WorldWideScience

Sample records for geological carbonate formation

  1. Microbial and Chemical Enhancement of In-Situ Carbon Mineralization in Geological Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matter, J.; Chandran, K.

    2013-05-31

    Predictions of global energy usage suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere unless major changes are made to the way energy is produced and used. Various carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies are currently being developed, but unfortunately little is known regarding the fundamental characteristics of CO{sub 2}-mineral reactions to allow a viable in-situ carbon mineralization that would provide the most permanent and safe storage of geologically-injected CO{sub 2}. The ultimate goal of this research project was to develop a microbial and chemical enhancement scheme for in-situ carbon mineralization in geologic formations in order to achieve long-term stability of injected CO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of CO{sub 2}-mineral-brine systems were systematically performed to develop the in-situ mineral carbonation process that utilizes organic acids produced by a microbial reactor. The major participants in the project are three faculty members and their graduate and undergraduate students at the School of Engineering and Applied Science and at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University: Alissa Park in Earth and Environmental Engineering & Chemical Engineering (PI), Juerg Matter in Earth and Environmental Science (Co-PI), and Kartik Chandran in Earth and Environmental Engineering (Co-PI). Two graduate students, Huangjing Zhao and Edris Taher, were trained as a part of this project as well as a number of graduate students and undergraduate students who participated part-time. Edris Taher received his MS degree in 2012 and Huangjing Zhao will defend his PhD on Jan. 15th, 2014. The interdisciplinary training provided by this project was valuable to those students who are entering into the workforce in the United States. Furthermore, the findings from this study were and will be published in referred journals to disseminate the results. The list of the papers is given at

  2. Geological Sequestration of CO2 by Hydrous Carbonate Formation with Reclaimed Slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von L. Richards; Kent Peaslee; Jeffrey Smith

    2008-02-06

    The concept of this project is to develop a process that improves the kinetics of the hydrous carbonate formation reaction enabling steelmakers to directly remove CO2 from their furnace exhaust gas. It is proposed to bring the furnace exhaust stream containing CO2 in contact with reclaimed steelmaking slag in a reactor that has an environment near the unit activity of water resulting in the production of carbonates. The CO2 emissions from the plant would be reduced by the amount sequestered in the formation of carbonates. The main raw materials for the process are furnace exhaust gases and specially prepared slag.

  3. Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitze, Arnold W. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2011-04-01

    The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

  4. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2002-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and

  5. Hydrogeological evaluation of geological formations in Ashanti ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study, therefore, employed Geographical Information System to assess some of these hydrogeological parameters in the Ashanti Region using the ordinary kriging interpolation method. Data on 2,788 drilled boreholes in the region were used and the assessment focused on the various geological formations in the ...

  6. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic

  7. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2001-09-14

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project has been reservoir description and characterization. This effort has included four tasks: (1) geoscientific reservoir characterization, (2) the study of rock-fluid interactions, (3) petrophysical and engineering characterization and (4) data integration. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 1. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been initiated. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been

  8. National assessment of geologic carbon dioxide storage resources: summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed an evaluation of the technically accessible storage resource (TASR) for carbon dioxide (CO2) for 36 sedimentary basins in the onshore areas and State waters of the United States. The TASR is an estimate of the geologic storage resource that may be available for CO2 injection and storage and is based on current geologic and hydrologic knowledge of the subsurface and current engineering practices. By using a geology-based probabilistic assessment methodology, the USGS assessment team members obtained a mean estimate of approximately 3,000 metric gigatons (Gt) of subsurface CO2 storage capacity that is technically accessible below onshore areas and State waters; this amount is more than 500 times the 2011 annual U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions of 5.5 Gt (U.S. Energy Information Administration, 2012, http://www.eia.gov/environment/emissions/carbon/). In 2007, the Energy Independence and Security Act (Public Law 110–140) directed the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national assessment of geologic storage resources for CO2 in consultation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, and State geological surveys. The USGS developed a methodology to estimate storage resource potential in geologic formations in the United States (Burruss and others, 2009, USGS Open-File Report (OFR) 2009–1035; Brennan and others, 2010, USGS OFR 2010–1127; Blondes, Brennan, and others, 2013, USGS OFR 2013–1055). In 2012, the USGS completed the assessment, and the results are summarized in this Fact Sheet and are provided in more detail in companion reports (U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Resources Assessment Team, 2013a,b; see related reports at right). The goal of this project was to conduct an initial assessment of storage capacity on a regional basis, and results are not intended for use in the evaluation of specific sites for potential CO2 storage. The national

  9. Environmental Responses to Carbon Mitigation through Geological Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunningham, Alfred [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Bromenshenk, Jerry [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

    2013-08-30

    In summary, this DOE EPSCoR project is contributing to the study of carbon mitigation through geological storage. Both deep and shallow subsurface research needs are being addressed through research directed at improved understanding of environmental responses associated with large scale injection of CO2 into geologic formations. The research plan has two interrelated research objectives. Objective 1: Determine the influence of CO2-related injection of fluids on pore structure, material properties, and microbial activity in rock cores from potential geological carbon sequestration sites. Objective 2: Determine the Effects of CO2 leakage on shallow subsurface ecosystems (microbial and plant) using field experiments from an outdoor field testing facility.

  10. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-25

    The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on

  11. The carbon dioxide capture and geological storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the carbon dioxide capture and geological storage. One possible means of climate change mitigation consists of storing the CO 2 generated by the greenhouse gases emission in order to stabilize atmospheric concentrations. This sheet presents the CO 2 capture from lage fossil-fueled combustion installations, the three capture techniques and the CO 2 transport options, the geological storage of the CO 2 and Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  12. On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

    2002-07-18

    Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by

  13. Geologic Controls of Sand Boil Formation at Buck Chute, Mississippi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    Geology ........................................................................................................................... 4 2.3 Description of...18 3.1 Geology of the Lower Mississippi River Valley...Hypothesis Sand boil formation at the Buck Chute site is the result of geology consisting of point bar and abandoned channel deposits with a thin

  14. Digital Geologic Map of New Mexico - Formations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — The geologic map was created in GSMAP at Socorro, New Mexico by Orin Anderson and Glen Jones and published as the Geologic Map of New Mexico 1:500,000 in GSMAP...

  15. Investigation of CO2 plume behavior for a large-scale pilot test of geologic carbon storage in a saline formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughty, C.

    2009-04-01

    The hydrodynamic behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injected into a deep saline formation is investigated, focusing on trapping mechanisms that lead to CO{sub 2} plume stabilization. A numerical model of the subsurface at a proposed power plant with CO{sub 2} capture is developed to simulate a planned pilot test, in which 1,000,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} is injected over a four-year period, and the subsequent evolution of the CO{sub 2} plume for hundreds of years. Key measures are plume migration distance and the time evolution of the partitioning of CO{sub 2} between dissolved, immobile free-phase, and mobile free-phase forms. Model results indicate that the injected CO{sub 2} plume is effectively immobilized at 25 years. At that time, 38% of the CO{sub 2} is in dissolved form, 59% is immobile free phase, and 3% is mobile free phase. The plume footprint is roughly elliptical, and extends much farther up-dip of the injection well than down-dip. The pressure increase extends far beyond the plume footprint, but the pressure response decreases rapidly with distance from the injection well, and decays rapidly in time once injection ceases. Sensitivity studies that were carried out to investigate the effect of poorly constrained model parameters permeability, permeability anisotropy, and residual CO{sub 2} saturation indicate that small changes in properties can have a large impact on plume evolution, causing significant trade-offs between different trapping mechanisms.

  16. Disposal of high level radioactive wastes in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, L.A.M.; Carvalho Bastos, J.P. de

    1978-01-01

    The disposal of high-activity radioactive wastes is the most serious problem for the nuclear industry. Among the solutions, the disposal of wastes in approriated geological formations is the most realistic and feasible. In this work the methods used for geological disposal, as well as, the criteria, programs and analysis for selecting a bite for waste disposal are presented [pt

  17. Mechanisms for CO2 Sequestration in Geological Formations and Enhanced Gas Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khosrokhavar, R.

    2014-01-01

    The work described in this thesis deals with a variety of aspects related to the storage of carbon dioxide in geological formations. In particular we focus on the transfer between the gas phase to a fluid (liquid) or solid phase. This thesis limits its interest to study the sequestration capacity of

  18. Method of detecting leakage from geologic formations used to sequester CO.sub.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Curt [Pittsburgh, PA; Wells, Arthur [Bridgeville, PA; Diehl, J Rodney [Pittsburgh, PA; Strazisar, Brian [Venetia, PA

    2010-04-27

    The invention provides methods for the measurement of carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs. Tracer moieties are injected along with carbon dioxide into geological formations. Leakage is monitored by gas chromatographic analyses of absorbents. The invention also provides a process for the early leak detection of possible carbon dioxide leakage from sequestration reservoirs by measuring methane (CH.sub.4), ethane (C.sub.2H.sub.6), propane (C.sub.3H.sub.8), and/or radon (Rn) leakage rates from the reservoirs. The invention further provides a method for branding sequestered carbon dioxide using perfluorcarbon tracers (PFTs) to show ownership.

  19. CQUESTRA, a risk and performance assessment code for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeNeveu, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    A computationally efficient semi-analytical code, CQUESTRA, has been developed for probabilistic risk assessment and rapid screening of potential sites for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The rate of dissolution and leakage from a trapped underground pool of carbon dioxide is determined. The trapped carbon dioxide could be mixed with hydrocarbons and other components to form a buoyant phase. The program considers potential mechanisms for escape from the geological formations such as the movement of the buoyant phase through failed seals in wellbores, the annulus around wellbores and through open fractures in the caprock. Plume animations of dissolved carbon dioxide in formation water around the wellbores are provided. Solubility, density and viscosity of the buoyant phase are determined by equations of state. Advection, dispersion, diffusion, buoyancy, aquifer flow rates and local formation fluid pressure are taken into account in the modeling of the carbon dioxide movement. Results from a hypothetical example simulation based on data from the Williston basin near Weyburn, Saskatchewan, indicate that this site is potentially a viable candidate for carbon dioxide sequestration. Sensitivity analysis of CQUESTRA indicates that criteria such as siting below aquifers with large flow rates and siting in reservoirs having fluid pressure below the pressure of the formations above can promote complete dissolution of the carbon dioxide during movement toward the surface, thereby preventing release to the biosphere. Formation of very small carbon dioxide bubbles within the fluid in the wellbores can also lead to complete dissolution

  20. Geological storage of carbon dioxide: the role of sedimentary basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunter, W.D.; Bachu, S.

    2001-01-01

    Sedimentary basins, occuring throughout the world, are thick piles of geologically deposited sediments that are the hosts for fossil fuel deposits. They may become even more important in the future if their large storage capacity is utilized for disposing of carbon dioxide. Sedimentary basins are dynamic, in the sense that they have an intricate plumbing system defined by the location of high and low permeability strata that control the flow of fluids throughout the basins and define 'hydrogeological' traps. The most secure type of hydrogeological trapping is found in oil and gas reservoirs in the form of 'structural' or 'stratigraphic' traps, termed 'closed' hydrogeological traps which have held oil and gas for millions of years. Obviously, these would be very attractive for CO 2 storage due to their long history of containment. A second type of hydrogeological trapping has been recognized in aquifers of sedimentary basins that have slow flow rates. The pore space in such 'open' hydrogeological traps is usually filled with saline ground or formation water. A volume of CO 2 injected into a deep open hydrogeological trap can take over a million years to travel updip to reach the surface and be released to the atmosphere. Although the capacity of structural/stratigraphic traps for CO 2 storage is small relative to open hydrogeological traps in deep sedimentary basins, they are likely to be used first as they are known to be secure, having held oil and gas for geological time. As the capacity of closed traps is exhausted and more is learned about geochemical trapping, the large storage capacity available in open hydrogeological traps will be utilized where security of the geological storage of CO 2 can be enhanced by geochemical reactions of the CO 2 with basic silicate minerals to form carbonates. Potential short circuits to the surface through faults or abandoned wells must be located and their stability evaluated before injection of CO 2 . In any event, a

  1. An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

    2005-10-01

    As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

  2. Risk Assessment of Geologic Formation Sequestration in The Rocky Mountain Region, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Si-Yong; McPherson, Brian

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the outcome of a targeted risk assessment of a candidate geologic sequestration site in the Rocky Mountain region of the USA. Specifically, a major goal of the probabilistic risk assessment was to quantify the possible spatiotemporal responses for Area of Review (AoR) and injection-induced pressure buildup associated with carbon dioxide (CO₂) injection into the subsurface. Because of the computational expense of a conventional Monte Carlo approach, especially given the likely uncertainties in model parameters, we applied a response surface method for probabilistic risk assessment of geologic CO₂ storage in the Permo-Penn Weber formation at a potential CCS site in Craig, Colorado. A site-specific aquifer model was built for the numerical simulation based on a regional geologic model.

  3. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breunig, Hanna M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Birkholzer, Jens T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Borgia, Andrea [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Price, Phillip N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Oldenburg, Curtis M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; McKone, Thomas E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2013-06-13

    Geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is the injection of carbon dioxide (CO2), typically captured from stationary emission sources, into deep geologic formations to prevent its entry into the atmosphere. Active pilot facilities run by regional United States (US) carbon sequestration partnerships inject on the order of one million metric tonnes (mt) CO2 annually while the US electric power sector emits over 2000 million mt-CO2 annually. GCS is likely to play an increasing role in US carbon mitigation initiatives, but scaling up GCS poses several challenges. Injecting CO2 into sedimentary basins raises fluid pressure in the pore space, which is typically already occupied by naturally occurring, or native, brine. The resulting elevated pore pressures increase the likelihood of induced seismicity, of brine or CO2 escaping into potable groundwater resources, and of CO2 escaping into the atmosphere. Brine extraction is one method for pressure management, in which brine in the injection formation is brought to the surface through extraction wells. Removal of the brine makes room for the CO2 and decreases pressurization. Although the technology required for brine extraction is mature, this form of pressure management will only be applicable if there are cost-­effective and sustainable methods of disposing of the extracted brine. Brine extraction, treatment, and disposal may increase the already substantial capital, energy, and water demands of Carbon dioxide Capture and Sequestration (CCS). But, regionally specific brine management strategies may be able to treat the extracted water as a source of revenue, energy, and water to subsidize CCS costs, while minimizing environmental impacts. By this approach, value from the extracted water would be recovered before disposing of any resulting byproducts. Until a price is placed on carbon, we expect that utilities and other CO2 sources will be

  4. The safe disposal of radioactive wastes in geologic salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuehn, K.; Proske, R.

    Geologic salt formations appear to be particularly suitable for final storage. Their existance alone - the salt formations in Northern Germany are more than 200 million years old - is proof of their stability and of their isolation from biological cycles. In 1967 the storage of LAW and later, in 1972, of MAW was started in the experimental storage area Asse, south-east of Braunschweig, after the necessary technical preparations had been made. In more than ten years of operation approx. 114,000 drums of slightly active and 1,298 drums of medium-active wastes were deposited without incident. Methods have been developed for filling the available caverns with wastes and salt to ensure the security of long term disposal without supervision. Tests with electric heaters for simulation of heat-generating highly active wastes confirm the good suitability of salt formations for storing these wastes. Safety analyses for the operating time as well as for the long term phase after closure of the final storage area, which among others also comprise the improbable ''greatest expected accident'', namely break through of water, are carried out and confirm the safety of ultimate storage of radioactive wastes in geological salt formations. (orig./HP) [de

  5. 75 FR 75059 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Injection and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... Greenhouse Gases: Injection and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal Register... Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Injection and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide AGENCY... greenhouse gas monitoring and reporting from facilities that conduct geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide...

  6. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, Mark A; Miller, James D; Morey, G B

    2008-10-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a approximately 1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by approximately 1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact.

  7. Geology of the Biwabik Iron Formation and Duluth Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jirsa, M.A.; Miller, J.D.; Morey, G.B.

    2008-01-01

    The Biwabik Iron Formation is a ???1.9 billion year-old sequence of iron-rich sedimentary rocks that was metamorphosed at its eastern-most extent by ???1.1 billion year-old intrusions of the Duluth Complex. The metamorphic recrystallization of iron-formation locally produced iron-rich amphiboles and other fibrous iron-silicate minerals. The presence of these minerals in iron-formation along the eastern part of what is known as the Mesabi Iron Range, and their potential liberation by iron mining has raised environmental health concerns. We describe here the geologic setting and mineralogic composition of the Biwabik Iron Formation in and adjacent to the contact metamorphic aureole of the Duluth Complex. The effects of metamorphism are most pronounced within a few kilometers of the contact, and decrease progressively away from it. The contact aureole has been divided into four metamorphic zones-each characterized by the composition and crystal structure of the metamorphic minerals it contains. The recrystallization of iron-formation to iron-rich amphibole minerals (grunerite and cummingtonite) and iron-pyroxene minerals (hedenbergite and ferrohypersthene) is best developed in zones that are most proximal to the Duluth Complex contact. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. State and Regional Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitze, Arnold [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Durrant, Marie [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2011-03-01

    The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Carbon capture and geologic sequestration offer one method to reduce carbon emissions from coal and other hydrocarbon energy production. While the federal government is providing increased funding for carbon capture and sequestration, recent congressional legislative efforts to create a framework for regulating carbon emissions have failed. However, regional and state bodies have taken significant actions both to regulate carbon and facilitate its capture and sequestration. This article explores how regional bodies and state government are addressing the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. Several regional bodies have formed regulations and model laws that affect carbon capture and storage, and three bodies comprising twenty-three states—the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, the Midwest Regional Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord, and the Western Climate initiative—have cap-­and-trade programs in various stages of development. State property, land use and environmental laws affect the development and implementation of carbon capture and sequestration projects, and unless federal standards are imposed, state laws on torts and renewable portfolio requirements will directly affect the liability and viability of these projects. This paper examines current state laws and legislative efforts addressing carbon capture and sequestration.

  9. The formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Liu, Liren; Lu, Junzhe; Zhu, Hengjiang

    2018-02-01

    The nuclei and the formation mechanism of chiral carbon nanotubes, namely, single-, double-, and triple-walled carbon nanotubes are simulated by the first principle density functional theory. The formation mechanism from nuclei to corresponding infinitely long carbon nanotubes occurs spirally and via absorbing carbon atoms layer by layer. Carbon atoms at the open end are metastable state compared with ones in the tube wall or the closed end, which indicate the growth point of chiral carbon nanotubes is located at the open end. Growth of outer layer tubular clusters takes precedence over the inner layer in the process of forming multi-walled nuclear structures. Because of the ratio of carbon atoms at the open end to all carbon atoms decreases, the stability of the tubular clusters increases with their length. The infinitely long carbon nanotubes are obtained by executing periodic boundary conditions depend on corresponding nuclear structures.

  10. Device for investigation of the porosity of geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tittman, J.; Hickman, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    A device for neutron well logging is described in which errors due to caked drilling mud on the walls of the hole are compensated for. This is achieved by using two neutron sources and two detectors. One of the neutron sources emits neutrons with so high energy, about 3 or 4 MeV, that their slowing down length is much greater than the thickness of the drilling mud, while the other emits neutrons with an energy of about 240 KeV (lithium-plutonium) or 25 KeV (antimony - beryllium), ie they have a very high probability of interacting with the material in the drilling mud. The detectors are adjusted to react selectively to neutrons of epithermal energy, and the difference in the signals represents the porosity, or hydrocarbon content of the geological formation. (JIW)

  11. Optimization of Geological Environments for Carbon Dioxide Disposan in Saline Aquifers in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovorka, Susan

    1999-02-01

    Recent research and applications have demonstrated technologically feasible methods, defined costs, and modeled processes needed to sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in saline-water-bearing formations (aquifers). One of the simplifying assumptions used in previous modeling efforts is the effect of real stratigraphic complexity on transport and trapping in saline aquifers. In this study we have developed and applied criteria for characterizing saline aquifers for very long-term sequestration of CO{sub 2}. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate a methodology for optimizing matches between CO{sub 2} sources and nearby saline formations that can be used for sequestration. This project identified 14 geologic properties used to prospect for optimal locations for CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline-water-bearing formations. For this demonstration, we digitized maps showing properties of saline formations and used analytical tools in a geographic information system (GIS) to extract areas that meet variably specified prototype criteria for CO{sub 2} sequestration sites. Through geologic models, realistic aquifer properties such as discontinuous sand-body geometry are determined and can be used to add realistic hydrologic properties to future simulations. This approach facilitates refining the search for a best-fit saline host formation as our understanding of the most effective ways to implement sequestration proceeds. Formations where there has been significant drilling for oil and gas resources as well as extensive characterization of formations for deep-well injection and waste disposal sites can be described in detail. Information to describe formation properties can be inferred from poorly known saline formations using geologic models in a play approach. Resulting data sets are less detailed than in well-described examples but serve as an effective screening tool to identify prospects for more detailed work.

  12. Environmental Externalities of Geological Carbon Sequestration Effects on Energy Scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smekens, K.; Van der Zwaan, B.

    2004-03-01

    Geological carbon sequestration seems one of the promising options to address, in the near term, the global problem of climate change, since carbon sequestration technologies are in principle available today and their costs are expected to be affordable. Whereas extensive technological and economic feasibility studies rightly point out the large potential of this 'clean fossil fuel' option, relatively little attention has been paid so far to the detrimental environmental externalities that the sequestering of CO2 underground could entail. This paper assesses what the relevance might be of including these external effects in long-term energy planning and scenario analyses. Our main conclusion is that, while these effects are generally likely to be relatively small, carbon sequestration externalities do matter and influence the nature of future world energy supply and consumption. More importantly, since geological carbon storage (depending on the method employed) may in some cases have substantial external impacts, in terms of both environmental damage and health risks, it is recommended that extensive studies are performed to quantify these effects. This article addresses three main questions: (1) What may energy supply look like if one accounts for large-scale CO2 sequestration in the construction of long-term energy and climate change scenarios; (2) Suppose one hypothesizes a quantification of the external environmental costs of CO2 sequestration, how do then these supposed costs affect the evolution of the energy system during the 21st century; (3) Does it matter for these scenarios whether carbon sequestration damage costs are charged directly to consumers or, instead, to electricity producers?

  13. Experimental observations of dolomite dissolution in geologic carbon sequestration conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Kong, X.; Tutolo, B. M.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    One sequestration scenario proposed to reduce CO2 emissions involves injecting CO2 into saline formations or hydrocarbon reservoirs, where dolomite frequently occurs. To better understand fluid-mineral interactions in these sequestration settings, we have conducted a series of single-pass, flow-through experiments on dolomite core samples with CO2-bearing brine. An important component of the experimental design was to maintain the fabric of the rock so as to more accurately simulate fluid flow in natural dolomite-bearing systems. Seven experiments were conducted at 100°C and a pore-fluid pressure of 150 bars with a fluid containing 1 molal NaCl and 0.6 molal dissolved CO2. Flow rates ranged from 0.01 to 1 ml/min. Each experiment was terminated before dissolution breakthrough, but permeability increased by approximately an order of magnitude for all experiments. In general, Ca and Mg concentrations were initially high, but then decreased with reaction progress. We hypothesize that time-dependent changes in fluid chemistry reflect reduction in reactive surface area. Fluid chemistry also indicates preferential removal of Ba, Mn, and Sr with respect to Ca and Mg. In the extreme case, 70% of the Ba was removed from one core, while only 3% of the Ca, Mg, or the entire core mass was removed by dissolution. Ongoing work is focused on identifying elemental distributions throughout the rock to better understand the dissolution process. With fluid chemistry and BET surface area, we model dissolution rate as a function of core length using reactive transport simulations and compare our whole rock, far from equilibrium dissolution rates with analogous data reported in the literature. Finally, X-ray computed tomography images enable reconstructions of dissolution patterns, and they are being used to explore the effect of pore space heterogeneity on flow path development. Geologic carbon sequestration in dolomite will produce significant dissolution at the brine/CO2 interface

  14. Aluminosilicate Dissolution and Silicate Carbonation during Geologic CO2 Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Yujia

    Geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) is considered a promising method to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emission. Assessing the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) gas or liquid phase water (g, l)-mineral interactions is critical to evaluating the viability of GCS processes. This work contributes to our understanding of geochemical reactions at CO 2-water (g, l)-mineral interfaces, by investigating the dissolution of aluminosilicates in CO2-acidified water (l). Plagioclase and biotite were chosen as model minerals in reservoir rock and caprock, respectively. To elucidate the effects of brine chemistry, first, the influences of cations in brine including Na, Ca, and K, have been investigated. In addition to the cations, the effects of abundant anions including sulfate and oxalate were also examined. Besides the reactions in aqueous phase, we also examine the carbonation of silicates in water (g)-bearing supercritical CO2 (scCO2) under conditions relevant to GCS. For the metal carbonation, in particular, the effects of particle sizes, water, temperature, and pressure on the carbonation of wollastonite were systematically examined. For understanding the cations effects in brine, the impacts of Na concentrations up to 4 M on the dissolution of plagioclase and biotite were examined. High concentrations of Na significantly inhibited plagioclase dissolution by competing adsorption with proton and suppressing proton-promoted dissolution. Ca has a similar effect to Na, and their effects did not suppress each other when Na and Ca co-existed. For biotite, the inhibition effects of Na coupled with an enhancing effect due to ion exchange reaction between Na and interlayer K, which cracked the basal surfaces of biotite. The K in aqueous phase significantly inhibited the dissolution. If the biotite is equilibrated with NaCl solutions initially, the biotite dissolved faster than the original biotite and the dissolution was inhibited by Na and K in brine. The outcomes improve our current knowledge of

  15. A Probabilistic Assessment Methodology for the Evaluation of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Sean T.; Burruss, Robert A.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Freeman, P.A.; Ruppert, Leslie F.

    2010-01-01

    In 2007, the Energy Independence and Security Act (Public Law 110-140) authorized the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of potential geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2) in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy. The first year of that activity was specified for development of a methodology to estimate storage potential that could be applied uniformly to geologic formations across the United States. After its release, the methodology was to receive public comment and external expert review. An initial methodology was developed and published in March 2009 (Burruss and others, 2009), and public comments were received. The report was then sent to a panel of experts for external review. The external review report was received by the USGS in December 2009. This report is in response to those external comments and reviews and describes how the previous assessment methodology (Burruss and others, 2009) was revised. The resource that is assessed is the technically accessible storage resource, which is defined as the mass of CO2 that can be stored in the pore volume of a storage formation. The methodology that is presented in this report is intended to be used for assessments at scales ranging from regional to subbasinal in which storage assessment units are defined on the basis of common geologic and hydrologic characteristics. The methodology does not apply to site-specific evaluation of storage resources or capacity.

  16. Carbon nanotube formation by laser direct writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Su, H.-C.; Tsai, C.-M.; Liu, K.-L.; Chen, G.-D.; Huang, R.-H.; Yew, T.-R.

    2008-01-01

    This letter presents carbon nanotube (CNT) formation by laser direct writing using 248 nm KrF excimer pulsed laser in air at room temperature, which was applied to irradiate amorphous carbon (a-C) assisted by Ni catalysts underneath for the transformation of carbon species into CNTs. The CNTs were synthesized under appropriate combination of laser energy density and a-C thickness. The growth mechanism and key parameters to determine the success of CNT formation were also discussed. The demonstration of the CNT growth by laser direct writing in air at room temperature opens an opportunity of in-position CNT formation at low temperatures

  17. The geological carbon cycle and the global warming / climate debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frank, F.

    2013-01-01

    The extensively cited seasonal carbon cycle describes the size and the annual fluxes between the temporary reservoirs (ocean, atmosphere, biosphere and soils). Compared with these large annual fluxes (approx. 200 GtC/y) the human contribution seems to be of minor amount and is currently (2011) in the range of 4-5%. However, in the geological carbon cycle, which describes the nearly equal amounts of input (volcanoes etc.) and output (sediments) into and from the temporary reservoirs, the human contribution has now reached 30-50 times the average natural level (9.5 Gt C/y versus ca. 0.2-0.3Gt C/y). In the long-term range (1-10x106y), the variable, but much smaller net imbalance between these geological sources und sinks was responsible for the atmospheric CO2-level in the last 400 My (since then comparable temporary reservoirs exist) and influenced via the various feedbacks the climate on earth. In nearly 95% of this long time the climate system was in (nearly) equilibrium conditions and changes occurred extremely slow. Whenever a certain range of higher rate of change of these driving forces were reached, it had - together with other effects - severe influence on the evolution of life, causing 5 large and many minor 'geological accidents'. Based on isotope geochemistry and a fairly good time resolution by orbitally tuned cyclostratigraphy (astrochronology) in the sedimentary record, we are able to quantify these rates of change with reasonable errors. It turns out that the present rate of change - caused by the C-based fossil energy use - is one to two orders of magnitude more rapid than these severe events (impacts excluded) in the earth system. A vast amount of data is available from the ice age cycles. Climate geology (e.g. the group of M. Sarnthein) made considerable progress in understanding the related geological/oceanic processes and proposed a reasonably constrained mass balance of CO2 during the last cycle, which could help us to understand the future

  18. 75 FR 18575 - Mandatory Reporting of Greenhouse Gases: Injection and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-12

    ...: Injection and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide; Proposed Rule #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No...: Injection and Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION.... \\4\\ DOE. 2008. Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada (Atlas II). Available at...

  19. Palaeogeographical peculiarities of the Pabdeh Formation (Paleogene) in Iran: New evidence of global diversity-determined geological heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Tahereh; Nielsen, Jan K.; Ponedelnik, Alena A.; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2017-11-01

    Unique palaeogeographical peculiarities of sedimentary formations are important for geological heritage conservation and use for the purposes of tourism. The heritage value of the Pabdeh Formation (Paleocene-Oligocene) of the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt in Iran has been investigated. The uniqueness of its palaeogeographical peculiarities has been assessed on the basis of the literature, field studies of three representative sections in the Fars Province (Kavar, Zanjiran, and Shahneshin sections), and comparison with the similar features known in Iran and globally. The Pabdeh Formation reflects the process of mixed siliciclastic-carbonate ramp progradation and the onset of a typical carbonate platform. The other unique features include representation of mesopelagic palaeohabitat, specific trace fossil assemblages, prehistoric bituminous artefacts (production of which was linked to the Pabdeh deposits), etc. It is established that the palaeogeographical type of geological heritage of the Pabdeh Formation is represented by all known subtypes, namely facies, palaeoecosystem, ichnological, taphonomical, event, and geoarchaeological subtypes. Their rank varies between regional and global. The very fact of co-occurrence of these subtypes determines the global importance of the entire palaeogeographical type in the case of this formation. The establishment of geopark in the Zagros Fold-Thrust Belt will facilitate adequate use of the Pabdeh Formation for the purpose of geotourism development. The aesthetic properties (rocks of different colour and striped patterns of outcrops) increase the attractiveness of this geological body to visitors.

  20. Geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources in Aptian carbonates, onshore northern Gulf of Mexico Basin, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Karlsen, Alexander W.

    2014-01-01

    Carbonate lithofacies of the Lower Cretaceous Sligo Formation and James Limestone were regionally evaluated using established U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment methodology for undiscovered conventional hydrocarbon resources. The assessed area is within the Upper Jurassic–Cretaceous–Tertiary Composite total petroleum system, which was defined for the assessment. Hydrocarbons reservoired in carbonate platform Sligo-James oil and gas accumulations are interpreted to originate primarily from the Jurassic Smackover Formation. Emplacement of hydrocarbons occurred via vertical migration along fault systems; long-range lateral migration also may have occurred in some locations. Primary reservoir facies include porous patch reefs developed over paleostructural salt highs, carbonate shoals, and stacked linear reefs at the carbonate shelf margin. Hydrocarbon traps dominantly are combination structural-stratigraphic. Sealing lithologies include micrite, calcareous shale, and argillaceous lime mudstone. A geologic model, supported by discovery history analysis of petroleum geology data, was used to define a single regional assessment unit (AU) for conventional reservoirs in carbonate facies of the Sligo Formation and James Limestone. The AU is formally entitled Sligo-James Carbonate Platform Oil and Gas (50490121). A fully risked mean undiscovered technically recoverable resource in the AU of 50 million barrels of oil (MMBO), 791 billion cubic feet of natural gas (BCFG), and 26 million barrels of natural gas liquids was estimated. Substantial new development through horizontal drilling has occurred since the time of this assessment (2010), resulting in cumulative production of >200 BCFG and >1 MMBO.

  1. Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warwick, Peter D.; Corum, Margo D.

    2012-01-01

    The 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (Public Law 110–140) directs the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of potential geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2) and to consult with other Federal and State agencies to locate the pertinent geological data needed for the assessment. The geologic sequestration of CO2 is one possible way to mitigate its effects on climate change. The methodology used for the national CO2 assessment (Open-File Report 2010-1127; http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2010/1127/) is based on previous USGS probabilistic oil and gas assessment methodologies. The methodology is non-economic and intended to be used at regional to subbasinal scales. The operational unit of the assessment is a storage assessment unit (SAU), composed of a porous storage formation with fluid flow and an overlying sealing unit with low permeability. Assessments are conducted at the SAU level and are aggregated to basinal and regional results. This report identifies and contains geologic descriptions of SAUs in separate packages of sedimentary rocks within the assessed basin and focuses on the particular characteristics, specified in the methodology, that influence the potential CO2 storage resource in those SAUs. Specific descriptions of the SAU boundaries as well as their sealing and reservoir units are included. Properties for each SAU such as depth to top, gross thickness, net porous thickness, porosity, permeability, groundwater quality, and structural reservoir traps are provided to illustrate geologic factors critical to the assessment. Although assessment results are not contained in this report, the geologic information included here will be employed, as specified in the methodology, to calculate a statistical Monte Carlo-based distribution of potential storage space in the various SAUs. Figures in this report show SAU boundaries and cell maps of well penetrations through the sealing unit into the top of the storage

  2. Outstanding diversity of heritage features in large geological bodies: The Gachsaran Formation in southwest Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Tahereh; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2017-09-01

    The ideas of geological heritage and geological diversity have become very popular in the modern science. These are usually applied to geological domains or countries, provinces, districts, etc. Additionally, it appears to be sensible to assess heritage value of geological bodies. The review of the available knowledge and the field investigation of the Gachsaran Formation (lower Miocene) in southwest Iran permit to assign its features and the relevant phenomena to as much as 10 geological heritage types, namely stratigraphical, sedimentary, palaeontological, palaeogeographical, geomorphological, hydrogeological, engineering, structural, economical, and geohistorical types. The outstanding diversity of the features of this formation determines its high heritage value and the national rank. The geological heritage of the Gachsaran Formation is important to scientists, educators, and tourists. The Papoon and Abolhaiat sections of this formation are potential geological heritage sites, although these do not represent all above-mentioned types. The large territory, where the Gachsaran Formation outcrop, has a significant geoconservation and geotourism potential, and further inventory of geosites on this territory is necessary. Similar studies of geological bodies in North Africa and the Middle East can facilitate better understanding of the geological heritage of this vast territory.

  3. Developing Radioactive Carbon Isotope Tagging for Monitoring, Verification and Accounting in Geological Carbon Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yinghuang

    In the wake of concerns about the long-term integrity and containment of sub-surface CO2 sequestration reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification, and accounting methods for geo-sequestered CO2. This Ph.D. project has been part of a larger U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored research project to demonstrate the feasibility of a system designed to tag CO2 with radiocarbon at a concentration of one part per trillion, which is the ambient concentration of 14C in the modern atmosphere. Because carbon found at depth is naturally free of 14C, this tag would easily differentiate pre-existing carbon in the underground from anthropogenic, injected carbon and provide an excellent handle for monitoring its whereabouts in the subsurface. It also creates an excellent handle for adding up anthropogenic carbon inventories. Future inventories in effect count 14C atoms. Accordingly, we developed a 14C tagging system suitable for use at the part-per-trillion level. This tagging system uses small containers of tracer fluid of 14C enriched CO2. The content of these containers is transferred into a CO2 stream readied for underground injection in a controlled manner so as to tag it at the part-per-trillion level. These containers because of their shape are referred to in this document as tracer loops. The demonstration of the tracer injection involved three steps. First, a tracer loop filling station was designed and constructed featuring a novel membrane based gas exchanger, which degassed the fluid in the first step and then equilibrated the fluid with CO2 at fixed pressure and fixed temperature. It was demonstrated that this approach could achieve uniform solutions and prevent the formation of bubbles and degassing downstream. The difference between measured and expected results of the CO2 content in the tracer loop was below 1%. Second, a high-pressure flow loop was built for injecting, mixing, and sampling of the fast flowing stream of

  4. Carbon nanostructure formation driven by energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhiyuan; Gong Jinlong; Zhu Dezhang

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanostructures, especially carbon nanotubes (CNTs), have been envisaged to be the building blocks of a variety of nanoscale devices and materials. The inherent nanometer-size and ability of being either metallic or semiconductive of CNTs lead to their application in nanoelectronics. Excellent mechanical characteristics of CNTs suggest their use as structural reinforcements. However, to fully exploit the potential applications, effective means of tailoring CNT properties must be developed. Irradiation of materials with energetic particles beams (ions and electrons) is a standard and important tool for modifying material properties. Irradiation makes it possible to dope the samples, to create local amorphous region or vice versa, recrystallize the lattice and even drive a phase transition. In this paper, we report our results of (1) phase transfromation from carbon nanotubes to nanocrystalline diamond driven by hydrogen plasma, (2) onion-like nanostructure from carbon nanotubes driven by ion beams of several tens keV, and (3) amorphous carbon nanowire network formation by ion beam irradiation. Structural phase transformation from multiwalled carbon nanotubes to nanocrystalline diamond by hydrogen plasma post-treatment was carried out. Ultrahigh equivalent diamond nucleation density of more than 1011 nuclei/cm 2 was obtained. The diamond formation and growth mechanisms were proposed to be the consequence of the formation of sp3 bonded amorphous carbon clusters. The hydrogen chemisorption on curved graphite network and the energy deposited on CNTs by continuous impingement of activated molecular or atomic hydrogen are responsible for the formation of amorphous carbon matrix. Diamond nucleates and grows in the way similar to that of diamond chemical vapor deposition processes on amorphous carbon films. Furthermore, single crystalline diamond nanorods of 4-8 nm in diameter and up to 200 nm in length have been successfully synthesized by hydrogen plasma post

  5. Physicochemical Properties, Micromorphology and Clay Mineralogy of Soils Affected by Geological Formations, Geomorphology and Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bayat

    2017-01-01

    Neogene conglomerates are among dominant geological formations of piedmont plain. Eleven pedons affected by young Quaternary sediments, Neogene and Cretaceous marls in aridic, aridic border to xeric, and xeric moisture regimes on above-mentioned geomorphic surfaces were described and sampled using Natural Resources Conservation Service (2012 guideline. Physicochemical properties, clay mineralogy, and micromorphology of soil samples investigated and soils were classified by Soil Taxonomy (2014 and WRB (2015 systems. Results and Discussion: Calcic, gypsic, argillic, and cambic diagnostic horizons investigated after field and laboratory studies. Typic Calcigypsids, Lithic Torriorthents, Typic Haplogypsids, Typic Haplocalcids, Typic Torrifluvents, Sodic Haplocambids, Typic Calciargids, and Xeric Haplocalcids subgroups were found using Soil Taxonomy (2014 system. Gypsisols, Calcisols, Luvisols, Cambisols, and Regosols reference soil groups identified by WRB (2015 classification system. Developed Alfisols, formed on piedmont plain geomorphic surface in xeric moisture regime. On the other hand, Entisols formed on rock pediments with aridic moisture regime. Soils in aridic moisture regimes were little developed with gypsic horizon, and where calcic horizon was formed, it was near the surface. Moving to the west with increasing humidity, gypsum was leached from the pedon and clay illuviation caused argillic horizon to be formed. Formation of Btk horizon in pedon 9 was attributed to a more paleoclimate. The maximum gypsum content of 44.7 % (gypsiferous soils was found in soils affected by Quaternary formations and Cretaceous marls, but the maximum calcium carbonate (44 %, calcareous soils was investigated in soils formed on Neogene conglomerate formations. Moreover, the maximum sodium adsorption ratio (SAR content (29.2 (mmol(± L-10.5 was determined for soils on unstable surface of alluvial plain. Smectite, vermiculite, illite, kaolinite, and chlorite clay minerals were

  6. Khadum Formation of Pre-Caucasus region as potential source of oil shales: geology and geochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Sh. Yandarbiev1

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the main modern aim for oil industry is the development of hydrocarbon extraction technologies from «oil shale». In Russia there are kerogen-saturated carbonate-clayey-siliceous deposits of the Bazhenov Formation, carbonate rocks of the Volga-Ural and Timan-Pechora oil and gas bearing basins and clayey Maikop series of Pre-Caucasus region. The Khadum Formation is lower part of the Maikop series represented by carbonate-clay and clayey deposits. On the basis of long-term field and laboratory investigation conducted by specialists of the Oil and Gas Department from Geological Faculty of the Lomonosov Moscow State University. a comprehensive study of the lithological composition, structure, geochemical, hydrogeological and hydrodynamic characteristics of the Paleogene section and monitoring of the drilled wells, the prospects of the oil and gas potential of the Khadum deposits of the Oligocene in the Eastern Pre-Caucasus oil and gas bearing basin were estimated. 11 gas and 19 oil deposits are discovered within the Khadum deposits, and they are confined to the sand layers and lenses, but most of the Khadum section belongs to «unconventional» sources of hydrocarbons. Based on the integrated approach, a map of oil and gas potential prospects for the Khadum deposits was constructed. Highly prospective territories for drilling for oil, areas with small and medium perspectives, and gas prospecting areas have been singled out. Recommendations are given for drilling and technology for the development of the Pre-Caucasus oil shales, based on the world experience in the development of such formations.

  7. The Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin, SW Iran: An assessment of highly-complex geological heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Tahereh; Ruban, Dmitry A.

    2017-05-01

    North Africa and the Middle East possess rich geological heritage, but the latter is yet to be fully identified and described. The Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin in southwest Iran, which corresponds to the lower part of the Asmari Formation, has significant potential for geoconservation and geotourism. The types of the geological heritage, their value, and the possible geosites have been assessed. The studied deposits are interesting because of lithology (carbonate rocks), fossils (larger foraminifera, other microfossils, diverse marine invertebrates, fish microremains, and trace fossils), biostratigraphical developments, facies (homoclinal carbonate ramp) and signature of global events (glacioeustatic fluctuations), and outstanding hydrocarbon resources. The five main geological heritage types are sedimentary, palaeontological, stratigraphical, palaeogeographical, and economical, from which the palaeontological, palaeogeographical, and economical types are of global rank. The Khollar and Kavar sections in the Fars Province of Iran are recommended as geosites suitable for research, education, and tourism. The high complexity of the geological heritage linked to the Oligocene carbonate platform of the Zagros Basin implies the phenomenon of geodiversity should be understood with regard to the relationships between types and their values.

  8. Ganglion dynamics and its implications to geologic carbon dioxide storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles; Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E; Jove-Colon, Carlos

    2013-01-02

    Capillary trapping of a nonwetting fluid phase in the subsurface has been considered as an important mechanism for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO(2)). This mechanism can potentially relax stringent requirements for the integrity of cap rocks for CO(2) storage and therefore can significantly enhance storage capacity and security. We here apply ganglion dynamics to understand the capillary trapping of supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) under relevant reservoir conditions. We show that, by breaking the injected scCO(2) into small disconnected ganglia, the efficiency of capillary trapping can be greatly enhanced, because the mobility of a ganglion is inversely dependent on its size. Supercritical CO(2) ganglia can be engineered by promoting CO(2)-water interface instability during immiscible displacement, and their size distribution can be controlled by injection mode (e.g., water-alternating-gas) and rate. We also show that a large mobile ganglion can potentially break into smaller ganglia due to CO(2)-brine interface instability during buoyant rise, thus becoming less mobile. The mobility of scCO(2) in the subsurface is therefore self-limited. Vertical structural heterogeneity within a reservoir can inhibit the buoyant rise of scCO(2) ganglia. The dynamics of scCO(2) ganglia described here provides a new perspective for the security and monitoring of subsurface CO(2) storage.

  9. Techno-economic Comparison of Geological Disposal of Carbon Dioxide and Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-12-01

    The reduction of greenhouse gas emissions is an important prerequisite for sustainable development. The energy sector is a major contributor to such emissions, which are mostly from fossil fuel fired power plants acting as point sources of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) discharges. For the last twenty years, the new technology of carbon capture and storage, which mitigates CO 2 emissions, has been considered in many IAEA Member States. This technology involves the removal of CO 2 from the combustion process and its disposal in geological formations, such as depleted oil or gas fields, saline aquifers or unmineable coal seams. A large scale energy supply option with low CO 2 emissions is nuclear power. The high level radioactive waste produced during nuclear power plant operation and decommissioning as well as in nuclear fuel reprocessing is also planned to be disposed of in deep geological formations. To further research and development in these areas and to compare and learn from the planning, development and implementation of these two underground waste disposal concepts, the IAEA launched the coordinated research project (CRP) Techno-economic Comparison of Ultimate Disposal Facilities for Carbon Dioxide and Radioactive Waste. The project started in 2008 and was completed in 2012. The project established an international network of nine institutions from nine IAEA Member States, representing both developing and developed countries. The CRP results compared the geological disposal facilities in the following areas: geology, environmental impacts, risk and safety assessment, monitoring, cost estimation, public perception, policy, regulation and institutions. This publication documents the outcome of the CRP and is structured into thematic chapters, covering areas analysed. Each chapter was prepared under the guidance of a lead author and involved co-authors from different Member States with diverse expertise in related areas. Participants drew on the results of earlier

  10. Radon potential, geologic formations, and lung cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen J. Hahn

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Radon potential maps that account for geologic factors and observed radon values may be superior to using observed radon values only. Knowing radon-prone areas could help target population-based lung cancer prevention interventions given the inequities that exist related to radon.

  11. Probabilistic Assessment of Above Zone Pressure Predictions at a Geologic Carbon Storage Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namhata, Argha; Oladyshkin, Sergey; Dilmore, Robert M.; Zhang, Liwei; Nakles, David V.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage into geological formations is regarded as an important mitigation strategy for anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. This study first simulates the leakage of CO2 and brine from a storage reservoir through the caprock. Then, we estimate the resulting pressure changes at the zone overlying the caprock also known as Above Zone Monitoring Interval (AZMI). A data-driven approach of arbitrary Polynomial Chaos (aPC) Expansion is then used to quantify the uncertainty in the above zone pressure prediction based on the uncertainties in different geologic parameters. Finally, a global sensitivity analysis is performed with Sobol indices based on the aPC technique to determine the relative importance of different parameters on pressure prediction. The results indicate that there can be uncertainty in pressure prediction locally around the leakage zones. The degree of such uncertainty in prediction depends on the quality of site specific information available for analysis. The scientific results from this study provide substantial insight that there is a need for site-specific data for efficient predictions of risks associated with storage activities. The presented approach can provide a basis of optimized pressure based monitoring network design at carbon storage sites.

  12. Onshore/ Offshore Geologic Assessment for Carbon Storage in the Southeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, C. C.; Knapp, J. H.; Brantley, D.; Lakshmi, V.; Almutairi, K.; Almayahi, D.; Akintunde, O. M.; Ollmann, J.

    2017-12-01

    Eighty percent of the world's energy relies on fossil fuels and under increasingly stricter national and international regulations on greenhouse gas emissions storage of CO2 in geologic repositories seems to be not only a feasible, but also and vital solution for near/ mid-term reduction of carbon emissions. We have evaluated the feasibility of CO2 storage in saline formations of the Eastern North American Margin (ENAM) including (1) the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sandstones of the buried South Georgia Rift (SGR) basin, and (2) the Mesozoic and Cenozoic geologic formations along the Mid- and South Atlantic seaboard. These analyses have included integration of subsurface geophysical data (2- and 3-D seismic surveys) with core samples, well logs as well as uses of geological databases and geospatial analysis leading to CO2 injection simulation models. ENAM is a complex and regionally extensive mature Mesozoic passive margin rift system encompassing: (1) a large volume and regional extent of related magmatism known as the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP), (2) a complete stratigraphic column that records the post-rift evolution in several basins, (3) preserved lithospheric-scale pre-rift structures including Paleozoic sutures, and (4) a wide range of geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies both onshore and offshore. While the target reservoirs onshore show heterogeneity and a highly complex geologic evolution they also show promising conditions for significant safe CO2 storage away from the underground acquifers. Our offshore study (the Southeast Offshore Storage Resource Assessment - SOSRA) is focused on the outer continental shelf from North Carolina to the southern tip of Florida. Three old exploration wells are available to provide additional constraints on the seismic reflection profiles. Two of these wells (TRANSCO 1005-1 and COST GE-1) penetrate the pre-rift Paleozoic sedimentary formations while the EXXON 564-1 well penetrates the post

  13. Relation between methane hydrate-bearing formations and geological phenomena on the seafloor in the eastern Nankai trough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagakubo, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Inamori, T.; Saeki, T.; Shimoda, N.; Fujii, T. [Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp., Chiba (Japan). Technology Research Center; Morita, S.; Tanahashi, M. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba (Japan). Inst. for Geo-Resources and Environment

    2008-07-01

    Bathymetric and sea floor amplitude maps of the Tokai-Oki area, Daini-Atsumi Knoll, and Kumao-Nada areas were constructed using data obtained from 3-D seismic surveys. The study examined the control factors of fluid migration between methane hydrate formations and the sea floor. The aim of the study was to understand the relationship between methane hydrate-bearing formation and geological phenomena in the eastern Nankai trough. Sea floor geological features in the region include canyons, pockmarks, landslides, and undulations. The study identified methane seeps with biological colonies, bacteria mats and methane-enriched pore water. Strong sea floor amplitudes corresponded with distributions of carbonate outcrops and methane-bearing fluids around the BSR. The study showed that the principle geological control factors for fluid migration between methane hydrate-bearing formations and the sea floor are permeable sandy sediments; shallow faults; and natural hydraulic fractures. Significant shallow anomalies were observed in the Daini-Atsumi Knoll area. Sandy sediments derived from turbidites control the distributions of bottom simulating reflectors. It was concluded that permeable sandy sediments may play an important role in fluid migration between methane hydrate-bearing formations and the sea floor. 12 refs., 13 figs.

  14. Multiphase modeling of geologic carbon sequestration in saline aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandilla, Karl W; Celia, Michael A; Birkholzer, Jens T; Cihan, Abdullah; Leister, Evan C

    2015-01-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is being considered as a climate change mitigation option in many future energy scenarios. Mathematical modeling is routinely used to predict subsurface CO2 and resident brine migration for the design of injection operations, to demonstrate the permanence of CO2 storage, and to show that other subsurface resources will not be degraded. Many processes impact the migration of CO2 and brine, including multiphase flow dynamics, geochemistry, and geomechanics, along with the spatial distribution of parameters such as porosity and permeability. In this article, we review a set of multiphase modeling approaches with different levels of conceptual complexity that have been used to model GCS. Model complexity ranges from coupled multiprocess models to simplified vertical equilibrium (VE) models and macroscopic invasion percolation models. The goal of this article is to give a framework of conceptual model complexity, and to show the types of modeling approaches that have been used to address specific GCS questions. Application of the modeling approaches is shown using five ongoing or proposed CO2 injection sites. For the selected sites, the majority of GCS models follow a simplified multiphase approach, especially for questions related to injection and local-scale heterogeneity. Coupled multiprocess models are only applied in one case where geomechanics have a strong impact on the flow. Owing to their computational efficiency, VE models tend to be applied at large scales. A macroscopic invasion percolation approach was used to predict the CO2 migration at one site to examine details of CO2 migration under the caprock. © 2015, National Ground Water Association.

  15. Geological history of Mengkarang formation for enhancing the geodiversity of Merangin Geopark

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasetio, A. D.; Syahputra, R.; Kristyanto, T. H. W.; Tempessy, A. S.; Rokhmatuloh

    2017-07-01

    Merangin area, a national geopark in Jambi Province, is currently being proposed to be the global Geopark to the UNESCO. To make it successful, Merangin Geopark should fulfil the essential requirement, i.e. having outstanding rock outcrop and influence the global process or geological history of the world. The most attractive outcrop in Merangin Area is the Permian Mengkarang Formation with abundance of floral fossil. As the oldest exposed formation in Jambi, Mengkarang Formation has its unique tectonic process that made this formation exposed in the surface with the shape of inversed "U" curve. Therefore, this research aimed to model the geological history of Merangin as fulfilment of the Global Geopark requirement. This research used three methods, first of all, field work that consists of the stratigraphic measurement, geological structure investigation, and rock sampling. The next method was the laboratory work that consisted of petrographic analysis, paleontological analysis, and XRD (X-Ray powder Diffraction) analysis. The last method was the studio work that consisted of the stratigraphic parameter analysis in this area, structural geology analysis, and modelling the geological history of this area. The result of this research shows that the historical geology in Merangin area has its unique tectonic sedimentation, and denudation process that made the Permian Mengkarang Formation exposed to the surface in unique "U" shape. This research will add knowledge about Merangin Geopark to help fulfilling the requirement of the proposed Merangin Global Geopark.

  16. Ice Formation of Coated Black Carbon Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B.; Kulkarni, G.; Beránek, J.; Zelenyuk, A.; Cziczo, D. J.; Thornton, J. A.

    2010-12-01

    The importance of black carbon particles as heterogeneous ice nuclei is currently in question. While pure black carbon is hydrophobic, atmospheric processing or aging by condensation or heterogeneous oxidation may alter the surface, physical and chemical properties, likely causing the particle surface and perhaps the particle bulk to become more hydrophilic. The impact of such atmospheric processing on the ice nucleating ability of soot remains poorly explored. In this laboratory study we simulated various atmospheric processing mechanisms and their effect on the ice formation of black carbon particles. Black carbon particles were generated by both dry powder dispersion of commercial carbon black and using a miniCAST soot generator. The particles were then coated with various atmospherically relevant coatings, including dicarboxylic acids of varying solubility. The ice-forming potential of the resulting particles was continuously determined at heterogeneous conditions in the PNNL Compact Ice Chamber. Single Particle Mass Spectrometer (SPLAT) was used to characterize the size, chemical composition, morphology, fractal dimension, and effective densities of individual particles with and without the coatings and to quantify the relationship between particle chemical and physical properties and their IN activity. We discuss the implications of our results in the context of typical lifetimes and processing history experienced by black carbon particles emitted into the upper troposphere.

  17. Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2009-07-21

    Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

  18. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate wettability. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

  19. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

  20. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have acquired field oil and core samples and field brine compositions from Marathon. We have conducted preliminary adsorption and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Receding contact angles increase with surfactant adsorption. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

  1. Geology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This database is an Arc/Info implementation of the 1:500,000 scale Geology Map of Kansas, M­23, 1991. This work wasperformed by the Automated Cartography section of...

  2. Analytical solution of geological carbon sequestration under constant pressure injection into a horizontal radial reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, R.; Liou, T.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is believed to be an economically feasible technology to mitigate global warming by capturing carbon dioxide (CO2), the major component of greenhouse gases, from the atmosphere and injecting it into deep geological formations.Several mechanisms can help trap CO2 in the pore space of a geological reservoir, stratigraphic and structural trapping, hydrodynamic trapping, and geochemical trapping.Besides these trapping mechanisms, another important issue that deserves careful attention is the risk of CO2 leakage. The common ';constant injection rate' scenario may induce high pressure buildup that will endanger the mechanical integrity as well as the sealing capability of the cap rock. Instead of injecting CO2 at a constant mass rate, CO2 can be injected into the reservoir by fixing the pressure (usually the bottom-hole pressure) in the injection borehole. By doing so, the inevitable pressure buildup associated with the constant injection scheme can be completely eliminated in the constant pressure injection scheme. In this paper, a semi-analytical solution for CO2 injection with constant pressure was developed. For simplicity, structural and geochemical trapping mechanisms were not considered. Therefore, a horizontal reservoir with infinite radial extent was considered. Prior to injection, the reservoir is fully saturated with the formation brine. It is assumed that CO2 does not mix with brine such that a sharp interface is formed once CO2 invades the brine-saturated pores. Because of the density difference between CO2 and brine, CO2 resides above the interface. Additional assumptions were also made when building up the brine and CO2 mass balance equations: (1) both of the fluids and the geological formations are incompressible, (2) capillary pressure is neglected, (3)there is no fluid flow in the vertical direction, and the horizontal flow satisfies the Darcy's law.In order to solve for the height of brine-CO2 interface, the two

  3. Focusing on clay formation as host media of HLW geological disposal in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Hualing; Chen Shi; Sun Donghui

    2007-01-01

    Host medium is vitally important for safety for HLW geological disposal. Chinese HLW disposal effort in the past decades were mainly focused on granite formation. However, the granite formation has fatal disadvantage for HLW geological disposal. This paper reviews experiences gained and lessons learned in the international community and analyzes key factors affecting the site selection. It is recommended that clay formation should be taken into consideration and additional effort should be made before decision making of host media of HLW disposal in China. (authors)

  4. Using improved technology for widespread application of a geological carbon sequestration study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Kansas Geological Survey is part of an ongoing collaboration between DOE-NETL, academia, and the petroleum industry to investigate the feasibility of carbon utilization and storage in Kansas. Latest findings in the 25,000 mi2 study area in southern Kansas estimate CO2 storage capacity ranges from 8.8 to 75.5 billion metric tons in a deep Lower Orodovican-age Arbuckle saline aquifer. In addition, an estimated 100 million tonnes of CO2 could be used for extracting additional oil from Kansas' fields, making transitions to carbon management economic. This partnership has a rare opportunity to synchronize abundant, yet previously disseminated knowledge into a cohesive scientific process to optimize sequestration site selection and implementation strategies. Following a thorough characterization, a small-scale CO2 injection of 70,000 tonnes will be implemented in Wellington Field in Sumner County, including a five-plot miscible CO2-EOR flood of a Mississippian reservoir followed by the underlying Arbuckle saline aquifer. Best practices and lessons learned from the field study will improve estimates on CO2 storage capacity, plume migration models, and identify potential leakage pathways to pursue safe and effective geological carbon sequestration at commercial scales. A highly accessible and multifunctional online database is being developed throughout the study that integrates all acquired geological, physical, chemical, and hydrogeologic knowledge. This public database incorporates tens of thousands of data points into easily viewable formats for user downloads. An Interactive Project Map Viewer is a key mechanism to present the scientific research, and will delineate compartment candidates and reservoirs matching reference criteria or user defined attributes. This tool uses a familiar pan and zoom interface to filter regional project data or scale down to detailed digitized information from over 3,300 carefully selected preexisting Kansas wells. A Java-based log

  5. Bacterial interactions and transport in geological formation of alumino-silica clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Kien; Yang, Guang; Wang, Boya; Tawfiq, Kamal; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial transport in the subsurface is controlled by their interactions with the surrounding environment, which are determined by the surface properties of the geological formation and bacterial surfaces. In this research, surface thermodynamic properties of Escherichia coli and the geological formation of alumino-silica clays were characterized based on contact angle measurements, which were utilized to quantify the distance-dependent interactions between E. coli and the geological formation according to the traditional and extended Derjaguin, Landau, Verwey and Overbeek (DLVO) theory. E. coli attachment to alumino-silica clays was evaluated in laboratory columns under saturated and steady-state flow conditions. E. coli deposition coefficient and desorption coefficient were simulated using convection-dispersion transport models against E. coli breakthrough curves, which were then linked to interactions between E. coli and the geological formation. It was discovered that E. coli deposition was controlled by the long-ranged electrostatic interaction and E. coli desorption was attributed to the short-ranged Lifshitz-van der Waals and Lewis acid-base interactions. E. coli transport in three layers of different alumino-silica clays was further examined and the breakthrough curve was simulated using E. coli deposition coefficient and desorption coefficient obtained from their individual column experiments. The well-fitted simulation confirmed that E. coli transport observations were interaction-dependent phenomena between E. coli and the geological formation. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Recovery Act: Multi-Objective Optimization Approaches for the Design of Carbon Geological Sequestration Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bau, Domenico

    2013-05-31

    The main objective of this project is to provide training opportunities for two graduate students in order to improve the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies. The graduate student effort will be geared towards the formulation and implementation of an integrated simulation-optimization framework to provide a rigorous scientific support to the design CCS systems that, for any given site: (a) maximize the amount of carbon storage; (b) minimize the total cost associated with the CCS project; (c) minimize the risk of CO2 upward leakage from injected formations. The framework will stem from a combination of data obtained from geophysical investigations, a multiphase flow model, and a stochastic multi-objective optimization algorithm. The methodology will rely on a geostatistical approach to generate ensembles of scenarios of the parameters that are expected to have large sensitivities and uncertainties on the model response and thus on the risk assessment, in particular the permeability properties of the injected formation and its cap rock. The safety theme will be addressed quantitatively by including the risk of CO2 upward leakage from the injected formations as one the objectives that should be minimized in the optimization problem. The research performed under this grant is significant to academic researchers and professionals weighing the benefits, costs, and risks of CO2 sequestration. Project managers in initial planning stages of CCS projects will be able to generate optimal tradeoff surfaces and with corresponding injection plans for potential sequestration sites leading to cost efficient preliminary project planning. In addition, uncertainties concerning CCS have been researched. Uncertainty topics included Uncertainty Analysis of Continuity of Geological Confining Units using Categorical Indicator Kriging (CIK) and the Influence of Uncertain Parameters on the Leakage of CO2 to

  7. Assessment of potential radionuclide transport in site-specific geologic formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.

    1980-08-01

    Associated with the development of deep, geologic repositories for nuclear waste isolation is a need for safety assessments of the potential for nuclide migration. Frequently used in estimating migration rates is a parameter generally known as a distribution coefficient, K/sub d/, which describes the distribution of a radionuclide between a solid (rock) and a liquid (groundwater) phase. This report is intended to emphasize that the use of K/sub d/ must be coupled with a knowledge of the geology and release scenarios applicable to a repository. Selected K/sub d/ values involving rock samples from groundwater/brine simulants typical of two potential repository sites, WIPP and NTS, are used to illustrate this concern. Experimental parameters used in K/sub d/ measurements including nuclide concentration, site sampling/rock composition, and liquid-to-solid ratios are discussed. The solubility of U(VI) in WIPP brine/groundwater was addressed in order to assess the potential contribution of this phenomena to K/sub d/ values. Understanding mehanisms of sorption of radionuclides on rocks would lead to a better predictive capability. Sorption is attributed to the presence of trace constituents (often unidentified) in rocks. An attempt was made to determine if this applied to WIPP dolomite rocks by comparing sorption behavior of the natural material with that of a synthetic dolomite prepared in the laboratory with reagent grade chemicals. The results were inconclusive. The results of a study of Tc sorption by an argillite sample from the Calico Hills formation at NTS under ambient laboratory conditions were more conclusive. The Tc sorption was found to be associated with elemental carbon. Available evidence points to a reduction mechanism leading to the apparent sorption of Tc on the solid phase

  8. Negative emissions in ecologic transition - Case of carbon geological storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laude-Depezay, Audrey; Royer-Adnot, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    The authors first report a bibliographical review on carbon assessment of BECCS (bio-energy and carbon capture and storage), and then propose a technological innovation which would result in an improvement of their carbon print: the CO 2 -Dissolved technology. Thus, they outline the challenges of the carbon print of fossil carbon capture and storage, discusses the specificities of BECCS (transformation of biomass into energy, carbon print of BECCS processes for the production of ethanol, of electricity, or of paper pulp). They discuss the contribution of the CO 2 -dissolved technology to the production of bio-ethanol: description of a French plant and case of supercritical carbon capture and storage, characteristics of the concept (operation, carbon print assessment)

  9. Study of microorganisms present in deep geologic formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camus, H.; Lion, R.; Bianchi, A.; Garcin, J.

