marsh with proportion of habitat composed of submerged vegetation were important variables for explaining occupancy of giant gartersnakes. In particular, giant gartersnakes were more likely to occur closer to historic marsh and where relatively fewer fish were captured in traps. At locations in or near historic marsh, giant gartersnakes were more likely to occur in areas with less submerged vegetation, but this relationship was reversed (and more uncertain) at sites distant from historic marsh. Additional research with a larger sample of sites would further elucidate the distribution of giant gartersnakes in the Sacramento Valley.

  10. Analysis of giant electrorheological fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Youngwook P; Seo, Yongsok

    2013-07-15

    The yield stress dependence on electric field strength for giant electrorheological (GER) fluids over the full range of electric fields was examined using Seo's scaling function which incorporated both the polarization and the conductivity models. If a proper scaling was applied to the yield stress data to collapse them onto a single curve, the Seo's scaling function could correctly fit the yield stress behavior of GER suspensions, even at very high electric field strengths. The model predictions were also compared with recently proposed Choi et al.'s model to allow a consideration of the universal framework of ER fluids. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Giant lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchidanand, S; Sharavana, S; Mallikarjun, M; Nataraja, H V

    2012-01-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis continues to be an important public health problem even with the availability of highly effective anti-tuberculous drugs. It constitutes 0.1% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis that occurs in previously sensitized individuals with a moderate degree of immunity against tubercle bacilli. The different types of lupus vulgaris include plaque, ulcerative, vegetative, papular and nodular, and tumor forms. A 40-year-old man presented with large multiple plaques over right upper limb, right side of chest and back, and right lower limb for the past 30 years. Histopathology showed numerous noncaseating granulomas with Langhan's type of giant cells. The Mantoux test showed strong positivity and there was excellent response to anti-tuberculous treatment. This case is being reported because of its extreme chronicity of 30 years duration, unusually large size and multiplicity of lesions.

  12. Giant lupus vulgaris: A rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sacchidanand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous tuberculosis continues to be an important public health problem even with the availability of highly effective anti-tuberculous drugs. It constitutes 0.1% of all cases of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Lupus vulgaris is the most common form of cutaneous tuberculosis that occurs in previously sensitized individuals with a moderate degree of immunity against tubercle bacilli. The different types of lupus vulgaris include plaque, ulcerative, vegetative, papular and nodular, and tumor forms. A 40-year-old man presented with large multiple plaques over right upper limb, right side of chest and back, and right lower limb for the past 30 years. Histopathology showed numerous noncaseating granulomas with Langhan′s type of giant cells. The Mantoux test showed strong positivity and there was excellent response to anti-tuberculous treatment. This case is being reported because of its extreme chronicity of 30 years duration, unusually large size and multiplicity of lesions.

  13. The magnetodiscs and aurorae of giant planets

    CERN Document Server

    Achilleos, Nicholas; Arridge, Chris; Badman, Sarah; Delamere, Peter; Grodent, Denis; Kivelson, Margaret; Louarn, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Readers will find grouped together here the most recent observations, current theoretical models and present understanding of the coupled atmosphere, magnetosphere and solar wind system. The book begins with a general discussion of mass, energy and momentum transport in magnetodiscs. The physics of partially ionized plasmas of the giant planet magnetodiscs is of general interest throughout the field of space physics, heliophysics and astrophysical plasmas; therefore, understanding the basic physical processes associated with magnetodiscs has universal applications. The second chapter characterizes the solar wind interaction and auroral responses to solar wind driven dynamics. The third chapter describes the role of magnetic reconnection and the effects on plasma transport. Finally, the last chapter characterizes the spectral and spatial properties of auroral emissions, distinguishing between solar wind drivers and internal driving mechanisms. The in-depth reviews provide an excellent reference for future re...

  14. Totally thrombosed giant anterior communicating artery aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V R Roopesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant anterior communicating artery aneurysmsarerare. Apatient presented with visual dysfunction, gait ataxia and urinary incontinence. MRI showed a giant suprasellar mass.At surgery, the lesion was identified as being an aneurysm arising from the anterior communicating artery.The difficulty in preoperative diagnosis and relevant literature are reviewed.

  15. Giant Cell Tumor of the Infratemporal Fossa

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Kevin; Singh, Anand; Kuriakose, M. Abraham; Loree, Thom R.; Harris, Kenneth; Rubenfeld, Ari; Goodloe, Samuel; Hicks, Wesley L.

    2000-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are an uncommon neoplasm; most are found in the long bones, formed by endochondral ossification. This article presents a case of giant cell tumor of the infratemporal fossa, which by radiographic and clinical examination appears to have originated in the squamous portion of the temporal bone.

  16. Giant Cell Tumor of the Infratemporal Fossa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Kevin; Singh, Anand; Kuriakose, M. Abraham; Loree, Thom R.; Harris, Kenneth; Rubenfeld, Ari; Goodloe, Samuel; Hicks, Wesley L.

    2000-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are an uncommon neoplasm; most are found in the long bones, formed by endochondral ossification. This article presents a case of giant cell tumor of the infratemporal fossa, which by radiographic and clinical examination appears to have originated in the squamous portion of the temporal bone. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17171141

  17. Evolution and history of Giant Sequoia

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Thomas Harvey

    1986-01-01

    Ancient ancestors of the giant sequoia (Sequoiadendron giganteum [Lindl.] Buchholz) were widespread throughout much of the Northern Hemisphere during the late Mesozoic Period. Climatic conditions changed, forcing the more recent ancestors of present giant sequoia into the southwestern United States. The native range is now restricted to the west slope of the Sierra...

  18. Giant bladder diverticulum in a boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Ozcakir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the bladder diverticula in children are seen commonly which is association with infravesical obstruction or neurogenic bladder function, the case of giant congenital bladder diverticula are rare. In this paper, an 11 years old boy with giant bladder diverticula presenting urinary infections is evaluated in terms of diagnosis and management by current literature.

  19. Giant lower oesophageal ulcer Bushman baby

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-02-26

    Feb 26, 1983 ... Giant lower oesophageal ulcer. Bushman baby. A case report. J. J. HEYDENRYCH, A. D. KEET. •. ID a. Summary. The case of a giant, penetrating lower oesophageal ulcer in a 14-month-old Bushman baby is reported. ... crying precluded a thorough systematic examination. Food was immediately rejected.

  20. Surface Compositions of Red Giant Stars in Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Eric; Lau, Marie; Smith, Graeme; Chen, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Globular clusters (GCs) are excellent “laboratories” to study the formation and evolution of our galaxy. In order to understand, more specifically, the chemical compositions and stellar evolution of the stars in GCs, we ask whether or not deep internal mixing occurs in red giants or if in fact the compositions come from the primordial interstellar medium or previous generations of stars. It has been discovered that as a star evolves up the red giant branch, the surface carbon abundance decreases, which is evidence of deep internal mixing. We questioned whether these processes also affect O or Na abundance as a star evolves. We collected measurement data of red giants from GCs out of academic journals and sorted the data into catalogs. Then, we plotted the catalogs into figures, comparing surface O and Na each with stellar luminosity. Statistical tests were ran to quantify the amount of correlation between the variables. Out of 27 GCs, we concluded that eight show a positive correlation between Na and luminosity, and two show a negative correlation between O and luminosity. Properties of GCs were compared to determine if chemical distribution in stars depends on GCs as the self-enrichment scenario suggests. We created histograms of sodium distribution to test for bimodality to examine if there are separate trends in each GC. In six GCs, two different sequences of red giants appear for Na versus luminosity, suggesting evidence that the depth of mixing may differ among each red giant in a GC. This study has provided new evidence that the changing chemical abundances on the surfaces of red giants can be due to stellar evolutionary effects and deep internal mixing, which may not necessarily depend on the GC and may differ in depth among each red giant. Through this study, we learn more about stellar evolution which will eventually help us understand the origins of our universe. Most of this work was carried out by high school students working under the auspices of

