WorldWideScience

Sample records for geophysical sciences division

  1. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division Program Report, 1988--1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    In 1990, the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division begins its 17th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to decades and from local to global. Our modeling is now reaching out from its atmospheric focus to treat linkages with the oceans and the land. In this report, we describe the Division's goal and organizational structure. We also provide tables and appendices describing the Division's budget, personnel, models, and publications. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division: Program report, FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    In 1988 the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division began its 15th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to years, and from kilometers to global, respectively. For this report, we have chosen to show a subset of results from several projects to illustrate the breadth, depth, and diversity of the modeling activities that are a major part of the Division's research, development, and application efforts. In addition, the recent reorganization of the Division, including the merger of another group with the Division, is described, and the budget, personnel, models, and publications are reviewed. 95 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division: Program report, FY 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-05-01

    In 1988 the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division began its 15th year as a division. As the Division has grown over the years, its modeling capabilities have expanded to include a broad range of time and space scales ranging from hours to years, and from kilometers to global, respectively. For this report, we have chosen to show a subset of results from several projects to illustrate the breadth, depth, and diversity of the modeling activities that are a major part of the Division's research, development, and application efforts. In addition, the recent reorganization of the Division, including the merger of another group with the Division, is described, and the budget, personnel, models, and publications are reviewed. 95 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Program report for FY 1984 and 1985 Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division of the Physics Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, J.B.; MacCracken, M.C.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gresho, P.M.; Luther, F.M.

    1986-08-01

    This annual report for the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division (G-Division) summarizes the activities and highlights of the past three years, with emphasis on significant research findings in two major program areas: the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), with its recent involvement in assessing the effects of the Chernobyl reactor accident, and new findings on the environmental consequences of nuclear war. The technical highlights of the many other research projects are also briefly reported, along with the Division's organization, budget, and publications.

  5. Program report for FY 1984 and 1985 Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division of the Physics Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, J.B.; MacCracken, M.C.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gresho, P.M.; Luther, F.M.

    1986-08-01

    This annual report for the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division (G-Division) summarizes the activities and highlights of the past three years, with emphasis on significant research findings in two major program areas: the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), with its recent involvement in assessing the effects of the Chernobyl reactor accident, and new findings on the environmental consequences of nuclear war. The technical highlights of the many other research projects are also briefly reported, along with the Division's organization, budget, and publications

  6. Program report for FY 1980. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division of the Physics Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, J.B.; Orphan, R.C.

    1981-02-01

    The FY 1980 research program conducted by the Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division and supporting segments at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is reviewed briefly. The work is divided into five research themes: advanced modeling, regional modeling and assessments, CO 2 and climate research, stratospheric research, and special projects. Specific projects are described, and significant findings of the work are indicated. Unique numerical modeling capabilities in use and under development are described

  7. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division, Physics Department program report, FY 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, J.B.; Orphan, R.C.

    1977-12-01

    Progress is reported on the development of a number of mathematical models for the simulation and computer analysis of a variety of environmental conditions. Regional, local, and global models for the environmental transport of chemical and radioactive effluents at surface and stratospheric levels are described. A list is included of publications in the atmospheric sciences during the time covered by this report

  8. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 59 papers of the 1981 annual report of the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The general topics covered included nuclear waste isolation, geophysics and reservoir engineering, and geosciences

  9. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. We are proud to be able to bring you this report, which we hope will convey not only a description of the Division's scientific activities but also a sense of the enthusiasm and excitement present today in the Earth Sciences.

  10. Earth Sciences Division annual report, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornady, B.; Duba, A.

    1977-01-01

    This compilation lists abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1976 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Subjects include: coal gasification, gas stimulation, geothermal fields, oil shale retorting, radioactive waste management, geochemistry, geophysics, seismology, explosive phenomenology, and miscellaneous studies

  11. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1981. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 59 papers of the 1981 annual report of the Earth Sciences Division at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The general topics covered included nuclear waste isolation, geophysics and reservoir engineering, and geosciences. (KRM)

  12. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division`s research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth`s crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required.

  13. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This Annual Report presents summaries of selected representative research activities grouped according to the principal disciplines of the Earth Sciences Division: Reservoir Engineering and Hydrogeology, Geology and Geochemistry, and Geophysics and Geomechanics. Much of the Division's research deals with the physical and chemical properties and processes in the earth's crust, from the partially saturated, low-temperature near-surface environment to the high-temperature environments characteristic of regions where magmatic-hydrothermal processes are active. Strengths in laboratory and field instrumentation, numerical modeling, and in situ measurement allow study of the transport of mass and heat through geologic media -- studies that now include the appropriate chemical reactions and the hydraulic-mechanical complexities of fractured rock systems. Of particular note are three major Division efforts addressing problems in the discovery and recovery of petroleum, the application of isotope geochemistry to the study of geodynamic processes and earth history, and the development of borehole methods for high-resolution imaging of the subsurface using seismic and electromagnetic waves. In 1989 a major DOE-wide effort was launched in the areas of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management. Many of the methods previously developed for and applied to deeper regions of the earth will in the coming years be turned toward process definition and characterization of the very shallow subsurface, where man-induced contaminants now intrude and where remedial action is required

  14. 2012 Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) Lidar: Whittier, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In support of geologic mapping and hazards evaluation in and near Whittier, Alaska, the Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) acquired, and is making...

  15. Technical activities, 1990: Surface Science Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, C.J.

    1991-05-01

    The report summarizes technical activities and accomplishments of the NIST Surface Science Division during Fiscal Year 1990. Overviews are presented of the Division and of its three constituent groups: Surface Dynamical Processes, Thin Films and Interfaces, and Surface Spectroscopies and Standards. These overviews are followed by reports of selected technical accomplishments during the year. A summary is given of Division outputs and interactions that includes lists of publications, talks, committee assignments, seminars (including both Division seminars and Interface Science seminars arranged through the Division), conferences organized, and a standard reference material certified. Finally, lists are given of Division staff and of guest scientists who have worked in the Division during the past year

  16. GSFC Heliophysics Science Division 2008 Science Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly R.; Strong, Keith T.; Saba, Julia L. R.; Firestone, Elaine R.

    2009-01-01

    This report is intended to record and communicate to our colleagues, stakeholders, and the public at large about heliophysics scientific and flight program achievements and milestones for 2008, for which NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Heliophysics Science Division (HSD) made important contributions. HSD comprises approximately 261 scientists, technologists, and administrative personnel dedicated to the goal of advancing our knowledge and understanding of the Sun and the wide variety of domains that its variability influences. Our activities include Lead science investigations involving flight hardware, theory, and data analysis and modeling that will answer the strategic questions posed in the Heliophysics Roadmap; Lead the development of new solar and space physics mission concepts and support their implementation as Project Scientists; Provide access to measurements from the Heliophysics Great Observatory through our Science Information Systems, and Communicate science results to the public and inspire the next generation of scientists and explorers.

  17. GSFC Heliophysics Science Division 2009 Science Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Keith T.; Saba, Julia L. R.; Strong, Yvonne M.

    2009-01-01

    This report is intended to record and communicate to our colleagues, stakeholders, and the public at large about heliophysics scientific and flight program achievements and milestones for 2009, for which NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Heliophysics Science Division (HSD) made important contributions. HSD comprises approximately 299 scientists, technologists, and administrative personnel dedicated to the goal of advancing our knowledge and understanding of the Sun and the wide variety of domains that its variability influences. Our activities include: Leading science investigations involving flight hardware, theory, and data analysis and modeling that will answer the strategic questions posed in the Heliophysics Roadmap; Leading the development of new solar and space physics mission concepts and support their implementation as Project Scientists; Providing access to measurements from the Heliophysics Great Observatory through our Science Information Systems; and Communicating science results to the public and inspiring the next generation of scientists and explorers.

  18. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  19. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This year's Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE's core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE)

  20. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, A.L.; Schwartz, L.L.

    1980-01-01

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1979 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract iself is given only under the name of the first author or the first Earth Sciences Division author. A topical index at the end of the report provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division

  1. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

  2. Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals

  3. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This year`s Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE`s core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  4. Earth Sciences Division, collected abstracts, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taasevigen, D.K.; Henry, A.L.; Madsen, S.K.

    1979-01-01

    Abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1978 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory are compiled. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For any given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor. A topical index at the end provides useful cross references, while indicating major areas of research interest in the Earth Sciences Division

  5. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, A.L.; Hornady, B.F. (eds.)

    1981-10-15

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, reports, and talks presented during 1980 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract itself is given only under the name of the first author (indicated in capital letters) or the first Earth Sciences Division author.

  6. Earth Sciences Division collected abstracts: 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, A.L.; Hornady, B.F.

    1981-01-01

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, reports, and talks presented during 1980 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The arrangement is alphabetical (by author). For a given report, a bibliographic reference appears under the name of each coauthor, but the abstract itself is given only under the name of the first author (indicated in capital letters) or the first Earth Sciences Division author

  7. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences)

  8. Chemical Sciences Division: Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    The Chemical Sciences Division (CSD) is one of twelve research Divisions of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, a Department of Energy National Laboratory. The CSD is composed of individual groups and research programs that are organized into five scientific areas: Chemical Physics, Inorganic/Organometallic Chemistry, Actinide Chemistry, Atomic Physics, and Physical Chemistry. This report describes progress by the CSD for 1992. Also included are remarks by the Division Director, a description of work for others (United States Office of Naval Research), and appendices of the Division personnel and an index of investigators. Research reports are grouped as Fundamental Interactions (Photochemical and Radiation Sciences, Chemical Physics, Atomic Physics) or Processes and Techniques (Chemical Energy, Heavy-Element Chemistry, and Chemical Engineering Sciences).

  9. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations

  10. Nuclear Science Division: 1993 Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D. [ed.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the 1993 calendar year. This was another significant year in the history of the Division with many interesting and important accomplishments. Activities for the following programs are covered here: (1) nuclear structure and reactions program; (2) the Institute for Nuclear and Particle Astrophysics; (3) relativistic nuclear collisions program; (4) nuclear theory program; (5) nuclear data evaluation program, isotope project; and (6) 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  11. Life Sciences Division annual report, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marrone, B.L.; Cram, L.S.

    1989-04-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Life Sciences Division for the calendar year 1988. Technical reports related to the current status of projects are presented in sufficient detail to permit the informed reader to assess their scope and significance. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the Group Leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information

  12. Life Sciences Division annual report, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrone, B.L.; Cram, L.S. (comps.)

    1989-04-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Life Sciences Division for the calendar year 1988. Technical reports related to the current status of projects are presented in sufficient detail to permit the informed reader to assess their scope and significance. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the Group Leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  13. Earth Sciences Division annual report 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-07-01

    Summaries of the highlights of programs in the Earth Sciences Division are presented under four headings; Geosciences, Geothermal Energy Development, Nuclear Waste Isolation, and Marine Sciences. Utilizing both basic and applied research in a wide spectrum of topics, these programs are providing results that will be of value in helping to secure the nation's energy future. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each project for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  14. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haines, N. (ed.)

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions.

  15. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, N.

    1990-06-01

    The Chemical and Laser Sciences Division Annual Report includes articles describing representative research and development activities within the Division, as well as major programs to which the Division makes significant contributions

  16. The relationship of fractals in geophysics to 'the new science'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    2004-01-01

    Many phenomena in geophysics satisfy fractal statistics, examples range from the frequency-area statistics of earthquakes to the time series of the earth's magnetic field. Solutions to classical differential equations cannot give this type of behavior. Several 'cellular automata' models have successfully reproduced the observed statistics. For example, the slider-block model for earthquakes. Stephen Wolfram's recent book A New Kind of Science sets forth a 'new science' based on cellular automata. This paper discusses the role of cellular automata in geophysics

  17. Using Geophysical Data to Improve Science Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vink, G. E.

    2002-12-01

    Although relatively few students will become professional geoscientists (i.e. producers of scientific information), essentially every student is a future consumer of scientific information. Government agencies, environmental organizations, businesses, and special interest groups use scientific arguments to set policy, create legislation, and develop international agreements. Often, decisions must be made even though the data are incomplete, ambiguous, or contradictory. In addition, such decisions frequently have severe social, economic, and political consequences. At Princeton University, we have developed courses designed to make students sophisticated consumers of scientific information. The courses are among the most popular and top rated courses in the University. Through a series of actual case studies that use geophysical data, students learn how to make decisions using scientific information in concert with engineering, economic, political, and social considerations. For each issue, they analyze the scientific arguments, evaluate the geophysical data upon which they are based, and determine the scientific credibility, political feasibility, and economic consequences of the various options. The class's actions are then compared against those of the actual decision-makers, and the accuracy of their predictions is evaluated against the outcome. Students gain first-hand experience with concepts such as valid inference, representative sampling, boundary values, and data discrimination.

  18. Division of information and quantum sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    The advent of the digital society where tremendous amount of information is electronically accessible has brought the intelligent information processing technologies indispensable. This division consists of seven departments; Information Science Departments (Knowledge Science, Intelligent Media, Architecture for Intelligence, Reasoning for Intelligence), Quantum Science Departments (Photonic and Electronic Materials, Semiconductor Electronics, and Advanced Electron Devices. The former four and the latter three departments aim to establish fundamental techniques to support the advanced digital society in terms of software and hardware technologies respectively. The departments on the former software technologies work on the task of computerizing the intelligent human information processing capability to help solving difficult engineering problems and assist intellectual activities. The departments on the latter hardware technologies pursue various approaches in the fields of electronic materials design and tailoring, surface physics, nanometer scale materials fabrication and characterization, semiconductor nanostructures for quantum devices, semiconductor-based new bio/chemical sensors, organic materials and biomolecules. We challenge to output world-widely significant achievements under our systematic cooperation, and further collaborate with researchers of domestic and overseas universities, research institutes and private companies. Moreover, we educate many graduate students belonging to Graduate School of Science (Department of Physics), Graduate School of Engineering (Department of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Department of Applied Physics), Graduate School of Engineering Science (Department of Materials Engineering Science), and Graduate School of Information Science and Technology (Department of Computer Science, Department of Information and Physical Sciences) under the aim to grow young researchers having both advanced knowledge and

  19. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2002-2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2003-11-01

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences is becoming increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than hydrocarbons and the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide and methane) are critical to the future energy needs and environmental safety of this planet. In addition, the cleanup of many contaminated sites in the U.S., along with the preservation and management of our water supply, remain key challenges for us as well as future generations. Addressing these energy, climate change, and environmental issues requires the timely integration of earth sciences' disciplines (such as geology, hydrology, oceanography, climatology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomechanics, ecology, and environmental sciences). This integration will involve focusing on fundamental crosscutting concerns that are common to many of these issues. A primary focus will be the characterization, imaging, and manipulation of fluids in the earth. Such capabilities are critical to many DOE applications, from environmental restoration to energy extraction and optimization. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is currently addressing many of the key technical issues described above. In this document, we present summaries of many of our current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, it is representative of the nature and breadth of our research effort. We are proud of our scientific efforts, and we hope that you will find our research useful and exciting. Any comments on our research are appreciated and can be sent to me personally. This report is divided into five sections that correspond to the major research programs in the Earth Sciences Division: (1) Fundamental and Exploratory Research; (2) Nuclear Waste; (3) Energy Resources; (4

  20. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2002-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences is becoming increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than hydrocarbons and the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide and methane) are critical to the future energy needs and environmental safety of this planet. In addition, the cleanup of many contaminated sites in the U.S., along with the preservation and management of our water supply, remain key challenges for us as well as future generations. Addressing these energy, climate change, and environmental issues requires the timely integration of earth sciences' disciplines (such as geology, hydrology, oceanography, climatology, geophysics, geochemistry, geomechanics, ecology, and environmental sciences). This integration will involve focusing on fundamental crosscutting concerns that are common to many of these issues. A primary focus will be the characterization, imaging, and manipulation of fluids in the earth. Such capabilities are critical to many DOE applications, from environmental restoration to energy extraction and optimization. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is currently addressing many of the key technical issues described above. In this document, we present summaries of many of our current research projects. While it is not a complete accounting, it is representative of the nature and breadth of our research effort. We are proud of our scientific efforts, and we hope that you will find our research useful and exciting. Any comments on our research are appreciated and can be sent to me personally. This report is divided into five sections that correspond to the major research programs in the Earth Sciences Division: (1) Fundamental and Exploratory Research; (2) Nuclear Waste; (3) Energy Resources; (4) Environmental

  1. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centrella, Joan; Reddy, Francis; Tyler, Pat

    2012-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division(ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center(GSFC)is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radiowavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for three orbiting astrophysics missions WMAP, RXTE, and Swift, as well as the Science Support Center for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contract imaging techniques to serch for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, and provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and suppport the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new conepts and inventing new technologies.

  2. Goddard's Astrophysics Science Division Annual Report 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kimberly A. (Editor); Reddy, Francis J. (Editor); Tyler, Patricia A. (Editor)

    2014-01-01

    The Astrophysics Science Division (ASD) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is one of the largest and most diverse astrophysical organizations in the world, with activities spanning a broad range of topics in theory, observation, and mission and technology development. Scientific research is carried out over the entire electromagnetic spectrum from gamma rays to radio wavelengths as well as particle physics and gravitational radiation. Members of ASD also provide the scientific operations for two orbiting astrophysics missions Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and Swift as well as the Science Support Center for Fermi. A number of key technologies for future missions are also under development in the Division, including X-ray mirrors, space-based interferometry, high contrast imaging techniques to search for exoplanets, and new detectors operating at gamma-ray, X-ray, ultraviolet, infrared, and radio wavelengths. The overriding goals of ASD are to carry out cutting-edge scientific research, provide Project Scientist support for spaceflight missions, implement the goals of the NASA Strategic Plan, serve and support the astronomical community, and enable future missions by conceiving new concepts and inventing new technologies.

  3. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, Donald; DePaolo, Donald

    2008-07-21

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences has become increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and other environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than fossil hydrocarbons, the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases, and a detailed understanding of the climatic consequences of our energy choices are all critical to meeting energy needs while ensuring environmental safety. The cleanup of underground contamination and the preservation and management of water supplies continue to provide challenges, as they will for generations into the future. To address the critical energy and environmental issues requires continuing advances in our knowledge of Earth systems and our ability to translate that knowledge into new technologies. The fundamental Earth science research common to energy and environmental issues largely involves the physics, chemistry, and biology of fluids in and on the Earth. To manage Earth fluids requires the ability to understand their properties and behavior at the most fundamental molecular level, as well as prediction, characterization, imaging, and manipulation of those fluids and their behavior in real Earth reservoirs. The broad range of disciplinary expertise, the huge range of spatial and time scales, and the need to integrate theoretical, computational, laboratory and field research, represent both the challenge and the excitement of Earth science research. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is committed to addressing the key scientific and technical challenges that are needed to secure our energy future in an environmentally responsibly way. Our staff of over 200 scientists, UC Berkeley faculty, support staff and guests perform world-acclaimed fundamental research in hydrogeology and reservoir engineering, geophysics and geomechanics, geochemistry, microbial ecology

  4. Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePaolo, Donald; DePaolo, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Research in earth and atmospheric sciences has become increasingly important in light of the energy, climate change, and other environmental issues facing the United States and the world. The development of new energy resources other than fossil hydrocarbons, the safe disposal of nuclear waste and greenhouse gases, and a detailed understanding of the climatic consequences of our energy choices are all critical to meeting energy needs while ensuring environmental safety. The cleanup of underground contamination and the preservation and management of water supplies continue to provide challenges, as they will for generations into the future. To address the critical energy and environmental issues requires continuing advances in our knowledge of Earth systems and our ability to translate that knowledge into new technologies. The fundamental Earth science research common to energy and environmental issues largely involves the physics, chemistry, and biology of fluids in and on the Earth. To manage Earth fluids requires the ability to understand their properties and behavior at the most fundamental molecular level, as well as prediction, characterization, imaging, and manipulation of those fluids and their behavior in real Earth reservoirs. The broad range of disciplinary expertise, the huge range of spatial and time scales, and the need to integrate theoretical, computational, laboratory and field research, represent both the challenge and the excitement of Earth science research. The Earth Sciences Division (ESD) of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) is committed to addressing the key scientific and technical challenges that are needed to secure our energy future in an environmentally responsibly way. Our staff of over 200 scientists, UC Berkeley faculty, support staff and guests perform world-acclaimed fundamental research in hydrogeology and reservoir engineering, geophysics and geomechanics, geochemistry, microbial ecology

  5. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D. [ed.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The {open_quotes}early implementation{close_quotes} phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large {gamma}-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive {sup 21}Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium.

  6. Nuclear Science Division 1994 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division for the period of January 1, 1994, to December 31, 1994. This was a time of significant accomplishment for all of the programs in the Division. Assembly of the solar neutrino detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is well under way. All of the components fabricated by LBL were shipped to Sudbury early in the year and our efforts are now divided between assisting the assembly of the detector and preparing software for data analysis once the detector is operational in 1996. Much of the activity at the 88-Inch Cyclotron centered on Gammasphere. The open-quotes early implementationclose quotes phase of the detector ended in September. This phase was extremely successful, involving over 60 experiments with nearly 200 users from 37 institutions worldwide. The mechanical structure was installed and the final electronic system is expected to operate in March 1995. The Division concurrently hosted a conference on physics for large γ-ray detector arrays at the Clark Kerr Campus at UC Berkeley in August. This was a very successful meeting, reflecting the enthusiasm for this field worldwide. Also at the Cyclotron, the progress toward weak interaction experiments using ultra-thin sources passed a major milestone with the trapping of radioactive 21 Na atoms. We are now engaged in a major upgrade of the experimental area and the outlook is very promising for these novel experiments. Another highlight of research at the Cyclotron was the confirmation of element 106. This development allowed the original LLNL/LBL discovery team to move forward with their proposal to name this element seaborgium

  7. Geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Bolt, Bruce

    1973-01-01

    Methods in Computational Physics, Volume 13: Geophysics is a 10-chapter text that focuses with the theoretical solid-earth geophysics. This volume specifically covers the general topics of terrestrial magnetism and electricity, the Earth's gravity field, tidal deformations, dynamics of global spin, spin processing, and convective models for the deep interior. This volume surveys first the construction of mathematical models, such as the representation of the geomagnetic field by assuming arrangements of multipole sources in the core and the fast computer evaluation of two- and three-dimensiona

  8. Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, M. H.; Cassen, P.

    1976-01-01

    Four areas of investigation, each dealing with the measurement of a particular geophysical property, are discussed. These properties are the gravity field, seismicity, magnetism, and heat flow. All are strongly affected by conditions, past or present, in the planetary interior; their measurement is the primary source of information about planetary interiors.

  9. Earth Sciences Division, collected abstracts-1977. [Research programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quitiquit, W.A.; Ledbetter, G.P.; Henry, A.L.

    1978-05-24

    This report is a compilation of abstracts of papers, internal reports, and talks presented during 1977 at national and international meetings by members of the Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. It is arranged alphabetically by author and includes a cross-reference by subject indicating the areas of research interest of the Earth Sciences Division.

  10. Bringing 3D Printing to Geophysical Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, A.; Turrin, M.; Porter, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    3D printing technology has been embraced by many technical fields, and is rapidly making its way into peoples' homes and schools. While there is a growing educational and hobbyist community engaged in the STEM focused technical and intellectual challenges associated with 3D printing, there is unrealized potential for the earth science community to use 3D printing to communicate scientific research to the public. Moreover, 3D printing offers scientists the opportunity to connect students and the public with novel visualizations of real data. As opposed to introducing terrestrial measurements through the use of colormaps and gradients, scientists can represent 3D concepts with 3D models, offering a more intuitive education tool. Furthermore, the tactile aspect of models make geophysical concepts accessible to a wide range of learning styles like kinesthetic or tactile, and learners including both visually impaired and color-blind students.We present a workflow whereby scientists, students, and the general public will be able to 3D print their own versions of geophysical datasets, even adding time through layering to include a 4th dimension, for a "4D" print. This will enable scientists with unique and expert insights into the data to easily create the tools they need to communicate their research. It will allow educators to quickly produce teaching aids for their students. Most importantly, it will enable the students themselves to translate the 2D representation of geophysical data into a 3D representation of that same data, reinforcing spatial reasoning.

  11. Environment and Medical Sciences Division Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainge, W.M.

    1980-06-01

    The 1979 annual progress report of the UKAEA Environmental and Medical Sciences Division covers both radiological and non-nuclear research programmes in the environmental and toxicological fields. The specific topics were 1) 'atmospheric pollution' which included the analysis of atmospheric trace gases by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, the life cycle of atmospheric sulphur compounds, photochemical pollution, studies on stratospheric reactions, stratospheric ozone and the effects of pollutants, upper air sampling and monitoring gaseous atmospheric pollutants with passive samplers; 2) miscellaneous 'environmental safety projects'; 3) 'radiation physics' projects concerning a) radioactive fallout, b) studies of stable trace elements in the atmospheric environment and studies of radioactivity in the environment, c) various aspects of dosimetry research including radiation biophysics, d) personnel dosimetry, e) applied radiation spectrometry and f) data systems; 5) 'aerosol and metabolic studies' including whole body counting studies; 6) 'inhalation toxicology and radionuclide analysis' studies including actinide inhalation, cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity of non-radioactive dusts, asbestos and glass fibre research, a Qauntimet 720 image analysis service and radionuclide analysis in biological materials; and 7) 'analytical services' used in relation to 'environmental safety and chemical analysis' projects. (U.K.)

  12. Resource Management in the Microgravity Science Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casselle, Justine

    2004-01-01

    In the Microgravity Science Division, the primary responsibilities of the Business Management Office are resource management and data collection. Resource management involves working with a budget to do a number of specific projects, while data collection involves collecting information such as the status of projects and workforce hours. This summer in the Business Management Office I assisted Margie Allen with resource planning and the implementation of specific microgravity projects. One of the main duties of a Project Control Specialists, such as my mentor, is to monitor and analyze project manager s financial plans. Project managers work from the bottom up to determine how much money their project will cost. They then set up a twelve month operating plan which shows when money will be spent. I assisted my mentor in checking for variances in her data against those of the project managers. In order to successfully check for those variances, we had to understand: where the project is including plans vs. actual performance, why it is in its present condition, and what the future impact will be based on known budgetary parameters. Our objective was to make sure that the plan, or estimated resources input, are a valid reflection of the actual cost. To help with my understanding of the process, over the course of my tenure I had to obtain skills in Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access.

  13. Geophysics and nutritional science: toward a novel, unified paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshel, Gidon; Martin, Pamela A

    2009-05-01

    This article discusses a few basic geophysical processes, which collectively indicate that several nutritionally adverse elements of current Western diets also yield environmentally harmful food consumption patterns. We address oceanic dead zones, which are at the confluence of oceanography, aquatic chemistry, and agronomy and which are a clear environmental problem, and agriculture's effects on the surface heat budget. These exemplify the unknown, complex, and sometimes unexpected large-scale environmental effects of agriculture. We delineate the significant alignment in purpose between nutritional and environmental sciences. We identify red meat, and to a lesser extent the broader animal-based portion of the diet, as having the greatest environmental effect, with clear nutritional parallels.

  14. Environmental Sciences Division Groundwater Program Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This first edition of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Annual Report summarizes the work carried out by the Energy Systems GWPO for fiscal year (FY) 1993. This introductory section describes the GWPO's staffing, organization, and funding sources. The GWPO is responsible for coordination and oversight for all components of the groundwater program at the three Oak Ridge facilities [ORNL, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], and the PGDP and PORTS, respectively. Several years ago, Energy systems senior management recognized that the manner in which groundwater activities were conducted at the five facilities could result in unnecessary duplication of effort, inadequate technical input to decisions related to groundwater issues, and could create a perception within the regulatory agencies of a confusing and inconsistent approach to groundwater issues at the different facilities. Extensive interactions among management from Environmental Compliance, Environmental Restoration (ER), Environmental Sciences Division, Environmental Safety and Health, and the five facilities ultimately led to development of a net technical umbrella organization for groundwater. On April 25, 1991, the GWPO was authorized to be set up within ORNL thereby establishing a central coordinating office that would develop a consistent technical and administrative direction for the groundwater programs of all facilities and result in compliance with all relevant U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations such as RCRA and Comprehensive Environmental Restoration, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) as well as U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and orders. For example, DOE Order 5400.1, issued on November 9, 1988, called for each DOE facility to develop an environmental monitoring program for all media (e.g., air, surface water, and groundwater)

  15. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  16. Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poskanzer, A.M.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document

  17. Nuclear Science Division, 1995--1996 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poskanzer, A.M. [ed.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division (NSD) for the two-year period, January 1, 1995 to January 1, 1997. This was a time of major accomplishments for all research programs in the Division-many of which are highlighted in the reports of this document.

  18. Geophysics applications in critical zone science: emerging topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysical studies have resulted in remarkable advances in characterization of critical zone. The geophysics applications uncover the relationships between structure and function in subsurface as they seek to define subsurface structural units with individual properties of retention and trans...

  19. Nutritional Science Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  20. Materials Sciences Division long range plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The intent of this document is to provide a framework for programmatic guidance into the future for Materials Sciences. The Materials Sciences program is the basic research program for materials in the Department of Energy. It includes a wide variety of activities associated with the sciences related to materials. It also includes the support for developing, constructing, and operating major facilities which are used extensively but not exclusively by the materials sciences

  1. Earth Sciences Division. Annual report 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-07-01

    This annual report contains articles describing the research programs conducted during the year. Major areas of interest include geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, geothermal environmental research, basic geosciences studies, applied geosciences studies, nuclear waste isolation, and marine sciences. (ACR)

  2. Earth Sciences Division. Annual report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-07-01

    This annual report contains articles describing the research programs conducted during the year. Major areas of interest include geothermal exploration technology, geothermal energy conversion technology, reservoir engineering, geothermal environmental research, basic geosciences studies, applied geosciences studies, nuclear waste isolation, and marine sciences

  3. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October - 31 December, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    The work of the Health Sciences Division during the quarter included development of improved radiation counters and dosimeters, studies of radionuclide migration through the environment, investigations of the effects of radiation upon a variety of living organisms, and calculation of improved dosimetry factors

  4. Materials Science Division activity report 1991-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amarendra, G.; Tiwari, A.M.; Subramanian, N.; Venugopal Rao, G.

    1995-01-01

    This progress report gives an account of the various research and developmental activities carried out at the Materials Science Division of the Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam during 1991-93. It also gives a summary of the results of the research activities, describes the experimental facilities and also list the publications

  5. Environmental and Medical Sciences Division progress report January - December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, J.E.

    1976-07-01

    The activities of the AERE Environmental and Medical Sciences Division for January to December 1975 are reported under sections entitled: introduction; inhalation toxicology and radionuclide analysis; whole body counting; radiation physics; environmental analysis, atmospheric pollution; medical; chemical analysis group; publications. (U.K.)

  6. Geophysics applications in critical zone science: emerging topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Martinez, G.; Guber, A.; Walthall, C. L.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical studies have resulted in remarkable advances in characterization of critical zone. The geophysics applications uncover the relationships between structure and function in subsurface as they seek to define subsurface structural units with individual properties of retention and transmission of water, energy, solutes, electrical charge, etc. Several focal points of the research have emerged as the knowledge base of the critical zone geophysics grows. Time-lapse or multiple geophysical surveys admittedly improve the subsurface characterization. One of intriguing possibilities here is to use the temporal variation in geophysical parameters among time-lapse surveys directly to model spatial variation in soil properties affecting soil-water contents. Because critical phenomena causing erratic routing have been recently discovered in hillslope subsurface flow networks, it remains to be seen whether the time-lapse imagery depicts the same flow network if weather conditions are seemingly similar. High-frequency network observations usually reveal the temporal stability patterns in soil variables, including water contents, CO2 fluxes, etc. It becomes clear that these patterns can be described with spatiotemporal geostatistics models, and the opportunity arises to infer the spatial correlation structure of soil parameters from temporal variations of soil dynamic variables. There are indications that the spatial correlation structures of the geophysical parameters and soil/plant variables can be similar even though the correlations between these parameters are low. This may open additional avenues for mapping sparsely measured soil and plant variables. Fallacies of scale in geophysical depicting subsurface structural units and patterns are far from being understood. Soil state variables affect geophysical retrieval in nonlinear ways, and therefore scale effects in retrievals are warranted. For this reason, the strength and type of dependencies between geophysical

  7. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology

  8. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  9. Chemical and Laser Sciences Division: Annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    As the Chemical and Laser Sciences Division concludes its first year, the Division personnel can be proud of their many scientific and technical accomplishments. Among the important milestones which the Division achieved were significant demonstrations of the process performance in the Special Isotope Separation program, of beam sensing techniques for the NPB program, and of optical angular multiplexing and energy extraction from the ICF KrF laser. In addition, the Los Alamos FTS was brought to operational status and the Bright Source attained intensities on the order of 10 17 W/cm 2 . A few highlights of these and other research and development activities are presented in the following sections of this report

  10. Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Program report, 1990--1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacCracken, M.C.; Albritton, J.R.; MacGregor, P.M.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes research programs from Lawrence Livermore Laboratory from 1990--1991 in atmospheric chemistry and geophysics. Programs such as mathematical modeling of atmospheric dispersions of pollutants and radionuclides,tropospheric chemistry, clouds, climate models, and the effects of atmospheric trace constiuents on ozone are described

  11. Life Sciences Division and Center for Human Genome Studies 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cram, L.S.; Stafford, C. [comp.

    1995-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities of the Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Life Sciences Division and the biological aspects of the Center for Human Genome Studies for the calendar year 1994. The technical portion of the report is divided into two parts, (1) selected research highlights and (2) research projects and accomplishments. The research highlights provide a more detailed description of a select set of projects. A technical description of all projects is presented in sufficient detail so that the informed reader will be able to assess the scope and significance of each project. Summaries useful to the casual reader desiring general information have been prepared by the group leaders and appear in each group overview. Investigators on the staff of the Life Sciences Division will be pleased to provide further information.

  12. Environmental Sciences Division: Summaries of research in FY 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This document describes the Fiscal Year 1996 activities and products of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. The report is organized into four main sections. The introduction identifies the basic program structure, describes the programs of the Environmental Sciences Division, and provides the level of effort for each program area. The research areas and project descriptions section gives program contact information, and provides descriptions of individual research projects including: three-year funding history, research objective and approach used in each project, and results to date. Appendixes provide postal and e-mail addresses for principal investigators and define acronyms used in the text. The indexes provide indexes of principal investigators, research institutions, and keywords for easy reference. Research projects are related to climatic change and remedial action.

  13. Atmospheric sciences division. Annual report, fiscal year 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raynor, G.S.

    1981-12-01

    The research activities of the Atmospheric Sciences Division of the Department of Energy and Environment for FY 1981 are presented. Facilities and major items of equipment are described. Research programs are summarized in three categories, modeling, field and laboratory experiments and data management and analysis. Each program is also described individually with title, principal investigator, sponsor and funding levels for FY 1981 and FY 1982. Future plans are summarized. Publications for FY 1981 are listed with abstracts. A list of personnel is included

  14. Progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1985 July 01 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical. Some of the aspects discussed include measurement and application of environmental isotopes, dosimetry and employee monitoring, environmental processes of radioisotope transport, the effects of ionizing radiation on living cells (cancer, hyperthermia, DNA, etc.), and statistics of hospital procedures

  15. Environmental and Medical Sciences Division progress report January - December, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainge, W.M.

    1982-02-01

    A progress report on the work performed during 1980 by the Environmental and Medical Sciences Division at UKAEA Harwell is given. The programmes considered were atmospheric pollution; landfill research; monitoring of radioactive fallout and other radionuclides and trace elements in the environment; radioactive and non-radioactive aerosol metabolic studies; inhalation toxicology of radioactive aerosols and other hazardous materials; chemical analytical services; and radiation physics in dosimetry research, applied radiation spectrometry and data systems. (U.K.)

  16. GSFC Heliophysics Science Division FY2010 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Holly R.; Strong, Keith T.; Saba, Julia L. R.; Clark, Judith B.; Kilgore, Robert W.; Strong, Yvonne M.

    2010-01-01

    This report is intended to record and communicate to our colleagues, stakeholders, and the public at large about heliophysics scientific and flight program achievements and milestones for 2010, for which NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Heliophysics Science Division (HSD) made important contributions. HSD comprises approximately 323 scientists, technologists, and administrative personnel dedicated to the goal of advancing our knowledge and understanding of the Sun and the wide variety of domains that its variability influences. Our activities include: Leading science investigations involving flight hardware, theory, and data analysis and modeling that will answer the strategic questions posed in the Heliophysics Roadmap; Leading the development of new solar and space physics mission concepts and support their implementation as Project Scientists; Providing access to measurements from the Heliophysics Great Observatory through our Science Information Systems; and Communicating science results to the public and inspiring the next generation of scientists and explorers.

  17. Increasing Underrepresented Students in Geophysics and Planetary Science Through the Educational Internship in Physical Sciences (EIPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrazas, S.; Olgin, J. G.; Enriquez, F.

    2017-12-01

    The number of underrepresented minorities pursuing STEM fields, specifically in the sciences, has declined in recent times. In response, the Educational Internship in Physical Sciences (EIPS), an undergraduate research internship program in collaboration with The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) Geological Sciences Department and El Paso Community College (EPCC), was created; providing a mentoring environment so that students can actively engage in science projects with professionals in their field so as to gain the maximum benefits in an academic setting. This past year, interns participated in planetary themed projects which exposed them to the basics of planetary geology, and worked on projects dealing with introductory digital image processing and synthesized data on two planetary bodies; Pluto and Enceladus respectively. Interns harnessed and built on what they have learned through these projects, and directly applied it in an academic environment in solar system astronomy classes at EPCC. Since the majority of interns are transfer students or alums from EPCC, they give a unique perspective and dimension of interaction; giving them an opportunity to personally guide and encourage current students there on available STEM opportunities. The goal was to have interns gain experience in planetary geology investigations and networking with professionals in the field; further promoting their interests and honing their abilities for future endeavors in planetary science. The efficacy of these activities toward getting interns to pursue STEM careers, enhance their education in planetary science, and teaching key concepts in planetary geophysics are demonstrated in this presentation.

  18. Materials Science Division progress report 1986-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vijay; Vasumathi, D.; Chandra Sekhar, N.V.

    1990-01-01

    This is a report on the various Research and Developmental (R and D) activities carried out in the Materials Science Division during the period 1986-88. Most contributions have been presented in the form of abstracts and wherever possible results of several contributions on a related problem have been consolidated into one. The R and D activities covered the following areas: (1) quasicrystalline phase, (2) high temperature superconducting behaviour in metal oxides, (3) physics of colloidal suspensions, (4) behaviour of materials under high pressure, (5) radiation effects in complex alloy systems, (6) inert gas behaviour in metals, and production of crystals, particularly of volatile semiconducting compounds. The lists of publications by the members of the Division and seminars held during 1986-88 are given at the end of the report. (a uthor)

  19. Near-Surface Geophysics: Advancing Earth Science Through Advances in Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, R.