    1987-01-01

    This work has been executed in the scope of the studies on high activity radioactive wastes storage in deep geological environments. The authors make reference to an as complete as possible literature on the existence of microorganisms in those environments or under similar conditions. Then they describe the equipment and methods they have implemented to perform their study of the populations present in three deep-reaching drill-holes in Auriat (France), Mol (Belgique) and Troon (Great Britain). The results of the study exhibit the presence of a certain biological activity, well adapted to that particular life environment. Strains appear to be very varied from the taxonomic point of view and seemingly show an important potential of mineral alteration when provided with an adequate source of energy. Complementary studies, using advanced techniques such as those employed during the work forming the basis of this paper, seem necessary for a more accurate evaluation of long-term risks of perturbation of a deep storage site [fr

  10. Formation and Reduction of Carbon Monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostami AA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The total amounts of carbon monoxide (CO and carbon dioxide (CO2 in the mainstream smoke of a burning cigarette during a steady draw were measured by a non-dispersive infrared (IR technique for a variety of flow rates. The temperature profiles in the cigarette were also measured under the same flow conditions. The data were used in a diffusion model to estimate the concentrations of these gases downstream of the pyrolysis zone. The contribution of pyrolysis in the generation of these gases was calculated using a kinetic model. The remaining CO and CO2 are attributed to processes occurring in the combustion zone. The calculated mean concentrations of carbon oxides behind the pyrolysis zone are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The contributions of pyrolysis and combustion to the formation of CO were found to be approximately 1/3 and 2/3 respectively. The results show that the peak temperature rises with an increase in the mainstream flow rate in the limited range of 0 to 200 mL/min. As a result, the concentrations of carbon oxides behind the pyrolysis zone also increase with the flow rate and reach plateaus at higher flow rates.

  11. Carbon deposits formation, nature and characterisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, J.; Barranco, R. [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre

    2007-07-01

    During the production of coke, some hydrocarbon components of the evolved volatile matter are pyrolytically decomposed under the existing thermal conditions, whereby some of the resulting decomposition products deposit on the various solid surface in the coke oven. Their adhesion to the brickwork can be strong and reactivity low, so removal can be difficult. The presence of wall and roof carbon deposits can cause a number of serious problems in the operation of a coke oven. The literature indicates there are three different types of pyrolytic carbon formed in coke ovens but the terminology and descriptions are not consistent. Different types of deposits are also found in different locations within the coke oven. The paper describes a study of nature and formation of carbon deposits in industrial coke ovens, with particular emphasis on the nature of the carbon deposited adjacent to the brickwork. The paper was presented at a COMA/CRF meeting at Scunthorpe on 27 April 2006. 12 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. International Approaches for Nuclear Waste Disposal in Geological Formations: Geological Challenges in Radioactive Waste Isolation—Fifth Worldwide Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, Boris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sassani, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swift, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-04-26

    The overall objective of the Fifth Worldwide Review (WWR-5) is to document the current state-of-the-art of major developments in a number of nations throughout the World pursuing geological disposal programs, and to summarize challenging problems and experience that have been obtained in siting, preparing and reviewing cases for the operational and long-term safety of proposed and operating nuclear waste repositories. The scope of the Review is to address current specific technical issues and challenges in safety case development along with the interplay of technical feasibility, siting, engineering design issues, and operational and post-closure safety. In particular, the chapters included in the report present the following types of information: the current status of the deep geological repository programs for high level nuclear waste and low- and intermediate level nuclear waste in each country, concepts of siting and radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel management in different countries (with the emphasis of nuclear waste disposal under different climatic conditions and different geological formations), progress in repository site selection and site characterization, technology development, buffer/backfill materials studies and testing, support activities, programs, and projects, international cooperation, and future plans, as well as regulatory issues and transboundary problems.

  13. Electrical Resistivity Models in Geological Formations in the Southern Area of the East of Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio García-Gutiérrez

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop electrical resistivity models in geological formations of greater interest for geological engineering in the southern area of the East of Cuba. A procedure for the generalization of the geo-electrical database was prepared to generate the referred geo-electrical models. A total of 38 works with 895 vertical electrical surveys, of which 317 (35.4% located near (parametrical drills. Three models for the Paso Real formation and one for the Capdevila, the most distributed in the region under investigation were defined. The surface quartz sands from the municipality of Sandino were identified to have higher electrical resistivity averages (1241 Ω•m, while they do not exceed 86 Ω•m in the lower horizons to resolve basic tasks of the geological engineering investigations. The assessment of the cover clayey sandy soils was satisfactory in both geological formations while the determination of the water table depth was unfavorable. The remaining tasks varied between relatively favorable to unfavorable according to the geological formations.

  14. Pilot Studies of Geologic and Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in the Big Sky Region, USA, and Opportunities for Commercial Scale Deployment of New Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waggoner, L. A.; Capalbo, S. M.; Talbott, J.

    2007-05-01

    Within the Big Sky region, including Montana, Idaho, South Dakota, Wyoming and the Pacific Northwest, industry is developing new coal-fired power plants using the abundant coal and other fossil-based resources. Of crucial importance to future development programs are robust carbon mitigation plans that include a technical and economic assessment of regional carbon sequestration opportunities. The objective of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) is to promote the development of a regional framework and infrastructure required to validate and deploy carbon sequestration technologies. Initial work compiled sources and potential sinks for carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Big Sky Region and developed the online Carbon Atlas. Current efforts couple geologic and terrestrial field validation tests with market assessments, economic analysis and regulatory and public outreach. The primary geological efforts are in the demonstration of carbon storage in mafic/basalt formations, a geology not yet well characterized but with significant long-term storage potential in the region and other parts of the world; and in the Madison Formation, a large carbonate aquifer in Wyoming and Montana. Terrestrial sequestration relies on management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO2 to storage in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration method can be implemented today and is on the front-line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO2 emissions. Details of pilot projects are presented including: new technologies, challenges and successes of projects and potential for commercial-scale deployment.

  15. Terminal storage of radioactive waste in geologic formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lomenick, T.F.

    1976-01-01

    The principal aim of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program is to develop pilot plants and, ultimately, repositories in several different rock formations in various parts of the country. Rocks such as salt, shale, limestone, granite, schists, and serpentinite may all qualify as host media for the disposition of radioactive wastes in the proper environments. In general, the only requirement for any rock formation or storage site is that it contain any emplaced wastes for so long as it takes for the radioactive materials to decay to innocuous levels. This requirement, though, is a formidable one as some of the wastes will remain active for periods of hundreds of thousands of years and the physical and chemical properties of rocks that govern circulating groundwater and hence containment, are difficult to determine and define. Nevertheless, there are many rock types and a host of areas throughout the country where conditions are promising for the development of waste repositories. Some of these are discussed below

  16. Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.A. Davis; A.L. Graham; H.W. Parker; J.R. Abbott; M.S. Ingber; A.A. Mammoli; L.A. Mondy; Quanxin Guo; Ahmed Abou-Sayed

    2005-12-07

    Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Formations The U.S. and other countries may enter into an agreement that will require a significant reduction in CO2 emissions in the medium to long term. In order to achieve such goals without drastic reductions in fossil fuel usage, CO2 must be removed from the atmosphere and be stored in acceptable reservoirs. The research outlined in this proposal deals with developing a methodology to determine the suitability of a particular geologic formation for the long-term storage of CO2 and technologies for the economical transfer and storage of CO2 in these formations. A novel well-logging technique using nuclear-magnetic resonance (NMR) will be developed to characterize the geologic formation including the integrity and quality of the reservoir seal (cap rock). Well-logging using NMR does not require coring, and hence, can be performed much more quickly and efficiently. The key element in the economical transfer and storage of the CO2 is hydraulic fracturing the formation to achieve greater lateral spreads and higher throughputs of CO2. Transport, compression, and drilling represent the main costs in CO2 sequestration. The combination of well-logging and hydraulic fracturing has the potential of minimizing these costs. It is possible through hydraulic fracturing to reduce the number of injection wells by an order of magnitude. Many issues will be addressed as part of the proposed research to maximize the storage rate and capacity and insure the environmental integrity of CO2 sequestration in geological formations. First, correlations between formation properties and NMR relaxation times will be firmly established. A detailed experimental program will be conducted to determine these correlations. Second, improved hydraulic fracturing models will be developed which are suitable for CO2 sequestration as opposed to enhanced oil recovery (EOR

  17. Geology and hydrogeology of the Dammam Formation in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Awadi, E.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Al-Senafy, M. N.

    The Dammam Formation of Middle Eocene age is one of the major aquifers containing useable brackish water in Kuwait. Apart from the paleokarst zone at the top, the Dammam Formation in Kuwait consists of 150-200m of dolomitized limestone that is subdivided into three members, on the basis of lithology and biofacies. The upper member consists of friable chalky dolomicrite and dolomite. The middle member is mainly laminated biomicrite and biodolomicrite. The lower member is nummulitic limestone with interlayered shale toward the base. Geophysical markers conform to these subdivisions. Core analyses indicate that the upper member is the most porous and permeable of the three units, as confirmed by the distribution of lost-circulation zones. The quality of water in the aquifer deteriorates toward the north and east. A potentiometric-head difference exists between the Dammam Formation and the unconformably overlying Kuwait Group; this difference is maintained by the presence of an intervening aquitard. Résumé La formation de Damman, d'âge Éocène moyen, est l'un des principaux aquifères du Koweit, contenant de l'eau saumâtre utilisable. A part dans sa partie supérieure où existe un paléokarst, la formation de Damman au Koweit est constituée par 150 à 200m de calcaires dolomitisés, divisés en trois unités sur la base de leur lithologie et de biofaciès. L'unité supérieure est formée d'une dolomicrite crayeuse et friable et d'une dolomie. L'unité médiane est pour l'essentiel une biomicrite laminée et une biodolomicrite. L'unité inférieure est un calcaire nummulitique avec des intercalations argileuses vers la base. Les marqueurs géophysiques sont conformes à ces subdivisions. Les analyses de carottes montrent que l'unité supérieure est la plus poreuse et la plus perméable des trois. La répartition des zones d'écoulement souterrain confirment ces données. La qualité de l'eau dans l'aquifère se dégrade en direction du nord et de l'est. Une

  18. Resting in peace?- regulatory approaches to the geological storage of radioactive waste and carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langlet, David (School of Business, Economics and Law, Univ. of Goeteborg, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2010-09-15

    An emerging and much heralded technology for fighting climate change by reducing anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions is carbon capture and storage (CCS). The final stage of CCS is the storage (or disposal) of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) away from the atmosphere, typically in a deep geological formation. Although the risks posed by CO{sub 2} differ from those presented by nuclear waste and spent fuel, the similarities - most noticeably the vast time scales involved and the preference for concentration and containment - make a comparison of regulatory approaches to such risks relevant and informative. The intention of the current paper is to carry out such a comparison. Using Sweden as a focal point, applicable legal frameworks for the management of captured CO{sub 2} and spent nuclear fuel and nuclear waste will be juxtaposed. Two aspects in particular will be chosen for closer scrutiny: requirements pertaining to the selection of sites for disposal/storage of nuclear material and captured CO{sub 2} respectively, and the nature and allocation of economic responsibility for handling and minimizing long-term hazards associated with those substances. In the case of nuclear residues, responsibility for spent fuel will be the main focus. However, the same principles mostly apply to other radioactive waste from the nuclear industry, such as parts of decommissioned nuclear reactors

  19. Near-surface monitoring strategies for geologic carbon dioxide storage verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hepple, Robert P.

    2003-10-31

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. Geologic CO{sub 2} storage verification will be needed to ensure that CO{sub 2} is not leaking from the intended storage formation and seeping out of the ground. Because the ultimate failure of geologic CO{sub 2} storage occurs when CO{sub 2} seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, and because elevated concentrations of CO{sub 2} near the ground surface can cause health, safety, and environmental risks, monitoring will need to be carried out in the near-surface environment. The detection of a CO{sub 2} leakage or seepage signal (LOSS) in the near-surface environment is challenging because there are large natural variations in CO{sub 2} concentrations and fluxes arising from soil, plant, and subsurface processes. The term leakage refers to CO{sub 2} migration away from the intended storage site, while seepage is defined as CO{sub 2} passing from one medium to another, for example across the ground surface. The flow and transport of CO{sub 2} at high concentrations in the near-surface environment will be controlled by its high density, low viscosity, and high solubility in water relative to air. Numerical simulations of leakage and seepage show that CO{sub 2} concentrations can reach very high levels in the shallow subsurface even for relatively modest CO{sub 2} leakage fluxes. However, once CO{sub 2} seeps out of the ground into the atmospheric surface layer, surface winds are effective at dispersing CO{sub 2} seepage. In natural ecological systems with no CO{sub 2} LOSS, near-surface CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations are controlled by CO{sub 2} uptake by photosynthesis, and production by root respiration, organic carbon biodegradation in soil, deep outgassing of CO{sub 2}, and by exchange of CO{sub 2} with the atmosphere. Existing technologies available for monitoring CO{sub 2} in the near-surface environment

  20. [Carbon-carbon bond formation based on alkenylphosphonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Y

    2001-11-01

    We have been engaged in the development of asymmetric conjugate addition reactions of lithium thiolates, organolithiums and organocopper reagents under the control of external chiral ligands and we have also developed an efficient asymmetric Horner-Wadsworth-Emmons (HWE) reaction using an external chiral Ligand. We attempted to synthesize axial chiral allenes by combination of these conjugate addition reaction and HWE reaction. In the course of this study, we found that Michael-aldol reaction of alkenylphosphonates 1 using LDA and aldehydes results in the direct formation of alpha,beta-unsaturated hydroxyphosphonate 4, which was efficiently converted to allene by treatment with KH or KH-18-crown-6. Furthermore, allenes were synthesized by sequential double HWE reaction in one-flask manner starting from methylenebisphosphonate 8. The key to success is a metal exchange of intermediate lithium alkoxide 4-Li to potassium alkoxide 4-K by the addition of t-BuOK. As our continuous study of carbon-carbon bond formation based on alkenylphosphonates, a cyclization reaction of bisalkenylphosphonate 6 was developed. Although the treatment of 6 with organolithium reagents afforded a mixture of addition-cyclization product 9 and deprotonation-cyclization product 10, the treatment of 6 with LDA gave 10 selectively. These cyclization methods were applied to the synthesis of efficient chiral phosphine ligands.

  1. Transport of Perfluorocarbon Tracers in the Cranfield Geological Carbon Sequestration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moortgat, J.; Soltanian, M. R.; Amooie, M. A.; Cole, D. R.; Graham, D. E.; Pfiffner, S. M.; Phelps, T.

    2017-12-01

    A field-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection pilot project was conducted by the Southeast Regional Sequestration Partnership (SECARB) at Cranfield, Mississippi. Two associated campaigns in 2009 and 2010 were carried out to co-inject perfluorocarbon tracers (PFTs) and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) with CO2. Tracers in gas samples from two observation wells were analyzed to construct breakthrough curves. We present the compiled field data as well as detailed numerical modeling of the flow and transport of CO2, brine, and introduced tracers. A high-resolution static model of the formation geology in the Detailed Area Study (DAS) was used in order to capture the impact of connected flow pathways created by fluvial channels on breakthrough curves and breakthrough times of PFTs and SF6 tracers. We use the cubic-plus-association (CPA) equation of state, which takes into account the polar nature of water molecules, to describe the phase behavior of CO2-brine-tracer mixtures. We show how the combination of multiple tracer injection pulses with detailed numerical simulations provide a powerful tool in constraining both formation properties and how complex flow pathways develop over time.

  2. Geology and application of geologic concepts, Morrison Formation, Grants uranium region, New Mexico, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawley, R.A.; Holen, H.K.; Chenoweth, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Grants uranium region is the most productive uranium mining area in the U.S.A., having produced 125,034 tonnes U. Most production is from sandstones in the upper Morrison Formation of Late Jurassic age. The productive sandstones are part of a broad alluvial-fan depositional system located largely in the San Juan Basin. A regional oxidation front, formed in the host sandstones, has advanced downdip into the basin from southern outcrop areas. Primary ore deposits are tabular deposits that trend in the direction of sedimentary transport, are in reduced sandstone at and downdip from the oxidation front, and are nearly as old as the host rocks. Redistributed ore deposits are thick deposits commonly localized by faults that offset primary ore and are remobilized primary deposits that have been reprecipitated at the oxidation front. Humate is coextensive with primary ore; yet, more than one ore model may be necessary to explain the origin of the uraniferous humate. Presence of grayish-green, montmorillonitic mudstone and claystone beds may indicate uraniferous humate in adjacent sandstone beds. Because ore occurs in trends, ''trendology'' is the most commonly used exploration concept. The oxidation front is the most productive environment because the front tends to ''hang up'' where highly-reducing primary orebodies are encountered, and it is where redistributed ore is found. Deeper in the basin in unoxidized sandstones, favorable depositional environments are good targets for primary ore. (author)

  3. Multivariate Analysis Of Ground Water Characteristics Of Geological Formations Of Enugu State Of Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orakwe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The chemometric data mining techniques using principal factor analysis PFA and hierarchical cluster analysis CA was employed to evaluate and to examine the borehole characteristics of geological formations of Enugu State of Nigeria to determine the latent structure of the borehole characteristics and to classify 9 borehole parameters from 49 locations into borehole groups of similar characteristics. PFA extracted three factors which accounted for a large proportion of the variation in the data 77.305 of the variance. Out of nine parameters examined the first PFA had the highest number of variables loading on a single factor where four borehole parameters borehole depth borehole casing static water level and dynamic water level loaded on it with positive coefficient as the most significant parameters responsible for variation in borehole characteristics in the study. The CA employed in this study to identified three clusters. The first cluster delineated stations that characterise Awgu sandstone geological formation while the second cluster delineated Agbani sandstone geological formation. The third cluster delineated Ajali sandstone formation. The CA grouping of the borehole parameters showed similar trend with PFA hence validating the efficiency of chemometric data mining techniques in grouping of variations in the borehole characteristics in the geological zone of the study area.

  4. Location of geologic structures from interpretation of ERTS-1 imagery, Carbon County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrs, R. W.; Barton, R.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Possible geologic structures in the basin sediments of Carbon County and vicinity were located by interpretation of ERTS-1 imagery. These same structures are not evident on existing conventional geologic maps of the area. Subsequent field checks confirmed much of the geologic interpretation, but revealed that two apparent closed structures identified on the ERTS-1 imagery were actually topographic pseudostructures in flat or homoclinal sediments. Stereoscopic coverage (where available) allows the interpreter to avoid such misinterpretations.

  5. Optimizing geologic CO2 sequestration by injection in deep saline formations below oil reservoirs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Weon Shik; McPherson, Brian J.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to present a best-case paradigm for geologic CO 2 storage: CO 2 injection and sequestration in saline formations below oil reservoirs. This includes the saline-only section below the oil-water contact (OWC) in oil reservoirs, a storage target neglected in many current storage capacity assessments. This also includes saline aquifers (high porosity and permeability formations) immediately below oil-bearing formations. While this is a very specific injection target, we contend that most, if not all, oil-bearing basins in the US contain a great volume of such strata, and represent a rather large CO 2 storage capacity option. We hypothesize that these are the best storage targets in those basins. The purpose of this research is to evaluate this hypothesis. We quantitatively compared CO 2 behavior in oil reservoirs and brine formations by examining the thermophysical properties of CO 2 , CO 2 -brine, and CO 2 -oil in various pressure, temperature, and salinity conditions. In addition, we compared the distribution of gravity number (N), which characterizes a tendency towards buoyancy-driven CO 2 migration, and mobility ratio (M), which characterizes the impeded CO 2 migration, in oil reservoirs and brine formations. Our research suggests competing advantages and disadvantages of CO 2 injection in oil reservoirs vs. brine formations: (1) CO 2 solubility in oil is significantly greater than in brine (over 30 times); (2) the tendency of buoyancy-driven CO 2 migration is smaller in oil reservoirs because density contrast between oil and CO 2 is smaller than it between brine and oil (the approximate density contrast between CO 2 and crude oil is ∝100 kg/m 3 and between CO 2 and brine is ∝350 kg/m 3 ); (3) the increased density of oil and brine due to the CO 2 dissolution is not significant (about 7-15 kg/m 3 ); (4) the viscosity reduction of oil due to CO 2 dissolution is significant (from 5790 to 98 mPa s). We compared these competing

  6. Multispectral Thermal Imagery and Its Application to the Geologic Mapping of the Koobi Fora Formation, Northwestern Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Mary K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2005-12-01

    The Koobi Fora Formation in northwestern Kenya has yielded more hominin fossils dated between 2.1 and 1.2 Ma than any other location on Earth. This research was undertaken to discover the spectral signatures of a portion of the Koobi Fora Formation using imagery from the DOE's Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) satellite. Creation of a digital geologic map from MTI imagery was a secondary goal of this research. MTI is unique amongst multispectral satellites in that it co-collects data from 15 spectral bands ranging from the visible to the thermal infrared with a ground sample distance of 5 meters per pixel in the visible and 20 meters in the infrared. The map was created in two stages. The first was to correct the base MTI image using spatial accuracy assessment points collected in the field. The second was to mosaic various MTI images together to create the final Koobi Fora map. Absolute spatial accuracy of the final map product is 73 meters. The geologic classification of the Koobi Fora MTI map also took place in two stages. The field work stage involved location of outcrops of different lithologies within the Koobi Fora Formation. Field descriptions of these outcrops were made and their locations recorded. During the second stage, a linear spectral unmixing algorithm was applied to the MTI mosaic. In order to train the linear spectra unmixing algorithm, regions of interest representing four different classes of geologic material (tuff, alluvium, carbonate, and basalt), as well as a vegetation class were defined within the MTI mosaic. The regions of interest were based upon the aforementioned field data as well as overlays of geologic maps from the 1976 Iowa State mapping project. Pure spectra were generated for each class from the regions of interest, and then the unmixing algorithm classified each pixel according to relative percentage of classes found within the pixel based upon the pure spectra values. A total of four unique combinations of geologic

  7. Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources: Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah, and Wyoming-Idaho-Utah Thrust Belt: Chapter E in Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buursink, Marc L.; Slucher, Ernie R.; Brennan, Sean T.; Doolan, Colin A.; Drake II, Ronald M.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Warwick, Peter D.; Blondes, Madalyn S.; Freeman, P.A.; Cahan, Steven M.; DeVera, Christina A.; Lohr, Celeste D.

    2014-01-01

    The 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (Public Law 110–140) directs the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of potential geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2). The methodology used by the USGS for the national CO2 assessment follows up on previous USGS work. The methodology is non-economic and intended to be used at regional to subbasinal scales. This report identifies and contains geologic descriptions of 14 storage assessment units (SAUs) in Ordovician to Upper Cretaceous sedimentary rocks within the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming, Colorado, and Utah, and eight SAUs in Ordovician to Upper Cretaceous sedimentary rocks within the Wyoming-Idaho-Utah Thrust Belt (WIUTB). The GGRB and WIUTB are contiguous with nearly identical geologic units; however, the GGRB is larger in size, whereas the WIUTB is more structurally complex. This report focuses on the characteristics, specified in the methodology, that influence the potential CO2 storage resource in the SAUs. Specific descriptions of the SAU boundaries, as well as their sealing and reservoir units, are included. Properties for each SAU, such as depth to top, gross thickness, porosity, permeability, groundwater quality, and structural reservoir traps, are typically provided to illustrate geologic factors critical to the assessment. This geologic information was employed, as specified in the USGS methodology, to calculate a probabilistic distribution of potential storage resources in each SAU. Figures in this report show SAU boundaries and cell maps of well penetrations through sealing units into the top of the storage formations. The cell maps show the number of penetrating wells within one square mile and are derived from interpretations of variably attributed well data and a digital compilation that is known not to include all drilling.

  8. Geologic age of the boundary part between the Embetsu Formation Koetoi Formation and the Yuchi Formation, northern Hokkaido, Japan. Rubeshube River and Kaminukanan River routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagayama, Tsumoru

    2003-01-01

    Two successive diatom zones, the Thalassiosira oestrupii zone and the Neodenticula koizumii-Neodenticula Kamtschatica Zone, are recognized, on the basis of 31 geologic samples collected from the Embetsu, Koetoi and Yuchi Formations, distributed int he Rubeshube River, the Kaminukanan River and the western part of Dannoppu in northern Hokkaido. It was clarified that the chronological gap up to one million years proposed by Akiba (2000) does not exist between the Embetsu Formation/Koetoi Formation and the Yuchi Formation in the surveyed area by the following reasons; 1) existence of those two diatom zones, 2) fission track dating (3.8±0.4 Ma), 3) gradual change of lithofacies from siltstone to fine sandstone in ascending order, and 4) identification of almost unchanged geologic structure. Increasing numbers of fresh water species and Miocene extinct species in upper part of the Yuchi Formation indicate the increase of the supply to terrigenous sediments and the shallowing of the sedimentary basin. (author)

  9. Strategies for CO2 Sequestration in Geologic Formations and the Role of Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klara, S. M.; Cohen, K.; Byrer, C.; Srivastava, R. D.

    2003-12-01

    Among proposed options for CO2 emissions mitigation, capture and sequestration is a promising solution that has the advantage of being able to cope with the large volume of CO2 involved, which will increase because of a growing energy demand. Consequently, an important component of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) research and development program is dedicated to reducing CO2 emissions from power plants by developing technologies for capturing CO2 and for subsequent utilization and/or sequestration. Capture technologies target novel, low-cost approaches for separation and capture of CO2 from energy production and conversion facilities. Injection of CO2 into geologic formations is being practiced today by the petroleum industry for enhanced oil recovery, but it is not yet possible to predict with confidence storage volume, formation integrity and storage permanence over long time periods. Many important issues dealing with geologic storage, monitoring, and verification of fluids (including CO2) in underground oil and gas reservoirs, coal beds, and saline formations are now being addressed. Preliminary field tests are being conducted to confirm practical considerations, such as economics, safety, stability, permanence, and public acceptance. This paper presents an overview of DOE's research program in the area of CO2 sequestration and storage in geologic formations and specifically addresses the status of new knowledge, improved tools and enhanced technology for cost optimization, monitoring, modeling and capacity estimation. This paper also highlights those fundamental and applied studies, including field tests, sponsored by DOE that are measuring the degree to which CO2 can be injected and remain safely and permanently sequestered in geologic formations while concurrently assuring no adverse long term ecological impacts. Field geophysical techniques are playing a major role in these demonstrations, such as the Weyburn project in North Dakota and Canada

  10. Effects on the mobility of metals from acidification caused by possible CO₂ leakage from sub-seabed geological formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Orte, Manoela Romanó; Sarmiento, Aguasanta M; Basallote, Maria Dolores; Rodríguez-Romero, Araceli; Riba, Inmaculada; Delvalls, Angel

    2014-02-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) in submarine geological formations has been proposed as a mitigation measure for the prevention of global warming. However, leakage of CO2 to overlying sediments may occur over time, leading to various effects on ecosystems. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed, involving direct release of carbon dioxide into sediment, inside non-pressurized chambers, in order to provide data on the possible effects of CO2 leakage from geological storage sites on the fate of several metals. Marine sediments from three sites with different levels of contamination were sampled and submitted to acidification by means of CO2 injection. The experiment lasted 10 days and sediment samples were collected at the beginning and end of the experiment and pore water was extracted for metal analysis. The results revealed that mobility of metals from sediment to pore water depends on the site, metal and length of time exposed. Mobilization of the metals Al, Fe, Zn, Co, Pb and Cu increases with acidification, and this response generally increases with time of exposure to CO2 injection. The geochemical model applied suggests that acidification also influences the speciation of metals, transforming metals and metalloids, like As, into species much more toxic to biota. The data obtained from this study will be useful for calculating the potential risk of CCS activities to the marine environment. © 2013.

  11. Final Report: Optimal Model Complexity in Geological Carbon Sequestration: A Response Surface Uncertainty Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ye [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2018-01-17

    The critical component of a risk assessment study in evaluating GCS is an analysis of uncertainty in CO2 modeling. In such analyses, direct numerical simulation of CO2 flow and leakage requires many time-consuming model runs. Alternatively, analytical methods have been developed which allow fast and efficient estimation of CO2 storage and leakage, although restrictive assumptions on formation rock and fluid properties are employed. In this study, an intermediate approach is proposed based on the Design of Experiment and Response Surface methodology, which consists of using a limited number of numerical simulations to estimate a prediction outcome as a combination of the most influential uncertain site properties. The methodology can be implemented within a Monte Carlo framework to efficiently assess parameter and prediction uncertainty while honoring the accuracy of numerical simulations. The choice of the uncertain properties is flexible and can include geologic parameters that influence reservoir heterogeneity, engineering parameters that influence gas trapping and migration, and reactive parameters that influence the extent of fluid/rock reactions. The method was tested and verified on modeling long-term CO2 flow, non-isothermal heat transport, and CO2 dissolution storage by coupling two-phase flow with explicit miscibility calculation using an accurate equation of state that gives rise to convective mixing of formation brine variably saturated with CO2. All simulations were performed using three-dimensional high-resolution models including a target deep saline aquifer, overlying caprock, and a shallow aquifer. To evaluate the uncertainty in representing reservoir permeability, sediment hierarchy of a heterogeneous digital stratigraphy was mapped to create multiple irregularly shape stratigraphic models of decreasing geologic resolutions: heterogeneous (reference), lithofacies, depositional environment, and a (homogeneous) geologic formation. To ensure model

  12. Prediction of terrestrial gamma dose rate based on geological formations and soil types in the Johor State, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; bin Hamzah, Khaidzir; Alajerami, Yasser; Moharib, Mohammed; Saeed, Ismael

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to predict and estimate unmeasured terrestrial gamma dose rate (TGDR) using statistical analysis methods to derive a model from the actual measurement based on geological formation and soil type. The measurements of TGDR were conducted in the state of Johor with a total of 3873 measured points which covered all geological formations, soil types and districts. The measurements were taken 1 m above the soil surface using NaI [Ti] detector. The measured gamma dose rates ranged from 9 nGy h(-1) to 1237 nGy h(-1) with a mean value of 151 nGy h(-1). The data have been normalized to fit a normal distribution. Tests of significance were conducted among all geological formations and soil types, using the unbalanced one way ANOVA. The results indicated strong significant differences due to the different geological formations and soil types present in Johor State. Pearson Correlation was used to measure the relations between gamma dose rate based on geological formation and soil type (D(G,S)) with the gamma dose rate based on geological formation (D(G)) or soil type (D(s)). A very good correlation was found between D(G,S) and D(G) or D(G,S) and D(s). A total of 118 pairs of geological formations and soil types were used to derive the statistical contribution of geological formations and soil types to gamma dose rates. The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation and soil type were found to be 0.594 and 0.399, respectively. The null hypotheses were accepted for 83% of examined data, therefore, the model could be used to predict gamma dose rates based on geological formation and soil type information. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Range of engineering-geological properties for some carbonate rock complexes for Balkan peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jovanovski, Milorad; Shpago, Azra; Peshevski, Igor

    2010-01-01

    The Carbonate Rock masses are a geological media with extremely complex states and properties, which has a certain influences on the mechanical and hydraulic behavior during construction and exploitation of engineering structures. Practical aspects of the problem analysis arise from the fact that the areas of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Macedonia and the entire Balkans is characterized by presence of wide areas covered with carbonate complexes, where large number of complex engineering structures have been, or shall be constructed in the future. In this context, their engineering-geological modeling is still a practical and scientific challenge. The analysis of engineering- geological properties is one of the main steps in forming of analytical and geotechnical models for complex rock structures. This article gives a data about the range for these properties, according to the results from an extensive investigation program. Some original correlations and testing results are given and they are compared with some published relations from the world. (Author)

  14. Uncertainty studies and risk assessment for CO2 storage in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Lena Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) in deep geological formations is one possible option to mitigate the greenhouse gas effect by reducing CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere. The assessment of the risks related to CO 2 storage is an important task. Events such as CO 2 leakage and brine displacement could result in hazards for human health and the environment. In this thesis, a systematic and comprehensive risk assessment concept is presented to investigate various levels of uncertainties and to assess risks using numerical simulations. Depending on the risk and the processes, which should be assessed, very complex models, large model domains, large time scales, and many simulations runs for estimating probabilities are required. To reduce the resulting high computational costs, a model reduction technique (the arbitrary polynomial chaos expansion) and a method for model coupling in space are applied. The different levels of uncertainties are: statistical uncertainty in parameter distributions, scenario uncertainty, e.g. different geological features, and recognized ignorance due to assumptions in the conceptual model set-up. Recognized ignorance and scenario uncertainty are investigated by simulating well defined model set-ups and scenarios. According to damage values, which are defined as a model output, the set-ups and scenarios can be compared and ranked. For statistical uncertainty probabilities can be determined by running Monte Carlo simulations with the reduced model. The results are presented in various ways: e.g., mean damage, probability density function, cumulative distribution function, or an overall risk value by multiplying the damage with the probability. If the model output (damage) cannot be compared to provided criteria (e.g. water quality criteria), analytical approximations are presented to translate the damage into comparable values. The overall concept is applied for the risks related to brine displacement and infiltration into drinking water

  15. Geology of carbonate aggregate resources of Illinois, Illinois mineral notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, J. H.

    Carbonate rocks ranging in age from Pennsylvanian through Ordovician provide the principal resources for crushed stone production in Illinois. In the northern third of Illinois, dolomite and calcareous dolomite of the Silurian and Ordovician Systems from the bedrock surface are the basis of a large quarrying industry. One of the largest quarries in the United States wins stone from Silurian reefal dolomite at Thornton, near Chicago. Aggregate for skid-resistant asphalt pavement is produced from Devonian chert in extreme southern Illinois.

  16. U.S. Department of Energy's site screening, site selection, and initial characterization for storage of CO2 in deep geological formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodosta, T.D.; Litynski, J.T.; Plasynski, S.I.; Hickman, S.; Frailey, S.; Myer, L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead Federal agency for the development and deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. As part of its mission to facilitate technology transfer and develop guidelines from lessons learned, DOE is developing a series of best practice manuals (BPMs) for carbon capture and storage (CCS). The "Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations" BPM is a compilation of best practices and includes flowchart diagrams illustrating the general decision making process for Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization. The BPM integrates the knowledge gained from various programmatic efforts, with particular emphasis on the Characterization Phase through pilot-scale CO2 injection testing of the Validation Phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Initiative. Key geologic and surface elements that suitable candidate storage sites should possess are identified, along with example Site Screening, Site Selection, and Initial Characterization protocols for large-scale geologic storage projects located across diverse geologic and regional settings. This manual has been written as a working document, establishing a framework and methodology for proper site selection for CO2 geologic storage. This will be useful for future CO2 emitters, transporters, and storage providers. It will also be of use in informing local, regional, state, and national governmental agencies of best practices in proper sequestration site selection. Furthermore, it will educate the inquisitive general public on options and processes for geologic CO2 storage. In addition to providing best practices, the manual presents a geologic storage resource and capacity classification system. The system provides a "standard" to communicate storage and capacity estimates, uncertainty and project development risk, data guidelines and analyses for adequate site characterization, and

  17. Investigating the Fundamental Scientific Issues Affecting the Long-term Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spangler, Lee [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Cunningham, Alfred [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Barnhart, Elliot [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Lageson, David [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Nall, Anita [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Dobeck, Laura [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Repasky, Kevin [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Shaw, Joseph [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Nugent, Paul [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Johnson, Jennifer [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Hogan, Justin [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Codd, Sarah [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Bray, Joshua [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Prather, Cody [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); McGrail, B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Oldenburg, Curtis [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wagoner, Jeff [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pawar, Rajesh [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-12-19

    The Zero Emissions Research and Technology (ZERT) collaborative was formed to address basic science and engineering knowledge gaps relevant to geologic carbon sequestration. The original funding round of ZERT (ZERT I) identified and addressed many of these gaps. ZERT II has focused on specific science and technology areas identified in ZERT I that showed strong promise and needed greater effort to fully develop.

  18. Paleogeographic evolution of carbonate reservoirs: geological and geophysical analysis at the Albian Campos Basin, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo Vincentelli, Maria Gabriela; Favoreto, Julia; Roemers-Oliveira, Eduardo

    2018-02-01

    An integrated geophysical and geological analysis of a carbonate reservoir can offer an effective method to better understand the paleogeographical evolution and distribution of a geological reservoir and non-reservoir facies. Therefore, we propose a better method for obtaining geological facies from geophysical facies, helping to characterize the permo-porous system of this kind of play. The goal is to determine the main geological phases from a specific hydrocarbon producer (Albian Campos Basin, Brazil). The applied method includes the use of a petrographic and qualitative description from the integrated reservoir with seismic interpretation of an attribute map (energy, root mean square, mean amplitude, maximum negative amplitude, etc), all calculated at the Albian level for each of the five identified phases. The studied carbonate reservoir is approximately 6 km long with a main direction of NE-SW, and it was sub-divided as follows (from bottom to top): (1) the first depositional sequence of the bank was composed mainly of packstone, indicating that the local structure adjacent to the main bank is protected from environmental conditions; (2) characterized by the presence of grainstone developed at the higher structure; (3) the main sequence of the peloidal packstone with mudstones oncoids; (4) corresponds to the oil production of carbonate reservoirs formed by oolitic grainstone deposited at the top of the carbonate bank; at this phase, rising sea levels formed channels that connected the open sea shelf with the restricted circulation shelf; and (5) mudstone and wackestone represent the system’s flooding phase.

  19. Modernization of geology and future directions of the raw materials base formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Vladimirovich Dushin

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a brief analysis of the current situation in geology, and makes suggestions for its modernization. As a result of the spontaneous transformation of the institutional environment in subsoil resources management, an institutional trap which hinders the reproduction of mineral resources was formed. On the one hand, the geological assets in the current institutional environment are not attractive for business, and on the other hand, the mechanisms of public funding of geological exploration are being eliminated. The solution of the identified problems, in the opinion of the author, is in an active and systematic implementation of public resources policy in the following areas: balance in the division of responsibility between government and business, balance of responsibilities between the center and regions, liberalization of geological services market and improvement of national resource regime efficiency. Since the early 90s of the last century, there were the processes of deindustrialization and industry primitivization in the Russian economy. Modernization of geology in this paper is defined as an improvement and alignment with current and anticipated requirements of all sectors and areas of the industry functioning. According to the author, it should be brought into compliance with restoration and development of the industrial potential of Russia. The paper identified possible promising directions of domestic industry and geological mineral resources development taking into account the formation of a new technological order. Geological exploration is a sector that creates the resource base for the breathrough industry, including sectors of the new technological order. The need for new materials determines the need for new ideas and new solutions in exploration, production and extraction of mineral resources. Currently, however, we must note that Russia is losing its position in the field of high technologies, both in

  20. Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources: Arkoma Basin, Kansas Basins, and Midcontinent Rift Basin study areas: Chapter F in Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buursink, Marc L.; Craddock, William H.; Blondes, Madalyn S.; Freeman, Phillip A.; Cahan, Steven M.; DeVera, Christina A.; Lohr, Celeste D.

    2013-01-01

    2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (Public Law 110–140) directs the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of potential geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2). The methodology used by the USGS for the national CO2 assessment follows that of previous USGS work. This methodology is non-economic and intended to be used at regional to subbasinal scales. This report identifies and contains geologic descriptions of three storage assessment units (SAUs) in Upper Cambrian to Mississippian sedimentary rocks within the Arkoma Basin study area, and two SAUs in Upper Cambrian to Mississippian sedimentary rocks within the Kansas Basins study area. The Arkoma Basin and Kansas Basins are adjacent with very similar geologic units; although the Kansas Basins area is larger, the Arkoma Basin is more structurally complex. The report focuses on the characteristics, specified in the methodology, that influence the potential CO2 storage resource in the SAUs. Specific descriptions of the SAU boundaries as well as their sealing and reservoir units are included. Properties for each SAU, such as depth to top, gross thickness, porosity, permeability, groundwater quality, and structural reservoir traps, are usually provided to illustrate geologic factors critical to the assessment. Although assessment results are not contained in this report, the geologic information herein was employed, as specified in the USGS methodology, to calculate a probabilistic distribution of potential storage resources in each SAU. The Midcontinent Rift Basin study area was not assessed, because no suitable storage formations meeting our size, depth, reservoir quality, and regional seal guidelines were found. Figures in this report show study area boundaries along with the SAU boundaries and cell maps of well penetrations through sealing units into the top of the storage formations. The cell maps show the number of penetrating wells within one-square mile and are

  1. CO2 Injectivity in Geological Storages: an Overview of Program and Results of the GeoCarbone-Injectivity Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombard, J.M.; Egermann, P.; Azaroual, M.; Pironon, J.; Broseta, D.; Egermann, P.; Munier, G.; Mouronval, G.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the GeoCarbone-Injectivity project was to develop a methodology to study the complex phenomena involved in the near well bore region during CO 2 injection. This paper presents an overview of the program and results of the project, and some further necessary developments. The proposed methodology is based on experiments and simulations at the core scale, in order to understand (physical modelling and definition of constitutive laws) and quantify (calibration of simulation tools) the mechanisms involved in injectivity variations: fluid/rock interactions, transport mechanisms, geomechanical effects. These mechanisms and the associated parameters have then to be integrated in the models at the well bore scale. The methodology has been applied for the study of a potential injection of CO 2 in the Dogger geological formation of the Paris Basin, in collaboration with the other ANR GeoCarbone projects. (authors)

  2. U.S. Geological Survey Methodology Development for Ecological Carbon Assessment and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Stackpoole, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Ecological carbon sequestration refers to transfer and storage of atmospheric carbon in vegetation, soils, and aquatic environments to help offset the net increase from carbon emissions. Understanding capacities, associated opportunities, and risks of vegetated ecosystems to sequester carbon provides science information to support formulation of policies governing climate change mitigation, adaptation, and land-management strategies. Section 712 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 mandates the Department of the Interior to develop a methodology and assess the capacity of our nation's ecosystems for ecological carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas (GHG) flux mitigation. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) LandCarbon Project is responding to the Department of Interior's request to develop a methodology that meets specific EISA requirements.

  3. Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, III, William B.

    1989-01-01

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed which allow measurement of the resistivity of a geological formation through borehole casing which may be surrounded by brine saturated cement. A.C. current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. The A.C. voltage difference is measured between two additional vertically disposed electrodes on the interior of the casing which provides a measure of the resistivity of the geological formation. A calibration and nulling procedure is presented which minimizes the influence of variations in the thickness of the casing. The procedure also minimizes the influence of inaccurate placements of the additional vertically disposed electrodes.

  4. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Although there are many publications pertaining to gas hydrates, their formation and stability in various geological conditions are poorly known. Therefore, for the same reasons and because of the very broad scope of our research, limited amount and extremely dispersed information, the study regions are very large. Moreover, almost without exception the geological environments controlling gas hydrates formation and stability of the studied regions are very complex. The regions studied (completed and partially completed - total 17 locations) during the reporting period, particularly the Gulf of Mexico and the Middle America Trench, are the most important in this entire research project. In the past, both of these regions have been extensively studied, the presence of gas hydrates confirmed and samples recovered. In our investigation it was necessary not only to review all previous data and interpretations, but to do a thorough analysis of the basins, and a critical evaluation of an previously reported and publicly available but not published information.

  5. Sensitivity analysis concerning dose equivalents associated with the disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewi, J.; Mejon-Goula, M.J.; Cernes, A.; Brun-Yaba, C.

    1989-11-01

    Even if dose calculations may be performed for nuclear waste repositories in deep geological formations, it is unavoidable that the credibility of the obtained results might be affected by huge incertitudes in connection in particular with a lack of precise knowledge of the different components of the performed evaluations (scenarios, models, parameters). In consequence, this paper presents the approach adopted at the CEA/IPSN for performing sensitivity analysis and some obtained results [fr

  6. Admissible thermal loading in geological formations. Consequences on radioactive waste disposal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The thermal loading in salt formation is studied for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste embedded in glass. Temperature effect on glass leaching, stability of gel layer on glass surface, quantity of leaching solution available in the borehole and corrosion resistance of materials used for containers are examined. The geological storage medium must satisfy particularly complex requirements: stratigraphy, brine migration, permeability, fissuring, mechanical strength, creep, thermal expansion, cavity structure ..

  7. CO 2 breakthrough—Caprock sealing efficiency and integrity for carbon geological storage

    KAUST Repository

    Espinoza, D. Nicolas

    2017-10-23

    Small pores in high specific surface clay-rich caprocks give rise to high capillary entry pressures and high viscous drag that hinder the migration of buoyant carbon dioxide CO2. We measured the breakthrough pressure and ensuing CO2 permeability through sediment plugs prepared with sand, silt, kaolinite and smectite, and monitored their volumetric deformation using high-pressure oedometer cells. The data show water expulsion and volumetric contraction prior to CO2 breakthrough, followed by preferential CO2 flow thereafter. Our experimental results and data gathered from previous studies highlight the inverse relationship between breakthrough pressure and pore size, as anticipated by Laplace’s equation. In terms of macro-scale parameters, the breakthrough pressure increases as the sediment specific surface increases and the porosity decreases. The breakthrough pressure is usually lower than the values predicted with average pore size estimations; it can reach ∼6.2MPa in argillaceous formations, and 11.2MPa in evaporites. The CO2 permeability after breakthrough is significantly lower than the absolute permeability, but it may increase in time due to water displacement and desiccation. Leakage will be advection-controlled once percolation takes place at most storage sites currently being considered. Diffusive and advective CO2 leaks through non-fractured caprocks will be minor and will not compromise the storage capacity at CO2 injection sites. The “sealing number” and the “stability number” combine the initial fluid pressure, the buoyant pressure caused by the CO2 plume, the capillary breakthrough pressure of the caprock, and the stress conditions at the reservoir depth; these two numbers provide a rapid assessment of potential storage sites. Unexpected CO2 migration patterns emerge due to the inherent spatial variability and structural discontinuities in geological formations; sites with redundant seal layers should be sought for the safe and long

  8. Geological component in the formation of natural - reserve fund of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyuk V.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The part of geological component of the natural environment in the formation of Natural Reserve Fund of Ukraine, the historical aspects of the origin and development of the geological heritage, as an important part of the environment, as well as the problem of acceptance geodiversity as well as the conservation of biodiversity. It was established that during the long history in countries not only in Europe but also in the world, formed biodiversity strategy in default or unwilling recognition of the need to preserve geodiversity. Underestimating abiotic factors in the development programs of the European environmental network Natura-2000 and EECONET has led to the need to develop special programs and initiatives in the conservation of the lithosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere. The basic stages of historical development problems of preservation of geological heritage in Ukraine and the world. It is determined that in Ukraine was established May 21, 1910 the first in Russia (which is then part Khortyts'ke Society for Nature Conservation. The Society, based on the initiative of of natural science teachers P.P. Вouzouk, had the goal of nature conservation within the animal, vegetable and mineral kingdoms of nature, and it was spelled out in the Charter of of society. A significant shift towards awareness of the importance of the geological component in the formation of natural reserve fund was effective collaboration with the Department of Environment and Natural Resources in the Dnipropetrovsk region on creation of new protected areas. When conducting a field and office work on reserving areas for new items Natural Heritage, the first fully studied geological and geomorphological structure of these areas. Moreover, the research facility in an unprecedented short time actually bequeathed, that have approved status of natural monuments, landscape reserves and so on.

  9. Site selection factors for repositories of solid high-level and alpha-bearing wastes in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide guidelines for the selection and evaluation of suitable areas and sites for the disposal of solid high-level and alpha-bearing wastes into geological formations. This report is also intended to provide summary information on many types of geological formations underlying the land masses that might be considered as well as guidance on the geological and hydrological factors that should be investigated to demonstrate the suitability of the formations. In addition, other factors that should be considered in selecting a site for a radioactive waste repository are discussed briefly. The information, as presented, was developed to the extent of current technology for application to the evaluation of deep (greater than about 300 metres below ground level) geological formations in the selection of suitable areas for the disposal of solid or solidified high-level and alpha-bearing wastes. The extreme complexity of many geological environments and of the rock features that govern the presence and circulation of groundwater does not make it feasible to derive strict criteria for the selection of a site for a radioactive waste repository in a geological formation. Each potential repository location must be evaluated according to its own unique geological and hydrological setting. Therefore, only general guidance is offered, and this is done through discussion of the many factors that need to be considered in order to obtain the necessary assurances that the radionuclides will be confined in the geological repository over the required period of time

  10. Lead isotope evidence for recent uranium mobility in geological formations of Brazil: implications for radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, S.S.; Babinski, M.; Marinho, M.M.; Barbosa, J.S.F.; Sato, I.M.; Salvador, V.L.

    1999-01-01

    Lead-lead isotope data from whole rock samples are used to investigate the recent (last few million years) mobility of U and Th. The method is based on the comparison of the calculated present day U and Th concentrations required to yield the Pb isotope composition in the samples with the actual present day concentrations of U and Th obtained by direct measurement. The geological formations studied include the Neoproterozoic carbonate sediments of the Bambui Group, Archean/Paleoproterozoic granite-greenstone terrain of the Contendas-Mirante Complex and a Proterozoic ortho-gneisses hosting U deposit in Lagoa Real. All these formations are in the Sao Francisco Craton, Brazil. The data show high U mobility in the carbonate sediments and in the deformed ortho-gneisses set in a ductile shear zone. Infiltration of groundwater through fault zones seems to have facilitated the U mobility. The Pb isotope approach is a useful technique complementing U-series disequilibrium studies and may be included for site characterization studies for radioactive waste disposal. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  11. Impacts of Methane on Carbon Dioxide Storage in Brine Formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltanian, Mohamad R; Amooie, Mohammad A; Cole, David R; Darrah, Thomas H; Graham, David E; Pfiffner, Susan M; Phelps, Tommy J; Moortgat, Joachim

    2018-03-01

    In the context of geological carbon sequestration (GCS), carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is often injected into deep formations saturated with a brine that may contain dissolved light hydrocarbons, such as methane (CH 4 ). In this multicomponent multiphase displacement process, CO 2 competes with CH 4 in terms of dissolution, and CH 4 tends to exsolve from the aqueous into a gaseous phase. Because CH 4 has a lower viscosity than injected CO 2 , CH 4 is swept up into a 'bank' of CH 4 -rich gas ahead of the CO 2 displacement front. On the one hand, this may provide a useful tracer signal of an approaching CO 2 front. On the other hand, the emergence of gaseous CH 4 is undesirable because it poses a leakage risk of a far more potent greenhouse gas than CO 2 if the cap rock is compromised. Open fractures or faults and wells could result in CH 4 contamination of overlying groundwater aquifers as well as surface emissions. We investigate this process through detailed numerical simulations for a large-scale GCS pilot project (near Cranfield, Mississippi) for which a rich set of field data is available. An accurate cubic-plus-association equation-of-state is used to describe the non-linear phase behavior of multiphase brine-CH 4 -CO 2 mixtures, and breakthrough curves in two observation wells are used to constrain transport processes. Both field data and simulations indeed show the development of an extensive plume of CH 4 -rich (up to 90 mol%) gas as a consequence of CO 2 injection, with important implications for the risk assessment of future GCS projects. © 2018, National Ground Water Association.

  12. Pore-scale studies of multiphase flow and reaction involving CO2 sequestration in geologic formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Q.; Wang, M.; Lichtner, P. C.

    2008-12-01

    In geologic CO2 sequestration, pore-scale interfacial phenomena ultimately govern the key processes of fluid mobility, chemical transport, adsorption, and reaction. However, spatial heterogeneity at the pore scale cannot be resolved at the continuum scale, where averaging occurs over length scales much larger than typical pore sizes. Natural porous media, such as sedimentary rocks and other geological media encountered in subsurface formations, are inherently heterogeneous. This pore-scale heterogeneity can produce variabilities in flow, transport, and reaction processes that take place within a porous medium, and can result in spatial variations in fluid velocity, aqueous concentrations, and reaction rates. Consequently, the unresolved spatial heterogeneity at the pore scale may be important for reactive transport modeling at the larger scale. In addition, current continuum models of surface complexation reactions ignore a fundamental property of physical systems, namely conservation of charge. Therefore, to better understand multiphase flow and reaction involving CO2 sequestration in geologic formations, it is necessary to quantitatively investigate the influence of the pore-scale heterogeneity on the emergent behavior at the field scale. We have applied the lattice Boltzmann method to simulating the injection of CO2 saturated brine or supercritical CO2 into geological formations at the pore scale. Multiple pore-scale processes, including advection, diffusion, homogeneous reactions among multiple aqueous species, heterogeneous reactions between the aqueous solution and minerals, ion exchange and surface complexation, as well as changes in solid and pore geometry are all taken into account. The rich pore scale information will provide a basis for upscaling to the continuum scale.

  13. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces

  14. A Geologic Symphony: Science, Artistic Inspiration and Community Engagement in Jeffrey Nytch's Symphony No 1: Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nytch, J.

    2017-12-01

    While the natural world has inspired works of visual art and music for centuries, examples of music being created as a direct expression of scientific processes or principles are relatively rare. In his 2013 work, Symphony No. 1: Formations, composer Jeffrey Nytch created a work that explicitly communicated the geologic history of the Rocky Mountain west through a musical composition. Commissioned by the Geological Society of America and premiered at the GSA's 125th Anniversary meeting, the symphony is more than merely inspired by the Rocky Mountains; rather, specific episodes of geologic history are depicted in the music. Moreover, certain processes such as metamorphosis, erosion, vulcanism, plate tectonics, and the relative duration of geologic time guided the structure and form of the music. This unique approach to musical composition allowed the work to play a novel and potent role in community engagement and education, both at the premiere performances in Colorado and subsequent performances of the symphony elsewhere. This project is thus a powerful example of how the arts can help illuminate scientific principles to the general public, in turn engaging them and helping to establish a more personal connection to the natural world around them.

  15. Geo3DML: A standard-based exchange format for 3D geological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhangang; Qu, Honggang; Wu, Zixing; Wang, Xianghong

    2018-01-01

    A geological model (geomodel) in three-dimensional (3D) space is a digital representation of the Earth's subsurface, recognized by geologists and stored in resultant geological data (geodata). The increasing demand for data management and interoperable applications of geomodelscan be addressed by developing standard-based exchange formats for the representation of not only a single geological object, but also holistic geomodels. However, current standards such as GeoSciML cannot incorporate all the geomodel-related information. This paper presents Geo3DML for the exchange of 3D geomodels based on the existing Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) standards. Geo3DML is based on a unified and formal representation of structural models, attribute models and hierarchical structures of interpreted resultant geodata in different dimensional views, including drills, cross-sections/geomaps and 3D models, which is compatible with the conceptual model of GeoSciML. Geo3DML aims to encode all geomodel-related information integrally in one framework, including the semantic and geometric information of geoobjects and their relationships, as well as visual information. At present, Geo3DML and some supporting tools have been released as a data-exchange standard by the China Geological Survey (CGS).

  16. Disposal and long-term storage in geological formations of solidified radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shischits, I.

    1996-01-01

    The special depository near Krasnoyarsk contains temporarily about 1,100 tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from WWR- should be solidified and for the most part buried in geological formations. Solid wastes and SNF from RBMK reactors are assumed to be buried as well. For this purpose special technologies and underground constructions are required. They are to be created in the geological plots within the territory of Russian Federation and adjacent areas of CIS, meeting the developed list of requirements. The burial structures will vary greatly depending on the geological formation, the amount of wastes and their isotope composition. The well-known constructions such as deep wells, shafts, mines and cavities can be mentioned. There is a need to design constructions, which have no analog in the world practice. In the course of the Project fulfillment the following work will be conducted: -theoretical work followed by code creation for mathematical simulation of processes; - modelling on the base of prototypes made from equivalent materials with the help of simulators; - bench study; - experiments in real conditions; - examination of massif properties in particular plots using achievements of geophysics, including gamma-gamma density detectors and geo locators. Finally, ecological-economical model will be given for designing burial sites

  17. Adhesion of CO2 on hydrated mineral surfaces and its implications to geologic carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Clarens, A. F.; Tao, Z.; Persily, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    and the mineral. N2 control experiments were carried out under the same pressure and temperature conditions and adhesion was also observed. The wettability hysteresis phenomena were quantified under adhesion conditions by means of advancing/receding contact angle measurements. The experimental results indicated that adhesion could cause an increase in the contact angle by a factor of three. These results support an emerging understanding of adhesion of nonpolar non-aqueous phase fluids on mineral surfaces influenced by the relative thickness of the electrical double layer embedded in the hydration layer between CO2 or N2 and the mineral surface. These findings could have important implications in certain geological formations for estimating residual trapping, capillary pressure, and a number of other processes that are strongly dependent on the wetting behavior of mineral surfaces. Keywords: geologic carbon sequestration, CO2 adhesion, hydration layer, wettability alteration and hysteresis, aqueous chemistry, surface roughness

  18. An Assessment of Geological Carbon Storage Options in the Illinois Basin: Validation Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, Robert

    2012-12-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) assessed the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in the 155,400 km{sup 2} (60,000 mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin, which underlies most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky. The region has annual CO{sub 2} emissions of about 265 million metric tonnes (292 million tons), primarily from 122 coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year (U.S. Department of Energy, 2010). Validation Phase (Phase II) field tests gathered pilot data to update the Characterization Phase (Phase I) assessment of options for capture, transportation, and storage of CO{sub 2} emissions in three geological sink types: coal seams, oil fields, and saline reservoirs. Four small-scale field tests were conducted to determine the properties of rock units that control injectivity of CO{sub 2}, assess the total storage resources, examine the security of the overlying rock units that act as seals for the reservoirs, and develop ways to control and measure the safety of injection and storage processes. The MGSC designed field test operational plans for pilot sites based on the site screening process, MVA program needs, the selection of equipment related to CO{sub 2} injection, and design of a data acquisition system. Reservoir modeling, computational simulations, and statistical methods assessed and interpreted data gathered from the field tests. Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) programs were established to detect leakage of injected CO{sub 2} and ensure public safety. Public outreach and education remained an important part of the project; meetings and presentations informed public and private regional stakeholders of the results and findings. A miscible (liquid) CO{sub 2} flood pilot project was conducted in the Clore Formation sandstone (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) at Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwestern

  19. Leveraging Regional Exploration to Develop Geologic Framework for CO2 Storage in Deep Formations in Midwestern United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neeraj Gupta

    2009-09-30

    the Ohio River Valley corridor in the Appalachian Basin, which underlies large concentrations of CO{sub 2} emission sources. In addition, some wells in the Michigan basin are included. Assessment of the geologic and petrophysical properties of zones of interest has been conducted. Although a large number of formations have been evaluated across the geologic column, the primary focus has been on evaluating the Cambrian sandstones (Mt. Simon, Rose Run, Kerbel) and carbonates layers (Knox Dolomite) as well as on the Silurian-Devonian carbonates (Bass Island, Salina) and sandstones (Clinton, Oriskany, Berea). Factors controlling the development of porosity and permeability, such as the depositional setting have been explored. In northern Michigan the Bass Islands Dolomite appears to have favorable reservoir development. In west central Michigan the St. Peter sandstone exhibits excellent porosity in the Hart and Feuring well and looks promising. In Southeastern Kentucky in the Appalachian Basin, the Batten and Baird well provided valuable data on sequestration potential in organic shales through adsorption. In central and eastern Ohio and western West Virginia, the majority of the wells provided an insight to the complex geologic framework of the relatively little known Precambrian through Silurian potential injection targets. Although valuable data was acquired and a number of critical data gaps were filled through this effort, there are still many challenges ahead and questions that need answered. The lateral extent to which favorable potential injection conditions exist in most reservoirs is still generally uncertain. The prolongation of the characterization of regional geologic framework through partnership would continue to build confidence and greatly benefit the overall CO{sub 2} sequestration effort.

  20. The role of optimality in characterizing CO2 seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Benson, Sally M.

    2008-09-15

    Storage of large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep geological formations for greenhouse gas mitigation is gaining momentum and moving from its conceptual and testing stages towards widespread application. In this work we explore various optimization strategies for characterizing surface leakage (seepage) using near-surface measurement approaches such as accumulation chambers and eddy covariance towers. Seepage characterization objectives and limitations need to be defined carefully from the outset especially in light of large natural background variations that can mask seepage. The cost and sensitivity of seepage detection are related to four critical length scales pertaining to the size of the: (1) region that needs to be monitored; (2) footprint of the measurement approach, and (3) main seepage zone; and (4) region in which concentrations or fluxes are influenced by seepage. Seepage characterization objectives may include one or all of the tasks of detecting, locating, and quantifying seepage. Each of these tasks has its own optimal strategy. Detecting and locating seepage in a region in which there is no expected or preferred location for seepage nor existing evidence for seepage requires monitoring on a fixed grid, e.g., using eddy covariance towers. The fixed-grid approaches needed to detect seepage are expected to require large numbers of eddy covariance towers for large-scale geologic CO{sub 2} storage. Once seepage has been detected and roughly located, seepage zones and features can be optimally pinpointed through a dynamic search strategy, e.g., employing accumulation chambers and/or soil-gas sampling. Quantification of seepage rates can be done through measurements on a localized fixed grid once the seepage is pinpointed. Background measurements are essential for seepage detection in natural ecosystems. Artificial neural networks are considered as regression models useful for distinguishing natural system behavior from anomalous behavior

  1. AAPB-B - Committee offers revised exchange format for transferring geologic and petroleum data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waller, H.O.; Guinn, D. (Texaco, Houston, TX (USA)); Herkommer, M. (Petrospec Computer Inc., Garland, TX (USA)); Shaw, B. (AAPG Computer Applications Committee, Houston, TX (USA))

    1990-04-01

    Comments received since the publication of Exchange Format for Transfer of Geologic and Petroleum Data revealed the need for more flexibility with the AAPG-A Format (Shaw and Waller, 1989). This discussion resulted in the proposed AAPG-B version, which has unlimited number of data fields per record and unlimited number of records. Comment lines can appear anywhere, including in data records, to help document data transfer. Data dictionary hooks have been added. The American Petroleum Institute has assisted by supplying an ANSI envelope for this format, which will permit the electronic transfer with verification of data sets between any two ANSI installations. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists Database Standards Subcommittee invites comments on the proposed revisions, and will review the suggestions when it meets June 2 in San Francisco.