  1. Effect of ski geometry on aggressive ski behaviour and visual aesthetics: equipment designed to reduce risk of severe traumatic knee injuries in alpine giant slalom ski racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröll, Josef; Spörri, Jörg; Gilgien, Matthias; Schwameder, Hermann; Müller, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive ski-snow interaction is characterised by direct force transmission and difficulty of getting the ski off its edge once the ski is carving. This behaviour has been suggested to be a main contributor to severe knee injuries in giant slalom (GS). The aim of the current study was to provide a foundation for new equipment specifications in GS by considering two perspectives: Reducing the ski's aggressiveness for injury prevention and maintaining the external attractiveness of a ski racer's technique for spectators. Three GS ski prototypes were defined based on theoretical considerations and were compared to a reference ski (Pref). Compared to Pref, all prototypes were constructed with reduced profile width and increased ski length. The construction radius (sidecut radius) of Pref was ≥ 27 m and was increased for the prototypes: 30 m (P30), 35 m (P35), and 40 m (P40). Seven World Cup level athletes performed GS runs on each of the three prototypes and Pref. Kinetic variables related to the ski-snow interaction were assessed to quantify the ski's aggressiveness. Additionally, 13 athletes evaluated their subjective perception of aggressiveness. 15 sports students rated several videotaped runs to assess external attractiveness. Kinetic variables quantifying the ski's aggressiveness showed decreased values for P35 and P40 compared to Pref and P30. Greater sidecut radius reduced subjectively perceived aggressiveness. External attractiveness was reduced for P40 only. This investigation revealed the following evaluation of the prototypes concerning injury prevention and external attractiveness: P30: no preventative gain, no loss in attractiveness; P35: substantial preventative gain, no significant loss in attractiveness; P40: highest preventative gain, significant loss in attractiveness. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Giant Primeval Magnetic Dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Christopher

    2017-07-01

    Macroscopic magnetic dipoles are considered cosmic dark matter. Permanent magnetism in relativistic field structures can involve some form of superconductivity, one example being current-carrying string loops (“springs”) with vanishing net tension. We derive the cross-section for free classical dipoles to collide, finding it depends weakly on orientation when mutual precession is rapid. The collision rate of “spring” loops with tension { T }˜ {10}-8{c}4/G in galactic halos approaches the measured rate of fast radio bursts (FRBs) if the loops compose most of the dark matter. A large superconducting dipole (LSD) with mass ˜1020 g and size ˜1 mm will form a ˜100 km magnetosphere moving through interstellar plasma. Although hydromagnetic drag is generally weak, it is strong enough to capture some LSDs into long-lived rings orbiting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) that form by the direct collapse of massive gas clouds. Repeated collisions near young SMBHs could dominate the global collision rate, thereby broadening the dipole mass spectrum. Colliding LSDs produce tiny, hot electromagnetic explosions. The accompanying paper shows that these explosions couple effectively to propagating low-frequency electromagnetic modes, with output peaking at 0.01-1 THz. We describe several constraints on, and predictions of, LSDs as cosmic dark matter. The shock formed by an infalling LSD triggers self-sustained thermonuclear burning in a C/O (ONeMg) white dwarf (WD) of mass ≳1 M ⊙ (1.3 M ⊙). The spark is generally located off the center of the WD. The rate of LSD-induced explosions matches the observed rate of Type Ia supernovae.

  3. Are Giant Tornadoes the Legs of Solar Prominences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedemeyer, Sven; Scullion, Eamon; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc; Bosnjak, Antonija; Antolin, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    Observations in the 171 Å channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the space-borne Solar Dynamics Observatory show tornado-like features in the atmosphere of the Sun. These giant tornadoes appear as dark, elongated, and apparently rotating structures in front of a brighter background. This phenomenon is thought to be produced by rotating magnetic field structures that extend throughout the atmosphere. We characterize giant tornadoes through a statistical analysis of properties such as spatial distribution, lifetimes, and sizes. A total number of 201 giant tornadoes are detected in a period of 25 days, suggesting that, on average, about 30 events are present across the whole Sun at a time close to solar maximum. Most tornadoes appear in groups and seem to form the legs of prominences, thus serving as plasma sources/sinks. Additional Hα observations with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope imply that giant tornadoes rotate as a structure, although they clearly exhibit a thread-like structure. We observe tornado groups that grow prior to the eruption of the connected prominence. The rotation of the tornadoes may progressively twist the magnetic structure of the prominence until it becomes unstable and erupts. Finally, we investigate the potential relation of giant tornadoes to other phenomena, which may also be produced by rotating magnetic field structures. A comparison to cyclones, magnetic tornadoes, and spicules implies that such events are more abundant and short-lived the smaller they are. This comparison might help to construct a power law for the effective atmospheric heating contribution as a function of spatial scale.

  4. ARE GIANT TORNADOES THE LEGS OF SOLAR PROMINENCES?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedemeyer, Sven; Scullion, Eamon; Rouppe van der Voort, Luc; Bosnjak, Antonija; Antolin, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Observations in the 171 Å channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly of the space-borne Solar Dynamics Observatory show tornado-like features in the atmosphere of the Sun. These giant tornadoes appear as dark, elongated, and apparently rotating structures in front of a brighter background. This phenomenon is thought to be produced by rotating magnetic field structures that extend throughout the atmosphere. We characterize giant tornadoes through a statistical analysis of properties such as spatial distribution, lifetimes, and sizes. A total number of 201 giant tornadoes are detected in a period of 25 days, suggesting that, on average, about 30 events are present across the whole Sun at a time close to solar maximum. Most tornadoes appear in groups and seem to form the legs of prominences, thus serving as plasma sources/sinks. Additional Hα observations with the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope imply that giant tornadoes rotate as a structure, although they clearly exhibit a thread-like structure. We observe tornado groups that grow prior to the eruption of the connected prominence. The rotation of the tornadoes may progressively twist the magnetic structure of the prominence until it becomes unstable and erupts. Finally, we investigate the potential relation of giant tornadoes to other phenomena, which may also be produced by rotating magnetic field structures. A comparison to cyclones, magnetic tornadoes, and spicules implies that such events are more abundant and short-lived the smaller they are. This comparison might help to construct a power law for the effective atmospheric heating contribution as a function of spatial scale

  5. Electromagnetic decay of giant resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beene, J.R.; Bertrand, F.E.; Halbert, M.L.; Auble, R.L.; Hensley, D.C.; Horen, D.J.; Robinson, R.L.; Sayer, R.O.; Sjoreen, T.P.

    1985-01-01

    Coincidence experiments were done to investigate the photon and neutron emission from the giant resonance regions of 208 Pb and 90 Zr using the ORNL Spin Spectrometer, a 72-segment NaI detector system. We have determined the total gamma-decay probability, the ground-state gamma branching ratio, and the branching ratios to a number of low-lying states as a function of excitation energy in 208 Pb to approx.15 MeV. Similar data were also obtained on 90 Zr. The total yield of ground-state E2 gamma radiation in 208 Pb and the comparative absence of such radiation in 90 Zr can only be understood if decay of compound (damped) states is considered. Other observations in 208 Pb include the absence of a significant branch from the giant quadrupole resonance (GQR) to the 3 - state at 2.6 MeV, a strong branch to a 3 - state at 4.97 MeV from the same region, and transitions to various 1 - states between 5 to 7 MeV from the E* approx. 14 MeV region (EO resonance)

  6. Self-consistent calculations of the electric giant dipole resonances in light and heavy nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutorovich, N; Tselyaev, V I; Speth, J; Krewald, S; Grümmer, F; Reinhard, P-G

    2012-08-31

    While bulk properties of stable nuclei are successfully reproduced by mean-field theories employing effective interactions, the dependence of the centroid energy of the electric giant dipole resonance on the nucleon number A is not. This problem is cured by considering many-particle correlations beyond mean-field theory, which we do within the quasiparticle time blocking approximation. The electric giant dipole resonances in 16O, 40Ca, and 208Pb are calculated using two new Skyrme interactions.

  7. Habitat use by giant panda in relation to man-made forest in Wanglang Nature Reserve of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dongwei; Wang, Xiaorong; Yang, Hongwei; Duan, Lijuan; Li, Junqing

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of human restoration in species conservation, in this study, we undertook a field survey of giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) habitat and man-made forest habitat in Wanglang Nature Reserve of China. Our results revealed that giant panda did not use the man-made forest in this area so far, and that there were significant differences between the giant panda habitat and the man-made forest habitat. Compared with giant panda habitat, the man-made forest habitat was characterized by lower shrub coverage, thinner trees and lower bamboo density. To improve the effectiveness of human restoration, the habitat requirement of giant panda should be fully consider in the whole process of habitat restoration.

  8. A practical guide to giant vesicles. Probing the membrane nanoregime via optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimova, Rumiana; Aranda, Said; Bezlyepkina, Natalya; Nikolov, Vesselin; Riske, Karin A; Lipowsky, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    Research on giant vesicles is becoming increasingly popular. Giant vesicles provide model biomembrane systems for systematic measurements of mechanical and rheological properties of bilayers as a function of membrane composition and temperature, as well as hydrodynamic interactions. Membrane response to external factors (for example electric fields, ions and amphiphilic molecules) can be directly visualized under the microscope. In this paper we review our current understanding of lipid bilayers as obtained from studies on giant unilamellar vesicles. Because research on giant vesicles increasingly attracts the interest of scientists from various backgrounds, we also try to provide a concise introduction for newcomers in the field. Finally, we summarize some recent developments on curvature effects induced by polymers, domain formation in membranes and shape transitions induced by electric fields

  9. Quantized TDHF for isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in spherical nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, S.; Okolowicz, J.; Ploszajczak, M.; Caurier, E.