    2006-05-01

    The near-surface of Earth (the top ~100 m) is the region that supports human infrastructure, provides water and mineral resources, and is the interface between solid Earth and atmosphere for many of the biogeochemical cycles that sustain life. Developing an understanding of the processes and properties that occur here is essential for advancing our understanding of many parts of the Earth system. Yet our ability to study, sample, or probe this zone is remarkably primitive. Many investigations rely on drilling, trenching, and direct sampling. But given the pervasive spatial heterogeneity of the region, such methods yield information that is inadequate in terms of the spatial extent and density of sampling. As a result, the Earth science community is turning to geophysical imaging. The area of research that is focused on developing and applying geophysical methods to study this region of Earth is referred to as near-surface geophysics. Near-surface geophysics, as an area of research, includes many types of research, and many types of researchers. Some researchers are drawn to near-surface geophysics due to an interest in specific properties, processes, or applications, which can range from applied to basic science. As examples, near-surface geophysical methods are used for resource exploration and extraction, for the characterization of contaminated sites, for the assessment and design of built infrastructure; and to address scientific questions in neotectonics, volcanology, glaciology, hydrology, sedimentology, archaeology, geochemistry and biogeochemistry. Other researchers are drawn to near-surface geophysics due to an interest in the science of imaging as the driving scientific question. Advances in imaging require investigating the ways in which physical sensors can (or cannot) capture the complexity of a natural system, determining how best to quantify and enhance the spatial and temporal resolution of a measurement, developing new methods for the inversion of

  20. Progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1985 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-09-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are the impact of studies on cultured human fibroblasts with abnormal carcinogen sensitivity. This includes mechanisms of DNA repair and for the initiation of cancer, contribution of such genes to overall societal cancer burden, impact on risk assessment, distribution of risk, and radiation protection, application to improved treatment of cancer, screening for abnormal carcinogen sensitivity and Roberts syndrome

  1. Communicating Ocean Science at the Lower-Division Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, A.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific Ocean Literacy for Youth, Publics, Professionals, and Scientists (POLYPPS) is an NSF-funded collaboration between the University of Hawai`i and the Center for Ocean Science Education Excellence (COSEE) - California, which is based at the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California - Berkeley. One of the objectives of this project is to instutionalize ocean science communications courses at colleges and universities in Hawai`i. Although the focus of most of these communications courses has been on training graduate students and scientists, lower-division students interested in the ocean sciences are finding this background helpful. At the University of Hawai`i Maui College there are several marine science courses and certificate programs that require students to interact with the public through internships, research assistantships, and course-related service-learning projects. Oceanography 270, Communicating Ocean Science, is now offered to meet the needs of these students who engage with the public in informal educational settings. Other students who enroll in this course have a general interest in the marine environment and are considering careers in K-12 formal education. This course gives this group of students an opportunity to explore formal education by assisting classroom teachers and preparing and presenting problem-based, hands-on, inquiry activities. Employers at marine-related businesses and in the tourist industry have welcomed this course with a focus on communication skills and indicate that they prefer to hire local people with strong backgrounds in marine and natural sciences. A basic premise of POLYPPS is that science education must draw not only from the latest advances in science and technology but also from the cultural contexts in which the learners are embedded and that this will achieve increased understanding and stewardship of ocean environments. Students in Oceanography 270 integrate traditional Hawaiian knowledge into their

  2. Mining the Geophysical Research Abstracts Corpus: Mapping the impact of Free and Open Source Software on the EGU Divisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, Peter; Klump, Jens; Robertson, Jesse

    2015-04-01

    Text mining is commonly employed as a tool in data science to investigate and chart emergent information from corpora of research abstracts, such as the Geophysical Research Abstracts (GRA) published by Copernicus. In this context current standards, such as persistent identifiers like DOI and ORCID, allow us to trace, cite and map links between journal publications, the underlying research data and scientific software. This network can be expressed as a directed graph which enables us to chart networks of cooperation and innovation, thematic foci and the locations of research communities in time and space. However, this approach of data science, focusing on the research process in a self-referential manner, rather than the topical work, is still in a developing stage. Scientific work presented at the EGU General Assembly is often the first step towards new approaches and innovative ideas to the geospatial community. It represents a rich, deep and heterogeneous source of geoscientific thought. This corpus is a significant data source for data science, which has not been analysed on this scale previously. In this work, the corpus of the Geophysical Research Abstracts is used for the first time as a data base for analyses of topical text mining. For this, we used a sturdy and customizable software framework, based on the work of Schmitt et al. [1]. For the analysis we used the High Performance Computing infrastructure of the German Research Centre for Geosciences GFZ in Potsdam, Germany. Here, we report on the first results from the analysis of the continuous spreading the of use of Free and Open Source Software Tools (FOSS) within the EGU communities, mapping the general increase of FOSS-themed GRA articles in the last decade and the developing spatial patterns of involved parties and FOSS topics. References: [1] Schmitt, L. M., Christianson, K.T, Gupta R..: Linguistic Computing with UNIX Tools, in Kao, A., Poteet S.R. (Eds.): Natural Language processing and Text

  3. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division. 1994 January 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.

    1995-09-01

    This report marks the change from biannual to annual reports recording technical developments in Physics Division. During this period, AECL has continued with its restructuring program, with Physics Division now included in an expanded Physical and Environmental Sciences Unit. The Division itself remains unchanged, with major activities on neutron scattering, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and developments and applications of accelerator technology. (author)

  4. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Progress for the period ending September 30, 1979 by the Environmental Sciences Division is reported. Sections reporting include terrestrial ecoloy; earth sciences; environmental resources; aquatic ecology; synthetic fuels; nuclear program; environmental impacts program; ecosystem studies; and burial ground technology

  5. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  6. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations

  7. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The major elements of the Materials Sciences Program can be grouped under the areas of (1) structural characterization, (2) high-temperature alloy studies, (3) structural ceramics, and (4) radiation effects

  8. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The major elements of the Materials Sciences Program can be grouped under the areas of (1) structural characterization, (2) high-temperature alloy studies, (3) structural ceramics, and (4) radiation effects.

  9. Environmental Sciences Division Toxicology Laboratory standard operating procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; Wicker, L.F.; Logsdon, G.M.

    1989-09-01

    This document was developed to provide the personnel working in the Environmental Sciences Division's Toxicology Laboratory with documented methods for conducting toxicity tests. The document consists of two parts. The first part includes the standard operating procedures (SOPs) that are used by the laboratory in conducting toxicity tests. The second part includes reference procedures from the US Environmental Protection Agency document entitled Short-Term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater Organisms, upon which the Toxicology Laboratory's SOPs are based. Five of the SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction test. These SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia food (SOP-3), maintaining Ceriodaphnia cultures (SOP-4), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-13), analyzing the test data (SOP-13), and conducting a Ceriodaphnia reference test (SOP-15). Five additional SOPs relate specifically to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test: methods for preparing fathead minnow larvae food (SOP-5), maintaining fathead minnow cultures (SOP-6), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-9), analyzing the test data (SOP-12), and conducting a fathead minnow reference test (DOP-14). The six remaining SOPs describe methods that are used with either or both tests: preparation of control/dilution water (SOP-1), washing of glassware (SOP-2), collection and handling of samples (SOP-7), preparation of samples (SOP-8), performance of chemical analyses (SOP-11), and data logging and care of technical notebooks (SOP-16).

  10. Progress report - physical sciences TASCC division 1991 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1991-09-01

    This is the second in a new series of reports of the work of the TASCC Division since the creation of the Physical Sciences Unit in 1990. Physical Sciences comprises four main sectors, namely the TASCC, Physics and Chemistry Divisions, and the National Fusion Program Management Office. Physics Division is responsible for research and development in the areas of condensed matter physics, neutron and neutrino physics, and accelerator physics, while TASCC Division deals with research performed with the Tandem and Superconducting Cyclotron accelerators, primarily in the field of Heavy Ion Nuclear Physics

  11. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, 1 January-31 December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1980-09-01

    This annual report describes the research work carried out by the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division during 1979. The major research effort of the Division remained High Energy Particle Physics with emphasis on preparing for experiments to be carried out at PEP. The largest effort in this field was for development and construction of the Time Projection Chamber, a powerful new particle detector. This work took a large fraction of the effort of the physics staff of the Division together with the equivalent of more than a hundred staff members in the Engineering Departments and shops. Research in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department of the Division (CSAM) has been rapidly expanding during the last few years. Cross fertilization of ideas and talents resulting from the diversity of effort in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division contributed to the software design for the Time Projection Chamber, made by the Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department.

  12. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, 1 January-31 December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepore, J.V.

    1980-09-01

    This annual report describes the research work carried out by the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division during 1979. The major research effort of the Division remained High Energy Particle Physics with emphasis on preparing for experiments to be carried out at PEP. The largest effort in this field was for development and construction of the Time Projection Chamber, a powerful new particle detector. This work took a large fraction of the effort of the physics staff of the Division together with the equivalent of more than a hundred staff members in the Engineering Departments and shops. Research in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department of the Division (CSAM) has been rapidly expanding during the last few years. Cross fertilization of ideas and talents resulting from the diversity of effort in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division contributed to the software design for the Time Projection Chamber, made by the Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department

  13. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1983. The major activity of the Division is research in high-energy physics, both experimental and theoretical, and research and development in associated technologies. A smaller, but still significant, program is in computer science and applied mathematics. During 1983 there were approximately 160 people in the Division active in or supporting high-energy physics research, including about 40 graduate students. In computer science and mathematics, the total staff, including students and faculty, was roughly 50. Because of the creation in late 1983 of a Computing Division at LBL and the transfer of the Computer Science activities to the new Division, this annual report is the last from the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. In December 1983 the Division reverted to its historic name, the Physics Division. Its future annual reports will document high energy physics activities and also those of its Mathematics Department

  14. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1983. The major activity of the Division is research in high-energy physics, both experimental and theoretical, and research and development in associated technologies. A smaller, but still significant, program is in computer science and applied mathematics. During 1983 there were approximately 160 people in the Division active in or supporting high-energy physics research, including about 40 graduate students. In computer science and mathematics, the total staff, including students and faculty, was roughly 50. Because of the creation in late 1983 of a Computing Division at LBL and the transfer of the Computer Science activities to the new Division, this annual report is the last from the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. In December 1983 the Division reverted to its historic name, the Physics Division. Its future annual reports will document high energy physics activities and also those of its Mathematics Department.

  15. Final Report DOE Contract No. DE-FG36-04G014294 ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP P.E. Malin, S.A. Onacha, E. Shalev Division of Earth and Ocean Sciences Nicholas School of the Environment Duke University Durham, NC 27708

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon; Onacha, Stepthen A.

    2006-12-15

    In this final report, we discuss both theoretical and applied research resulting from our DOE project, ICEKAP 2004: A Collaborative Joint Geophysical Imaging Project at Krafla and IDDP. The abstract below begins with a general discussion of the problem we addressed: the location and characterization of “blind” geothermal resources using microearthquake and magnetotelluric measurements. The abstract then describes the scientific results and their application to the Krafla geothermal area in Iceland. The text following this abstract presents the full discussion of this work, in the form of the PhD thesis of Stephen A. Onacha. The work presented here was awarded the “Best Geophysics Paper” at the 2005 Geothermal Resources Council meeting, Reno. This study presents the modeling of buried fault zones using microearthquake and electrical resistivity data based on the assumptions that fluid-filled fractures cause electrical and seismic anisotropy and polarization. In this study, joint imaging of electrical and seismic data is used to characterize the fracture porosity of the fracture zones. P-wave velocity models are generated from resistivity data and used in locating microearthquakes. Fracture porosity controls fluid circulation in the hydrothermal systems and the intersections of fracture zones close to the heat source form important upwelling zones for hydrothermal fluids. High fracture porosity sites occur along fault terminations, fault-intersection areas and fault traces. Hydrothermal fault zone imaging using resistivity and microearthquake data combines high-resolution multi-station seismic and electromagnetic data to locate rock fractures and the likely presence fluids in high temperature hydrothermal systems. The depths and locations of structural features and fracture porosity common in both the MT and MEQ data is incorporated into a joint imaging scheme to constrain resistivity, seismic velocities, and locations of fracture systems. The imaging of the

  16. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described. (CBS)

  17. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-07-01

    Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described

  18. Life Sciences Division progress report for CYs 1997-1998[Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Reinhold C.

    1999-01-01

    This is the first formal progress report issued by the ORNL Life Sciences Division. It covers the period from February 1997 through December 1998, which has been critical in the formation of our new division. The legacy of 50 years of excellence in biological research at ORNL has been an important driver for everyone in the division to do their part so that this new research division can realize the potential it has to make seminal contributions to the life sciences for years to come. This reporting period is characterized by intense assessment and planning efforts. They included thorough scrutiny of our strengths and weaknesses, analyses of our situation with respect to comparative research organizations, and identification of major thrust areas leading to core research efforts that take advantage of our special facilities and expertise. Our goal is to develop significant research and development (R and D) programs in selected important areas to which we can make significant contributions by combining our distinctive expertise and resources in the biological sciences with those in the physical, engineering, and computational sciences. Significant facilities in mouse genomics, mass spectrometry, neutron science, bioanalytical technologies, and high performance computing are critical to the success of our programs. Research and development efforts in the division are organized in six sections. These cluster into two broad areas of R and D: systems biology and technology applications. The systems biology part of the division encompasses our core biological research programs. It includes the Mammalian Genetics and Development Section, the Biochemistry and Biophysics Section, and the Computational Biosciences Section. The technology applications part of the division encompasses the Assessment Technology Section, the Environmental Technology Section, and the Toxicology and Risk Analysis Section. These sections are the stewards of the division's core competencies. The

  19. Life Sciences Division progress report for CYs 1997-1998 [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Reinhold C.

    1999-06-01

    This is the first formal progress report issued by the ORNL Life Sciences Division. It covers the period from February 1997 through December 1998, which has been critical in the formation of our new division. The legacy of 50 years of excellence in biological research at ORNL has been an important driver for everyone in the division to do their part so that this new research division can realize the potential it has to make seminal contributions to the life sciences for years to come. This reporting period is characterized by intense assessment and planning efforts. They included thorough scrutiny of our strengths and weaknesses, analyses of our situation with respect to comparative research organizations, and identification of major thrust areas leading to core research efforts that take advantage of our special facilities and expertise. Our goal is to develop significant research and development (R&D) programs in selected important areas to which we can make significant contributions by combining our distinctive expertise and resources in the biological sciences with those in the physical, engineering, and computational sciences. Significant facilities in mouse genomics, mass spectrometry, neutron science, bioanalytical technologies, and high performance computing are critical to the success of our programs. Research and development efforts in the division are organized in six sections. These cluster into two broad areas of R&D: systems biology and technology applications. The systems biology part of the division encompasses our core biological research programs. It includes the Mammalian Genetics and Development Section, the Biochemistry and Biophysics Section, and the Computational Biosciences Section. The technology applications part of the division encompasses the Assessment Technology Section, the Environmental Technology Section, and the Toxicology and Risk Analysis Section. These sections are the stewards of the division's core competencies. The

  20. Nutritional Science Funding Opportunities | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  1. Nutritional Science Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  2. Nutritional Science Meetings and Events | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  3. Active Nutritional Science Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  4. A Mathematical Sciences Program at an Upper-Division Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Frank J.

    1978-01-01

    The conception, objectives, contents, and limitations of a degree program in the mathematical sciences at Pennsylvania State University, Capitol Campus, are discussed. Career goals that may be pursued include: managerial, science, education, actuarial, and computer. (MP)

  5. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program.

  6. Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program

  7. Program report: FY 1976, Atmospheric and Geophysical Sciences Division, Physics Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, J.B.; Orphan, R.C.

    1976-01-01

    The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), with its central facility located at LLL, is meeting the long-term need for rapid and accurate regional dose-to-man estimates of nuclear material released as a result of accidents, operations, or terrorism acts. During the past two years, ARAC has been used in four potential WARMSPOT events and for one accidental release. Continuing research, in terms of new modeling techniques, simulation of regional tracer experiments, and other verification activities, support this capability. Emergency response is currently being upgraded to evaluate the consequences of atmospheric releases at selected nuclear facilities and for potential acts of nuclear terrorism anywhere in the Northern Hemisphere. Regional modeling was also applied in monitoring SO 2 -sulfate concentrations in the northeastern USA

  8. Geoethics and philosophy of Earth sciences: the role of geophysical factors in human evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Telmo Pievani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the role of philosophy of the Earth sciences in the foundation of the principles of ‘geoethics’. In particular, the focus is on two different examples of philosophical analysis in the field of geosciences: the first is the trial against the Italian National Commission for Forecasting and Predicting Great Risks, which was charged with negligence in communication and prediction on the occasion of the earthquake that almost destroyed the city of L’Aquila on the night of April 6, 2009; the second is related to the scientific and theoretical consequences of the updated geographical scenario of the human global populating of the Earth, based on archeological, paleontological and genetic data. Our concept of ‘scientific prediction’ in the case of geophysical phenomena and the new ways to see human evolution that depend on geophysical factors have ethical and philosophical implications that are crucial for the foundations of geoethics. The tentative conclusion is that we need an evolutionary sense of belonging to our Planet, and a concept of ‘natural’ phenomena and ‘natural’ disasters that should not be an alibi for the underestimation of our political and ethical responsibilities.

  9. [Funding in 2012 for Division of Microbiology by National Natural Science Foundation of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Mingzhang; Guo, Yiran; Zhao, Kai; Nie, Yong; Zhou, Min; Fang, Zemin

    2013-01-04

    We provide here an overview of proposals applied and projects funded by the division of microbiology, department of life sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China in 2012. We analyzed the traits and problems in different sub-disciplines, and illustrated the stimulating policy for future funding. This overview provides reference for Chinese researchers to apply relevant funding for projects in microbiology.

  10. [Funding for division of microbiology by National Natural Science Foundation of China in 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jianjun; Kang, Yijun; Weng, Qingbei; Wen, Mingzhang

    2014-01-04

    We provide an overview of proposals applied and projects funded by the division of microbiology, department of life sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China in 2013,. The traits and problems in different sub-disciplines were also analyzed, which provides reference for Chinese researchers to apply funding in microbiology next year.

  11. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K.

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  12. CISM-IUTAM International Summer School on Continuum Mechanics in Environmental Sciences and Geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    Modern continuum mechanics is the topic of this book. After its introduction it will be applied to a few typical systems arising in the environmental sciences and in geophysics. In large lake/ocean dynamics peculiar effects of the rotation of the Earth will be analyzed in linear/nonlinear processes of a homogenous and inhomogenous water body. Strong thermomechanical coupling paired with nonlinear rheology affects the flow of large ice sheets (such as Antarctica and Greenland) and ice shelves. Its response to the climatic forcing in an environmental of greenhouse warming may significantly affect the life of future generations. The mechanical behavior of granular materials under quasistatic loadings requires non-classical mixture concepts and encounters generally complicated elastic-plastic-type constitutive behavior. Creeping flow of soils, consolidation processes and ground water flow are described by such theories. Rapid shearing flow of granular materials lead to constitutive relations for the stresses whic...

  13. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys.

  14. Metals and Ceramics Division Materials Science Program. Annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1984-11-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Materials Sciences Program in the Metals and Ceramics Division for the period January 1, 1983, to June 30, 1984. These activities constitute about one-fourth of the research and development conducted by the division. The emphasis of the program can be described as the scientific design of materials. The efforts are directed toward three classes of materials: high-temperature metallic alloys based on intermetallic compounds, structural ceramics, and radiation-resistant alloys

  15. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD`s accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  16. Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division progress report for the period January 1, 1993--December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poutsma, M.L.

    1995-06-01

    This report provides brief summaries of progress in the Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division (CASD) during 1993 and 1994. The first four chapters, which cover the research mission, are organized to mirror the major organizational units of the division and indicate the scope of the research portfolio. These divisions are the Analytical Spectroscopy Section, Nuclear and Radiochemistry Section, Organic Chemistry Section, and Physical and Materials Chemistry Section. The fifth and sixth chapters summarize the support activities within CASD that are critical for research progress. Finally, the appendices indicate the productivity and recognition of the staff in terms of various forms of external publications, professional activities, and awards.

  17. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J.

    1995-01-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center

  18. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Medical Sciences Division report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, F.; Poston, S.; Engle, J. [eds.

    1995-08-01

    The primary mission of the Medical Sciences Division is (1) to conduct basic and applied biomedical research on human health related to energy systems, (2) to provide technical assistance and training in occupational and environmental medicine, and (3) to make related biomedical applications available to others through technology transfer. As can be gleaned from this report, the strengths and capabilities of their staff in carrying out this mission are closely aligned with the four core competencies of ORISE: (1) occupational and environmental health, (2) environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, (3) education and training, and (4) enabling research. Brief descriptions of the various scientific and technical programs and their progress, as well as the staff responsible for the accomplishments made during 1994, are presented in this report. Research programs include the following: biochemistry; cytogenetics; Center for Epidemiologic Research; Center for Human Reliability Studies; occupational medicine; Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site; and Radiation Internal Dose Information Center.

  19. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report

  20. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report.

  1. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during the period October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units is a section devoted to lists of information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts environmental research and analyses associated with both energy technology development and the interactions between people and the environment. The division engages in basic and applied research for a diverse list of sponsors. While the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the primary sponsor ESD staff also perform research for other federal agencies, state agencies, and private industry. The division works collaboratively with federal agencies, universities, and private organizations in achieving its research objectives and hosts a large number of visiting investigators from these organizations. Given the diverse interdisciplinary specialization of its staff, ESD provides technical expertise on complex environmental problems and renders technical leadership for major environmental issues of national and local concern. This progress report highlights many of ESD's accomplishment in these and other areas in FY 1991.

  2. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, 1 January--31 December 1977. [LBL, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during 1977. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics, although there is a relatively small program of medium-energy research. The High Energy Physics research program in the Physics Division is concerned with fundamental research which will enable man to comprehend the nature of the physical world. The major effort is now directed toward experiments with positron-electron colliding beam at PEP. The Medium Energy Physics program is concerned with research using mesons and nucleons to probe the properties of matter. This research is concerned with the study of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, and the interactions between nuclei and electromagnetic radiation and mesons. The Computer Science and Applied Mathematics Department engages in research in a variety of computer science and mathematics disciplines. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The Computer Center provides large-scale computational support to LBL's scientific programs. Descriptions of the various activities are quite short; references to published results are given. 24 figures. (RWR)

  3. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report.

  4. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report.

  5. About the Nutritional Science Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group (NSRG) promotes and supports studies establishing a comprehensive understanding of the precise role of diet and food components in modulating cancer risk and tumor cell behavior. This focus includes approaches to characterize molecular targets and variability in individual responses to nutrients and dietary patterns. |

  6. Social Science Libraries Section. Special Libraries Division. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Three papers on the nonconventional literature and social science libraries were presented at the 1983 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference. In "Grey Material: A Scandinavian View," Birgitta Bergdahl (Sweden) outlines the etymology and meaning of the concept of "grey literature" (which can include…

  7. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, January 1--December 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepore, J.V.

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during the calendar year 1976. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics; a vigorous program is maintained in this pioneering field. The high-energy physics research program in the Division now focuses on experiments with e + e - colliding beams using advanced techniques and developments initiated and perfected at the Laboratory. The Division continues its work in medium energy physics, with experimental work carried out at the Bevatron and at the Los Alamos Pi-Meson Facility. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The computer center serves the Laboratory by constantly upgrading its facility and by providing day-to-day service. This report is descriptive in nature; references to detailed publications are given

  8. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, January 1--December 31, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.V. (ed.)

    1977-01-01

    This annual report of the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division describes the scientific research and other work carried out within the Division during the calendar year 1976. The Division is concerned with work in experimental and theoretical physics, with computer science and applied mathematics, and with the operation of a computer center. The major physics research activity is in high-energy physics; a vigorous program is maintained in this pioneering field. The high-energy physics research program in the Division now focuses on experiments with e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams using advanced techniques and developments initiated and perfected at the Laboratory. The Division continues its work in medium energy physics, with experimental work carried out at the Bevatron and at the Los Alamos Pi-Meson Facility. Work in computer science and applied mathematics includes construction of data bases, computer graphics, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, and mathematical analysis of differential and integral equations resulting from physical problems. The computer center serves the Laboratory by constantly upgrading its facility and by providing day-to-day service. This report is descriptive in nature; references to detailed publications are given. (RWR)

  9. 75th anniversary of the N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 25 February 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) celebrating the 75th anniversary of the N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation of the RAS (IZMIRAN) was held in the IZMIRAN conference hall on 25 February 2015. The agenda of the session announced on the website http://www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division contained the following reports: (1) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Moscow) "N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) yesterday, today, and tomorrow"; (2) Gvishiani A D (Geophysical Center, Moscow) "Studies of the terrestrial magnetic field and the network of Russian magnetic laboratories"; (3) Sokoloff D D (Faculty of Physics, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Magnetic dynamo questions"; (4) Petrukovich A A (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Some aspects of magnetosphere-ionosphere relations"; (5) Lukin D S (Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Dolgoprudnyi, Moscow region) "Current problems of ionospheric radio wave propagation"; (6) Safargaleev V V (Polar Geophysical Institute, Kola Scientific Center, RAS, Murmansk), Sergienko T I (Swedish Institute of Space Physics (IRF), Sweden), Kozlovskii A E (Sodankyl \\ddot a Geophysical Observatory, Finland), Safargaleev A V (St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg), Kotikov A L (St. Petersburg Branch of IZMIRAN, St. Petersburg) "Magnetic and optical measurements and signatures of reconnection in the cusp and vicinity"; (7) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Moscow) "Space solar research: achievements and prospects". Papers written on the basis of oral reports 1, 3, 4, 6, and 7 are given below. • N V Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) yesterday, today, tomorrow, V D Kuznetsov Physics-Uspekhi, 2015

  10. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birge, R.W.

    1981-12-01

    Research in the physics, computer science, and mathematics division is described for the year 1980. While the division's major effort remains in high energy particle physics, there is a continually growing program in computer science and applied mathematics. Experimental programs are reported in e + e - annihilation, muon and neutrino reactions at FNAL, search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson, limits on neutrino oscillations from muon-decay neutrinos, strong interaction experiments at FNAL, strong interaction experiments at BNL, particle data center, Barrelet moment analysis of πN scattering data, astrophysics and astronomy, earth sciences, and instrument development and engineering for high energy physics. In theoretical physics research, studies included particle physics and accelerator physics. Computer science and mathematics research included analytical and numerical methods, information analysis techniques, advanced computer concepts, and environmental and epidemiological studies

  11. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division. Annual report, January 1-December 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birge, R.W.

    1981-12-01

    Research in the physics, computer science, and mathematics division is described for the year 1980. While the division's major effort remains in high energy particle physics, there is a continually growing program in computer science and applied mathematics. Experimental programs are reported in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation, muon and neutrino reactions at FNAL, search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson, limits on neutrino oscillations from muon-decay neutrinos, strong interaction experiments at FNAL, strong interaction experiments at BNL, particle data center, Barrelet moment analysis of ..pi..N scattering data, astrophysics and astronomy, earth sciences, and instrument development and engineering for high energy physics. In theoretical physics research, studies included particle physics and accelerator physics. Computer science and mathematics research included analytical and numerical methods, information analysis techniques, advanced computer concepts, and environmental and epidemiological studies. (GHT)

  12. Research Opportunities in Solid Earth Science (RESESS): Broadening Participation in Geology and Geophysics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Hubenthal, M.

    2009-12-01

    RESESS is a multi-year, paid, summer research internship program designed for students from underrepresented groups. The students receive extensive mentoring in science research and communication and become part of a community that provides ongoing support. This has been possible in the initial 5 years of the program through collaboration with Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS), where solid earth students have been an integral part of the SOARS cohort, benefiting from social as well as educational interactions. 11 students have taken part in RESESS for at least one year and of these, four students have graduated in geoscience and entered graduate programs in geophysics and one was recently awarded an NSF graduate fellowship. Students have presented over 20 posters at national science meetings, and one has co-authored a peer-reviewed article. 23 scientists have mentored students over the past 5 years and 17 percent of these mentors are from underrepresented groups in science; 19 other scientists and university/science consortia staff have mentored students in written and verbal presentations and supported their integration into the local communities. Mentorship over a period of years is one important hallmark of this program as students have benefited from the support of UNAVCO, IRIS, USGS, and university scientists and staff during the summer, academic year, and at professional meetings such as AGU, GSA, NABGG, and SACNAS as well as consortia and project science workshops (UNAVCO, IRIS, and EarthScope). One goal of the project has been to educate the scientific community on the benefits of mentoring undergraduate students from underrepresented groups in STEM fields. Increasingly, scientists are approaching RESESS to include this program in their implementation of broader impacts. RESESS has been funded by NSF for the next five years with plans to expand the number of students, geographic and scientific diversity, and sources of

  13. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1984-08-01

    This report summarizes research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between October 1, 1982 and September 30, 1983. Experimental and theoretical investigations of heavy ion reactions are reported. In addition, the development of instrumentation for charge measurements and an on-line mass analyzer are discussed. Individual reports are cataloged separately

  14. Progress report Physical and Environmental Sciences TASCC Division 1994 July 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The TASCC division of the Physics and Environmental Sciences releases this progress report to overview the research and instrumentation and facility development. The accelerator operation was smooth for the Tandem and rather difficult for the cyclotron. Progress has been made on all major development projects. A listing is included of all publications, reports, lectures and conference contributions. 14 tabs., 28 figs

  15. Progress report Health Sciences Division - 1984 July 01 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Health Physics, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, Biomedical Research and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are health and safety aspects of tritium. This includes instrumentation, environmental studies, metabolism, dosimetry and health effects

  16. [Funding for Division of Microbiology in 2014 by National Natural Science Foundation of China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jianjun; Huang, Chenyang; Liu, Lin; Wen, Mingzhang

    2015-02-04

    In this paper, we provided an overview of proposals submitted and projects funded in 2014 at the Division of Microbiology, Department of Life Sciences, National Natural Science Foundation of China. The traits and problems in different sub-disciplines were analyzed, the background, results and analysis of internet voting before panel meetings in Microbiology discipline were also introduced. The information will provide references for Chinese researchers to apply funding in microbiology discipline in the future.

  17. Environmental Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Environmental Geophysics website features geophysical methods, terms and references; forward and inverse geophysical models for download; and a decision support tool to guide geophysical method selection for a variety of environmental applications.

  18. Progress report: Health Sciences Division, 1983 July 1 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report summarizes programs in health physics, radiation biology, environmental sciences and biomedical research. Health physics research included work on neutron dosimetry, thermoluminescent dosimetry, measurements of γ- and β-sensitivity of MOSFET detectors, tritium monitoring, a stack effluent monitor, and other radiation instruments. Environmental research included studies of heated plumes, radiotracer studies of flow through rock fractures, radionuclide cycling by plants, stable cobalt in fish, long-term radiation protection objectives for radioactive waste disposal, and tritium in surface waters in the CRNL vicinity. Radiation biology research continued to be concerned with DNA damage from radiation and carcinogenic chemicals, and enzymatic Σrepair processesΣ which help protect cells from such damage. In biomedical research the experiment to measure the fraction of HT by volunteers that is converted to HTO in vivo is progressing satisfactorily

  19. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1993, which extended from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to convey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who were in ESD and the end of FY 1993 is located in the final section of the report

  20. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1994, which extended from October 1, 1993, through September 30, 1994. The report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Following the sections describing the organizational units are sections highlighting ESD Scientific, Technical, and Administrative Achievement awards and listing information necessary to covey the scope of the work in the division. An organizational chart of staff and long-term guests who wee in ESD at the end of FY 1994 is located in the final section of the report

  1. Geological and geophysical activities at Spallanzani Science Department (Liceo Scientifico Statale "Lazzaro Spallanzani" - Tivoli, Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favale, T.; De Angelis, F.; De Filippis, L.

    2012-04-01

    The high school Liceo Scientifico "Lazzaro Spallanzani" at Tivoli (Rome) has been fully involved in the study of geological and geophysical features of the town of Tivoli and the surrounding area in the last twelve years. Objective of this activity is to promote the knowledge of the local territory from the geological point of view. Main activities: • School year 2001-2002: Setting up inside the school building of a Geological Museum focusing on "Geological Evolution of Latium, Central Italy" (in collaboration with colleagues M. Mancini, and A. Pierangeli). • March, 15, 2001: Conference of Environmental Geology. Lecturer: Prof. Raniero Massoli Novelli, L'Aquila University and Società Italiana di Geologia Ambientale. • School years 2001-2002 and 2002-2003: Earth Sciences course for students "Brittle deformation and tectonic stress in Tivoli area". • November, 2003: Conference of Geology, GIS and Remote Sensing. Lecturers: Prof. Maurizio Parotto and Dr Alessandro Cecili (Roma Tre University, Rome), and Dr Stefano Pignotti (Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sulla Montagna, Rome). • November, 2003, 2004 and 2005: GIS DAY, organized in collaboration with ESRI Italia. • School year 2006-2007: Earth Sciences course for students "Acque Albule basin and the Travertine of Tivoli, Latium, Central Italy" (focus on travertine formation). • School year 2010-2011: Earth Sciences course for students "Acque Albule basin and the Travertine of Tivoli. Geology, Hydrogeology and Microbiology of the basin, Latium, Central Italy" (focus on thermal springs and spa). In the period 2009-2010 a seismic station with three channels, currently working, was designed and built in our school by the science teachers Felice De Angelis and Tomaso Favale. Our seismic station (code name LTTV) is part of Italian Experimental Seismic Network (IESN) with identification code IZ (international database IRIS-ISC). The three drums are online in real time on websites http

  2. Progress report Health Sciences Division - 1984 January 1 to June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for each of the following branches: Health Physics, Environmental Research, Radiation Biology, Biomedical Research and Medical. Some of the main areas of interest discussed are research goals, radiation levels, biological end points, assessment of carcinogenic and genetic hazards, research on radiation effects. Practical applications of research are highlighted

  3. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-08-01

    The energy crisis and creation of ERDA were dominant factors affecting the activities of the Environmental Sciences Division during the past year. Efforts primarily centered on coal conversion effluents, aquatic effects from power plants, terrestrial modeling of both radioactive and nonradioactive waste transport, mineral cycling, forest management, and information handling codes and techniques. A bibliography of publications, presentation, these, and other professional activities is included. (PCS)

  4. Progress report 1979 July 01 to September 30, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    In September 1979, the Biology and Health Physics Division and the Medical Division were amalgamated to form the Health Sciences Division. This is the first progress report of the new division. A new TLD reader for semi-automatic handling of individual TLD chips has been commissioned. As high range radiation detectors for spent fuel monitoring, optical photo-diodes show performance similar to that of silicon rectifiers. Studies continue on the use of water-permeable plastic membranes in tritium monitoring, particularly where it is important to distinguish between 3 H in elemental form and combined as water. The first of a series of radionuclide injection experiments was made in the sand aquifer near Perch Lake. These experiments are to develop methods for studying radionuclide transport in fractured rock. Investigations of soil and groundwater in the vicinity of waste management areas have shown that tritium is the only radionuclide present in significant quantities. Radiation damage to DNA and subsequent repair is being studied by observing both somatic and genetic effcts. Rare hereditary human diseases that present clinical or laboratory features indicative of defects in the DNA repair mechanism are being studied. Work on various metabolic models that describe retention and distribution of radionuclides in humans has continued with emphasis on tritium as HT, carbon as CO2, and compounds of the alkaline earth and actinide elements. Committed effective dose equivalent conversion factors for infants and adults have been calculated for 380 classes of compounds of radionuclide and intake routes, for 65 elements. (OT)

  5. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division 1990 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    A completely new administrative structure of AECL Research was implemented on 1990 July 1. All of the basic physics programs, together with accelerator physics, radiation applications and most of the chemistry programs of AECL, have been placed in a new organizational unit called Physical Sciences. This unit also includes the management of the National Fusion Program. The research programs of Physical Sciences are grouped into three divisions: Chemistry, Physics and TASCC. Progress in each division will henceforth be reported on a twice-yearly basis. This report is the first of the new series to be issued by the Physics Division. Of special note within the period covered by this report was the successful acceleration of over 75 mA of protons to 600 keV in RFQ1 making it the highest current RFQ in the world. Our electron accelerator expertise has been recognized by the award of one of the R and D 100 awards for the IMPELA (10 MeV 50 kW) machine. Considerable activity was associated with bringing the new dual beam neutron spectrometer DUALSPEC to completion. This instrument has been jointly funded by AECL and NSERC through McMaster University and will be a central component of the national neutron scattering facility at NRU in the 1990's. A major effort was made with the writing of a Project Definition Document for installation of a cold neutron source at the most opportune time

  6. Department of Energy: MICS (Mathematical Information, and Computational Sciences Division). High performance computing and communications program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, {open_quotes}The DOE Program in HPCC{close_quotes}), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW). The information pointed to by the URL is updated frequently, and the interested reader is urged to access the WWW for the latest information.

  7. Department of Energy Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences Division: High Performance Computing and Communications Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    This document is intended to serve two purposes. Its first purpose is that of a program status report of the considerable progress that the Department of Energy (DOE) has made since 1993, the time of the last such report (DOE/ER-0536, The DOE Program in HPCC), toward achieving the goals of the High Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Program. The second purpose is that of a summary report of the many research programs administered by the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) Division of the Office of Energy Research under the auspices of the HPCC Program and to provide, wherever relevant, easy access to pertinent information about MICS-Division activities via universal resource locators (URLs) on the World Wide Web (WWW).

  8. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1995 January 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.

    1996-05-01

    This document is a Progress Report for the Physical and Environmental Sciences, Physics Division, for the period 1995 January 1 to December 31, at the Chalk River nuclear Labs. The condensed matter science group continued to operate a multi-faceted program involving collaborative basic and applied research with external scientists in the fields of materials science, physics, chemistry and biology. The Applied Neutron Diffraction for Industry (And) program gained strength with ever wider applications for the nuclear, aerospace, and manufacturing programs. Steps continued towards making neutron scattering facilities at NRU reactor more user friendly. The neutrino physics group, as part of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Institute, collaborating with scientists from Canada, USA and UK. The accelerator physics group spent considerable effort working with materials and fuels scientists to show the value of accelerators as an out-reactor source of radiation. Specific research activities have included the demonstration of laser plasma deposition of diamond coating, which has potential application for high-wear components in reactors, and the study for a Free Electron Laser upgrade for the IMPELA accelerator. As a result of funding reduction all programs of the Division were dissolved as of 1997 March 31

  9. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1995 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey, M. (ed.)

    1996-05-01

    This document is a Progress Report for the Physical and Environmental Sciences, Physics Division, for the period 1995 January 1 to December 31, at the Chalk River nuclear Labs. The condensed matter science group continued to operate a multi-faceted program involving collaborative basic and applied research with external scientists in the fields of materials science, physics, chemistry and biology. The Applied Neutron Diffraction for Industry (And) program gained strength with ever wider applications for the nuclear, aerospace, and manufacturing programs. Steps continued towards making neutron scattering facilities at NRU reactor more user friendly. The neutrino physics group, as part of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) Institute, collaborating with scientists from Canada, USA and UK. The accelerator physics group spent considerable effort working with materials and fuels scientists to show the value of accelerators as an out-reactor source of radiation. Specific research activities have included the demonstration of laser plasma deposition of diamond coating, which has potential application for high-wear components in reactors, and the study for a Free Electron Laser upgrade for the IMPELA accelerator. As a result of funding reduction all programs of the Division were dissolved as of 1997 March 31.

  10. Graduate student theses supported by DOE`s Environmental Sciences Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Parra, Bobbi M. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Environmental Sciences Division; comps.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides complete bibliographic citations, abstracts, and keywords for 212 doctoral and master`s theses supported fully or partly by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Sciences Division (and its predecessors) in the following areas: Atmospheric Sciences; Marine Transport; Terrestrial Transport; Ecosystems Function and Response; Carbon, Climate, and Vegetation; Information; Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP); Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM); Oceans; National Institute for Global Environmental Change (NIGEC); Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV); Integrated Assessment; Graduate Fellowships for Global Change; and Quantitative Links. Information on the major professor, department, principal investigator, and program area is given for each abstract. Indexes are provided for major professor, university, principal investigator, program area, and keywords. This bibliography is also available in various machine-readable formats (ASCII text file, WordPerfect{reg_sign} files, and PAPYRUS{trademark} files).

  11. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report

  12. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1986-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1984 to September 30, 1985. As in previous years, experimental research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, during this time, preparations began for a new generation of relativistic heavy-ion experiments at CERN. The Nuclear Science Division is involved in three major experiments at CERN and several smaller ones. The report is divided into 5 sections. Part I describes the research programs and operations, and Part II contains condensations of experimental papers arranged roughly according to program and in order of increasing energy, without any further subdivisions. Part III contains condensations of theoretical papers, again ordered according to program but in order of decreasing energy. Improvements and innovations in instrumentation and in experimental or analytical techniques are presented in Part IV. Part V consists of appendices, the first listing publications by author for this period, in which the LBL report number only is given for papers that have not yet appeared in journals; the second contains abstracts of PhD theses awarded during this period; and the third gives the titles and speakers of the NSD Monday seminars, the Bevatron Research Meetings and the theory seminars that were given during the report period. The last appendix is an author index for this report.

  13. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K. (comps.)

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  14. A Diversity of Divisions: Tracing the History of the Demarcation between the Sciences and the Humanities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouterse, Jeroen; Karstens, Bart

    2015-06-01

    Throughout history, divides between the sciences and the humanities have been drawn in many different ways. This essay shows that the notion of a divide became more urgent and pronounced in the second half of the nineteenth century. While this shift has several causes, the essay focuses on the rise of the social sciences, which is interpreted as posing a profound challenge to the established disciplines of the study of humankind. This is demonstrated by zooming in on linguistics, one of the key traditional disciplines of the humanities. Through the assumption of a correspondence between mental and linguistic categories, psychology became of central importance in the various conceptions of linguistics that emerged in the nineteenth century. Both linguistics and psychology were very much engaged in a process of discipline formation, and opinions about the proper directions of the fields varied considerably. Debates on these issues catalyzed the construction of more radical divisions between the sciences and the humanities. Both Wilhelm Dilthey's dichotomy between understanding and explanation and Wilhelm Windelband's dichotomy between nomothetic and idiographic sciences respond to these debates. While their constructions are often lumped together, the essay shows that they actually meant very different things and have to be treated accordingly.