  2. Geotechnical characterization and seismic response of shallow geological formations in downtown Lisbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Teves-Costa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available  The geological and geotechnical characterization of shallow formations is one of the main steps in performing a microzonation study. This paper presents an example of the usefulness of the information compiled in a geological and geotechnical database for the estimation of the seismic response of the shallower formations of the Lisbon downtown area of Baixa. The geotechnical characterization of this area was performed based on the analysis of Standard Penetration Test (SPT data compiled in the geological and geotechnical database. This database, connected to a geoscientific information system (CGIS, allows, also, the definition of 2D geological profiles used for estimating the thickness of the shallower layers. The shear-wave velocities (VS for each layer were estimated from empirical correlations using mean SPT values computed from the statistical evaluation of the compiled data. These VS values were further calibrated with ambient vibration recording analysis. The seismic response of Baixa’s superficial deposits was estimated by applying a 1D equivalent linear method to a set of soil profiles, regularly distributed across the area, and using synthetic accelerograms to simulate input motions associated with probable earthquake occurrences in Lisbon. The results are presented in terms of maps of predominant frequencies, with the corresponding amplification level, as well as spectral amplification factors for 1 Hz and 2.5 Hz. The results show that the fundamental frequency of the Baixa area is between 1.2 Hz and 2 Hz, for the whole central valley, reaching 3 Hz near the edges where anthroprogenic and alluvial deposits have less expression. Amplification factors up to 5 were obtained. These results were achieved regardless of the considered input motion. The similarity of the obtained fundamental frequency with the natural frequency of Baixa’s old building stock increases the probability of resonance effects in future earthquakes.

  3. Effect of oxygen co-injected with carbon dioxide on Gothic shale caprock–CO2–brine interaction during geologic carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-09-01

    Co-injection of oxygen, a significant component in CO2 streams produced by the oxyfuel combustion process, can cause a significant alteration of the redox state in deep geologic formations during geologic carbon sequestration. The potential impact of co-injected oxygen on the interaction between synthetic CO2–brine (0.1 M NaCl) and shale caprock (Gothic shale from the Aneth Unit in Utah) and mobilization of trace metals was investigated at ~ 10 MPa and ~ 75 °C. A range of relative volume percentages of O2 to CO2 (0, 1, 4 and 8%) were used in these experiments to address the effect of oxygen on shale–CO2–brine interaction under various conditions. Major mineral phases in Gothic shale are quartz, calcite, dolomite, montmorillonite, and pyrite. During Gothic shale–CO2–brine interaction in the presence of oxygen, pyrite oxidation occurred extensively and caused enhanced dissolution of calcite and dolomite. Pyrite oxidation and calcite dissolution subsequently resulted in the precipitation of Fe(III) oxides and gypsum (CaSO4·2H2O). In the presence of oxygen, dissolved Mn and Ni were elevated because of oxidative dissolution of pyrite. The mobility of dissolved Ba was controlled by barite (BaSO4) precipitation in the presence of oxygen. Dissolved U in the experimental brines increased to ~ 8–14 μg/L, with concentrations being slightly higher in the absence of oxygen than in the presence of oxygen. Experimental and modeling results indicate the interaction between shale caprock and oxygen co-injected with CO2 during geologic carbon sequestration can exert significant impacts on brine pH, solubility of carbonate minerals, stability of sulfide minerals, and mobility of trace metals. The major impact of oxygen is most likely to occur in the zone near CO2 injection wells where impurity gases can accumulate. Finally, oxygen in CO2

  4. Prediction of terrestrial gamma dose rate based on geological formations and soil types in the Johor State, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Hamzah, Khaidzir bin; Alajerami, Yasser; Moharib, Mohammed; Saeed, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to predict and estimate unmeasured terrestrial gamma dose rate (TGDR) using statistical analysis methods to derive a model from the actual measurement based on geological formation and soil type. The measurements of TGDR were conducted in the state of Johor with a total of 3873 measured points which covered all geological formations, soil types and districts. The measurements were taken 1 m above the soil surface using NaI [Ti] detector. The measured gamma dose rates ranged from 9 nGy h −1 to 1237 nGy h −1 with a mean value of 151 nGy h −1 . The data have been normalized to fit a normal distribution. Tests of significance were conducted among all geological formations and soil types, using the unbalanced one way ANOVA. The results indicated strong significant differences due to the different geological formations and soil types present in Johor State. Pearson Correlation was used to measure the relations between gamma dose rate based on geological formation and soil type (D G,S ) with the gamma dose rate based on geological formation (D G ) or soil type (D s ). A very good correlation was found between D G,S and D G or D G,S and D s . A total of 118 pairs of geological formations and soil types were used to derive the statistical contribution of geological formations and soil types to gamma dose rates. The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation and soil type were found to be 0.594 and 0.399, respectively. The null hypotheses were accepted for 83% of examined data, therefore, the model could be used to predict gamma dose rates based on geological formation and soil type information. - Highlights: • A very good correlation coefficient was found between D G,S and D G or D G,S and D s . • The contribution of the gamma dose rate from geological formation (GDR) is 0.594. • The contribution of the GDR from soil type was found to be 0.399. • A 83% of examined data were accepted the null hypotheses. • The model

  5. Latest Permian carbonate carbon isotope variability traces heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation and authigenic carbonate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobben, Martin; van de Velde, Sebastiaan; Gliwa, Jana; Leda, Lucyna; Korn, Dieter; Struck, Ulrich; Vinzenz Ullmann, Clemens; Hairapetian, Vachik; Ghaderi, Abbas; Korte, Christoph; Newton, Robert J.; Poulton, Simon W.; Wignall, Paul B.

    2017-11-01

    Bulk-carbonate carbon isotope ratios are a widely applied proxy for investigating the ancient biogeochemical carbon cycle. Temporal carbon isotope trends serve as a prime stratigraphic tool, with the inherent assumption that bulk micritic carbonate rock is a faithful geochemical recorder of the isotopic composition of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon. However, bulk-carbonate rock is also prone to incorporate diagenetic signals. The aim of the present study is to disentangle primary trends from diagenetic signals in carbon isotope records which traverse the Permian-Triassic boundary in the marine carbonate-bearing sequences of Iran and South China. By pooling newly produced and published carbon isotope data, we confirm that a global first-order trend towards depleted values exists. However, a large amount of scatter is superimposed on this geochemical record. In addition, we observe a temporal trend in the amplitude of this residual δ13C variability, which is reproducible for the two studied regions. We suggest that (sub-)sea-floor microbial communities and their control on calcite nucleation and ambient porewater dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C pose a viable mechanism to induce bulk-rock δ13C variability. Numerical model calculations highlight that early diagenetic carbonate rock stabilization and linked carbon isotope alteration can be controlled by organic matter supply and subsequent microbial remineralization. A major biotic decline among Late Permian bottom-dwelling organisms facilitated a spatial increase in heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation. Combined with low marine sulfate, this resulted in varying degrees of carbon isotope overprinting. A simulated time series suggests that a 50 % increase in the spatial scatter of organic carbon relative to the average, in addition to an imposed increase in the likelihood of sampling cements formed by microbial calcite nucleation to 1 out of 10 samples, is sufficient to induce the observed signal of carbon

  6. Latest Permian carbonate carbon isotope variability traces heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation and authigenic carbonate formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schobben

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Bulk-carbonate carbon isotope ratios are a widely applied proxy for investigating the ancient biogeochemical carbon cycle. Temporal carbon isotope trends serve as a prime stratigraphic tool, with the inherent assumption that bulk micritic carbonate rock is a faithful geochemical recorder of the isotopic composition of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon. However, bulk-carbonate rock is also prone to incorporate diagenetic signals. The aim of the present study is to disentangle primary trends from diagenetic signals in carbon isotope records which traverse the Permian–Triassic boundary in the marine carbonate-bearing sequences of Iran and South China. By pooling newly produced and published carbon isotope data, we confirm that a global first-order trend towards depleted values exists. However, a large amount of scatter is superimposed on this geochemical record. In addition, we observe a temporal trend in the amplitude of this residual δ13C variability, which is reproducible for the two studied regions. We suggest that (sub-sea-floor microbial communities and their control on calcite nucleation and ambient porewater dissolved inorganic carbon δ13C pose a viable mechanism to induce bulk-rock δ13C variability. Numerical model calculations highlight that early diagenetic carbonate rock stabilization and linked carbon isotope alteration can be controlled by organic matter supply and subsequent microbial remineralization. A major biotic decline among Late Permian bottom-dwelling organisms facilitated a spatial increase in heterogeneous organic carbon accumulation. Combined with low marine sulfate, this resulted in varying degrees of carbon isotope overprinting. A simulated time series suggests that a 50 % increase in the spatial scatter of organic carbon relative to the average, in addition to an imposed increase in the likelihood of sampling cements formed by microbial calcite nucleation to 1 out of 10 samples, is sufficient to induce the

  7. Geology of the host formation for the new hydraulic fracturing facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haase, C.S.; Stow, S.H.; Zucker, C.L.; University of Tennessee, Knoxville)

    1985-01-01

    Liquid low-level radioactive wastes are disposed of at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the hydrofracture process. Wastes are mixed with cement and other additives to form a slurry that is injected into a low permeability shale at 300-m depth. Important properties for a host shale formation at a hydrofracture facility include: (1) predictable fracture behavior; (2) hydrologic isolation; and (3) favorable mineralogy and geochemistry to retard radionuclide migration and enhance grout stability. The stratigraphy, petrology, diagenesis, structural geology, and hydrology of the Pumpkin Valley Shale host formation at the ORNL site are summarized and discussed in light of these three properties. Empirical data from hydrofracture operations at ORNL over the past 25 years suggest that many aspects of the Pumpkin Valley Shale make it favorable for use as a host. This observation agrees with analysis of several aspects of the Pumpkin Valley Shale geology at the ORNL site. Although presently available data suggest that the permeability of the Pumpkin Valley Shale is low and that it should provide sufficient hydrologic isolation, more data are needed to properly evaluate this aspect of host formation performance

  8. Study of heat diffusion in a granitic geologic formation of high level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldstein, S.; Juignet, N.

    1980-06-01

    Thermal study of granitic underground storage of vitrified high level radioactive wastes in a regular network of shafts and galleries. The aim is to show influence on temperature rise of the geologic formation of main parameters to define the storage zone and to determine the network dimension in function of the rock properties. Two models were studied allowing a rapid variation of geometrical and physical parameters. A numerical method using finite element method or Green functions were used for calculations. Temperatures are determined either for the whole storage site or a unit cell of the lattice [fr

  9. Site Development, Operations, and Closure Plan Topical Report 5 An Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin. Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, Robert [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States); Payne, William [Schlumberger Carbon Services, Houston, TX (United States); Kirksey, Jim [Univ. of Illinois, Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has partnered with Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) and Schlumberger Carbon Services to conduct a large-volume, saline reservoir storage project at ADM’s agricultural products processing complex in Decatur, Illinois. The Development Phase project, named the Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) involves the injection of 1 million tonnes of carbon dioxide (CO2) into a deep saline formation of the Illinois Basin over a three-year period. This report focuses on objectives, execution, and lessons learned/unanticipated results from the site development (relating specifically to surface equipment), operations, and the site closure plan.

  10. Wellbore cement fracture evolution at the cement–basalt caprock interface during geologic carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Carson, James P.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; Um, Wooyong; Martin, Paul F.; Dahl, Michael E.; Kafentzis, Tyler A.; Varga, Tamas; Stephens, Sean A.; Arey, Bruce W.; Carroll, KC; Bonneville, Alain; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2014-08-07

    Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock cores with fractures, as well as neat Portland cement columns, were prepared to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores with defects during geologic carbon sequestration. The samples were reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50 ºC and 10 MPa for 3 months under static conditions, while one cement-basalt core was subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. Micro-XRD and SEM-EDS data collected along the cement-basalt interface after 3-month reaction with CO2-saturated groundwater indicate that carbonation of cement matrix was extensive with the precipitation of calcite, aragonite, and vaterite, whereas the alteration of basalt caprock was minor. X-ray microtomography (XMT) provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnection of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling further revealed that this stress led to the increase in fluid flow and hence permeability. After the CO2-reaction, XMT images displayed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along the fracture located at the cement-basalt interface. The 3-D visualization and CFD modeling also showed that the precipitation of calcium carbonate within the cement fractures after the CO2-reaction resulted in the disconnection of cement fractures and permeability decrease. The permeability calculated based on CFD modeling was in agreement with the experimentally determined permeability. This study demonstrates that XMT imaging coupled with CFD modeling represent a powerful tool to visualize and quantify fracture evolution and permeability change in geologic materials and to predict their behavior during geologic carbon sequestration or hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production and enhanced geothermal systems.

  11. Geochemical Impacts to Groundwater from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Controls on pH and Inorganic Carbon Concentrations from Reaction Path and Kinetic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geologic carbon sequestration has the potential to cause long-term reductions in global emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Safe and effective application of carbon sequestration technology requires an understanding of the potential risks to the quality of underground...

  12. Analysis by neutronic activation of samples of a geologic formation of Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capote Rodriguez, G.; Pena Fortes, B.; Padilla Alvarez, R.; Llanes Castro, A.I.; Perez Zayas, G.; Hernandez Rivero, A.T.; Lopez Reyes, M. C.; Ribeiro Guevara, S.; Molina Insfran, J.

    1997-01-01

    The analysis by neutronic activation (AAN) is an analytical non destructive technique of high accuracy and sensibility. These advantages are very utilized in the determination of geological multielemental samples. In the job 22 elements are determined in 9 geological samples pertaining to the complex of dams of acid composition that includes the graphitic micaceous schist and the quartzites of the Canada Formation, developed fundamentally in the fasteners of the anticlinal Victoria (Yac. of Wolframio Lela, Island of the Youth, Cuba) The results obtained are of great importance for the evaluation of the potentiality of these rocks as fountains or of uranium adjusting and for the geologic prognostic of the region in study. The irradiation of the samples was carried out during three campaigns, in two occasions (October 1992 and November 1994) in the reactor of investigations of the ININ of Mexico, with a flow of thermic neutrons of 10a the 13 n.s -1 cm -2 and in an occasion in the nuclear reactor of the CAB (september 1994), with a flow of thermic neutrons of 6x 10 to the 12 n.s-1. The results were processed with the program ACTAM in the CEADEN. (S. Grainger) [es

  13. Representation and judgement of possible host rock formations and areas under consideration of geology and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-08-01

    This comprehensive report issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at the representation and judgement of possible host rock formations and areas as far as safety and geological aspects are concerned. Nagra has to demonstrate the basic feasibility of the safe disposal of spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level waste (HLW) and long-lived intermediate-level waste (ILW) in a deep geological repository, The report shows which possibilities for the disposal of SF, HLW and ILW exist in Switzerland and summarises the current state of general academic and applied geo-scientific research as well as the project-specific knowledge base that has been developed by Nagra over the past 30 years. The descriptions and assessments of the potential host rocks and areas are based on attributes that take into account experience gained both in Switzerland and abroad and are in agreement with international practice. An assessment of potential siting areas is looked at, in view of the preparation of a General Licence application, Nagra will also have to consider land-use planning and socio-economic aspects. This will be carried out in the next step according to the Sectoral Plan for Geological Disposal under the guidance of the relevant Swiss authorities

  14. Basin-Scale Leakage Risks from Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Impact on Carbon Capture and Storage Energy Market Competitiveness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Catherine; Fitts, Jeffrey; Wilson, Elizabeth; Pollak, Melisa; Bielicki, Jeffrey; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-03-13

    This three-year project, performed by Princeton University in partnership with the University of Minnesota and Brookhaven National Laboratory, examined geologic carbon sequestration in regard to CO{sub 2} leakage and potential subsurface liabilities. The research resulted in basin-scale analyses of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage in light of uncertainties in the characteristics of leakage processes, and generated frameworks to monetize the risks of leakage interference with competing subsurface resources. The geographic focus was the Michigan sedimentary basin, for which a 3D topographical model was constructed to represent the hydrostratigraphy. Specifically for Ottawa County, a statistical analysis of the hydraulic properties of underlying sedimentary formations was conducted. For plausible scenarios of injection into the Mt. Simon sandstone, leakage rates were estimated and fluxes into shallow drinking-water aquifers were found to be less than natural analogs of CO{sub 2} fluxes. We developed the Leakage Impact Valuation (LIV) model in which we identified stakeholders and estimated costs associated with leakage events. It was found that costs could be incurred even in the absence of legal action or other subsurface interference because there are substantial costs of finding and fixing the leak and from injection interruption. We developed a model framework called RISCS, which can be used to predict monetized risk of interference with subsurface resources by combining basin-scale leakage predictions with the LIV method. The project has also developed a cost calculator called the Economic and Policy Drivers Module (EPDM), which comprehensively calculates the costs of carbon sequestration and leakage, and can be used to examine major drivers for subsurface leakage liabilities in relation to specific injection scenarios and leakage events. Finally, we examined the competiveness of CCS in the energy market. This analysis, though qualitative, shows that financial

  15. Establishing MICHCARB, a geological carbon sequestration research and education center for Michigan, implemented through the Michigan Geological Repository for Research and Education, part of the Department of Geosciences at Western Michigan University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, David A. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States); Harrison, William B. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo MI (United States)

    2014-01-28

    The Michigan Geological Repository for Research and Education (MGRRE), part of the Department of Geosciences at Western Michigan University (WMU) at Kalamazoo, Michigan, established MichCarb—a geological carbon sequestration resource center by: • Archiving and maintaining a current reference collection of carbon sequestration published literature • Developing statewide and site-specific digital research databases for Michigan’s deep geological formations relevant to CO2 storage, containment and potential for enhanced oil recovery • Producing maps and tables of physical properties as components of these databases • Compiling all information into a digital atlas • Conducting geologic and fluid flow modeling to address specific predictive uses of CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery, including compiling data for geological and fluid flow models, formulating models, integrating data, and running the models; applying models to specific predictive uses of CO2 storage and enhanced oil recovery • Conducting technical research on CO2 sequestration and enhanced oil recovery through basic and applied research of characterizing Michigan oil and gas and saline reservoirs for CO2 storage potential volume, injectivity and containment. Based on our research, we have concluded that the Michigan Basin has excellent saline aquifer (residual entrapment) and CO2/Enhanced oil recovery related (CO2/EOR; buoyant entrapment) geological carbon sequestration potential with substantial, associated incremental oil production potential. These storage reservoirs possess at least satisfactory injectivity and reliable, permanent containment resulting from associated, thick, low permeability confining layers. Saline aquifer storage resource estimates in the two major residual entrapment, reservoir target zones (Lower Paleozoic Sandstone and Middle Paleozoic carbonate and sandstone reservoirs) are in excess of 70-80 Gmt (at an overall 10% storage efficiency factor; an approximately

  16. International Approaches for Nuclear Waste Disposal in Geological Formations: Report on Fifth Worldwide Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, Boris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Persoff, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sassani, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swift, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The goal of the Fifth Worldwide Review is to document evolution in the state-of-the-art of approaches for nuclear waste disposal in geological formations since the Fourth Worldwide Review that was released in 2006. The last ten years since the previous Worldwide Review has seen major developments in a number of nations throughout the world pursuing geological disposal programs, both in preparing and reviewing safety cases for the operational and long-term safety of proposed and operating repositories. The countries that are approaching implementation of geological disposal will increasingly focus on the feasibility of safely constructing and operating their repositories in short- and long terms on the basis existing regulations. The WWR-5 will also address a number of specific technical issues in safety case development along with the interplay among stakeholder concerns, technical feasibility, engineering design issues, and operational and post-closure safety. Preparation and publication of the Fifth Worldwide Review on nuclear waste disposal facilitates assessing the lessons learned and developing future cooperation between the countries. The Report provides scientific and technical experiences on preparing for and developing scientific and technical bases for nuclear waste disposal in deep geologic repositories in terms of requirements, societal expectations and the adequacy of cases for long-term repository safety. The Chapters include potential issues that may arise as repository programs mature, and identify techniques that demonstrate the safety cases and aid in promoting and gaining societal confidence. The report will also be used to exchange experience with other fields of industry and technology, in which concepts similar to the design and safety cases are applied, as well to facilitate the public perception and understanding of the safety of the disposal approaches relative to risks that may increase over long times frames in the absence of a successful

  17. The Certification Framework: Risk Assessment for Safety and Effectiveness of Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldenburg, C. M.; Nicot, J.; Bryant, S. L.

    2008-12-01

    Motivated by the dual objectives of (1) encouraging geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) as one of several strategies urgently needed to reduce CO2 emissions, and (2) protecting the environment from unintended CO2 injection-related impacts, we have developed a simple and transparent framework for certifying GCS safety and effectiveness at individual sites. The approach we developed, called the Certification Framework (CF), is proposed as a standard way for project proponents, regulators, and the public to analyze and understand risks and uncertainties of GCS. In the CF, we relate effective trapping to CO2 leakage risk, where we use the standard definition of risk involving the two factors (1) probability of a particular leakage scenario, and (2) impact of that leakage scenario. In short, if the CO2 leakage risk as calculated by the CF is below threshold values for the life of the project, then effective trapping is predicted and the site can be certified. The concept of effective trapping is more general than traditional "no migration" approaches to underground injection regulation. We achieve simplicity in the CF by using (1) wells and faults as the potential leakage pathways, (2) five compartments to represent where impacts can occur (underground sources of drinking water, hydrocarbon and mineral resources, near-surface environment, health and safety, and emission credits and atmosphere), (3) modeled CO2 fluxes and concentrations as proxies for impact to compartments, (4) broad ranges of storage formation properties to generate a catalog of simulated CO2 plumes, and (5) probabilities of intersection of the CO2 plume with the conduits and compartments. In a case study application of the CF for a saline formation GCS site in the Texas Gulf Coast, analysis with the CF suggested the overall leakage risk to be very small, with the largest contribution coming from risk to the near-surface environment due to potential leakage up abandoned wells, depending on the

  18. The Tarim Basin, NW China: formation and aspects of petroleum geology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Q.M.; Coward, M.P. (Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Geology); Nishidai, T. (Japex Geoscience Inst., Inc., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-01-01

    The formation and evolution since the Sinian of the Tarim Basin, in Northwest China, are introduced in this paper, on the basis of a study of stratigraphical and sedimentary facies, and an analysis of structural features. Mechanisms of basin formation have varied throughout this time, caused by frequent tectonic movements along the southern margin of the Eurasian Plate. As regards petroleum geology, six structural units have been classified from a consideration of the distribution of major source-rock sequences. An overall evaluation is made concerning hydrocarbon exploration in the individual structural units. Moreover, a general review is presented regarding source rocks, hydrocarbon reservoirs, trap structures, sealing layers and hydrocarbon generation, as well as possible recent exploration successes. (author)

  19. Carbonate Mineral Formation on Mars: Clues from Stable Isotope Variation Seen in Cryogenic Laboratory Studies of Carbonate Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socki, Richard; Niles, Paul B.; Sun, Tao; Fu, Qi; Romanek, Christopher S.; Gibson, Everett K.

    2013-01-01

    The geologic history of water on the planet Mars is intimately connected to the formation of carbonate minerals through atmospheric CO2 and its control of the climate history of Mars. Carbonate mineral formation under modern martian atmospheric conditions could be a critical factor in controlling the martian climate in a means similar to the rock weathering cycle on Earth. The combination of evidence for liquid water on the martian surface and cold surface conditions suggest fluid freezing could be very common on the surface of Mars. Cryogenic calcite forms readily when a rise in pH occurs as a result of carbon dioxide degassing quickly from freezing Ca-bicarbonate-rich water solutions. This is a process that has been observed in some terrestrial settings such as arctic permafrost cave deposits, lakebeds of the Dry Valleys of Antarctica, and in aufeis (river icings) from rivers of N.E. Alaska. We report here the results of a series of laboratory experiments that were conducted to simulate potential cryogenic carbonate formation on the planet Mars. These results indicate that carbonates grown under martian conditions (controlled atmospheric pressure and temperature) show enrichments from starting bicarbonate fluids in both carbon and oxygen isotopes beyond equilibrium values with average delta13C(DIC-CARB) values of 20.5%0 which exceed the expected equilibrium fractionation factor of [10(sup 3) ln alpha = 13%0] at 0 degC. Oxygen isotopes showed a smaller enrichment with delta18O(H2O-CARB) values of 35.5%0, slightly exceeding the equilibrium fractionation factor of [10(sup 3) ln alpha = 34%0 ] at 0degC. Large kinetic carbon isotope effects during carbonate precipitation could substantially affect the carbon isotope evolution of CO2 on Mars allowing for more efficient removal of 13C from the Noachian atmosphere enriched by atmospheric loss. This mechanism would be consistent with the observations of large carbon isotope variations in martian materials despite the

  20. Carbon dust formation in a cold plasma from cathode sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnas, C.; Mouberi, A.; Hassouni, K.; Michau, A.; Lombardi, G.; Bonnin, X.; Benedic, F.; Pegourie, B.

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles are produced in argon glow plasmas where carbon is introduced by sputtering of a graphite cathode. A scaling law of growth is reported on as a function of the discharge time. Two successive stages of growth of concomitant agglomeration and carbon deposition are observed, followed by a final stage of growth by carbon deposition. A model of formation of molecular precursors by coagulation of neutral clusters on the one hand and of neutral-negative clusters on the other hand is presented, based on formation enthalpy and cluster geometry.

  1. Carbon dust formation in a cold plasma from cathode sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnas, C.; Mouberi, A.; Hassouni, K.; Michau, A.; Lombardi, G.; Bonnin, X.; Bénédic, F.; Pégourié, B.

    2009-06-01

    Nanoparticles are produced in argon glow plasmas where carbon is introduced by sputtering of a graphite cathode. A scaling law of growth is reported on as a function of the discharge time. Two successive stages of growth of concomitant agglomeration and carbon deposition are observed, followed by a final stage of growth by carbon deposition. A model of formation of molecular precursors by coagulation of neutral clusters on the one hand and of neutral-negative clusters on the other hand is presented, based on formation enthalpy and cluster geometry.

  2. The use of the MCNP code for the quantitative analysis of elements in geological formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cywicka-Jakiel, T.; Woynicka, U. [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Zorski, T. [University of Mining and Metallurgy, Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, Krakow (Poland)

    2003-07-01

    The Monte Carlo modelling calculations using the MCNP code have been performed, which support the spectrometric neutron-gamma (SNGL) borehole logging. The SNGL enables the lithology identification through the quantitative analysis of the elements in geological formations and thus can be very useful for the oil and gas industry as well as for prospecting of the potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. In the SNGL experiment, gamma-rays induced by the neutron interactions with the nuclei of the rock elements are detected using the gamma-ray probe of complex mechanical and electronic construction. The probe has to be calibrated for a wide range of the elemental concentrations, to assure the proper quantitative analysis. The Polish Calibration Station in Zielona Gora is equipped with a limited number of calibration standards. An extension of the experimental calibration and the evaluation of the effect of the so-called side effects (for example the borehole and formation salinity variation) on the accuracy of the SNGL method can be done by the use of the MCNP code. The preliminary MCNP results showing the effect of the borehole and formation fluids salinity variations on the accuracy of silicon (Si), calcium (Ca) and iron (Fe) content determination are presented in the paper. The main effort has been focused on a modelling of the complex SNGL probe situated in a fluid filled borehole, surrounded by a geological formation. Track length estimate of the photon flux from the (n,gamma) interactions as a function of gamma-rays energy was used. Calculations were run on the PC computer with AMD Athlon 1.33 GHz processor. Neutron and photon cross-sections libraries were taken from the MCNP4c package and based mainly on the ENDF/B-6, ENDF/B-5 and MCPLIB02 data. The results of simulated experiment are in conformity with results of the real experiment performed with the use of the main lithology models (sandstones, limestones and dolomite). (authors)

  3. The use of the MCNP code for the quantitative analysis of elements in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cywicka-Jakiel, T.; Woynicka, U.; Zorski, T.

    2003-01-01

    The Monte Carlo modelling calculations using the MCNP code have been performed, which support the spectrometric neutron-gamma (SNGL) borehole logging. The SNGL enables the lithology identification through the quantitative analysis of the elements in geological formations and thus can be very useful for the oil and gas industry as well as for prospecting of the potential host rocks for radioactive waste disposal. In the SNGL experiment, gamma-rays induced by the neutron interactions with the nuclei of the rock elements are detected using the gamma-ray probe of complex mechanical and electronic construction. The probe has to be calibrated for a wide range of the elemental concentrations, to assure the proper quantitative analysis. The Polish Calibration Station in Zielona Gora is equipped with a limited number of calibration standards. An extension of the experimental calibration and the evaluation of the effect of the so-called side effects (for example the borehole and formation salinity variation) on the accuracy of the SNGL method can be done by the use of the MCNP code. The preliminary MCNP results showing the effect of the borehole and formation fluids salinity variations on the accuracy of silicon (Si), calcium (Ca) and iron (Fe) content determination are presented in the paper. The main effort has been focused on a modelling of the complex SNGL probe situated in a fluid filled borehole, surrounded by a geological formation. Track length estimate of the photon flux from the (n,gamma) interactions as a function of gamma-rays energy was used. Calculations were run on the PC computer with AMD Athlon 1.33 GHz processor. Neutron and photon cross-sections libraries were taken from the MCNP4c package and based mainly on the ENDF/B-6, ENDF/B-5 and MCPLIB02 data. The results of simulated experiment are in conformity with results of the real experiment performed with the use of the main lithology models (sandstones, limestones and dolomite). (authors)

  4. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 23. Environmental effluent analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/23, ''Environmental Effluent Analysis,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Drat Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This volume discusses the releases to the environment of radioactive and non-radioactive materials that arise during facility construction and waste handling operations, as well as releases that could occur in the event of an operational accident. The results of the analyses are presented along with a detailed description of the analytical methodologies employed

  5. Long-term risk assessment of radioactive waste disposal in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardi, F.; Bertozzi, G.; D'Alessandro, M.

    1978-01-01

    Methods for long-term safety analysis of waste from nuclear power production in the European Community are under study at the Joint Research Centre (JRC) at Ispra, Italy. Aim of the work is to develop a suitable methodology for long-term risk assessment. The methodology under study is based on the assessment of the quantitative value of a system of barriers which may be interposed between waste and man. The barriers considered are: a) quality of the segregation afforded by the geological formation, b) chemical and physical stability of conditioned waste, c) interaction with geological environments (subsoil retention), d) distribution in the biosphere. The methodology is presently being applied to idealized test cases based on the following assumptions: waste are generated during 30 years of operations in a nuclear park (reprocessing + refabrication plant) capable of treating 1000 ton/yr of LWR fuel. High activity waste is conditioned as borosilicate glass (HAW) while low- and medium-level wastes are bituminized (BIP). All waste is disposed off into a salt formation. Transport to the biosphere, following the containment failure occurs by groundwater, with no delay due to retention on adsorbing media. Distribution into the biosphere occurs according to the terrestrial model indicated. Under these assumptions, information was drawn concerning environmental contamination, its levels, contributing elements and pathways to man

  6. Radioactivity of rocks from the geological formations belonging to the Tibagi River hydrographic basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, Rodrigo Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    This work is a study of the 40 K and the 238 U and 232 Th series radioactivity in rocks measured with high resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The rocks were taken from the geologic formations in the region of the Tibagi river hydrographic basin. The course of this river cuts through the Paleozoic and Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences of the Parana sedimentary basin. In order to take into account the background radiation attenuation by the samples, a technique was developed that eliminated the need to measure a blank sample. The effects of the radiation's self-attenuation in the sample matrix were taken into account by using a gamma ray direct transmission method. The results for 87 rock samples, taken from 14 distinct formations, and their corresponding radioactivity variations are presented and discussed according to the possible geological processes from which they originated. Among the most discussed results are: an outcrop that profiles shale, limestone and rhythmite in the Irati Formation; a sandstone and siltstone sequence from the Rio do Rasto Formation; and a profile sampled in a coal mine located in the Rio Bonito Formation. The calculations of the rocks' contributions to the outdoor gamma radiation dose rate agree with the values presented by other authors for similar rocks. The highest dose values were obtained from felsic rocks (rhyolite of the Castro group, 129.8 ± 3.7 nGy.h -1 , and Cunhaporanga granite, 167 ± 37 nGy.h -1 ). The other highest values correspond to the shale rocks from the Irati Formation (109 ± 16 nGy.h -1 ) and the siltic shale rocks from the Ponta Grossa Formation (107.9 ± 0.7 nGy.h -1 ). The most recent geological formations presented the lowest dose values (e.g. the Botucatu sandstone, 3.3 ± 0.6 nGy.h -1 ). The average value for sedimentary rocks from seven other formations is equal to 59 ± 26 nGy.h -1 . The Rio Bonito Formation presented the highest dose value (334 ± 193 nGy.h -1 ) mainly due to the anomalous 226 Ra

  7. Variation in the carbon isotopic composition of alkanes during shale gas desorption process and its geological significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Meng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Taking Chang 7 shale of the Yanchang Formation in the southeastern area of the Yishan slope of the Ordos Basin as our research subject, desorption experiments were performed on more than 30 shale samples that helped this study focus on the variation of carbon isotopic composition of alkanes during the desorption process of shale gas, the possible causes of this phenomenon and its geological significance will also be discussed as follows. It was found that carbon isotopic composition became higher by 9.2‰ (from −50.1‰ to −40.9‰ for methane desorbed gas (δ13C1, and it also became higher by 2.8‰ (from −35.5‰ to −32.7‰ for ethane (δ13C2, but there's barely any differences for propane during the desorption process. At room temperature or constant temperature, carbon isotopic composition for both methane and ethane (δ13C1 & δ13C2 increased continuously. The values of δ13C1 and δ13C2 were low at first and then it gradually became high whilst the desorption process of shale gas that was optimized with the aid of the increasing temperature. The reason for this phenomenon is most likely due to the main adsorption/desorption of shale gas and diffusion migration fractionation of isotope. Additionally, these variation characteristics of methane and ethane carbon isotope composition of shale gas may be a vital reason for the relatively low carbon isotopic composition of methane compared to δ13C calculated by means of the vitrinite reflectance (RO, and this may be applied to evaluate the remaining amount of shale gas resources.

  8. Corrosion of carbon steel in clay environments relevant to radioactive waste geological disposals, Mont Terri rock laboratory (Switzerland)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Necib, S. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Déchets Radioactifs ANDRA, Meuse Haute-Marne, Center RD 960, Bure (France); Diomidis, N. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA), Wettingen (Switzerland); Keech, P. [Nuclear Waste Management Organisation NWMO, Toronto (Canada); Nakayama, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency JAEA, Horonobe-Cho (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Carbon steel is widely considered as a candidate material for the construction of spent fuel and high-level waste disposal canisters. In order to investigate corrosion processes representative of the long term evolution of deep geological repositories, two in situ experiments are being conducted in the Mont Terri rock laboratory. The iron corrosion (IC) experiment, aims to measure the evolution of the instantaneous corrosion rate of carbon steel in contact with Opalinus Clay as a function of time, by using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. The Iron Corrosion in Bentonite (IC-A) experiment intends to determine the evolution of the average corrosion rate of carbon steel in contact with bentonite of different densities, by using gravimetric and surface analysis measurements, post exposure. Both experiments investigate the effect of microbial activity on corrosion. In the IC experiment, carbon steel showed a gradual decrease of the corrosion rate over a period of 7 years, which is consistent with the ongoing formation of protective corrosion products. Corrosion product layers composed of magnetite, mackinawite, hydroxychloride and siderite with some traces of oxidising species such as goethite were identified on the steel surface. Microbial investigations revealed thermophilic bacteria (sulphate and thiosulphate reducing bacteria) at the metal surface in low concentrations. In the IC-A experiment, carbon steel samples in direct contact with bentonite exhibited corrosion rates in the range of 2 µm/year after 20 months of exposure, in agreement with measurements in absence of microbes. Microstructural and chemical characterisation of the samples identified a complex corrosion product consisting mainly of magnetite. Microbial investigations confirmed the limited viability of microbes in highly compacted bentonite. (authors)

  9. Automated analysis of carbon in powdered geological and environmental samples by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparkes, Robert; Hovius, Niels; Galy, Albert; Kumar, R Vasant; Liu, James T

    2013-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be used to assess the structure of naturally occurring carbonaceous materials (CM), which exist in a wide range of crystal structures. The sources of these geological and environmental materials include rocks, soils, river sediments, and marine sediment cores, all of which can contain carbonaceous material ranging from highly crystalline graphite to amorphous-like organic compounds. In order to fully characterize a geological sample and its intrinsic heterogeneity, several spectra must be collected and analyzed in a precise and repeatable manner. Here, we describe a suitable processing and analysis technique. We show that short-period ball-mill grinding does not introduce structural changes to semi-graphitized material and allows for easy collection of Raman spectra from the resulting powder. Two automated peak-fitting procedures are defined that allow for rapid processing of large datasets. For very disordered CM, Lorentzian profiles are fitted to five characteristic peaks, for highly graphitized material, three Voigt profiles are fitted. Peak area ratios and peak width measurements are used to classify each spectrum and allow easy comparison between samples. By applying this technique to samples collected in Taiwan after Typhoon Morakot, sources of carbon to offshore sediments have been identified. Carbon eroded from different areas of Taiwan can be seen mixed and deposited in the offshore flood sediments, and both graphite and amorphous-like carbon have been recycled from terrestrial to marine deposits. The practicality of this application illustrates the potential for this technique to be deployed to sediment-sourcing problems in a wide range of geological settings.

  10. Well materials durability in case of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulphide geological sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquemet, N.

    2006-01-01

    The geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) is a promising solution for the long-term storage of these undesirable gases. It consists in injecting them via wells into deep geological reservoirs. The steel and cement employed in the well casing can be altered and provide pathways for leakage with subsequent human and environmental consequences. The materials ageing was investigated by laboratory experiments in geologically relevant P-T conditions. A new experimental and analysis procedure was designed for this purpose. A numerical approach was also done. The cement and steel were altered in various fluid phases at 500 bar-120 C and 500 bar-200 C: a brine, a brine saturated with H 2 S-CO 2 , a mixture of brine saturated with H 2 S-CO 2 and of supercritical H 2 S-CO 2 phase, a dry supercritical H 2 S-CO 2 phase without liquid water. In all cases, two distinct reactions are observed: the cement carbonation by the CO 2 and the steel sulfidation by the H 2 S. The carbonation and sulfidation are respectively maximal and minimal when they occur within the dry supercritical phase without liquid water. The textural and porosity properties of the cement are weakly affected by all the treatments at 120 C. The porosity even decreases in presence of H 2 S-CO 2 . But these properties are affected at 200 C when liquid water is present in the system. At this temperature, the initial properties are only preserved or improved by the treatments within the dry supercritical phase. The steel is corroded in all cases and thus is the vulnerable material of the wells. (author)

  11. Geological and geochemical characterization of the Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation, Maverick Basin, south Texas: A future shale gas resource?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    As part of an assessment of undiscovered hydrocarbon resources in the northern Gulf of Mexico onshore Mesozoic section, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) evaluated the Lower Cretaceous Pearsall Formation of the Maverick Basin, south Texas, as a potential shale gas resource. Wireline logs were used to determine the stratigraphic distribution of the Pearsall Formation and to select available core and cuttings samples for analytical investigation. Samples used for this study spanned updip to downdip environments in the Maverick Basin, including several from the current shale gas-producing area of the Pearsall Formation.The term shale does not adequately describe any of the Pearsall samples evaluated for this study, which included argillaceous lime wackestones from more proximal marine depositional environments in Maverick County and argillaceous lime mudstones from the distal Lower Cretaceous shelf edge in western Bee County. Most facies in the Pearsall Formation were deposited in oxygenated environments as evidenced by the presence of biota preserved as shell fragments and the near absence of sediment laminae, which is probably caused by bioturbation. Organic material is poorly preserved and primarily consists of type III kerogen (terrestrial) and type IV kerogen (inert solid bitumen), with a minor contribution from type II kerogen (marine) based on petrographic analysis and pyrolysis. Carbonate dominates the mineralogy followed by clays and quartz. The low abundance and broad size distribution of pyrite are consistent with the presence of oxic conditions during sediment deposition. The Pearsall Formation is in the dry gas window of hydrocarbon generation (mean random vitrinite reflectance values, Ro = 1.2–2.2%) and contains moderate levels of total organic carbon (average 0.86 wt. %), which primarily resides in the inert solid bitumen. Solid bitumen is interpreted to result from in-situ thermal cracking of liquid hydrocarbon generated from original type II kerogen

  12. Leakage and Seepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and its storage in deep geologic formations. One of the concerns of geologic carbon sequestration is that injected CO 2 may leak out of the intended storage formation, migrate to the near-surface environment, and seep out of the ground or into surface water. In this research, we investigate the process of CO 2 leakage and seepage into saturated sediments and overlying surface water bodies such as rivers, lakes, wetlands, and continental shelf marine environments. Natural CO 2 and CH 4 fluxes are well studied and provide insight into the expected transport mechanisms and fate of seepage fluxes of similar magnitude. Also, natural CO 2 and CH 4 fluxes are pervasive in surface water environments at levels that may mask low-level carbon sequestration leakage and seepage. Extreme examples are the well known volcanic lakes in Cameroon where lake water supersaturated with respect to CO 2 overturned and degassed with lethal effects. Standard bubble formation and hydrostatics are applicable to CO 2 bubbles in surface water. Bubble-rise velocity in surface water is a function of bubble size and reaches a maximum of approximately 30 cm s -1 at a bubble radius of 0.7 mm. Bubble rise in saturated porous media below surface water is affected by surface tension and buoyancy forces, along with the solid matrix pore structure. For medium and fine grain sizes, surface tension forces dominate and gas transport tends to occur as channel flow rather than bubble flow. For coarse porous media such as gravels and coarse sand, buoyancy dominates and the maximum bubble rise velocity is predicted to be approximately 18 cm s -1 . Liquid CO 2 bubbles rise slower in water than gaseous CO 2 bubbles due to the smaller density contrast. A comparison of ebullition (i.e., bubble formation) and resulting bubble flow versus dispersive gas transport for CO 2 and CH 4 at three different seepage rates reveals that

  13. An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Finley

    2005-09-30

    The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline

  14. Heterogeneity-enhanced gas phase formation in shallow aquifers during leakage of CO2-saturated water from geologic sequestration sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plampin, Michael R.; Lassen, Rune Nørbæk; Sakaki, Toshihiro

    2014-01-01

    A primary concern for geologic carbon storage is the potential for leakage of stored carbon dioxide (CO2) into the shallow subsurface where it could degrade the quality of groundwater and surface water. In order to predict and mitigate the potentially negative impacts of CO2 leakage, it is import......A primary concern for geologic carbon storage is the potential for leakage of stored carbon dioxide (CO2) into the shallow subsurface where it could degrade the quality of groundwater and surface water. In order to predict and mitigate the potentially negative impacts of CO2 leakage...... concentration in the flowing water, the distance between the heterogeneity and the leakage location, and some fundamental properties of the porous media. Results also show that interfaces where a less permeable material overlies a more permeable material affect gas phase evolution more significantly than...

  15. R and D program concerning radioactive waste disposal in deep geologic formation (Study of an argilaceous formation in Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In 1974 it was decided to start up research with a view to safe disposal of conditioned waste in geological formations in Belgium. A first R and D programme was set up for study of the Boom clay in the Mol region. Multiple research projects have been undertaken; both experimental research in the field and in the laboratory and theoretical studies. Different exploratory drillings for geohydrological and geotechnical research were performed at the potential site. Teledetection and seismic prospection campaigns have provided data on the dimensions of the argillaceous layer and on the absence of major faults. Clay samples collected during drilling campaigns have been submitted to a number of analyses in laboratory as well as analyses of possible interactions between the clay and the conditioned waste to be stored. Some of these laboratory analyses, in particular, those concerning heat transfer and corrosion have been completed by more representative experiments in a clay pit. Various mathematical models have been developed and adapted with a view to better understanding of physical and physico-chemical phenomena like heat transfer, migration and retardation of radionuclides. A feasibility study was performed. Concerning safety analyses, a probabilistic study was undertaken on the behaviour of the geological barrier. The fault tree analysis technique was applied and the study was carried out in close collaboration with the Joint Rsearch Centre in Ispra. The underground experimental room at about 220 m depth was not yet relised but the technico-economical dossier has made such progress that the excavation can start in the very beginning of the next five-year programme

  16. Terrestrial gamma radiation and its statistical relation with geological formation in the Mersing district, Johor, Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleh, M. A.; Ramli, A. T.; Alajeramie, Y.; Suhairul, H.; Aliyu, A. S.; Basri, N. A.

    2013-01-01

    An extensive survey was carried out for gamma dose rates (GDRs) in the Mersing district, Johor, Malaysia. The average value of GDR measured in the district was found to be 140 nGy h -1 , in the range of 40-355 nGy h -1 . The mean weighted dose rate to the population, annual effective dose equivalent, collective effective dose equivalent, lifetime cancer risk were 0.836 mSv y -1 , 0.171 mSv, 1.183101 man Sv y -1 and 6.983 10 -4 Sv y, respectively. An isodose map was produced for the district. One way analysis of variance was used to test for differences due to different geological formations present in the Mersing District. (authors)

  17. Admissible thermal loading in geological formations. Consequences on radioactive waste disposal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Every granite formation possesses, the following main characteristics: presence of fissures; physico-chemical alterability; presence of internal or peripheral heterogeneities. From samples at ambient temperature, sound granite is found to have the properties of a hard, elastic rock with a relatively low thermal conductivity. Its natural permeability is low or very low, and most of the percolating water passes through fissures affecting the rock mass. In this report are examined: effects of heat on cavity stability, mechanical interaction between conditioned wastes and the geological environment, effects on the stability of infilling materials, heat effects on the host rock and underground water, assessment of the permissible thermal load and design of the storage facility

  18. Terrestrial gamma radiation and its statistical relation with geological formation in the Mersing district, Johor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Alajeramie, Yasser; Suhairul, Hashim; Aliyu, Abubakar Sadiq; Basri, Nor Afifah

    2013-09-01

    An extensive survey was carried out for gamma dose rates (GDRs) in the Mersing district, Johor, Malaysia. The average value of GDR measured in the district was found to be 140 nGy h(-1), in the range of 40-355 nGy h(-1). The mean weighted dose rate to the population, annual effective dose equivalent, collective effective dose equivalent, lifetime cancer risk were 0.836 mSv y(-1), 0.171 mSv, 1.18 × 10(1) man Sv y(-1) and 6.98 × 10(-4) Sv y, respectively. An isodose map was produced for the district. One way analysis of variance was used to test for differences due to different geological formations present in the Mersing District.

  19. Corrosion scenario development for corrosion lifetime prediction of carbon steel used for geological disposal package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuda, Takanori; Nakayama, Guen; Akashi, Masatsune

    1994-01-01

    A corrosion scenario has been developed in an attempt to ensure the long-term integrity of carbon steel geological disposal packages for high-level nuclear waste. As the service life of the packages must span 1,000-10,000 years, the temperature, pH, and amount of oxygen, in the disposal facilities can hardly be expected to remain constant. Therefore, we clarified a system for predicting the corrosion lifetime of packages, taking into account long-term changes in the types of corrosion of carbon steel in disposal facilities relative to changes in the conditions of such facilities. This corrosion scenario charts the possible types of corrosion (i.e., general corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and crevice corrosion) to which packages are subjected

  20. Biosurfactant as an Enhancer of Geologic Carbon Storage: Microbial Modification of Interfacial Tension and Contact Angle in Carbon dioxide/Water/Quartz Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taehyung Park

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Injecting and storing of carbon dioxide (CO2 in deep geologic formations is considered as one of the promising approaches for geologic carbon storage. Microbial wettability alteration of injected CO2 is expected to occur naturally by microorganisms indigenous to the geologic formation or microorganisms intentionally introduced to increase CO2 storage capacity in the target reservoirs. The question as to the extent of microbial CO2 wettability alteration under reservoir conditions still warrants further investigation. This study investigated the effect of a lipopeptide biosurfactant—surfactin, on interfacial tension (IFT reduction and contact angle alteration in CO2/water/quartz systems under a laboratory setup simulating in situ reservoir conditions. The temporal shifts in the IFT and the contact angle among CO2, brine, and quartz were monitored for different CO2 phases (3 MPa, 30°C for gaseous CO2; 10 MPa, 28°C for liquid CO2; 10 MPa, 37°C for supercritical CO2 upon cultivation of Bacillus subtilis strain ATCC6633 with induced surfactin secretion activity. Due to the secreted surfactin, the IFT between CO2 and brine decreased: from 49.5 to 30 mN/m, by ∼39% for gaseous CO2; from 28.5 to 13 mN/m, by 54% for liquid CO2; and from 32.5 to 18.5 mN/m, by ∼43% for supercritical CO2, respectively. The contact angle of a CO2 droplet on a quartz disk in brine increased: from 20.5° to 23.2°, by 1.16 times for gaseous CO2; from 18.4° to 61.8°, by 3.36 times for liquid CO2; and from 35.5° to 47.7°, by 1.34 times for supercritical CO2, respectively. With the microbially altered CO2 wettability, improvement in sweep efficiency of injected and displaced CO2 was evaluated using 2-D pore network model simulations; again the increment in sweep efficiency was the greatest in liquid CO2 phase due to the largest reduction in capillary factor. This result provides novel insights as to the role of naturally occurring biosurfactants in CO2 storage and

  1. Metrics to assess the mitigation of global warming by carbon capture and storage in the ocean and in geological reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Haugan, Peter Mosby; Joos, Fortunat

    2004-01-01

    Different metrics to assess mitigation of global warming by carbon capture and storage are discussed. The climatic impact of capturing 30% of the anthropogenic carbon emission and its storage in the ocean or in geological reservoir are evaluated for different stabilization scenarios using a reduced-form carbon cycle-climate model. The accumulated Global Warming Avoided (GWA) remains, after a ramp-up during the first ~50 years, in the range of 15 to 30% over the next millennium for de...

  2. Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources: Williston Basin, Central Montana Basins, and Montana Thrust Belt study areas: Chapter J in Geologic framework for the national assessment of carbon dioxide storage resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buursink, Marc L.; Merrill, Matthew D.; Craddock, William H.; Roberts-Ashby, Tina L.; Brennan, Sean T.; Blondes, Madalyn S.; Freeman, P.A.; Cahan, Steven M.; DeVera, Christina A.; Lohr, Celeste D.; Warwick, Peter D.; Corum, Margo D.

    2014-01-01

    The 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act directs the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to conduct a national assessment of potential geologic storage resources for carbon dioxide (CO2). The methodology used by the USGS for the national CO2 assessment follows that of previous USGS work. This methodology is non-economic and is intended to be used at regional to sub-basinal scales.

  3. Electron Transfer Strategies Regulate Carbonate Mineral and Micropore Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Zhirui; Tice, Michael M.

    2018-01-01

    Some microbial carbonates are robust biosignatures due to their distinct morphologies and compositions. However, whether carbonates induced by microbial iron reduction have such features is unknown. Iron-reducing bacteria use various strategies to transfer electrons to iron oxide minerals (e.g., membrane-bound enzymes, soluble electron shuttles, nanowires, as well as different mechanisms for moving over or attaching to mineral surfaces). This diversity has the potential to create mineral biosignatures through manipulating the microenvironments in which carbonate precipitation occurs. We used Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Geothrix fermentans, and Geobacter metallireducens GS-15, representing three different strategies, to reduce solid ferric hydroxide in order to evaluate their influence on carbonate and micropore formation (micro-size porosity in mineral rocks). Our results indicate that electron transfer strategies determined the morphology (rhombohedral, spherical, or long-chained) of precipitated calcium-rich siderite by controlling the level of carbonate saturation and the location of carbonate formation. Remarkably, electron transfer strategies also produced distinctive cell-shaped micropores in both carbonate and hydroxide minerals, thus producing suites of features that could potentially serve as biosignatures recording information about the sizes, shapes, and physiologies of iron-reducing organisms.

  4. Policy interactions, risk and price formation in carbon markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blyth, William; Bunn, Derek; Kettunen, Janne; Wilson, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Carbon pricing is an important mechanism for providing companies with incentives to invest in carbon abatement. Price formation in carbon markets involves a complex interplay between policy targets, dynamic technology costs, and market rules. Carbon pricing may under-deliver investment due to R and D externalities, requiring additional policies which themselves affect market prices. Also, abatement costs depend on the extent of technology deployment due to learning-by-doing. This paper introduces an analytical framework based on marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves with the aim of providing an intuitive understanding of the key dynamics and risk factors in carbon markets. The framework extends the usual static MAC representation of the market to incorporate policy interactions and some technology cost dynamics. The analysis indicates that supporting large-scale deployment of mature abatement technologies suppresses the marginal cost of abatement, sometimes to zero, whilst increasing total abatement costs. However, support for early stage R and D may reduce both total abatement cost and carbon price risk. An important aspect of the analysis is in elevating risk management considerations into energy policy formation, as the results of the stochastic modelling indicate wide distributions for the emergence of carbon prices and public costs around the policy expectations. (author)

  5. The Heat of Combustion of Tobacco and Carbon Oxide Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman AB

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated a relationship between mass burn rates of straight-grade cigarettes and heats of combustion of the tobacco materials. In the present work, relationships between measured heats of combustion and elemental composition of the tobacco materials were further analyzed. Heats of combustion measured in oxygen were directly correlated with the carbon and hydrogen content of the tobacco materials tested. Ash content of the materials was inversely related to the heats of combustion. The water insoluble residues from exhaustively extracted tobacco materials showed higher heats of combustion and higher carbon content than the non-extracted materials, confirming a direct relationship between carbon content and heat of combustion. A value for the heat of formation of tobacco was estimated (1175 cal/g from the heat of combustion data and elemental analysis results. The estimated value for heat of formation of tobacco appears to be constant regardless of the material type. Heat values measured in air were uniformly lower than the combustion heats in oxygen, suggesting formation of CO and other reaction products. Gases produced during bomb calorimetry experiments with five tobacco materials were analyzed for CO and CO2 content. When the materials were burned in oxygen, no CO was found in the gases produced. Measured heats of combustion matched estimates based on CO2 found in the gas and conversion of the sample hydrogen content to water. Materials burned in air produced CO2 (56% to 77% of the sample carbon content and appreciable amounts of CO (7% to 16% of the sample carbon content. Unburned residue containing carbon and hydrogen was found in the air combustion experiments. Estimated heat values based on amounts of CO and CO2 found in the gas and water formed from the hydrogen lost during combustion in air were higher than the measured values. These observations indicate formation of products containing hydrogen when the materials

  6. Formation of carbon quantum dots and nanodiamonds in laser ablation of a carbon film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorov, A. I.; Lebedev, V. F.; Kobranova, A. A.; Nashchekin, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    We have experimentally shown that nanosecond near-IR pulsed laser ablation of a thin amorphous carbon film produces carbon quantum dots with a graphite structure and nanodiamonds with a characteristic size of 20 - 500 nm on the substrate surface. The formation of these nanostructures is confirmed by electron microscopic images, luminescence spectra and Raman spectra. The mechanisms explaining the observed effects are proposed.

  7. Micro-CT in situ study of carbonate rock microstructural evolution for geologic CO2 storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Yang, Y.; Rogowska, M.; Gundlach, C.

    2017-09-01

    To achieve the 2°C target made in the 2016 Paris Agreement, it is essential to reduce the emission of CO2 into the atmosphere. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) has been given increasing importance over the last decade. One of the suggested methods for CCS is to inject CO2 into geologic settings such as the carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea. The final aim of our project is to find out how to control the evolution of petrophysical parameters during CO2 injection using an optimal combination of flow rate, injection pressure and chemical composition of the influent. The first step to achieve this is to find a suitable condition to create a stable 3D space in carbonate rock by injecting liquid to prepare space for the later CO2 injection. Micro-CT imaging is a non-destructive 3D method that can be used to study the property changes of carbonate rocks during and after CO2 injection. The advance in lab source based micro-CT has made it capable of in situ experiments. We used a commercial bench top micro-CT (Zeiss Versa XRM410) to study the microstructure changes of chalk during liquid injection. Flexible temporal CT resolution is essential in this study because that the time scales of coupled physical and chemical processes can be very different. The results validated the feasibility of using a bench top CT system with a pressure cell to monitor the mesoscale multiphase interactions in chalk.

  8. A data driven model for the impact of IFT and density variations on CO2 storage capacity in geologic formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomeli, Mohammad A.; Riaz, Amir

    2017-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in depleted hydrocarbon reservoirs and deep saline aquifers is one of the most promising solutions for decreasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. One of the important issues for CO2 storage in subsurface environments is the sealing efficiency of low-permeable cap-rocks overlying potential CO2 storage reservoirs. Though we focus on the effect of IFT in this study as a factor influencing sealing efficiency or storage capacity, other factors such as interfacial interactions, wettability, pore radius and interfacial mass transfer also affect the mobility and storage capacity of CO2 phase in the pore space. The study of the variation of IFT is however important because the pressure needed to penetrate a pore depends on both the pore size and the interfacial tension. Hence small variations in IFT can affect flow across a large population of pores. A novel model is proposed to find the IFT of the ternary systems (CO2/brine-salt) in a range of temperatures (300-373 K), pressures (50-250 bar), and up to 6 molal salinity applicable to CO2 storage in geological formations through a multi-variant non-linear regression of experimental data. The method uses a general empirical model for the quaternary system CO2/brine-salts that can be made to coincide with experimental data for a variety of solutions. We introduce correction parameters into the model, which compensates for uncertainties, and enforce agreement with experimental data. The results for IFT show a strong dependence on temperature, pressure, and salinity. The model has been found to describe the experimental data in the appropriate parameter space with reasonable precision. Finally, we use the new model to evaluate the effects of formation depth on the actual efficiency of CO2 storage. The results indicate that, in the case of CO2 storage in deep subsurface environments as a global-warming mitigation strategy, CO2 storage capacity increases with reservoir depth.

  9. Formate oxidation driven calcium carbonate precipitation by Methylocystis parvus OBBP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganendra, G; De Muynck, W; Ho, A.; Arvaniti, EC; Hosseinkhani, B; Ramos, JA; Rahier, H; Boon, N.

    2014-01-01

    Microbially Induced Carbonate Precipitation (MICP) applied in the construction industry poses several disadvantages such as ammonia release to the air and nitric acid production. An alternative MICP from calcium formate by Methylocystis parvus OBBP is presented in this study to overcome these

  10. Metamodeling-based approach for risk assessment and cost estimation: Application to geological carbon sequestration planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Alexander Y.; Jeong, Hoonyoung; González-Nicolás, Ana; Templeton, Thomas C.

    2018-04-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is being evaluated globally as a geoengineering measure for significantly reducing greenhouse emission. However, long-term liability associated with potential leakage from these geologic repositories is perceived as a main barrier of entry to site operators. Risk quantification and impact assessment help CCS operators to screen candidate sites for suitability of CO2 storage. Leakage risks are highly site dependent, and a quantitative understanding and categorization of these risks can only be made possible through broad participation and deliberation of stakeholders, with the use of site-specific, process-based models as the decision basis. Online decision making, however, requires that scenarios be run in real time. In this work, a Python based, Leakage Assessment and Cost Estimation (PyLACE) web application was developed for quantifying financial risks associated with potential leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. PyLACE aims to assist a collaborative, analytic-deliberative decision making processes by automating metamodel creation, knowledge sharing, and online collaboration. In PyLACE, metamodeling, which is a process of developing faster-to-run surrogates of process-level models, is enabled using a special stochastic response surface method and the Gaussian process regression. Both methods allow consideration of model parameter uncertainties and the use of that information to generate confidence intervals on model outputs. Training of the metamodels is delegated to a high performance computing cluster and is orchestrated by a set of asynchronous job scheduling tools for job submission and result retrieval. As a case study, workflow and main features of PyLACE are demonstrated using a multilayer, carbon storage model.

  11. Mathematical modeling of convective mixing in porous media for geological carbon dioxide storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Hassan

    As concern about the adverse consequences of anthropogenic climate change has grown, so too has research into methods to reduce the emissions of greenhouse gases that will drive future climatic change. Carbon dioxide emissions arising from use of fossil-fuels are likely to be the dominant drivers of climate change over the coming century. The use of carbon dioxide and geologic storage (or sequestration) offers the possibility of maintaining access to fossil energy while reducing emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. One of the essential concerns in geologic storage is the risk of leakage of CO 2 from the injection sites. Carbon dioxide injected into saline aquifers, dissolves in the resident brines, increasing their density potentially leading to convective mixing. Convective mixing increases the rate of dissolution, and therefore decreases the time-scale over which leakage is possible. Understanding the factors that drive convective mixing and accurate estimation of the rate of dissolution in saline aquifers is important for assessing geological CO 2 storage sites. This dissertation has three components, which includes linear stability analysis, prediction of CO2-brine PVT, and numerical modeling. A hydrodynamic stability analysis is performed for non-linear, transient concentration fields in a saturated, homogenous and isotropic porous medium under various initial and boundary conditions. The role of the natural flow of aquifers and associated dispersion on the onset of convection in the saline aquifers is also investigated. A fugacity and an activity models are combined to develop an accurate thermodynamic module appropriate for geological CO2 storage application. A three-dimensional, two-phase and two-component numerical model for simulation of CO2 storage in saline aquifers is also developed. The numerical model employs higher order and total-variation-diminishing schemes, capillary pressure, relative permeability hysteresis, and full dispersion

  12. Risk Assessment and Management for Long-Term Storage of CO2 in Geologic Formations — United States Department of Energy R&D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Deel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Concern about increasing atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2 and other greenhouse gases (GHG and their impact on the earth's climate has grown significantly over the last decade. Many countries, including the United States, wrestle with balancing economic development and meeting critical near-term environmental goals while minimizing long-term environmental risks. One promising solution to the buildup of GHGs in the atmosphere, being pursued by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL and its industrial and academic partners, is carbon sequestration—a process of permanent storage of CO2 emissions in underground geologic formations, thus avoiding CO2 release to the atmosphere. This option looks particularly attractive for point source emissions of GHGs, such as fossil fuel fired power plants. CO2 would be captured, transported to a sequestration site, and injected into an appropriate geologic formation. However, sequestration in geologic formations cannot achieve a significant role in reducing GHG emissions unless it is acceptable to stakeholders, regulators, and the general public, i.e., unless the risks involved are judged to be acceptable. One tool that can be used to achieve acceptance of geologic sequestration of CO2 is risk assessment, which is a proven method to objectively manage hazards in facilities such as oil and natural gas fields, pipelines, refineries, and chemical plants. Although probabilistic risk assessment (PRA has been applied in many areas, its application to geologic CO2 sequestration is still in its infancy. The most significant risk from geologic carbon sequestration is leakage of CO2. Two types of CO2 releases are possible—atmospheric and subsurface. High concentrations of CO2 caused by a release to the atmosphere would pose health risks to humans and animals, and any leakage of CO2 back into the atmosphere negates the effort expended to sequester the CO2

  13. Porphyry-Style Petropavlovskoe Gold Deposit, the Polar Urals: Geological Position, Mineralogy, and Formation Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikentyev, I. V.; Mansurov, R. Kh.; Ivanova, Yu. N.; Tyukova, E. E.; Sobolev, I. D.; Abramova, V. D.; Vykhristenko, R. I.; Trofimov, A. P.; Khubanov, V. B.; Groznova, E. O.; Dvurechenskaya, S. S.; Kryazhev, S. G.