    1988-01-01

    The time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory supplemented with the regularity and single-valuedness quantization condition for the gauge invariant component of the wavefunction is applied to the description of the centroid energy and escape width of isoscalar giant quadrupole resonances in 16 O, 40 Ca and 110 Zr. Calculations are performed using the Skyrme SIII effective interaction. An important role of the finite oscillation amplitude in the mean-field dynamics is emphasized. (orig.)

  10. Giant Leiomyoma of the Oesophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Dhamodaran; Kannan, Sujatha; Samuel, Vasundaran

    2017-01-01

    Leiomyomas are rare benign tumours of the oesophagus that remain silent in more than 50% of the cases. Giant leiomyomas measuring more than 5 cm are very rare. A 47-year-old female presented with chest pain, cough and dysphagia for two months. Imaging studies were indicative of a 12.1x11.9 cm mass lesion in the distal oesophagus, CT guided biopsy confirmed leiomyoma. The patient being taken up for surgery was found to have a 20x19x17 cm irregular lobulated and encapsulated mass lesion arising from distal oesophagus encapsulating submucosally. En bloc resection of the tumour along with distal oesophagus with a clearance of 4 cm above and below the oesophagogastric junction was done followed by gastro-oesophageal anastomosis. Histopathologically, leiomyoma was confirmed. The patient had a smooth postoperative recovery. PMID:28571208

  11. Giant trichobezoar mimicking gastric tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, S.A.; Soomro, A.G.; Jarwar, M.; Memon, A.S.; Siddiqui, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of giant gastric trichobezoar retrieved through a long gastrotomy in a 40 years old married women from rural Sindh with unreported psychological disturbance. Trichobezoar almost exclusively occur in females with an underlying psychiatric disorder. It has an insidious development of symptoms which accounts for its delayed presentation and large size at the time of diagnosis. They are associated with trichophagia (habit of compulsive hair eating) and are usually diagnosed on CT Scans or upper GI Endoscopy. They can give rise to complications like gastro-duodenal ulceration, haemorrhage, perforation, peritonitis or obstruction with a high rate of mortality. The treatment is endoscopic, laparoscopic or surgical removal and usually followed by psychiatric opinion. (author)

  12. Multipole giant resonances in highly excited nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Keding; Cai Yanhuang

    1989-01-01

    The isoscalar giant surface resonance and giant dipole resonance in highly excited nuclei are discussed. Excitation energies of the giant modes in 208 Pb are calculated in a simplified model, using the concept of energy wieghted sum rule (EWSR), and the extended Thomas-Fermi approximation at the finite temperature is employed to describe the finite temperature is employed to describe the finite temperature equilibrium state. It is shown that EWSR and the energy of the resonance depend only weakly on temperature in the system. This weak dependence is analysed

  13. Revised Stroemgren metallicity calibration for red giants

    OpenAIRE

    Hilker, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A new calibration of the Stroemgren (b-y),m_1 diagram in terms of iron abundance of red giants is presented. This calibration is based on a homogeneous sample of giants in the globular clusters omega Centauri, M22, and M55 as well as field giants from the list of Anthony-Twarog & Twarog (1998). Towards high metallicities, the new calibration is connected to a previous calibration by Grebel & Richtler (1992), which was unsatisfactory for iron abudances lower than -1.0 dex. The revised calibrat...

  14. Fatal canine distemper virus infection of giant pandas in China

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Na; Yu, Yicong; Wang, Tiecheng; Wilker, Peter; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Yuanguo; Sun, Zhe; Gao, Yuwei; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-01-01

    We report an outbreak of canine distemper virus (CDV) infection among endangered giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca). Five of six CDV infected giant pandas died. The surviving giant panda was previously vaccinated against CDV. Genomic sequencing of CDV isolated from one of the infected pandas (giant panda/SX/2014) suggests it belongs to the Asia-1 cluster. The hemagglutinin protein of the isolated virus and virus sequenced from lung samples originating from deceased giant pandas all possess...

  15. Multinuclear giant cell formation is enhanced by down-regulation of Wnt signaling in gastric cancer cell line, AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Shi-Mun; Kim, Rockki; Ryu, Jae-Hyun; Jho, Eek-Hoon; Song, Ki-Joon; Jang, Shyh-Ing; Kee, Sun-Ho

    2005-01-01

    AGS cells, which were derived from malignant gastric adenocarcinoma tissue, lack E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion but have a high level of nuclear β-catenin, which suggests altered Wnt signal. In addition, approximately 5% of AGS cells form multinuclear giant cells in the routine culture conditions, while taxol treatment causes most AGS cells to become giant cells. The observation of reduced nuclear β-catenin levels in giant cells induced by taxol treatment prompted us to investigate the relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. After overnight serum starvation, the shape of AGS cells became flattened, and this morphological change was accompanied by decrease in Myc expression and an increase in the giant cell population. Lithium chloride treatment, which inhibits GSK3β activity, reversed these serum starvation effects, which suggests an inverse relationship between Wnt signaling and giant cell formation. Furthermore, the down-regulation of Wnt signaling caused by the over-expression of ICAT, E-cadherin, and Axin enhanced giant cell formation. Therefore, down-regulation of Wnt signaling may be related to giant cell formation, which is considered to be a survival mechanism against induced cell death

  16. Rare giant frontal sinus osteoma mimicking fibrous dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, R P; Markey, A; Rutherford, S; Bhalla, R K

    2015-03-01

    To present the first report of a giant frontal sinus osteoma treated by excision and single-stage reconstruction with custom-made titanium cranioplasty and left orbital roof prostheses. A 31-year-old man with a history of chronic frontal sinusitis presented with a deforming, painless, midline forehead swelling of 11 years' duration, which had been treated unsuccessfully in Nigeria. Differential diagnosis included both benign and malignant bony tumours. Computerised tomography revealed a giant bony frontal sinus tumour extending beyond the sinus roof and breaching the left orbit, consistent with fibrous dysplasia. Given the extent of the tumour, open craniectomy was performed for surgical extirpation. Histological analysis identified multiple osteomas. This surgical approach achieved excellent cosmesis, with no evidence of recurrence at 12-month follow up. Forehead swelling may pose diagnostic and management dilemmas for the ENT surgeon; however, effective management is facilitated by a multidisciplinary approach.

  17. Extensión del Formalismo de Orbitales de Defecto Cuántico al tratamiento del efecto Stark (SQDO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, J. M.; Martín, I.; Velasco, A. M.

    El estudio experimental de las interacciones de átomos Rydberg altamente excitados con campos eléctricos ha experimentado un creciente interés durante las dos últimas décadas debido, en gran medida, al desarrollo de nuevas técnicas para crear y estudiar átomos Rydberg en el laboratorio. Acompañando a estas nuevas técnicas experimentales, es necesario el desarrollo de modelos teóricos que nos permitan contrastar sus medidas y conocer mejor los fundamentos de los mismos. Desde el punto de vista teórico el conocimiento del desdoblamiento de los niveles energéticos de un átomo en función de la magnitud del campo eléctrico aplicado (lo que se conoce como mapa Stark) es el mejor punto de partida para la descripción del sistema y un prerrequisito fundamental para el cálculo de distintas propiedades atómicas en presencia del campo eléctrico tales como intensidades de transición, umbrales de ionización de campo eléctrico, tiempos de vida, posición y anchura de cruces evitados, etc. En este trabajo presentamos la adaptación del método de orbitales de defecto cuántico [1,2,3] al tratamiento del efecto Stark (SQDO) [4] y su aplicación al cálculo de los desdoblamientos energéticos y fuerzas de oscilador de estados Rydberg en los átomos de Li, Na y K. El propósito de este estudio es, por un lado, desarrollar métodos fiables para la determinación de propiedades atómicas en presencia de campos eléctricos y, por otro, mostrar la fiabilidad de las funciones de onda QDO en la descripción del efecto Stark en sistemas atómicos.

  18. Giant Plagioclase Basalts, eruption rate versus time

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 111; Issue 4. Giant Plagioclase Basalts, eruption rate versus time: Response to Sheth's comments and some additional thoughts. Gautam Sen. Volume 111 Issue 4 December 2002 pp 487-488 ...

  19. Recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenomas with hemihypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantrige, Priyan Maleuwe; Hassanally, Delilah

    2011-01-01

    Giant juvenile fibroadenomas in patients with hemihypertrophy are exceptionally rare. We present a very interesting case of a 13 year old girl with hemihypertrophy of the left side presenting with recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenomas of the left breast. The giant fibroadenomas occurred twice in the left breast over two years. The first had a diameter of 12 cm and was excised through an inframammary incision. The second occurred a year later, had a diameter of 11 cm, and was associated with three smaller fibroadenomas. These lesions were removed through a single periareolar incision. The procedures were complicated by keloid scarring but the results were improved with steroid impregnated tape dressing and local methylprednisolone injection. This report adds to our experience in managing patients with recurrent giant juvenile fibroadenomas complicated by hemihypertrophy and raises awareness to anticipate keloid scarring.