  15. Scientific session of the General meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (7 December 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    A scientific session of the General meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS on 7 December 2015. The papers collected in this issue were written based on talks given at the session (the program of the session is available on the RAS Physical Sciences Division website http://www.gpad.ac.ru). (1) Loshchenov V B (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Pharmacodynamics of a nanophotosensitizer under irradiation by an electromagnetic field: from THz to Cherenkov radiation"; (2) Zhuikov B L (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) "Successes and problems in the development of medical radioisotope production in Russia"; (3) Tikhonov Yu A (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk) "Applying nuclear physics methods in healthcare"; (4) Turchin I V (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhny Novgorod) "Methods of biomedical optical imaging: from subcellular structures to tissues and organs"; (5) Breus T K, Petrukovich A A (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow), Binhi V N (Prokhorov General Physics Institute, RAS, Moscow; Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Magnetic factor in solar-terrestrial relations and its impact on the human body: physical problems and prospects for research"; (6) Makarov D I (Special Astrophysical Observatory, RAS, Nizhnii Arkhyz, Zelenchukskii region, Karachai-Cherkessian Republic) "Studying the Local University". Papers based on oral reports 2, 4, and 5 are presented below. • Successes and problems in the development of medical radioisotope production in Russia, B L Zhuikov Physics-Uspekhi, 2016, Volume 59, Number 5, Pages 481-486 • Methods of biomedical optical imaging: from subcellular structures to tissues and organs, I V Turchin Physics-Uspekhi, 2016, Volume 59, Number 5, Pages 487-501 • Magnetic factor in solar-terrestrial relations and its impact on the human body: physical problems and

  16. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO 2 and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program

  17. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-04-01

    The Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conducts research on the environmental aspects of existing and emerging energy systems and applies this information to ensure that technology development and energy use are consistent with national environmental health and safety goals. Offering an interdisciplinary resource of staff and facilities to address complex environmental problems, the division is currently providing technical leadership for major environmental issues of national concern: (1) acidic deposition and related environmental effects, (2) effects of increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} and the resulting climatic changes to ecosystems and natural and physical resources, (3) hazardous chemical and radioactive waste disposal and remediation research and development, and (4) development of commercial biomass energy production systems. This progress report outlines ESD's accomplishments in these and other areas in FY 1990. Individual reports are processed separately for the data bases in the following areas: ecosystem studies; environmental analyses; environmental toxicology; geosciences; technical and administrative support; biofuels feedstock development program; carbon dioxide information analysis and research program; and environmental waste program.

  18. Progress report, Health Sciences Division, 1 October to 31 December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This is the second quarterly progress report of the Health Sciences Division. Developments in health physics include construction of a simple monitor for measurement of tritium concentration at or above the maximum permissible level and measurements on the behaviour of Geiger counters at high temperature for monitoring activity in reactor cooling circuits. Environmental Research Branch continues to monitor groundwater in the vicinity of the glass blocks containing fission products. Work in radiation biology deals with the effects of radiation on a variety of living organisms. Emphasis continued on the study of damage to DNA and its repair. Research into certain human diseases which are believed to be caused by a deficient DNA repair mechanism is also summarized. (OT)

  19. Annual progress report - Health Sciences Division - 1990 January 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    This progress report contains a topical summary of major research in the Health Sciences Division. Separate reports are included for the Dosimetric Research Branch and the Radiation Biology Branch. The major topics discussed in this report include: neutron dosimetry, photon dosimetry, beta ray dosimetry, tritium measurement and dosimetry, internal dosimetry, biological dosimetry, instrumentation and measurement techniques, bioassay and in vivo counting development, dosimetry services, external activities, dose estimation by electron spin resonance, molecular and physical approaches to the structure and genetic function of DNA that determine cellular radioresponse, carcinogenic risks of radiation, stress induced changes in DNA structure and in cell biology, assessment of variation in the responses of individuals to ionizing radiation, cytotoxicity of beryllium, RBE of tritium beta rays for causes of death other than myeloid leukemia in male CBA/H mice, animal facility operations, and the Chalk River follow-up study

  20. Progress report - Physical Sciences, Physical Division 1993 July 1 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, M.

    1994-05-01

    The progress report on the Physical Sciences, Physics Division, is split into Accelerator Physics and Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch. The Accelerator Physics Group in collaboration with Fuel Channel Components Branch has undertaken a unique series of experiments to prove the feasibility of using high energy electron beams for out-reactor irradiation of bulk samples of pressure-tube materials. The Neutron and Condensed Matter Branch, has among other topics, been involved with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory project. It is part of an international collaboration including Canada, United States, and the United Kingdom. The project involves the use of heavy water to detect particles called neutrinos that are emitted from the centre of the sun and from exploding stars. Results from the Molecular Physics program include a study of the differing structures of ice grown in an electric field. Atomic Ordering in the new intermetallics Al 3 Ti-X was extensively investigated in the Materials Science program. In the theory program a code to calculate the multiphonon expansion of the incoherent scattering function was written and it was applied in the analysis of phonon density of states for amorphous and crystalline ice. Further calculations were made to develop improved understanding of superconductivity and a theory for the conductivity of vortex cores was proposed. 3 tabs., 15 figs

  1. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birge, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1981. During the year under review the Division devoted roughly half its effort to the final construction stages of the Time Projection Chamber and other equipment for the PEP-4 facility at SLAC. The year was marked by the successful passage of milestone after milestone - the two-sector test of the TPC with cosmic rays in July 1981, the full TPC test in November 1981, and the roll-in onto the PEP beam line on 6 January 1982. In other e + e - experiments, the Mark II detector continued its productive data-taking at PEP. In other areas, the final stages of data analysis, particularly for the structure functions, proceeded for the inelastic muon scattering experiment performed at Fermilab, a muon polarimeter experiment was developed and mounted at TRIUMF to probe for the presence of right-handed currents in muon decay, and the design and then construction began of fine-grained hadron calorimeters for the end caps of the Colliding Detector Facility at Fermilab. The Particle Data Group intensified its activities, despite financial constraints, as it proceeded toward production of a new edition of its authoritative Review of Particle Properties early in 1982. During 1981 the Theoretical Physics Group pursued a diverse spectrum of research in its own right and also interacted effectively with the experimental program. Research and development continued on the segmented mirror for the ten-meter telescope proposed by the University of California. Activities in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department encompassed networking, database management, software engineering, and computer graphics, as well as basic research in nonlinear phenomena in combustion and fluid flow

  2. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January-31 December 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birge, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during calendar year 1981. During the year under review the Division devoted roughly half its effort to the final construction stages of the Time Projection Chamber and other equipment for the PEP-4 facility at SLAC. The year was marked by the successful passage of milestone after milestone - the two-sector test of the TPC with cosmic rays in July 1981, the full TPC test in November 1981, and the roll-in onto the PEP beam line on 6 January 1982. In other e/sup +/e/sup -/ experiments, the Mark II detector continued its productive data-taking at PEP. In other areas, the final stages of data analysis, particularly for the structure functions, proceeded for the inelastic muon scattering experiment performed at Fermilab, a muon polarimeter experiment was developed and mounted at TRIUMF to probe for the presence of right-handed currents in muon decay, and the design and then construction began of fine-grained hadron calorimeters for the end caps of the Colliding Detector Facility at Fermilab. The Particle Data Group intensified its activities, despite financial constraints, as it proceeded toward production of a new edition of its authoritative Review of Particle Properties early in 1982. During 1981 the Theoretical Physics Group pursued a diverse spectrum of research in its own right and also interacted effectively with the experimental program. Research and development continued on the segmented mirror for the ten-meter telescope proposed by the University of California. Activities in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department encompassed networking, database management, software engineering, and computer graphics, as well as basic research in nonlinear phenomena in combustion and fluid flow.

  3. Econophysics and evolutionary economics (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 November 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The scientific session "Econophysics and evolutionary economics" of the Division of Physical Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) took place on 2 November 2010 in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences. The session agenda announced on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports: (1) Maevsky V I (Institute of Economics, RAS, Moscow) "The transition from simple reproduction to economic growth"; (2) Yudanov A Yu (Financial University of the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow) "Experimental data on the development of fast-growing innovative companies in Russia"; (3) Pospelov I G (Dorodnitsyn Computation Center, RAS, Moscow) "Why is it sometimes possible to successfully model an economy? (4) Chernyavskii D S (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Theoretical economics"; (5) Romanovskii M Yu (Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, RAS, Moscow) "Nonclassical random walks and the phenomenology of fluctuations of the yield of securities in the securities market"; (6) Dubovikov M M, Starchenko N V (INTRAST Management Company, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow) "Fractal analysis of financial time series and the prediction problem"; Papers written on the basis of these reports are published below. • The transition from simple reproduction to economic growth, V I Maevsky, S Yu Malkov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 729-733 • High-growth firms in Russia: experimental data and prospects for the econophysical simulation of economic modernization, A Yu Yudanov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 733-737 • Equilibrium models of economics in the period of a global financial crisis, I G Pospelov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 738-742 • On econophysics and its place in modern theoretical economics, D S Chernavskii, N I Starkov, S Yu Malkov, Yu V Kosse, A V Shcherbakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume

  4. Econophysics and evolutionary economics (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 November 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The scientific session 'Econophysics and evolutionary economics' of the Division of Physical Sciences of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) took place on 2 November 2010 in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences. The session agenda announced on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports: (1) Maevsky V I (Institute of Economics, RAS, Moscow) 'The transition from simple reproduction to economic growth'; (2) Yudanov A Yu (Financial University of the Government of the Russian Federation, Moscow) 'Experimental data on the development of fast-growing innovative companies in Russia'; (3) Pospelov I G (Dorodnitsyn Computation Center, RAS, Moscow) 'Why is it sometimes possible to successfully model an economy?' (4) Chernyavskii D S (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Theoretical economics'; (5) Romanovskii M Yu (Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, RAS, Moscow) 'Nonclassical random walks and the phenomenology of fluctuations of the yield of securities in the securities market'; (6) Dubovikov M M, Starchenko N V (INTRAST Management Company, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow) 'Fractal analysis of financial time series and the prediction problem'; Papers written on the basis of these reports are published below. The transition from simple reproduction to economic growth, V I Maevsky, S Yu Malkov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 729-733. High-growth firms in Russia: experimental data and prospects for the econophysical simulation of economic modernization, A Yu Yudanov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 733-737. Equilibrium models of economics in the period of a global financial crisis, I G Pospelov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 7, Pages 738-742. On econophysics and its place in modern theoretical economics, D S Chernavskii, N I Starkov, S Yu Malkov, Yu V Kosse, A V Shcherbakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number

  5. Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the ..beta..-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; ..beta..-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC.

  6. Nuclear Science Division annual report, July 1, 1981-September 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1983-06-01

    This report summarizes the scientific research carried out within the Nuclear Science Division between July 1, 1981, and September 30, 1982. Heavy-ion investigations continue to dominate the experimental and theoretical research efforts. Complementary programs in light-ion nuclear science, in nuclear data evaluation, and in the development of advanced instrumentation are also carried out. Results from Bevalac experiments employing a wide variety of heavy ion beams, along with new or upgraded detector facilities (HISS, the Plastic Ball, and the streamer chamber) are contained in this report. These relativistic experiments have shed important light on the degree of equilibration for central collisions, the time evolution of a nuclear collision, the nuclear density and compressional energy of these collisions, and strange particle production. Reaction mechanism work dominates the heavy-ion research at the 88-Inch Cyclotron and the SuperHILAC. Recent experiments have contributed to our understanding of the nature of light-particle emission in deep-inelastic collisions, of peripheral reactions, incomplete fusion, fission, and evaporation. Nuclear structure investigations at these accelerators continue to be directed toward the understanding of the behavior of nuclei at high angular momentum. Research in the area of exotic nuclei has led to the observation at the 88-Inch Cyclotron of the β-delayed proton decay of odd-odd T/sub z/ = -2 nuclides; β-delayed proton emitters in the rare earth region are being investigated at the SuperHILAC

  7. European analytical column No. 36 from the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC) of the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, Bo; Emons, Hendrik; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2008-01-01

    European analytical column no. 36 from the division of analytical chemistry (DAC) of the European association for chemical and molecular sciences (EuCheMS)......European analytical column no. 36 from the division of analytical chemistry (DAC) of the European association for chemical and molecular sciences (EuCheMS)...

  8. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Seventy years of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Waves Propagation (IZMIRAN) (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 25 November 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences dedicated to the 70th anniversary of the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IZMIRAN) (Troitsk, Moscow region) was held in the conference hall of IZMIRAN on 25 November 2009. The following reports were put on the session agenda posted on the web site www.gpad.ac.ru of the Physical Sciences Division, RAS: (1) Gurevich A V (Lebedev Physical Institute RAS, Moscow) "The role of cosmic rays and runaway electron breakdown in atmospheric lightning discharges"; (2) Aleksandrov E B (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) "Advances in quantum magnetometry for geomagnetic research"; (3) Dorman L I (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region, CR & SWC, Israel) "Cosmic ray variations and space weather"; (4) Mareev E A (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhnii Novgorod) "Global electric circuit research: achievements and prospects"; (5) Tereshchenko E D, Safargaleev V V (Polar Geophysical Institute, Kola Research Center, RAS, Murmansk) "Geophysical research in Spitsbergen Archipelago: status and prospects"; (6) Gulyaev Yu V, Armand N A, Efimov A I, Matyugov S S, Pavelyev A G, Savich N A, Samoznaev L N, Smirnov V V, Yakovlev O I (Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics RAS, Fryazino Branch, Fryazino, Moscow region) "Results of solar wind and planetary ionosphere research using radiophysical methods"; (7) Kunitsyn V E (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Satellite radio probing and the radio tomography of the ionosphere"; (8) Kuznetsov V D (IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow region) "Space Research at the Pushkov Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Russian Academy of Sciences." Papers based on reports 2-8 are published below. The main contents of report 1 are reproduced in A V Gurevich's review, "Nonlinear effects in the ionosphere" [Phys. Usp. 50

  9. Preparing culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math using the Geophysical Institute Framework for Professional Development in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry Bertram, Kathryn

    2011-12-01

    The Geophysical Institute (GI) Framework for Professional Development was designed to prepare culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Professional development programs based on the framework are created for rural Alaskan teachers who instruct diverse classrooms that include indigenous students. This dissertation was written in response to the question, "Under what circumstances is the GI Framework for Professional Development effective in preparing culturally responsive teachers of science, technology, engineering, and math?" Research was conducted on two professional development programs based on the GI Framework: the Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP) and the Science Teacher Education Program (STEP). Both programs were created by backward design to student learning goals aligned with Alaska standards and rooted in principles of indigenous ideology. Both were created with input from Alaska Native cultural knowledge bearers, Arctic scientists, education researchers, school administrators, and master teachers with extensive instructional experience. Both provide integrated instruction reflective of authentic Arctic research practices, and training in diverse methods shown to increase indigenous student STEM engagement. While based on the same framework, these programs were chosen for research because they offer distinctly different training venues for K-12 teachers. STEP offered two-week summer institutes on the UAF campus for more than 175 teachers from 33 Alaska school districts. By contrast, ACMP served 165 teachers from one rural Alaska school district along the Bering Strait. Due to challenges in making professional development opportunities accessible to all teachers in this geographically isolated district, ACMP offered a year-round mix of in-person, long-distance, online, and local training. Discussion centers on a comparison of the strategies used by each program to address GI Framework cornerstones, on

  10. Expected Recovery of Europa's Geophysical Attributes with Clipper Gravity Science Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Ashok Kumar; Margot, Jean-Luc

    2017-10-01

    The primary gravity science objective of NASA’s Clipper mission to Europa is to confirm the presence or absence of a global subsurface ocean beneath Europa's icy crust. Gravity field measurements obtained with a radio science investigation can reveal much about Europa's interior structure. Here, we conduct extensive simulations of the radio science measurements with the anticipated spacecraft trajectory and attitude (17F12V2) and assets on the spacecraft and the ground, including antenna orientations and beam patterns, transmitter characteristics, and receiver noise figures. In addition to two-way Doppler measurements, we also include radar altimeter crossover range measurements. We concentrate on +/-2 hour intervals centered on the closest approach of each one of the 46 flybys. Our covariance analyses reveal the precision with which the tidal Love number k2, second-degree gravity coefficients C20 and C22, and higher-order gravity coefficients can be determined. The results depend strongly on the Deep Space Network (DSN) assets that are deployed to track the spacecraft. We find that some DSN allocations are sufficient to conclusively confirm the presence or absence of a global ocean and to evaluate whether the ice shell is hydrostatic.

  11. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division 1991 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This is the second in the new series of reports for the Physics Division since the creation of the Physical Sciences Unit in 1990. This report has been subdivided into three self-contained sections covering the activities in the branches for Accelerator Physics, Neutron and Solid State Physics and Theoretical Physics. It is noteworthy that the RFQ1 program with the original vanes has come to a successful conclusion having accelerated 79 mA of protons to 600 keV. The new vanes to achieve a high energy of 1.2 MeV have now been installed and will form the basis for the low energy end of high current proton accelerator development. The progress in the neutron scattering program has been hampered by the NRU reactor being down for repairs since January 1991. Nevertheless a very successful opening ceremony was held to mark the completion of the new DUALSPEC spectrometers and several workshops have been held to promote the understanding of neutron scattering

  12. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division - 1993 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    After significant organizational change for the Physics Division, there are now two groups: Neutron and Condensed Matter Science, and Nuclear Physics. Theoretical Physics Branch was disbanded. A topical review of work on high power proton linacs describes the historical development of high power ion linacs and the ion source development program from initiation to its completion in 1993. RFQ1 became the first particle accelerator to be driven by a klystrode-based rf system. The accelerator operated at 1.25 MeV and accelerated more than 50 mA of high quality beam. The equipment has been sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory and will be recommissioned as the Chalk River Injection Test Stand (CRITS). The laser plasma beatwave accelerator generating accelerating field gradients of up to 1.8 GeV/m and acceleration of an injected electron beam to at least 30 meV over a 1 cm distance. The high power CO 2 laser beam was used to irradiate Zr-N6 pressure tube samples. The aim was to assess surface modifications particularly from shock hardening. Application of radiofrequency waves were used to investigate the properties of relevant materials, notably industrial ferrites. Chalk River participated in an international collaboration on measurement of dielectric properties of materials at high temperatures. A second topical review on neutron scattering and mineral physics deals with phase transitions in carbonate and in silicates. Dualspec is operating successfully. Modifications have been made to improve safety, reproducibility, angle control, calibration and sample analysis. Reviews from six programs: physics, molecular physics, material science, condensed matter theory, neutrino physics, and molecular dating and modelling are given. 1 tab., 17 figs

  13. Geophysics education on the Internet: Course production and assessment of our MOOC, "Deep Earth Science"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuda, Y.; Tazawa, K.; Sugie, K.; Sakuraba, H.; Hideki, M.; Tagawa, S.; Cross, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, massive open online courses (MOOC or MOOCs) have gained wide-spread attention as a new educational platform delivered via the internet. Many leading institutions all over the world have provided many fascinating MOOC courses in various fields. Students enrolled in MOOCs study their interested topic in a course not only by watching video lectures, reading texts, and answering questions, but also by utilizing interactive online tools such as discussion boards, Q&A sessions and peer assessments. MOOC is also gaining popularity as a way to do outreach activity and diffuse research results. Tokyo Institute of Technology provided its 1st MOOC, "Introduction to Deep Earth Science Part1" on edX, which is one of the largest MOOC providers. This four-week-long course was designed for 1st year college students and with two learning goals in this course; 1) to introduce students to the fascinating knowledge of solid Earth, 2) to provide an opportunity to use scientific thinking as well as to show how interesting and exciting science can be. This course contained materials such as 1) structure of inside of the Earth 2) internal temperature of the earth and how it is estimated and 3) chemical compositions and dynamics inside the earth. After the end of the provision of Part1, this course was re-made as "Introduction to Deep Earth Science"(so to speak, Part2) on the basis of opinions obtained from students who have attended our course and student teaching assistants (TA) who have run and produced this course. In this presentation, we will explain our MOOC making model, which is a team based course creation effort between the course instructor, Tokyo Tech Online Education Development Office (OEDO) staff and TA students. Moreover, we will share details and feedback of Part1 received from some of the 5000 enrolled students from 150 counties and regions, and report the implementation of Part2 in the light of challenges resulted from Part1.

  14. The Influence of Science Process Skills, Logical Thinking Abilities, Attitudes towards Science, and Locus of Control on Science Achievement among Form 4 Students in the Interior Division of Sabah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fah, Lay Yoon

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the direct and indirect effects of science process skills, logical thinking abilities, attitudes towards science, and locus of control on science achievement among Form 4 students in the Interior Division of Sabah, Malaysia. Research findings showed that there were low to moderate, positive but significant…

  15. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J. (ed.)

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report.

  16. Nuclear Science Division annual report, October 1, 1986--September 30, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1988-09-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Nuclear Science Division during the period October 1, 1986 to September 30, 1987. A highlight of the experimental program during this time was the completion of the first round of heavy-ion running at CERN with ultrarelativistic oxygen and sulfur beams. Very rapid progress is being made in the analysis of these important experiments and preliminary results are presented in this report. During this period, the Bevalac also continued to produce significant new physics results, while demand for beam time remained high. An important new community of users has arrived on the scene, eager to exploit the unique low-energy heavy-beam capabilities of the Bevalac. Another major highlight of the program has been the performance of the Dilepton Spectrometer which has entered into production running. Dileptons have been observed in the p + Be and Ca + Ca reactions at several bombarding energies. New data on pion production with heavy beams measured in the streamer chamber to shed light on the question of nuclear compressibility, while posing some new questions concerning the role of Coulomb forces on the observed pion spectra. In another quite different area, the pioneering research with radioactive beams is continuing and is proving to be one of the fastest growing programs at the Bevalac. Exotic secondary beams (e.g., 8He, 11Li, and 14Be) have been produced for fundamental nuclear physics studies. In order to further enhance the scientific research program and ensure the continued vitality of the facility, the Laboratory has proposed an upgrade of the existing Bevalac. Specifically, the Upgrade would replace the Bevatron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams to continue the forefront research program. Other papers on nuclear physics research are included in this report

  17. Exploration Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savit, Carl H.

    1978-01-01

    Expansion of activity and confirmation of new technological directions characterized several fields of exploration geophysics in 1977. Advances in seismic-reflection exploration have been especially important. (Author/MA)

  18. Agricultural Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The four geophysical methods predominantly used for agricultural purposes are resistivity, electromagnetic induction, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and time domain reflectometry (TDR). Resistivity and electromagnetic induction methods are typically employed to map lateral variations of apparent so...

  19. Dr Hiroshi Ikukawa Director Planning and Evaluation Division Science and Technology Policy Bureau Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan and Mr Robert Aymar signed an accord for the CERN.

    CERN Document Server

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    Dr Hiroshi Ikukawa Director Planning and Evaluation Division Science and Technology Policy Bureau Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) of Japan and Mr Robert Aymar signed an accord for the CERN.

  20. 100th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic rays (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 24 October 2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), entitled ''100th anniversary of the discovery of cosmic rays'', was held on 24 October 2012 in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The agenda of the session announced on the RAS Physical Sciences Division website www.gpad.ac.ru included the following reports: (1) Panasyuk M I (Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Lomonosov State University, Moscow) T he contribution of Russian scientists to the centennial history of the development of the physics of cosmic rays ; (2) Ryazhskaya O G (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) O n experiments in underground physics ; (3) Krymskii G F, Berezhko E G (Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Yakutsk) T he origin of cosmic rays ; (4) Stozhkov Yu I (Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) C osmic rays in the heliosphere ; (5) Troitsky S V (Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) ''Cosmic particles of energies >10 19 eV: a short review of results''. Papers based on reports 2 and 5 are presented below. . On experiments in Underground Physics, O G Ryazhskaya Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 3, Pages 296–304 . Cosmic particles with energies above 10 19 eV: a brief summary of results, S V Troitsky Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 3, Pages 304–310 (conferences and symposia)

  1. Geophysical Institute. Biennial report, 1993-1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The 1993-1994 Geophysical Institute Biennial Report was published in November 1995 by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. It contains an overview of the Geophysical Institute, the Director`s Note, and research presentations concerning the following subjects: Scientific Predictions, Space Physics, Atmospheric Sciences, Snow, Ice and Permafrost, Tectonics and Sedimentation, Seismology, Volcanology, Remote Sensing, and other projects.

  2. Visualising Migration and Social Division: Insights From Social Sciences and the Visual Arts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Ball

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a growing number of social scientists have taken an interest in "the visual". These scholars have utilised and developed a wide range of different visual methodologies. The number of social scientists employing visual methodologies has grown to a point where there are now critical masses of scholars working on particular topics. Alongside this a number of practitioners working in visual arts have taken an interest in the issue of migration. This FQS special issue is devoted to the use of visual methodologies to explore the particular topic of migration and social division. In this introductory article the editors provide a brief introduction to research on "the visual" and research on migration and social division. We then go on to explore what the use of visual methodologies might contribute to research on migration and social division. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1002265

  3. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - TASCC Division -1995 July 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, J.C.

    1996-05-01

    Included in this progress report of the TASCC division at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is the research and development being carried out at this time and a listing of the relevant publications, reports, lectures and conference contributions. The TASCC staff is also detailed. 8 tabs.,16 figs

  4. Environmental and Medical Sciences Division progress report January-December, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainge, W.M.

    1977-05-01

    The report falls under the following headings: introduction (a general survey of the research programme of the Division); inhalation studies and radionuclide analysis; whole body counting; radiation physics (including dosimetry, fallout, environmental analysis); atmospheric pollution; medical department; chemical analysis group; publications. (U.K.)

  5. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - TASCC Division -1995 January 1 to June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    Included in this progress report of the TASCC division at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories is the research and development being carried out at this time and a listing of the relevant publications, reports. lectures and conference contributions. 15 tabs. 19 figs

  6. Advances in materials science, metals and ceramics division. Triannual progress report, June-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truhan, J.J.; Hopper, R.W.; Gordon, K.M.

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning the magnetic fusion energy program; the laser fusion energy program; geothermal research; nuclear waste management; Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) research; diffusion in silicate minerals; chemistry research resources; and chemistry and materials science research

  7. Advances in materials science, metals and ceramics division. Triannual progress report, June-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truhan, J.J.; Hopper, R.W.; Gordon, K.M. (eds.)

    1980-10-28

    Information is presented concerning the magnetic fusion energy program; the laser fusion energy program; geothermal research; nuclear waste management; Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) research; diffusion in silicate minerals; chemistry research resources; and chemistry and materials science research.

  8. Grounding Hypnosis in Science: The 'New' APA Division 30 definition of hypnosis as a step backwards.

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn, Stephen Jay; Green, Joseph P.; Kirsch , Irving; Capafons, Antonio; Lilienfeld, .S.OScott O; Laurence, Jean R.; Montgomery, Guy H.

    2015-01-01

    Every decade or so, the Division 30 of the American Psychological Association (APA) has seen fit to redefine hypnosis (Elkins, Barabasz, Council, & Spiegel, 2015; Green, Barabasz, Barrett, & Montgomery, 2005; Kirsch, 1994). In the latest attempt, the Hypnosis Definition Committee (HDC) defined hypnosis as a 'state of consciousness involving focused attention and reduced peripheral awareness characterized by an enhanced capacity for response to suggestion' (Elkins et al., 2015, p. 6). One migh...

  9. International Conference-Session of the Section of Nuclear Physics of the Physical Sciences Division of RAS

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    From November 17 to 21, 2014 the Section of Nuclear Physics of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences and the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI will hold in MEPhI, Moscow, the International Conference-Session of SNP PSD RAS "Physics of Fundamental Interactions". The program of the session covers basic theoretical and experimental aspects of particle physics and related problems of nuclear physics and cosmology, and will consist of 30-minute highlight and review talks as well as 10-15-minute contributed reports. All highlight talks and part of contributed reports will be presented at plenary sessions of the conference. The remaining reports will be presented at the sections which will be formed after receiving of abstracts. On the recommendation of the Organizing Committee reports and talks containing new unpublished results will be published in special issues of journals "Nuclear Physics" and "Nuclear Physics and Engineering". For the institutions belonging to the Rosatom s...

  10. THE DEVELOPMENT OF BOOK SCIENCE IN LITHUANIA: DIVISION INTO PERIODS AND CHRONOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navickiene, Ausra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It is possible to distinguish two main periods in the history of Lithuanian book science: the initial period of formation of the book science started at the beginning of the 19th century and ended by the first decades of the 20th century; the period of the independent, autonomous development of book science from the beginning of the 20th century till now. The first period is also known as a bibliographic period of book science, because the disciplines investigating a book were concentrated around bibliography, which was understood as a universal encyclopaedic science of book at that time. The border between the two periods is marked by a change in the book researchworks: the wide concept of bibliography stopped dominating the discourse; book science and bibliography were understood as two disciplines with specific objects of research, their own structures and methods. It is difficult to point out a specific date of this change but it is certain that it must have happened not later than in the 20s of the 20th century. Within these two periods, it is possible to distinguish a variety of factors that influenced the development of book science.In Lithuania, book science has emerged and was formed within the European model of development. Just after a decade since the first courses in book science delivered in France at the end of the 18th century, the subject of book science was included into the programme at Vilnius University and later the lectures were read. The most significant European (French and German book science works were known to the academic faculty at Vilnius University and collected in its library. They were used as a foundation to create the first works of book history and theory in Lithuania. These works disseminated widely popular theoretical concepts enriched by original research, which helped the formation of independent disciplines of book science, bibliography and history of literature.The development of the autonomous book

  11. IFLA General Conference, 1986. Special Libraries Division. Section: Science and Technology Libraries. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on science and technology libraries which were presented at the 1986 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "Online Information Service of the Japan Information Center of Science and Technology" (Ryuko Igarashi, Japan); (2) "A View from the Chip--The Influence of Information…

  12. A Portable Bioinformatics Course for Upper-Division Undergraduate Curriculum in Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floraino, Wely B.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the challenges that bioinformatics education is facing and describes a bioinformatics course that is successfully taught at the California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, to the fourth year undergraduate students in biological sciences, chemistry, and computer science. Information on lecture and computer practice…

  13. Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Triannual progress report, October 1979-January 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-31

    Progress is summarized concerning magnetic fusion energy materials, laser fusion energy, aluminium-air battery and vehicle, geothermal research, oil-shale research, nuclear waste management, office of basic energy sciences research, and materials research notes. (FS)

  14. Surface and catalysis science in the Materials and Molecular Research Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Surface science studies at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are detailed. Subject areas include: structure of surfaces and adsorbed monolayers; reduction and oxidation of surfaces; catalytic chemistry; and structure of interfaces and thin films

  15. Progress report: Physical Sciences - Physics Division, 1992 July 01 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungrin, J.; Kim, S.M.; Sears, V.F.

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes operations and research activities in the Accelerator Physics, Neutron and Condensed Matter Science and Theoretical Physics branches at Chalk River Laboratories during the last half of 1992. 21 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Undergraduate Experiences of Division I Athlete Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeaux, Eddie; Bachman, Tina; Burton, Rena M.; Aliyeva, Aida

    2017-02-01

    Employing the conceptual model developed by Comeaux and Harrison (Coll Stud Aff J 30(1):75-87, 2011), this study explored the undergraduate experience of Division I athlete STEM graduates. Data collection involved 17 in-depth interviews with former athletes at two research-intensive, public institutions. Results revealed that pre-college characteristics, involvement in purposeful STEM-related activities, and sport participation, as well as academic support and guidance within athletic departments, play important roles in shaping the experiences of athletes who earn STEM degrees. Implications for student affairs professionals, faculty, and others who frequently interact with college athletes and are committed to creating more equitable educational environments are discussed.

  17. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHargue, C.J.

    1977-09-01

    Progress is reported for research programs in the metals and ceramics division of ORNL. In structure of materials, theoretical research, x-ray diffraction studies, studies of erosion of ceramics, preparation and synthesis of high temperature and special service materials, and studies of stabilities of microphases in high-temperature structural materials. Research into deformation and mechanical properties included physical metallurgy, and grain boundary segregation and embrittlement. Physical properties and transport phenomena were studied and included mechanisms of surface and solid state reactions, and properties of superconducting materials. The radiation effects program, directed at understanding the effects of composition and microstructure on the structure and properties of materials irradiated at elevated temperatures, is also described

  18. Metals and Ceramics Division materials science annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHargue, C.J. (comp.)

    1977-09-01

    Progress is reported for research programs in the metals and ceramics division of ORNL. In structure of materials, theoretical research, x-ray diffraction studies, studies of erosion of ceramics, preparation and synthesis of high temperature and special service materials, and studies of stabilities of microphases in high-temperature structural materials. Research into deformation and mechanical properties included physical metallurgy, and grain boundary segregation and embrittlement. Physical properties and transport phenomena were studied and included mechanisms of surface and solid state reactions, and properties of superconducting materials. The radiation effects program, directed at understanding the effects of composition and microstructure on the structure and properties of materials irradiated at elevated temperatures, is also described. (GHT)

  19. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division 1991 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The reports from the three branches in Physics Division, Accelerator Physics, Neutron and Solid State Physics and Theoretical Physics, are each presented in separate sections. Each section features a topical review, highlighting in this report the use of high-temperature rf and microwave response of materials, magnetic excitations in hexagonal ABX 3 materials, and meson exchange currents in nuclear beta decay. Noteworthy achievements in the Accelerator Physics program include the successful operation to design energy of the re-vaned RFQ1 accelerator enabling now an energy of 1250 keV. The ECR ion source has operated for greater than 75 hours without failure and has produced the 100 mA needed for the RFQ1 accelerator. The neutron scattering program was again hampered by the NRU Reactor being down for repair. The good news is that the reactor was brought back up to full power in December thus enabling experiments to begin again. Experiments earlier in the year were carried out at Oak Ridge (US), Riso (Denmark), National Institute for Standards and Technology (US) and the Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (UK). A new high capacity, portable pumping system was commissioned replacing a fixed one that had become obsolete and allowing now greater use of environment control devices on all spectrometers. An analysis of double-charge exchange reactions in nuclei has been used to provide limits on the radius of the neutron halo in 11 Li. The most up-to-date, complete and accurate tables of neutron scattering lengths and cross-sections have been completed. Continuous quality improvement (CQI) analyses were initiated for all the activities in Physics Division with the goal to enhance performance and provide better service to our many customers

  20. ANNALS OF GEOPHYSICS: AD MAJORA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Florindo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Annals of Geophysics is a bimonthly international journal, which publishes scientific papers in the field of geophysics sensu lato. It derives from Annali di Geofisica, which commenced publication in January 1948 as a quarterly periodical devoted to general geophysics, seismology, earth magnetism, and atmospheric studies. The journal was published regularly for a quarter of a century until 1982 when it merged with the French journal Annales de Géophysique to become Annales Geophysicae under the aegis of the European Geophysical Society. In 1981, this journal ceased publication of the section on solid earth geophysics, ending the legacy of Annali di Geofisica. In 1993, the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica (ING, founder of the journal, decided to resume publication of its own journal under the same name, Annali di Geofisica. To ensure continuity, the first volume of the new series was assigned the volume number XXXVI (following the last issue published in 1982. In 2002, with volume XLV, the name of the journal was translated into English to become Annals of Geophysics and in consequence the journal impact factor counter was restarted. Starting in 2010, in order to improve its status and better serve the science community, Annals of Geophysics has instituted a number of editorial changes including full electronic open access, freely accessible online, the possibility to comment on and discuss papers online, and a board of editors representing Asia and the Americas as well as Europe. [...

  1. An overview on integrated data system for archiving and sharing marine geology and geophysical data in Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sang-Hwa; Kim, Sung Dae; Park, Hyuk Min; Lee, SeungHa

    2016-04-01

    We established and have operated an integrated data system for managing, archiving and sharing marine geology and geophysical data around Korea produced from various research projects and programs in Korea Institute of Ocean Science & Technology (KIOST). First of all, to keep the consistency of data system with continuous data updates, we set up standard operating procedures (SOPs) for data archiving, data processing and converting, data quality controls, and data uploading, DB maintenance, etc. Database of this system comprises two databases, ARCHIVE DB and GIS DB for the purpose of this data system. ARCHIVE DB stores archived data as an original forms and formats from data providers for data archive and GIS DB manages all other compilation, processed and reproduction data and information for data services and GIS application services. Relational data management system, Oracle 11g, adopted for DBMS and open source GIS techniques applied for GIS services such as OpenLayers for user interface, GeoServer for application server, PostGIS and PostgreSQL for GIS database. For the sake of convenient use of geophysical data in a SEG Y format, a viewer program was developed and embedded in this system. Users can search data through GIS user interface and save the results as a report.

  2. Archaeological Geophysics in Field Courses and Flipped-Classrooms: Lessons Learned from the Marine and Geological Science Programs at North Carolina State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Wall, J.; Sprinkle, D. P., II

    2016-12-01

    The Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at North Carolina State University routinely uses archaeological geophysics as an inquiry based teaching tool in our capstone Coastal Processes and Geologic Field Camps. Examples of past projects include a search for civil war artifacts within the moat surrounding historic Fort Macon, near Beaufort North Carolina, and investigations of ancient adobe pueblos in northern New Mexico. These types of studies, being of modest spatial scale, provide students with an opportunity to image the subsurface using multiple techniques and integrate the results into a geographic information system for analysis and interpretation. In the spring of 2016, our semester-long Applied Geophysics course was built around a project to identify unmarked graves at the Oberlin African-American cemetery Raleigh, North Carolina. The classroom experience was flipped with required readings, video lectures and weekly graded quizzes accessible online. Class meeting time was entirely spent collecting or processing data. To facilitate hands on learning, the class was taught with two sections having only ten students each. The methods used included GPR, EMI, Magnetics, and DC Resistivity. Students responded positively to the opportunity to tackle a real-world problem as part of the class; however, many where frustrated by the expectation that they master theoretical aspects of the course using the online content. Compared to a class taught with a traditional lecture format, students clearly gained more knowledge regarding field procedures; however, their performance on a comprehensive final suggests a poorer understand of many fundamental concepts.

  3. A review of nuclear geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clayton, C.G.; Schweitzer, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of nuclear geophysics in scientific and technological content and in range from its beginnings early in this century to the present day. We note that the early work in nuclear geophysics was originally referred to under the umbrella of open-quotes isotope applicationsclose quotes and the origin of the term open-quotes nuclear geophysicsclose quotes (which is seen to clarify and to focus work in this area) is exposed in this paper. The current expansion of nuclear geophysics front its original concern with oil well logging is an important trend because much of the underlying science, technology, and instrumentation is common ground. A review of nuclear geophysics would be a barren document without reference to long-term and, in some cases, short-term commercial and economic as well as to technological considerations, since these factors are the principal motivation for further development

  4. Introducing Multiplication and Division, Kangaroos and Numbers: MINNEMAST Coordinated Mathematics - Science Series, Unit 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihrig, Elizabeth A., Ed.

    This volume is the seventeenth in a series of 29 coordinated MINNEMAST units in mathematics and science for kindergarten and the primary grades. Intended for use by second-grade teachers, this unit guide provides a summary and overview of the unit, a list of materials needed, and descriptions of five groups of activities. The purposes and…

  5. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Research programs from the following sections and programs are summarized: aquatic ecology, environmental resources, earth sciences, terrestrial ecology, advanced fossil energy program, toxic substances program, environmental impacts program, biomass, low-level waste research and development program, US DOE low-level waste management program, and waste isolation program

  6. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section. (ACR)

  7. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section

  8. Educational Transformation in Upper-Division Physics: The Science Education Initiative Model, Outcomes, and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasteen, Stephanie V.; Wilcox, Bethany; Caballero, Marcos D.; Perkins, Katherine K.; Pollock, Steven J.; Wieman, Carl E.

    2015-01-01

    In response to the need for a scalable, institutionally supported model of educational change, the Science Education Initiative (SEI) was created as an experiment in transforming course materials and faculty practices at two institutions--University of Colorado Boulder (CU) and University of British Columbia. We find that this departmentally…

  9. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Research programs from the following sections and programs are summarized: aquatic ecology, environmental resources, earth sciences, terrestrial ecology, advanced fossil energy program, toxic substances program, environmental impacts program, biomass, low-level waste research and development program, US DOE low-level waste management program, and waste isolation program.