    2017-11-01

    Geological and structural conditions of localization, hydrothermal metasomatic alteration, and mineralization of the Petropavlovskoe gold deposit (Novogodnenskoe ore field) situated in the northern part of the Lesser Ural volcanic-plutonic belt, which is a constituent of the Middle Paleozoic island-arc system of the Polar Urals, are discussed. The porphyritic diorite bodies pertaining to the late phase of the intrusive Sob Complex play an ore-controlling role. The large-volume orebodies are related to the upper parts of these intrusions. Two types of stringer-disseminated ores have been revealed: (1) predominant gold-sulfide and (2) superimposed low-sulfide-gold-quartz ore markedly enriched in Au. Taken together, they make up complicated flattened isometric orebodies transitory to linear stockworks. The gold potential of the deposit is controlled by pyrite-(chlorite)-albite metasomatic rock of the main productive stage, which mainly develops in a volcanic-sedimentary sequence especially close to the contacts with porphyritic diorite. The relationships between intrusive and subvolcanic bodies and dating of individual zircon crystals corroborate a multistage evolution of the ore field, which predetermines its complex hydrothermal history. Magmatic activity of mature island-arc plagiogranite of the Sob Complex and monzonite of the Kongor Complex initiated development of skarn and beresite alterations accompanied by crystallization of hydrothermal sulfides. In the Early Devonian, due to emplacement of the Sob Complex at a depth of approximately 2 km, skarn magnetite ore with subordinate sulfides was formed. At the onset of the Middle Devonian, the large-volume gold porphyry Au-Ag-Te-W ± Mo,Cu stockworks related to quartz diorite porphyry—the final phase of the Sob Complex— were formed. In the Late Devonian, a part of sulfide mineralization was redistributed with the formation of linear low-sulfide quartz vein zones. Isotopic geochemical study has shown that the

  14. Soils and Global Change in the Carbon Cycle over Geological Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retallack, G. J.

    2003-12-01

    sedimentary rocks; organic matter burial is an important long-term control on CO2 levels in the atmosphere (Berner and Kothavala, 2001). The magnitudes of carbon pools and fluxes involved provide a perspective on the importance of soils compared with other carbon reservoirs ( Figure 1). (6K)Figure 1. Pools and fluxes of reduced carbon (bold) and oxidized carbon (regular) in Gt in the pre-industrial carbon cycle (sources Schidlowski and Aharon, 1992; Siegenthaler and Sarmiento, 1993; Stallard, 1998). Before industrialization, there was only 600 Gt (1 Gt=1015g) of carbon in CO2 and methane in the atmosphere, which is about the same amount as in all terrestrial biomass, but less than half of the reservoir of soil organic carbon. The ocean contained only ˜3 Gt of biomass carbon. The deep ocean and sediments comprised the largest reservoir of bicarbonate and organic matter, but that carbon has been kept out of circulation from the atmosphere for geologically significant periods of time (Schidlowski and Aharon, 1992). Humans have tapped underground reservoirs of fossil fuels, and our other perturbations of the carbon cycle have also been significant ( Vitousek et al., 1997b; see Chapter 8.10).Atmospheric increase of carbon in CO2 to 750 Gt C by deforestation and fossil fuel burning has driven ongoing global warming, but is not quite balanced by changes in the other carbon reservoirs leading to search for a "missing sink" of some 1.8±1.3 GtC, probably in terrestrial organisms, soils, and sediments of the northern hemisphere (Keeling et al., 1982; Siegenthaler and Sarmiento, 1993; Stallard, 1998). Soil organic matter is a big, rapidly cycling reservoir, likely to include much of this missing sink.During the geological past, the sizes of, and fluxes between, these reservoirs have varied enormously as the world has alternated between greenhouse times of high carbon content of the atmosphere, and icehouse times of low carbon content of the atmosphere. Oscillations in the atmospheric

  15. An integrated approach to geological disposal of UK wastes containing carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vines, Sarah; Lever, David

    2013-01-01

    Carbon-14 is a key radionuclide in the assessment of the safety of a geological disposal facility for radioactive waste because of the calculated assessment of the radiological consequences of gaseous carbon-14 bearing species [i]. It may be that such calculations are based on overly conservative assumptions and that better understanding could lead to considerably reduced assessment of the radiological consequences from these wastes. Alternatively, it may be possible to mitigate the impact of these wastes through alternative treatment, packaging or design options. The Radioactive Waste Management Directorate of the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA RWMD) has established an integrated project team in which the partners are working together to develop a holistic approach to carbon-14 management in the disposal system [ii]. For a waste stream containing carbon-14 to be an issue: There must be a significant inventory of carbon-14 in the waste stream; and That waste stream has to generate carbon-14 bearing gas; and a bulk gas phase has to entrain the carbon-14 bearing gas: and these gases must migrate through the engineered barriers in significant quantities; and these gases must migrate through the overlying geological environment (either as a distinct gas phase or as dissolved gas); and these gases must interact with materials in the biosphere (i.e. plants) in a manner that leads to significant doses and risks to exposed groups or potentially exposed groups. The project team has developed and used this 'and' approach to structure and prioritise the technical work and break the problem down in a manageable way. We have also used it to develop our approach to considering alternative treatment, packaging and design options. For example, it may be possible to pre-treat some wastes to remove some of the inventory or to segregate other wastes so that they are removed from any bulk gas phase which might facilitate migration through the geosphere

  16. Study on the Seepage and Stability of Carbon Dioxide Geological Storage in Scrap Metal Mine: A Finite Difference Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwen Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon dioxide geological storage is one of the most effective ways to slow down the earth's climate warming. The ideal location for storage is in the deep scrap mines. Because of the characteristics of the deep underground condition, the long-term mechanical stability must have close relationship with the geostress fields and permeability, whose development can determine and reflect the mechanical behaviors of carbon dioxide geological storage. The permeability of host rock is affected by existing joints and discontinuity surfaces. Furthermore, as the liquid carbon dioxide is injected into the geological storage, the injection pressure and buoyancy force will change the state of geostress obviously. In this paper, based on mechanical properties of the host rock (granite, coupled brittle shear constitutive model was adopted and the analysis module was implemented in software FLAC3D. Then, with the in situ survey of joints in the host rock and the monitoring of in situ geostress, the permeability characteristics and geostress inverse analysis were input in FLAC3D. At last, fluid-solid coupled model was used to analyze the seepage characteristics of each phase after the injection and long-term storage of liquid carbon dioxide. Therefore, the systematic analysis of the storage stability of carbon dioxide geological could be carried out.

  17. Economic Screening of Geologic Sequestration Options in the United States with a Carbon Management Geographic Information System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahowski, Robert T.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Dooley, James J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Brown, Daryl R.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stephan, Alex J.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Badie I. Morsi

    2001-10-19

    Developing a carbon management strategy is a formidable task for nations as well as individual companies. It is often difficult to understand what options are available, let alone determine which may be optimal. In response to the need for a better understanding of complex carbon management options, Battelle has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) model with economic screening capability focused on carbon capture and geologic sequestration opportunities in the United States. This paper describes the development of this GIS-based economic screening model and demonstrates its use for carbon management analysis.

  18. Carbon formation and metal dusting in advanced coal gasification processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.; Judkins, R.R.; Wright, I.G.

    1997-02-01

    The product gases generated by coal gasification systems contain high concentrations of CO and, characteristically, have relatively high carbon activities. Accordingly, carbon deposition and metal dusting can potentially degrade the operation of such gasifier systems. Therefore, the product gas compositions of eight representative gasifier systems were examined with respect to the carbon activity of the gases at temperatures ranging from 480 to 1,090 C. Phase stability calculations indicated that Fe{sub 3}C is stable only under very limited thermodynamic conditions and with certain kinetic assumptions and that FeO and Fe{sub 0.877}S tend to form instead of the carbide. As formation of Fe{sub 3}C is a necessary step in the metal dusting of steels, there are numerous gasifier environments where this type of carbon-related degradation will not occur, particularly under conditions associated with higher oxygen and sulfur activities. These calculations also indicated that the removal of H{sub 2}S by a hot-gas cleanup system may have less effect on the formation of Fe{sub 3}C in air-blown gasifier environments, where the iron oxide phase can exist and is unaffected by the removal of sulfur, than in oxygen-blown systems, where iron sulfide provides the only potential barrier to Fe{sub 3}C formation. Use of carbon- and/or low-alloy steels dictates that the process gas composition be such that Fe{sub 3}C cannot form if the potential for metal dusting is to be eliminated. Alternatively, process modifications could include the reintroduction of hydrogen sulfide, cooling the gas to perhaps as low as 400 C and/or steam injection. If higher-alloy steels are used, a hydrogen sulfide-free gas may be processed without concern about carbon deposition and metal dusting.

  19. Zn(II, Mn(II and Sr(II Behavior in a Natural Carbonate Reservoir System. Part II: Impact of Geological CO2 Storage Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auffray B.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Some key points still prevent the full development of geological carbon sequestration in underground formations, especially concerning the assessment of the integrity of such storage. Indeed, the consequences of gas injection on chemistry and petrophysical properties are still much discussed in the scientific community, and are still not well known at either laboratory or field scale. In this article, the results of an experimental study about the mobilization of Trace Elements (TE during CO2 injection in a reservoir are presented. The experimental conditions range from typical storage formation conditions (90 bar, supercritical CO2 to shallower conditions (60 and 30 bar, CO2 as gas phase, and consider the dissolution of the two carbonates, coupled with the sorption of an initial concentration of 10−5 M of Zn(II, and the consequent release in solution of Mn(II and Sr(II. The investigation goes beyond the sole behavior of TE in the storage conditions: it presents the specific behavior of each element with respect to the pressure and the natural carbonate considered, showing that different equilibrium concentrations are to be expected if a fluid with a given concentration of TE leaks to an upper formation. Even though sorption is evidenced, it does not balance the amount of TE released by the dissolution process. The increase in porosity is clearly evidenced as a linear function of the CO2 pressure imposed for the St-Emilion carbonate. For the Lavoux carbonate, this trend is not confirmed by the 90 bar experiment. A preferential dissolution of the bigger family of pores from the preexisting porosity is observed in one of the samples (Lavoux carbonate while the second one (St-Emilion carbonate presents a newly-formed family of pores. Both reacted samples evidence that the pore network evolves toward a tubular network type.

  20. Carbon dioxide storage in subsurface geologic medium: A review on capillary trapping mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Raza

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 storage in subsurface geologic medium is presently the most promising option for mitigating the anthropogenic CO2 emissions. To have an effective storage in immobile phase, however, it is necessary to determine the distribution of CO2 in a medium, which mainly depends on three trapping mechanisms known as capillary, dissolution and mineral mechanisms. Previous studies have emphasized on these mechanisms individually in different aspects, particularly by considering the aquifer system. The purpose of this review is to give a comprehensive discussion on the advancement made toward capillary trapping in terms of effective and non-effective factors. It also throws light into the importance of capillary trapping in depleted hydrocarbon reservoir. Considering various factors and their impacts on capillary trapping, it is suggested to carry out an integrated study for the assessment of the major and minor influential parameters for better modeling and understanding of capillary trapping in any storage medium.

  1. Characterization of the Triassic Newark Basin of New York and New Jersey for geologic storage of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Daniel J. [Geostock Sandia, LLC, Houston, TX (United States)

    2017-06-30

    The Newark Basin is a Triassic-aged rift basin underlying densely populated, industrialized sections of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. The Basin is an elongate half-graben encompassing an area of more than 7,510 square-kilometers (2,900 square-miles), and could represent a key storage component for commercial scale management of carbon dioxide emissions via geologic sequestration. The project team first acquired published reports, surface and subsurface maps, and seismic data, which formed the basis for a three-dimensional model framework for the northern end of the Basin incorporating stratigraphic, hydrologic, and water quality data. Field investigations included drilling, coring, and logging of two stratigraphic test borings in Clarkstown, NY (Exit 14 Tandem Lot Well No. 1), drilled to a depth of 2,099 meters (6,885 feet); and Palisades, NY (Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Test Well No. 4) drilled to a depth of 549 meters (1,802 feet). Two two-dimensional seismic reflection data lines arrayed perpendicularly were acquired by Schlumberger/WesternGeco to help characterize the structure and stratigraphy and as part of pre-drilling field screening activities for the deep stratigraphic borehole. A total of 47 meters (155 feet) of continuous whole core was recovered from the Tandem Lot boring from depths of 1,393 meters (4,570 feet) to 1,486 meters (4,877 feet). Twenty-five horizontal rotary cores were collected in mudstones and sandstones in the surface casing hole and fifty-two cores were taken in various lithologies in the deep borehole. Rotary core plugs were analyzed by Weatherford Laboratories for routine and advanced testing. Rotary core plug trim end thin sections were evaluated by the New York State Museum for mineralogical analysis and porosity estimation. Using core samples, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory designed and completed laboratory experiments and numerical modeling analyses to characterize the dissolution and reaction of carbon

  2. Geological Carbon Sequestration Storage Resource Estimates for the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone, Illinois and Michigan Basins, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, David; Ellett, Kevin; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    The Cambro-Ordovician strata of the Midwest of the United States is a primary target for potential geological storage of CO2 in deep saline formations. The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive evaluation of the Cambro-Ordovician strata in the Illinois and Michigan Basins above the basal Mount Simon Sandstone since the Mount Simon is the subject of other investigations including a demonstration-scale injection at the Illinois Basin Decatur Project. The primary reservoir targets investigated in this study are the middle Ordovician St Peter Sandstone and the late Cambrian to early Ordovician Knox Group carbonates. The topic of this report is a regional-scale evaluation of the geologic storage resource potential of the St Peter Sandstone in both the Illinois and Michigan Basins. Multiple deterministic-based approaches were used in conjunction with the probabilistic-based storage efficiency factors published in the DOE methodology to estimate the carbon storage resource of the formation. Extensive data sets of core analyses and wireline logs were compiled to develop the necessary inputs for volumetric calculations. Results demonstrate how the range in uncertainty of storage resource estimates varies as a function of data availability and quality, and the underlying assumptions used in the different approaches. In the simplest approach, storage resource estimates were calculated from mapping the gross thickness of the formation and applying a single estimate of the effective mean porosity of the formation. Results from this approach led to storage resource estimates ranging from 3.3 to 35.1 Gt in the Michigan Basin, and 1.0 to 11.0 Gt in the Illinois Basin at the P10 and P90 probability level, respectively. The second approach involved consideration of the diagenetic history of the formation throughout the two basins and used depth-dependent functions of porosity to derive a more realistic spatially variable model of porosity rather than applying a

  3. CO2-mineral Wettability and Implications for Understanding Leakage Processes from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarens, A. F.; Edwards, I.; Wang, S.

    2011-12-01

    In geological carbon sequestration (GCS), leakage events will be difficult to predict because parcels of CO2 will travel over long length scales and encounter a number of heterogeneous formations and endogenous brine in their rise to the surface. A constitutive model of a rising parcel of CO2 includes at least three main forces: 1) buoyant forces, 2) surface tension forces, and 3) shear drag forces. Of these, surface tension forces are of great significance, especially for predicting capillary and mineral trapping, and are affected by surface tension and the three-phase contact angle between CO2, brine, and the solid host mineral surfaces. Very limited experimental data on contact angles in GCS relevant systems has been reported in the academic literature. Here, the contact angle of several of the rock and clay species prevailing near GCS sites, e.g. quartz, feldspar, calcite, kaolinite, smectite and illite, were measured under a range of relevant temperature, pressure and ionic strength conditions. The measurements were made in a custom-built high-pressure view cell by introducing precisely controlled pendant CO2 droplets of constant volume to smooth and clean mineral surfaces after saturating the surrounding brine with CO2 and images were recorded using a high resolution digital camera. Images were processed and the contact angle measured using ImageJ software with a plug-in designed for this purpose. To measure the contact angle of CO2 on clay surfaces, ultra-pure microscope glass slides were coated with cleaned and particle-size-separated clay particles using hydrolyzed polyvinyl alcohol to ensure adhesion and a continuous coating on the surface. The uniform morphology of the surface was confirmed using electron microscopy. Preliminary results demonstrate differences in contact angle between the tested minerals, with calcite > quartz > feldspar. The absolute differences between the minerals were on the order of 3-7%. The results also demonstrate that under

  4. Mixing and trapping of dissolved CO2 in deep geologic formations with shale layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agartan, Elif; Cihan, Abdullah; Illangasekare, Tissa H.; Zhou, Quanlin; Birkholzer, Jens T.

    2017-07-01

    For dissolution trapping, the spatial variability of the geologic properties of naturally complex storage formations can significantly impact flow patterns and storage mechanisms of dissolved CO2. The significance of diffusive mixing that occurs in low permeability layers embedded between relatively higher permeability materials was highlighted by Agartan et al. (2015) using a highly controlled laboratory experimental study on trapping of dissolved CO2 in multilayered systems. In this paper, we present a numerical modeling study on the impacts of low permeability layers on flow and storage of dissolved CO2 in realistic field-scale settings. The simulator of variable-density flow used in this study was first verified using the experimental data in Agartan et al. (2015) to capture the observed processes. The simulator was then applied to a synthetic, field-scale multilayered system, with 19 sensitivity cases having variable permeability and thickness of the shale layers as well as the source strength and geometry of the source zone of dissolved CO2. Simulation results showed that the presence of continuous shale layers in the storage system disrupts the convective mixing by enhancing lateral spreading of dissolved CO2 in sandstone layers and retarding the vertical mixing of dissolved CO2. The effectiveness of trapping of dissolved CO2 depends on the physical properties of the shale layers and configurations of the source zone. The comparison to homogeneous cases with effective vertical permeability shows that it is important to capture these continuous thin shale layers in a storage formation and include them in the models to enhance dissolution trapping.

  5. Semi-empirical model for carbon steel corrosion in long term geological nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.; Gras, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    In France and other countries, carbon and low alloy steels have been proposed as suitable materials for nuclear waste containers for long term geological disposal since, for such types of steels, general and localised corrosion can be fairly well predicted in geological environments (mainly argillaceous and granitic conditions) during the initial oxic and the following anoxic stages. This paper presents a model developed for the long term estimation of general and localised corrosion of carbon steel in argillaceous and granitic environments. In the case of localised corrosion, the model assumes that pitting and crevice corrosion propagation rates are similar. The estimations are based on numerous data coming from various experimental programmes conducted by the following laboratories: UKAEA (United Kingdom); NAGRA (Switzerland); SCK-CEN (Belgium); JNC (Japan) and ANDRA-CEA-EDF (France). From these data, the corrosion rates measured over long periods (from six months to several years) and derived from mass loss measurements have been selected to construct the proposed models. For general corrosion, the model takes into account an activation energy deduced from the experimental results (Arrhenius law) and proposes three equations for the corrosion rate: one for the oxic conditions, one for the early stage of the anoxic conditions and one for the long term anoxic corrosion. Concerning localised corrosion, a semi-empirical model, based on the evolution of the pitting factor (ratio between the maximum pit depth and the average general corrosion depth) as a function of the general corrosion depth, is proposed. This model is compared to other approaches where the maximum pit depth is directly calculated as a function of time, temperature and oxic or anoxic conditions. Finally, the presented semi-empirical models for long term corrosion estimation are applied to the case of nuclear waste storage. The results obtained by the different methods are then discussed and compared

  6. Safety guidebook relative to the disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The French nuclear safety authority (ASN) initiated in 2003 a revision process of the objectives to be considered during the research and work steps of the implementation of a radioactive waste storage facility in deep geologic formations. The purpose of this document is to define the safety objectives that have to be retained at each step of this implementation, from the site characterization to the closure of the facility. This update takes into account the works carried out by the ANDRA (French national agency of radioactive wastes) in the framework of the law from December 30, 1991, and the advices of the permanent experts group about these works. It takes also into consideration the international research works in this domain and the choices defined in the program law no 2006-739 from June 28, 2006 relative to the sustainable management of radioactive materials and wastes. The main modifications concern: the notion of reversibility, the definition of the safety functions of disposal components, the safety goals and the design principles assigned to waste packages, the control of nuclear materials and the monitoring objectives of the facility. The documents treats of the following points: 1 - the objectives of public health and environment protection; 2 - the safety principles and the safety-related design bases of the facility; and 3 - the method used for demonstrating the disposal safety. (J.S.)

  7. Site investigations for repositories for solid radioactive wastes in deep continental geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report reviews the earth-science investigations and associated scientific studies that may be needed to select a repository site and confirm that its characteristics are such that it will provide a safe confinement for solidified high-level and alpha-bearing and certain other solid radioactive wastes. Site investigations, as used in this report, cover earth sciences and associated safety analyses. Other site-investigation activities are identified but not otherwise considered here. The repositories under consideration are those consisting of mined cavities in deep continental rocks for accepting wastes in the solid and packaged form. The term deep as used in this report is used solely to emphasize the distinction between the repositories discussed in this report and those for shallow-ground disposal. In general, depths under consideration here are greater than 200 metres. The term continental refers to those geological formations that occur either beneath present-day land masses and adjoining islands or beneath the shallow seas. One of the objectives of site investigations is to collect the site-specific data necessary for the different evaluations, such as modelling required to assess the long-term safety of an underground repository

  8. A directory of computer programs for assessment of radioactive waste disposal in geological formations. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, J.; Broyd, T.W.; Jones, M.A.; Knowles, N.C.; Liew, S.K.; Mawbey, C.S.; Read, D.; Smith, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    This directory describes computer programs suitable for the assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities in geological formations. The programs, which are mainly applicable to the post-closure analysis of the repository, address combinations of the following topics: nuclide inventory, corrosion, leaching, geochemistry, geomechanics, heat transfer, groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, biosphere modelling, safety assessment and site evolution. A total of 320 programs are identified, of which 84 are reviewed in detail, 192 in summary and 44 in tabular fashion. Originally published in 1983, the directory was updated in 1985 with the addition of new programs and the revision of some of the existing program reviews. This directory has been completely rewritten in 1991 with the addition of more new programs and a full revision of all the existing program reviews, some of which have been deleted as they are no longer in general use. Although the directory is specific to the post-closure assessment of a repository site, some of the programs described can also be used in other areas of repository (e.g. repository design). This directory is composed of two volumes, the present volume is the second

  9. A directory of computer programs for assessment of radioactive waste disposal in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broyd, T.W.; Dean, R.B.; Hobbs, G.D.; Knowles, N.C.; Putney, J.M.; Wrigley, J.

    1984-01-01

    This Directory describes computer programs suitable for the assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities in geological formations. The programs, which are mainly applicable to the post closure analysis of the repository, address combinations of the following topics: nuclide inventory, corrosion, leaching, geochemistry, stress analysis, heat transfer, groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Biosphere modelling, surface water flow and risk analysis are not covered. A total of 248 programs are identified, of which 50 are reviewed in detail, 134 in summary and 64 in tabular fashion. The directory has been compiled using a combination of literature searches, telephone and postal correspondence and meetings with recognised experts in the respective areas of work covered. It differs from previous reviews of computer programs for similar topics areas in two main respects. Firstly, the method of obtaining information has resulted in program descriptions of considerable breadth and detail. Secondly, the Directory has concentrated wherever possible on European codes, whereas most previous work of this nature has looked solely at programs developed in North America. The reviews are presented in good faith, but it has not been possible to run any of the programs on a computer, and so truly objective comparisons may not be made. Finally, although the Directory is specific to the post-closure assessment of a repository site, some of the programs described could also be used in other areas of repository analysis (eg repository design)

  10. A directory of computer programs for assessment of radioactive waste disposal in geological formations. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashton, J.; Broyd, T.W.; Jones, M.A.; Knowles, N.C.; Liew, S.K.; Mawbey, C.S.; Read, D.; Smith, S.L.

    1993-01-01

    This directory describes computer programs suitable for the assessment of radioactive waste disposal facilities in geological formations. The programs, which are mainly applicable to the post-closure analysis of the repository, address combinations of the following topics: nuclide inventory, corrosion, leaching, geochemistry, geomechanics, heat transfer, groundwater flow, radionuclide migration, biosphere modelling, safety assessment and site evolution. A total of 320 programs are identified of which 84 are reviewed in detail, 192 in summary and 44 in tabular fashion. Originally published in 1983, the directory was updated in 1985 with the addition of new programs and the revision of some of the existing program reviews. This directory has been completely rewritten in 1991 with the addition of more new programs and a full revision of all the existing program reviews, some of which have been deleted as they are no longer in general use. Although the directory is specific to the post-closure assessment of a repository site, some of the programs described can also be used in other areas of repository (e.g. repository design). This directory is composed of two volumes, the present volume is the first

  11. Characterisation, quantification and modelling of CO2 transport and interactions in a carbonate vadose zone: application to a CO2 diffusive leakage in a geological sequestration context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Global warming is related to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentration increase and especially anthropogenic CO 2 emissions. Geologic sequestration has the potential capacity and the longevity to significantly diminish anthropogenic CO 2 emissions. This sequestration in deep geological formation induces leakage risks from the geological reservoir. Several leakage scenarios have been imagined. Since it could continue for a long period, inducing environmental issues and risks for human, the scenario of a diffusive leakage is the most worrying. Thus, monitoring tools and protocols are needed to set up a near-surface monitoring plan. The present thesis deals with this problematic. The aims are the characterisation, the quantification and the modelling of transport and interactions of CO 2 in a carbonate unsaturated zone. This was achieved following an experimental approach on a natural pilot site in Saint-Emilion (Gironde, France), where diffusive gas leakage experiments were set up in a carbonate unsaturated zone. Different aspects were investigated during the study: natural pilot site description and instrumentation; the physical and chemical characterisation of carbonate reservoir heterogeneity; the natural functioning of the carbonate unsaturated zone and especially the set-up of a CO 2 concentrations baseline; the characterisation of gas plume extension following induced diffusive leakage in the carbonate unsaturated zone and the study of gas-water-rock interactions during a CO 2 diffusive leakage in a carbonate unsaturated zone through numerical simulations. The results show the importance of the carbonate reservoir heterogeneity characterisation as well as the sampling and analysing methods for the different phases. The baseline set-up is of main interest since it allows discrimination between the induced and the natural CO 2 concentrations variations. The transfer of CO 2 in a carbonate unsaturated zone is varying in function of physical and chemical properties

  12. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 7. Baseline rock properties-basalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/7 Baseline Rock Properties--Basalt, is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-36'' which supplements a ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-44.'' The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This report contains an evaluation of the results of a literature survey to define the rock mass properties of a generic basalt, which could be considered as a geological medium for storing radioactive waste. The general formation and structure of basaltic rocks is described. This is followed by specific descriptions and rock property data for the Dresser Basalt, the Amchitka Island Basalt, the Nevada Test Site Basalt and the Columbia River Group Basalt. Engineering judgment has been used to derive the rock mass properties of a typical basalt from the relevant intact rock property data and the geological information pertaining to structural defects, such as joints and faults.

  13. Estimating the carbon sequestration capacity of shale formations using methane production rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhiyuan; Clarens, Andres

    2013-10-01

    Hydraulically fractured shale formations are being developed widely for oil and gas production. They could also represent an attractive repository for permanent geologic carbon sequestration. Shales have a low permeability, but they can adsorb an appreciable amount of CO2 on fracture surfaces. Here, a computational method is proposed for estimating the CO2 sequestration capacity of a fractured shale formation and it is applied to the Marcellus shale in the eastern United States. The model is based on historical and projected CH4 production along with published data and models for CH4/CO2 sorption equilibria and kinetics. The results suggest that the Marcellus shale alone could store between 10.4 and 18.4 Gt of CO2 between now and 2030, which represents more than 50% of total U.S. CO2 emissions from stationary sources over the same period. Other shale formations with comparable pressure-temperature conditions, such as Haynesville and Barnett, could provide significant additional storage capacity. The mass transfer kinetic results indicate that injection of CO2 would proceed several times faster than production of CH4. Additional considerations not included in this model could either reinforce (e.g., leveraging of existing extraction and monitoring infrastructure) or undermine (e.g., leakage or seismicity potential) this approach, but the sequestration capacity estimated here supports continued exploration into this pathway for producing carbon neutral energy.

  14. Radiological impact of a spent fuel disposal in a deep geological granite formation - results of the european spa project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudoin, P.; Gay, D.; Certes, C.; Serres, C.

    2000-01-01

    The SPA project (Spent fuel disposal Performance Assessment) is the latest of four integrated performance assessment exercises on nuclear waste disposal in geological formations, carried out in the framework of the European Community 'Nuclear Fission' Research Programmes. The SPA project, which was undertaken by ENRESA, GRS, IPSN, NRG, SCK.CEN and VTT between May 1996 and April 1999, was devoted to the study of disposal of spent fuel in various host rock formations (clay, crystalline rocks and salt formation). This project is a direct continuation of the efforts made by the European Community since 1982 to build a common understanding of the methods applicable to deep disposal performance assessment. (authors)

  15. Intermediate Scale Laboratory Testing to Understand Mechanisms of Capillary and Dissolution Trapping during Injection and Post-Injection of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illangasekare, Tissa [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Trevisan, Luca [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Agartan, Elif [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Mori, Hiroko [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Vargas-Johnson, Javier [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Cihan, Abdullah [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Zhou, Quanlin [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) represents a technology aimed to reduce atmospheric loading of CO2 from power plants and heavy industries by injecting it into deep geological formations, such as saline aquifers. A number of trapping mechanisms contribute to effective and secure storage of the injected CO2 in supercritical fluid phase (scCO2) in the formation over the long term. The primary trapping mechanisms are structural, residual, dissolution and mineralization. Knowledge gaps exist on how the heterogeneity of the formation manifested at all scales from the pore to the site scales affects trapping and parameterization of contributing mechanisms in models. An experimental and modeling study was conducted to fill these knowledge gaps. Experimental investigation of fundamental processes and mechanisms in field settings is not possible as it is not feasible to fully characterize the geologic heterogeneity at all relevant scales and gathering data on migration, trapping and dissolution of scCO2. Laboratory experiments using scCO2 under ambient conditions are also not feasible as it is technically challenging and cost prohibitive to develop large, two- or three-dimensional test systems with controlled high pressures to keep the scCO2 as a liquid. Hence, an innovative approach that used surrogate fluids in place of scCO2 and formation brine in multi-scale, synthetic aquifers test systems ranging in scales from centimeter to meter scale developed used. New modeling algorithms were developed to capture the processes controlled by the formation heterogeneity, and they were tested using the data from the laboratory test systems. The results and findings are expected to contribute toward better conceptual models, future improvements to DOE numerical codes, more accurate assessment of storage capacities, and optimized placement strategies. This report presents the experimental and modeling methods

  16. Modeling carbon dioxide solubility in salty water for geological sequestration purposes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darwish, N.A. [American Univ. of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Hilal, N. [Nottingham Univ. (United Kingdom). Faculty of Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in deep saline aquifers is now being considered as a method of reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. This paper discussed the development of a model for predicting CO{sub 2} solubility in a salt water system designed to replicate conditions typically found in a geological sequestration area. The model was based on the Setschenov model and was designed to predict CO{sub 2} solubility for temperatures from 300 to 500 K, pressures from 40 to 2000 bar, and salt concentrations from 1 to 4 molal. The model evaluated the effects of pressure, temperature, and salt concentrations on the Setschenov constant (K{sub gs}). The study demonstrated that there is a unique value of temperature at which the Setschenov constant becomes a monotonic increasing function in P, whereas at temperatures below T{sub 0}, K{sub gs} becomes a monotonic decreasing function in P. The study showed that K{sub gs} cannot be assumed constant for conditions such as those encountered in carbon sequestration environments. The model was validated using experimental data. 19 refs., 7 figs.

  17. A Machine-Learning and Filtering Based Data Assimilation Framework for Geologic Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B.; Harp, D. R.; Lin, Y.; Keating, E. H.; Pawar, R.

    2017-12-01

    Monitoring is a crucial aspect of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) risk management. It has gained importance as a means to ensure CO2 is safely and permanently stored underground throughout the lifecycle of a GCS project. Three issues are often involved in a monitoring project: (i) where is the optimal location to place the monitoring well(s), (ii) what type of data (pressure, rate and/or CO2 concentration) should be measured, and (iii) What is the optimal frequency to collect the data. In order to address these important issues, a filtering-based data assimilation procedure is developed to perform the monitoring optimization. The optimal monitoring strategy is selected based on the uncertainty reduction of the objective of interest (e.g., cumulative CO2 leak) for all potential monitoring strategies. To reduce the computational cost of the filtering-based data assimilation process, two machine-learning algorithms: Support Vector Regression (SVR) and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) are used to develop the computationally efficient reduced-order-models (ROMs) from full numerical simulations of CO2 and brine flow. The proposed framework for GCS monitoring optimization is demonstrated with two examples: a simple 3D synthetic case and a real field case named Rock Spring Uplift carbon storage site in Southwestern Wyoming.

  18. Formation of carbide derived carbon coatings on silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambaz, Zarife Goknur

    Control over the structure of materials on nanoscale can open numerous opportunities for the development of materials with controlled properties. Carbon, which is one of the most promising materials for nanotechnology, can be produced by many different methods. One of the most versatile, in terms of a variety of structures demonstrated (graphite, porous amorphous carbon, nanotubes, graphene and diamond), is selective etching of SiC and other carbides. Since the Si atoms are extracted layer by layer, atomic level control of the carbon structures can potentially be achieved without changing the size and shape of the sample. Carbon produced by this method is called Carbide-Derived Carbon (CDC). In this work, CDC formation was studied on single crystalline 3C-SiC whiskers and 6H-SIC wafers by chlorination and vacuum decomposition at high temperatures with the goals to better understand the mechanism of carbide-to-carbon transformation and determine conditions for synthesis of desired carbon structures. The reaction kinetics, morphology and shape conservation were investigated at nanoscale. The transformation mechanism of the SIC surface to carbon was discussed in detail accounting to the effects of processing parameters (temperature, and composition of the environment), and material parameters (surface conditions, surface chemistry, crystal face, etc.). The characterization of the carbon structures was performed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We compared chlorination of SiC whiskers with wet etching and showed that chlorination revealed the dislocations, while wet etching resulted in pagoda-like 3-D nanostructures upon selective etching of stacking faults (SFs). The difference in etching mechanisms was discussed. We determined the processing conditions for controlled synthesis of carbon structures like graphene, graphite and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on the surface of alpha-SiC wafers by

  19. Pattern Formation and Reaction Textures during Dunite Carbonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zhu, W.

    2015-12-01

    Alteration of olivine-bearing rocks by fluids is one of the most pervasive geochemical processes on the surface of the Earth. Serpentinized and/or carbonated ultramafic rocks often exhibit characteristic textures on many scales, from polygonal mesh textures on the grain-scale to onion-skin or kernel patterns on the outcrop scale. Strong disequilibrium between pristine ultramafic rocks and common geological fluids such as water and carbon dioxide leads to rapid reactions and coupled mechanical and chemical feedbacks that manifest as characteristic textures. Textural evolution during metasomatic reactions can control effective reaction rates by modulating dynamic porosity and therefore reactant supply and reactive surface area. We run hydrostatic experiments on thermally cracked dunites saturated with carbon dioxide bearing brine at 15 MPa confining pressure and 150°C to explore the evolution of physical properties and reaction textures as carbon mineralization takes place in the sample. Compaction and permeability reduction are observed throughout experiments. Rates of porosity and permeability changes are sensitive to pore fluid chemistry. After reaction, samples are imaged in 3-dimension (3D) using a dual-beam FIB-SEM. Analysis of the high resolution 3D microstructure shows that permeable, highly porous domains are created by olivine dissolution at a characteristic distance from pre-existing crack surfaces while precipitation of secondary minerals such as serpentine and magnesite is limited largely to the primary void space. The porous dissolution channels provide an avenue for fluid ingress, allow reactions to continue and could lead to progressive hierarchical fracturing. Initial modeling of the system indicates that this texture is the result of coupling between dissolution-precipitation reactions and the local stress state of the sample.

  20. Neon ion beam induced pattern formation on amorphous carbon surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Bobes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the ripple pattern formation on amorphous carbon surfaces at room temperature during low energy Ne ion irradiation as a function of the ion incidence angle. Monte Carlo simulations of the curvature coefficients applied to the Bradley-Harper and Cater-Vishnyakov models, including the recent extensions by Harrison-Bradley and Hofsäss predict that pattern formation on amorphous carbon thin films should be possible for low energy Ne ions from 250 eV up to 1500 eV. Moreover, simulations are able to explain the absence of pattern formation in certain cases. Our experimental results are compared with prediction using current linear theoretical models and applying the crater function formalism, as well as Monte Carlo simulations to calculate curvature coefficients using the SDTrimSP program. Calculations indicate that no patterns should be generated up to 45° incidence angle if the dynamic behavior of the thickness of the ion irradiated layer introduced by Hofsäss is taken into account, while pattern formation most pronounced from 50° for ion energy between 250 eV and 1500 eV, which are in good agreement with our experimental data.

  1. The Carancas meteorite impact crater, Peru: Geologic surveying and modeling of crater formation and atmospheric passage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenkmann, T.; Artemieva, N. A.; Wünnemann, K.; Poelchau, M. H.; Elbeshausen, D.; Núñez Del Prado, H.

    2009-08-01

    The recent Carancas meteorite impact event caused a worldwide sensation. An H4-5 chondrite struck the Earth south of Lake Titicaca in Peru on September 15, 2007, and formed a crater 14.2 m across. It is the smallest, youngest, and one of two eye-witnessed impact crater events on Earth. The impact violated the hitherto existing view that stony meteorites below a size of 100 m undergo major disruption and deceleration during their passage through the atmosphere and are not capable of producing craters. Fragmentation occurs if the strength of the meteoroid is less than the aerodynamic stresses that occur in flight. The small fragments that result from a breakup rain down at terminal velocity and are not capable of producing impact craters. The Carancas cratering event, however, demonstrates that meter-sized stony meteoroids indeed can survive the atmospheric passage under specific circumstances. We present results of a detailed geologic survey of the crater and its ejecta. To constrain the possible range of impact parameters we carried out numerical models of crater formation with the iSALE hydrocode in two and three dimensions. Depending on the strength properties of the target, the impact energies range between approximately 100-1000 MJ (0.024- 0.24 t TNT). By modeling the atmospheric traverse we demonstrate that low cosmic velocities (12- 14 kms-1) and shallow entry angles (<20°) are prerequisites to keep aerodynamic stresses low (<10 MPa) and thus to prevent fragmentation of stony meteoroids with standard strength properties. This scenario results in a strong meteoroid deceleration, a deflection of the trajectory to a steeper impact angle (40-60°), and an impact velocity of 350-600 ms-1, which is insufficient to produce a shock wave and significant shock effects in target minerals. Aerodynamic and crater modeling are consistent with field data and our microscopic inspection. However, these data are in conflict with trajectories inferred from the analysis of

  2. Geochemical characteristics and geological significance of shale gas from the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation in Sichuan Basin, China

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Bo

    2016-01-01

    The shale of the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation has become a key target for shale gas exploration and development in China recently. The origin of carbon and hydrogen isotopic reversal in shale gas is discussed in this paper based on the analysis of the chemical components and stable isotope composition of natural gas in the Carboniferous Huanglong Formation sourced from Longmaxi Formation and Longmaxi shale gas. The shale gas was mainly composed of hydrocarbon gas in which the content of ...

  3. Geological and geomechanical properties of the carbonate rocks at the eastern Black Sea Region (NE Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersoy, Hakan; Yalçinalp, Bülent; Arslan, Mehmet; Babacan, Ali Erden; Çetiner, Gözde

    2016-11-01

    Turkey located in the Alpine-Himalayan Mountain Belt has 35% of the natural stone reserves of the world and has good quality marble, limestone, travertine and onyx reserves especially in the western regions of the country. The eastern Black Sea Region with a 1.4 million meters cubes reserve has a little role on the natural stone production in the country. For this reason, this paper deals with investigation on the potential of carbonate stone in the region and determination of the geological and geo-mechanical properties of these rocks in order to provide economic contribution to the national economy. While the study sites are selected among the all carbonate rock sites, the importance as well as the representative of the sites were carefully considered for the region. After representative samples were analyzed for major oxide and trace element compositions to find out petrochemical variations, the experimental program conducted on rock samples for determination of both physical and strength properties of the carbonate rocks. The results of the tests showed that there are significant variations in the geo-mechanical properties of the studied rock groups. The density values vary from 2.48 to 2.70 gr/cm3, water absorption by weight values range from 0.07 to 1.15% and the apparent porosity of the carbonate rocks are between 0.19 and 3.29%. However, the values of the UCS shows variation from 36 to 80 MPa. Tensile and bending strength values range from 3.2 to 7.5 MPa and 6.0-9.2 MPa respectively. Although the onyx samples have the lowest values of apparent porosity and water absorption by weight, these samples do not have the highest values of UCS values owing to occurrence of the micro-cracks. The UCS values of the rock samples were also found after cycling tests However, the limestone samples have less than 5% deterioration after freezing-thawing and wetting-drying tests, but travertine and onyx samples have more than 15% deterioration. Exception of the apparent

  4. Preliminary analysis on the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in geological formations of Sao Paulo state, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattos, Luis Antonio Terribile de

    1981-01-01

    Several studies show that deep geological formations are the most promising solution - technical and economical - for the safe disposal of the high-level radioactive wastes produced by the nuclear industry. In order to obtain the necessary information to assess on the use of geological sites in Brazil - for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste generated by the brazilian nuclear industry - a careful survey on the basalt and granite rocks of Sao Paulo State was made. The data obtained were evaluated according to guidelines established by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The favourable and unfavourable characteristics of the basalts, granites and their respective occurrence areas in the Sao Paulo state territory - as potential waste disposal sites - were analysed. This preliminary and regional characterization is not a conclusive study whether these two rocks types are definitively the most suitable geological formations for use as nuclear waste repository or not. It is the subsidy for a more detailed analysis. Other factors such as social, political and economical aspects, ecological effects, engineering geology, heat generation rate of the waste, type of radiation emitted and corrosive nature of the waste must also be taken into account. (author)

  5. National 2010 survey on the awareness and opinion of the French about geological carbon storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha-Duong, Minh; Arnoux, Stephanie; Chaabane, Naceur; Mardon, Gilles; Nadai, Alain; Neri O'Neill, Rebeca

    2011-01-01

    This report presents the results of the 2010 CIRED / TNS Sofres public opinion survey about geological storage of CO 2 in France. The first survey, in April 2007, demonstrated a broad consensus for action against climate change. Three years later in March 2010, even a wide support for action remains, the public opinion was marked from the Copenhagen fiasco and the 'climate-gate'. More generally, in a context of global economic crisis, compared to 2007 the economy/environment balance moves back in 2010 towards the former term. Thus, 62% of the French answered that there is a need to act against climate change, that is 17 points less than three years ago. And 67% estimated that 'the priority must go to the protection of the environment' instead of the economy, that is 11 points less. The 2007 survey suggested that 6% of the respondents were able to define correctly geological storage of CO 2 . The approval rate was 59% at first, but fell to 38% after reading about the risks of the technology. Three years later, the context included emerging CCS projects in France, a (failed) carbon tax proposal and sustained debates on climate change. While CCS has never been a hot topic in the media, it moved from being inexistent to a few specific papers each semesters in important newspapers and some TV / radio air-time. Between 2007 and 2010 the notoriety of CCS increased in France, but the rates of approval mostly stagnated: 57% at first, falling to 37% after the reading on risks. The expression 'stockage geologique du CO 2 ' is now recognized by one third of the French, and about 17% can provide an exact definition. There remain an ambiguity with sequestration in forests, and the mental image of storing CO 2 in underground caves or vessels remains widespread. Our study shows a statistically significant positive correlation between more information and a favorable opinion towards geological sequestration. The opinion of respondents is more stable

  6. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 8. Repository preconceptual design studies: salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Volume 8 ''Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Salt,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in salt. The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area, and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/9, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Salt.''

  7. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 10. Repository preconceptual design studies: granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Volume 10 ''Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Granite,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in granite. The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area, and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/11, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Granite.''

  8. Information on scientific and technological co-operation between the CMEA member countries in radioactive waste burial in geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolpygo, V.K.

    1984-02-01

    Research on radioactive waste treatment and disposal constitutes an important area of cooperation between the CMEA member countries. An important part in cooperation has been assigned to the study of systems for disposing radioactive waste of all kinds in geological formations. The cooperation which was initiated in 1971 was realized within the two research programmes scheduled for subsequent periods, viz. for 1971 to 1975, and from 1976 to 1983. Programme work for 1971 to 1975 included three major fields of research: theoretical and experimental research, scientific and technological research and methodological research. As regards methodological research and results of work by the plan for 1976 to 1983, comprehensive research on the methods of disposing radioactive waste in geological formations has been practically completed and documents relating to the industrial introduction of these methods have been prepared. The results of research renders it possible to properly organize from the standpoint of methodology surveying, designing of schematic diagrams and structures of all facilities involving the burial of radioactive waste in geological formations, the evaluation of suitability of the sanitary protection zone from the standpoint of environmental protection and the rational use of natural resources. The drawing of prognostic charts and the development of recommendations on the use of interior of the earth for burying radioactive waste make it possible for the planning bodies, ministries and agencies to evaluate the possibilities for underground burial of radioactive waste in selecting a site and in designing and construction of new nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities

  9. The carbon dioxide capture and geological storage; Le captage et le stockage geologique de CO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-06-15

    This road-map proposes by the Group Total aims to inform the public on the carbon dioxide capture and geological storage. One possible means of climate change mitigation consists of storing the CO{sub 2} generated by the greenhouse gases emission in order to stabilize atmospheric concentrations. This sheet presents the CO{sub 2} capture from lage fossil-fueled combustion installations, the three capture techniques and the CO{sub 2} transport options, the geological storage of the CO{sub 2} and Total commitments in the domain. (A.L.B.)

  10. Geological storage of carbon dioxide in the coal seams: from material to the reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikoosokhan, S.

    2012-01-01

    CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere are recognized to have a significant effect on global warming. Geological storage of CO 2 is widely regarded as an essential approach to reduce the impact of such emissions on the environment. Moreover, injecting carbon dioxide in coal bed methane reservoirs facilitates the recovery of the methane naturally present, a process known as enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM). But the swelling of the coal matrix induced by the preferential adsorption by coal of carbon dioxide over the methane in place leads to a closure of the cleat system (a set of small natural fractures) of the reservoir and therefore to a loss of injectivity. This PhD thesis is dedicated to a study of how this injectivity evolves in presence of fluids. We derive two poro-mechanical dual-porosity models for a coal bed reservoir saturated by a pure fluid. The resulting constitutive equations enable to better understand and model the link between the injectivity of a coal seam and the adsorption-induced swelling of coal. For both models, the pore space of the reservoir is considered to be divided into the macroporous cleats and the pores of the coal matrix. The two models differ by how adsorption of fluid is taken into account: the first model is restricted to surface adsorption, while the second model can be applied for adsorption in a medium with a generic pore size distribution and thus in a microporous medium such as coal, in which adsorption mostly occurs by micropore filling. The latter model is calibrated on two coals with different sorption and swelling properties. We then perform simulations at various scales (Representative Elementary Volume, coal sample, coal seam). In particular, we validate our model on experimental data of adsorption-induced variations of permeability of coal. We also perform simulations of seams from which methane would be produced (CBM) or of methane-free seams into which CO 2 would be injected. We study the effect of various

  11. Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon SequestrationSites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

    2005-06-17

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. One of the concerns of geologic carbon sequestration is that injected CO{sub 2} may leak out of the intended storage formation, migrate to the near-surface environment, and seep out of the ground or into surface water. In this research, we investigate the process of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage into saturated sediments and overlying surface water bodies such as rivers, lakes, wetlands, and continental shelf marine environments. Natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are well studied and provide insight into the expected transport mechanisms and fate of seepage fluxes of similar magnitude. Also, natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are pervasive in surface water environments at levels that may mask low-level carbon sequestration leakage and seepage. Extreme examples are the well known volcanic lakes in Cameroon where lake water supersaturated with respect to CO{sub 2} overturned and degassed with lethal effects. Standard bubble formation and hydrostatics are applicable to CO{sub 2} bubbles in surface water. Bubble-rise velocity in surface water is a function of bubble size and reaches a maximum of approximately 30 cm s{sup -1} at a bubble radius of 0.7 mm. Bubble rise in saturated porous media below surface water is affected by surface tension and buoyancy forces, along with the solid matrix pore structure. For medium and fine grain sizes, surface tension forces dominate and gas transport tends to occur as channel flow rather than bubble flow. For coarse porous media such as gravels and coarse sand, buoyancy dominates and the maximum bubble rise velocity is predicted to be approximately 18 cm s{sup -1}. Liquid CO{sub 2} bubbles rise slower in water than gaseous CO{sub 2} bubbles due to the smaller density contrast. A comparison of ebullition (i.e., bubble formation) and resulting bubble flow versus dispersive gas transport for CO

  12. The formation of carbon chain molecules in IRC + 10216

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howe, D.A.; Millar, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper considers the formation of carbon-chain molecules, including C 2n H, C n S, HC 2n+1 N (n = 1-3) and SiC n (n = 1-4), in the outflowing envelope of the late-type carbon star IRC + 10216. The results suggest that the organo-sulphur species C 2 S and C 3 S can be formed in ion-molecule reactions involving acetylene ions and parent CS and SiS molecules. In addition to ion-molecule processes, neutral-neutral reactions can play a significant role in the formation of hydrocarbons and cyanopolyynes with up to six heavy atoms and in the formation of SiC 4 , and suggest that SiC 3 might be observable. However, the short time-scales available in the outflow are such that the observed abundances of the cyanopolyynes larger than HC 5 N cannot be reproduced using the parent molecules and abundances adopted here. (author)

  13. Volcanostratigraphic Sequences of Kebo-Butak Formation at Bayat Geological Field Complex, Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Mulyaningsih

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available DOI:10.17014/ijog.3.2.77-94Bayat Complex is usually used as a work field for students of geology and other geosciences. The study area is located in the southern part of the Bayat Complex. Administratively, it belongs to Central Java Province and Yogyakarta Special Province. The lithology of Bayat is very complex, composed of various kinds of igneous, sedimentary, metamorphic, and volcanic rocks. Most of previous researchers interpreted Bayat as a melange complex constructed within a subduction zone. Kebo-Butak is one of formations that forms the Bayat field complex. The formation is composed of basalt, layers of pumice, tuff, shale, and carbonaceous tuff. Most of them are known as volcanic rocks. These imply that volcanic activities are more probable to construct the geology of Bayat rather than the subducted melange complex. The geological mapping, supported by geomorphology, petrology, stratigraphy, and geological structures, had been conducted in a comprehensive manner using the deduction-induction method. The research encounters basalt, black pumice, tuff with basaltic glasses fragments, zeolite, argilic clay, as well as feldspathic- and pumice tuff. Petrographically, the basalt is composed of labradorite, olivine, clinopyroxene, and volcanic glass. Black pumice and tuff contain prismatic clinopyroxene, granular olivine, and volcanic glasses. Feldspathic tuff and pumice tuff are crystal vitric tuff due to more abundant feldspar, quartz, and amphibole than volcanic glass. Zeolite comprises chlorite and altered glasses as deep sea altered volcanic rocks. The geologic structure is very complex, the major structures are normal faults with pyrite in it. There were two deep submarine paleovolcanoes namely Tegalrejo and Baturagung. The first paleovolcano erupted effusively producing basaltic sequence, while the second one erupted explosively ejecting feldspathic-rich pyroclastic material. The two paleovolcanoes erupted simultaneously and

  14. Characterization of carbon nanomaterial formation and manganese oxide reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumlas, Samantha Lyn

    Characterization of a material's surface, structural and physical properties is essential to understand its chemical reactivity. Control over these properties helps tailor a material to a particular application of interest. The research presented in this dissertation focuses on characterizing a synthetic method for carbon nanomaterials and the determination of structural properties of manganese oxides that contribute to its reactivity for environmental chemistry. In particular, one research effort was focused on the tuning of synthetic parameters towards the formation of carbon nanomaterials from gaseous methane and gaseous mixtures containing various mixtures of methane, argon and hydrogen. In a second research effort, photochemical and water oxidation chemistry were performed on the manganese oxide, birnessite, to aid in the remediation of arsenic from the environment and provide more options for alternative energy catalysts, respectively. (Abstract shortened by ProQuest.).

  15. Relative stability and significance of dawsonite and aluminum minerals in geologic carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszuba, John P.; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Carey, J. William

    2011-04-01

    Computer simulations predict dawsonite, NaAlCO3(OH)2, will provide long-term mineral sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 whereas dawsonite rarely occurs in nature or in laboratory experiments that emulate a carbon repository. Resolving this discrepancy is important to determining the significance of dawsonite mineralization to the long-term security of geologic carbon sequestration. This study is an equilibrium-based experimental and modeling evaluation of underlying causes for inconsistencies between predicted and observed dawsonite stability. Using established hydrothermal methods, 0.05 molal NaHCO3 aqueous solution and synthetic dawsonite were reacted for 18.7 days (449.2 hours) at 50°C, 20 MPa. Temperature was increased to 75°C and the experiment continued for an additional 12.3 days (295.1 hours). Incongruent dissolution yielded a dawsonite-gibbsite-nordstrandite assemblage. Geochemical simulations using Geochemist's Workbench and the resident database thermo.com.V8.R6+ incorrectly predicted a dawsonite-diaspore assemblage and underestimated dissolved aluminum by roughly 100 times. Higher aqueous aluminum concentrations in the experiment suggest that dawsonite or diaspore is less stable than predicted. Simulations employing an alternate database, thermo.dat, correctly predict dawsonite and dawsonite-gibbsite assemblages at 50 and 75°C, respectively, although dissolved aluminum concentrations are still two to three times lower than experimentally measured values. Correctly reproducing dawsonite solubility in standard geochemical simulations requires an as yet undeveloped internally consistent thermodynamic database among dawsonite, gibbsite, boehmite, diaspore, aqueous aluminum complexes and other Al-phases such as albite and kaolinite. These discrepancies question the ability of performance assessment models to correctly predict dawsonite mineralization in a sequestration site.

  16. Tropical Soil Carbon Stocks do not Reflect Aboveground Forest Biomass Across Geological and Rainfall Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusack, D. F.; Markesteijn, L.; Turner, B. L.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic carbon (C) dynamics present a large source of uncertainty in global C cycle models, and inhibit our ability to predict effects of climate change. Tropical wet and seasonal forests exert a disproportionate influence on the global C cycle relative to their land area because they are the most C-rich ecosystems on Earth, containing 25-40% of global terrestrial C stocks. While significant advances have been made to map aboveground C stocks in tropical forests, determining soil C stocks using remote sensing technology is still not possible for closed-canopy forests. It is unclear to what extent aboveground C stocks can be used to predict soil C stocks across tropical forests. Here we present 1-m-deep soil organic C stocks for 42 tropical forest sites across rainfall and geological gradients in Panama. We show that soil C stocks do not correspond to aboveground plant biomass or to litterfall productivity in these humid tropical forests. Rather, soil C stocks were strongly and positively predicted by fine root biomass, soil clay content, and rainfall (R2 = 0.47, p chemical characteristics form an important basis for improving model estimates of soil C stocks and predictions of climate change effects on tropical C storage.

  17. Development of an Intelligent Monitoring System for Geological Carbon Sequestration (GCS) Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, A. Y.; Jeong, H.; Xu, W.; Hovorka, S. D.; Zhu, T.; Templeton, T.; Arctur, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    To provide stakeholders timely evidence that GCS repositories are operating safely and efficiently requires integrated monitoring to assess the performance of the storage reservoir as the CO2 plume moves within it. As a result, GCS projects can be data intensive, as a result of proliferation of digital instrumentation and smart-sensing technologies. GCS projects are also resource intensive, often requiring multidisciplinary teams performing different monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) tasks throughout the lifecycle of a project to ensure secure containment of injected CO2. How to correlate anomaly detected by a certain sensor to events observed by other devices to verify leakage incidents? How to optimally allocate resources for task-oriented monitoring if reservoir integrity is in question? These are issues that warrant further investigation before real integration can take place. In this work, we are building a web-based, data integration, assimilation, and learning framework for geologic carbon sequestration projects (DIAL-GCS). DIAL-GCS will be an intelligent monitoring system (IMS) for automating GCS closed-loop management by leveraging recent developments in high-throughput database, complex event processing, data assimilation, and machine learning technologies. Results will be demonstrated using realistic data and model derived from a GCS site.

  18. Late-stage formation of carbon-fluorine bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Michael G; Ritter, Tobias

    2014-06-01

    In this account, we review work from our lab on the development of methods for carbon-fluorine bond formation, with an emphasis on late-stage fluorination of functionalized small molecules and synthesis of (18) F-labeled molecules for potential use as tracers in positron emission tomography (PET). We attempt to highlight reactions that we feel are of particular practical relevance, as well as areas of research where there is still significant room for advancement. Copyright © 2014 The Chemical Society of Japan and Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Rapid carbon-carbon bond formation and cleavage revealed by carbon isotope exchange between the carboxyl carbon and inorganic carbon in hydrothermal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glein, C. R.; Cody, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    reaction. We confirmed this by determining the exchange kinetics for various ring-substituted phenylacetates, and we find that the observed rate constants are consistent with the amount of negative charge that would be expected on the alpha carbon of the enolate. The emerging picture of the reaction mechanism is that enolization allows fixation of labeled carbon dioxide as a beta-carboxy group, where subsequent heterolytic decarboxylation of the unlabeled carboxy group completes the exchange process. Solvent stabilization of ionic reaction intermediates would lead to faster than expected rates of exchange, and ultimately to an isotopic equilibrium over even short geologic timescales. For enolizable carboxylic acids in natural systems, one has to consider this exchange mechanism when interpreting the carbon isotopic composition. [1] Dias R.F. (2000) Ph.D. Dissertation, Penn. State Univ. [2] Seewald J.S. & Boekelheide N. (2005) Goldschmidt Conf., A558.

  20. Tribological behavior and film formation mechanisms of carbon nanopearls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Chad Nicholas

    amounts of undesired carbon (99.36 atomic % carbon as measured by XPS) because carbon rather than gold was sputtered from the magnetron target surface. Carbon impurities of co-deposited films were reduced with increasing oxygen concentration using argon-oxygen mixtures; EQP analysis showed that reactive oxygen species such as O and O+ effectively remove unwanted carbon during co-deposition processes. The tribological behavior of films deposited using simultaneous MAPLE and magnetron sputtering was similar to hydrogenated Diamond-like Carbon (DLC) in that a structure transformation (graphitization) occurred in the wear track during cyclic loading resulting in low friction coefficients. In fact, carbon and hydrocarbon fragments from solvent vapor were incorporated into the films leading to formation of hydrogenated DLC-gold composites. This behavior occurs for frozen toluene MAPLE targets regardless of whether they are loaded with CNPs. The exception to this is in a humid air environment where higher friction coefficients are observed for CNP-loaded targets. In these studies, the potential of carbon nanopearls to create environmentally stable solid lubricants has been demonstrated for future aerospace needs. This development could drastically change current approaches of lubrication for space applications. Additionally a new MAPLE-sputtering process in which solvent-dispersed nano-scale materials are incorporated into metal and ceramic matrices was developed to enable synthesis of novel nanostructured hybrid materials for a variety of applications.

  1. Effect of carbonization temperatures on biochar formation of bamboo leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattnaik, D.; Kumar, S.; Bhuyan, S. K.; Mishra, S. C.

    2018-03-01

    Bamboo is a typical plant native in Asia, been used in many sectors, which also produces a large volume of leaves which goes waste and not find its application for any useful purposes; is often considered as a bio-waste and normally incinerated or dumped; as its applications are not yet fully explored. However, some research work done on bamboo fibers for use as a reinforcement in making polymer matrix composite. In the present piece of research work, the influence of burning/carbonization of bamboo leaves (at different temperatures) have been studied and characterized. Proximate analysis gave the fixed carbon content (of ~nearly21%). X-Ray diffraction results revealed the presence of various phases viz. cristobalite (SiO2), Calcite (Ca2O3) etc. accompanied with changes in crystal structures. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy results showed various modes of vibrations viz. O-H stretching bending of other bonds; (for aromatic benzene derivatives) etc. Scanning Electron Microscopic observation (of morphology) showed irregular stacking arrangements between the randomly spaced lamellae structure, with variation in carbonizing temperature. Results revealed the advantages of pyrolysis process in biochar production/formation. It appears that, the bamboo biochar can have suitable properties for its use as an alternative energy source and also for agricultural applications. Its high porosity and carbon content suggest its application as activated carbon also; after physical or chemical treatments. The present research focuses on extending the frontiers of use of bamboo leaves from being an unutilized biowaste to its conversion into a value added product, which can be compassed in terms of sustainable applications.

  2. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 5. Baseline rock properties-granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/5, Baseline Rock Properties--Granite, is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-36'' which supplements a ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-44.'' The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This report, on the rock properties of typical granites, includes an evaluation of the various test results reported in the literature. Firstly, a literature survey was made in order to obtain a feel for the range of rock properties encountered. Then, granites representative of different geologic ages and from different parts of the United States were selected and studied in further detail. Some of the special characteristics of granite, such as anisotropy, creep and weathering were also investigated. Lastly, intact properties for a typical granite were selected and rock mass properties were derived using appropriate correction factors

  3. MAPPING SUBSURFACE FORMATIONS ON THE EASTERN RED SEA COAST IN JORDAN USING GEOELECTRICAL TECHNIQUES: GEOLOGICAL AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batayneh Awni T.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available During 2006, geoelectrical measurements using the vertical electrical sounding (VES method were conducted on the eastern Red Sea coast in Jordan, using the SYSCAL-R2 resistivity instrument.
    The objectives of the study were (i to evaluate the possibility of mapping of Quaternary sediments medium in areas where little is known about the subsurface geology and to infer shallow geological
    structure from the electrical interpretation, and (ii to identify formations that may present fresh aquifer waters, and subsequently to estimate the relationship between groundwater resources and geological structures. Data collected at 47 locations were interpreted first with curve matching techniques, using theoretically calculated master curves, in conjunction with the auxiliary curves. The initial earth
    models were second checked and reinterpreted using a 1-D inversion program (i.e., RESIX-IP in order to obtain final earth models. The final layer parameters (thicknesses and resistivities were then
    pieced together along survey lines to make electrical cross sections. Resistivity measurements show a dominant trend of decreasing resistivity (thus increasing salinity with depth and westward toward
    the Red Sea. Accordingly, three zones with different resistivity values were detected, corresponding to three different bearing formations: (i a water-bearing formation in the west containing Red Sea saltwater; (ii a transition zone of clay and clayey sand thick formation; (iii stratas saturated with fresh groundwater in the east disturbed by the presence of clay and clayey sand horizons. Deep borehole (131 m drilled in the northwestern part of the study area for groundwater investigation, has
    confirmed the findings of the resistivity survey.

  4. Analysis of hydraulic pressure fluctuation in deep geologic formations in Tono area, Japan using artificial neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Mahesh R.; Watanabe, Kunio; Saegusa, Hiromitsu

    2003-12-01

    In this study, the concept and possible uses of artificial neural network (ANN) for mapping hydraulic pressures within boreholes are presented. ANN models were developed using monitored hydraulic pressure data over a certain period representing near-natural conditions to map the fluctuating patterns of hydraulic pressure in deep geologic formations in the Tono area, Japan. The ANN models developed captured the natural effects due to barometric pressure, earth tides, and other factors. It was also observed that geologic structures such as the Tsukiyoshi Fault divided the groundwater flow domains in the area. The formulated models that satisfactorily captured those natural effects were then used to evaluate the effect of pumping over a different period.

  5. Satellite-based measurements of surface deformation reveal fluid flow associated with the geological storage of carbon dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasco, D.W.; Rucci, A.; Ferretti, A.; Novali, F.; Bissell, R.; Ringrose, P.; Mathieson, A.; Wright, I.

    2009-10-15

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), gathered over the In Salah CO{sub 2} storage project in Algeria, provides an early indication that satellite-based geodetic methods can be effective in monitoring the geological storage of carbon dioxide. An injected volume of 3 million tons of carbon dioxide, from one of the first large-scale carbon sequestration efforts, produces a measurable surface displacement of approximately 5 mm/year. Using geophysical inverse techniques we are able to infer flow within the reservoir layer and within a seismically detected fracture/ fault zone intersecting the reservoir. We find that, if we use the best available elastic Earth model, the fluid flow need only occur in the vicinity of the reservoir layer. However, flow associated with the injection of the carbon dioxide does appear to extend several kilometers laterally within the reservoir, following the fracture/fault zone.

  6. Safety assessment of radioactive waste disposal into geological formations; a preliminary application of fault tree analysis to salt deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertozzi, B.; D'Alessandro, M.; Girardi, F.; Vanossi, M.

    1978-01-01

    The methodology of the fault tree analysis (FTA) has been widely used at the Joint Research Centre of Ispra in nuclear reactor safety studies. The aim of the present work consisted in studying the applicability of this methodology to geological repositories of radioactive wastes, including criteria and approaches for the quantification of probalities of primary events. The present work has just an illustrative purpose. Two ideal cases of saline formations, I.E. a bedded salt and a diapir were chosen as potential disposal sites for radioactive waste. On the basis of arbitrarily assumed hydrogeological features of the salt formations and their surrounding environment, possible phenomena capable of causing the waste to be released from each formation have been discussed and gathered following the logical schemes of the FTA. The assessment of probability values for release events due to natural causes as well as to human actions, over different time periods, up to one million years, has been discussed

  7. Communication regarding the geology and vertebrate palaeontology of the adamantina formation (bauru group, upper cretaceous) in campina verde, minas gerais state, brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira de Oliveira, Emerson; Rangel, Caio César; Sullivan de Jesus Alves, Diego; Silva Limonta, Filipi; Carvalho, Adelino; A. Candeiro, Carlos Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Several geological events occurred onthe surface of the earth with the division of the megacontinent Gondwana, including volcanic activity involving extensive lava flows, thus locally and regionally altering the surface's geology. Lava flows in the Serra Geral formation predominantly consist of volcanic lava fissure-derived basalt. Sedimentation upon extrusive igneous rocks occurred after this volcanic event, leading to the deposition of sediments from three formations (Adamantina, Uberaba, a...

  8. Geophysical investigation for the evaluation of the long-time safety of repositories and underground disposals in deep geological formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Just, A.; Salinar Group

    2003-04-01

    The performance assessment of underground disposal facilities is an indispensable premise to ensure that repositories fulfil the requirements for permanent and safe disposal of hazardous waste. The geological barrier is supposed to be a virtually impermeable host formation like rock salt. The efficiency of the barrier is endangered by the presence of risk zones such as faults or fractures particularly with regard to water-bearing host rocks. Thus the evaluation of the long-time safety of the geological barrier has to be carried out with a minimum of invasion of the future host formation and a maximum of spatial coverage and resolution. Especially geophysical methods are suitable to investigate the geological barrier due to their non-destructive character and spatial information content. Three research projects supported by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) are engaged in the design and enhancement of a complex geophysical measuring and evaluation system for the investigation of problem zones of the geological barrier in rock salt. The benefit of the combination of high-performance geophysical measuring techniques as seismics, DC-geoelectrics, ground penetrating radar (GPR), electromagnetics and sonar together with strong knowledge of regional salt geology is to increase essentially the reliability of the interpretation of underground measurements. The measuring methods and interpretation tools for host rock characterisation were applied, developed and improved in a flat salt seam structure of an inoperative salt mine in the Lower Harz region. The joint interpretation of the underground geophysical measurements revealed a by-then unknown wet zone, which was tectonically affected. With the scope of refining the complex geophysical measuring and evaluation system and transferring the precedingly acquired experiences to another type of host formation, an operating potassium salt mine in the vicinity of Hannover/Germany was chosen as a new

  9. Experimental Investigation, Modeling and Simulation of Ostwald Ripening in the Context of Geologic Carbon Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Chalendar, J.; Garing, C.; Benson, S. M.

    2016-12-01

    In a gas-liquid solution Ostwald ripening is the process by which a gas bubble consume nearby smaller bubbles due to inter-bubble gas diffusion resulting from pressure differences between each gas bubble. In the context of geological sequestration of carbon dioxide, snap-off mechanisms occurring during re-imbibition process lead to CO2 ganglia of various sizes residually trapped in the pore structure. Although considered permanently trapped in the simulations, the disconnected CO2 ganglia may coalesce over time due to fluid phase redistribution by the mechanism of Ostwald ripening resulting in a further connected gas phase that could then be remobilized by buoyancy. In porous media the relation between capillary pressure and mass is much more complicated than it is in a free liquid and assessing Ostwald ripening mechanism therefore requires a better understanding of the morphology (size and shape) of disconnected gas ganglia in rocks, its relation to capillary pressure and its evolution in time. This work aims at describing and quantifying Ostwald ripening of a residually trapped CO2 phase in porous media. The approach consists in i) assessing the potential for Ostwald ripening and observing the mechanism using a set of pore-scale experiments and ii) developing a modeling framework to simulate Ostwald ripening based on realistic initial conditions and pore structures. X-ray microtomography experiments show that there is a distribution of capillary pressures in the sandstones investigated and that the system is not at a stable state after imbibition. The evolution of disconnected ganglia with time was simulated in simplistic pore network models. The results show that both the pore structure and the initial conditions have a significant impact on stability and time scales. An algorithm to generate random pore network models that are more representative of real rocks was also developed using experimental distributions for pore body and throat radius, pore body

  10. Public attitudes toward geological disposal of carbon dioxide in Canada : final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, J.

    2005-01-01

    A research project investigating the public's perceptions of the risks and benefits of the geologic disposal of carbon dioxide (GDC) technology was presented. Data for the project was collected in 2 phases. Focus groups were conducted in order to understand the likely range of attitudes and concerns about the technology. The information obtained from the focus groups was then used to design an Internet-based survey for administration to a sample of 1967 Canadians. The survey included questions about climate change and GDC as well as a discrete choice experiment. Linear multiple regression analysis was used to identify the determinants of the respondents' support for GDC. Results showed that while a strong majority of Canadians believed that climate change was occurring, climate change ranked very low in importance compared to other national issues, and was the lowest ranked environmental issue. Knowledge of GDC was low, and the vast majority of those who had heard of GDC could not identify what environmental problem it was meant to address. The most important benefits of GDC were seen to be its utility as a bridging technology while long-term climate change solutions are developed; the potential for its use in enhanced oil recovery; and its ability to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. However, the risks of GDC were rated as more important than the benefits, and included concerns about unknown future impacts; contamination of groundwater; the risk of a carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) leak; and risks to plants and animals. It was concluded that respondents were slightly supportive of GDC development in Canada, and perceived the technology as having a net positive impact on the environment. GDC was seen as less risky than normal oil and gas industry operations, nuclear power, or coal-burning power plants. It was concluded that GDC is less popular then energy efficiency and renewable energy alternatives, and should be used in combination with these technologies in order to

  11. Modeled Differential Muon Flux Measurements for Monitoring Geological Storage of Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, M. L.; Naudet, C. J.; Gluyas, J.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, we published the first, theoretical feasibility study of the use of muon tomography to monitor injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into a geological storage reservoir for carbon storage (Kudryavtsev et al., 2012). Our initial concept showed that attenuation of the total muon downward flux, which is controlled effectively by its path-length and the density of the material through which it passes, could quantify the replacement in a porous sandstone reservoir of relatively dense aqueous brine by less dense supercritical carbon dioxide (specific gravity, 0.75). Our model examined the change in the muon flux over periods of about one year. However, certainly, in the initial stages of carbon dioxide injection it would be valuable to examine its emplacement over much shorter periods of time. Over a year there are small fluctuations of about 2% in the flux of high energy cosmic ray muons, because of changes in pressure and temperature, and therefore density, of the upper atmosphere (Ambrosio, 1997). To improve precision, we developed the concept of differential muon monitoring. The muon flux at the bottom of the reservoir is compared with the incident flux at its top. In this paper we present the results of three simulations. In all of them, as in our previous modeling exercise, we assume a 1000 sq. m total area of muon detectors, but in this case both above and below a 300 m thick sandstone bed, with 35% porosity, capped by shale and filled initially with a dense brine (specific gravity, 1.112). We assume high sweep efficiency, since supercritical CO2 and water are miscible, and therefore that 80% of the water will be replaced over a period of injection spanning 10 years. In the first two cases the top of the reservoir is at 1200 m and the overburden is either continuous shale or a 100m shale horizon beneath a sandstone aquifer, respectively. In the third case, which is somewhat analogous to the FutureGen 2.0 site in Illinois (FutureGen Industrial

  12. Controllable synthesis and formation mechanism of carbon micro/nano-structural materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chang'an; Lv, Meijiao; Wang, Xianbao; Li, Jing; Yang, Xuyu; Yang, Jia; Hu, Hao

    2013-10-01

    Three different structures of carbon materials, including carbon spheres, bamboo-like carbon nanotubes and straight carbon nanotubes, were obtained by pyrolysis of iron(II) phthalocyanine with different flow rates of H2 at 1000 °C. The suitable mechanism for formation process of the carbon nanomaterials from spheres to straight nanotubes was suggested. The competing processes between the catalyst forward and the shell growth have been used to explain the formation mechanism of three materials. The controllable synthesis of carbon materials was achieved only by changing the H2 flow rates, and it is important to explore applications of carbon materials with different shapes.

  13. Assessing European capacity for geological storage of carbon dioxide-the EU GeoCapacity project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vangkilde-Pedersen, T.; Anthonsen, K.L.; Smith, N.; Kirk, K.; Neele, F.; Meer, B. van der; Le Gallo, Y. le; Bossie-Codreanu, D.; Wojcicki, A.; Nindre, Y.-M. le; Hendriks, C.; Dalhoff, F.; Peter Christensen, N.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of the GeoCapacity project is GIS mapping of CO2 point sources, infrastructure and geological storage in Europe. The main objective is to assess the European capacity for geological storage of CO2 in deep saline aquifers, oil and gas structures and coal beds. Other priorities are further

  14. Brown carbon formation from ketoaldehydes of biogenic monoterpenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Tran B.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey

    2013-04-10

    Sources and chemical composition of the brown carbon are poorly understood, and even less is known about the mechanisms of its atmospheric transformations. This work presents molecular level investigation of the reactive compound ketolimononaldehyde (KLA, C9H14O3), a second generation ozonolysis product of limonene (C10H16), as a potent brown carbon precursor in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) through its reactions with reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonium ion (NH4+), ammonia, and amino acids. The reactions of synthesized and purified KLA with NH4+ and glycine resulted in the formation of chromophores nearly identical in spectral properties and formation rates to those found in similarly-aged limonene/O3 SOA. Similar chemical reaction processes of limononaldehyde (LA, C10H16O2) and pinonaldehyde (PA, C10H16O2), the first-generation ozonolysis products in the oxidation of limonene and α-pinene, respectively, were also studied, but the resulting products did not exhibit light absorption properties of brown carbon, suggesting that the unique molecular structure of KLA produces visible-light-absorbing compounds. The KLA/NH4+ and KLA/GLY reactions produce water-soluble, hydrolysis-resilient chromophores with high mass absorption coefficients (MAC = 2000-4000 cm2 g-1) at λ ~ 500 nm, precisely at the maximum of the solar emission spectrum. Liquid chromatography was used to isolate the light-absorbing fraction, and UV-Vis, FTIR, NMR and high-resolution mass spectrometry (HR-MS) techniques were used to investigate the structures and chemical properties of the light-absorbing compounds. The KLA browning reaction generates a diverse mixture of light-absorbing compounds, with the majority of the observable products containing 1-4 units of KLA and 0-2 nitrogen atoms. Based on the HR-MS product distribution, conjugated aldol condensates, secondary imines (Schiff bases), and N-heterocycles like pyrroles may contribute in varying degree to the light-absorbing properties

  15. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 6. Baseline rock properties-shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM36/6 Baseline Rock Properties--Shale, is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-36'' which supplements a ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations, Y/OWI/TM-44.'' The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. The report is a result of a literature survey of the rock properties of shales occurring in the United States. Firstly, data were collected from a wide variety of sources in order to obtain a feel for the range of properties encountered. Secondly, some typical shales were selected for detailed review and these are written up as separate chapters in this report. Owing to the wide variability in lithology and properties of shales occurring in the United States, it became necessary to focus the study on consolidated illite shales. Using the specific information already generated, a consistent set of intact properties for a typical, consolidated illite shale was obtained. Correction factors, largely based on geological considerations, were then applied to the intact data in order to yield typical rock mass properties for this type of shale. Lastly, excavation problems in shale formations were reviewed and three tunnel jobs were written up as case histories

  16. Formation and Evolution of Lakshmi Planum (V-7), Venus: Assessment of Models using Observations from Geological Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, M. A.; Head, James W.

    2008-01-01

    Lakshmi Planum is a high-standing plateau (3.5-4.5 km above MPR) surrounded by the highest mountain ranges on Venus. Lakshmi represents a unique type of elevated region different from dome-shaped and rifted rises and tessera-bearing crustal plateaus. The unique characteristics of Lakshmi suggest that it formed by an unusual combination of processes and played an important role in Venus geologic history. Lakshmi was studied with Venera-15/16 and Magellan data, resulting in two classes of models, divergent and convergent, to explain its unusual topographic and morphologic characteristics. Divergent models explain Lakshmi as a site of mantle upwelling due to rising and subsequent collapse of a mantle diapir; such models explain emplacement of a lava plateau inside Lakshmi and, in some circumstances, formation of the mountain ranges. The convergent models consider Lakshmi as a locus of mantle downwelling, convergence, underthrusting, and possible subduction. Key features in these models are the mountain ranges, high topography of Lakshmi interior, and the large volcanic centers in the plateau center. These divergent and convergent models entail principally different mechanisms of formation and suggest different geodynamic regimes on Venus. Almost all models make either explicit or implicit predictions about the type and sequence of major events during formation and evolution of Lakshmi and thus detailed geological mapping can be used to test them. Here we present the results of such geological mapping (the V-7 quadrangle, 50-75degN, 300-360degE; scale 1:5M) that allows testing the proposed models for Lakshmi.

  17. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 12. Repository preconceptual design studies: shale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in shale. The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area, and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/13, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Shale.''

  18. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 14. Repository preconceptual design studies: basalt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in basalt. The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/15, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: Basalt.''

  19. Carbide formation in tungsten coatings on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasinski, M.; Maier, H.; Ruset, C.; Lewandowska, M.; Kurzydlowski, K.J.

    2013-01-01

    Tungsten coatings with molybdenum interlayer deposited on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon (CFC) substrates were selected as the first wall material for the divertor in the Wall Project at Joint European Torus (similar to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). For such a layered structure, diffusion of carbon from the CFC substrate towards the Mo and W deposits is expected during the operation of the reactor. As both molybdenum and tungsten form stable carbides, brittle compounds may form at the interface, thus strongly affecting the thermomechanical performance of the coated tiles. For the purpose of prediction of the operation time of such coated tiles, carbon diffusion and carbide formation kinetics need to be determined. In the present study, W/Mo/CFC samples were subjected to heat treatment at 1470 K for various annealing times. The Focused Ion Beam technique was used for sample preparation for electron microscopy examinations. Transmission electron microscopy observations supported with diffraction pattern analyses revealed the both W 2 C and WC carbides in the W coating, as well as that of Mo 2 C carbide in the Mo layer. The results were used to estimate the kinetics of coatings degradation. - Highlights: ► Thin Mo/W layers system on carbon-fibre reinforced carbon divertor tile ► Heat treatment at 1470 K results in two tungsten carbide creation — W 2 C and WC ► The total tungsten carbide creation is limited by carbon diffusion ► WC carbide creation is limited by W 2 C–WC reaction rate

  20. El Paso Formation - a Lower Ordovician platform carbonate deposit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemons, R.E.

    1987-05-01

    The eastward-transgressive Lower Ordovician El Paso Formation conformably overlies Bliss Sandstone in southern New Mexico. Locally, lower El Paso was deposited on low hills of plutonic and volcanic rocks. The region subsided gradually throughout Canadian time, receiving the El Paso carbonate rock blanket up to 460 m thick. Lithologic and chronologic correlative rocks were deposited over most of the southwestern US as the first Paleozoic carbonate platform sequence. The El Paso Formation contains four members, listed here in ascending order: Hitt Canyon, Jose, McKelligon, and Padre. Gradually decreasing sand content upward through the Hitt Canyon indicates deepening water and/or greater distance to shore. Girvanella(.) oncolites are locally abundant. Stromatolite mounds near the top of the Hitt Canyon, combined with an influx of sand, ooids, and rounded bioclasts in the Jose Member, recorded a shoaling phase. The overlying McKelligon Member contains little or no sand, and sponge-Calathium mounds are prominent at some locales. Stromatolite mounds are interbedded with sponge-Calathium mounds in a few sections. Lower Padre Member beds are typically silty to sandy and locally contain thinly-laminated zones. The Padre contains more restricted fauna that includes traces of ostracods. Pervasive bioturbation of El Paso beds and fauna consisting of echinoderms, sponges, gastropods, trilobites, Nuia, Calathium, cephalopods, and algae plus minor brachiopods and Pulchrilamina indicate predominating shallow-subtidal environments. Low-energy platform environments, in which a large volume of micritic muds accumulated, were disturbed thousands of times by storms producing abundant thin, poorly washed biosparite, intrasparite, and intrasparrudite lenses.

  1. FY12 ARRA-NRAP Report – Studies to Support Risk Assessment of Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, C. J.; Zhong, Lirong; Jung, Hun Bok; Um, Wooyong

    2011-09-27

    This report summarizes results of research conducted during FY2012 to support the assessment of environmental risks associated with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and storage. Several research focus areas are ongoing as part of this project. This includes the quantification of the leachability of metals and organic compounds from representative CO2 storage reservoir and caprock materials, the fate of metals and organic compounds after release, and the development of a method to measure pH in situ under supercritical CO2 (scCO2) conditions. Metal leachability experiments were completed on 6 different rock samples in brine in equilibrium with scCO2 at representative geologic reservoir conditions. In general, the leaching of RCRA metals and other metals of concern was found to be limited and not likely to be a significant issue (at least, for the rocks tested). Metals leaching experiments were also completed on 1 rock sample with scCO2 containing oxygen at concentrations of 0, 1, 5, and 10% to simulate injection of CO2 originating from the oxy-fuel combustion process. Significant differences in the leaching behavior of certain metals were observed when oxygen is present in the CO2. These differences resulted from oxidation of sulfides, release of sulfate, ferric iron and other metals, and subsequent precipitation of iron oxides and some sulfates such as barite. Experiments to evaluate the potential for mobilization of organic compounds from representative reservoir materials and cap rock and their fate in porous media (quartz sand) have been conducted. Results with Fruitland coal and Gothic shale indicate that lighter organic compounds were more susceptible to mobilization by scCO2 compared to heavier compounds. Alkanes demonstrated very low extractability by scCO2. No significant differences were observed between the extractability of organic compounds by dry or water saturated scCO2. Reaction equilibrium appears to have been reached by 96 hours. When

  2. Qualitative acceptance criteria for radioactive wastes to be disposed of in deep geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    The present Safety Guide has to be seen as a companion document to the IAEA Safety Series No. 99. It is concerned with the waste form which is an important component of the overall disposal system. Because of the broad range of waste types and conditioned forms and variations in the sites, designs and constructional approaches being considered for deep geological repositories, this report necessarily approaches the waste acceptance criteria in a general way, recognizing that the assignment of quantitative limits to these criteria has to be the responsibility of national authorities. The main objective of this Safety Guide is to set out qualitative waste acceptance criteria as a basis for specifying quantitative limits for the waste forms and packages which are intended to be disposed of in deep geological repositories. It should serve as guidance for assigning such parameter values which would fully comply with the safety assessment and performance of a waste disposal system as a whole. This document is intended to serve both national authorities and regulatory bodies involved in the development of deep underground disposal systems. The qualitative waste acceptance criteria dealt with in the present Safety Guide are primarily concerned with the disposal of high level, intermediate level and long-lived alpha bearing wastes in deep geological repositories. Although some criteria are also applicable in other waste disposal concepts, it has to be borne in mind that the set of criteria presented here shall ensure the isolation capability of a waste disposal system for periods of time much longer than for other waste streams with shorter lifetimes. 51 refs, 1 tab

  3. A Study of the Relationship of Geological Formation to the NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursh, Talmage P.; Chriss, Derald

    1999-01-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) is a common and costly contaminant of produced waters associated with natural gas production and exploration. One way of combating this problem is by identifying the problem beforehand. Our approach to this problem involves development of NORM prediction capabilities based on the geological environment. During the tenth quarter of this project, emphasis again remained on two major tasks; identifying new sampling sites and seeking approval for final project revisions. In light of the delays experienced, the project has been granted a one year extension, and a revision is currently under review

  4. A Study of the Relationship of Geological Formation to the NORM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursh, Talmage P.; Chriss, Derald

    1999-01-01

    Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM) is a common and costly contaminant of produced waters associated with natural gas production and exploration. One way of combating this problem is by identifying the problem beforehand. Our approach to this problem involves development of NORM prediction capabilities based on the geological environment. During quarter fifteen of this project, work has continued under the recently approved revisions. We have selected sampling sites and are awaiting samples for analysis. In addition, the QA/QC plans are in the final stages in anticipation of sample acquisition

  5. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 22. Nuclear considerations for repository design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/22, ''Nuclear Considerations for Repository Design,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. Included in this volume are baseline design considerations such as characteristics of canisters, drums, casks, overpacks, and shipping containers; maximum allowable and actual decay-heat levels; and canister radiation levels. Other topics include safeguard and protection considerations; occupational radiation exposure including ALARA programs; shielding of canisters, transporters and forklift trucks; monitoring considerations; mine water treatment; canister integrity; and criticality calculations

  6. Anti-parallel dimer and tetramer formation of propylene carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayana Tagawa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Raman scattering and infrared (IR absorption spectra of enantiopure (R-propylene carbonate ((RPC and racemic propylene carbonate (PC were recorded at room temperature, 25 °C, in benzene (Bz solution and in the pure liquid state to investigate the presence of dimers and other higher order intermolecular associations. (RPC and PC both demonstrated a strong C=O stretching vibrational band. The band exhibited changes in its shape and resonance wavenumber highly dependent on the concentrations of PCs, whereas a difference between the chirality of (RPC and PC had little influence. In an extremely dilute condition, doubly split bands were observed at 1807 and 1820 cm-1 in both Raman and IR spectra, which are assigned to the characteristic bands of isolated monomeric PCs. An additional band appeared at 1795 cm-1 in a dilute to concentrated regime, and its magnitude strengthened with increasing concentrations accompanied with slight increasing in the magnitude of 1807 cm-1 band in Raman spectra, while an increase in the magnitude of 1807 cm-1 band was clearly greater than that of 1795 cm-1 band in IR spectra. The spectrum changes at 1795 and 1807 cm-1 were attributed to characteristics of anti-parallel dimer formation of PCs caused by strong dipole-dipole interactions between C=O groups. Moreover, another additional signal was clearly observed at 1780-1790 cm-1 in a concentrated regime, and became the primary signal in the pure liquid state with slight increasing in the intensity of 1795 cm-1 band in Raman spectra. On the other hand, in IR spectra the observed increasing of 1780-1790 cm-1 band was much less than that of 1795 cm-1 band. These newly found spectrum changes in the concentrated regime are attributed to the formation of anti-parallel tetramers of PCs based on the characteristics of band selection rule found in Raman and IR spectra. Equilibrium constants for the anti-parallel dimer (KD and tetramer formation (KT of PCs in Bz solution and in

  7. Anti-parallel dimer and tetramer formation of propylene carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, Ayana; Numata, Tomoko; Shikata, Toshiyuki

    2017-09-01

    Raman scattering and infrared (IR) absorption spectra of enantiopure (R)-propylene carbonate ((R)PC) and racemic propylene carbonate (PC) were recorded at room temperature, 25 °C, in benzene (Bz) solution and in the pure liquid state to investigate the presence of dimers and other higher order intermolecular associations. (R)PC and PC both demonstrated a strong C=O stretching vibrational band. The band exhibited changes in its shape and resonance wavenumber highly dependent on the concentrations of PCs, whereas a difference between the chirality of (R)PC and PC had little influence. In an extremely dilute condition, doubly split bands were observed at 1807 and 1820 cm-1 in both Raman and IR spectra, which are assigned to the characteristic bands of isolated monomeric PCs. An additional band appeared at 1795 cm-1 in a dilute to concentrated regime, and its magnitude strengthened with increasing concentrations accompanied with slight increasing in the magnitude of 1807 cm-1 band in Raman spectra, while an increase in the magnitude of 1807 cm-1 band was clearly greater than that of 1795 cm-1 band in IR spectra. The spectrum changes at 1795 and 1807 cm-1 were attributed to characteristics of anti-parallel dimer formation of PCs caused by strong dipole-dipole interactions between C=O groups. Moreover, another additional signal was clearly observed at 1780-1790 cm-1 in a concentrated regime, and became the primary signal in the pure liquid state with slight increasing in the intensity of 1795 cm-1 band in Raman spectra. On the other hand, in IR spectra the observed increasing of 1780-1790 cm-1 band was much less than that of 1795 cm-1 band. These newly found spectrum changes in the concentrated regime are attributed to the formation of anti-parallel tetramers of PCs based on the characteristics of band selection rule found in Raman and IR spectra. Equilibrium constants for the anti-parallel dimer (KD) and tetramer formation (KT) of PCs in Bz solution and in the pure

  8. Formation of graphitic carbon nitride and boron carbon nitride film on sapphire substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaka, Maito; Urakami, Noriyuki; Hashimoto, Yoshio

    2018-02-01

    As a novel production method of boron carbon nitride (BCN) films, in this paper, we present the incorporation of B into graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4). First, we investigated the formation of g-C3N4 films via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) using melamine powder as the precursor. The formation of g-C3N4 films on a c-plane sapphire substrate was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Raman spectroscopy measurements. The deposition temperature of g-C3N4 films was found to be suitable between 550 and 600 °C since the degradation and desorption of hexagonal C–N bonds should be suppressed. As for BCN films, we prepared BCN films via two-zone extended CVD using ammonia borane as the B precursor. Several XPS signals from B, C, and N core levels were detected from B-incorporated g-C3N4 films. While the N composition was almost constant, the marked tendencies for increasing B composition and decreasing C composition were achieved with the increase in the B incorporation, indicating the incorporation of B atoms by the substitution for C atoms. Optical absorptions were shifted to the high-energy side by B incorporation, which indicates the successful formation of BCN films using melamine and ammonia borane powders as precursors.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Non-Fickian Diffusional Mass Exchange of Radioactive Contaminants in Geological Disposal Formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Suzuki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep geological repositories for nuclear wastes consist of both engineered and natural geologic barriers to isolate the radioactive material from the human environment. Inappropriate repositories of nuclear waste would cause severe contamination to nearby aquifers. In this complex environment, mass transport of radioactive contaminants displays anomalous behaviors and often produces power-law tails in breakthrough curves due to spatial heterogeneities in fractured rocks, velocity dispersion, adsorption, and decay of contaminants, which requires more sophisticated models beyond the typical advection-dispersion equation. In this paper, accounting for the mass exchange between a fracture and a porous matrix of complex geometry, the universal equation of mass transport within a fracture is derived. This equation represents the generalization of the previously used models and accounts for anomalous mass exchange between a fracture and porous blocks through the introduction of the integral term of convolution type and fractional derivatives. This equation can be applied for the variety of processes taking place in the complex fractured porous medium, including the transport of radioactive elements. The Laplace transform method was used to obtain the solution of the fractional diffusion equation with a time-dependent source of radioactive contaminant.

  10. Feasibility studies for alpha waste disposal on geological formations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Boulanger, A.

    1986-01-01

    Since 1977, SGN has been involved in many feasibility studies and consultant works in the fields of HLW storages. Starting as nuclear consultant company in the KBS review of the long term storage of HLW, SGN and GEOSTOCK were entrusted in 1978 by the EEC for the basic design and evaluation of the deep storage into granite rock of HLW, followed by a participation in the thermal sensitivity study of such a storage. The cooperation with GEOSTOCK was first extended in 1981 to a preliminary study of HLW storage conditions in granite for a Japanese company, and then in France for several feasibility studies of HLW and TRU waste geological disposal. Three kinds of scenarios have been forecasted and evaluated in the case of vitrified HLW storage, allowing the thermal power to be decreased and the whole management scheme to be optimized. More recently, SGN participation to French engineering studies has been extended by ANDRA to the TRU waste repository evaluation. All these works for French authorities have been performed in a close connection with several specialized departments in the CEA group, and with the help of geological specialists, under the leadership of ANDRA [fr

  11. Feasibility studies for alpha waste disposal on geological formations in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaouen, C.; Boulanger, A.

    1985-01-01

    Since 1977, SGN has been involved in many feasibility studies and consultant works in the fields of HLW storages. Starting as nuclear consultant company in the KBS review of the long term storage of HLW, SGN and Geostock were entrusted in 1978 by the EEC for the basic design and evaluation of the deep storage into granite rock of HLW, followed by a participation in the thermal sensitivity study of such a storage. The cooperation with Geostock was first extended in 1981 to a preliminary study of HLW storage conditions in granite for a Japanese company, and then in France for several feasibility studies of HLW and TRU waste geological disposal. Three kinds of scenarios have been forecasted and evaluated in the case of vitrified HLW storage, allowing the thermal power to be decreased and the whole management scheme to be optimized. More recently, SGN participation to French engineering studies has been extended by ANDRA to the TRU waste repository evaluation. All these works for French authorities have been performed in a close connection with several specialized departments in the CEA group, and with the help of geological specialists, under the leadership of ANDRA [fr

  12. Risks attributable to water quality changes in shallow potable aquifers from geological carbon sequestration leakage into sediments of variable carbonate content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cahill, Aaron Graham; Jakobsen, Rasmus; Mathiesen, Tina Bay

    2013-01-01

    The consequences of CO2 leakage from geological sequestration into shallow aquifers must be fully understood before such geo-engineering technology can be implemented. A series of CO2 exposure batch reactor experiments were conducted utilizing 8 sediments of varying composition obtained from across...... Denmark including; siliceous, carbonate and clay materials. Sediments were exposed to CO2 and hydro-geochemical effects were observed in order to improve general understanding of trace metal mobility, quantify carbonate influence, assess risks attributable to fresh water resources from a potential leak...... and aid monitoring measurement and verification (MMV) program design. Results demonstrate control of water chemistry by sediment mineralogy and most significantly carbonate content, for which a potential semi-logarithmic relationship with pH and alkalinity was observed. In addition, control of water...

  13. Two-phase flow visualization under reservoir conditions for highly heterogeneous conglomerate rock: A core-scale study for geologic carbon storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kue-Young; Oh, Junho; Han, Weon Shik; Park, Kwon Gyu; Shinn, Young Jae; Park, Eungyu

    2018-03-20

    Geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is considered a viable strategy for significantly reducing anthropogenic CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere; however, understanding the flow mechanisms in various geological formations is essential for safe storage using this technique. This study presents, for the first time, a two-phase (CO 2 and brine) flow visualization under reservoir conditions (10 MPa, 50 °C) for a highly heterogeneous conglomerate core obtained from a real CO 2 storage site. Rock heterogeneity and the porosity variation characteristics were evaluated using X-ray computed tomography (CT). Multiphase flow tests with an in-situ imaging technology revealed three distinct CO 2 saturation distributions (from homogeneous to non-uniform) dependent on compositional complexity. Dense discontinuity networks within clasts provided well-connected pathways for CO 2 flow, potentially helping to reduce overpressure. Two flow tests, one under capillary-dominated conditions and the other in a transition regime between the capillary and viscous limits, indicated that greater injection rates (potential causes of reservoir overpressure) could be significantly reduced without substantially altering the total stored CO 2 mass. Finally, the capillary storage capacity of the reservoir was calculated. Capacity ranged between 0.5 and 4.5%, depending on the initial CO 2 saturation.

  14. Mechanical and hydrological characterization of the near-field surrounding excavations in a geologic salt formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Clifford L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The technical basis for salt disposal of nuclear waste resides in salt’s favorable physical, mechanical and hydrological characteristics. Undisturbed salt formations are impermeable. Upon mining, the salt formation experiences damage in the near-field rock proximal to the mined opening and salt permeability increases dramatically. The volume of rock that has been altered by such damage is called the disturbed rock zone (DRZ).

  15. SUBSURFACE PROPERTY RIGHTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR GEOLOGIC CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chapter discusses subsurface property rights as they apply to geologic sequestration (GS) of carbon dioxide (CO2). GS projects inject captured CO2 into deep (greater than ~1 km) geologic formations for the explicit purpose of avoiding atmospheric emission of CO2. Because of t...

  16. SUBSURFACE PROPERTY RIGHTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR GEOLOGIC CO2 SEQUESTRATION (PRESENTATION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses subsurface property rights as they apply to geologic sequestration (GS) of carbon dioxide (CO2). GS projects inject captured CO2 into deep (greater than ~1 km) geologic formations for the explicit purpose of avoiding atmospheric emission of CO2. Because of the...

  17. SUBSURFACE PROPERTY RIGHTS: IMPLICATIONS FOR GEOLOGIC CO2 STORAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper discusses subsurface property rights as they apply to geologic sequestration (GS) of carbon dioxide (CO2). GS projects inject captured CO2 into deep (greater than ~1 km) geologic formations for the explicit purpose of avoiding atmospheric emission of CO2. Because of the...

  18. Hysteresis of methane hydrate formation/decomposition at subsea geological conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klapproth, Alice; Piltz, Ross; Peterson, Vanessa K.; Kennedy, Shane J.; Kozielski, Karen A.; Hartley, Patrick G.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Gas hydrates are a major risk when transporting oil and gas in offshore subsea pipelines. Under typical conditions in these pipelines (at high pressure and low temperature) the formation of gas hydrates is favourable. The hydrates form large solid plugs that can block pipelines and can even cause them to burst. This represents a major problem for the gas mining industry, which currently goes to extreme measures to reduce the risk of hydrate formation because there is no reliable experimental data on hydrate processes. The mechanisms of gas hydrate formation, growth and inhibition are poorly understood. A clear understanding of the fundamental processes will allow development of cost effective technologies to avoid production losses in gas pipelines. We are studying the nucleation of the methane hydrates by measuring the hysteresis of hydrate formation/decomposition by neutron diffraction. When a gas hydrate is decomposed (melted) the resulting water has a 'supposed memory effect' raising the probability of rapid hydrate reformation. This rapid reformation does not occur for pure water where nucleation can be delayed by several hours (induction time) due to metastability [1]. The memory effect can only be destroyed by extreme heating of the effected area. Possible causes of this effect include residual water structure, persistent hydrate crystal lites remaining in solution and remaining dissolved gas. We will compare the kinetics of formation and the stability region of hydrate formation of 'memory' water for comparison with pure water. This information has important implications for the oil and gas industry because it should provide a better understanding of the role of multiple dissociation and reformation of gas hydrates in plug formation.

  19. Geothermal resources: Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast. Geological circular 76-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Bosch, S.C.; Dorfman, M.H.

    1976-01-01

    Major sand trends were identified in the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast as part of the evaluation of its potential for producing geothermal energy. Electrical logs from 465 wells spaced 5 to 10 miles apart were used in the study. Maps illustrating total net sand and total sand percentage of the Frio Formation are included. It was found that subsurface fluid temperatures of greater than 250/sup 0/F occur in the Frio sand bodies up to 100 ft thick downdip of the high-sand trends. LA broad band in Brazoria and Galveston Counties was delineated as having geothermal potential. (JGB)

  20. Inventory of Shale Formations in the US, Including Geologic, Hydrological, and Mechanical Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobson, Patrick; Houseworth, James

    2013-11-22

    The objective of this report is to build upon previous compilations of shale formations within many of the major sedimentary basins in the US by developing GIS data delineating isopach and structural depth maps for many of these units. These data are being incorporated into the LANL digital GIS database being developed for determining host rock distribution and depth/thickness parameters consistent with repository design. Methods were developed to assess hydrological and geomechanical properties and conditions for shale formations based on sonic velocity measurements.

  1. Natural analogue of nuclear waste glass in a geologic formation. Study on long-term behavior of volcanic glass shards collected from drill cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hideki; Yui, Mikazu; Futakuchi, Katsuhito; Hiroki, Minenari

    2005-01-01

    Alteration of the volcanic glass in geologic formation was investigated as one of the natural analog for a glass of high-level nuclear waste in geological disposal. We analyzed some volcanic glasses included in the core sample of the bore hole and estimated the history of its burying and observed its alteration using the polarizing microscope. Some information at the piling up temperature and the piling up time was collected. (author)

  2. Inherent-opening-controlled pattern formation in carbon nanotube arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Xiao; Zhou, Jijie J; Sansom, Elijah; Gharib, Morteza; Haur, Sow Chorng

    2007-01-01

    We have introduced inherent openings into densely packed carbon nanotube arrays to study self-organized pattern formation when the arrays undergo a wetting-dewetting treatment from nanotube tips. These inherent openings, made of circular or elongated hollows in nanotube mats, serve as dewetting centres, from where liquid recedes from. As the dewetting centres initiate dry zones and the dry zones expand, surrounding nanotubes are pulled away from the dewetting centres by liquid surface tension. Among short nanotubes, the self-organized patterns are consistent with the shape of the inherent openings, i.e. slender openings lead to elongated trench-like structures, and circular holes result in relatively round nest-like arrangements. Nanotubes in a relatively high mat are more connected, like in an elastic body, than those in a short mat. Small cracks often initialize themselves in a relatively high mat, along two or more adjacent round openings; each of the cracks evolves into a trench as liquid dries up. Self-organized pattern control with inherent openings needs to initiate the dewetting process above the nanotube tips. If there is no liquid on top, inherent openings barely enlarge themselves after the wetting-dewetting treatment

  3. Geological nature of early Precambrian formations (considering the example of the Anabar shield)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, A. A.

    The primordial nature of the catarchean-early Proterozoic crystalline formations making up the Anabar shield is analyzed on the basis of a variety of data, including Landsat observations. The shield is found to have a layered structure and a massively stratified rhythmic texture, consisting of geometrically regular layer-horizons, from several centimeters to several dozens of meters thick.

  4. Phase 1 user instruction manual. A geological formation - drill string dynamic interaction finite element program (GEODYN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinianow, M.A.; Rotelli, R.L. Jr.; Baird, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    User instructions for the GEODYN Interactive Finite Element Computer Program are presented. The program is capable of performing the analysis of the three-dimensional transient dynamic response of a Polycrystalline Diamond Compact Bit - Bit Sub arising from the intermittent contact of the bit with the downhole rock formations. The program accommodates non-linear, time dependent, loading and boundary conditions.

  5. Performance assessment of geological isolation systems for radioactive waste. Disposal in clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marivoet, J.; Bonne, A.

    1988-01-01

    In the framework of the PAGIS project of the CEC Research Programme on radioactive waste, performance assessment studies have been undertaken on the geological disposal of vitrified high-level waste in clay layers at a reference site at Mol (B) and a variant site at Harwell (UK). The calculations performed for the reference site shown that most radionuclides decay to negligible levels within the first meters of the clay barrier. The maximum dose rates arising from the geological disposal of HLW, as evaluated by the deterministic approach are about 10 -11 Sv/y for river pathways. If the sinking of a water well into the 150 m deep aquifer layer in the vicinity of the repository is considered together with a climatic change, the maximum calculated dose rate rises to a value of 3.10 -7 Sv/y. The calculated maxima arise between 1 million and 15 million years after disposal. The maximum dose rates evaluated by stochastic calculations are about one order of magnitude higher due to the considerable uncertainties in the model parameters. In the case of the Boom clay the estimated consequences of a fault scenario are of the same order of magnitude as the results obtained for the normal evolution scenario. The maximum risk is estimated from stochastic calculations to be about 4.10 -8 per year. For the variant site the case of the normal evolution scenario has been evaluated. The maximum dose rates calculated deterministically are about 1.10 -6 Sv/y for river pathways and 6.10 -5 Sv/y for a water well pathways; these doses would occur after about 1 million years. This document is one of a set of 5 reports covering a relevant project of the European Community on a nuclear safety subject having very wide interest. The five volumes are: the summary (EUR 11775-EN), the clay (EUR 11776-EN), the granite (EUR 11777-FR), the salt (EUR 11778-EN) and the sub-seabed (EUR 11779-EN)

  6. International Approaches for Nuclear Waste Disposal in Geological Formations: Report on Fifth Worldwide Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faybishenko, Boris [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Persoff, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sassani, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Swift, Peter N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-08-01

    An important issue for present and future generations is the final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. Over the past over forty years, the development of technologies to isolate both spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other high-level nuclear waste (HLW) generated at nuclear power plants and from production of defense materials, and low- and intermediate-level nuclear waste (LILW) in underground rock and sediments has been found to be a challenging undertaking. Finding an appropriate solution for the disposal of nuclear waste is an important issue for protection of the environment and public health, and it is a prerequisite for the future of nuclear power. The purpose of a deep geological repository for nuclear waste is to provide to future generations, protection against any harmful release of radioactive material, even after the memory of the repository may have been lost, and regardless of the technical knowledge of future generations. The results of a wide variety of investigations on the development of technology for radioactive waste isolation from 19 countries were published in the First Worldwide Review in 1991 (Witherspoon, 1991). The results of investigations from 26 countries were published in the Second Worldwide Review in 1996 (Witherspoon, 1996). The results from 32 countries were summarized in the Third Worldwide Review in 2001 (Witherspoon and Bodvarsson, 2001). The last compilation had results from 24 countries assembled in the Fourth Worldwide Review (WWR) on radioactive waste isolation (Witherspoon and Bodvarsson, 2006). Since publication of the last report in 2006, radioactive waste disposal approaches have continued to evolve, and there have been major developments in a number of national geological disposal programs. Significant experience has been obtained both in preparing and reviewing cases for the operational and long-term safety of proposed and operating repositories. Disposal of radioactive waste is a complex issue, not only because of the nature

  7. Geochemical characteristics and geological significance of shale gas from the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation in Sichuan Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Gao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The shale of the Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation has become a key target for shale gas exploration and development in China recently. The origin of carbon and hydrogen isotopic reversal in shale gas is discussed in this paper based on the analysis of the chemical components and stable isotope composition of natural gas in the Carboniferous Huanglong Formation sourced from Longmaxi Formation and Longmaxi shale gas. The shale gas was mainly composed of hydrocarbon gas in which the content of CH4 was in the range of 95.52%–99.59%, C2H6 0.23%–0.72%, and C3H8 0.0%–0.03%. The drying coefficient (Cl/Cl–5 was more than 0.99, indicating typical dry gas. The values of δ13C1, δ13C2 and δ13C3 ranged from −37.3‰ to −26.7‰, −42.8‰ to −31.6‰, and −43.5‰ to −33.1‰, respectively. The carbon isotope values indicated that the hydrocarbon gas was an oil-type gas. However, the reversal of carbon and hydrogen isotopes of hydrocarbon gases in shale gas occurred, i.e., δ13C1 > δ13C2, δD1 > δD2. The geochemical characteristic of high thermal maturity and carbon isotope reversal in the Longmaxi shale gas was similar to those of the Fayetteville shale gas in U.S. The Longmaxi shale gas is a mixture of gases from decomposition of kerogen at high thermal maturity and cracking of soluble organic matter retained within the shale, suggesting there is an abundance of shale gas to support high productivity.

  8. Long-term evolution of radio-active waste storage in geological formations: analogy with the weathering of mineral deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantinolle, P.; Griffault, L.; Jebrak, M.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this study was to select examples of mineral deposits and their weathering environment, showing the long-term behaviour, in geological time, measuring (area, volume) some constituent elements of radio-active waste storage subject to the hazards of hydrogeochemical weathering. Initially, a feasibility study was made to collate data available within the BRGM (mining group and public service) and from literature dealing with weathering of deposits. It was thus discovered that the analogy between radio-active waste storage and mineral deposits could be approached in two different yet complementary ways: - one approach is to observe the behaviour of a mineral deposit in relation to the country rocks. For this a bibliographic metallogenic study was made. The other approach is to observe the behaviour of chemical elements during deposition of a mineral deposit whose genesis is similar to the spatial and thermal environment of a deposit of radio-active waste in a geological formation. For this two sites were selected corresponding to hydrothermal systems showing strong analogies to those expected in the neighbourhood of the storage sites. These two sites, Langenberg in the Vosges and La Telhaie in Brittany, were the subject of complementary analytical work [fr

  9. Preliminary assessment of the radiological protection aspects of disposal of high-level waste in geologic formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.D; Grimwood, P.D.

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to carry out a preliminary assessment of the potential radiological consequences of disposing of vitrified high-level radioactive waste in geologic formations. The events which could lead to the release of radioactivity from a geologic repository are reviewed and ingress of ground-water is identified as the principal mechanism by which radioactivity may be transported back to the biosphere. A mathematical model of radionuclide migration with ground-water is used to predict possible rates of release of radioactivity into fresh water from a hypothetical repository containing all the high-level waste which may be generated in the UK up to the year 2000. The individual and collective doses which could be received as a result of man's use of contaminated fresh water are evaluated. The numerical results of the study depend very much on the assumptions made and cannot be used to draw any detailed conclusions. The main result is the identification of areas where further studies are required in order to carry out a full evaluation of this disposal option. (author)

  10. Formation of nanocrystalline TiC from titanium and different carbon sources by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Haoling [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China); Zhang Zhonghua [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China)], E-mail: zh_zhang@sdu.edu.cn; Qi Zhen [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China); Liu Guodong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061 (China); Bian Xiufang [Key Lab of Liquid Structure and Heredity of Materials, Jingshi Road 73, Jinan 250061, Shandong (China)

    2009-03-20

    In this paper, the formation of nanocrystalline TiC from titanium powders and different carbon resources by mechanical alloying (MA) has been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results show that nanocrystalline TiC can be synthesized from Ti powders and different carbon resources (activated carbon, carbon fibres or carbon nanotubes) by MA at room temperature. Titanium and different carbon resources have a significant effect on the Ti-C reaction and the formation of TiC during MA. Moreover, the formation of nanocrystalline TiC is governed by a gradual diffusion reaction mechanism during MA, regardless of different carbon resources.

  11. Petroleum geological features and exploration prospect of deep marine carbonate rocks in China onshore: A further discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Wenzhi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Deep marine carbonate rocks have become one of the key targets of onshore oil and gas exploration and development for reserves replacement in China. Further geological researches of such rocks may practically facilitate the sustainable, steady and smooth development of the petroleum industry in the country. Therefore, through a deep investigation into the fundamental geological conditions of deep marine carbonate reservoirs, we found higher-than-expected resource potential therein, which may uncover large oil or gas fields. The findings were reflected in four aspects. Firstly, there are two kinds of hydrocarbon kitchens which were respectively formed by conventional source rocks and liquid hydrocarbons cracking that were detained in source rocks, and both of them can provide large-scale hydrocarbons. Secondly, as controlled by the bedding and interstratal karstification, as well as the burial and hydrothermal dolomitization, effective carbonate reservoirs may be extensively developed in the deep and ultra-deep strata. Thirdly, under the coupling action of progressive burial and annealing heating, some marine source rocks could form hydrocarbon accumulations spanning important tectonic phases, and large quantity of liquid hydrocarbons could be kept in late stage, contributing to rich oil and gas in such deep marine strata. Fourthly, large-scale uplifts were formed by the stacking of multi-episodic tectonism and oil and gas could be accumulated in three modes (i.e., stratoid large-area reservoir-forming mode of karst reservoirs in the slope area of uplift, back-flow type large-area reservoir-forming mode of buried hill weathered crust karst reservoirs, and wide-range reservoir-forming mode of reef-shoal reservoirs; groups of stratigraphic and lithologic traps were widely developed in the areas of periclinal structures of paleohighs and continental margins. In conclusion, deep marine carbonate strata in China onshore contain the conditions for

  12. Morphology and formation of pyrolytic carbon in moulding mixtures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, P.; Buchtele, Jaroslav; Kříž, Vlastimil; Němeček, S.; Kříž, A.; Fiala, J.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2002), s. 415-422 ISSN 1335-1532 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : pyrolytic carbon * lustrous carbon * casting surface quality Subject RIV: DH - Mining, incl. Coal Mining

  13. Perspectives for deep geological formation disposal research in France beyond 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landais, P.

    2006-01-01

    One finalised aim underlies research conducted on the feasibility of geological disposal: the possibility of having a reversible disposal system available. A model has been drawn up to provide a framework for the analysis and propose possible research content between 2006 and 2015. This period will correspond to the move from the feasibility to a development, optimisation and detailed study phase. It aims at answering any questions raised by reviewers and develops forward the study of a repository. It will also correspond to the consolidation of scientific data, greater understanding of certain mechanisms and an approach of scientific and technical integration. Another goal of the period 2006-2015 would be to collect elements for a decision on the sitting issue through an extended survey. This phase of development includes confirmation of the data acquired during the previous phase and over relatively long periods, optimisation of repository concepts and detailed study of their main components, the production of full-scale mock-ups or simulations to validate the main technological design points and refining of data extrapolation methods. (author)

  14. Concepts and examples of safety analyses for radioactive waste repositories in continental geological formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This document is addressed to authorities and specialists responsible for or involved in planning, performing and/or reviewing safety assessments of underground radioactive waste repositories. It is a companion to a general introductory document on the subject ''Safety Assessment for the Underground Disposal of Radioactive Wastes'', IAEA Safety Series No. 56, 1981, and reference to this earlier document will facilitate the reader's understanding of the present report. Since examples of safety analyses are summarized here, it is hoped that this document will contribute to providing a basis for a common understanding among authorities and specialists concerned with the numerous studies involving a variety of scientific disciplines. While providing technical information, this document is also intended to stimulate further international discussion. The purposes of this report are: a) to identify the factors to be taken into account in radiological safety analyses of deep geological repositories, indicating as far as possible their relative importance during the various phases of system development; b) to show how these factors have been analysed in various safety assessment studies; and c) to comment on the merits of the selected and alternative approaches

  15. The OPLA-research program on the final disposal of radioactive waste in geological formations (salt) in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vons, L.H.

    1987-01-01

    The OPLA-program is the Dutch national research work on the final disposal, focussed on rocksalt formations, of all categories of solid radioactive waste that will arise from nuclear powerplants, hospitals and laboratories. The activities are split up in three stages: 1, 2 and 3. In the fall of 1987, stage 1, in which a comparison is made between disposal concepts, has to be finished. Before entering stage 2, existing of field work focussed on geological and geohydrological comparison of sites, a positive decision of the Dutch government is needed. In the technological and scientific activities of the OPLA-program, there is an extensive and fruitful cooperation between ECN and GSF (IFT) in the FRG

  16. Microbial Mg-carbonate Precipitation and Early Diagenetic Dolomite Crust Formation at Hypersaline Lagoon, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahniuk Rumbelsperger, A. M.; McKenzie, J. A.; Perri, E.; Vögeli, N.; Vasconcelos, C.

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentary dolomite rocks are commonly considered to be primarily a replacement product of the calcium carbonate components comprising the original limestone, a process known as secondary replacement dolomitization. Although numerous dolomite formations in the geologic record are composed of fine-grained crystals of micritic dolomite, an alternative process, i.e., direct precipitation, is often excluded because of the absence of visible or geochemical indicators supporting primary precipitation. We present a study of a modern coastal hypersaline lagoon, Brejo do Espinho, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, which is located in a special climatic regime where a well-defined seasonal cycle of wet and dry conditions occur. The direct precipitation of modern high-Mg calcite and Ca-dolomite mud from the lagoonal waters under low-temperature hypersaline conditions is associated with the activity of microbial organisms living in this restricted environment. The mud undergoes an early diagenetic transformation into a 100% dolomite crust on the margins of the lagoon. The biomineralization process, characterized by the variations of the physico-chemical conditions in this environment during the annual hydrologic cycle, is integrated with isotopic analysis to define the early diagenetic processes responsible for the formation of both dolomitic mud and crust. The carbon isotope values indicate a contribution of respired organic carbon, which is greater for the crust (δ13C = -9.5‰ VPDB) than mud (δ13C = -1.2‰ VPDB). The oxygen isotope values reflect a moderate degree of evaporation during mud formation (δ18O = 1.1‰ VPDB), whereas it is greatly enhanced during early diagenetic crust formation (δ18O = 4.2‰ VPDB). The clumped isotope formation temperatures derived for the Brejo do Espinho mud is 34°C and 32°C for the crust. These temperatures are consistent with the upper range of measured values during the dry season when the lagoon experiences the most hypersaline

  17. Characterization of electron beam evaporated carbon films and compound formation on titanium and silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luthin, J.; Linsmeier, C.

    2001-01-01

    The formation of carbon-based mixed materials is unavoidable on the plasma-facing components (e.g. first wall and divertor) of fusion devices when carbon is used together with other materials. On the surfaces of these components very different conditions with respect to particle and energy impact occur. To predict the mixed material formation under these conditions the precise knowledge of the fundamental mechanisms governing these interactions is essential. In this paper we present the results of carbon interaction with titanium and silicon, as model substances for metallic and covalent carbides, during thermal treatment. To perform basic studies of the reactions of carbon with different elements, thin carbon films are produced by electron beam evaporation on the different substrates under UHV conditions. All measurements for chemical analysis are performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). We discuss first the properties of the deposited carbon films. The carbon films are characterized on inert gold surfaces and are compared to bulk graphite. Annealing of the carbon films up to 970 K leads to a transition from a disordered carbon network into a graphitic structure. Preparation of carbon films at room temperature on titanium or silicon leads to a limited carbide formation at the carbon/substrate interface. Carbon deposited in excess of several monolayers is present in elementary form. Annealing of the samples leads to complete carbidization consuming the available carbon in both cases. Titanium reacts to TiC and additional substoichiometric carbide, silicon forms SiC with exact stoichiometry. (orig.)

  18. Admissible thermal loading in geological formations. Consequences on radioactive waste disposal methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    For the final disposal of conditioned radioactive wastes clay formations have plasticity, low permeability and high sorption capacity in their favour. Their disadvantage lies in their thermal conductivity and moisture content. The aim of this document is to take stock of the state of the art pertaining to the thermal phenomena linked to the dispoasl of conditioned radioactive wastes. The study, limited to normal, non-accident operating conditions, considers vitrified wastes cast in metal containers and disposal of in an underground infrastructure built in clay. The composition and characteristics of clays can vary widely between formations and even between sites, since the nature and content of argillaceous and other minerals depend on age, sedimentation conditions, depth, origin of the sediments, etc. This study is therefore limited to a specific clay in a specific deposit, i.e., the Boom clay located at Mol beneath the CEN/SCK establishment

  19. The evolution of the Porcupine and Rockall basins, offshore Ireland: the geological template for carbonate mound development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, P. M.; McDonnell, A.; Bailey, W. R.

    2007-02-01

    The margins of the deep-water sedimentary basins west of Ireland contain a number of large clusters (provinces) of spectacular carbonate mounds and build-ups. These basins have a complex development history involving the interplay of rift tectonics, thermal subsidence, igneous activity and oceanographic variations. The Porcupine and Rockall basins both rest upon thin continental crust, the consequence of major rift episodes in Permo-Triassic, Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous times. Phases of volcanism occurred in the Early Cretaceous and especially in the Early Cenozoic. Fluid flow within the basins is likely to have been controlled by the overall basin geometry and by the distribution and linkage of permeable strata with fault systems, stratal surfaces and unconformities. A number of regional unconformities, controlled by both basin tectonic and regional oceanographic effects, can be mapped and correlated throughout the Porcupine and Rockall basins. The youngest of these unconformities (C10: Early Pliocene) can be traced throughout much of the NW European Atlantic margin. It forms the horizon on which virtually all the carbonate mounds in the basins develop, suggesting a geologically instantaneous mound nucleation and growth event. Although the control on their development is uncertain, the mound clusters show a spatial association with lithified strata, buried contourite and deltaic deposits, slope failure features and with the basin margins. Analysis of these relationships points to a combination of geological and oceanographic processes controlling mound initiation and growth.

  20. Systematic assessment of wellbore integrity for geologic carbon storage projects using regulatory and industry information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moody, Mark [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Sminchak, J.R. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Under this three year project, the condition of legacy oil and gas wells in the Midwest United States was evaluated through analysis of well records, well plugging information, CBL evaluation, sustained casing pressure (SCP) field testing, and analysis of hypothetical CO2 test areas to provide a realistic description of wellbore integrity factors. The research included a state-wide review of oil and gas well records for Ohio and Michigan, along with more detailed testing of wells in Ohio. Results concluded that oil and gas wells are clustered along fields in areas. Well records vary in quality, and there may be wells that have not been identified in records, but there are options for surveying unknown wells. Many of the deep saline formations being considered for CO2 storage have few wells that penetrate the storage zone or confining layers. Research suggests that a variety of well construction and plugging approaches have been used over time in the region. The project concluded that wellbore integrity is an important issue for CO2 storage applications in the Midwest United States. Realistic CO2 storage projects may cover an area in the subsurface with several hundred legacy oil and gas wells. However, closer inspection may often establish that most of the wells do not penetrate the confining layers or storage zone. Therefore, addressing well integrity may be manageable. Field monitoring of SCP also indicated that tested wells provided zonal isolation of the reservoirs they were designed to isolate. Most of these wells appeared to exhibit gas pressure originating from intermediate zones. Based on these results, more flexibility in terms of cementing wells to surface, allowing well testing, and monitoring wells may aid operators in completing CO2 storage project. Several useful products were developed under this project for examining wellbore integrity for CO2 storage applications including, a

  1. Transformation of Strontium during formation of biogenic calcium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, T.; Kozai, N.; Sakamoto, F.; Yamashita, M.; Horiieke, T.; Utsunomiya, S.

    2016-12-01

    Some amounts of radionuclides contaminated water containing 90Sr generated in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant were leaked to sea water in the port. One of the possible method to eliminate 90Sr is co-precipitated with biogenic carbonates minerals (CCM). Specific bacteria are known to form biogenic CCM in groundwater. In the present study, we have screened specific bacterium to form CCM in saline water, and studied transformation of Sr during biogenic CCM. A marine microbe of strain TK2d, which is screened from Tokyo bay to form CCM in saline solution, was grown in the medium solution contained urea and Sr. The concentratuion of Sr2+ in the solution was monitored by ICP-OES (ICP-OES; 720 Agilent Technologies, Inc., USA) during the formation of biogenic CCM. The precipitates were analyzed by SEM, TEM, and XAFS. When 1.0 mM Sr was dissolved in the medium solution, the concentration of Sr decreased up to 0.02 mM within 10 days, indicating that most of Sr in the solution was eliminated within 10 days. SEM and TEM analyses showed that needle shaped CCM containing Ca and Sr were formed. The CCM was not single crystalline, but poly-crystalline of calcite and aragonite. The elemental mapping showed that Sr was present at the same position of Ca, indicating that Sr was coprecipitated with Ca. The XANES analysis of Sr in the precipitates showed that the XANES spectrum was not the same as that of Sr coprecipitated with an abiotic Ca carbonates. Linear combination fitting of XANES spectra by those of SrCl2 and SrCO3 showed that both Sr2+ and SrCO3 were present in CCM. Longer contact time resulted in higher content of SrCO3, indicating that Sr was incorporated gradually with time into CCM structure. Thus, Sr was changed its chemical species from adsorbed one to the incorporated one in biogenic CCM in saline solution. This work was partially supported by a research grant from the Japan Science and Technology Agency, Japan (research grant No. 260502).

  2. Evidence for microbial activity in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucha, H.; Raith, J.

    2009-04-01

    *Kucha H **Raith J *University of Mining and Metallurgy, Faculty of Geology, Geophysics and Environmental Protection, Mickiewicza 30, PL-30-059 Krakow, Poland. ** University of Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics, A-8700 Leoben, Peter Tunner Str. 5, Austria Evidence for microbial activity in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits To date evaluation of bacterial processes in the formation of carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits is largely based on sulphur isotope evidence. However, during a past few years, textural criteria, have been established, which support the bacterial origin of many of these deposits. This has received a strong support from micro-, and nano-textures of naturally growing bacterial films in a flooded tunnel within carbonates that host the Piquette Zn-Pb deposit (Druschel et al., 2002). Bacterial textures, micro- and nano textures found in carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits are: i)wavy bacterial films up to a few mm thick to up to a few cm long composed of peloids, ii)semimassive agglomeration of peloids in the carbonate matrix, and iii)solitary peloids dispersed in the carbonate matrix. Peloids are usually composed of a distinct 50-90um core most often made up of Zn-bearing calcite surrounded by 30-60um thick dentate rim composed of ZnS. Etching of Zn-carbonate cores reveals 1 - 2um ZnS filaments, and numerous 15 to 90nm large ZnS nano-spheres (Kucha et al., 2005). In massive ore composite Zn-calcite - sphalerite peloids are entirely replaced by zinc sulphide, and form peloids ghosts within banded sulphide layers. Bacterially derived micro- and nano-textures have been observed in the following carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb deposits: 1)Irish-type Zn-Pb deposits. In the Navan deposit the basic sulphur is isotopically light bacteriogenic S (Fallick at al., 2001). This is corroborated by semimassive agglomerations of composite peloids (Zn-calcite-ZnS corona or ZnS core-melnikovite corona). Etching of Zn-calcite core reveals globular

  3. Impact of the capillary pressure-saturation pore-size distribution parameter on geological carbon sequestration estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu-Lin Cheng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost estimates for geologic carbon sequestration (GCS are vital for policy and decision makers evaluating carbon capture and storage strategies. Numerical models are often used in feasibility studies for the different stages of carbon injection and redistribution. Knowledge of the capillary pressure-saturation function for a selected storage rock unit is essential in applications used for simulating multiphase fluid flow and transport. However, the parameters describing these functions (e.g. the van Genuchten m pore size distribution parameter are often not measured or neglected compared to other physical properties such as porosity and intrinsic permeability. In addition, the use of average instead of point estimates of m for numerical simulations of flow and transport can result in significant errors, especially in the case of coarse-grained sediments and fractured rocks. Such erroneous predictions can pose great risks and challenges to decision-making. We present a comparison of numerical simulation results based on average and point estimates of the van Genuchten m parameter for different porous media. Forward numerical simulations using the STOMP code were employed to illustrate the magnitudes of the differences in carbon sequestration predictions resulting from the use of height-averaged instead of point parameters. The model predictions were converted into cost estimates and the results indicate that varying m values in GCS modeling can cause cost differences of up to hundreds of millions dollars.

  4. Petrophysical Characterization of Arroyal Antiform Geological Formations (Aguilar de Campoo, Palencia) as a Storage and Seal Rocks in the Technology Development Plant for Geological CO2 Storage (Hontomin, Burgos)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, R.; Barrios, I.; Gonzalez, A. M.; Pelayo, M.; Saldana, R.

    2011-01-01

    The geological storage program of Energy City Foundation is focusing its research effort in the Technological Development and Research Plant in Hontomin (Burgos) start off. The present report shows the petrophysical characterization of of the Arroyal antiform geological formations since they are representatives, surface like, of the storage and seal formations that will be found in the CO 2 injection plant in Hontomin. In this petrophysics characterization has taken place the study of matrix porosity, specific surface and density of the storage and seal formations. Mercury intrusion porosimetry, N 2 adsorption and He pycnometry techniques have been used for the characterization. Furthermore, it has carried out a mineralogical analysis of the seal materials by RX diffraction. (Author) 26 refs.

  5. Carbonate clumped isotopes and in situ temperature monitoring for Holocene soils in the San Luis Valley, USA indicate springtime carbonate formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, A. M.; Paces, J. B.; Ruleman, C.

    2017-12-01

    Pedogenic carbonate horizons are abundant in semi-arid and arid regions worldwide and within the geologic record. They present a widely distributed archive of past environmental conditions, driven by global climate or tectonically-controlled elevation changes. Oxygen and carbon isotopes in calcite-rich nodules and clast rinds are widely-applied indicators of past soil water and CO2 composition linked to changing precipitation and plant communities. The temperature of carbonate formation, however, provides key constraint on past water/CO2 values and elucidate why they may have changed in the past. Clumped isotope thermometry can provide this constraint and additional climate information, given the carbonate forming system is well understood. We present preliminary clumped isotope (Δ47) temperatures for Holocene soil carbonates, constrained by 14C and U-Th disequilibrium dating, compared with two years of in situ soil temperature data to better understand the mechanism and seasonality of carbonate formation in the San Luis Valley region of the southern Rocky Mountains. Five temperature-monitoring sites ranging in elevation (1940-2450 m) and latitude (36.2-37.9°N) were installed in a variety of settings (range front, valley center, and canyon). The resulting records show indistinguishable seasonal temperature variations at >60 cm depth. This suggests Δ47 temperatures should be comparable at sites across the region. Temperatures based on Δ47 measurements of Holocene (>1.8 to 11.0 ka BP) carbonates at these sites yield consistent inter-site temperatures of 10±4°C, which are similar to modern springtime soil temperatures at depth. This seasonality matches previous results of isotopic modeling at sites further south along the Rio Grande corridor. Temperatures during March to May show multiple, abrupt warming and cooling cycles on weekly timescales caused by wetting and drying of the soil during spring precipitation events. This may drive carbonate precipitation

  6. Micro-CT in situ study of carbonate rock microstructural evolution for geologic CO2 storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yi; Yang, Yan; Rogowska, M.

    2017-01-01

    settings such as the carbonate reservoirs in the North Sea. The final aim of our project is to find out how to control the evolution of petrophysical parameters during CO2 injection using an optimal combination of flow rate, injection pressure and chemical composition of the influent. The first step...... to achieve this is to find a suitable condition to create a stable 3D space in carbonate rock by injecting liquid to prepare space for the later CO2 injection. Micro-CT imaging is a non-destructive 3D method that can be used to study the property changes of carbonate rocks during and after CO2 injection...

  7. Proposed format and content of environmental reports for deep geologic terminal repositories for radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrell, D.J.; Jones, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    As the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has not yet issued a format guide for the preparation of an environmental impact statement for radioactive waste repositories, Rockwell Hanford operations has developed an annotated outline which will serve as the basis for the environmental evaluation activities until replaced by an appropriate NRC regulatory guide. According to the outline, the applicant should summarize the major environmental effects that are expected to occur during the construction, operation, and terminal isolation phases of the radioactive material repository. Compare these environmental effects with the possible effect of continued use of interim storage facilities. Unless unforeseen environmental effects become apparent, the summary should be a positive statement indicating that the short-term environmental effects are outweighed by the long-term benefits of the repository

  8. Methodology for assessing the risk from the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cranwell, R.M.; Ortiz, N.R.; Runkle, G.E.

    1983-01-01

    The Fuel Cycle Risk Analysis Division of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, has recently completed the development of a risk assessment methodology for use in assessing the post-closure, long-term risk from the disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in deep geologic formations. Briefly, this methodology consists of: (1) techniques for selecting and screening scenarios, (2) models for use in simulating the physical processes and estimating the consequences associated with the occurrence of these scenarios, (3) probabilistic and statistical techniques for use in risk estimates and sensitivity and uncertainty analyses, (4) a procedure for utilizing these models and techniques to arrive at estimates of consequences and risk. The methodology has been demonstrated by applying it to the analysis of a hypothetical site containing a bedded salt formation as the host medium for the waste repository. In this demonstration analysis, consequences resulting from the occurrence of several hypothetical scenarios were determined. These consequences were expressed in terms of radionuclide discharges to the biosphere and health effects resulting from these discharges. Health effects were expressed in terms of the probability of an individual developing a latent cancer. Sensitivity analyses were performed to determine the model input variables which are most important in influencing variation in predicted discharges and health effects. The result of the analysis was compared with the requirements of the US Environmental Protection Agency Standard for high-level waste disposal

  9. Characterization of shale gas enrichment in the Wufeng Formation–Longmaxi Formation in the Sichuan Basin of China and evaluation of its geological construction–transformation evolution sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang He

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Shale gas in Upper Ordovician Wufeng Formation–Lower Silurian Longmaxi Formation in the Sichuan Basin is one of the key strata being explored and developed in China, where shale gas reservoirs have been found in Fuling, Weiyuan, Changning and Zhaotong. Characteristics of shale gas enrichment in the formation shown by detailed profiling and analysis are summarized as “high, handsome and rich”. “High” mainly refers to the high quality of original materials for the formation of shale with excellent key parameters, including the good type and high abundance of organic matters, high content of brittle minerals and moderate thermal evolution. “Handsome” means late and weak deformation, favorable deformation mode and structure, and appropriate uplift and current burial depth. “Rich” includes high gas content, high formation pressure coefficient, good reservoir property, favorable reservoir scale transformation and high initial and final output, with relative ease of development and obvious economic benefit. For shale gas enrichment and high yield, it is important that the combination of shale was deposited and formed in excellent conditions (geological construction, and then underwent appropriate tectonic deformation, uplift, and erosion (geological transformation. Evaluation based on geological construction (evolution sequence from formation to the reservoir includes sequence stratigraphy and sediment, hydrocarbon generation and formation of reservoir pores. Based on geological transformation (evolution sequence from the reservoir to preservation, the strata should be evaluated for structural deformation, the formation of reservoir fracture and preservation of shale gas. The evaluation of the “construction - transformation” sequence is to cover the whole process of shale gas formation and preservation. This way, both positive and negative effects of the formation-transformation sequence on shale gas are assessed. The evaluation

  10. Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in deep saline aquifers and formations: Chapter 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbauer, Robert J.; Thomas, Burt

    2010-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and sequestration in geologic media is one among many emerging strategies to reduce atmospheric emissions of anthropogenic CO2. This chapter looks at the potential of deep saline aquifers – based on their capacity and close proximity to large point sources of CO2 – as repositories for the geologic sequestration of CO2. The petrochemical characteristics which impact on the suitability of saline aquifers for CO2 sequestration and the role of coupled geochemical transport models and numerical tools in evaluating site feasibility are also examined. The full-scale commercial CO2 sequestration project at Sleipner is described together with ongoing pilot and demonstration projects.

  11. Performance assessment of geological isolation systems for radioactive waste. Disposal in salt formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storck, R.; Aschenbach, J.; Hirsekom, R.P.; Nies, A.; Stelte, N.

    1988-01-01

    In the framework of the PAGIS project of the CEC Research Programme on radioactive waste, a performance assessment of a repository of vitrified HLW in rock salt formations has been carried out. The first volume of the study is split into four tasks. Task 1 recalls the main steps that have led to the selection of the reference and the variant site. Task 2 condenses all information available on the rock formations which are planned to host the repository, the overlying geosphere and the geohistoric development of the sites. Task 3 states the technical details of repository planning, while in Task 4 conceivable release scenarios are discussed. Volume II (Tasks 5 to 10) is concerned with the modelling procedures. In Task 5 data for the waste inventory are collected and the selection of relevant nuclides for transport calculations is discussed. Task 6 gives the near-field modelling, i.e. the models for corrosion of the waste canisters, the degradation of the waste matrix and the models used for the HLW boreholes. Task 7 deals with the modelling of the repository. Its division into sections is discussed and models for physical and chemical effects taken into account in each section are presented. In Task 8 the modelling of the overburden is given. In Task 9 additional models for the subrosion scenario and a human intrusion scenario are given. Task 10 is concerned with the biosphere modelling. In Volume III results of deterministic and probabilistic calculations are presented. Task 11 gives the results for deterministic calculations with best estimate values for the parameters involved in the models. Task 12 presents the result of the uncertainty analysis, and Task 13 those of local and global sensitivity analyses followed by concluding remarks. This document is one of a set of 5 reports covering a relevant project of the European Community on a nuclear safety subject having very wide interest. The five volumes are: the summary (EUR 11775-EN), the clay (EUR 11776-EN), the

  12. System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2006-01-01

    One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhouse gases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial sources into deep geological formations such as brine formations or depleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted to improve understanding of factors affecting particular aspects of geological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safety and environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2 capture and related p...

  13. Geology and formation of titaniferous placer deposits in Upper Jogaz Valley area, Fanuj, Sistan and Baluchestan province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Javad Moghaddasi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Fanuj titaniferous placer deposits are located 35 km northwest of the Fanuj, Sistan and Baluchestan province (1 . The studied area comprises a (2 small part of the late Cretaceous Fanuj-Maskutan (Rameshk ophiolite complex (Arshadi and Mahdavi, 1987. Reconnaissance and comprehensive exploration programs in the Fanuj district (East of the 1:100000 Fanuj quadrangle map,Yazdi, 2010 revealed that the Upper Jogaz Valley area has the highest concentration of titaniferous placer deposits. In this study, geology and formation of the titaniferous placer deposits in Upper Jogaz Valley area are discussed. Materials and Methods (3 Forty samples were collected from surface and drainage sediments to evaluate the potential for titaniferous placers. Mineralogical studies indicated the high Ti (ilmenite bearing areas, which led to detailed exploration by 29 shallow drill holes and 9 trenches. A total of 61 sub-surface samples were collected for heavy mineral studies and ore grade determination. The exploration studies suggest that the the Upper Jogaz Valley area in the Fanuj district has a high potential for titaniferous placer deposits. Extensive exposures of black sands in the sreambeds of this area suggested detailed sampling, so that 12 holes were drilled (2-3 m depthfrom which 26 samples were collected, and five trenches were excavated to 2-4 m depth (4. The distribution of drill holes and trenches were plotted with “Logplot” software for further interpretation. Twenty-two samples from these drill holes were analyzed for TiO2. Results The reconnaissance and comprehensive exploration in Fanuj district shows that the Upper Jogaz Valley area has the highest concentration of titaniferous placer deposits. The general geology of the region and petrology and mineralogy of collected samples suggest that the source rock of the Upper Jogaz Valley titaniferous placers is the hornblende- and olivine-gabbro unit of the Fanuj-Ramesh ophiolites. The Ti

  14. Performance assessment of alpha wastes disposal in deep geological formations, PACOMA project: granite option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun-Yaba, C.; Cernes, A.; Mangin, J.P.

    1989-11-01

    After the CEC PAGIS project (for vitrified waste), the PACOMA project has been launched at the end of 1987 for cemented waste. The CEA-IPSN is in charge of the granite option. For the PACOMA project, a representative inventory of this type of waste has been built up, a repository concept (with one variant) has been defined and an adaptation of the near field module, Condiment, of the safety evaluation code MELODIE, has been made in order to take into account the particularities of cemented waste with respect to the vitrified waste. The best-estimate calculations have been performed on one reference site (the French Auriat Site) which is an outcropping granite and two variants, one representing a coastal granite formation (Barfleur) and the other, a granite with a sedimentary cover (notional British site). Moreover, the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis have been performed in the PACOMA project with a 2D modelling of the geosphere (module METIS of MELODIE code) instead of the 1D modelling (stream tube) previously used in the PAGIS project. After a general presentation of these points, the main results, namely the dose rates obtained through deterministic calculations, and the most important geosphere parameters, are presented [fr

  15. Probabilistic modeling and global sensitivity analysis for CO 2 storage in geological formations: a spectral approach

    KAUST Repository

    Saad, Bilal Mohammed

    2017-09-18

    This work focuses on the simulation of CO2 storage in deep underground formations under uncertainty and seeks to understand the impact of uncertainties in reservoir properties on CO2 leakage. To simulate the process, a non-isothermal two-phase two-component flow system with equilibrium phase exchange is used. Since model evaluations are computationally intensive, instead of traditional Monte Carlo methods, we rely on polynomial chaos (PC) expansions for representation of the stochastic model response. A non-intrusive approach is used to determine the PC coefficients. We establish the accuracy of the PC representations within a reasonable error threshold through systematic convergence studies. In addition to characterizing the distributions of model observables, we compute probabilities of excess CO2 leakage. Moreover, we consider the injection rate as a design parameter and compute an optimum injection rate that ensures that the risk of excess pressure buildup at the leaky well remains below acceptable levels. We also provide a comprehensive analysis of sensitivities of CO2 leakage, where we compute the contributions of the random parameters, and their interactions, to the variance by computing first, second, and total order Sobol’ indices.

  16. In Situ Formation of Carbon Nanomaterials on Bulk Metallic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Y. Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanomaterials were synthesized in situ on bulk 316L stainless steel, pure cobalt, and pure nickel by hybrid surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT. The microstructures of the treated samples and the resulted carbon nanomaterials were investigated by SEM and TEM characterizations. Different substrates resulted in different morphologies of products. The diameter of carbon nanomaterials is related to the size of the nanograins on the surface layer of substrates. The possible growth mechanism was discussed. Effects of the main parameters of the synthesis, including the carbon source and gas reactant composition, hydrogen, and the reaction temperature, were studied. Using hybrid SMAT is proved to be an effective way to synthesize carbon nanomaterials in situ on surfaces of metallic materials.

  17. Drilling, Completion, and Data Collection Plans An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin: Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkewicz, Nicholas; Kirksey, Jim; Finley, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Executive Summary The Illinois Basin – Decatur Project (IBDP) is managed by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) and is led by the Illinois State Geological Survey (ISGS) at the University of Illinois. The project site is located on the Archer Daniels Midland Company (ADM) property in Decatur, Illinois, and is a fully integrated carbon capture and storage (CCS) project that uses CO₂ captured from the ethanol-producing fermentation process at the ADM corn-processing plant (Finley et. al., 2013). IBDP has a goal of injecting one million tonnes of CO₂ into the basal sands of the Mt. Simon Sandstone over a three-year period. This is a multifaceted project, and this report details the planning and results of the drilling, completions, well testing, log data acquisition, and the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) aspects of the project. Three deep wells were planned for the IBDP: • The injection well: Injection Well #1 (CCS1); • The monitoring well (both in-zone and above seal): Verification Well #1 (VW1); and • The geophone monitoring well: Geophysical Monitoring Well #1 (GM1). The detailed plans for these wells are attached to the appendices of this document. The wells were drilled successfully with little deviation from the original plans. The biggest change from the plan to execution was the need to adjust for larger-than-expected loss of circulation in the Potosi section of the Knox Formation. The completions reports also attached to this document detail the well constructions as they were actually built. Injectivity testing was carried out, and the perforating plans were adjusted based on the results. Additional perforations and acidizing were performed as a result of the injectivity testing. The testing plans are detailed in this report along with the actual testing results. The injectivity testing results were used in the modeling and simulation efforts. Detailed HSE plans were developed and implemented during the planning and

  18. The role of carbon dioxide in the transport and fractionation of metals by geological fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokh, Maria A.; Akinfiev, Nikolay N.; Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Salvi, Stefano; Guillaume, Damien

    2017-01-01

    Although carbon dioxide is one of the major components of crustal fluids responsible for ore deposit formation, its effect on transport and precipitation of metals remains unknown, due to a lack of direct experimental data and physical-chemical models for CO2-rich fluids. To fill this gap, we combined laboratory experiments and thermodynamic modeling to systematically quantify the role played by CO2 for the solubility of economically important metals such as Fe, Cu, Zn, Au, Mo, Pt, Sn under hydrothermal conditions. Solubility measurements of common ore minerals of these metals (FeS2, CuFeS2, ZnS, Au, MoS2, PtS, SnO2) were performed, using a flexible-cell reactor equipped with a rapid sampling device, in a single-phase fluid (CO2-H2O-KCl) at 350-450 °C and 600-750 bar, buffered with iron sulfide and oxide and alkali-aluminosilicate mineral assemblages. In addition, another type of experiments was conducted to measure gold solubility in more sulfur-rich supercritical CO2-H2O-S-NaOH fluids at 450 °C and 700 bar using a batch reactor that allows fluid quenching. Our results show that the solubilities of Si, Au, Mo, Pt and Cu either decrease (within 1 log unit) with CO2 contents in the fluid increasing from 0 to 50 wt%. These data were interpreted using a simple model that does not require any new adjustable parameters, and is based on the dielectric constant of the H2O-CO2 solvent and on the Born solvation parameter for the dominant metal-bearing species in an aqueous fluid. Our predictions using this model suggest that in a supercritical CO2-H2O-S-salt fluid typical of metamorphic Au deposits, in equilibrium with pyrite and chalcopyrite, the Cu/Fe ratio decreases by up to 2 orders of magnitude with an increase of CO2 content from 0 to 70 wt%. This effect is due to the decrease of the fluid dielectric constant in the presence of CO2, which favors the stability of neutral species (FeCl20) compared to charged ones (CuCl2-). Our results explain the Fe enrichment and Cu

  19. Geology and petrography of the basaltic rocks (Arapey formation) cropping out in toad 4 between Arapey river (92 km) and Artigas (200 Km)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyhantcabal, P.; Pineiro, G.

    2007-01-01

    This contribution presents a geological map of the basaltic flows of Arapey formation (Mezosoic) cropping out in Road 4 between the Arapey river (92 Km) and Artigas city (200 Km) together with the description of the petrographic features of the different portions of the 13 recognized flow units. (author)

  20. Geology and petrography in basaltic rocks (Arapey formation) cropping out in road 30 between the Bella Union round point (27 km) and Penas cuesta (225 Km)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyhantcabal, P.; Pineiro, G.

    2007-01-01

    This contribution presents a geological map of the basaltic flows of Arapey formation (Mezosoic) cropping out in Road 30 between the Bella Union round point (27 Km) and Pena s cuesta (225 Km) together with the description of the petrographic features of the different portions of the 20 recognized flow units

  1. Modeling of concrete carbonation in deep geological disposal of intermediate level waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poyet S.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Simulations of atmospheric carbonation of Intermediate-Level Long-lived radioactive Waste (ILLW concrete packages were conducted to evaluate their possible chemical degradations. Two-phase liquid water-air flow is combined with gas component diffusion processes leading to a progressive drying of the concrete.Complete drying of the 11 cm thick waste disposal package wall occurs over a period ranging from 2 years for the low-performance concrete to 10 years for the high-performance concrete. The drying process slows down when transport characteristics of concretes are enhanced. Carbonation depths in the order of 2 to 3 cm in 100 years are predicted for this cementitious component. However, these values are slightly overestimated compared to experimental data. Also the kinetic model of mineral reactivity requires improvements with respect to the protective effect of secondary carbonates and to thermodynamic data.

  2. Geologic assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources: Oligocene Frio and Anahuac Formations, United States Gulf of Mexico coastal plain and State waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Sharon M.; Karlsen, Alexander W.; Valentine, Brett J.

    2013-01-01

    The Oligocene Frio and Anahuac Formations were assessed as part of the 2007 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) assessment of Tertiary strata of the U.S. Gulf of Mexico Basin onshore and State waters. The Frio Formation, which consists of sand-rich fluvio-deltaic systems, has been one of the largest hydrocarbon producers from the Paleogene in the Gulf of Mexico. The Anahuac Formation, an extensive transgressive marine shale overlying the Frio Formation, contains deltaic and slope sandstones in Louisiana and Texas and carbonate rocks in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. In downdip areas of the Frio and Anahuac Formations, traps associated with faulted, rollover anticlines are common. Structural traps commonly occur in combination with stratigraphic traps. Faulted salt domes in the Frio and Anahuac Formations are present in the Houston embayment of Texas and in south Louisiana. In the Frio Formation, stratigraphic traps are found in fluvial, deltaic, barrier-bar, shelf, and strandplain systems. The USGS Tertiary Assessment Team defined a single, Upper Jurassic-Cretaceous-Tertiary Composite Total Petroleum System (TPS) for the Gulf Coast basin, based on previous studies and geochemical analysis of oils in the Gulf Coast basin. The primary source rocks for oil and gas within Cenozoic petroleum systems, including Frio Formation reservoirs, in the northern, onshore Gulf Coastal region consist of coal and shale rich in organic matter within the Wilcox Group (Paleocene–Eocene), with some contributions from the Sparta Sand of the Claiborne Group (Eocene). The Jurassic Smackover Formation and Cretaceous Eagle Ford Formation also may have contributed substantial petroleum to Cenozoic reservoirs. Modeling studies of thermal maturity by the USGS Tertiary Assessment Team indicate that downdip portions of the basal Wilcox Group reached sufficient thermal maturity to generate hydrocarbons by early Eocene; this early maturation is the result of rapid sediment accumulation in the early

  3. Formation of a supersaturated carbon solution in a metal under the process of carbon nano fibers obtaining by PECVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takopulo, D. A.; Fisenko, S. P.

    2012-01-01

    Heat and mass transfer processes in a highly porous carbon layer appeared on a catalytic surface of a plasma chemical reactor during carbon nano fibers obtaining by PECVD (plasma enhanced CVD) are considered. Nano fibers formation in such a process is carried out as a result of the catalytic decomposition of the carbon contained plasma pyrolysis yields followed by carbon atoms diffusion into the catalyst bulk with a subsequent formation of carbon in a metal solid solution. The results of the numerical investigation of the transfer processes in the porous layer have shown that the layer thickness growth significantly reduces the catalytic surface temperature. This effect causes the carbon solid solution supersaturation, which is an obligatory condition of the carbon clusters nucleation. The transfer problems initial data have been obtained in a result of experimental investigations of thin porous carbon layers gathered from the catalytic surface of the plasma chemical reactor. It have been determined that the layer porosity has an average value of about 70%, and it's effective heat conductivity in the temperature range of 600-1000 C is about 10 -1 W/(m*K) and slightly depends on the temperature. A numerical modeling has been made for a steady state approximation. The correctness of this approximation is based on the comparison of the steady stale stabilization characteristic time with the porous layer growth characteristic time. The latter appeared to be much longer than the former one. (authors).

  4. Carbon Formation and Metal Dusting in Hot-Gas Cleanup Systems of Coal Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, Peter F.; Judkins, Roddie R.; DeVan, Jackson H.; Wright, Ian G.

    1995-12-31

    There are several possible materials/systems degradation modes that result from gasification environments with appreciable carbon activities. These processes, which are not necessarily mutually exclusive, include carbon deposition, carburization, metal dusting, and CO disintegration of refractories. Carbon formation on solid surfaces occurs by deposition from gases in which the carbon activity (a sub C) exceeds unity. The presence of a carbon layer CO can directly affect gasifier performance by restricting gas flow, particularly in the hot gas filter, creating debris (that may be deposited elsewhere in the system or that may cause erosive damage of downstream components), and/or changing the catalytic activity of surfaces.

  5. Geological factors of the isotopic distribution of carbon of organic matter in sedimentary rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maass, J.

    1981-01-01

    The isotope ratio of carbon of fossile organic matter can be regarded as a definite criterion of its genetic origin. As the biofacial character of organic matter, especially the chemical composition (H/C-ratio), decisively influences the mode and quantity of the potential hydrocarbon production, isotopic analysis is an essential method for the prognostic evaluation of sedimentary basins with regard to their oil and gas perspectives. The genetic relations to the parent substance continue in the bituminization and coalification products and make it possible to apply the isotopic analysis of carbon to prospection work for hydrocarbons. (author)

  6. Constraining the climate and ocean pH of the early Earth with a geological carbon cycle model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Arney, Giada N; Catling, David C

    2018-04-02

    The early Earth's environment is controversial. Climatic estimates range from hot to glacial, and inferred marine pH spans strongly alkaline to acidic. Better understanding of early climate and ocean chemistry would improve our knowledge of the origin of life and its coevolution with the environment. Here, we use a geological carbon cycle model with ocean chemistry to calculate self-consistent histories of climate and ocean pH. Our carbon cycle model includes an empirically justified temperature and pH dependence of seafloor weathering, allowing the relative importance of continental and seafloor weathering to be evaluated. We find that the Archean climate was likely temperate (0-50 °C) due to the combined negative feedbacks of continental and seafloor weathering. Ocean pH evolves monotonically from [Formula: see text] (2σ) at 4.0 Ga to [Formula: see text] (2σ) at the Archean-Proterozoic boundary, and to [Formula: see text] (2σ) at the Proterozoic-Phanerozoic boundary. This evolution is driven by the secular decline of pCO 2 , which in turn is a consequence of increasing solar luminosity, but is moderated by carbonate alkalinity delivered from continental and seafloor weathering. Archean seafloor weathering may have been a comparable carbon sink to continental weathering, but is less dominant than previously assumed, and would not have induced global glaciation. We show how these conclusions are robust to a wide range of scenarios for continental growth, internal heat flow evolution and outgassing history, greenhouse gas abundances, and changes in the biotic enhancement of weathering. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  7. Tagging CO2 to Enable Quantitative Inventories of Geological Carbon Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, Klaus; Matter, Juerg; Park, Ah-Hyung; Stute, Martin; Carson, Cantwell; Ji, Yinghuang

    2014-06-30

    In the wake of concerns about the long term integrity and containment of sub-surface CO2 sequestration reservoirs, many efforts have been made to improve the monitoring, verification, and accounting methods for geo-sequestered CO2. Our project aimed to demonstrate the feasibility of a system designed to tag CO2 with carbon isotope 14C immediately prior to sequestration to a level that is normal on the surface (one part per trillion). Because carbon found at depth is naturally free of 14C, this tag would easily differentiate pre-existing carbon from anthropogenic injected carbon and provide an excellent handle for monitoring its whereabouts in the subsurface. It also creates an excellent handle for adding up anthropogenic carbon inventories. Future inventories in effect count 14C atoms. Accordingly, we have developed a 14C tagging system suitable for use at the part-per-trillion level. This system consists of a gas-exchange apparatus to make disposable cartridges ready for controlled injection into a fast flowing stream of pressurized CO2. We built a high-pressure injection and tagging system, and a 14C detection system. The disposable cartridge and injection system have been successfully demonstrated in the lab with a high-pressure flow reactor, as well as in the field at the CarbFix CO2 sequestration site in Iceland. The laser-based 14C detection system originally conceived has been shown to possess inadequate sensitivity for ambient levels. Alternative methods for detecting 14C, such as saturated cavity absorption ringdown spectroscopy and scintillation counting, may still be suitable. KEYWORDS

  8. Effect of carbonic anhydrase on silicate weathering and carbonate formation at present day CO₂ concentrations compared to primordial values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Leilei; Lian, Bin; Hao, Jianchao; Liu, Congqiang; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-13

    It is widely recognized that carbonic anhydrase (CA) participates in silicate weathering and carbonate formation. Nevertheless, it is still not known if the magnitude of the effect produced by CA on surface rock evolution changes or not. In this work, CA gene expression from Bacillus mucilaginosus and the effects of recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation under different conditions are explored. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to explore the correlation between CA gene expression and sufficiency or deficiency in calcium and CO₂ concentration. The results show that the expression of CA genes is negatively correlated with both CO₂ concentration and ease of obtaining soluble calcium. A pure form of the protein of interest (CA) is obtained by cloning, heterologous expression, and purification. The results from tests of the recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation at different levels of CO₂ concentration show that the magnitudes of the effects of CA and CO₂ concentration are negatively correlated. These results suggest that the effects of microbial CA in relation to silicate weathering and carbonate formation may have increased importance at the modern atmospheric CO₂ concentration compared to 3 billion years ago.

  9. Effect of carbonic anhydrase on silicate weathering and carbonate formation at present day CO2 concentrations compared to primordial values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Leilei; Lian, Bin; Hao, Jianchao; Liu, Congqiang; Wang, Shijie

    2015-01-01

    It is widely recognized that carbonic anhydrase (CA) participates in silicate weathering and carbonate formation. Nevertheless, it is still not known if the magnitude of the effect produced by CA on surface rock evolution changes or not. In this work, CA gene expression from Bacillus mucilaginosus and the effects of recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation under different conditions are explored. Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to explore the correlation between CA gene expression and sufficiency or deficiency in calcium and CO2 concentration. The results show that the expression of CA genes is negatively correlated with both CO2 concentration and ease of obtaining soluble calcium. A pure form of the protein of interest (CA) is obtained by cloning, heterologous expression, and purification. The results from tests of the recombination protein on wollastonite dissolution and carbonate formation at different levels of CO2 concentration show that the magnitudes of the effects of CA and CO2 concentration are negatively correlated. These results suggest that the effects of microbial CA in relation to silicate weathering and carbonate formation may have increased importance at the modern atmospheric CO2 concentration compared to 3 billion years ago. PMID:25583135

  10. Trace-Element Analyses of Carbonate Minerals in the Gunflint Banded Iron Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Aurora; Papike, James J.; Shearer, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the petrography, mineralogy and trace-element abundances of individual carbonate grains in the Early Proterozoic Gunflint BIF (Banded Iron Formation). Trace-element data may be used as environmental recorders of the fluid evolution from which the various carbonate phases precipitated. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  11. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  12. Site characterization of the highest-priority geologic formations for CO2 storage in Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surdam, Ronald C. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Bentley, Ramsey [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Campbell-Stone, Erin [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Dahl, Shanna [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Deiss, Allory [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Ganshin, Yuri [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Jiao, Zunsheng [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Kaszuba, John [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Mallick, Subhashis [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); McLaughlin, Fred [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Myers, James [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Quillinan, Scott [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2013-12-07

    This study, funded by U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory award DE-FE0002142 along with the state of Wyoming, uses outcrop and core observations, a diverse electric log suite, a VSP survey, in-bore testing (DST, injection tests, and fluid sampling), a variety of rock/fluid analyses, and a wide range of seismic attributes derived from a 3-D seismic survey to thoroughly characterize the highest-potential storage reservoirs and confining layers at the premier CO2 geological storage site in Wyoming. An accurate site characterization was essential to assessing the following critical aspects of the storage site: (1) more accurately estimate the CO2 reservoir storage capacity (Madison Limestone and Weber Sandstone at the Rock Springs Uplift (RSU)), (2) evaluate the distribution, long-term integrity, and permanence of the confining layers, (3) manage CO2 injection pressures by removing formation fluids (brine production/treatment), and (4) evaluate potential utilization of the stored CO2

  13. Safety guidebook relative to the disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geologic formation; Guide de surete relatif au stockage definitif des dechets radioactifs en formation geologique profonde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-07-01

    The French nuclear safety authority (ASN) initiated in 2003 a revision process of the objectives to be considered during the research and work steps of the implementation of a radioactive waste storage facility in deep geologic formations. The purpose of this document is to define the safety objectives that have to be retained at each step of this implementation, from the site characterization to the closure of the facility. This update takes into account the works carried out by the ANDRA (French national agency of radioactive wastes) in the framework of the law from December 30, 1991, and the advices of the permanent experts group about these works. It takes also into consideration the international research works in this domain and the choices defined in the program law no 2006-739 from June 28, 2006 relative to the sustainable management of radioactive materials and wastes. The main modifications concern: the notion of reversibility, the definition of the safety functions of disposal components, the safety goals and the design principles assigned to waste packages, the control of nuclear materials and the monitoring objectives of the facility. The documents treats of the following points: 1 - the objectives of public health and environment protection; 2 - the safety principles and the safety-related design bases of the facility; and 3 - the method used for demonstrating the disposal safety. (J.S.)

  14. Geology and structure of the Pine River, Florida River, Carbon Junction, and Basin Creek gas seeps, La Plata County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, James E.; Condon, Steven M.; Huffman, A. Curtis; Taylor, David J.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: This study was commissioned by a consortium consisting of the Bureau of Land Management, Durango Office; the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission; La Plata County; and all of the major gas-producing companies operating in La Plata County, Colorado. The gas-seep study project consisted of four parts; 1) detailed surface mapping of Fruitland Formation coal outcrops in the above listed seep areas, 2) detailed measurement of joint and fracture patterns in the seep areas, 3) detailed coal-bed correlation of Fruitland coals in the subsurface adjacent to the seep areas, and 4) studies of deep-seated seismic patterns in those seep areas where seismic data was available. This report is divided into three chapters labeled 1, 2, and 3. Chapter 1 contains the results of the subsurface coal-bed correla-tion study, chapter 2 contains the results of the surface geologic mapping and joint measurement study, and chapter 3, contains the results of the deep-seismic study. A preliminary draft of this report was submitted to the La Plata County Group in September 1996. All of the members of the La Plata Group were given an opportunity to critically review the draft report and their comments were the basis for revising the first draft to create this final version of a geologic report on the major La Plata County gas seeps located north of the Southern Ute Indian Reservation.

  15. In situ atomic-scale observation of irradiation induced carbon nanocrystalline formation from dense carbon clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengbing; Li, Zhengtong; Ling, San; Lei, Tao; Su, Jinbu

    2018-03-01

    We present a direct observation of the transformation of dense amorphous carbon clusters into diamond nanocrystalline under electron beam irradiation by in situ transmission electron microscopy, where the surrounding carbon matrix did not significantly change. Our findings provide clear and convincing evidence for the diamond nanocrystalline evolving from energetic amorphous carbon sites. Furthermore, graphitization of amorphous carbons usually demands a high temperature combined with high pressure. Hence, graphitization of amorphous carbons at relatively low temperatures is highly desired. Here we offer a useful method for catalyst-free graphitization of amorphous carbons by employing moderate electron beam irradiation, without external heating being applied.

  16. Communication regarding the geology and vertebrate palaeontology of the Adamantina formation (Bauru group, Upper Cretaceous in Campina Verde, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Candeiro Carlos Roberto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Several geological events occurred onthe surface of the earth with the division of the megacontinent Gondwana, including volcanic activity involving extensive lava flows, thus locally and regionally altering the surface's geology. Lava flows in the Serra Geral formation predominantly consist of volcanic lava fissure-derived basalt. Sedimentation upon extrusive igneous rocks occurred after this volcanic event, leading to the deposition of sediments from three formations (Adamantina, Uberaba, and Marília collectively comprising the upper Cretaceous Bauru group, beginning about 83 million years ago. This was a period when large animals inhabited the planet, including the study area; the Adamantina formation is the largest and oldest. The city of Campina Verde is located there and is where most studies were carried out; the region is known as fossil field.

  17. Separation and capture of CO2 from large stationary sources and sequestration in geological formations--coalbeds and deep saline aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Curt M; Strazisar, Brian R; Granite, Evan J; Hoffman, James S; Pennline, Henry W

    2003-06-01

    The topic of global warming as a result of increased atmospheric CO2 concentration is arguably the most important environmental issue that the world faces today. It is a global problem that will need to be solved on a global level. The link between anthropogenic emissions of CO2 with increased atmospheric CO2 levels and, in turn, with increased global temperatures has been well established and accepted by the world. International organizations such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have been formed to address this issue. Three options are being explored to stabilize atmospheric levels of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and global temperatures without severely and negatively impacting standard of living: (1) increasing energy efficiency, (2) switching to less carbon-intensive sources of energy, and (3) carbon sequestration. To be successful, all three options must be used in concert. The third option is the subject of this review. Specifically, this review will cover the capture and geologic sequestration of CO2 generated from large point sources, namely fossil-fuel-fired power gasification plants. Sequestration of CO2 in geological formations is necessary to meet the President's Global Climate Change Initiative target of an 18% reduction in GHG intensity by 2012. Further, the best strategy to stabilize the atmospheric concentration of CO2 results from a multifaceted approach where sequestration of CO2 into geological formations is combined with increased efficiency in electric power generation and utilization, increased conservation, increased use of lower carbon-intensity fuels, and increased use of nuclear energy and renewables. This review covers the separation and capture of CO2 from both flue gas and fuel gas using wet scrubbing technologies, dry regenerable sorbents, membranes, cryogenics, pressure and temperature swing adsorption, and other advanced concepts. Existing

  18. Supercomputing with TOUGH2 family codes for coupled multi-physics simulations of geologic carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H.; Nakajima, K.; Zhang, K.; Nanai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Powerful numerical codes that are capable of modeling complex coupled processes of physics and chemistry have been developed for predicting the fate of CO2 in reservoirs as well as its potential impacts on groundwater and subsurface environments. However, they are often computationally demanding for solving highly non-linear models in sufficient spatial and temporal resolutions. Geological heterogeneity and uncertainties further increase the challenges in modeling works. Two-phase flow simulations in heterogeneous media usually require much longer computational time than that in homogeneous media. Uncertainties in reservoir properties may necessitate stochastic simulations with multiple realizations. Recently, massively parallel supercomputers with more than thousands of processors become available in scientific and engineering communities. Such supercomputers may attract attentions from geoscientist and reservoir engineers for solving the large and non-linear models in higher resolutions within a reasonable time. However, for making it a useful tool, it is essential to tackle several practical obstacles to utilize large number of processors effectively for general-purpose reservoir simulators. We have implemented massively-parallel versions of two TOUGH2 family codes (a multi-phase flow simulator TOUGH2 and a chemically reactive transport simulator TOUGHREACT) on two different types (vector- and scalar-type) of supercomputers with a thousand to tens of thousands of processors. After completing implementation and extensive tune-up on the supercomputers, the computational performance was measured for three simulations with multi-million grid models, including a simulation of the dissolution-diffusion-convection process that requires high spatial and temporal resolutions to simulate the growth of small convective fingers of CO2-dissolved water to larger ones in a reservoir scale. The performance measurement confirmed that the both simulators exhibit excellent

  19. Methods and systems for the formation of cyclic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Trevor Alan; Jamison, Timothy F; Kozak, Jennifer Aiden; Simeon, Fritz; Wu, Jie

    2014-12-30

    Described herein are inventive methods for synthesis of cyclic carbonates from CO.sub.2 and epoxide. In some embodiments, the methods are carried out in the presence of a catalyst comprising an electrophilic halogen. In some embodiments, the methods are carried out in a flow reactor.

  20. Dissolution of carbon dioxide in aqueous electrolyte solutions, in the context of geological storage: A thermodynamic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liborio, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This thesis studies the enthalpy of solution of carbon dioxide in electrolyte aqueous solutions. To develop theoretical models describing the systems (CO 2 -water-salt) under the geological storage conditions of carbon dioxide, it is necessary to have experimental data, namely solubility and enthalpy. In this study, a customized flow mixing unit was adapted to a SETARAM C-80 calorimeter to measure the enthalpy of CO 2 solution in aqueous electrolyte solutions (NaCl, CaCl 2 and Na 2 SO 4 ) at the ionic strengths between 2 and 6 and at temperatures between 323.1 K and 372.9 K and pressures ranging from 2 to 16 MPa. Data from the literature were used to adjust the thermodynamic phase equilibrium model in the Y-φ approach. The thermodynamic model reproduces the experimental enthalpies to plus or minus 10%. The calculation of the enthalpy in the rigorous model is strongly dependent on the data of the literature. An experimental device has been set up for the determination of the molar volume of CO 2 at infinite dilution, which is necessary for thermodynamic modeling. The carbon dioxide to be stored may contain impurities such as annexes (O 2 , N 2 , SO x , H 2 S, N y O x , H 2 , CO and Ar). Under the objective of studying the influence of these impurities, an experimental apparatus has been set up for the measurement of enthalpies of solution of SO 2 in water and aqueous solutions of NaCl and the first results are promising. (author)

  1. Method for carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.

    2017-12-05

    A method for geo-sequestration of a carbon dioxide includes selection of a target water-laden geological formation with low-permeability interbeds, providing an injection well into the formation and injecting supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO.sub.2) and water or bine into the injection well under conditions of temperature, pressure and density selected to cause the fluid to enter the formation and splinter and/or form immobilized ganglia within the formation.

  2. Subsurface Monitor for Dissolved Inorganic Carbon at Geological Sequestration Site Phase 1 SBIR Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng Wu

    2012-08-03

    Phase I research of this SBIR contract has yielded anticipated results and enable us to develop a practical new instrument to measure the Dissolved Inorganic Carbons (DIC) as well as Supercritical (SC) CO2 in underground brine water at higher sensitivity, lower cost, higher frequency and longer period of time for the Monitoring, Verification & Accounting (MVA) of CO2 sequestration as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). We show that reduced cost and improved performance are possible; both future and emerging market exist for the proposed new instrument.

  3. Monitoring Conformance and Containment for Geological Carbon Storage: Can Technology Meet Policy and Public Requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, D. C.; Osadetz, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Province of Alberta, Canada identified carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a key element of its 2008 Climate Change strategy. The target is a reduction in CO2 emissions of 139 Mt/year by 2050. To encourage uptake of CCS by industry, the province has provided partial funding to two demonstration scale projects, namely the Quest Project by Shell and partners (CCS), and the Alberta Carbon Trunk Line Project (pipeline and CO2-EOR). Important to commercial scale implementation of CCS will be the requirement to prove conformance and containment of the CO2 plume injected during the lifetime of the CCS project. This will be a challenge for monitoring programs. The Containment and Monitoring Institute (CaMI) is developing a Field Research Station (FRS) to calibrate various monitoring technologies for CO2 detection thresholds at relatively shallow depths. The objective being assessed with the FRS is sensitivity for early detection of loss of containment from a deeper CO2 storage project. In this project, two injection wells will be drilled to sandstone reservoir targets at depths of 300 m and 700 m. Up to four observation wells will be drilled with monitoring instruments installed. Time-lapse surface and borehole monitoring surveys will be undertaken to evaluate the movement and fate of the CO2 plume. These will include seismic, microseismic, cross well, electrical resistivity, electromagnetic, gravity, geodetic and geomechanical surveys. Initial baseline seismic data from the FRS will presented.

  4. Behavioral responses of Arctica islandica (Bivalvia: Arcticidae) to simulated leakages of carbon dioxide from sub-sea geological storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamber, Shaw D., E-mail: shaw.bamber@iris.no; Westerlund, Stig, E-mail: sw@iris.no

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Valve pumping activity in A. islandica significantly increased at pH 6.2 seawater. • Changes in valve movements were not related to attempted burrowing activities. • Valve activity returned to control levels after 5 days of continuous exposure. • A. islandica tolerate pH reductions likely to follow leakage of sub-sea stored CO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Sub-sea geological storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) provides a viable option for the Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) approach for reducing atmospheric emissions of this greenhouse gas. Although generally considered to offer a low risk of major leakage, it remains relevant to establish the possible consequences for marine organisms that live in or on sediments overlying these storage areas if such an event may occur. The present study has used a series of laboratory exposures and behavioral bioassays to establish the sensitivity of Arctica islandica to simulated leakages of CO{sub 2}. This long-lived bivalve mollusc is widely distributed throughout the North Sea, an area where geological storage is currently taking place and where there are plans to expand this operation significantly. A recently published model has predicted a maximum drop of 1.9 pH units in seawater at the point source of a substantial escape of CO{sub 2} from sub-sea geological storage in this region. Valve movements of A. islandica exposed to reduced pH seawater were recorded continuously using Hall effect proximity sensors. Valve movement regulation is important for optimising the flow of water over the gills, which supplies food and facilitates respiration. A stepwise reduction in seawater pH showed an initial increase in both the rate and extent of valve movements in the majority of individuals tested when pH fell to 6.2 units. Exposing A. islandica to pH 6.2 seawater continuously for seven days resulted in a clear increase in valve movements during the first 40 h of exposure, followed by a gradual reduction in activity

  5. Manganese carbonates in the Upper Jurassic Georgiev Formation of the Western Siberian marine basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Vika G.; Föllmi, Karl B.; Zanin, Yuri N.; Zamirailova, Albina G.

    2018-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) carbonate rocks are a common lithological constituent of the Upper Oxfordian to Lower Tithonian (Volgian) Georgiev Formation of the Western Siberian marine basin (WSMB). The Mn carbonates in the Georgiev Formation are present in the form of massive sediments, stromatolites, and oncolites, and are associated with glauconite and partly also phosphate-rich clay- and siltstones. Unlike most Mn carbonates, they are not directly associated with organic-rich sediments, but occur below an organic-rich succession (Bazhenov Formation). The Mn carbonate occurrences can be traced from the western central area of the WSMB to its center along a distance of at least 750 km. The thickness of the Mn carbonates and their Mn contents becomes reduced in an eastward direction, related to increased detrital input. The geochemical and mineralogical heterogeneity within the Mn carbonates indicates that they were deposited stepwise in a diagenetic regime characterized by steep gradients in Mn, Ca, and Mg. A first step consisted in the replacement of initial sediments within the microbialites during an early diagenetic stage, followed by a second step where massive sediments were transformed into Mn carbonate. During both steps, the decomposition of organic matter was an important source of the newly formed carbonate. During a further step, voids were cemented by Mn carbonates, which are rich in pyrite. This last generation may only have formed once the organic-rich sediments of the overlying Bazhenov Formation were deposited. Accumulation of the Mn carbonates in the Upper Jurassic WSMB was controlled by the proximity of Mn-enriched parent rocks, likely in the Ural, which were subjected to intense geochemical weathering during the Late Jurassic.

  6. Relevance of carbon structure to formation of tar and liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Peng; Le, Jiawei; Wang, Lanlan; Pan, Tieying; Lu, Xilan; Zhang, Dexiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Curve-fitting method was used to quantify the accurate contents of structural carbon. • Effect of carbon structure in coal with different rank on formation of pyrolysis tar was studied. • Numerical interrelation between carbon types in coal structure and tar yield is elaborated. • Effect of carbon structure on formation of liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis is discussed. - Abstract: The relevance of carbon structure to formation of tar and liquid alkane during coal pyrolysis were discussed extensively. The pyrolysis tests were carried out in a tube reactor at 873 K and keep 15 min. The carbon distribution in coals was investigated by solid state 13 C nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.). The curve-fitting method was used to quantify the accurate contents of structural carbon. The alkanes in coal tar were analyzed by Gas Chromatograph–Mass Spectrometer (GC–MS). The results show that oxygen-linked aromatic carbon decreases with the increasing of coal rank. The aliphatic carbon contents of Huainan (HN) coal are 44.20%, the highest among the four coals. The carbon types in coal structure have a significant influence on the formation of tar and liquid alkane. The coal tar yields are related to the aliphatic substituted aromatic carbon, CH 2 /CH 3 ratio and oxygen-linked carbon in coal so that the increasing order of tar yield is Inner Mongolia lignite (IM, 6.30 wt.%) < Sinkiang coal (SK, 7.55 wt.%) < Shenmu coal (SM, 12.84 wt.%) < HN (16.29 wt.%). The highest contents of oxygen-linked aromatic carbon in IM lead to phenolic compound of 41.06% in IM-tar. The contents of alkane in SM-tar are the highest because the appropriate CH 2 /CH 3 ratio and the highest aliphatic side chains on aromatic rings in SM leading to generate aliphatic hydrocarbon with medium molecular weight easily. The mechanism on formation of tar and liquid alkane plays an important role in guiding the industrialization of pyrolysis-based poly-generation producing tar with high

  7. The provenance, formation, and implications of reduced carbon phases in Martian meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Andrew; McCubbin, Francis M.; Fries, Marc D.

    2016-11-01

    This review is intended to summarize the current observations of reduced carbon in Martian meteorites, differentiating between terrestrial contamination and carbon that is indigenous to Mars. Indeed, the identification of Martian organic matter is among the highest priority targets for robotic spacecraft missions in the next decade, including the Mars Science Laboratory and Mars 2020. Organic carbon compounds are essential building blocks of terrestrial life, so the occurrence and origin (biotic or abiotic) of organic compounds on Mars is of great significance; however, not all forms of reduced carbon are conducive to biological systems. This paper discusses the significance of reduced organic carbon (including methane) in Martian geological and astrobiological systems. Specifically, it summarizes current thinking on the nature, sources, and sinks of Martian organic carbon, a key component to Martian habitability. Based on this compilation, reduced organic carbon on Mars, including detections of methane in the Martian atmosphere, is best described through a combination of abiotic organic synthesis on Mars and infall of extraterrestrial carbonaceous material. Although conclusive signs of Martian life have yet to be revealed, we have developed a strategy for life detection on Mars that can be utilized in future life-detection studies.

  8. Updating the Geologic Barcodes for South China: Discovery of Late Archean Banded Iron Formations in the Yangtze Craton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hui; Wu, Chang-Zhi; Yang, Tao; Santosh, M; Yao, Xi-Zhu; Gao, Bing-Fei; Wang, Xiao-Lei; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-11-08

    Banded iron formations (BIFs) in Archean cratons provide important "geologic barcodes" for the global correlation of Precambrian sedimentary records. Here we report the first finding of late Archean BIFs from the Yangtze Craton, one of largest Precambrian blocks in East Asia with an evolutionary history of over 3.3 Ga. The Yingshan iron deposit at the northeastern margin of the Yangtze Craton, displays typical features of BIF, including: (i) alternating Si-rich and Fe-rich bands at sub-mm to meter scales; (ii) high SiO 2  + Fe 2 O 3total contents (average 90.6 wt.%) and Fe/Ti ratios (average 489); (iii) relative enrichment of heavy rare earth elements and positive Eu anomalies (average 1.42); (iv) and sedimentary Fe isotope compositions (δ 56 Fe IRMM-014 as low as -0.36‰). The depositional age of the BIF is constrained at ~2464 ± 24 Ma based on U-Pb dating of zircon grains from a migmatite sample of a volcanic protolith that conformably overlied the Yingshan BIF. The BIF was intruded by Neoproterozoic (805.9 ± 4.7 Ma) granitoids that are unique in the Yangtze Craton but absent in the North China Craton to the north. The discovery of the Yingshan BIF provides new constraints for the tectonic evolution of the Yangtze Craton and has important implications in the reconstruction of Pre-Nuna/Columbia supercontinent configurations.

  9. Field-scale forward modelling of a shallow marine carbonate ramp: the Upper Jurassic Arab Formation (onshore Abu Dhabi - UAE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchionda, Elisabetta; Deschamps, Rémy; Nader, Fadi H.; Ceriani, Andrea; Di Giulio, Andrea; Lawrence, David; Morad, Daniel J.

    2017-04-01

    The stratigraphic record of a carbonate system is the result of the interplay of several local and global factors that control the physical and the biological responses within a basin. Conceptual models cannot be detailed enough to take into account all the processes that control the deposition of sediments. The evaluation of the key controlling parameters on the sedimentation can be investigated with the use of stratigraphic forward models, that permit dynamic and quantitative simulations of the sedimentary basin infill. This work focuses on an onshore Abu Dhabi field (UAE) and it aims to provide a complete picture of the stratigraphic evolution of Upper Jurassic Arab Formation (Fm.). In this study, we started with the definition of the field-scale conceptual depositional model of the Formation, resulting from facies and well log analysis based on five wells. The Arab Fm. could be defined as a shallow marine carbonate ramp, that ranges from outer ramp deposits to supratidal/evaporitic facies association (from bottom to top). With the reconstruction of the sequence stratigraphic pattern and several paleofacies maps, it was possible to suggest multiple directions of progradations at local scale. Then, a 3D forward modelling tool has been used to i) identify and quantify the controlling parameters on geometries and facies distribution of the Arab Fm.; ii) predict the stratigraphic architecture of the Arab Fm.; and iii) integrate and validate the conceptual model. Numerous constraints were set during the different simulations and sensitivity analyses were performed testing the carbonate production, eustatic oscillations and transport parameters. To verify the geological consistency the 3D forward modelling has been calibrated with the available control points (five wells) in terms of thickness and facies distribution.

  10. Addressing the Grand Challenge of atmospheric carbon dioxide: geologic sequestration vs. biological recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Ben J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract On February 15, 2008, the National Academy of Engineering unveiled their list of 14 Grand Challenges for Engineering. Building off of tremendous advancements in the past century, these challenges were selected for their role in assuring a sustainable existence for the rapidly increasing global community. It is no accident that the first five Challenges on the list involve the development of sustainable energy sources and management of environmental resources. While the focus of this review is to address the single Grand Challenge of "develop carbon sequestration methods", is will soon be clear that several other Challenges are intrinsically tied to it through the principles of sustainability. How does the realm of biological engineering play a role in addressing these Grand Challenges?

  11. New Prespective Paleogeography of East Java Basin; Implicationrespond to Oil and Gas Eksploration at Kujung Formation Carbonate Reservoar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprilana, C.; Premonowati; S, Hanif I.; Choirotunnisa; Shirly, A.; Utama, M. K.; Sinulingga, Y. R.; Syafitra, F.

    2018-03-01

    Paleogeography is one of critical points that always less considered by explorationist in the world. Almost all of the consideration is focused on trapping mechanism. Paleogeography is guidance in understanding both of physical and chemical of rock characteristic which will correlate with its depositional environment. Integration of various geological and geophysical data such as; tectonic, structural geology, stratigraphy, lithology, and biostratigraphy will lead us to a better understanding of rock characteristics. Six paleogeographic interpretations was made consist of; Early Tertiary (P5-56-55 ma), Middle Eocene (P14-41 ma), Late Oiligocene (P22-25.5 ma), Early Miocene (N7-16.5 ma), Middle Miocene (N9-14.5 ma), and Pleistocene (NN19-1.5 ma). That six paleogeographic interpretations are assumed represent the paleogeographic evolution of East Java Basin time after time. In Middle Eocene time, it would be more than hundred possibilities regarding the location where the formation deposited. This would be controlled by the existence of some local structural paleohighs and horsts which oriented NW-SE followed by their own sedimentary transportation path. With assumption that hydrocarbon generation was occurred in 15 Ma and the depth of maturation window lies on about 2,500 m depth. Therefore, the possibility of source rock maturation is high, due to almost of the clastics sediment of Ngimbang deposited into the series of grabens. The Kujung reef types simplified defines and categorize into; 1) Patch Reef 2) Berrier Reef 3) Pinnacle Reef Over Isolated Reef. Kujung Carbonates were deposited in Early Miocene when regional transgression occurred. The depositional environments were dominated by shallow marine littoral-sublittoral. Generally, the reservoir quality of this Kujung Carbonate shows fair to good quality, in range7-32% porosity, and 1-1400 mD permeability (internal SKK Migas data).

  12. Influence of thermal treatment on porosity formation on carbon fiber from textile PAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jossano Saldanha Marcuzzo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon fibers (ACFs are known as an excellent adsorbent material due to their particular characteristics such as their high speed adsorption rate and for being easy to handle. The ACFs are commercially manufactured from carbon fibers (CF which receive an additional activation process and can be produced from celluloses, phenolic resin, pitch and Polyacrylonitrile (PAN. In the present work, the oxidized 5.0 dtex textile PAN fiber was carbonized to CFs formation. During the carbonization process in different heating rates, the topographic features changes on fibers were monitored in order to determine the best carbonization condition for CFs production to be used as raw material for ACF. Different heating rates and maximum temperature of treatment were tested and the results indicated that it is possible to produce poorly activated carbon fiber, directly from oxidized textile PAN fiber, by one single step production process.

  13. Influence of thermal treatment on porosity formation on carbon fiber from textile PAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jossano Saldanha Marcuzzo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon fibers (ACFs are known as an excellent adsorbent material due to their particular characteristics such as their high speed adsorption rate and for being easy to handle. The ACFs are commercially manufactured from carbon fibers (CF which receive an additional activation process and can be produced from celluloses, phenolic resin, pitch and Polyacrylonitrile (PAN. In the present work, the oxidized 5.0 dtex textile PAN fiber was carbonized to CFs formation. During the carbonization process in different heating rates, the topographic features changes on fibers were monitored in order to determine the best carbonization condition for CFs production to be used as raw material for ACF. Different heating rates and maximum temperature of treatment were tested and the results indicated that it is possible to produce poorly activated carbon fiber, directly from oxidized textile PAN fiber, by one single step production process.

  14. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2004-06-30

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2004, 6.26 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 250 MCFD. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May. The amount of carbon dioxide produced was small during this period. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.5 B/D in May and June. Operational problems encountered during the initial stages of the flood were identified and resolved.

  15. Determination of the scenarios to be included in the assessment of the safety of site for the disposal of radioactive waste in a deep geological formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escalier des Orres, P.; Devillers, C.; Cernes, A.; Izabel, C.

    1990-01-01

    The procedure for selection and qualification of a site for the disposal of radioactive waste in a deep geological formation began in France in the early eighties. The public authorities, working from a recommendation by the ANDRA, made a pre-selection of four sites, each of which corresponded to a particular type of geological formation - granite, clay, salt and shale. Within two years, one of these sites would be chosen as the location for an underground laboratory, intended to verify whether the site was suitable as a nuclear waste repository and to prepare for its construction. The safety analysis for site qualification makes use of evolutionary scenarios representing the repository and its environment, selected by means of a deterministic method. This analysis defines, with an appropriate level of detail, a 'reference' scenario and 'random events' scenarios. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Second annual technical progress report, October 1, 1985--September 30, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-12-31

    Although there are many publications pertaining to gas hydrates, their formation and stability in various geological conditions are poorly known. Therefore, for the same reasons and because of the very broad scope of our research, limited amount and extremely dispersed information, the study regions are very large. Moreover, almost without exception the geological environments controlling gas hydrates formation and stability of the studied regions are very complex. The regions studied (completed and partially completed - total 17 locations) during the reporting period, particularly the Gulf of Mexico and the Middle America Trench, are the most important in this entire research project. In the past, both of these regions have been extensively studied, the presence of gas hydrates confirmed and samples recovered. In our investigation it was necessary not only to review all previous data and interpretations, but to do a thorough analysis of the basins, and a critical evaluation of an previously reported and publicly available but not published information.

  17. Data report: geology of reef-front carbonate sediment deposits around Oahu, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Monty A.; Blay, Charles T.; Murray, Christopher; Torresan, Laura Z.; Frazee, Cathy S.; Richmond, Bruce M.; Fletcher, Charles H.

    2003-01-01

    This Open-File Report presents data and derivative products from an investigation of carbonate sediment deposits on the reef front in four areas around the island of Oahu, Hawaii - in Kailua Bay off Oahu's windward (east) side, off the leeward (west) coast from Makua to Kahe Point, off the north coast from Waimea to Camp Erdman, and off the south coast around Waikiki (Figure 1). The primary purpose of the investigation was to assess the resource potential of the deposits, particularly as a source of sand for beach nourishment. This work builds on previous studies by researchers from the University of Hawaii (Moberly et al., 1975; Coulbourn et al., 1988; Barry, 1995). The field program included collection of high-resolution acoustic-reflection profiles and vibracore sediment samples in Kailua Bay and off the leeward and north coasts. In a related project, in collaboration with the Hawaii State Department of Land and Natural Resources and the University of Hawaii, sidescan images and vibracores were collected in the Halekulani channel and on the adjacent Makua Terrace off Waikiki along the south coast.

  18. Mineralization and other geologic factors related to the Morrison Formation in particular the northern two-thirds of the Colorado Plateau region; basic data and factor-analysis results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadigan, Robert Allen

    1982-01-01

    A vanadium-mercury mineralization factor and five other significant geologic factors were determined by multivariate factor analysis of data for Morrison Formation rock samples from the Colorado Plateau region. The data presented in the report were obtained from an agglomeration of 876 samples which yielded a correlation matrix of 44 variables. The variables consisted of geochemical, petrographic, and geographic location parameters. Mineralization factor scores demonstrate the relative intensity of mineralization in rock samples collected in and around uranium-vanadium ore deposits. The factors affecting composition and texture of the rocks identified from the analysis are: (1) metalliferous mudstones; (2) interstitial carbonate cements; (3) competing sources of different composition; (4) heavy mineral sources; (5) vanadium mineralization; and (6) regional and stratigraphic sampling bias.

  19. Natural emissions of CO2 from the geosphere and their bearing on the geological storage of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, S.; Pearce, J.M.; Hards, V.L.; Ohsumi, T.; Gale, J.

    2007-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and storage has the potential to reduce CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion. Although leakage from monitored CO 2 injection sites has been minimal to non-existent, experience from the natural gas storage industry suggests that, if it becomes a widely deployed technology, leaks may be expected from some storage sites. Natural occurrences of CO 2 in the geosphere, some of which have been exploited, provide insights into the types of emissions that might be expected from anthropogenic CO 2 storage sites. CO 2 emission sites are commonly found in clusters in CO 2 -prone geological provinces: the most common natural emissions sites in sedimentary basins consist of carbonated springs and mofettes. These represent at worst only a local hazard. In volcanic and hydrothermal provinces, more energetic emissions may occur due to active supply from degassing magma. These include rare, sudden emissions from fissures and craters that have caused fatalities. It is unlikely that such provinces would be considered for CO 2 storage. Major lake overturn events such as occurred at Lake Nyos in 1986 are considered highly unlikely to occur as a result of CO 2 storage, not least because CO 2 levels in lake waters can be monitored and remediated. Natural CO 2 fields indicate that under favourable conditions CO 2 can be retained in the subsurface for millions of years. The main risk from man-made CO 2 storage sites that does not have any close analogy in nature is considered to be a well blowout. A blowout that took place at a natural CO 2 field provides some indication of the likely hazard. (author)

  20. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 16. Repository preconceptual design studies: BPNL waste forms in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Volume 16, ''Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: BPNL Waste Forms in Salt,'' is one of a 23 volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provide a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This document describes a preconceptual design for a nuclear waste storage facility in salt. The waste forms assumed to arrive at the repository were supplied by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BPNL). The facility design consists of several chambers excavated deep within a geologic formation together with access shafts and supportive surface structures. The facility design provides for: receiving and unloading waste containers; lowering them down shafts to the mine level; transporting them to the proper storage area and emplacing them in mined storage rooms. Drawings of the facility design are contained in TM-36/17, ''Drawings for Repository Preconceptual Design Studies: BPNL Waste Forms in Salt.''

  1. Pre-injection Comparison of Methods for Sampling Formation Water and Associated Gas from a Monitoring Well at a Carbon Dioxide Injection Site, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, C.; Thordsen, J. J.; Manning, M. A.; Cook, P. J.; Abedini, A. A.; Trautz, R. C.; Thomas, B.; Kharaka, Y. K.

    2012-12-01

    The chemical composition of formation water and associated gases from the lower Cretaceous Paluxy Formation was determined using four different sampling methods at a well in the Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama, a site that will be used for a carbon dioxide injection experiment. Prior to each of the two sampling periods, the well was cleaned from the drilling fluids and KCl solutions by producing at least three pore volumes of formation water. Accurate measurements of the chemical composition of groundwater or formation water, including dissolved gasses, and gas samples is essential in understanding subsurface geochemical processes occurring as a result of geologic carbon dioxide injection, which is used for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and has been proposed as a means of carbon sequestration. In this study, formation water and gas samples for geochemical analyses were obtained from well D-9-8 #2 at Citronelle using nitrogen lift, submersible pump, U-Tube, and a downhole (Kuster) sampler. Field chemical analyses included electrical conductivity, hydrogen sulfide, alkalinity, and pH, and laboratory analyses included major, minor and trace elements by mass spectrometry and ion chromatography, dissolved carbon, organic acid anions, free and dissolved gas species. The formation water obtained from this well is a Na-Ca-Cl brine with a salinity of 160,000 and 200,000 mg/L total dissolved solids (TDS). Differences were evident between sampling methodologies, particularly in pH, Fe and alkalinity measurements. The results of the comparison demonstrate the difficulty and importance of preserving volatile analytes in samples, with the downhole sampler and U-Tube system performing most favorably in this aspect.

  2. The Formation of Carbon Nanostructures via Catalytic Pyrolysis of Naphthalene under Its Autogenic Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Gang Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs, spherical carbon nanocapsules (CNCs, and carbon spheres (CSs is accomplished by using the method of reactions under autogenic pressure at elevated temperatures (RAPET. A powder mixture of naphthalene and nickel acetate tetrahydrate is dissociated under its autogenic pressure. The resultant CNTs and CNCs exhibit good graphitic quality, and the diameters range from 50~200 nm. Smooth and monodisperse CSs with the diameter ranging from 5~10 μm can be obtained by pyrolysis of pure naphthalene. Our results show that the reaction temperature and catalyst proportion play a key role in the formation of carbon nanostructures with RAPET method.

  3. Training and Research on Probabilistic Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Geological Sequestration in Fractured Porous Rocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez, Marte

    2013-05-31

    Colorado School of Mines conducted research and training in the development and validation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS (Geological Sequestration) probabilistic simulation and risk assessment model. CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment is used to develop advanced numerical simulation models of the subsurface to forecast CO2 behavior and transport; optimize site operational practices; ensure site safety; and refine site monitoring, verification, and accounting efforts. As simulation models are refined with new data, the uncertainty surrounding the identified risks decrease, thereby providing more accurate risk assessment. The models considered the full coupling of multiple physical processes (geomechanical and fluid flow) and describe the effects of stochastic hydro-mechanical (H-M) parameters on the modeling of CO{sub 2} flow and transport in fractured porous rocks. Graduate students were involved in the development and validation of the model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in subsurface formations, and to evaluate the risk of potential leakage to the atmosphere and underground aquifers. The main major contributions from the project include the development of: 1) an improved procedure to rigorously couple the simulations of hydro-thermomechanical (H-M) processes involved in CO{sub 2} GS; 2) models for the hydro-mechanical behavior of fractured porous rocks with random fracture patterns; and 3) probabilistic methods to account for the effects of stochastic fluid flow and geomechanical properties on flow, transport, storage and leakage associated with CO{sub 2} GS. The research project provided the means to educate and train graduate students in the science and technology of CO{sub 2} GS, with a focus on geologic storage. Specifically, the training included the investigation of an advanced CO{sub 2} GS simulation and risk assessment model that can be used to predict the fate, movement, and storage of CO{sub 2} in

  4. Buffering dissociation/formation reaction of biogenic calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Kazuhiko

    2007-01-01

    The oscillating stability of coral reef seawater pH has been maintained at around physiological pH values over the past 300 years (Pelejero et al., 2005). The stability mechanism of its pH has been interpreted in terms of the buffering dissolution/formation reaction of CaCO(3) as well as the proton consumption/generation reaction in CaCO(3)-saturated water. Here the pH-dependent solubility product [HCO(3)(-)][Ca(2+)] has been derived on the basis of the actual pH-dependent reactions for the atmospheric CO(2)/CO(2 (aq.))/HCO(3)(-)/CO(3)(2-)/Ca(2+)/CaCO(3) system. Overbasic pH peaks appeared between pH approximately 8 and approximately 9.5 during sodium hydroxide titration, as a result of simultaneous CaCO(3) formation and proton generation. The spontaneous and prompt water pH recovery from the acidic to the physiological range has been confirmed by the observation of acid/base time evolution, because of simultaneous CaCO(3) dissolution and proton consumption. The dissolution/formation of CaCO(3) in water at pH 7.5-9 does not take place without a proton consumption/generation reaction, or a buffering chemical reaction of HCO(3)(-)+Ca(2+)right arrow over left arrowCaCO(3)+H(+). SEM images of the CaCO(3) fragments showed that the acid water ate away at the CaCO(3) formed at physiological pH values. Natural coral reefs can thus recover the physiological pH levels of seawater from the acidic range through partial dissolution of their own skeletons.

  5. Aggregate formation and soil carbon sequestration by earthworms at the ORNL FACE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-de Leon, Y.; Gonzalez-Meler, M. A.; Lugo-Perez, J.; Wise, D. H.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Earthworms have an important role in soil carbon sequestration, but their contribution to carbon sequestration in soils exposed to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations has been largely overlooked. Previous studies at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Free Air CO2 Experiment (ORNL FACE) site showed that the formation of soil aggregates is a key mechanism for soil carbon sequestration. We did a microcosm experiment to quantify earthworm-mediated aggregate formation and compare between two earthworm species with different feeding habits (endogeic vs. epi-edogeic). In addition, we wanted to identify the carbon source (soil, leaf litter or root litter) within aggregates formed by earthworms. We used 13C-depleted soil and 15N-enriched sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua) leaf and root litter collected from the ORNL FACE site to assess soil aggregate formation of the native, endogeic earthworm Diplocardia sp. and European, epi-endogeic earthworm Lumbricus rubellus. Both earthworm species are present at the ORNL FACE site. We crushed, sieved ( 250 μm) were higher in treatments with earthworms (III and IV) than in treatments without earthworms (I and II) (p = 0.02). Within macroaggregates, most of the carbon was soil-derived. Leaf and root-derived carbon was found in treatment IV only. Our results suggest that earthworms at the ORNL FACE site directly contribute to the formation of soil aggregates, thus contributing to soil carbon sequestration. Carbon source within macroaggregates correspond with earthworm feeding habits, with endogeic earthworms (Diplocardia sp.) feeding mostly on mineral soil and epi-endogeic earthworm (L. rubellus) feeding on both plant residues and soil organic matter.

  6. Formation and in vitro biocompatibility of biomimetic hydroxyapatite coatings on chemically treated carbon substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, Alexander; Will, Julia; Detsch, Rainer; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Greil, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Carbon derived materials such as pyrolytic carbon or carbon-carbon composites (CCCs) exhibit excellent mechanical properties making them promising candidates for bone replacement. However, these materials are considered bioinert and not to induce bone formation in vivo. In this study, a two-step chemical surface treatment including etching with HCl/HNO3 solution and subsequent soaking in CaCl2 solution was applied to carbon substrates in order to activate the materials surface towards bioactive behavior. The bioactivity was proven by soaking the samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) and formation of carbonated hydroxyapatite layer (HCA), which indicates the ability of the material to bond to bone in vivo. The materials surface is shown to be functionalized through the chemical etching creating COO(-)Ca(2+) complexes on the surface as confirmed by FTIR and XPS analyses. These ionic complexes provide nucleation sites for HAp precipitation. After similar immersion time in SBF under the condition of local supersaturation the thickness and homogeneity of the HAp layer were found to depend on the chemical pretreatment with HCl/HNO3. Homogenous HAp layers with a thickness ranging from ∼ 6 to ∼ 17 μm were achieved. The proposed bioactivating treatment of carbon stimulates HAp formation in vivo and can be considered an easy biomimetic approach for coating carbon derived materials with bone-like hydroxyapatite. In vitro cell assay with osteosarcoma cells (MG-63) showed increased cell viability (+70%) on HAp coated carbon substrates as compared to uncoated reference while both materials induced ALP expression in MG-63 cells confirming the osteoblastic phenotype. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley Company.

  7. Iron-catalyzed hydrogenation of bicarbonates and carbon dioxide to formates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fengxiang; Zhu-Ge, Ling; Yang, Guangfu; Zhou, Shaolin

    2015-02-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate to formate has been explored extensively. The vast majority of the known active catalyst systems are based on precious metals. Herein, we describe an effective, phosphine-free, air- and moisture-tolerant catalyst system based on Knölker's iron complex for the hydrogenation of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide to formate. The catalyst system can hydrogenate bicarbonate at remarkably low hydrogen pressures (1-5 bar). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Formation of carbon-containing deposits on chromia/alumina during isobutane dehydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airaksinen, S.M.K.; Krause, A.O.I. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Lab. of Industrial Chemistry, Espoo (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    The formation of carbon-containing species during isobutane dehydrogenation was studied for a chromia/alumina catalyst with 13.5 wt-% chromium. Measurements were done by in situ DRIFT spectroscopy combined with on line mass spectrometry both as a function of temperature and of time on stream. Oxygen-containing carbon species formed on the catalyst during reduction by isobutane, whereas hydrocarbon species (aliphatic, unsaturated/aromatic) appeared under conditions where dehydrogenation of isobutane took place. Hydrogen prereduction of the catalyst decreased the formation of oxygen-containing and aliphatic species, but it did not have an observable effect on the unsaturated/aromatic species. (orig.)

  9. Biogeochemical processes controlling authigenic carbonate formation within the sediment column from the Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiwei; Peng, Xiaotong; Bai, Shijie; Chen, Zhiyan; Van Nostrand, Joy D.

    2018-02-01

    Authigenic carbonates are one type of conspicuous manifestation in seep environments that can provide long-term archives of past seepage activity and methane cycling in the oceans. Comprehensive investigations of the microbial community functional structure and their roles in the process of carbonate formation are, however, lacking. In this study, the mineralogical, geochemical, and microbial functional composition were examined in seep carbonate deposits collected from the west slope of the northern section of the Okinawa Trough (OT). The aim of this work was to explore the correspondence between the mineralogical phases and microbial metabolism during carbonate deposit formation. The mineralogical analyses indicated that authigenic carbonate minerals (aragonite, magnesium-rich calcite, dolomite, ankerite and siderite) and iron-bearing minerals (limonite, chlorite, and biotite) were present in these carbonate samples. The carbon and oxygen isotopic values of the carbonate samples varied between -51.1‰ to -4.7‰ and -4.8‰ to 3.7‰, respectively. A negative linear correlation between carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions was found, indicating a mixture of methane-derived diagenetic (low δ13C/high 18O) carbonates and detrital origin (high δ13C/low 18O) carbonates at the OT. GeoChip analyses suggested that various metabolic activities of microorganisms, including methanogenesis, methane oxidation, sulfite oxidation, sulfate reduction, and metal biotransformations, all occurred during the formation process. On the basis of these findings, the following model for the methane cycle and seep carbonate deposit formation in the sediment column at the OT is proposed: (1) in the upper oxidizing zone, aerobic methane oxidation was the main way of methane consumption; (2) in the sulfate methane transition zone, sulfate-dependent AOM (anaerobic oxidation of methane) consumes methane, and authigenic minerals such as aragonite, magnesium-calcite, and sulfide minerals

  10. Microbial mat-related structures shared by both siliciclastic and carbonate formations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subir Sarkar

    2016-07-01

    Interestingly, these microbial mat layers are recognized selectively within the lower of the two tiers of the Bhander Limestone. The lagoonal carbonate of the lower tier of the Bhander Limestone is muddy and contains a substantial proportion of silt-sized quartz grains that possibly impeded stromatolite growth. Stromatolites abound in the wave agitated upper tier of the Bhander Limestone which is dominated by oosparite. This paper provides evidence that the delicate microbial mat-related structures reported so far only from siliciclastic rocks can also be recognized within carbonate formations, and hopes to stimulate the search for additional such features, more preferably within carbonates originated in shallow and quiet water.

  11. Nanopattern formation using localized plasma for growth of single-standing carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javadi, Mohammad; Abdi, Yaser, E-mail: y.abdi@ut.ac.ir [University of Tehran, Nanophysics Research Laboratory, Department of Physics (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    We report a novel method for formation of self-organized single-standing carbon nanotubes by customizing a plasma-based process. The growth of carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition provides suitable grounds to utilize plasma–solid interactions for nanopatterning. The bulk plasma is utilized to fabricate carbon nanotubes on the prepatterned Ni catalyst which in turn can confine the plasma to the growth region. The plasma localization leads to a dielectrophoretic force exerted on Ni atoms and can be engineered in order to grow a specific pattern of self-organized single-standing carbon nanotubes. Numerical simulations based on the plasma localization and dielectrophoretic force confirmed the experimental results. This method provides a simple and cost-effective approach to obtain nanopatterned arrays of carbon nanotubes which can be used for fabrication of photonic and phononic crystals, self-gated field emission-based transistors and displays.

  12. Deactivating Carbon Formation on a Ni/Al2O3 Catalyst under Methanation Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Sine Ellemann; Andersson, Klas J.; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2017-01-01

    The carbon formation causing deactivation during CO methanation was studied for a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Sulfur-free methanation at low temperature (573 K) for various lengths of time was followed by temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH) providing information on carbon types involved in the deac......The carbon formation causing deactivation during CO methanation was studied for a Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. Sulfur-free methanation at low temperature (573 K) for various lengths of time was followed by temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH) providing information on carbon types involved...... in the deactivation of the catalyst.Three main carbon hydrogenation peaks were evident from TPHs following methanation: ∼460, ∼650, and ∼775 K. It is suggested that the ∼460 K TPH peak was composed of two peaks: a surface carbide peak at 445–460 K, and a peak due to carbon dissolved into the nickel at 485 K based...... on CO and CH4 adsorption measurements and XRD analysis. The 650 and 775 K temperature peaks are assigned to polymerized carbon structures and the ∼775K peak was found to be the primary cause of deactivation as judged by a linear correlation between its amount and the degree of catalyst deactivation...

  13. Understanding carbon nanotube channel formation in the lipid membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moon-ki; Kim, Hyunki; Lee, Byung Ho; Kim, Teayeop; Rho, Junsuk; Kim, Moon Ki; Kim, Kyunghoon

    2018-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been considered a prominent nano-channel in cell membranes because of their prominent ion-conductance and ion-selectivity, offering agents for a biomimetic channel platform. Using a coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we clarify a construction mechanism of vertical CNT nano-channels in a lipid membrane for a long period, which has been difficult to observe in previous CNT-lipid interaction simulations. The result shows that both the lipid coating density and length of CNT affect the suitable fabrication condition for a vertical and stable CNT channel. Also, simulation elucidated that a lipid coating on the surface of the CNT prevents the CNT from burrowing into the lipid membrane and the vertical channel is stabilized by the repulsion force between the lipids in the coating and membrane. Our study provides an essential understanding of how CNTs can form stable and vertical channels in the membrane, which is important for designing new types of artificial channels as biosensors for bio-fluidic studies.

  14. The Formation and Evolution of Tessera and Insights into the Beginning of Recorded History on Venus: Geology of the Fortuna Tessera Quadrangle (V-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, J. W.; Ivanov, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    Today, and throughout its recorded history, Venus can be classified as a "one-plate planet." The observable geological record of the planet comprises only the last 1/4 or less of its overall geologic history. As shown by many authors, it started with intensive deformation in broad regions to form tessera [1-6] during the Fortunian period of history [7]. The period of tessera formation quickly changed to numerous zonal deformational belts of ridges and grooves that were followed by emplacement of vast volcanic plains (shield plains, regional plains) [7,8]. During the final epoch of the geologic history of Venus, large but isolated centers of volcanism formed extensive fields of lavas, with tectonics concentrated within fewer very prominent rift zones [8,9]. The observable changes in intensity and character of volcanism and tectonics suggest progressive changes from thin lithosphere early in the geologic history to thick lithosphere during later epochs [6,10]. We have little idea of the character of the first 3/4 of Venus' history. So, what does the earliest period of recorded history tell us about the transition from the Pre-Fortunian to the Fortunian period and what insight does this give us into this earlier period?

  15. Cryogenic cave carbonates from the Cold Wind Cave, Nízke Tatry Mountains, Slovakia: Extending the age range of cryogenic cave carbonate formation to the Saalian

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žák, Karel; Hercman, H.; Orvošová, M.; Jačková, I.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 2 (2009), s. 139-152 ISSN 0392-6672 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : cryogenic cave carbonate * U-series dating * carbon and oxygen stable isotopes * Western Carpathians * Nízké Tatry Mts. Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.900, year: 2009 http://www.ijs.speleo.it/pdf/71.589.38(2)_Zak.et.al.pdf

  16. Adsorbed Carbon Formation and Carbon Hydrogenation for CO2 Methanation on the Ni(111) Surface: ASED-MO Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Sang Joon; Kang, Hae Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Park, Sung Bae; Park, Dong Ho; Huh, Do Sung

    2005-01-01

    Using the ASED-MO (Atom Superposition and Electron Delocalization-Molecular Orbital) theory, we investigated carbon formation and carbon hydrogenation for CO 2 methanation on the Ni (111) surface. For carbon formation mechanism, we calculated the following activation energies, 1.27 eV for CO 2 dissociation, 2.97 eV for the CO, 1.93 eV for 2CO dissociation, respectively. For carbon methanation mechanism, we also calculated the following activation energies, 0.72 eV for methylidyne, 0.52 eV for methylene and 0.50 eV for methane, respectively. We found that the calculated activation energy of CO dissociation is higher than that of 2CO dissociation on the clean surface and base on these results that the CO dissociation step are the ratedetermining of the process. The C-H bond lengths of CH 4 the intermediate complex are 1.21 A, 1.31 A for the C···H (1) , and 2.82 A for the height, with angles of 105 .deg. for H (1) CH and 98 .deg. for H (1) CH (1)

  17. Carbonate Geochemistry of Marine Authigenic Carbonates and Host Sediments: Exploring Mineral Formation Pathways and Organic Preservation Potential in Modern Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnoff, M. N.; Loyd, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Ancient authigenic dolomites (e.g., concretions) have been long studied in order to determine formation conditions and provide insight into shallow diagenetic environments. The formation of these dolomites is commonly attributed to the anaerobic microbial degradation of organic matter (a process that can increase the local pore water alkalinity), based on carbon isotope as well as other geochemical data. Authigenic dolomites also occur in modern, "still soft" sediments rich in organic matter. However, a comprehensive carbon isotopic characterization of these precipitates has yet to be conducted. Preliminary data show a wide range of δ13C values (about -11 to +12‰). Positive values that typify dolomites of the Gulf of California and the southwestern African margin indicate methanogenesis. Dolomites of the Peru margin and Cariaco Basin yield negative values that may represent a variety of organic matter degradation mechanisms. Regardless of specific mechanisms, organic matter degradation can promote authigenesis. Ultimately, mineralization encases primary sedimentary components and may act to preserve organic matter from subsequent degradation due to permeability reduction resulting from cementation. Concretionary carbonates have been found to preserve macro and micro fossils, metastable sedimentary grains, magnetic minerals, sedimentary structures, various specific organic compounds, and overmature organic matter exposed in outcrop. However, a similar protective relationship has not been demonstrated for disseminated, bulk organic matter in still-soft sediments. The study of these sediments 1) reveal the relationship between organic carbon degradation and authigenesis and 2) may provide insight into the potential of cementation to preserve organic matter during subsequent burial.

  18. ABOUT MECHANISM OF STRUCTURE FORMATION OF PARTICULAR SOLID CARBONIC PHASE IN NANOCOMPOSITE ON THE BASIS OF IRON AND NANO-DISPERSE CARBON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Kuis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of structure formation in super-solid carbon phase in nanocomposite on the basis of iron and nano-disperse carbon, which can be used at development of technology and composition of creation of new materials using inexpensive nano-carbon materials is offered.

  19. Radio-astrochronology of the Agrio Formation (Neuquén Basin, Argentina) to reduce the uncertainties of the geological time scale in Early Cretaceous times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Mathieu; Beatriz, Aguirre-Urreta; Marina, Lescano; Julieta, Omarini; Maisa, Tunik; Thomas, Frederichs; Anna-Leah, Nickl; Heiko, Pälike

    2017-04-01

    Important discrepancies between the numerical ages stated by the Geological Time Scale 2016 and radio-astrochronological works have been reported in the last years (Aguirre-Urreta et al., 2015; Martinez et al., 2015; Ogg et al., 2016). Large uncertainties notably exist for the Valanginian-Hauterivian stages for which the recently provided timescales are still debated. Here, we present an astronomical calibration for the Agrio Formation (Neuquén Basin, Argentina) to better constraint the durations of the Valanginian and the Hauterivian stages. The formation is divided into a lower and an upper member (called Pilmatué and Agua de la Mula members, respectively) composed of marl-limestone alternations deposited in a semi-pelagic to outer ramp environment and related to an orbital forcing (Sagasti, 2005). A rapidly (Global and Planetary Change 131, 158-173. Ogg, J.G., et al., 2016. A Concise Geological Time Scale 2016. Elsevier B.V., 243 pp. Sagasti, G., 2005. Hemipelagic record of orbitally-induced dilution cycles in Lower Cretaceous sediments of the Neuquén Basin, in Veiga, G.D., Spaletti, L.A., Howell, J.A. and Schwarz E. (Eds.). The Neuquén Basin, Argentina: A Case Study in Sequence Stratigraphy and Basin Dynamics. Geological Society, London, Special Publications 252, 231-250.

  20. Selection of the situations taken into account for the safety demonstration of a repository in deep geological formations - French regulatory guidance and IPSN modelling experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escalier des Orres, P.; Greneche, D.

    1993-01-01

    A regulatory guidance has been recently set up in France for the safety assessment of radwaste deep geological disposal: the present paper deals with the methodology related to the safety demonstration of such a disposal, particularly the situations to be taken into account to address the potential evolution of the repository under natural or human induced events. This approach, based on a selection of events considered as reasonably envisageable, relies on a reference scenario characterized by a great stability of the geological formation and on hypothetical situations corresponding to the occurrence of random events of natural origin or of conventional nature. The implementation of this methodology within the framework of the IPSN (Protection and Nuclear Safety Institute, CEA) participation in the CEC EVEREST project is addressed. This programme consists in the evaluation of the sensitivity of the radiological consequences associated to deep radwaste disposal systems to the different elements of the performance assessment (scenario characteristics, phenomena, physico-chemical parameters) in three types of geological formations (granite, salt and clay).(author). 11 refs., 3 tabs

  1. Book review: Economic geology: Principles and practice: Metals, minerals, coal and hydrocarbons—Introduction to formation and sustainable exploitation of mineral deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric

    2013-01-01

    This volume, available in both hardcover and paperback, is an English translation of the fifth edition of the German language text Mineralische und Energie-Rohstoffe. The book provides an extensive overview of natural resources and societal issues associated with extracting raw materials. The comprehensive list of raw materials discussed includes metals, industrial minerals, coal, and hydrocarbons. The book is divided into four parts: (1) “Metalliferous ore deposits,” (2) “Nonmetallic minerals and rocks,” (3) “Practice of economic geology,” and (4) “Fossil energy raw materials—coal, oil, and gas.” These sections are bound by a brief introduction and an extensive list of up-to-date references as well as an index. Each chapter begins with a concise synopsis and concludes with a summary that contains useful suggestions for additional reading. All figures are grayscale images and line drawings; however, several have been grouped together and reproduced as color plates. Also included is a companion website (www.wiley.com/go/pohl/geology) that contains additional resources, such as digital copies of figures, tables, and an expanded index, all available for download in easy-to-use formats.Economic Geology: Principles and Practice: Metals, Minerals, Coal and Hydrocarbons—Introduction to Formation and Sustainable Exploitation of Mineral Deposits. Walter l. Pohl. 2011. Wiley-Blackwell. Pp. 663. ISBN 978-1-4443-3663-4 (paperback).

  2. Formation and composition of adsorbates on hydrophobic carbon surfaces from aqueous laccase-maltodextrin mixture suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corrales Ureña, Yendry Regina; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo Noronha; Szardenings, Michael; Gätjen, Linda; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Rischka, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Less than 10 nm layer formed on carbon based materials composed by laccase and maltodextrin. • Improvement of the wettability of carbon based materials. • A protein-polysaccharide biofilm layer formation at solid liquid interface. • Stable layers formed under buffer and water rinsing. - Abstract: A robust procedure for the surface bio-functionalization of carbon surfaces was developed. It consists on the modification of carbon materials in contact with an aqueous suspension of the enzyme laccase from Trametes versicolor and the lyophilization agent maltodextrin, with the pH value adjusted close to the isoelectric point of the enzyme. We report in-situ investigations applying Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) for carbon-coated sensor surfaces and, moreover, ex-situ measurements with static contact angle measurements, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) for smooth Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) substrates, for contact times between the enzyme formulation and the carbon material surface ranging from 20 s to 24 h. QCM-D studies reveals the formation of rigid layer of biomaterial, a few nanometers thin, which shows a strongly improved wettability of the substrate surface upon contact angle measurements. Following spectroscopic characterization, these layers are composed of mixtures of laccase and maltodextrin. The formation of these adsorbates is attributed to attractive interactions between laccase, the maltodextrin-based lyophilization agent and the hydrophobic carbon surfaces; a short-term contact between the aqueous laccase mixture suspension and HOPG surfaces is shown to merely result in de-wetting patterns influencing the results of contact angle measurements. The new enzyme-based surface modification of carbon-based materials is suggested to be applicable for the improvement of not only the wettability of low energy substrate surfaces with fluid formulations like coatings

  3. Formation and composition of adsorbates on hydrophobic carbon surfaces from aqueous laccase-maltodextrin mixture suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corrales Ureña, Yendry Regina, E-mail: yendry386@hotmail.com [UNESP São Paulo State University, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo Carrijo Coube, 14-01, Bauru, São Paulo (Brazil); Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Lisboa-Filho, Paulo Noronha [UNESP São Paulo State University, Av. Eng. Luiz Edmundo Carrijo Coube, 14-01, Bauru, São Paulo (Brazil); Szardenings, Michael [Fraunhofer Institute for Cell Therapy and Immunology IZI, Perlickstrasse 1, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Gätjen, Linda; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Rischka, Klaus [Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM, Wiener Strasse 12, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Less than 10 nm layer formed on carbon based materials composed by laccase and maltodextrin. • Improvement of the wettability of carbon based materials. • A protein-polysaccharide biofilm layer formation at solid liquid interface. • Stable layers formed under buffer and water rinsing. - Abstract: A robust procedure for the surface bio-functionalization of carbon surfaces was developed. It consists on the modification of carbon materials in contact with an aqueous suspension of the enzyme laccase from Trametes versicolor and the lyophilization agent maltodextrin, with the pH value adjusted close to the isoelectric point of the enzyme. We report in-situ investigations applying Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) for carbon-coated sensor surfaces and, moreover, ex-situ measurements with static contact angle measurements, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) for smooth Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) substrates, for contact times between the enzyme formulation and the carbon material surface ranging from 20 s to 24 h. QCM-D studies reveals the formation of rigid layer of biomaterial, a few nanometers thin, which shows a strongly improved wettability of the substrate surface upon contact angle measurements. Following spectroscopic characterization, these layers are composed of mixtures of laccase and maltodextrin. The formation of these adsorbates is attributed to attractive interactions between laccase, the maltodextrin-based lyophilization agent and the hydrophobic carbon surfaces; a short-term contact between the aqueous laccase mixture suspension and HOPG surfaces is shown to merely result in de-wetting patterns influencing the results of contact angle measurements. The new enzyme-based surface modification of carbon-based materials is suggested to be applicable for the improvement of not only the wettability of low energy substrate surfaces with fluid formulations like coatings

  4. Self-organized formation of metal-carbon nanostructures by hyperthermal ion deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannstein, I.K.

    2006-04-26

    The quasi-simultaneous deposition of mass-selected hyperthermal carbon and metal ions results in a variety of interesting film morphologies, depending on the metal used and the deposition conditions. The observed features are of the order of a few nanometres and are therefore interesting for future potential applications in the various fields of nanotechnology. The present study focuses on the structural analysis of amorphous carbon films containing either copper, silver, gold, or iron using amongst others Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy. The film morphologies found are as follows: copper-containing films consist of copper nanoclusters with sizes ranging from about 3 to 9 nm uniformly distributed throughout the amorphous carbon matrix. The cluster size hereby rises with the copper content of the films. The silver containing films decompose into a pure amorphous carbon film with silver agglomerates at the surface. Both, the gold- and the iron-containing films show a multilayer structure of metal-rich layers with higher cluster density separated by metal-depleted amorphous carbon layers. The layer distances are of the order of up to 15 nm in the case of gold-carbon films and 7 nm in the case of iron-carbon films. The formation of theses different structures cannot be treated in the context of conventional self-organization mechanisms basing upon thermal diffusion and equilibrium thermodynamics. Instead, an ion-induced atomic transport, sputtering effects, and the stability of small metal clusters were taken into account in order to model the structure formation processes. A similar multilayer morphology was recently also reported in the literature for metal-carbon films grown by magnetron sputtering techniques. In order to investigate, whether the mechanisms are the same as in the case of the ion beam deposited films described above, first experiments were conducted

  5. The first Uruguayan geological and pale ontological in Uruguay: memories about recent Rio de la Plata formation was been concluded from their shell fossils by D.A. Larranaga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, S.

    1998-01-01

    The first Uruguayan geological and pale ontological manuscript, al thought published later, is the Memorial geological about recent formation of Rio de la Plata deduced from their shell fossils, written by Damaso Antonio Larranaga, probably in 1819.This opus is commended here. (author)

  6. Lithofacies and sequence stratigraphic description of the upper part of the Avon Park Formation and the Arcadia Formation in U.S. Geological Survey G–2984 test corehole, Broward County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.; Robinson, Edward

    2017-07-18

    Rock core and sediment from U.S. Geological Survey test corehole G–2984 completed in 2011 in Broward County, Florida, provide an opportunity to improve the understanding of the lithostratigraphic, sequence stratigraphic, and hydrogeologic framework of the intermediate confining unit and Floridan aquifer system in southeastern Florida. A multidisciplinary approach including characterization of sequence stratigraphy, lithofacies, ichnology, foraminiferal paleontology, depositional environments, porosity, and permeability was used to describe the geologic samples from this test corehole. This information has produced a detailed characterization of the lithofacies and sequence stratigraphy of the upper part of the middle Eocene Avon Park Formation and Oligocene to middle Miocene Arcadia Formation. This enhancement of the knowledge of the sequence stratigraphic framework is especially important, because subaerial karst unconformities at the upper boundary of depositional cycles at various hierarchical scales are commonly associated with secondary porosity and enhanced permeability in the Floridan aquifer system.

  7. Formation of bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes on carbon black in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Kinshuk, E-mail: kdg@barc.gov.in [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Materials Group (India); Sen, D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Solid State Physics Division (India); Mazumdar, T. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Research Reactor Services Division (India); Lenka, R. K.; Tewari, R. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Materials Group (India); Mazumder, S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Solid State Physics Division (India); Joshi, J. B., E-mail: jb.joshi@ictmumbai.edu.in [Institute of Chemical Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering (India); Banerjee, S. [Homi Bhabha National Institute (India)

    2012-03-15

    For the first time, bamboo-shaped multiwalled carbon nanotubes, having diameter of the order of 50 nm, have been grown on carbon black in a fluidized bed in bulk amount. The activation energy for the synthesis of the product was found out to be around 33 kJ/mol in the temperature range of 700-900 Degree-Sign C. The carbon nanotubes were separated from the carbon black by preferential oxidation of the later, the temperature of which was determined by thermogravimetry. The transmission electron microscopy revealed different features of the nanotubes such as 'Y' junction, bend, and catalyst filling inside the nanotubes. Small angle neutron scattering was performed on the nanotubes synthesized at different temperatures. The data were fitted into a suitable model in order to find out the average diameter, which decreases with increase in synthesis temperature. The Monte Carlo simulation predicts the same behavior. Based on the above observations, a possible growth mechanism has been predicted. The oscillation in carbon saturation value inside the catalyst in the fluidized bed has been indicated as the responsible factor for the bamboo-shaped structure.

  8. Formation of bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes on carbon black in a fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Sen, D.; Mazumdar, T.; Lenka, R. K.; Tewari, R.; Mazumder, S.; Joshi, J. B.; Banerjee, S.

    2012-03-01

    For the first time, bamboo-shaped multiwalled carbon nanotubes, having diameter of the order of 50 nm, have been grown on carbon black in a fluidized bed in bulk amount. The activation energy for the synthesis of the product was found out to be around 33 kJ/mol in the temperature range of 700-900 °C. The carbon nanotubes were separated from the carbon black by preferential oxidation of the later, the temperature of which was determined by thermogravimetry. The transmission electron microscopy revealed different features of the nanotubes such as "Y" junction, bend, and catalyst filling inside the nanotubes. Small angle neutron scattering was performed on the nanotubes synthesized at different temperatures. The data were fitted into a suitable model in order to find out the average diameter, which decreases with increase in synthesis temperature. The Monte Carlo simulation predicts the same behavior. Based on the above observations, a possible growth mechanism has been predicted. The oscillation in carbon saturation value inside the catalyst in the fluidized bed has been indicated as the responsible factor for the bamboo-shaped structure.

  9. Formation of bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes on carbon black in a fluidized bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Sen, D.; Mazumdar, T.; Lenka, R. K.; Tewari, R.; Mazumder, S.; Joshi, J. B.; Banerjee, S.

    2012-01-01

    For the first time, bamboo-shaped multiwalled carbon nanotubes, having diameter of the order of 50 nm, have been grown on carbon black in a fluidized bed in bulk amount. The activation energy for the synthesis of the product was found out to be around 33 kJ/mol in the temperature range of 700−900 °C. The carbon nanotubes were separated from the carbon black by preferential oxidation of the later, the temperature of which was determined by thermogravimetry. The transmission electron microscopy revealed different features of the nanotubes such as “Y” junction, bend, and catalyst filling inside the nanotubes. Small angle neutron scattering was performed on the nanotubes synthesized at different temperatures. The data were fitted into a suitable model in order to find out the average diameter, which decreases with increase in synthesis temperature. The Monte Carlo simulation predicts the same behavior. Based on the above observations, a possible growth mechanism has been predicted. The oscillation in carbon saturation value inside the catalyst in the fluidized bed has been indicated as the responsible factor for the bamboo-shaped structure.

  10. Geologic characterization and carbon storage resource estimates for the knox group, Illinois Basin, Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, David; Ellett, Kevin; Rupp, John; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Research documented in this report includes (1) refinement and standardization of regional stratigraphy across the 3-state study area in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, (2) detailed core description and sedimentological interpretion of Knox cores from five wells in western Kentucky, and (3) a detailed calculation of carbon storage volumetrics for the Knox using three different methodologies. Seven regional cross sections document Knox formation distribution and thickness. Uniform stratigraphic nomenclature for all three states helps to resolve state-to-state differences that previously made it difficult to evaluate the Knox on a basin-wide scale. Correlations have also refined the interpretation of an important sandstone reservoir interval in southern Indiana and western Kentucky. This sandstone, a CO2 injection zone in the KGS 1 Blan well, is correlated with the New Richmond Sandstone of Illinois. This sandstone is over 350 ft (107 m) thick in parts of southern Indiana. It has excellent porosity and permeability at sufficient depths, and provides an additional sequestration target in the Knox. The New Richmond sandstone interval has higher predictability than vuggy and fractured carbonates, and will be easier to model and monitor CO2 movement after injection.

  11. Microbial mediated formation of Fe-carbonate minerals under extreme acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Román, Mónica; Fernández-Remolar, David; Amils, Ricardo; Sánchez-Navas, Antonio; Schmid, Thomas; San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Rodríguez, Nuria; McKenzie, Judith A; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2014-04-23

    Discovery of Fe-carbonate precipitation in Rio Tinto, a shallow river with very acidic waters, situated in Huelva, South-western Spain, adds a new dimension to our understanding of carbonate formation. Sediment samples from this low-pH system indicate that carbonates are formed in physico-chemical conditions ranging from acid to neutral pH. Evidence for microbial mediation is observed in secondary electron images (Fig. 1), which reveal rod-shaped bacteria embedded in the surface of siderite nanocrystals. The formation of carbonates in Rio Tinto is related to the microbial reduction of ferric iron coupled to the oxidation of organic compounds. Herein, we demonstrate for the first time, that Acidiphilium sp. PM, an iron-reducing bacterium isolated from Rio Tinto, mediates the precipitation of siderite (FeCO3) under acidic conditions and at a low temperature (30°C). We describe nucleation of siderite on nanoglobules in intimate association with the bacteria cell surface. This study has major implications for understanding carbonate formation on the ancient Earth or extraterrestrial planets.

  12. Roles of Nano- and Micro-Scale Subsurface Geochemical Reactions on Environmentally Sustainable Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yandi

    Geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) is a promising approach to reduce anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. At GCS sites, injected CO2 is kept in formation rock by an overlying low permeability caprock. During and after CO2 injection, geochemical reactions can affect the porosity, permeability, and pollutant transport in aquifers. Despite their importance, nano- and micro-scale subsurface geochemical reactions are far from well-understood. Clay mobilization has been reported to decrease aquifer permeability during water flooding, and clay minerals are abundant in caprock. Thus, we studied CO2-brine-clay interactions under varied conditions relevant to different GCS sites (at 35-95°C and under 35-120 atm CO2, in water, NaCl, MgCl2, or CaCl2 solutions). Biotite, Fe-bearing mica, was used as a model clay mineral. We observed numerous fibrous illite precipitates on mica after reaction for only 3 h, which had not been previously reported. A few hours later, the mica surface cracked and fibrous illite detached. The mobilization of fibrous illite can decrease the aquifer's permeability greatly and affect the safety and efficiency of GCS. Mechanisms related to ion exchange, mica swelling, and CO2 intercalation were explored. Oriented aggregation of illite nanoparticles forming the fibrous illite was directly observed, suggesting a new mechanism for fibrous illite formation. Interestingly, besides the pH effect, aqueous CO2 enhances mica cracking over N2. These findings can help to achieve safer subsurface operations. At GCS field sites, Fe concentration increased near the injection sites and originally adsorbed pollutants were released. As the brine flows, Fe re-precipitated because of pH increase. To better predict the fate and transport of aqueous pollutants, the nucleation and growth of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides were studied. New information about sizes and volumes of the Fe(III) (hydr)oxide nanoparticles precipitated in solution and on quartz, mica, and sapphire

  13. Formation of Titanium Carbide in the Surface Layer of Cavityless-Cast Iron-Carbon Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovcharenko, P. G.; Leshchev, A. Yu.; Makhneva, T. M.

    2018-01-01

    Special features of formation of titanium carbide in the surface layer of castings of iron-carbon alloys obtained with the use of investment patterns and "Ti - C" and "FeTi - C" alloying compositions are considered. The phase composition, the structure, and the hardness of the alloyed layers are determined.

  14. A wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) as countermeasure to mist formation in amine based carbon capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, J.; Anderlohr, C.; Rogiers, P.; Brachert, L.; Khakharia, P.M.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Schaber, K.

    2014-01-01

    This study is to our knowledge the first to evaluate the potential of a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) to prevent aerosol formation issues inside amine based carbon capture installations. A WESP is a suitable option since this study proves that it is very efficient for the removal of the mist

  15. Selective formation and efficient photocurrent generation of [70]fullerene-single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Umeyama, Tomokazu; Tezuka, Noriyasu; Seki, Shu; Matano, Yoshihiro; Nishi, Masayuki; Hirao, Kazuyuki; Lehtivuori, Heli; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Nakao, Yoshihide; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    For the first time nanocarbon composites with C 70 molecules aligned on the sidewall of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are demonstrated. The C70-SWNT photoelectrochemical devices exhibit efficient photocurrent generation properties that result from selective formation of a single composite

  16. Electrochemical studies of the film formation on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions under open circuit conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geronov, Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schwager, F. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Muller, R. H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1981-06-01

    The nature of protective surface layers formed on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions of and at open circuit has been investigated by electrochemical pulse measurements. The results are consistent with the fast formation of a compact thin layer resulting from the reaction with residual water. This layer acts as a solid ionic conductor. Slow corrosion or decomposition processes produce a thicker porous overlayer.

  17. Improving Formate and Methanol Fuels: Catalytic Activity of Single Pd Coated Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiuting; Hodson, Hannah; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Shao, Lidong; Compton, Richard G

    2016-10-07

    The oxidations of formate and methanol on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes decorated with palladium nanoparticles were studied at both the single-nanotube and ensemble levels. Significant voltammetric differences were seen. Pd oxide formation as a competitive reaction with formate or methanol oxidation is significantly inhibited at high overpotentials under the high mass transport conditions associated with single-particle materials in comparison with that seen with ensembles, where slower diffusion prevails. Higher electro-oxidation efficiency for the organic fuels is achieved.

  18. Geology of the Early Arikareean sharps formation on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation and surrounding areas of South Dakota and Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Thomas H; Dibenedetto, Joseph N

    2012-01-01

    Based on geologic mapping, measured sections, and lithologic correlations, the local features of the upper and lower type areas of the Early Arikareean (30.8-20.6 million years ago) Sharps Formation are revised and correlated. The Sharps Formation above the basal Rockyford Member is divided into two members of distinct lithotypes. The upper 233 feet of massive siltstones and sandy siltstones is named the Gooseneck Road Member. The middle member, 161 feet of eolian volcaniclastic siltstones with fluvially reworked volcaniclastic lenses and sandy siltstone sheets, is named the Wolff Camp Member. An ashey zone at the base of the Sharps Formation is described and defined as the Rockyford Ash Zone (RAZ) in the same stratigraphic position as the Nonpareil Ash Zone (NPAZ) in Nebraska. Widespread marker beds of fresh water limestones at 130 feet above the base of the Sharps Formation and a widespread reddish-brown clayey siltstone at 165 feet above the base of the Sharps Formation are described. The Brown Siltstone Beds of Nebraska are shown to be a southern correlative of the Wolff Camp Member and the Rockyford Member of the Sharps Formation. Early attempts to correlate strata in the Great Plains were slow in developing. Recognition of the implications of the paleomagnetic and lithologic correlations of this paper will provide an added datum assisting researchers in future biostratigraphic studies. Based on similar lithologies, the Sharps Formation, currently assigned to the Arikaree Group, should be reassigned to the White River Group.

  19. U.S. Geological Survey input-data forms for the assessment of the Spraberry Formation of the Midland Basin, Permian Basin Province, Texas, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Kristen R.

    2017-10-24

    In 2017, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) completed an updated assessment of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil and gas resources in the Spraberry Formation of the Midland Basin (Permian Basin Province) in southwestern Texas (Marra and others, 2017). The Spraberry Formation was assessed using both the standard continuous (unconventional) and conventional methodologies established by the USGS for three assessment units (AUs): (1) Lower Spraberry Continuous Oil Trend AU, (2) Middle Spraberry Continuous Oil Trend AU, and (3) Northern Spraberry Conventional Oil AU. The revised assessment resulted in total estimated mean resources of 4,245 million barrels of oil, 3,112 billion cubic feet of gas, and 311 million barrels of natural gas liquids. The purpose of this report is to provide supplemental documentation of the input parameters used in the USGS 2017 Spraberry Formation assessment.

  20. Geology of the Fox Hills Formation (late Cretaceous) in the Williston Basin of North Dakota, with reference to uranium potential. Report of investigation No. 55

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvancara, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The Fox Hills Formation is a marine and brackish sequence of primarily medium and fine clastics within the Late Cretaceous Montana Group. In the Williston basin of North Dakota, four members (in ascending order) are recognized: Trail City, Timber Lake, Iron Lightning (with Bullhead and Colgate lithofacies), and Linton. The Fox Hills conformably overlies the Pierre Shale and conformably and disconformably underlies and interfingers with the Hell Creek Formation; it occurs in about the western two-thirds of the state. The geology of the Fox Hills Formation in North Dakota, and the stratigraphy of which is based on previous surface information and recent subsurface data, are summarized, and its potential for uranium is evaluated

  1. Formation of Gas-Phase Formate in Thermal Reactions of Carbon Dioxide with Diatomic Iron Hydride Anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Xue; Zhao, Chongyang; Li, Xiao-Na; Chen, Hui; He, Sheng-Gui

    2017-04-03

    The hydrogenation of carbon dioxide involves the activation of the thermodynamically very stable molecule CO 2 and formation of a C-H bond. Herein, we report that HCO 2 - and CO can be formed in the thermal reaction of CO 2 with a diatomic metal hydride species, FeH - . The FeH - anions were produced by laser ablation, and the reaction with CO 2 was analyzed by mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical calculations. Gas-phase HCO 2 - was observed directly as a product, and its formation was predicted to proceed by facile hydride transfer. The mechanism of CO 2 hydrogenation in this gas-phase study parallels similar behavior of a condensed-phase iron catalyst. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Formation of nanocrystalline diamond in polymer like carbon films deposited by plasma CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, A; Chaudhuri, P

    2009-09-01

    Conventional plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) method is generally not suitable for the growth of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films. However, our study shows that conditions favourable for powder formation help to grow large amount of nanocrystallites in conventional PECVD. With CH4 as the carbon source gas, dilution with Ar and moderate (50 W) rf power enhances formations of powders (nanoparticles) and C2 dimers within the plasma. On the other hand, with pure CH4 or with hydrogen diluted CH4, powder formation as also NCD growth is hindered. It is proposed that the nanoparticles formed in the plasma act as the "islands" while the C2 dimers are the "seeds" for the NCD growth. The structure of the films deposited on the grounded anode under different conditions of dilution has been studied. It is observed that with high Ar dilution the films contain NCD embedded in polymer like carbon (PLC) matrix.

  3. Reconstruction of limnology and microbialite formation conditions from carbonate clumped isotope thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryshyn, V A; Lim, D; Laval, B L; Brady, A; Slater, G; Tripati, A K

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative tools for deciphering the environment of microbialite formation are relatively limited. For example, the oxygen isotope carbonate-water geothermometer requires assumptions about the isotopic composition of the water of formation. We explored the utility of using 'clumped' isotope thermometry as a tool to study the temperatures of microbialite formation. We studied microbialites recovered from water depths of 10-55 m in Pavilion Lake, and 10-25 m in Kelly Lake, spanning the thermocline in both lakes. We determined the temperature of carbonate growth and the (18)O/(16)O ratio of the waters that microbialites grew in. Results were then compared to current limnological data from the lakes to reconstruct the history of microbialite formation. Modern microbialites collected at shallow depths (11.7 m) in both lakes yield clumped isotope-based temperatures of formation that are within error of summer water temperatures, suggesting that clumped isotope analyses may be used to reconstruct past climates and to probe the environments in which microbialites formed. The deepest microbialites (21.7-55 m) were recovered from below the present-day thermoclines in both lakes and yield radioisotope ages indicating they primarily formed earlier in the Holocene. During this time, pollen data and our reconstructed water (18)O/(16)O ratios indicate a period of aridity, with lower lake levels. At present, there is a close association between both photosynthetic and heterotrophic communities, and carbonate precipitation/microbialite formation, with biosignatures of photosynthetic influences on carbonate detected in microbialites from the photic zone and above the thermocline (i.e., depths of generally <20 m). Given the deeper microbialites are receiving <1% of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), it is likely these microbialites primarily formed when lower lake levels resulted in microbialites being located higher in the photic zone, in warm surface waters. © 2014 John

  4. Role of waste packages in the safety of a high level waste repository in a deep geological formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretheau, F.; Lewi, J.

    1990-06-01

    The safety of a radioactive waste disposal facility lays on the three following barriers placed between the radioactive materials and the biosphere: the waste package; the engineered barriers; the geological barrier. The function assigned to each of these barriers in the performance assessment is an option taken by the organization responsible for waste disposal management (ANDRA in France), which must show that: expected performances of each barrier (confinement ability, life-time, etc.) are at least equal to those required to fulfill the assigned function; radiation protection requirements are met in all situations considered as credible, whether they be the normal situation or random event situations. The French waste management strategy is based upon two types of disposal depending on the nature and activity of waste packages: - surface disposal intended for low and medium level wastes having half-lives of about 30 years or less and alpha activity less than 3.7 MBq/kg (0.1 Ci/t), for individual packages and less than 0.37 MBq/kg (0.01 Ci/t) in the average. Deep geological disposal intended for TRU and high level wastes. The conditions of acceptance of packages in a surface disposal site are subject to the two fundamental safety rules no. I.2 and III.2.e. The present paper is only dealing with deep geological disposal. For deep geological repositories, three stages are involved: stage preceding definitive disposal (intermediate storage, transportation, handling, setting up in the disposal cavities); stage subsequent to definitive sealing of the disposal cavities but prior to the end of operation of the repository; stage subsequent to closure of the repository. The role of the geological barrier has been determined as the essential part of long term radioactivity confinement, by a working group, set up by the French safety authorities. Essential technical criteria relating to the choice of a site so defined by this group, are the following: very low permeability

  5. Effects of Climate Change and Vegetation Type on Carbon and Nitrogen Accumulation during Incipient Soil Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingley, R.; Juarez, S.; Dontsova, K.; Hunt, E.; Le Galliard, J. F.; Chollet, S.; Cros, A.; Llavata, M.; Massol, F.; Barré, P.; Gelabert, A.; Daval, D.; Troch, P. A. A.; Barron-Gafford, G.; Van Haren, J. L. M.; Ferrière, R.

    2016-12-01

    Plants play an important role in carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the environment. Plants remove carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and deposit a fraction of this carbon into the soil as a result of root exudation and senescence, contributing to soil formation. Additionally, plants can facilitate sequestration of CO2 from the atmosphere in inorganic form during the process of mineral weathering. With increasing temperatures and levels of CO2 in the atmosphere, it is unknown what effect these changes will have on plant growth and weathering of silicate rocks, and by extension on carbon accumulation in the soils. To identify climate change effects on C and N fluxes, a controlled study was conducted at Ecotron Ile-de-France utilizing mesocosms maintained at elevated and ambient CO2 concentration and temperature with four different vegetation treatments: control, alfalfa, velvet mesquite, and green sprangletop. Each experiment lasted for 4 months with monthly rainfall events using deionized water. After each rain, soil solution and drainage were collected and analyzed for major and trace elements, as well as anions, nitrogen, and organic and inorganic carbon. CO2 concentrations in the soil air were monitored as well. At the end of this study, soil samples were collected from each mesocosm at four different depths and then analyzed for organic carbon, inorganic carbon, and total nitrogen. Accumulation of organic and inorganic carbon and nitrogen with clear differences with depth was observed in all mesocosms. Elevated CO2 in the atmosphere influenced C accumulation in the soils, while the type of vegetation significantly affected concentrations of nitrogen and organic carbon in soil and solution. This indicates that climate change would affect carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the soils causing feedbacks to the atmospheric CO2.

  6. Methods and apparatus for measurement of the resistivity of geological formations from within cased wells in presence of acoustic and magnetic energy sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, W.B. III.

    1991-08-27

    Methods and apparatus are provided for measuring the acoustically modulated electronic properties of geological formations and cement layers adjacent to cased boreholes. Current is passed from an electrode in electrical contact with the interior of the borehole casing to an electrode on the surface of the earth. Voltage measuring electrodes in electrical contact with the interior of the casing measure the voltage at various points thereon. The voltage differences between discrete pairs of the voltage measuring electrodes provide a measurement of the leakage current conducted into formation in the vicinity of those electrodes. Simultaneously subjecting the casing and formation to an acoustic source acoustically modulates the leakage current measured thereby providing a measure of the acoustically modulated electronic properties of the adjacent formation. Similarly, methods and apparatus are also described which measure the leakage current into formation while simultaneously subjecting the casing to an applied magnetic field which therefore allows measurement of the magnetically modulated electronic properties of the casing and the adjacent formation. 9 figures.

  7. Dry season limnological conditions and basin geology exhibit complex relationships with δ13C and δ15N of carbon sources in four Neotropical floodplains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaia Alves, Gustavo H; Hoeinghaus, David J; Manetta, Gislaine I; Benedito, Evanilde

    2017-01-01

    Studies in freshwater ecosystems are seeking to improve understanding of carbon flow in food webs and stable isotopes have been influential in this work. However, variation in isotopic values of basal production sources could either be an asset or a hindrance depending on study objectives. We assessed the potential for basin geology and local limnological conditions to predict stable carbon and nitrogen isotope values of six carbon sources at multiple locations in four Neotropical floodplain ecosystems (Paraná, Pantanal, Araguaia, and Amazon). Limnological conditions exhibited greater variation within than among systems. δ15N differed among basins for most carbon sources, but δ13C did not (though high within-basin variability for periphyton, phytoplankton and particulate organic carbon was observed). Although δ13C and δ15N values exhibited significant correlations with some limnological factors within and among basins, those relationships differed among carbon sources. Regression trees for both carbon and nitrogen isotopes for all sources depicted complex and in some cases nested relationships, and only very limited similarity was observed among trees for different carbon sources. Although limnological conditions predicted variation in isotope values of carbon sources, we suggest the resulting models were too complex to enable mathematical corrections of source isotope values among sites based on these parameters. The importance of local conditions in determining variation in source isotope values suggest that isotopes may be useful for examining habitat use, dispersal and patch dynamics within heterogeneous floodplain ecosystems, but spatial variability in isotope values needs to be explicitly considered when testing ecosystem models of carbon flow in these systems.

  8. Reversible interconversion of carbon dioxide and formate by an electroactive enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reda, Torsten; Plugge, Caroline M; Abram, Nerilie J; Hirst, Judy

    2008-08-05

    Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is a kinetically and thermodynamically stable molecule. It is easily formed by the oxidation of organic molecules, during combustion or respiration, but is difficult to reduce. The production of reduced carbon compounds from CO(2) is an attractive proposition, because carbon-neutral energy sources could be used to generate fuel resources and sequester CO(2) from the atmosphere. However, available methods for the electrochemical reduction of CO(2) require excessive overpotentials (are energetically wasteful) and produce mixtures of products. Here, we show that a tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase enzyme (FDH1) adsorbed to an electrode surface catalyzes the efficient electrochemical reduction of CO(2) to formate. Electrocatalysis by FDH1 is thermodynamically reversible--only small overpotentials are required, and the point of zero net catalytic current defines the reduction potential. It occurs under thoroughly mild conditions, and formate is the only product. Both as a homogeneous catalyst and on the electrode, FDH1 catalyzes CO(2) reduction with a rate more than two orders of magnitude faster than that of any known catalyst for the same reaction. Formate oxidation is more than five times faster than CO(2) reduction. Thermodynamically, formate and hydrogen are oxidized at similar potentials, so formate is a viable energy source in its own right as well as an industrially important feedstock and a stable intermediate in the conversion of CO(2) to methanol and methane. FDH1 demonstrates the feasibility of interconverting CO(2) and formate electrochemically, and it is a template for the development of robust synthetic catalysts suitable for practical applications.

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory : determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon by wet-chemical oxidation and infrared spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Mark R.; Kammer, James A.; Jha, Virendra K.; O'Mara-Lopez, Peggy G.; Woodworth, Mark T.

    1997-01-01

    Precision and accuracy results are described for the determination of nonpurgeable suspended organic carbon (SOC) by silver-filter filtration, wet-chemical oxidation, and infrared determination of hte resulting carbon dioxide (CO2) used at the U.S. Geological Survey's nationalWater Quality Laboratory. An aliquot of raw water isfiltered through a 0.45-micrometer silver filter. The trapped organic material is oxidized using phosphoric acid and potassium persulfate in a scaled glass ampule,and the rseulting CO2 is measured by an infrared CO2 detector. The amount of CO3 is proportional to the concentration of chemically oxidizable nonpurgeable organic carbon in the sample. The SOC method detection limit for routine analysis is 0.2 milligram per liter. The average percent recovery is 97.1 percent and the average standard deviation is 11 percent.

  10. Low-cost formation of bulk and localized polymer-derived carbon nanodomains from polydimethylsiloxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcántara, Juan Carlos Castro; Cerda Zorrilla, Mariana; Cabriales, Lucia; Rossano, Luis Manuel León; Hautefeuille, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    We present two simple alternative methods to form polymer-derived carbon nanodomains in a controlled fashion and at low cost, using custom-made chemical vapour deposition and selective laser ablation with a commercial CD-DVD platform. Both processes presented shiny and dark residual materials after the polymer combustion and according to micro-Raman spectroscopy of the domains, graphitic nanocrystals and carbon nanotubes have successfully been produced by the combustion of polydimethylsiloxane layers. The fabrication processes and characterization of the byproduct materials are reported. We demonstrate that CVD led to bulk production of graphitic nanocrystals and single-walled carbon nanotubes while direct laser ablation may be employed for the formation of localized fluorescent nanodots. In the latter case, graphitic nanodomains and multi-wall carbon nanotubes are left inside microchannels and preliminary results seem to indicate that laser ablation could offer a tuning control of the nature and optical properties of the nanodomains that are left inside micropatterns with on-demand geometries. These low-cost methods look particularly promising for the formation of carbon nanoresidues with controlled properties and in applications where high integration is desired.

  11. Diatom Resting Spore Formation and Carbon Export in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rembauville, M.; Salter, I.; Blain, S.

    2016-02-01

    In the Southern Ocean, numerous observations suggest a strong attenuation of the vertical carbon flux with depth. This is probably due to efficient particle reprocessing by zooplankton and high remineralization rates by active bacterial communities in productive areas. Resting spore formation by diatoms is an ecological strategy frequently observed in neritic productive areas. Until recently, the impact of this process on biogeochemical cycles and more specifically carbon export was neglected. We present chemical and diatom export fluxes from sediment trap deployments located in the vicinity of Subantarctic Islands: South Georgia, Crozet and Kerguelen. For each island system, an annual record of export is available in an HNLC site and a productive site. Carbon export appears to be low at the three sites (exported diatom community. We highlight the important contribution (40-60 %) of resting spores to carbon export at different depth horizons in the productive, naturally-fertilized areas, supporting their high transfer efficiency. This similar mechanism observed in the three island systems suggests that resting spore formation is a significant process driving carbon export in the Southern Ocean.

  12. The Contribution of Carbon and Water in Modulating Wood Formation in Black Spruce Saplings1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Annie; Balducci, Lorena; Rossi, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Nonstructural carbohydrates (NSCs) play a crucial role in xylem formation and represent, with water, the main constraint to plant growth. We assessed the relationships between xylogenesis and NSCs in order to (1) verify the variance explained by NSCs and (2) determine the influence of intrinsic (tissue supplying carbon) and extrinsic (water availability and temperature) factors. During 2 years, wood formation was monitored in saplings of black spruce (Picea mariana) subjected to a dry period of about 1 month in June and exposed to different temperature treatments in a greenhouse. In parallel, NSC concentrations were determined by extracting the sugar compounds from two tissues (cambium and inner xylem), both potentially supplying carbon for wood formation. A mixed-effect model was used to assess and quantify the potential relationships. Total xylem cells, illustrating meristematic activity, were modeled as a function of water, sucrose, and d-pinitol (conditional r2 of 0.79). Water availability was ranked as the most important factor explaining total xylem cell production, while the contribution of carbon was lower. Cambium stopped dividing under water deficit, probably to limit the number of cells remaining in differentiation without an adequate amount of water. By contrast, carbon factors were ranked as most important in explaining the variation in living cells (conditional r2 of 0.49), highlighting the functional needs during xylem development, followed by the tissue supplying the NSCs (cambium) and water availability. This study precisely demonstrates the role of carbon and water in structural growth expressed as meristematic activity and tissue formation. PMID:26850274

  13. The Contribution of Carbon and Water in Modulating Wood Formation in Black Spruce Saplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Annie; Huang, Jian-Guo; Balducci, Lorena; Beaulieu, Marilène; Rossi, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    Nonstructural carbohydrates (NSCs) play a crucial role in xylem formation and represent, with water, the main constraint to plant growth. We assessed the relationships between xylogenesis and NSCs in order to (1) verify the variance explained by NSCs and (2) determine the influence of intrinsic (tissue supplying carbon) and extrinsic (water availability and temperature) factors. During 2 years, wood formation was monitored in saplings of black spruce (Picea mariana) subjected to a dry period of about 1 month in June and exposed to different temperature treatments in a greenhouse. In parallel, NSC concentrations were determined by extracting the sugar compounds from two tissues (cambium and inner xylem), both potentially supplying carbon for wood formation. A mixed-effect model was used to assess and quantify the potential relationships. Total xylem cells, illustrating meristematic activity, were modeled as a function of water, sucrose, and d-pinitol (conditional r(2) of 0.79). Water availability was ranked as the most important factor explaining total xylem cell production, while the contribution of carbon was lower. Cambium stopped dividing under water deficit, probably to limit the number of cells remaining in differentiation without an adequate amount of water. By contrast, carbon factors were ranked as most important in explaining the variation in living cells (conditional r(2) of 0.49), highlighting the functional needs during xylem development, followed by the tissue supplying the NSCs (cambium) and water availability. This study precisely demonstrates the role of carbon and water in structural growth expressed as meristematic activity and tissue formation. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Seismic interpretation of the sedimentation systems, structural geology and stratigraphic of the Chicxulub crater, carbonate platform of Yucatan, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iza, Canales-Garcia; Jaime, Urrutia-Fucugauchi; Joaquin Eduardo, Aguayo-Camargo; Angel, Alatorre-Mendieta Miguel

    2016-04-01

    In order to describe the structural and stratigraphic features of the Chicxulub crater, was performed the present work of seismic interpretation, seismic attributes and generation of 3D surfaces. Load data it was performed in SEG-Y format, to display a total of 19 seismic reflection profiles were worked at domain time; the corresponding interpretation was carried out by separating five packages with textural differences, for this separation were used five horizons with seismic response representing the base of these packages, the correlation of horizons was made for all lines, creating composed lines so that all profiles were interpret together at intersections for form a grid. Multiple fault zones, were interpreted with the help of seismic attributes, like RMS amplitude, complex trace analysis, gradient of the trace and cosine phase. Was obtained the structural and stratigraphic interpretation , 3D models of the surfaces interpreted with which it is possible to observe the morphology of the base of the basin, it is controlled by the effect of the impact that formed the crater, has the features as a multi-ring crater. Shallower horizons shows that the topography of the base of the crater continues to affect the upper relief, which tends to be horizontal as it approaches the surface but is modeled by themselves sedimentary processes of the carbonate platform of Yucatán; packages below the base of the crater show the characteristics that own carbonated breccia, product the rupture of the material at impact, the material was deposited in a chaotic way, at this level we found the faults and fractures zone.

  15. Stratigraphy on Oxygen and Carbon Isotope of Paciran Formation East Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premonowati; R P Koesoemadinata; Harsono-Pringgoprawiro; Wahyoe-S-Hantoro

    2004-01-01

    Paleotemperature fluctuation in tropical zone (centennial and decad al scale) has been known. It's based on stable isotopic analysis from each of unconformity zones. Those boundaries have derived on reef units of shallows marine reef complex of Paciran Formation, Tuban area in Northeast Java Basin. From 25 samples have been choosen on undeformed calcite and analyzed by oxygen and carbon stable isotope. It used to validizing a sea level changes during the formation to Reef 1 to Reef 17 from Paciran formation with sea surface temperature (SST) since 4 Ma until now. On early forming of Reef 1 to Reef 3 (since 4 Ma - 2,88 Ma), sea level occurred marine flooding surface. Since the formation of reef 4 (2,59 Ma) to Reef 8 (1,4 Ma) occurred stagnant temperature and almost to warmer condition. Then, δ 18 O have arise up drastically to 5 0/00 and shows warmer condition to Reef 8 formation, in contrary, the sea level have been arised to Reef 10 formation (0,7 Ma). The temperature have been fluctuated between 0,5 o and 1 o C until the formation of Reef 17 (Early Holocene) and continued to Reef 17 formation at 2 o C based on the rapidity sampling of Po rites sp. Wholly, in centennial scale, since the formation of Reef 4 (2,59 Ma) to Reef 17 (1 Ma), the curve of oxygen stable isotope shows decrease or cooler condition. Those condition have conducted to sea level drop since the formation to Reef 7 and Reef 8. There are 4 periods of interglacial since the formation of Reef 4. The warmer condition indicated since the formation of Reef 9, Reef 11 and Reef 17. Recently, a curve of oxygen isotopes reveals warmer drastically or sea level have been arisen. (author)

  16. Primary and diagenetic controls of isotopic compositions of iron-formation carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Alan J.; Hayes, J. M.; Klein, C.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented on parallel analyses of carbonate and chert microbands in segments from the early Proterozoic Dales Gorge Member of the Brockman Iron Formation (western Australia), including data on isotopic, chemical, and mineralogic variations in microbanded carbonates, cherts, and coexisting minerals in four core segments from Paraburdoo and one from Wittenoom. It is shown that patterns of variation observed in isotopic abundance and mineral composition can be consistently explained in terms of diagenetic replacement of fine-grained primary precipitates by secondary ones, rather than by mineral-dependent fractionations, metamorphism, or the influence of large volumes of water in an open system.

  17. Selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnichenko, A.V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning was studied. DLC films was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, filtered vacuum arc deposition, laser ablation, magnetron sputtering and ion-beam lithography methods. The DLC coatings were...... obtained by means of a single short and intensive carbon plasma deposition pulse. The deposited DLC coating was characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements. The DLC coating process gave rise to wide potential possibilities in micro-devices manufacturing productions....

  18. STRUCTURAL MODIFICATION OF NEW FORMATIONS IN CEMENT MATRIX USING CARBON NANOTUBE DISPERSIONS AND NANOSILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Khroustalev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex nanodispersed systems with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and nanodispersed silica have a significant impact on the processes of hydration, hardening and strength gain of construction composites predetermining their durability. While using a scanning electron microscope with an attachment for X-ray microanalysis and a device for infrared spectral analysis investigations have shown that the main effect of the cement matrix modification in the case of adding complex nanodispersed systems is provided by direct influence of hydration processes with subsequent crystallization of new formations. It has been noted that while adding carbon nanotube dispersion and nanosized silica a binding matrix is structured in the form of an extremely dense shell from crystalline hydrate new formations on the surface of solid phases that provides strong binding matrix in cement concrete. The addition effect of carbon nanotubes has been analyzed and quantitatively assessed through an investigation for every case of one sample with nanotubes and one sample without them with the help of a nanoindenter and scanning electron microscope. It is necessary to solve rather complicated challenging task in order to assess quantitatively the addition effect of CNT on material characteristics at a micromechanical level. At the same time it is possible to investigate surface of a concrete sample with one-micron resolution. In this case it is necessary to prepare samples for nanoindentation with exclusion of all CNT defectable effects that have been shown by a SEM. So in this case more adequate method for assessment must be a picoindenter , which combines a test method for nanoindentation with an optical SEM potential. Such equipment is in the stage of in-situ testing process at the Vienna University of Technology. The investigation is based on the fact that the main modification effect of mineral binding matrix while using incorporated complex nanodispersed systems and

  19. Mobilization of metals from Eau Claire siltstone and the impact of oxygen under geological carbon dioxide sequestration conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hongbo; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Krogstad, Eirik J.; Newburn, Matt K.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2014-09-01

    To investigate the impact of O2 as an impurity co-injected with CO2 on geochemical interactions, especially trace metal mobilization from a geological CO2 sequestration (GCS) reservoir rock, batch studies were conducted with Eau Claire siltstone collected from CO2 sequestration sites. The rock was reacted with synthetic brines in contact with either 100% CO2 or a mixture of 95 mol% CO2-5 mol% O2 at 10.1 MPa and 75 °C. Both microscopic and spectroscopic measurements, including 57Fe-Mössbauer spectroscopy, Laser Ablation-Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry, powder X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and chemical extraction were combined in this study to investigate reaction mechanisms. The Eau Claire siltstone contains quartz (52 wt%), fluorapatite (40%), and aluminosilicate (5%) as major components, and dolomite (2%), pyrite (1%), and small-particle-/poorly-crystalline Fe-oxides as minor components. With the introduction of CO2 into the reaction vessel containing rock and brine, the leaching of small amounts of fluorapatite, aluminosilicate, and dolomite occurred. Trace metals of environmental concern, including Pb, As, Cd, and Cu were detected in the leachate with concentrations up to 400 ppb in the CO2-brine-rock reaction system within 30 days. In the presence of O2, the oxidation of Fe(II) and the consequent changes in the reaction system, including a reduction in pH, significantly enhanced the mobilization of Pb, Cd, and Cu, whereas As concentrations decreased, compared with the reaction system without O2. The presence of O2 resulted in the formation of secondary Fe-oxides which appear to be Fe(II)-substituted P-containing ferrihydrite. Although the rock contained only 1.04 wt% total Fe, oxidative dissolution of pyrite, leaching and oxidation of structural Fe(II) in fluorapatite, and precipitation of Fe-oxides significantly decreased the pH in brine with O2 (pH 3.3-3.7), compared with the reaction

  20. Room Temperature Formation of Carbon Onions via Ultrasonic Agitation of MoS₂ in Isopropanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stollenwerk, Andrew J; Clausen, Eric; Cook, Matthew; Doore, Keith; Holzapfel, Ryan; Weber, Jacob; He, Rui; Kidd, Timothy E

    2018-05-01

    Ultrasonic agitation is a proven method for breaking down layered materials such as MoS2 into single or few layer nanoparticles. In this experiment, MoS2 powder is sonicated in isopropanol for an extended period of time in an attempt to create particles of the smallest possible size. As expected, the process yielded a significant quantity of nanoscale MoS2 in the form of finite layer sheets with lateral dimensions as small as a few tens of nanometers. Although no evidence was found to indicate a larger the longer sonication times resulted in a significant increase in yield of single layer MoS2, the increased sonication did result in the formation of several types of carbon allotropes in addition to the sheets of MoS2. These carbon structures appear to originate from the breakdown of the isopropanol and consist of finite layer graphite platelets as well as a large number of multi-walled fullerenes, also known as carbon onions. Both the finite layer graphite and MoS2 nanoplatelets were both found to be heavily decorated with carbon onions. However, isolated clusters of carbon onions could also be found. Our results show that liquid exfoliation of MoS2 is not only useful for forming finite layer MoS2, but also creating carbon onions at room temperature as well.

  1. Microwave formation and photoluminescence mechanisms of multi-states nitrogen doped carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guili; Shu, Mengjun; Yang, Zhi; Ma, Yujie; Huang, Da; Xu, Shusheng; Wang, Yanfang; Hu, Nantao; Zhang, Yafei; Xu, Lin

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, carbon dots (CDs) have attracted much attention in the material field because of their remarkable performance in various aspects. Therefore, the exploration of complex and variable photoluminescence mechanisms shows great significance. Herein, we present a systematic study on the correlation between the formation process and photoluminescence mechanisms through the characterization and analysis of three states of nitrogen doped carbon dots (N-CDs) obtained by microwave irradiation. At low temperature of 160 °C, the small organic molecule polymer nanodots whose photoluminescence center is molecule state are obtained with superior quantum yield of about 51.61%. Increasing the reaction temperature up to 200 °C, the intermediate transition products named carbon nanodots begin to appear. Prolonging the holding time, the typical carbon quantum dots with a special stable optical properties are finally generated, and their most photoluminescence arises from the carbon cores which are gained through the polymerization, dehydration, carbonation of organic fluorescent molecules. Furthermore, N-CDs have been applied in metal ions detection as well as animal and plant cell fluorescence imaging owing to their excellent water solubility and low cytotoxicity. Our exploration provides the theoretical basis for synthesis of CDs with different properties and purposes. In the near future, more high-quality CDs will be developed in order to better benefit the various fields of mankind.

  2. Storage of radioactive wastes in geological formations. Technical criteria for site selection. Report by the work-group chaired by Professor Goguel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goguel, Jean; Candes, Pierre; Izabel, Cecile; Autran, Albert; Barthoux, Alain; Baudin, Guy; Devillers, Christian; Habib, Pierre; Lafuma, Jacques; Lefevre, Jean; Peaudecerf, Pierre; Pradel, Jacques; Salle, Claude; Treuil, Michel; Lebrun, Patrick; Tissier, Marie-Solange

    1985-06-01

    This document is the result of a prospective mission on the long term storage of radioactive wastes containing long-period emitters (wastes of B and C categories), and notably on a definitive storage in deep continental geological formations. After a presentation of hypotheses (brief description of the storage concept, main safety principles, objectives in terms of radiological safety, safety options, time-related considerations), the authors addressed the following issues: safety before closing during the exploitation period, and safety after closure (after backfilling and sealing of all underground cavities). For the first issue, they discuss the impacts of works on safety and thermal effects during exploitation. For the second issue, they discuss the site natural hydro-geological context, the disturbances brought by the storage (access of water to the storage, and return of water into the biosphere), and the influence of external factors (geological phenomena, human intrusion). Then, the authors make recommendations regarding reconnaissance programs and studies for the selection and qualification of a site. They finally propose technical criteria and main recommendations for site selection. Appendices propose a list of hearings, a presentation of the storage concept, a report on the impact of works, a report on the presence of mineralisation in granite massifs, reports on radiological consequences of intrusions in salt formations and in granite massif containing storage of radioactive wastes or vitrified wastes, a report on the characterization of unsteady parts of the French continental construction, a presentation of the evolution of climate and icings, and a study of seismic movements in the case of deep storages

  3. Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles, for Large-Scale Geologic Storage of CO₂

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Michael [Geomechanics Technologies, Incorporated, Monrovia, CA (United States)

    2014-12-08

    Geomechanics Technologies has completed a detailed characterization study of the Wilmington Graben offshore Southern California area for large-scale CO₂ storage. This effort has included: an evaluation of existing wells in both State and Federal waters, field acquisition of about 175 km (109 mi) of new seismic data, new well drilling, development of integrated 3D geologic, geomechanics, and fluid flow models for the area. The geologic analysis indicates that more than 796 MMt of storage capacity is available within the Pliocene and Miocene formations in the Graben for midrange geologic estimates (P50). Geomechanical analyses indicate that injection can be conducted without significant risk for surface deformation, induced stresses or fault activation. Numerical analysis of fluid migration indicates that injection into the Pliocene Formation at depths of 1525 m (5000 ft) would lead to undesirable vertical migration of the CO₂ plume. Recent well drilling however, indicates that deeper sand is present at depths exceeding 2135 m (7000 ft), which could be viable for large volume storage. For vertical containment, injection would need to be limited to about 250,000 metric tons per year per well, would need to be placed at depths greater than 7000ft, and would need to be placed in new wells located at least 1 mile from any existing offset wells. As a practical matter, this would likely limit storage operations in the Wilmington Graben to about 1 million tons per year or less. A quantitative risk analysis for the Wilmington Graben indicate that such large scale CO₂ storage in the area would represent higher risk than other similar size projects in the US and overseas.

  4. Geologic, geochemical, and isotopic studies of a carbonate- and siliciclastic-hosted Pb-Zn deposit at Lion Hill, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Nora K.; Clark, Sandra H.B.; Woodruff, Laurel G.; Mosier, Elwin L.

    1995-01-01

    Zn-, Pb-, Cu-, and Fe-bearing rocks of the Lion Hill area in western Vermont formed during the Early Cambrian by syngenetic sedimentary-exhalative and diagenetic replacement processes. Sphalerite, galena, chalcopyrite, pyrite, and, locally, magnetite form stratabound and broadly stratiform lenticular zones, -300 meters long and 25-50 meters thick, which are uneconomic at the present time. The lenses are structurally disrupted and metamorphosed to greenschist facies, probably due to the Taconic orogeny. Textural evidence suggests that mineralizing fluids permeated the sediments prior to lithification and that a dilatant fracture zone, possibly a feeder zone, contains some of the discordant veins at Lion Hill. The veins may have formed when the sediments were in a plastic, semiconsolidated state. The association of layered iron formation containing base-metal sulfide minerals provides possible lithologic evidence for syngenetic mineralization by submarine exhalative activity. Sand bars and tidal channels present in the sedimentary section could have acted as permeable pathways for movement of mineralizing fluids. The complex interlayering in the sedimentary sequence of carbonate and siliciclastic rock types having widely varying permeabilities created numerous fluid traps.

  5. Fuels for fuel cells: Fuel and catalyst effects on carbon formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, R. L. (Rodney L.); Inbody, M. A. (Michael A.); Perry, W. L. (William Lee); Parkinson, W. J. (William Jerry),

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this research is to explore the effects of fuels, fuel constituents, additives and impurities on the performance of on-board hydrogen generation devices and consequently on the overall performance of fuel cell systems using reformed hydrocarbon fuels. Different fuels and components have been tested in automotive scale, adiabatic autothermal reactors to observe their relative reforming characteristics with various operating conditions. Carbon formation has been modeled and was experimentally monitored in situ during operation by laser measurements of the effluent reformate. Ammonia formation was monitored, and conditions varied to observe under what conditions N H 3 is made.

  6. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 2. Commercial waste forms, packaging and projections for preconceptual repository design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/2, ''Commercial Waste Forms, Packaging and Projections for Preconceptual Repository Design Studies,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This volume contains the data base for waste forms, packages, and projections from the commercial waste defined by the Office of Waste Isolation in ''Nuclear Waste Projections and Source Term Data for FY 1977,'' Y/OWI/TM-34. Also, as an alternative data base for repository design and analysis, waste forms, packages, and projections for commercial waste defined by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (BPNL) have been included. This data base consists of a reference case for use in the alternative design study and a definition of combustible wastes for use in mine fire and hydrogen generation analyses

  7. Technical support for GEIS: radioactive waste isolation in geologic formations. Volume 2. Commercial waste forms, packaging and projections for preconceptual repository design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-04-01

    This volume, Y/OWI/TM-36/2, ''Commercial Waste Forms, Packaging and Projections for Preconceptual Repository Design Studies,'' is one of a 23-volume series, ''Technical Support for GEIS: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-36, which supplements the ''Contribution to Draft Generic Environmental Impact Statement on Commercial Waste Management: Radioactive Waste Isolation in Geologic Formations,'' Y/OWI/TM-44. The series provides a more complete technical basis for the preconceptual designs, resource requirements, and environmental source terms associated with isolating commercial LWR wastes in underground repositories in salt, granite, shale and basalt. Wastes are considered from three fuel cycles: uranium and plutonium recycling, no recycling of spent fuel and uranium-only recycling. This volume contains the data base for waste forms, packages, and projections from the commercial waste defined by the Office of Waste Isolation in ''Nuclear Waste Projections and Source Term Data for FY 1977,'' Y/OWI/TM-34. Also, as an alternative data base for repository design and analysis, waste forms, packages, and projections for commercial waste defined by Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (BPNL) have been included. This data base consists of a reference case for use in the alternative design study and a definition of combustible wastes for use in mine fire and hydrogen generation analyses.

  8. Geotechnical characterization through in situ and laboratory tests of several geological formations present in the route of the Future Fix Connection between Spain and Morocco through Gibraltar Strait

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perucho Martinez, A.; Diez Torres, J. A.; Muniz Menendez, M.; Cano Linares, H.; Ruiz Fonticiella, J. M.

    2015-01-01

    CEDEX and SECEGSA (Sociedad Española para la Comunicación Fija a través del Estrecho de Gibraltar), Have been collaborating since a few decades ago to study different technical aspects related to the Fix Connection through the Gibraltar Strait, mainly in relation to the geological and geotechnical properties of the different formations present in the route. In order to do so, many studies of geotechnical characterization of materials, in situ and laboratory testing campaigns have been carried out. Furthermore, they have participated in some Expertise Committees carrying out some advice work related to studies performed by other organizations. This paper presents a brief description of the most relevant aspects of the main geological and geotechnical studies performed related to this Project of the Future Fix Connection and obtained through the study of SECEGSAs extensive data base. Moreover, it includes a synopsis of the geotechnical characterization carried out through in situ and laboratory tests on different Miocene and Eocene formations from the Algeciras Unit, present in the route of the future Fix Connection between Spain and gibraltar through the Gibraltar Strait. (Author)

  9. The orientation of formate and carbonate on ZnO(101¯0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R.; Walsh, J. F.; Muryn, C. A.; Thornton, G.; Dhanak, V. R.; Prince, K. C.

    1993-12-01

    Polarisation dependent CK-edge NEXAFS spectra of carbonate and formate species on ZnO(101¯0) indicate that both species are aligned by the substrate. The carbonate species, formed by adsorption of CO 2, is oriented with its molecular plane close to the [0001] azimuth. This suggests a bond geometry in which one O atom of CO 2-3 is in the substrate, and a second interacts with a surface cation, consistent with the results of previous cluster calculations. In contrast, the formate species, formed by adsorption of formic acid, is not azimuthally ordered, although the molecular rotation axis is aligned close to the surface normal, consistent with bidentate bonding to a single cation.

  10. Cryogenian cap carbonates - what do laminar scale investigations reveal about formation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, N. R.; Maupin, C. R.; Partin, J. W.; Quinn, T.; Giddings, J.

    2009-12-01

    Mid- to Late-Neoproterozoic “Cryogenian” cap carbonates are generally regarded as marine chemical sediments rapidly deposited during climatic recoveries from some of Earth’s most extreme glacial intervals, but there is little consensus regarding formation. Many cap successions initiate abruptly above glacigenic strata as finely laminated carbonate (typically dolostone), even in otherwise siliciclastic dominated marine continua, suggesting water mass control and widespread deposition below storm wave base. Cap carbonate units often culminate intervals of ongoing negative δ13C, transitioning to positive δ13C in the higher succession. Considering that fine lamination is a common characteristic among many cap carbonate units in space and time, laminar scale chemostratigraphic investigations may offer insights to modes of formation. Toward this end, we integrate bedding-normal LA-ICP-MS scans and high-resolution C and O isotope stratigraphy, for an array of cap carbonate units spanning “Kaigas”, “Sturtian”, and “Marinoan” post-glacial intervals; namely: Assem Limestone, N. Ethiopia (Nubia); Beck Spring Dolomite and Noonday Dolomite, Death Valley Area (W. Laurentia); Scout Mountain Member of the Pocatello Formation, S. Idaho (W. Laurentia); Tindelpina Shale Member, S. Australia (Adelaide Geosyncline); Rasthof and Keilberg Formations, N. Namibia (Congo Craton); and Mirrasol O’est, Brazil (Sao Francisco Craton). Whole-rock assessments for basal cap samples have δ13C between -4.8 to -1.4‰ and δ18O between -15.5 to -3.1‰. Corresponding PASS-normalized REE patterns show moderate LREE depletion, minor MREE enrichment, and slight HREE depletion. Cap samples from the higher positive δ13C succession (Noonday/Rasthof) display flatter patterns. Laser ablation scans for the Rasthof Fm (basal rhythmite and middle sublittoral microbialite) and Noonday Dolomite show that lamina couplets consist of alternations of comparatively darker organic/terrigenous (Si

  11. Radioactivity of rocks from the geological formations belonging to the Tibagi River hydrographic basin; Radioatividade de rochas provenientes das formacoes geologicas pertencentes a bacia hidrografica do Rio Tibagi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Rodrigo Oliveira

    2008-07-01

    This work is a study of the {sup 40}K and the {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th series radioactivity in rocks measured with high resolution gamma ray spectrometry. The rocks were taken from the geologic formations in the region of the Tibagi river hydrographic basin. The course of this river cuts through the Paleozoic and Mesozoic stratigraphic sequences of the Parana sedimentary basin. In order to take into account the background radiation attenuation by the samples, a technique was developed that eliminated the need to measure a blank sample. The effects of the radiation's self-attenuation in the sample matrix were taken into account by using a gamma ray direct transmission method. The results for 87 rock samples, taken from 14 distinct formations, and their corresponding radioactivity variations are presented and discussed according to the possible geological processes from which they originated. Among the most discussed results are: an outcrop that profiles shale, limestone and rhythmite in the Irati Formation; a sandstone and siltstone sequence from the Rio do Rasto Formation; and a profile sampled in a coal mine located in the Rio Bonito Formation. The calculations of the rocks' contributions to the outdoor gamma radiation dose rate agree with the values presented by other authors for similar rocks. The highest dose values were obtained from felsic rocks (rhyolite of the Castro group, 129.8 {+-} 3.7 nGy.h{sup -1}, and Cunhaporanga granite, 167 {+-} 37 nGy.h{sup -1}). The other highest values correspond to the shale rocks from the Irati Formation (109 {+-} 16 nGy.h{sup -1}) and the siltic shale rocks from the Ponta Grossa Formation (107.9 {+-} 0.7 nGy.h{sup -1}). The most recent geological formations presented the lowest dose values (e.g. the Botucatu sandstone, 3.3 {+-} 0.6 nGy.h{sup -1}). The average value for sedimentary rocks from seven other formations is equal to 59 {+-} 26 nGy.h{sup -1}. The Rio Bonito Formation presented the highest dose value (334

  12. Spatial Distributions of Metal Atoms During Carbon SWNTs Formation: Measurements and Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cau, M.; Dorval, N.; Attal-Tretout, B.; Cochon, J. L.; Loiseau, A.; Farhat, S.; Hinkov, I.; Scott, C. D.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments and modelling have been undertaken to clarify the role of metal catalysts during single-wall carbon nanotube formation. For instance, we wonder whether the metal catalyst is active as an atom, a cluster, a liquid or solid nanoparticle [1]. A reactor has been developed for synthesis by continuous CO2-laser vaporisation of a carbon-nickel-cobalt target in laminar helium flow. The laser induced fluorescence technique [2] is applied for local probing of gaseous Ni, Co and CZ species throughout the hot carbon flow of the target heated up to 3500 K. A rapid depletion of C2 in contrast to the spatial extent of metal atoms is observed in the plume (Fig. 1). This asserts that C2 condenses earlier than Ni and Co atoms.[3, 4]. The depletion is even faster when catalysts are present. It may indicate that an interaction between metal atoms and carbon dimers takes place in the gas as soon as they are expelled from the target surface. Two methods of modelling are used: a spatially I-D calculation developed originally for the arc process [5], and a zero-D time dependent calculation, solving the chemical kinetics along the streamlines [6]. The latter includes Ni cluster formation. The peak of C2 density is calculated close to the target surface where the temperature is the highest. In the hot region, C; is dominant. As the carbon products move away from the target and mix with the ambient helium, they recombine into larger clusters, as demonstrated by the peak of C5 density around 1 mm. The profile of Ni-atom density compares fairly well with the measured one (Fig. 2). The early increase is due to the drop of temperature, and the final decrease beyond 6 mm results from Ni cluster formation at the eutectic temperature (approx.1600 K).

  13. Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2010-03-07

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

  14. Electrochemical studies of the film formation on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions under open circuit conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geronov, Y.; Schwager, F.; Muller, R.H.

    1981-04-01

    The nature of protective surface layers formed on lithium in propylene carbonate solutions of LiClO/sub 4/ and LiAsF/sub 6/ at open circuit has been investigated by electrochemical pulse measurements and other techniques. The results are consistent with the fast formation of a compact thin layer of Li/sub 2/O by reaction with residual water. This layer acts as a solid ionic conductor. Slow corrosion processes produce a thicker porous overlayer.

  15. Experimental methodology to study radionuclide sorption and migration in geological formations and engineered barriers of waste repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo Sanz, H.

    2010-01-01

    In Spain, the waste management options include either the possibility of a final storage in a deep geological repository (DGR) or the centralized temporal surface disposal (CTS). DGRs are based in a multi-barrier concept with the geological barrier and including the vitrified waste, the metal containers and engineered barriers such as compacted bentonite and cement-based materials. On the other hand, CTS mainly considers concrete and cement to confine the metal canisters containing the waste. Radionuclide migration will mainly take place by the existence of chemical concentration gradients being thus diffusion the main transport mechanism or by the existence of hydraulic gradients due to the existence of water-conductive fractures. Radionuclide sorption/retention on the materials composing the natural and engineered barriers is the fundamental process controlling contaminant migration. The evaluation of sorption parameters and the understanding of the different mechanisms leading to radionuclide retention are very important issues. The study of diffusion processes is very relevant as well. This paper describes the main experimental methodologies applied to analyse radionuclide transport in the different barriers of radioactive repositories. Particularly we focused on obtaining of retention parameters as distribution coefficients, kd, or retardation factors, Rf, and diffusion coefficients of radionuclides. (Author) 6 refs.

  16. Insight into carbon formation from acetic acid decomposition over Pd(100) via density functional theory calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yingzhe; Sun, Xuanyu; Zhang, Minhua

    2017-10-01

    The mechanism of carbon deposition in acetic acid/palladium system is of great research significance in the catalytic field. In order to illustrate the plausible carbon formation routes, a systematic survey on the stepwise decomposition from adsorbed acetic acid to atomic carbon on Pd(100) was conducted via density functional theory calculations. A complex reaction network including Osbnd H bond scission reaction and various Csbnd H and Csbnd C bond scission reactions was built and the relevant structural and energetic properties were calculated. The results show that Osbnd H bond breaking is very possible for CH3COOH, that Csbnd C bond breaking is always more favorable than Csbnd H bond breaking for CHxCOO (x = 1-3), and the dehydrogenation of CHx (x = 1-3) is more likely to proceed than most of other reactions. The most possible pathway for the formation of carbon monomer was proposed based on the analysis of the reaction network and it features the decarbonation of CH3COO to CH3 as the rate-limiting step.

  17. Formation and composition of adsorbates on hydrophobic carbon surfaces from aqueous laccase-maltodextrin mixture suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales Ureña, Yendry Regina; Lisboa-Filho, Paulo Noronha; Szardenings, Michael; Gätjen, Linda; Noeske, Paul-Ludwig Michael; Rischka, Klaus

    2016-11-01

    A robust procedure for the surface bio-functionalization of carbon surfaces was developed. It consists on the modification of carbon materials in contact with an aqueous suspension of the enzyme laccase from Trametes versicolor and the lyophilization agent maltodextrin, with the pH value adjusted close to the isoelectric point of the enzyme. We report in-situ investigations applying Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) for carbon-coated sensor surfaces and, moreover, ex-situ measurements with static contact angle measurements, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Force Microscopy (SFM) for smooth Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite (HOPG) substrates, for contact times between the enzyme formulation and the carbon material surface ranging from 20 s to 24 h. QCM-D studies reveals the formation of rigid layer of biomaterial, a few nanometers thin, which shows a strongly improved wettability of the substrate surface upon contact angle measurements. Following spectroscopic characterization, these layers are composed of mixtures of laccase and maltodextrin. The formation of these adsorbates is attributed to attractive interactions between laccase, the maltodextrin-based lyophilization agent and the hydrophobic carbon surfaces; a short-term contact between the aqueous laccase mixture suspension and HOPG surfaces is shown to merely result in de-wetting patterns influencing the results of contact angle measurements. The new enzyme-based surface modification of carbon-based materials is suggested to be applicable for the improvement of not only the wettability of low energy substrate surfaces with fluid formulations like coatings or adhesives, but also their adhesion in contact with hardened polymers.

  18. Can environmental conditions trigger cyanobacterial surfaces and following carbonate formation: implication for biomineralization and biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, C.; Dittrich, M.; Zhu, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we will give an overview what kind of the factors may trigger carbonate formations at the cell surfaces under a variety of environmental conditions. As examples, we will present the results from our recent studies on formation of calcium carbonates, dolomites and bio-cements. The extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in the Synechococcuscell envelope are recognized key players in the nucleation of carbonates in marine and freshwater environments. Yet, little is known about a nutrient contents control over the molecular composition of Synechococcus cell envelope, and consequently, biomineralization. In the first study, we investigated how a variation of the phosphorus (P) in the growth media can lead to changes in the surface reactivity of the cells and impact their ability to form carbonates. The objective of the second study is to gain insights into the spatial distribution of cyanobacterial EPS and dolomite from different sediment layers of Khor Al-Adaid sabkha (Qatar). Here, we characterized microbial mats on molecular level in respect of organic and inorganic components using in-situ 2D Raman spectroscopy and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) were used. Additionally, 2D chemical maps of sediment layers documented spectral characterizations of minerals and organic matter of microbial origins at high spatial resolution. Finally, we will show the results from the experiments with auto-phototrophic cyanobacteria Gloeocapsa PCC73106, which habitat on the monument surfaces, towards its application for bio-concrete, a product of microbial carbonate precipitation. We studied the biomineralization in biofilm forming Gloeocapsa PCC73106 on the concrete surface as a pre-requirement for microbial carbonate precipitation. Biomineralization on the concrete surface by live cells and killed cells were compared with that under the abiotic condition. Our experiments allow us to conclude that environmental conditions play a significant role in the control of

  19. Geologic framework, age, and lithologic characteristics of the North Park Formation in North Park, north-central Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroba, Ralph R.

    2016-10-18

    Deposits of the North Park Formation of late Oligocene and Miocene age are locally exposed at small, widely spaced outcrops along the margins of the roughly northwest-trending North Park syncline in the southern part of North Park, a large intermontane topographic basin in Jackson County in north-central Colorado. These outcrops suggest that rocks and sediments of the North Park Formation consist chiefly of poorly consolidated sand, weakly cemented sandstone, and pebbly sandstone; subordinate amounts of pebble conglomerate; minor amounts of cobbly pebble gravel, siltstone, and sandy limestone; and rare beds of cobble conglomerate and altered tuff. These deposits partly filled North Park as well as a few small nearby valleys and half grabens. In North Park, deposits of the North Park Formation probably once formed a broad and relatively thick sedimentary apron composed chiefly of alluvial slope deposits (mostly sheetwash and stream-channel alluvium) that extended, over a distance of at least 150 kilometers (km), northwestward from the Never Summer Mountains and northward from the Rabbit Ears Range across North Park and extended farther northwestward into the valley of the North Platte River slightly north of the Colorado-Wyoming border. The maximum preserved thickness of the formation in North Park is about 550 meters near the southeastern end of the North Park syncline.The deposition of the North Park Formation was coeval in part with local volcanism, extensional faulting, development of half grabens, and deposition of the Browns Park Formation and Troublesome Formation and was accompanied by post-Laramide regional epeirogenic uplift. Regional deposition of extensive eolian sand sheets and loess deposits, coeval with the deposition of the North Park Formation, suggests that semiarid climatic conditions prevailed during the deposition of the North Park Formation during the late Oligocene and Miocene.The North Park Formation locally contains a 28.1-mega-annum (Ma

  20. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H. [LISA Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systèmes Atmosphériques, UMR CNRS 7583, Université Paris Est Créteil (UPEC), Université Paris Diderot (UPD), Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Labex ESEP, Paris (France); Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T., E-mail: vvinogradoff@mnhn.fr [PIIM, Laboratoire de Physique des Interactions Ioniques et Moléculaires, Université Aix-Marseille, UMR CNRS 7345, Marseille (France)

    2015-08-20

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites.

  1. CARBON DIOXIDE INFLUENCE ON THE THERMAL FORMATION OF COMPLEX ORGANIC MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Fray, N.; Bouilloud, M.; Cottin, H.; Duvernay, F.; Chiavassa, T.

    2015-01-01

    Interstellar ices are submitted to energetic processes (thermal, UV, and cosmic-ray radiations) producing complex organic molecules. Laboratory experiments aim to reproduce the evolution of interstellar ices to better understand the chemical changes leading to the reaction, formation, and desorption of molecules. In this context, the thermal evolution of an interstellar ice analogue composed of water, carbon dioxide, ammonia, and formaldehyde is investigated. The ice evolution during the warming has been monitored by IR spectroscopy. The formation of hexamethylenetetramine (HMT) and polymethylenimine (PMI) are observed in the organic refractory residue left after ice sublimation. A better understanding of this result is realized with the study of another ice mixture containing methylenimine (a precursor of HMT) with carbon dioxide and ammonia. It appears that carbamic acid, a reaction product of carbon dioxide and ammonia, plays the role of catalyst, allowing the reactions toward HMT and PMI formation. This is the first time that such complex organic molecules (HMT, PMI) are produced from the warming (without VUV photolysis or irradiation with energetic particles) of abundant molecules observed in interstellar ices (H 2 O, NH 3 , CO 2 , H 2 CO). This result strengthens the importance of thermal reactions in the ices’ evolution. HMT and PMI, likely components of interstellar ices, should be searched for in the pristine objects of our solar system, such as comets and carbonaceous chondrites

  2. Geology of the Cannonball Formation (Paleocene) in the Williston basin, with reference to uranium potential. Report of investigation No. 57

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cvancara, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The Paleocene Cannonball Formation is a marine, non-lignitic-bearing clastic sequence in the lower part of the Fort Union Group. It is overlain by the lignite-bearing Tongue River Formation in places and both overlain and underlain by the lignite-bearing Ludlow Formation in places. The Cannonball crops out primarily in southwest-central North Dakota and probably occurs throughout the western one-half of the state. It occurs also in northwestern South Dakota and may extend into parts of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Poorly consolidated, very fine- to fine-grained, light to medium brownish yellow-weathering sandstone and light gray-weathering, sandy mudstone are the principal types of lithology. Mudstone generally predominates in North Dakota whereas sandstone seems to predominate in South Dakota. Although uranium in the Williston basin has been found almost entirely in lignite and nonmarine carbonaceous rocks, its occurrence in the marine Cannonball Formation is possible. If the Cannonball, Ludlow, Tongue River, and Sentinel Butte Formations are at least partly penecontemporaneous, a variety of depositional environments were in areal juxtaposition during the Paleocene. Streams originating or passing through coastal plain bogs could have carried uranium ions (derived from volcanic materials) to the Cannonball sea where they were deposited syngenetically. Epigenetic uranium may occur in Cannonball mudstones or sandstones that directly underlie the Ludlow Formation, which is known to contain volcanic materials

  3. Formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite during adsorption of lead from aqueous solution on oxidized carbons by cold oxygen plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Velasco Maldonado, Paola S. [Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Av. Adolfo López Mateos No. 1801 Ote. C.P, Aguascalientes, Ags, 20256 (Mexico); Hernández-Montoya, Virginia, E-mail: virginia.hernandez@yahoo.com.mx [Instituto Tecnologico de Aguascalientes, Av. Adolfo López Mateos No. 1801 Ote. C.P, Aguascalientes, Ags, 20256 (Mexico); Concheso, A.; Montes-Morán, Miguel A. [Instituto Nacional del Carbon, INCAR-CSIC, Apartado 73, E-33080, Oviedo (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite was observed on the carbon surface. • Occurrence of CaCO{sub 3} on the carbons surface plays a crucial role in the formation. • The carbons were prepared by carbonization and oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. • Oxidation with cold oxygen plasma increases the formation of these compounds. - Abstract: A new procedure of elimination of Pb{sup 2+} from aqueous solution using carbon adsorbents, in which high amounts of cerussite and hydrocerussite are deposited on the carbon surfaces, is reported. The procedure includes the preparation of carbons from selected lignocellulosic wastes (pecan nut shells and peach stones) by single carbonization and further oxidation with cold oxygen plasma. The materials prior and after the oxidation treatment were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR spectroscopy, SEM/EDX analysis, adsorption of N{sub 2} at −196 °C and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The adsorption of Pb{sup 2+} was carried out in batch systems under constant agitation. The formation of cerussite and hydrocerussite on the spent carbon surfaces was confirmed by XRD, SEM/EDX and FT-IR. A Pb{sup 2+} removal mechanism is proposed in which a co-precipitation of lead nitrate and calcium carbonate would render the formation of the lead carbonates. In such mechanism, the occurrence of CaCO{sub 3} on the surface of the adsorbents plays a crucial role. The presence of calcium carbonate on the precursors is understood on the basis of the thermal evolution of calcium oxalate originally present in the biomass. The oxygen plasma treatment helps to expose the calcium carbonate nanocrystals thus improving dramatically the removal capacity of Pb{sup 2+}. Accordingly, retention capacities as high as 63 mg of Pb{sup 2+} per gram of adsorbent have been attained.

  4. Remarkably efficient synthesis of 2H-indazole 1-oxides and 2H-indazoles via tandem carbon-carbon followed by nitrogen-nitrogen bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillon, Isabelle; Zajícek, Jaroslav; Pudelová, Nadĕzda; Krchnák, Viktor

    2008-11-21

    Base-catalyzed tandem carbon-carbon followed by nitrogen-nitrogen bond formations quantitatively converted N-alkyl-2-nitro-N-(2-oxo-2-aryl-ethyl)-benzenesulfonamides to 2H-indazoles 1-oxides under mild conditions. Triphenylphosphine or mesyl chloride/triethylamine-mediated deoxygenation afforded 2H-indazoles.

  5. System-Level Analysis Modeling of Impacts of Operation Schemes of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage on Deep Groundwater and Carbon Dioxide Leakage Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S.; Lee, S.; Park, J.; Kim, J.; Kihm, J.

    2013-12-01

    The objectives of this study are to predict quantitatively groundwater and carbon dioxide flow in deep saline sandstone aquifers under various carbon dioxide injection schemes (injection rate, injection period) and to analyze integratively impacts of such carbon dioxide injection schemes on deep groundwater (brine) and carbon dioxide leakage risk through abandoned wells or faults. In order to achieve the first objective, a series of process-level prediction modeling of groundwater and carbon dioxide flow in a deep saline sandstone aquifer under several carbon dioxide injection schemes was performed using a multiphase thermo-hydrological numerical model TOUGH2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The prediction modeling results show that the extent of carbon dioxide plume is significantly affected by such carbon dioxide injection schemes. In order to achieve the second objective, a series of system-level analysis modeling of deep groundwater and carbon dioxide leakage risk through an abandoned well or a fault under several carbon dioxide injection schemes was then performed using a brine and carbon dioxide leakage risk analysis model CO2-LEAK (Kim, 2012). The analysis modeling results show that the rates and amounts of deep groundwater and carbon dioxide leakage through an abandoned well or a fault increase as the carbon dioxide injection rate increases. However, the rates and amounts of deep groundwater and carbon dioxide leakage through an abandoned well or a fault decrease as the carbon dioxide injection period increases. These system-level analysis modeling results for deep groundwater and carbon dioxide leakage risk can be utilized as baseline data for establishing guidelines to mitigate anticipated environmental adverse effects on shallower groundwater systems (aquifers) when deep groundwater and carbon dioxide leakage occur. This work was supported by the Geo-Advanced Innovative Action (GAIA) Program funded by the Korea Environmental Industry and Technology Institute

  6. Coke formation and carbon atom economy of methanol-to-olefins reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingxu; Yuan, Cuiyu; Li, Jinzhe; Xu, Shutao; Zhou, You; Chen, Jingrun; Wang, Quanyi; Xu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Zhongmin

    2012-05-01

    The methanol-to-olefins (MTO) process is becoming the most important non-petrochemical route for the production of light olefins from coal or natural gas. Maximizing the generation of the target products, ethene and propene, and minimizing the production of byproducts and coke, are major considerations in the efficient utilization of the carbon resource of methanol. In the present work, the heterogeneous catalytic conversion of methanol was evaluated by performing simultaneous measurements of the volatile products generated in the gas phase and the confined coke deposition in the catalyst phase. Real-time and complete reaction profiles were plotted to allow the comparison of carbon atom economy of methanol conversion over the catalyst SAPO-34 at varied reaction temperatures. The difference in carbon atom economy was closely related with the coke formation in the SAPO-34 catalyst. The confined coke compounds were determined. A new type of confined organics was found, and these accounted for the quick deactivation and low carbon atom economy under low-reaction-temperature conditions. Based on the carbon atom economy evaluation and coke species determination, optimized operating conditions for the MTO process are suggested; these conditions guarantee high conversion efficiency of methanol. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Complex formation during dissolution of metal oxides in molten alkali carbonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Qingfeng; Borup, Flemming; Petrushina, Irina

    1999-01-01

    Dissolution of metal oxides in molten carbonates relates directly to the stability of materials for electrodes and construction of molten carbonate fuel cells. In the present work the solubilities of PbO, NiO, Fe2O3,and Bi2O3 in molten Li/K carbonates have been measured at 650 degrees C under...... carbon dioxide atmosphere. It is found that the solubilities of NiO and PbO decrease while those of Fe2O3 and Bi2O3 remain approximately constant as the lithium mole fraction increases from 0.43 to 0.62 in the melt. At a fixed composition of the melt, NiO and PbO display both acidic and basic dissolution...... as the partial pressure of carbon dioxide varies. By combination of solubility and electromotive force measurements, a model is constructed assuming the dissolution involves complex formation. The possible species for lead are proposed to be [Pb(CO3)(2)](-2) and/or [Pb(CO3)(3)](-4). A similar complex chemistry...

  8. PICOREF: carbon sequestration in geological reservoirs in France.Map of the unknown ''ground motion''. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohmer, J.; Lembezat, C.

    2006-01-01

    in the framework of the PICOREF project, ''CO 2 sequestration in geological reservoirs in France'', two main objectives are decided: the characterization of french adapted sites and the redaction of a document to ask for the storage authorization, including a methodology to survey and study the storage site. This report aims to define the unknown ground motion which the impact should present a risk for the surface installations. The project is presented, as the geological context and the proposed methodology. (A.L.B.)

  9. Tectono-Thermal History Modeling and Reservoir Simulation Study of the Nenana Basin, Central Alaska: Implications for Regional Tectonics and Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Nilesh C.

    Central Interior Alaska is an active tectonic deformation zone highlighted by the complex interactions of active strike-slip fault systems with thrust faults and folds of the Alaska Range fold-and-thrust belt. This region includes the Nenana basin and the adjacent Tanana basin, both of which have significant Tertiary coal-bearing formations and are also promising areas (particularly the Nenana basin) with respect to hydrocarbon exploration and geologic carbon sequestration. I investigate the modern-day crustal architecture of the Nenana and Tanana basins using seismic reflection, aeromagnetic and gravity anomaly data and demonstrate that the basement of both basins shows strong crustal heterogeneity. The Nenana basin is a deep (up to 8 km), narrow transtensional pull-apart basin that is deforming along the left-lateral Minto Flats fault zone. The Tanana basin has a fundamentally different geometry and is a relatively shallow (up to 2 km) asymmetrical foreland basin with its southern, deeper side controlled by the northern foothills of the central Alaska Range. NE-trending strike-slip faults within the Tanana basin are interpreted as a zone of clockwise crustal block rotation. Seismic refection data, well data, fracture data and apatite fission track data further constrain the tectonic evolution and thermal history of the Nenana basin. The Nenana basin experienced four distinct tectonic phases since Late Paleocene time. The basin initiated as a narrow half-graben structure in Late Paleocene with accumulation of greater than 6000 feet of sediments. The basin was then uplifted, resulting in the removal of up to 5000 feet of Late Paleocene sediments in Eocene to Oligocene time. During Middle to Late Miocene time, left lateral strike-slip faulting was superimposed on the existing half-graben system. Transtensional deformation of the basin began in the Pliocene. At present, Miocene and older strata are exposed to temperatures > 60°C in the deeper parts of the Nenana

  10. Chemistry of carbonization - I. A theoretical study of free radical formation from starting materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruette, F.; Sierraalta, A.; Castells, V.; Laya, M. (Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela). Laboratorio de Quimica Computacional)

    1993-01-01

    The effect of size, shape, and aromaticity in the formation of radicals from model polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) was theoretically studied using the MINDO/3 method. The results were interpreted in terms of hydrogen transfer on carbonization and liquefaction processes of coal-related compounds. Additives that donate or withdraw electrons were modeled by calculating negatively or positively charged systems. The results show that the hydrogen donating properties of PAHs increase with the increase of their molecular weights. The formation of anionic [pi]-radicals is thermodynamically favoured, contrary to cationic [pi]-radicals. Negative charge favoured the formation of low molecular weight radicals, and therefore, the hydrogen transfer from light to heavy PAHs. Positive charges, in general, do not facilitate the hydrogen transfer. 42 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Myer

    2005-09-29

    Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have

  12. A modelling study for long-term life prediction of carbon steel overpack for geological isolation of High-Level Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Naoki; Honda, Akira; Ishikawa, Hirohisa

    1996-01-01

    Current plans for the geological disposal of High-Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) in Japan include metal overpacks which contain HLW. Overpacks may be required to remain intact for more than several hundred years in order to provide containment of radio nuclides. The main factor limiting the performance of overpacks is considered to be corrosion by groundwater. Carbon steel is one of the candidate material for overpacks. A mathematical model for life prediction of carbon steel overpack has been developed based on corrosion mechanism. General corrosion and localized corrosion are considered because these are likely to initiate in repository conditions. In general corrosion model, the reduction of oxygen and water are considered as cathodic reaction. In localized corrosion model, we have constructed a model which predict the period for localized corrosion based on oxygen transport in bentonite. We also developed a model which predict the propagation rate of localized corrosion that is based on mass balance within the corroding cavity. (author)

  13. Effect of diamond-like carbon thin film coated acrylic resin on candida albicans biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, José Renato Cavalcanti; Fissmer, Sara Fernanda; Koga-Ito, Cristiane Yumi; Salvia, Ana C R D; Massi, Marcos; Sobrinho, Argermiro Soares da Silva; Júnior, Lafayette Nogueira

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of diamond-like carbon thin films doped and undoped with silver nanoparticles coating poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) on Candida albicans biofilm formation. The control of biofilm formation is important to prevent oral diseases in denture users. Forty-five PMMA disks were obtained, finished, cleaned in an ultrasonic bath, and divided into three groups: Gc, no surface coating (control group); Gdlc, coated with diamond-like carbon film; and Gag, coated with diamond-like carbon film doped with silver nanoparticles. The films were deposited using a reactive magnetron sputtering system (physical vapor deposition process). The specimens were characterized by optical profilometry, atomic force microscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy analyses that determined differences in chemical composition and morphological structure. Following sterilization of the specimens by γ-ray irradiation, C. albicans (ATCC 18804) biofilms were formed by immersion in 2 ml of Sabouraud dextrose broth inoculated with a standardized fungal suspension. After 24 hours, the number of colony forming units (cfu) per specimen was counted. Data concerning biofilm formation were analyzed using ANOVA and the Tukey test (p 0.05). The Tukey test showed no significant difference between Gdlc and Gag. Films deposited were extremely thin (∼50 nm). The silver particles presented a diameter between 60 and 120 nm and regular distribution throughout the film surface (to Gag). Diamond-like carbon films, doped or undoped with silver nanoparticles, coating the base of PMMA-based dentures could be an alternative procedure for preventing candidosis in denture users. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. Mechanism of organic aerosol formation and aging: Role of the precursor carbon skeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, J. F.; Carrasquillo, A. J.; Daumit, K. E.; Cross, E. S.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kroll, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    Oxidative aging of organic aerosol consists of a complex set of reactions coupled with gas-particle partitioning processes. Functionalization reactions involve adding oxygen containing functional groups onto a molecule, leading to reduced vapor pressures and promoting aerosol formation. In fragmentation reactions carbon-carbon bonds are broken as oxygen containing functional groups are added, which generally splits the parent molecule into two smaller and more volatile products. The initial structure of an aerosol-forming precursor molecule may influence what chemistry will occur both by changing the branching between fragmentation and functionalization processes as well as changing the effects of those processes. The fate of early generation oxidation products upon further aging is dependent on this initial chemistry, leading to a persistent effect of the precursor carbon skeleton. Aging experiments have been conducted using a high NOx smog chamber based aging technique. Long residence times and modestly elevated OH concentrations lead to typical maximum OH exposure of 3e11 molecule*seconds/cc, approaching several days equivalent exposure to ambient OH concentrations. A broad set of linear, branched and cyclic aliphatic hydrocarbons has been oxidized to determine the effects of carbon skeleton on the relative importance of fragmentation and functionalization and impacts on aerosol formation chemistry. Relative degree of fragmentation and functionalization is constrained by mass spectrometry of both the gas and particle phase. Measurements of the aerosol oxygen content and mass yield are reported, and structural effects on these properties are determined. Degree of unsaturation is hypothesized to have a significant impact on the effect of fragmentation reactions and to promote additional aerosol formation, extended aging and more oxygenated aerosol.

  15. Carbonate petrography, kerogen distribution, and carbon and oxygen isotope variations in an early Proterozoic transition from limestone to iron-formation deposition, Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukes, N. J.; Klein, C.; Kaufman, A. J.; Hayes, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The transition zone comprises Campbellrand microbialaminated (replacing "cryptalgalaminate") limestone and shale, with minor dolomite, conformably overlain by the Kuruman Iron Formation of which the basal part is characterized by siderite-rich microbanded iron-formation with minor magnetite and some hematite-containing units. The iron-formation contains subordinate intraclastic and microbialaminated siderite mesobands and was deposited in deeper water than the limestones. The sequence is virtually unaltered with diagenetic mineral assemblages reflecting a temperature interval of about 110 degrees to 170 degrees C and pressures of 2 kbars. Carbonate minerals in the different rock types are represented by primary micritic precipitates (now recrystallized to microsparite), early precompactional sparry cements and concretions, deep burial limpid euhedral sparites, and spar cements precipitated from metamorphic fluids in close contact with diabase sills. Paragenetic pathways of the carbonate minerals are broadly similar in all lithofacies with kerogen intimately associated with them. Kerogen occurs as pigmentation in carbonate crystals, as reworked organic detritus in clastic-textured carbonate units, and as segregations of kerogen pigment around late diagenetic carbonate crystals. Locally kerogen may also be replaced by carbonate spar. Carbon isotope compositions of the carbonate minerals and kerogen are dependent on their mode of occurrence and on the composition of the dominant carbonate species in a specific lithofacies. Integration of sedimentary, petrographic, geochemical, and isotopic results makes it possible to distinguish between depositional, early diagenetic, deep burial, and metamorphic effects on the isotopic compositions of the carbonate minerals and the kerogen in the sequence. Major conclusions are that deep burial thermal decarboxylation led to 13C depletion in euhedral ferroan sparites and 13C enrichment in kerogen (organic carbon). Metamorphic

  16. Cyclic architecture of a carbonate sequence, early Aptian Shuaiba formation, Al Huwaisah field, Oman

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groetsch, J. (Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands))

    1993-09-01

    Sequence stratigraphy of carbonates is a topic of ongoing controversy. In particular, small-scale shallowing-upward cycles can provide some key information needed for interpretation of carbonate sequences and/or third-order sea level changes. The early Aptian Shuaiba Formation in the Al Huwaisah field consists of about 90 m of shallow-water limestones. Throughout the formation, an overall decreasing influx of fine detritus is notable toward the top. The sequence can be subdivided into a basal unit and an overlying unit. Both units are composed of meter-scale shallowing-upward cycles of different composition, which can be recognized in core and well logs. Fourier analysis of the first principle component of a set of well logs (GR, FDC, CNL, Sonic) revealed an abrupt change in spectral behavior between the two units. Toward the top, the spectra are [open quotes]cleaning upward[close quotes] with an increasing pronunciation of a peak grouping of 1: 2: 5, suggesting a better preservation of orbital variations in the upper unit. Preservation of orbital forcing in shallowing-upward cycles requires rapid rates of sedimentation. In addition, increased shallow-water carbonate production on the platform is indicated by the appearance of reefal organisms. Hence, a higher rate of sedimentation and therefore a faster aggradation of the platform is inferred for the upper unit, which could have resulted from an increased rate of relative sea level rise. The sudden facies differentiation on the broad Arabian shelf in the upper part of the early Aptian reflects the development of an intrashelf basin. Changes in rate of relative sea level rise on the Arabian shelf might explain the repeated alternation from an easily correlatable ramp-type sedimentation, with slightly higher input of fine terrigenous sediment (e.g., lower unit of Shuaiba Formation) and a differentiation into platform and intrashelf basin facies due to faster aggradation (e.g., upper unit of Shuaiba Formation).

  17. Carbon and oxygen isotope analysis of leaf biomass reveals contrasting photosynthetic responses to elevated CO2 near geologic vents in Yellowstone National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Williams

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we explore the use of natural CO2 emissions in Yellowstone National Park (YNP in Wyoming, USA to study responses of natural vegetation to elevated CO2 levels. Radiocarbon (14C analysis of leaf biomass from a conifer (Pinus contortus; lodgepole pine and an invasive, non-native herb (Linaria dalmatica; Dalmation toadflax was used to trace the inputs of vent CO2 and quantify assimilation-weighted CO2 concentrations experienced by individual plants near vents and in comparable locations with no geologic CO2 exposure. The carbon and oxygen isotopic composition and nitrogen percent of leaf biomass from the same plants was used to investigate photosynthetic responses of these plants to naturally elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The coupled shifts in carbon and oxygen isotope values suggest that dalmation toadflax responded to elevated CO2 exposure by increasing stomatal conductance with no change in photosynthetic capacity and lodgepole pine apparently responded by decreasing stomatal conductance and photosynthetic capacity. Lodgepole pine saplings exposed to elevated levels of CO2 likewise had reduced leaf nitrogen concentrations compared to plants with no enhanced CO2 exposure, further suggesting widespread and dominant conifer down-regulated photosynthetic capacity under elevated CO2 levels near geologic vents.

  18. Geophysical and Geochemical Aspects of Pressure and CO2 Saturation Modeling due to Migration of Fluids into the Above Zone Monitoring Interval of a Geologic Carbon Storage Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Namhata, A.; Dilmore, R. M.; Bromhal, G. S.

    2016-12-01

    An increasing emphasis on the industrial scale implementation of CO2 storage into geological formations has led to the development of whole-system models to evaluate performance of candidate geologic storage sites, and the environmental risk associated with them. The components of that engineered geologic system include the storage reservoir, primary and secondary seals, and the overlying formations above primary and secondary seals (above-zone monitoring interval, AZMI). Leakage of CO2 and brine through the seal to the AZMI may occur due to the presence of natural or induced fractures in the seal. In this work, an AZMI model that simulates pressure and CO2 saturation responses through time to migration of fluids (here, CO2 and brine) from the primary seal to the AZMI is developed. A hypothetical case is examined wherein CO2 is injected into a storage reservoir for 30 years and a heterogeneous primary seal exists above the reservoir with some permeable zones. The total simulation period is 200 years (30 years of CO2 injection period and 170 years of post CO2 injection period). Key geophysical parameters such as permeability of the AZMI, thickness of the AZMI and porosity of the AZMI have significant impact on pressure evolution in the AZMI. arbitrary Polynomial Chaos (aPC) Expansion analysis shows that permeability of the AZMI has the most significant impact on pressure build up in the AZMI above the injection well at t=200 years, followed by thickness of the AZMI and porosity of the AZMI. Geochemical reactions have no impact on pressure and CO2 saturation evolution in the AZMI during the CO2 injection period. After the CO2 injection stops, precipitation of secondary minerals (e.g., amorphous silica and kaolinite) at the CO2 plume/brine interface in the AZMI formation may cause permeability reduction of the AZMI, which restrains horizontal migration of CO2 in the AZMI.

  19. The role of evaporites in the formation of gems during metamorphism of carbonate platforms: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Gaston; Dubessy, Jean; Ohnenstetter, Daniel; Banks, David; Branquet, Yannick; Feneyrol, Julien; Fallick, Anthony E.; Martelat, Jean-Emmanuel

    2018-01-01

    The mineral and fluid inclusions trapped by gemstones during the metamorphism of carbonate platform successions are precious markers for the understanding of gem genesis. The nature and chemical composition of inclusions highlight the major contribution of evaporites through dissolution or fusion, depending on the temperature of formation from greenschist to granulite facies. The fluids are highly saline NaCl-brines circulating either in an open system in the greenschist facies (Colombian and Afghan emeralds) and with huge fluid-rock metasomatic interactions, or sulphurous fluids (ruby, garnet tsavorite, zoisite tanzanite and lapis-lazuli) or molten salts formed in a closed system with a low fluid mobility (ruby in marble) in the conditions of the amphibolite to granulite facies. These chloride-fluoride-sulphate ± carbonate-rich fluids scavenged the metals essential for gem formation. At high temperature, the anions SO4 2-, NO3 -, BO3 - and F- are powerful fluxes which lower the temperature of chloride- and fluoride-rich ionic liquids. They provided transport over a very short distance of aluminium and/or silica and transition metals which are necessary for gem growth. In summary, the genetic models proposed for these high-value and ornamental gems underline the importance of the metamorphism of evaporites formed on continental carbonate shelves and emphasise the chemical power accompanying metamorphism at moderate to high temperatures of evaporite-rich and organic matter-rich protoliths to form gem minerals.

  20. Carbon, oxygen and strontium isotopic constraints on fluid sources, temperatures and biogeochemical processes during the formation of seep carbonates - Secchia River site, Northern Apennines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Irene; Capozzi, Rossella; Bernasconi, Stefano M.; Rickli, Jörg

    2017-07-01

    Understanding authigenic seep carbonate formation provides clues for hydrocarbon exploration and insights into contributions to gas budgets of marine environments and the atmosphere. Seep carbonates discovered in the outcropping succession along the Secchia riverbanks (near Modena, Italy) belong to the Argille Azzurre Formation of Early Pleistocene age deposited in an upper shelf environment overlying the Miocene foredeep successions, which include hydrocarbon fields. The fluid migration from the hydrocarbon fields, up to the surface, is presently active on land and started in the marine succession during the Late Miocene. Authigenic globular carbonate concretions and carbonate chimneys are interspersed along the strata throughout the section. A comprehensive geochemical characterisation of the carbonates has been carried out to understand the processes leading to their formation. The carbonate concretions are the record of past hydrocarbon vents linked to the Miocene petroleum system of the Northern Apennines. The samples are composed of > 50% microcrystalline dolomite. The δ13C signatures identify two groups in the samples according to different type of formation processes. Globular concretions have positive values that suggest an influence of CO2 associated to secondary methanogenesis due to microbial degradation of higher hydrocarbons. The analysed chimney, with negative δ13C values, is interpreted as former conduit where carbonate precipitation is promoted by Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane coupled with Sulfate Reduction. The δ18O range, coupled with 87/86Sr signatures, indicate that the contribution of deep connate water from the Miocene reservoirs is up to 23% during the formation of the globular concretions. The connate water occurrence is also documented by higher ambient temperatures. The different isotope signatures in seep carbonates result from the relative contribution of the recognised gas and water components, linked to different plumbing systems

  1. Covariant C and O Isotope Trends in Some Terrestrial Carbonates and ALH 84001: Possible Linkage Through Similar Formation Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Kathryn E.; Niles, Paul B.; Socki, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Carbonate minerals found on the surface of Mars and in martian meteorites indicate that liquid water has played a significant role in the planet's history. These findings have raised questions regarding the history of the martian hydrosphere and atmosphere as well as the possibility of life. Sunset Crater, Arizona is a dry environment with relatively high evaporation and brief periods of precipitation. This environment resembles Mars and may make Sunset Crater a good analog to martian carbonates. In this study we sought to identify discrete micro-scale isotopic variation within the carbonate crusts in Sunset Crater to see if they resembled the micro-scale isotope variation found in ALH 84001 carbonates. Sunset Crater carbonate formation may be used as a martian analog and ultimately provide insight into carbonate formation in ALH 84001.

  2. Effects of increasing seawater carbon dioxide concentrations on chain formation of the diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Barcelos e Ramos

    Full Text Available Diatoms can occur as single cells or as chain-forming aggregates. These two strategies affect buoyancy, predator evasion, light absorption and nutrient uptake. Adjacent cells in chains establish connections through various processes that determine strength and flexibility of the bonds, and at distinct cellular locations defining colony structure. Chain length has been found to vary with temperature and nutrient availability as well as being positively correlated with growth rate. However, the potential effect of enhanced carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations and consequent changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on chain formation is virtually unknown. Here we report on experiments with semi-continuous cultures of the freshly isolated diatom Asterionellop