  20. Giant Omental Lipoma in a Child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Narula, Mahender Kaur; Anand, Rama; Gupta, Isha; Kaur, Gurmeen; Kalra, Kanika

    2011-01-01

    Omental lipomas are extremely rare tumors of childhood. We report a case of solitary giant lipoma of the omentum in a child, successfully managed by complete excision, without any recurrence on follow-up study

  1. AFSC/ABL: Female Giant Grenadier maturity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Giant grenadiers Albatrossia pectoralis are caught as bycatch in deep-sea commercial fisheries in relatively large numbers. The population appears to be stable,...

  2. Enhanced recovery after giant ventral hernia repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K K; Brøndum, T L; Harling, H.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Giant ventral hernia repair is associated with a high risk of postoperative morbidity and prolonged length of stay (LOS). Enhanced recovery (ERAS) measures have proved to lead to decreased morbidity and LOS after various surgical procedures, but never after giant hernia repair. The current...... study prospectively examined the results of implementation of an ERAS pathway including high-dose preoperative glucocorticoid, and compared the outcome with patients previously treated according to standard care (SC). METHODS: Consecutive patients who underwent giant ventral hernia repair were included......-dose glucocorticoid may lead to low scores of pain, fatigue and nausea after giant ventral hernia repair with reduced LOS compared with patients treated according to SC....

  3. Red giants as precursors of planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renzini, A.

    1981-01-01

    It is generally accepted that Planetary Nebulae are produced by asymptotic giant-branch stars. Therefore, several properties of planetary nebulae are discussed in the framework of the current theory of stellar evolution. (Auth.)

  4. Blood Lead Levels in Captive Giant Pandas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintle, Nathan J P; Martin-Wintle, Meghan S; Zhou, Xiaoping; Zhang, Hemin

    2018-01-01

    Fifteen giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) from the Chinese Conservation and Research Center for the Giant Panda (CCRCGP) in Bifengxia, Sichuan, China were analyzed for blood lead concentrations (Pb-B) during the 2017 breeding season. Thirteen of the 15 bears showed Pb-B below the method detection limit (MDL) of 3.3 µg/dL. The two remaining bears, although above the MDL, contained very low concentrations of lead of 3.9 and 4.5 µg/dL. All 15 giant pandas in this analysis had Pb-B concentrations that were within normal background concentrations for mammals in uncontaminated environments. For a threatened species, whose native country is plagued by reports of extremely high air pollution, our findings suggest that giant pandas at the CCRCGP are not absorbing lead at concentrations that would adversely affect their health.

  5. Innate predator recognition in giant pandas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yiping; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Hemin; Li, Desheng; Yang, Bo; Wei, Ming; Zhou, Yingmin; Liu, Yang

    2012-02-01

    Innate predator recognition confers a survival advantage to prey animals. We investigate whether giant pandas exhibit innate predator recognition. We analyzed behavioral responses of 56 naive adult captive giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca), to urine from predators and non-predators and water control. Giant pandas performed more chemosensory investigation and displayed flehmen behaviors more frequently in response to predator urine compared to both non-predator urine and water control. Subjects also displayed certain defensive behaviors, as indicated by vigilance, and in certain cases, fleeing behaviors. Our results suggest that there is an innate component to predator recognition in captive giant pandas, although such recognition was only slight to moderate. These results have implications that may be applicable to the conservation and reintroduction of this endangered species.

  6. The cytology of giant solitary trichoepithelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamurthy Jayashree

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant solitary trichoepithelioma (GST is a rare trichogenic tumor, which may present as a pigmented lesion. An 80-year-old man was diagnosed to have giant solitary trichoepithelioma on fine-needle aspiration cytology. The cytological findings represented the histological features. The recognition of GST is important because of its close resemblance to basal cell carcinoma and other skin adnexal tumors - clinically, cytologically and histologically.

  7. Giant Planet Interior Structure and Thermal Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Fortney, Jonathan J.; Baraffe, Isabelle; Militzer, Burkhard

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the interior structure and composition of giant planets, and how this structure changes as these planets cool and contract over time. Here we define giant planets as those that have an observable hydrogen-helium envelope, which includes Jupiter-like planets, which are predominantly H/He gas, and Neptune-like planets which are predominantly composed of elements heavier than H/He. We describe the equations of state of planetary materials and the construction of static structural mode...

  8. Giant rhinophyma: Excision with coblation assisted surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caner Sahin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An 83-year-old man presented with an unusually severe case of rhinophyma. Giant rhinopyhma is very rare in literature. The giant lesion was widely excised using sharp surgical incision and coblation assisted surgery. Using direct coblation to the nasal dorsum may cause edema in the surrounding tissue. There was minimal edema in surrounding tissue using this technique. A full thickness-skin graft was applied after excision. Cosmetic and functional postoperative results were satisfactory.

  9. Star bursts and giant HII regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagel, B.E.J.

    1990-01-01

    Massive star formation bursts occur in a variety of galactic environments and can temporarily dominate the light output of a galaxy even when a relatively small proportion of its mass is involved. Inferences about their ages, the IMF and its dependence on chemical composition are still somewhat wobbly owing to an excess of unknowns, but certain things can be deduced from emission spectra of associated H II regions when due regard is paid to the effects of chemical composition and ionization parameter: In particular, largest ionization parameters and effective temperatures of exciting stars, at any given oxygen abundance, are anti-correlated with the abundance, and the second effect suggests an increasing proportion of more massive stars at lower abundances, although this is not yet satisfactorily quantified. A new blue compact galaxies could be very young, but it is equally possible that there is an older population of low surface brightness. Some giant H II regions may be self-polluted with nitrogen and helium due to winds from massive stars in the associated burst. (orig.)

  10. Swiss roll operation for giant fibroadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Saleem A; Memon, Sohail A; Mohammad, Noor; Maher, Mumtaz

    2009-01-01

    Fibroadenoma 5 cm or more is called giant fibroadenoma. Giant fibroadenoma can distort the shape of breast and causes asymmetry, so it should be excised. There are several techniques for excision of giant fibroadenoma. In our technique we remove them through cosmetically acceptable circumareolar incision to maintain the shape and symmetry of breast. The objectives were to assess the cosmetic results of Swiss roll operation for giant fibroadenoma. The study was conducted for six years from January, 2002 to December, 2007. Seventy patients of giant fibroadenoma were included in this study. They were diagnosed on history and clinical examination supported by ultrasound and postoperative histopathological examination. Data were collected from outpatient department and operation theatre. Swiss roll operation was performed under general anaesthesia. Mean tumor size was 6.38 cm. Three cm and 4 cm incisions were used for tumour 6 cm in size respectively. Skin closed with Vicryl 3/0 subcuticular stitches. Sixteen out of 70 patients had no scar while others hadminimal scar. All patients had normal shape and symmetry of breast. On histopathology fibroadenoma was confirmed. Giant fibroadenoma should be removed through cosmetically acceptable cicumareolar incision especially in unmarried young females who have small breast. Swiss-roll operation is superior in maintaining the shape and symmetry of breast. No major complication was found in our series except seroma formation in 10 patients.

  11. Thickness dependence of magnetic properties and giant magneto-impedance effect in amorphous Co{sub 73}Si{sub 12}B{sub 15} thin films prepared by Dual-Ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yu [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); BISSE/BUAA-SPNEE joint Laboratory Magnetism and Sperconducting technology on Spacecraft, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, San-sheng, E-mail: wangssh@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); BISSE/BUAA-SPNEE joint Laboratory Magnetism and Sperconducting technology on Spacecraft, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Hu, Teng [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); He, Tong-fu [School of Instrumentation Science and Opto-electronics Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Chen, Zi-yu [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yi, Zhong; Meng, Li-Fei [Science and Technology on Reliability and Environmental Engineering Laboratory, Beijing Institute of Spacecraft Environment Engineering, Beijing 100094 (China); BISSE/BUAA-SPNEE joint Laboratory Magnetism and Sperconducting technology on Spacecraft, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

    2017-03-15

    Dual-Ion Beam Assisted Deposition is a suitable method for the preparation of giant magneto-impedance (GMI) materials. In this paper, Co{sub 73}Si{sub 12}B{sub 15} thin films with different thicknesses were prepared by Dual-Ion Beam Assisted Deposition, and the influences of film thickness on magnetic properties and GMI effect were investigated. It was found that the asymmetric magnetic hysteresis loop in the prepared Co{sub 73}Si{sub 12}B{sub 15} thin films occurs at ambient temperature, and the shift behavior of hysteresis loop associated with film thickness. With the film thickness increasing, the values of shift field and coercive field and other parameters such as remanence and shift ratio appeared complex variation. At a certain frequency, the large GMI effect is only observed in some films, which have good magnetic properties including low coercivity, low remanence ratio and high shift ratio. The results indicated that the thickness dependence of magnetic properties nonlinearly determined the GMI effect in Co{sub 73}Si{sub 12}B{sub 15} thin films. - Highlights: • The relationship between film thickness and ΔZ/Z, ΔR/R, ΔX/X ratio of CoSiB film exhibits a complex behavior as the film thickness increases from 1.33 to 7.34 µm. The maximum value of GMI ratio is observed when the film thickness was 1.56, 2.48, 3.81 or 7.34 µm. • With the increase of film thickness, the peak frequency shifts to lower frequency, but does not decrease following the t-power law. • The above thickness phenomenon is due to the different magnetic properties of thin films. • The Dual-Ion Beam Assisted Deposition is introduced to prepare the GMI materials.