  10. IFLA General Conference, 1985. Division on Special Libraries. Section on Science and Technology Libraries. Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Papers on science and technology libraries which were presented at the 1985 International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA) conference include: (1) "UAP (Universal Availability of Publications) and User Training for Categories of Grey Literature" (Dieter Schmidmaier, Mining Academy Freiberg, East Germany); (2) "Resource…

  11. Black holes: theory and observations (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 23 December 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), "Black holes: theory and observations," was held in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, on 23 December 2015. The papers collected in this issue were written based on talks given at the session: (1) I D Novikov (Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Astro Space Center, Moscow; The Niels Bohr International Academy, The Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen; National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow) "Black holes, wormholes, and time machines"; (2) A M Cherepashchuk (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow) "Observing stellar-mass and supermassive black holes"; (3) N S Kardashev (Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Astro Space Center, Moscow) "Millimetron space project: a tool for researching black holes and wormholes." Papers written on the basis of oral presentations 1, 2 are published below. • Observing stellar mass and supermassive black holes, A M Cherepashchuk Physics-Uspekhi, 2016, Volume 59, Number 7, Pages 702-712 • Black holes, wormholes, and time machines, I D Novikov Physics-Uspekhi, 2016, Volume 59, Number 7, Pages 713-715

  12. From the history of physics (Scientific session of the General Meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 17 December 2012)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    A scientific session of the General Meeting of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS on 17 December 2012. The following reports were put on the session's agenda posted on the website http://www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division: (1) Dianov E M (Fiber Optics Research Center, RAS, Moscow) O n the threshold of a peta era ; (2) Zabrodskii A G (Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg) S cientists' contribution to the great victory in WWII using the example of the Leningrad (now A F Ioffe) Physical Technical Institute ; (3) Ilkaev R I (Russian Federal Nuclear Center --- All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, Sarov) M ajor stages of the Soviet Atomic Project ; (4) Cherepashchuk A M (Sternberg State Astronomical Institute of Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) H istory of the Astronomy history . Papers written on the basis of the reports are published below. . On the Threshold of Peta-era, E M Dianov Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 5, Pages 486–492 . Scientists' contribution to the Great Victory in WWII on the example of the Leningrad (now A F Ioffe) Physical Technical Institute, A G Zabrodskii Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 5, Pages 493–502 . Major stages of the Atomic Project, R I Ilkaev Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 5, Pages 502–509. History of the Universe History, A M Cherepashchuk Physics-Uspekhi, 2013, Volume 56, Number 5, Pages 509–530 (conferences and symposia)

  13. The Hidden Curriculum--Faculty-Made Tests in Science. Part 2: Upper-Division Courses. Innovations in Science and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Sheila; Raphael, Jacqueline

    This volume, part two of "The Hidden Curriculum," is premised on the belief that testing practices influence educational procedures and learning outcomes. Graduate level science educators shared their assessment techniques in terms of the following categories: (1) exam design; (2) exam format; (3) exam environment; and (4) grading practices.…

  14. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January--31 December 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepore, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research and other work carried out during the calendar year 1975. The report is nontechnical in nature, with almost no data. A 17-page bibliography lists the technical papers which detail the work. The contents of the report include the following: experimental physics (high-energy physics--SPEAR, PEP, SLAC, FNAL, BNL, Bevatron; particle data group; medium-energy physics; astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmic rays; instrumentation development), theoretical physics (particle theory and accelerator theory and design), computer science and applied mathematics (data management systems, socio-economic environment demographic information system, computer graphics, computer networks, management information systems, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, programing languages, applied mathematics research), real-time systems (ModComp and PDP networks), and computer center activities (systems programing, user services, hardware development, computer operations). A glossary of computer science and mathematics terms is also included. 32 figures

  15. Physics, Computer Science and Mathematics Division annual report, 1 January--31 December 1975. [LBL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepore, J.L. (ed.)

    1975-01-01

    This annual report describes the scientific research and other work carried out during the calendar year 1975. The report is nontechnical in nature, with almost no data. A 17-page bibliography lists the technical papers which detail the work. The contents of the report include the following: experimental physics (high-energy physics--SPEAR, PEP, SLAC, FNAL, BNL, Bevatron; particle data group; medium-energy physics; astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmic rays; instrumentation development), theoretical physics (particle theory and accelerator theory and design), computer science and applied mathematics (data management systems, socio-economic environment demographic information system, computer graphics, computer networks, management information systems, computational physics and data analysis, mathematical modeling, programing languages, applied mathematics research), real-time systems (ModComp and PDP networks), and computer center activities (systems programing, user services, hardware development, computer operations). A glossary of computer science and mathematics terms is also included. 32 figures. (RWR)

  16. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1996 January 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, B.M.

    1997-04-01

    This document is the last Progress Report for the Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch, at Chalk River Labs of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The materials science program continued to include measurements of stress as a major component, but the determination of phase diagrams for specific alloys was also a prominent activity. Studies were made of two types of unusual magnetic materials. The magnetic properties of several oxide pyrochlore were investigated and spin waves were measured in the magnetic semiconductor, chalcopyrite. The crystal structures of the deuterated anti fluorite were determined and the reorientation of the ammonium ion was refined in detail. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate whether spontaneous phase separation into chiral domains occurs for mixtures of DPPC of opposite chirality. A new Neutron Velocity Selector was commissioned

  17. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division, 1996 January 1 to December 31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powell, B.M. (ed.)

    1997-04-01

    This document is the last Progress Report for the Neutron and Condensed Matter Science Branch, at Chalk River Labs of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The materials science program continued to include measurements of stress as a major component, but the determination of phase diagrams for specific alloys was also a prominent activity. Studies were made of two types of unusual magnetic materials. The magnetic properties of several oxide pyrochlore were investigated and spin waves were measured in the magnetic semiconductor, chalcopyrite. The crystal structures of the deuterated anti fluorite were determined and the reorientation of the ammonium ion was refined in detail. Differential scanning calorimetry measurements were used to investigate whether spontaneous phase separation into chiral domains occurs for mixtures of DPPC of opposite chirality. A new Neutron Velocity Selector was commissioned.

  18. Nuclear Science Division: Annual report for the period October 1, 1985-September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, J.

    1987-07-01

    Research has for the most part been carried out using three local accelerators, the Bevalac, the SuperHILAC and the 88-Inch Cyclotron. However, at CERN, oxygen-16 beams were accelerated to 3.2 TeV using the LBL-GSI heavy ion injector into the CERN SPS. First results obtained during the beam test period are presented in this report. Bevalac research has probed new regions of the nuclear matter equation of state. Studies of collisions between the most massive nuclei have revealed rich new phenomena such as collective flow, where the pressures generated force the emerging particles away from the beam direction. Experiments on dileptons e + e - pairs) utilizing the newly completed Dilepton Spectrometer (DLS) are being carried out to glean new insights into the hot, high-density stage of the collision. Major new results on the nuclear structure of exotic, very neutron-rich light nuclei are being obtained by exploiting the projectile fragmentation process to produce secondary radioactive beams. The Laboratory has proposed the Bevalac Upgrade Project to replace the Bevalac's weak-focusing synchrotron with a modern, strong-focusing synchrotron to provide higher intensity and higher quality beams. The significant enhancement of the heavy ion capability at the 88-Inch Cyclotron as a result of the recent development of the ECR source has led to a renaissance of the cyclotron as indicated by the increased demand for beam time. A variety of other scientific activities were also carried out during this period. The Isotopes Project published the first edition of a new radioactivity reference book for applied users-The Table of Radioactive Isotopes and division members organized several major scientific meetings

  19. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G. (comps.)

    1982-10-01

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  20. Physics, computer science and mathematics division. Annual report, 1 January - 31 December 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1983-08-01

    Experimental physics research activities are described under the following headings: research on e + e - annihilation; research at Fermilab; search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson; the particle data center; high energy astrophysics and interdisciplinary experiments; detector and other research and development; publications and reports of other research; computation and communication; and engineering, evaluation, and support operations. Theoretical particle physics research and heavy ion fusion research are described. Also, activities of the Computer Science and Mathematics Department are summarized. Publications are listed

  1. Physics, computer science and mathematics division. Annual report, 1 January - 31 December 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, J.D.

    1983-08-01

    Experimental physics research activities are described under the following headings: research on e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation; research at Fermilab; search for effects of a right-handed gauge boson; the particle data center; high energy astrophysics and interdisciplinary experiments; detector and other research and development; publications and reports of other research; computation and communication; and engineering, evaluation, and support operations. Theoretical particle physics research and heavy ion fusion research are described. Also, activities of the Computer Science and Mathematics Department are summarized. Publications are listed. (WHK)

  2. Honoring the 90th birthday of Academician I M Khalatnikov (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 21 October 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenshchik, Aleksandr Yu; Pokrovsky, Valery L.; Khriplovich, Iosif B.

    2010-06-01

    21 October 2009, in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, a scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division was held honoring the 90th birthday of Academician I M Khalatnikov. The following talks were given at the session: (1) Andreev A F (Kapitza Institute of Physical Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow) "Momentum deficit in quantum glasses" (2) Kamenshchik A Yu (Dipartimento di Fisica and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Bologna, Italy; Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics RAS, Moscow) "The problem of singularities and chaos in cosmology" (3) Pokrovsky V L (Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, RAS, Moscow; Department of Physics, Texas A&M University, USA) "I M Khalatnikov's works on scattering of high-energy particles" (4) Khriplovich I B (Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk) "Screening and antiscreening of charge in gauge theories." Brief versions of talks 2-4 are given below. • The problem of singularities and chaos in cosmology, A Yu Kamenshchik Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 3, Pages 301-309 • Above the barriers (I M Khalatnikov's works on the scattering of high-energy particles), V L Pokrovsky Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 3, Pages 309-314 • Screening and antiscreening of charge in gauge theories, I B Khriplovich Physics-Uspekhi, 2010, Volume 53, Number 3, Pages 315-316

  3. Progress report physical sciences - TASCC division - 1991 July 01 -December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    The past six-month period saw completion of our program of cyclotron commissioning, with the extraction on 1992 October 14 of a 3.0 MeV/u beam of 238 U. In three years were developed the cyclotron and its subsystems to demonstrate the full range of operating parameters, and they converted what was, in effect, a prototype accelerator into a fully engineered, reliable facility. The number of available beams was increased from two, to forty-two. Currently, we are adding one or two new beams per month. In spite of the commissioning activity during the reporting period, the number of cyclotron-based experiments has increased . Reaction studies and atomic-physics experiments dominated. Perhaps the outcome of broadest interest was the production and detection of secondary (radioactive beams downstream from a gold target bombarded by 40 MeV/u 12 C from the cyclotron. . Including beam development, the cyclotron operated for 967 hours, or 32% of the total facility beam time, about the same percentage as in the previous six-month period. Between July and the end of the year, Tandem beams were used, either for experiments or development purposes, for a total of 3117 hours. This beam time was 86% of the scheduled operating time and 71% of the the total time available - a rather lower value than usual owing to an unexpected materials failure in the conductive-rim chain pulleys of the charging system. Viewed as a whole, the facility operated for 83% of its scheduled time, or 67% of the total time. Most of our eexperiments are collaborative efforts. This period, the former contributed 40% of the total laboratory research efforts and figure prominently in all nine scientific publications. The numbers and diversity of our user community continue to increase, particularly in non-nuclear areas: accelerator mass spectrometry, single event upset and materials science, etc

  4. Research results reported by OEO summer (1981) student employees of LLNL working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, M. C.; Griffith, P. J.; Kreevoy, E. P.; Turner, III, H. J.; Tatman, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Significant experimental results were achieved in a number of research programs that were carried out during the summer of 1981 by students sponsored by the Office of Equal Opportunity at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These students were working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel. Accomplishments include the following: (1) preparation of post-burn stratigraphic sections for the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification project; (2) preparation of miscellaneous stratigraphic sections in the Climax granite near the Spent Fuel Test, Nevada Test Site, for the Waste Isolation Project; (3) confirmation of the applicability of a new theory relating to subsidence (solid matrix movement); (4) experimental confirmation that organic groundwater contaminants produced during an underground coal gasification experiment can be removed by appropriate bacterial treatment; (5) development of data supporting the extension of the Greenville Fault Zone into the Northern Diablo Range (Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California); (6) completion of a literature review on hazardous waste (current disposal technology, regulations, research needs); (7) preparation of a map showing levels of background seismic noise in the USSR; (8) demonstration of a correlation of explosion size with the P-wave magnitude of the seismic signal produced by the explosion; and (9) reduction of data showing the extent of ground motion resulting from subsidence in the vicinity of the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification Project.

  5. Research results reported by OEO summer (1981) student employees of LLNL working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doyle, M.C.; Griffith, P.J.; Kreevoy, E.P.; Turner, H.J. III; Tatman, D.A.

    1982-01-01

    Significant experimental results were achieved in a number of research programs that were carried out during the summer of 1981 by students sponsored by the Office of Equal Opportunity at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. These students were working with Earth Sciences (K) Division personnel. Accomplishments include the following: (1) preparation of post-burn stratigraphic sections for the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification project; (2) preparation of miscellaneous stratigraphic sections in the Climax granite near the Spent Fuel Test, Nevada Test Site, for the Waste Isolation Project; (3) confirmation of the applicability of a new theory relating to subsidence (solid matrix movement); (4) experimental confirmation that organic groundwater contaminants produced during an underground coal gasification experiment can be removed by appropriate bacterial treatment; (5) development of data supporting the extension of the Greenville Fault Zone into the Northern Diablo Range (Alameda and Santa Clara Counties, California); (6) completion of a literature review on hazardous waste (current disposal technology, regulations, research needs); (7) preparation of a map showing levels of background seismic noise in the USSR; (8) demonstration of a correlation of explosion size with the P-wave magnitude of the seismic signal produced by the explosion; and (9) reduction of data showing the extent of ground motion resulting from subsidence in the vicinity of the Hoe Creek III experiment, Underground Coal Gasification Project

  6. Chemical Engineering Division basic energy sciences research: July 1976--September 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-01-01

    Studies in basic energy science covered many different activities, nearly all of which were designed to gain information required for a better understanding of systems important to national needs in energy and environment. Studies of associating gases included measurements of thermal conductivities and basic molecular orbital calculations. Raman spectroscopy and spectrophotometry were used to determine thermodynamic and spectroscopic data on salt vapor complexes. Polarized Raman spectra of As/sub 2/S/sub 3/ thin films and vapors were recorded. Halogenation of lanthanide oxides with aluminum chloride allowed the separation of the resultant chloride complexes by vapor transport. Electrochemical titrations were used to obtain the solubility product of iron sulfide in molten LiCl--KCl eutectic. Solubility products of eleven sulfides in the same eutectic mixture were calculated. Galvanostatic techniques were used to study metal deposition/dissolution reactions in molten salts. Activity coefficients of lithium in lithium--lead alloys were determined electrochemically; phase diagrams of ternary alloys of Li--Al--Mg and Li--Ca--Mg were computed. Thermodynamic studies are being made of the sorption of hydrogen by Li--Al and Li--Pb alloys. The study of the solubility of oxygen in liquid lithium was completed. An electric resistance method for measuring distribution properties of nonmetallic elements in binary metallic systems containing lithium is being developed. Calorimetric methods were used to measure standard enthalpies of formation of some coal components, lanthanum and rare earth trifluorides, and ..gamma..-UO/sub 3/, UF/sub 6/, Cs/sub 3/CrO/sub 4/, Cs/sub 4/CrO/sub 4/, As/sub 4/S/sub 4/, and As/sub 2/S/sub 3/. High-temperature enthalpy increments were measured for LaF/sub 3/ and ..beta..-As/sub 4/S/sub 4/. The acidities of airborne ammonium sulfate-bearing particles from various areas of the U.S. were measured using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy.

  7. In memory of V L Ginzburg (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 27 October 2010)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division (PSD) of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), dedicated to the memory of V L Ginzburg, took place in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS on 27 October 2010. The agenda of the session announced on the website www.gpad.ac.ru of the RAS Physical Sciences Division listed the following reports: (1) Mesyats G A (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Introductory word'; (2) Rubakov V A (Institute for Nuclear Research, RAS, Moscow) 'Cosmology and the Large Hadron Collider'; (3) Gurevich A V (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow), Zelenyi L M (Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Intense gamma bursts in Earth's atmosphere (TGE) and the mission 'Chibis''; (4) Vasiliev M A (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'Higher-spin theory'; (5) Maksimov E G (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) 'What is and what is not known about HTSC'; (6) Pudalov V M (Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow, and Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) 'V L Ginzburg and the development of experimental work on high-temperature superconductivity at LPI: 'iron superconductors'' Papers based on talks 2, 4, and 6 are published below. For several reasons, L P Pitaevskii was unable to attend the session. He presented a paper dedicated to the memory of V L Ginzburg, which is published in this issue of Physics-Uspekhi (p. 625). Cosmology and the Large Hadron Collider, V A Rubakov Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 6, Pages 633-641 . V L Ginzburg and higher-spin fields, M A Vasiliev Physics-Uspekhi, 2011, Volume 54, Number 6, Pages 641-648 . V L Ginzburg and the development of experimental work on high-temperature superconductivity at LPI: 'iron superconductors', V M Pudalov, O E Omel'yanovskii, E P Khlybov, A V Sadakov, Yu F El'tsev, K V Mitsen, O M Ivanenko, K S Pervakov, D R Gizatulin, A S Usol'tsev, A S Dormidontov, S Yu Gavrilkin, A Yu Tsvetkov, Ya G Ponomarev, S A Kuzmichev, M G Mikheev, S N

  8. The ADS Abstract Service: A Free Search System for Literature in Astronomy, Planetary Sciences, Physics, Geophysics, and Instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, G.; Accomazzi, A.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Rey Bacaicoa, V.; Murray, S. S.

    2002-05-01

    The Astrophysics Data System (ADS) provides access to the astronomical literature through the World Wide Web. It is a NASA funded project and access to all the ADS services is free to everybody world-wide. The ADS Abstract Service allows searching of four databases with abstracts in Astronomy, Instrumentation, Physics/Geophysics, and the astro-ph Preprints with a total of almost 2.5 million references in the databases. The system also provides access to reference and citation information, links to on-line data and other on-line information, and to on-line electronic journals. In addition the ADS has 1.9 million scanned article pages from about 250,000 articles, dating back as far as 1829. The ADS Article Service contains the full articles for most of the astronomical literature back to volume 1. It contains the scanned pages of all the major journals in Astronomy (Astrophysical Journal, Astronomical Journal, Astronomy & Astrophysics, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, and Solar Physics), as well as most smaller journals back to volume 1 for each of these journals. One important aspect of the ADS is the system of links to other data systems. We have currently more than 6 million links to other on-line resources, including on-line data and on-line journal articles. There are currently more than 10,000 regular users (more than 10 queries/month). The total number of users is greater than 50,000 per month. They issue almost 1 million queries per month and receive more than 30 million records and 1.2 million scanned article pages per month. The ADS is accessed from almost 100 countries. Approximately 1/3 of the use is from the USA, 1/3 from Europe, and 1/3 from the rest of the world. Usage depends primarily on the number of astronomers in each country, but also on the Gross Domestic Product of that country. In order to improve access from different parts of the world, we maintain 9 mirror sites of the ADS in Brazil, Chile, China, England, France, Germany

  9. Sustainable urban development and geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lanbo; Chan, L. S.

    2007-09-01

    -hazards. The three papers by B Zhao et al and Z Zhao et al address the problem of earthquake strong ground motion in urban regions using case studies from Osaka, Japan and the city of Yinchuan, China. The other two papers study the geological hazard of surface subsidence using geophysical tools: G Leucci reported a comprehensive study in Nardo, Italy, while Kim et al reported a similar case study for a small city in South Korea. One striking feature of all the papers in this special issue is that multiple authors with at least 3 co-authors wrote the majority of the papers, which is an indication of strong team work and interdisciplinary collaboration. This is essential for the successful application of geophysical science and technology in tackling a variety of engineering and environmental problems for the urban setting. The only sole author, Dr Leucci, expressed deep gratitude in his acknowledgements to his team members who carried out substantial parts of the data acquisition. We are pleased to present this special issue to the engineering and environmental geophysics community and hope that it can serve as a snapshot of the current state-of-the-art studies in urban geophysics. References [1] United Nations 1990 World Demographic Estimates and Projections (1950-2025) (New York: Press of United Nations) [2] Chen Y, L-S Chan and S Yu 2003 J. Geodesy & Geodynamics 23 1-4 (in Chinese) [3] American Geophysics Union 2006 Eos Trans. AGU 87 (36)

  10. DOE Final Report -NON-LINEAR WAVES IN CONTINUOUS MEDIA- BES- Division of Engineering and Materials Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth J. Putterman

    2006-01-01

    FINAL REPORT ON : NON-LINEAR WAVES IN CONTINUOUS MEDIA Doe DE FG03-87ER13686 (001312-001) Submitted January 10, 2006 by Seth J. Putterman 310-8252269 Physics Department University of California Los Angeles, CA 90095 puherman at ritva.physics.ucla.edu NON-LINEAR WAVES IN CONTINUOUS MEDIA I am happy to report that this project has been a big success. For over 10 years the DOE [Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering] has funded our research program on the overarching theme of spontaneous energy focusing phenomena. These effects occur when a nonlinear macroscopic system is excited so as to drive it far from equilibrium. The subsequent relaxation to equilibrium does not occur smoothly but instead is accompanied by the formation of structured domains where the energy density is highly concentrated. A signature example is picosecond sonoluminescence [1] wherein a smooth sound wave has its energy density focused by 12 orders of magnitude to generate a clock-like string of picosecond flashes of ultraviolet light. Our earlier work on solitons [2] demonstrated how uniform surface waves break up into stable localized structures. Our experimental work on turbulence produced photos of localized structures lying many standard deviations outside the range of gaussian statistics[3]. This effect is referred to as intermittency. Our recent work on friction finds its motivation in those theories of sonoluminescence which invoke frictional electricity. In its most common form this is the generation of a spark when we touch a doorknob after walking over a carpet. Our reading of the literature on this subject indicated that frictional electricity like sonoluminescence is not understood. So to probe triboelectrification we set up a modern version of an experiment performed by Bernoulli in 1700. Here sparking is caused by the rubbing of glass against mercury. We indeed observed flashes of light which were accompanied by events of stick-slip friction at the interface between the

  11. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    1979-01-01

    The content of this book is based, largely, on the core curriculum in geophys­ ical fluid dynamics which I and my colleagues in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at The University of Chicago have taught for the past decade. Our purpose in developing a core curriculum was to provide to advanced undergraduates and entering graduate students a coherent and systematic introduction to the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics. The curriculum and the outline of this book were devised to form a sequence of courses of roughly one and a half academic years (five academic quarters) in length. The goal of the sequence is to help the student rapidly advance to the point where independent study and research are practical expectations. It quickly became apparent that several topics (e. g. , some aspects of potential theory) usually thought of as forming the foundations of a fluid-dynamics curriculum were merely classical rather than essential and could be, however sadly, dispensed with for our purposes. At the same ti...

  12. Geophysical fluid dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pedlosky, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    The content of this book is based, largely, on the core curriculum in geophys­ ical fluid dynamics which land my colleagues in the Department of Geophysical Sciences at The University of Chicago have taught for the past decade. Our purpose in developing a core curriculum was to provide to advanced undergraduates and entering graduate students a coherent and systematic introduction to the theory of geophysical fluid dynamics. The curriculum and the outline of this book were devised to form a sequence of courses of roughly one and a half academic years (five academic quarters) in length. The goal of the sequence is to help the student rapidly advance to the point where independent study and research are practical expectations. It quickly became apparent that several topics (e. g. , some aspects of potential theory) usually thought of as forming the foundations of a fluid-dynamics curriculum were merely classical rather than essential and could be, however sadly, dispensed with for our purposes. At the same tim...

  13. Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysical methods continue to show great promise for use in agriculture. The term “agricultural geophysics” denotes a subdiscipline of geophysics that is focused only on agricultural applications. The Handbook of Agricultural Geophysics was compiled to include a comprehensive overview of the geoph...

  14. Serious games for Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Valerio; Rubbia, Giuliana

    2015-04-01

    Childhood stage is indispensable in the education of human beings and especially critical to arise scientific interest in children. We discuss the participatory design of a didactic videogame, i.e. a "serious" game to teach geophysics and Earth sciences to high and low-school students. Geophysics is the application of the laws and techniques of physics to uncover knowledge about the earth's dynamic processes and subsurface structure. It explores phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanoes, tsunamis to improve our understanding of the earth's physical processes and our ability to predict reoccurrences. Effective mitigation of risks from catastrophic geologic hazards requires knowledge and understanding of local geology and geologic processes. Scientific outreach can be defined as discourse activity, whose main objective is to communicate some knowledge previously produced in scientific contexts to a non-expert massive audience. One of the difficulties science educators need to overcome is to explain specific concepts from a given discipline in a language simple and understandable for their audience. Digital games today play a large role in young people's lives. Games are directly connected to the life of today's adolescents. Therefore, digital games should be included and broached as a subject in the classroom. The ardor and enthusiasm that digital games evoke in teenagers has indeed brought many researchers, school leaders and teachers to the question "how video games" can be used to engage young people and support their learning inside the classroom. Additionally, studies have shown that digital games can enhance various skills such as the ability to concentrate, stamina, tactical aptness, anticipatory thinking, orientation in virtual spaces, and deductive reasoning. Thus, videogames become an effective didactic mechanism and should have a place in the classroom. The project aims to explore the potentials of entertainment technologies in educational processes

  15. 1 March 2012 - British University of Oxford Head of the Mathematical, Physical & Life Sciences Division A. N. Halliday FRS signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    1 March 2012 - British University of Oxford Head of the Mathematical, Physical & Life Sciences Division A. N. Halliday FRS signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  16. Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Hans Chang, Director, Physics Research Committee, Stichting voor Fundamenteel Onderzoek der Materie (FOM), Dr. Joris Van Enst, Head of Science Policy Division, Ministry of Education, Culture and S cience, Dr. Jan Bezemer, NL Delegate CERN, Netherlands

  17. 18 MArch 2008 - Director, Basic and Generic Research Division, Research Promotion Bureau, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Prof.Ohtake visiting ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    18 MArch 2008 - Director, Basic and Generic Research Division, Research Promotion Bureau, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Prof.Ohtake visiting ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  18. Geophysical Research Abstracts. Volume 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The EGU general assembly 2008 brought together geoscientists and space and planetary scientists from all over Europe and the rest of the world into one meeting covering all disciplines of the earth and planetary sciences: geology, geomorphology, geochemistry, geophysics, geobiology and hazards research as well as planetary and space sciences. Its scientific program included oral and poster sessions on disciplinary and interdisciplinary topics such as atmospheric sciences; climate: past, present, future; energy; resources and the environment; isotopes in geosciences: instrumentation and data systems; magnetism, palaeomagnetism, rock physics and geomaterials; ocean sciences; soil system sciences and solar-terrestrial sciences among others. Those presentations which belong to the subject scope of INIS database are indexed separately. (nevyjel)

  19. Fifty years of geophysical researches of glaciers in Institute of Geography, the Russian Academy of Sciences, 1966–2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Kotlyakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1967‑2015, Institute of Geography of the USSR/Russian Academy of Sciences together with other organizations carried out field expeditions in different areas of mountain and polar glaciations in many regions: the Polar Urals, Caucasus, Pamir, Zailiysky and Jungar Alatau, Tien‑Shan, Pamir‑Alai, the Kamchatka Peninsula, the Pyrenees, the Arctic – Spitsbergen, Novaya Zemlya, Franz Josef and Severnaya Zemlya, and Antarctica – on the ice flow B, and in the sub‑Antarctic – Islands King George, Galindez, and Livingston. The gravimetric and ground and aerial radar observations were made in these expeditions. About 300 glaciers of different morphological types and sizes with cold, subpolar and temperate thermal regime were studied. Basic results of these studies are the following: (1 the new data on the ice thicknesses, ice volumes, subglacial relief, internal structure, and thermal state of the glaciers were obtained; (2 the two‑layered (polythermal glaciers consisting of the upper layer of cold ice and the lower layer of temperate water‑filled ice had been revealed in Svalbard for the first time; spatial distribution of cold, polythermal and temperate glaciers had been determined; (3 the evidences were obtained that measured changes in thickness of the upper cold ice layer in polythermal glaciers can be used to estimate the long‑period variations of regional climates and serve as regional paleothermometers; (4 methods for estimating the water content in temperate and polythermal glaciers from the RES data were developed; and its space‑time variations in temperate ices of the Svaldbald glaciers were estimated since even small water content inside of them can noticeably change their dynamic behavior; (5 methods for estimating the ice volume within glaciers in large regions of mountain and polar glaciations had been created; the ice storages were estimated in Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Dzhungrsky Alatau, the

  20. Calibration and Confirmation in Geophysical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werndl, Charlotte

    2016-04-01

    For policy decisions the best geophysical models are needed. To evaluate geophysical models, it is essential that the best available methods for confirmation are used. A hotly debated issue on confirmation in climate science (as well as in philosophy) is the requirement of use-novelty (i.e. that data can only confirm models if they have not already been used before. This talk investigates the issue of use-novelty and double-counting for geophysical models. We will see that the conclusions depend on the framework of confirmation and that it is not clear that use-novelty is a valid requirement and that double-counting is illegitimate.

  1. On the first direct detection of gravitational waves (Scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 2 March 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), "On the first direct detection of gravitational waves," was held in the conference hall of the Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS on 2 March 2016. The papers collected in this issue were written based on talks given at the session: (1) Pustovoit V I (Scientific and Technological Center of Unique Instrumentation, Moscow) "On the direct detection of gravitational waves"; (2) Braginsky V B, Bilenko I A, Vyatchanin S P, Gorodetsky M L, Mitrofanov V P, Prokhorov L G, Strigin S E, Khalili F Ya (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "The road to the discovery of gravitational waves"; (3) Khazanov E A (Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, Nizhny Novgorod) "Thermooptics of magnetoactive media: Faraday isolators for high average power lasers"; (4) Cherepashchuk A M (Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Discovery of gravitational waves: a new chapter in black hole studies"; (5) Lipunov V M (Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow) "Astrophysical meaning of the discovery of gravitational waves." Papers based on talks 2-5 are published in this issue of the journal. A paper based on talk 1 will be published in a forthcoming issue of Physics-Uspekhi. Additional information on the discovery of gravitational waves, the history of their theoretical prediction, and the advances in possible methods for their investigation can be found on the Physics-Uspekhi site www.ufn.ru, on the page http://ufn.ru/en/events/gravitational_waves_discovery.html dedicated to this outstanding discovery. • The road to the discovery of gravitational waves, V B Braginsky, I A Bilenko, S P Vyatchanin, M L Gorodetskii, V P Mitrofanov, L G Prokhorov, S E Strigin, F Ya Khalili Physics-Uspekhi, 2016, Volume 59, Number 9, Pages 879-885 • Thermooptics of magnetoactive media: Faraday isolators for high average power lasers, E A Khazanov

  2. Numerical studies in geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hier Majumder, Catherine Anne

    2003-10-01

    This thesis focuses on the use of modern numerical techniques in the geo- and environmental sciences. Four topics are discussed in this thesis: finite Prandtl number convection, wavelet analysis, inverse methods and data assimilation, and nuclear waste tank mixing. The finite Prandtl number convection studies examine how convection behavior changes as Prandtl numbers are increased to as high as 2 x 104, on the order of Prandtl numbers expected in very hot magmas or mushy ice diapirs. I found that there are significant differences in the convection style between finite Prandtl number convection and the infinite Prandtl number approximation even for Prandtl numbers on the order of 104. This indicates that the infinite Prandtl convection approximation might not accurately model behavior in fluids with large, but finite Prandtl numbers. The section on inverse methods and data assimilation used the technique of four dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-VAR) developed by meteorologists to integrate observations into forecasts. It was useful in studying the predictability and dependence on initial conditions of finite Prandtl simulations. This technique promises to be useful in a wide range of geological and geophysical fields, including mantle convection, hydrogeology, and sedimentology. Wavelet analysis was used to help image and scrutinize at small-scales both temperature and vorticity fields from convection simulations and the geoid. It was found to be extremely helpful in both cases. It allowed us to separate the information in the data into various spatial scales without losing the locations of the signals in space. This proved to be essential in understanding the processes producing the total signal in the datasets. The nuclear waste study showed that techniques developed in geology and geophysics can be used to solve scientific problems in other fields. I applied state-of-the-art techniques currently employed in geochemistry, sedimentology, and mantle

  3. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Presently at Applied Geophysical Laboratories, Department of Geophysics, University of Houston, Texas 77204, USA; Marine and Water Resources Group, Remote Sensing Applications Area, Space Applications Centre (ISRO), Ahmedabad 380 015, India. 2Geological Oceanography Division, National Institute of ...

  4. European Analytical Column no. 38 from the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC of the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS, January 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BO KARLBERG

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The Euroanalysis conference series constitutes the cornerstone activity of the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC of the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS. Hence this column reports on the last Euroanalysis conference held in Innsbruck, Austria, in September 2009. The present column also follows up the pattern from the previous two columns; namely to invite a European analytical chemist to give his or her view on a certain topic of interest. This time Professor Paul Worsfold gives his personal view on water quality in the developing world.

  5. Advances in geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Haruo

    2013-01-01

    The critically acclaimed serialized review journal for over 50 years, Advances in Geophysics is a highly respected publication in the field of geophysics. Since 1952, each volume has been eagerly awaited, frequently consulted, and praised by researchers and reviewers alike. Now in its 54th volume, it contains much material still relevant today--truly an essential publication for researchers in all fields of geophysics.Key features: * Contributions from leading authorities * Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field

  6. Waterberg coalfield airborne geophysics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fourie, S

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Geophysics Project Number: 1.5.5 Sub Committee: Geology and Geophysics Presenter: Dr. Stoffel Fourie Co-Workers: Dr. George Henry & Me. Leonie Marè Collaborators: Coaltech & CSIR Project Objectives Major Objectives: circle5 Initiate Semi...-Regional Exploration of the Waterberg Coalfield to the benefit of the Industry. circle5 Generate a good quality Airborne Geophysical Dataset. circle5 Generate a basic lineament and surface geology interpretation of the Ellisras Basin. circle5 Generate a basic...

  7. Geophysical interpretation using integral equations

    CERN Document Server

    Eskola, L

    1992-01-01

    Along with the general development of numerical methods in pure and applied to apply integral equations to geophysical modelling has sciences, the ability improved considerably within the last thirty years or so. This is due to the successful derivation of integral equations that are applicable to the modelling of complex structures, and efficient numerical algorithms for their solution. A significant stimulus for this development has been the advent of fast digital computers. The purpose of this book is to give an idea of the principles by which boundary-value problems describing geophysical models can be converted into integral equations. The end results are the integral formulas and integral equations that form the theoretical framework for practical applications. The details of mathematical analysis have been kept to a minimum. Numerical algorithms are discussed only in connection with some illustrative examples involving well-documented numerical modelling results. The reader is assu­ med to have a back...

  8. A field guide to geophysics in archaeology

    CERN Document Server

    Oswin, John

    2009-01-01

    Geophysics operations in archaeology have become well known through exposure on television. However, the technique is presented as the action of specialists and something of a mystery, where people walk about with strange contraptions, and results appear from a computer. This is not the case, however. Some scientific knowledge is needed in order to understand how the machines work and what they detect but otherwise it is only necessary to know how to handle the instruments, how to survey a field and how to interpret the computer results. This book provides all the relevant information. It explains geophysics operations in archaeology, describes the science that gives the soil properties to measure and the means by which the instruments make their measurements. Dr John Oswin is in charge of the geophysics operation of the Bath and Camerton Archaeological Society and his work has recently been the subject of a television programme. He has taught many students how to use geophysical equipment.

  9. Geophysical Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eloranta, E.

    2003-11-01

    The geophysical field theory includes the basic principles of electromagnetism, continuum mechanics, and potential theory upon which the computational modelling of geophysical phenomena is based on. Vector analysis is the main mathematical tool in the field analyses. Electrostatics, stationary electric current, magnetostatics, and electrodynamics form a central part of electromagnetism in geophysical field theory. Potential theory concerns especially gravity, but also electrostatics and magnetostatics. Solid state mechanics and fluid mechanics are central parts in continuum mechanics. Also the theories of elastic waves and rock mechanics belong to geophysical solid state mechanics. The theories of geohydrology and mass transport form one central field theory in geophysical fluid mechanics. Also heat transfer is included in continuum mechanics. (orig.)

  10. Artificial intelligence and dynamic systems for geophysical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gvishiani, Alexei

    2002-01-01

    The book presents new clustering schemes, dynamical systems and pattern recognition algorithms in geophysical, geodynamical and natural hazard applications. The original mathematical technique is based on both classical and fuzzy sets models. Geophysical and natural hazard applications are mostly original. However, the artificial intelligence technique described in the book can be applied far beyond the limits of Earth science applications. The book is intended for research scientists, tutors, graduate students, scientists in geophysics and engineers

  11. Biological and Environmental Research: Climate and Environmental Sciences Division: U.S./European Workshop on Climate Change Challenges and Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, James [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; McCord, Raymond [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Sisterson, Doug [Argonne National Laboratory; Voyles, Jimmy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2012-11-08

    The workshop aimed to identify outstanding climate change science questions and the observational strategies for addressing them. The scientific focus was clouds, aerosols, and precipitation, and the required ground- and aerial-based observations. The workshop findings will be useful input for setting priorities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and the participating European centers. This joint workshop was envisioned as the first step in enhancing the collaboration among these climate research activities needed to better serve the science community.

  12. Multiscale geophysical imaging of the critical zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsekian, Andy; Singha, Kamini; Minsley, Burke J.; Holbrook, W. Steven; Slater, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Details of Earth's shallow subsurface—a key component of the critical zone (CZ)—are largely obscured because making direct observations with sufficient density to capture natural characteristic spatial variability in physical properties is difficult. Yet this inaccessible region of the CZ is fundamental to processes that support ecosystems, society, and the environment. Geophysical methods provide a means for remotely examining CZ form and function over length scales that span centimeters to kilometers. Here we present a review highlighting the application of geophysical methods to CZ science research questions. In particular, we consider the application of geophysical methods to map the geometry of structural features such as regolith thickness, lithological boundaries, permafrost extent, snow thickness, or shallow root zones. Combined with knowledge of structure, we discuss how geophysical observations are used to understand CZ processes. Fluxes between snow, surface water, and groundwater affect weathering, groundwater resources, and chemical and nutrient exports to rivers. The exchange of gas between soil and the atmosphere have been studied using geophysical methods in wetland areas. Indirect geophysical methods are a natural and necessary complement to direct observations obtained by drilling or field mapping. Direct measurements should be used to calibrate geophysical estimates, which can then be used to extrapolate interpretations over larger areas or to monitor changing processes over time. Advances in geophysical instrumentation and computational approaches for integrating different types of data have great potential to fill gaps in our understanding of the shallow subsurface portion of the CZ and should be integrated where possible in future CZ research.

  13. Radioactivity and geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radvanyi, P.

    1992-01-01

    The paper recalls a few steps of the introduction of radioactivity in geophysics and astrophysics: contribution of radioelements to energy balance of the Earth, age of the Earth based on radioactive disintegration and the discovery of cosmic radiations

  14. Geophysical Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geophysical Research Facility (GRF) is a 60 ft long × 22 ft wide × 7 ft deep concrete basin at CRREL for fresh or saltwater investigations and can be temperature...

  15. Life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, L.

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs

  16. Life sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, L. (ed.)

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  17. Geophysical borehole logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, D.; Barton, K.J.; Hearn, K.

    1981-08-01

    Most of the available literature on geophysical borehole logging refers to studies carried out in sedimentary rocks. It is only in recent years that any great interest has been shown in geophysical logging in boreholes in metamorphic and igneous rocks following the development of research programmes associated with geothermal energy and nuclear waste disposal. This report is concerned with the programme of geophysical logging carried out on the three deep boreholes at Altnabreac, Caithness, to examine the effectiveness of these methods in crystalline rock. Of particular importance is the assessment of the performance of the various geophysical sondes run in the boreholes in relation to the rock mass properties. The geophysical data can be used to provide additional in-situ information on the geological, hydrogeological and engineering properties of the rock mass. Fracturing and weathering in the rock mass have a considerable effect on both the design parameters for an engineering structure and the flow of water through the rock mass; hence, the relation between the geophysical properties and the degree of fracturing and weathering is examined in some detail. (author)

  18. Geophysics report of Santa Rosa place Canelones province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cicalese, H.; Mari, C.; Lema, F.

    1985-01-01

    The Geophysical Division of the DINAMIGE has carried out several vertical electric well of long reach, with the purpose of estimating the basaltic mantel power of Arapey Formation , the thickness of the deep Tacuarembo Yaguari aquifer and the depth of the crystalline basement.

  19. Compilation of the Dakota Aquifer Project isotope data and publications: The Isotope Hydrology Program of the Isotope Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davisson, M.L.; Smith, D.K.; Hudson, G.B.; Niemeyer, S.; Macfarlane, P.A.; Whittemore, D.O.

    1995-01-01

    In FY92 the then Nuclear Chemistry Division embarked on a scientific collaboration with the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) to characterize with isotope techniques groundwater of the Dakota Formation of Kansas. The Dakota Formation is a Cretaceous-aged marine sandstone hosting potable groundwater in most regions of Kansas whose use will serve to partially offset the severe overdraft problems in the overlying Ogallala Formation. The isotope characterization of the Dakota groundwater has generated data that delineates sources, ages, and subsurface controls on the water quality. Initial interpretations of the data have been published in abstract volumes of (1) the 1993 Geological Society of America National Meeting, (2) the 8th International Conference on Geochronology, Cosmochronology and Isotope Geology, and (3) the 1994 Dakota Aquifer Workshop and Clinic. Copies of all abstracts are included in this brief review. One report will focus on the sources and ages of the groundwater, and the other will focus on the subsurface controls on the natural water quality

  20. Predictive geophysics: geochemical simulations to geophysical targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopping, R. G.; Cleverley, J.

    2017-12-01

    With an increasing focus on deep exploration for covered targets, new methods are required to target mineral systems under cover. Geophysical responses are driven by physical property contrasts; for example, density contrasts provide a gravity signal, acoustic impedance contrasts provide a seismic reflection signal. In turn, the physical properties for basement, crystalline rocks which host the vast majority of mineral systems are determined almost wholly by the mineralogy of the rocks in question. Mineral systems, through the transport of heat and reactive fluids, will serve to modify the physical properties of country rock as they chemically alter the hosting strata. To understand these changes, we have performed 2D reactive transport modelling that simulates the formation of Archean gold deposits of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia. From this, we derive a model of mineralogy that we can use to predict the density, magnetic susceptibility and seismic reflection changes associated with ore formation. It is then possible to predict the gravity, magnetic and seismic reflection responses associated with these deposits. Scenario mapping, such as testing the ability to resolve buried ore bodies or the geophysical survey spacing required to resolve the mineral system, can be performed to produce geophysical targets from these geochemical simulations. We find that there is a gravity response of around 9% of the unaltered response for deposits even buried by 1km of cover, and there is a magnetic spike associated with proximal alteration of the ore system. Finally, seismic reflection response is mostly characterised by additional reflections along faults that plumb the alteration system.

  1. 2005 Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys Lidar: Unalakleet, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report is a summary of a LiDAR data collection over the community of Unalakleet, in the Norton Sound region of Alaska. The original data were collected on...

  2. Open Access to Geophysical Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyeva, Nataliya A.; Zabarinskaya, Ludmila P.

    2017-04-01

    Russian World Data Centers for Solar-Terrestrial Physics & Solid Earth Physics hosted by the Geophysical Center of the Russian Academy of Sciences are the Regular Members of the ICSU-World Data System. Guided by the principles of the WDS Constitution and WDS Data Sharing Principles, the WDCs provide full and open access to data, long-term data stewardship, compliance with agreed-upon data standards and conventions, and mechanisms to facilitate and improve access to data. Historical and current geophysical data on different media, in the form of digital data sets, analog records, collections of maps, descriptions are stored and collected in the Centers. The WDCs regularly fill up repositories and database with new data, support them up to date. Now the WDCs focus on four new projects, aimed at increase of data available in network by retrospective data collection and digital preservation of data; creation of a modern system of registration and publication of data with digital object identifier (DOI) assignment, and promotion of data citation culture; creation of databases instead of file system for more convenient access to data; participation in the WDS Metadata Catalogue and Data Portal by creating of metadata for information resources of WDCs.

  3. Inverse problems of geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanovskaya, T.B.

    2003-07-01

    This report gives an overview and the mathematical formulation of geophysical inverse problems. General principles of statistical estimation are explained. The maximum likelihood and least square fit methods, the Backus-Gilbert method and general approaches for solving inverse problems are discussed. General formulations of linearized inverse problems, singular value decomposition and properties of pseudo-inverse solutions are given

  4. Device for geophysical exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergashev S.F.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article a device is offered for geophysical secret service, resulted block chart and temporal diagrams. It is experimentally set, the use of detonation generators allowed to use more high-frequency harmonic constituents of echo-signals for determination of object on a depth a to 100 m.

  5. The Teach for America RockCorps, Year 2: Using Authentic Research Experiences in Geophysics for STEM Teachers to Inspire Earth Science-Themed Lessons in High School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, B.; Kassimu, R.; Borjas, C. N.; Griffith, W. A.

    2016-12-01

    Brooke Parsons1, Rahmatu Kassimu2, Christopher Borjas3, and W. Ashley Griffith31Uplift Hampton Preparatory High School, Dallas, TX, 75232 2H. Grady Spruce High School, Dallas, TX, 75217 3Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas Arlington, Arlington, TX, 76019 As Earth Science courses appear in fewer high school curricula, we seek to find creative ways to integrate Earth Science themes as contextual examples into other K-12 STEM courses in order to develop (A) Earth Science literacy, and (B) a pipeline of young talent into our field. This presentation details the efforts of the 2nd year Teach for America (TFA) Rock Corps, a five year NSF-sponsored partnership between TFA and the University of Texas at Arlington designed to provide STEM teachers with genuine research opportunities using components that can be extrapolated to develop dynamic Geophysics-themed lesson plans and materials for their classrooms. Two teachers were selected from the Dallas-Fort Worth region of TFA to participate in original research modeling off-fault damage that occurs during earthquakes in a lab setting using a Split-Hopkinson-Pressure Bar (SHPB). In particular, we simulate a coseismic transient stress perturbation in a fault damage zone by combining traditional SHPB with a traveling harmonic oscillator: Two striker bars attached by an elastic spring are launched with a gas gun allowing us to create the double stress pulse expected during an earthquake rupture. This research affords teachers inspiration to implement Geophysics-themed lesson plans for their courses, Physics/Pre-AP Physics and Chemistry. The physics course will adopt principles of seismic wave propagation to teach concepts of impulse, momentum, conservation of energy, harmonic motion, wave velocity, wave propagation, and real world applications of waves. The chemistry course will implement geochemistry themed techniques into applying the scientific method, density, isotopic composition, p

  6. Development of Geophysical Ideas and Institutions in Ottoman Empire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcep, Ferhat; Ozcep, Tazegul

    2015-04-01

    In Anatolia, the history of geophysical sciences may go back to antiquity (600 BC), namely the period when Thales lived in Magnesia (Asia Minor). In the modern sense, geophysics started with geomagnetic works in the 1600s. The period between 1600 and 1800 includes the measurement of magnetic declination, inclination and magnetic field strength. Before these years, there is a little information, such as how to use a compass, in the Kitab-i Bahriye (the Book of Navigation) of Piri Reis, who is one of the most important mariners of the Ottoman Empire. However, this may not mean that magnetic declination was generally understood. The first scientific book relating to geophysics is the book Fuyuzat-i Miknatissiye that was translated by Ibrahim Müteferrika and printed in 1731. The subject of this book is earth's magnetism. There is also information concerning geophysics in the book Cihannuma (Universal Geography) that was written by Katip Celebi and in the book Marifetname written by Ibrahim Hakki Erzurumlu, but these books are only partly geophysical books. In Istanbul the year 1868 is one of the most important for geophysical sciences because an observatory called Rasathane-i Amire was installed in the Pera region of this city. At this observatory the first systematic geophysical observations such as meteorological, seismological and even gravimetrical were made. There have been meteorological records in Anatolia since 1839. These are records of atmospheric temperature, pressure and humidity. In the Ottoman Empire, the science of geophysics is considered as one of the natural sciences along with astronomy, mineralogy, geology, etc., and these sciences are included as a part of physics and chemistry.

  7. Notes on the history of geophysics in the Ottoman Empire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcep, F.; Ozcep, T.

    2014-09-01

    In Anatolia, the history of geophysical sciences may go back to antiquity (600 BC), namely the period when Thales lived in Magnesia (Asia Minor). In the modern sense, geophysics started with geomagnetic works in the 1600s. The period between 1600 and 1800 includes the measurement of magnetic declination, inclination and magnetic field strength. Before these years, there is a little information, such as how to use a compass, in the Kitab-i Bahriye (the Book of Navigation) of Piri Reis, who is one of the most important mariners of the Ottoman Empire. However, this may not mean that magnetic declination was generally understood. The first scientific book relating to geophysics is the book Fuyuzat-i Miknatissiye that was translated by Ibrahim Müteferrika and printed in 1731. The subject of this book is earth's magnetism. There is also information concerning geophysics in the book Cihannuma (Universal Geography) that was written by Katip Celebi and in the book Marifetname written by Ibrahim Hakki Erzurumlu, but these books are only partly geophysical books. In Istanbul the year 1868 is one of the most important for geophysical sciences because an observatory called Rasathane-i Amire was installed in the Pera region of this city. At this observatory the first systematic geophysical observations such as meteorological, seismological and even gravimetrical were made. There have been meteorological records in Anatolia since 1839. These are records of atmospheric temperature, pressure and humidity. In the Ottoman Empire, the science of geophysics is considered as one of the natural sciences along with astronomy, mineralogy, geology, etc., and these sciences are included as a part of physics and chemistry.

  8. Geophysical investigations in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, R.L.; Andreasen, G.E.; Gettings, M.E.; El-Kaysi, K.

    1990-01-01

    A number of geophysical investigations have been undertaken in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan to provide data for understanding the tectonic framework, the pattern of seismicity, earthquake hazards and geothermal resources of the country. Both the historical seismic record and the observed recent seismicity point to the dominance of the Dead Sea Rift as the main locus of seismic activity but significant branching trends and gaps in the seismicity pattern are also seen. A wide variety of focal plane solutions are observed emphasizing the complex pattern of fault activity in the vicinity of the rift zone. Geophysical investigations directed towards the geothermal assessment of the prominent thermal springs of Zerga Ma'in and Zara are not supportive of the presence of a crustal magmatic source. ?? 1990.

  9. E-Division activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barschall, H.H.

    1984-07-01

    E (Experimental Physics) Division carries out basic and applied research in atomic and nuclear physics, in materials science, and in other areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Some of the activities are cooperative efforts with other divisions of the Laboratory, and, in a few cases, with other laboratories. Many of the experiments are directly applicable to problems in weapons and energy, some have only potential applied uses, and others are in pure physics. This report presents abstracts of papers published by E (Experimental Physics) Division staff members between July 1983 and June 1984. In addition, it lists the members of the scientific staff of the division, including visitors and students, and some of the assignments of staff members on scientific committees. A brief summary of the budget is included

  10. Rapid Geophysical Surveyor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of US Department of Energy waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sites where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed because of refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL in September 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 in. along survey lines spaced 1-ft apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 worker-days using conventional ground survey techniques

  11. Current programmes of Metallurgy Division (1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Current research and development programmes of the Metallurgy Division are listed under the headings: 1)Thrust Areas, 2)High Temperature Materials Section, 3)Chemical Metallurgy Section, 4)Metallurgical Thermochemistry Section, 5)Physical Metallurgy Section, 6)Mechanical Metallurgy Section, 7)Corrosion Metallurgy Section, 8)Electrochemical Science and Technology Section, 9)Ceramics Section, and 10)Fabrication and Maintenance Group. A list of equipment in the Division and a list of sciientific personnel of the Division are also given. (M.G.B.)

  12. Development, Deployment, and Assessment of Dynamic Geological and Geophysical Models Using the Google Earth APP and API: Implications for Undergraduate Education in the Earth and Planetary Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Gobert, J.

    2009-12-01

    We previously reported on innovative techniques for presenting data on virtual globes such as Google Earth using emergent Collada models that reveal subsurface geology and geophysics. We here present several new and enhanced models and linked lesson plans to aid deployment in undergraduate geoscience courses, along with preliminary results from our assessment of their effectiveness. The new Collada models are created with Google SketchUp, Bonzai3D, and MeshLab software, and are grouped to cover (i) small scale field mapping areas; (ii) regional scale studies of the North Atlantic Ocean Basin, the Appalachian Orogen, and the Pacific Ring of Fire; and (iii) global scale studies of terrestrial planets, moons, and asteroids. Enhancements include emergent block models with three-dimensional surface topography; models that conserve structural orientation data; interactive virtual specimens; models that animate plate movements on the virtual globe; exploded 3-D views of planetary mantles and cores; and server-generated dynamic KML. We tested volunteer students and professors using Silverback monitoring software, think-aloud verbalizations, and questionnaires designed to assess their understanding of the underlying geo-scientific phenomena. With the aid of a cohort of instructors across the U.S., we are continuing to assess areas in which users encounter difficulties with both the software and geoscientific concepts. Preliminary results suggest that it is easy to overestimate the computer expertise of novice users even when they are content knowledge experts (i.e., instructors), and that a detailed introduction to virtual globe manipulation is essential before moving on to geoscience applications. Tasks that seem trivial to developers may present barriers to non-technical users and technicalities that challenge instructors may block adoption in the classroom. We have developed new models using the Google Earth API which permits enhanced interaction and dynamic feedback and

  13. Psychological Sciences Division 1979 Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-11-01

    Bartlett, Bobko. views in the prediction of performance; and (4) a Mosier & Hannan, 1978, Guion , 1978; Locke. Mento & Katch- large-scale study of the way...records in five groups (ham radio operators, deaf teletype communicators, workers in IMPROVING THE CREDIBILITY AND IM- two different work groups, and...NR kowski (Ed.), Psychological models in inter- 157-408) national politics. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, in press. (NR 170-821) Guion , R. M

  14. Progress report, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    In Health Physics Branch, work is continuing on development of neutron dosimetry techniques, new thermoluminescent dosimeters, and portable tritium-in-air monitoring instruments. Development of beneficial uses of waste heat has continued in the Environmental Research Branch. Other work includes studies in meteorology, biogeochemistry of nuclear waste management areas, and soil and groundwater studies. Research activity in the Radiation Biology Branch is dealing with the effects of radiation upon a variety of living organisms. Both genetic and mutagenic effects of damage to DNA are being studied as well as repair mechanisms and human diseases caused by repair mechanism deficiencies. In the Biomedical Research Branch, a collaborative study is being undertaken into the retention and excretion of uranium in fuel fabrication workers. (O.T.)

  15. Progress report, Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    A re-designed automatic TLD reader has been constructed. The thermoluminescent material MgB 4 O 7 :Dy appears to be attractive for environmental gamma monitoring. The field prototype of a simple, light weight tritium monitor is being built, and field-tests of a pocket warning dosimeter have been completed. A computer program for the calculation of beta doses from point and plane sources has been used to calculate distributions for 90 nuclides. Research into the adsorption of 134 Cs, 60 Co and 90 Sr onto soil particles and processes associated with the release of these nuclides is continuing. Studies are being carried out into the culture of algae in municipal wastewater, heat and solute transfer in lakes, and groundwater seepage flow into lakes. Radiation biology work continues to deal with radiation damage of DNA and cellular repair mechanisms. A metabolic model for the tellurium-iodine decay chain has been completed. (LL)

  16. Biological Sciences Division 1991 Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    activities, in an otherwise aerobic water column. SIGNIFICANCE: Rapidly sinking , macroscopic aggregates are largely responsible for the flux of...hyperactivity and seizures. Postischemic treatment with di-Calciphor reduced postischemic neuropathology; > 90% of the hippocampus neurons were preserved at 6

  17. When tsunamology and geophysics clash, throw geophysics in the trash (Sergey Soloviev Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synolakis, Costas

    2014-05-01

    Tsunami science has evolved differently from research on other extreme natural hazards, primarily because of the unavailability, until recently, of instrumental recordings of tsunamis in the open ocean. Recordings and observations have catapulted tsunamology into a rapidly evolving high-interdisciplinary field spanning geology, geophysics, oceanography, coastal engineering, hydrodynamics and social science. I will discuss progress in tsunami geology and geophysics in the past thirty years, and describe the evolution of numerical codes and analytical results. I will describe field observations which, while counter-intuitive at first, they later helped explain complex dynamics and assisted us in improving tsunami hazard mitigation. While the grand science synthesis remains elusive, we are converging to where we can reduce tsunami-related fatalities and injuries by about one half in the next few years.

  18. Fundamentals of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, James C.

    2006-07-01

    Earth's atmosphere and oceans exhibit complex patterns of fluid motion over a vast range of space and time scales. These patterns combine to establish the climate in response to solar radiation that is inhomogeneously absorbed by the materials comprising air, water, and land. Spontaneous, energetic variability arises from instabilities in the planetary-scale circulations, appearing in many different forms such as waves, jets, vortices, boundary layers, and turbulence. Geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) is the science of all these types of fluid motion. This textbook is a concise and accessible introduction to GFD for intermediate to advanced students of the physics, chemistry, and/or biology of Earth's fluid environment. The book was developed from the author's many years of teaching a first-year graduate course at the University of California, Los Angeles. Readers are expected to be familiar with physics and mathematics at the level of general dynamics (mechanics) and partial differential equations. Covers the essential GFD required for atmospheric science and oceanography courses Mathematically rigorous, concise coverage of basic theory and applications to both oceans and atmospheres Author is a world expert; this book is based on the course he has taught for many years Exercises are included, with solutions available to instructors from solutions@cambridge.org

  19. Earth sciences within the project Ev-K2-CNR: Geodesy and geophysics; Le scienze della Terra nel progetto Ev-K2-CNR: Geodesia e geofisica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poretti, Giorgio [Trieste, Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Matematiche

    1997-05-01

    Earth Sciences started the Ev-K2-CNR project in 1987 with the comparison between the heights of Mt. Everest and K2. Several gravimetric campaigns followed in the most difficult areas of the Himalayas. In 1991 a GPS network was established in Nepal for the determination of the Earth crust movements in the area. In 1992 a precise measurement of mount Everest was performed with classical and satellite technologies. Mount K2 was remeasured in Summer 1996.

  20. Rapid geophysical surveyor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roybal, L.G.; Carpenter, G.S.; Josten, N.E.

    1993-01-01

    The Rapid Geophysical Surveyor (RGS) is a system designed to rapidly and economically collect closely-spaced geophysical data used for characterization of Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. Geophysical surveys of waste sites are an important first step in the remediation and closure of these sites; especially older sties where historical records are inaccurate and survey benchmarks have changed due to refinements in coordinate controls and datum changes. Closely-spaced data are required to adequately differentiate pits, trenches, and soil vault rows whose edges may be only a few feet from each other. A prototype vehicle designed to collect magnetic field data was built at the Idaho national Engineering Laboratory (INEL) during the summer of 1992. The RGS was one of several projects funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. This vehicle was demonstrated at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) on the INEL in September of 1992. Magnetic data were collected over two areas in the SDA, with a total survey area of about 1.7 acres. Data were collected at a nominal density of 2 1/2 inches along survey lines spaced 1 foot apart. Over 350,000 data points were collected over a 6 day period corresponding to about 185 man-days using conventional ground survey techniques. This report documents the design and demonstration of the RGS concept including the presentation of magnetic data collected at the SDA. The surveys were able to show pit and trench boundaries and determine details of their spatial orientation never before achieved

  1. Accelerator Technology Division: Annual Report FY 1990

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schriber, Stanley

    1991-01-01

    The Accelerator Technology (AT) Division continued in fiscal year 1990 to fulfill its mission of developing accelerator science and technology for application to research, defense, energy, and other problems of national interest...

  2. Geophysics on Wikipedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, A. J.

    2010-12-01

    A priority for both NSF and AGU is the communication of scientific knowledge to the public. One way of determining where the public is looking for information is to search for geophysical terms on Google. Often the first hit is a Wikipedia site. Wikipedia is often the first place that high school students look. Yet there are few geophysicists who contribute to Wikipedia pages. This is particularly true of paleomagnetism and related subjects. In this project, efforts to improve the extent and quality of paleomagnetism coverage are described. The state of the Wikipedia articles at the beginning of this project is compared with their current state. The process of organizing the large number of articles and prioritizing them is described, along with ways to form collaborations on Wikipedia between geophysicists.

  3. Geophysics of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    A physical model of Mars is presented on the basis of light-scattering observations of the Martian atmosphere and surface and interior data obtained from observations of the geopotential field. A general description of the atmosphere is presented, with attention given to the circulation and the various cloud types, and data and questions on the blue haze-clearing effect and the seasonal darkening wave are summarized and the Mie scattering model developed to explain these observations is presented. The appearance of the planet from earth and spacecraft through Mariner 9 is considered, and attention is given to the preparation of topographical contour maps, the canal problem and large-scale lineaments observed from Mariner 9, the gravity field and shape of the planet and the application of Runcorn's geoid/convection theory to Mars. Finally, a summary of Viking results is presented and their application to the understanding of Martian geophysics is discussed.

  4. Sampling functions for geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacaglia, G. E. O.; Lunquist, C. A.

    1972-01-01

    A set of spherical sampling functions is defined such that they are related to spherical-harmonic functions in the same way that the sampling functions of information theory are related to sine and cosine functions. An orderly distribution of (N + 1) squared sampling points on a sphere is given, for which the (N + 1) squared spherical sampling functions span the same linear manifold as do the spherical-harmonic functions through degree N. The transformations between the spherical sampling functions and the spherical-harmonic functions are given by recurrence relations. The spherical sampling functions of two arguments are extended to three arguments and to nonspherical reference surfaces. Typical applications of this formalism to geophysical topics are sketched.

  5. Developments in geophysical exploration methods

    CERN Document Server

    1982-01-01

    One of the themes in current geophysical development is the bringing together of the results of observations made on the surface and those made in the subsurface. Several benefits result from this association. The detailed geological knowledge obtained in the subsurface can be extrapolated for short distances with more confidence when the geologi­ cal detail has been related to well-integrated subsurface and surface geophysical data. This is of value when assessing the characteristics of a partially developed petroleum reservoir. Interpretation of geophysical data is generally improved by the experience of seeing the surface and subsurface geophysical expression of a known geological configuration. On the theoretical side, the understanding of the geophysical processes themselves is furthered by the study of the phenomena in depth. As an example, the study of the progress of seismic wave trains downwards and upwards within the earth has proved most instructive. This set of original papers deals with some of ...

  6. Immersive, hands-on, team-based geophysical education at the University of Texas Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saustrup, S.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Davis, M. B.; Duncan, D.; Reece, R.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG), part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a unique and intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring/summer semester intersession. Now entering its seventh year, the course transitions students from a classroom environment through real-world, hands-on field acquisition, on to team-oriented data interpretation, culminating in a professional presentation before academic and industry employer representatives. The course is available to graduate students and select upper-division undergraduates, preparing them for direct entry into the geoscience workforce or for further academic study. Geophysical techniques used include high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling, data processing, and laboratory analysis of sediments. Industry-standard equipment, methods, software packages, and visualization techniques are used throughout the course, putting students ahead of many of their peers in this respect. The course begins with a 3-day classroom introduction to the field area geology, geophysical methods, and computing resources used. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of hands-on field and lab work aboard two research vessels: UTIG's 22-foot, aluminum hulled Lake Itasca; and NOAA's 82-foot high-speed catamaran R/V Manta. The smaller vessel handles primarily shallow, inshore targets using multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and grab sampling. The larger vessel is used both inshore and offshore for multichannel seismic, CHIRP profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibracoring. Field areas to date have included Galveston and Port Aransas, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, with further work in Grand Isle scheduled for 2014. In the field, students work in teams of three, participating in survey design, instrument set-up, field deployment

  7. Exploring the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in the earth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, L.; Atekwana, E.; Brantley, S.; Gorby, Y.; Hubbard, S. S.; Knight, R.; Morgan, D.; Revil, A.; Rossbach, S.; Yee, N.

    2009-05-15

    AGU Chapman Conference on Biogeophysics; Portland, Maine, 13-16 October 2008; Geophysical methods have the potential to detect and characterize microbial growth and activity in subsurface environments over different spatial and temporal scales. Recognition of this potential has resulted in the development of a new subdiscipline in geophysics called 'biogeophysics,' a rapidly evolving Earth science discipline that integrates environmental microbiology, geomicrobiology, biogeochemistry, and geophysics to investigate interactions that occur between the biosphere (microorganisms and their products) and the geosphere. Biogeophysics research performed over the past decade has confirmed the potential for geophysical techniques to detect microbes, microbial growth/biofilm formation, and microbe-mineral interactions. The unique characteristics of geophysical data sets (e.g., noninvasive data acquisition, spatially continuous properties retrieved) present opportunities to explore geomicrobial processes outside of the laboratory, at unique spatial scales unachievable with microbiological techniques, and possibly in remote environments such as the deep ocean. In response to this opportunity, AGU hosted a Chapman Conference with a mission to bring together geophysicists, biophysicists, geochemists, geomicrobiologists, and environmental microbiologists conducting multidisciplinary research with potential impact on biogeophysics in order to define the current state of the science, identify the critical questions facing the community, and generate a road map for establishing biogeophysics as a critical subdiscipline of Earth science research. For more information on the conference, see http://www.agu.org/meetings/chapman/2008/fcall/.

  8. Molecular sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The research in molecular sciences summarized includes photochemistry, radiation chemistry, geophysics, electromechanics, heavy-element oxidizers , heavy element chemistry collisions, atoms, organic solids. A list of publications is included

  9. Integrated Research and Capacity Building in Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willemann, R. J.; Lerner-Lam, A.; Nyblade, A.

    2008-05-01

    There have been special opportunities over the past several years to improve the ways that newly-constructed geophysical observatories in Southeast Asia and the Americas are linked with educational and civil institutions. Because these opportunities have been only partially fulfilled, there remains the possibility that new networks will not fully address desired goals or even lose operational capabilities. In contrast, the AfricaArray project continues to progress towards goals for linkages among education, research, mitigation and observatories. With support from the Office of International Science and Education at the US National Science Foundation, we convened a workshop to explore lessons learned from the AfricaArray experience and their relevance to network development opportunities in other regions. We found closer parallels than we expected between geophysical infrastructure in the predominantly low income countries of Africa with low risk of geophysical disasters and the mostly middle-income countries of Southeast Asia and the Americas with high risk of geophysical disasters. Except in larger countries of South America, workshop participants reported that there are very few geophysicists engaged in research and observatory operations, that geophysical education programs are nearly non-existent even at the undergraduate university level, and that many monitoring agencies continue to focus on limited missions even though closer relationships researchers could facilitate new services that would make important contributions to disaster mitigation and sustainable operations. Workshop participants began discussing plans for international research collaborations that, unlike many projects of even the recent past, would include long-term capacity building and disaster mitigation among their goals. Specific project objectives would include national or regional hazard mapping, development of indigenous education programs, training to address the needs of local

  10. Health, Safety, and Environment Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wade, C [comp.

    1992-01-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environmental (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. Meeting these responsibilities requires expertise in many disciplines, including radiation protection, industrial hygiene, safety, occupational medicine, environmental science and engineering, analytical chemistry, epidemiology, and waste management. New and challenging health, safety, and environmental problems occasionally arise from the diverse research and development work of the Laboratory, and research programs in HSE Division often stem from these applied needs. These programs continue but are also extended, as needed, to study specific problems for the Department of Energy. The results of these programs help develop better practices in occupational health and safety, radiation protection, and environmental science.

  11. GEOPHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF SOILS

    KAUST Repository

    Santamarina, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Low energy perturbations used in geophysical methods provide insightful information about constant-fabric soil properties and their spatial variability. There are causal links between soil type, index properties, elastic wave velocity, electromagnetic wave parameters and thermal properties. Soil type relates to the stress-dependent S-wave velocity, thermal and electrical conductivity and permittivity. The small strain stiffness reflects the state of stress, the extent of diagenetic cementation and/or freezing. Pore fluid chemistry, fluid phase and changes in either fluid chemistry or phase manifest through electromagnetic measurements. The volumetric water content measured with electromagnetic techniques is the best predictor of porosity if the water saturation is 100%. Changes in water saturation alter the P-wave velocity when Srà100%, the S-wave velocity at intermediate saturations, and the thermal conductivity when the saturation is low Srà0%. Finally, tabulated values suffice to estimate heat capacity and latent heat for engineering design, however thermal conductivity requires measurements under proper field conditions.

  12. A ''model'' geophysics program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyquist, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    In 1993, I tested a radio-controlled airplane designed by Jim Walker of Brigham Young University for low-elevation aerial photography. Model-air photography retains most of the advantages of standard aerial photography --- the photographs can be used to detect lineaments, to map roads and buildings, and to construct stereo pairs to measure topography --- and it is far less expensive. Proven applications on the Oak Ridge Reservation include: updating older aerial records to document new construction; using repeated overflights of the same area to capture seasonal changes in vegetation and the effects of major storms; and detecting waste trench boundaries from the color and character of the overlying grass. Aerial photography is only one of many possible applications of radio-controlled aircraft. Currently, I am funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development to review the state of the art in microavionics, both military and civilian, to determine ways this emerging technology can be used for environmental site characterization. Being particularly interested in geophysical applications, I am also collaborating with electrical engineers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to design a model plane that will carry a 3-component flux-gate magnetometer and a global positioning system, which I hope to test in the spring of 1994

  13. Karoo airborne geophysical survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, D.J.; Stettler, E.H.

    1984-01-01

    Thirty four uranium anomalies were selected for ground follow-up from the analogue spectrometer records of Block 4 of the Karoo Airborne Geophysical Survey. The anomalies were plotted on 1:50 000 scale topographic maps and to 1:250 000 scale maps which are included in this report. The anomaly co-ordinates are tabulated together with the farms on which they occur. Results of the ground follow-up of the aerial anomalies are described. Twenty two anomalies are related to uranium mineralisation of which seventeen occur over baked mudstone adjacent to a dolerite intrusion. Five are located over fluvial channel sandstone of the Beaufort Group and subsurface mineralised sandstone may be present. The other twelve anomalies are spurious. Of the anomalies located over baked mudstone, fifteen emanate from ferruginous mudstone of the Whitehill Formation west of longitude 21 degrees 15 minutes. One of the two remaining anomalies over baked mudstone occurs over the Prince Albert Formation and the other anomaly is over baked mudstone and calcareous nodules of the Beaufort Group. The general low uranium values (less than 355 ppm eU3O8) render the occurrences uneconomic

  14. Geophysics: The Earth in Space. A Guide for High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Geophysical Union, Washington, DC.

    Geophysics is the application of physics, chemistry, and mathematics to the problems and processes of the earth, from its innermost core to its outermost environs in space. Fields within geophysics include the atmospheric sciences; geodesy; geomagnetism and paleomagnetism; hydrology; oceanography; planetology; seismology; solar-planetary…

  15. Planetary Geophysics and Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The broad objective of this work is to improve understanding of the internal structures and thermal and stress histories of the solid planets by combining results from analytical and computational modeling, and geophysical data analysis of gravity, topography and tectonic surface structures. During the past year we performed two quite independent studies in the attempt to explain the Mariner 10 magnetic observations of Mercury. In the first we revisited the possibility of crustal remanence by studying the conditions under which one could break symmetry inherent in Runcorn's model of a uniformly magnetized shell to produce a remanent signal with a dipolar form. In the second we applied a thin shell dynamo model to evaluate the range of intensity/structure for which such a planetary configuration can produce a dipole field consistent with Mariner 10 results. In the next full proposal cycle we will: (1) develop numerical and analytical and models of thin shell dynamos to address the possible nature of Mercury s present-day magnetic field and the demise of Mars magnetic field; (2) study the effect of degree-1 mantle convection on a core dynamo as relevant to the early magnetic field of Mars; (3) develop models of how the deep mantles of terrestrial planets are perturbed by large impacts and address the consequences for mantle evolution; (4) study the structure, compensation, state of stress, and viscous relaxation of lunar basins, and address implications for the Moon s state of stress and thermal history by modeling and gravity/topography analysis; and (5) use a three-dimensional viscous relaxation model for a planet with generalized vertical viscosity distribution to study the degree-two components of the Moon's topography and gravity fields to constrain the primordial stress state and spatial heterogeneity of the crust and mantle.

  16. Activities and Plan of the Center for Geophysics (Beijing from WDC to WDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenglin Peng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report we introduce the development of the WDC for Geophysics, Beijing included our activities in the electronic Geophysical Year (eGY and in the transition period from WDC to WDS. We also present our future plans. We have engaged in the development of geophysical informatics and related data science. We began the data visualization of geomagnetic fields in the GIS system. Our database has been expanded from geomagnetic data to the data of solid geophysics, including geothermal data, gravity data, and the records of aurora sightings in ancient China. We also joined the study of the history of the development of geophysics in China organized by the Chinese Geophysical Society (CGS.

  17. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The titles in this section include: 1) Distribution of Large Visible and Buried Impact Basins on Mars: Comparison with Free-Air Gravity, Crustal Thickness, and Magnetization Models; 2) The Early Thermal and Magnetic State of Terra Cimmeria, Southern Highlands of Mars; 3) Compatible Vector Components of the Magnetic Field of the Martian Crust; 4) Vertical Extrapolation of Mars Magnetic Potentials; 5) Rock Magnetic Fields Shield the Surface of Mars from Harmful Radiation; 6) Loading-induced Stresses near the Martian Hemispheric Dichotomy Boundary; 7) Growth of the Hemispheric Dichotomy and the Cessation of Plate Tectonics on Mars; 8) A Look at the Interior of Mars; 9) Uncertainties on Mars Interior Parameters Deduced from Orientation Parameters Using Different Radio-Links: Analytical Simulations; 10) Refinement of Phobos Ephemeris Using Mars Orbiter Laser Altimetry Radiometry.

  18. Physics division. Progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, M.; Bacon, D.S.; Aine, C.J.; Bartsch, R.R.

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Physics Division Progress Report describes progress and achievements in Physics Division research during the period January 1, 1995-December 31, 1996. The report covers the five main areas of experimental research and development in which Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in applied and basic sciences: (1) biophysics, (2) hydrodynamic physics, (3) neutron science and technology, (4) plasma physics, and (5) subatomic physics. Included in this report are a message from the Division Director, the Physics Division mission statement, an organizational chart, descriptions of the research areas of the five groups in the Division, selected research highlights, project descriptions, the Division staffing and funding levels for FY95-FY97, and a list of publications and presentations

  19. Physics division. Progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, M.; Bacon, D.S.; Aine, C.J.; Bartsch, R.R. [eds.] [comps.] [and others

    1997-10-01

    This issue of the Physics Division Progress Report describes progress and achievements in Physics Division research during the period January 1, 1995-December 31, 1996. The report covers the five main areas of experimental research and development in which Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in applied and basic sciences: (1) biophysics, (2) hydrodynamic physics, (3) neutron science and technology, (4) plasma physics, and (5) subatomic physics. Included in this report are a message from the Division Director, the Physics Division mission statement, an organizational chart, descriptions of the research areas of the five groups in the Division, selected research highlights, project descriptions, the Division staffing and funding levels for FY95-FY97, and a list of publications and presentations.

  20. Experimental Problem-Solving Item Pool: Junior and Intermediate Division Science. Project #80-4029, Final R&D Report to the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John A.; Maynes, Florence J.

    The absence of suitable instruments to measure scientific inquiry skills, and the inability of teachers to construct their own tests to measure mastery of science skills led the Peterborough County (Ontario) Board of Education to develop skill-oriented curriculum guidelines in response to changes in Ministry of Education priorities in science.…

  1. Physics division annual report - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thayer, K.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R and D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part, defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design

  2. PREFACE: Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosandi, Y.; Urbassek, H. M.; Yamanaka, H.

    2016-01-01

    This issue of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science contains selected papers presented at the Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI. The meeting was held from June 8 to 10, 2015, at the Bale-Sawala of Universitas Padjadjaran in Jatinangor, Indonesia. The PEDISGI is a symposium to accommodate communication between researchers, in particular geophysicists and related scientists, and to enable sharing of knowledge and research findings concerning local and global geophysical issues. The symposium was attended by 126 participants and 64 contributors from Indonesian universities and the neighbouring countries in four categories, viz. Theoretical and Computational Geophysics, Environmental Geophysics, Geophysical Explorations, and Geophysical Instrumentations and Methods. The symposium was accompanied by a dialog, discussing a chosen topic regarding environmental and geological problems of relevance for the Indonesian archipelago and the surrounding regions. For this first event the topic was ''The formation of Bandung-Basin between myths and facts: Exemplary cultural, geological and geophysical study on the evolution of the earth surface'', presented by invited speakers and local experts. This activity was aimed at extending our knowledge on this particular subject, which may have global impact. This topic was augmented by theoretical background lectures on the earth's surface formation, presented by the invited speakers of the symposium. The meeting would not have been successful without the assistance of the local organizing committee. We want to specially thank Irwan A. Dharmawan for managing the programme, Anggie Susilawati and Mia U. Hasanah for the conference administration, and Dini Fitriani for financial management. We also thank the National Geographic Indonesia for its support via the Business to Business Collaboration Program. The conference photograph can be viewed in the PDF.

  3. Division of atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroell, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Division of Atomic Physics, Lund Institute of Technology (LTH), is responsible for the basic physics teaching in all subjects at LTH and for specialized teaching in Optics, Atomic Physics, Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy and Laser Physics. The Division has research activities in basic and applied optical spectroscopy, to a large extent based on lasers. It is also part of the Physics Department, Lund University, where it forms one of eight divisions. Since the beginning of 1980 the research activities of our division have been centred around the use of lasers. The activities during the period 1991-1992 is described in this progress reports

  4. The teaching of geophysics in Latin America: An updated assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencio, Daniel A.; Schneider, Otto

    The situation of geophysics in developing countries has been the subject of discussions and analysis by diverse international organizations. It was also discussed in some articles in Eos [e.g., Lomnitz, 1982; Urrutia Fucugauchi, 1982; Bolt, 1982]. We have been requested to contribute a current evaluation of the problem, with particular reference to geophysical education in Latin America.In the following report on specialized training of geophysicists in Latin American countries, we consider the “exact earth sciences” in the broader sense, i.e., the mathematical and physical (and, to a certain extent, chemical) aspects of the planet earth as a whole, including its fluid portions, as opposed to the more restricted concept of just solid earth geophysics. In other words, our inquiry follows the scope of both AGU and the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG), so geodesy, although not explicitly covered, will still be mentioned occasionally. We will also consider the applied branches, especially exploration geophysics, since these areas furnish powerful motivation for fostering our sciences, both in the governmental circles of developing countries and among the young people looking for a promising professional future.

  5. Scientists of tomorrow - Geophysics School Lab for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschämmer, Ellen; Bohlen, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Starting in 2012, the Geophysical Institute (GPI) at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) developed several geophysical experiments for secondary school students which are now part of the Geophysics School Lab at the GPI. Usually, the students visit the School Lab as a class together with their teacher (Physics, Geography, Science), but the School Lab can also be used for extracurricular learning of individual students. The experiments carried out deal with the topics Seismology, Geoelectrics, and Fluid Dynamics: A horizontal seismometer is decoupled from its registration unit for the time of the visit of the students. With this setup, the students can measure the natural period of the pendulum, and adjust the seismometer accordingly. At different experimental stations, students can analyse seismic data registered with this unit, locate earthquakes, or get to know and understand an accelerometer. The accelerometer is attached to a registration unit and data can be visualized in real time. In another experimental setup, the students can measure the viscosity of a fluid as a function of temperature in order to get a better understanding of different magma types and their viscosity. Furthermore, a geoelectric experiment is carried out in a sandbox: The students experience with non-destructive testing, and try to reveal the subsurface structure. For our experiments, secondary school teachers can receive free supportive materials for the preparation of the visit. The aim of the Geophysics School Lab is to encourage and acquaint secondary school students to the concepts of Geophysics, and to enthuse them with the applied issues of Geosciences.

  6. Basic elements of nuclear geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordemann, D.J.R.; Pereira, E.B.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear Geophysics applies the nuclear radiation detection methodology to the geosciences, specially to study the dynamical processes of the lithosphere, the hydrosphere and the atmosphere as well as some aspects of planetology and astrophysics. Here the main methods are described: alpha-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry, the interaction of alpha and gamma radiation with matter and the detectors used (grid chambers, surface barrier silicon detector for alpha radiation; and sodium iodide thallium activated phosphors, hyperpure and lithium drifted germanium semiconductor detectors for gamma radiation). The principal applications of Nuclear Geophysics are given as examples to ilustrate the use of the methods described. (AUthor) [pt

  7. Computational Fair Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branzei, Simina

    Fair division is a fundamental problem in economic theory and one of the oldest questions faced through the history of human society. The high level scenario is that of several participants having to divide a collection of resources such that everyone is satisfied with their allocation -- e.g. two...... heirs dividing a car, house, and piece of land inherited. The literature on fair division was developed in the 20th century in mathematics and economics, but computational work on fair division is still sparse. This thesis can be seen as an excursion in computational fair division divided in two parts....... The first part tackles the cake cutting problem, where the cake is a metaphor for a heterogeneous divisible resource such as land, time, mineral deposits, and computer memory. We study the equilibria of classical protocols and design an algorithmic framework for reasoning about their game theoretic...

  8. Conceptual Design of Geophysical Microsatellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matviyenko, S.A.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article covers the issue of Earth gravitational field (EGF parameters measurement from space. The radiophysical method of measurement of gravitational frequency shift of electromagnetic radiation using existent GNSS and its two variants are developed by the author. The designlayout drawing of geophysical microsatellite, which implements the radiophysical method of EGF measurement and provides Earth plasmasphere and magnetosphere monitoring, is offered.

  9. Divisible ℤ-modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Futa Yuichi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we formalize the definition of divisible ℤ-module and its properties in the Mizar system [3]. We formally prove that any non-trivial divisible ℤ-modules are not finitely-generated.We introduce a divisible ℤ-module, equivalent to a vector space of a torsion-free ℤ-module with a coefficient ring ℚ. ℤ-modules are important for lattice problems, LLL (Lenstra, Lenstra and Lovász base reduction algorithm [15], cryptographic systems with lattices [16] and coding theory [8].