  12. Stark Widths of Hydrogen Spectral Lines in Plasmas: a Highly-Advanced Non-Simulative Semiclassical Theory and Tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oks, Eugene

    2006-01-01

    Plasma spectroscopy had served as a fertile field for applications of the formalism of Dressed Atomic States in Plasmas (DASP). The theory named in the title of this paper is based primarily on a generalization of the formalism of DASP. In its contemporary composition, this theory brings together: A) non-impact description of the indirect coupling of the electron and ion microfields; B) non-binary description of the direct coupling of the electron and ion microfields; C) non-binary non-impact description of the ion-dynamical broadening. The latter produces, in particular, a new counter-intuitive result for the dependence of the Ion-Dynamical Stark Width (IDSW) on the temperature T: it predicts that in distinction to the high-T limit, for which it was known that IDSW ∼ 1/T1/2, in the low-T limit the temperature dependence changes to IDSW ∼ T1/4. In other words, as the temperature decreases from the high-T limit, the IDSW first increases ∼ 1/T1/2, then reaches a maximum, and then decreases ∼ T1/4 (this being a non-binary result). A non-binary result on the density dependence of the IDSW is also presented. The theory composed of the above items A), B), C), is used for creating extensive Tables of Stark widths of hydrogen lines in plasmas. By comparison with benchmark experiments, it is shown that these Tables are more accurate than the corresponding tables published previously by other authors

  13. Formation of Ice Giant Satellites During Thommes Model Mirgration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Christopher; Spiegelberg, Josephine

    2018-01-01

    Inconsistencies between ice giant planet characteristics and classic planet formation theories have led to a re-evaluation of the formation of the outer Solar system. Thommes model migration delivers proto-Uranus and Neptune from orbits interior to Saturn to their current locations. The Thommes model has also been able to reproduce the large Galilean and Saturnian moons via interactions between the proto-ice giants and the gas giant moon disks.As part of a series of investigations examining the effects of Thommes model migration on the formation of moons, N-body simulations of the formation of the Uranian and Neptunian satellite systems were performed. Previous research has yielded conflicting results as to whether satellite systems are stable during planetary migration. Some studies, such as Beaugé (2002) concluded that the system was not stable over the proposed duration of migration. Conversely, Fuse and Neville (2011) and Yokoyama et al. (2011) found that moons were retained, though the nature of the resulting system was heavily influenced by interactions with planetesimals and other large objects. The results of the current study indicate that in situ simulations of the Uranus and Neptune systems can produce stable moons. Whether with current orbital parameters or located at pre-migration, inner Solar system semi-major axes, the simulations end with 5.8 ± 0.15 or 5.9 ± 0.7 regular satellites around Uranus and Neptune, respectively. Preliminary simulations of a proto-moon disk around a single planet migrating via the Thommes model have failed to retain moons. Furthermore, simulations of ejection of the current Uranian satellite system retained at most one moon. Thus, for the Thommes model to be valid, it is likely that moon formation did not begin until after migration ended. Future work will examine the formation of gas and ice giant moons through other migration theories, such as the Nice model (Tsiganis et al. 2006).

  14. Endoscopic endonasal surgery for giant pituitary adenomas: advantages and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutourousiou, Maria; Gardner, Paul A; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Wang, Eric W; Snyderman, Carl H

    2013-03-01

    Giant pituitary adenomas (> 4 cm in maximum diameter) represent a significant surgical challenge. Endoscopic endonasal surgery (EES) has recently been introduced as a treatment option for these tumors. The authors present the results of EES for giant adenomas and analyze the advantages and limitations of this technique. The authors retrospectively reviewed the medical files and imaging studies of 54 patients with giant pituitary adenomas who underwent EES and studied the factors affecting surgical outcome. Preoperative visual impairment was present in 45 patients (83%) and partial or complete pituitary deficiency in 28 cases (52%), and 7 patients (13%) presented with apoplexy. Near-total resection (> 90%) was achieved in 36 patients (66.7%). Vision was improved or normalized in 36 cases (80%) and worsened in 2 cases due to apoplexy of residual tumor. Significant factors that limited the degree of resection were a multilobular configuration of the adenoma (p = 0.002) and extension to the middle fossa (p = 0.045). Cavernous sinus invasion, tumor size, and intraventricular or posterior fossa extension did not influence the surgical outcome. Complications included apoplexy of residual adenoma (3.7%), permanent diabetes insipidus (9.6%), new pituitary insufficiency (16.7%), and CSF leak (16.7%, which was reduced to 7.4% in recent years). Fourteen patients underwent radiation therapy after EES for residual mass or, in a later stage, for recurrence, and 10 with functional pituitary adenomas received medical treatment. During a mean follow-up of 37.9 months (range 1-114 months), 7 patients were reoperated on for tumor recurrence. Three patients were lost to follow-up. Endoscopic endonasal surgery provides effective initial management of giant pituitary adenomas with favorable results compared with traditional microscopic transsphenoidal and transcranial approaches.

  15. Electron inelastic scattering by compound nuclei and giant multipole resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhavadov, A.V.; Mukhtarov, A.I.; Mirabutalybov, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    Multipole giant resonances in heavy nuclei have been investigated with the application of the Danos-Greiner dynamic collective theory to the Tassi model. The monopole giant resonance has been studied in 158 Gd, 166 Er, 184 W, 232 Th and 238 V nuclei at the incident electron energy E=200 MeV. Dependences of the form factor square of electron scattering by a 166 Er nucleus on the scattering angle obtained in the distorted-wave high-energy approximation (DWHEA) are presented. Giant dipole and quadrupole resonances in 60 Ni and 90 Zr nuclei have been studied. A comparison has been made of theoretical results obtained in the DWHEA for the dependence of the form factor square on the effective momentum transfer with the experimental data. The analysis of the obtained results led to the following conclusions. To draw a conclusion about the validity of one or another nuclear model and methods for calculating form factors, it is necessary to investigate, both theoretically and experimentally, electron scattering at great angles (THETA>=70 deg). To obtain a good agreement it is necessary to take account of the actual proton and neutron distributions in the ground state and their dynamic properties in an excited state [ru

  16. Mixing of exciton and charge-transfer states in Photosystem II reaction centers: Modeling of stark spectra with modified redfield theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novoderezhkin, V.I.; Dekker, J.P.; van Grondelle, R.

    2007-01-01

    We propose an exciton model for the Photosystem II reaction center (RC) based on a quantitative simultaneous fit of the absorption, linear dichroism, circular dichroism, steady-state fluorescence, triplet-minus-singlet, and Stark spectra together with the spectra of pheophytin-modified RCs, and

  17. Giant hepatocellular adenoma; case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitella, F.A.; Coutinho, A.M.N.; Coura Filho, G.B.; Costa, P.L.A.; Ono, C.R.; Watanabe, T.; Sapienza, M.T.; Hironaka, F.; Cerri, G.G.; Buchpiguel, C.A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FM/USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Radiologia. Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Hepatocellular adenoma is a benign hepatic tumor identified mainly in women during fertility age, with estimated incidence of 4/1000 inhabitants. It is usually unique, well circumscribed, with or without a capsule, size varying from 1 to 30 cm, with possible central areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Case Report: A 37-year-old female patient presenting with no comorbities, use of hormonal birth control pills for 18 years, a condition of reduction in the consistency of feces, increase in number of daily defecations, abdominal cramps, and a stuffed sensation after meals for two years. A palpable abdominal mass extending from the right hypochondriac to the right iliac fossa was noticed four months ago. A computerized tomography (CT) showed an extensive hepatic mass on the right which was considered, within the diagnostic hypotheses, hepatic adenomatosis, without ruling out secondary lesions. A hepatic scintillography with {sup 99m}Tc-DISIDA showed an extensive exophytic area from segment V to the right iliac fossa with arterialized blood flow and hepatocytic activity, as well as a hepatic nodule in segment VII with hepatocytic activity consistent with the hepatic adenomas hypothesis. The biopsy confirmed the hepatic adenoma diagnosis and the patient was submitted to a partial hepatectomy and cholecystectomy with good clinical evolution. Conclusion: Nuclear Medicine may supplement the assessment of hepatic nodules, including giant masses, thus suggesting new hypotheses and direction to therapeutic conduct. (author)