  10. Study of the Division of Allied Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelle, Ira B.

    This study examines student outcomes in the seven curriculum programs (chemical technology, dental hygiene, dental laboratory, medical laboratory, nursing, opthalmic dispensing, and radiologic technology) of the Division of Allied Health and Natural Sciences at New York City Community College. The following variables are examined: student…

  11. Detecting Buried Archaeological Remains by the Use of Geophysical Data Processing with 'Diffusion Maps' Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, Lev

    2015-04-01

    observe that as a result of the above operations we embedded the original data into 3-dimensional space where data related to the AT subsurface are well separated from the N data. This 3D set of the data representatives can be used as a reference set for the classification of newly arriving data. Geophysically it means a reliable division of the studied areas for the AT-containing and not containing (N) these objects. Testing this methodology for delineation of archaeological cavities by magnetic and gravity data analysis displayed an effectiveness of this approach. References Alperovich, L., Eppelbaum, L., Zheludev, V., Dumoulin, J., Soldovieri, F., Proto, M., Bavusi, M. and Loperte, A., 2013. A new combined wavelet methodology applied to GPR and ERT data in the Montagnole experiment (French Alps). Journal of Geophysics and Engineering, 10, No. 2, 025017, 1-17. Averbuch, A., Hochman, K., Rabin, N., Schclar, A. and Zheludev, V., 2010. A diffusion frame-work for detection of moving vehicles. Digital Signal Processing, 20, No.1, 111-122. Averbuch A.Z., Neittaanmäki, P., and Zheludev, V.A., 2014. Spline and Spline Wavelet Methods with Applications to Signal and Image Processing. Volume I: Periodic Splines. Springer. Coifman, R.R. and Lafon, S., 2006. Diffusion maps, Applied and Computational Harmonic Analysis. Special issue on Diffusion Maps and Wavelets, 21, No. 7, 5-30. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2011. Study of magnetic anomalies over archaeological targets in urban conditions. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, 36, No. 16, 1318-1330. Eppelbaum, L.V., 2014a. Geophysical observations at archaeological sites: Estimating informational content. Archaeological Prospection, 21, No. 2, 25-38. Eppelbaum, L.V. 2014b. Four Color Theorem and Applied Geophysics. Applied Mathematics, 5, 358-366. Eppelbaum, L.V., Alperovich, L., Zheludev, V. and Pechersky, A., 2011. Application of informational and wavelet approaches for integrated processing of geophysical data in complex environments. Proceed

  12. Underwater Sound Reference Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Underwater Sound Reference Division (USRD) serves as the U.S. standardizing activity in the area of underwater acoustic measurements, as the National Institute...

  13. On Geometric Infinite Divisibility

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhya, E.; Pillai, R. N.

    2014-01-01

    The notion of geometric version of an infinitely divisible law is introduced. Concepts parallel to attraction and partial attraction are developed and studied in the setup of geometric summing of random variables.

  14. Theoretical physics division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Research activities of the theoretical physics division for 1979 are described. Short summaries are given of specific research work in the following fields: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, intermediate energy physics, elementary particles [fr

  15. Division Level Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    consumes, and the disparity of demographics at the division level. Organic reach across Facebook is decreasing due to more paid advertisements and...U.S. Army units of all sizes have their own social media pages on Facebook , Instagram, Twitter, or a combination of all three sites. Social media...TERMS Division, Facebook , Internet, Social Media 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME

  16. The Cadre Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-20

    NAME OF MONITORING ORGANIZATION U.S. Army War College (if & pika ble) Carlisle Barracks I 6c. ADDRESS (City, State, and ZIP Code) 7b. ADDRESS (City...divisions in the shortest possible time with the smallest feasible cost to the American taxpayer. This concept puts a cadre of active and reserve soldiers in...fighting divisions in the shortest possible time with the smallest feasible cost to the American taxpayer. This concept puts a cadre of active and

  17. Mathematics applied to nuclear geophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, E.B.; Nordemann, D.J.R.

    1987-01-01

    One of the powerful auxiliary to nuclear geophysics is the obtention and interpretation of the alpha and gamma radiation spectra. This work discuss, qualitative and quantitative, the lost information problem, motivated by the noise in the process of information codification. The decodification process must be suppield by the appropriate mathematical model on the measure system to recovery the information from nuclear source. (C.D.G.) [pt

  18. News Letter: European Geophysical Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    GLOWACKA, E.; ARELLANO, F. Land subsidence measurements at Cerro Prieto geothermal field (Baja California, Mexico ) using SAR interferometry 126...topics’ of ionospheric research, written by specialists in their respective fields . Useful as a textbook for students as well as for research...Geophysics thus have available mature, thoughtful reviews of recent developments in their own field , and they may be confident of keeping abreast in

  19. SAGE (Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience): Learning Geophysics by Doing Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiracek, G. R.; Baldridge, W. S.; Biehler, S.; Braile, L. W.; Ferguson, J. F.; Gilpin, B. E.; Pellerin, L.

    2005-12-01

    SAGE, a field-based educational program in applied geophysical methods has been an REU site for 16 years and completed its 23rd year of operation in July 2005. SAGE teaches the major geophysical exploration methods (including seismics, gravity, magnetics, and electromagnetics) and applies them to the solution of specific local and regional geologic problems. These include delineating buried hazardous material; mapping archaeological sites; and studying the structure, tectonics, and water resources of the Rio Grande rift in New Mexico. Nearly 600 graduates, undergraduates, and professionals have attended SAGE since 1983. Since 1990 REU students have numbered 219 coming from dozens of different campuses. There have been 124 underrepresented REU students including 100 women, 14 Hispanics, 7 Native Americans, and 3 African Americans. Tracking of former REU students has revealed that 81% have gone on to graduate school. Keys to the success of SAGE are hands-on immersion in geophysics for one month and a partnership between academia, industry, and a federal laboratory. Successful approaches at SAGE include: 1) application of the latest equipment by all students; 2) continued updating of equipment, computers, and software by organizing universities and industry affiliates; 3) close ties with industry who provide supplemental instruction, furnish new equipment and software, and alert students to the current industry trends and job opportunities; 4) two-team, student data analysis structure that simultaneously addresses specific geophysical techniques and their integration; and 5) oral and written reports patterned after professional meetings and journals. An eight member, 'blue ribbon' advisory panel from academia, industry, and the federal government has been set up to maintain the vitality of SAGE by addressing such issues as funding, new faculty, organization, and vision. SAGE is open to students from any university (or organization) with backgrounds including

  20. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, G.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2)

  1. Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G. (ed.)

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

  2. Detecting Underground Mine Voids Using Complex Geophysical Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, V. F.; Harbert, W. P.; Hammack, R. W.; Ackman, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    In July 2006, the National Energy Technology Laboratory in collaboration with Department of Geology and Planetary Science, University of Pittsburgh conducted complex ground geophysical surveys of an area known to be underlain by shallow coal mines. Geophysical methods including electromagnetic induction, DC resistivity and seismic reflection were conducted. The purpose of these surveys was to: 1) verify underground mine voids based on a century-old mine map that showed subsurface mine workings georeferenced to match with present location of geophysical test-site located on the territory of Bruceton research center in Pittsburgh, PA, 2) deliniate mine workings that may be potentially filled with electrically conductive water filtrate emerging from adjacent groundwater collectors and 3) establish an equipment calibration site for geophysical instruments. Data from electromagnetic and resistivity surveys were further processed and inverted using EM1DFM, EMIGMA or Earthimager 2D capablilities in order to generate conductivity/depth images. Anomaly maps were generated, that revealed the locations of potential mine openings.

  3. Educational Geophysics at INGV, Rome (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dida Working Group Ingv,.

    2002-12-01

    Italy is a country prone to Earth phenomena such as earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods and landslides that left a trace in the memory of people. About 60% of the Italian territory is classified in the current seismic hazard maps, and large cities as Neaples and Catania are located close to the two largest active volcanoes of Europe (Mt. Vesuvius and Mt. Etna, respectively). Nevertheless, school programs are often inadequate about the natural hazards of the country. For this reason there are many requests from schoolteachers to visit with their classes the academic Institutions and to attend geophysical talks. The working group for educational activities of the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica and Vulcanologia promotes and realizes Earth science outreach programs devoted to increase the knowledge of geophysical topics. The educational activity is one of the most important tasks of our Institution together with the research activities and the 24-hours survey of the Italian Seismic Network. The INGV hosts in its headquarter of Rome many visits of primary, secondary and high schools with an increasing demand year by year. Every year about 3,000 students visit our Institute over more than 60 open-days, and we participate to exhibitions and outreach projects organized by several Institutions. We show here what has been done at INGV for the geophysical education, underlining the problems and the successes of these activities. We describe also an educational project developed together with a teacher's team of secondary-school. Aim of this experience was to stimulate the interest of 12-year-old kids to unfamiliar arguments like seismology. The class was introduced to physical topics as waves and wave propagation by means of simple experiments. Then they visited the INGV were the research activities were shown, with emphasis on seismological studies; they were also thought how the Italian Seismic Network monitors earthquakes and how to use the P and S waves for their

  4. Applied Geophysics Opportunities in the Petroleum Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olgaard, D. L.; Tikku, A.; Roberts, J. C.; Martinez, A.

    2012-12-01

    Meeting the increasing global demand for energy over the next several decades presents daunting challenges to engineers and scientists, including geoscientists of all disciplines. Many opportunities exist for geophysicists to find and produce oil and gas in a safe, environmentally responsible and affordable manner. Successful oil and gas exploration involves a 'Plates to Pores' approach that integrates multi-scale data from satellites, marine and land seismic and non-seismic field surveys, lab experiments, and even electron microscopy. The petroleum industry is at the forefront of using high performance computing to develop innovative methods to process and analyze large volumes of seismic data and perform realistic numerical modeling, such as finite element fluid flow and rock deformation simulations. Challenging and rewarding jobs in exploration, production and research exist for students with BS/BA, MS and PhD degrees. Geophysics students interested in careers in the petroleum industry should have a broad foundation in science, math and fundamental geosciences at the BS/BA level, as well as mastery of the scientific method, usually gained through thesis work at MS and PhD levels. Field geology or geophysics experience is also valuable. Other personal attributes typical for geoscientists to be successful in industry include a passion for solving complex geoscience problems, the flexibility to work on a variety of assignments throughout a career and skills such as teamwork, communication, integration and leadership. In this presentation we will give examples of research, exploration and production opportunities for geophysicists in petroleum companies and compare and contrast careers in academia vs. industry.

  5. Theoretical Division progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, N.G.

    1979-04-01

    This report presents highlights of activities in the Theoretical (T) Division from October 1976-January 1979. The report is divided into three parts. Part I presents an overview of the Division: its unique function at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) and within the scientific community as a whole; the organization of personnel; the main areas of research; and a survey of recent T-Division initiatives. This overview is followed by a survey of the 13 groups within the Division, their main responsibilities, interests, and expertise, consulting activities, and recent scientific accomplisments. The remainder of the report, Parts II and III, is devoted to articles on selected research activities. Recent efforts on topics of immediate interest to energy and weapons programs at LASL and elsewhere are described in Part II, Major National Programs. Separate articles present T-Divison contributions to weapons research, reactor safety and reactor physics research, fusion research, laser isotope separation, and other energy research. Each article is a compilation of independent projects within T Division, all related to but addressing different aspects of the major program. Part III is organized by subject discipline, and describes recent scientific advances of fundamental interest. An introduction, defining the scope and general nature of T-Division efforts within a given discipline, is followed by articles on the research topics selected. The reporting is done by the scientists involved in the research, and an attempt is made to communicate to a general audience. Some data are given incidentally; more technical presentations of the research accomplished may be found among the 47 pages of references. 110 figures, 5 tables

  6. Power Dissipation in Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    A few classes of algorithms to implement division in hardware have been used over the years: division by digit-recurrence, by reciprocal approximation by iterative methods and by polynomial approximation. Due to the differences in the algorithms, a comparison among their implementation in terms o...... of performance and precision is sometimes hard to make. In this work, we use power dissipation and energy consumption as metrics to compare among those different classes of algorithms. There are no previous works in the literature presenting such a comparison....

  7. Digital Arithmetic: Division Algorithms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montuschi, Paolo; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    implement it in hardware to not compromise the overall computation performances. This entry explains the basic algorithms, suitable for hardware and software, to implement division in computer systems. Two classes of algorithms implement division or square root: digit-recurrence and multiplicative (e.......g., Newton–Raphson) algorithms. The first class of algorithms, the digit-recurrence type, is particularly suitable for hardware implementation as it requires modest resources and provides good performance on contemporary technology. The second class of algorithms, the multiplicative type, requires...

  8. Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Institute of Geophysics, Planetary Physics, and Signatures at Los Alamos National Laboratory is committed to promoting and supporting high quality, cutting-edge...

  9. Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borns, D.J.

    1995-08-01

    An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier

  10. SURFACE GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION - COMPENDIUM DOCUMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RUCKER DF; MYERS DA

    2011-10-04

    This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

  11. Surface Geophysical Exploration - Compendium Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rucker, D.F.; Myers, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    This report documents the evolution of the surface geophysical exploration (SGE) program and highlights some of the most recent successes in imaging conductive targets related to past leaks within and around Hanford's tank farms. While it is noted that the SGE program consists of multiple geophysical techniques designed to (1) locate near surface infrastructure that may interfere with (2) subsurface plume mapping, the report will focus primarily on electrical resistivity acquisition and processing for plume mapping. Due to the interferences from the near surface piping network, tanks, fences, wells, etc., the results of the three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of electrical resistivity was more representative of metal than the high ionic strength plumes. Since the first deployment, the focus of the SGE program has been to acquire and model the best electrical resistivity data that minimizes the influence of buried metal objects. Toward that goal, two significant advances have occurred: (1) using the infrastructure directly in the acquisition campaign and (2) placement of electrodes beneath the infrastructure. The direct use of infrastructure was successfully demonstrated at T farm by using wells as long electrodes (Rucker et al., 2010, 'Electrical-Resistivity Characterization of an Industrial Site Using Long Electrodes'). While the method was capable of finding targets related to past releases, a loss of vertical resolution was the trade-off. The burying of electrodes below the infrastructure helped to increase the vertical resolution, as long as a sufficient number of electrodes are available for the acquisition campaign.

  12. Energy Technology Division research summary - 1999.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-31

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization, or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book.

  13. Use of the radon gas as a natural geophysical tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena, P.; Balcazar, M.; Flores R, J.H.; Lopez M, A.

    2006-01-01

    In this work it is denoted the applications of the radon gas like a natural geophysical radiotracer in the different branches of the Earth Sciences (Geology, geophysics and geochemistry). It importance resides in its employment like one additional tool to register the possible occurrence of seismic events by means of radon anomalies that are presented in land movements (volcanic eruptions and presence of geothermal areas), as well as its potential in environmental works whose purpose is the evaluation of the feather of contamination in the underground water and the porous media for spills of hydrocarbons. The measurement techniques to determine the concentration of radon was carried out by means of Solid Detectors of Nuclear tracks, as well as by Liquid scintillation, Clipperton, Honeywell, AlphaGUARD. The towns where these techniques its were applied were: Mexico City, Estado de Mexico (Toluca, ININ), Jalisco (The Spring), Guerrero coast. (Author)

  14. Solid State Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M.

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces

  15. Solid State Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Watson, D.M. (eds.)

    1989-08-01

    This report contains brief discussions on work done in the Solid State Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The topics covered are: Theoretical Solid State Physics; Neutron scattering; Physical properties of materials; The synthesis and characterization of materials; Ion beam and laser processing; and Structure of solids and surfaces. (LSP)

  16. Theoretical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a survey of the studies done in the Theoretical Physics Division of the Nuclear Physics Institute; the subjects studied in theoretical nuclear physics were the few-nucleon problem, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, weak interactions, intermediate energy and high energy physics. In this last field, the subjects studied were field theory, group theory, symmetry and strong interactions [fr

  17. THE SPRINGBOK SIXTH DIVISION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Springboks showed the enemy that they were on the ball. On Lordly Mont' Sorrate they trained their ... From peak to peak in front of them the message was relayed. By the Reichsfuehrer Division, the SS corps d' ... Between the Sixth Div front line and the German rock-bound lair. Lay a sinister stretch of no-man's land of ...

  18. On infinitely divisible semimartingales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basse-O'Connor, Andreas; Rosiński, Jan

    2015-01-01

    processes, including linear fractional processes, mixed moving averages, and supOU processes, as particular cases. The proof of the main theorem relies on series representations of jumps of cadlag infinitely divisible processes given in Basse-O'Connor and Rosinski [2013, Ann. Probab. 41(6)] combined...... with techniques of stochastic analysis....

  19. Geophysical Research Abstracts. Volume 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The EGU General Assembly is the largest and most prominent event in the geosciences held in Europe today. Many sessions were dedicated to subjects such as hydrological sciences; isotopes in geosciences: instrumentation and applications; atmospheric sciences; magnetism, rock physics and geomaterials; natural hazards; climate: past, present, future; ocean sciences; geochemistry; mineralogy; petrology and volcanology; soil system sciences; geodynamics; stratigraphy; sedimentology and paleontology among others. Those presentations which belong to the subject scope of INIS database are indexed separately (nevyjel)

  20. A review of integrated geophysical investigations from archaeological and cultural sites under encroaching urbanisation in İzmir, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drahor, Mahmut Göktuğ

    In the new millennium, globalisation, and with it urbanisation, has been expanding as a consequence of economic development throughout the world. Urbanisation is a major social problem, not only for developing countries but also for developed countries. Urbanisation also has a major impact on archaeological sites and cultural heritages in urbanised zones. Non-destructive investigation techniques, such as geophysics, which uses remote sensing, and is non-invasive, are of great importance in urban areas. We are now capable of solving urbanisation-related problems, and these techniques reduce the cost of projects at urbanised sites. Geophysics has increased the possibilities of new applications in determining intensive urbanisation effects in earth science. Geophysics deals with numerous physical variations such as electricity, electromagnetism, magnetics, acoustics, gravity and radioactivity. There are numerous ways geophysics can be applied in archaeological and cultural heritage studies. In addition the hazard mitigation, infrastructure investigation, waste management, water supply, urban gateways and other factors are documented by geophysics. In recent years, archaeological sites under the encroachment of urbanisation have been investigated on numerous occasions using non-invasive geophysical techniques, allowing parameters such as the depth, dimension and extension of targets to be clearly determined. The term “urban geophysics” has recently been seen in various references related to geophysics and other earth science studies. This study reviews the results of geophysical investigations carried out at important archaeological sites under encroaching urbanisation in the city of İzmir, Turkey.

  1. How Collecting and Freely Sharing Geophysical Data Broadly Benefits Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassetto, A.; Woodward, R.; Detrick, R. S.

    2017-12-01

    Valuable but often unintended observations of environmental and human-related processes have resulted from open sharing of multidisciplinary geophysical observations collected over the past 33 years. These data, intended to fuel fundamental academic research, are part of the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS), which is sponsored by the National Science Foundation and has provided a community science facility supporting earthquake science and related disciplines since 1984. These community facilities have included arrays of geophysical instruments operated for EarthScope, an NSF-sponsored science initiative designed to understand the architecture and evolution of the North American continent, as well as the Global Seismographic Network, Greenland Ice Sheet Monitoring Network, a repository of data collected around the world, and other community assets. All data resulting from this facility have been made openly available to support researchers across any field of study and this has expanded the impact of these data beyond disciplinary boundaries. This presentation highlights vivid examples of how basic research activities using open data, collected as part of a community facility, can inform our understanding of manmade earthquakes, geomagnetic hazards, climate change, and illicit testing of nuclear weapons.

  2. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sincovec, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL`s research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division.

  3. Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division progress report for period ending December 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sincovec, R.F.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides a record of the research activities of the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division for the period January 1, 1993, through December 31, 1994. This report is the final archival record of the EPM Division. On October 1, 1994, ORELA was transferred to Physics Division and on January 1, 1995, the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division and the Computer Applications Division reorganized to form the Computer Science and Mathematics Division and the Computational Physics and Engineering Division. Earlier reports in this series are identified on the previous pages, along with the progress reports describing ORNL's research in the mathematical sciences prior to 1984 when those activities moved into the Engineering Physics and Mathematics Division

  4. Responsibilities, opportunities and challenges in geophysical exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rytle, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    Geophysical exploration for engineering purposes is conducted to decrease the risk in encountering site uncertainties in construction of underground facilities. Current responsibilities, opportunities and challenges for those with geophysical expertise are defined. These include: replacing the squiggly line format, developing verification sites for method evaluations, applying knowledge engineering and assuming responsibility for crucial national problems involving rock mechanics expertise

  5. Agricultural Geophysics: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysical methods are becoming an increasingly valuable tool for agricultural applications. Agricultural geophysics investigations are commonly (although certainly not always) focused on delineating small- and/or large-scale objects/features within the soil profile (~ 0 to 2 m depth) over very lar...

  6. GeoFramework: A Modeling Framework for Solid Earth Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurnis, M.; Aivazis, M.; Tromp, J.; Tan, E.; Thoutireddy, P.; Liu, Q.; Choi, E.; Dicaprio, C.; Chen, M.; Simons, M.; Quenette, S.; Appelbe, B.; Aagaard, B.; Williams, C.; Lavier, L.; Moresi, L.; Law, H.

    2003-12-01

    As data sets in geophysics become larger and of greater relevance to other earth science disciplines, and as earth science becomes more interdisciplinary in general, modeling tools are being driven in new directions. There is now a greater need to link modeling codes to one another, link modeling codes to multiple datasets, and to make modeling software available to non modeling specialists. Coupled with rapid progress in computer hardware (including the computational speed afforded by massively parallel computers), progress in numerical algorithms, and the introduction of software frameworks, these lofty goals of merging software in geophysics are now possible. The GeoFramework project, a collaboration between computer scientists and geoscientists, is a response to these needs and opportunities. GeoFramework is based on and extends Pyre, a Python-based modeling framework, recently developed to link solid (Lagrangian) and fluid (Eulerian) models, as well as mesh generators, visualization packages, and databases, with one another for engineering applications. The utility and generality of Pyre as a general purpose framework in science is now being recognized. Besides its use in engineering and geophysics, it is also being used in particle physics and astronomy. Geology and geophysics impose their own unique requirements on software frameworks which are not generally available in existing frameworks and so there is a need for research in this area. One of the special requirements is the way Lagrangian and Eulerian codes will need to be linked in time and space within a plate tectonics context. GeoFramework has grown beyond its initial goal of linking a limited number of exiting codes together. The following codes are now being reengineered within the context of Pyre: Tecton, 3-D FE Visco-elastic code for lithospheric relaxation; CitComS, a code for spherical mantle convection; SpecFEM3D, a SEM code for global and regional seismic waves; eqsim, a FE code for dynamic

  7. Virtual Geophysics Laboratory: Exploiting the Cloud and Empowering Geophysicsts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Ryan; Vote, Josh; Goh, Richard; Cox, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Over the last five decades geoscientists from Australian state and federal agencies have collected and assembled around 3 Petabytes of geoscience data sets under public funding. As a consequence of technological progress, data is now being acquired at exponential rates and in higher resolution than ever before. Effective use of these big data sets challenges the storage and computational infrastructure of most organizations. The Virtual Geophysics Laboratory (VGL) is a scientific workflow portal addresses some of the resulting issues by providing Australian geophysicists with access to a Web 2.0 or Rich Internet Application (RIA) based integrated environment that exploits eResearch tools and Cloud computing technology, and promotes collaboration between the user community. VGL simplifies and automates large portions of what were previously manually intensive scientific workflow processes, allowing scientists to focus on the natural science problems, rather than computer science and IT. A number of geophysical processing codes are incorporated to support multiple workflows. For example a gravity inversion can be performed by combining the Escript/Finley codes (from the University of Queensland) with the gravity data registered in VGL. Likewise, tectonic processes can also be modeled by combining the Underworld code (from Monash University) with one of the various 3D models available to VGL. Cloud services provide scalable and cost effective compute resources. VGL is built on top of mature standards-compliant information services, many deployed using the Spatial Information Services Stack (SISS), which provides direct access to geophysical data. A large number of data sets from Geoscience Australia assist users in data discovery. GeoNetwork provides a metadata catalog to store workflow results for future use, discovery and provenance tracking. VGL has been developed in collaboration with the research community using incremental software development practices and open

  8. Symmetries in geology and geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, D L; Newman, W I

    1996-12-10

    Symmetries have played an important role in a variety of problems in geology and geophysics. A large fraction of studies in mineralogy are devoted to the symmetry properties of crystals. In this paper, however, the emphasis will be on scale-invariant (fractal) symmetries. The earth's topography is an example of both statistically self-similar and self-affine fractals. Landforms are also associated with drainage networks, which are statistical fractal trees. A universal feature of drainage networks and other growth networks is side branching. Deterministic space-filling networks with side-branching symmetries are illustrated. It is shown that naturally occurring drainage networks have symmetries similar to diffusion-limited aggregation clusters.

  9. Numerical simulation in applied geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Juan Enrique

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the theory of waves propagation in a fluid-saturated porous medium (a Biot medium) and its application in Applied Geophysics. In particular, a derivation of absorbing boundary conditions in viscoelastic and poroelastic media is presented, which later is employed in the applications. The partial differential equations describing the propagation of waves in Biot media are solved using the Finite Element Method (FEM). Waves propagating in a Biot medium suffer attenuation and dispersion effects. In particular the fast compressional and shear waves are converted to slow diffusion-type waves at mesoscopic-scale heterogeneities (on the order of centimeters), effect usually occurring in the seismic range of frequencies. In some cases, a Biot medium presents a dense set of fractures oriented in preference directions. When the average distance between fractures is much smaller than the wavelengths of the travelling fast compressional and shear waves, the medium behaves as an effective viscoelastic an...

  10. Fractals in geology and geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1989-01-01

    The definition of a fractal distribution is that the number of objects N with a characteristic size greater than r scales with the relation N of about r exp -D. The frequency-size distributions for islands, earthquakes, fragments, ore deposits, and oil fields often satisfy this relation. This application illustrates a fundamental aspect of fractal distributions, scale invariance. The requirement of an object to define a scale in photograhs of many geological features is one indication of the wide applicability of scale invariance to geological problems; scale invariance can lead to fractal clustering. Geophysical spectra can also be related to fractals; these are self-affine fractals rather than self-similar fractals. Examples include the earth's topography and geoid.

  11. Strainmeters and tiltmeters in geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulty, N. R.

    1976-01-01

    Several types of sensitive strainmeters and tiltmeters have been developed, and it is now becoming clear which geophysical applications are most suitable for these instruments. In general, strainmeters and tiltmeters are used for observing ground deformation at periods of minutes to days. Small-scale lateral inhomogeneities at the instrument sites distort signals by a few percent, although the effects of large structures can be calculated. In earth tide work these lateral inhomogeneities and unknown ocean loading signals prevent accurate values of the regional tide from being obtained. This limits tidal investigations to looking for temporal variations, possibly associated with pre-earthquake dilatancy, and spatial variations caused by gross elasticity contrasts in the local geological structure. Strainmeters and tiltmeters are well suited for observing long-period seismic waves, seismic slip events on faults and volcano tumescence, where small site-induced distortions in the measured signals are seldom important.

  12. Geophysical phenomena classification by artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, M. P.; Bruckner, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Space science information systems involve accessing vast data bases. There is a need for an automatic process by which properties of the whole data set can be assimilated and presented to the user. Where data are in the form of spectrograms, phenomena can be detected by pattern recognition techniques. Presented are the first results obtained by applying unsupervised Artificial Neural Networks (ANN's) to the classification of magnetospheric wave spectra. The networks used here were a simple unsupervised Hamming network run on a PC and a more sophisticated CALM network run on a Sparc workstation. The ANN's were compared in their geophysical data recognition performance. CALM networks offer such qualities as fast learning, superiority in generalizing, the ability to continuously adapt to changes in the pattern set, and the possibility to modularize the network to allow the inter-relation between phenomena and data sets. This work is the first step toward an information system interface being developed at Sussex, the Whole Information System Expert (WISE). Phenomena in the data are automatically identified and provided to the user in the form of a data occurrence morphology, the Whole Information System Data Occurrence Morphology (WISDOM), along with relationships to other parameters and phenomena.

  13. Fluctuations and Response in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucarini, Valerio

    The climate is a complex, chaotic, non-equilibrium system featuring a limited horizon of predictability, variability on a vast range of temporal and spatial scales, instabilities resulting into energy transformations, and mixing and dissipative processes resulting into entropy production. Despite great progresses, we still do not have a complete theory of climate dynamics able to account for instabilities, equilibration processes, response to changing parameters of the system, and multiscale effects. We will outline some possible applications of the response theory developed by Ruelle for non-equilibrium statistical mechanical systems, showing how it allows for setting on firm ground and on a coherent framework concepts like climate sensitivity, climate response, and climate tipping points, and to construct parametrizations for unresolved processes. We will show results for comprehensive global climate models. The results are promising in terms of suggesting new ways for approaching the problem of climate change prediction and for using more efficiently the enormous amounts of data produced by modeling groups around the world. Ref: V. Lucarini, R. Blender, C. Herbert, F. Ragone, S. Pascale, J. Wouters, Mathematical and Physical Ideas for Climate Science, Reviews of Geophysics 52, 809-859 (2014)

  14. Podcast: The Electronic Crimes Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sept 26, 2016. Chris Lukas, the Special Agent in Charge of the Electronic Crimes Division within the OIG's Office of Investigations talks about computer forensics, cybercrime in the EPA and his division's role in criminal investigations.

  15. 2016 T Division Lightning Talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Adams, Luke Clyde [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Ferre, Gregoire Robing [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Grantcharov, Vesselin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Iaroshenko, Oleksandr [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Krishnapriyan, Aditi [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Kurtakoti, Prajvala Kishore [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Le Thien, Minh Quan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Lim, Jonathan Ng [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Low, Thaddeus Song En [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Lystrom, Levi Aaron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Ma, Xiaoyu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Nguyen, Hong T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Pogue, Sabine Silvia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Orandle, Zoe Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Reisner, Andrew Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Revard, Benjamin Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Roy, Julien [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Sandor, Csanad [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Slavkova, Kalina Polet [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Weichman, Kathleen Joy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Wu, Fei [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division; Yang, Yang [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Theoretical Division

    2016-11-29

    These are the slides for all of the 2016 T Division lightning talks. There are 350 pages worth of slides from different presentations, all of which cover different topics within the theoretical division at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  16. 2017 T Division Lightning Talks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsey, Marilyn Leann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Abeywardhana, Jayalath AMM [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Colin Mackenzie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Adams, Luke Clyde [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carter, Austin Lewis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ducru, Pablo Philippe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Duignan, Thomas John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gifford, Brendan Joel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hills, Benjamin Hale [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hoffman, Kentaro Jack [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Khair, Adnan Ibne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kochanski, Kelly Anne Pribble [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ledwith, Patrick John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Leveillee, Joshua Anthony [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewis, Sina Genevieve [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ma, Xiaoyu [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Merians, Hugh Drake [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moore, Bryan Alexander [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nijjar, Parmeet Kaur [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Oles, Vladyslav [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Olszewski, Maciej W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Philipbar, Brad Montgomery [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Reisner, Andrew Ray [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Roberts, David Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rufa, Dominic Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sifain, Andrew E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Justin Steven [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Smith, Lauren Taylor Wisbey [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Svolos, Lampros [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Thibault, Joshua Ryan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ushijima-Mwesigwa, Hayato Montezuma [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Weaver, Claire Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Witzen, Wyatt Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zentgraf, Sabine Silvia [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Alred, John Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-06

    All members of the T Division Community, students, staff members, group leaders, division management, and other interested individuals are invited to come and support the following student(s) as they present their Lightning Talks.

  17. Division of Integrity and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdarek, J.

    1995-01-01

    The organization structure is described of the Division of Integrity and Materials, Institute of Nuclear Research plc, Rez, and the main fields of their activities given. Listed are the major research projects of the Division in 1994. (Z.S.)

  18. Division of Labor

    KAUST Repository

    Oke, Muse

    2014-09-12

    The first assignment of DNA polymerases at the eukaryotic replication fork was possible after the in vitro reconstitution of the simian virus 40 (SV40) replication system. In this system, DNA polymerase α (Pol α) provides both leading and lagging strands with RNA-DNA primers that are extended by DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ). Extrapolating the architecture of the replication fork from the SV40 model system to an actual eukaryotic cell has been challenged by the discovery of a third DNA polymerase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, DNA polymerase ε (Pol ε). A division of labor has been proposed for the eukaryotic replication fork whereby Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand. However, an alternative model of unequal division of labor in which Pol δ can still participate in leading-strand synthesis is plausible.

  19. Agricultural geophysics: Past/present accomplishments and future advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geophysical methods have become an increasingly valuable tool for application within a variety of agroecosystems. Agricultural geophysics measurements are obtained at a wide range of scales and often exhibit significant variability both temporally and spatially. The three geophysical methods predomi...

  20. 3. Theoretical Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the period September 1980 - Aug 1981, the studies in theoretical physics divisions have been compiled under the following headings: in nuclear physics, nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and intermediate energies; in particle physics, NN and NantiN interactions, dual topological unitarization, quark model and quantum chromodynamics, classical and quantum field theories, non linear integrable equations and topological preons and Grand unified theories. A list of publications, lectures and meetings is included [fr

  1. Reconsidering Division Cavalry Squadrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    February of 1970, with the US Army’s withdrawal from Vietnam underway, 1-4 CAV assumed rearguard duty—an economy -of-force mission traditionally assigned to...operations case study in Vietnam , and a reconnaissance operations case study in the Persian Gulf, this study proposes a series of organizational...troop; squadron; regiment; division; corps; reconnaissance; security; Persian Gulf War; Vietnam ; task force; brigade combat team; modularity; tank

  2. Mapping Urban Social Divisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Ball

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Against the background of increased levels of interest in space and images beyond the field of geography, this article (re- introduces earlier work on the semiotics of maps undertaken by geographers in the 1960s. The data limitations, purpose and cultural context in which a user interprets a map's codes and conventions are highlighted in this work, which remains relevant to the interpretation of maps—new and old—forty years later. By means of drawing on geography's contribution to the semiotics of maps, the article goes on to examine the concept of urban social divisions as represented in map images. Using a small number of map images, including two of the most widely known maps of urban social division in Europe and North America, the roles of context, data and purpose in the production and interpretation of maps are discussed. By presenting the examples chronologically the article shows that although advances in data collection and manipulation have allowed researchers to combine different social variables in maps of social division, and to interact with map images, work by geographers on the semiotics of maps is no less relevant today than when it was first proposed forty years ago. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1002372

  3. Division Quilts: A Measurement Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Sarah S.; Lupton, Tina M.; Richardson, Kerri

    2015-01-01

    As teachers seek activities to assist students in understanding division as more than just the algorithm, they find many examples of division as fair sharing. However, teachers have few activities to engage students in a quotative (measurement) model of division. Efraim Fischbein and his colleagues (1985) defined two types of whole-number…

  4. Cognitive and Neural Sciences Division 1989 Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-01

    Network Sonar Signal Processor by Bionic Processing Techniques PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven L. Speidel Naval Ocean Systems Center Code 632 (619...and the tail withdrawal reflex); 2) an all-or-none response (the inking response); and 3) a cyclical behavior (escape locomotion ). Progress: The PI has...based message streams. This will include body scans, beam steering, and locomotion induced changes in the emitted signal stream. Progress: Initial data

  5. Nuclear Science Division annual report for 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses research being conducted under the following programs: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation program; and 88-inch cyclotron operations

  6. Nutritional Science | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This group promotes and supports studies establishing a comprehensive understanding of the precise role of diet and fo | Establishing a comprehensive understanding of diet and food components in cancer risk and tumor cell behavior.

  7. Nuclear Science Division 1992 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W. D. [ed.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains short papers from research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Nuclear Physics. The categories of these papers are: Low-Energy Research Program; Bevalac Research Program; Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Program; Nuclear Theory Program; Nuclear Data Evaluation Program; and 88-Inch Cyclotron Operations.

  8. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H 2 , and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO 2 , potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures

  9. Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    This report contains sections on the following topics: photochemistry of materials in the stratosphere, energy transfer and structural studies of molecules on surfaces, crossed molecular beams, molecular interactions, theory of atomic and molecular collision processes, selective photochemistry, photodissociation of free radicals, physical chemistry with emphasis on thermodynamic properties, chemical physics at the high photon energies, high-energy atomic physics, atomic physics, high-energy oxidizers and delocalized-electron solids, catalytic hydrogenation of CO, transition metal-catalyzed conversion of CO, NO, H{sub 2}, and organic molecules to fuels and petrochemicals, formation of oxyacids of sulfur from SO{sub 2}, potentially catalytic and conducting polyorganometallics, actinide chemistry, and molecular thermodynamics for phase equilibria in mixtures.

  10. Nuclear Science Division annual report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, W.D. [ed.

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses research being conducted under the following programs: Low energy research program; bevalac research program; ultrarelativistic research program; nuclear theory program; nuclear theory program; nuclear data evaluation program; and 88-inch cyclotron operations.

  11. Cognitive And Neural Sciences Division 1992 Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Neuronal Micronets as Nodal Elements PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas H. Brown Yale University Department of Psychology (203) 432-7008 R&T PROJECT CODE...of neural nets, and to develop a micronet architecture which captures the computations in neurons. Approach: Simulations will be conducted of the

  12. Nuclear Science Division 1992 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, W.D.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains short papers from research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in Nuclear Physics. The categories of these papers are: Low-Energy Research Program; Bevalac Research Program; Relativistic Nuclear Collisions Program; Nuclear Theory Program; Nuclear Data Evaluation Program; and 88-Inch Cyclotron Operations

  13. A tool for Exploring Geophysical Data: The VGEE-IDV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, R. E.; Murray, D.

    2002-12-01

    heart of the VGEE is the visualization environment. The visualization environment is a customized version of the Integrated Data Viewer, or IDV, a platform-independent software package being developed by Unidata for display and analysis of geophysical data. In addition to the learner-centered functionality mentioned above, this environment allows the ability to locate and analyze remote data sets, including both archived and real-time data. As such, the tool represents a road toward creating a "data web" where educational users can browse and use data in a seamless way. While our discussion of the VGEE will highlight its use in specific curricula; we will point towards the development of the next generation data web in the Digital Library for Earth Science Education (DLESE). Our discussion will also summarize the data gathered while using the VGEE in an entry-level geoscience laboratory course.

  14. Physics division annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glover, J.

    2007-01-01

    the first time, a major milestone in an innovative search for the violation of time-reversal symmetry. New results from HERMES establish that strange quarks carry little of the spin of the proton and precise results have been obtained at JLAB on the changes in quark distributions in light nuclei. New theoretical results reveal that the nature of the surfaces of strange quark stars. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques have been extended to scattering problems and show great promise for the accurate calculation, from first principles, of important astrophysical reactions. Flame propagation in type 1A supernova has been simulated, a numerical process that requires considering length scales that vary by factors of eight to twelve orders of magnitude. Argonne continues to lead in the development and exploitation of the new technical concepts that will truly make an advanced exotic beam facility, in the words of NSAC, 'the world-leading facility for research in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics'. Our science and our technology continue to point the way to this major advance. It is a tremendously exciting time in science for these new capabilities hold the keys to unlocking important secrets of nature. The great progress that has been made in meeting the exciting intellectual challenges of modern nuclear physics reflects the talents and dedication of the Physics Division staff and the visitors, guests and students who bring so much to the research

  15. Physics division annual report 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2007-03-12

    isotopes were trapped in an atom trap for the first time, a major milestone in an innovative search for the violation of time-reversal symmetry. New results from HERMES establish that strange quarks carry little of the spin of the proton and precise results have been obtained at JLAB on the changes in quark distributions in light nuclei. New theoretical results reveal that the nature of the surfaces of strange quark stars. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques have been extended to scattering problems and show great promise for the accurate calculation, from first principles, of important astrophysical reactions. Flame propagation in type 1A supernova has been simulated, a numerical process that requires considering length scales that vary by factors of eight to twelve orders of magnitude. Argonne continues to lead in the development and exploitation of the new technical concepts that will truly make an advanced exotic beam facility, in the words of NSAC, 'the world-leading facility for research in nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics'. Our science and our technology continue to point the way to this major advance. It is a tremendously exciting time in science for these new capabilities hold the keys to unlocking important secrets of nature. The great progress that has been made in meeting the exciting intellectual challenges of modern nuclear physics reflects the talents and dedication of the Physics Division staff and the visitors, guests and students who bring so much to the research.