  18. Infiltrating giant cellular blue naevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, A L; Monteiro, D A; De Pretto, O J

    2007-01-01

    Cellular blue naevi (CBN) measure 1-2 cm in diameter and affect the dermis, occasionally extending into the subcutaneous fat. The case of a 14-year-old boy with a giant CBN (GCBN) involving the right half of the face, the jugal mucosa and the lower eyelid with a tumour that had infiltrated the bone and the maxillary and ethmoidal sinuses is reported. Biopsies were taken from the skin, jugal mucosa and maxillary sinus. The following markers were used in the immunohistochemical evaluation: CD34, CD56, HMB-45, anti-S100, A-103, Melan A and MIB-1. The biopsy specimens showed a biphasic pattern affecting the lower dermis, subcutaneous fat, skeletal muscle, bone, jugal mucosa and maxillary sinus, but there was no histological evidence of malignancy. The tumour cells were CD34-, CD56-, HMB45+, anti-S100+ and A-103+. Melan A was focally expressed. No positive MIB-1 cells were identified. The present case shows that GCBN may infiltrate deeply, with no evidence of malignancy.

  19. Atmospheres of the Giant Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    2002-01-01

    The giant planets, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, are fluid objects. They have no solid surfaces because the light elements constituting them do not condense at solar-system temperatures. Instead, their deep atmospheres grade downward until the distinction between gas and liquid becomes meaningless. The preceding chapter delved into the hot, dark interiors of the Jovian planets. This one focuses on their atmospheres, especially the observable layers from the base of the clouds to the edge of space. These veneers arc only a few hundred kilometers thick, less than one percent of each planet's radius, but they exhibit an incredible variety of dynamic phenomena. The mixtures of elements in these outer layers resemble a cooled-down piece of the Sun. Clouds precipitate out of this gaseous soup in a variety of colors. The cloud patterns are organized by winds, which are powered by heat derived from sunlight (as on Earth) and by internal heat left over from planetary formation. Thus the atmospheres of the Jovian planets are distinctly different both compositionally and dynamically from those of the terrestrial planets. Such differences make them fascinating objects for study, providing clues about the origin and evolution of the planets and the formation of the solar system.

  20. Nebulin--a giant chameleon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelin, Katarina; Wallgren-Pettersson, Carina

    2008-01-01

    Nebulin is an enormous protein of the muscle sarcomere. It is a determinant of thin filament length, Z-disk structure and fiber contractility. The nebulin gene contains four regions of alternative splicing, providing a wealth of different isoforms of the protein. The precise function of these numerous isoforms in various types of muscle tissue remains to be elucidated, as does their role in the maintenance of normal muscle strength and activity. Understanding these basic mechanisms is a prerequisite for the development of specific therapies for the disorders caused by mutations in the nebulin gene. Such mutations are the main cause of autosomal recessive nemaline (rod) myopathy, especially of the typical form of this congenital myopathy. Further known disorders caused by nebulin mutations are several other subcategories of recessively inherited nemaline myopathy and a novel distal myopathy caused byhomozygous missense mutations in the nebulin gene. Because of the giant size of the gene, molecular genetic testing methods are difficult to design for routine diagnostic use.

  1. Endoscopically removed giant submucosal lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Ivan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although uncommon, giant submucosal colon lipomas merit attention as they are often presented with dramatic clinical features such as bleeding, acute bowel obstruction, perforation and sometimes may be mistaken for malignancy. There is a great debate in the literature as to how to treat them. Case report. A patient, 67-year old, was admitted to the Clinic due to a constipation over the last several months, increasing abdominal pain mainly localized in the left lower quadrant accompanied by nausea, vomiting and abdominal distension. Physical examination was unremarkable and the results of the detailed laboratory tests and carcinoembryonic antigen remained within normal limits. Colonoscopy revealed a large 10 cm long, and 4 to 5 cm in diameter, mobile lesion in his sigmoid colon. Conventional endoscopic ultrasound revealed 5 cm hyperechoic lesion of the colonic wall. Twenty MHz mini-probe examination showed that lesion was limited to the submucosa. Since polyp appeared too large for a single transaction, it was removed piecemeal. Once the largest portion of the polyp has been resected, it was relatively easy to place the opened snare loop around portions of the residual polyp. Endoscopic resection was carried out safely without complications. Histological examination revealed the common typical histological features of lipoma elsewhere. The patient remained stable and eventually discharged home. Four weeks later he suffered no recurrent symptoms. Conclusion. Colonic lipomas can be endoscopically removed safely eliminating unnecessary surgery.

  2. A giant thunderstorm on Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G; Kurth, W S; Gurnett, D A; Zarka, P; Dyudina, U A; Ingersoll, A P; Ewald, S P; Porco, C C; Wesley, A; Go, C; Delcroix, M

    2011-07-06

    Lightning discharges in Saturn's atmosphere emit radio waves with intensities about 10,000 times stronger than those of their terrestrial counterparts. These radio waves are the characteristic features of lightning from thunderstorms on Saturn, which last for days to months. Convective storms about 2,000 kilometres in size have been observed in recent years at planetocentric latitude 35° south (corresponding to a planetographic latitude of 41° south). Here we report observations of a giant thunderstorm at planetocentric latitude 35° north that reached a latitudinal extension of 10,000 kilometres-comparable in size to a 'Great White Spot'-about three weeks after it started in early December 2010. The visible plume consists of high-altitude clouds that overshoot the outermost ammonia cloud layer owing to strong vertical convection, as is typical for thunderstorms. The flash rates of this storm are about an order of magnitude higher than previous ones, and peak rates larger than ten per second were recorded. This main storm developed an elongated eastward tail with additional but weaker storm cells that wrapped around the whole planet by February 2011. Unlike storms on Earth, the total power of this storm is comparable to Saturn's total emitted power. The appearance of such storms in the northern hemisphere could be related to the change of seasons, given that Saturn experienced vernal equinox in August 2009. ©2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  3. YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM's FIFTH GIANT PLANET?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesvorný, David

    2011-01-01

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside ∼15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  4. Young Solar System's Fifth Giant Planet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvorný, David

    2011-12-01

    Studies of solar system formation suggest that the solar system's giant planets formed and migrated in the protoplanetary disk to reach the resonant orbits with all planets inside ~15 AU from the Sun. After the gas disk's dispersal, Uranus and Neptune were likely scattered by the gas giants, and approached their current orbits while dispersing the transplanetary disk of planetesimals, whose remains survived to this time in the region known as the Kuiper Belt. Here we performed N-body integrations of the scattering phase between giant planets in an attempt to determine which initial states are plausible. We found that the dynamical simulations starting with a resonant system of four giant planets have a low success rate in matching the present orbits of giant planets and various other constraints (e.g., survival of the terrestrial planets). The dynamical evolution is typically too violent, if Jupiter and Saturn start in the 3:2 resonance, and leads to final systems with fewer than four planets. Several initial states stand out in that they show a relatively large likelihood of success in matching the constraints. Some of the statistically best results were obtained when assuming that the solar system initially had five giant planets and one ice giant, with the mass comparable to that of Uranus and Neptune, and which was ejected to interstellar space by Jupiter. This possibility appears to be conceivable in view of the recent discovery of a large number of free-floating planets in interstellar space, which indicates that planet ejection should be common.

  5. Giant comets and mass extinctions of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, W. M.

    2015-03-01

    I find evidence for clustering in age of well-dated impact craters over the last 500 Myr. At least nine impact episodes are identified, with durations whose upper limits are set by the dating accuracy of the craters. Their amplitudes and frequency are inconsistent with an origin in asteroid breakups or Oort cloud disturbances, but are consistent with the arrival and disintegration in near-Earth orbits of rare, giant comets, mainly in transit from the Centaur population into the Jupiter family and Encke regions. About 1 in 10 Centaurs in Chiron-like orbits enter Earth-crossing epochs, usually repeatedly, each such epoch being generally of a few thousand years' duration. On time-scales of geological interest, debris from their breakup may increase the mass of the near-Earth interplanetary environment by two or three orders of magnitude, yielding repeated episodes of bombardment and stratospheric dusting. I find a strong correlation between these bombardment episodes and major biostratigraphic and geological boundaries, and propose that episodes of extinction are most effectively driven by prolonged encounters with meteoroid streams during bombardment episodes. Possible mechanisms are discussed.

  6. Low cost medium for spore production of Bacillus KKU02 and KKU03 and the effects of the produced spores on growth of giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Man).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangka-Orm, Charkrit; Deeseenthum, Sirirat; Leelavatcharamas, Vichai

    2014-08-01

    In order to extend the shelf life of 2 high potential Bacillus probiotic isolates which were Bacillus KKU02 and Bacillus KKU03, the spore forms of these 2 Bacillus isolates were studied for using as probiotic instead. The low cost medium for spore production of these 2 Bacillus isolates was examined in order to produce probiotic spores for feeding the shrimps. It was found that cassava at 100 g L(-1) and supplemented with 20.0 g L(-1) dextrose, 0.1 g L(-1) MgSO4 and 2.0 g L(-1) (NH4)2SO4 showed the highest spore concentration at about 1 x 10(8) CFU mL(-1). The effects of feeding these 2 Bacillus spores on the growth of giant freshwater prawns were further examined. The spores of Bacillus KKU02 and Bacillus KKU03 (-10(7) spore mL(-1)) in pure and mixed culture forms were mixed with commercial prawn feed (200 mL kg(-1)) to give six feed treatments. Body length and weight of the prawns in mixed spore culture tanks after rearing for 90 days (13.5 cm and 59.8 g, respectively) were significantly higher (p = 0.05) than other treatments. The treated prawns were further challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila for 7 days. The percentages of survival after the challenge in the prawns fed with the mixed spores (46.8%) were also found significantly higher (p = 0.05) than others groups, except the mixed live cell treatment (60%). These results indicated that the spores of Bacillus KKU02 and Bacillus KKU03 had a high potential for using as commercial probiotics.

  7. Asteroseismology of Red Giants and Galactic Archaeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekker, Saskia

    From the oscillations in red-giant stars measured in time-series data it is possible to derive more accurate stellar parameters (e.g., mass, radius and age) as can be done using only single-epoch spectroscopy or photometry. These stellar parameters combined with chemical composition and the position, distance and velocity of the stars play an important role in studying the formation and evolution of the Milky Way. In this chapter we discuss some key physical phenomena that are at play in (red-giant) stars as well as some important phases in red-giant evolution. Subsequently, oscillation characteristics that are of importance for the determination of stellar parameters (as indicated above) of red-giant stars are introduced followed by a description of the main components of the Milky Way. Finally, the role red giants can play in creating a detailed observational picture of the Milky Way and deciphering the formation and evolution of the Milky Way is discussed.

  8. Decay of coherent acoustic phonons generated by femtosecond pulsed optical excitation and injected in a Wannier-Stark superlattice (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Anthony J.; Poyser, Caroline L.; Akimov, Andrey V.; York, William; Henini, Mohamed; Campion, Richard P.

    2017-02-01

    In the past decade, sound amplification by the stimulated emission of (acoustic phonon) radiation (saser) devices for generating coherent terahertz (THz) acoustic waves have been demonstrated [1 - 3]. The devices exploit the electron-phonon interactions in periodic semiconductor nanostructures known as superlattices (SLs) to amplify acoustic phonons. In addition, the particular acoustic properties of SLs can be exploited to make mirrors and cavities for THz phonons. Thus SLs can provide the two essential elements of a saser: the acoustic gain medium and the acoustic cavity. In this presentation I will describe experimental studies of the THz phonon dynamics in a weakly-coupled GaAs/AlAs saser SL, which is DC electrically biased into the Wannier-Stark regime. Picoseconds-duration pulses of coherent THz acoustic phonons were generated using pump light pulses from a femtosecond laser and injected into the SL device. These phonon pulses seeded the saser cavity modes at about 220 and 440 GHz, which were amplified within the device. The phonons were detected using two methods: reflection of femtosecond probe light pulses, in a conventional pump-probe arrangement, and through the transient electrical response of the device itself. When the DC bias conditions for saser were achieved in the device, the amplitude and lifetime of the seeded modes were both increased, analogous to the threshold and spectral line narrowing effects seen in laser devices. [1] R P Beardsley et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 085501 (2010). [2] W Maryam et al., Nature Communications 4:2184 (2013). [3] K Shinokita et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 075504 (2016).

  9. Flea (Pulex simulans) infestation in captive giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlow, Adrian G; Dryden, Michael W; Payne, Patricia A

    2006-09-01

    A pair of captive adult giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) presented heavily infested with a flea species (Pulex simulans) commonly found on Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana) and raccoons (Procyon lotor) in the central United States. In this case, the flea was demonstrated to have completed its entire life cycle with the anteaters as the host. A single treatment of topical imidacloprid, coupled with removal and replacement of infested bedding, was rapidly effective at controlling the infestation and no adverse effects of the drug were noted. Control of the anteater infestation also removed the flea infestation of aardvarks in the same building.

  10. Pressure enhancement of the giant magnetocaloric effect in Tb.sub.5./sub.Si.sub.2./sub.Ge.sub.2./sub..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morellon, L.; Arnold, Zdeněk; Magen, C.; Ritter, C.; Skorokhod, Yuriy; Prokhnenko, Olexandr; Algarabel, P. A.; Ibarra, M. R.; Kamarád, Jiří

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 13 (2004), 137201/1-137201/4 ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0943 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : magnetocaloric effect * high-pressure * neutron diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.218, year: 2004

  11. A GIANT SAMPLE OF GIANT PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mickaliger, M. B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Palliyaguru, N. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Langston, G. I. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Bilous, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Kondratiev, V. I. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Lyutikov, M. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, 525 Northwestern Avenue, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2036 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2012-11-20

    We observed the Crab pulsar with the 43 m telescope in Green Bank, WV over a timespan of 15 months. In total we obtained 100 hr of data at 1.2 GHz and seven hours at 330 MHz, resulting in a sample of about 95,000 giant pulses (GPs). This is the largest sample, to date, of GPs from the Crab pulsar taken with the same telescope and backend and analyzed as one data set. We calculated power-law fits to amplitude distributions for main pulse (MP) and interpulse (IP) GPs, resulting in indices in the range of 2.1-3.1 for MP GPs at 1.2 GHz and in the range of 2.5-3.0 and 2.4-3.1 for MP and IP GPs at 330 MHz. We also correlated the GPs at 1.2 GHz with GPs from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), which were obtained simultaneously at a higher frequency (8.9 GHz) over a span of 26 hr. In total, 7933 GPs from the 43 m telescope at 1.2 GHz and 39,900 GPs from the GBT were recorded during these contemporaneous observations. At 1.2 GHz, 236 (3%) MP GPs and 23 (5%) IP GPs were detected at 8.9 GHz, both with zero chance probability. Another 15 (4%) low-frequency IP GPs were detected within one spin period of high-frequency IP GPs, with a chance probability of 9%. This indicates that the emission processes at high and low radio frequencies are related, despite significant pulse profile shape differences. The 43 m GPs were also correlated with Fermi {gamma}-ray photons to see if increased pair production in the magnetosphere is the mechanism responsible for GP emission. A total of 92,022 GPs and 393 {gamma}-ray photons were used in this correlation analysis. No significant correlations were found between GPs and {gamma}-ray photons. This indicates that increased pair production in the magnetosphere is likely not the dominant cause of GPs. Possible methods of GP production may be increased coherence of synchrotron emission or changes in beaming direction.

  12. A GIANT SAMPLE OF GIANT PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickaliger, M. B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Lorimer, D. R.; Palliyaguru, N.; Langston, G. I.; Bilous, A. V.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Lyutikov, M.; Ransom, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    We observed the Crab pulsar with the 43 m telescope in Green Bank, WV over a timespan of 15 months. In total we obtained 100 hr of data at 1.2 GHz and seven hours at 330 MHz, resulting in a sample of about 95,000 giant pulses (GPs). This is the largest sample, to date, of GPs from the Crab pulsar taken with the same telescope and backend and analyzed as one data set. We calculated power-law fits to amplitude distributions for main pulse (MP) and interpulse (IP) GPs, resulting in indices in the range of 2.1-3.1 for MP GPs at 1.2 GHz and in the range of 2.5-3.0 and 2.4-3.1 for MP and IP GPs at 330 MHz. We also correlated the GPs at 1.2 GHz with GPs from the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT), which were obtained simultaneously at a higher frequency (8.9 GHz) over a span of 26 hr. In total, 7933 GPs from the 43 m telescope at 1.2 GHz and 39,900 GPs from the GBT were recorded during these contemporaneous observations. At 1.2 GHz, 236 (3%) MP GPs and 23 (5%) IP GPs were detected at 8.9 GHz, both with zero chance probability. Another 15 (4%) low-frequency IP GPs were detected within one spin period of high-frequency IP GPs, with a chance probability of 9%. This indicates that the emission processes at high and low radio frequencies are related, despite significant pulse profile shape differences. The 43 m GPs were also correlated with Fermi γ-ray photons to see if increased pair production in the magnetosphere is the mechanism responsible for GP emission. A total of 92,022 GPs and 393 γ-ray photons were used in this correlation analysis. No significant correlations were found between GPs and γ-ray photons. This indicates that increased pair production in the magnetosphere is likely not the dominant cause of GPs. Possible methods of GP production may be increased coherence of synchrotron emission or changes in beaming direction.

  13. Characteristics of cerebrovascular accidents at time of diagnosis in a series of 98 patients with giant cell arteritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenone, Thierry; Puget, Marie

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the characteristics of cerebrovascular accidents at time of diagnosis in patients with giant cell arteritis. Retrospective data were collected from 98 patients at a single hospital with giant cell arteritis (according to the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria) diagnosed between October 1999 and January 2012. Cerebrovascular accident was found at initial presentation in 6 patients (6.1 %, 95 % CIs 2.3-12.9). Most of them had other symptoms of giant cell arteritis when the disease began. Signs reflecting the involvement of vertebro-basilar territory were present in 3 cases. No other case of cerebrovascular accident was described during the follow-up of patient; particularly no case of cerebrovascular accident occurred once corticosteroid therapy for the treatment of giant cell arteritis had been initiated. No differences in the epidemiologic, clinical and laboratory features at the time of diagnosis between patients who had cerebrovascular accidents and the rest of the giant cell arteritis patients were observed. Prognosis was good in our survey. However, there was no case of bilateral vertebral artery occlusion, a condition associated with poor prognosis. The present study confirms that cerebrovascular accidents may be the initial manifestation of giant cell arteritis, an argument in favor of a direct effect of the vasculitis in the development of cerebrovascular accidents rather than a complication of the corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis of giant cell arteritis should always be considered in an elderly patient with stroke and an unexplained elevation of inflammatory biomarkers.

  14. Giant bladder lithiasis: case report and bibliographic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego Vilar, Daniel; Beltran Persiva, José; Pérez Mestre, Mateo; Povo Martin, Iván José; Miralles Aguado, Jaume; Garau Perelló, Carmen; De Francia, Jose Antonio

    2011-05-01

    Urinary lithiasis is a very frequent urological disease but bladder lithiasis is very uncommon.Patients usually refer voiding symptoms and hematuria. The diagnosis is made after imaging tests. We report a clinical case describing a giant bladder stone and perform a bibliographic review. A 43 year old man with the diagnosis of giant bladder stone (more than 10 cm diameter). We searched Medline using the terms: giant bladder stone, giant bladder lithiasis, bladder lithiasis, giant bladder lithiasis. We made the diagnosis of giant bladder stone after a simple kidney, ureter and bladder (KUB) X Ray. The treatment for this patient was a cystolithotomy. We found more than 230 reports at Medline and chose the most referred ones and the last 10 years reports. Giant bladder lithiasis is a very rare pathology. The gold standard for diagnosis is cystoscopy but sometimes with a KUB Xray or an ultrasound is enough. Because of its size, cistolitotomy is the correct treatment for giant bladder stone.

  15. Giant pseudopolyps in the colon transversum in Crohn's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowin, W.; Fobbe, F.

    1986-01-01

    A case of giant pseudopolyps in the colon transversum in histologically verified Crohn's disease is presented. Giant pseudopolyps are a very rare manifestation in granulomatous colitis. Differential diagnosis espec. for polypous adenocarcinoma is discussed. (orig.) [de

  16. Isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in giant freshwater pawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): effects on the oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymatic activities and apoptosis in haemocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yufan; Ye, Chaoxia; Wang, Anli; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Changhong; Xian, Jianan; Sun, Zhenzhu

    2015-10-01

    The residual contaminators such as ammonia and nitrite are widely considered as relevant sources of aquatic environmental pollutants, posing a great threat to shrimp survival. To study the toxicological effects of ammonia and nitrite exposure on the innate immune response in invertebrates, we investigated the oxidative stress and apoptosis in haemocytes of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) under isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in order to provide useful information about adult prawn immune responses. M. rosenbergii (13.44 ± 2.75 g) were exposed to 0, 5, and 25 mg/L total ammonia-N (TAN) and 0, 5, and 20 mg/L nitrite-N for 24 h. All ammonia concentrations were combined with all nitrite concentrations, making a total of nine treatments studied. Following the exposure treatment, antioxidant enzyme activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, nitric oxide (NO) generation, and apoptotic cell ratio of haemocytes were measured using flow cytometry. Results indicated that ROS generation was sensitive to the combined effect of ammonia and nitrite, which subsequently affected the Cu-Zn SOD activity. In addition, CAT showed the highest activity at 5 mg/L TAN while GPx decreased at 5 mg/L TAN and returned towards baseline at 25 mg/L. NO generation synchronized with the apoptotic cell ratio in haemocytes, indicating that NO production was closely associated with programmed cell death. Both NO production and apoptotic ratios significantly decreased following 25 mg/L TAN, which may be due to the antagonistic regulation of NO and GPx. We hypothesized that the toxicological effect of nitrite exhibited less change in physiological changes compared to that of ammonia, because of the high tolerance to nitrite exposure in mature M. rosenbergii and/or the competitive effects of chloride ions. Taken together, these results showed that ammonia and nitrite caused a series of combined oxidative stress and apoptosis in M. rosenbergi, but further

  17. Pressure effects in the giant magnetocaloric compounds Gd.sub.5./sub.(Si.sub.x./sub.Ge.sub.1 - x./sub.).sub.4./sub..

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Morellon, L.; Arnold, Zdeněk; Algarabel, P. A.; Magen, C.; Ibarra, M. R.; Skorokhod, Yuriy

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 16, - (2004), s. 1623-1630 ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/02/0943 Grant - others:CICYT(ES) MAT2000-1756 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : magnetocaloric effect * high pressure * Gd 5 Si 4-x Ge x * magnetic transitions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.049, year: 2004

  18. Effect of culture season and stocking density on the growth and production of giant freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii de Ma raised in northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo P. Baysa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effects of culture season and different stocking density on productivity of freshwater prawn that was raised in northern Thailand. The experiment was conducted at the Faculty of Fisheries Technology and Aquatic Resources, Maejo University, Chiang Mai, Thailand. This study was divided into two experiments; each treatment was replicated three times. The first experiment investigated the effect of climatic condition on the culture and production of freshwater prawn post larvae (PL 10; mean weight of 0.02 g stocked in 400m2 ponds. Results of the first experiment revealed freshwater prawn raised during the dry season to summer obtained higher growth rate (0.19 g and 0.15 g/day and survival rate (34.27% and 24.49% than that of summer to rainy season (p<0.05. The second experiment investigated the effect of 2 different socking densities (25 and 50 individuals/m2 on the production survival of freshwater prawn. Results showed that the rate of growth, survival rate, and production, were much higher at a stocking density of 25 individuals/m2 (p<0.05 in contrast to 50 individuals/m2. Growth performances of freshwater prawns were triggered by stocking density and season.

  19. Hepatic Giant Cell Arteritis and Polymyalgia Rheumatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R Duerksen

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR is a clinical syndrome of the elderly characterized by malaise, proximal muscle aching and stiffness, low grade fever, elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rare and the frequent association with temporal giant cell arteritis. The authors describe a case of PMR associated with hepatic giant cell arteritis. This lesion has been described in two other clinical reports. The distribution of the arteritis may be patchy; in this report, diagnosis was made with a wedge biopsy performed after an initial nonspecific percutaneous liver biopsy. The authors review the spectrum of liver involvement in PMR and giant cell arteritis. Hepatic abnormalities respond to systemic corticosteroids, and patients with hepatic arteritis have a good prognosis.

  20. Bilateral Giant Juvenile Fibroadenoma of Breast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkar, Nikhil; Singh, Sumitoj; Paul, Surinder; Sandhu, Mandeep Singh; Kumar, Ashok

    2017-06-01

    Fibroadenomas are benign lesions of breast commonly found in young age group. These focal tumours contain both mesenchymal and glandular tissue. Giant juvenile fibroma of breast is rare variant of fibroadenoma found usually in less than 20 years of age. They present with rapid enlargement of single or multiple, discrete, painless large nodule of breast. A 14-years-old premenarche girl presented with large bilateral breast lumps for two months. FNAC showed features of juvenile fibroadenoma. Breast conserving surgical excision of lumps was performed and histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of juvenile fibroadenoma. Giant juvenile fibroadenomas are characterised by rapid enlargement of encapsulated mass. The aetiology is unknown, although end-organ hypersensitivity to normal level of estrogen is postulated. We present a case of bilateral giant juvenile fibroadenoma for its rarity.