  16. Ceres' Geophysical Evolution Inferred from Dawn Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Rogez, Julie; Bowling, Timothy; Ermakov, Anton I.; Fu, Roger; Park, Ryan; Raymond, Carol; De Sanctis, Maria Cristina; Ammannito, Eleonora; Ruesch, Ottaviano; Prettyman, Thomas H.; Y McSween, Harry; Toplis, Michael J.; Russell, Christopher T.; Dawn Team

    2016-10-01

    If Ceres formed as an ice-rich body, as suggested by its low density and the detection of ammoniated phyllosilicates [1], then it should have differentiated an ice-dominated shell, analogous to large icy satellites [2]. Instead, Dawn observations revealed an enrichment of Ceres' shell in strong materials, either a rocky component and/or salts and gas hydrates [3, 4, 5, 6]. We have explored several scenarios for the emplacement of Ceres' surface. Endogenic processes cannot account for its overall homogeneity. Instead we suggest that Ceres differentiated an icy shell upon freezing of its early ocean that was removed as a consequence of frequent exposure by impacting after the dwarf planet migrated from a cold accretional environment to the warmer outer main belt (or when the solar nebula dissipated, if Ceres formed in situ). This scenario implies that Ceres' current surface represents the interface between the original ice shell and the top of the frozen ocean, a region that is extremely rich chemistry-wise, as illustrated by the mineralogical observations returned by Dawn [7]. Thermal modeling shows that the shell could remain warm over the long term and offer a setting for the generation of brines that may be responsible for the emplacement of Ahuna Mons [8] and Occator's bright spots [7] on an otherwise homogeneous surface [9]. An important implication is that Ceres' surface offers an analog for better understanding the deep interior and chemical evolution of large ice-rich bodies.References: [1] De Sanctis et al., Nature, 2015; [2] McCord and Sotin, Journal of Geophysical Research, 2005; [3] Park et al., Nature, 2016 (in press); [4] Hiesinger et al., Science (submitted); [5] Bland et al., Nature Geoscience, 2016 (in press); [6] Fu et al., AGU Fall Meeting, 2015 [7] De Sanctis et al., Nature, 2016 (in press); [8] Ruesch et al., Science, in revision; [9] Ammannito et al., Science, 2016 (accepted).Acknowledgements: Part of this work is being carried out at the Jet

  17. Geophysical Anomalies and Earthquake Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D. D.

    2008-12-01

    Finding anomalies is easy. Predicting earthquakes convincingly from such anomalies is far from easy. Why? Why have so many beautiful geophysical abnormalities not led to successful prediction strategies? What is earthquake prediction? By my definition it is convincing information that an earthquake of specified size is temporarily much more likely than usual in a specific region for a specified time interval. We know a lot about normal earthquake behavior, including locations where earthquake rates are higher than elsewhere, with estimable rates and size distributions. We know that earthquakes have power law size distributions over large areas, that they cluster in time and space, and that aftershocks follow with power-law dependence on time. These relationships justify prudent protective measures and scientific investigation. Earthquake prediction would justify exceptional temporary measures well beyond those normal prudent actions. Convincing earthquake prediction would result from methods that have demonstrated many successes with few false alarms. Predicting earthquakes convincingly is difficult for several profound reasons. First, earthquakes start in tiny volumes at inaccessible depth. The power law size dependence means that tiny unobservable ones are frequent almost everywhere and occasionally grow to larger size. Thus prediction of important earthquakes is not about nucleation, but about identifying the conditions for growth. Second, earthquakes are complex. They derive their energy from stress, which is perniciously hard to estimate or model because it is nearly singular at the margins of cracks and faults. Physical properties vary from place to place, so the preparatory processes certainly vary as well. Thus establishing the needed track record for validation is very difficult, especially for large events with immense interval times in any one location. Third, the anomalies are generally complex as well. Electromagnetic anomalies in particular require

  18. Results of the studies of radiation ecology and radiation biology at the Institute of Biology of Komi Science Centre, Ural Division of Russian Academy of Sciences. (On the 40th anniversary of the radiation ecology department)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taskaev, A.I.; Kudyasheva, A.G.; Popova, O.N.; Materij, L.D.; Shuktomova, I.I.; Frolova, N.P.; Kozubov, G.M.; Zajnullin, V.G.; Ermakova, O.V.; Rakin, A.O.; Bashlykova, L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Materials on the history of foundation of the radiation Ecology Department at the Institute of Biology of the Komi Science Centre of the Russian Academy of Sciences on the occasion of its 40-th anniversary are presented. The results of studies on radiation effects in low doses on the plant and animal populations as well as on radionuclide migration in natural biogeocenoses by increased radiation levels are analyzed. The performed complex studies were used as the basis for developing methodological approaches to the solution of a number of problems on the surface radioecology. Multiyear studies on the biogeocenoses of increased radioactivity of different origin made it possible to obtain multiple materials, indicating high diversity and specificity of reaction of living organisms in response to the background low level chronic irradiation. Attention was paid to studies on the Komi contamination by atmospheric radioactive fall-outs as well as to studies on the consequences of radioactive contamination of the Ukrainian Polesje due to the Chernobyl accident [ru

  19. Faculty receives Excellence in Geophysical Education Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, Sarah; Baldridge, W. Scott; Biehler, Shawn; Braile, Lawrence W.; Ferguson, John F.; Gilpin, Bernard E.; Jiracek, George R.

    “The second AGU Excellence in Geophysical Education Award was presented to the faculty of the Summer of Applied Geophysical Experience (SAGE): Scott Baldridge, Shawn Biehler, Larry Braile, John Ferguson, Bernard Gilpin, and George Jiracek. The persistence and commitment of this group has provided the geophysical community with a superb educational program for over 16 years, reaching nearly 400 students, including undergraduates, graduates, and professionals. The award was presented at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, which was held on December 8, 1998, in San Francisco, California.

  20. Physics Division annual report 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.

    2006-04-06

    This report highlights the research performed in 2004 in the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research, nuclear theory, medium energy nuclear research and accelerator research and development. The intellectual challenges of this research represent some of the most fundamental challenges in modern science, shaping our understanding of both tiny objects at the center of the atom and some of the largest structures in the universe. A great strength of these efforts is the critical interplay of theory and experiment. Notable results in research at ATLAS include a measurement of the charge radius of He-6 in an atom trap and its explanation in ab-initio calculations of nuclear structure. Precise mass measurements on critical waiting point nuclei in the rapid-proton-capture process set the time scale for this important path in nucleosynthesis. An abrupt fall-off was identified in the subbarrier fusion of several heavy-ion systems. ATLAS operated for 5559 hours of research in FY2004 while achieving 96% efficiency of beam delivery for experiments. In Medium Energy Physics, substantial progress was made on a long-term experiment to search for the violation of time-reversal invariance using trapped Ra atoms. New results from HERMES reveal the influence of quark angular momentum. Experiments at JLAB search for evidence of color transparency in rho-meson production and study the EMC effect in helium isotopes. New theoretical results include a Poincare covariant description of baryons as composites of confined quarks and non-point-like diquarks. Green's function Monte Carlo techniques give accurate descriptions of the excited states of light nuclei and these techniques been extended to scattering states for astrophysics studies. A theoretical description of the phenomena of proton radioactivity has been extended to triaxial nuclei. Argonne

  1. Aspects of Fair Division,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-01

    Kuhn, H. W. "On Games of Fair Division," in Essays in Mathematical Economics in honor of Oskar Morgenstern , Princeton University Press, 1967, [9] Neyman...valuation of the ith participant. If the game (N,v) is symmetric in the Von Nuemann- Morgenstern sense (14], Ch.X), it can be shown that D = = " = tn...Mathematicae, Vol. 16, 1930, pp. 140-150. [14] Von Neumann, J., and 0. Morgenstern , Theory of Games and Economic Behavior, Princeton University Press, Princeton, 1944.

  2. Living microorganisms change the information (Shannon) content of a geophysical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fiona H M; Maggi, Federico

    2017-06-12

    The detection of microbial colonization in geophysical systems is becoming of interest in various disciplines of Earth and planetary sciences, including microbial ecology, biogeochemistry, geomicrobiology, and astrobiology. Microorganisms are often observed to colonize mineral surfaces, modify the reactivity of minerals either through the attachment of their own biomass or the glueing of mineral particles with their mucilaginous metabolites, and alter both the physical and chemical components of a geophysical system. Here, we hypothesise that microorganisms engineer their habitat, causing a substantial change to the information content embedded in geophysical measures (e.g., particle size and space-filling capacity). After proving this hypothesis, we introduce and test a systematic method that exploits this change in information content to detect microbial colonization in geophysical systems. Effectiveness and robustness of this method are tested using a mineral sediment suspension as a model geophysical system; tests are carried out against 105 experiments conducted with different suspension types (i.e., pure mineral and microbially-colonized) subject to different abiotic conditions, including various nutrient and mineral concentrations, and different background entropy production rates. Results reveal that this method can systematically detect microbial colonization with less than 10% error in geophysical systems with low-entropy background production rate.

  3. Biennial report [for] 1978 and 1979, Electronics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Electronics Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, during the calendar years 1978-1979 are reported. The Division designed and fabricated electronic equipment and instruments for use in the fields of nuclear science, nuclear reactors, microcomputer hardware and software, health and safety, medicine, chemical analysis and industry. Many of these are described in brief mentioning their special features and in many cases block diagrams are given. (M.G.B.)

  4. Nuclear Power Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The 1981-85 research program planned by the Nuclear Power Division of EPRI places major emphasis on the assurance of safety and realiability of light water reactors (LWRs). Of high priority is a better knowledge of LWR-system behavior undeer abnormal conditions and the behavior of structural materials used for pressure vessels, piping, and large nuclear-plant components. Strong emphasis is also placed on achieving the most-effective performance and utilization of nuclear fuels and improving the corrosion resistance of pressurized-water-reactor steam generators. Efforts are underway to reduce radiation exposure and outage duration and to investigate the human factors involved in plant operation and maintenance. Substantial emphasis is placed on short-range goals designed to achieve useful results in the next two to seven years. The Division's mid- and long-range goal is to improve the use of fissionable and fertile materials and aid in the realization of other reactor systems. A series of general goals, categorized into three time frames and planned expenditures shows the trend of work to be undertaken. 53 figures

  5. Hydro geophysical Investigation for Groundwater Development at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    lateritic sand, shale/clay, weathered layer, fractured basement and fresh basement respectively. Geo-electric sounding ... numerical modeling solutions. The electrical geophysical survey method is the detection of the surface effects produced by the.

  6. Exploring the oceans- The geophysical way

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murthy, K.S.R.

    The evolution of the eastern continental margin of India (ECMI), the Bengal Fan and the Central Indian Basin (CIB) is a consequence of the breakup of India from the eastern Gondwanaland in Late Jurassic to Early Cretaceous. Recent marine geophysical...

  7. Geophysical field disturbances and quantum mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Geophysical phenomena considered here have no clear and consistent interpretation in the context of classical physics. We attempt to involve the recent achievements of quantum physics namely the quantum entanglement between elementary particles implicated in considered phenomena.

  8. COLLADA Computing for Geophysical Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The COLLADATM open industry XML standard for 3D Graphics Exchange is applied for representation, combination and analysis of geophysical information from disparate...

  9. Marine geophysical data management and presentation system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.

    The Geophysical Data Management and Presentation System (GPDMPS) constitutes an integral part of the large Geological Oceanographic Database (GODBASE) which is under development at the Indian National Oceanographic Data Centre (INODC...

  10. Tabletop Models for Electrical and Electromagnetic Geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Charles T.

    2002-01-01

    Details the use of tabletop models that demonstrate concepts in direct current electrical resistivity, self-potential, and electromagnetic geophysical models. Explains how data profiles of the models are obtained. (DDR)

  11. A geological and geophysical data collection system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sudhakar, T.; Afzulpurkar, S.

    A geological and geophysical data collection system using a Personal Computer is described below. The system stores data obtained from various survey systems typically installed in a charter vessel and can be used for similar applications on any...

  12. Applied Physics Division 1998 Progress Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchini, M.; Crescentini, L; Ghezzi, L.; Kent, C.; Bottomei, M.

    2001-01-01

    This report outlines the 1998 research activities carried out by the Applied Physics Division of the Innovation Department of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment). The fields addressed and discussed include: optical and electro-optical technologies (chaps. 1 and 2); accelerator technologies (chap. 3); diagnostic systems for science and engineering (chaps. 4 and 5); theory, modelling and computational methods (chaps. 6 and 7). The aim of the Applied Physics Division is to develop technologies and systems that can be directly applied by internal (ENEA) and external users in research (high-resolution spectroscopy, laser-generated soft-x-ray sources), production processes (laser material photoproduction, structural analysis), social, cultural and environmental sciences (laser remote sensing, modelling of ecosystems and population dynamics) and medicine (particle accelerator for radiotherapy). Most of the work in 1998 was performed by the division's laboratories at the Frascati, Casaccia and Bologna Research Centres of ENEA; some was done elsewhere in collaboration with other ENEA units, external laboratories and industries. A good share of the activities was carried out for international projects; in particular, the IV European Union Framework Program

  13. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1985 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) advanced batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (3) corrosion-protective coatings for high-strength steel; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methodologies for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) nuclear technology related to waste management, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and proof of breeding in a light water breeder reactor; and (7) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL

  14. Applied Physics Division 1998 Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecchini, M.; Crescentini, L; Ghezzi, L.; Kent, C.; Bottomei, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Frascati, RM (Italy). Applied physics Division

    1999-07-01

    This report outlines the 1998 research activities carried out by the Applied Physics Division of the Innovation Department of ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment). The fields addressed and discussed include: optical and electro-optical technologies (chaps. 1 and 2); accelerator technologies (chap. 3); diagnostic systems for science and engineering (chaps. 4 and 5); theory, modelling and computational methods (chaps. 6 and 7). The aim of the Applied Physics Division is to develop technologies and systems that can be directly applied by internal (ENEA) and external users in research (high-resolution spectroscopy, laser-generated soft-x-ray sources), production processes (laser material photoproduction, structural analysis), social, cultural and environmental sciences (laser remote sensing, modelling of ecosystems and population dynamics) and medicine (particle accelerator for radiotherapy). Most of the work in 1998 was performed by the division's laboratories at the Frascati, Casaccia and Bologna Research Centres of ENEA; some was done elsewhere in collaboration with other ENEA units, external laboratories and industries. A good share of the activities was carried out for international projects; in particular, the IV European Union Framework Program.

  15. The remote sensing needs of Arctic geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. J.

    1970-01-01

    The application of remote sensors for obtaining geophysical information of the Arctic regions is discussed. Two significant requirements are to acquire sequential, synoptic imagery of the Arctic Ocean during all weather and seasons and to measure the strains in the sea ice canopy and the heterogeneous character of the air and water stresses acting on the canopy. The acquisition of geophysical data by side looking radar and microwave sensors in military aircraft is described.

  16. New determination of period and quality factor of Chandler wobble, considering geophysical excitations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vondrák, Jan; Ron, Cyril; Chapanov, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 5 (2017), s. 1395-1407 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15943S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : polar motion * chandler wobble * geophysical excitations Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 1.401, year: 2016

  17. Geophysical studies over a segment of the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramana, M.V.; Ramprasad, T.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Desa, M.

    -28 21 Elsevier Science Publishers B.V., Amsterdam Letter Section Geophysical studies over a segment of the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean M.V. Ramana, T. Ramprasad, K.A. Kamesh Raju and Maria Desa National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa...

  18. Non-Seismic Geophysical Approaches to Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoversten, G.M.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2004-09-01

    This chapter considers the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration of CO2. The relative merits of the seismic, gravity, electromagnetic (EM) and streaming potential (SP) geophysical techniques as monitoring tools are examined. An example of tilt measurements illustrates another potential monitoring technique, although it has not been studied to the extent of other techniques in this chapter. This work does not represent an exhaustive study, but rather demonstrates the capabilities of a number of geophysical techniques on two synthetic modeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhance oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, the Schrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The second scenario is of a pilot DOE CO2 sequestration experiment scheduled for summer 2004 in the Frio Brine Formation in South Texas, USA. Numerical flow simulations of the CO2 injection process for each case were converted to geophysical models using petrophysical models developed from well log data. These coupled flow simulation geophysical models allow comparrison of the performance of monitoring techniques over time on realistic 3D models by generating simulated responses at different times during the CO2 injection process. These time-lapse measurements are used to produce time-lapse changes in geophysical measurements that can be related to the movement of CO2 within the injection interval.

  19. Bayesian Model Selection in Geophysics: The evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrugt, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Bayesian inference has found widespread application and use in science and engineering to reconcile Earth system models with data, including prediction in space (interpolation), prediction in time (forecasting), assimilation of observations and deterministic/stochastic model output, and inference of the model parameters. Per Bayes theorem, the posterior probability, , P(H|D), of a hypothesis, H, given the data D, is equivalent to the product of its prior probability, P(H), and likelihood, L(H|D), divided by a normalization constant, P(D). In geophysics, the hypothesis, H, often constitutes a description (parameterization) of the subsurface for some entity of interest (e.g. porosity, moisture content). The normalization constant, P(D), is not required for inference of the subsurface structure, yet of great value for model selection. Unfortunately, it is not particularly easy to estimate P(D) in practice. Here, I will introduce the various building blocks of a general purpose method which provides robust and unbiased estimates of the evidence, P(D). This method uses multi-dimensional numerical integration of the posterior (parameter) distribution. I will then illustrate this new estimator by application to three competing subsurface models (hypothesis) using GPR travel time data from the South Oyster Bacterial Transport Site, in Virginia, USA. The three subsurface models differ in their treatment of the porosity distribution and use (a) horizontal layering with fixed layer thicknesses, (b) vertical layering with fixed layer thicknesses and (c) a multi-Gaussian field. The results of the new estimator are compared against the brute force Monte Carlo method, and the Laplace-Metropolis method.

  20. Geophysics of Small Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, Erik I.

    1998-01-01

    As a SETI Institute PI from 1996-1998, Erik Asphaug studied impact and tidal physics and other geophysical processes associated with small (low-gravity) planetary bodies. This work included: a numerical impact simulation linking basaltic achondrite meteorites to asteroid 4 Vesta (Asphaug 1997), which laid the groundwork for an ongoing study of Martian meteorite ejection; cratering and catastrophic evolution of small bodies (with implications for their internal structure; Asphaug et al. 1996); genesis of grooved and degraded terrains in response to impact; maturation of regolith (Asphaug et al. 1997a); and the variation of crater outcome with impact angle, speed, and target structure. Research of impacts into porous, layered and prefractured targets (Asphaug et al. 1997b, 1998a) showed how shape, rheology and structure dramatically affects sizes and velocities of ejecta, and the survivability and impact-modification of comets and asteroids (Asphaug et al. 1998a). As an affiliate of the Galileo SSI Team, the PI studied problems related to cratering, tectonics, and regolith evolution, including an estimate of the impactor flux around Jupiter and the effect of impact on local and regional tectonics (Asphaug et al. 1998b). Other research included tidal breakup modeling (Asphaug and Benz 1996; Schenk et al. 1996), which is leading to a general understanding of the role of tides in planetesimal evolution. As a Guest Computational Investigator for NASA's BPCC/ESS supercomputer testbed, helped graft SPH3D onto an existing tree code tuned for the massively parallel Cray T3E (Olson and Asphaug, in preparation), obtaining a factor xIO00 speedup in code execution time (on 512 cpus). Runs which once took months are now completed in hours.

  1. Physics division annual report - October 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K. [ed.

    2000-10-16

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part, defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design.

  2. Physics division annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thayer, K., ed.; Physics

    2000-12-06

    This report summarizes the research performed in the past year in the Argonne Physics Division. The Division's programs include operation of ATLAS as a national heavy-ion user facility, nuclear structure and reaction research with beams of heavy ions, accelerator research and development especially in superconducting radio frequency technology, nuclear theory and medium energy nuclear physics. The Division took significant strides forward in its science and its initiatives for the future in the past year. Major progress was made in developing the concept and the technology for the future advanced facility of beams of short-lived nuclei, the Rare Isotope Accelerator. The scientific program capitalized on important instrumentation initiatives with key advances in nuclear science. In 1999, the nuclear science community adopted the Argonne concept for a multi-beam superconducting linear accelerator driver as the design of choice for the next major facility in the field a Rare Isotope Accelerator (WA) as recommended by the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee's 1996 Long Range Plan. Argonne has made significant R&D progress on almost all aspects of the design concept including the fast gas catcher (to allow fast fragmentation beams to be stopped and reaccelerated) that in large part defined the RIA concept the superconducting rf technology for the driver accelerator, the multiple-charge-state concept (to permit the facility to meet the design intensity goals with existing ion-source technology), and designs and tests of high-power target concepts to effectively deal with the full beam power of the driver linac. An NSAC subcommittee recommended the Argonne concept and set as tie design goal Uranium beams of 100-kwatt power at 400 MeV/u. Argonne demonstrated that this goal can be met with an innovative, but technically in-hand, design. The heavy-ion research program focused on GammaSphere, the premier facility for nuclear structure gamma-ray studies. One example

  3. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Theoretical Structural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 8. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Theoretical Structural Geology, Crystallography, Mineralogy, Thermodynamics, Experimental Petrology and Theoretical Geophysics. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 8 August 2017 ...

  4. Global Journal of Geological Sciences: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Global Journal of Geological Sciences is aimed at promoting research in all areas of geological Sciences including Petrology, Mineralogy, geophysics, hydrogeology, Engineering geology, Petroleum geology, Palaeontology, environmental geology, Economic geology, etc.

  5. Resonance – Journal of Science Education | News

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Science Academies' Refresher Course on Theoretical Structural Geology, Crystallography, Mineralogy, Thermodynamics, Experimental Petrology and Theoretical Geophysics · More Details Abstract Fulltext PDF. pp 816-816 Information and Announcements. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Foundations of ...

  6. Journal of Earth System Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. C Mondal1 S Adike2 V S Singh1 S Ahmed1 K V Jayakumar3. Earth Process Modeling Group, CSIR-National Geophysical Research Institute, Hyderabad 500 007, India. Rural Water Supply & Sanitation, Mahaboobnagar, Telangana, India. Water & Environmental Division, Department of Civil Engineering, ...

  7. Bulletin of Materials Science | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Verma1 P Ravindran2 R S Rao1 B K Godwal1 R Jeanloz3. High Pressure Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India; Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, Blindern N-0315, Oslo, Norway; Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, ...

  8. Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Infrastructure Engineering and Deployment Division advances transportation innovation by being leaders in infrastructure technology, including vehicles and...

  9. Situational Awareness and Logistics Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Situational Awareness and Logistics Division researches, develops, implements, and analyzes advanced systems to protect, enhance, and ensure resilienceof the...

  10. Security and Emergency Management Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Security and Emergency Management Division identifies vulnerabilities, risks, and opportunities to improve the security of transportation systems, critical...

  11. Systems Safety and Engineering Division

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Volpe's Systems Safety and Engineering Division conducts engineering, research, and analysis to improve transportation safety, capacity, and resiliency. We provide...

  12. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-21

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water

  13. Energy Technology Division research summary 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The Energy Technology Division provides materials and engineering technology support to a wide range of programs important to the US Department of Energy. As shown on the preceding page, the Division is organized into ten sections, five with concentrations in the materials area and five in engineering technology. Materials expertise includes fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, friction and lubrication, and irradiation effects. Our major engineering strengths are in heat and mass flow, sensors and instrumentation, nondestructive testing, transportation, and electromechanics and superconductivity applications. The Division Safety Coordinator, Environmental Compliance Officers, Quality Assurance Representative, Financial Administrator, and Communication Coordinator report directly to the Division Director. The Division Director is personally responsible for cultural diversity and is a member of the Laboratory-wide Cultural Diversity Advisory Committee. The Division's capabilities are generally applied to issues associated with energy production, transportation, utilization or conservation, or with environmental issues linked to energy. As shown in the organization chart on the next page, the Division reports administratively to the Associate Laboratory Director (ALD) for Energy and Environmental Science and Technology (EEST) through the General Manager for Environmental and Industrial Technologies. While most of our programs are under the purview of the EEST ALD, we also have had programs funded under every one of the ALDs. Some of our research in superconductivity is funded through the Physical Research Program ALD. We also continue to work on a number of nuclear-energy-related programs under the ALD for Engineering Research. Detailed descriptions of our programs on a section-by-section basis are provided in the remainder of this book. This Overview highlights some major trends. Research related to the operational safety of commercial light water nuclear

  14. Ore and rock mass characterization using borehole geophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Wänstedt, Stefan

    1997-01-01

    A geophysical log represents the measurement of a geophysical parameter along a borehole, plotted against time or depth. A variety of geophysical logging tools exist that measure different geophysical parameters. Some geophysical instruments react to the lithological changes along the borehole, others to the fluid within or around the borehole, but very few react solely to a single feature. In every case the user must determine what effect the borehole and its surroundings have on the measure...

  15. science

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    David Spurgeon

    green revolution". — seemed to confirm the value of science and technology to international development. Yet studies showed that, at that time, only about two percent of ... gap in science and technology between the Third World and the industrial- ..... Finance; Treasury Board; Industry, Trade and Commerce; Agriculture;.

  16. Generalized rheology and geophysical consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Michele

    1985-06-01

    In some portions of the Earthś crust one finds stresses and creeps which are incompatible with the local geologic history and/or the generally accepted rheological models of Voigt, or Maxwell or Standard linear solid. Also there is no reason to accept that the rheology of the Earth is represented by mathematical formulae modeling combinations of simplicistic springs and dash pots which lead to represent the phenomenon by means of first order time derivatives of stress and/or strains. We describe here an attempt to obtain a rheological model for the lithosphere which is more realistic and flexible than the Voigt, the Maxwell and the Standard linear solid models which are generally used in geophysics and geology. In this model the first-order derivatives of Maxwell stress-strain relations are replaced by z-order derivatives; the resulting creep rates are variable functions of time as indicated by laboratory observations. In the one-dimensional case as well as in the case of the sphere the relaxation rate after a given time is a decreasing function of time. A small value of z could explain the residual deviatoric stress present in the Fennoscandia and Canadian Shields (Herget, 1980; Leijon et al., 1981) and the deviatoric stress present in the Rocky Mountains and in the Appalachian Range (Caputo et al., 1985) which seem stable and were formed many tens of millions of years ago. A small value of z would also explain why the seismicity is decreasing with lithospheric age (Stein, 1979; Bergman and Solomon, 1980) but is still present 100 millions of years after the origin of the lithosphere which implies a relevant residual shear stress after long time. If one wants to take into account the effect of temperature then one should consider that there is evidence that in some materials the creep rate is linearly increasing with temperature in the range between 100°C to 400°C (Caputo, 1983) and that it is independent of the confining pressure; then one would infer that the

  17. The Environmental Geophysics Web Site and Geophysical Decision Support System (GDSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This product provides assistance to project managers, remedial project managers, stakeholders, and anyone interested in on-site investigations or environmental geophysics. The APM is the beta version of the new U.S. EPA Environmental Geophysics Web Site which includes the Geophys...

  18. Geophysical System Verification (GSV): A Physics-Based Alternative to Geophysical Prove-Outs for Munitions Response. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-24

    FINAL REPORT Geophysical System Verification (GSV): A Physics-Based Alternative to Geophysical Prove-Outs for Munitions Response July 2009...NUMBER (Include area code) 15-07-2009 Final Report July 2009 GEOPHYSICAL SYSTEM VERIFICATION (GSV): A PHYSICS-BASED ALTERNATIVE TO GEOPHYSICAL PROVE-OUTS...Arlington, Virginia 22203 SERDP/ESTCP N/A Unlimited distribution This document highlights a more rigorous physics-based alternative to geophysical

  19. Geophysical System Verification (GSV): A Physics-Based Alternative to Geophysical Prove-Outs for Munitions Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-24

    FINAL REPORT Geophysical System Verification (GSV): A Physics-Based Alternative to Geophysical Prove-Outs for Munitions Response July 2009...NUMBER (Include area code) 15-07-2009 Final Report July 2009 GEOPHYSICAL SYSTEM VERIFICATION (GSV): A PHYSICS-BASED ALTERNATIVE TO GEOPHYSICAL PROVE-OUTS...Arlington, Virginia 22203 SERDP/ESTCP N/A Unlimited distribution This document highlights a more rigorous physics-based alternative to geophysical

  20. Phillips Laboratory Geophysics Scholar Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-30

    on Marine Science in the Western Pacific, December, 1986. McCaffiry, R., The Fault Plane Solutions of Earquakes in Indonesia and New Guinea, Lamont...chemiluminescent NO (RAW89]. 21 Results: The field observations from the CIRRIS IA mission produced a large database of infrared spectra. Inside this database ... database commenced to obtain tangent height dependencies of the vibrational column densities. As described in the fitting techniques section, the analysis

  1. E-Division activities report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barschall, H.H.

    1979-07-01

    This report describes some of the activities in E (Experimental Physics) Division during the past year. E-Division carries out research and development in areas related to the missions of the Laboratory. Many of the activities are in pure and applied atomic and nuclear physics. In addition, this report describes work on accelerators, radiation damage, microwaves, and plasma diagnostics

  2. Developmental control of cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxem, M. (Mike)

    2002-01-01

    During development of multicellular organisms, cell divisions need to be coordinated with the developmental program of the entire organism. Although the mechanisms that drive cells through the division cycle are well understood, very little is known about the pathways that link extracellular signals

  3. Division of Analytical Chemistry, 1998

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Elo Harald

    1999-01-01

    The article recounts the 1998 activities of the Division of Analytical Chemistry (DAC- formerly the Working Party on Analytical Chemistry, WPAC), which body is a division of the Federation of European Chemical Societies (FECS). Elo Harald Hansen is the Danish delegate, representing The Danish...... Chemical Society/The Society for Analytical Chemistry....

  4. Important projects of the Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter important projects of the Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management of the VUJE, a. s. are presented. Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management has successfully carried out variety of significant projects. The most significant projects that were realised, are implemented and possible future projects are introduced in the following part of presentation.

  5. Lightning Talks 2015: Theoretical Division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, Jack S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    This document is a compilation of slides from a number of student presentations given to LANL Theoretical Division members. The subjects cover the range of activities of the Division, including plasma physics, environmental issues, materials research, bacterial resistance to antibiotics, and computational methods.

  6. Geophysical images of basement rocks. Geophysical images in the Guianese basement. Airborne geophysical campaign in French Guiana - 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delor, C.; Perrin, J.; Truffert, C.; Asfirane, F.; Rossi, Ph.; Bonjoly, D.; Dubreuihl, J.; Chardon, D.

    1998-01-01

    The French Office for Geological and Mining Research (BRGM) has carried out a high sensitivity airborne geophysical survey of northern French Guiana during the second half of 1996. The aim was to realize a high resolution magnetic and gamma spectrometric mapping for future prospecting, land use and environment management. This paper describes in details the geophysical campaign, the material used, the navigation techniques, the processing of magnetic data, the gamma radiation sources used, the spectrometric calibrations and the geologic interpretation of the results. (J.S.)

  7. Deep Interior: The first comprehensive geophysical investigation of an asteroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asphaug, E.; Belton, M.; Klaasen, K.; McFadden, L.; Ostro, S.; Safaeinili, A.; Scheeres, D.; Sunshine, J.; Yeomans, D.

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) come closer to Earth than any other celestial body, and their compositions are represented on Earth by thousands of well-studied meteorites. Yet we understand neither their origin, evolution, nor their geophysical behavior. These secrets are locked up in their unexplored interiors. Goal 1 of the NASA Strategic Plan emphasizes the requirement to catalogue and understand NEOs down to 1 km diameter. Goal 4 urges us to understand natural processes at work in the low gravity environment. Goal 5 expresses the need to explore the solar system and to learn how planets originated and evolved. In response to the NASA Strategic Plan we are proposing a NASA Discovery mission whose primary science objective is to greatly advance the realization of these Goals by conducting the first investigation of the global geophysics of an asteroid. Radio reflection data from 5 km orbit about a 1 km NEO will provide a tomographic 3D image of electromagnetic properties. Mechanical properties will be examined in the simplest possible way, using explosions to initiate seismic cratering events and to expose diverse interior units for spectroscopic analysis. Deep Interior is the lowest-risk, lowest cost path towards attaining the required characterization of NEOs. It breaks new ground for future missions to asteroids and comets and facilitates the design of reliable NEO technologies. Our science goals are as follows, and the techniques (radio science, imaging, IR spectroscopy, active surface science) will be described at this meeting: Asteroid Interiors. Radio, gravity, and seismology experiments give a complete first picture of an asteroid's deep interior, resolving inclusions, voids and unit boundaries at ˜ 30 m scales, and determining global and regional mechanical properties. Surface Geophysics. Blast experiments explore the structure and mechanics of the upper meters, demonstrate microgravity cratering, trigger natural geomorphic events, and expose subsurface

  8. Moving Beyond IGY: An Electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Barton, C. E.; Rodger, A. S.; Thompson, B. J.; Fraser, B.; Papitashvili, V.

    2003-12-01

    During the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958), member countries established many new geophysical observatories pursuing the major IGY objectives - to collect geophysical data as widely as possible and to provide free access to these data for all scientists around the globe. Today, geophysics has attained a rather good understanding within traditional regions, i.e., the atmosphere, ionosphere, magnetosphere, and other such geospheres. At the same time, it has become clear that much of the new and important science is coming from the studies of interfaces and coupling between geospheres. Thus, if geophysical data are made `'transparently'' available to a much wider range of scientists and students than to those who do the observations, then new and exciting discoveries can be expected. An International Association of Geomagnetic and Aeronomy (IAGA) task force, recognizing that a key achievement of the IGY was the establishment of a worldwide system of data centers and physical observatories, proposes that for the 50th anniversary of IGY, the worldwide scientific community should endorse and promote an electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) initiative. The proposed eGY concept would both commemorate the IGY in 2007-2008 and provide a forward impetus to geophysics in 21st century, similar to that provided by the IGY fifty years ago. The IAGA task force strongly advocates: (1) Securing permission and release of existing data; (2) Creating access to information; and (3) Conversion of relevant analog data to digital form. The eGY concept embraces all available and upcoming geophysical data (e.g., atmospheric, ionospheric, geomagnetic, gravity, etc.) through the establishment of a series of virtual geophysical observatories now being `'deployed'' in cyberspace. The eGY concept is modern, global, and timely; it is attractive, pragmatic, and affordable. The eGY is based on the existing and continually developing computing/networking technologies (e.g., XML, Semantic Web

  9. Environmental Chemistry Division annual report, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, L.

    1990-01-01

    The research activities making up the programs in the Environmental Chemistry Division of the Department of Applied Science are presented. Some of the more significant accomplishments during 1989 are described and plans for 1990 are discussed briefly. Publications for the period are listed and abstracts are provided. Research objectives and principal investigators are given for each of the active programs. A list of personnel and collaborators during the past year is presented. The support distribution of FY 1989 is approximately 85% from the Department of Energy (65% Office of Health and Environmental Research), and 15% other agencies (principally from the Electric Power Research Institute).

  10. Environmental Chemistry Division annual report, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newman, L.

    1990-01-01

    The research activities making up the programs in the Environmental Chemistry Division of the Department of Applied Science are presented. Some of the more significant accomplishments during 1989 are described and plans for 1990 are discussed briefly. Publications for the period are listed and abstracts are provided. Research objectives and principal investigators are given for each of the active programs. A list of personnel and collaborators during the past year is presented. The support distribution of FY 1989 is approximately 85% from the Department of Energy (65% Office of Health and Environmental Research), and 15% other agencies (principally from the Electric Power Research Institute)

  11. Chemistry Division : Annual progress report of 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    Research and development activities (during 1974) of the Chemistry Division of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, are described. Some of the activities of particular interest to nuclear science and technology are: (1) chemistry-based problems of the operating power reactors such as development of a decontaminating solution for power reactors, correlation of iodine-131 levels in the primary heat transport system of a reactor with its operation (2) release of fission gases like xenon from ceramic fuels and (3) radiation chemistry of nitrate solutions (M.G.B.)

  12. Preface: Current perspectives in modelling, monitoring, and predicting geophysical fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancho, Ana M.; Hernández-García, Emilio; López, Cristóbal; Turiel, Antonio; Wiggins, Stephen; Pérez-Muñuzuri, Vicente

    2018-02-01

    The third edition of the international workshop Nonlinear Processes in Oceanic and Atmospheric Flows was held at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences (ICMAT) in Madrid from 6 to 8 July 2016. The event gathered oceanographers, atmospheric scientists, physicists, and applied mathematicians sharing a common interest in the nonlinear dynamics of geophysical fluid flows. The philosophy of this meeting was to bring together researchers from a variety of backgrounds into an environment that favoured a vigorous discussion of concepts across different disciplines. The present Special Issue on Current perspectives in modelling, monitoring, and predicting geophysical fluid dynamics contains selected contributions, mainly from attendants of the workshop, providing an updated perspective on modelling aspects of geophysical flows as well as issues on prediction and assimilation of observational data and novel tools for describing transport and mixing processes in these contexts. More details on these aspects are discussed in this preface.

  13. Divisions-ST Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Henny, L

    2001-01-01

    Au CERN la formation est une partie intégrante des activités de l'Organisation. Mentionnée dans le Statut du Personnel depuis l'origine, elle figure au Règlement depuis 1981 et est largement explicitée dans la Circulaire Administrative N° 16. L'organe réglementaire est constitué par la Commission Paritaire de Formation (Joint Training Board dont le sigle est JTB) qui a pour but de conseiller le Directeur Général en matière de formation, de définir la politique de formation et d'en faire l'évaluation. Des organes spécifiques ont été mis en place pour organiser les différents programmes : le Groupe Formation et Développement, le Comité exécutif de formation (sigle TEC), le Comité d'enseignement académique. Des délégués divisionnaires à la formation (sigle DTO) servent de courroie de transmission entre ces organes, le personnel et le Service de l'Enseignement (Div. HR). La Division ST dont les activités présentent une grande variété se doit de poursuivre une politique de formation s...

  14. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1990--December 31, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shera, E.B.; Hollen, G.Y.

    1991-07-01

    This report provides selected accounts of significant progress in research and development achieved by Physics Division personnel during the period January 1, 1990, through December 31, 1990. It also provides a general description of the goals and interests of the Division, very brief descriptions of projects in the Division, and a list of publications produced during this period. The report represents the three main areas of experimental research and development in which the Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in defense and basic sciences: (1) fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics, condensed-matter physics, and biophysics; (2) laser physics and applications, especially to high-density plasmas; and (3) defense physics, including the development of diagnostic methods for weapons tests, weapons-related high energy-density physics, and programs supporting the Strategic Defense Initiative

  15. Physics Division progress report, January 1, 1991--December 31, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shera, E.B.; Hollen, G.Y.

    1992-06-01

    This report provides selected accounts of significant progress in research and development achieved by Physics Division personnel during the period January 1, 1991, through December 31, 1991. It also provides a general description of the goals and interests of the Division, very brief descriptions of projects in the Division, and a list of publications produced during this period. The report represents the three main areas of experimental research and development in which the Physics Division serves the needs of Los Alamos National Laboratory and the nation in defense and basic sciences: (1) fundamental research in nuclear and particle physics, condensed-matter physics, and biophysics; (2) laser physics and applications, especially to high-density plasmas; (3) defense physics, including the development of diagnostic methods for weapons tests, weapons-related high energy-density physics, and other programs

  16. Geophysical Measurements at Merseburg Cathedral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Thomas; Erkul, Ercan; Schulte-Kortnack, Detlef; Sobott, Robert; Hilbert, Helene; Esel, Yunus; Tesch, Marcel; Wiemann, Timo

    2017-04-01

    Merseburg Cathedral has been founded in 1015 by Bishop Thietmar von Merseburg and has been converted into a gothic cathedral from 1510 to 1517 by Bishop Thilo von Trotha. The cathedral together with the cloister, the castle and several appurtenant buildings are well preserved. The entire complex represents one of the most complete examples of medieval royal palaces and bishop's sees in Germany northeast of the Roman Limes. Here we present examples of geophysical measurements at the cathedral namely ultrasonic surface measurements, ground penetrating radar (GPR) as well as thermographic measurements. Ultrasonic surface measurements have been carried out at epitaphs made of sandstone to quantify changes in stone properties due to weathering. The 95 measurements reveal a strong variability in Rayleigh wave velocities ranging from about 800 m/s to 2000 m/s. Unweathered parts of the sandstone epitaphs show Rayleigh wave velocities of about 1500 m/s. A reduction in Rayleigh wave velocities hints at loosening of the rock surface whereas an increase is due to surficial black crusts with pores filled mainly by gypsum. Waveform inversion of the dispersed Rayleigh waveform yields depth profiles of the shear-wave velocity indicating the thickness of altered surficial layers. Also a loosening below the black crust may be detected non-destructively. A number of measurements have been repeated after one year and after a rainy day. Statistical analysis shows that random errors in Rayleigh wave velocities are less than about 3 %. Increase of moisture in porous sandstones leads to stronger damping of the Rayleigh wave and consequently to a reduction in Rayleigh wave velocities by up to about 10 %. At strongly altered epitaphs a reduction in Rayleigh wave velocity by up to 20 % has been observed within one year. Within one day an increase of up to about 7 % may indicate stiffening of black crusts due to moisture absorption. GPR measurements have been performed at several locations

  17. Geophysics: creativity and the archaeological imagination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Ferraby

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper article explores archaeology as a creative practice by engaging specifically with the processes and visuals of geophysics. An area of archaeology considered highly scientific, a different way of looking reveals geophysics to be a poetic form of landscape study. The processes used to collect, alter, interpret and visualize visualise the data are creative acts that have parallels with more easily recognizable recognisable arts practices such as painting, drawing or photography. The paper article explores the ideas behind ways of seeing, the archaeological imagination, technologies and process. The section that follows explores the different elements of work and the ways of seeing and thinking they inspire. The paper article ends by showcasing how other arts practices can give alternative perspectives on geophysics and how these can in turn influence fine art.

  18. Chemical Engineering Division annual technical report, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burris, L.; Webster, D.S.; Barney, D.L.; Cafasso, F.A.; Steindler, M.J.

    1981-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Engineering (CEN) Division's activities during 1980 are presented. In this period, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) rechargeable lithium-aluminum/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and other applications; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) energy-efficient industrial electrochemical processes; (4) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (5) coal technology, mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO 2 sorbent of limestone; (6) heat- and seed-recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (7) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (8) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (9) fuel cycle technology - management of nuclear wastes, reprocessing of nuclear fuels, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; and (10) magnetic fusion research - systems analysis and engineering experimentation, materials research, and neutron dosimetry and damage analysis. The CEN Division also has a basic energy sciences program, which includes experimental and theoretical research on (1) the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide and methanol homologation, (2) the thermodynamic properties of a wide variety of inorganic and organic materials, (3) significant mechanisms for the formation of atmospheric sulfate and nitrogen-bearing aerosols, (4) processes occurring at electrodes and in electrolytes, and (5) the physical properties of salt vapors. In addition, the Division operated the Central Analytical Chemistry Laboratory

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing 99 Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  20. Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  1. Archaeological Geophysics in Israel: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppelbaum, L. V.

    2009-04-01

    et al., 1999; Reeder et al., 2004; Reinhardt et al., 2006; Reich et al., 2003; Ron et al., 2003; Segal et al., 2003; Sternberg and Lass, 2007; Sternberg et al., 1999; Verri et al., 2004; Weiner et al., 1993; Weinstein-Evron et al., 1991, 2003; Weiss et al., 2007; Witten et al., 1994), and (3) future [2010 -]. The past stage with several archaeoseismic reviews and very limited application of geophysical methods was replaced by the present stage with the violent employment of numerous geophysical techniques (first of all, high-precise magnetic survey and GPR). It is supposed that the future stage will be characterized by extensive development of multidiscipline physical-archaeological databases (Eppelbaum et al., 2009b), utilization of supercomputers for 4D monitoring and ancient sites reconstruction (Foster et al., 2001; Pelfer et al., 2004) as well as wide application of geophysical surveys using remote operated vehicles at low altitudes (Eppelbaum, 2008a). REFERENCES Batey, R.A., 1987. Subsurface Interface Radar at Sepphoris, Israel 1985. Journal of Field Archaeology, 14 (1), 1-8. Bauman, P., Parker, D., Coren, A., Freund, R., and Reeder, P., 2005. Archaeological Reconnaissance at Tel Yavne, Israel: 2-D Electrical Imaging and Low Altitude Aerial Photography. CSEG Recorder, No. 6, 28-33. Ben-Dor, E., Portugali, J., Kochavi, M., Shimoni, M., and Vinitzky, L., 1999. Airborne thermal video radiometry and excavation planning at Tel Leviah, Golan Heights, Israel. Journal of Field Archaeology, 26 (2), 117-127. Ben-Menahem, A., 1979. Earthquake catalogue for the Middle East (92 B.C. - 1980 A.D.). Bollettino di Geofisica Teorica ed Applicata, 21 (84), 245-310. Ben-Yosef, E., Tauxe, L., Ronb, H., Agnon, A., Avner, U., Najjar, M., and Levy, T.E., 2008. A new approach for geomagnetic archaeointensity research: insights on ancient metallurgy in the Southern Levant. Journal of Archaeological Science, 25, 2863-2879. Berkovitch, A.L., Eppelbaum, L.V., and Basson, U., 2000

  2. Applied geophysics for civil engineering and mining engineering. 2. rev. and enlarged ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Militzer, H.; Schoen, J.; Stoetzner, U.

    1986-01-01

    In the process of geological and geotechnical prospecting for the exploration and exploitation of deposits, as well as for engineering structures, the knowledge contributed by geophysics is of significance in order to ensure an objective assessment of geological and geotechnical conditions of a given site, and to promote economic efficiency in the field of civil engineering and mining. For this reason, engineering and mining geophysics has become an important special subject field. The present second edition of the textbook offers enhanced information about practical applications of available methods and measuring techniques, and about the information to be obtained by civil and mining engineers from the geophysical science. The material has been arranged with a view to practice, facilitating an overview over potential applications and efficiencies as well as limits of geophysical methods. The methods are also explained in terms of suitability for the various steps of civil engineering or mining geological activities and studies. A major extension of the first edition's material consists of the chapter on basic principles and aspects of well geophysics for shallow well drilling. (orig./HP) [de

  3. Rapid estimation of aquifer salinity structure from oil and gas geophysical logs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimabukuro, D.; Stephens, M.; Ducart, A.; Skinner, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    We describe a workflow for creating aquifer salinity maps using Archie's equation for areas that have geophysical data from oil and gas wells. We apply this method in California, where geophysical logs are available in raster format from the Division of Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Resource (DOGGR) online archive. This method should be applicable to any region where geophysical logs are readily available. Much of the work is controlled by computer code, allowing salinity estimates for new areas to be rapidly generated. For a region of interest, the DOGGR online database is scraped for wells that were logged with multi-tool suites, such as the Platform Express or Triple Combination Logging Tools. Then, well construction metadata, such as measured depth, spud date, and well orientation, is attached. The resultant local database allows a weighted criteria selection of wells that are most likely to have the shallow resistivity, deep resistivity, and density porosity measurements necessary to calculate salinity over the longest depth interval. The algorithm can be adjusted for geophysical log availability for older well fields and density of sampling. Once priority wells are identified, a student researcher team uses Neuralog software to digitize the raster geophysical logs. Total dissolved solid (TDS) concentration is then calculated in clean, wet sand intervals using the resistivity-porosity method, a modified form of Archie's equation. These sand intervals are automatically selected using a combination of spontaneous potential and the difference in shallow resistivity and deep resistivity measurements. Gamma ray logs are not used because arkosic sands common in California make it difficult to distinguish sand and shale. Computer calculation allows easy adjustment of Archie's parameters. The result is a semi-continuous TDS profile for the wells of interest. These profiles are combined and contoured using standard 3-d visualization software to yield preliminary salinity

  4. Geophysical methods for evaluation of plutonic rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibb, R.A.; Scott, J.S.

    1986-04-01

    Geophysical methods are systematically described according to the physical principle and operational mode of each method, the type of information produced, limitations of a technical and/or economic nature, and the applicability of the method to rock-mass evaluation at Research Areas of the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The geophysical methods fall into three categories: (1) airborne and other reconnaissance surveys, (2) detailed or surface (ground) surveys, and (3) borehole or subsurface surveys. The possible roles of each method in the site-screening and site-evaluation processes of disposal vault site selection are summarized

  5. Geophysical characterization from Itu intrusive suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascholati, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    The integrated use of geophysical, geological, geochemical, petrographical and remote sensing data resulted in a substantial increase in the knowledge of the Itu Intrusive Suite. The main geophysical method was gamma-ray spectrometry together with fluorimetry and autoradiography. Three methods were used for calculation of laboratory gamma-ray spectrometry data. For U, the regression method was the best one. For K and Th, equations system and absolute calibration presented the best results. Surface gamma-ray spectrometry allowed comparison with laboratory data and permitted important contribution to the study of environmental radiation. (author)

  6. Nonlinear regularization with applications in geophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, Eva Ann-Charlotte

    2002-01-01

    geophysical inverse problems: a seismic tomography problem, and a geoelectrical sounding problem. We found that all four methods gave reasonable solutions for the two geophysical problem. However, the inexact Gauss-Newton method converged faster than the others for the seismic tomography problem......, and the inexact Gauss-Newton method and the IRGN method work better than the other two for the geoelectrical sounding problem. However, for the nonlinear Hammerstein integral equation the inexact Gauss-Newton method diverges, and the IRGN method converges fastest. The work presented here also considers linear ill...

  7. Computers and geophysics: Requirements outlined

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of computers to process enormous volumes of data is likely to improve our abilities to predict earthquakes and issue tsunami warnings, geophysicist J. Freeman Gilbert recently told a House of Representatives task force on science policy. Gilbert, of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, testified before the task force on September 11, in one of a series of hearings intended to explore the “impact of the information age on science.” Scientists and administrators from universities and private industry served as witnesses during the 3 days of hearings.Rep. George E. Brown, J r . , (D-Calif.) asked Gilbert to compare the amount of damage done by tsunamis in the United States to the cost of improved detection and warning systems. “I think it's worth the effort,” Gilbert responded, adding that as in the case of hurricane warnings, tsunami warnings would affect only a small proportion of the nation's population but could be crucial to protect their lives and property. Such a system, Gilbert said, “represents technology that is easy to implement.”

  8. 78 FR 32672 - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-31

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS... that the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Division of Extramural Research... Division. Organizing Institute: National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. Dates and Times: June...

  9. Physics division annual report 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, J.; Physics

    2008-02-28

    This report highlights the activities of the Physics Division of Argonne National Laboratory in 2006. The Division's programs include the operation as a national user facility of ATLAS, the Argonne Tandem Linear Accelerator System, research in nuclear structure and reactions, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear theory, investigations in medium-energy nuclear physics as well as research and development in accelerator technology. The mission of nuclear physics is to understand the origin, evolution and structure of baryonic matter in the universe--the core of matter, the fuel of stars, and the basic constituent of life itself. The Division's research focuses on innovative new ways to address this mission.

  10. Progress report, Physics and Health Sciences: Health Sciences Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report reviews the activities of the Dosimetric Research, Environmental Research, and Radiation Biology Branches of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. The Reactor Stack Effluent Monitor, which is designed to cover the full range of releases for the main reactor stack at Chalk River, is the subject of a topical review. The GENMOD software has been improved to include a better method of calculating the distribution of particulates in respiratory organs. Development continues on methods of monitoring 147 Pm in urine. Attempts are being made to determine whether the saline waters discharging at 'moose licks' in the Nipigon region come from deep brines characteristic of the Precambrian shield. Trace metals and 90 Sr are being measured in mussel shells to determine whether the shells are suitable recorders of environmental changes. Work continues on the grow-back assay of lymphoblastoid cells to screen for inherited variations in response to genotoxic agents

  11. Annals of the International Geophysical Year solar radio emission during the International Geophysical Year

    CERN Document Server

    Smerd, S F

    1969-01-01

    Annals of the International Geophysical Year, Volume 34: Solar Radio Emission During the International Geophysical Year covers the significant solar radio emission events observed during the International Geophysical Year (IGY). This book is composed of six chapters, and begins with a summary of tabulated quantities describing solar radio emission during the IGY. The tabulated figures illustrate the method of recording the position of radio sources on the sun, the use of symbols in describing the structure of bursts observed at single frequencies, and the different types used in a spectral

  12. Palaeomagnetism principles and applications in geology, geophysics and archaeology

    CERN Document Server

    Tarling, D H

    1983-01-01

    Palaeomagnetism and archaeomagnetism are fascinating specialized studies because they are applicable to such a wide range of problems in geology, archaeology and geophysics. They can also be undertaken cheaply, when compared with most other geophysical techniques, and, at first sight, simply. In fact, real comprehension of the magnetic processes that have occurred in rocks and other types of material over several thousands or many millions of years is still extremely difficult to assess and measure. On this basis, this book cannot explain all such features, nor can it attempt to cover all the actual and potential applications of the method. All that can be attempted is to give an impression of the ways in which such techniques can be used in a wide variety of fields, and how these techniques are usually applied. The magnetization of rocks is, in fact, one of the earliest of the true sciences, but we are still not in a position to answer many of the problems posed. Consequently some of the examples given of ap...

  13. Geophysics and the search of freshwater bodies: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Rachael; Ruffell, Alastair; Hughes, David; Pringle, Jamie

    2010-09-01

    Geophysics may assist scent dogs and divers in the search of water bodies for human and animal remains, contraband, weapons and explosives by surveying large areas rapidly and identifying targets or environmental hazards. The most commonly applied methods are described and evaluated for forensic searches. Seismic reflection or refraction and CHIRPS are useful for deep, open water bodies and identifying large targets, yet limited in streams and ponds. The use of ground penetrating radar (GPR) on water (WPR) is of limited use in deep waters (over 20 m) but is advantageous in the search for non-metallic targets in small ditches and ponds. Large metal or metal-bearing targets can be successfully imaged in deep waters by using towfish magnetometers: in shallow waters such a towfish cannot be used, so a non-metalliferous boat can carry a terrestrial magnetometer. Each device has its uses, depending on the target and location: unknown target make-up (e.g. a homicide victim with or without a metal object) may be best located using a range of methods (the multi-proxy approach), depending on water depth. Geophysics may not definitively find the target, but can provide areas for elimination and detailed search by dogs and divers, saving time and effort. Copyright © 2009 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Solid State Division progress report for period ending March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, P.H.; Hinton, L.W. [eds.

    1997-12-01

    This report covers research progress in the Solid State Division from April 1, 1995, through March 31, 1997. During this period, the division conducted a broad, interdisciplinary materials research program in support of Department of Energy science and technology missions. The report includes brief summaries of research activities in condensed matter theory, neutron scattering, synthesis and characterization of materials, ion beam and laser processing, and the structure of solids and surfaces. An addendum includes listings of division publications and professional activities.

  15. Marine mammal observations conducted during US National Science Foundation geophysical research cruises in the global oceans from the platforms Maurice Ewing, Marcus G. Langseth, Thomas G. Thompson, and the R/V Knorr from 28 May 2003 to 25 August 2009 (NODC Accession 0083783)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — All marine mammals and sea turtles that were visually observed during a marine geophysical survey were recorded to: 1) determine whether a mitigation measure needed...

  16. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of the AAS (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  17. Laboratory Astrophysics Division of The AAS (LAD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid; Drake, R. P.; Federman, S. R.; Haxton, W. C.; Savin, D. W.

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of the Laboratory Astrophysics Division (LAD) is to advance our understanding of the Universe through the promotion of fundamental theoretical and experimental research into the underlying processes that drive the Cosmos. LAD represents all areas of astrophysics and planetary sciences. The first new AAS Division in more than 30 years, the LAD traces its history back to the recommendation from the scientific community via the White Paper from the 2006 NASA-sponsored Laboratory Astrophysics Workshop. This recommendation was endorsed by the Astronomy and Astrophysics Advisory Committee (AAAC), which advises the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) on selected issues within the fields of astronomy and astrophysics that are of mutual interest and concern to the agencies. In January 2007, at the 209th AAS meeting, the AAS Council set up a Steering Committee to formulate Bylaws for a Working Group on Laboratory Astrophysics (WGLA). The AAS Council formally established the WGLA with a five-year mandate in May 2007, at the 210th AAS meeting. From 2008 through 2012, the WGLA annually sponsored Meetings in-a-Meeting at the AAS Summer Meetings. In May 2011, at the 218th AAS meeting, the AAS Council voted to convert the WGLA, at the end of its mandate, into a Division of the AAS and requested draft Bylaws from the Steering Committee. In January 2012, at the 219th AAS Meeting, the AAS Council formally approved the Bylaws and the creation of the LAD. The inaugural gathering and the first business meeting of the LAD were held at the 220th AAS meeting in Anchorage in June 2012. You can learn more about LAD by visiting its website at http://lad.aas.org/ and by subscribing to its mailing list.

  18. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO 2 recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1986 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in areas that include the following: (1) high-performance batteries - mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants, the technology for fluidized-bed combustion, and a novel concept for CO/sub 2/ recovery from fossil fuel combustion; (5) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste; (6) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet; (7) techniques for treatment of hazardous waste such as reactive metals and trichloroethylenes; (8) nuclear technology related to waste management, a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, and the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor; and (9) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of catalytic hydrogenation and catalytic oxidation; materials chemistry for associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, surface science, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of zeolites and related silicates; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 127 refs., 71 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Nutrition Frontiers E-Newsletter | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention at NCI issues a quarterly electronic newsletter, Nutrition Frontiers, that highlights emerging evidence linking diet to cancer prevention and showcases recent findings about who will likely benefit most from dietary change. |

  1. Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research Practicum | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nutritional Science Research Group in the Division of Cancer Prevention at the National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health and the Department of Nutrition at the Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health are offering a one week educational opportunity in "Nutrition and Cancer Prevention Research" for individuals with a sustained commitment to nutrition

  2. Divisibility of class numbers of imaginary quadratic function fields by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 1. Divisibility of Class Numbers of Imaginary Quadratic Function Fields by a Fixed Odd Number. Pradipto Banerjee Srinivas Kotyada. Volume 123 Issue 1 February 2013 pp 1-18 ... http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pmsc/123/01/0001-0018 ...

  3. Divisibility of class numbers of imaginary quadratic function fields by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Math. Sci.) Vol. 123, No. 1, February 2013, pp. 1–18. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Divisibility of class numbers of imaginary quadratic function fields by a fixed ... quadratic extensions of the function field Fq(x) whose class groups have elements of ...... [15] Heegner K, Diophantische Analysis und Modulfunktionen, Math.

  4. GEOPHYSICAL AND WELL CORELLATION ANALYSIS OF OGO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A suite of geophysical wire line logs were run in hole. The wells data were acquired from bottom to top and not top to bottom. Basically, we have the qualitative and the quantitative evaluation techniques.Qualitative means is usually used for identification of the type of lithology and also for the component of the formation.

  5. Seismic and Geophysical Characterization of Northern Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    SEISMIC AND GEOPHYSICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NORTHERN ASIA Kevin Mackey1, Hans Hartse2, Kazuya Fujita1, Michael Pasyanos3, and Michael Begnaud2...improve the calibration of northern Asia for nuclear explosion monitoring purposes. This project builds off previous work, and is a cooperative...propagation characteristics in northern Asia . Our work will further improve location and detection and discrimination capabilities, crustal and upper

  6. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF GROUND SUBSIDENCE: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A geophysical investigation involving the electrical resistivity and gravity methods was carried out within the premises of a Beverage Factory in Edo State. The investigation was to enable the determination of the cause(s) of a ground subsidence within the premises of the boilers. The vertical electrical sounding interpretation ...

  7. Geophysical investigations for groundwater in the middle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, geophysical investigations were carried out in twelve (12) communities in the Up-per Denkyira District located in the Birimian and the Tarkwaian Formations of the Central Re-gion of Ghana with the aim of delineating groundwater potential zones, drilling the selected sites, and subsequently comparing the ...

  8. Integrated geophysical approach in groundwater exploration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A combined geophysical investigation comprising electromagnetic (EM) and resistivity depth sounding carried out around Gwoza area indicate that the area is suitable for borehole development. The electromagnetic results along six profiles identified five locations that are favorable for detail vertical electrical sounding ...

  9. Hydrogeological and geophysical study for deeper groundwater ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electrical resistivity method is a versatile and economical technique for groundwater prospecting in different geological settings due to wide spectrum of resistivity compared to other geophysical parameters. Exploration and exploitation of groundwater, a vital and precious resource, is a challenging task in hard rock, which ...

  10. Geophysical Identification of Hydrothermally Altered Structures That ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research study uses geophysical method (aeromagnetic) to identify hydrothermally altered structures which favour the inflow of hydrothermal fluid that usually brings about gold mineralisation in Egbe-Isanlu Schist Belt Area, North Central Nigeria. The application of data enhancement filtering algorithm such as ...

  11. Early geophysical maps published by A. Petermann

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kozák, Jan; Vaněk, Jiří

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 4 (2012), s. 1109-1122 ISSN 0039-3169 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : August Petermann * Geographische Mitteilungen * geophysical maps Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2012

  12. African Journals Online: Earth Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 8 of 8 ... Global Journal of Geological Sciences is aimed at promoting research in all areas of Geological Sciences including geochemistry, geophysics, engineering geology, hydrogeology, petrology, mineralogy, geochronology, tectonics, mining, structural geology, marine geology, space science etc. Visit the Global ...

  13. Global Journal of Geological Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal of Geological Sciences is aimed at promoting research in all areas of Geological Sciences including geochemistry, geophysics, engineering geology, hydrogeology, petrology, mineralogy, geochronology, tectonics, mining, structural geology, marine geology, space science etc. Visit the Global Journal Series ...

  14. Computers in Nuclear Physics Division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalczyk, M.; Tarasiuk, J.; Srebrny, J.

    1997-01-01

    Improving of the computer equipment in Nuclear Physics Division is described. It include: new computer equipment and hardware upgrading, software developing, new programs for computer booting and modernization of data acquisition systems

  15. Some geological and geophysical aspects in electric rock breaking

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Henry, G

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This presentation looks at the way rocks break and the geological and geophysical aspects thereof. It it important to know that rocks are much weaker under tension (10 times) than under compression. Geological and geophysical factors play...

  16. A portable marine geophysical data access and management system

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kunte, P.D.; Narvekar, P.

    The marine Geophysical Data Access and Management System (GPDAMS) is a portable software system designed for computerized storage, selective retrieval and management of marine geophysical data. It constitutes an integral part of the larger...

  17. IGY+50, the IPY, and the electronic Geophysical Year (eGY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, C.; Baker, D. N.

    2004-12-01

    During the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958), member countries established geophysical observatories around the world. These nations were pursuing major IGY objectives - to collect geophysical data as widely as possible and to provide free access to these data for all scientists around the globe. By the beginning of the 21st century, we have achieved an unparalleled ability to acquire data and attained a good understanding of traditional regions - the troposphere, the magnetosphere, and other such "spheres". Much of the new and important science now is coming from the study of the boundaries between these regions and of coupling between geophysical domains. Thus, we need to make data available in a readily accessible form and in much greater quantities to a wider range of scientists than ever before. Several major international initiatives - notably the International Polar Year - have been proposed to commemorate and to follow on from the original IGY. As an important part of IGY+50, an International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG) task group has recognized that a key achievement of the IGY was the establishment of a system of data centers and physical observatories. It has been agreed that for the 50th anniversary of IGY, scientific societies should promote the establishment of a system of Virtual Observatories. This can provide a forward impetus to geophysics n this century similar to that provided by the IGY fifty years ago. The proposed electronic Geophysical Year (eGY) concept embraces all available and upcoming geophysical data (e.g., atmospheric, geomagnetic, gravity, ionospheric, magnetospheric, etc.) and would organize them into a series of virtual geophysical observatories "deployed" in cyberspace. This concept implies a free access to all available data through the Internet and World Wide Web, taking advantage of existing networking hardware and software technologies (e.g., Internet, XML, Semantic Web, etc.). The eGY can be smoothly

  18. Geophysical Signitures From Hydrocarbon Contaminated Aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M.; Jardani, A.

    2015-12-01

    The task of delineating the contamination plumes as well as studying their impact on the soil and groundwater biogeochemical properties is needed to support the remediation efforts and plans. Geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), induced polarization (IP), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and self-potential (SP) have been previously used to characterize contaminant plumes and investigate their impact on soil and groundwater properties (Atekwana et al., 2002, 2004; Benson et al., 1997; Campbell et al., 1996; Cassidy et al., 2001; Revil et al., 2003; Werkema et al., 2000). Our objective was to: estimate the hydrocarbon contamination extent in a contaminated site in northern France, and to adverse the effects of the oil spill on the groundwater properties. We aim to find a good combination of non-intrusive and low cost methods which we can use to follow the bio-remediation process, which is planned to proceed next year. We used four geophysical methods including electrical resistivity tomography, IP, GPR, and SP. The geophysical data was compared to geochemical ones obtained from 30 boreholes installed in the site during the geophysical surveys. Our results have shown: low electrical resistivity values; high chargeability values; negative SP anomalies; and attenuated GPR reflections coincident with groundwater contamination. Laboratory and field geochemical measurements have demonstrated increased groundwater electrical conductivity and increased microbial activity associated with hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater. Our study results support the conductive model suggested by studies such as Sauck (2000) and Atekwana et al., (2004), who suggest that biological alterations of hydrocarbon contamination can substantially modify the chemical and physical properties of the subsurface, producing a dramatic shift in the geo-electrical signature from resistive to conductive. The next stage of the research will include time lapse borehole

  19. The International Geophysical Month: Short periods of cooperative study can consolidate the gains of the International Geophysical Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helliwell, R A; Martin, L H

    1961-12-01

    For convenience, we summarize below some of the main advantages of the IGM concept. 1) Most organizations can mount and support intensive field operations for short periods. 2) High-quality data would be obtained, and the data could be processed more promptly than in long-term projects. 3) Laboratory equipment could in many instances be mnade available for field operations. 4) Top-caliber researchers would be available for field operations. 5) The participation of small research groups and of research workers from government and industry would be fostered. 6) Student participation would improve educational programs in, and attract needed talent to, the geophysical sciences. 7) Ship, satellite, and rocket observations could be scheduled for IGM's. 8) International scientific conferences scheduled to follow IGM's would attract working scientists. It is not suggested that these short-term exercises should replace the long synoptic programs characteristic of the IGY. Rather it is proposed that they supplement and guide any such future long-term program. If adopted, they would produce many data of value for the planning and timing of the International Year of the Quiet Sun. To bring emphasis on special observations during the IQSY, International Geophysical Months might well be scheduled to coincide with the June and December solstices, to be followed by an IGM at an equinoctial period. This would provide periods for concentrated sampling-periods in somewhat the same category as the Regular World Intervals adopted during the IGY. The more elaborate experiments could be confined to the International Geophysical Months, so that only those studies for which continuous observations are essential would be scheduled for the entire period. The duration of an International Geophysical Month would be sufficient for carrying out experiments requiring moving platforms such as ships, rockets, or satellites. It is recommended that every effort be made to schedule the first IGM

  20. Division of Scientific Equipment - Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halik, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The Scientific Equipment Division consists of the Design Group and the Mechanical Workshop. The activity of the Division includes the following: * designs of devices and equipment for experiments in physics; their mechanical construction and assembly. In particular, these are vacuum chambers and installations for HV and UHV;* maintenance and upgrading of the existing installations and equipment in our Institute; * participation of our engineers and technicians in design works, equipment assembly and maintenance for experiments in foreign laboratories. The Design Group is equipped with PC-computers and AutoCAD graphic software (release 2000 and Mechanical Desktop 4.0) and an A0 plotter, which allow us to make drawings and 2- and 3-dimensional mechanical documentation to the world standards. The Mechanical Workshop offers a wide range of machining and treatment methods with satisfactory tolerances and surface quality. They include: * turning - cylindrical elements of a length up to 2000 mm and a diameter up to 400 mm, and also disc type elements of a diameter up to 600 mm and a length not exceeding 300 mm, * milling - elements of length up to 1000 mm and gear wheels of diameter up to 300 mm, * grinding - flat surfaces of dimensions up to 300 mm x 1000 mm and cylindrical elements of a diameter up to 200 mm and a length up to 800 mm, * drilling - holes of a diameter up to 50 mm, * welding - electrical and gas welding, including TIG vacuum-tight welding, * soft and hard soldering, * mechanical works including precision engineering, * plastics treatment - machining and polishing using diamond milling, modelling, lamination of various shapes and materials, including plexiglas, scintillators and light-guides, * painting - paint spraying with possibility of using furnace-fired drier of internal dimensions of 800 mm x 800 mm x 800 mm. Our workshop is equipped with the CNC milling machine which can be used for machining of work pieces up to 500 kg. The machine

  1. The ACS-NUCL Division 50th Anniversary: Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobart, David E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-10

    The ACS Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology was initiated in 1955 as a subdivision of the Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry. Probationary divisional status was lifted in 1965. The Division’s first symposium was held in Denver in 1964 and it is fitting that we kicked-off the 50th Anniversary in Denver in the spring of 2015. Listed as a small ACS Division with only about 1,000 members, NUCL’s impact over the past fifty years has been remarkable. National ACS meetings have had many symposia sponsored or cosponsored by NUCL that included Nobel Laureates, U.S. Senators, other high-ranking officials and many students as speakers. The range of subjects has been exceptional as are the various prestigious awards established by the Division. Of major impact has been the past 30 years of the NUCL Nuclear Chemistry Summer Schools to help fill the void of qualified nuclear scientists and technicians. In celebrating the 50th Anniversary we honor the past, celebrate the present and shape the future of the Division and nuclear science and technology. To celebrate this auspicious occasion a commemorative lapel pin has been designed for distribution to NUCL Division members.

  2. Merging information in geophysics: the triumvirat of geology, geophysics, and petrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.

    2016-12-01

    We know that geophysical inversion is non-unique and that many classical regularization techniques are unphysical. Despite this, we like to use them because of their simplicity and because geophysicists are often afraid to bias the inverse problem by introducing too much prior information (in a broad sense). It is also clear that geophysics is done on geological objects that are not random structures. Spending some time with a geologist in the field, before organizing a field geophysical campaign, is always an instructive experience. Finally, the measured properties are connected to physicochemical and textural parameters of the porous media and the interfaces between the various phases of a porous body. .Some fundamental parameters may control the geophysical observtions or their time variations. If we want to improve our geophysical tomograms, we need to be risk-takers and acknowledge, or rather embrqce, the cross-fertilization arising by coupling geology, geophysics, and ptrophysics. In this presentation, I will discuss various techniques to do so. They will include non-stationary geostatistical descriptors, facies deformation, cross-coupled petrophysical properties using petrophysical clustering, and image-guided inversion. I will show various applications to a number of relevant cases in hydrogeophysics. From these applications, it may become clear that there are many ways to address inverse or time-lapse inverse problems and geophysicists have to be pragmatic regarding the methods used depending on the degree of available prior information.

  3. 25 CFR 211.56 - Geological and geophysical permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Geological and geophysical permits. 211.56 Section 211.56... FOR MINERAL DEVELOPMENT Rents, Royalties, Cancellations and Appeals § 211.56 Geological and geophysical permits. Permits to conduct geological and geophysical operations on Indian lands which do not...

  4. 36 CFR 902.59 - Geological and geophysical information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Geological and geophysical information. 902.59 Section 902.59 Parks, Forests, and Public Property PENNSYLVANIA AVENUE DEVELOPMENT... Geological and geophysical information. Any geological or geophysical information and data (including maps...

  5. 25 CFR 212.56 - Geological and geophysical permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Geological and geophysical permits. 212.56 Section 212.56... FOR MINERAL DEVELOPMENT Rents, Royalties, Cancellations, and Appeals § 212.56 Geological and geophysical permits. (a) Permits to conduct geological and geophysical operations on Indian lands which do not...

  6. Increasing diversity in the geosciences through the AfricaArray geophysics field course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, G.; Emry, E.; Galindo, B. L.; Carranza, V.; Gomez, C. D.; Ortiz, K.; Castro, J. G.; Guandique, J.; Falzone, C.; Webb, S. J.; Manzi, M.; Mngadi, S. B.; Stephens, K.; Chinamora, B.; Whitehead, R.; de Villiers, D. P.; Tshitlho, K.; Delhaye, R. P.; Smith, J. A.; Nyblade, A.

    2014-12-01

    For the past nine years, the AfricaArray diversity program, sponsored by industry, the National Science Foundation, and several partnering universities have supported outstanding U.S. STEM underrepresented minority undergraduates to gain field experience in near-surface geophysical techniques during an 8-week summer program at Penn State University and the University of Witwatersrand (Wits). The AfricaArray geophysics field school, which is run by Wits, has been teaching field-based geophysics to African students for over a decade. In the first 2-3 weeks of the program, the U.S. students are given basic instruction in near-surface geophysics, South African geology, and South African history and culture. The students then join the Wits AfricaArray geophysics field school - working alongside Wits students and students from several other African universities to map the shallow subsurface in prospective areas of South Africa for platinum mining. In addition to the primary goals of collecting and interpreting gravity, magnetic, resistivity, seismic refraction, seismic reflection, and EM data, students spend time mapping geologic units and gathering information on the physical properties of the rocks in the region (i.e. seismic velocity, density, and magnetic susceptibility). Subsurface targets include mafic dikes, faults, the water table, and overburden thickness. Upon returning to the U.S., students spend 2-3 weeks finalizing their project reports and presentations. The program has been effective at not only providing students with fundamental skills in applied geophysics, but also in fostering multicultural relationships, preparing students for graduate work in the geosciences, and attracting STEM students into the geosciences. Student presenters will discuss their experiences gained through the field school and give their impressions about how the program works towards the goal of increasing diversity in the geosciences in the U.S.

  7. Geophysical methods for road construction and maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Hedi; Karlson, Caroline; Jamali, Imran; Earon, Robert; Olofsson, Bo

    2015-04-01

    Infrastructure, such as road transportation, is a vital in civilized societies; which need to be constructed and maintained regularly. A large part of the project cost is attributed to subsurface conditions, where unsatisfactory conditions could increase either the geotechnical stabilization measures needed or the design cost itself. A way to collect information of the subsurface and existing installations which can lead to measures reducing the project cost and damage is to use geophysical methods during planning, construction and maintenance phases. The moisture in road layers is an important factor, which will affect the bearing capacity of the construction as well as the maintenances. Moisture in the road is a key factor for a well-functioning road. On the other hand the excessive moisture is the main reason of road failure and problems. From a hydrological point of view geophysical methods could help road planners identify the water table, geological strata, pollution arising from the road and the movement of the pollution before, during and after construction. Geophysical methods also allow road planners to collect valuable data for a large area without intrusive investigations such as with boreholes, i.e. minimizing the environmental stresses and costs. However, it is important to specify the investigation site and to choose the most appropriate geophysical method based on the site chosen and the objective of the investigation. Currently, numerous construction and rehabilitation projects are taking places around the world. Many of these projects are focused on infrastructural development, comprising both new projects and expansion of the existing infrastructural network. Geophysical methods can benefit these projects greatly during all phases. During the construction phase Ground Penetrating radar (GPR) is very useful in combination with Electrical Resistivity (ER) for detecting soil water content and base course compaction. However, ER and Electromagnetic

  8. Sadhana | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mechanical Engineering Group, Educational Hardware Division, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani 333 031, India; Research and Consultancy Division, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani 333 031, India; Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110 016, India ...

  9. Review of geophysical characterization methods used at the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GV Last; DG Horton

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a review of geophysical methods used at Hanford in two parts: (1) shallow surface-based geophysical methods and (2) borehole geophysical methods. This review was not intended to be ''all encompassing'' but should represent the vast majority (>90% complete) of geophysical work conducted onsite and aimed at hazardous waste investigations in the vadose zone and/or uppermost groundwater aquifers. This review did not cover geophysical methods aimed at large-scale geologic structures or seismicity and, in particular, did not include those efforts conducted in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. This review focused primarily on the more recent efforts

  10. Review of geophysical characterization methods used at the Hanford Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GV Last; DG Horton

    2000-03-23

    This paper presents a review of geophysical methods used at Hanford in two parts: (1) shallow surface-based geophysical methods and (2) borehole geophysical methods. This review was not intended to be ``all encompassing'' but should represent the vast majority (>90% complete) of geophysical work conducted onsite and aimed at hazardous waste investigations in the vadose zone and/or uppermost groundwater aquifers. This review did not cover geophysical methods aimed at large-scale geologic structures or seismicity and, in particular, did not include those efforts conducted in support of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program. This review focused primarily on the more recent efforts.

  11. Beyond Cookies: Understanding Various Division Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Cindy; Magruder, Robin

    2014-01-01

    Having a deeper understanding of division derived from multiple models is of great importance for teachers and students. For example, students will benefit from a greater understanding of division contexts as they study long division, fractions, and division of fractions. The purpose of this article is to build on teachers' and students'…

  12. Geophysical field disturbances and quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    Quantum processes impact into physics of geophysical field disturbances is discussed here in examples of phenomena such as an earthquake with processes preceding and accompanying it, volcanoes eruptions and diamond exploding pipes. Physics of shock waves generation in ionosphere and atmosphere, mechanism of atmosphere phenomena in supercooled clouds recorded by a stormglass is considered. The report treats of physics of ball and dark lightning, of generating in atmosphere the high-energy particles involved in sprites occurrence, and so on. Geophysical phenomena considered here have no clear and consistent interpretation in the context of classical physics. We attempt to involve the recent achievements of quantum physics namely the quantum entanglement between elementary particles implicated in considered phenomena.

  13. Geophysical and atmospheric evolution of habitable planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammer, Helmut; Selsis, Frank; Chassefière, Eric; Breuer, Doris; Griessmeier, Jean-Mathias; Kulikov, Yuri N; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Khodachenko, Maxim L; Biernat, Helfried K; Leblanc, Francois; Kallio, Esa; Lundin, Richard; Westall, Frances; Bauer, Siegfried J; Beichman, Charles; Danchi, William; Eiroa, Carlos; Fridlund, Malcolm; Gröller, Hannes; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Hausleitner, Walter; Henning, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Léger, Alain; Leitzinger, Martin; Lichtenegger, Herbert I M; Liseau, René; Lunine, Jonathan; Motschmann, Uwe; Odert, Petra; Paresce, Francesco; Parnell, John; Penny, Alan; Quirrenbach, Andreas; Rauer, Heike; Röttgering, Huub; Schneider, Jean; Spohn, Tilman; Stadelmann, Anja; Stangl, Günter; Stam, Daphne; Tinetti, Giovanna; White, Glenn J

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of Earth-like habitable planets is a complex process that depends on the geodynamical and geophysical environments. In particular, it is necessary that plate tectonics remain active over billions of years. These geophysically active environments are strongly coupled to a planet's host star parameters, such as mass, luminosity and activity, orbit location of the habitable zone, and the planet's initial water inventory. Depending on the host star's radiation and particle flux evolution, the composition in the thermosphere, and the availability of an active magnetic dynamo, the atmospheres of Earth-like planets within their habitable zones are differently affected due to thermal and nonthermal escape processes. For some planets, strong atmospheric escape could even effect the stability of the atmosphere.

  14. Introduction to the JEEG Agricultural Geophysics Special Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Barry J.; Smith, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Near-surface geophysical methods have become increasingly important tools in applied agricultural practices and studies. The great advantage of geophysical methods is their potential rapidity, low cost, and spatial continuity when compared to more traditional methods of assessing agricultural land, such as sample collection and laboratory analysis. Agricultural geophysics investigations commonly focus on obtaining information within the soil profile, which generally does not extend much beyond 2 meters beneath the ground surface. Although the depth of interest oftentimes is rather shallow, the area covered by an agricultural geophysics survey can vary widely in scale, from experimental plots (10 s to 100 s of square meters), to farm fields (10 s to 100 s of hectares), up to the size of watersheds (10 s to 100 s of square kilometers). To date, three predominant methods—resistivity, electromagnetic induction (EMI), and ground-penetrating radar (GPR)—have been used to obtain surface-based geophysical measurements within agricultural settings. However, a recent conference on agricultural geophysics (Bouyoucos Conference on Agricultural Geophysics, September 8–10, 2009, Albuquerque, New Mexico; www.ag-geophysics.org) illustrated that other geophysical methods are being applied or developed. These include airborne electromagnetic induction, magnetometry, seismic, and self-potential methods. Agricultural geophysical studies are also being linked to ground water studies that utilize deeper penetrating geophysical methods than normally used.

  15. Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    These simulations of atmospheric flow use the same experimental parameters but started with slightly different initial conditions in the model. The simulations were part of data analysis for the Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC), a planet in a test tube apparatus flown on Spacelab to mimic the atmospheres on gas giant planets and stars. (Credit: Dr. Tim Miller of Global Hydrology and Climate Center at the Marshall Space Flight Center)

  16. Airborne geophysics in Australia: the government contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denham, D.

    1997-01-01

    Airborne geophysical data sets provide important cost-effective information for resource exploration and land management. Improved techniques, developed recently, now enable high-resolution aeromagnetic and gamma-ray surveys to be used extensively by the resource industries to improve the cost effectiveness of exploration and by governments to encourage resource development and sustainable management of natural resources. Although airborne geophysical techniques have been used extensively and are now used almost routinely by mineral explorers, it is only in the last few years that governments have been involved as major players in the acquisition of data. The exploration industry pioneered the imaging of high-resolution airborne geophysical data sets in the early 1980s and, at the same time, the Northern Territory Government started a modest program of flying the Northern Territory, at 500 m flight-line spacing, to attract mineral exploration. After the start of the National Geoscience Mapping Accord in 1990, the then BMR and its State/Territory counterparts used the new high-resolution data as an essential ingredient to underpin mapping programs. These new data sets proved so valuable that, starting in 1992/93, the annual expenditure by the Commonwealth and States/Northern Territory increased from roughly $2 million per year to a massive $10 million per year. These investments by governments, although unlikely to be permanently sustainable, have been made to encourage and expand exploration activity by providing new high-quality data sets in industry at very low cost. There are now approximately 11 million line-km of airborne geophysical data available in databases held by the Commonwealth, States and Northern Territory. The results so far have seen a significant increase in exploration activity in States that have embarked on this course (e.g. South Australia and Victoria), and the information provided from these surveys is proving crucial to understanding the

  17. GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATION OF MARBLE OCCURRENCE IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The outline of the deposit and its plunge direction were confirmed by drilling from which borehole logs show marble thicknesses of 1.3-2.7m at the edges and 16.0 and 19.6m within the marble outlined zone. KeyWords: Marble, Abuja, geophysical investigation, Plunge. [Global Jnl Geol. Sci. Vol.1(1) 2003: 51-62] ...

  18. Symmetries in geology and geophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Turcotte, Donald L.; Newman, William I.

    1996-01-01

    Symmetries have played an important role in a variety of problems in geology and geophysics. A large fraction of studies in mineralogy are devoted to the symmetry properties of crystals. In this paper, however, the emphasis will be on scale-invariant (fractal) symmetries. The earth’s topography is an example of both statistically self-similar and self-affine fractals. Landforms are also associated with drainage networks, which are statistical fractal trees. A unive...

  19. Application of geophysical methods for fracture characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.H.; Majer, E.L.; McEvilly, T.V.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA; Morrison, H.F.; California Univ., Berkeley, CA

    1990-01-01

    One of the most crucial needs in the design and implementation of an underground waste isolation facility is a reliable method for the detection and characterization of fractures in zones away from boreholes or subsurface workings. Geophysical methods may represent a solution to this problem. If fractures represent anomalies in the elastic properties or conductive properties of the rocks, then the seismic and electrical techniques may be useful in detecting and characterizing fracture properties. 7 refs., 3 figs

  20. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs