WorldWideScience

Sample records for genotyping cryptosporidium spp

  1. Molecular surveillance of Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia duodenalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi by genotyping and subtyping parasites in wastewater.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite their wide occurrence, cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis are considered neglected diseases by the World Health Organization. The epidemiology of these diseases and microsporidiosis in humans in developing countries is poorly understood. The high concentration of pathogens in raw sewage makes the characterization of the transmission of these pathogens simple through the genotype and subtype analysis of a small number of samples. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The distribution of genotypes and subtypes of Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia duodenalis, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in 386 samples of combined sewer systems from Shanghai, Nanjing and Wuhan and the sewer system in Qingdao in China was determined using PCR-sequencing tools. Eimeria spp. were also genotyped to assess the contribution of domestic animals to Cryptosporidium spp., G. duodenalis, and E. bieneusi in wastewater. The high occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. (56.2%, G. duodenalis (82.6%, E. bieneusi (87.6%, and Eimeria/Cyclospora (80.3% made the source attribution possible. As expected, several human-pathogenic species/genotypes, including Cryptosporidium hominis, Cryptosporidium meleagridis, G. duodenalis sub-assemblage A-II, and E. bieneusi genotype D, were the dominant parasites in wastewater. In addition to humans, the common presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Eimeria spp. from rodents indicated that rodents might have contributed to the occurrence of E. bieneusi genotype D in samples. Likewise, the finding of Eimeria spp. and Cryptosporidium baileyi from birds indicated that C. meleagridis might be of both human and bird origins. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The distribution of Cryptosporidium species, G. duodenalis genotypes and subtypes, and E. bieneusi genotypes in urban wastewater indicates that anthroponotic transmission appeared to be important in epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis, giardiasis, and microsporidiosis in the study areas. The finding of

  2. Genotyping of Cryptosporidium spp. from free-living wild birds from Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevá, Anaiá da Paixão; Funada, Mikaela Renata; Richtzenhain, Leonardo; Guimarães, Marta Brito; Souza, Sheila de Oliveira; Allegretti, Luciana; Sinhorini, Juliana Anaya; Duarte, Vanessa Vertematti; Soares, Rodrigo Martins

    2011-01-10

    In wild and domestic birds, cryptosporidiosis is often associated with infections by Cryptosporidium galli, Cryptosporidium baileyi and Cryptosporidium meleagridis. In addition to these species, a number of avian Cryptosporidium species yet to be fully characterized are commonly found among exotic and wild avian isolates. The present study aimed to detect and identify samples of Cryptosporidium spp. from free-living wild birds, in order to contribute to the knowledge of the variability of this parasite in the free-living population of Brazil. Stool samples were collected from 242 birds, with the following proportions of individuals: 50 Emberizidae (20.7%), 112 Psittacidae (46.3%), 44 Cardinalidae (18.2%), 12 Turdidae (5.0%), eight Ramphastidae (3.3%), seven Icteridae (2.9%), three Estrilididae (1.2%), two Contigidae (0.8%), two Thraupidae (0.8%) and two Fringilidae (0.8%). Among the 242 fecal samples from wild birds, 16 (6.6%) were positive for the presence of oocysts of Cryptosporidium. Molecular characterization of the 16 samples of Cryptosporidium, were performed with phylogenetic reconstructions employing 292 positions of 18S rDNA. None of the samples of birds was characterized as C. meleagridis. C. galli was identified in one rufous-bellied thrush (Turdus rufiventris), five green-winged saltators (Saltator similis), one slate-coloured seedeater (Sporophila schistacea), one goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) and three saffron finches (Sicalis flaveola). One goldfinch isolate, one buffy-fronted seedeater (Sporophila frontalis), one red-cowled cardinal (Paroaria dominicana) and one other saffron finch (S. flaveola) were identified as C. baileyi. Avian genotype II was found in an isolate from a white-eyed parakeet (Aratinga leucophthalma). Clinical symptoms of cryptosporidiosis in birds have already been described and the number of wild birds which were shedding parasites was high. Therefore, further epidemiological research and disease surveillance of birds in the

  3. Genotypes of Cryptosporidium spp., Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Giardia duodenalis in dogs and cats in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hailing; Jin, Yue; Wu, Wenxian; Li, Pei; Wang, Lin; Li, Na; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Controversies exist on the potential role of companion animals in the transmission of enteric pathogens in humans. This study was conducted to examine the genotype distribution of Cryptosporidium spp., Enterocytozoon bieneusi, and Giardia duodenalis in companion animals in Shanghai, China, and to assess their zoonotic potential. Fecal specimens from 485 dogs and 160 cats were examined for the occurrence and genotype distribution of the three pathogens by PCR. PCR products were sequenced to determine the species and genotypes. The χ(2) test was used to compare differences in infection rates between living conditions or age groups. Cryptosporidium spp., E. bieneusi and G. duodenalis were found in 39 (8.0 %), 29 (6.0 %) and 127 (26.2 %) of dogs, and 6 (3.8 %), 9 (5.6 %) and 21 (13.1 %) of cats, respectively. Infection rates of the pathogens in dogs from pet shops and a clinic were higher than those in household dogs, and higher in cats from one animal shelter than from pet shops. No significant differences in infection rates were detected among age groups. Cryptosporidium canis and C. felis were the only Cryptosporidium species found in dogs and cats, respectively. Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotype PtEb IX was the dominant genotype in dogs, whereas Type IV and D were the most common ones in cats. Multi-locus sequence typing at the glutamate dehydrogenase, β-giardin, and triosephosphate isomerase loci revealed the presence of G. duodenalis assemblages A (n = 23), B (n = 1), C (n = 26), and D (n = 58) in dogs (only A in household dogs) and assemblages A (n = 2), B (n = 6), C (n = 2), D (n = 1), and F (n = 7) in cats. Co-infection was detected in 24 dogs and 5 cats, especially those living in crowded conditions. Living condition is a major risk factor affecting the occurrence of enteric protists in companion animals in China, and although dogs and cats can be potential sources of human infections, the different distribution of

  4. Development and Evaluation of Three Real-Time PCR Assays for Genotyping and Source Tracking Cryptosporidium spp. in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Neumann, Norman F.; Ruecker, Norma; Alderisio, Kerri A.; Sturbaum, Gregory D.; Villegas, Eric N.; Chalmers, Rachel; Monis, Paul; Feng, Yaoyu

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in drinking source water can present a serious public health risk. To rapidly and effectively assess the source and human-infective potential of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water, sensitive detection and correct identification of oocysts to the species level (genotyping) are essential. In this study, we developed three real-time PCR genotyping assays, two targeting the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene (18S-LC1 and 18S-LC2 assays) and one targeting the 90-kDa heat shock protein (hsp90) gene (hsp90 assay), and evaluated the sensitivity and Cryptosporidium species detection range of these assays. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes and melt curve analysis, the 18S-LC1 and hsp90 assays could differentiate common human-pathogenic species (C. parvum, C. hominis, and C. meleagridis), while the 18S-LC2 assay was able to differentiate nonpathogenic species (such as C. andersoni) from human-pathogenic ones commonly found in source water. In sensitivity evaluations, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays could detect as few as 1 Cryptosporidium oocyst per sample. Thus, the 18S-LC2 and hsp90 genotyping assays might be used in environmental monitoring, whereas the 18S-LC1 genotyping assay could be useful for genotyping Cryptosporidium spp. in clinical specimens or wastewater samples. PMID:26092455

  5. Occurrence and molecular genotyping of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in wild mesocarnivores in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Marta; de Mingo, Marta Hernández; de Lucio, Aida; Morales, Lucía; Balseiro, Ana; Espí, Alberto; Barral, Marta; Lima Barbero, José Francisco; Habela, Miguel Ángel; Fernández-García, José L; Bernal, Rafael Calero; Köster, Pamela C; Cardona, Guillermo A; Carmena, David

    2017-02-15

    There is a surprisingly scarce amount of epidemiological and molecular data on the prevalence, frequency, and diversity of the intestinal protozoan parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in wildlife in general and mesocarnivore species in particular. Consequently, the extent of the cyst/oocyst environmental contamination attributable to these wild host species and their potential implications for public veterinary health remain largely unknown. In this molecular epidemiological survey a total of 193 individual faecal samples from badgers (Meles meles, n=70), ferrets (Mustela putorius furo, n=2), genets (Genetta genetta, n=6), Iberian lynxes (Lynx pardinus, n=6), beech martens (Martes foina, n=8), mongooses (Herpestes ichneumon, n=2), otters (Lutra lutra, n=2), polecats (Mustela putorius, n=2), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes, n=87), wildcats (Felis silvestris, n=2), and wolves (Canis lupus, n=6) were obtained from road-killed, hunted, and accidentally found carcasses, and from camera-trap surveys or animals entering rescue shelters, during the period December 2003-April 2016. Investigated specimens were collected in five Spanish autonomous regions including Andalusia (n=1), Asturias (n=69), Basque Country (n=49), Castile-La Mancha (n=38), and Extremadura (n=36). The presence of cysts/oocysts was confirmed by PCR-based methods targeting the small subunit (ssu) ribosomal RNA gene of these parasite species. Genotyping of the obtained isolates were attempted at appropriate markers including the glutamate dehydrogenase (G. duodenalis) and the 60-kDa glycoprotein (C. parvum and C. ubiquitum) loci. Overall, G. duodenalis was detected in 8% (7/87) of red foxes, a single beech marten, and a single wolf, respectively. Cryptosporidium was identified in 3% (2/70) of badgers, 8% (7/87) of red foxes, a single genet, and a single mongoose, respectively. None of the nine G. duodenalis isolates generated could be genotyped at the assemblage/sub-assemblage level. Out of the

  6. Genetic Diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in Captive Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lihua; Ryan, Una M.; Graczyk, Thaddeus K.; Limor, Josef; Li, Lixia; Kombert, Mark; Junge, Randy; Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Zhou, Ling; Arrowood, Michael J.; Koudela, Břetislav; Modrý, David; Lal, Altaf A.

    2004-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium in reptiles was analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene. A total of 123 samples were analyzed, of which 48 snake samples, 24 lizard samples, and 3 tortoise samples were positive for Cryptosporidium. Nine different types of Cryptosporidium were found, including Cryptosporidium serpentis, Cryptosporidium desert monitor genotype, Cryptosporidium muris, Cryptosporidium parvum bovine and mouse genotypes, one C. serpentis-like parasite in a lizard, two new Cryptosporidium spp. in snakes, and one new Cryptosporidium sp. in tortoises. C. serpentis and the desert monitor genotype were the most common parasites and were found in both snakes and lizards, whereas the C. muris and C. parvum parasites detected were probably the result of ingestion of infected rodents. Sequence and biologic characterizations indicated that the desert monitor genotype was Cryptosporidium saurophilum. Two host-adapted C. serpentis genotypes were found in snakes and lizards. PMID:14766569

  7. Unusual Cryptosporidium Genotypes in Human Cases of Diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Guy; Elwin, Kristin; Chalmers, Rachel M.

    2008-01-01

    Several Cryptosporidium spp. are known to infect humans, but most cases of illness are caused by Cryptosporidium hominis or C. parvum. During a long-term genotyping in the United Kingdom, we identified 3 unusual Cryptosporidium genotypes (skunk, horse, and rabbit) in human patients with diarrhea.

  8. Native and introduced squirrels in Italy host different Cryptosporidium spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prediger, Jitka; Horčičková, Michaela; Hofmannová, Lada; Sak, Bohumil; Ferrari, Nicola; Mazzamuto, Maria Vittoria; Romeo, Claudia; Wauters, Lucas A; McEvoy, John; Kváč, Martin

    2017-10-01

    The present study was undertaken to describe Cryptosporidium spp. infection in tree squirrels from 17 locations in Northern Italy. A total of 357 squirrels were examined, including species native to Europe (Sciurus vulgaris; n=123), and species introduced from North America (Sciurus carolinensis; n=162) and Southeast Asia (Callosciurus erythraeus; n=72). Faecal samples of all squirrels were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium infection by microscopy (flotation method) and PCR/sequence analysis of the Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA, actin, and gp60 genes. Despite the overlapping ranges of native and introduced tree squirrel species in the study area, they host different Cryptosporidium spp. Sciurus vulgaris were exclusively infected with Cryptosporidium ferret genotype (n=13) belonging to three novel gp60 subtypes, VIIIb-VIIId. Sciurus carolinensis hosted C. ubiquitum subtype XIIb (n=2), Cryptosporidium skunk genotype subtype XVIa (n=3), and chipmunk genotype I subtype XIVa (n=1). Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I subtype XIVa was also found in two C. erythraeus. Comparing data from this and previous studies, we propose that Cryptosporidium skunk genotype and possibly C. ubiquitum subtype XIIb were introduced to Europe with eastern grey squirrels. Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I and ferret genotype were associated with high intensity infections, but there was no association with diarrhoea. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis through drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Hermida, José Antonio; García-Presedo, Ignacio; Almeida, André; González-Warleta, Marta; Correia Da Costa, José Manuel; Mezo, Mercedes

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in the influent and final effluent of sixteen drinking water treatment plants located in a hydrographic basin in Galicia (NW Spain) - in which the principal river is recognised as a Site of Community Importance (SCI) - estimate the efficiency of treatment plants in removing these protozoans and determine the species and genotypes of the parasites by means of a molecular assay. All plant samples of influent and final effluent (50-100 l) were examined in the spring, summer, autumn and winter of 2007. A total of 128 samples were analysed by method 1623, developed by US Environmental Protection Agency for isolation and detection of both parasites. To identify the genotypes present the following genes were amplified and sequenced: 18S SSU rRNA (Cryptosporidium spp.) and b-giardina (G. duodenalis). The mean concentrations of parasites in the influent were 0.0-10.5 Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts per litre and 1.0-12.8 of G. duodenalis cysts per litre. In the final treated effluent, the mean concentration of parasites ranged from 0.0-3.0 oocysts per litre and 0.5-4.0 cysts per litre. The distribution of results by season revealed that in all plants, the highest numbers of (oo)cysts were recorded in spring and summer. Cryptosporidium parvum, C. andersoni, C. hominis and assemblages A-I, A-II, E of G. duodenalis were detected. Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis were consistently found at high concentrations in drinking water destined for human and animal consumption in the hydrographic basin under study, in Galicia (NW Spain). It is important that drinking water treatment authorities rethink the relevance of contamination levels of both parasites in drinking water and develop adequate countermeasures.

  10. Cryptosporidium spp. in caged exotic psittacines from Brazil: Evaluation of diagnostic methods and molecular characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Elis Domingos; Nakamura, Alex Akira; Nardi, Ana Rita Moraes; Santana, Bruna Nicoleti; da Silva Camargo, Vinicius; Nagata, Walter Bertequini; Bresciani, Katia Denise Saraiva; Meireles, Marcelo Vasconcelos

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of and diagnostic methods for Cryptosporidium spp. in caged adult exotic parrots from Southern and Southeastern Brazil. Oocysts were purified from fecal samples from 463 psittacines by centrifugal-flotation in Sheather's sugar solution. Cryptosporidium spp. were detected by malachite green negative staining and nested PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene. Cryptosporidium species were identified by sequencing nested PCR amplicons. Samples were also tested by duplex real-time PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium galli and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III. The prevalence rates of Cryptosporidium spp. determined by microscopy and nested PCR were 3.0% (14/463) and 5.0% (23/463), respectively. The nested PCR/sequencing identified avian genotype III (1.7%; 8/463), Cryptosporidium parvum (0.9%; 4/463) and Cryptosporidium canis (0.2%; 1/463). Duplex real-time PCR was positive for gastric Cryptosporidium in 9.5% (44/463) of the samples. Among them, 1.9% (9/463) were positive for C. galli, 5.8% (27/463) were positive for avian genotype III and 1.7% (8/463) showed mixed infections with C. galli and avian genotype III. With regards to the positive detection of Cryptosporidium spp., there was no statistically significant difference between nested PCR and microscopic analysis (p = .1237), and a fair agreement existed between them (Kappa = 0.242). A statistically significant difference (p < .0001) and fair agreement (Kappa = 0.317) were obtained between nested PCR/sequencing and duplex real-time PCR for the detection of gastric Cryptosporidium. We determined that nested PCR and duplex real-time PCR are the best options for the detection of Cryptosporidium spp. and gastric Cryptosporidium, respectively, and that avian genotype III is the most common Cryptosporidium genotype/species in psittacines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular characterization of a new genotype of Cryptosporidium from American minks (Mustela vison) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongjun; Zhang, Longxian; Feng, Yaoyu; Ning, Changshen; Jian, Fuchun; Xiao, Lihua; Zhao, Jinfeng; Wang, Yongli

    2008-06-14

    A total of 469 fecal samples were collected from American minks (Mustela vison) on a farm in Hebei Province in China and examined for Cryptosporidium by Sheather's sugar flotation technique and 8 Cryptosporidim isolates were obtained. The partial 18S rRNA, 70kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and actin genes of six isolates were sequenced. Sequence data were analyzed together with known Cryptosporidium spp. and genotypes. Results of this multi-locus genetic characterization indicated that the six Cryptosporidium isolates in this study shared the same sequences of the genes studied and were different from known Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. The closest relative was Cryptosporidium ferret genotype with 7, 22, 2 and 2 nucleotide differences in the 18S rRNA, HSP70, COWP and actin genes, respectively. The homology to ferret genotype at the 18S rRNA locus was 99.1%, which is comparable to that between C. parvum and C. hominis (99.2%), or between C. muris and C. andersoni (99.4%). Therefore, the Cryptosporidium in minks in this study is considered a new genotype, the Cryptosporidium mink genotype.

  12. Cryptosporidium Pig Genotype II in Immunocompetent Man

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Květoňová, Dana; Sak, Bohumil; Ditrich, Oleg

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 6 (2009), s. 982-983 ISSN 1080-6040 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP523/07/P117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : immunocompetent patients * cryptosporidiosis * Cryptosporidium pig genotype II Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 6.794, year: 2009

  13. Cryptosporidium parvum: infectivity and pathogenicity of the 'porcine' genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Heidi L.; Ahrens, Peter; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    2003-01-01

    Genetic studies have demonstrated profound differences between the 'porcine' genotype of Cryptosporidium parvum, versus 'human' and 'bovine' genotypes. The study analysed infectivity and pathogenicity of the 'porcine' genotype (CPP-13 isolate) of C. parvum, and compared the results with published...... evidence for the existence of a new species of Cryptosporidium adapted to pigs....

  14. Cryptosporidium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Of nearly 25 named species and numerous genotypes of Cryptosporidium, two are of special importance relative to human health and food safety: Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, the former with a predilection for humans and the latter a promiscuous species. Genetic tools have been es...

  15. Detection of Cryptosporidium hominis and novel Cryptosporidium bat genotypes in wild and captive Pteropus hosts in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Sabine Eva; Webster, Koa Narelle; Power, Michelle

    2016-10-01

    Spillover of zoonotic pathogens from wildlife to humans has been identified as a primary threat to global health. In contrast, the process of reverse pathogen transmission (zooanthroponosis), whereby pathogens move from humans into wildlife species is still largely unexplored. Globally, increasing urbanisation and habitat loss are driving many wildlife species into urban and regional centres. In Australia, large numbers of flying foxes now live in close proximity to humans, increasing the risk of zooanthroponosis. The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium is an emerging zoonotic parasite that infects a wide range of vertebrates yet there are limited studies on transmission potential of Cryptosporidium between humans and urban wildlife. To explore the presence of zooanthroponosis in flying foxes in Australia the occurrence and diversity of Cryptosporidium was investigated in urbanised wild and captive flying foxes. PCR screening of faecal samples (n=281) from seven wild sites and two captive facilities identified the presence of Cryptosporidium in 3.2% (95% CI 1.5% to 6.0%) of faecal samples. In faecal samples from wild sites Cryptosporidium occurrence was 1.7% (95% CI 0.3% to 4.8%) versus 5.9% (95% CI 2.2% to 12.4%) in samples from captive individuals, with no significant difference between captive and wild sites (p=0.077). Multilocus sequencing using three loci, 18s rDNA, actin and gp60 was used to identify Cryptosporidium in flying fox species. The host specific Cryptosporidium hominis was identified in faecal samples from two captive flying foxes, and one of these samples was confirmed as C. hominis at both actin and gp60. Sequencing of the 18s rDNA also revealed four novel Cryptosporidium genotypes in wild and captive individuals, actin and gp60 amplification and sequencing were unreliable for all four novel genotypes. These novel genotypes have been designated Cryptosporidium bat genotypes VIII-XI. This first report of Cryptosporidium spp. in Australian flying

  16. Biological and Genetic Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis Isolates from Five Hydrographical Basins in Northern Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Maria João; Soares, Sónia; de Lurdes Delgado, Maria; Figueiredo, João; Magalhães, Elisabete Silva; Castro, António; Viana Da Costa, Alexandra; Correia da Costa, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    To understand the situation of water contamination with Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in the northern region of Portugal, we have established a long-term program aimed at pinpointing the sources of surface water and environmental contamination, working with the water-supply industry. Here, we describe the results obtained with raw water samples collected in rivers of the 5 hydrographical basins. A total of 283 samples were analyzed using the Method 1623 EPA, USA. Genetic characterization was performed by PCR and sequencing of genes 18S rRNA of Cryptosporidium spp. and β-giardin of Giardia spp. Infectious stages of the protozoa were detected in 72.8% (206 of 283) of the water samples, with 15.2% (43 of 283) positive for Giardia duodenalis cysts, 9.5% (27 of 283) positive for Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts, and 48.1% (136 of 283) samples positive for both parasites. The most common zoonotic species found were G. duodenalis assemblages A-I, A-II, B, and E genotypes, and Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium andersoni, Cryptosporidium hominis, and Cryptosporidium muris. These results suggest that cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis are important public health issues in northern Portugal. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report evaluating the concentration of environmental stages of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in raw water samples in the northern region of Portugal. PMID:20585525

  17. Prevalence and Genotyping of Cryptosporidium Infection in Pet Parrots in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Zhang, Nian-Zhang; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Zhao, Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Cryptosporidium spp., sometimes leading to severe diarrhea in humans and animals. In the present study, 311 parrots, belonging to four species, namely, Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), Lovebirds (Agapornis sp.), Alexandrine parakeets (Psittacula eupatria), and Cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), from Beijing and Weifang cities, were examined for Cryptosporidium spp. infection. Blood samples of each bird were examined using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and fecal samples were examined by Sheather's sugar flotation technique. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection were 3.22% (10/311) and 0.64% (2/311) by ELISA and Sheather's sugar flotation technique, respectively. Seroprevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in different breeds varied from 0 to 15.39%. Sequencing analysis showed that both positive samples from fecal samples belonged to Cryptosporidium avian genotype V. This is the first report of Cryptosporidium avian genotype V in Budgerigars. The results of the present study provided foundation-data for prevention and control of cryptosporidiosis in pet birds in China.

  18. Molecular detection and prevalence of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. among long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sricharern, Wanat; Inpankaew, Tawin; Keawmongkol, Sarawan; Supanam, Juthamas; Stich, Roger W; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn

    2016-06-01

    Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. are divergent protozoal intestinal parasites that infect human beings and other animals, including non-human primates. Although long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) reside in human communities in Thailand, the prevalence of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. in these primates has not been previously investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate long-tailed macaques living near human communities as possible hosts of these intestinal parasites. In 2014, 200 fecal samples were randomly collected from long-tailed macaques living in different areas of Lopburi province, Thailand, and tested with a panel of PCR assays for Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. G. duodenalis assemblage B was most frequently detected (6%), while assemblage A and an inconclusive assemblage were detected in single samples, for a total G. duodenalis infection rate of 7%. Two samples (1%) tested positive for Cryptosporidium spp., which were both classified as monkey genotypes. No significant associations were found between G. duodenalis infection and sex or location of macaques. This study indicates that long-tailed macaques can carry G. duodenalis and, to a lesser extent, Cryptosporidium spp. monkey genotype. These results warrant education of residents and tourists to limit contact with long-tailed macaques and to take hygienic precautions to mitigate risk of zoonotic and anthroponotic transmission of these parasites between people and macaques. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Subtype analysis of zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium skunk genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenchao; Alderisio, Kerri; Roellig, Dawn M; Elwin, Kristin; Chalmers, Rachel M; Yang, Fengkun; Wang, Yuanfei; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2017-11-01

    Cryptosporidium skunk genotype is a zoonotic pathogen commonly identified in surface water. Thus far, no subtyping tool exists for characterizing its transmission in humans and animals and transport in environment. In this study, a subtyping tool based on the 60kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene previously developed for Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I was used in the characterization of Cryptosporidium skunk genotype in animal and storm runoff samples from a watershed in New York. Altogether, 17 positive samples from this watershed and 5 human and animal specimens from other areas were analyzed. We identified 14 subtypes of Cryptosporidium skunk genotype, 11 of which were seen in the watershed. In phylogenetic analysis, these subtypes belonged to 4 subtype families (XVIa, XVIb, XVIc, and XVId). No host-adapted subtypes were identified and the two subtypes in humans were genetically similar to some in raccoons, otters, and storm runoff samples from the watershed. The characteristics of gp60 protein sequences of the Cryptosporidium skunk genotype are similar to those of other Cryptosporidium species, but only its XVIb subtype family has a putative furin cleavage site. This subtyping tool might be useful in characterizing Cryptosporidium skunk genotype in clinical and environmental samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Cryptosporidium testudinis sp. n., Cryptosporidium ducismarci Traversa, 2010 and Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype III (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in tortoises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezkova, Jana; Horcickova, Michaela; Hlaskova, Lenka; Sak, Bohumil; Kvetonova, Dana; Novak, Jan; Hofmannova, Lada; McEvoy, John; Kvac, Martin

    2016-10-14

    Understanding of the diversity of species of Cryptosporidium Tyzzer, 1910 in tortoises remains incomplete due to the limited number of studies on these hosts. The aim of the present study was to characterise the genetic diversity and biology of cryptosporidia in tortoises of the family Testudinidae Batsch. Faecal samples were individually collected immediately after defecation and were screened for presence of cryptosporidia by microscopy using aniline-carbol-methyl violet staining, and by PCR amplification and sequence analysis targeting the small subunit rRNA (SSU), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and actin genes. Out of 387 faecal samples from 16 tortoise species belonging to 11 genera, 10 and 46 were positive for cryptosporidia by microscopy and PCR, respectively. All samples positive by microscopy were also PCR positive. Sequence analysis of amplified genes revealed the presence of the Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I (n = 22), C. ducismarci Traversa, 2010 (n = 23) and tortoise genotype III (n = 1). Phylogenetic analyses of SSU, COWP and actin gene sequences revealed that Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I and C. ducismarci are genetically distinct from previously described species of Cryptosporidium. Oocysts of Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I, measuring 5.8-6.9 µm × 5.3-6.5 µm, are morphologically distinguishable from C. ducismarci, measuring 4.4-5.4 µm × 4.3-5.3 µm. Oocysts of Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I and C. ducismarci obtained from naturally infected Russian tortoises (Testudo horsfieldii Gray) were infectious for the same tortoise but not for Reeve's turtles (Mauremys reevesii [Gray]), common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis [Linnaeus]), zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata [Vieillot]) and SCID mice (Mus musculus Linnaeus). The prepatent period was 11 and 6 days post infection (DPI) for Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype I and C. ducismarci, respectively; the patent period was longer than 200 days for both cryptosporidia

  1. The first report of Cryptosporidium spp. in Microtus fuscus (Qinghai vole) and Ochotona curzoniae (wild plateau pika) in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueyong; Jian, Yingna; Li, Xiuping; Ma, Liqing; Karanis, Gabriele; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2018-05-01

    Cryptosporidium is one of the most important genera of intestinal zoonotic pathogens, which can infect various hosts and cause diarrhoea. There is little available information about the molecular characterisation and epidemiological prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. in Microtus fuscus (Qinghai vole) and Ochotona curzoniae (wild plateau pika) in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau area of Qinghai Province, Northwest China. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine Cryptosporidium species/genotypes and epidemiological prevalence in these mammals by detecting the SSU rRNA gene by PCR amplification. The Cryptosporidium spp. infection rate was 8.9% (8/90) in Qinghai voles and 6.25% (4/64) in wild plateau pikas. Positive samples were successfully sequenced, and the following Cryptosporidium species were found: C. parvum, C. ubiquitum, C. canis and a novel genotype in Qinghai voles and C. parvum and a novel genotype in wild plateau pikas. This is the first report of Cryptosporidium infections in M. fuscus and wild O. curzoniae in Northwest China. The results suggest the possibility of Cryptosporidium species transmission among these two hosts, the environment, other animals and humans and provide useful molecular epidemiological data for the prevention and control of Cryptosporidium infections in wild animals and the surrounding environments. The results of the present study indicate the existence of Cryptosporidium species infections that have potential public health significance. This is the first report of Cryptosporidium multi-species infections in these animal hosts.

  2. Infection rate of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in cashmere, dairy and meat goats in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xian-Qi; Tian, Ge-Ru; Ren, Guan-Jing; Yu, Zheng-Qing; Lok, James Barron; Zhang, Long-Xian; Wang, Xue-Ting; Song, Jun-Ke; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2016-07-01

    Cryptosporidiosis, microsporidiosis, and giardiasis contribute significantly to the high burden of zoonotic diarrhea worldwide. Goats constitute an important species in animal agriculture by providing cashmere wool, meat, and dairy products for human consumption. However, zoonotic pathogens with the potential to cause morbidity and to degrade production have been reported frequently in goats recently. The present study examined 629 fecal specimens from goats, including 315 cashmere goats, 170 dairy goats and 144 meat goats, in multiple cities of Shaanxi and Henan provinces, northwestern and central China, to investigate the infection rate and species/assemblages/genotypes of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi. Of these samples, 274 (43.6%) were positive for three zoonotic pathogens, including 80 (12.7%), 104 (16.5%) and 179 (28.5%) for G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi, respectively. Infections with G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi existed in meat, dairy and cashmere goats, with the highest infection rate of each pathogen being observed in meat goats. DNA sequencing of the SSU rRNA gene from 104 Cryptosporidium-positive specimens revealed existence of Cryptosporidium xiaoi, and the zoonotic parasites Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium ubiquitum. Genotyping of G. duodenalis based on the triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) gene identified parasites from zoonotic assemblage A in four cashmere goats and the animal-adapted assemblage E in a group of 76 goats that included cashmere, dairy and meat animals. Polymorphisms in the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer characterized E. bieneusi genotype CHG1 and a novel genotype named as SX1 in both dairy and cashmere goats, genotypes CHS7 and COSI in meat goats, the genotype CHG2 in dairy goats, and the human-pathogenic genotype BEB6 in dairy and meat goats. This is the first detailed study to compare infection rate of the zoonotic protozoan pathogens

  3. Molecular characterization and first report of Cryptosporidium genotypes in human population in the Slovak Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrincová, Antónia; Valenčáková, Alexandra; Luptáková, Lenka; Ondriska, František; Kalinová, Jana; Halánová, Monika; Danišová, Oľga; Jarčuška, Pavol

    2015-12-01

    In our study, we examined 91 fecal samples from five different groups of people containing HIV patients, hemodialysis patients, kidney transplant recipients, immunocompetent humans without clinical signs, and humans with suspected cryptosporidiosis. The purpose of our study was to determine species and genotype composition of representatives of Cryptosporidium spp. using PCR analysis of small subunit ribosomal RNA gene and 60-kDa glycoprotein gene and examine their phylogenetic relationship. In HIV-positive/AIDS-infected group of patients and in hemodialysis patients, no presence of Cryptosporidium species was detected. In two kidney transplant recipients, we detected species/genotypes Cryptosporidium parvum IIaA13G1T1R1 (KT355488) and Cryptosporidium hominis IaA11G2R8 (KT355489) and in two immunocompetent patients with clinical symptoms, we identified Cryptosporidium muris and C. hominis IbA10G2T1 (KT355490). In the group of healthy immunocompetent individuals without clinical signs, we identified species/genotype C. hominis IbA11G2 (KT355491) in one sample. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Existence of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts and Giardia spp. cysts in well water in Nineveh governorate

    OpenAIRE

    R. G. Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    The study included examination of 110 water samples from well distributed in Mosul city and few towns and villages around it from May 2009 to March 2010 for detection of Cryptosporidium spp oocysts and Giardia spp cysts in well water. The results revealed that the prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts was 16.36% while the prevalence of Giardia cysts was 12.72%. The percentages of prevalence with Cryptosporidium and Giardia were in high rate in Bartilla and some villages around it 20% for Cryp...

  5. Between-year variation and spatial dynamics of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. infections in naturally infected rodent populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajer, A

    2008-12-01

    Prevalence and abundance of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. infections were studied over the 8-year period in 3 species of rodents in N.E. Poland (bank vole Myodes glareolus-1523; yellow-necked mouse Apodemus flavicollis- 638; common vole Microtus arvalis- 419). Prevalence was 53.8, 28.1 and 62.3% respectively for Cryptosporidium spp. and 58.3, 24.4 and 74.2% respectively for Giardia spp. Prevalence and abundance of infection varied markedly across 8 years of the study with 1998 and 2002 being years of higher prevalence and abundance, following changes in the densities of host species. The distribution of intestinal protozoa in forest rodents did not vary in the 3 isolated sites during the 4-year study. In the case of Cryptosporidium, fewer older animals carried infection and infections of the oldest bank and common voles were relatively milder. In the case of Giardia in yellow-necked mice, infections were more common in older age classes (2 and 3). The two species showed significant co-occurrence and in animals carrying both species there was a strong significant positive correlation between abundance of infection with each. These data are discussed in relation to the parasite genotypes identified in this region and in respect of the role of various ecological factors in shaping of intestinal protozoa communities.

  6. Identification of novel Cryptosporidium genotypes in kangaroos from Western Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rongchang; Fenwick, Stanley; Potter, Abbey; Ng, Josephine; Ryan, Una

    2011-06-30

    A total of 763 faecal samples were collected from western grey kangaroos (Macropus fuliginosus) in Western Australia and screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium by PCR at the 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) locus. Samples that were positive at the 18S locus were also amplified at the actin locus. The overall prevalence was 9.3% (71/763). At the 18S rRNA locus, sequences were obtained for 28 of the 71 positives. Sequence analysis identified four species; Cryptosporidium fayeri in seven isolates, Cryptosporidium marcopodum in four isolates, Cryptosporidium xiaoi in six isolates and a novel genotype (kangaroo genotype I) in eleven isolates. Analysis at the actin locus confirmed the genetic distinctness of the novel genotype. The results of the present study indicate that in addition to C. fayeri and C. marcopodum, kangaroos may be capable of being infected with a wider range of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes including livestock species such as C. xiaoi. The novel genotype identified in the kangaroos most likely represents a cryptic species that requires further analyses to confirm its species status. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Infectivity of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum Genotype 2 Isolates in Immunosuppressed Mongolian Gerbils

    OpenAIRE

    Baishanbo, Asiya; Gargala, Gilles; Delaunay, Agnès; François, Arnaud; Ballet, Jean-Jacques; Favennec, Loïc

    2005-01-01

    One-month-old dexamethasone-immunosuppressed Mongolian gerbils were challenged with 1 oocyst to 2 × 105 oocysts from two isolates genotyped as Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum (genotype 2), respectively. A similar dose-dependent gut infection was obtained, and the initial genotype maintained for 21 to 22 days. The data suggest that immunosuppressed gerbils provide a reliable rodent model of persistent C. hominis infection.

  8. Cryptosporidium hominis subtypes and Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotypes in HIV-infected persons in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayinmode, A B; Zhang, H; Dada-Adegbola, H O; Xiao, L

    2014-06-01

    Cryptosporidium and Enterocytozoon are common opportunistic pathogens in HIV+ patients in developing countries, especially those do not have access to antiretroviral therapy. To determine the distribution of genotypes/subtypes of Cryptosporidium and Enterocytozoon bieneusi, faecal specimens were collected from 132 HIV+ persons attending a tertiary hospital in Ibadan, Nigeria. By polymerase chain reaction, eight and ten patients were identified as positive for Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi, respectively. Seven of the Cryptosporidium specimens were identified as C. hominis, while the remaining one as the new species C. viatorum recently identified in the United Kingdom. DNA sequencing of the 60-kDa glycoprotein gene showed that the C. hominis belonged to three common subtype families: Ia (in three patients), Ib (in one patient) and Ie (in one patient). In contrast, DNA sequencing of the E. bieneusi internal transcribed spacer products showed the occurrence of genotypes associated with both humans (Peru 8 in one patient, Nig2 in two patients and a new genotype in one patient) and animals (D in one patient and Type IV in five patients). Low CD4+ cell count was identified as a risk factor for both cryptosporidiosis and microsporidiosis. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Cryptosporidium spp. in wild, laboratory, and pet rodents in china: prevalence and molecular characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chaochao; Zhang, Longxian; Wang, Rongjun; Jian, Fuchun; Zhang, Sumei; Ning, Changshen; Wang, Helei; Feng, Chao; Wang, Xinwei; Ren, Xupeng; Qi, Meng; Xiao, Lihua

    2009-12-01

    To understand the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in rodents in China and to assess the potential role of rodents as a source for human cryptosporidiosis, 723 specimens from 18 rodent species were collected from four provinces of China and examined between August 2007 and December 2008 by microscopy after using Sheather's sugar flotation and modified acid-fast staining. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 83 specimens, with an overall prevalence of 11.5%. Phodopus sungorus, Phodopus campbelli, and Rattus tanezumi were new reported hosts of Cryptosporidium. The genotypes and subtypes of Cryptosporidium strains in microscopy-positive specimens were further identified by PCR and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA and the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) genes. In addition to Cryptosporidium parvum, C. muris, C. andersoni, C. wrairi, ferret genotype, and mouse genotype I, four new Cryptosporidium genotypes were identified, including the hamster genotype, chipmunk genotype III, and rat genotypes II and III. Mixed Cryptosporidium species/genotypes were found in 10.8% of Cryptosporidium-positive specimens. Sequence analysis of the gp60 gene showed that C. parvum strains in pet Siberian chipmunks and hamsters were all of the subtype IIdA15G1, which was found previously in a human isolate in The Netherlands and lambs in Spain. The gp60 sequences of C. wrairi and the Cryptosporidium ferret genotype and mouse genotype I were also obtained. These findings suggest that pet rodents may be potential reservoirs of zoonotic Cryptosporidium species and subtypes.

  10. Detection of Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba spp. and Monocercomonas spp. in the gastrointestinal tract of snakes by in-situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, B; Kübber-Heiss, A; Weissenböck, H; Schmidt, P

    2008-01-01

    This report describes the development of a diagnostic method for protozoal infections of the gastrointestinal tract of captive snakes, based on chromogenic in-situ hybridization with probes designed for the detection of 18S rRNA genes from Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba spp., Entamoeba invadens and Monocercomonas spp. The specificity of the probes was confirmed with the help of parasitic cultures and gene sequence analysis. The probes gave clear positive signals. Of 182 snakes examined, seven were positive with the Cryptosporidium probe, 13 with the Entamoeba probe (of which nine were also positive with the E. invadens probe), and 34 with the Monocercomonas probe.

  11. Existence of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts and Giardia spp. cysts in well water in Nineveh governorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. G. Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The study included examination of 110 water samples from well distributed in Mosul city and few towns and villages around it from May 2009 to March 2010 for detection of Cryptosporidium spp oocysts and Giardia spp cysts in well water. The results revealed that the prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts was 16.36% while the prevalence of Giardia cysts was 12.72%. The percentages of prevalence with Cryptosporidium and Giardia were in high rate in Bartilla and some villages around it 20% for Cryptosporidium and 17.14% for Giardia, the low rates were in Mosul city 10% for both protozoa. The highest prevalence rate of Cryptosporidium was in March 38.46% and the lowest was in November and July 0%. The highest prevalence rate of Giardia was in October 23.53% and the lowest rate in July 0%. This first study shows the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts in well water (Ground water in Nineveh governorate.

  12. Equine cryptosporidial infection associated with Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype in Algeria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laatamna, A.E.; Wágnerová, P.; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Aissi, M.; Rost, M.; Kváč, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 197, 1-2 (2013), s. 350-353 ISSN 0304-4017 Grant - others:GAJU(CZ) 022/2010/Z; GAJU(CZ) 011/2013/Z Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : horses * Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype * PCR * SSU * GP60 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.545, year: 2013

  13. Molecular Genotyping of Viable Cryptosporidium Oocysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryptosporidium is a chlorination-resistant protozoan parasite that causes a self-limiting diarrheal disease in the immunocompetent or severe chronic diarrhea in the immunocompromised. Two species, C. parvum and C. hominis, cause most cases of cryptosporidiosis in humans, while C...

  14. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in Children from Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Olivia; González-Díaz, Mariana; Garibay-Escobar, Adriana; Burgara-Estrella, Alexel; Cano, Manuel; Durazo, María; Bernal, Rosa M.; Hernandez, Jesús; Xiao, Lihua

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a parasitic disease caused by Cryptosporidium spp. In immunocompetent individuals, it usually causes an acute and self-limited diarrhea; in infants, infection with Cryptosporidium spp. can cause malnutrition and growth retardation, and declined cognitive ability. In this study, we described for the first time the distribution of C. parvum and C. hominis subtypes in 12 children in Mexico by sequence characterization of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene of Cryptosporidium. Altogether, 7 subtypes belonging to 4 subtype families of C. hominis (Ia, Ib, Id and Ie) and 1 subtype family of C. parvum (IIa) were detected, including IaA14R3, IaA15R3, IbA10G2, IdA17, IeA11G3T3, IIaA15G2R1 and IIaA16G1R1. The frequency of the subtype families and subtypes in the samples analyzed in this study differed from what was observed in other countries. PMID:24755606

  15. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in children from Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Valenzuela

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis is a parasitic disease caused by Cryptosporidium spp. In immunocompetent individuals, it usually causes an acute and self-limited diarrhea; in infants, infection with Cryptosporidium spp. can cause malnutrition and growth retardation, and declined cognitive ability. In this study, we described for the first time the distribution of C. parvum and C. hominis subtypes in 12 children in Mexico by sequence characterization of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60 gene of Cryptosporidium. Altogether, 7 subtypes belonging to 4 subtype families of C. hominis (Ia, Ib, Id and Ie and 1 subtype family of C. parvum (IIa were detected, including IaA14R3, IaA15R3, IbA10G2, IdA17, IeA11G3T3, IIaA15G2R1 and IIaA16G1R1. The frequency of the subtype families and subtypes in the samples analyzed in this study differed from what was observed in other countries.

  16. A new genotype of Cryptosporidium from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuehan; He, Tingmei; Zhong, Zhijun; Zhang, Hemin; Wang, Rongjun; Dong, Haiju; Wang, Chengdong; Li, Desheng; Deng, Jiabo; Peng, Guangneng; Zhang, Longxian

    2013-10-01

    Fifty-seven fecal samples were collected from giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in the China Conservation and Research Centre for the Giant Panda (CCRCGP) in Sichuan and examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts by Sheather's sugar flotation technique. An 18-year-old male giant panda was Cryptosporidium positive, with oocysts of an average size of 4.60×3.99 μm (n=50). The isolate was genetically analyzed using the partial 18S rRNA, 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and actin genes. Multi-locus genetic characterization indicated that the present isolate was different from known Cryptosporidium species and genotypes. The closest relative was the Cryptosporidium bear genotype, with 11, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the 18S rRNA, HSP70, and actin genes, respectively. Significant differences were also observed in the COWP gene compared to Cryptosporidium mongoose genotype. The homology to the bear genotype at the 18S rRNA locus was 98.6%, which is comparable to that between Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis (99.2%), or between Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium andersoni (99.4%). Therefore, the Cryptosporidium in giant pandas in this study is considered as a new genotype: the Cryptosporidium giant panda genotype. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cryptosporidium galli and novel Cryptosporidium avian genotype VI in North American red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chelladurai, J.J.; Clark, M.E.; Kváč, Martin; Holubová, Nikola; Khan, E.; Stenger, B.L.S.; Giddings, C.W.; McEvoy, J.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 5 (2016), s. 1901-1906 ISSN 0932-0113 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptosporidium * Red-winged blackbird * Passerines * Cryptosporidium galli * Avian genotypeVI * Proventriculus * Intestine Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.329, year: 2016

  18. The first report on Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium pig genotype II in Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa) (Czech Republic)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němejc, K.; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Hanzal, V.; Jeníková, Martina; Kváč, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 184, 2/4 (2012), 122-125 ISSN 0304-4017 Grant - others:Mšk(CZ) 6007665806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518; CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Cryptosporidium suis * Cryptosporidium pig genotype II * Eurasian wild boar * SSU * PCR Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.381, year: 2012

  19. Zoonotic potential of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. and prevalence of intestinal parasites in young dogs from different populations on Prince Edward Island, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehlinger, Fabienne D; Greenwood, Spencer J; McClure, J Trenton; Conboy, Gary; O'Handley, Ryan; Barkema, Herman W

    2013-09-23

    The prevalence of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and other intestinal parasites was determined in dogs Intestinal parasites isolated included G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., Toxocara canis, Isospora spp. and Uncinaria stenocephala. To estimate the zoonotic risk associated with these infections, genotypes of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. were determined using 16S rRNA and Hsp70 gene sequencing, respectively. Dogs from the pet store had the highest prevalence of intestinal parasites (78%, 95% CI: 68-88%), followed by the private veterinary clinics (49%, 95% CI: 37-60%), and the local animal shelter (34%, 95% CI: 22-46%). The majority G. duodenalis belonged to host-adapted assemblages D (47%, 95% CI: 31-64%) and C (26%, 95% CI: 13-43%), respectively. Zoonotic assemblages A and B were isolated alone or in mixed infections from 16% (95% CI: 6-31%) of G. duodenalis-positive dogs. All Cryptosporidium spp. were the host-adapted C. canis. While host-adapted, non-zoonotic G. duodenalis genotypes were more common, the presence of G. duodenalis assemblages A and B, T. canis, and U. stenocephala suggests that these dogs may present a zoonotic risk. The zoonotic risk from Cryptosporidium-infected dogs was minimal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in diarrhoeic patients in the Qikiqtani Region, Nunavut, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Iqbal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the prevalences of infection with the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in humans appear to be relatively high in the Canadian North, their transmission patterns are poorly understood. Objective: To determine the detection rate and the molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in diarrhoeic patients in the Qikiqtani (Baffin Island Region of Nunavut, Canada, in order to better understand the burden of illness and the potential mechanisms of transmission. Study design/methods: Diarrhoeal stool specimens (n=108 submitted to the Qikiqtani General Hospital for clinical testing were also tested for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis using epifluorescence microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. DNA sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analyses were performed on PCR-positive specimens to determine the species, genotypes and sub-genotypes of the parasites. Results: Cryptosporidium was detected in 15.7% of the diarrhoeic patients, while Giardia was detected in 4.6%. DNA sequencing of a fragment of the small subunit rRNA gene indicated that all of the Cryptosporidium amplicons had a 100% homology to C. parvum, and a gp60 assay showed that all aligned with C. parvum sub-genotype IIa. Microsatellite analysis revealed 3 cases of sub-genotype IIaA15G2R1, 2 of IIaA15G1R and 1 case each of sub-genotypes IIaA16G1R1 and IIaA15R1. For Giardia, results based on the amplification of both the 16S rRNA gene and the gdh gene were generally in agreement, and both DNA sequencing and RFLP demonstrated the presence of the G. duodenalis Assemblage B genotype. Conclusions: Both C. parvum and G. duodenalis Assemblage B were present in human diarrhoeal stool specimens from Nunavut, which was suggestive of zoonotic transmission, although human-to-human transmission cannot be ruled out. To fully understand the public health significance of the

  1. Genotypic identification of Cryptosporidium spp. isolated from hiv-infected patients and immunocompetent children of São Paulo, Brazil Identificação genotípica de Cryptosporidium spp. isolados a partir de pacientes com HIV e crianças imunocompetentes de São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Julia Urias dos Santos Araújo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium isolates identified in fourteen stool samples, collected from five HIV-infected patients and nine immunocompetent children, living in the Sate of São Paulo, Brazil, were submitted to a molecular analysis using a nested PCR followed of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP, for genetic characterization. The analysis was based on digestion with RsaI restriction enzyme of a DNA fragment amplified from the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP gene. Based on this analysis, four samples were identified as Cryptosporidium parvum, eight as Cryptosporidium hominis and two presented a profile that correspondedto Cryptosporidium meleagridis when compared to the standards used in the analysis. The use of molecular methods can be helpful to identify source of infections and risk factors related to Cryptosporidium infection in our communities.Isolados de Cryptosporidium identificados em quatorze amostras de fezes, coletadas de cinco pacientes com infecção por HIV e de nove crianças imunocompetentes, residentes no estado de São Paulo, Brasil, foram submetidos a análise molecular por Nested-PCR, seguido da caracterização genética por polimorfismo do tamanho do fragmento de restrição (RFLP. A análise foi baseada na digestão, com a enzima de restrição RsaI, de um fragmento de DNA amplificado do gene que codifica a proteína de parede do oocisto de Cryptosporidium (COWP. Baseado nesta análise, quando comparadas aos padrões utilizados, quatro amostras foram identificadas como Cryptosporidium parvum, oito como Cryptosporidium hominis e duas apresentaram um perfil correspondente ao de Cryptosporidium meleagridis. O uso de métodos moleculares pode ser útil para identificar a fonte das infecções e os fatores de risco relacionados à infecção por Cryptosporidium em nossas comunidades.

  2. Prevalence and Genotyping of Cryptosporidium Infection in Pet Parrots in North China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Zhang, Nian-Zhang; Zhao, Guang-Hui; Zhao, Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Cryptosporidium spp., sometimes leading to severe diarrhea in humans and animals. In the present study, 311 parrots, belonging to four species, namely, Budgerigars (Melopsittacus undulatus), Lovebirds (Agapornis sp.), Alexandrine parakeets (Psittacula eupatria), and Cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus), from Beijing and Weifang cities, were examined for Cryptosporidium spp. infection. Blood samples of each bird were examined using enzyme linked...

  3. First molecular investigation of Cryptosporidium spp. in young calves in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhouda, Djahida; Hakem, Ahcène; Sannella, Anna Rosa; Benhouda, Afaf; Cacciò, Simone M

    2017-01-01

    To date, no information is available on the prevalence and genetic identity of Cryptosporidium spp. in cattle in Algeria. In this study, 17 dairy farms in the province of Batna, located in the northeast of the country, were visited to collect 132 fecal samples from young calves (< 8 weeks old). Samples were examined microscopically using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast staining method, and at least one sample per farm was submitted for molecular analysis. Amplification of a fragment of the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene was positive for 24 of the 61 samples (40%), and sequence analysis identified three species, namely Cryptosporidium bovis (n = 14), C. ryanae (n = 6), and C. parvum (n = 4). The C. parvum IIaA13G2R1 subtype, an uncommon zoonotic subtype, was identified in two isolates from a single farm by sequencing a fragment of the GP60 gene. This is the first report about genotyping and subtyping of Cryptosporidium in calves in Algeria. © D. Benhouda et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  4. Genotyping Cryptosporidium andersoni in cattle in Shaanxi Province, Northwestern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Hui Zhao

    Full Text Available The present study examined the prevalence and genotypes of Cryptosporidium andersoni in cattle in Shaanxi province, China. A total of 2071 fecal samples (847 from Qinchuan cattle and 1224 from dairy cattle were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts, and 70 samples (3.4% were C. andersoni-positive and those positive samples were identified by PCR amplification of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA and the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP genes. C. andersoni was the only species found in the examined cattle in this province. Fifty-seven C. andersoni isolates were characterized into 5 MLST subtypes using multilocus sequence typing analysis, including a new subtype in the native beef breed Qinchuan cattle. All of these C. andersoni isolates presented a clonal genetic structure. These findings provide new insights into the genetic structure of C. andersoni isolates in Shaanxi province and basic data of Cryptosporidium prevalence status, which in turn have implications for controlling cryptosporidiosis in this province.

  5. Cryptosporidium spp. in Wild, Laboratory, and Pet Rodents in China: Prevalence and Molecular Characterization▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chaochao; Zhang, Longxian; Wang, Rongjun; Jian, Fuchun; Zhang, Sumei; Ning, Changshen; Wang, Helei; Feng, Chao; Wang, Xinwei; Ren, Xupeng; Qi, Meng; Xiao, Lihua

    2009-01-01

    To understand the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in rodents in China and to assess the potential role of rodents as a source for human cryptosporidiosis, 723 specimens from 18 rodent species were collected from four provinces of China and examined between August 2007 and December 2008 by microscopy after using Sheather's sugar flotation and modified acid-fast staining. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 83 specimens, with an overall prevalence of 11.5%. Phodopus sungorus, Phodopus campbelli, and Rattus tanezumi were new reported hosts of Cryptosporidium. The genotypes and subtypes of Cryptosporidium strains in microscopy-positive specimens were further identified by PCR and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA and the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) genes. In addition to Cryptosporidium parvum, C. muris, C. andersoni, C. wrairi, ferret genotype, and mouse genotype I, four new Cryptosporidium genotypes were identified, including the hamster genotype, chipmunk genotype III, and rat genotypes II and III. Mixed Cryptosporidium species/genotypes were found in 10.8% of Cryptosporidium-positive specimens. Sequence analysis of the gp60 gene showed that C. parvum strains in pet Siberian chipmunks and hamsters were all of the subtype IIdA15G1, which was found previously in a human isolate in The Netherlands and lambs in Spain. The gp60 sequences of C. wrairi and the Cryptosporidium ferret genotype and mouse genotype I were also obtained. These findings suggest that pet rodents may be potential reservoirs of zoonotic Cryptosporidium species and subtypes. PMID:19820152

  6. Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis as pathogenic contaminants of water in Galicia, Spain: the need for safe drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Hermida, José Antonio; González-Warleta, Marta; Mezo, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to detect the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in drinking water treatments plants (DWTPs) in Galicia (NW Spain) and to identify which species and genotype of these pathogenic protozoans are present in the water. Samples of untreated water (surface or ground water sources) and of treated drinking water (in total, 254 samples) were collected from 127 DWTPs and analysed by an immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and by PCR. Considering the untreated water samples, Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 69 samples (54.3%) by IFAT, and DNA of this parasite was detected in 57 samples (44.8%) by PCR, whereas G. duodenalis was detected in 76 samples (59.8%) by IFAT and in 56 samples (44.0%) by PCR. Considering the treated drinking water samples, Cryptosporidium spp. was detected in 52 samples (40.9%) by IFAT, and the parasite DNA was detected in 51 samples (40.1%) by PCR, whereas G. duodenalis was detected in 58 samples (45.6%) by IFAT and in 43 samples (33.8%) by PCR. The percentage viability of the (oo)cysts ranged between 90.0% and 95.0% in all samples analysed. Cryptosporidium andersoni, C. hominis, C. parvum and assemblages A-I, A-II, E of G. duodenalis were identified. The results indicate that Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis are widespread in the environment and that DWTPs are largely ineffective in reducing/inactivating these pathogens in drinking water destined for human and animal consumption in Galicia. In conclusion, the findings suggest the need for better monitoring of water quality and identification of sources of contamination. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Occurence of Cryptosporidium spp. in low quality water and on vegetables in Kumasi, Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T. B.; Petersen, H. H.; Abaidoo, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Protozoan parasites belonging to the genus Cryptosporidium are transmitted e.g. by food and water and may cause severe diarrhoea, dehydration, weight loss and malnutrition. Ingestion of 10 oocysts can lead to infection and pathogenic symptoms. Thus, to characterize Cryptosporidium spp. contaminat...

  8. Unusual Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotypes and Cryptosporidium hominis subtypes in HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinbo, Frederick O; Okaka, Christopher E; Omoregie, Richard; Adamu, Haileeyesus; Xiao, Lihua

    2013-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons are commonly infected with Cryptosporidium species and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in both developed and developing countries, particularly patients with CD4+ cell counts below 200 cells/μL; 285 HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were enrolled in this study, and both stool and blood specimens were collected from participants. The stool specimens were analyzed and typed for E. bieneusi and Cryptosporidium spp. by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. CD4 count was analyzed using flow cytometry. E. bieneusi and Cryptosporidium were detected in 18 (6.3%) and 4 (1.4%) patients, respectively. The E. bieneusi detected mostly belonged to a new genotype group that, thus far, has only been found in a few humans: genotype Nig4 in 2 patients and two new genotypes related to Nig4 in 12 patients. The Cryptosporidium detected included C. hominis (two patients), C. parvum (one patient), and C. felis (one patient), with the two C. hominis infections belonging to an unusual subtype family. Additional studies are required to determine whether some E. bieneusi genotypes and C. hominis subtypes are more prevalent in HIV patients on HAART.

  9. Natural infection with two genotypes of Cryptosporidium in red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvác, Martin; Hofmannová, Lada; Bertolino, Sandro; Wauters, Luc; Tosi, Guido; Modrý, David

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the genotypes of Cryptosporidium infecting red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris L.) in two areas of the Western Alps in Italy. Examination of 141 faecal samples from 70 red squirrels revealed oocysts of Cryptosporidium in 17 animals (24.3%). Based on 18S rRNA gene sequencing, two genotypes of Cryptosporidium species were found: 15 squirrels were positive for the Cryptosporidium ferret genotype and 2 for the Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I. The occurrence and intensity of Cryptosporidium infection did not differ between the study areas or sex. More than 85% of the positive animals were adults; however no difference was found between Cryptosporidium infection in the juvenile and adult age groups. Oocysts of the Cryptosporidium ferret genotype measured 5.5 +/- 0.3 x 5.2 +/- 0.2 microm (shape index 1.06) and the Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I 5.8 +/- 0.3 x 5.4 +/- 0.3 microm (shape index 1.07). Neonatal and adult CD1 and BABL/c mice inoculated with 1 x 10(3) fresh oocysts of both genotypes did not produce detectable infection.

  10. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. from fecal samples of birds kept in captivity in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Alex Akira; Simões, Daniel Castendo; Antunes, Rômulo Godik; da Silva, Deuvânia Carvalho; Meireles, Marcelo Vasconcelos

    2009-12-03

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in birds kept in captivity in Brazil. A total of 966 samples from 18 families of birds was collected and stored in 5% potassium dichromate solution at 4 degrees C until processing. Oocysts were purified in Sheather sugar solution following extraction of genomic DNA. Molecular analyses were performed using nested-PCR for amplification of fragments of the 18S subunit of rRNA gene and of the actin gene. Amplification of Cryptosporidium DNA fragments was obtained in 47 (4.86%) samples. Sequencing of amplified fragments and phylogenetic analyses allowed the identification of Cryptosporidium baileyi in a black vulture (Coragyps atratus), a domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) and a saffron finch (Sicalis flaveola); Cryptosporidium galli in canaries (Serinus canaria), a cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus) and lesser seed-finches (Oryzoborus angolensis); Cryptosporidium meleagridis in a domestic chicken (G. g. domesticus); Cryptosporidium parvum in a cockatiel (N. hollandicus); Cryptosporidium avian genotype I in a canary (S. canaria) and an Indian peafowl (Pavo cristatus); Cryptosporidium avian genotype II in ostriches (Struthio camelus) and Cryptosporidium avian genotype III in a cockatiel (N. hollandicus) and a peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicolis).

  11. Detection and Differentiation of Cryptosporidium spp. in Human Clinical Samples by Use of Real-Time PCR▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Stephen J.; Robinson, Guy; Elwin, Kristin; Chalmers, Rachel M.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR has the potential to streamline detection and identification of Cryptosporidium spp. in human clinical samples. In the present article, we report the first such assay to allow not only detection and differentiation of the most common human pathogens, Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, but also simultaneous amplification of a region of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, permitting direct sequence analysis to identify any Cryptosporidium species. An internal control is incorporated to identify the presence of PCR inhibitors. Analytical sensitivity was determined to be as low as 200 oocysts per gram of feces processed, equivalent to 2 oocysts per PCR. The C. hominis and C. parvum PCRs specifically detected only species/genotypes in their respective target clades. Diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, evaluated against a widely used conventional nested SSU rRNA gene PCR as a nominated gold standard using a panel of 258 (151 positive and 107 negative) samples, were 100% and 99.1%, respectively. The assay agreed with PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein gene for 134 of 136 (98.5%) samples tested prospectively and typed two additional isolates. The real-time PCR assay was sensitive, specific, and reproducible and significantly improved laboratory work flow and turnaround times. PMID:21177904

  12. Literature Reference for Cryptosporidium spp. (Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 2007. 73(13): 4218–4225)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procedures are described for analysis of drinking water samples and may be adapted for assessment of solid, particulate, aerosol, and liquid samples. The method uses real-time PCR for identification of Cryptosporidium spp.

  13. Detection and molecular diversity of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in sheltered dogs and cats in Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Horacio; Cano, Lourdes; de Lucio, Aida; Bailo, Begoña; de Mingo, Marta Hernández; Cardona, Guillermo A; Fernández-Basterra, José A; Aramburu-Aguirre, Juan; López-Molina, Nuria; Carmena, David

    2017-06-01

    Domestic dogs and cats may act as natural reservoirs of a large number of zoonotic pathogens, including the enteric parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp., the most relevant protozoan species causing gastrointestinal disease worldwide. A cross-sectional epidemiological study aiming to assess the prevalence and molecular diversity of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. was conducted in an animal rescue centre in the province of Álava (Northern Spain). A total of 194 and 65 faecal dropping samples from individual dogs and cats, respectively, were collected between November 2013 and June 2016. G. duodenalis cysts and Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected by direct fluorescence microscopy and PCR-based methods targeting the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene of these parasites. Overall, G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 33% (63/194) and 4.1% (8/194) of dogs, and 9.2% (6/65) and 4.6% (3/65) of cats, respectively. G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium co-infections were observed in 1.5% (3/194) of dogs, but not in cats. No significant differences in infection rates could be demonstrated among dogs or cats according to their sex, age group, status, or geographical origin. Multi-locus sequence-based genotyping of the glutamate dehydrogenase and β-giardin genes of G. duodenalis allowed the characterization of 19 canine isolates that were unambiguously assigned to sub-assemblages AII (n=7), BIII (n=1), and BIV (n=7), and assemblages C (n=3) and D (n=1). Two feline isolates were genotyped as assemblages A and F, respectively. No mixed assemblage or sub-assemblage infections were identified. C. canis (n=5) and C. hominis (n=1) were the Cryptosporidium species found in dogs, whereas C. felis (n=1) was identified in cats. The finding of G. duodenalis sub-assemblages AII, BIII, and BIV circulating in dogs (but not cats) may have zoonotic potential, although most of the AII and BIV isolates sub-genotyped corresponded to genetic variants not

  14. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. among children in rural Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Eibach

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The relevance of Cryptosporidium infections for the burden of childhood diarrhoea in endemic settings has been shown in recent years. This study describes Cryptosporidium subtypes among symptomatic and asymptomatic children in rural Ghana to analyse subtype-specific demographic, geographical, seasonal and clinical differences in order to inform appropriate control measures in endemic areas. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Stool samples were collected from 2232 children below 14 years of age presenting with and without gastrointestinal symptoms at the Agogo Presbyterian Hospital in the rural Ashanti region of Ghana between May 2007 and September 2008. Samples were screened for Cryptosporidium spp. by PCR and isolates were classified into subtypes based on sequence differences in the gp60 gene. Subtype specific frequencies for age, sex, location and season have been determined and associations with disease symptoms have been analysed within a case-control study. Cryptosporidium infections were diagnosed in 116 of 2232 (5.2% stool samples. Subtyping of 88 isolates revealed IIcA5G3 (n = 26, 29.6%, IbA13G3 (n = 17, 19.3% and IaA21R3 (n = 12, 13.6% as the three most frequent subtypes of the two species C. hominis and C. parvum, known to be transmitted anthroponotically. Infections peak at early rainy season with 67.9% and 50.0% of infections during the months April, May and June for 2007 and 2008 respectively. C. hominis infection was mainly associated with diarrhoea (odds ratio [OR] = 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2-4.9 whereas C. parvum infection was associated with both diarrhoea (OR = 2.6; CI: 1.2-5.8 and vomiting (OR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.5-6.1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Cryptosporidiosis is characterized by seasonal anthroponotic transmission of strains typically found in Sub-Saharan Africa. The infection mainly affects young infants, with vomiting and diarrhoea being one of the leading symptoms in C. parvum infection. Combining

  15. Subtyping of Cryptosporidium cuniculus and genotyping of Enterocytozoon bieneusi in rabbits in two farms in Heilongjiang Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ziyin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon bieneusi are two prevalent opportunistic pathogens in humans and animals. Currently, few data are available on genetic characterization of both pathogens in rabbits in China. The aim of the present study was to understand prevalence and genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi in rabbits. We collected 215 fecal samples from 150 Rex rabbits and 65 New Zealand White rabbits on two different farms in Heilongjiang Province, China. Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequencing the partial small subunit of ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS region of rDNA, respectively. Cryptosporidium was detected in 3.3% (5/150 of Rex rabbits and 29.2% (19/65 of New Zealand White rabbits. All the 24 Cryptosporidium isolates were identified as C. cuniculus. Enterocytozoon bieneusi was only found in 14.7% (22/150 of Rex rabbits. Five known genotypes: CHN-RD1 (n = 12, D (n = 3, Type IV (n = 2, Peru6 (n = 1, and I (n = 1, and three novel ones CHN-RR1 to CHN-RR3 (one each were detected. By analyzing the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60 gene sequences of C. cuniculus isolates, three subtypes were obtained: VbA28 (n = 2, VbA29 (n = 16, and VbA32 (n = 3. All these three C. cuniculus subtypes were reported previously in humans. Four known E. bieneusi genotypes have been found to be present in humans. The three novel ones fell into zoonotic group 1. The results suggest zoonotic potential of C. cuniculus and E. bieneusi isolates in rabbits.

  16. Detection and molecular characterisation of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Entamoeba spp. among patients with gastrointestinal symptoms in Gambo Hospital, Oromia Region, southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flecha, María J; Benavides, Cynthia M; Tissiano, Gabriel; Tesfamariam, Abraham; Cuadros, Juan; de Lucio, Aida; Bailo, Begoña; Cano, Lourdes; Fuentes, Isabel; Carmena, David

    2015-09-01

    To assess the prevalence and genetic diversity of the enteric protozoa species G. duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Entamoeba histolytica in individuals with gastrointestinal symptoms compatible with infections by these pathogens seeking medical attention in a rural area in southern Ethiopia. A total of 92 stool samples were initially screened by direct microscopy and immunochromatography and further confirmed by molecular methods. G. duodenalis-positive samples were molecularly characterised by multilocus genotyping of the glutamate dehydrogenase and β-giardin genes of the parasite. PCR and DNA sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein was used for the subtyping of Cryptosporidium isolates. Detection and differential diagnosis of E. histolytica/dispar were conducted by real-time PCR. PCR-based prevalences were 10.9% for G. duodenalis, 1.1% for Cryptosporidium spp. and 3.3% for Entamoeba spp. Seven (four novel and three known) subtypes of G. duodenalis assemblage B were identified at the GDH locus and 5 (one novel and four known) at the BG locus. A novel variant of C. hominis subtype IbA9G3 was also identified. Two Entamoeba isolates were assigned to E. dispar and an additional one to E. histolytica. Although preliminary, our results strongly suggest that giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis and amoebiasis represent a significant burden in Ethiopian rural population. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Ocurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. in Amazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis, Natterer, 1883

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida da Glória Faustino

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The apicomplexa protozoa Cryptosporidium infects several mammals, including terrestrial and aquatic species. In the epidemiology of this infection, the ingestion of water and/or food contamined with oocysts comprises the main mechanism of transmission to susceptible animals. Among the Sirenians, the occurrence of this coccidium has been reported in dugongs (Dugong dugon and Antillean manatee (Trichechus manatus manatus. The present study was conducted with the aim of verifying the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. in Amazonian manatee. For this purpose, fecal samples were collected from ten free-ranging Amazonian manatees, two specimens in captivity, and 103 supernatants fecal samples. The samples were processed by the sedimentation method in formol-ether and Kinyoun stain technique for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp.. The positive samples were then submitted to Direct Immunoflorescence Test. The results showed 4.34% (05/115 of positive samples. This is the first report of Cryptosporidium spp. in the Amazonian manatee.

  18. New view on the age-specificity of pig Cryptosporidium by species-specific primers for distinguishing Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium pig genotype II

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeníková, M.; Němejc, K.; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Kváč, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 176, 2/3 (2011), 120-125 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP523/07/P117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Cryptosporidium suis * Cryptosporidium pig genotype II * Mixed infection * Age-specificity * Species-specific primers Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.579, year: 2011

  19. Prevalence and Multilocus Genotyping Analysis of Cryptosporidium and Giardia Isolates from Dogs in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangtrongsup, Sahatchai; Scorza, A Valeria; Reif, John S; Ballweber, Lora R; Lappin, Michael R; Salman, Mo D

    2017-05-10

    The occurrence and zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis isolated from dogs in Chiang Mai, Thailand were determined. Fecal samples were collected from 109 dogs between July and August 2008. Cryptosporidium spp. infection was determined by immunofluorescent assay (IFA), PCR assays that amplify Cryptosporidium heat-shock protein 70 kDa (hsp70), and two PCR assays that amplify a small subunit-ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA). Giardia duodenalis infection was identified using zinc sulfate centrifugal flotation, IFA, and four PCR assays that amplify the Giardia glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh), beta-giardin (bg), and generic and dog-specific assays of triosephosphate isomerase (tpi) genes. Overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis was 31.2% and 45.9%, respectively. Sequence analysis of 22 Cryptosporidium -positive samples and 21 Giardia -positive samples revealed the presence of C. canis in 15, and C. parvum in 7, G. duodenalis Assemblage C in 8, D in 11, and mixed of C and D in 2 dogs. Dogs in Chiang Mai were commonly exposed to Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis . Cryptosporidium parvum can be isolated from the feces of dogs, and all G. duodenalis assemblages were dog-specific. Dogs could be a reservoir for a zoonotic Cryptosporidium infection in humans, but further studies will be required to determine the clinical and zoonotic importance.

  20. Prevalence and Multilocus Genotyping Analysis of Cryptosporidium and Giardia Isolates from Dogs in Chiang Mai, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahatchai Tangtrongsup

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence and zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis isolated from dogs in Chiang Mai, Thailand were determined. Fecal samples were collected from 109 dogs between July and August 2008. Cryptosporidium spp. infection was determined by immunofluorescent assay (IFA, PCR assays that amplify Cryptosporidium heat-shock protein 70 kDa (hsp70, and two PCR assays that amplify a small subunit-ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA. Giardia duodenalis infection was identified using zinc sulfate centrifugal flotation, IFA, and four PCR assays that amplify the Giardia glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh, beta-giardin (bg, and generic and dog-specific assays of triosephosphate isomerase (tpi genes. Overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis was 31.2% and 45.9%, respectively. Sequence analysis of 22 Cryptosporidium-positive samples and 21 Giardia-positive samples revealed the presence of C. canis in 15, and C. parvum in 7, G. duodenalis Assemblage C in 8, D in 11, and mixed of C and D in 2 dogs. Dogs in Chiang Mai were commonly exposed to Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis. Cryptosporidium parvum can be isolated from the feces of dogs, and all G. duodenalis assemblages were dog-specific. Dogs could be a reservoir for a zoonotic Cryptosporidium infection in humans, but further studies will be required to determine the clinical and zoonotic importance.

  1. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in a public water-treatment system, Paraná, Southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatas Campos Almeida

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in a public water-treatment system. Samples of raw and treated water were collected and concentrated using the membrane filtration technique. Direct Immunofluorescence Test was performed on the samples. DNA extraction using a commercial kit was performed and the DNA extracted was submitted to a nested-PCR reaction (n-PCR and sequencing. In the immunofluorescence, 2/24 (8.33% samples of raw water were positive for Giardia spp.. In n-PCR and sequencing, 2/24 (8.33% samples of raw water were positive for Giardia spp., and 2/24 (8.33% samples were positive for Cryptosporidium spp.. The sequencing showed Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis DNA. In raw water, there was moderate correlation among turbidity, color and Cryptosporidium spp. and between turbidity and Giardia spp.. The presence of these protozoans in the water indicates the need for monitoring for water-treatment companies.

  2. The Prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. in Children, Taiz District, Yemen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AH Al-Shamiri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: This is the first work done on cryptosporidiosis among the children in Taiz, Yemen.Methods: A number of 712 samples were collected from children of different ages (ranging from 1 month to 12 years from Dec 2006 to Aug 2007. The collected samples were examined by Sheather's sugar floatation and Modified Ziehl- Neelsen stain as well as ELISA methods. The test results were statistically analyzed by SPSS software.Results: The overall positive percentage was 43.7%. The higher incidence (36.2 % was oc­curred in males while the lowest incidence (32.7 % was observed in females (r= 0.876; P= 0.001. The correlation between infected cases and the type of drinking water was r =0.121. Among the cases examined by ELISA (92 cases, 26.1 % were infected. The correlation be­tween seropositivity and gender was r= 0.652 (P=0.031.Conclusion: Cryptosporidium spp. is a significant pathogen among children at Taiz. Fresh water supplies, education, eating habits and domestic animals are considered the main sources for transmission of cryptosporidiosis.

  3. Subtype analysis of Cryptosporidium specimens from sporadic cases in Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, and Iowa in 2007: widespread occurrence of one Cryptosporidium hominis subtype and case history of an infection with the Cryptosporidium horse genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lihua; Hlavsa, Michele C; Yoder, Jonathan; Ewers, Christina; Dearen, Theresa; Yang, Wenli; Nett, Randall; Harris, Stephanie; Brend, Sarah M; Harris, Meghan; Onischuk, Lisa; Valderrama, Amy L; Cosgrove, Shaun; Xavier, Karen; Hall, Nancy; Romero, Sylvia; Young, Stephen; Johnston, Stephanie P; Arrowood, Michael; Roy, Sharon; Beach, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    Subtyping was conducted in late 2007 on 57 Cryptosporidium specimens from sporadic cases in Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, and Iowa. One previously rare Cryptosporidium hominis subtype was identified in 40 cases (70%) from all four states, and the Cryptosporidium horse genotype was identified in a pet shop employee with severe clinical symptoms.

  4. Identification and discrimination of Toxoplasma gondii, Sarcocystis spp., Neospora spp., and Cryptosporidium spp. by righ-resolution melting analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hllytchaikra Ferraz Fehlberg

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to standardize the high-resolution melting method for identification and discrimination of Toxoplasma gondii, Sarcocystis spp., Neospora spp., and Cryptosporidium spp. by amplification of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA using a single primer pair. The analyses were performed on individual reactions (containing DNA from a single species of a protozoan, on duplex reactions (containing DNA from two species of protozoa in each reaction, and on a multiplex reaction (containing DNA of four parasites in a single reaction. The proposed method allowed us to identify and discriminate the four species by analyzing the derivative, normalized, and difference melting curves, with high reproducibility among and within the experiments, as demonstrated by low coefficients of variation (less than 2.2% and 2.0%, respectively. This is the first study where this method is used for discrimination of these four species of protozoa in a single reaction.

  5. Identification and discrimination of Toxoplasma gondii, Sarcocystis spp., Neospora spp., and Cryptosporidium spp. by righ-resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlberg, Hllytchaikra Ferraz; Maciel, Bianca Mendes; Albuquerque, George Rêgo

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to standardize the high-resolution melting method for identification and discrimination of Toxoplasma gondii, Sarcocystis spp., Neospora spp., and Cryptosporidium spp. by amplification of 18S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) using a single primer pair. The analyses were performed on individual reactions (containing DNA from a single species of a protozoan), on duplex reactions (containing DNA from two species of protozoa in each reaction), and on a multiplex reaction (containing DNA of four parasites in a single reaction). The proposed method allowed us to identify and discriminate the four species by analyzing the derivative, normalized, and difference melting curves, with high reproducibility among and within the experiments, as demonstrated by low coefficients of variation (less than 2.2% and 2.0%, respectively). This is the first study where this method is used for discrimination of these four species of protozoa in a single reaction.

  6. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Danish organic pig farms: seasonal and age-related variation in prevalence, infection intensity and species/genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Heidi Huus; Jianmin, Wang; Katakam, Kiran K.

    2015-01-01

    Although pigs are commonly infected with Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis, including potentially zoonotic species or genotypes, little is known about age-related infection levels, seasonal differences and genetic variation in naturally infected pigs raised in organic management systems....... Therefore, the current study was conducted to assess seasonal and age-related variations in prevalence and infection intensity of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, evaluate zoonotic potential and uncover correlations between species/genotypes, infection intensity and faecal consistency. Shedding of oocysts...... and cysts ((oo-) cysts) was monitored at quarterly intervals (September 2011 to June 2012) in piglets (n=152), starter pigs (n=234), fatteners (n=230) and sows (n=240) from three organic farms in Denmark. (Oo-) cysts were quantified by immunofluorescence microscopy; and 56/75 subsamples from Cryptosporidium...

  7. Genetic Diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. within a Remote Population of Soay Sheep on St. Kilda Islands, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, L.; Craig, B. H.; Jones, B.

    2013-01-01

    This is the first report to characterize the genotypes and subtypes of Cryptosporidium species infecting a geographically isolated population of feral Soay sheep (Ovis aries) on Hirta, St. Kilda, Scotland, during two distinct periods: (i) prior to a population crash and (ii) as host numbers increased. Cryptosporidium DNA was extracted by freeze-thawing of immunomagnetically separated (IMS) bead-oocyst complexes, and species were identified following nested-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP)/PCR sequencing at two Cryptosporidium 18S rRNA loci. Two hundred fifty-five samples were analyzed, and the prevalent Cryptosporidium species in single infections were identified as C. hominis (11.4% of all samples tested), C. parvum (9%), C. xiaoi (12.5%), and C. ubiquitum (6.7%). Cryptosporidium parvum was also present with other Cryptosporidium species in 27.1% of all samples tested. Cryptosporidium parvum- and C. hominis-positive isolates were genotyped using two nested-PCR assays that amplify the Cryptosporidium glycoprotein 60 gene (GP60). GP60 gene analysis showed the presence of two Cryptosporidium genotypes, namely, C. parvum IIaA19G1R1 and C. hominis IbA10G2. This study reveals a higher diversity of Cryptosporidium species/genotypes than was previously expected. We suggest reasons for the high diversity of Cryptosporidium parasites within this isolated population and discuss the implications for our understanding of cryptosporidiosis. PMID:23354707

  8. Cryptosporidium genotype and subtype distribution in raw wastewater in Shanghai, China: evidence for possible unique Cryptosporidium hominis transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yaoyu; Li, Na; Duan, Liping; Xiao, Lihua

    2009-01-01

    To identify the genotype and subtype distributions of Cryptosporidium oocysts in domestic wastewater in Shanghai, China, and to facilitate the characterization of the endemic transmission of cryptosporidiosis, raw domestic wastewater samples were collected from four wastewater treatment plants in Shanghai, China, from December 2006 to April 2007. Genotypes of Cryptosporidium species were detected based on PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analyses of the small-subunit rRNA gene. Samples that contained Cryptosporidium hominis were further subtyped by DNA sequencing of the 60-kDa glycoprotein gene. Among a total of 90 samples analyzed, 63 were PCR positive, 10 of which had mixed genotypes. Fifty-nine (93.7%) of the PCR-positive samples had C. hominis, and 7 (11.1%) had C. meleagridis. The other seven Cryptosporidium species/genotypes identified included C. baileyi, C. parvum, C. suis, C. muris, rat genotype, avian genotype III, and a novel genotype. Forty-seven of the 59 C. hominis-positive samples were successfully subtyped, with 29 having subtype family Ib and the remaining belonging to subtype families Ia, Id, Ie, and If. The three Ib subtypes identified, IbA19G2, IbA20G2, and IbA21G2, were very different from the two common Ib subtypes (IbA9G3 and IbA10G2) found in other areas of the world. Likewise, the Ie subtype IeA12G3T3 was also different from the common IeA11G3T3 subtype. Thus, the presence of multiple subtype families and unique Ib, Ie, and If subtypes indicates that there might be endemic transmission of cryptosporidiosis in the study area and that C. hominis populations there might be very different from those in other areas.

  9. Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia sp. in aquatic mammals in northern and northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, João Carlos; Lima, Danielle Dos; da Silva, Edson Moura; Moreira, André Lucas de Oliveira; Marmontel, Miriam; Carvalho, Vitor Luz; Amaral, Rodrigo de; Lazzarini, Stella Maris; Alves, Leucio Câmara

    2017-09-20

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are protozoans that can infect humans and wild and domestic animals. Due to the growing importance of diseases caused by protozoan parasites in aquatic species, we aimed to evaluate the frequency of infection by Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia sp. in aquatic and marine mammals in the northern and northeastern regions of Brazil. We collected 553 fecal samples from 15 species of wild-ranging and captive aquatic mammals in northern and northeastern Brazil. All samples were analyzed by the Kinyoun technique for identification of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts. Giardia sp. cysts were identified by means of the centrifugal-flotation technique in zinc sulfate solution. Subsequently, all samples were submitted for direct immunofluorescence testing. The overall frequency of infection was 15.55% (86/553) for Cryptosporidium spp. and 9.04% (50/553) for Giardia sp. The presence of Cryptosporidium spp. was detected in samples from 5 species: neotropical river otter Lontra longicaudis (15.28%), giant otter Pteronura brasiliensis (41.66%), Guiana dolphin Sotalia guianensis (9.67%), Amazonian manatee Trichechus inunguis (16.03%), and Antillean manatee T. manatus (13.79%). Giardia sp. was identified in L. longicaudis (9.23%), P. brasiliensis (29.16%), pygmy sperm whale Kogia breviceps (100%), dwarf sperm whale K. sima (25%), S. guianensis (9.67%), T. inunguis (3.81%), and T. manatus (10.34%). This is the first report of Cryptosporidium spp. in L. longicaudis, P. brasiliensis, and S. guianensis, while the occurrence of Giardia sp., in addition to the 2 otter species, was also identified in manatees, thus extending the number of hosts susceptible to these parasitic agents.

  10. Molecular diversity and frequency of the diarrheagenic enteric protozoan Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in a hospital setting in Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azcona-Gutiérrez, José Manuel; de Lucio, Aida; Hernández-de-Mingo, Marta; García-García, Concepción; Soria-Blanco, Luis Miguel; Morales, Lucía; Aguilera, María; Fuentes, Isabel; Carmena, David

    2017-01-01

    Human giardiosis and cryptosporidiosis are caused by the enteric protozoan parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. Both pathogens are major contributors to the global burden of diarrhoeal disease, affecting primarily children and immunodebilitated individuals in resource-poor settings. Giardiosis and cryptosporidiosis also represent an important, often underestimate, public health threat in developed countries. In Spain only limited information is currently available on the epidemiology of these infections. Molecular data on the diversity, frequency, geographical distribution, and seasonality of G. duodenalis assemblages/sub-assemblages and Cryptosporidium species/sub-genotypes are particularly scarce. A longitudinal molecular epidemiological survey was conducted between July 2015 to September 2016 in patients referred to or attended at the Hospital San Pedro (La Rioja, Northern Spain) that tested positive for G. duodenalis (N = 106) or Cryptosporidium spp. (N = 103) by direct microscopy and/or a rapid lateral flow immunochromatographic assay. G. duodenalis infections were subsequently confirmed by real-time PCR and positive isolates assessed by multi-locus sequence genotyping of the glutamate dehydrogenase and β-giardin genes of the parasite. Cryptosporidium species and sub-genotypes were investigated at the 60 kDa glycoprotein or the small subunit ribosomal RNA genes of the parasite. Sociodemographic and clinical parameters of infected patients were also gathered and analysed. Out of 90 G. duodenalis-positive isolates by real-time PCR a total of 16 isolates were successfully typed. AII (44%, 7/16) was the most prevalent sub-assemblage found, followed by BIV (31%, 5/16) and BIII (19%, 3/16). A discordant genotype result AII/AIII was identified in an additional (6%, 1/16) isolate. No mixed infections A+B were detected. Similarly, a total of 81 Cryptosporidium spp. isolates were successfully typed, revealing the presence of C. hominis (81%, 66/81) and

  11. Molecular diversity and frequency of the diarrheagenic enteric protozoan Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in a hospital setting in Northern Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Azcona-Gutiérrez

    Full Text Available Human giardiosis and cryptosporidiosis are caused by the enteric protozoan parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. Both pathogens are major contributors to the global burden of diarrhoeal disease, affecting primarily children and immunodebilitated individuals in resource-poor settings. Giardiosis and cryptosporidiosis also represent an important, often underestimate, public health threat in developed countries. In Spain only limited information is currently available on the epidemiology of these infections. Molecular data on the diversity, frequency, geographical distribution, and seasonality of G. duodenalis assemblages/sub-assemblages and Cryptosporidium species/sub-genotypes are particularly scarce.A longitudinal molecular epidemiological survey was conducted between July 2015 to September 2016 in patients referred to or attended at the Hospital San Pedro (La Rioja, Northern Spain that tested positive for G. duodenalis (N = 106 or Cryptosporidium spp. (N = 103 by direct microscopy and/or a rapid lateral flow immunochromatographic assay. G. duodenalis infections were subsequently confirmed by real-time PCR and positive isolates assessed by multi-locus sequence genotyping of the glutamate dehydrogenase and β-giardin genes of the parasite. Cryptosporidium species and sub-genotypes were investigated at the 60 kDa glycoprotein or the small subunit ribosomal RNA genes of the parasite. Sociodemographic and clinical parameters of infected patients were also gathered and analysed.Out of 90 G. duodenalis-positive isolates by real-time PCR a total of 16 isolates were successfully typed. AII (44%, 7/16 was the most prevalent sub-assemblage found, followed by BIV (31%, 5/16 and BIII (19%, 3/16. A discordant genotype result AII/AIII was identified in an additional (6%, 1/16 isolate. No mixed infections A+B were detected. Similarly, a total of 81 Cryptosporidium spp. isolates were successfully typed, revealing the presence of C. hominis (81

  12. Prevalence and determinants of Cryptosporidium spp. infection in smallholder dairy cattle in Iringa and Tanga Regions of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Swai

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. infection in a cross-sectional study of dairy cattle, from two contrasting dairying regions in Tanzania, were determined by staining smears of faecal samples with the modified Ziehl-Neelsen technique. Of the 1 126 faecal samples screened, 19.7% were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. The prevalence was lower in Tanga Region than in Iringa Region. The prevalence of affected farms was 20% in Tanga and 21% in Iringa. In both regions, the probability of detecting Cryptosporidium oocysts in faeces varied with animal class, but these were not consistent in both regions. In Tanga Region, Cryptosporidium oocysts were significantly more likely to be found in the faeces of milking cows. In Iringa Region, the likelihood that cattle had Cryptosporidium-positive faeces declined with age, and milking cattle were significantly less likely to have Cryptosporidium positive faeces. In this region, 7% of cattle were housed within the family house at night, and this was marginally associated with a higher likelihood that animals had Cryptosporidium-positive faeces. Our study suggests that even though herd sizes are small, Cryptosporidium spp. are endemic on many Tanzanian smallholder dairy farms. These protozoa may impact on animal health and production, but also on human health, given the close associations between the cattle and their keepers. Further studies are required to assess these risks in more detail, and understand the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium spp. in this management system.

  13. Cryptosporidium spp. in pet birds: genetic diversity and potential public health significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Meng; Wang, Rongjun; Ning, Changshen; Li, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Longxian; Jian, Fuchun; Sun, Yanru; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-08-01

    To characterize the prevalence and assess the zoonotic transmission burden of Cryptosporidium species/genotypes in pet birds in Henan, China, 434 fecal samples were acquired from 14 families of birds in pet shops. The overall prevalence of Cryptopsoridium was 8.1% (35/434) by the Sheather's sugar flotation technique. The Cryptosporidium-positive samples were analyzed by DNA sequence analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. Three Cryptosporidium species and two genotypes were identified, including C. baileyi (18/35 or 51.4%) in five red-billed leiothrixes (Leiothrix lutea), four white Java sparrows (Padda oryzivora), four common mynas (Acridotheres tristis), two zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), a crested Lark (Galerida cristata), a Gouldian finch (Chloebia gouldiae), and a black-billed magpie (Pica pica); Cryptosporidium meleagridis (3/35 or 8.6%) in a Bohemian waxwing (Bombycilla garrulus), a Rufous turtle dove (Streptopelia orientalis), and a fan-tailed pigeon (Columba livia); Cryptosporidium galli (5/35 or 14.3%) in four Bohemian waxwings (Bombycilla garrulus) and a silver-eared Mesia (Leiothrix argentauris); Cryptosporidium avian genotype III (3/35 or 8.6%) in two cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus) and a red-billed blue magpie (Urocissa erythrorhyncha); and Cryptosporidium avian genotype V (6/35 or 17.1%) in six cockatiels (Nymphicus hollandicus). Among the pet birds, 12 species represented new hosts for Cryptosporidum infections. The presence of C. meleagridis raises questions on potential zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis from pet birds to humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy cattle in South Bohemia, the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ondráčková, Z.; Kváč, Martin; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Rost, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 165, 1/2 (2009), s. 141-144 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP523/07/P117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Cryptosporidium spp. * cattle * slaughterhouses Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.278, year: 2009

  15. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in captive reptiles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Xiao, L.; Ryan, U. M.; Graczyk, T. K.; Limor, J.; Li, L.; Kombert, M.; Junge, R.; Sulaiman, I. M.; Zhou, L.; Arrowood, M. J.; Koudela, Břetislav; Modrý, David; Lal, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 2 (2004), s. 891-899 ISSN 0099-2240 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/00/P015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Cryptosporidium * reptiles * genetic diversity Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.810, year: 2004

  16. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in poultry from Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryptosporidiosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by the protozoa Cryptosporidium. Infections in birds are mainly caused by three species C. meleagridis, C. baileyi, and C. galli. C. meleagridis is the third most common cause of cryptosporidiosis in immunocompromised and immunocompetent huma...

  17. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in pigs in Lusaka, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Siwila

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed at determining the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in pigs which were being raised in intensive management systems. Faecal samples were collected from pigs of all age groups from three different piggery units. Samples were collected directly from the rectum for piglets and weaners and from the floor within 2 min – 5 min of excretion for sows and boars. At the time of collection, faecal consistency was noted as being normal, pasty or diarrhoeic. Samples were analysed further using the Merifluor® Cryptosporidium/Giardia immunofluorescence assay. All piggeries had at least one pig infected with either parasite. From a total 217 samples collected, 96 (44.2%; confidence interval [CI] = 37.6% – 50.9% were positive for Cryptosporidium spp., whilst 26 (12%; CI = 7.6% – 16.3% had G. duodenalis parasites. Of all the pigs, 6.9% (15/217 harboured both parasites. With regard to Cryptosporidium spp. infection, statistically significant differences were observed amongst the three units (p = 0.001, whereas no significant differences were observed for G. duodenalis infection (p = 0.13. Prevalence was higher in weaners as compared to other pig classes for both parasites, with significant differences being observed for G. duodenalis infection (p = 0.013. There was, however, no difference in infection between male and female pigs for both parasites. Furthermore, most infections were asymptomatic. From the study results it was clear that Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis infections were prevalent amongst pigs in the piggeries evaluated and, as such, may act as a source of infection for persons who come into contact with them.

  18. Epidemiological survey of Cryptosporidium spp. in companion and stray dogs in Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mirzaei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. infection in companion and stray dogs in Kerman, Iran. Faecal samples were randomly collected from 548 dogs (450 companion and 98 stray. Cryptosporidium oocysts were concentrated using the formalin ether sedimentation method according to the modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining technique. Cryptosporidium oocysts were identified in 2% (11/548 of samples. Faeces were classified according to the consistency as diarrhoeic (56/548 and non-diarrhoeic (492/548. Diarrhoea was recorded in 4 of the positive samples (7.14%. The prevalence of cryptosporidiosis was significantly higher in diarrhoeic dogs (7.14% compared to the non-diarrhoeic dogs (1.4% (p0.05. This study confirmed that dogs have a potential role in human cryptosporidiosis and faecal examination of dogs with persistent diarrhoea should be performed on a routine basis.

  19. Molecular characterization of the Cryptosporidium cervine genotype from a sika deer (Cervus nippon Temminck) in Zhengzhou, China and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongjun; Wang, Jinchan; Sun, Mingfei; Dang, Hailiang; Feng, Yaoyu; Ning, Changshen; Jian, Fuchun; Zhang, Longxian; Xiao, Lihua

    2008-09-01

    A total of 124 fecal specimens were collected from four deer farms in Zhengzhou City, China and examined for Cryptosporidium by Sheather's sugar flotation technique. Cryptosporidim oocysts were detected in two 1-year-old sika deer, and one of the two specimens was genotyped by sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) (18S rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), actin, and Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) genes. Results obtained suggested that the Cryptosporidium studied belonged to Cryptosporidium cervine genotype, although slight sequence differences were noticed at the three loci. The similarities between this isolate and other Cryptosporidium cervine genotype isolates were 99.1-99.8%, 9.8%, 99.7%, and 100% at the 18S rRNA, HSP70, actin, and COWP loci, respectively. This study is the first report of Cryptosporidium infection in sika deer in China.

  20. Native and introduced squirrels in Italy host different Cryptosporidium spp.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Prediger, Jitka; Horčičková, Michaela; Hofmannová, L.; Sak, Bohumil; Ferrari, N.; Mazzamuto, M.V.; Romeo, C.; Wauters, L.A.; McEvoy, J.; Kváč, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 61, OCT (2017), s. 64-75 ISSN 0932-4739 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01090S; GA MŠk LTAUSA17165 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptosporidium * gp60 * infection * Italy * phylogeny * tree squirrels Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine OBOR OECD: Veterinary science Impact factor: 2.581, year: 2016

  1. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and other intestinal parasites in children with diarrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mutalip Çiçek

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was planned to determine the role of Cryptosporidium sp. and other intestinal parasites in the diarrheal diseases in children with 0-15 years old Van district.Materials and methods: In this study, stool samples of 450 children were examined for parasites. In the study, nativ-lugol, formaldehyde-ethyl acetate sedimentation methods and trichrome staining methods were used to detect parasites in stool samples. Additionally, sedimentation methods and modified acid fast staining method were used to detect the Cryptosporidium oocysts.Results: Parasites were found in 154 (34.2% among 450 children’s with diarrhea. In this study; the ratios of parasites were as follow: Giardia intestinalis 13.5%, Blastocystis hominis 10%, Entamoeba coli 3.78%, Cryptosporidium spp. 2.2%, Hymenolepis nana 1.33 %ve Ascaris lumbricoides 1.11%.Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar 0.89%, Chilomastix mesnili 1.78%, Iodamoeba butschlii 0.89%, Entamoeba hartmanni 0.89%, Trichomonas hominis 0.67%, Enteromonas hominis 0.67%,Conclusion: In the investigate, it was found that Giardia intestinalis and Blastocystis hominis were most prominent agents in children with diarrhea in our vicinity and Cryptosporidium spp also was an important agent which should be investigated carefully in especially risk group in routine laboratory studies.

  2. Ocorrência de infecção Cryptosporidium spp. em peixe-boi marinho (Trichechus manatus Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. infection in antillean manatee (Trichechus manatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Carlos Gomes Borges

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A criptosporidiose constitui-se como uma zoonose que pode afetar o homem e uma ampla variedade de animais domésticos e silvestres, principalmente indivíduos imunodeficientes. O objetivo desse trabalho foi registrar a ocorrência de infecção por Cryptosporidium em peixe-boi marinho. Após ser constatada a mudança de comportamento de um peixe-boi marinho mantido nos oceanários do Centro Mamíferos Aquáticos, ICMBio - FMA, animal foi submetido à exame clínico e, posteriormente, à coleta de amostra fecal. As amostras fecais foram analisadas pela técnica de Kinyoun, teste de imunofluorescência direta e pelo corante 4'.6'-Diamidino-2-Phenilindole (DAPI. No exame clínico, o animal apresentou sinais de desconforto abdominal. Os resultados obtidos nas análises de microscopia de luz e fluorescente revelaram a presença de oocistos de Cryptosporidium nas fezes desse peixe-boi.Cryptosporidiosis is a zoonosis which can affect man and a wide range of domestic and wild animals, mainly immunodeficient individuals. The objective of this paper was reported the occurrence of a Cryptosporidium infection in Antillean manatee. After an unusual behavior of an Antillean manatee kept in captivity at the Centro Mamíferos Aquáticos, ICMBio - FMA, clinical examination and posterior fecal sampling was performed. Fecal samples were examined by the Kinyoun technique, Direct Immunofluorescence Test and also examined by 4'.6'-Diamidino-2-Phenylindole (DAPI staining. At the clinical examination, the animal showed signs of abdominal pain. The results obtained by light and fluorescence microscopy analysis showed the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. oocyst in feces of this manatee.

  3. Identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in dairy cattle in Brazil Identificação de espécies e genótipos de Cryptosporidium em bovinos leiteiros no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Medeiros Paz e Silva

    Full Text Available In this study, we identified Cryptosporidium species and genotypes present in dairy cattle in the central region of São Paulo state, Brazil. Fecal specimens were collected from 200 animals (100 calves and 100 cows in ten dairy farms. Fecal samples were examined using microscopic examination (ME, enzyme immunoassay (EIA and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Cryptosporidium species and genotypes were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP or DNA sequencing analysis of the SSU-rRNA and GP60 genes. The occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. infection was 14% (28/200. The occurrence in calves (26% was significantly higher than in cows (2%. Of the 27 Cryptosporidium-positive specimens submitted to genotyping, C. andersoni was identified in 23 (85.1%, C. bovis in three (11.1%, and the zoonotic C. parvum subtype IIaA15G2R1 in one (3.7%. The study demonstrates that Cryptosporidium spp. infection was common and widespread in dairy cattle in this region and that calves have a high prevalence of C. andersoni. Furthermore, the presence of C. parvum subtype IIaA15G2R1 indicates that dairy calves from this region should be considered a potential source of zoonotic Cryptosporidium oocysts.No presente estudo foram identificadas espécies e genótipos de Cryptosporidium originadas de bovinos leiteiros na região central do estado de São Paulo, Brasil. Amostras fecais foram coletadas de 200 animais (100 bezerros e 100 vacas em 10 propriedades leiteiras. As amostras foram examinadas utilizando os métodos de microscopia óptica (MO, ensaio imunoenzimático (EI e reação em cadeia da polimerase (PCR. As espécies e genótipos de Cryptosporidium foram determinados pelo método de polimorfismo no tamanho dos fragmentos de restrição (RFLP ou sequenciamento dos genes SSU-rRNA e GP60. A infecção por Cryptosporidium spp. teve ocorrência de 14% (28/200. A ocorrência em bezerros (26% foi significativamente maior do que em vacas (2%. Do total de 27

  4. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in the maintenance water of Antillean manatees (Trichechusmanatus in captivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeane Kury Nobre Gomes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research was to verify the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in the water consumption and supply of pools used by Antillean manatee (Trichechus manatus in captivity. Six samples were collected from the pool's supply system (at the beach, water used for manatee consumption, mineral water used in the preparation of artificial milk formulas offered to orphan manatee calves, also used in permanent maintenance pools in the visitation area, and water utilized in the rehabilitation area, where calves of all ages were kept. Before the water samples were processed, each sample was submitted to a filtration process. The diagnosis of the parasite was obtained by Kinyoun technique and the positive samples were submitted to the Direct Immunoflorescence Test. The results showed the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in 66.67% (4/6 of the samples from the water supply system and pool, with eight to 56 oocysts per liter. There was evidence that the water used in the maintenance of the Antillean manatees could be an important medium for hydric transmission of Cryptosporidium spp. and that it may be a predisposing factor to the occurrence of cryptosporidiosis in Antillean manatees in captivity.

  5. Presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in Drinking Water Samples in the North of Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Maria João; Soares, Sónia; de Lurdes Delgado, Maria; Figueiredo, João; Silva, Elisabete; Castro, António; Cosa, José Manuel Correida Da

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are 2 protozoan parasites responsible for waterborne diseases outbreaks worldwide. In order to assess the prevalence of these protozoans in drinking water samples in the northern part of Portugal and the risk of human infection, we have established a long term program aiming at pinpointing the sources of surface water, drinking water, and environmental contamination, working with the water-supply industry. Total 43 sources of drinking water samples were selected, and a total of 167 samples were analyzed using the Method 1623. Sensitivity assays regarding the genetic characterization by PCR and sequencing of the genes, 18S SSU rRNA, for Cryptosporidium spp. and β,-giardin for G. duodenalis were set in the laboratory. According to the defined criteria, molecular analysis was performed over 4 samples. Environmental stages of the protozoa were detected in 25.7% (43 out of 167) of the water samples, 8.4% (14 out of 167) with cysts of Giardia, 10.2% (17 out of 167) with oocysts of Cryptosporidium and 7.2% (12 out of 167) for both species. The mean concentrations were 0.1-12.7 oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. per 10 L and 0.1-108.3 cysts of Giardia duodenalis per 10 L. Our results suggest that the efficiency in drinking water plants must be ameliorated in their efficiency in reducing the levels of contamination. We suggest the implementation of systematic monitoring programs for both protozoa. To authors' knowledge, this is the first report evaluating the concentration of environmental stages of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in drinking water samples in the northern part of Portugal. PMID:20333284

  6. Presence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis in drinking water samples in the north of Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, André; Moreira, Maria João; Soares, Sónia; Delgado, Maria de Lurdes; Figueiredo, João; Silva, Elisabete; Castro, António; Cosa, José Manuel Correida Da

    2010-03-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are 2 protozoan parasites responsible for waterborne diseases outbreaks worldwide. In order to assess the prevalence of these protozoans in drinking water samples in the northern part of Portugal and the risk of human infection, we have established a long term program aiming at pinpointing the sources of surface water, drinking water, and environmental contamination, working with the water-supply industry. Total 43 sources of drinking water samples were selected, and a total of 167 samples were analyzed using the Method 1623. Sensitivity assays regarding the genetic characterization by PCR and sequencing of the genes, 18S SSU rRNA, for Cryptosporidium spp. and beta,-giardin for G. duodenalis were set in the laboratory. According to the defined criteria, molecular analysis was performed over 4 samples. Environmental stages of the protozoa were detected in 25.7% (43 out of 167) of the water samples, 8.4% (14 out of 167) with cysts of Giardia, 10.2% (17 out of 167) with oocysts of Cryptosporidium and 7.2% (12 out of 167) for both species. The mean concentrations were 0.1-12.7 oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. per 10 L and 0.1-108.3 cysts of Giardia duodenalis per 10 L. Our results suggest that the efficiency in drinking water plants must be ameliorated in their efficiency in reducing the levels of contamination. We suggest the implementation of systematic monitoring programs for both protozoa. To authors' knowledge, this is the first report evaluating the concentration of environmental stages of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in drinking water samples in the northern part of Portugal.

  7. Novel Cryptosporidium bat genotypes III and IV in bats from the USA and Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kváč, Martin; Hořická, Anna; Sak, Bohumil; Prediger, Jitka; Salát, Jiří; Širmarová, Jana; Bartonička, Tomáš; Clark, Mark; Chelladurai, Jeba Rose Jennifer Jesudoss; Gillam, Erin; McEvoy, John

    2015-10-01

    Bats from the families Rhinolophidae (n = 90) and Vespertilionidae (n = 191) in the USA and Czech Republic were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium by microscopic and molecular analysis of faecal samples collected from rectum of dissected animals and from the ground beneath roosting sites. Cryptosporidium oocysts were not detected in any of the 281 faecal specimens examined using the aniline-carbol-methyl violet staining method. Nested PCR amplification, sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the small ribosomal subunit rRNA and actin genes were used to identify isolates and infer evolutionary relationships. Cryptosporidium parvum was identified in a western small-footed bat (Myotis ciliolabrum) from the USA and a common pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus pipistrellus) from the Czech Republic. Two novel genotypes were identified and named Cryptosporidium bat genotype III and IV. Bat genotype III was found in two big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) from the USA. Bat genotype IV was detected in two common pipistrelle bats from the Czech Republic.

  8. A Study of Cryptosporidium parvum Genotypes and Population Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Widmer

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Genetic evidence for the occurrence of two Cryptosporidium parvum subgroups is presented. This evidence is based on restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of several independent loci. Sequence analysis of the b -tubulin intron revealed additional polymorphism. The stability of the genetic profiles following passage of C. parvum isolates between different hosts was investigated.

  9. Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in feces and water and the associated exposure factors on dairy farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Felippe Danyel Cardoso; Ferreira, Fernanda Pinto; de Almeida, Jonatas Campos; Ogawa, Liza; dos Santos, Hannah Lia Ettiene Peruch Lemos; dos Santos, Maíra Moreira; Pinheiro, Filipe Aguera; Navarro, Italmar Teodorico; Garcia, João Luis; Freire, Roberta Lemos

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to verify the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in animal feces and drinking water on dairy farms and to identify a possible relation between the exposure factors and the presence of these parasites. Fecal samples from cattle and humans and water samples were collected on dairy farms in Paraná, Brazil. Analysis of (oo)cysts in the feces was performed by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining and centrifugal flotation in zinc sulfate. Test-positive samples were subjected to nested PCR amplification of the 18SSU ribosomal RNA gene for identification of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and of the gp60 gene for subtyping of Cryptosporidium. Microbiological analysis of water was carried out by the multiple-tube method and by means of a chromogenic substrate, and parasitological analysis was performed on 31 samples by direct immunofluorescence and nested PCR of the genes mentioned above. Identification of the species of Cryptosporidium was performed by sequencing and PCR with analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium was higher in calves than in adults. Among the samples of cattle feces, Cryptosporidium parvum was identified in 41 (64%), C. ryanae in eight (12.5%), C. bovis in four (6.3%), C. andersoni in five (7.8%), and a mixed infection in 20 samples (31.3%). These parasites were not identified in the samples of human feces. Thermotolerant coliform bacteria were identified in 25 samples of water (45.5%). Giardia duodenalis and C. parvum were identified in three water samples. The gp60 gene analysis of C. parvum isolates revealed the presence of two strains (IIaA20G1R1 and IIaA17G2R2) in the fecal samples and one (IIaA17G2R1) in the water samples. The presence of coliforms was associated with the water source, structure and degradation of springs, rain, and turbidity. The prevalence of protozoa was higher in calves up to six months of age. C. parvum and G. duodenalis were

  10. Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in feces and water and the associated exposure factors on dairy farms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Dos Santos Toledo

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to verify the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in animal feces and drinking water on dairy farms and to identify a possible relation between the exposure factors and the presence of these parasites. Fecal samples from cattle and humans and water samples were collected on dairy farms in Paraná, Brazil. Analysis of (oocysts in the feces was performed by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining and centrifugal flotation in zinc sulfate. Test-positive samples were subjected to nested PCR amplification of the 18SSU ribosomal RNA gene for identification of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and of the gp60 gene for subtyping of Cryptosporidium. Microbiological analysis of water was carried out by the multiple-tube method and by means of a chromogenic substrate, and parasitological analysis was performed on 31 samples by direct immunofluorescence and nested PCR of the genes mentioned above. Identification of the species of Cryptosporidium was performed by sequencing and PCR with analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium was higher in calves than in adults. Among the samples of cattle feces, Cryptosporidium parvum was identified in 41 (64%, C. ryanae in eight (12.5%, C. bovis in four (6.3%, C. andersoni in five (7.8%, and a mixed infection in 20 samples (31.3%. These parasites were not identified in the samples of human feces. Thermotolerant coliform bacteria were identified in 25 samples of water (45.5%. Giardia duodenalis and C. parvum were identified in three water samples. The gp60 gene analysis of C. parvum isolates revealed the presence of two strains (IIaA20G1R1 and IIaA17G2R2 in the fecal samples and one (IIaA17G2R1 in the water samples. The presence of coliforms was associated with the water source, structure and degradation of springs, rain, and turbidity. The prevalence of protozoa was higher in calves up to six months of age. C. parvum and G

  11. Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in feces and water and the associated exposure factors on dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Roberta Dos Santos; Martins, Felippe Danyel Cardoso; Ferreira, Fernanda Pinto; de Almeida, Jonatas Campos; Ogawa, Liza; Dos Santos, Hannah Lia Ettiene Peruch Lemos; Dos Santos, Maíra Moreira; Pinheiro, Filipe Aguera; Navarro, Italmar Teodorico; Garcia, João Luis; Freire, Roberta Lemos

    2017-01-01

    The aims of this study were to verify the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. in animal feces and drinking water on dairy farms and to identify a possible relation between the exposure factors and the presence of these parasites. Fecal samples from cattle and humans and water samples were collected on dairy farms in Paraná, Brazil. Analysis of (oo)cysts in the feces was performed by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining and centrifugal flotation in zinc sulfate. Test-positive samples were subjected to nested PCR amplification of the 18SSU ribosomal RNA gene for identification of Cryptosporidium and Giardia and of the gp60 gene for subtyping of Cryptosporidium. Microbiological analysis of water was carried out by the multiple-tube method and by means of a chromogenic substrate, and parasitological analysis was performed on 31 samples by direct immunofluorescence and nested PCR of the genes mentioned above. Identification of the species of Cryptosporidium was performed by sequencing and PCR with analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium was higher in calves than in adults. Among the samples of cattle feces, Cryptosporidium parvum was identified in 41 (64%), C. ryanae in eight (12.5%), C. bovis in four (6.3%), C. andersoni in five (7.8%), and a mixed infection in 20 samples (31.3%). These parasites were not identified in the samples of human feces. Thermotolerant coliform bacteria were identified in 25 samples of water (45.5%). Giardia duodenalis and C. parvum were identified in three water samples. The gp60 gene analysis of C. parvum isolates revealed the presence of two strains (IIaA20G1R1 and IIaA17G2R2) in the fecal samples and one (IIaA17G2R1) in the water samples. The presence of coliforms was associated with the water source, structure and degradation of springs, rain, and turbidity. The prevalence of protozoa was higher in calves up to six months of age. C. parvum and G. duodenalis were

  12. PCR-mediated recombination between Cryptosporidium spp. of lizards and snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ling; Yang, Chunfu; Xiao, Lihua

    2003-01-01

    The presence or absence of genetic recombination has often been used as one of the criteria for Cryptosporidium species designation and population structure delineation. During a recent study of cryptosporidiosis in reptiles that were housed in the same room, 4 lizards were found to have concurrent infections of C. serpentis (a gastric parasite) and C. saurophilum (an intestinal parasite), and 6 snakes were concurrently infected with C. serpentis, C. saurophilum and a new Cryptosporidium as indicated by PCR-RFLP analysis of the SSU rRNA gene. DNA sequence analysis of cloned PCR products confirmed the diagnosis of mixed infections. Surprisingly, it appeared that 11 of the 22 clones (8 and 14 clones from a lizard and a snake, respectively) had chimeric sequences of two Cryptosporidium spp. BootScan analysis indicated the existence of recombinants among the cloned sequences and detection of the informative sites confirmed the BootScan results. Because the probability for genetic recombination between gastric and intestinal parasites is small, these hybrid sequences were likely results of PCR artifacts due to the presence of multiple templates. This was confirmed by PCR-sequencing analysis of single-copy templates using diluted DNA samples. Direct sequencing of 69 PCR products from 100- to 1,000-fold diluted DNAs from the same snake and lizard produced only sequences of C. serpentis, C. saurophilum and the unnamed Cryptosporidium sp. Thus, care should be taken to eliminate PCR artifacts when determining the presence of genetic recombination or interpreting results of population genetic studies.

  13. Survey on gastrointestinal parasites and detection of Cryptosporidium spp. on cattle in West Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananta, Sylvia Maharani; Suharno; Hidayat, Adi; Matsubayashi, Makoto

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate the presence of gastrointestinal parasites on cattle in Indonesia because the prevalence of parasites varies between countries depending on the terrain surrounding livestock farms and investigations in Indonesia have never been performed. Fecal samples from cattle at 35 farms in 7 districts in West Java, Indonesia, has been examined using the floatation or sedimentation methods, and a immunofluorescence assay and experimentally inoculation to mice for Cryptosporidium or Giardia.spp. 153 of 394 examined cattle (38.8%) were infected with gastrointestinal parasites. The prevalence of Eimeria spp., Nematoda spp. (including Oesophagustomum and Bunostomum-like), Fasciola gigantica and Paramphistomum spp. was 22.4%, 11.2%, 12.5% and 3.8%, respectively. Cryptosporidium andersoni (C. andersoni) was also found in two samples. One isolate of this parasite was confirmed to be transmitted to mice, in contrast to the isolates from other countries. although this survey is preliminary, the results shows that the infection of gastrointestinal parasites in Indonesia was not high, but these infected cattle could be as a potential source leading to economic losses in livestock production. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Occurrence, Source, and Human Infection Potential of Cryptosporidium and Giardia spp. in Source and Tap Water in Shanghai, China▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yaoyu; Zhao, Xukun; Chen, Jiaxu; Jin, Wei; Zhou, Xiaonong; Li, Na; Wang, Lin; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Genotyping studies on the source and human infection potential of Cryptosporidium oocysts in water have been almost exclusively conducted in industrialized nations. In this study, 50 source water samples and 30 tap water samples were collected in Shanghai, China, and analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 1623. To find a cost-effective method to replace the filtration procedure, the water samples were also concentrated by calcium carbonate flocculation (CCF). Of the 50 source water samples, 32% were positive for Cryptosporidium and 18% for Giardia by Method 1623, whereas 22% were positive for Cryptosporidium and 10% for Giardia by microscopy of CCF concentrates. When CCF was combined with PCR for detection, the occurrence of Cryptosporidium (28%) was similar to that obtained by Method 1623. Genotyping of Cryptosporidium in 17 water samples identified the presence of C. andersoni in 14 water samples, C. suis in 7 water samples, C. baileyi in 2 water samples, C. meleagridis in 1 water sample, and C. hominis in 1 water sample. Therefore, farm animals, especially cattle and pigs, were the major sources of water contamination in Shanghai source water, and most oocysts found in source water in the area were not infectious to humans. Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in 2 of 30 tap water samples. The combined use of CCF for concentration and PCR for detection and genotyping provides a less expensive alternative to filtration and fluorescence microscopy for accurate assessment of Cryptosporidium contamination in water, although the results from this method are semiquantitative. PMID:21498768

  15. The first report of Cryptosporidium andersoni in horses with diarrhea and multilocus subtype analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Aiqin; Zhang, Jia; Zhao, Jingmin; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Rongjun; Zhang, Longxian

    2015-01-01

    Background Horses interact with humans in a wide variety of sport competitions and non-competitive recreational pursuits as well as in working activities. Cryptosporidium spp are one of the most important zoonotic pathogens causing diarrhea of humans and animals. The reports of Cryptosporidium in horses and the findings of zoonotic Cryptosporidium species/genotypes show a necessity to carry out molecular identification of Cryptosporidium in horses, especially in diarrheic ones. The aim of the...

  16. [Intestinal coccidiosis in children admitted to a hospital in Peru and comparison of two methods for detecting Cryptosporidium spp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Díaz, Heber; Campos-Flores, Hamer; Llagas-Linares, Jean Pier; LLatas-Cancino, Dunalia

    2016-01-01

    A cross-sectional study was done between October 2014 and June 2015 to estimate the frequency of infection due to intestinal coccidiosis in children admitted to a hospital in Peru, and compare the modified acid-fast staining procedure with the enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) method for the detection of Cryptosporidium spp. Coccidia were detected using the modified acid-fast staining procedure and the Cryptosporidium ELISA method (kit r-Biopharm) on seriated stool samples. Out of a total of 325 children, 5.5% had some type of intestinal coccidiosis: 3.7% involved Cryptosporidium spp. (using both techniques) and 1.8% involved Cyclospora cayetanensis (using the modified acid-fast staining procedure). The modified acid-fast staining procedure and ELISA method revealed a 0.955 consistency in the detection of Cryptosporidium spp. In conclusion, intestinal coccidiosis is frequent in children based on the population studied; similarly, both techniques can be used to detect Cryptosporidium spp., but the modified acid-fast staining procedure has an advantage over the other because it is cost-effective and can detect other coccidia in everyday practice.

  17. Molecular diagnosis and characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in turkeys and chickens in Germany reveals evidence for previously undetected parasite species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosra A Helmy

    Full Text Available A total of 256 fecal specimens were randomly collected from farmed poultry in Germany and screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. by PCR and further characterized by direct automated DNA sequencing. Using a nested PCR amplifying approximately 830 bp 18S rDNA fragment, 7.03% (n = 18 of the samples were Cryptosporidium-positive. In detail, Cryptosporidium was detected in 9.3% (8/86 of turkeys, 5.7% (9/158 of broilers and 8.3% (1/12 of layers. After DNA sequencing, Cryptosporidium parvum the most frequently observed species was identified in 5.1% (13/256 of all poultry species, including 8.1% (7/86 of turkeys, 3.2% (5/158 of broilers and 8.3% (1/12 of layers. Cryptosporidium baileyi was detected in 1.3% (2/256 of the broilers only. Three novel unclassified Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in 1.2% (1/86 of turkeys and 1.3% (2/158 of broilers. The infection rate was high in 13-20 week old turkeys, 1-6 weeks old broilers and >20 weeks old layers but differences between age groups were not significant. This is the first study in Germany uses molecular methods for the detection of Cryptosporidium in poultry. The results indicate that Cryptosporidium parasites are common among broilers and turkeys in Germany. Considering the large size of the poultry industry, the large amount of poultry meat that is consumed and the fact that C. parvum is also the most common Cryptosporidium parasite in humans, poultry might also be a source of human infections.

  18. Local and global genetic diversity of protozoan parasites: Spatial distribution of Cryptosporidium and Giardia genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-R, Juan C; French, Nigel; Pita, Anthony; Velathanthiri, Niluka; Shrestha, Rima; Hayman, David

    2017-07-01

    Cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis are recognized as significant enteric diseases due to their long-term health effects in humans and their economic impact in agriculture and medical care. Molecular analysis is essential to identify species and genotypes causing these infectious diseases and provides a potential tool for monitoring. This study uses information on species and genetic variants to gain insights into the geographical distribution and spatial patterns of Cryptosporidium and Giardia parasites. Here, we describe the population heterogeneity of genotypic groups within Cryptosporidium and Giardia present in New Zealand using gp60 and gdh markers to compare the observed variation with other countries around the globe. Four species of Cryptosporidium (C. hominis, C. parvum, C. cuniculus and C. erinacei) and one species of Giardia (G. intestinalis) were identified. These species have been reported worldwide and there are not unique Cryptosporidium gp60 subtype families and Giardia gdh assemblages in New Zealand, most likely due to high gene flow of historical and current human activity (travel and trade) and persistence of large host population sizes. The global analysis revealed that genetic variants of these pathogens are widely distributed. However, genetic variation is underestimated by data biases (e.g. neglected submission of sequences to genetic databases) and low sampling. New genotypes are likely to be discovered as sampling efforts increase according to accumulation prediction analyses, especially for C. parvum. Our study highlights the need for greater sampling and archiving of genotypes globally to allow comparative analyses that help understand the population dynamics of these protozoan parasites. Overall our study represents a comprehensive overview for exploring local and global protozoan genotype diversity and advances our understanding of the importance for surveillance and potential risk associated with these infectious diseases.

  19. Local and global genetic diversity of protozoan parasites: Spatial distribution of Cryptosporidium and Giardia genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Garcia-R

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis are recognized as significant enteric diseases due to their long-term health effects in humans and their economic impact in agriculture and medical care. Molecular analysis is essential to identify species and genotypes causing these infectious diseases and provides a potential tool for monitoring. This study uses information on species and genetic variants to gain insights into the geographical distribution and spatial patterns of Cryptosporidium and Giardia parasites. Here, we describe the population heterogeneity of genotypic groups within Cryptosporidium and Giardia present in New Zealand using gp60 and gdh markers to compare the observed variation with other countries around the globe. Four species of Cryptosporidium (C. hominis, C. parvum, C. cuniculus and C. erinacei and one species of Giardia (G. intestinalis were identified. These species have been reported worldwide and there are not unique Cryptosporidium gp60 subtype families and Giardia gdh assemblages in New Zealand, most likely due to high gene flow of historical and current human activity (travel and trade and persistence of large host population sizes. The global analysis revealed that genetic variants of these pathogens are widely distributed. However, genetic variation is underestimated by data biases (e.g. neglected submission of sequences to genetic databases and low sampling. New genotypes are likely to be discovered as sampling efforts increase according to accumulation prediction analyses, especially for C. parvum. Our study highlights the need for greater sampling and archiving of genotypes globally to allow comparative analyses that help understand the population dynamics of these protozoan parasites. Overall our study represents a comprehensive overview for exploring local and global protozoan genotype diversity and advances our understanding of the importance for surveillance and potential risk associated with these infectious diseases.

  20. Prevalence and risk factors for shedding of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in dairy calves of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. Garro

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the prevalence and risk factors for shedding of Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy calves, a cross-sectional study was carried out in the northeastern region of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. Fecal samples from a total of 552 calves from 27 dairy herds were collected, along with a questionnaire about management factors. Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected by light microscopy using Kinyoun staining. Putative risk factors were tested for association using generalized linear mixed models (GLMMs. Oocyst shedding calves were found in 67% (CI95% = 49–84 of herds (corresponding to a true herd prevalence of 98% and 16% (CI95% = 13–19 of calves (corresponding to a true calve prevalence of 8%. Within-herd prevalence ranged from 0 to 60%, with a median of 8%. Cryptosporidium spp. excretion was not associated with the type of liquid diet, gender, time the calf stayed with the dam after birth, use of antibiotics, blood presence in feces, and calving season. However, important highly significant risk factors of oocyst shedding of calves was an age of less or equal than 20 days (OR = 7.4; 95% CI95% = 3–16; P < 0.0001 and occurrence of diarrhea (OR = 5.5; 95% CI95% = 2–11; P < 0.0001. The observed association with young age strongly suggests an early exposure of neonatal calves to Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in maternity pens and/or an age-related susceptibility. Association with diarrhea suggests that Cryptosporidium spp. is an important enteropathogen primarily responsible for the cause of the observed diarrheal syndrome. Results demonstrate that Cryptosporidium spp. infection is widespread in the study region. Monitoring and control of this parasitic protozoan infection in dairy herds is recommended.

  1. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. in two centers of training horses in Curitiba, Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keila Youko Fujii

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho investigou a ocorrência de parasitismo por Cryptosporidium spp. em equinos alojados em dois centros de treinamento de equinos localizados no município de Curitiba, Paraná. Foram examinados 108 cavalos, sendo 48 procedentes do Centro de Treinamento 1 (CT1 e 60 do Centro de Treinamento 2 (CT2. As coletas de amostras de fezes foram realizadas no período de outubro de 2010 a janeiro de 2011. A metodologia utilizada para a confirmação da presença de oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. foi a técnica de Ziehl-Neelsen modificada. A ocorrência encontrada foi de 18,52% para o total de animais examinados. Houve diferença estatística significativa (p > 0,05 quando comparadas as prevalências encontradas nos dois centros de treinamento, sendo no CT1 de 4,16% e no CT2 de 30%. Não houve associação entre a prevalência e a idade, o sexo e raça (p > 0,05.

  2. No molecular epidemiological evidence supporting household transmission of zoonotic Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. from pet dogs and cats in the province of Álava, Northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lucio, Aida; Bailo, Begoña; Aguilera, María; Cardona, Guillermo A; Fernández-Crespo, Juan C; Carmena, David

    2017-06-01

    The role of pet dogs and cats as suitable source of human infections by the diarrheagenic protozoan parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. has been a topic of intense debate for long time and still remains a largely unsolved problem. In this cross-sectional molecular epidemiological survey we attempted to investigate whether zoonotic (or zooanthroponotic) disease transmission was occurring among humans and domestic dogs and cats sharing the same spatial and temporal setting in both rural and urban areas of the province of Álava, Northern Spain. A total of 268 (including 179 human, 55 canine, and 34 feline) individual faecal specimens were obtained from 63 family households during February-March and November-December 2014. Detection of G. duodenalis cysts and Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts was achieved by direct fluorescence microscopy (DFAT) and PCR-based methods targeting the small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA gene of the parasites. Giardia-positive isolates were subsequently sub-genotyped at the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and β-giardin (BG) genes. Overall, G. duodenalis infections were identified in 3.4% (6/179) of humans, 29% (16/55) of dogs, and 5.9% (2/34) of cats, respectively. Cryptosporidium spp. infections were detected in 1.1% (2/179) of humans, 5.5% (3/55) of dogs, and 8.8% (3/34) of cats, respectively. Simultaneous infections in human and canine/feline hosts by G. duodenalis or Cryptosporidium spp. were only demonstrated in a single household in which a cat and its owner tested positive for Cryptosporidium by DFAT, but this result could not be confirmed by SSU-PCR. Infections were homogeneously distributed among the studied human or animal populations irrespectively of their sex, age group, or geographical region of origin. Inadequate washing of raw vegetables and fruits was the only risk factor significantly associated to a higher likelihood of having human giardiosis/cryptosporidiosis. Molecular characterization of G. duodenalis

  3. Prevalence and Genetic Diversity of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. among School Children in a Rural Area of the Amhara Region, North-West Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida de Lucio

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. are enteric protozoan causing gastrointestinal illness in humans and animals. Giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis are not formally considered as neglected tropical diseases, but belong to the group of poverty-related infectious diseases that impair the development and socio-economic potential of infected individuals in developing countries.We report here the prevalence and genetic diversity of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in children attending rural primary schools in the Bahir Dar district of the Amhara Region, Ethiopia. Stool samples were collected from 393 children and analysed by molecular methods. G. duodenalis was detected by real-time PCR, and the assemblages and sub-assemblages were determined by multilocus sequence-based genotyping of the glutamate dehydrogenase and β-giardin genes of the parasite. Detection and identification of Cryptosporidium species was carried out by sequencing of a partial fragment of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA gene.The PCR-based prevalences of G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. were 55.0% (216/393 and 4.6% (18/393, respectively. A total of 78 G. duodenalis isolates were successfully characterized, revealing the presence of sub-assemblages AII (10.3%, BIII (28.2%, and BIV (32.0%. Discordant typing results AII/AIII and BIII/BIV were identified in 7.7% and 15.4% of the isolates, respectively. An additional five (6.4% isolates were assigned to assemblage B. No mixed infections of assemblages A+B were found. Extensive genetic variation at the nucleotide level was observed within assemblage B (but no within assemblage A, resulting in the identification of a large number of sub-types. Cryptosporidium diversity was demonstrated by the occurrence of C. hominis, C. parvum, and C. viatorum in the population under study.Our data suggest an epidemiological scenario with an elevated transmission intensity of a wide range of G. duodenalis genetic variants. Importantly

  4. Prevalence and genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. and Cystoisospora belli in HIV-infected patients Prevalência e caracterização genética de Cryptosporidium spp. e Cystoisospora belli em pacientes infectados pelo HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dnieber Chagas Assis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium spp. and Cystoisospora belli are monoxenic protozoa that have been recognized as the causative agents of chronic diarrhea in immunocompromised individuals, especially HIV-infected subjects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the frequency of these intestinal protozoa in HIV-positive patients in the Triângulo Mineiro region of Brazil and to correlate the presence of these infections with clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data of the patients. Oocysts were detected in stool samples of 10 (16.9% of the 59 patients studied, while Cryptosporidium spp. were present in 10.1% (6/59 and C. belli in 6.7% (4/59. The frequency of these parasites was higher among patients with diarrheic syndrome and CD4+ T lymphocyte counts Cryptosporidium spp. e Cystoisospora belli são protozoários monoxenos reconhecidos como agentes causadores de diarréia crônica em indivíduos imunocomprometidos, especialmente aqueles infectados pelo HIV. Os objetivos deste estudo foram o de avaliar a frequência destes protozoários em pacientes HIV - positivos na região do Triângulo Mineiro, Brasil, e correlacionar a presença destas infecções com dados clínicos, epidemiológicos e laboratoriais dos pacientes. Oocistos foram detectados em amostras fecais de 10 (16,9% dos 59 pacientes estudados, sendo 10.1% (6/59 das amostras positivas para Cryptosporidium spp. e 6,7% (4/59 das amostras positivas para C. belli. A frequência destes parasitos foi maior entre pacientes com síndrome diarreica e contagem de linfócitos T CD4+ < 200 cells/mm 3 , o que demonstra o caráter oportunista destas infecções. Foi observada uma associação significativa entre a falta de aderência à terapia antiretroviral e a presença de Cryptosporidium spp. e/ou C. belli. Parasitismo por Cryptosporidium spp. foi mais frequente em fevereiro e abril, meses subsequentes ao período chuvoso. O mesmo não foi observado para C. belli. A caracterização genética de dois

  5. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in calves (Bos taurus and Bos indicus in the Formiga city, Minas Gerais - Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto César Araujo Lima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis is a waterborne disease, has as aggravating the difficulty of preventing environmental contamination and lack of effective therapeutic measures. With marked importance to the cattle, causes inflammation and intestinal villous atrophy resulting in loss of absorptive surface. This study aimed to perform molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in calves in the city of Formiga, Minas Gerais. A total of 300 faeces samples from Holstein calves, Nelore and indefinite breed, both healthy, were evaluated by negative contrast staining technique of malachite green and through the reaction of nested PCR for amplification of DNA fragments of the 18S subunit of the RNA gene ribosomal. Occurrence of 5.33 % ( 16/300 for malachite green and 4.66 % ( 14/300 by PCR was observed, whereas no correlation was found between positive and variables studied. Through molecular characterization were identified Cryptosporidium andersoni and Cryptosporidium ryanae species. In conclusion, we observed a low incidence of infection and elimination of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts, the absence of clinical signs in animals, strong agreement between the results obtained by the two techniques. Beyond, with the molecular characterization ( nested PCR , species of C. andersoni and C. ryanae were diagnosed in age groups not present in the literature. These two species of Cryptosporidium are described above for the first time parasitizing cattle in the state of Minas Gerais.

  6. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in low quality water and on vegetables irrigated with low quality water in Kumasi, Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Tobias B; Petersen, Heidi H.; Abaidoo, Robert C.

    Protozoan parasites belonging to the genus Cryptosporidium are transmitted e.g. by food and water and may cause severe diarrhoea, dehydration, weight loss and malnutrition. Ingestion of 10 oocysts can lead to infection and pathogenic symptoms. Thus, to characterize Cryptosporidium spp. contaminat...

  7. [Presence and viability of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. in drinking water and wastewater in the high basin of Bogotá river].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Marlén Andrea; Beltrán, Milena; Cárdenas, Martha Liliana; Campos, María Claudia

    2005-09-01

    Faecal contamination in wastewater and drinking water is linked to the dissemination of water related diseases. The bacteria, virus and parasites present in drinking water are responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality, especially among infants. Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. were the organisms selected as parasite contamination indicators. Their presence serves as a useful tool for evaluating water quality and determining sanitary risk. At present, in Colombia, concentration and occurrence of these parasites is unknown and an immediate assessment was considered necessary. Protozoan presence was determined in five sampling stations in the Bogotá river upper basin and in two drinking water plants near the same area. The techniques applied for counting encysted forms consisted of inorganic flocculation for wastewater or filtration for drinking water. Fluorogenic vital dyes tested for viability. The presence of Cryptosporidium spp. was confirmed in two of the sampled stations and at two of the drinking water plants. Giardia spp. was found at two of the drinking water plants but not at the sampled stations. Viable cysts were found for Cryptosporidium spp. in one of the samples from the Bogotá river, but only inviable exemplars were obtained from the drinking water plants. The results revealed protozoan presence in drinking and residual water implying the presence of a potential sanitary hazard.

  8. WATER FROM DIFFERENT SOURCES USED FOR THE IRRIGATION OF VEGETABLES TO BE MARKETED: RESEARCH ON Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., AND COLIFORMS IN PARANA, BRAZIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiyo, Rogerio; de Souza, Carla Zangari; Nishi, Letícia; Brustolin, Camila Fernanda; Ratti, Bianca Altrão; Falavigna Guilherme, Ana Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare, from a parasitological ( Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis), bacteriological (total and thermotolerants coliforms) and physicochemical perspective, water sources used for drinking and irrigation of vegetables intended to be sold for human consumption. From January 2010 to May 2011, samples of different water sources from vegetable producing properties were collected; 100 liters for parasitological analysis, 200 mL for bacteriological analysis, and five liters for physicochemical analysis. Water samples were filtered under vacuum with a kit containing a cellulose acetate membrane filter, 1.2 µm (Millipore(r), Barueri, SP, Brazil). The material retained on the membrane was mechanically extracted and analyzed by direct immunofluorescence (Merifluor(r)kit). From 20 rural properties investigated, 10 had artesian wells (40 samples), 10 had common wells (40 samples), and one had a mine (four samples), the latter contaminated by Cryptosporidium spp. In samples from artesian wells, 90 to 130 meters depth, 42.5% were positive for total coliforms and 5.0% were identified to have abnormal coloration. From the samples of common wells, 14 to 37 meters depth, 87.5% were contaminated with total coliforms, 82.5% were positive for thermotolerant coliforms, and 12.5% had color abnormalities. We did not detect the presence of Giardia spp. or Cryptosporidium spp. in artesian and common wells. The use of artesian or common wells is an important step in the control of the spreading of zoonoses, particularly Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp., as well as artesian wells for coliform control in local production of vegetables to be marketed.

  9. First report of Cryptosporidium canis in foxes (Vulpes vulpes) and raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) and identification of several novel subtype families for Cryptosporidium mink genotype in minks (Mustela vison) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Siwen; Tao, Wei; Liu, Chengwu; Jiang, Yanxue; Wan, Qiang; Li, Qiao; Yang, Hang; Lin, Yongchao; Li, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Despite the rapid and extensive advances in molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in humans and a variety of animals, the prevalence and genetic traits of the parasite in wildlife bred in captivity and the role of the neglected hosts in zoonotic transmission of human cryptosporidiosis are rarely understood. This study investigated the prevalence, species/genotype, and subtype of Cryptosporidium in farmed fur animals in China and assessed the possibility of zoonotic transmission. Three of 191 (1.6%) foxes (Vulpes vulpes), 17 of 162 (10.5%) raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides), and 48 of 162 (29.6%) minks (Mustela vison) were positive for Cryptosporidium by nested PCRs targeting the small subunit rRNA gene. Sequence analysis indicated the presence of only Cryptosporidium canis in foxes and raccoon dogs. There is no significant difference in prevalence between young and adult foxes (or raccoon dogs). Three Cryptosporidium species or genotype including C. canis, Cryptosporidium meleagridis, and mink genotype were determined in minks aged five to six months. Subtyping based on nucleotide and amino acid sequence polymorphisms of the 60kDa glycoprotein facilitated identification of three novel subtype families named as Xb to Xd for Cryptosporidium mink genotype. The presence of zoonotic C. canis, C. meleagridis, and Cryptosporidium mink genotype in captive-bred fur animals is of public health concerns. The findings expanded the host ranges of C. canis and C. meleagridis and confirmed genetic diversity at the subtype level in Cryptosporidium mink genotype. This is the first study reporting Cryptosporidium infections in foxes and raccoon dogs in China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Multicentric evaluation of a new real-time PCR assay for quantification of Cryptosporidium spp. and identification of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary, C; Chapey, E; Dutoit, E; Guyot, K; Hasseine, L; Jeddi, F; Menotti, J; Paraud, C; Pomares, C; Rabodonirina, M; Rieux, A; Derouin, F

    2013-08-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite responsible for gastroenteritis, especially in immunocompromised patients. Laboratory diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis relies on microscopy, antigen detection, and nucleic acid detection and analysis. Among the numerous molecular targets available, the 18S rRNA gene displays the best sensitivity and sequence variations between species and can be used for molecular typing assays. This paper presents a new real-time PCR assay for the detection and quantification of all Cryptosporidium species associated with the identification of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum. The sensitivity and specificity of this new PCR assay were assessed on a multicentric basis, using well-characterized Cryptosporidium-positive and -negative human stool samples, and the efficiencies of nine extraction methods were comparatively assessed using Cryptosporidium-seeded stool samples and phosphate-buffered saline samples. A comparison of extraction yields showed that the most efficient extraction method was the Boom technique in association with mechanical grinding, and column extraction showed higher binding capacity than extraction methods based on magnetic silica. Our PCR assay was able to quantify at least 300 oocysts per gram of stool. Satisfactory reproducibility between laboratories was observed. The two main species causing human disease, Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, were identified using a duplex real-time PCR assay with specific TaqMan minor-groove-binding ligand (MGB) probes for the same amplicon. To conclude, this one-step quantitative PCR is well suited to the routine diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis since practical conditions, including DNA extraction, quantification using well-defined standards, and identification of the two main species infecting humans, have been positively assessed.

  11. Molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium spp. in lambs in the South Central region of the State of São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Zucatto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Considering the proximity of sheep farmers to animals that are possibly diseased or releasing fecal oocysts into the environment and the marked pathogenicity in lambs, the aim of this study was to determine the occurrence and to molecularly characterize the infection by Cryptosporidium spp. in lambs in the South Central region of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. A total of 193 fecal samples were collected from sheep of several breeds, males and females, aged up to one year. Polymerase chain reaction (nested-PCR was used to amplify DNA fragments from the subunit 18S rRNA gene and indicated 15% positivity; sequencing of amplified fragments was possible for 19 samples. Analysis of the obtained sequences showed that the identified species were Cryptosporidium xiaoi for 15 samples, constituting thus the first molecular characterization study of this Cryptosporidium species in Brazil. Cryptosporidium ubiquitum was identified for three samples and Cryptosporidium meleagridis for one sample; the latter two are considered zoonotic species.

  12. Detection and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium and Eimeria species in Philippine bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakoshi, Fumi; Recuenco, Frances C; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Sano, Kaori; Taniguchi, Satoshi; Masangkay, Joseph S; Alviola, Philip; Eres, Eduardo; Cosico, Edison; Alvarez, James; Une, Yumi; Kyuwa, Shigeru; Sugiura, Yuki; Kato, Kentaro

    2016-05-01

    The genus Cryptosporidium, which is an obligate intracellular parasite, infects various vertebrates and causes a diarrheal disease known as cryptosporidiosis. Bats are naturally infected with zoonotic pathogens; thus, they are potential reservoirs of parasites. We investigated the species and genotype distribution as well as prevalence of Cryptosporidium and Eimeria in Philippine bats. We captured and examined 45 bats; four were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. and seven were positive for Eimeria spp. We detected Cryptosporidium bat genotype II from Ptenochirus jagori. Three other Cryptosporidium sequences, detected from Rhinolophus inops, Cynopterus brachyotis, and Eonycteris spelaea, could not be classified as any known species or genotype; we therefore propose the novel genotype Cryptosporidium bat genotypes V, VI, and VII. Bat genotype V is associated with human cryptosporidiosis clade, and therefore, this genotype may be transmissible to humans. Among the Eimeria sequences, BE3 detected from Scotophilus kuhlii was classified with known bat and rodent clades; however, other sequences detected from C. brachyotis, E. spelaea, Rousettus amplexicaudatus, and R. inops could not be classified with known Eimeria species. These isolates might represent a new genotype. Our findings demonstrate that the bats of the Philippines represent a reservoir of multiple Cryptosporidium and Eimeria spp.

  13. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) in Guangdong Province, Southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Lin, Xuhui; Zhang, Longxian; Qi, Nanshan; Liao, Shenquan; Lv, Minna; Wu, Caiyan; Sun, Mingfei

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the prevalence and assess the zoonotic transmission burden of Cryptosporidium species in domestic pigeons in Guangdong Province, Southern China, 244 fecal samples were collected from four pigeon breeding farms between June 2012 and March 2013. Cryptosporidium oocysts were purified by Sheather's sugar flotation technique and characterized by DNA sequencing of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. Cryptosporidium species were determined by comparison of sequences with corresponding Cryptosporidium sequences in GenBank and phylogenetic analysis using neighbor-joining (NJ) in MEGA5.2. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in domestic pigeons in Guangdong Province was 0.82% (2/244). Two Cryptosporidium species, namely Cryptosporidium baileyi and Cryptosporidium meleagridis, were identified in Huizhou and Chaozhou farm, respectively. These findings confirmed the existence of C. meleagridis infection in domestic pigeons in China for the first time and provided base-line information for further studies to evaluate the public health risk from pigeon to human.

  14. Primeiro relato de Cryptosporidium spp. em emas (Rhea americana) cativas de zoológicos no Brasil.

    OpenAIRE

    Ludwig, Rodrigo; Marques, Sandra Marcia Tietz

    2008-01-01

    Este estudo objetivou avaliar a ocorrência de oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. em emas (Rhea americana) cativas no Parque Zoológico da Fundação Zoobotânica do Rio Grande do Sul, sul do Brasil. Foram identificados oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. em esfregaços de fezes de emas e em amostras de água, coradas pela técnica de Ziehl-Neelsen modificada. A análise morfométrica dos coccídeos revelou pequenos oocistos esféricos medindo, em média, 4,91 μm X 4,91 μm e relação comprimento/largura de razã...

  15. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. from HIV infected patients from an urban area of Brazil Caracterização molecular de Cryptosporidium spp. de pacientes de área urbana do Brasil infectados por HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia de Lucca

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium spp. are important cause of enteric disease in humans, but may also infect animals. This study describes the relative frequency of several Cryptosporidium species found in human specimens from HIV infected patients in the São Paulo municipality obtained from January to July 2007. Sequence analysis of the products of nested-PCR based on small subunit rRNA and Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein coding genes revealed 17 (63.0% isolates of C. hominis, four (14.8% C. parvum, five (18.5% C. felis and one (3.7% C. canis. These findings suggest that, in urban environments of Brazil, the cat adapted C. felis may play a potential role in the zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis whereas the anthroponotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis caused by C. hominis seems to predominate.Cryptosporidium spp. são importantes causas de doenças entéricas em humanos, mas podem também ser encontrados em animais. O presente estudo descreve a frequência relativa de diversas espécies de Cryptosporidium em amostras de humanos da cidade de São Paulo, Brasil, obtidas de janeiro a julho de 2007. Análises de sequências de produtos de nested PCR direcionadas ao genes codificadores da menor unidade ribosomal e da proteina de parede de oocistos revelaram 17 (63,0% isolados de C. hominis, quatro (14,8% C. parvum, cinco (18,5% C. felis, e um (3,7% C. canis. Estes resultados sugerem que, em ambientes urbanos no Brasil, o genótipo adaptado ao gato pode desempenhar potencial papel na transmissão zoonótica de criptosporidiose, enquanto a transmissão antroponótica da criptosporidiose causada pelo C. hominis parece predominar.

  16. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp. and other pathogenic intestinal parasites in the Beberibe River in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Dayana Andrade de; Paiva, Anderson Luiz Ribeiro de; Carvalho Filho, José Adson Andrade de; Cabral, Jaime Joaquim da Silva Pereira; Rocha, Francisca Janaína Soares

    2015-01-01

    Transmission of pathogenic protozoa and helminths by water is a serious public health problem. In this study, we analyzed the presence of these organisms in the Beberibe River in Pernambuco, Brazil. Parasite analysis was performed using the Hoffman, Pons, & Janer method followed by centrifugation and preparation of slides by staining with acetic acid and Lugol's solution. Protozoan oocysts were isolated by the modified Ziehl Neelsen method. Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp. and other parasites were found in the Beberibe River. Sanitation companies must assess pathogenic intestinal parasites in water basins providing public water and subsequently develop improved treatment systems for removal of such parasites.

  17. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp. and other pathogenic intestinal parasites in the Beberibe River in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayana Andrade de Freitas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Transmission of pathogenic protozoa and helminths by water is a serious public health problem. In this study, we analyzed the presence of these organisms in the Beberibe River in Pernambuco, Brazil. METHODS: Parasite analysis was performed using the Hoffman, Pons, & Janer method followed by centrifugation and preparation of slides by staining with acetic acid and Lugol's solution. Protozoan oocysts were isolated by the modified Ziehl Neelsen method. RESULTS: Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp. and other parasites were found in the Beberibe River. CONCLUSIONS: Sanitation companies must assess pathogenic intestinal parasites in water basins providing public water and subsequently develop improved treatment systems for removal of such parasites.

  18. Common occurrence of Cryptosporidium hominis in horses and donkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Fuchun; Liu, Aiqin; Wang, Rongjun; Zhang, Sumei; Qi, Meng; Zhao, Wei; Shi, Yadong; Wang, Jianling; Wei, Jiujian; Zhang, Longxian; Xiao, Lihua

    2016-09-01

    Extensive genetic variation is observed within the genus Cryptosporidium and the distribution of Cryptosporidium species/genotypes in humans and animals appears to vary by geography and host species. To better understand the genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in horses and donkeys, we characterized five horse-derived and 82 donkey-derived Cryptosporidium isolates from five provinces or autonomous regions (Sichuan, Gansu, Henan, Inner Mongolia and Shandong) in China at the species/genotype and subtype levels. Three Cryptosporidium species/genotypes were identified based on the analysis of the SSU rRNA gene, including Cryptosporidium parvum (n=22), the Cryptosporidium horse genotype (n=4), and Cryptosporidium hominis (n=61). The identification of C. hominis was confirmed by sequence analysis of the HSP70 and actin genes. Subtyping using sequence analysis of the 60kDa glycoprotein gene identified 21 C. parvum isolates as subtype IIdA19G1, the four horse genotype isolates as subtypes VIaA15G4 (n=2) and VIaA11G3 (n=2), and the 61 C. hominis isolates as IkA16G1 (n=59) and IkA16 (n=2). The common finding of C. hominis reaffirms the heterogeneity of Cryptosporidium spp. in horses and donkeys and is possibly a reflection of endemic transmission of C. hominis in these animals. Data of the study suggest that horses and donkeys as companion animals may potentially transmit Cryptosporidium infections to humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. including novel identification of the Cryptosporidium muris and Cryptosporidium tyzzeri in horses in the Czech Republic and Poland

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; McEvoy, J.; Rost, M.; Perec Matysiak, A.; Ježková, J.; Kváč, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 4 (2015), s. 1619-1624 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01090S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : horse * Cryptosporidium * SSU * gp60 * MLST Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.027, year: 2015

  20. Caracterização molecular de Cryptosporidium spp. em criações comerciais brasileiras de coelhos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Heker

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO A criptosporidiose é uma importante zoonose que pode ser transmitida por meio de alimentos, água de bebida e por contato com animais e pessoas infectadas. Além disso, trata-se de uma enfermidade clínica ou subclínica frequente em diversas espécies de animais, incluindo coelhos domésticos. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a ocorrência de Cryptosporidium spp., realizar sua classificação molecular e relacionar a presença do parasito às diferentes fases de criação em 21 criações comerciais de coelhos, localizadas nos estados de Minas Gerais, Mato Grosso do Sul, Pernambuco, Paraná, Rio de Janeiro, Rio Grande do Sul e São Paulo. Quinhentas e catorze amostras de fezes foram colhidas e armazenadas em solução de dicromato de potássio 5%. Os oocistos foram purificados por centrífugo-flutuação em solução de Sheather e visualizados por microscopia, utilizando-se a coloração negativa com verde malaquita. Cinquenta e cinco amostras foram submetidas à reação em cadeia pela polimerase (nested PCR e ao sequenciamento de fragmentos amplificados, referentes aos genes da subunidade 18S do rRNA e da glicloproteína GP60, visando à caracterização molecular de Cryptosporidium spp. Oito amostras foram positivas para Cryptosporidium spp. pela microscopia (1,56%; 8/514 e sete foram positivas pela nested PCR (12,73%; 7/55. Pela análise molecular, foi possível identificar Cryptosporidium cuniculus (18S rRNA e C. cuniculus subtipo VbA21 (gp60 em coelhos jovens e em matrizes.

  1. Cryptosporidium hominis genotypes involved in increased incidence and clusters of cases, Navarra, Spain, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, I; Martín, C; Beristain, X; Mazón, A; Saugar, J M; Blanco, A; García Cenoz, M; Valle-Cristia, M; Ezpeleta, C; Castilla, J

    2015-04-01

    SUMMARY Two clusters of confirmed cryptosporidiosis infections were detected in Navarra, Spain, in the summer of 2012, in the context of an increased incidence in the region. Molecular subtyping of Cryptosporidium hominis determined that one cluster, occurring in an urban area, was due to the predominant circulating subtype IbA10G2R2 and the other cluster, with cases occurring in a rural area, was due to a rare subtype IaA18R3. No single exposure was associated with infection, although exposure to certain children's pools was reported by a majority of patients interviewed in each cluster. Genotyping tools were useful in the investigation and could aid investigation of cryptosporidiosis outbreaks in Spain in the future.

  2. Assessment of Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp. as a Microbial Source Tracking Tool for Surface Water: Application in a Mixed-Use Watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Prystajecky, Natalie; Huck, Peter M.; Schreier, Hans; Isaac-Renton, Judith L.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of host specificity, combined with genomic sequencing of Giardia and Cryptosporidium spp., has demonstrated a microbial source tracking (MST) utility for these common waterborne microbes. To explore the source attribution potential of these pathogens, water samples were collected in a mixed rural-urban watershed in the Township of Langley, in southwestern British Columbia (BC), Canada, over a 2-year period. Cryptosporidium was detected in 63% of surface water samples at concentratio...

  3. Molecular identification of Giardia and Cryptosporidium from dogs and cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriadou, Isaia; Pantchev, Nikola; Gassmann, Doreen; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to diagnose the presence of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in household animals using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence analysis. One hundred faecal samples obtained from 81 dogs and 19 cats were investigated. The Cryptosporidium genotypes were determined by sequencing a fragment of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, while the Giardia Assemblages were determined through analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) locus. Isolates from five dogs and two cats were positive by PCR for the presence of Giardia, and their sequences matched the zoonotic Assemblage A of Giardia. Cryptosporidium spp. isolated from one dog and one cat were both found to be C. parvum. One dog isolate harboured a mixed infection of C. parvum and Giardia Assemblage A. These findings support the growing evidence that household animals are potential reservoirs of the zoonotic pathogens Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. for infections in humans. PMID:23477297

  4. Molecular identification of Giardia and Cryptosporidium from dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiriadou Isaia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to diagnose the presence of Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts in household animals using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR and sequence analysis. One hundred faecal samples obtained from 81 dogs and 19 cats were investigated. The Cryptosporidium genotypes were determined by sequencing a fragment of the small subunit (SSU rRNA gene, while the Giardia Assemblages were determined through analysis of the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH locus. Isolates from five dogs and two cats were positive by PCR for the presence of Giardia, and their sequences matched the zoonotic Assemblage A of Giardia. Cryptosporidium spp. isolated from one dog and one cat were both found to be C. parvum. One dog isolate harboured a mixed infection of C. parvum and Giardia Assemblage A. These findings support the growing evidence that household animals are potential reservoirs of the zoonotic pathogens Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp. for infections in humans.

  5. Multilocus genotyping of Cryptosporidium hominis associated with diarrhea outbreak in a day care unit in São Paulo Genotipagem de multilocus de Cryptosporidium hominis associado a surto diarréico em creche de São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elenice Messias do Nascimento Gonçalves

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A number of species of Cryptosporidium are associated with diarrhea worldwide. Little data exists regarding the genotypes and species of Cryptosporidium associated with cases of infections in Brazil. PURPOSE: In the present study, we ascertained by molecular methods the species and the genotype of Cryptosporidium sp from a diarrhea outbreak diagnosed in a day care at the Hospital Clínicas, São Paulo University Medical School. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Specific identification and typing of the isolates associated with the outbreak was done by DNA sequencing analysis of fragments amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR from 3 different Cryptosporidium loci: the SSUrRNA coding region, the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP gene, and the microsatellite locus 1 (ML1, a tandem GAG-trinucleotide repeat containing substitutions that differentiate the genotypes of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis. RESULTS: A total of 29 positive samples from the outbreak were studied by the molecular methods described. Our study revealed the presence of a single genotype of Cryptosporidium hominis in all samples. CONCLUSION: The molecular analysis reinforced the hypothesis that the transmission of Cryptosporidium hominis during the period the samples were collected occurred in an outbreak pattern, possibly by person-to-person contact through the fecal-oral route. As far as we know, this is the first time that molecular tools have been used to identify the species and the genotype of isolates showing the presence of the ML1 genotype in samples from Brazilian patients.Mundialmente, diferentes espécies de Cryptosporidium estão relacionadas com doenças diarréicas. No Brasil há poucos dados sobre os genótipos das espécies de Cryptosporidium associadas a infecções. OBJETIVO: No presente estudo, caracterizamos, por métodos moleculares, a espécie e o genótipo de Cryptosporidium sp diagnosticado em surto diarréico ocorrido na creche do

  6. Ocorrência de Cryptosporidium spp. e outros parasitas em hortaliças consumidas in natura, no Recife Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. and others parasites in vegetables consumed in natura, Recife, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celiane Gomes Maia da Silva

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a ocorrência de enteroparasitas em hortaliças comercializadas e consumidas em Pernambuco. Foram utilizadas 100 amostras de hortaliças: 40 amostras de alface lisa (Lactuca sativa, 40 de agrião (Nasturtium officinale e 20 de acelga (Beta vulgaris, provenientes de feiras livres e supermercados. A detecção de Cryptosporidium spp. foi realizada conforme Monge e Arias sendo utilizado dois métodos de coloração, Koster modificado e Ziehl-Nielsen. Foi usada a técnica de sedimentação espontânea de Gelli et al. para a análise parasitológica. As análises de coliformes totais e Escherichia coli foram realizadas de acordo com Andrews. Os resultados obtidos mostraram um percentual de contaminação parasitária em 60% de alface, 30% de agrião e 20% de acelga, destacando-se o Ascaris lumbricoides, Strongyloides stercoralis e Ancylostoma duodenale dentre os helmintos, e o Cryptosporidium spp., Entamoeba coli e o complexo Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba díspar, dentre os protozoários com maior freqüência. As hortaliças mais contaminadas por coliformes totais e Escherichia coli foram alface nas amostras de supermercado e agrião em feira livre. Esses dados sugerem a necessidade da adoção de medidas educativas aos produtores, e do monitoramento das águas destinadas à irrigação das hortas.The study was carried with the aim to evaluate the occurrence of enteroparasites in vegetables commercialized and consumed in natural form in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil. Horticultural samples purchased from supermarket and free market: 40 from lettuce (Lactuca sativa, 40 from watercress (Nasturtium officinale and 20 from chard (Beta vulgaris were analyzed. Cryptosporidium spp. detection was realized following Monge and Arias methodology, using two staining processes (Koster modified and Ziehl-Nielsen. Parasitological analysis was determined by the spontaneous sedimentation technique (Gelli et al., and total

  7. Potential role of beavers (Castor fiber in contamination of water in the Masurian Lake District (north-eastern Poland with protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sroka Jacek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the possible influence of beavers on the contamination of lake water with zoonotic parasites Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp., with respect to the risk to human health. A total of 79 water samples were taken around the habitats of beavers from 14 localities situated in the recreational Masurian Lake District (north-eastern Poland. Water was sampled in the spring and autumn seasons, at different distances from beavers’ lodges (0-2, 10, 30, and 50 m. The samples were examined for the presence of (oocysts of zoonotic protozoa Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. by direct fluorescence assay (DFA and by nested and real time PCR. By DFA, the presence of Giardia cysts was found in 36 samples (45.6% and the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in 26 samples (32.9%. Numbers of Giardia cysts, Cryptosporidium oocysts, and summarised (oocysts of both parasites showed a significant variation depending on locality. The numbers of Giardia cysts significantly decreased with the distance from beavers’ lodges while the numbers of Cryptosporidium oocysts did not show such dependence. The amount of Giardia cysts in samples collected in spring was approximately 3 times higher than in autumn. Conversely, a larger number of Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in samples collected in autumn than in spring. By PCR, Giardia DNA was found in 38 samples (48.1% whereas DNA of Cryptosporidium was found in only 7 samples (8.9%. Eleven Giardia isolates were subjected to phylogenetic analysis by restriction fragment length polymorphism PCR or sequencing which evidenced their belonging to zoonotic assemblages: A (3 isolates and B (8 isolates. In conclusion, water in the vicinity of beavers’ lodges in the tested region was markedly contaminated with (oocysts of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp., which confirms the potential role of beavers as a reservoir of these parasites and indicates a need for

  8. Genotyping of Acanthamoeba spp. from water sources from Northwestern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniloo, Ali; Pezeshki, Ali; Mahmmodzadeh, Abbas; Kadkhodamohammadi, Elnaz

    2017-12-20

    Acanthamoeba spp. are free-living amoebae which are ubiquitously distributed worldwide and can be found in the wide range of environments, particularly in various types of water sources, where they able to cause important health problems. In the present study, cultures containing Acanthamoeba from water samples were obtained from our earlier survey. For an analysis of the genetic pattern of Acanthamoeba isolates, DNA sequencing of nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene (18S rRNA or Rns) was applied. A phylogenetic analyses of the isolates displayed that all of them were belonged to the potentially pathogenic T4 genotype. This investigation provides further evidence that the T4 genotype is the most prevalent in water samples and demonstrates that there is a need for taking more consideration to water sources in order to prevent complications associated with pathogenic Acanthamoeba spp.

  9. Caracterização molecular de Cryptosporidium spp. em criações comerciais brasileiras de coelhos

    OpenAIRE

    Heker,M.M.; Nakamura,A.A.; Meireles,M.V.

    2016-01-01

    RESUMO A criptosporidiose é uma importante zoonose que pode ser transmitida por meio de alimentos, água de bebida e por contato com animais e pessoas infectadas. Além disso, trata-se de uma enfermidade clínica ou subclínica frequente em diversas espécies de animais, incluindo coelhos domésticos. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a ocorrência de Cryptosporidium spp., realizar sua classificação molecular e relacionar a presença do parasito às diferentes fases de criação em 21 criações come...

  10. Emergence of Cryptosporidium hominis Monkey Genotype II and Novel Subtype Family Ik in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuehan Liu

    Full Text Available A single Cryptosporidium isolate from a squirrel monkey with no clinical symptoms was obtained from a zoo in Ya'an city, China, and was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA, 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70, Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and actin genes. This multilocus genetic characterization determined that the isolate was Cryptosporidium hominis, but carried 2, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin loci, respectively, which is comparable to the variations at these loci between C. hominis and the previously reported monkey genotype (2, 3, and 3 nucleotide differences. Phylogenetic studies, based on neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods, showed that the isolate identified in the current study had a distinctly discordant taxonomic status, distinct from known C. hominis and also from the monkey genotype, with respect to the three loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the SSU rRNA gene obtained from this study were similar to those of known C. hominis but clearly differentiated from the monkey genotype. Further subtyping was performed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60. Maximum homology of only 88.3% to C. hominis subtype IdA10G4 was observed for the current isolate, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this particular isolate belonged to a novel C. hominis subtype family, IkA7G4. This study is the first to report C. hominis infection in the squirrel monkey and, based on the observed genetic characteristics, confirms a new C. hominis genotype, monkey genotype II. Thus, these results provide novel insights into genotypic variation in C. hominis.

  11. Emergence of Cryptosporidium hominis Monkey Genotype II and Novel Subtype Family Ik in the Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri sciureus) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuehan; Xie, Na; Li, Wei; Zhou, Ziyao; Zhong, Zhijun; Shen, Liuhong; Cao, Suizhong; Yu, Xingming; Hu, Yanchuan; Chen, Weigang; Peng, Gangneng

    2015-01-01

    A single Cryptosporidium isolate from a squirrel monkey with no clinical symptoms was obtained from a zoo in Ya'an city, China, and was genotyped by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein, and actin genes. This multilocus genetic characterization determined that the isolate was Cryptosporidium hominis, but carried 2, 10, and 6 nucleotide differences in the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin loci, respectively, which is comparable to the variations at these loci between C. hominis and the previously reported monkey genotype (2, 3, and 3 nucleotide differences). Phylogenetic studies, based on neighbor-joining and maximum likelihood methods, showed that the isolate identified in the current study had a distinctly discordant taxonomic status, distinct from known C. hominis and also from the monkey genotype, with respect to the three loci. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms of the SSU rRNA gene obtained from this study were similar to those of known C. hominis but clearly differentiated from the monkey genotype. Further subtyping was performed by sequence analysis of the gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60). Maximum homology of only 88.3% to C. hominis subtype IdA10G4 was observed for the current isolate, and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this particular isolate belonged to a novel C. hominis subtype family, IkA7G4. This study is the first to report C. hominis infection in the squirrel monkey and, based on the observed genetic characteristics, confirms a new C. hominis genotype, monkey genotype II. Thus, these results provide novel insights into genotypic variation in C. hominis.

  12. Towards a more accurate quantitative assessment of seasonal Cryptosporidium infection risks in surface waters using species and genotype information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapen, D R; Schmidt, P J; Thomas, J L; Edge, T A; Flemming, C; Keithlin, J; Neumann, N; Pollari, F; Ruecker, N; Simhon, A; Topp, E; Wilkes, G; Pintar, K D M

    2016-11-15

    Many Cryptosporidium species/genotypes are not considered infectious to humans, and more realistic estimations of seasonal infection risks could be made using human infectious species/genotype information to inform quantitative microbial risk assessments (QMRA). Cryptosporidium oocyst concentration and species/genotype data were collected from three surface water surveillance programs in two river basins [South Nation River, SN (2004-09) and Grand River, GR (2005-13)] in Ontario, Canada to evaluate seasonal infection risks. Main river stems, tributaries, agricultural drainage streams, water treatment plant intakes, and waste water treatment plant effluent impacted sites were sampled. The QMRA employed two sets of exposure data to compute risk: one assuming all observed oocysts were infectious to humans, and the other based on the fraction of oocysts that were C. hominis and/or C. parvum (dominant human infectious forms of the parasite). Viability was not considered and relative infection risk was evaluated using a single hypothetical recreational exposure. Many sample site groupings for both river systems, had significant seasonality in Cryptosporidium occurrence and concentrations (p ≤ 0.05); occurrence and concentrations were generally highest in autumn for SN, and autumn and summer for GR. Mean risk values (probability of infection per exposure) for all sites combined, for each river system, were roughly an order of magnitude lower (avg. of SN and GR 5.3 × 10 -5 ) when considering just C. parvum and C. hominis oocysts, in relation to mean infection risk (per exposure) assuming all oocysts were infectious to humans (5.5 × 10 -4 ). Seasonality in mean risk (targeted human infectious oocysts only) was most strongly evident in SN (e.g., 7.9 × 10 -6 in spring and 8.1 × 10 -5 in summer). Such differences are important if QMRA is used to quantify effects of water safety/quality management practices where inputs from a vast array of fecal pollution

  13. Infestation of Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Carica spp. and Vasconcella spp. genotypes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fancelli, Marilene; Sanches, Nilton F.; Dantas, Jorge L.L.; Caldas, Ranulfo C.; Morales, Cinara F.G.

    2008-01-01

    The papaya borer weevil, Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall), is generally considered a secondary pest, but it has been reported in high infestations in Northeast Brazil. This work aimed at evaluating the occurrence of P. papayanus and reporting its infestation level in papaya genotypes kept at the germplasm bank of EMBRAPA Cassava and Tropical Fruits (Cruz das Almas, Bahia, Brazil). The number of larvae, pupae and adults found in each plant of 65 Carica spp. genotypes and of three Vasconcella spp. genotypes was registered in three to five plants of each genotype, by cutting the exsudating trunks lengthwise. Papaya borer weevil was found in C. papaya and V. cauliflora but not in those of V. quercifolia. Among the evaluated genotypes, 52.4% of those belonging to the Solo group were infested, against 25.0% of the Formosa group. Larval infestation was the best criterion for sorting out genotypes concerning this insect infestation. This is also the first occurrence of the papaya borer weevil . (author)

  14. Detecção de oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. e cistos de Giardia spp. em amostras de esgoto bruto ou tratado: avaliação crítica dos métodos Detection of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts and Giardia spp. cysts in raw and effluent wastewater: critical evaluation of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Urbano dos Santos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, avaliou-se a eficiência dos métodos centrífugo-concentração e filtração em membrana, na detecção de oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. e cistos de Giardia spp. em amostras de esgoto bruto e tratado, provenientes de um sistema de lodos ativados (estação de tratamento de esgoto, Samambaia, Campinas, em São Paulo. As amostras foram coletadas quinzenalmente por dois anos: 53 amostras de esgoto bruto (AFL, 53 de efluente tratado sem desinfecção por luz ultravioleta (EFL e 38 de efluente tratado e desinfetado por luz ultravioleta (EFL+UV. Cistos de Giardia spp. foram encontrados em 90,5% das amostras AFL; em 96,2%, de EFL; e em 94,7%, de EFL+UV. Oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. foram detectados em 6,4% das amostras AFL e em 2,6 % de EFL+UV. Ambos os métodos mostraram-se eficientes na detecção destes protozoários em todos os tipos de amostras, além de apresentarem baixo custo por análise.In this study, the efficiency of centrifuge-concentration and membrane filtrated methods was evaluated in the detection of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts and Giardia spp. cysts in raw or treated wastewater samples, from activated sludge systems (ETE - Samambaia, Campinas, in São Paulo. The samples were collected once a fortnight for two years: 53 samples of influent (AFL, 53 samples of treated effluent without ultraviolet disinfection (EFL, and 38 samples of treated effluent with ultraviolet disinfection (EFL+UV. Giardia spp. cysts were found in 90.5% of the AFL samples; in 96.2% of the samples, EFL; and in 94.7%, EFL+UV. Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected in 6.4% of AFL samples and 2.6% of EFL+UV. Both methods showed efficiency when detecting protozoa in all types of samples, besides having low costs by analysis.

  15. Literature Reference for Cryptosporidium spp. (Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 1999. 65(9): 3936–3941)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procedures are described for analysis of animal samples using tissue culture techniques that may be adapted for assessment of solid, particulate, liquid and water samples contaminated with Cryptosporidium parvum.

  16. Cryptosporidium andersoni as a novel predominant Cryptosporidium species in outpatients with diarrhea in Jiangsu Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanyan; Ren, Jinhua; Yuan, Zhongying; Liu, Aiqin; Zhao, Hong; Liu, Hua; Chu, Lei; Pan, Wei; Cao, Jianping; Lin, Yijin; Shen, Yujuan

    2014-10-25

    Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum are usually considered to be the major pathogens responsible for human cryptosporidiosis. However, there have been few studies regarding the molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in human infections in China. Here we investigated Cryptosporidium infection in patients with diarrhea, in Danyang Hospital of Jiangsu Province, China, at the genotype level. A total of 232 stool specimens were collected from outpatients with diarrhea in Danyang Hospital of Jiangsu Province, China, from February 2012 to January 2013. Each specimen was stained from direct fecal smears and examined for Cryptosporidium using modified acid fast staining and microscopy. Moreover, genomic DNA of each fecal sample was screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium with nested PCR, which was genotyped by analyzing the DNA sequences of small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA). The average infection rate of Cryptosporidium was 1.3% (3/232) by microscopy and subjected to PCR amplification of the SSU rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium, with 9.91% (23/232) being positive for Cryptosporidium with a significant peak in autumn. Based on the SSU rRNA gene, two Cryptosporidium spp. were identified, including C. andersoni (n =21) and C. hominis (n =2). Two types of C. andersoni, designated as A370 + and A370 - , were found in the SSU rRNA gene in our present study, which was 100% homologous to C. andersoni infections derived from dairy calves and goats, respectively. The clinical questionnaires showed no significant difference in age, gender and frequency of diarrhea, but duration of diarrhea was shorter for C. andersoni than that of C. hominis (mean, 2 vs. 4 days; p hominis indicated that different Cryptosporidium species might cause different clinical manifestations.

  17. Infectivity, pathogenicity, and genetic characteristics of mammalian gastric Cryptosporidium spp. in domestic ruminants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Ditrich, Oleg; Hofmannová, L.; Modrý, David; Vítovec, J.; Xiao, L.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 153, 3/4 (2008), s. 363-367 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/05/0992; GA ČR GD524/03/H133 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Cryptosporidium andersoni * Cryptosporidium muris * ruminants Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 2.039, year: 2008

  18. Cryptosporidium spp. in Wild, Laboratory, and Pet Rodents in China: Prevalence and Molecular Characterization▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Chaochao; Zhang, Longxian; Wang, Rongjun; Jian, Fuchun; Zhang, Sumei; Ning, Changshen; Wang, Helei; Feng, Chao; Wang, Xinwei; Ren, Xupeng; Qi, Meng; Xiao, Lihua

    2009-01-01

    To understand the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in rodents in China and to assess the potential role of rodents as a source for human cryptosporidiosis, 723 specimens from 18 rodent species were collected from four provinces of China and examined between August 2007 and December 2008 by microscopy after using Sheather's sugar flotation and modified acid-fast staining. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 83 specimens, with an overall prevalence of 11.5%. Phodopus sungorus, Phodo...

  19. Recuento y determinación de viabilidad de giardia spp. y Cryptosporidium spp. en aguas potables y residuales en la cuenca alta del rio Bogotá.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlén Andrea Alarcón

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. La transmisión de enfermedades de origen hídrico está relacionada con la contaminación de origen fecal en aguas residuales y potables. Estas enfermedades son causadas por la presencia de bacterias, virus y parásitos, los cuales generan altos porcentajes de morbimortalidad, especialmente, en la población infantil. Se han seleccionado Giardia spp. y Cryptosporidium spp. como organismos indicadores de contaminación de origen parasitario y su análisis es útil para evaluar la calidad del agua y determinar el riesgo sanitario. En Colombia se conoce poco sobre la presencia y la concentración de estos parásitos en aguas, razón por la cual es importante continuar su estudio. Objetivo. El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la presencia de estos protozoos en cinco estaciones de muestreo de la cuenca alta del río Bogotá y en dos sistemas de potabilización de la misma área. Materiales y métodos. Las técnicas aplicadas para la determinación y el recuento de las formas quísticas fueron: floculación inorgánica para aguas residuales, filtración para aguas potables y pruebas de colorantes vitales para viabilidad. Resultados. Se confirmó la presencia de Cryptosporidium spp. en dos de las estaciones del río Bogotá y en las dos potabilizadoras. Giardia spp. se encontró en las dos potabilizadoras pero no en el río Bogotá. La viabilidad fue positiva para Cryptosporidium spp. en una muestra proveniente del río, y negativa para las muestras de agua potable. Conclusiones. Estos resultados muestran la presencia de protozoos en aguas potables y residuales lo cual puede generar riesgo sanitario para la población de dicha zona.

  20. Molecular epidemiology of Cryptosporidium species in livestock in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhashemi, Marzieh Ezzaty; Zintl, Annetta; Grant, Tim; Lucy, Frances; Mulcahy, Grace; De Waal, Theo

    2016-01-30

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan that can cause gastro-intestinal illness with diarrhoea in a wide range of hosts. In fact some species of Cryptosporidium can infect the broad range of hosts. The current paper is focused to investigate monthly prevalence and diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. during the spring and early summer (March-June) in 2009 and 2010 in farms with no history of cryptosporidiosis. Animal samples were analyzed to elucidate the prevalence of Cryptosporidium in two regions, West and the East catchments in Ireland. Our investigation demonstrates the prevalence ranges from 14% to 26% an early summer peak (June) was observed. Based on the findings of this study Cryptosporidium ryanae (in cattle, horses), and Cryptosporidium bovis/xiaoi followed by Cryptosporidium parvum (in sheep) were found to be the predominant species in asymptomatic cases. The circulation of other Cryptosporidium species such as C. parvum, C. bovis, C. ubiquitum, C. andersoni and Cryptosporidium horse and pig genotypes in livestock was investigated. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Epidemiology and molecular relationships of Cryptosporidium spp. in people, primates, and livestock from Western Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie J Salyer

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium is one of the most common parasitic diarrheal agents in the world and is a known zoonosis. We studied Cryptosporidium in people, livestock, and non-human primates in the region of Kibale National Park, Uganda. Land use change near the park has resulted in fragmented forest patches containing small, remnant populations of wild primates that interact intensively with local people and livestock. Our goal was to investigate risk factors for Cryptosporidium infection and to assess cross-species transmission using molecular methods.Diagnostic PCR revealed a prevalence of Cryptosporidium of 32.4% in humans, 11.1% in non-human primates, and 2.2% in livestock. In the case of humans, residence in one particular community was associated with increased risk of infection, as was fetching water from an open water source. Although 48.5% of infected people reported gastrointestinal symptoms, this frequency was not significantly different in people who tested negative (44.7% for Cryptosporidium, nor was co-infection with Giardia duodenalis associated with increased reporting of gastrointestinal symptoms. Fecal consistency was no different in infected versus uninfected people or animals. DNA sequences of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein gene placed all infections within a well-supported C. parvum/C. hominis clade. However, the only two sequences recovered from primates in the core of the park's protected area fell into a divergent sub-clade and were identical to published sequences from C. parvum, C. hominis, and C. cuniculus, suggesting the possibility of a separate sylvatic transmission cycle.Cryptosporidium may be transmitted frequently among species in western Uganda where people, livestock, and wildlife interact intensively as a result of anthropogenic changes to forests, but the parasite may undergo more host-specific transmission where such interactions do not occur. The parasite does not appear to have strong effects on human or

  2. Genotyping of Cryptosporidium Species and Their Clinical Manifestations in Patients with Renal Transplantation and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmita Dey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study we aimed to determine (i frequency of Cryptosporidium species among patients with renal transplantation (RT and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection and (ii relationship of the nature, severity, and duration of symptoms with different species and load of Cryptosporidium. Stool samples from 70 (42 RT and 28 HIV and 140 immunocompromised patients with and without cryptosporidiosis by modified Kinyoun’s staining were subjected to qPCR-melting curve analysis for identification of parasite species. qPCR detected one microscopically negative sample to be positive for cryptosporidiosis. C. hominis, C. parvum, and mixed infection were detected in 50/71 (70.4%, 19/71 (26.8%, and 2/71 (2.8% patients, respectively. Patients with cryptosporidiosis had higher stool frequency (median, IQR: 4, 3–6/d versus 3, 2–4/d; P=0.017 and watery stool (52/71 [73%] versus 64/139 [46%]; P=0.003. Parasite load (median, IQR: Log10 6.37 (5.65–7.12, Log10 5.81 (4.26–6.65; P=0.046 and nausea/vomiting (29/50 [58%] versus 5/19 [26%]; P=0.032 were more frequent with C. hominis than with C. parvum infection. Thus, Cryptosporidium spp. (mainly C. hominis is a common cause of diarrhoea in RT and HIV patients.

  3. High association of Cryptosporidium spp. infection with colon adenocarcinoma in Lebanese patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Osman

    Full Text Available The association between Cryptosporidium and human colon cancer has been reported in different populations. However, this association has not been well studied. In order to add new strong arguments for a probable link between cryptosporidiosis and colon human cancer, the aim of this study was to determine prevalence and to identify species of Cryptosporidium among Lebanese patients.Overall, 218 digestive biopsies were collected in Tripoli, Lebanon, from three groups of patients: (i patients with recently diagnosed colon intraepithelial neoplasia/adenocarcinoma before any treatment (n = 72; (ii patients with recently diagnosed stomach intraepithelial neoplasia/adenocarcinoma before any treatment (n = 21; and (iii patients without digestive intraepithelial neoplasia/adenocarcinoma but with persistent digestive symptoms (n = 125. DNA extraction was performed from paraffin-embedded tissue. The presence of the parasite in tissues was confirmed by PCR, microscopic observation and immunofluorescence analysis. We identified a high rate (21% of Cryptosporidium presence in biopsies from Lebanese patients with recently diagnosed colonic neoplasia/adenocarcinoma before any treatment. This prevalence was significantly higher compared to 7% of Cryptosporidium prevalence among patients without colon neoplasia but with persistent gastrointestinal symptoms (OR: 4, CI: 1.65-9.6, P = 0.001. When the comparison was done against normal biopsies, the risk of infection increased 11-fold in the group of patients with colon adenocarcinoma (OR: 11.315, CI: 1.44-89.02, P = 0.003.This is the first study performed in Lebanon reporting the prevalence of Cryptosporidium among patients with digestive cancer. These results show that Cryptosporidium is strongly associated with human colon cancer being maybe a potential etiological agent of this disease.

  4. The genotypic characterization of Cronobacter spp. isolated in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghua Cui

    Full Text Available Cronobacter spp. (Enterobacter sakazakii is an important pathogen contaminating powdered infant formula (PIF. To describe the genotypic diversity of Cronobacter isolated in China, we identified the isolates using fusA allele sequencing, and subtyped all of the isolates using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, and multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA. A total of 105 isolates were identified, which included C. sakazakii (58 isolates, C. malonaticus (30 isolates, C. dublinensis (11 isolates, C. turicensis (5 isolates, and C. muytjensii (1 isolate. These isolates were showed to have 85 PFGE-patterns, 71 sequence types (STs, and 55 MLVA-patterns. Comparisons among the three molecular subtyping methods revealed that the PFGE method was the most distinguishable tool in identifying clusters of Cronobacter spp. through DNA fingerprinting, and MLST method came second. However, ESTR-1, ESTR-2, ESTR-3, and ESTR-4 were not effective loci for subtyping Cronobacter spp. such that the MLVA method requires further improvement.

  5. Cryptosporidium spp. infection in mares and foals of the northwest region of São Paulo State, Brazil Infecção por Cryptosporidium spp. em éguas e potros da região noroeste do estado de São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Valéria Inácio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to analyze the occurrence of infection by Cryptosporidium spp. in mares and their respective foals. This study was carried out in 11 farms located in the municipalities of Araçatuba, Birigui, Guararapes and Santo Antônio do Aracangua, in the northwest region of the State of Sao Paulo, from November 2010 to March 2011. A total of 98 mares and 98 foals of several breeds were analyzed; among foals, 59 were males and 39 females, aged from three to 330 days. Feces were collected directly from the rectal ampulla, purified and processed according to modified Kinyoun stain. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. was 21.4% (21/98 for foals and 18.4% (18/98 for mares. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. had significant association with breeds and age of animals. Results obtained led to the conclusion that foals older than two months and Mangalarga animals are less susceptible to the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp.O presente estudo teve como objetivo analisar a ocorrência da infecção por Cryptosporidium spp. em éguas e seus respectivos potros. Este estudo foi realizado em 11 fazendas localizadas nos municípios de Araçatuba, Birigui, Guararapes e Santo Antônio do Aracangua, na região Noroeste do Estado de São Paulo, de novembro de 2010 a março de 2011. Um total de 98 éguas e 98 potros de diversas raças foram analisados, sendo que, entre os filhotes, 59 eram machos e 39 fêmeas, cujas idades variavam de três até 330 dias. Fezes foram colhidas diretamente da ampola retal, purificadas e processadas pela técnica de Kinyoun modificada. A ocorrência de Cryptosporidium spp. observada foi de 21,4% (21/98 para potros e 18,4% (18/98 para éguas. A ocorrência de Cryptosporidium spp. teve uma associação significativa com a raça e a idade dos animais. A partir dos resultados obtidos, conclui-se neste estudo que potros com idade superior a dois meses e animais da raça Mangalarga foram menos susceptíveis à ocorrência de

  6. The effects of Moringa lieifera seed powder on turbidity and sedimentation of Cryptosporidium spp. in wastewater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, H. H.; Wolsey, I.; Dalsgaard, A.

    2013-01-01

    or water used for postharvest washing of the produce is contaminated. A laboratory study was carried out to investigate the effect of a coagulant from the seeds of Moringa oleifera (MO) in reducing Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts and turbidity in Danish wastewater. To each of five time points, 12 replicates...

  7. Genetic Characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. among Children with Diarrhea in Tehran and Qazvin Provinces, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Nazemalhoseini Mojarad

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Cryptosporidium is an intracellular apicomplexan parasite that infects a wide range of vertebrates including humans. Cryptosporidiosis is a major cause of diarrhea in children with and without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in developing countries. More recently, the molecular methods for identification of morphologically indistin­guishable species have been developed. The aim of this study was to determine the characterization of various species of this coccidian among children with diarrhea by using molecular methods."nMethods: Fecal samples were collected from 1263 children with diarrhea who referred to Pediatrics Medical Centers in Qazvin and Tehran, two central provinces of Iran. Initial identification of Cryptosporidium was carried out by Zeihl-Neel­sen acid-fast staining method of stool samples. DNA was extracted from positive microscopically samples and were sub­jected to a two step nested PCR-RFLP based on SSU-rRNA gene."nResults: Out of 1263 collected samples, 31 (2.5% were found to be contained Cryptosporidium oocysts. RFLP analysis showed that 80.6% of the positive isolates were Cryptosporidium parvum, 16.1% C. hominis and 3.2% had mix infection pattern of both C. parvum and C. hominis."nConclusion: Our results showed that the zoonotic pattern of transmission is predominant and has considerable significance in epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis in the study areas.

  8. Bison PRNP genotyping and potential association with Brucella spp. seroprevalence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabury, C.M.; Halbert, N.D.; Gogan, P.J.P.; Templeton, J.W.; Derr, J.N.

    2005-01-01

    The implication that host cellular prion protein (PrPC) may function as a cell surface receptor and/or portal protein for Brucella abortus in mice prompted an evaluation of nucleotide and amino acid variation within exon 3 of the prion protein gene (PRNP) for six US bison populations. A non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (T50C), resulting in the predicted amino acid replacement M17T (Met ??? Thr), was identified in each population. To date, no variation (T50: Met) has been detected at the corresponding exon 3 nucleotide and/or amino acid position for domestic cattle. Notably, 80% (20 of 25) of the Yellowstone National Park bison possessing the C/C genotype were Brucella spp. seropositive, representing a significant (P = 0.021) association between seropositivity and the C/C genotypic class. Moreover, significant differences in the distribution of PRNP exon 3 alleles and genotypes were detected between Yellowstone National Park bison and three bison populations that were either founded from seronegative stock or previously subjected to test-and-slaughter management to eradicate brucellosis. Unlike domestic cattle, no indel polymorphisms were detected within the corresponding regions of the putative bison PRNP promoter, intron 1, octapeptide repeat region or 3???-untranslated region for any population examined. This study provides the first evidence of a potential association between nucleotide variation within PRNP exon 3 and the presence of Brucella spp. antibodies in bison, implicating PrPC in the natural resistance of bison to brucellosis infection. ?? 2005 International Society for Animal Genetics.

  9. Genotyping and subtyping of Giardia and Cryptosporidium isolates from commensal rodents in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Z; Wang, R; Zhao, W; Qi, M; Zhao, J; Zhang, L; Li, J; Liu, A

    2015-05-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are two important zoonotic intestinal parasites responsible for diarrhoea in humans and other animals worldwide. Rodents, as reservoirs or carriers of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, are abundant and globally widespread. In the present study, we collected 232 fecal specimens from commensal rodents captured in animal farms and farm neighbourhoods in China. We collected 33 Asian house rats, 168 brown rats and 31 house mice. 6.0% (14/232) and 8.2% (19/232) of these rodents were microscopy-positive for Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts, respectively. All 14 Giardia isolates were identified as Giardia duodenalis assemblage G at a minimum of one or maximum of three gene loci (tpi, gdh and bg). By small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequencing, Cryptosporidium parvum (n = 12) and Cryptosporidium muris (n = 7) were identified. The gp60 gene encoding the 60-kDa glycoprotein was successfully amplified and sequenced in nine C. parvum isolates, all of which belonged to the IIdA15G1 subtype. Observation of the same IIdA15G1 subtype in humans (previously) and in rodents (here) suggests that rodents infected with Cryptosporidium have the potential to transmit cryptosporidiosis to humans.

  10. Genotypic characterization of Cryptosporidium hominis from water samples in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Ronalda S; Dropa, Milena; Fernandes, Licia N; Carvalho, Terezinha T; Sato, Maria Inês Z; Soares, Rodrigo M; Matté, Glavur R; Matté, Maria Helena

    2011-11-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium has emerged as one of the most important water contaminants, causing waterborne outbreaks of diarrheal diseases worldwide. The small size of oocysts under the microscope and the possibility of changes in characteristics of oocysts, mainly in environmental samples, make the taxonomy of the genus difficult if morphologic characteristics are considered. This limitation encouraged the application of molecular methods to identify this microorganism. The aim of this study was to detect and identify by nested-polymerase chain reaction oocysts of Cryptosporidium present in water samples in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Water samples were concentrated through a membrane filter, DNA was extracted by using a standard technique, and both amplification reactions used forward and reverse oligonucleotides that were complementary to Cryptosporidium 18S ribosomal RNA gene sequences. Thirty water samples from different sites of collection in the state of São Paulo were evaluated. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 30% of the samples. By genoptyping, C. hominis and Cryptosporidium sp. were identified in recreational water and C. meleagridis was identified in surface water samples. This is the first report of C. hominis in environmental samples in Brazil. Although identification of Cryptosporidium is still a difficult task, molecular methods are essential for specific identification and are a helpful tool to aid to understand the epidemiology of this parasite in Brazil.

  11. Environmental Transport of Emerging Human-Pathogenic Cryptosporidium Species and Subtypes through Combined Sewer Overflow and Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengchen; Hu, Yue; Wang, Lin; Wang, Yuanfei; Li, Na; Guo, Yaqiong; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2017-08-15

    The environmental transport of Cryptosporidium spp. through combined sewer overflow (CSO) and the occurrence of several emerging human-pathogenic Cryptosporidium species in developing countries remain unclear. In this study, we collected 40 CSO samples and 40 raw wastewater samples from Shanghai, China, and examined them by PCR and DNA sequencing for Cryptosporidium species (targeting the small subunit rRNA gene) and Giardia duodenalis (targeting the triosephosphate isomerase, β-giardin, and glutamate dehydrogenase genes) and Enterocytozoon bieneusi (targeting the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer) genotypes. Human-pathogenic Cryptosporidium species were further subtyped by sequence analysis of the 60-kDa glycoprotein gene, with additional multilocus sequence typing on the emerging zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium ubiquitum. Cryptosporidium spp., G. duodenalis , and E. bieneusi were detected in 12 and 15, 33 and 32, and 37 and 40 CSO and wastewater samples, respectively, including 10 Cryptosporidium species, 3 G. duodenalis assemblages, and 8 E. bieneusi genotypes. In addition to Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum , two new pathogens identified in industrialized nations, C. ubiquitum and Cryptosporidium viatorum , were frequently detected. The two novel C. ubiquitum subtype families identified appeared to be genetic recombinants of known subtype families. Similarly, the dominant group 1 E. bieneusi genotypes and G. duodenalis subassemblage AII are known human pathogens. The similar distribution of human-pathogenic Cryptosporidium species and E. bieneusi and G. duodenalis genotypes between wastewater and CSO samples reaffirms that storm overflow is potentially a significant contamination source of pathogens in surface water. The frequent identification of C. ubiquitum and C. viatorum in urban wastewater suggests that these newly identified human pathogens may be endemic in China. IMPORTANCE Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia duodenalis , and

  12. Cryptosporidium genotypes in children and calves living at the wildlife or livestock interface of the Kruger National Park, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Abu Samra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium infection is one of the most common causes of parasitic diarrhoea worldwide in cattle and humans. In developing countries, human cryptosporidiosis is most prevalent during early childhood and links between zoonotic infection and animal related activities have been demonstrated. This study investigated the prevalence and species/genotype distribution of Cryptosporidium among children (< 5 years and calves (< 6 months living in a rural farming area adjacent to the Kruger National Park in South Africa, where interactions between humans and wild and domestic animals are known to occur. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 8/143 stool samples of children recruited within the hospital system (5.6%; 95% CI 2.4%, 10.7% and in 2/352 faecal samples of calves (0.6%; 95% CI 0.1%, 2.0% using the modified Ziehl–Neelsen (MZN staining technique. Microscopy positive samples from children were further analysed by PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene and identified as Cryptosporidium hominis (3/4 and Cryptosporidium meleagridis (1/4. Regardless of the microscopy outcome, randomly selected samples (n = 36 from calves 0–4 months of age were amplified and sequenced at the 18S rRNA gene using nested PCR. Two calves tested positive (5.6%; 95% CI 1.7%, 18.7%, and revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium bovis. The detection of only two zoonotic species (C. parvum in one calf and C. meleagridis in one child suggests that zoonotic cryptosporidiosis is not currently widespread in our study area; however, the potential exists for amplification of transmission in an immunocompromised population. Keywords: Cryptosporidium; children; calves; South Africa; genotyping; GP60 subtyping

  13. Molecular identification of Cryptosporidium spp. in animal and human hosts from the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hajdušek, Ondřej; Ditrich, Oleg; Šlapeta, J.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 3 (2004), s. 183-192 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS6022006 Grant - others:GA MŠk1(CZ) 1260/2001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Cryptosporidium * molecular identification * SSU rRNA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.445, year: 2004

  14. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and other intestinal parasites in children with diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Mutalip Çiçek; Hasan Yılmaz

    2011-01-01

    This study was planned to determine the role of Cryptosporidium sp. and other intestinal parasites in the diarrheal diseases in children with 0-15 years old Van district.Materials and methods: In this study, stool samples of 450 children were examined for parasites. In the study, nativ-lugol, formaldehyde-ethyl acetate sedimentation methods and trichrome staining methods were used to detect parasites in stool samples. Additionally, sedimentation methods and modified acid fast staining method ...

  15. Assessing viability and infectivity of foodborne and waterborne stages (cysts/oocysts of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Toxoplasma gondii: a review of methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rousseau Angélique

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii are protozoan parasites that have been highlighted as emerging foodborne pathogens by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and the World Health Organization. According to the European Food Safety Authority, 4786 foodborne and waterborne outbreaks were reported in Europe in 2016, of which 0.4% were attributed to parasites including Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Trichinella. Until 2016, no standardized methods were available to detect Giardia, Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma (oocysts in food. Therefore, no regulation exists regarding these biohazards. Nevertheless, considering their low infective dose, ingestion of foodstuffs contaminated by low quantities of these three parasites can lead to human infection. To evaluate the risk of protozoan parasites in food, efforts must be made towards exposure assessment to estimate the contamination along the food chain, from raw products to consumers. This requires determining: (i the occurrence of infective protozoan (oocysts in foods, and (ii the efficacy of control measures to eliminate this contamination. In order to conduct such assessments, methods for identification of viable (i.e. live and infective parasites are required. This review describes the methods currently available to evaluate infectivity and viability of G. duodenalis cysts, Cryptosporidium spp. and T. gondii oocysts, and their potential for application in exposure assessment to determine the presence of the infective protozoa and/or to characterize the efficacy of control measures. Advantages and limits of each method are highlighted and an analytical strategy is proposed to assess exposure to these protozoa.

  16. Molecular and phylogenetic characterization of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from pigs and cattle in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold; Vigre, Håkan; Enemark, Heidi L.

    2007-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis from dairy cattle and pigs in Denmark was determined in the present study. Faecal samples from 1237 pigs and 1150 cattle originating from 50 sow herds and 50 dairy herds, respectively, were analysed for the presence of the two...... parasites by immunofluorescence microscopy. A large proportion of the (oo)cyst containing samples were selected for molecular characterization. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the 18S rDNA locus and/or the HSP70 gene of 183 pig and 154 cattle isolates of Cryptosporidium revealed the presence of C....... suis, pig genotype II, C. parvum (cattle genotype), C. bovis, Cryptosporidium deer-like genotype and a novel C. suis-like genotype. For both cattle and pigs, a host age-related change in distribution of species/genotypes was observed. The zoonotic C. parvum (cattle genotype) was most prevalent in young...

  17. Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in the intestinal contents of ringed seals (Phoca hispida) and bearded seals (Erignathus barbatus) in Nunavik, Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Brent R; Parrington, Lorna J; Parenteau, Monique; Leclair, Daniel; Santín, Mónica; Fayer, Ronald

    2008-10-01

    The prevalence of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. was determined for ringed and bearded seals harvested for food in the Nunavik region in northern Quebec, Canada. Flow cytometric results demonstrated that G. duodenalis was present in the intestinal contents of 80% of the ringed seals and 75% of the bearded seals tested, while Cryptosporidium spp. were present in 9% of the ringed seals and none of the bearded seals. Prevalence of both parasites was highest in animals less than 1 yr of age. Giardia sp. isolates from ringed seals were identified as G. duodenalis Assemblage B, which is commonly identified in human infections. The high prevalence of G. duodenalis in ringed seals, and the presence of Assemblage B in these animals, highlights the potential for zoonotic transmission to the Inuit people, who consume dried seal intestines and uncooked seal meat.

  18. Probabilistic quantitative microbial risk assessment model of farmer exposure to Cryptosporidium spp. in irrigation water within Kumasi Metropolis-Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sampson, Angelina; Owusu-Ansah, Emmanuel de-Graft Johnson; Mills-Robertson, Felix C.

    2017-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite which can be transmitted via food and water. Some studies have shown irrigation water to be routes of transmission for Cryptosporidium into the food chain, however, little information is known about Cryptosporidium levels in wastewater used for irrigation i...

  19. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. oocytes in artificial beaches of Itaipu Lake, Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Snak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis is an emerging zoonosis that causes many outbreaks worldwide. Its main route of transmission is the consumption of contaminated water or food. In Brazil, data on to the occurrence of cryptosporidiosis in animals and in humans are scarce; thus, it is important to determine the occurrence of Cryptosporidium sp. and to identify possible sources of water and food contamination in order to prevent the disease and, consequently, preserve of human health. From July/2011 to March/2012, five liters of water were collected in 10 different locations from eight artificial beaches of Itaipu Lake, Paraná, in a total of 40 samples. In two other small beaches of the lake, water was also collected from two different sites of each beach, given their size and because they were made up of water from different sources. Samples were analyzed by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen technique and nested-PCR (nPCR. All samples were negative in the modified Ziehl-Neelsen; only one (2.25% sample was positive in nPCR. These results indicate that PCR is a more sensitive technique for the identification of Cryptosporidium in water samples. In this study, it was not possible to identify the species involved and, thus, the source of infection. Water contamination by Cryptosporidium oocytes can be caused by livestock kept near waterways, and by the people who use the place for recreational purposes. These results demonstrate risk for people who use the lake. Care should be determined to prevent the transmission of this important zoonosis.

  20. Novel Cryptosporidium bat genotypes III and IV in bats/nfrom the USA and Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Hořická, A.; Sak, Bohumil; Prediger, Jitka; Salát, J.; Širmarová, J.; Bartonička, T.; Clark, M.; Chelladurai, J.R.J.J.; Gillam, E.; McEvoy, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 10 (2015), s. 3917-3921 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01090S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptosporidium * Bats * SSU * Actin * PCR Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.027, year: 2015

  1. North American tree squirrels and ground squirrels with overlapping ranges host different Cryptosporidium species and genotypes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stenger, B.L.S.; Clark, M.E.; Kváč, Martin; Khan, E.; Giddings, C.W.; Prediger, Jitka; McEvoy, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 36, 2015-Dec (2015), s. 287-293 ISSN 1567-1348 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01090S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptosporidium * Tree squirrels * Ground squirrels * Host specificity * Zoonotic Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases , Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.591, year: 2015

  2. Prevalence, species identification and genotyping Cryptosporidium from livestock and deer in a catchment in the Cairngorms with a history of a contaminated public water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Beth; Shaw, Hannah; Hotchkiss, Emily; Gilray, Janice; Ayton, Remedios; Green, James; Katzer, Frank; Wells, Andrew; Innes, Elisabeth

    2015-02-04

    The apicomplexan parasite Cryptosporidium represents a threat to water quality and public health. An important zoonotic species involved in human cryptosporidiosis from contaminated water is Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum), the main reservoirs of which are known to be farm livestock particularly neonatal calves, although adult cattle, sheep, lambs and wildlife are also known to contribute to catchment loading of C. parvum. This study aimed to establish Cryptosporidium prevalence, species and genotype in livestock, deer and water in a catchment with a history of Cryptosporidium contamination in the public water supply. A novel method of processing adult ruminant faecal sample was used to concentrate oocysts, followed by a nested species specific multiplex (nssm) PCR, targeting the 18S rRNA gene, to speciate Cryptosporidium. A multilocus fragment typing (MLFT) tool was used, in addition to GP60 sequencing, to genotype C. parvum positive samples. A very high prevalence of Cryptosporidium was detected, with speciation identifying a predominance of C. parvum in livestock, deer and water samples. Four GP60 subtypes were detected within C. parvum with the majority IIaA15G2R1 which was detected in all host species and on all farms. Multilocus fragment typing further differentiated these into 6 highly related multilocus genotypes. The high prevalence of Cryptosporidium detected was possibly due to a combination of the newly developed sample processing technique used and a reflection of the high rates of the parasite present in this catchment. The predominance of C. parvum in livestock and deer sampled in this study suggested that they represented a significant risk to water quality and public health. Genotyping results suggested that the parasite is being transmitted locally within the study area, possibly via free-roaming sheep and deer. Further studies are needed to verify particular host associations with subtypes/MLGs. Land and livestock management solutions to

  3. Ocorrência de Cryptosporidium spp. em animais exóticos de companhia no Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. de Souza

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOA infecção por algumas espécies ou genótipos de Cryptosporidiumrepresenta um risco em potencial para a saúde pública, principalmente por causa de morbidade e mortalidade em crianças de zero a cinco anos de idade e em pacientes imunodeprimidos. Embora existam alguns relatos de infecção por Cryptosporidiumem animais de companhia, sua participação na epidemiologia da criptosporidiose humana é incerta, e a literatura sobre esse tema ainda é bastante escassa. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar a ocorrência e realizar a classificação molecular deCryptosporidiumspp. em amostras fecais de animais exóticos criados como animais de estimação no Brasil. Um total de 386 amostras de seis espécies de animais foi colhido e armazenado em solução de dicromato de potássio 5% a 4°C. Os oocistos foram purificados por centrífugo-sedimentação em água/éter, seguindo-se a extração de DNA genômico e a realização da nestedPCR para amplificação de fragmento parcial do gene da subunidade 18S do rRNA. Positividade para Cryptosporidiumspp. foi observada em 11,40% (44/386 das amostras. O sequenciamento de fragmentos amplificados permitiu a identificação de Cryptosporidium tyzzeri em camundongos,Cryptosporidium murisem camundongos, hamster e chinchila, Cryptosporidium parvumem chinchila, Cryptosporidiumgenótipo hamsterem hamstere Cryptosporidiumsp. em porquinho-da-índia. Os resultados deste estudo mostram que há uma variedade de espécies de Cryptosporidiumpresentes em animais exóticos de companhia no Brasil. Os dados sugerem que esses animais podem participar da epidemiologia da criptosporidiose humana, particularmente por seu estreito convívio.

  4. Prevalência de Cryptosporidium spp e Giardia sp em eqüinos estabulados no Jockey Club de Santa Maria - RS, Brasil Prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia sp. infection in horses stabled in the Jockey Club of Santa Maria - RS, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Diefenbach Gomes

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available O Cryptosporidium spp. e a Giardia sp. são atualmente reconhecidos como os principais patógenos entéricos com potencial zoonótico. O presente estudo visou estabelecer a prevalência desses protozoários em eqüinos hospedados no Jockey Club de Santa Maria, RS, Brasil, no período de 19 de maio a 30 de junho de 2007. Foram coletadas amostras de fezes, diretamente da ampola retal, de 64 animais. As amostras de fezes foram processadas por meio do método de centrifugação-flutuação de Faust modificado. Posteriormente essas amostras foram visualizadas ao microscópio óptico para a pesquisa de cistos e oocistos. Os resultados encontrados revelaram a presença de Cryptosporidium spp. em 75% (48/64 das amostras. Cistos de Giardia sp. não foram encontrados nas amostras de fezes analisadas. A freqüência de Cryptosporidium spp. nas diferentes faixas etárias foi de 83,3% (15/18 nos potros até dois anos de idade, 71% (22/31 nos jovens entre dois e cinco anos e 80% (12/15 nos adultos. Os resultados demonstram que o Cryptosporidium spp. está amplamente disseminado na população de eqüinos do Jockey Club de Santa Maria e pode representar uma fonte de infecção significativa para a população da região.Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia sp. are currently recognised as the main enteric pathogens with potential zoonotic transmission risk. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of these parasites in horses stabled in the Santa Maria Jockey Club between May 19 and June 30, 2007. Fecal samples from 64 horses were collected directly from the animals’ rectal ampoule. The 64 fecal samples were processed using modified Faust’s method through the centrifugation-floatation technique, and were then later visualized under optical microscope for detection of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts and Giardia sp. cysts. The results showed the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. in 75% (48/64 of the samples. Giardia sp. cysts were not found in the

  5. Detection of Cryptosporidium species and sources of contamination with Cryptosporidium hominis during a waterborne outbreak in north west Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Rachel M; Robinson, Guy; Elwin, Kristin; Hadfield, Stephen J; Thomas, Euron; Watkins, John; Casemore, David; Kay, David

    2010-06-01

    As part of investigations into the cause of a waterborne outbreak of Cryptosporidium hominis infection linked to a mains water supply, surface waters and wastewater treatment plants were tested for Cryptosporidium spp. Oocyst counts in base flow surface water samples ranged from nil to 29 per 10 l. Oocyst counts in effluent from a community wastewater treatment plant were up to 63 fold higher and breakout from one septic tank five logs higher. There were no peak (storm) flow events during the investigation. C. hominis, four named genotypes (cervine, muskrat II, rat, W19) and six new small subunit ribosomal RNA gene sequences were identified. Four of the new sequences were closely related to Cryptosporidium muskrat genotype I, one was closely related to the fox genotype and one to Cryptosporidium canis. C. hominis was found extensively in the catchment, but only at sites contaminated by wastewater, and in the treated water supply to the affected area. All were gp60 subtype IbA10G2, the outbreak subtype. Multiple routes of contamination of the reservoir were identified, resulting in persistent detection of low numbers of oocysts in the final water. This work demonstrates the utility of genotyping Cryptosporidium isolates in environmental samples during outbreak investigations.

  6. Natural infection with two genotypes of Cryptosporidium in red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) in Italy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Hofmannová, L.; Bertolino, S.; Wauters, L.; Tosi, G.; Modrý, David

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 2 (2008), s. 95-99 ISSN 0015-5683 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP523/07/P117; GA ČR GA524/05/0992 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Cryptosporidium * Sciurus vulgaris * 18S rRNA * oocyst morphology * infectivity * red squirrel Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.307, year: 2008

  7. PREVALENCE OF Cryptosporidium spp. AND ASSOCIATED RISK FACTORS IN FEMALE CALVES IN THE CENTRAL REGION OF VERACRUZ, MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Romero Salas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. and its associated risk factors in female calves in central Veracruz, Mexico. A cross-sectional study with a convenience sampling was conducted. One fecal sample was obtained from each of 120 female calves. The lateral flow immunochromatographic (LFIC and the Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN tests were performed. A questionnaire was applied in each farm to obtain individual and herd information. Overall prevalence was 3.33% (CI95% 1-8 through LFIC and 12.50% (CI95% 8-20 through ZN. Prevalence by municipality was 0 to 9.1% (CI95% 0.03-0.24 through LFIC and 0 to 30.43% (CI95% 16-51 through ZN. Prevalence by age was 0% at 31-45 days and 9.10% at 1-15 days through LFIC, and 0% at 31-45 days and 18.8% at 1-15 days through ZN. The calves with diarrhea had the highest prevalence, which was 14.3% (CI95% 3-51 through LFIC and 57.1% (CI95% 25-84 through ZN. The protective factors were calves housed in individual stalls, compared with those in common stalls but separated one from the other (OR=0.27; 0.09-0.85, P

  8. Ocorrencia de Cryptosporidium spp. e Giardia spp. em hortaliças da região metropolitana de Campinas (SP) : sua relação com a comunidade de trabalhadores e com a area agricola

    OpenAIRE

    Mirna Aparecida Pereira

    2008-01-01

    Resumo: Cryptosporidium spp. e Giardia spp. são parasitos causadores de gastroenterites destacando se pela elevada incidência de casos, características de resistência aos tratamentos químicos e capacidade de permanência no meio ambiente. O importante papel desses protozoários em vários surtos epidêmicos de veiculação hídrica e alimentar coloca em evidência as hortaliças que, por serem ingeridas cruas, favorecem a aquisição destas parasitoses. No Brasil, são escassos os dados sobre a ocorrênci...

  9. Detection of Cryptosporidium spp and other intestinal parasites in children with acute diarrhea and severe dehydration in Rio de Janeiro Detecção de Cryptosporidium spp e outros parasitas intestinais em crianças com diarréia aguda e desidratação grave no Rio de Janeiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipe Anibal Carvalho-Costa

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to estimate the frequency of infection by Cryptosporidium spp and other intestinal parasites in dehydrated children with gastroenteritis who were admitted to a pediatric hospital. Stool examinations from 218 children were performed. Cryptosporidium spp was identified in eighteen out of 193 stool samples (9.3% subjected to safranin-methylene blue staining. Giardia lamblia was detected in ten out of 213 (4.7% samples examined via the direct or Ritchie methods. Other parasites identified were Ascaris lumbricoides (4.2%, Blastocystis hominis (1.4%, Entamoeba coli (0.9%, Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (0.5%, Endolimax nana (0.5%, Trichuris trichiura (0.5% and Enterobius vermicularis (0.5%.O objetivo do presente estudo foi estimar a freqüência das infecções por Cryptosporidium spp e outros parasitas intestinais em crianças desidratadas com gastroenterite, internadas em um hospital pediátrico. Exames de fezes de 218 crianças foram realizados. Cryptosporidium spp foi detectado em 18 de 193 (9,3% amostras fecais submetidas à coloração pela safranina/azul-de-metileno. Giardia lamblia foi detectada em dez de 213 (4,7% amostras submetidas ao exame direto ou ao método de Ritchie. Também foram identificados Ascaris lumbricoides (4,2%, Blastocystis hominis (1,4%, Entamoeba coli (0,9%, Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar (0,5%, Endolimax nana (0,5%, Trichuris trichiura (0,5% and Enterobius vermicularis (0,5%.

  10. Coccidiosis intestinal en niños admitidos en un hospital de Perú y comparación de dos métodos para la detección del Cryptosporidium spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heber Silva-Díaz

    Full Text Available Con el objetivo de estimar la frecuencia de infección por coccidios intestinales en niños admitidos en un hospital de Perú, y comparar la tinción ácido-resistente modificada (TARM y el ELISA para la detección de Cryptosporidium spp.; se realizó un estudio transversal entre octubre de 2014 y junio de 2015. Los coccidios se detectaron mediante la TARM y ELISA Cryptosporidium (kit r-Biopharm en muestras seriadas de heces. De un total de 325 niños, el 5,5% tuvieron algún coccidio intestinal, 3,7% Cryptosporidium spp. (usando ambas técnicas y 1,8% Cyclospora cayetanensis (TARM. La TARM y ELISA mostraron una concordancia de 0,955 en la detección de Cryptosporidium spp. Se concluye que los coccidios intestinales son frecuentes en niños de la población estudiada; asimismo, ambas técnicas pueden usarse para la detección de Cryptosporidium spp., sin embargo, el menor costo y la capacidad de detectar otros coccidios ofrecen una ventaja a la TARM en la práctica diaria.

  11. Simultaneous detection and differentiation of Entamoeba histolytica, E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. in human fecal samples using multiplex PCR and qPCR-MCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebardast, Nozhat; Yeganeh, Farshid; Gharavi, Mohammad Javad; Abadi, Alireza; Seyyed Tabaei, Seyyed Javad; Haghighi, Ali

    2016-10-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. are common causes of diarrheal and intestinal diseases all over the world. Microscopic methods are useful in the diagnosis of intestinal parasites (IPs), but their sensitivity was assessed approximately 60 percent. Recently, molecular techniques have been used increasingly for the identification and characterization of the parasites. Among those, in this study we have used multiplex PCR and Real-time PCR with melting curve analysis (qPCR-MCA) for simultaneous detection and differentiation of E. histolytica, E. dispar, E. moshkovskii, G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. in human fecal samples. Twenty DNA samples from 12 E. histolytica and 8 E. dispar samples and twenty stool samples confirmed positive for G. lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. were analyzed. After DNA extraction from the samples, multiplex PCR was done for detection and differentiation of above mentioned parasites. QPCR-MCA was also performed for the detection and differentiation of 11 isolates of above mentioned parasite in a cycle with a time and temperature. Multiplex PCR was able to simultaneous detect and differentiate of above mentioned parasite in a single reaction. QPCR-MCA was able to differentiate genus and species those five protozoa using melting temperature simultaneously at the same time and temperature programs. In total, qPCR-MCA diagnosed 7/11 isolation of E. histolytica, 6/8 isolation of E. dispar, 1/1 E. moshkovskii Laredo, 10/11 G. Lamblia and 6/11 Cryptosporidium spp. Application of multiplex PCR for detection of more than one species in a test in developing countries, at least in reference laboratories has accurate diagnosis and plays a critical role in differentiation of protozoan species. Multiplex PCR assay with a template and multi template had different results and it seems that using a set of primers with one template has higher diagnostic capability in compare with multi template. The results of this study

  12. Prevalence and genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium, Enterocytozoon, Giardia and Cyclospora in diarrheal outpatients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua; Shen, Yujuan; Yin, Jianhai; Yuan, Zhongying; Jiang, Yanyan; Xu, Yuxin; Pan, Wei; Hu, Yuan; Cao, Jianping

    2014-01-13

    Cryptosporidium spp., Enterocytozoon spp., Giardia spp. and Cyclospora spp. are important intestinal protozoan parasites causing diarrhea in humans, livestocks and wildlife and have a significant impact on public health. No reports exist about simultaneous prevalence rates or genotyping data of these four parasites in outpatients from China. Fecal specimens from 252 diarrhea patients in a pediatric clinic (n = 169) and an intestinal clinic (n = 83) of a hospital in Shanghai, China, were collected between October 2012 and March 2013. All samples were examined for the presence of the four parasites by using molecular methods. In total, 76/252 (30.16%) patients were positive for at least one intestinal parasite, of which Cryptosporidium spp., Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Giardia intestinalis were detected by nested PCR in 34 (13.49%), 34 (13.49%) and 17 (6.75%) of the fecal specimens, respectively. Sequence analysis showed that all Cryptosporidium-positive specimens were C. andersoni and that most G. intestinalis- positive patients were infected by assemblage C, which is usually found in canids, while only one sample was from assemblage B. Eight patients were co-infected with Cryptosporidium spp. and Enterocytozoon, while one was co-infected with Cryptosporidium and Giardia. The patients infected with Cryptosporidium and Enterocytozoon bieneusi had higher infection rates in winter than in spring in this area. Data indicated that C. andersoni is the fourth major Cryptosporidium species infecting humans in addition to C. hominis, C. parvum and C. meleagridis. Our study also revealed a short-term outbreak of cryptosporidiosis and microsporidiosis and sporadic cases of giardiasis that occurred among humans in Shanghai, China.

  13. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis in human patients in Cairo, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El Kader, Nour M; Blanco, María-Alejandra; Ali-Tammam, Marwa; Abd El Ghaffar, Abd El Rahman B; Osman, Ahmed; El Sheikh, Nabila; Rubio, José Miguel; de Fuentes, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a significant cause of diarrheal disease in developing and industrialized nations. Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum are the main agents of cryptosporidiosis in humans. In Egypt, very little is known about genetic structure of Cryptosporidium spp. Therefore, this study was designed to examine samples from sporadic cases of cryptosporidiosis in Egyptians in order to identify the species involved in infection as well as the transmission dynamics and distribution of the parasite in the Great Cairo area. A total of 391 human faecal samples were collected, between May 2008 and March 2009, from ten public hospitals in Great Cairo. Initial screening by immunochromatographic detection kit "the Stick Crypto-Giardia; Operon" showed 23 possible positive cases. Twenty of them were confirmed by microscopic examination. PCR was performed by amplification of the oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene where 18 out of 23 samples were positive, one not detected by microscopy. Cryptosporidium genotyping was performed by RFLP analysis of PCR products of the diagnosis PCR. Only 15 samples rendered a digestion pattern. The genotyping distribution was nine cases showing C. hominis genotype, three showing C. parvum genotype and three showing mixed infection by C. hominis and C. parvum. The data showed an elevated prevalence of C. hominis (80.0%), the most anthroponotic species, suggesting a human-human transmission. Furthermore, the presence of up to 40% of samples infected with C. parvum shows that further investigations are required to determine the subgenotypes of C. parvum to clarify the mode of transmission in order to improve the control measures.

  14. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in Sichuan province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Zuqin; Xie, Yue; Hou, Rong; Wu, Qidun; Gu, Xiaobing; Lai, Weiming; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2015-06-25

    Cryptosporidium spp. have been extensively reported to cause significant diarrheal disease in humans and domestic animals. On the contrary, little information is available on the prevalence and characterization of Cryptosporidium in wild animals in China, especially in giant pandas. The aim of the present study was to detect Cryptosporidium infections and identify Cryptosporidium species at the molecular level in both captive and wild giant pandas in Sichuan province, China. Using a PCR approach, we amplified and sequenced the 18S rRNA gene from 322 giant pandas fecal samples (122 from 122 captive individuals and 200 collected from four habitats) in Sichuan province, China. The Cryptosporidium species/genotypes were identified via a BLAST comparison against published Cryptosporidium sequences available in GenBank followed by phylogenetic analysis. The results revealed that both captive and wild giant pandas were infected with a single Cryptosporidium species, C. andersoni, at a prevalence of 15.6% (19/122) and 0.5% (1/200) in captive and wild giant pandas, respectively. The present study revealed the existence of C. andersoni in both captive and wild giant panda fecal samples for the first time, and also provided useful fundamental data for further research on the molecular epidemiology and control of Cryptosporidium infection in giant pandas.

  15. Genotyping and subtyping Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia duodenalis carried by flies on dairy farms in Henan, China

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zifang; Dong, Haiju; Wang, Rongjun; Zhao, Wei; Chen, Gongyi; Li, Shouyi; Qi, Meng; Zhang, Sumei; Jian, Fuchun; Zhao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Longxian; Wang, Haiyan; Liu, Aiqin

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidium and Giardia are important causes of diarrhea diseases in humans and animals worldwide, and both of them are transmitted by the fecal–oral route, either by direct contact or by the ingestion of contaminated food or water. The role of flies in the mechanical transmission of Cryptosporidium and Giardia has been receiving increasing attention. To date, no information is available in China about the occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in flies. We here investigated...

  16. Prevalence and age-related infection of Cryptosporidium suis, C. muris and Cryptosporidium pig genotype II in pigs on a farm complex in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Hanzlíková, D.; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 160, 3/4 (2009), s. 319-322 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP523/07/P117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Cryptosporidium infection * age specificity * pigs Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.278, year: 2009

  17. Isolation and genotyping of Acanthamoeba spp. from Acanthamoeba meningitis/ meningoencephalitis (AME) patients in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Himanshu Sekhar; Satpathy, Gita; Tripathi, Manjari

    2016-08-09

    Acanthamoeba spp. are free-living ubiquitous protozoans capable of causing Acanthamoeba meningitis/meningoencephalitis (AME) of the central nervous system in humans. Acanthamoeba spp. are divided into 20 different genotypes (T1-T20) on the basis of variation in nucleotide sequences of the 18S rRNA gene. The objective of this study was to identify the genotypes of Acanthamoeba spp. in patients of Acanthamoeba meningitis/meningoencephalitis (AME) using 18S rRNA gene-based PCR assay. The present study provides information regarding the involvement of the most prevalent and predominant genotype of Acanthamoeba spp. in Acanthamoeba meningitis/meningoencephalitis infections in India. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from 149 clinically suspected Acanthamoeba meningitis/meningoencephalitis (AME) patients reporting to the outpatient department/causality services of the Neurosciences Centre, AIIMS, New Delhi, India during the past five years. Samples were inoculated onto 2 % non-nutrient agar plates overlaid with E. coli and incubated at 30 °C for 14 days. Among 149 suspected patients, ten were found culture-positive for Acanthamoeba spp. out of which six isolates were established in axenic culture for molecular analysis. DNA was isolated and a PCR assay was performed for amplification of the Diagnostic fragment 3 (DF3) (~280 bp) region of the 18S rRNA gene from axenic culture of six Acanthamoeba spp. isolates. Rns genotyping was performed on the basis of the variation in nucleotide sequences of DF3 region of the 18S rRNA gene. In the phylogenetic analysis, all of the six Acanthamoeba spp. isolates were found to belong to genotype T4. The sequence homology search for these six isolates in the NCBI databank showed homology with the available strains of Acanthamoeba spp. The newly generated sequences are available in the GenBank database under accession numbers KT004416-KT004421. In the present study, genotype T4 was found as the most prevalent and

  18. The first report of Cryptosporidium andersoni in horses with diarrhea and multilocus subtype analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aiqin; Zhang, Jia; Zhao, Jingmin; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Rongjun; Zhang, Longxian

    2015-09-22

    Horses interact with humans in a wide variety of sport competitions and non-competitive recreational pursuits as well as in working activities. Cryptosporidium spp are one of the most important zoonotic pathogens causing diarrhea of humans and animals. The reports of Cryptosporidium in horses and the findings of zoonotic Cryptosporidium species/genotypes show a necessity to carry out molecular identification of Cryptosporidium in horses, especially in diarrheic ones. The aim of the present study was to understand Cryptosporidium infection and species/genotypes in diarrheic horses, and to trace the source of infection of horse-derived Cryptosporidium isolates at a subtype level. Fecal specimens of 29 diarrheic adult horses were collected in Taikang County in northeastern China's Heilongjiang Province. Cryptosporidium oocysts were concentrated by Sheather's sugar flotation technique, and then examined by a bright-field microscope. Meanwhile, all the specimens were subjected to PCR amplification of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium. C. andersoni isolates were further subtyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) at the four microsatellite/minisatellite loci (MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16). One and two Cryptosporidium-positive isolates were obtained in horses by microscopy and by PCR, respectively. The two C. andersoni isolates were identified by sequencing of the SSU rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium. Both of them were identical to each other at the MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16 loci, and MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 was found here. This is the first report of C. andersoni in horses. The fact that the MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 was reported in cattle suggests a large possibility of transmission of C. andersoni between cattle and horses.

  19. Genetic relationships among some hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) species and genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Kadir Ugurtan; Yanar, Makbule; Ercisli, Sezai; Sahiner, Hatice; Taskin, Tuncer; Zengin, Yasar

    2010-10-01

    The genus Crataegus is well distributed in Turkey as a wild plant, with numerous, inherently variable species and genotypes. RAPD markers were used to study 17 hawthorn genotypes belonging to Crataegus monogyna ssp. monogyna Jacq (2 genotypes), C. monogyna ssp. azarella Jacq (1), Crataegus pontica K.Koch (3), Crataegus orientalis var. orientalis Pallas Ex Bieb (3), Crataegus pseudoheterophylla Pojark (1), Crataegus aronia var. dentata Browicz (1), C. aronia var. aronia Browicz (4), and Crateagus x bornmuelleri Zabel (2). The 10 RAPD primers produced 72 polymorphic bands (88% polymorphism). A dendrogram based on Jaccard's index included four major groups and one outgroup according to taxa. The lowest genetic variability was observed within C. aronia var. aronia genotypes. The study demonstrated that RAPD analysis is efficient for genotyping wild-grown hawthorns.

  20. Epidemiology and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in humans, wild primates, and domesticated animals in the Greater Gombe Ecosystem, Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele B Parsons

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium is an important zoonotic parasite globally. Few studies have examined the ecology and epidemiology of this pathogen in rural tropical systems characterized by high rates of overlap among humans, domesticated animals, and wildlife. We investigated risk factors for Cryptosporidium infection and assessed cross-species transmission potential among people, non-human primates, and domestic animals in the Gombe Ecosystem, Kigoma District, Tanzania. A cross-sectional survey was designed to determine the occurrence and risk factors for Cryptosporidium infection in humans, domestic animals and wildlife living in and around Gombe National Park. Diagnostic PCR revealed Cryptosporidium infection rates of 4.3% in humans, 16.0% in non-human primates, and 9.6% in livestock. Local streams sampled were negative. DNA sequencing uncovered a complex epidemiology for Cryptosporidium in this system, with humans, baboons and a subset of chimpanzees infected with C. hominis subtype IfA12G2; another subset of chimpanzees infected with C. suis; and all positive goats and sheep infected with C. xiaoi. For humans, residence location was associated with increased risk of infection in Mwamgongo village compared to one camp (Kasekela, and there was an increased odds for infection when living in a household with another positive person. Fecal consistency and other gastrointestinal signs did not predict Cryptosporidium infection. Despite a high degree of habitat overlap between village people and livestock, our results suggest that there are distinct Cryptosporidium transmission dynamics for humans and livestock in this system. The dominance of C. hominis subtype IfA12G2 among humans and non-human primates suggest cross-species transmission. Interestingly, a subset of chimpanzees was infected with C. suis. We hypothesize that there is cross-species transmission from bush pigs (Potaochoerus larvatus to chimpanzees in Gombe forest, since domesticated pigs are

  1. First report of predation of Giardia sp. cysts by ciliated protozoa and confirmation of predation of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts by ciliate species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Castro, Isabel Cristina Vidal; Greinert-Goulart, Juliane Araújo; Bonatti, Tais Rondello; Yamashiro, Sandra; Franco, Regina Maura Bueno

    2016-06-01

    Ciliated protozoa are important components of the microbial food web in various habitats, especially aquatic environments. These organisms are useful bioindicators for both environmental quality assessment and the wastewater purification process. The pathogenic parasitic protozoan species Giardia and Cryptosporidium represent a significant concern for human health, being responsible for numerous disease outbreaks worldwide. The predation of cysts and oocysts in 15 ciliate species from water and sewage samples collected in Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil were verified under laboratory conditions. The ciliated protozoan species were selected based on their mode of nutrition, and only bacterivorous and suspension-feeders were considered for the experiments. The species Blepharisma sinuosum, Euplotes aediculatus, Sterkiella cavicola, Oxytricha granulifera, Vorticella infusionum, Spirostomum minus, and Stentor coeruleus ingested cysts and oocysts, the resistance forms of Giardia spp. and Cryptosporidium spp., respectively. This is the first time that the ingestion of Giardia cysts by ciliated protozoa has been reported. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of the biological removal of these pathogens from aquatic environments.

  2. Remoção de cistos de Giardia spp. e oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. na Estação de Tratamento de Esgoto Garcia, no município de Blumenau, SC, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Giovanni Miglioli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Giardia spp. e Cryptosporidium spp. são agentes etiológicos responsáveis por uma série de epidemias de gastroenterites ocorridas, principalmente, após o consumo de água contaminada. Os cistos e oocistos destes protozoários são resistentes às variações ambientais, bem como a maioria dos processos físicos, químicos e microbiológicos utilizados nas estações de tratamento de água e esgoto. Deste modo, este estudo teve como objetivo detectar e avaliar a remoção de cistos de Giardia spp. e oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. no sistema de tratamento combinado anaeróbio + aeróbio da ETE Garcia em Blumenau, SC. Para efetuar a detecção de cistos e oocistos, as amostras de efluentes e lodos provenientes da ETE foram concentradas através de filtração em membranas de ésteres de celulose e centrifugação, seguida por reação de imunofluorescência direta (RID utilizando o Kit diagnóstico - Merifluor. Para a obtenção dos parâmetros físicos, químicos e microbiológicos, as análises seguiram os padrões preconizados em APHA (2012. Concentrações elevadas de cistos de Giardia spp. (máx. 900.000 cistos L-1 foram detectadas em 83,3% dos pontos analisados. Oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. também foram detectados em elevadas concentrações (máx. 300.000 oocistos L-1 em 66,6% dos pontos analisados. Não foram detectados cistos e oocistos nas amostras do efluente tratado, deste modo o sistema combinado da ETE Garcia apresentou uma eficiência >99,9% para a remoção das formas resistentes destes patógenos, contribuindo para a redução da contaminação ambiental por protozoários patogênicos presentes no esgoto doméstico do município de Blumenau, SC, Brasil.

  3. Prevalence and multilocus genotyping of Cryptosporidium andersoni in dairy cattle and He cattle in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Meng; Wang, Rongjun; Jing, Bo; Jian, Fuchun; Ning, Changshen; Zhang, Longxian

    2016-10-01

    Cryptosporidium andersoni is the predominant species in post-weaned and adult cattle in China. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and understand the transmission of cattle cryptosporidiosis in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, China, a total of 1827 fecal samples (436 from He cattle and 1391 from dairy cattle) were examined for the presence of C. andersoni-like oocysts by microscopy after Sheather's sugar flotation technique. The overall prevalence of C. andersoni-like was 3.8% (70/1827) and all the C. andersoni-like isolates were identified as C. andersoni at the SSU rRNA locus. Among the C. andersoni isolates, a total of 60 isolates were successfully characterized into eight multilocus sequence typing (MLST) subtypes using MLST analysis at the four microsatellite/minisatellite loci (MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16), and three new subtypes were identified. The MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 showed a predominance and a wide distribution among the eight MLST subtypes obtained in the investigated areas. The MLST subtypes A2,A4,A2,A1 and A4,A5,A2,A1 showed a unique distribution in the investigated areas. A linkage disequilibrium analysis showed the presence of an epidemic population genetic structure of C. andersoni isolated from dairy and He cattle in Xinjiang. These findings provide new insights into the genetic structure of C. andersoni isolates and are also helpful to explore the infection source of C. andersoni in cattle in Xinjiang, China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Soil and Rhizosphere Populations of Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Associated with Field-grown Plants are Affected by Sorghum Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is valued for bioenergy, feed and food. Potential of sorghum genotypes to support differing populations of root- and soil-associated fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. or Fusarium spp., in two soils, was assessed. Pseudomonads and Fusarium spp. were assessed from root...

  5. First description of Cryptosporidium hominis GP60 genotype IkA20G1 and Cryptosporidium parvum GP60 genotypes IIaA18G3R1 and IIaA15G2R1 in foals in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inácio, Sandra Valéria; Widmer, Giovanni; de Brito, Roberta Lomonte Lemos; Zucatto, Anaiza Simão; de Aquino, Monally Conceição Costa; Oliveira, Bruno César Miranda; Nakamura, Alex Akira; Neto, Luiz da Silveira; Carvalho, João Gabriel Balizardo; Gomes, Jancarlo Ferreira; Meireles, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Bresciani, Katia Denise Saraiva

    2017-01-15

    The present study focuses on Cryptosporidium infections of foals in Brazil. A total of 92 animals of different breeds from 11 farms in the vicinity of Araçatuba in the state of São Paulo, were examined. According to PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene, Cryptosporidium sp. DNA was detected in 21.7% (20/92) of foals. Good quality 18S rRNA, actin, HSP70 and gp60 genes nPCR amplicons were obtained from five fecal samples. PCR amplification and sequencing of a fragment of the GP60 sporozoite surface glycoprotein gene revealed C. parvum genotypes IIaA18G3R1, IIaA15G2R1. Interestingly, we also detected in two foals a GP60 genotype related to the human parasite C. hominis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Susceptibility, Oviposition Preference, and Biology of Grapholita molesta (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in Prunus Spp. Rootstock Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, D; Lazzari, J C; Andreazza, F; Mayer, N A; Botton, M; Nava, D E

    2017-08-01

    Studying the susceptibility of peach trees to Grapholita molesta (Busck) is one of the major steps in the development of pest-resistant peach varieties. This work evaluated the susceptibility of 55 genotypes of the "Prunus Rootstock Collection" ("Coleção Porta-enxerto de Prunus") of Embrapa Temperate Climate (Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil) to the natural infestation of G. molesta, assessed the oviposition preference of G. molesta in choice and no-choice bioassays, and estimated the biological parameters and the fertility life table on different Prunus spp. genotypes in the laboratory. Genotypes Prunus kansuensis (Rehder), I-67-52-9, and I-67-52-4 were the most susceptible to G. molesta infestation in the field (>60% of branches infested), while 'Sharpe' (Prunus angustifolia x Prunus spp.) and Prunus sellowii (Koehne) were the least infested (0% of branches infested). In choice and no-choice bioassays, G. molesta preferred to oviposit on P. kansuensis when compared with Sharpe. The Sharpe genotype also showed an antibiosis effect, resulting in negative effects on the fertility life table parameters when compared with the genotypes P. kansuensis and 'Capdeboscq.' The results found in the present study can provide information to initiate a long-term breeding program moving desired G. molesta resistance traits from the rootstock into the Prunus spp. cultivars. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Genotypes of pathogenic Leptospira spp isolated from rodents in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loffler, Sylvia Grune; Pavan, Maria Elisa; Vanasco, Bibiana; Samartino, Luis; Suarez, Olga; Auteri, Carmelo; Romero, Graciela; Brihuega, Bibiana

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is the most widespread zoonosis in the world and significant efforts have been made to determine and classify pathogenic Leptospira strains. This zoonosis is maintained in nature through chronic renal infections of carrier animals, with rodents and other small mammals serving as the most important reservoirs. Additionally, domestic animals, such as livestock and dogs, are significant sources of human infection. In this study, a multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was applied to genotype 22 pathogenic Leptospira strains isolated from urban and periurban rodent populations from different regions of Argentina. Three MLVA profiles were identified in strains belonging to the species Leptospira interrogans (serovars Icterohaemorrhagiae and Canicola); one profile was observed in serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae and two MLVA profiles were observed in isolates of serovars Canicola and Portlandvere. All strains belonging to Leptospira borgpetersenii serovar Castellonis exhibited the same MLVA profile. Four different genotypes were isolated from urban populations of rodents, including both mice and rats and two different genotypes were isolated from periurban populations. PMID:24676656

  8. Cryptosporidium cuniculus and Giardia duodenalis in rabbits: genetic diversity and possible zoonotic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weizhe; Shen, Yujuan; Wang, Rongjun; Liu, Aiqin; Ling, Hong; Li, Yihong; Cao, Jianping; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Shu, Jing; Zhang, Longxian

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are the two important zoonotic pathogens causing diarrhea of humans and animals worldwide. Considering the human cryptosporidiosis outbreak and sporadic cases caused by C. cuniculus, the important public health significance of G. duodenalis and little obtained information regarding rabbit infected with Cryptosporidium and Giardia in China, the aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and molecularly characterize Cryptosporidium and Giardia in rabbits in Heilongjiang Province, China. 378 fecal samples were obtained from rabbits in Heilongjiang Province. Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts were detected using Sheather's sugar flotation technique and Lugol's iodine stain method, respectively. The infection rates of Cryptosporidium and Giardia were 2.38% (9/378) and 7.41% (28/378), respectively. Genotyping of Cryptosporidium spp. was done by DNA sequencing of the small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene and all the nine isolates were identified as Cryptosporidium cuniculus. The nine isolates were further subtyped using the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene and two subtypes were detected, including VbA32 (n = 3) and a new subtype VbA21 (n = 6). G. duodenalis genotypes and subtypes were identified by sequence analysis of the triosephosphate isomerase (TPI) gene. The assemblage B (belonging to eight different subtypes B-I to B-VIII) was found in 28 G. duodenalis-positive samples. The rabbits have been infected with Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Heilongjiang Province. The results show that the rabbits pose a threat to human health in the studied areas. Genotypes and subgenotypes of C. cuniculus and G. duodenalis in this study might present the endemic genetic characterization of population structure of the two parasites.

  9. Cryptosporidium cuniculus and Giardia duodenalis in rabbits: genetic diversity and possible zoonotic transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhe Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cryptosporidium and Giardia are the two important zoonotic pathogens causing diarrhea of humans and animals worldwide. Considering the human cryptosporidiosis outbreak and sporadic cases caused by C. cuniculus, the important public health significance of G. duodenalis and little obtained information regarding rabbit infected with Cryptosporidium and Giardia in China, the aim of this study is to determine the prevalence and molecularly characterize Cryptosporidium and Giardia in rabbits in Heilongjiang Province, China. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 378 fecal samples were obtained from rabbits in Heilongjiang Province. Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts were detected using Sheather's sugar flotation technique and Lugol's iodine stain method, respectively. The infection rates of Cryptosporidium and Giardia were 2.38% (9/378 and 7.41% (28/378, respectively. Genotyping of Cryptosporidium spp. was done by DNA sequencing of the small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA gene and all the nine isolates were identified as Cryptosporidium cuniculus. The nine isolates were further subtyped using the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60 gene and two subtypes were detected, including VbA32 (n = 3 and a new subtype VbA21 (n = 6. G. duodenalis genotypes and subtypes were identified by sequence analysis of the triosephosphate isomerase (TPI gene. The assemblage B (belonging to eight different subtypes B-I to B-VIII was found in 28 G. duodenalis-positive samples. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The rabbits have been infected with Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Heilongjiang Province. The results show that the rabbits pose a threat to human health in the studied areas. Genotypes and subgenotypes of C. cuniculus and G. duodenalis in this study might present the endemic genetic characterization of population structure of the two parasites.

  10. Molecular characterization of cryptosporidium in children aged 0- 5 years with diarrhea in Jos, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anejo-Okopi, Joseph Aje; Okojokwu, Julius Ocheme; Ebonyi, Augustine Odo; Ejeliogu, Emeka Uba; Isa, Samson Ejiji; Audu, Onyemocho; Akpakpan, Edoama Edet; Nwachukwu, Esther Ebere; Ifokwe, Christabel Kelechi; Ali, Murna; Lar, Patricia; Oguche, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cryptosporidium is an important cause of diarrhea in children and immune-compromised individuals. Recent advances in molecular diagnostics have led to the discovery of subtype families that are thought to be more commonly associated with diarrhea. We aimed to isolate and characterize Cryptosporidium spp among children with diarrhea in Jos, Nigeria. Methods Stool samples were collected from165 children aged 0-5 years with diarrhea. Cryptosporidium oocysts were examined by wet mount preparation, using formalin ether and a modified acid fast staining method. DNA was extracted from positive samples using QIAamp DNA stool mini kit and PCR-RFLP assay was carried out after quantification. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis were done to determine the subtype families and their relatedness. Results From the 165 children studied, 8 (4.8%) were infected with Cryptosporidium. PCR-RFLP assay and genotype characterization found the following Cryptosporidium species: C. hominis 6 (75%) and C. parvum 2 (25.0%), with family subtypes Id-5, Ie-1 and IIa-1, IId-1 respectively.The most common species was C. hominis and the frequent subtype was C. hominis-Id 5 (62.5%). Conclusion Cryptosporidium is not an uncommon cause of diarrhea in children, with C. hominis being the dominant species. Also C. hominis Id is the commonest sub-family subtype. Put together, zoonotic species may be an important cause of diarrhea in children aged 0-5 years in Jos, Nigeria. PMID:28293369

  11. Giardia assemblage A: human genotype in muskoxen in the Canadian Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy John

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract As part of an ongoing program assessing the biodiversity and impacts of parasites in Arctic ungulates we examined 72 fecal samples from muskoxen on Banks Island, Northwest Territories, Canada for Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Cryptosporidium spp. were not detected, but 21% of the samples were positive for Giardia. Sequencing of four isolates of Giardia demonstrated G. duodenalis, Assemblage A, a zoonotic genotype.

  12. Rodents as a reservoir of infection caused by multiple zoonotic species/genotypes of C. parvum, C. hominis, C. suis, C. scrofarum, and the first evidence of C. muskrat genotypes I and II of rodents in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danišová, Oľga; Valenčáková, Alexandra; Stanko, Michal; Luptáková, Lenka; Hatalová, Elena; Čanády, Alexander

    2017-08-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. is an important causative agent of intestinal parasitoses-induced diarrhoea in humans and animals worldwide. Rodents (small mammals), the main reservoir of infections, are globally expanded and overpopulated, which increases the risk of transfer of human and zoonotic pathogens from the genus Cryptosporidium. In this study, Cryptosporidium was detected in wild immunocompetent asymptomatic small mammals. Altogether 262 fecal samples were collected from five areas in Eastern Slovakia from four different rodent species (Myodes glareolus, Apodemus agrarius, Apodemus flavicollis, Rattus norvegicus), eight samples originated from two insectivore species (Sorex araneus, Crocidura suaveolens), and two sample from a carnivore Mustela nivalis. The samples were examined using a method modified in our laboratory, based on the use of specific primers on a small subunit rRNA (18S rRNA) gene for species identification, and amplification of GP60 gene coding 60-kDa glycoprotein for genotype determination. The following species were identified: Cryptosporidium parvum (n=15), genotypes IIaA18G3R1 (n=11; KU311673), IIaA10G1R1 (n=1; KU311670), IIcA5G3a (n=1; KU311669), IIiA10 (n=2; KU311672); Cryptosporidium suis (n=4; KU311671); Cryptosporidium scrofarum (n=28); Cryptosporidium environment sp. (n=12; KU311677); Cryptosporidium muskrat genotype I (n=3; KU311675); Cryptosporidium muskrat genotype II (n=3; KU311676). From one of the rodent, the species Cryptosporidium hominis genotype IbA10G2 (KU311668) was identified for the first time. The results of this study indicate low host specificity of the detected Cryptosporidium species and imply the importance of free-living small mammals in urban and suburban habitats as a potential source of human cryptosporidiosis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Estudo da remoção de cistos de Giardia spp. e oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. e avaliação da microfauna em estações de tratamento de esgoto : instrumentos de avaliação e controle do processo

    OpenAIRE

    Juliane Araújo Greinert-Goulart

    2013-01-01

    Resumo: Os protozoários Giardia spp. e Cryptosporidium spp. são importantes patógenos de veiculação hídrica e são responsáveis por diversos surtos epidêmicos relacionados ao consumo de água contaminada. O estudo da remoção de patógenos e da microfauna que compõem sistemas combinados anaeróbio/aeróbio ainda é incipiente no mundo. Este trabalho teve como objetivo Estudar a remoção de cistos de Giardia spp. e oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. e avaliar a microfauna do sistema combinado anaeróbio/...

  14. Genotyping of Giardia lamblia and Entamoeba spp from river waters in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Mohammad Reza; Nazemalhosseini-Mojarad, Ehsan; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2015-12-01

    In this study, DNA from 55 surface and river water samples, which were collected from some water sources of Tehran and the Guilan Province, Iran, were extracted and examined for Entamoeba spp. and Giardia lamblia by PCR and genotyping. Twenty-seven samples, which were concentrated using the immunomagnetic separation technology (IMS) method, were examined for Giardia alone. Twenty-eight samples, which were concentrated using the sucrose flotation (SF) method, were examined for both Giardia and Entamoeba species. The results showed that 27/55 (17/27 and 10/28) (49 %), 4 /28 (14.28 %) and 3/28 (10.7 %) of the samples were positive for Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba spp and mixed infections (Entamoeba spp. and Giardia spp.), respectively. Sixteen out of 55 samples were negative. Entamoeba genus-specific PCR primers in single-round PCR were used to differentiate between the Entamoeba spp. (E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii). With respect to the 7 samples that were positive for Entamoeba, (14.28 %) 4 out of 28 were positive for E. moshkovskii, (7.14 %), 2 out of 28 were positive for E. histolytica and (3.57 %) 1 out of 28 was positive for E. dispar. Genus-specific PCR primers in a semi-nested PCR assay was performed to genotype Giardia species. Of the 27 samples that were positive for Giardia, 10 samples were sequences. All 10 successfully sequenced samples contained assemblage B of Giardia lamblia.This is first study to investigate the G. lamblia genotypes in the water supply of the Tehran and Guilan provinces, and it is the first study to investigate Entamoeba species in the water supplies of Iran. The investigated river water supplies, which are used for agriculture, camping and animal farming, were heavily contaminated by the human pathogenic Entamoeba and Giardia parasites. There is a potential risk of waterborne outbreaks in humans and animals.

  15. Isolation and enrichment of Cryptosporidium DNA and verification of DNA purity for whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yaqiong; Li, Na; Lysén, Colleen; Frace, Michael; Tang, Kevin; Sammons, Scott; Roellig, Dawn M; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2015-02-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of Cryptosporidium spp. is hampered by difficulties in obtaining sufficient, highly pure genomic DNA from clinical specimens. In this study, we developed procedures for the isolation and enrichment of Cryptosporidium genomic DNA from fecal specimens and verification of DNA purity for whole-genome sequencing. The isolation and enrichment of genomic DNA were achieved by a combination of three oocyst purification steps and whole-genome amplification (WGA) of DNA from purified oocysts. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis of WGA products was used as an initial quality assessment of amplified genomic DNA. The purity of WGA products was assessed by Sanger sequencing of cloned products. Next-generation sequencing tools were used in final evaluations of genome coverage and of the extent of contamination. Altogether, 24 fecal specimens of Cryptosporidium parvum, C. hominis, C. andersoni, C. ubiquitum, C. tyzzeri, and Cryptosporidium chipmunk genotype I were processed with the procedures. As expected, WGA products with low (sequences in Sanger sequencing. The cloning-sequencing analysis, however, showed significant contamination in 5 WGA products (proportion of positive colonies derived from Cryptosporidium genomic DNA, ≤25%). Following this strategy, 20 WGA products from six Cryptosporidium species or genotypes with low (mostly sequencing, generating sequence data covering 94.5% to 99.7% of Cryptosporidium genomes, with mostly minor contamination from bacterial, fungal, and host DNA. These results suggest that the described strategy can be used effectively for the isolation and enrichment of Cryptosporidium DNA from fecal specimens for whole-genome sequencing. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Cryptosporidium parvum and Enterocytozoon bieneusi in American Mustangs and Chincoteague ponies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; McEvoy, John; Rost, Michael; Sherwood, Dawn; Holcomb, Kevin; Kváč, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The prevalence of Cryptosporidium and microsporidia in feral horses, which have minimal contact with livestock and humans, is not currently known. We report the findings of a study on Cryptosporidium and microsporidia in 34 Mustangs and 50 Chincoteague ponies in the USA. Fecal samples were screened for presence of Cryptosporidium spp. by analysis of the small-subunit rRNA (SSU) and 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) genes, and Enterocytozoon bieneusi and Encephalitozoon spp. by analysis of the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (ITS). Cryptosporidium spp. and E. bieneusi were detected in 28/84 (33.3%) and 7/84 (8.3%) samples, respectively. Sequence analysis of SSU and ITS revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum (n = 20) and E. bieneusi genotype horse 1 (n = 7), respectively. Subtyping of C. parvum isolates at the gp60 locus showed the presence of subtype IIaA17G2R1 in Mustangs and subtypes IIaA13G2R1 and IIaA15G2R1 in Chincoteague ponies. Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotype horse 1 was detected in Mustangs (n = 2) and Chincoteague ponies (n = 5). No Cryptosporidium or E. bieneusi positive animals had diarrhea. The finding that Mustangs and Chincoteague ponies are host to the zoonotic pathogen C. parvum suggests that their infrequent contact with humans and livestock is sufficient to maintain transmission; however, we should also consider the possibility that C. parvum is an established parasite of Mustangs and Chincoteague ponies that persists in these animals independently of contact with humans or livestock. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar, and Cryptosporidium spp in Da Nang, Vietnam, detected by a multiplex real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ögren, Jessica; Van Nguyen, Song; Nguyen, Minh Khac; Dimberg, Jan; Matussek, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    We surveyed the prevalence of Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia duodenalis, Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Cryptosporidium spp in individuals with and without gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms residing in and around Da Nang city, Vietnam. Fecal samples were collected from children (n = 100) and adults (n = 80) with GI symptoms and from healthy individuals (n = 88) reporting no GI symptoms. Parasite detection was performed by multiplex real-time PCR. Overall, except for G. duodenalis, we found a low prevalence (<5%) of D. fragilis and E. dispar and no detection of E. histolytica and C. spp in all participants with GI symptoms. Specifically for D. fragilis this contrasts with findings in European populations of children with GI symptoms showing prevalence up to 73%. Moreover, our results indicate that the prevalence of G. duodenalis is higher in patients with GI symptoms compared to asymptomatic individuals and this difference is most obvious in young patients. © 2016 The Authors. APMIS published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Scandinavian Societies for Medical Microbiology and Pathology.

  18. Highly divergent 18S rRNA gene paralogs in a Cryptosporidium genotype from eastern chipmunks (Tamias striatus)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stenger, B.L.S.; Clark, M.E.; Kváč, Martin; Khan, E.; Giddings, C.W.; Dyer, N.W.; Schultz, J.L.; McEvoy, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 32, JUN 2015 (2015), s. 113-123 ISSN 1567-1348 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11061 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptosporidium * Paralogy * 18S rRNA * 18S rDNA Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.591, year: 2015

  19. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium baileyi in ostriches (Struthio camelus) in Zhengzhou, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongjun; Qi, Meng; Jingjing, Zhu; Sun, Dong; Ning, Changshen; Zhao, Jinfeng; Zhang, Longxian; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-01-10

    Few data are available on the molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in ostriches. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium species or genotypes in ostriches. A total of 452 fecal samples from five farms, a zoo, and an animal rescue center in Zhengzhou, Henan Province, China were examined for Cryptosporidium oocysts by microscopy of wet mount of fecal materials concentrated by the Sheather's sugar flotation technique. Fifty-three samples were Cryptosporidium-positive from four farms, with an overall prevalence of 11.7%. The percentage of animals shedding oocysts was 0, 16.2%, 7.2%, and 0 in 1-3 weeks, 4-8 weeks, 3-12 months, and more than 12 months ostriches, respectively (χ(2)=17.74; ρ<0.01). PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene of the 53 Cryptosporidium-positive samples showed the presence of only Cryptosporidium baileyi, which was confirmed by DNA sequencing of the SSU rRNA PCR products from 16 positive samples. Cross-transmission studies demonstrated that the C. baileyi isolate could infect chickens and quails. Thus, ostriches are commonly infected with C. baileyi that is genetically and biologically similar to C. baileyi found in other birds. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Susceptibilidad de genotipos de Solanum spp. al nematodo causante del nudo radical Meloidogyne spp. (chitwood) Susceptibility of genotypes of Solanum spp. to the nematode causative of the root knot Meloidogyne spp. (chitwood)

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Gelpud Chaves

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El cultivo del lulo (Solanum quitoense L.) presenta una disminución en su productividad, debido al ataque de patógenos como el nematodo del nudo radical Meloidogyne spp., en el Departamento de Nariño (Colombia), se han reportado incidencias cercanas al 79%, y pérdidas del 50%. En la presente investigación, se colectaron 45 genotipos de (Solanum quitoense L.) en los Departamentos de Nariño y Putumayo y 4 genotipos silvestres (S. mammosum, S. hirtum, S. marginatum y S. umbellatum) buscando fuentes de resistencia al nematodo. Se inocularon 9 plantas de cada genotipo de dos meses de edad con 10000 huevos de Meloidogyne spp., dejando tres testigos por cada material. Las variables evaluadas fueron: altura de planta, severidad, incidencia, peso fresco (tallo y raíz) y especies prevalentes de Meloidogyne spp. Se hizo una clasificación de genotipos mediante escala de resistencia y regresión entre la severidad y las demás variables para establecer el efecto de Meloidogyne spp. sobre los genotipos de planta. Los resultados mostraron 100% de incidencia del nematodo en todos los genotipos, 2.04% genotipos resistentes, 34.7% moderadamente resistentes, 42.8% moderadamente susceptibles, 18.3% susceptibles, y 2.04% altamente susceptibles. El genotipo SQbr05 resistente, no se vio afectado por la severidad, al contrario SQbc04 genotipo susceptible, mostró reducciones significativas en peso fresco de tallo y raíz, (R² = 0.71 y 0.98), el genotipo silvestre (S. mammosum) es altamente susceptible, Meloidogyne incognita presentó 55.31% de presencia. El genotipo SQbr05 es promisorio para ser evaluado en campo.The green orange (Solanum quitoense L.) crop has decreased in its productivity due to the pathogens attack such as the root knot nematode Meloidogyne spp. In the Nariño Department of Colombia, pest incidences near to 79% and losses of 50% have been reported. In this study, 45 genotypes of Solanum quitoense were collected in Nariño and Putumayo

  1. Microsporidia and Cryptosporidium in horses and donkeys in Algeria: detection of a novel Cryptosporidium hominis subtype family (Ik) in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laatamna, Abd Elkarim; Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Xiao, Lihua; Rost, Michael; McEvoy, John; Saadi, Ahmed Rachid; Aissi, Meriem; Kváč, Martin

    2015-03-15

    A total of 219 and 124 individual fecal samples of horses and donkeys, respectively, were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium spp., Encephalitozoon spp., and Enterocytozoon bieneusi DNA by genus-specific nested PCR. Isolates were genotyped by sequence analysis of SSU rRNA, GP60, TRAP-C1, COWP, and HSP70 loci in Cryptosporidium, and the ITS region in microsporidia. Cryptosporidium spp. was detected on 3/18 horse farms and 1/15 farms where donkeys were kept. Overall, five (2.3%) horse and two (1.6%) donkey specimens were PCR positive for Cryptosporidium. Genotyping at SSU and GP60 loci revealed that three isolates from horses and donkeys were C. parvum subtype family IIaA16G1R1, one isolate from a horse was, C. muris RN66, and one isolate from a donkey was C. muris TS03. An isolate from a horse shared 99.4% and 99.3% similarity with Cryptosporidium hominis and C. cuniculus, respectively, at the SSU locus. This isolate shared 100% identity with C. hominis at the TRAP-C1, COWP, and HSP70 loci, and it was from the novel gp60 subtype family IkA15G1. Microsporidia were found on 6/18 horse and 2/15 donkey farms. E. bieneusi was identified in 6.8% (15/219) and 1.6% (2/124), and Encephalitozoon cuniculi was identified in 1.8% (4/219) and 1.6% (2/124), of horses and donkeys, respectively. Three genotypes of E. cuniculi (I, II and III) were detected in horses, and E. cuniculi genotype II was detected in donkeys. Four genotypes of E. bieneusi (horse1, horse 2, CZ3, D) were described in horses. An additional five horses and two donkeys were positive for E. bieneusi, but the isolated were not genotyped. Neither Cryptosporidium nor microsporidia prevalence were affected by sex, age, type of breeding, or whether the host was a horse or a donkey. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Infestation of Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on Carica spp. and Vasconcella spp. genotypes; Infestacao de Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) em genotipos de Carica spp. e Vasconcella spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fancelli, Marilene; Sanches, Nilton F.; Dantas, Jorge L.L.; Caldas, Ranulfo C. [EMBRAPA Mandioca e Fruticultura Tropical, Cruz das Almas, BA (Brazil)]. E-mail: fancelli@cnpmf.embrapa.br; Morales, Cinara F.G. [Fundacao Estadual de Pesquisa Agropecuaria (FEPAGRO), Ijui, RS (Brazil)

    2008-09-15

    The papaya borer weevil, Pseudopiazurus papayanus (Marshall), is generally considered a secondary pest, but it has been reported in high infestations in Northeast Brazil. This work aimed at evaluating the occurrence of P. papayanus and reporting its infestation level in papaya genotypes kept at the germplasm bank of EMBRAPA Cassava and Tropical Fruits (Cruz das Almas, Bahia, Brazil). The number of larvae, pupae and adults found in each plant of 65 Carica spp. genotypes and of three Vasconcella spp. genotypes was registered in three to five plants of each genotype, by cutting the exsudating trunks lengthwise. Papaya borer weevil was found in C. papaya and V. cauliflora but not in those of V. quercifolia. Among the evaluated genotypes, 52.4% of those belonging to the Solo group were infested, against 25.0% of the Formosa group. Larval infestation was the best criterion for sorting out genotypes concerning this insect infestation. This is also the first occurrence of the papaya borer weevil . (author)

  3. Genotypes of Leptospira spp. strains isolated from dogs in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grune Loffler, Sylvia; Passaro, Diego; Samartino, Luis; Soncini, Analía; Romero, Graciela; Brihuega, Bibiana

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is an infectious disease of wide global distribution, which is endemic in Argentina. The objective of this study was to obtain the genetic profiles of Leptospira spp. strains isolated from clinical cases of dogs in the province of Buenos Aires by the multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA). Eight isolated canine strains were genotyped by MLVA, obtaining the identical profile of Leptospira interrogans serovar Canicola Hond Utrecht IV in the strains named Dogy and Mayo. The strains named Bel, Sarmiento, La Plata 4581 and La Plata 5478 were identical to the profile of the genotype of L. interrogans serovar Portlandvere MY 1039.The strain named Avellaneda was identical to the genotype profile of L. interrogans serovar Icterohaemorrhagiae RGA and the strain named SB had the same profile as the L. interrogans serovar Pomona Baires genotype and was similar to the profile of serovar Pomona Pomona genotype. It would be useful to include a larger number of isolates from different dog populations in various provinces of Argentina and to characterize the genetic profiles of the strains circulating in the country. The information obtained will be useful for the control of leptospirosis in the dog population. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium species coproantigens on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to assess the potential of animals, used for teaching and research, as a source of Cryptosporidium infection for students and staff of a University in Nigeria. Faecal samples from 185 animals reared on the teaching and research farm were collected and examined for Cryptosporidium spp. antigens ...

  5. Distribution and clinical manifestations of Cryptosporidium species and subtypes in HIV/AIDS patients in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamu, Haileeyesus; Petros, Beyene; Zhang, Guoqing; Kassa, Hailu; Amer, Said; Ye, Jianbin; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2014-04-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is an important cause for chronic diarrhea and death in HIV/AIDS patients. Among common Cryptosporidium species in humans, C. parvum is responsible for most zoonotic infections in industrialized nations. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of C. parvum and role of zoonotic transmission in cryptosporidiosis epidemiology in developing countries remain unclear. In this cross-sectional study, 520 HIV/AIDS patients were examined for Cryptosporidium presence in stool samples using genotyping and subtyping techniques. Altogether, 140 (26.9%) patients were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. by PCR-RFLP analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene, belonging to C. parvum (92 patients), C. hominis (25 patients), C. viatorum (10 patients), C. felis (5 patients), C. meleagridis (3 patients), C. canis (2 patients), C. xiaoi (2 patients), and mixture of C. parvum and C. hominis (1 patient). Sequence analyses of the 60 kDa glycoprotein gene revealed a high genetic diversity within the 82 C. parvum and 19 C. hominis specimens subtyped, including C. parvum zoonotic subtype families IIa (71) and IId (5) and anthroponotic subtype families IIc (2), IIb (1), IIe (1) and If-like (2), and C. hominis subtype families Id (13), Ie (5), and Ib (1). Overall, Cryptosporidium infection was associated with the occurrence of diarrhea and vomiting. Diarrhea was attributable mostly to C. parvum subtype family IIa and C. hominis, whereas vomiting was largely attributable to C. hominis and rare Cryptosporidium species. Calf contact was identified as a significant risk factor for infection with Cryptosporidium spp., especially C. parvum subtype family IIa. Results of the study indicate that C. parvum is a major cause of cryptosporidiosis in HIV-positive patients and zoonotic transmission is important in cryptosporidiosis epidemiology in Ethiopia. In addition, they confirm that different Cryptosporidium species and subtypes are linked to different clinical manifestations.

  6. Distribution and clinical manifestations of Cryptosporidium species and subtypes in HIV/AIDS patients in Ethiopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haileeyesus Adamu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cryptosporidiosis is an important cause for chronic diarrhea and death in HIV/AIDS patients. Among common Cryptosporidium species in humans, C. parvum is responsible for most zoonotic infections in industrialized nations. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of C. parvum and role of zoonotic transmission in cryptosporidiosis epidemiology in developing countries remain unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this cross-sectional study, 520 HIV/AIDS patients were examined for Cryptosporidium presence in stool samples using genotyping and subtyping techniques. Altogether, 140 (26.9% patients were positive for Cryptosporidium spp. by PCR-RFLP analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene, belonging to C. parvum (92 patients, C. hominis (25 patients, C. viatorum (10 patients, C. felis (5 patients, C. meleagridis (3 patients, C. canis (2 patients, C. xiaoi (2 patients, and mixture of C. parvum and C. hominis (1 patient. Sequence analyses of the 60 kDa glycoprotein gene revealed a high genetic diversity within the 82 C. parvum and 19 C. hominis specimens subtyped, including C. parvum zoonotic subtype families IIa (71 and IId (5 and anthroponotic subtype families IIc (2, IIb (1, IIe (1 and If-like (2, and C. hominis subtype families Id (13, Ie (5, and Ib (1. Overall, Cryptosporidium infection was associated with the occurrence of diarrhea and vomiting. Diarrhea was attributable mostly to C. parvum subtype family IIa and C. hominis, whereas vomiting was largely attributable to C. hominis and rare Cryptosporidium species. Calf contact was identified as a significant risk factor for infection with Cryptosporidium spp., especially C. parvum subtype family IIa. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results of the study indicate that C. parvum is a major cause of cryptosporidiosis in HIV-positive patients and zoonotic transmission is important in cryptosporidiosis epidemiology in Ethiopia. In addition, they confirm that different Cryptosporidium species and

  7. Phenotypic and Genotypic Diversity of Thermophilic Campylobacter spp. in Commercial Turkey Flocks: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashoma, Isaac P.; Kumar, Anand; Sanad, Yasser M.; Gebreyes, Wondwossen; Kazwala, Rudovick R.; Garabed, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Poultry are recognized as a main reservoir of Campylobacter spp. However, longitudinal studies investigating the persistence of Campylobacter on commercial meat turkeys are rare. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility, and persistence of genotypically related strains of Campylobacter spp. recovered from three commercial turkey farms in Ohio belonging to a single producer. Eight hundred ten samples were collected from birds aged 1 week to slaughter, consisting of 750 fecal droppings and 60 ceca at slaughter. Overall Campylobacter prevalence was 55.9%. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) confirmed 72.3% of all isolates as C. coli, 5.3% as C. jejuni, 10.6% as both, and 11.9% as other Campylobacter spp. PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism of the flaA gene subtyping detected 70 types—62 for C. coli and 8 for C. jejuni isolates—with most (80%) of flaA-types constituting farm homogeneous groups. Multilocus sequence typing of 99 selected Campylobacter isolates resulted in 23 sequence types (STs), consisting of 8 STs for C. jejuni and 15 STs for C. coli isolates. Six novel STs—four for C. jejuni and two—for C. coli, were detected. In a subset of isolates (n=98) tested for antimicrobial resistance, the most common resistance was to tetracycline (95%), followed by azithromycin (43%), while 42% and 18% of the isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and erythromycin, respectively. All isolates were susceptible to florfenicol. C. coli isolates displayed a higher proportion of resistance than C. jejuni to most antimicrobials. This study highlights the high prevalence, genotypic diversity, and antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter spp. in commercial turkey from farm to slaughter. PMID:25184688

  8. Molecular prevalence and genotyping of Chlamydia spp. in wild birds from South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Jipseol; An, Injung; Oem, Jae-Ku; Wang, Seung-Jun; Kim, Yongkwan; Shin, Jeong-Hwa; Woo, Chanjin; Kim, Youngsik; Jo, Seong-Deok; Son, Kidong; Lee, Saemi; Jheong, Weonhwa

    2017-07-07

    Wild birds are reservoirs for Chlamydia spp. Of the total 225 samples from wild birds during January to September 2016 in Korea, 4 (1.8%) and 2 (0.9%) showed positive for Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia gallinacea, respectively. Phylogenetic analyses and comparisons of sequence identities for outer-membrane protein A (ompA) revealed that Korean C. psittaci fall into three previously known genotypes; genotype E, 1V and 6N, whereas the Korean C. gallinacea were classified as new variants of C. gallinacea. Our study demonstrates that wild birds in South Korea carry at least two Chlamydia species: C. psittaci and C. gallinacea, and provides new information on the epidemiology of avian chlamydiosis in wild birds.

  9. Reaction of genotypes of lulo (Solanum quitoense Lam. to Meloidogyne spp. under field conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Salazar-González

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In Colombia, root-knot nematodes Meloidog yne spp. are considered as one of the main constraints in lulo crop production . These nematodes can cause root damage resulting in low production. The aim of this study was to evaluate under field conditions the reaction of 16 genotypes of lulo, Solanum quitoense Lam. (Solanaceae, of the Castilla variety and the species S. hirtum Vahl., previously selected in a greenhouse experiment and categorized as moderately resistant and resistant to the attack by Meloidog yne sp. A chemical treatment and a control treatment, the latter based on the most susceptible genotype in greenhouse experiments were also included. The experiment was conducted in a lulo grove naturally infested with root-knot nematodes under a randomized complete block design with three replications and nine plants per experimental unit. The response variables were incidence, severity and yield. The incidence was higher than 80 % in all cases, but the severity varied because of their genetic condition; BR03 and BR01 being genotypes with lower rates of severity, with values of 1.0 % and 0.8 %, respectively. The yield analysis of variance showed significant differences, indicating that genotypes SQBR01 and SQLF04, reached the highest values with 4.77 and 4.74 t/ha in a total of three harvests.

  10. Development of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius,1889 biotype B on Lycopersicon spp. genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilene Fancelli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Whiteflies are phytophagous insects, whose nymphs and adults suck the phloem sap, causing direct damage due to host plant weakness. In tomato (Lycopersicon spp. crops, they are important vectors of limiting fitoviruses. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of Lycopersicon spp. genotypes on Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius, 1889 biotype B development under greenhouse conditions. The evaluated genotypes were LA462 (L. peruvianum, LA716 (L. pennellii, LA1584 (L. pimpinellifolium, LA1609 (L. peruvianum, LA1739 (L. hirsutum, P25 (L. esculentum, PI134417 (L. hirsutum f. glabratum and Santa Clara (L. esculentum. LA716 was non-preferred for oviposition by the whitefly, which suggests an antixenotic effect. LA1584 showed an antibiotic resistance because nymphal survival was reduced and nymphal developmental time was increased. Antixenotic resistance was observed in LA1739 and PI134417, based on a reduction of oviposition. PI134417 also reduced nymphal survival, which suggests an antibiotic effect, but LA1739 was suitable for insect development. LA1609 was highly preferred for oviposition, however it reduced insect survival. P25 and Santa Clara (L. esculentum were highly preferred for oviposition.

  11. Cryptosporidium varanii infection in leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) in Argentina

    OpenAIRE

    A. Dellarupe; J.M. Unzaga; G. Moré; M. Kienast; A. Larsen; C. Stiebel; M. Rambeaud; M.C. Venturini

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is observed in reptiles with high morbidity and considerable mortality. The objective of this study was to achieve the molecular identification of Cryptosporidium spp. in pet leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) from a breeder colony in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Oocysts comparable to those of Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in three geckos with a history of diarrhea, anorexia and cachexia. Molecular identification methods confirmed the presence of Cryptosporidium varani...

  12. Detection and Genotyping of Leuconostoc spp. in a Sausage Processing Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla-Frausto, J J; Cepeda-Marquez, L G; Salgado, L M; Iturriaga, M H; Arvizu-Medrano, S M

    2015-12-01

    Some Leuconostoc spp. have the ability to produce slime and undesirable compounds in cooked sausage. The objectives of this research were to identify Leuconostoc sources in a Vienna-type sausage processing plant and to evaluate the genetic diversity of the isolated strains. Three hundred and two samples of sausage batter, sausages during processing, spoiled sausage, equipment surfaces, chilling brine, workers' gloves and aprons, and used casings were collected (March to November 2008 and February to April 2010) from a sausage processing plant. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were quantified, and Leuconostoc were detected using PCR. Strains were isolated and identified in Leuconostoc-positive samples. Leuconostoc strains were genotyped using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. LAB content of nonspoiled and spoiled sausage ranged from sausages showed the same genotype. One L. lactis genotype included strains isolated from spoiled sausages analyzed in April 2008 and March to April 2010. Equipment and conveyor belts constitute Leuconostoc contamination sources. Leuconostoc persistence in the sausage processing environment and in the final product suggests the existence of microbial reservoirs, possibly on equipment surfaces.

  13. A novel photoinduced electron transfer (PET) primer technique for rapid real-time PCR detection of Cryptosporidium spp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jothikumar, N., E-mail: jin2@cdc.gov; Hill, Vincent R.

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •Uses a single-labeled fluorescent primer for real-time PCR. •The detection sensitivity of PET PCR was comparable to TaqMan PCR. •Melt curve analysis can be performed to confirm target amplicon production. •Conventional PCR primers can be converted to PET PCR primers. -- Abstract: We report the development of a fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide primer that can be used to monitor real-time PCR. The primer has two parts, the 3′-end of the primer is complimentary to the target and a universal 17-mer stem loop at the 5′-end forms a hairpin structure. A fluorescent dye is attached to 5′-end of either the forward or reverse primer. The presence of guanosine residues at the first and second position of the 3′ dangling end effectively quenches the fluorescence due to the photo electron transfer (PET) mechanism. During the synthesis of nucleic acid, the hairpin structure is linearized and the fluorescence of the incorporated primer increases several-fold due to release of the fluorescently labeled tail and the absence of guanosine quenching. As amplicons are synthesized during nucleic acid amplification, the fluorescence increase in the reaction mixture can be measured with commercially available real-time PCR instruments. In addition, a melting procedure can be performed to denature the double-stranded amplicons, thereby generating fluorescence peaks that can differentiate primer dimers and other non-specific amplicons if formed during the reaction. We demonstrated the application of PET-PCR for the rapid detection and quantification of Cryptosporidium parvum DNA. Comparison with a previously published TaqMan® assay demonstrated that the two real-time PCR assays exhibited similar sensitivity for a dynamic range of detection of 6000–0.6 oocysts per reaction. PET PCR primers are simple to design and less-expensive than dual-labeled probe PCR methods, and should be of interest for use by laboratories operating in resource

  14. Genotyping of Indian antigenic, vaccine, and field Brucella spp. using multilocus sequence typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shome, Rajeswari; Krithiga, Natesan; Shankaranarayana, Padmashree B; Jegadesan, Sankarasubramanian; Udayakumar S, Vishnu; Shome, Bibek Ranjan; Saikia, Girin Kumar; Sharma, Narendra Kumar; Chauhan, Harshad; Chandel, Bharat Singh; Jeyaprakash, Rajendhran; Rahman, Habibur

    2016-03-31

    Brucellosis is one of the most important zoonotic diseases that affects multiple livestock species and causes great economic losses. The highly conserved genomes of Brucella, with > 90% homology among species, makes it important to study the genetic diversity circulating in the country. A total of 26 Brucella spp. (4 reference strains and 22 field isolates) and 1 B. melitensis draft genome sequence from India (B. melitensis Bm IND1) were included for sequence typing. The field isolates were identified by biochemical tests and confirmed by both conventional and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) targeting bcsp 31Brucella genus-specific marker. Brucella speciation and biotyping was done by Bruce ladder, probe qPCR, and AMOS PCRs, respectively, and genotyping was done by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). The MLST typing of 27 Brucella spp. revealed five distinct sequence types (STs); the B. abortus S99 reference strain and 21 B. abortus field isolates belonged to ST1. On the other hand, the vaccine strain B. abortus S19 was genotyped as ST5. Similarly, B. melitensis 16M reference strain and one B. melitensis field isolate were grouped into ST7. Another B. melitensis field isolate belonged to ST8 (draft genome sequence from India), and only B. suis 1330 reference strain was found to be ST14. The sequences revealed genetic similarity of the Indian strains to the global reference and field strains. The study highlights the usefulness of MLST for typing of field isolates and validation of reference strains used for diagnosis and vaccination against brucellosis.

  15. Identification of Cryptosporidiumspecies and genotypes in dairy cattle in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Medeiros Paz e Silva

    Full Text Available In this study, we identified Cryptosporidium species and genotypes present in dairy cattle in the central region of São Paulo state, Brazil. Fecal specimens were collected from 200 animals (100 calves and 100 cows in ten dairy farms. Fecal samples were examined using microscopic examination (ME, enzyme immunoassay (EIA and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Cryptosporidiumspecies and genotypes were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP or DNA sequencing analysis of the SSU-rRNA and GP60 genes. The occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. infection was 14% (28/200. The occurrence in calves (26% was significantly higher than in cows (2%. Of the 27 Cryptosporidium-positive specimens submitted to genotyping, C. andersoni was identified in 23 (85.1%, C. bovis in three (11.1%, and the zoonotic C. parvum subtype IIaA15G2R1 in one (3.7%. The study demonstrates thatCryptosporidium spp. infection was common and widespread in dairy cattle in this region and that calves have a high prevalence of C. andersoni. Furthermore, the presence of C. parvumsubtype IIaA15G2R1 indicates that dairy calves from this region should be considered a potential source of zoonotic Cryptosporidiumoocysts.

  16. Genomic Variation in IbA10G2 and Other Patient-Derived Cryptosporidium hominis Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Per; Andersson, Sofia; Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga; Hallström, Björn; Alsmark, Cecilia; Troell, Karin; Beser, Jessica; Arrighi, Romanico B G

    2017-03-01

    In order to improve genotyping and epidemiological analysis of Cryptosporidium spp., genomic data need to be generated directly from a broad range of clinical specimens. Utilizing a robust method that we developed for the purification and generation of amplified target DNA, we present its application for the successful isolation and whole-genome sequencing of 14 different Cryptosporidium hominis patient specimens. Six isolates of subtype IbA10G2 were analyzed together with a single representative each of 8 other subtypes: IaA20R3, IaA23R3, IbA9G3, IbA13G3, IdA14, IeA11G3T3, IfA12G1, and IkA18G1. Parasite burden was measured over a range of more than 2 orders of magnitude for all samples, while the genomes were sequenced to mean depths of between 17× and 490× coverage. Sequence homology-based functional annotation identified several genes of interest, including the gene encoding Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein 9 (COWP9), which presented a predicted loss-of-function mutation in all the sequence subtypes, except for that seen with IbA10G2, which has a sequence identical to the Cryptosporidium parvum reference Iowa II sequence. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis showed that all the IbA10G2 genomes form a monophyletic clade in the C. hominis tree as expected and yet display some heterogeneity within the IbA10G2 subtype. The current report validates the aforementioned method for isolating and sequencing Cryptosporidium directly from clinical stool samples. In addition, the analysis demonstrates the potential in mining data generated from sequencing multiple whole genomes of Cryptosporidium from human fecal samples, while alluding to the potential for a higher degree of genotyping within Cryptosporidium epidemiology. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Cryptosporidium enteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be effective. If you have a weakened immune system, ask your provider if you need to boil your water. Alternative Names Cryptosporidiosis Images Cryptosporidium, organism Digestive system organs References Huston CD. Intestinal protozoa. In: ...

  18. Acción de distintos coagulantes para la eliminación de Cryptosporidium spp. en el proceso de potabilización del agua The action of different coagulants to remove Cryptosporidium during the process of water treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Abramovich

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium es uno de los microorganismos de mayor interés desde el punto de vista de la Salud Pública y constituye un problema prioritario para las plantas y organismos reguladores de agua. Debido a su pequeño tamaño y a su resistencia a la cloración, la eliminación por el proceso de potabilización es una tarea compleja. En este trabajo se analizó la efectividad de distintos coagulantes utilizados comúnmente en tal proceso para lograr la remoción de los ooquistes. Se trabajó con la prueba de jarras (Jar Test. Se halló que: 1 Los coagulantes con agregado de polímeros coadyuvantes producen remociones de ooquistes superiores a 2 log. 2 Un valor bajo de turbiedad no asegura una remoción óptima de los parásitos. 3 La adición de polielectrolitos al cloruro férrico disminuye la variabilidad tanto en la turbiedad final como en la eliminación de Cryptosporidium.Cryptosporidium is one of the microorganisms of main concern from the point of view of Public Health, being a priority problem for water treatment plants and water regulatory institutions. Due to its small size and resistance to chlorination, Cryptosporidium removal during the process of drinking water treatmentis a hard task. The effectiveness of different coagulants commonly used in the process of removal of oocysts was analyzed. Thetechnique used was the Jar Test. It was found that: 1 coagulants with the addition of polimeric coadjuvants produce over 2 logs of oocyst removal; 2 a low value in turbidity does not necessarily mean optimal parasite removal, and 3 the addition of polyelectrolites to ferric chloride diminishes variability, both in final turbidity and Cryptosporidium removal.

  19. Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia duodenalis, Enterocytozoon bieneusi and other intestinal parasites in young children in Lobata province, Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Principe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luísa Lobo

    Full Text Available Rare systemic studies concerning prevalence of intestinal parasites in children have been conducted in the second smallest country in Africa, the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe. Fecal specimens from 348 children (214 in-hospital attending the Aires de Menezes Hospital and 134 from Agostinho Neto village in São Tome Island were studied by parasitological and molecular methods. Of the 134 children from Agostinho Neto, 52.2% presented intestinal parasites. 32.1% and 20.2% of these children had monoparasitism and polyparasitism, respectively. Ascaris lumbricoides (27.6%, G. duodenalis (7.5%, T. trichiura (4.5% and Entamoeba coli (10.5% were the more frequent species identified in the children of this village. Giardia duodenalis (7.5% and E. bieneusi (5.2% were identified by PCR. Nested-PCR targeting G. duodenalis TPI identified Assemblage A (60% and Assemblage B (40%. The E. bieneusi ITS-based sequence identified genotypes K (57.1%, KIN1 (28.6% and KIN3 (14.3%. Among the 214 in-hospital children, 29.4% presented intestinal parasites. In 22.4% and 7.0% of the parasitized children, respectively, one or more species were concurrently detected. By microscopy, A. lumbricoides (10.3% and Trichiuris trichiura (6.5% were the most prevalent species among these children, and Cryptosporidium was detected by PCR in 8.9% of children. GP60 locus analysis identified 6.5% of C. hominis (subtypes IaA27R3 [35.7%], IaA23R3 [14.3%], IeA11G3T3 [28.6%] and IeA11G3T3R1 [21.4%] and 2.3% of C. parvum (subtypes IIaA16G2R1 [20.0%], IIaA15G2R1 [20.0%], IIdA26G1 [40.0%] and IIdA21G1a [20.0%]. G. duodenalis and E. bieneusi were identified in 0.5% and 8.9% of the in-hospital children, respectively. G. duodenalis Assemblage B was characterized. The E. bieneusi genotypes K (52.6%, D (26.4%, A (10.5% and KIN1 (10.5% were identified. Although further studies are required to clarify the epidemiology of these infectious diseases in this endemic region the significance

  20. Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia duodenalis, Enterocytozoon bieneusi and other intestinal parasites in young children in Lobata province, Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Principe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Maria Luísa; Augusto, João; Antunes, Francisco; Ceita, José; Xiao, Lihua; Codices, Vera; Matos, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Rare systemic studies concerning prevalence of intestinal parasites in children have been conducted in the second smallest country in Africa, the Democratic Republic of São Tomé and Príncipe. Fecal specimens from 348 children (214 in-hospital attending the Aires de Menezes Hospital and 134 from Agostinho Neto village) in São Tome Island were studied by parasitological and molecular methods. Of the 134 children from Agostinho Neto, 52.2% presented intestinal parasites. 32.1% and 20.2% of these children had monoparasitism and polyparasitism, respectively. Ascaris lumbricoides (27.6%), G. duodenalis (7.5%), T. trichiura (4.5%) and Entamoeba coli (10.5%) were the more frequent species identified in the children of this village. Giardia duodenalis (7.5%) and E. bieneusi (5.2%) were identified by PCR. Nested-PCR targeting G. duodenalis TPI identified Assemblage A (60%) and Assemblage B (40%). The E. bieneusi ITS-based sequence identified genotypes K (57.1%), KIN1 (28.6%) and KIN3 (14.3%). Among the 214 in-hospital children, 29.4% presented intestinal parasites. In 22.4% and 7.0% of the parasitized children, respectively, one or more species were concurrently detected. By microscopy, A. lumbricoides (10.3%) and Trichiuris trichiura (6.5%) were the most prevalent species among these children, and Cryptosporidium was detected by PCR in 8.9% of children. GP60 locus analysis identified 6.5% of C. hominis (subtypes IaA27R3 [35.7%], IaA23R3 [14.3%], IeA11G3T3 [28.6%] and IeA11G3T3R1 [21.4%]) and 2.3% of C. parvum (subtypes IIaA16G2R1 [20.0%], IIaA15G2R1 [20.0%], IIdA26G1 [40.0%] and IIdA21G1a [20.0%]). G. duodenalis and E. bieneusi were identified in 0.5% and 8.9% of the in-hospital children, respectively. G. duodenalis Assemblage B was characterized. The E. bieneusi genotypes K (52.6%), D (26.4%), A (10.5%) and KIN1 (10.5%) were identified. Although further studies are required to clarify the epidemiology of these infectious diseases in this endemic region the significance

  1. Detection and Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium Species in Recreational Waters of Chaharmahal va Bakhtiyari Province of Iran Using Nested-PCR-RFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Manouchehri Naeini

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to detect and characterize Cryptosporidium spp. in water sam­ples collected from recreational ponds of Chaharmahal va Bakhtiyari Province of Iran .Meth­ods: Thirty water samples were collected from November 2009 to May 2010. Each sample con­tained 10 liters of water. We used the SSU rRNA-based PCR-RFLP technique.Results: Out of thirty samples examined, 6 (20% were positive for different Cryptosporidium spp. Restriction pattern analysis showed that C. parvum has been the most prevalent genotype, fol­lowed by C. hominis and C. canis , respectively. In this area, the higher prevalence of C. par­vum compared with other genotypes is consistent with the distribution of cattle.Conclusion: Farm animals, particularly cattle are the main source of cryptosporidial contamina­tion for recreational waters in this area.

  2. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Genotypic Characteristic of Campylobacter spp. Isolates from Free-Living Birds in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawiec, Marta; Woźniak-Biel, Anna; Bednarski, Michał; Wieliczko, Alina

    2017-11-01

    Campylobacter spp. is the most commonly reported, bacterial cause of human foodborne infection worldwide. Commercial poultry and free-living birds are natural reservoirs of three particular species: Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, and Campylobacter lari. The aim of this study was to determine the genotypic characteristics and antibiotic susceptibility of 43 Campylobacter strains, obtained from free-living birds, in Poland. In total, 700 birds were examined. The strains were isolated from 43 birds (6.14%) from the feces of 7 wild bird species: Mallard ducks Anas platyrhynchos (29 positive/121 tested), great cormorants Phalacrocorax carbo (5/77), velvet scoters Melanitta fusca (4/30), tawny owls Strix aluco (2/5), common buzzard Buteo buteo (1/3), rook Corvus frugilegus (1/6), and Eurasian tree sparrow Passer montanus (1/30). Thirty-eight (88.37%) of obtained strains belonged to C. jejuni and five (11.63%) to C. coli. Other 428 examined birds from different bird species were Campylobacter negative. The antimicrobial susceptibility to nine antimicrobials was also studied in investigated isolates of Campylobacter spp. Sixteen of the examined strains (37.21% of all positive samples) showed susceptibility to all of the nine antimicrobials. Moreover, the prevalence of selected virulence genes, such as flaA, cadF, ceuE, virB11, cdtA, cdtB, and cdtC were all analyzed. The virulence gene that was found most frequently in total number of Campylobacter strains was ceuE (72.10%) and other genes, such as flaA, cadF, cdtA, cdtB, and cdtC, were found in over 60% of all examined strains. Variable antimicrobial susceptibility and the presence of different virulence genes of examined strains, isolated from free-living birds, suggest that special attention should be given to wild birds and any potential approaches to the control of antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter should be discussed.

  3. Molecular characterization and epidemiological investigation of Cryptosporidium hominis IkA18G1 and C. hominis monkey genotype IiA17, two unusual subtypes diagnosed in Swedish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebbad, Marianne; Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga; Insulander, Mona; Beser, Jessica

    2018-03-06

    Cryptosporidium hominis is considered a strictly human-adapted species, and it is only occasionally diagnosed in animals. However, two variants, C. hominis monkey genotype and C. hominis Ik, were originally described in non-human hosts, monkeys and horses, respectively. During a Swedish national Cryptosporidium study, where all samples were analyzed at the small subunit rRNA and the 60 kDa (gp60) glycoprotein loci, we identified two patients infected with C. hominis monkey genotype (subtype IiA17) and two infected with C. hominis subtype IkA18G1. The isolates were further analyzed at the actin and the 70 kDa heat shock protein loci, and these analyses showed that these two subtype families are closely related to each other and to human-adapted C. hominis as well as to Cryptosporidium cuniculus. The two patients with C. hominis monkey genotype infection (a father and son) had visited a monkey farm in Thailand prior to infection, while the two cases with C. hominis Ik were unrelated, both probably infected in Sweden. This is the first time that a monkey genotype infection in humans has been related to contact with monkeys and where the gp60 subtype was identified. It is also the first time that human infection caused by C. hominis subtype Ik is described. Even though we were not able to detect any parasites in the animal samples, zoonotic transmission cannot be ruled out in any of these cases because both subtype families are regarded as animal adapted. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lab on a chip genotyping for Brucella spp. based on 15-loci multi locus VNTR analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianelli Cinzia

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucellosis is an important zoonosis caused by the genus Brucella. In addition Brucella represents potential biological warfare agents due to the high contagious rates for humans and animals. Therefore, the strain typing epidemiological tool may be crucial for tracing back source of infection in outbreaks and discriminating naturally occurring outbreaks versus bioterroristic event. A Multiple Locus Variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR Analysis (MLVA assay based on 15 polymorphic markers was previously described. The obtained MLVA band profiles may be resolved by techniques ranging from low cost manual agarose gels to the more expensive capillary electrophoresis sequencing. In this paper a rapid, accurate and reproducible system, based on the Lab on a chip technology was set up for Brucella spp. genotyping. Results Seventeen DNA samples of Brucella strains isolated in Sicily, previously genotyped, and twelve DNA samples, provided by MLVA Brucella VNTR ring trial, were analyzed by MLVA-15 on Agilent 2100. The DNA fragment sizes produced by Agilent, compared with those expected, showed discrepancies; therefore, in order to assign the correct alleles to the Agilent DNA fragment sizes, a conversion table was produced. In order to validate the system twelve unknown DNA samples were analyzed by this method obtaining a full concordance with the VNTR ring trial results. Conclusion In this paper we described a rapid and specific detection method for the characterization of Brucella isolates. The comparison of the MLVA typing data produced by Agilent system with the data obtained by standard sequencing or ethidium bromide slab gel electrophoresis showed a general concordance of the results. Therefore this platform represents a fair compromise among costs, speed and specificity compared to any conventional molecular typing technique.

  5. Common occurrence of a unique Cryptosporidium ryanae variant in zebu cattle and water buffaloes in the buffer zone of the Chitwan National Park, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yaoyu; Karna, Sandeep Raj; Dearen, Theresa K; Singh, Dinesh Kumar; Adhikari, Lekh Nath; Shrestha, Aruna; Xiao, Lihua

    2012-04-30

    There are very few studies on the diversity and public health significance of Cryptosporidium species in zebu cattle and water buffaloes in developing countries. In this study, PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and DNA sequence analyses of the small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene were used to genotype Cryptosporidium specimens from 12 zebu cattle calves, 16 water buffalo calves, and four swamp deer (Cervus duvaucelii) collected from the buffer zone of the Chitwan National Park, Nepal. All Cryptosporidium specimens from cattle and buffaloes belonged to Cryptosporidium ryanae, whereas those from deer belonged to Cryptosporidium ubiquitum. Comparison of the SSU rRNA gene sequences obtained with those from earlier studies has identified a nucleotide substitution unique to all C. ryanae isolates from Nepal, in addition to some sequence heterogeneity among different copies of the gene. The finding of the dominance of a unique C. ryanae variant in both zebu cattle and water buffaloes in Nepal indicates that there is unique cryptosporidiosis transmission in bovine animals in the study area, and cross-species transmission of some Cryptosporidium spp. can occur between related animal species sharing the same habitats. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. UV Inactivation of Cryptosporidium hominis as Measured in Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Anne M.; Linden, Karl; Ciociola, Kristina M.; De Leon, Ricardo; Widmer, Giovanni; Rochelle, Paul A.

    2005-01-01

    The Cryptosporidium spp. UV disinfection studies conducted to date have used Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. However, Cryptosporidium hominis predominates in human cryptosporidiosis infections, so there is a critical need to assess the efficacy of UV disinfection of C. hominis. This study utilized cell culture-based methods to demonstrate that C. hominis oocysts displayed similar levels of infectivity and had the same sensitivity to UV light as C. parvum. Therefore, the water industry can be ...

  7. Clonal diversity and population genetic structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (Glomus spp.) studied by multilocus genotyping of single spores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtgrewe-Stukenbrock, Eva; Rosendahl, Søren

    2005-01-01

    A nested multiplex PCR (polymerase chain reaction) approach was used for multilocus genotyping of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal populations. This method allowed us to amplify multiple loci from Glomus single spores in a single PCR amplification. Variable introns in the two protein coding genes Gm......FOX2 and GmTOR2 were applied as codominant genetic markers together with the LSU rDNA.   Genetic structure of Glomus spp. populations from an organically and a conventionally cultured field were compared by hierarchical sampling of spores from four plots in each field. Multilocus genotypes were...

  8. MLST Genotypes and Antibiotic Resistance of Campylobacter spp. Isolated from Poultry in Grenada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Diana; Davis, Margaret; Baker, Katherine; Besser, Tom; Roopnarine, Rohini; Sharma, Ravindra

    2013-01-01

    This study determined whether multilocus sequence types (MLST) of Campylobacter from poultry in 2 farms in Grenada, West Indies, differed by farm, antimicrobial resistance and farm antibiotic use. Farm A used fluoroquinolones in the water and Farm B used tetracyclines. The E-test was used to determine resistance of isolates to seven antibiotics. PCR of the IpxA gene confirmed species and MLST was used to characterize 38 isolates. All isolates were either C. jejuni or C. coli. Farm antibiotic use directly correlated with antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter isolates. Almost 80% of the isolates from Farm A were fluoroquinolone resistant and 17.9% of the isolates from Farm B were fluoroquinolone resistant. All Campylobacter isolates from Farm A were tetracycline sensitive, whereas 35.7% of isolates from Farm B were tetracycline resistant. Six previously recognized sequence types (STs) and 2 novel STs were identified. Previously recognized STs were those overwhelmingly reported from poultry and humans globally. Isolates with the same ST did not always have the same antibiotic resistance profile. There was little ST overlap between the farms suggesting that within-farm transmission of Campylobacter genotypes may dominate. MLST typing was useful for tracking Campylobacter spp. among poultry units and can help elucidate Campylobacter host-species population structure and its relevance to human health. PMID:23555097

  9. MLST genotypes and antibiotic resistance of Campylobacter spp. isolated from poultry in Grenada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Diana; Davis, Margaret; Baker, Katherine; Besser, Tom; Roopnarine, Rohini; Sharma, Ravindra

    2013-01-01

    This study determined whether multilocus sequence types (MLST) of Campylobacter from poultry in 2 farms in Grenada, West Indies, differed by farm, antimicrobial resistance and farm antibiotic use. Farm A used fluoroquinolones in the water and Farm B used tetracyclines. The E-test was used to determine resistance of isolates to seven antibiotics. PCR of the IpxA gene confirmed species and MLST was used to characterize 38 isolates. All isolates were either C. jejuni or C. coli. Farm antibiotic use directly correlated with antimicrobial resistance of Campylobacter isolates. Almost 80% of the isolates from Farm A were fluoroquinolone resistant and 17.9% of the isolates from Farm B were fluoroquinolone resistant. All Campylobacter isolates from Farm A were tetracycline sensitive, whereas 35.7% of isolates from Farm B were tetracycline resistant. Six previously recognized sequence types (STs) and 2 novel STs were identified. Previously recognized STs were those overwhelmingly reported from poultry and humans globally. Isolates with the same ST did not always have the same antibiotic resistance profile. There was little ST overlap between the farms suggesting that within-farm transmission of Campylobacter genotypes may dominate. MLST typing was useful for tracking Campylobacter spp. among poultry units and can help elucidate Campylobacter host-species population structure and its relevance to human health.

  10. Identification, antimicrobial resistance and genotypic characterization of Enterococcus spp. isolated in Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Eduardo André; de Freitas, Ana Lúcia Peixoto; Reiter, Keli Cristine; Lutz, Larissa; Barth, Afonso Luís

    2009-01-01

    In the past two decades the members of the genus Enterococcus have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens worldwide. In the present study, we evaluated the antimicrobial resistance and genotypic characteristics of 203 Enterococcus spp. recovered from different clinical sources from two hospitals in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The species were identified by conventional biochemical tests and by an automated system. The genetic diversity of E. faecalis presenting high-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR) was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA after SmaI digestion. The E. faecalis was the most frequent specie (93.6%), followed by E. faecium (4.4%). The antimicrobial resistance profile was: 2.5% to ampicillin, 0.5% to vancomycin, 0.5% teicoplanin, 33% to chloramphenicol, 2% to nitrofurantoin, 66.1% to erythromycin, 66.5% to tetracycline, 24.6% to rifampicin, 30% to ciprofloxacin and 87.2% to quinupristin-dalfopristin. A total of 10.3% of the isolates proved to be HLAR to both gentamicin and streptomycin (HLR-ST/GE), with 23.6% resistant only to gentamicin (HLR-GE) and 37.4% only to streptomycin (HLR-ST). One predominant clonal group was found among E. faecalis HLR-GE/ST. The prevalence of resistance among beta-lactam antibiotics and glycopeptides was very low. However, in this study there was an increased number of HLR Enterococcus which may be spreading intra and inter-hospital. PMID:24031416

  11. Subtype Analysis of Cryptosporidium Specimens from Sporadic Cases in Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, and Iowa in 2007: Widespread Occurrence of One Cryptosporidium hominis Subtype and Case History of an Infection with the Cryptosporidium Horse Genotype▿

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Lihua; Hlavsa, Michele C.; Yoder, Jonathan; Ewers, Christina; Dearen, Theresa; Yang, Wenli; Nett, Randall; Harris, Stephanie; Brend, Sarah M.; Harris, Meghan; Onischuk, Lisa; Valderrama, Amy L.; Cosgrove, Shaun; Xavier, Karen; Hall, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Subtyping was conducted in late 2007 on 57 Cryptosporidium specimens from sporadic cases in Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, and Iowa. One previously rare Cryptosporidium hominis subtype was indentified in 40 cases (70%) from all four states, and the Cryptosporidium horse genotype was identified in a pet shop employee with severe clinical symptoms.

  12. Improving the genotyping resolution of Cryptosporidium hominis subtype IbA10G2 using one step PCR-based amplicon sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beser, Jessica; Hallström, Björn M; Advani, Abdolreza; Andersson, Sofia; Östlund, Gabriel; Winiecka-Krusnell, Jadwiga; Lebbad, Marianne; Alm, Erik; Troell, Karin; Arrighi, Romanico B G

    2017-11-01

    Cryptosporidium hominis gp60 subtype IbA10G2 is a common cause of cryptosporidiosis. This subtype is responsible for many waterborne outbreaks as well as sporadic cases and is considered virulent and highly important in the epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis. Due to low heterogeneity within the genome of C. hominis it has been difficult to identify epidemiological markers with higher resolution than gp60. However, new markers are required in order to improve outbreak investigations and studies of the transmission dynamics of this clinically important subtype. Based on the whole genome sequences of 17 C. hominis isolates, we have identified several differential loci and developed a new sequence based typing panel with higher resolution than gp60. An amplicon sequencing method was also developed which is based on a one-step PCR which can be sequenced using a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) platform. Such a system provides a rapid and high-throughput workflow. A panel of nine loci with 10 single nucleotide variants (SNV) was selected and evaluated using clinical IbA10G2 isolates from sporadic, cluster and outbreak associated cases. The specimens were separated into 10 different genetic profiles named sequence types (STs). All isolates within an outbreak or cluster belonged to the same ST, including several samples from the two large waterborne outbreaks which occurred in Sweden between 2010 and 2011 indicating that these outbreaks might be linked. The results demonstrate the methods suitability for improved genotyping of C. hominis IbA10G2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular characterization of Danish Cryptosporidium parvum isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Heidi L.; Ahrens, Peter; Juel, Cynthia Dawn

    2002-01-01

    The genetic polymorphism among 271 Danish Cryptosporidium isolates of human and animal origin was studied by partial amplification and sequencing of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene, the 18S rDNA, and a microsatellite locus.dagger Furthermore, the microsatellite locus was studied...... (P Cryptosporidium isolates of human origin the anthroponotic subgenotype H1 was identified, in addition to the zoonotic subgenotypes C1, C2, and C3. Of 44 human samples, 56.8% were anthroponotic, whereas 40.9% were zoonotic genotypes. One human isolate...... was characterized as C. meleagridis. The porcine Cryptosporidium isolates (N = 4) revealed a pattern which was genetically distinct from human and bovine isolates. Cryptosporidium in a hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus L.) was identified for the first time. By microsatellite sequencing the hedgehog isolate showed...

  14. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium identified in clinical samples from cities in Brazil and Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Helena Saramago Peralta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The identification and characterisation of Cryptosporidiumgenotypes and subtypes are fundamental to the study of cryptosporidiosis epidemiology, aiding in prevention and control strategies. The objective was to determine the genetic diversity ofCryptosporidium in samples obtained from hospitals of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. Samples were analysed by microscopy and TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays forCryptosporidium detection, genotyped by nested-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP analysis of the 18S rRNA gene and subtyped by DNA sequencing of the gp60 gene. Among the 89 samples from Rio de Janeiro, Cryptosporidium spp were detected in 26 by microscopy/TaqMan PCR. In samples from Buenos Aires,Cryptosporidium was diagnosed in 15 patients of the 132 studied. The TaqMan PCR and the nested-PCR-RFLP detected Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, and co-infections of both species. In Brazilian samples, the subtypes IbA10G2 and IIcA5G3 were observed. The subtypes found in Argentinean samples were IbA10G2, IaA10G1R4, IaA11G1R4, and IeA11G3T3, and mixed subtypes of Ia and IIa families were detected in the co-infections. C. hominis was the species more frequently detected, and subtype family Ib was reported in both countries. Subtype diversity was higher in Buenos Aires than in Rio de Janeiro and two new subtypes were described for the first time.

  15. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium identified in clinical samples from cities in Brazil and Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Regina Helena Saramago; Velásquez, Jorge Néstor; Cunha, Flavia de Souza; Pantano, María Laura; Sodré, Fernando Campos; da Silva, Sidnei; Astudillo, Osvaldo Germán; Peralta, José Mauro; Carnevale, Silvana

    2016-01-01

    The identification and characterisation of Cryptosporidiumgenotypes and subtypes are fundamental to the study of cryptosporidiosis epidemiology, aiding in prevention and control strategies. The objective was to determine the genetic diversity ofCryptosporidium in samples obtained from hospitals of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. Samples were analysed by microscopy and TaqMan polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays forCryptosporidium detection, genotyped by nested-PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the 18S rRNA gene and subtyped by DNA sequencing of the gp60 gene. Among the 89 samples from Rio de Janeiro, Cryptosporidium spp were detected in 26 by microscopy/TaqMan PCR. In samples from Buenos Aires,Cryptosporidium was diagnosed in 15 patients of the 132 studied. The TaqMan PCR and the nested-PCR-RFLP detected Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, and co-infections of both species. In Brazilian samples, the subtypes IbA10G2 and IIcA5G3 were observed. The subtypes found in Argentinean samples were IbA10G2, IaA10G1R4, IaA11G1R4, and IeA11G3T3, and mixed subtypes of Ia and IIa families were detected in the co-infections. C. hominis was the species more frequently detected, and subtype family Ib was reported in both countries. Subtype diversity was higher in Buenos Aires than in Rio de Janeiro and two new subtypes were described for the first time. PMID:26814641

  16. Cryptosporidium infection in cattle in Ogun state, Nigeria | Akinkuotu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. in cattle faeces in Ogun state, Nigeria was determined by a commercially produced enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Out of a total of 200 samples, 37.5% were positive for Cryptosporidium coproantigens. The highest rate of infection (78.1%) was observed in calves up to 3 ...

  17. Evaluation of Genetic Diversity of Iris Genotypes (Iris spp Using ISSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyedeh zeinab attari

    2017-02-01

    demonstrate that ISSR marker is a simple, informative, reproducible and suitable approach to evaluation of molecular diversity and phylogenetic relationships in Iris spp. The highest genetic similarity was between species Iris kopetdaghensis and Iris fosteriana. This study revealed a significant variation especially between Iris kopetdaghensis and Iris songarica. Conclusions: The results of cluster analysis showed that molecular markers able to identify the species and genotypes within a species from each other. Results of this study showed that the use of molecular markers in breeding programs, especially fingerprinting is useful for lily. ISSR molecular markers have proved to be an efficient tool for studying genetic diversity and management of lily germplasm. . Also the result showed these genotypes have high genetic diversity, and the success in Iris breeding programs use to recommend Iranian local Iris.

  18. Prevalence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) in Sichuan province, China

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Tao; Chen, Zuqin; Xie, Yue; Hou, Rong; Wu, Qidun; Gu, Xiaobing; Lai, Weiming; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2015-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidium spp. have been extensively reported to cause significant diarrheal disease in humans and domestic animals. On the contrary, little information is available on the prevalence and characterization of Cryptosporidium in wild animals in China, especially in giant pandas. The aim of the present study was to detect Cryptosporidium infections and identify Cryptosporidium species at the molecular level in both captive and wild giant pandas in Sichuan province, China. Findin...

  19. Soil and Rhizosphere Populations of Fusarium and Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Associated with Field-Grown Plants are Affected by Sorghum Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is valued for bioenergy, feed and food. Potential of sorghum genotypes to support differing populations of root- and soil-associated fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. or Fusarium spp., in two soils, was assessed. Pseudomonad and Fusarium numbers were assessed from ro...

  20. Soil and Root Populations of Fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. Associated with Seedlings and Field-grown Plants are Affected by Sorghum Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] is valued for bioenergy, feed and food. Aims: Potential of sorghum genotypes to support differing populations of root- and soil-associated fluorescent Pseudomonas spp. or Fusarium spp., in two soils, was assessed. Methods: Culturable pseudomonads were enumerated...

  1. Molecular characterization of bovine Cryptosporidium isolated from diarrheic calves in the Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Shahinaz; Elmalik, Khitma; Bangoura, Berit; Lendner, Matthias; Mossaad, Ehab; Daugschies, Arwid

    2017-11-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a common protozoan infection causing morbidity and mortality in young cattle and may be zoonotically transmitted to humans. So far, there is no data available on the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. in the Sudan. The aim of this study was to isolate, identify, and genotype Cryptosporidium oocysts sampled from diarrheic calves housed at different farms in three different municipalities in Khartoum State (Khartoum, Khartoum North, Omdurman). A total of 149 fecal samples were evaluated microscopically for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen staining method and 87 (58.3%) samples tested positive. Positive and negative samples were further analyzed by nested PCR targeting the SSU rRNA region. Positive samples were subjected to restriction enzyme analysis of PCR amplicons (PCR-RFLP). Nested PCR identified Cryptosporidium DNA in 53 samples (35.5%); restriction digestion of the PCR products revealed the presence of C. parvum (73.5%), C. ryanae (13.2%), C. andersoni (7.5%), and C. bovis (1.8%). Species distribution was clearly related to age with C. parvum being the predominant species in dysenteric pre-weaned calves. Sequencing of three genes (SSU rRNA, COWP, and GP60) for three C. parvum isolates originating from the three different municipalities showed that all belong to C. parvum subtype family IId. Based on data obtained by GP60, sequencing the two C. parvum isolates from Khartoum and Omdurman represent subtype IIdA18G1, whereas oocysts isolated in Khartoum North belong to subtype IIdA19G1. The observed genotypes are zoonotic and thus C. parvum in calves is potentially a health risk to humans in Khartoum State, Sudan. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported attempt to characterize Cryptosporidium isolated from cattle in the Sudan.

  2. Subtype analysis of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis isolates from humans and cattle in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazemalhosseini-Mojarad, Ehsan; Haghighi, Ali; Taghipour, Niloofar; Keshavarz, Akbar; Mohebi, Seyed Reza; Zali, Mohammad Reza; Xiao, Lihua

    2011-06-30

    Cryptosporidium is an intestinal parasite associated with severe acute diarrhea in humans and animals. To investigate subtypes of Cryptosporidium spp. isolated from humans and cattle in Iran, 47 Cryptosporidium parvum (22 from children and 25 from cattle) and three Cryptosporidium hominis from children were characterized by sequence analysis of the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Nine subtypes (two of C. hominis and seven of C. parvum) in four subtype families were identified. Cattle were mainly infected with C. parvum IIa subtypes and humans mostly with the C. parvum IIa and IId subtypes. Consequently, cattle could be a source of human infection with C. parvum IIa in Iran. However, the occurrence of subtype IId families in Iranian children, suggests that other infection sources might also be involved in C. parvum transmission. To our knowledge, this is the first published record and description of Cryptosporidium subtypes in Iran. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cryptosporidium infection in Brazil: implications for veterinary medicine and public health Infecção por Cryptosporidium no Brasil: implicações em medicina veterinária e em saúde pública

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Vasconcelos Meireles

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review paper is to report the results of cryptosporidiosis research in Brazil, mainly its occurrence in animals and implications for veterinary medicine and public health. An increasing number of papers related to Cryptosporidium spp. infection in Brazil are available at national and international literature. The main focus described in these papers is the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. in food, environmental samples, in humans and several animal species, particularly birds, cattle, dogs and cats. Using molecular biology techniques, most Cryptosporidium species and genotypes identified in other countries have been described in Brazil. In mammals, there are descriptions of infection by C. bovis, C. canis, C. felis, C. meleagridis, C. parvum, and the cervine genotype; in birds, the following species and genotypes have been described: C. baileyi, C. galli, C. meleagridis, C. parvum and the avian genotypes I, II and III. Several species have been described in humans, such as C. parvum, C. hominis, and some species adapted to animal hosts such as C. canis, C. felis and C. meleagridis.O objetivo deste trabalho foi relatar, por meio de revisão de literatura, os resultados de pesquisas sobre a criptosporidiose no Brasil, com ênfase em sua ocorrência em animais e suas implicações em medicina veterinária e em saúde pública. Um número crescente de trabalhos sobre a infecção por Cryptosporidium spp. no Brasil está disponível na literatura nacional e internacional. Nestes trabalhos, são abordados principalmente aspectos relacionados à ocorrência de Cryptosporidium spp. em alimentos, amostras ambientais, no homem e em diversas espécies animais, particularmente em aves, bovinos, cães e gatos. Por meio de técnicas de biologia molecular, a maioria das espécies e alguns genótipos identificados em outros países foram descritos no Brasil. Em mamíferos, houve identificação de C. bovis, C. canis, C. felis, C. meleagridis

  4. Cryptosporidium oocysts in Ghanaian AIDS patients with diarrhoea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Although Cryptosporidium spp. infections in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients (AIDS) with chronic diarrhoea have been reported in several African countries, there is no information regarding cryptosporidial diarrhoea in Ghanaian AIDS patients. Objective: To investigate the occurrence of C.

  5. Presencia de Giardia lamblia y Cryptosporidium spp. en aguas residuales depuradas reutilizadas para riego agrícola en la isla de Tenerife, España. Efectos del transporte a larga distancia sobre la calidad del agua reutilizada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Abreu Acosta

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available El empleo de aguas residuales depuradas para riego agrícola es la alternativa de reutilización con más relevancia hoy día, siempre y cuando se desarrolle con garantías sanitarias y medioambientales.Giardia lamblia y Cryptosporidium spp. son dos protozoos patógenos entéricos de amplia distribución ambiental, frecuentes en hábitats acuáticos. La investigación y detección de estos parásitos en aguas ha adquirido importancia en los últimos años debido a que poseen formas de dispersión resistentes a los tratamientos habituales, aplicados tanto en procesos de potabilización como de depuración, y a que han sido clasificados como patógenos emergentes causantes de importantes brotes de transmisión hídrica.En este trabajo se estudia la presencia de quistes de Giardia lamblia y ooquistes de Cryptosporidium spp. en el agua residual depurada de la ciudad de Santa Cruz de Tenerife que es transportada hasta el sur de la isla de Tenerife para su reutilización en agricultura. Asimismo se investiga el efecto del transporte, el almacenamiento y el tratamiento avanzado sobre la concentración de quistes y ooquistes a través del sistema, y la existencia de relaciones con otros parámetros bacteriológicos y físico-químicos.Los resultados obtenidos ponen de manifiesto comportamientos variables de los contenidos en quistes y ooquistes frente a los tratamientos aplicados, y el efecto depurador que el transporte a larga distancia, parece tener sobre el agua residual depurada.No se han encontrado relaciones entre las concentraciones de quistes y ooquistes en el agua residual depurada y el contenido de los indicadores tradicionales de contaminación fecal.

  6. Presencia de Giardia lamblia y Cryptosporidium spp. en aguas residuales depuradas reutilizadas para riego agrícola en la isla de Tenerife, España. Efectos del transporte a larga distancia sobre la calidad del agua reutilizada Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. Presence in treated wastewater reutilised for irrigation in Tenerife island, Spain. Long-distance transport effects in the reutilised water quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escolástico Aguiar González

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available El empleo de aguas residuales depuradas para riego agrícola es la alternativa de reutilización con más relevancia hoy día, siempre y cuando se desarrolle con garantías sanitarias y medioambientales.Giardia lamblia y Cryptosporidium spp. son dos protozoos patógenos entéricos de amplia distribución ambiental, frecuentes en hábitats acuáticos. La investigación y detección de estos parásitos en aguas ha adquirido importancia en los últimos años debido a que poseen formas de dispersión resistentes a los tratamientos habituales, aplicados tanto en procesos de potabilización como de depuración, y a que han sido clasificados como patógenos emergentes causantes de importantes brotes de transmisión hídrica.En este trabajo se estudia la presencia de quistes de Giardia lamblia y ooquistes de Cryptosporidium spp. en el agua residual depurada de la ciudad de Santa Cruz de Tenerife que es transportada hasta el sur de la isla de Tenerife para su reutilización en agricultura. Asimismo se investiga el efecto del transporte, el almacenamiento y el tratamiento avanzado sobre la concentración de quistes y ooquistes a través del sistema, y la existencia de relaciones con otros parámetros bacteriológicos y físico-químicos.Los resultados obtenidos ponen de manifiesto comportamientos variables de los contenidos en quistes y ooquistes frente a los tratamientos aplicados, y el efecto depurador que el transporte a larga distancia, parece tener sobre el agua residual depurada.No se han encontrado relaciones entre las concentraciones de quistes y ooquistes en el agua residual depurada y el contenido de los indicadores tradicionales de contaminación fecal.Treated wastewater use for irrigation is, nowadays, the more relevant reutilization alternative of wastewater, if it is developed with sanitary and environmental warranties.Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium spp. two wide distributed enteric pathogen protozoan, which are frequent in aquatic

  7. Seasonal prevalence and incidence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis and associated diarrhoea in children attending pre-schools in Kafue, Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwila, J.; Phiri, I.G.K.; Enemark, Heidi L.

    2011-01-01

    Prevalence, incidence and seasonal variation of Cryptosporidium and Giardia duodenalis were studied over a 12-month period in 100 children from four pre-schools in Kafue, Zambia. Questionnaire data and a single stool sample were collected monthly from each child. Samples were processed using...... a commercial kit (Meridian Diagnostics Inc., USA) and oo(cysts) visualised by immunofluorescence microscopy. Cryptosporidium was detected in 30.7% (241/786; 95% CI = 27.5-33.9) while G. duodenalis was detected in 29.0% (228/786; 95% CI = 25.8-32.2). A total of 86% experienced one or more episodes...... of cryptosporidiosis while 75% had giardiasis. Cumulative incidence per 100 children was 75.4 for Cryptosporidium and 49.0 for G. duodenalis. Both infections were significantly more common in the wet compared to the dry season (34.8%, 162/466 vs. 24.7%, 79/320, P = 0.003 and 35.2%, 164/466 vs. 20.0%, 64/320, P

  8. Cryptosporidium varanii infection in leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dellarupe

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis is observed in reptiles with high morbidity and considerable mortality. The objective of this study was to achieve the molecular identification of Cryptosporidium spp. in pet leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius from a breeder colony in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Oocysts comparable to those of Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in three geckos with a history of diarrhea, anorexia and cachexia. Molecular identification methods confirmed the presence of Cryptosporidium varanii (syn. C. saurophilum. This agent was considered to be the primary cause of the observed clinical disease. This is the first description of C. varanii infection in pet reptiles in Argentina.

  9. Cryptosporidium varanii infection in leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellarupe, A; Unzaga, J M; Moré, G; Kienast, M; Larsen, A; Stiebel, C; Rambeaud, M; Venturini, M C

    2016-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is observed in reptiles with high morbidity and considerable mortality. The objective of this study was to achieve the molecular identification of Cryptosporidium spp. in pet leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) from a breeder colony in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Oocysts comparable to those of Cryptosporidium spp. were detected in three geckos with a history of diarrhea, anorexia and cachexia. Molecular identification methods confirmed the presence of Cryptosporidium varanii (syn. C. saurophilum). This agent was considered to be the primary cause of the observed clinical disease. This is the first description of C. varanii infection in pet reptiles in Argentina.

  10. The potential of different lime tree (Tilia spp genotypes for phytoextraction of heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šijačić-Nikolić Mirjana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The research of heavy metals contents (Pb, Mn, Zn, Ni, Fe in soil in the area of the National Park „Fruška gora”, along the highway M21 shows lower values for manganese, zinc and iron than the maximum allowed quantity prescribed by law. For nickel and lead it shows higher values than maximum allowed quantity. The heavy metals contents in leaves of lime tree in 12 analyzed genotypes are far below average values in accordance with ECCE with all genotypes except genotype 7 for lead and genotypes 7 and 8 for iron. The results of analysis of variance components show that out of four components (locality, genotype, locality x genotype and error only the interaction between locality and genotype does not contribute to variance. The contents of Pb, Mn, Fe and Zn in leaves is primarily influenced by genotype while Ni contents may be considered a consequence of locality. The selection of genotypes which is able to uptake greater quantities of heavy metals than other genotypes may serve as a solid basis for phytoextraction of heavy metals as a technology by which heavy metals, metalloids and radionuclides are extracted from environment through usage of suitable species and plant genotypes able to uptake and accumulate the given pollutants in parts of plant tissue. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43007: Studying climate change and its influence on the environment: Impacts, adaptation and mitigation

  11. Cryptosporidium erinacei n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in hedgehogs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Hofmannová, L.; Hlásková, Lenka; Květoňová, Dana; Vitovec, J.; McEvoy, J.; Sak, Bohumil

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 201, 1-2 (2014), s. 9-17 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11061 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptosporidium erinacei * taxonomy * morphology * molecular analyses * transmission studies * Cryptosporidium hedgehog genotype Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.460, year: 2014

  12. Cryptosporidium avium n. sp (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in birds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holubová, Nikola; Sak, Bohumil; Horčičková, Michaela; Hlásková, Lenka; Květoňová, Dana; Menchaca, S.; McEvoy, J.; Kváč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 6 (2016), s. 2243-2251 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01090S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptosporidium avium * morphology * molecular analyses * transmission studies * Cryptosporidium avian genotype V Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.329, year: 2016

  13. The impact of cold on photosynthesis in genotypes of Coffea spp.--photosystem sensitivity, photoprotective mechanisms and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista-Santos, P; Lidon, F C; Fortunato, A; Leitão, A E; Lopes, E; Partelli, F; Ribeiro, A I; Ramalho, J C

    2011-05-15

    Environmental constraints disturb plant metabolism and are often associated with photosynthetic impairments and yield reductions. Among them, low positive temperatures are of up most importance in tropical plant species, namely in Coffea spp. in which some acclimation ability has been reported. To further explain cold tolerance, the impacts on photosynthetic functioning and the expression of photosynthetic-related genes were analyzed. The experiments were carried out along a period of slow cold imposition (to allow acclimation), after chilling (4°C) exposure and in the following rewarming period, using 1.5-year-old coffee seedlings of 5 genotypes with different cold sensitivity: Coffea canephora cv. Apoatã, Coffea arabica cv. Catuaí, Coffea dewevrei and 2 hybrids, Icatu (C. arabica×C. canephora) and Piatã (C. dewevrei×C. arabica). All genotypes suffered a significant leaf area loss only after chilling exposure, with Icatu showing the lowest impact, a first indication of a higher cold tolerance, contrasting with Apoatã and C. dewevrei. During cold exposure, net photosynthesis and Chl a fluorescence parameters were strongly affected in all genotypes, but stomatal limitations were not detected. However, the extent of mesophyll limitation, reflecting regulatory mechanisms and/or damage, was genotype dependent. Overnight retention of zeaxanthin was common to Coffea genotypes, but the accumulation of photoprotective pigments was highest in Icatu. That down-regulated photochemical events but efficiently protected the photosynthetic structures, as shown, e.g., by the lowest impacts on A(max) and PSI activity and the strongest reinforcement of PSII activity, the latter possibly reflecting the presence of a photoprotective cycle around PSII in Icatu (and Catuaí). Concomitant to these protection mechanisms, Icatu was the sole genotype to present simultaneous upregulation of caCP22, caPI and caCytf, related to, respectively, PSII, PSI and to the complex Cytb(6)/f

  14. Common occurrence of Cryptosporidium hominis in asymptomatic and symptomatic calves in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razakandrainibe, Romy; Diawara, El Hadji Ibrahima; Costa, Damien; Le Goff, Laetitia; Lemeteil, Denis; Ballet, Jean Jacques; Gargala, Gilles; Favennec, Loïc

    2018-03-29

    Cryptosporidium spp. are infections the most frequent parasitic cause of diarrhea in humans and cattle. However, asymptomatic cases are less often documented than symptomatic cases or cases with experimentally infected animals. Cryptosporidium (C.) hominis infection accounts for the majority of pediatric cases in several countries, while C. parvum is a major cause of diarrhea in neonatal calves. In cattle Cryptosporidium spp. infection can be caused by C. parvum, C. bovis, C.andersoni and C. ryanae, and recently, reports of cattle cases of C. hominis cryptosporidiosis cases suggest that the presence of C. hominis in calves was previously underestimated. From February to November 2015, Cryptosporidium spp. infected calves were detected in 29/44 randomly included farms from 5 geographic regions of France. C. hominis and C. parvum were found in 12/44 and 26/44 farms, respectively with higher C. hominis prevalence in the western region. In 9 farms, both C. parvum and C. hominis were detected. Eighty-six of 412 (73/342 asymptomatic and 13/70 symptomatic) one to nine-week-old calves shed C. hominis or C. parvum oocysts (15 and 71 calves, respectively), with no mixed infection detected. The predominant C. hominis IbA9G3 genotype was present in all regions, and more frequent in the western region. An incompletely characterized Ib, and the IbA13G3, IbA9G2 and IbA14G2 genotypes were present only in the western region. For C. parvum, the most frequent genotype was IIaA16G3R1 with no geographic clustering. Most C. hominis infected calves were asymptomatic, with some exceptions of IbA9G2 and IbA9G3 isolates, while C. parvum IIaA16G3R1 was associated with symptoms. Present results indicate for the first time that in several geographic regions of France, C. hominis was present in about one fifth of both asymptomatic and symptomatic infected calves, with isolated genotypes likely associated with human infection. Further investigations are aimed at documenting direct or indirect

  15. Cryptosporidium varanii infection in leopard geckos ( Eublepharis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cryptosporidiosis is observed in reptiles with high morbidity and considerable mortality. The objective of this study was to achieve the molecular identification of Cryptosporidium spp. in pet leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) from a breeder colony in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Oocysts comparable to those of ...

  16. Identification of Cryptosporidium Species in Fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certad, Gabriela; Dupouy-Camet, Jean; Gantois, Nausicaa; Hammouma-Ghelboun, Ourida; Pottier, Muriel; Guyot, Karine; Benamrouz, Sadia; Osman, Marwan; Delaire, Baptiste; Creusy, Colette; Viscogliosi, Eric; Aliouat-Denis, Cecile Marie; Follet, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium, a protozoan parasite that can cause severe diarrhea in a wide range of vertebrates including humans, is increasingly recognized as a parasite of a diverse range of wildlife species. However, little data are available regarding the identification of Cryptosporidium species and genotypes in wild aquatic environments, and more particularly in edible freshwater fish. To evaluate the prevalence of Cryptosporidiumspp. in fish from Lake Geneva (Lac Léman) in France, 41 entire fish and 100 fillets (cuts of fish flesh) were collected from fishery suppliers around the lake. Nested PCR using degenerate primers followed by sequence analysis was used. Five fish species were identified as potential hosts of Cryptosporidium: Salvelinus alpinus, Esox lucius, Coregonus lavaretus, Perca fluviatilis, and Rutilus rutilus. The presence of Cryptosporidium spp. was found in 15 out of 41 fish (37%), distributed as follows: 13 (87%) C. parvum, 1 (7%) C. molnari, and 1 (7%) mixed infection (C. parvum and C. molnari). C. molnari was identified in the stomach, while C. parvum was found in the stomach and intestine. C. molnari was also detected in 1 out of 100 analyzed fillets. In order to identify Cryptosporidium subtypes, sequencing of the highly polymorphic 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) was performed. Among the C. parvum positive samples, three gp60 subtypes were identified: IIaA15G2R1, IIaA16G2R1, and IIaA17G2R1. Histological examination confirmed the presence of potential developmental stages of C. parvum within digestive epithelial cells. These observations suggest that C. parvum is infecting fish, rather than being passively carried. Since C. parvum is a zoonotic species, fish potentially contaminated by the same subtypes found in terrestrial mammals would be an additional source of infection for humans and animals, and may also contribute to the contamination of the environment with this parasite. Moreover, the risk of human transmission is strengthened by the

  17. Ocorrência e caracterização molecular de Cryptosporidium spp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) em aves domésticas e em aves exóticas mantidas em cativeiro no Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Akira Nakamura

    2008-01-01

    A criptosporidiose é considerada uma das principais infecções por protozoários em aves, e já foi descrita em mais de 30 espécies de aves de várias Ordens, como Anseriformes, Charadriformes, Columbiformes, Galliformes, Passeriformes, Psitaciformes e Struthioniformes. Três espécies de Cryptosporidium infectam aves: Cryptosporidium baileyi, Cryptosporidium galli e Cryptosporidium meleagridis. Além dessas espécies, há vários genótipos distintos geneticamente das espécies de Cryptosporidium já des...

  18. Avaliação da resistência a tobamovirus em acessos de Capsicum spp. Evaluation of resistance of Capsicum spp. genotypes to tobamovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Aparecida Cezar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A resistência em Capsicum spp a tobamovírus é governada pelos genes L¹ a L4. Baseado na capacidade de alguns isolados suplantarem a resistência destes genes, os tobamovírus podem ser classificados nos patótipos P0, P1, P1-2 e P1-2-3. No Brasil, até o momento as três espécies de tobamovírus conhecidas são: Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV, pertencentes aos patótipos P0 e Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV pertencente ao patótipo P1-2, respectivamente e podem infectar pimentas e pimentões. Oitenta e seis genótipos de pimentão e pimenta foram avaliados quanto à resistência a tobamovírus, sendo 62 de Capsicum annuum, 18 de C. baccatum e seis de C. chinense. Oito acessos de C. annuum, seis de C. baccatum e os acessos ICA #39, Pimenta de cheiro e PI 152225 de C. chinense apresentaram reação de hipersensibilidade ao ToMV, enquanto que o acesso Ancho de C. annuum foi considerado tolerante, permanecendo assintomático, porém permitindo a recuperação do vírus quando inoculado em Nicotiana glutinosa. Para o PMMoV patótipo P1,2 foram avaliados os acessos de pimentão e pimenta considerados resistentes ao ToMV. Somente o PI 152225 de C. chinense desencadeou reação de hipersensibilidade ao PMMoV, sendo fonte potencial de resistência para programas de melhoramento a este vírus no Brasil.The resistance of Capsicum spp to tobamoviruses is conferred by the genes series L¹ to L4. Based on the ability of some isolates to overcome the resistance genes, the tobamovirus can be classificated in the pathotypes P0, P1, P1-2 and P1-2-3. In Brazil, at this moment there are three species of tobamovirus: Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV, belonging to pathotype P0 and Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV belonging to pathotype P1-2 respectively, that can infect sweet and hot peppers. Eighty-six genotypes of sweet and hot pepper were evaluated for the resistance to tobamovirus. Eigth genotypes of C. annuum, five

  19. Isolation and genotyping of Acanthamoeba spp. from recreational soil of parks in Tehran, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Niyyati

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Acanthamoeba is a genus of free-living amoebae found in environmental sources. These amphizoic amoebae can lead to severe human disease such as encephalitis and keratitis. Acanthamoeba transmits to humans through contact with soil and dust from scratching the skin. The aim of the present study was to identify the genotypes of Acanthamoeba in parks of the city of Tehran using molecular and morphological - based methods. Methods: In this study, 52 samples of soil were collected from 17 parks in Tehran. Samples were then filtered and cultured on 1.5% non-nutrient agar. DNA extraction and PCR amplification was performed using genus specific primers. Sequencing analysis and BLAST search were done for genotype identification. Results: Out of 52 soil samples, 14 strain (26.9% were positive for Acanthamoeba amoebae by microscopic observation. Out Of 14 positive isolates, 9 (17.3% were positive for Acanthamoeba using genus specific primer pairs. Of 14 strains, 9 were sequenced successfully. Genotype identification was revealed that all strains were belonged to T4 type. T4 genotypes among strains are human pathogens. Conclusions: Identification of pathogenic Acanthamoeba belonging to T4 genotype in recreational parks could be of utmost importance. Results of this study show that soil contamination, particularly in parks where children play and assemble is a sanitary risk for them. Key words: Acanthamoeba, Genotypes, Soil, Park

  20. Evidence for a new species of Cryptosporidium infecting tortoises: Cryptosporidium ducismarci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traversa Donato

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cryptosporidiosis affects the gastrointestinal and respiratory tract of humans as well as of a wide range of companion, farm, laboratory and wild animals. In the past few years, three independent studies have provided strong evidence for the existence of a distinct Cryptosporidium species affecting tortoises and likely circulating in other reptile species as well. A new Cryptosporidium genotype was firstly detected and genetically characterized in a marginated tortoise in Italy in 2007 and named Cryptosporidium sp. ex Testudo marginata CrIT-20. The phylogenetic analysis of this isolate indicated that this Cryptosporidium was unique and belonged to the intestinal clade. These findings were later on confirmed by the detection of genetic homologies of isolates from a python and a chameleon from Spain and by recent research in the United States. The latter study presented both the occurrence of intestinal lesions in a pancake tortoise and a Russian tortoise and the genetic characterization of the isolates, together with the first pictures of the endogenous stages of Cryptosporidium CrIT-20. Phylogenetic inference based on the sequences representing small subunit of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (SSU of these isolates confirmed the pathological findings because this Cryptosporidium was related to the intestinal group and supported previous results in T. marginata from Italy. The present scientific data on the Cryptosporidium CrIT-20 support its classification as a new species of Cryptosporidium causing intestinal diseases in tortoises. Although further morphological (i.e. exogenous stages and biological aspects (i.e. complete host range are yet to be elucidated, it is proposed that this Cryptosporidium is designated Cryptosporidium ducismarci.

  1. Use of a New High Resolution Melting Method for Genotyping Pathogenic Leptospira spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Naze

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonosis that is endemic in tropical areas, such as Reunion Island. The species Leptospira interrogans is the primary agent in human infections, but other pathogenic species, such as L. kirschner and L. borgpetersenii, are also associated with human leptospirosis.In this study, a melting curve analysis of the products that were amplified with the primer pairs lfb1 F/R and G1/G2 facilitated an accurate species classification of Leptospira reference strains. Next, we combined an unsupervised high resolution melting (HRM method with a new statistical approach using primers to amplify a two variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR for typing at the subspecies level. The HRM analysis, which was performed with ScreenClust Software, enabled the identification of genotypes at the serovar level with high resolution power (Hunter-Gaston index 0.984. This method was also applied to Leptospira DNA from blood samples that were obtained from Reunion Island after 1998. We were able to identify a unique genotype that is identical to that of the L. interrogans serovars Copenhageni and Icterohaemorrhagiae, suggesting that this genotype is the major cause of leptospirosis on Reunion Island.Our simple, rapid, and robust genotyping method enables the identification of Leptospira strains at the species and subspecies levels and supports the direct genotyping of Leptospira in biological samples without requiring cultures.

  2. Isolation and Genotyping of Acanthamoeba spp. as Neglected Parasites in North of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Azar; Sarvi, Shahabeddin; Daryani, Ahmad; Sharif, Mehdi

    2016-08-01

    Acanthamoeba, a free-living amoeba, is widely distributed in the environment, water sources, soil, dust, and air. It can cause keratitis in contact lens wearers with poor hygiene and also fatal granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) in immunocompromised hosts. The aim of this study was to gain some insights into the distribution and genotypes of the potentially pathogenic species of Acanthamoeba present in water sources in north of Iran. Total 43 Acanthamoeba species were isolated from 77 water samples taken from different water sources within the Mazandaran province in Northern Iran (Sari city and suburbs). Isolates were identified based on cyst and trophozoite morphological characteristics as well genetics. PCR fragments corresponding to the small-subunit 18S rRNA gene were sequenced for 20 of 43 positive isolates. The results revealed that 83.3% of sequenced isolates belonged to the T4 genotype and the rest belonged to the T2 genotype. Our results indicated that Acanthamoeba is widely distributed in Sari city. As the incidence in Iran of amoebic keratitis has increased in recent years, the exact estimation of the prevalence of this amoeba and its predominant genotype may play a crucial role in prevention of the disease. Sari city has several rivers, seashores, and natural recreational amenities, which attract visitors during the year. This is the first report of Acanthamoeba genotypes from water sources in Sari city, Mazandaran province of Iran, and the results suggest that more attention is needed to protect the visiting population and immunocompromised individuals.

  3. Genotypic characterization of Brochothrix spp. isolated from meat, poultry and fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y Zh; Anyogu, A; Ouoba, L I I; Sutherland, J P

    2010-09-01

    To study genotypic diversity of isolates of Brochothrix thermosphacta recovered from meat, poultry and fish. A total of 27 bacteria isolated from 19 samples of meat, poultry and fish were identified phenotypically and genotypically using PCR amplification of 16S-23S rDNA intergenic transcribed spacer (ITS-PCR), repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) and 16S rDNA sequencing. Using ITS-PCR, all bacteria showed the same DNA profile as the reference strains of Br. thermosphacta, allowing typing of the isolates at species level. Using 16S rDNA sequencing, all isolates were identified, at genus and species level, as Br. thermosphacta. Identification as Br. campestris was observed with a lower, but very close, level of similarity. Rep-PCR was more discriminatory than ITS-PCR and allowed differentiation of four subgroups among the isolates. Minor genotypic differences among Br. thermosphacta strains from meat, poultry and fish were observed. A rudimentary exploration of genotypic differences of Br. thermosphacta from meat, poultry and fish resulted in preliminary confirmation of the suitability of ITS-PCR for typing Br. thermosphacta and confirmed the value of rep-PCR fingerprinting to discriminate between Br. thermosphacta strains.

  4. Exploiting genotypic diversity of 2,4-Diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas spp.: characterization of superior root-colonizing P. fluorescens strain Q8r1-96

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, J.M.; Weller, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    The genotypic diversity that occurs in natural populations of antagonistic microorganisms provides an enormous resource for improving biological control of plant diseases. In this study, we determined the diversity of indigenous 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG)-producing Pseudomonas spp. occurring

  5. Genotype-by-Environment Interaction and Testing Environments for Plantain and Banana (Musa spp. L. Breeding in West Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortiz, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available With reduced budgets allocated for international agricultural research, site rationalisation had become an important issue to consider when carrying out multilocational testing of promising selections. The aim of this paper was to determine the importance of the genotype-by-environment interaction in multilocational trials of plantains and bananas (Musa spp. L. in selected sites of West Africa comprising the humid forest and the forest-savanna transition zones. A sample of plantain-banana hybrids, plantain landraces, exotic banana cultivars and diploid parental banana accessions were evaluated in three locations : Mbalmayo and Onne (humid forest and Ibadan (forest-savanna transition. The experimental results of our research suggested that multilocational testing is more profitable than single site evaluation over several years in the Musa breeding station. Furthermore, based on correlated responses across environments for yield potential, we suggest that one of the selection sites in the humid forest (i. e., Mbalmayo be dropped since selections in one site (Onne may be well adapted to the other location in the same agroecozone. Conversely, the relatively poor performance of most genotypes in dry environments (e. g. Ibadan reinforces the importance of early testing across a wide range of environments. In this way selections with broad or specific adaptation may be identified for further release to targeted farmers.

  6. Cryptosporidium species from common edible bivalves in Manila Bay, Philippines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoso, Edison Jay A; Rivera, Windell L

    2017-06-15

    Manila Bay is one of the major propagation sites of edible bivalves in the Philippines. Studies have shown that bivalves might be contaminated with human pathogens like the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium, one of the major causes of gastroenteritis in the world. In this study, Cryptosporidium from four species of edible bivalves were isolated using a combination of sucrose flotation and immunomagnetic separation. Using direct fluorescent antibody test, Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in 67 out of 144 samples collected. DNA sequence analysis of the 18S rRNA gene of the isolates detected C. parvum and C. hominis (major causes of human cryptosporidiosis) and C. meleagridis (causes infection in avian species). Analysis of the 60kDa glycoprotein gene further confirmed the genotypes of the Cryptosporidium isolates. This study is the first to provide baseline information on Cryptosporidium contamination of Manila Bay where bivalves are commonly cultured. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular detection and genotyping of Acanthamoeba spp. among stray dogs using conjunctival swab sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakuş, Mehmet; Aykur, Mehmet; Özbel, Yusuf; Töz, Seray; Dağcı, Hande

    2016-12-01

    Acanthamoeba is one of the most common free-living amoebas (FLA) that present in environment. In humans, Acanthamoeba can cause an infection of the eye termed Acanthamoeba keratitis, which mostly occurs in contact lens wearers. In the present study, we aimed to screen the presence of Acanthamoeba DNA in stray dogs using previously collected conjunctival swab samples in a hyper-endemic area for canine leishmaniasis. Totally, 184 dogs were included in the study and 27 of them (14.6%) were found positive for Acanthamoeba according to the 18s rRNA gene sequencing. Two different genotypes (T4 and T5) were identified and T5 was firstly reported in Turkey in the present study. Statistical analysis was performed and no correlation was found between Leishmania and Acanthamoeba positivity (PAcanthamoeba among stray dogs. Further studies are necessary to reveal the infection status and genotypes among dogs and its possible correlation with leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Genetic Diversity of Cryptosporidium in Children in an Urban Informal Settlement of Nairobi, Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Mbae

    Full Text Available Globally Cryptosporidium and Giardia species are the most common non-bacterial causes of diarrhoea in children and HIV infected individuals, yet data on their role in paediatric diarrhoea in Kenya remains scant. This study investigated the occurrence of Cryptosporidium species, genotypes and subtypes in children, both hospitalized and living in an informal settlement in Nairobi.This was a prospective cross-sectional study in which faecal specimen positive for Cryptosporidium spp. by microscopy from HIV infected and uninfected children aged five years and below presenting with diarrhoea at selected outpatient clinics in Mukuru informal settlements, or admitted to the paediatric ward at the Mbagathi District Hospital were characterized. The analysis was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP of the 18srRNA gene for species identification and PCR-sequencing of the 60 kDa glycoprotein (GP60 gene for subtyping.C. hominis was the most common species of Cryptosporidium identified in125/151(82.8% of the children. Other species identified were C. parvum 18/151(11.9%, while C. felis and C. meleagridis were identified in 4 and 2 children, respectively. Wide genetic variation was observed within C. hominis, with identification of 5 subtype families; Ia, Ib, Id, Ie and If and 21 subtypes. Only subtype family IIc was identified within C. parvum. There was no association between species and HIV status or patient type.C. hominis is the most common species associated with diarrhoea in the study population. There was high genetic variability in the C. hominis isolates with 22 different subtypes identified, whereas genetic diversity was low within C. parvum with only one subtype family IIc identified.

  9. Genetic Diversity of Cryptosporidium in Children in an Urban Informal Settlement of Nairobi, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbae, Cecilia; Mulinge, Erastus; Waruru, Anthony; Ngugi, Benjamin; Wainaina, James; Kariuki, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Globally Cryptosporidium and Giardia species are the most common non-bacterial causes of diarrhoea in children and HIV infected individuals, yet data on their role in paediatric diarrhoea in Kenya remains scant. This study investigated the occurrence of Cryptosporidium species, genotypes and subtypes in children, both hospitalized and living in an informal settlement in Nairobi. This was a prospective cross-sectional study in which faecal specimen positive for Cryptosporidium spp. by microscopy from HIV infected and uninfected children aged five years and below presenting with diarrhoea at selected outpatient clinics in Mukuru informal settlements, or admitted to the paediatric ward at the Mbagathi District Hospital were characterized. The analysis was done by Polymerase Chain Reaction-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) of the 18srRNA gene for species identification and PCR-sequencing of the 60 kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene for subtyping. C. hominis was the most common species of Cryptosporidium identified in125/151(82.8%) of the children. Other species identified were C. parvum 18/151(11.9%), while C. felis and C. meleagridis were identified in 4 and 2 children, respectively. Wide genetic variation was observed within C. hominis, with identification of 5 subtype families; Ia, Ib, Id, Ie and If and 21 subtypes. Only subtype family IIc was identified within C. parvum. There was no association between species and HIV status or patient type. C. hominis is the most common species associated with diarrhoea in the study population. There was high genetic variability in the C. hominis isolates with 22 different subtypes identified, whereas genetic diversity was low within C. parvum with only one subtype family IIc identified.

  10. Development of Vibrio spp. infection resistance related SNP markers using multiplex SNaPshot genotyping method in the clam Meretrix meretrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Qing; Yue, Xin; Liu, Baozhong

    2015-04-01

    The clam Meretrix meretrix is a commercially important mollusc species in the coastal areas of South and Southeast Asia. In the present study, large-scale SNPs were genotyped by the Multiplex SNaPshot genotyping method among the stocks of M. meretrix with different Vibrio spp. infection resistance profile. Firstly, the AUTOSNP software was applied to mine SNPs from M. meretrix transcriptome, and 323 SNP loci (including 120 indels) located on 64 contigs were selected based on Uniprot-GO associations. Then, 38 polymorphic SNP loci located on 15 contigs were genotyped successfully in the clam stocks with different resistance to Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection (11-R and 11-S groups). Pearson's Chi-square test was applied to compare the allele and genotype frequency distributions of the SNPs between the different stocks, and seven SNP markers located on three contigs were found to be associated with V. parahaemolyticus infection resistance trait. Haplotype-association analysis showed that six haplotypes had significantly different frequency distributions in 11-S and 11-R (P Vibrio harveyi infection, four out of the seven selected SNPs had significantly different distributions (P Vibrio spp. infection resistance. Sequence alignments and annotations indicated that the contigs containing the associated SNPs had high similarity to the immune related genes. All these results would be useful for the future marker-assisted selection of M. meretrix strains with high Vibrio spp. infection resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. CRYPTOSPORIDIUM OOCYST RECOVERY IN WATER BY EPA METHOD 1623: EVALUATION OF A MODIFIED IMS DISSOCIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA Methods 1622 and 1623 are the benchmarks for detection of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in water. These methods consist of filtration, elution, purification by immunomagnetic separation (IMS), and microscopic analysis after staining with a fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugate...

  12. Genotipagem de multilocus de Cryptosporidium hominis associado a surto diarréico em creche de São Paulo

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Elenice Messias do Nascimento; Silva, Alexandre J. da; Eduardo, Maria Bernadete de Paula; Uemura, Iaiko Horroiva; Moura, Iaci N. S.; Castilho, Vera L. Pagliusi; Corbett, Carlos Eduardo Pereira

    2006-01-01

    A number of species of Cryptosporidium are associated with diarrhea worldwide. Little data exists regarding the genotypes and species of Cryptosporidium associated with cases of infections in Brazil. PURPOSE: In the present study, we ascertained by molecular methods the species and the genotype of Cryptosporidium sp from a diarrhea outbreak diagnosed in a day care at the Hospital Clínicas, São Paulo University Medical School. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Specific identification and typing of the is...

  13. Molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium : An emerging parasite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagamani K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of Crytposporidium in local population and to understand its epidemiology by molecular methods. Methods: Faecal samples from 681 children and 804 adults, admitted to tertiary care hospitals in twin cities of Hyderabad and Secunderabad with complaints of diarrhoea; and six calves with diarrhoea, were screened for Cryptosporidium oocysts by microscopy and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR RFLP based identification of Cryptosporidium species in positive specimens was done to elucidate epidemiology of Cryptosporidium. Results : Cryptosporidium was found in 52 (7.6% children and 7(0.9% adults and 1(16.6% calf with diarrhoea. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium in children below five years of age was 8.2% and 14.3% in children in the age group of six months to one year. Of the 42 samples genotyped 29 (69% were C. hominis and 8 (19% were C. parvum and 5 (11.9% were mixed infection with the two species. Conclusions : Children in the age group of six months to one year were found to be the most vulnerable. The occurrence of C. parvum , in nearly one third of cases in the present series indicates that the zoonotic transmission is of considerable significance in the epidemiology of Cryptosporidiosis in the study area.

  14. Polymorphism study of Cryptosporidium hominis gp60 subtypes circulating in Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essid, Rym; Chelbi, Hanen; Siala, Emna; Bensghair, Ines; Menotti, Jean; Bouratbine, Aïda

    2017-09-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are a major cause of gastrointestinal diseases in humans worldwide. While a single subtype of Cryptosporidium hominis has been shown to be responsible for several large outbreaks related to water contamination in developed countries, little is known about the epidemiology of C. hominis in developing countries. This study reports the first genetic characterization of C. hominis at the subtype level in several human populations in Tunisia using the gp60 gene. Eighteen isolates were identified as C. hominis by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. The prevalence of this species in different human populations ranges from 1.53% to 13.04% with a high prevalence being reported in immunocompromised children (13.04%) followed by patients with malignent myeloma (5.5%) and HIV-infected patients (4.59%). The gp60 analysis on C. hominis isolates, performed in 14 cases, showed the presence of a single subtype family: "Ia". Different subtypes were identified within this family (A11G1R1, A12R3, A23G1R1, A26G1R1, A27G1R1, A28G1R1). The IaA26G1R1 subtype was the most dominant subtype described in this area (50%). Despite the high genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp, a low heterogeneity at the subtype level was observed within C. hominis circulating in Tunisia. This distribution is an indicator for intensive and stable anthroponotic cryptosporidiosis in this region. Besides, the presence of a unique genotype in 5 HIV-infected patients attending the same hospital ward suggests the possible occurrence of hospital-acquired infection and underlines the need to implement preventive measures to avoid nosocomial transmission. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cryptosporidium Source Tracking in the Potomac River Watershed▿

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Wenli; Chen, Plato; Villegas, Eric N.; Landy, Ronald B.; Kanetsky, Charles; Cama, Vitaliano; Dearen, Theresa; Schultz, Cherie L.; Orndorff, Kenneth G.; Prelewicz, Gregory J.; Brown, Miranda H.; Young, Kim Roy; Xiao, Lihua

    2008-01-01

    To better characterize Cryptosporidium in the Potomac River watershed, a PCR-based genotyping tool was used to analyze 64 base flow and 28 storm flow samples from five sites in the watershed. These sites included two water treatment plant intakes, as well as three upstream sites, each associated with a different type of land use. The uses, including urban wastewater, agricultural (cattle) wastewater, and wildlife, posed different risks in terms of the potential contribution of Cryptosporidium...

  16. Prevalence of Trichomonas spp. in domestic pigeons in Shandong Province, China, and genotyping by restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiyue; Sun, Jingjing; Wang, Fangkun; Li, Hongmei; Zhao, Xiaomin

    2016-05-01

    Oropharyngeal swabs (n = 609) were collected randomly from 80,000 domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) on five pigeon farms and at one pigeon slaughterhouse in Shandong Province, China, from September 2012 to July 2013. Trichomonas spp. were detected in 206/609 (33.8%) samples. The prevalence was 14.9-31.1%, depending on different levels of sanitation and management, and was 4.8% in nestling pigeons, 13.6% in breeding pigeons and 35.2% in adolescent pigeons. Trichomonas gallinae genotypes A and B, and Trichomonas tenax-like isolates were identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis and sequencing of the 5.8S rDNA-internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. RFLP analysis with the restriction enzyme BsiEI generated different RFLP band patterns between T. gallinae and T.tenax-like isolates. When BsiEI RFLP analysis was combined with HaeIII RFLP analysis, all infection types of T. gallinae and T.tenax-like isolates could be identified. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection, identification and genotyping of Borrellia spp. in rodents in Slovenia by PCR and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerar, Tjaša; Korva, Miša; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana; Ružić-Sabljić, Eva

    2015-08-08

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the agent of Lyme borreliosis, is mainly maintained in natural foci through the transmission cycles of competent tick vectors (Ixodes sp.) and a vertebrate reservoir. Specific rodents have been identified as the principal reservoir of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato in Europe. Borrelia miyamotoi is the only relapsing fever spirochete transmitted by the same tick. The aim of the present study was to perform an epidemiological survey to determine the presence of B. burgdorferi sensu lato in rodents occurring in Slovenia and to explore the presence of Borrelia miyamotoi. The study was performed in two parts, retrospective and prospective; a total of 297 rodents was analyzed. Detection and identification of borrelia was performed by molecular methods and additionally in the prospective study by isolation and genotyping (MluI-LRFP and MLST). During the prospective part of the study, borrelia was isolated from 2/46 (4.3 %) lung specimens and from 10/46 (21.7 %) heart specimens of rodents. All isolated strains were identified as B. afzelii subtype Mla1, and MLST analysis revealed 5 distinct sequence types. Borrelia DNA was successfully detected by one or other of the PCR methods in 18/46 (39.1 %) and 75/251 (29.9 %) samples in the prospective and retrospective studies, respectively. LightMix® was found to be more sensitive than the ''in-house" nested PCR (91/297 (30.6 %) vs 48/297 (16.1 %)). Borrelia miyamotoi DNA was detected in 1/251 (0.4 %) and in 1/46 (2.2 %) heart specimens, in the retrospective and prospective parts of the study, respectively. We determined the prevalence of B. afzelii in rodents and report for the first time the presence of B. miyamotoi in Slovenia.

  18. Evaluation of five commercial methods for the extraction and purification of DNA from human faecal samples for downstream molecular detection of the enteric protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia duodenalis, and Entamoeba spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulos, Silvia; Mateo, Marta; de Lucio, Aida; Hernández-de Mingo, Marta; Bailo, Begoña; Saugar, José M; Cardona, Guillermo A; Fuentes, Isabel; Mateo, María; Carmena, David

    2016-08-01

    High quality, pure DNA is required for ensuring reliable and reproducible results in molecular diagnosis applications. A number of in-house and commercial methods are available for the extraction and purification of genomic DNA from faecal material, each one offering a specific combination of performance, cost-effectiveness, and easiness of use that should be conveniently evaluated in function of the pathogen of interest. In this comparative study the marketed kits QIAamp DNA stool mini (Qiagen), SpeedTools DNA extraction (Biotools), DNAExtract-VK (Vacunek), PowerFecal DNA isolation (MoBio), and Wizard magnetic DNA purification system (Promega Corporation) were assessed for their efficacy in obtaining DNA of the most relevant enteric protozoan parasites associated to gastrointestinal disease globally. A panel of 113 stool specimens of clinically confirmed patients with cryptosporidiosis (n=29), giardiasis (n=47) and amoebiasis by Entamoeba histolytica (n=3) or E. dispar (n=10) and apparently healthy subjects (n=24) were used for this purpose. Stool samples were aliquoted in five sub-samples and individually processed by each extraction method evaluated. Purified DNA samples were subsequently tested in PCR-based assays routinely used in our laboratory. The five compared methods yielded amplifiable amounts of DNA of the pathogens tested, although performance differences were observed among them depending on the parasite and the infection burden. Methods combining chemical, enzymatic and/or mechanical lysis procedures at temperatures of at least 56°C were proven more efficient for the release of DNA from Cryptosporidium oocysts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cryptosporidium Zoonosis in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    Cryptosporidium Zoonosis in Nigeria. Ayinmode, A. B. and Fagbemi B. O. Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Parasitology,. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria. ABSTRACT: Cryptosporidium is a coocidian parasite that infects a wide range of vertebrate hosts including man.

  20. Review of cryptosporidium and giardia in the eastern part of Europe, 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plutzer, Judit; Lassen, Brian; Jokelainen, Pikka

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reviews the current knowledge and understanding of Cryptosporidium spp. an d Giardia spp. in humans, animals and the environment in 10 countries in the eastern part of Europe: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Czech Republic, Estonia, Hungary, Latvia, Poland, Romania, Serbia...... and research on these pathogens, as well as analyse knowledge gaps and areas for further research. Results: Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia spp. were found to be common in eastern Europe, but the results from different countries are difficult to compare because of variations in reporting practices...

  1. Cryptosporidium scrofarum n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in domestic pigs (Sus scrofa)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Kestřánová, M.; Pinková, Martina; Květoňová, Dana; Kalinová, Jana; Wagnerová, Pavla; Kotková, Michaela; Vitovec, J.; Ditrich, Oleg; McEvoy, J.; Stenger, B.; Sak, Bohumil

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 191, 3-4 (2013), s. 218-227 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11061 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : Cryptosporidium scrofarum * Taxonomy * Morphology * Molecular analyses * Transmission studies * Cryptosporidium pig genotype II Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.545, year: 2013

  2. Molecular Identification of Cryptosporidium Species from Pet Snakes in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yimming, Benjarat; Pattanatanang, Khampee; Sanyathitiseree, Pornchai; Inpankaew, Tawin; Kamyingkird, Ketsarin; Pinyopanuwat, Nongnuch; Chimnoi, Wissanuwat; Phasuk, Jumnongjit

    2016-08-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important pathogen causing gastrointestinal disease in snakes and is distributed worldwide. The main objectives of this study were to detect and identify Cryptosporidium species in captive snakes from exotic pet shops and snake farms in Thailand. In total, 165 fecal samples were examined from 8 snake species, boa constrictor (Boa constrictor constrictor), corn snake (Elaphe guttata), ball python (Python regius), milk snake (Lampropeltis triangulum), king snake (Lampropeltis getula), rock python (Python sebae), rainbow boa (Epicrates cenchria), and carpet python (Morelia spilota). Cryptosporidium oocysts were examined using the dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-modified acid-fast staining and a molecular method based on nested-PCR, PCR-RFLP analysis, and sequencing amplification of the SSU rRNA gene. DMSO-modified acid-fast staining revealed the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in 12 out of 165 (7.3%) samples, whereas PCR produced positive results in 40 (24.2%) samples. Molecular characterization indicated the presence of Cryptosporidium parvum (mouse genotype) as the most common species in 24 samples (60%) from 5 species of snake followed by Cryptosporidium serpentis in 9 samples (22.5%) from 2 species of snake and Cryptosporidium muris in 3 samples (7.5%) from P. regius.

  3. Molecular fingerprinting of Cryptosporidium oocysts isolated during water monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Rosely A B; Campbell, Brian M; Smith, Huw V

    2006-08-01

    We developed and validated a PCR-based method for identifying Cryptosporidium species and/or genotypes present on oocyst-positive microscope slides. The method involves removing coverslips and oocysts from previously examined slides followed by DNA extraction. We tested four loci, the 18S rRNA gene (N18SDIAG and N18SXIAO), the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene (STN-COWP), and the dihydrofolate reductase (dhfr) gene (by multiplex allele-specific PCR), for amplifying DNA from low densities of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts experimentally seeded onto microscope slides. The N18SDIAG locus performed consistently better than the other three tested. Purified oocysts from humans infected with C. felis, C. hominis, and C. parvum and commercially purchased C. muris were used to determine the sensitivities of three loci (N18SDIAG, STN-COWP, and N18SXIAO) to detect low oocyst densities. The N18SDIAG primers provided the greatest number of positive results, followed by the N18SXIAO primers and then the STN-COWP primers. Some oocyst-positive slides failed to generate a PCR product at any of the loci tested, but the limit of sensitivity is not entirely based on oocyst number. Sixteen of 33 environmental water monitoring Cryptosporidium slides tested (oocyst numbers ranging from 1 to 130) contained mixed Cryptosporidium species. The species/genotypes most commonly found were C. muris or C. andersoni, C. hominis or C. parvum, and C. meleagridis or Cryptosporidium sp. cervine, ferret, and mouse genotypes. Oocysts on one slide contained Cryptosporidium muskrat genotype II DNA.

  4. Genotypic analysis of plasmid-mediated beta-lactamases amongst Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia spp. and Klebsiella spp. that are non-susceptible to a broad-spectrum cephalosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiratisin, Pattarachai; Henprasert, Arunocha

    2010-10-01

    Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia spp. and Klebsiella spp. are recognisable for their increasing resistance. Plasmid-mediated beta-lactamases, including extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs), plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamases (pAmpCs) and the newly emerged KPC, play an important role in beta-lactam resistance. In this study, we investigated the genetic characteristics of plasmid-mediated beta-lactamases amongst non-Escherichia, non-Klebsiella Enterobacteriaceae that were non-susceptible to at least a broad-spectrum cephalosporin. A total of 143 (23.9%) of 598 isolates during the 6-month study period met the screening criteria, amongst which 142 (99.3%) and 99 (69.2%) isolates carried ESBL and pAmpC genes, respectively. Resistance genotypes were described. bla(KPC) was not detected in isolates with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems. This study provides an insight into plasmid-mediated resistance determinants amongst cephalosporin-non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae other than Escherichia spp. and Klebsiella spp. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  5. Cryptosporidium and cryptosporidiosis in calves at Jos, northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fecal samples were obtained directly from the rectum of each animal. The samples were processed based on the formol ether concentration technique and the saturated sodium chloride flotation method. Cryptosporidium spp. was detected using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen (ZN) method. Significant relationships (p>0.05) ...

  6. Microsporidia and Cryptosporidium in horses and donkeys in Algeria: Detection of a novel Cryptosporidium hominis subtype family (Ik) in a horse

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laatamna, A.E.; Wagnerová, Pavla; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Xiao, L.; Rost, M.; McEvoy, J.; Saadi, A.R.; Aissi, M.; Kváč, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 208, 3-4 (2015), s. 135-142 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01090S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Horses * Donkeys * Cryptosporidium spp. * Encephalitozoon spp. * Enterocytozoon bieneusi * Molecular prevalence Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.242, year: 2015

  7. Global Cryptosporidium Loads from Livestock Manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Lucie C; Benders, Jorien; Medema, Gertjan; Hofstra, Nynke

    2017-08-01

    Understanding the environmental pathways of Cryptosporidium is essential for effective management of human and animal cryptosporidiosis. In this paper we aim to quantify livestock Cryptosporidium spp. loads to land on a global scale using spatially explicit process-based modeling, and to explore the effect of manure storage and treatment on oocyst loads using scenario analysis. Our model GloWPa-Crypto L1 calculates a total global Cryptosporidium spp. load from livestock manure of 3.2 × 10 23 oocysts per year. Cattle, especially calves, are the largest contributors, followed by chickens and pigs. Spatial differences are linked to animal spatial distributions. North America, Europe, and Oceania together account for nearly a quarter of the total oocyst load, meaning that the developing world accounts for the largest share. GloWPa-Crypto L1 is most sensitive to oocyst excretion rates, due to large variation reported in literature. We compared the current situation to four alternative management scenarios. We find that although manure storage halves oocyst loads, manure treatment, especially of cattle manure and particularly at elevated temperatures, has a larger load reduction potential than manure storage (up to 4.6 log units). Regions with high reduction potential include India, Bangladesh, western Europe, China, several countries in Africa, and New Zealand.

  8. Prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium species in dog park attending dogs compared to non-dog park attending dogs in one region of Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Andrea; Ruch-Gallie, Rebecca; Scorza, Valeria; Lin, Philip; Lappin, Michael R

    2012-03-23

    Dog parks are very popular in urban areas, but there are no current studies attempting to correlate visits to dog parks and risk of colonization by enteric parasites. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dog park visitation is associated with an increased prevalence of enteric parasites or an increase in prevalence of gastrointestinal signs in dogs in northern Colorado. Feces from dogs owned by veterinary students or Veterinary Teaching Hospital staff members were submitted with a completed survey form detailing dog park attendance rates, fecal character scores, and other clinical information. Feces were examined microscopically for parasites after sugar centrifugation, for Giardia spp. cysts and Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts by a commercially available immunofluorescence assay (FA) and the FA positive samples were genotyped after PCR amplification. The Giardia assemblages were determined using the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) β-giardin and triose phosphate isomerase (TPI) genes and the Cryptosporidium species were determined using the heat shock protein-70 gene. A total of 129 fecal samples were assayed; 66 were from dog park attending dogs and 63 were from non-dog park-attending dogs. The overall parasite prevalence rate was 7.0% (9 of 129 samples). Dog park attending dogs were more likely to be positive for Giardia or Cryptosporidium than non-dog park-attending dogs (p=0.0279), but there was no association of gastrointestinal signs with dog park attendance or with fecal flotation or FA results. The five Giardia isolates were assemblage C and/or D and the one Cryptosporidium isolate was Ctenocephalides canis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Surveillance Systems for Waterborne Cryptosporidium: US EPA method 1523 and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterborne cryptosporidiosis remains a significant public health concern in countries around the world. Many species and genotypes of Cryptosporidium contaminate drinking water sources, but C. parvum and C. hominis remain the two predominant species known to cause waterborne dis...

  10. Study on Cryptosporidium contamination in vegetable farms around Tehran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar-Bahadori, Sh; Mostoophi, A; Shemshadi, B

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, an increase in the number of cases of food-borne illnesses linked to fresh vegetables has been reported. One of the causative agents of these infections is Cryptosporidium and it appears that one route of transmission to humans is food-borne, so fruits and vegetables have important roles. The goal of this study was to determine the level of Cryptosporidium contamination in vegetable farms around Tehran, Iran. A total of 496 samples from 115 vegetable farms in different regions around Tehran (Capital city of Iran) were collected and different types of vegetables were investigated for the parasite in June and July, 2012. A sediment concentration method followed by modified Ziehl-Neelsen's acid-fast staining was used to determine the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts. Our findings revealed that 6.6% of studied samples were contaminated with Cryptosporidium species. The highest rate of contamination was reported in Bagher Abad (South of Tehran) (11.1%), and green onions were more commonly contaminated (14.8%) than any other vegetables tested. Furthermore, when waste water was used to irrigate vegetable farms, the contamination rate was (33.3%). Statistical analysis showed a correlation between contamination with Cryptosporidium spp. and studied risk factors including: different regions around Tehran, type of vegetables, and type of water used for farm irrigation. Therefore, vegetables may provide a route by which Cryptosporidium can be transmitted to humans, and control strategies should be considered.

  11. Cryptosporidium Source Tracking in the Potomac River Watershed▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenli; Chen, Plato; Villegas, Eric N.; Landy, Ronald B.; Kanetsky, Charles; Cama, Vitaliano; Dearen, Theresa; Schultz, Cherie L.; Orndorff, Kenneth G.; Prelewicz, Gregory J.; Brown, Miranda H.; Young, Kim Roy; Xiao, Lihua

    2008-01-01

    To better characterize Cryptosporidium in the Potomac River watershed, a PCR-based genotyping tool was used to analyze 64 base flow and 28 storm flow samples from five sites in the watershed. These sites included two water treatment plant intakes, as well as three upstream sites, each associated with a different type of land use. The uses, including urban wastewater, agricultural (cattle) wastewater, and wildlife, posed different risks in terms of the potential contribution of Cryptosporidium oocysts to the source water. Cryptosporidium was detected in 27 base flow water samples and 23 storm flow water samples. The most frequently detected species was C. andersoni (detected in 41 samples), while 14 other species or genotypes, almost all wildlife associated, were occasionally detected. The two common human-pathogenic species, C. hominis and C. parvum, were not detected. Although C. andersoni was common at all four sites influenced by agriculture, it was largely absent at the urban wastewater site. There were very few positive samples as determined by Environmental Protection Agency method 1623 at any site; only 8 of 90 samples analyzed (9%) were positive for Cryptosporidium as determined by microscopy. The genotyping results suggest that many of the Cryptosporidium oocysts in the water treatment plant source waters were from old calves and adult cattle and might not pose a significant risk to human health. PMID:18776033

  12. Real-time PCR assays for detection of Brucella spp. and the identification of genotype ST27 in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingzhong; McFee, Wayne E; Goldstein, Tracey; Tiller, Rebekah V; Schwacke, Lori

    2014-05-01

    Rapid detection of Brucella spp. in marine mammals is challenging. Microbiologic culture is used for definitive diagnosis of brucellosis, but is time consuming, has low sensitivity and can be hazardous to laboratory personnel. Serological methods can aid in diagnosis, but may not differentiate prior exposure versus current active infection and may cross-react with unrelated Gram-negative bacteria. This study reports a real-time PCR assay for the detection of Brucella spp. and application to screen clinical samples from bottlenose dolphins stranded along the coast of South Carolina, USA. The assay was found to be 100% sensitive for the Brucella strains tested, and the limit of detection was 0.27fg of genomic DNA from Brucella ceti B1/94 per PCR volume. No amplification was detected for the non-Brucella pathogens tested. Brucella DNA was detected in 31% (55/178) of clinical samples tested. These studies indicate that the real-time PCR assay is highly sensitive and specific for the detection of Brucella spp. in bottlenose dolphins. We also developed a second real-time PCR assay for rapid identification of Brucella ST27, a genotype that is associated with human zoonotic infection. Positive results were obtained for Brucella strains which had been identified as ST27 by multilocus sequence typing. No amplification was found for other Brucella strains included in this study. ST27 was identified in 33% (18/54) of Brucella spp. DNA-positive clinical samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of a real-time PCR assay for identification of Brucella genotype ST27 in marine mammals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of N2-fixing plant growth promoting endophytic and epiphytic bacterial community of Indian cultivated and wild rice (Oryza spp.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Avishek; Mukhopadhaya, Subhra Kanti; Dangar, Tushar Kanti

    2016-03-01

    The diversity of endophytic and epiphytic diazotrophs in different parts of rice plants has specificity to the niche (i.e. leaf, stem and root) of different genotypes and nutrient availability of the organ. Inoculation of the indigenous, polyvalent diazotrophs can facilitate and sustain production of non-leguminous crops like rice. Therefore, N2-fixing plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) were isolated from different parts of three Indian cultivated [Oryza sativa L. var. Sabita (semi deep/deep water)/Swarna (rain fed shallow lowland)/Swarna-Sub1(submergence tolerant)] and a wild (O. eichingeri) rice genotypes which respond differentially to nitrogenous fertilizers. Thirty-five isolates from four rice genotypes were categorized based on acetylene reduction assay on nitrogenase activity, biochemical tests, BIOLOG and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The bacteria produced 9.36-155.83 nmole C2H4 mg(-1) dry bacteria h(-1) and among them nitrogenase activity of 11 potent isolates was complemented by nifH-sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequencing divided them into five groups (shared 95-100 % sequence homology with type strains) belonging to five classes-alpha (Ancylobacter, Azorhizobium, Azospirillum, Rhizobium, Bradyrhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Novosphingobium, spp.), beta (Burkholderia sp.), gamma (Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Azotobacter, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Stenotrophomonas spp.) Proteobacteria, Bacilli (Bacillus, Paenibacillus spp.) and Actinobacteria (Microbacterium sp.). Besides, all bacterial strains possessed the intrinsic PGP traits of like indole (0.44-7.4 µg ml(-1)), ammonia (0.18-6 mmol ml(-1)), nitrite (0.01-3.4 mol ml(-1)), and siderophore (from 0.16-0.57 μmol ml(-1)) production. Inoculation of rice (cv. Swarna) seedlings with selected isolates had a positive impact on plant growth parameters like shoot and root elongation which was correlated with in vitro PGP attributes. The results indicated that the

  14. RNA Extraction Methods for Reverse Transcriptase Real-Time PCR and Microarray Analysis of Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of infectious oocyst forms of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium spp. to resist disinfection treatments and cause disease may have significant public health implications. Currently, little is known about oocyst-specific factors involved during host cell invasion p...

  15. RNA Extraction Methods for Real-Time PCR and Microarray Analyses of Cryptosporidium and Toxoplasma gondii Oocysts - 2nd Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability of infectious oocyst forms of Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium spp. to resist disinfection treatments and cause disease may have significant public health implications. Currently, little is known about oocyst-specific factors involved during host cell invasion pr...

  16. Evaluation of Four RNA Extraction Methods for Gene Expression Analyses of Cryptosporidium parvum and Toxoplasma gondii Oocys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Toxoplasma gondii are important coccidian parasites that have caused waterborne and foodborne disease outbreaks worldwide. Techniques like subtractive hybridization, microarrays, and quantitative reverse transcriptase real-time polymerase chain reaction (...

  17. Cryptosporidium Pathogenicity and Virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Maha; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Tyler, Kevin M.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of medical and veterinary importance that causes gastroenteritis in a variety of vertebrate hosts. Several studies have reported different degrees of pathogenicity and virulence among Cryptosporidium species and isolates of the same species as well as evidence of variation in host susceptibility to infection. The identification and validation of Cryptosporidium virulence factors have been hindered by the renowned difficulties pertaining to the in vitro culture and genetic manipulation of this parasite. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in identifying putative virulence factors for Cryptosporidium. This progress has been accelerated since the publication of the Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis genomes, with the characterization of over 25 putative virulence factors identified by using a variety of immunological and molecular techniques and which are proposed to be involved in aspects of host-pathogen interactions from adhesion and locomotion to invasion and proliferation. Progress has also been made in the contribution of host factors that are associated with variations in both the severity and risk of infection. Here we provide a review comprised of the current state of knowledge on Cryptosporidium infectivity, pathogenesis, and transmissibility in light of our contemporary understanding of microbial virulence. PMID:23297262

  18. Patterns of Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting an Australian watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Michelle L; Sangster, Nicholas C; Slade, Martin B; Veal, Duncan A

    2005-10-01

    The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in feces from a population of wild eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a protected watershed in Sydney, Australia, was investigated. Over a 2-year period, Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 239 of the 3,557 (6.7%) eastern grey kangaroo fecal samples tested by using a combined immunomagnetic separation and flow cytometric technique. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium in this host population was estimated to range from 0.32% to 28.5%, with peaks occurring during the autumn months. Oocyst shedding intensity ranged from below 20 oocysts/g feces to 2.0 x 10(6) oocysts/g feces, and shedding did not appear to be associated with diarrhea. Although morphologically similar to the human-infective Cryptosporidium hominis and the Cryptosporidium parvum "bovine" genotype oocysts, the oocysts isolated from kangaroo feces were identified as the Cryptosporidium "marsupial" genotype I or "marsupial" genotype II. Kangaroos are the predominant large mammal inhabiting Australian watersheds and are potentially a significant source of Cryptosporidium contamination of drinking water reservoirs. However, this host population was predominantly shedding the marsupial-derived genotypes, which to date have been identified only in marsupial host species.

  19. First report of Cryptosporidium canis in farmed Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xuan; Cong, Wei; Ma, Jian-Gang; Lou, Zhi-Long; Zheng, Wen-Bin; Zhao, Quan; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2016-03-03

    Cryptosporidium is an important genus of enteric zoonotic parasites, which can infect a wide range of animals including foxes. Little information is available concerning the prevalence and molecular characterisation of Cryptosporidium spp. in farmed Arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) in China. Thus, the objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. in Arctic foxes in China using nested PCR amplification of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. in Arctic foxes was 15.9 % (48/302), with 12.9 % in male (18/139) and 18.4 % in female (30/163) foxes, respectively. The prevalence in different farms varied from 0 to 31.43 %. The prevalence of infection in different age groups varied from 14.1 % to 19.0 %. Foxes from Hebei Province (7.8 %, 11/141) had a significantly lower Cryptosporidium spp. prevalence than those from Heilongjiang Province (22.9 %, 16/70) and Jilin Province (23.1 %, 21/91) (P= 0.0015). Sequence analysis of the SSU rRNA gene indicated that all the 48 isolates represented C. canis. This is the first report of C. canis infection in farmed Arctic foxes in China, which also provides foundation data for preventing and controlling Cryptosporidium infection in foxes, other animals and humans.

  20. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. in pre-weaned dairy calves in the Czech Republic: Absence of C. ryanae and management-associated distribution of C. andersoni, C. bovis and C. parvum subtypes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Hromadová, N.; Květoňová, Dana; Rost, M.; Sak, Bohumil

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 177, 3/4 (2011), s. 378-382 ISSN 0304-4017 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Calves * Cryptosporidium andersoni * C. bovis * C. parvum * GP60 * SSU Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.579, year: 2011

  1. Occurrence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium spp. isolated from domestic animals in a rural area surrounding Atlantic dry forest fragments in Teodoro Sampaio municipality, State of São Paulo, Brazil Ocorrência e caracterização molecular de Cryptosporidium spp. isolados de animais domésticos de propriedades rurais circunvizinhas a fragmentos de Floresta Atlântica Seca do Estado de São Paulo, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaiá da Paixão Sevá

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the occurrence of Cryptosporidium in domestic animals in rural properties surrounding rain forest fragments within the municipality of Teodoro Sampaio, southeastern Brazil. Conventional sucrose flotation method followed by molecular characterization of the parasites by sequencing PCR products amplified from SSU rRNA gene were used. Stool samples were collected from domestic animals raised as pets and livestock in all rural properties surrounding three forest fragments. Samples from cattle (197, equine (63, pigs (25, sheep (11, and dogs (28 were collected from 98 rural properties. The frequency of occurrence of Cryptosporidium within each animal species was 3.0% (6/197 among cattle and 10.7% (3/28 among dogs. Cryptosporidium was not detected in stool samples from equine, sheep, and pigs. All sequences obtained from the six samples of calves showed molecular identity with Cryptosporidium andersoni while all sequences from dog samples were similar to C. canis. The frequency of occurrence of Cryptosporidium in these domestic animal species was low. The absence of C. parvum in the present study suggests that the zoonotic cycle of cryptosporidiosis may not be relevant in the region studied. The presence of Cryptosporidium species seldom described in humans may be, otherwise, important for the wild fauna as these animals are a source of infection and dissemination of this protozoan to other animal species. The impact and magnitude of infection by C. andersoni in wild ruminants and C. canis in wild canids have to be assessed in future studies to better understand the actual importance of these species in this region.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a ocorrência de Cryptosporidium, em animais domésticos de propriedades rurais ao redor de fragmentos de mata Atlântica de interior no município de Teodoro Sampaio, por exame convencional de flutuação em solução de sacarose, seguido de caracterização molecular

  2. Molecular characterization of Danish Cryptosporidium parvum isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Heidi L.; Ahrens, Peter; Juel, Cynthia Dawn

    2002-01-01

    The genetic polymorphism among 271 Danish Cryptosporidium isolates of human and animal origin was studied by partial amplification and sequencing of the Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) gene, the 18S rDNA, and a microsatellite locus.dagger Furthermore, the microsatellite locus was studied...... directly using fragment analysis. A comparative analysis of DNA sequences showed the presence of 3 different subgenotypes (C1, C2 and C3) in C. parvum isolates from Danish cattle, with prevalences of 16.7, 17.2 and 73.1% including 13 (7.0%) mixed infections. Subgenotype C1 was significantly more prevalent...... (P isolates of human origin the anthroponotic subgenotype H1 was identified, in addition to the zoonotic subgenotypes C1, C2, and C3. Of 44 human samples, 56.8% were anthroponotic, whereas 40.9% were zoonotic genotypes. One human isolate...

  3. Molecular Characterization of Acanthamoeba spp. Occurring in Water Bodies and Patients in Poland and Redefinition of Polish T16 Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Acanthamoeba genus is divided into 20 genotypes (T1-T20) on the basis of the gene encoding 18S rRNA sequence. Using of at least 2 kbp gene fragments is strongly recommended to identify new genotypes and 5% difference is commonly used as a criterion of new genotypes, however, this value is questionable. In this paper, Polish Acanthamoeba strains described earlier on the basis of ~850 bp Ami fragment of 18S rRNA gene as T4, T11 and a new T16 genotype, have been analyzed using near-complete sequence of the gene. This analysis was needed because the Ami fragment does not reveal full variability within 18S rRNA gene. Phylogenetic analysis based on Ami fragment is biased by artifacts in the construction of the tree, so the fragment should not be used for identification of new putative Acanthamoeba genotypes. The analysis confirmed that the Polish sequences represent T4 and T11 genotypes and that the strains described earlier as T16 genotype are in fact a new subgroup of the T20 genotype and that this genotype should be divided into two subgroups: T20a (two strains described by [J. Eukaryot. Microbiol. 62 (2015) 69]) and T20b (11 Polish strains described in this study). The T20b subgroup was isolated from both clinical samples and water bodies used by people as bathing places and there is a risk of infection for humans during contact with water. © 2015 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2015 International Society of Protistologists.

  4. Cryptosporidium outbreak in calves on a large dairy farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niine, Tarmo; Dorbek-Kolin, Elisabeth; Lassen, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. infections in neonatal dairy calves can cause diarrhoea and, in rare cases, death. The infection is usually self-limiting, but halofuginone lactate (HL) can be used prophylactically. Calves (n = 144) in the study were born during a 2-month period on one farm. A total of 901...... of life. HP concentration and HL treatment were negatively associated with weight gain at 3 months of age. Cryptosporidium positive faecal samples were significantly (P ... the shedding of Cryptosporidium oocysts and improved survival, but was negatively associated with weight gain. Incorrect treatment had a low impact on mortality and resembled no treatment regarding the proportion of calves shedding oocysts. Acute phase response (APR) in the second week of life seemed...

  5. T3SS-dependent differential modulations of the jasmonic acid pathway in susceptible and resistant genotypes of Malus spp. challenged with Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugé De Bernonville, Thomas; Gaucher, Matthieu; Flors, Victor; Gaillard, Sylvain; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Dat, James F; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2012-06-01

    Fire blight is a bacterial disease of Maloideae caused by Erwinia amylovora (Ea). This necrogenic enterobacterium uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject type III effectors into the plant cells to cause disease on its susceptible hosts, including economically important crops like apple and pear. The expressions of marker genes of the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense regulation pathways were monitored by RT-qPCR in leaves of two apple genotypes, one susceptible and one resistant, challenged with a wild type strain, a T3SS-deficient strain or water. The transcriptional data taken together with hormone level measurements indicated that the SA pathway was similarly induced in both apple genotypes during infection by Ea. On the contrary, the data clearly showed a strong T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway in leaves of the susceptible genotype but not in those of the resistant one. Accordingly, methyl-jasmonate treated susceptible plants displayed an increased resistance to Ea. Bacterial mutant analysis indicated that JA manipulation by Ea mainly relies on the type III effector DspA/E. Taken together, our data suggest that the T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway is a critical step in the infection process of Malus spp. by Ea. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genotypic variation in tolerance to drought stress is highly coordinated with hydraulic conductivity-photosynthesis interplay and aquaporin expression in field-grown mulberry (Morus spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kanubothula Sitarami; Sekhar, Kalva Madhana; Reddy, Attipalli Ramachandra

    2017-07-01

    Hydraulic conductivity quantifies the efficiency of a plant to transport water from root to shoot and is a major constriction on leaf gas exchange physiology. Mulberry (Morus spp.) is the most economically important crop for sericulture industry. In this study, we demonstrate a finely coordinated control of hydraulic dynamics on leaf gas exchange characteristics in 1-year-old field-grown mulberry genotypes (Selection-13 (S13); Kollegal Local (KL) and Kanva-2 (K2)) subjected to water stress by withholding water for 20 days and subsequent recovery for 7 days. Significant variations among three mulberry genotypes have been recorded in net photosynthetic rates (Pn), stomatal conductance and sap flow rate, as well as hydraulic conductivity in stem (KS) and leaf (KL). Among three genotypes, S13 showed significantly high rates of Pn, KS and KL both in control as well as during drought stress (DS) and recovery, providing evidence for superior drought-adaptive strategies. The plant water hydraulics-photosynthesis interplay was finely coordinated with the expression of certain key aquaporins (AQPs) in roots and leaves. Our data clearly demonstrate that expression of certain AQPs play a crucial role in hydraulic dynamics and photosynthetic carbon assimilation during DS and recovery, which could be effectively targeted towards mulberry improvement programs for drought adaptation. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Isolation and genotyping of free-living environmental isolates of Acanthamoeba spp. from bromeliads in Southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landell, Melissa Fontes; Salton, Juliana; Caumo, Karin; Broetto, Leonardo; Rott, Marilise B

    2013-07-01

    Species of Acanthamoeba are frequently isolated from distinct environmental sources such as water, soil, dust and air. They are responsible to cause infections and disease in humans and animals. In addition, Acanthamoeba sp. are considered an important reservoir of bacteria, virus and fungi, which act as "Trojan horses" to protect these microorganisms of harsh environmental conditions. In this study, nine Acanthamoeba isolates from bromeliads phylloplane were identified based on the morphology of cyst and trophozoite forms. The genotype level was accessed by the sequence analysis of Acanthamoeba small-subunit rRNA gene. Genotypic characterization grouped five isolates in the genotype T2/T6, three in the T4 genotype and one in the genotype T16. The results obtained indicate that the genotype T2/T6 is common on phylloplane. To predict the pathogenic potential of the Acanthamoeba isolates, thermo and osmotolerance assays were employed, although all isolates were capable of surviving at temperatures of 37°C, other tests will be conducted in the future to determine the potential pathogenic of the isolates. Altogether, our results revealed the importance of the presence of Acanthamoeba associated with bromeliads in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and the necessity for further studies to determine the environmental distribution and the role of these species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Occurrence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in domestic animals in peri-urban communities of Kafue district, Zambia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siwila, J.; Phiri, I. G. K.; Enemark, Heidi L.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia duodenalis are important parasites infecting a wide range of domestic animals worldwide. The aim of the present study was to determine the occurrence of Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia parasites in different domestic animals living in close contact with humans...... within rural/semiurban communities in Kafue district in Zambia. A single faecal sample per animal was collected from pigs, goats, dogs, ducks, chickens and pigeons and analysed by Merifluor Cryptosporidium/Giardia immunofluorescence antibody assay for the simultaneous detection of these parasites....... The faecal consistency was noted and scored as non-diarrhoeic or diarrhoeic. A total of 236 samples were collected. Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts were detected in pigs (11.5%, 17/148), goats (5.9%; 1/17), ducks (10.0%; 3/30) and chickens (14.3%; 2/14) while Giardia cysts were detected in pigs (8.1%; 12...

  9. Exploiting genotypic diversity of 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol-producing Pseudomonas spp.: characterization of superior root-colonizing P. fluorescens strain Q8r1-96.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, J M; Weller, D M

    2001-06-01

    The genotypic diversity that occurs in natural populations of antagonistic microorganisms provides an enormous resource for improving biological control of plant diseases. In this study, we determined the diversity of indigenous 2,4-diacetylphloroglucinol (DAPG)-producing Pseudomonas spp. occurring on roots of wheat grown in a soil naturally suppressive to take-all disease of wheat. Among 101 isolates, 16 different groups were identified by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. One RAPD group made up 50% of the total population of DAPG-producing Pseudomonas spp. Both short- and long-term studies indicated that this dominant genotype, exemplified by P. fluorescens Q8r1-96, is highly adapted to the wheat rhizosphere. Q8r1-96 requires a much lower dose (only 10 to 100 CFU seed(-1) or soil(-1)) to establish high rhizosphere population densities (10(7) CFU g of root(-1)) than Q2-87 and 1M1-96, two genotypically different, DAPG-producing P. fluorescens strains. Q8r1-96 maintained a rhizosphere population density of approximately 10(5) CFU g of root(-1) after eight successive growth cycles of wheat in three different, raw virgin soils, whereas populations of Q2-87 and 1M1-96 dropped relatively quickly after five cycles and were not detectable after seven cycles. In short-term studies, strains Q8r1-96, Q2-87, and 1M1-96 did not differ in their ability to suppress take-all. After eight successive growth cycles, however, Q8r1-96 still provided control of take-all to the same level as obtained in the take-all suppressive soil, whereas Q2-87 and 1M1-96 gave no control anymore. Biochemical analyses indicated that the superior rhizosphere competence of Q8r1-96 is not related to in situ DAPG production levels. We postulate that certain rhizobacterial genotypes have evolved a preference for colonization of specific crops. By exploiting diversity of antagonistic rhizobacteria that share a common trait, biological control can be improved significantly.

  10. Cryptosporidium sp. in lizards

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudela, Břetislav; Modrý, D.

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 1 (1998), s. 8 ISSN 1066-5234. [ Cryptosporidium sp. in lazards. 01.01.1998-02.01.1998, Praha] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA508/95/0273; GA AV ČR IPP2020702 Subject RIV: fp - Other Medical Disciplines

  11. Genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis spp. in road-killed wild mammals from the Central Western Region of the State of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richini-Pereira, Virgínia Bodelão; Marson, Pâmela Merlo; Silva, Rodrigo Costa da; Langoni, Helio

    2016-01-01

    Road-killed wild animals host zoonotic pathogens such as Toxoplasma gondii, offering a new opportunity for the epidemiological study of these infectious organisms. This investigation aimed to determine the presence of T. gondii and other apicomplexan parasites in tissue samples of 64 road-killed wild animals, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Positive samples were then typed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) using 7 markers: SAG1, 5'-3'SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, c29-6, PK1, and Apico. PCR-RFLP targeting 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes was also performed on all samples to detect other apicomplexan parasites. T. gondii DNA was detected in 16 tissue samples from 8 individual animals, as follows: 1 Cerdocyon thous (crab-eating fox), 1 Didelphis albiventris (white-eared opossum), 1 Lutreolina crassicaudata (lutrine opossum), 2 Myrmecophaga tridactyla (giant anteater), 1 Procyon cancrivorus (crab-eating raccoon), and 2 Sphiggurus spinosus (Paraguay hairy dwarf porcupine). Seven different T. gondii genotypes were identified, 6 of which were novel. Typing by 18S rRNA verified these 16 T. gondii-infected samples, and identified 1 Sarcocystis spp.-infected animal [Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillo)]. The amplified T. gondii (GenBank accession No. L37415.1) and Sarcocystis spp. 18S rRNA products were confirmed by sequencing. Our results indicate that T. gondii is commonly present in wild mammals, which act as sources of infection for humans and animals, including other wild species. The approach employed herein proved useful for detecting T. gondii and Sarcocystis spp. in the environment and identifying their natural reservoirs, contributing to our understanding of host-parasite interactions.

  12. Genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis spp. in road-killed wild mammals from the Central Western Region of the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgínia Bodelão Richini-Pereira

    Full Text Available Abstract INTRODUCTION: Road-killed wild animals host zoonotic pathogens such as Toxoplasma gondii, offering a new opportunity for the epidemiological study of these infectious organisms. METHODS This investigation aimed to determine the presence of T. gondii and other apicomplexan parasites in tissue samples of 64 road-killed wild animals, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Positive samples were then typed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP using 7 markers: SAG1, 5′-3′SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, c29-6, PK1, and Apico. PCR-RFLP targeting 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes was also performed on all samples to detect other apicomplexan parasites. RESULTS T. gondii DNA was detected in 16 tissue samples from 8 individual animals, as follows: 1 Cerdocyon thous (crab-eating fox, 1 Didelphis albiventris (white-eared opossum, 1 Lutreolina crassicaudata (lutrine opossum, 2 Myrmecophaga tridactyla (giant anteater, 1 Procyon cancrivorus (crab-eating raccoon, and 2 Sphiggurus spinosus (Paraguay hairy dwarf porcupine. Seven different T. gondii genotypes were identified, 6 of which were novel. Typing by 18S rRNA verified these 16 T. gondii-infected samples, and identified 1 Sarcocystis spp.-infected animal [Dasypus novemcinctus (nine-banded armadillo]. The amplified T. gondii (GenBank accession No. L37415.1 and Sarcocystis spp. 18S rRNA products were confirmed by sequencing. CONCLUSIONS Our results indicate that T. gondii is commonly present in wild mammals, which act as sources of infection for humans and animals, including other wild species. The approach employed herein proved useful for detecting T. gondii and Sarcocystis spp. in the environment and identifying their natural reservoirs, contributing to our understanding of host-parasite interactions.

  13. Meta-analysis of a polymorphic surface glycoprotein of the parasitic protozoa Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, G

    2009-12-01

    Due to its extensive polymorphism, a partial sequence of the Cryptosporidium surface glycoprotein gene gp60 has been frequently used as a genetic marker. I explored the global diversity of this protein, and compared its sequence diversity in Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis. In marked contrast to the geographical partition of C. parvum and C. hominis multi-locus genotypes, gp60 allelic groups showed no evidence of segregating in space, or of differing with respect to geographical diversity. Globally, genetic diversity of C. hominis gp60 exceeded that of C. parvum. Within C. parvum, gp60 alleles originating from human isolates were more diverse than those infecting ruminants. Phylogenetic analysis grouped gp60 sequences into a small number of relatively homogenous allelic groups, with only a small number of alleles having evolved independently. With the notable exception of a group of alleles restricted to humans, C. parvum alleles are found in ruminants and humans.

  14. BIALLELIC POLYMORPHISM IN THE INTRON REGION OF B-TUBULIN GENE OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARASITES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucleotide sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified intron region of the Cryptosporidium parvum B-tubulin gene in 26 human and 15 animal isolates revealed distinct genetic polymorphism between the human and bovine genotypes. The separation of 2 genotypes of C. parvum is...

  15. Development of Sensitive Detection of Cryptosporidium and Giardia from Surface Water in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Taghipour Lailabadi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia are known to occur widely in both raw and drinking waters. They are two of the causative agents of waterborne out-breaks of gastroenteritis throughout the world. In the present study, a PCR assay and FA were developed for detection of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cyst in environmental samples. Methods: We have detected Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts and Giardia cysts in seeded and un-seeded environmental water samples by PCR method. Water samples were spiked with oocysts (50, 100,300,500 and filtrated with a 1.2-µm pore size cellulose nitrate and follow by DNA extrac¬tion and purification by QIAamp DNA mini kit. Nested-PCR assay amplified an 850 bp fragment of 18s rRNA gene specific for Cryptosporidium and 435 bp fragment of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH target gene for Giardia. Also many river water from north of Iran, be checked by these methods. Results: Cryptosporidium and Giardia DNAs were detected in seeded water sample and Giardia was detected in all 5 water samples from river in north of Iran by nested- PCR and FA. Also in one river water sample, Cryptosporidium was detected.Conclusion: This protocol is effective for detection of these waterborne parasites in treated and untreated water samples. This study can also serve as a platform for further investigations and research water source in Iran.

  16. Parasitic infection among HIV/AIDS patients at Bela-Bela clinic, Limpopo province, South Africa with special reference to Cryptosporidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samie, Amidou; Makuwa, Stanley; Mtshali, Sibusiso; Potgieter, Natasha; Thekisoe, Oriel; Mbati, Peter; Bessong, Pascal O

    2014-07-01

    Intestinal parasitic organisms are common pathogens among HIV patients worldwide and have been known to cause severe and life-threatening diarrhea in such subjects. In the present study, the prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp and other intestinal parasites in stool samples from 151 HIV/AIDS patients attending a HIV treatment center in South Africa was determined using' standard parasitological methods, as well as molecular methods including PCR and quantitative PCR for confirmation of Cryptosporidium spp. In addition, the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method was evaluated for detection of Cryptosporidium spp in 24 stool samples. Standard parasitological methods indicated that Cryptospo- ridium spp (26.5%), Entamoeba spp (26.5%) and Giardia lamblia (13%) were the most common protozoan parasites, while Ascaris lumbricoides (8%), Schistosoma mansoni (6%) and Trichuris trichiura (4.6%) were the most commonly found helminths. PCR, quantitative PCR and LAMP methods identified Cryptosporidium spp in 28% (30/106), 35% (53/151) and 58% (14/24) of the stool samples, respectively. Multiple infections (34%) were commonly found in the study population. Females above 45 years had the highest Cryptosporidium prevalence (58%). Prevention measures must be implemented in order to curb the negative impact of Cryptosporidium-causing diarrhea among HIV/AIDS patients in this region as well as other parasitic infections identified in this study.

  17. Assessment of zoonotic transmission of Giardia and Cryptosporidium between cattle and humans in rural villages in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amimul M Ehsan

    Full Text Available Giardia and Cryptosporidium are important causes of diarrhoea in Bangladesh. The high prevalence of both parasites in humans and cattle in rural Bangladesh and the common use of water ponds by village inhabitants and their animals suggest a potential for zoonotic transmission. Direct transmission of Giardia and Cryptosporidium between cattle and their handlers and indirect transmission through water ponds was investigated. Faecal/stool samples were collected from 623 calves and 125 calf handlers in a cross-sectional survey. In two villages, water samples were collected monthly from water ponds and faecal/stool samples were collected monthly from inhabitants and their cattle. Giardia cysts and Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in water samples and in faecal/stool samples and positive samples were genotyped, to determine their human or animal origin. The prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in calves was 22% and 5% respectively. In calf handlers, the prevalence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium was 11.2% and 3.2% respectively. Both in the cross-sectional survey and in the longitudinal study in the villages, G. duodenalis assemblage E was most prevalent in calves, while in humans assemblage AII, BIII and BIV were found. In cattle, Cryptosporidium parvum, C. bovis and C. andersoni were identified, but no Cryptosporidium sequences were obtained from humans. Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in 14/24 and 12/24 water samples respectively. G. duodenalis assemblage E and BIV (-like, as well as C. andersoni and C. hominis were identified. Although the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in both water ponds suggests that water-borne transmission of Giardia and Cryptosporidium is possible, the genotyping results indicate that there is no significant direct or indirect (water-borne transmission of Giardia between cattle and people in this area of rural Bangladesh. No conclusions could be drawn for Cryptosporidium, because of the low number

  18. Occurrence and Genetic Characteristics of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium andersoni in Horses from Southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lei; Li, Wei; Zhong, Zhijun; Gong, Chao; Cao, Xuefeng; Song, Yuan; Wang, Wuyou; Huang, Xiangming; Liu, Xuehan; Hu, Yanchun; Fu, Hualin; He, Min; Wang, Ya; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Kongju; Peng, Guangneng

    2017-09-01

    A total of 333 fecal specimens from horses in southwestern China were genotyped based on analysis of the small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA) gene. Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium andersoni were identified in 2 and 4 stool specimens, respectively. The identification of C. hominis was confirmed by sequence analysis of the 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) and oocyst wall protein (COWP) genes. Subtyping analysis of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (GP60) gene sequence of C. hominis revealed a new rare subtype Id, named IdA15; only three Id isolates have been reported in humans to date. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis indicated that the C. andersoni subtype was A6, A5, A2, and A1 at the four minisatellite loci (MS1, MS2, MS3, and MS16, respectively). This is the first report to identify the presence of C. andersoni and C. hominis in horses in southwestern China and the first to identify a rare zoonotic subtype Id of C. hominis in horses. These findings suggest that infected horses may act as potential reservoirs of Cryptosporidium to transmit infections to humans. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society of Protistologists.

  19. Occurrence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium sp. in sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Snak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Considered a zoonosis of utmost importance, cryptosporidiosis has a worldwide distribution and can infect mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians. It is caused by a highly resistant protozoan present in the environment and can cause death in immunosuppressed individuals and pups, as well as in farm animals such as cattle and sheep, generating losses. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of Cryptosporidium spp. in sheep feces from the farms of Western Paraná, which have different management styles, and compare the results with their respective management methods. One hundred and forty-four stool samples were collected (69 from Property 1 and 75 from Property 2 and analyzed using a fecal smear on slides after staining by the modified Ziehl-Neelsen method. Samples tested positive by this method were subjected to nested PCR and the products obtained were sent for sequencing to determine the species. While 82.60% of the samples from Property 1 were tested positive, only 36% of the samples from Property 2 were tested positive. On analyzing the sequencing data, it was observed that the Cryptosporidium species of samples from Property 1 showed high similarity to Cryptosporidium xiaoi and those from Property 2, to Cryptosporidium ubiquitum. The reason for divergence in results can be attributed to differences in management systems adopted by each property, thus showing the importance of detecting carrier animals, as they can contaminate the environment, especially the water sources, and spread the disease to humans and other animals.

  20. Variabilidade genética de genótipos de bananeira (Musa spp submetidos ao estresse salino Genetic variability of banana (Musa spp genotypes subjected to saline stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline W. F. Gomes

    2005-06-01

    alternative. Thus, identifying genotypes that adapt to the saline soil in the northeast region is fundamental for the genetic improvement. The objective of this study was to utilize molecular markers, obtained by the amplification of DNA via PCR with RAPD primers, in order to assess the genetic variability among ten banana genotypes (Musa spp: Pacovan, Nanicão, Caipira, FHIA18, Calcuttá, SN/2, Borneo, M-53, Microcarpa and Lidi, correlating their tolerance to saline stress. Twenty five primers were tested. The D0142A07 primer generated the greatest number of polymorphic loci, while the D0142B05 generated the lowest. In general, polymorphism generated with the DNA markers showed that, despite the narrow genetic base of those formed by the same genomic group, the banana genotypes exhibited a relatively high genetic variability. The varieties of higher tolerance to saline stress, such as Pacovan and SN/2, proved to be genetically distant when compared to the most salt sensitive, such as Calcuttá and Lidi.

  1. Generation of whole genome sequences of new Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum isolates directly from stool samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Stephen J; Pachebat, Justin A; Swain, Martin T; Robinson, Guy; Cameron, Simon Js; Alexander, Jenna; Hegarty, Matthew J; Elwin, Kristin; Chalmers, Rachel M

    2015-08-29

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) of Cryptosporidium spp. has previously relied on propagation of the parasite in animals to generate enough oocysts from which to extract DNA of sufficient quantity and purity for analysis. We have developed and validated a method for preparation of genomic Cryptosporidium DNA suitable for WGS directly from human stool samples and used it to generate 10 high-quality whole Cryptosporidium genome assemblies. Our method uses a combination of salt flotation, immunomagnetic separation (IMS), and surface sterilisation of oocysts prior to DNA extraction, with subsequent use of the transposome-based Nextera XT kit to generate libraries for sequencing on Illumina platforms. IMS was found to be superior to caesium chloride density centrifugation for purification of oocysts from small volume stool samples and for reducing levels of contaminant DNA. The IMS-based method was used initially to sequence whole genomes of Cryptosporidium hominis gp60 subtype IbA10G2 and Cryptosporidium parvum gp60 subtype IIaA19G1R2 from small amounts of stool left over from diagnostic testing of clinical cases of cryptosporidiosis. The C. parvum isolate was sequenced to a mean depth of 51.8X with reads covering 100 % of the bases of the C. parvum Iowa II reference genome (Bioproject PRJNA 15586), while the C. hominis isolate was sequenced to a mean depth of 34.7X with reads covering 98 % of the bases of the C. hominis TU502 v1 reference genome (Bioproject PRJNA 15585). The method was then applied to a further 17 stools, successfully generating another eight new whole genome sequences, of which two were C. hominis (gp60 subtypes IbA10G2 and IaA14R3) and six C. parvum (gp60 subtypes IIaA15G2R1 from three samples, and one each of IIaA17G1R1, IIaA18G2R1, and IIdA22G1), demonstrating the utility of this method to sequence Cryptosporidium genomes directly from clinical samples. This development is especially important as it reduces the requirement to propagate

  2. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium isolates from pigs at slaughterhouses in South Bohemia, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Sak, Bohumil; Hanzlíková, D.; Kotilová, J.; Květoňová, Dana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 2 (2009), s. 425-428 ISSN 0932-0113 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP523/07/P117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Cryptosporidium spp. * slaughterhouse * pigs Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.721, year: 2009

  3. Prevalence, environmental loading, and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium and Giardiaanimals along the Central California Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, Stori C; Miller, Melissa A.; Hardin, Dane; Conrad, Patricia A.; Melli, Ann; Jessup, David A.; Dominik, Clare; Roug, Annette; Tinker, M. Tim; Miller, Woutrina A.

    2012-01-01

    The risk of disease transmission from waterborne protozoa is often dependent on the origin (e.g., domestic animals versus wildlife), overall parasite load in contaminated waterways, and parasite genotype, with infections being linked to runoff or direct deposition of domestic animal and wildlife feces. Fecal samples collected from domestic animals and wildlife along the central California coast were screened to (i) compare the prevalence and associated risk factors for fecal shedding of Cryptosporidium and Giardia species parasites, (ii) evaluate the relative importance of animal host groups that contribute to pathogen loading in coastal ecosystems, and (iii) characterize zoonotic and host-specific genotypes. Overall, 6% of fecal samples tested during 2007 to 2010 were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts and 15% were positive for Giardia cysts. Animal host group and age class were significantly associated with detection of Cryptosporidium and Giardia parasites in animal feces. Fecal loading analysis revealed that infected beef cattle potentially contribute the greatest parasite load relative to other host groups, followed by wild canids. Beef cattle, however, shed host-specific, minimally zoonotic Cryptosporidium and Giardia duodenalis genotypes, whereas wild canids shed potentially zoonotic genotypes, including G. duodenalis assemblages A and B. Given that the parasite genotypes detected in cattle were not zoonotic, the public health risk posed by protozoan parasite shedding in cattle feces may be lower than that posed by other animals, such as wild canids, that routinely shed zoonotic genotypes.

  4. Effective Concentration and Detection of Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and the Microsporidia from Environmental Matrices

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, Joseph A.; Gordy, John; Snyder, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., and members of Microsporidia are enteropathogenic parasites of humans and animals, producing asymptomatic to severe intestinal infections. To circumvent various impediments associated with current detection methods, we tested a method providing multistage purification and separation in a single, confined step. Standard real-time PCR was used as a detection method. Samples spiked with C. parvum and G. intestinalis were split for comparison to standard Metho...

  5. Species and Strain-specific Typing of Cryptosporidium Parasites in Clinical and Environmental Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Lihua

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis has recently attracted attention as an emerging waterborne and foodborne disease as well as an opportunistic infection in HIV infected individuals. The lack of genetic information, however, has resulted in confusion in the taxonomy of Cryptosporidium parasites and in the development of molecular tools for the identification and typing of oocysts in environmental samples. Phylogenetic analysis of the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA gene has shown that the genus Cryptosporidium is comprised of several distinct species. Our data show the presence of at least four species: C. parvum, C. muris, C. baileyi and C. serpentis (C. meleagridis, C. nasorum and C. felis were not studied. Within each species, there is some sequence variation. Thus, various genotypes (genotype 1, genotype 2, guinea pig genotype, monkey genotype and koala genotype, etc. of C. parvum differ from each other in six regions of the SSU rRNA gene. Information on polymorphism in Cryptosporidium parasites has been used in the development of species and strain-specific diagnostic tools. Use of these tools in the characterization of oocysts various samples indicates that C. parvum genotype 1 is the strain responsible for most human Cryptosporidium infections. In contrast, genotype 2 is probably the major source for environmental contamination of environment, and has been found in most oysters examined from Chesapeake Bay that serve as biologic monitors of surface water. Parasites of Cryptosporidium species other than C. parvum have not been detected in HIV+ individuals, indicating that the disease in humans is caused only by C. parvum.

  6. Caracterização de genótipos de Citrus spp. através de marcadores RAPD Characterization of citrus genotypes (Citrus spp using RAPDs markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinês Bastianel

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Em programas de melhoramento de citros, a caracterização adequada dos recursos genéticos disponíveis é de grande importância, principalmente devido às características biológicas da cultura, como a heterozigosidade, a embrionia nucelar e o longo ciclo reprodutivo. A facilidade com que ocorrem hibridações (interespecíficas e intergenéricas e a embrionia nucelar favoreceram a formação e a preservação de novas combinações, classificadas como espécies. Neste estudo, marcadores RAPDs foram utilizados para analisar 15 acessos de Citrus spp., sendo quatro variedades de laranjeiras doce (C. sinensis Osbeck, quatro tangerineiras (C. reticulata Blanco, C. nobilis Loureiro, C. sunki Loureiro e C. deliciosa Tenore, uma laranjeira azeda (C. aurantium L., um pomeleiro (C. paradisi Macf., uma torangeira (C. grandis Osbeck, uma cidreira (C. medica L., uma limeira ácida (C. latifolia e dois híbridos (Citrus clementina T. x (C. tangerina T. x C. paradisi Macf.. Doze sequências iniciadoras aleatórias foram utilizadas para estudar os 15 genótipos, encontrando-se um grau de similaridade mínimio de 0,81 ("Simple Matching" entre as tangerineiras. Os menores graus de similaridade foram encontrados entre as espécies de Citrus menos aparentadas (C. medica, C. grandis e C. latifolia. As quatro cultivares de laranjeiras doces não puderam ser diferenciadas pelos marcadores RAPD utilizados, apresentando similaridade máxima.In citrus improvement programs the characterization of the available genetic resources is of great importance, mainly concerning biological characteristics of the culture, as the heterozigosity, nucellar the embriony and long reproductive cycle. Favored by nucellar embriony interespecific and intergeneric hybridizations and genotypes preservation happen easily. RAPDs markers were used to analyze 15 Citrus spp., four sweet orange (C. sinensis Osbeck, (C. medica, C. grandis e C. latifolia, four mandarins (C. reticulata Blanco, C

  7. Comparative Genomics of Cryptosporidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien J. Mazurie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the apicomplexan parasites, Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum, were considered the same species. However, the two parasites, now considered distinct species, exhibit significant differences in host range, infectivity, and pathogenicity, and their sequenced genomes exhibit only 95–97% identity. The availability of the complete genome sequences of these organisms provides the potential to identify the genetic variations that are responsible for the phenotypic differences between the two parasites. We compared the genome organization and structure, gene composition, the metabolic and other pathways, and the local sequence identity between the genes of these two Cryptosporidium species. Our observations show that the phenotypic differences between C. hominis and C. parvum are not due to gross genome rearrangements, structural alterations, gene deletions or insertions, metabolic capabilities, or other obvious genomic alterations. Rather, the results indicate that these genomes exhibit a remarkable structural and compositional conservation and suggest that the phenotypic differences observed are due to subtle variations in the sequences of proteins that act at the interface between the parasite and its host.

  8. Prevalence and genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium in yaks in Qinghai Province of China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongsheng Mi

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, species and subtypes of Cryptosporidium infecting yaks in the Qinghai Province of Northwestern China. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. was detected by microscopy and nested-PCR. A total of 586 fecal samples were collected from yaks in 6 counties, of which 142 (24.2% samples tested positive for Cryptosporidium. The small subunit (SSU rRNA gene of fifty-five samples were amplified and sequenced successfully and demonstrated that Cryptosporidium bovis (31/55, 56.4% was the most common species, followed by C. parvum (16/55, 29.1% and C. ryanae (5/55, 9.0%. Mixed infections of C. parvum and C. bovis (n = 2, C. ryanae and C. bovis (n = 1 were also detected. All three species were found in yaks ranging in age from 2 years. Cryptosporidium was most commonly detected in spring (28.4%, followed by summer (20.9%, then winter (17.5%. Cryptosporidium parvum positive samples were subtyped using the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60 gene. Subtypes IIaA15G2R1 (n = 8, IIaA16G2R1 (n = 2, IIaA14G1R1 (n = 1, IIaA14G2R1 (n = 1 and IIaA16G3R1 (n = 1 were detected. All of these subtypes are zoonotic, and may pose a potential threat to human health.

  9. Household Socioeconomic and Demographic Correlates of Cryptosporidium Seropositivity in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Becker

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium are parasitic protozoa that infect humans, domestic animals, and wildlife globally. In the United States, cryptosporidiosis occurs in an estimated 750,000 persons annually, and is primarily caused by either of the Cryptosporidium parvum genotypes 1 and 2, exposure to which occurs through ingestion of food or water contaminated with oocytes shed from infected hosts. Although most cryptosporidiosis cases are caused by genotype 1 and are of human origin, the zoonotic sources of genotype 2, such as livestock, are increasingly recognized as important for understanding human disease patterns. Social inequality could mediate patterns of human exposure and infection by placing individuals in environments where food or water contamination and livestock contact is high or through reducing the availability of educational and sanitary resources required to avoid exposure.We here analyzed data from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES between 1999 and 2000, and related seropositivity to Cryptosporidium parvum to correlates of social inequality at the household and individual scale. After accounting for the complex sampling design of NHANES and confounding by individual demographics and household conditions, we found impaired household food adequacy was associated with greater odds of Cryptosporidium seropositivity. Additionally, we identified individuals of non-white race and ethnicity and those born outside the United States as having significantly greater risk than white, domestic-born counterparts. Furthermore, we provide suggestive evidence for direct effects of family wealth on Cryptosporidium seropositivity, in that persons from low-income households and from families close to the poverty threshold had elevated odds of seropositivity relative to those in high-income families and in households far above the poverty line.These results refute assertions that cryptosporidiosis in the United States is independent of

  10. Inferences about the Global Population Structures of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrıverdi, Sultan; Grinberg, Alex; Chalmers, Rachel M.; Hunter, Paul R.; Petrovic, Zorana; Akiyoshi, Donna E.; London, Eric; Zhang, Linghui; Tzipori, Saul; Tumwine, James K.; Widmer, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis are two related species of apicomplexan protozoa responsible for the majority of human cases of cryptosporidiosis. In spite of their considerable public health impact, little is known about the population structures of these species. In this study, a battery of C. parvum and C. hominis isolates from seven countries was genotyped using a nine-locus DNA subtyping scheme. To assess the existence of geographical partitions, the multilocus genotype data were mined using a cluster analysis based on the nearest-neighbor principle. Within each country, the population genetic structures were explored by combining diversity statistical tests, linkage disequilibrium, and eBURST analysis. For both parasite species, a quasi-complete phylogenetic segregation was observed among the countries. Cluster analysis accurately identified recently introduced isolates. Rather than conforming to a strict paradigm of either a clonal or a panmictic population structure, data are consistent with a flexible reproductive strategy characterized by the cooccurrence of both propagation patterns. The relative contribution of each pattern appears to vary between the regions, perhaps dependent on the prevailing ecological determinants of transmission. PMID:18836013

  11. Comparison of single- and multilocus genetic diversity in the protozoan parasites Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widmer, Giovanni; Lee, Yongsun

    2010-10-01

    The genotyping of numerous isolates of Cryptosporidium parasites has led to the definition of new species and a better understanding of the epidemiology of cryptosporidiosis. A single-locus genotyping method based on the partial sequence of a polymorphic sporozoite surface glycoprotein gene (GP60) has been favored by many for surveying Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis populations. Since genetically distinct Cryptosporidium parasites recombine in nature, it is unclear whether single-locus classifications can adequately represent intraspecies diversity. To address this question, we investigated whether multilocus genotypes of C. parvum and C. hominis cluster according to the GP60 genotype. C. hominis multilocus genotypes did not segregate according to this marker, indicating that for this species the GP60 sequence is not a valid surrogate for multilocus typing methods. In contrast, in C. parvum the previously described "anthroponotic" genotype was confirmed as a genetically distinct subspecies cluster characterized by a diagnostic GP60 allele. However, as in C. hominis, several C. parvum GP60 alleles did not correlate with distinct subpopulations. Given the rarity of some C. parvum GP60 alleles in our sample, the existence of additional C. parvum subgroups with unique GP60 alleles cannot be ruled out. We conclude that with the exception of genotypically distinct C. parvum subgroups, multilocus genotyping methods are needed to characterize C. parvum and C. hominis populations. Unless parasite virulence is controlled at the GP60 locus, attempts to find associations within species or subspecies between GP60 and phenotype are unlikely to be successful.

  12. Prevalence of the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium on three organic pig farms in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Heidi H.; Jianmin, Wang; Mejer, Helena

    2013-01-01

    Pigs are a potential source of contamination with Cryptosporidium spp., which can lead to infection in humans. Two species C. parvum and C. hominis can cause an acute diarrheal illness in humans, which can become severe in e.g. patients with HIV. The oocyst can survive for long periods in the env......Pigs are a potential source of contamination with Cryptosporidium spp., which can lead to infection in humans. Two species C. parvum and C. hominis can cause an acute diarrheal illness in humans, which can become severe in e.g. patients with HIV. The oocyst can survive for long periods...... in the environment and is resistant to many common disinfectants. In order to estimate the prevalence of the zoonotic parasite Cryptosporidium in organic pigs and to improve our knowledge of the parasite epidemiology, the prevalence was monitored four times between September 2011 and June 2012 in three Danish...... organic pig farms. Faecal samples were collected for examination of Cryptosporidium spp. with a total of 994 pigs grouped as sows, fatteners, young pigs and piglets. The number of pigs in each age group was 298, 232, 315 and 161 respectively, distributed on the three farms. Faecal samples were collected...

  13. Multilocus sequence typing ofCryptosporidium hominisfrom northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pooja; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Makharia, Govind K; Chaudhry, Rama

    2017-01-01

    Human cryptosporidiosis is endemic worldwide, and at least eight species have been reported in humans; the most common being Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum. Detailed understanding of the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium is increasingly facilitated using standardized universal technique for species differentiation and subtyping. In this study micro- and minisatellite targets in chromosome 6 were used to assess genetic diversity of C. hominis by sequence length polymorphisms along with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A total of 84 Cryptosporidium positive stool specimens were subjected to speciation and genotyping using small subunit (SSU) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) as the target gene. Genetic heterogeneity amongst C. hominis isolates was assessed by sequencing minisatellites, microsatellites and polymorphic markers including genes encoding the 60 kDa glycoprotein (GP60), a 47 kDa protein (CP47), a mucin-like protein (Mucin-1), a serine repeat antigen (MSC6-7) and a 56 kDa transmembrane protein (CP56). Of the 84 Cryptosporidium positive stool specimens, 77 (92%) were positive by SSU rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Of these 77 isolates, 54 were identified as C. hominis and 23 as C. parvum. Of all the loci studied by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), GP60 gene could reveal the highest genetic diversity. Population substructure analysis of C. hominis performed by combined sequence length and nucleotide polymorphism showed nine multilocus subtypes, all of which were distinct groups in the study population. MLST, a powerful discriminatory test, demonstrated both variations and distribution pattern of Cryptosporidium species and its subtypes.

  14. High diversity of Cryptosporidium subgenotypes identified in Malaysian HIV/AIDS individuals targeting gp60 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Iqbal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, there is a lack of vital information in the genetic makeup of Cryptosporidium especially in developing countries. The present study aimed at determining the genotypes and subgenotypes of Cryptosporidium in hospitalized Malaysian human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, 346 faecal samples collected from Malaysian HIV positive patients were genetically analysed via PCR targeting the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60 gene. Eighteen (5.2% of 346 isolates were determined as Cryptosporidium positive with 72.2% (of 18 identified as Cryptosporidium parvum whilst 27.7% as Cryptosporidium hominis. Further gp60 analysis revealed C. parvum belonging to subgenotypes IIaA13G1R1 (2 isolates, IIaA13G2R1 (2 isolates, IIaA14G2R1 (3 isolates, IIaA15G2R1 (5 isolates and IIdA15G1R1 (1 isolate. C. hominis was represented by subgenotypes IaA14R1 (2 isolates, IaA18R1 (1 isolate and IbA10G2R2 (2 isolates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings highlighted the presence of high diversity of Cryptosporidium subgenotypes among Malaysian HIV infected individuals. The predominance of the C. parvum subgenotypes signified the possibility of zoonotic as well as anthroponotic transmissions of cryptosporidiosis in HIV infected individuals.

  15. Cryptosporidium rubeyi n. sp. (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae in multiple Spermophilus ground squirrel species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xunde Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Previously we reported the unique Cryptosporidium sp. “c” genotype (e.g., Sbey03c, Sbey05c, Sbld05c, Sltl05c from three species of Spermophilus ground squirrel (Spermophilus beecheyi, Spermophilus beldingi, Spermophilus lateralis located throughout California, USA. This follow-up work characterizes the morphology and animal infectivity of this novel genotype as the final step in proposing it as a new species of Cryptosporidium. Analysis of sequences of 18S rRNA, actin, and HSP70 genes of additional Cryptosporidium isolates from recently sampled California ground squirrels (S. beecheyi confirms the presence of the unique Sbey-c genotype in S. beecheyi. Phylogenetic and BLAST analysis indicates that the c-genotype in Spermophilus ground squirrels is distinct from Cryptosporidium species/genotypes from other host species currently available in GenBank. We propose to name this c-genotype found in Spermophilus ground squirrels as Cryptosporidium rubeyi n. sp. The mean size of C. rubeyi n. sp. oocysts is 4.67 (4.4–5.0 μm × 4.34 (4.0–5.0 μm, with a length/width index of 1.08 (n = 220. Oocysts of C. rubeyi n. sp. are not infectious to neonatal BALB/c mice and Holstein calves. GenBank accession numbers for C. rubeyi n. sp. are DQ295012, AY462233, and KM010224 for the 18S rRNA gene, KM010227 for the actin gene, and KM010229 for the HSP70 gene.

  16. A new species of Cryptosporidium (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) from eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, Michelle L; Ryan, Una M

    2008-10-01

    Cryptosporidium macropodum n. sp is described. Oocysts of C. macropodum from the feces of kangaroos (Macropus spp.) are morphologically indistinguishable from other mammalian Cryptosporidium species, including C. parvum, C. hominis, C. suis, and C. canis. The oocysts are fully sporulated on excretion, lack sporocysts, and have an average width of 4.9 microm (4.5-6.0), a length of 5.4 microm (5.0-6.0), and a length:width ratio of 1.1. Phylogenetic analyses of the 18S ribosomal RNA, actin, and heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) loci demonstrate that C. macropodum is genetically distinct from all described Cryptosporidium species, including others found in marsupials. The parasite seems to be highly host-specific, because it has been found only in marsupials to date. Therefore, based on biological and molecular data, we consider C. macropodum a new species.

  17. Common occurrence of zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium meleagridis in broiler chickens and turkeys in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroudi, Djamel; Khelef, Djamel; Goucem, Rachid; Adjou, Karim T; Adamu, Haileeyesus; Zhang, Hongwei; Xiao, Lihua

    2013-09-23

    Only a small number of birds have been identified by molecular techniques as having Cryptosporidium meleagridis, the third most important species for human cryptosporidiosis. In this study, using PCR-RFLP analysis of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, we examined the ileum of 90 dead chickens from 23 farms and 57 dead turkeys from 16 farms in Algeria for Cryptosporidium spp. C. meleagridis-positive specimens were subtyped by sequence analysis of the 60 kDa glycoprotein gene. Cryptosporidium infection rates were 34% and 44% in chickens and turkeys, respectively, with all positive turkeys (25) and most positive chickens (26/31) having C. meleagridis. All C. meleagridis specimens belonged to a new subtype family. The frequent occurrence of C. meleagridis in chickens and turkeys illustrates the potential for zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis in Algeria. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Cryptosporidium suis infection in post-weaned and adult pigs in Shaanxi province, northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qing; Wang, Xing-Ye; Chen, Jian-Wen; Ding, Ling; Zhao, Guang-Hui

    2015-02-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., ubiquitous enteric parasitic protozoa of vertebrates, recently emerged as an important cause of economic loss and zoonosis. The present study aimed to determine the distribution and species of Cryptosporidium in post-weaned and adult pigs in Shaanxi province, northwestern China. A total of 1,337 fresh fecal samples of post-weaned and adult pigs were collected by sterile disposable gloves from 8 areas of Shaanxi province. The samples were examined by Sheather's sugar flotation technique and microscopy at × 400 magnification for Cryptosporidium infection, and the species in positive samples was further identified by PCR amplification of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene. A total of 44 fecal samples were successfully amplified by the nested PCR of the partial SSU rRNA, with overall prevalence of 3.3%. The average prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in each pig farms ranged from 0 to 14.4%. Species identification by sequencing of SSU rRNA gene revealed that 42 (3.1%) samples were Cryptosporidium suis and 2 (0.15%) were Cryptosporidium scrofarum. C. suis had the highest prevalence (7.5%) in growers and the lowest in breeding pigs (0.97%). C. suis was the predominant species in pre-weaned and adult pigs, while C. scrofarum infected pigs older than 3 months only. A season-related difference of C. suis was observed in this study, with the highest prevalence in autumn (5.5%) and the lowest (1.7%) in winter. The present study provided basic information for control of Cryptosporidium infection in pigs and assessment of zoonotic transmission of pigs in Shaanxi province, China.

  19. Evolution of mitosome metabolism and invasion-related proteins in Cryptosporidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shiyou; Roellig, Dawn M; Guo, Yaqiong; Li, Na; Frace, Michael A; Tang, Kevin; Zhang, Longxian; Feng, Yaoyu; Xiao, Lihua

    2016-12-08

    The switch from photosynthetic or predatory to parasitic life strategies by apicomplexans is accompanied with a reductive evolution of genomes and losses of metabolic capabilities. Cryptosporidium is an extreme example of reductive evolution among apicomplexans, with losses of both the mitosome genome and many metabolic pathways. Previous observations on reductive evolution were largely based on comparative studies of various groups of apicomplexans. In this study, we sequenced two divergent Cryptosporidium species and conducted a comparative genomic analysis to infer the reductive evolution of metabolic pathways and differential evolution of invasion-related proteins within the Cryptosporidium lineage. In energy metabolism, Cryptosporidium species differ from each other mostly in mitosome metabolic pathways. Compared with C. parvum and C. hominis, C. andersoni possesses more aerobic metabolism and a conventional electron transport chain, whereas C. ubiquitum has further reductions in ubiquinone and polyisprenoid biosynthesis and has lost both the conventional and alternative electron transport systems. For invasion-associated proteins, similar to C. hominis, a reduction in the number of genes encoding secreted MEDLE and insulinase-like proteins in the subtelomeric regions of chromosomes 5 and 6 was also observed in C. ubiquitum and C. andersoni, whereas mucin-type glycoproteins are highly divergent between the gastric C. andersoni and intestinal Cryptosporidium species. Results of the study suggest that rapidly evolving mitosome metabolism and secreted invasion-related proteins could be involved in tissue tropism and host specificity in Cryptosporidium spp. The finding of progressive reduction in mitosome metabolism among Cryptosporidium species improves our knowledge of organelle evolution within apicomplexans.

  20. Occurrence and molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium in dogs in Henan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Fuchun; Qi, Meng; He, Xiaoyi; Wang, Rongjun; Zhang, Sumei; Dong, Heping; Zhang, Longxian

    2014-01-17

    Cryptosporidiosis in dogs has been reported worldwide, involving both asymptomatic and diarrheic dogs. Large-scale surveys of Cryptosporidium infection in dogs have been performed in some countries using different diagnostic methods. But, few data are available on the infection rate and molecular characteristics of Cryptosporidium spp. in dogs in China. In this study, 770 fecal samples from 66 locations in Henan Province were examined. The average Cryptosporidium infection rate was 3.8%, with dogs in kennels having the highest rate of 7.0% (χ² = 14.82, P dogs younger than 90 days, which was significantly higher than that in the other age groups (1.1-3.8%;χ² = 18.82, P dogs. Twenty-nine Cryptosporidium-positive samples were amplified at the small subunit rRNA (SSU rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), and actin loci using PCR. Sequence analysis of these amplicons identified only Cryptosporidium canis, which showed 100% identity with the published sequences of the SSU rRNA, HSP70, and actin genes. Our results confirm that C. canis is popular in the dog population in China, considering the large number of dogs in China and the close contact between dogs and humans, the role of C. canis in the transmission of human cryptosporidiosis warrants attention.

  1. Molecular identification of a rare subtype of Cryptosporidium hominis in infants in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huili; Zhao, Jinfeng; Wang, Rongjun; Zhang, Longxian

    2012-01-01

    Two Cryptosporidium isolates from separate infants suffering from diarrhea were obtained from a hospital in Zhengzhou, China and were genotyped by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA) (SSU rRNA), 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70), and actin genes. Further subtyping was performed by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Both the isolates were identified as Cryptosporidium hominis subtype IdA21, a rare subtype previously found only in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected child in South Africa and another child in Jordan.

  2. Molecular identification of a rare subtype of Cryptosporidium hominis in infants in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili Zhu

    Full Text Available Two Cryptosporidium isolates from separate infants suffering from diarrhea were obtained from a hospital in Zhengzhou, China and were genotyped by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the small-subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA (SSU rRNA, 70-kDa heat shock protein (HSP70, and actin genes. Further subtyping was performed by PCR amplification and sequence analysis of the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60 gene. Both the isolates were identified as Cryptosporidium hominis subtype IdA21, a rare subtype previously found only in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected child in South Africa and another child in Jordan.

  3. Investigation into the Prevalence of Cryptosporidium Infection in Calves among Small-Holder Dairy and Traditional Herds in Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel S. Swai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine prevalence and risk factors of cryptosporidiosis in bovine from two contrasting production system in and around Tanga municipality between May 2003 and January 2004. The study populations comprised 117 calves aged ≤3 months, randomly selected from 44 smallholders dairy and traditional managed herds, respectively. Individual calf and herd-level information was collected using a structured questionnaire and feacal samples were screened for Cryptosporidium spp oocysts using the modified Ziehl-Neelsen method. Overall, 35% of the calves in the study were shedding Cryptosporidium spp oocysts, with at least one positive calf detected in 54.5% of herds. Independent risk factors for cryptosporidiosis were: age ≥1 to ≤2 months and level of cleanness of calf house floor categorized as dirty (<.05. Similarly an increases risk of Cryptosporidium spp infection was found in calves from smallholder dairy units compared to traditional herds (<.05. The finding highlights that Cryptosporidium spp is prevalent among calves in the area under study. The high prevalence of cryptosporidiosis detected in this study suggests that it may have a significant impact on livestock industry and that the close interaction between cattle and human may play a role in zoonotic transmission to humans.

  4. Método rápido para la observación de Cryptosporidium en heces Rapid method for detection of cryptosporidium in stools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Barona

    1993-02-01

    Full Text Available Entre agosto de 1990 y diciembre de 1991 se examinaron 120 muestras de materia fecal de niños o adultos que consultaron por diarrea, sugestiva de ser causada por Cryptosporidium spp. En todos los casos se realizó la coloración con Lugol-Nigroslna, que proponemos, y se hizo la confirmación con la de Ziehl Neelsen modificada, pese a su limitación de teñir con el mismo patrón de coloración el Cryptosporldium y estructuras diferentes a él. En 20 (16.6% muestras (12 de niños y 8 de adultos se identificaron ooquistes de Cryptosporldlum spp y todas se confirmaron como positivas por la coloración de Ziehl Neelsen modificada. Dado que no siempre es fácil la observación de parásitos de poca prevalencia sugerimos esta coloración como ensayo de rutina porque ayuda a distinguir los ooquistes de Cryptosporidium y mejora la observación de todos los protozoarios.

    We examined 120 stool specimens from patients with diarrheal disease, suspected of being infected with Cryptosporidium. Preliminary observation was made with a Lugol-Nigrosine stain and confirmation with modified Ziehl-Neelsen. Twenty specimens (12 from children and 8 from adults (16.6% were positive for Cryptosporidium oocysts andevery one of them was confirmed with ZN stain. Since It may be difficult to detect low-prevalence parasites we suggest routine use of Lugol-Nigrosine which is useful for the detection of Cryptosporidium as well as of other protozoa.

  5. Identification of Cryptosporidium subtype isolates from HIV-seropositive patients in Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, María A; Montoya, Ana; Iborra, Asunción; Fuentes, Isabel

    2014-09-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. are enteric parasites that infect humans and animals. In immunocompromised patients infection can be fatal. This study was conducted to identify sub-populations of Cryptosporidium hominis and C. parvum isolates from HIV-seropositive patients in Equatorial Guinea. In a previous study conducted in Equatorial Guinea, faecal samples from 171 HIV patients with gastrointestinal symptoms were analyzed. Of these, 13 and 17 were positive for C. hominis and C. parvum, respectively. The isolates were characterized using gp60 gene analysis. The gp60 gene could only be detected in 57% (17/30) of cases (10 C. parvum and 7 C. hominis). Three C. hominis (Ia, Ib and Id) and two C. parvum (IIc and IIe) subtype families were detected, including several subtypes. The study identified a high diversity of Cryptosporidium subtypes, suggesting that anthroponotic transmission plays an important role in the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium spp. in HIV-seropositive patients in Equatorial Guinea. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Cryptosporidium diagnosis by qPCR in cats at Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Patrícia Santos Carrasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Carrasco L.P.S., Oliveira R.L.S., Moreira C.M.R., Santos C.R.G.R., Corgozinho K.B. & Souza H.J.M. [Cryptosporidium diagnosis by qPCR in cats at Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.] Diagnóstico de Cryptosporidium spp. pela técnica de qPCR em gatos no estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 38(Supl.:22-26, 2016. Programa de Pós-Graduação em MedicinaVeteriná- ria, Instituto de Veterinária, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR-465, Km 7, Seropédica, RJ 23890-000, Brasil. E-mail: carrasco.lara@gmail.com Cryptosporidium spp. is recognized as an important etiologic agent of diarrhea in many countries. The aim of this study was to detect the presence of DNA of the parasite Cryptosporidium spp. in feces of cats with history of chronic diarrhea attended in the Feline Medicine Sector of the Veterinary Hospital of the Federal Rural University of Rio de Janeiro, by the polymerase chain reaction technique in real time (RT-PCR. In this study, 100 animals were admitted, of any breed or sex and from 8 weeks of age. As inclusion criteria, patients had to have diarrhea history for more than three weeks, with little success of clinical response to previously established therapies. From the samples obtained by collecting via washing the animal colon and spontaneous defecation, methods of direct examination of the feces, centrifugal flotation technique and real-time PCR were carried out. Of all cats selected for this study, 10% showed infection by Cryptosporidium spp. Most positive animals were aged over one year (70% and only 30% had up to one year old. Cats were 50% purebred and 50% were domestic short hair cats. The clinical signs presented by these cats at the time of consultation were diarrhea (60% and prolapsed rectum (40%. Four animals had co-infections with other enteropathogens (40%, such as Giardia, Toxocara sp. or Tritrichomonas fetus alone or combined. We concluded that infection by

  7. Giardia and Cryptosporidium in harp and hooded seals from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbee, A J; Thompson, R C A; Measures, L M; Olson, M E

    2010-10-11

    Giardia and Cryptosporidium are protozoan parasites known to cause enteric disease in terrestrial wildlife species (mammals, reptiles and birds). Few surveys for Giardia and Cryptosporidium in marine wildlife species, such as pinnipeds, have been reported. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and genotype of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in two species of pinnipeds, harp seal (Phoca groenlandica) and hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. Faecal samples were collected from pup and adult seals and examined for the presence of cysts of Giardia and oocysts of Cryptosporidium using microscopy and immunofluorescent staining. Tissues from the small intestine of adult seals were also collected and examined for infections using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. Giardia cysts were found in the faeces of 42% (16/38) of adult harp seals, but in none of the harp seal pups (0/20). Although Giardia cysts were not detected in faeces of adult hooded seals (0/10) using microscopy, 80% tested positive for Giardia using PCR of intestinal tissue indicative of a true replicating infection. Both harp and hooded seals harboured infections with the zoonotic strain, Giardia duodenalis Assemblage A, as determined using a nested-PCR technique to amplify a small subunit ribosomal (SSU-rRNA) gene of Giardia. Cryptosporidium was not detected by microscopy, nor using the PCR technique on intestinal tissues from any of the 68 seals examined. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Aural-pharyngeal polyps associated with Cryptosporidium infection in three iguanas (Iguana iguana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, E W; Jacobson, E; Bartick, T E; Micinilio, J; Schimdt, R

    2001-03-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. infection was associated with aural-pharyngeal polyps in three iguanas (Iguana iguana). All iguanas were presented for masses protruding from the ear canal, and the disease was characterized by a chronic clinical course. The masses consisted of nests of cystic glands surrounded by abundant fibrous connective tissue and lined by hyperplastic cuboidal to pseudostratified columnar epithelium that was moderately to heavily colonized by cryptosporidial organisms. Electron microscopy revealed that the majority of organisms were trophozoites.

  9. Infectivity of gastric and intestinal Cryptosporidium species in immunocompetent Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kváč, Martin; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Secor, W. E.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 163, 1/2 (2009), s. 33-38 ISSN 0304-4017 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500960701; GA ČR GP523/07/P117 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Cryptosporidium spp. * Meriones unguiculatus * infectivity Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 2.278, year: 2009

  10. Cryptosporidiosis in Humans with Reference to the First Case of Cryptosporidium hominis Infection in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim Yılmazer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Cryptosporidiosis is a worldwide zoonosis. Microscopic examinations may fail due to indistinctive morphological peculiarities of causative species. Hence, molecular diagnostics has become more important. Methods: Stool samples from 150 patients were examined using carbol-fuchsin stain to determine Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts. Combined nested polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique was used for establishing different species in positive samples. The samples were also screened for other parasites by wet-mount and zinc sulfate flotation methods. Results: Microscopic examinations and molecular techniques revealed 0.67% (1/150 and 8.93% (5/56 positivity, respectively. Nested PCR-RFLP enabled the detection of Cryptosporidium hominis (C. hominis in one sample, while Cryptosporidium parvum (C. parvum was detected in four samples. With this study, C. hominis was reported from humans for the first time in Turkey. Among infected ones, three of which were children, four patients excreted C. parvum oocysts had gastroenteritis, and a patient positive for C. hominis had gastroenteritis accompanied by nausea and vomiting. No Giardia spp. and Entamoeba spp. were detected in all infected individuals. Conclusion: C. parvum cases outnumbered C. hominis cases, suggesting a zoonotic transmission although infected individuals were living in an urban area where animal husbandry was not allowed. However, water-borne pathogen contamination in the city’s water supply is considered a factor for transmission.

  11. Development of PCR-RFLP method to distinguish between Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis in Taiwan water samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ya-Tien; Tsaihong, John Chin; Tseng, Yu-Chuan; Tsai, Chia-Mu; Peng, Shih-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Cryptosporidium, a protozoan pathogen that causes cryptosporidiosis has emerged as an important source of diarrheal illness among humans and animals. The current routine laboratory technique used for Cryptosporidium diagnosis is light microscopy with acid-fast staining but the technique has low efficiency and sensitivity for species-specific identification. Single PCR to amplify a 220 bp fragment of 18 S ribosomal DNA of C. parvum and C. hominis was developed. The restriction enzymes, TaqI and VspI, were used to distinguish between amplicons of human and bovine C. parvum genotype. Water samples, collected from Lo-Na, Ton-Pu, Ho-Ping, and Jen-Ai, Taiwan contained only bovine C. parvum genotype whereas in the Ton-Pu and Jen-Ai samples C. hominis was also present. Thus, the used of PCR-RFLP allowed successful identification of Cryptosporidium in water samples and differentiation between human and bovine species.

  12. Analysis of the genetic diversity within Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum from imported and autochtonous cases of human cryptosporidiosis by mutation scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jex, Aaron R; Gasser, Robin B

    2008-11-01

    The present study investigated sequence variation in part of the 60 kilodalton glycoprotein (pgp60) gene among Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum isolates (n=115) from citizens of the UK inferred to have been infected whilst travelling abroad (to 25 countries) or in the UK. The genomic DNA samples from these isolates were subjected to PCR-coupled single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, followed by targeted sequencing of pgp60. Individual samples were classified to the genotypic and subgenotypic levels based on phylogenetic analysis (Bayesian inference) of pgp60 data, including published sequences for comparison. Based on this analysis, five C. hominis (Ia-If) and four C. parvum (IIa, IIc-IIe) genotypes were identified, equating to 16 and 10 subgenotypes, respectively. Of these genotypes, C. hominis Ib was predominant (n=82). Interestingly, one subgenotype (C. hominis Ib A10G2R2) accounted for the majority of the samples examined and was identified in travellers to 14 countries; the examination of published records suggested that C. hominis Ib A10G2R2 has a global distribution. Numerous new and seemingly rare subgenotypes (eight for C. hominis and six for C. parvum) were also discovered. In conclusion, the present study revealed substantial genetic variation in pgp60 within both C. hominis and C. parvum and emphasizes the need to undertake investigations of human and animal populations in countries for which there is no information on the genetic make-up of Cryptosporidium infecting humans.

  13. Occurrence and potential health risk of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in different water catchments in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsan, Amimul; Geurden, Thomas; Casaert, Stijn; Paulussen, Jef; De Coster, Lut; Schoemaker, Toon; Chalmers, Rachel; Grit, Grietje; Vercruysse, Jozef; Claerebout, Edwin

    2015-02-01

    Human wastewater and livestock can contribute to contamination of surface water with Cryptosporidium and Giardia. In countries where a substantial proportion of drinking water is produced from surface water, e.g., Belgium, this poses a constant threat on drinking water safety. Our objective was to monitor the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in different water catchment sites in Belgium and to discriminate between (oo)cysts from human or animal origin using genotyping. Monthly samples were collected from raw water and purified drinking water at four catchment sites. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were detected using USEPA method 1623 and positive samples were genotyped. No contamination was found in purified water at any site. In three catchments, only low numbers of (oo)cysts were recovered from raw water samples (agriculture may be a more important source of surface water contamination than human waste in this catchment. In catchment sites with contaminated surface water, such as the Blankaart, continuous monitoring of treated water for the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia would be justified and (point) sources of surface water contamination should be identified.

  14. Identification of opportunistic enteric parasites among immunocompetent patients with diarrhoea from Northern India and genetic characterisation of Cryptosporidium and Microsporidia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U Ghoshal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Enteric parasitic infestation is a major public health problem in developing countries. Parasites such as Cryptosporidium spp., Cyclospora spp., Cystoisospora spp. and Microsporidia may cause severe diarrhoea among immunocompromised patients. There is scanty data on their frequency among immunocompetent patients. Accordingly, we studied the frequency of enteric opportunistic parasites among immunocompetent patients with diarrhoea from northern India; we also performed genetic characterisation of Cryptosporidia and Microsporidia among them. Patients and Methods: Stool samples from 80 immunocompetent patients with diarrhoea, and 110 healthy controls were examined. Parasites were detected by direct microscopy, modified acid-fast (Kinyoun's and modified trichrome stain. Polymerase chain reaction – restriction fragment length polymorphism was used for genetic characterisation of selected species such as Cryptosporidia and Microsporidia. Results: Enteric parasites were detected in 16/80 (20% patients (mean age 28.8 ± 20 years, 45, 56% males and in 2/110 (1.8% healthy controls (P = 0.00007. Parasites detected were Cryptosporidium spp. (8/16, 50.0%, Cystoisospora spp. (4/16, 25%, Microsporidia (1/16, 6.25%, Cyclospora spp. (1/16, 6.25% and Giardia spp. (1/16, 6.25%. One patient had mixed infection with Cystoisospora spp. and Giardia spp. The species of Cryptosporidia and Microsporidia detected were Cryptosporidium hominis and Enterocytozoon bieneusi, respectively. Parasites were more often detected in younger patients (≤20 years of age than in older. Most of the parasite infected patients presented with chronic diarrhoea. Conclusion: Opportunistic enteric parasitic infestation was more common among immunocompetent patients with diarrhoea than healthy subjects. Special staining as well as molecular methods are essential for appropriate diagnosis of these parasites.

  15. Assessment of polymorphic genetic markers for multi-locus typing of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Guy; Chalmers, Rachel M

    2012-10-01

    The use of high resolution molecular tools to study Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis intra-species variation is becoming common practice, but there is currently no consensus in the methods used. The most commonly applied tool is partial gp60 gene sequence analysis. However, multi-locus schemes are acknowledged to improve resolution over analysis of a single locus, which neglects potential re-assortment of genes during the sexual phase of the Cryptosporidium life-cycle. Multi-locus markers have been investigated in isolates from a variety of sampling frames, in varying combinations and using different assays and methods of analysis. To identify the most informative markers as candidates for the development of a standardised multi-locus fragment size-based typing (MLFT) scheme to integrate with epidemiological analyses, we examined the published literature. A total of 31 MLFT studies were found, employing 55 markers of which 45 were applied to both C. parvum and C. hominis. Of the studies, 11 had sufficient raw data, from three or more markers, and a sampling frame containing at least 50 samples, for meaningful in-depth analysis using assessment criteria based on the sampling frame, study size, number of markers investigated in each study, marker characteristics (>2 nucleotide repeats) and the combinations of markers generating all possible multi-locus genotypes. Markers investigated differed between C. hominis and C. parvum. When each scheme was analysed for the fewest markers required to identify 95% of all MLFTs, some redundancy was identified in all schemes; an average redundancy of 40% for C. hominis and 27% for C. parvum. Ranking markers, based on the most productive combinations, identified two different sets of potentially most informative candidate markers, one for each species. These will be subjected to technical evaluation including typability (percentage of samples generating a complete multi-locus type) and discriminatory power by

  16. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium species and Giardia intestinalis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cryptosporidium species and Giardia intestinalis cause diarrheal infections in humans and other vertebrate animals globally and are considered to be of great public health importance. The study was conducted to determine the prevalence Cryptosporidium species and G. intestinalis infections among patients attending ...

  17. Emissie van Cryptosporidium en Giardia door landbouwhuisdieren

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijven JF; Bruin HAM de; Engels GB; Leenen EJTM; MGB

    1999-01-01

    In this study, the relative contributions of the pathogenic protozoa Cryptosporidium and Giardia by manure of farm animals in The Netherlands to the total yearly environmental load was studied. Manure of veal calves forms a very large source of Cryptosporidium (1.5 m 10 square 16 oocysts per year)

  18. Exploring global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, N.; Bouwman, A.F.; Beusen, A.H.W.; Medema, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium is a major cause of diarrhoea worldwide. This paper presents the first model-based inventory with 0.5 by 0.5 degree resolution of global Cryptosporidium emissions for the year 2000 from humans and animals to surface water. The model is based on nutrient

  19. First description of Cryptosporidium parvum in carrier pigeons (Columba livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Bruno César Miranda; Ferrari, Elis Domingos; da Cruz Panegossi, Mariele Fernanda; Nakamura, Alex Akira; Corbucci, Flávio Sader; Nagata, Walter Bertequini; Dos Santos, Bianca Martins; Gomes, Jancarlo Ferreira; Meireles, Marcelo Vasconcelos; Widmer, Giovanni; Bresciani, Katia Denise Saraiva

    2017-08-30

    The carrier pigeon and the domestic pigeon are different breeds of the species Columba livia. Carrier pigeons are used for recreational activities such as bird contests and exhibitions. Due to the close contact with humans, these birds may potentially represent a public health risk, since they can host and disseminate zoonotic parasites, such as those belonging to the genus Cryptosporidium (phylum Apicomplexa). The purpose of this work was the detection by microscopic and molecular techniques of Cryptosporidium spp. oocysts in fecal samples of carrier pigeons, and subsequently to sequence the 18S ribosomal RNA marker of positive samples to identify the species. A total of 100 fecal samples were collected individually in two pigeon breeding facilities from Formiga and Araçatuba, cities located in Minas Gerais state and São Paulo state, Brazil, respectively. The age of the birds ranged from one to 12 years; 56 were females and 44 males. Fecal smears were stained with negative malachite green, whereas the molecular characterization was based on the sequence of a ∼800bp fragment of the 18S rRNA gene. Microscopic examination of fecal smears revealed 4% (4/100) oocyst positivity. On the other hand, 7% (7/100) of positivity were found using nested PCR. Three samples were 99% to 100% similar to Cryptosporidium parvum 18S rDNA type A (Genbank AH006572) and the other three samples had 99% to 100% similarity to C. parvum 18S rDNA type B (Genbank AF308600). To our knowledge, this is the first report of C. parvum oocysts in carrier pigeons. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Low Lignin (Brown Mid-rib) Sorghum Genotypes Restrict Growth of Fusarium Spp. as Compared with Near-Isogenic Wild-Type Sorghum

    Science.gov (United States)

    To increase usability of sorghum for bioenergy and forages, two different brown midrib (bmr) genes, bmr-6 and bmr-12, were backcrossed into five elite backgrounds, resulting in reduced lignin near-isogenic genotypes. Field-grown grain from bmr-6 and bmr-12 plants had significantly reduced colonizati...

  1. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium species isolated from HIV/AIDS patients in southwest of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafari, Reza; Rafiei, Abdollah; Tavalla, Mehdi; Moradi Choghakabodi, Parastoo; Nashibi, Rohangez; Rafiei, Reza

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence and species of Cryptosporidium among HIV/AIDS patients in southwest of Iran. Two hundred fifty faecal samples from HIV patients were examined for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts using a conventional coproscopic approach. Such oocysts were detected in 18 (7.2%) out of 250 faecal samples. Genomic DNAs from 250 samples were then subjected to a nested-PCR-RFLP technique targeting different loci of 18S rRNA gene for species identification. Out of 250 samples, 27 (10.8%) were positive for different Cryptosporidium spp; Restriction patterns resulting from the digestion of the nested amplicon with restriction endonucleases VspI and SspI showed that C. parvum (70.38%) was the most prevalent species, followed by C. hominis (25.92%) and C. meleagridis (3.7%), respectively. The mean CD4+ T-cell count was 215 cells/μL. There was a strong association between cryptosporidiosis and CD4+ T-cell count (P = 0.000) with the highest prevalence recorded among patients with CD4+ T-cell count CD4+ T-cell count increases. Also HIV infection increased the risk of having Cryptosporidium. Our epidemiological findings are useful for any preventive intervention to control disease diffusion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Drug treatment and novel drug target against Cryptosporidium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargala G.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis emergence triggered the screening of many compounds for potential anti-cryptosporidial activity in which the majority were ineffective. The outbreak of cryptosporidiosis which occurred in Milwaukee in 1993 was not only the first significant emergence of Cryptosporidium spp. as a major human pathogen but also a huge waterborne outbreak thickening thousands of people from a major city in North America. Since then, outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis are regularly occurring throughout the world. New drugs against this parasite became consequently urgently needed. Among the most commonly used treatments against cryptosporidiosis are paromomycin, and azithromycin, which are partially effective. Nitazoxanide (NTZ’s effectiveness was demonstrated in vitro, and in vivo using several animal models and finally in clinical trials. It significantly shortened the duration of diarrhea and decreased mortality in adults and in malnourished children. NTZ is not effective without an appropriate immune response. In AIDS patients, combination therapy restoring immunity along with antimicrobial treatment of Cryptosporidium infection is necessary. Recent investigations focused on the potential of molecular-based immunotherapy against this parasite. Others tested the effects of probiotic bacteria, but were unable to demonstrate eradication of C. parvum. New synthetic isoflavone derivatives demonstrated excellent activity against C. parvum in vitro and in a gerbil model of infection. Newly synthesized nitroor non nitro- thiazolide compounds, derived from NTZ, have been recently shown to be at least as effective as NTZ against C. parvum in vitro development and are promising new therapeutic agents.

  3. Freqüência de oocistos de coccídios do gênero "Cryptosporidium" em ovinos no estado do Rio de Janeiro Frequency of gender of “Cryptosporidium” coccidia in sheep in the Rio de Janeiro State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Ricardo da Silva Fiúza

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A freqüência de oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. foi investigada em 10 rebanhos ovinos no estado do Rio de Janeiro em 2007. Amostras fecais de 130 ovinos foram coletadas para identificar oocistos de Cryptosporidium spp. pela técnica de Ziehl-Neelsen modificada. Verificou-se que 41% dos animais estavam infectados pelo protozoário, não sendo observadas diferenças significativas (P=0,1728, P=0,7082 e P=0,2850 e P=0,4997 com relação a sexo, idades dentro do sexo e classes zootécnicas, respectivamente. Distintos tamanhos e formas dos oocistos revelaram a existência de espécies diferentes de Cryptosporidium spp. parasitando estes ovinos, de modo que o adensamento dos animais observados nas criações intensivas foi determinante fator de risco na infecção.The frequency of Cryptosporidium spp. oocists was evaluated in 10 sheep herds in the Rio de Janeiro state in 2007. Faecal samples from 130 sheep were collected for the identification of Cryptosporidium spp. oocists by using the Ziehl–Neelsen modified technique. Statistical analysis showed that 41% of the animals were infected with this protozoa and no significant differences (P = 0,1728, P = 0.7082 and P=0.2850 and P=0.4997 were observed for sex, age between gender sex and animal class, respectively. Different sizes and shapes of Cryptosporidium oocists indicated the probable existence of different species of Cryptosporidium in these animals, and the big number of the animals in the intensive creation is the determinant risk factor for the infection.

  4. Genetic characterization of Cryptosporidium in animal and human isolates from Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijjawi, Nawal; Mukbel, Rami; Yang, Rongchang; Ryan, Una

    2016-09-15

    Little is known about the epidemiology of Cryptosporidium in Jordan and to date, only one genotyping study has been conducted on Cryptosporidium isolates from Jordanian children. In the present study, a total of 284 faecal samples from Jordanian cattle, sheep, goats and chicken and 48 human faecal samples were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium using an 18S quantitative PCR (qPCR) and a C. parvum/C. hominis specific qPCR at a lectin locus. Of these, 37 of 284 animal faecal samples were positive by qPCR at the 18S locus giving an overall prevalence of 11.6%. The point prevalence of Cryptosporidium in chickens, sheep, horses, cattle and goats ranged from 4.8% (chickens) to 18.7% (cattle). A total of six species were detected; C. xiaoi (n=9),C. andersoni (n=7),C. ryanae (n=5),C. parvum (n=4),C. baileyi (n=1) and a genetically distinct and potentially novel species in two isolates from horses. Sub-genotype analysis of the 4 C. parvum isolates at the 60-kDa glycoprotein (gp60) locus identified subtype IIaA19G2R1 (n=2) and IIaA16GR1 (n=2). For the human samples, 4 positives (8.3% prevalence) were detected. Of these, two were C. parvum (subtypes IIdA20G1 and IIaA15G2R1) and two were C. hominis (subtypes 1bA9G3 and 1bA10G2R2). Further studies are required to better understand the epidemiology and transmission of Cryptosporidium in Jordan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Various pfcrt and pfmdr1 Genotypes of Plasmodium falciparum Cocirculate with P. malariae, P. ovale spp., and P. vivax in Northern Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fançony, Cláudia; Gamboa, Dina; Sebastião, Yuri; Hallett, Rachel; Sutherland, Colin; Sousa-Figueiredo, José Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy for malaria has become widely available across Africa. Populations of Plasmodium falciparum that were previously dominated by chloroquine (CQ)-resistant genotypes are now under different drug selection pressures. P. malariae, P. ovale curtisi, and P. ovale wallikeri are sympatric with P. falciparum across the continent and are frequently present as coinfections. The prevalence of human Plasmodium species was determined by PCR using DNA from blood spots collected during a cross-sectional survey in northern Angola. P. falciparum was genotyped at resistance-associated loci in pfcrt and pfmdr1 by real-time PCR or by direct sequencing of amplicons. Of the 3,316 samples collected, 541 (16.3%) contained Plasmodium species infections; 477 (88.2%) of these were P. falciparum alone, 6.5% were P. falciparum and P. malariae together, and 1.1% were P. vivax alone. The majority of the remainder (3.7%) harbored P. ovale curtisi or P. ovale wallikeri alone or in combination with other species. Of 430 P. falciparum isolates genotyped for pfcrt, 61.6% carried the wild-type allele CVMNK at codons 72 to 76, either alone or in combination with the resistant allele CVIET. No other pfcrt allele was found. Wild-type alleles dominated at codons 86, 184, 1034, 1042, and 1246 of the pfmdr1 locus among the sequenced isolates. In contrast to previous studies, P. falciparum in the study area comprises an approximately equal mix of genotypes associated with CQ sensitivity and with CQ resistance, suggesting either lower drug pressure due to poor access to treatment in rural areas or a rapid impact of the policy change away from the use of standard monotherapies. PMID:22850519

  6. Effective Concentration and Detection of Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and the Microsporidia from Environmental Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Moss

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium spp., Giardia spp., and members of Microsporidia are enteropathogenic parasites of humans and animals, producing asymptomatic to severe intestinal infections. To circumvent various impediments associated with current detection methods, we tested a method providing multistage purification and separation in a single, confined step. Standard real-time PCR was used as a detection method. Samples spiked with C. parvum and G. intestinalis were split for comparison to standard Method 1623. Results were equivalent to immunomagnetic procedures for Cryptosporidium, and Giardia. Overall percent recovery for Cryptosporidium with Method 1623 averaged 26.89% (std 21.44%; min = 0%; max = 73% and was similar but less variable for qPCR method at an estimated average of 27.67 (std 17.65%; min = 5%; max = 63%. For Giardia, Method 1623 had an overall average recovery of 27.11% (std 17.98%; min = 1%; max = 58%, while multistage purification and qPCR had an estimated lower overall recovery at 18.58% (std 13.95%; min = 0%; max = 35%. Microsporidia were also readily detected with an estimated recovery of 46.81% overall (std 17.66%; min = 18%; max = 70% for E. intestinalis and 38.90% (std 14.36%; min = 13%; max = 62% for E. bieneusi.

  7. First molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium in Yemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyousefi, N A; Mahdy, M A K; Lim, Y A L; Xiao, L; Mahmud, R

    2013-05-01

    Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of humans and animals and has a worldwide distribution. The parasite has a unique epidemiology in Middle Eastern countries where the IId subtype family of Cryptosporidium parvum dominates. However, there has been no information on Cryptosporidium species in Yemen. Thus, this study was conducted in Yemen to examine the distribution of Cryptosporidium species and subtype families. Fecal samples were collected from 335 patients who attended hospitals in Sana'a city. Cryptosporidium species were determined by PCR and sequence analysis of the 18 s rRNA gene. Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis subtypes were identified based on sequence analysis of the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Out of 335 samples, 33 (9.9%) were positive for Cryptosporidium. Of them, 97% were identified as C. parvum whilst 1 case (3%) was caused by C. hominis. All 7 C. parvum isolates subtyped belonged to the IIaA15G2R1 subtype. The common occurrence of the zoonotic IIa subtype family of C. parvum highlights the potential occurrence of zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis in Yemen. However, this postulation needs confirmation with future molecular epidemiological studies of cryptosporidiosis in both humans and animals in Yemen.

  8. Cryptosporidium infections in Denmark, 2010-2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensvold, Christen Rune; Ethelberg, Steen; Hansen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    . RESULTS: A total of 689 Cryptosporidium-positive stool samples were submitted by 387 patients. Limiting case episodes to two months (60 days), a total of 388 case episodes representing 387 patients were identified. Cryptosporidiosis was most common among infants and toddlers. Moreover, a peak in incidence...... was observed among younger adults aged 23-24 years. In 43 Cryptosporidium-positive faecal samples, identification was performed to species and subtype level. Cryptosporidium parvum was found in 34 samples, C. hominis in eight, and C. meleagridis in one sample; C. parvum subtypes IIaA15G2R1 (n = 10) and IIaA16G...

  9. The first report of Cryptosporidium bovis, C. ryanae and Giardia duodenalis sub-assemblage A-II in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Presedo, Ignacio; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana; González-Warleta, Marta; Mezo, Mercedes; Gómez-Bautista, Mercedes; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel; Castro-Hermida, José Antonio

    2013-11-08

    The aim of the present study was to identify the species and/or genotypes of Cryptosporidium and Giardia duodenalis infecting roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) in Galicia (NW Spain). The presence of both enteropathogens was investigated in 212 faecal samples from roe deer shot in diverse game preserves in three different areas of Galicia. The samples were analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy and PCR amplification, and fragments of the 18S SSU rRNA gene of Cryptosporidium and the β-giardin gene of G. duodenalis were sequenced. In total, 9 samples (4.2%) were positive for Cryptosporidium and 19 samples (8.9%) for G. duodenalis. These samples tested positive with both techniques. However, gene sequencing was only possible for Cryptosporidium in 6 of the samples and for G. duodenalis in 7 of the samples. Cryptosporidium bovis was identified in 3 samples and C. ryanae oocysts were detected in another 3 samples. Sequencing of the amplicons identified G. duodenalis sub-assemblage A-II in 7 samples. Both Cryptosporidium and G. duodenalis infections were more prevalent in juvenile than in adult animals, although the differences were not significant. G. duodenalis was more prevalent than Cryptosporidium in both age groups, although again the differences were not statistically significant. The mean intensity of infection by Cryptosporidium and G. duodenalis was similar in both age groups and ranged between 5 and 225 oocysts/g and 5 and 320 cysts/g of faeces, respectively. This study represents the first molecular characterization of these parasites in Spanish roe deer. Identification of C. bovis and G. duodenalis sub-assemblage A-II indicates that zoonotic transmission of these enteropathogens between roe deer and humans is possible and that cross transmission of some Cryptosporidium species and G. duodenalis (sub-assemblage A-II) may occur between related animal species sharing the same habitats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Reação de resistência de genótipos de tomateiro (Lycopersicum spp. à infecção por Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn Resistance reaction of tomato genotypes (Lycopersicum spp. to Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Rodrigues Cassiolato

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Dada a importância da tomaticultura no Brasil e das enfermidades que atacam esta cultura, da mesma forma que visando futuros estados em programas de melhoramento vegetal para resistência à patógenos, este trabalho teve por objetivos: avaliar o grau de patogenicidade de quatro isolados de Rhizoctonia solani obtidos de plantas doentes de tomateiro (RT, berinjelas (RB1 e RB2 e pimentão (RP, em viveiros, frente a 9 genótipos de tomateiros e avaliar a reação de resistência de 73 genótipos de tomateiros ao R. solani. Nos experimentos utilizou-se solo esterilizado, em condições de casa de vegetação. Para o experimento I, os isolados de R. solani, oriundos das plantas de tomateiro (RT e berinjela (RB, foram igualmente mais patogênicos que os isolados de berinjela (RB, e pimentão (RP, com relação aos 9 genótipos de tomateiro testados. Pode-se dizer que os isolados variaram em graus de agressividade. Quanto às reações de resistência a R. solani, observou-se que os diferentes genótipos não diferiram estatisticamente entre si. Com relação ao experimento II, entre os 73 genótipos de tomateiro (incluindo espécies selvagens, variedades nacionais e introduções, pode-se observar que houve grande variabilidade quanto a reação de resistência a R. solani (isolado do tomateiro - RT, com percentuais de sobrevivência de plantas variando de 91%, para a cultivar Quinck Pick, até 0% de sobrevivência para o genótipo LA-462. Não foi verificada imunidade em nenhum material avaliado e sim níveis de resistência, onde esta, expressa em percentagem de sobrevivência, ocorreu de uma maneira contínua, desde uma reação de suscetibilidade até altos níveis de resistência.The present study was undertaken with the following objectives: 1 to evaluate the level of pathogenicity of four Rhizoctonia solani isolates obtained from diseased tomato plants (RT, from eggplant (RB1 and RB2, and pepper (RP and tested on 9 tomato genotypes grown in

  11. First survey of Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Enterocytozoon in diarrhoeic children from Wuhan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Fan, Yingying; Koehler, Anson V; Ma, Guangxu; Li, Tao; Hu, Min; Gasser, Robin B

    2017-07-01

    Intestinal protozoan pathogens cause significant diarrhoeal diseases in children. However, to date, there has been limited genetic study of the intestinal pathogens Cryptosporidium, Giardia and Enterocytozoon in humans in China, with the exception of research in a small number of cities/provinces. In the present study, PCR-based tools were used to detect and characterise these protistan parasites from 500 children with a history of diarrhoea in Wuhan and environs, Hubei province, China. Genomic DNAs from faecal samples were screened for the particular protists by PCR utilising regions in the small subunit (SSU) of the nuclear ribosomal RNA, the 60kDa glycoprotein (gp60), the internal transcribed spacer of nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS) and/or the triose phosphate isomerase (tpi) genes as markers. Cryptosporidium meleagridis subtype IIIb (10/500, 2.0%), Giardia duodenalis assemblage A (7/500, 1.4%) and Enterocytozoon bieneusi genotype D (1/500, 0.2%) were identified in small percentages of the 500 samples. No significant gender- or age-associated differences in the prevalence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia infections were found. Future studies might focus on the occurrence of these protists in children as well as animals, with an emphasis on Cryptosporidium meleagridis in pets and agriculturally important birds, in different parts of Hubei province. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A genome-scale metabolic model of Cryptosporidium hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanee, Niti; Roberts, Seth B; Fong, Stephen S; Manque, Patricio; Buck, Gregory A

    2010-05-01

    The apicomplexan Cryptosporidium is a protozoan parasite of humans and other mammals. Cryptosporidium species cause acute gastroenteritis and diarrheal disease in healthy humans and animals, and cause life-threatening infection in immunocompromised individuals such as people with AIDS. The parasite has a one-host life cycle and commonly invades intestinal epithelial cells. The current genome annotation of C. hominis, the most serious human pathogen, predicts 3884 genes of which ca. 1581 have predicted functional annotations. Using a combination of bioinformatics analysis, biochemical evidence, and high-throughput data, we have constructed a genome-scale metabolic model of C. hominis. The model is comprised of 213 gene-associated enzymes involved in 540 reactions among the major metabolic pathways and provides a link between the genotype and the phenotype of the organism, making it possible to study and predict behavior based upon genome content. This model was also used to analyze the two life stages of the parasite by integrating the stage-specific proteomic data for oocyst and sporozoite stages. Overall, this model provides a computational framework to systematically study and analyze various functional behaviors of C. hominis with respect to its life cycle and pathogenicity.

  13. Variações genéticas em populações de Eucalyptus spp. detectadas por meio de marcadores moleculares Genetic variations in Eucalyptus spp. genotypes detected by means of molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronaldo Pereira Caixeta

    2003-06-01

    can contribute significantly to a basic understanding of the crop and character investigated and help generate and develop improved products. The objective of this work is to utilize RAPD markers to detect and maximize the genetic variability in eucalyptus genotypes, identifying crossings favorable to a forest breeding program, aiming at multiple use. A total of 44 natural hybrid genotypes of the Eucalyptus genus, planted in northwestern Minas Gerais was analyzed. The RAPD molecular markers presented efficient discriminating power among the 44 evaluated genotypes, determining an average genetic distance among them of 54% and genetic divergence ranging from 24 to 73%. This shows that there is a wide genetic basis among the individuals analyzed, allowing a manipulation of this material in breeding programs. The genetic distance among the genotypes 5 and 9; 9 and 10; 9 and 19; 9 and 25; 9 and 33; 9 and 35; 9 and 36; 9 and 44; 10 and 33; 12 and 19; 12 and 33; 12 and 39 proved to be either greater or equal to 70%. Grouping analysis established by the UPGMA method, and the cut of 80% of the total genetic distance as a criterion allowed the formation of nine distinct groups. These groups presented an average genetic divergence superior to 60%. The highest mean of distance occurred between group I and the remaining groups, with 67%. The evaluation by RAPD molecular markers provided an indirect identification of the genetic variation of the genotypes and, in this sense, new crosses for the production of specific hybrids can be generated, increasing the genetic divergence and yield of wood products of superior quality for multiple uses in forest breeding programs.

  14. Avaliação da divergência nutricional de genótipos de cana-de-açúcar (Saccharum spp. Evaluation of the nutritional divergence of sugarcane (Saccharum spp. genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acyr Wanderley de Paula Freitas

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se neste trabalho avaliar a divergência nutricional de genótipos de cana-de-açúcar para uso na alimentação de animais ruminantes. Foram avaliados os genótipos: RB72454, RB835486, SP80-1842, IAC86-2480, RB977512, RB867515, RB935566, RB925345, RB977625, SP79-1011, SP80-1816, SP81-3250 e SP91-1049, colhidos em soca aos 11 meses de idade, quanto às variáveis FDN, hemicelulose, lignina, relação FDN x carboidratos solúveis, fração indegradável da FDN, taxa de degradação da FDN e taxa de degradação da matéria seca. A aplicação da análise de agrupamento segundo o método de Tocher, utilizando a matriz de distâncias euclidiana média, permitiu o estabelecimento de três grupos de genótipos. A FDN e a taxa de degradação da MS foram as variáveis de maior importância para a discriminação dos grupos, contribuindo cada uma com 25,64% do poder de discriminação total. A fração indegradável da FDN foi a variável que apresentou a menor contribuição para discriminação dos grupos (11,54%. A variáveis FDN, fração indegradável da FDN, hemicelulose, taxa de degradação da MS e taxa de degradação da FDN mostraram-se eficazes para o estudo da diversidade nutricional da cana-de-açúcar. O grupo III, constituído pelo clone RB977512, apresentou as melhores médias para as variáveis avaliadas e, portanto, pode ser considerado de melhor qualidade nutricional para alimentação de ruminantes.The objective of this trial was to study the nutritional divergence of sugarcane genotypes for feeding ruminants. The following sugarcane genotypes were evaluated: RB72454, RB835486, SP80-1842, IAC86-2480, RB977512, RB867515, RB935566, RB925345, RB977625, SP79-1011, SP80-1816, SP81-3250, and SP91-1049 all harvested at 11 months of age. The discriminatory variables were: neutral detergent fiber (NDF, hemicellulose, lignin, NDF to soluble carbohydrate ratio, NDF undegradable fraction, and rates of NDF and DM degradation

  15. Cryptosporidium testudinis sp. n., Cryptosporidium ducismarci Traversa, 2010 and Cryptosporidium tortoise genotype III (Apicomplexa: Cryptosporidiidae) in tortoises

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježková, Jana; Horčičková, Michaela; Hlásková, Lenka; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Novák, J.; Hofmannová, L.; McEvoy, J.; Kváč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 63, October 14 (2016), č. článku 035. ISSN 1803-6465 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01090S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : morphology * transmission studies * taxonomy * new species * molecular phylogeny Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.082, year: 2016

  16. Cryptosporidium en Giardia in Nederlandse zwembaden

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schets FM; Engels GB; Leenen EJTM; MGB

    2003-01-01

    Zwembad gerelateerde explosies van cryptosporidiose zijn regelmatig gerapporteerd in Groot-Brittannie en de Verenigde Staten. De bron van de explosie kon soms achterhaald worden doordat Cryptosporidium oocysten in het zwembadwater of in het terugspoelwater van de zwembadfilters konden worden

  17. A foodborne outbreak of Cryptosporidium hominis infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethelberg, S.; Lisby, M.; Vestergaard, L. S.

    2009-01-01

    Foodborne outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis are uncommon. In Denmark human cases are generally infrequently diagnosed. In 2005 an outbreak of diarrhoea affected company employees near Copenhagen. In all 99 employees were reported ill; 13 were positive for Cryptosporidium hominis infection. Two...

  18. Cryptosporidium: A Guide to Water Filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cryptosporidium Tracking in the United States CryptoNet Healthy Water Sites Healthy Water Drinking Water Healthy Swimming Global ... lt;/label> Parasites Home A Guide to Water Filters Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Filtering ...

  19. Cryptosporidium Infections Among Children in Peru

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-09-25

    Cryptosporidium is a waterborne bacteria that can cause severe diarrhea and vomiting. In this podcast, Dr. Vita Cama, CDC microbiologist, discusses an article in the October 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases. The paper examines Cryptosporidium infections among children in Peru, including the number of infections, symptoms experienced, and what species of Crypto were responsible.  Created: 9/25/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 9/25/2008.

  20. Características pós-colheita de frutos de genótipos de bananeira (Musa spp. Post-harvest fruit characteristics of different banana (Musa spp. genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo Conceição Cerqueira

    2002-12-01

    íbridos da Prata São Tomé (ST42-08 e Pacovan (PV42-85, PV42-81, PV42-68, PV42-53, PV42-129 e PV42-143 podem substituir as cultivares Prata Comum e Pacovan nos sitemas produção.The knowledge of the post-harvest characteristics of new banana hybrids is an important information that helps the breeder in making his decision. This work has the objective to evaluate banana genotypes in relation to their post-harvest characteristics and resistance to fruit drop. Fruits of the second hand of 16 hybrids (Calipso, Bucaneiro, Ambrosia, YB42-21, PV42-53, PV42-68, PV42-81, PV42-85, PV42-129, PV42-142, PV42-143, ST12-31, ST42-08, PV03-44, FHIA-03 and SH 3640 and four cultivars (Pacovan, Prata Comum, Nam and Figue Pomme Naine were evaluated according to their weight, length, circumference, pulp/peel ratio, resistance to fruit drop, firmness, total soluble solids (TSS, total titratable acidity (TTA, TSS/TTA ratio and maturation period. A completely randomized experimental design was used, with five replications, except fruit firmness with ten replications, each unit was constituted by one fruit. The data were submitted to the analysis of variance and the means were compared by the Scott & Knott test at 5% of probability. The cultivar Nam had the lowest TTA and the highest TSS/TTA ratio, while the highest fruit firmness was observed in PV42-81 and PV42-53. The SH 3640 produced the heaviest fruits, and Bucaneiro and PV42-81 produced the longest ones. PV42-85 and ST42-08 showed high resistance to fruit drop, with no statistical difference from 'Pacovan'. 'Prata Comum' showed the lowest resistance. The genotypes ' Nam', PV42-143 and PV42-129 showed longer shelf life when compared to 'Prata Comum'. 'Nam' genotype can be considered as alternative in banana production. SH3640 the Prata dwarf hybrid, might be considered as a new cultivar. Hybrids from Prata São Tomé (ST42-08 and from Pacovan (PV42-68, PV42-81, PV42-85, PV42-129 e PV42-143 can replace Prata Comum and Pacovan in the banana

  1. Genotypic and Phenotypic Detection of AmpC β-lactamases in Enterobacter spp. Isolated from a Teaching Hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Khari, Fatin Izzati; Karunakaran, Rina; Rosli, Roshalina; Tee Tay, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence of chromosomal and plasmid-mediated β-lactamases (AmpC) genes in a collection of Malaysian isolates of Enterobacter species. Several phenotypic tests for detection of AmpC production of Enterobacter spp. were evaluated and the agreements between tests were determined. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for 117 Enterobacter clinical isolates obtained from the Medical Microbiology Diagnostic Laboratory, University Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia, from November 2012-February 2014 were determined in accordance to CLSI guidelines. AmpC genes were detected using a multiplex PCR assay targeting the MIR/ACT gene (closely related to chromosomal EBC family gene) and other plasmid-mediated genes, including DHA, MOX, CMY, ACC, and FOX. The AmpC β-lactamase production of the isolates was assessed using cefoxitin disk screening test, D69C AmpC detection set, cefoxitin-cloxacillin double disk synergy test (CC-DDS) and AmpC induction test. Among the Enterobacter isolates in this study, 39.3% were resistant to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone and 23.9% were resistant to ceftazidime. Ten (8.5%) of the isolates were resistant to cefepime, and one isolate was resistant to meropenem. Chromosomal EBC family gene was amplified from 36 (47.4%) E. cloacae and three (25%) E. asburiae. A novel blaDHA type plasmid-mediated AmpC gene was identified for the first time from an E. cloacae isolate. AmpC β-lactamase production was detected in 99 (89.2%) of 111 potential AmpC β-lactamase producers (positive in cefoxitin disk screening) using D69C AmpC detection set. The detection rates were lower with CC-DDS (80.2%) and AmpC induction tests (50.5%). There was low agreement between the D69C AmpC detection set and the other two phenotypic tests. Of the 40 isolates with AmpC genes detected in this study, 87.5%, 77.5% and 50.0% of these isolates were positive by the D69C AmpC detection set, CC-DDS and AmpC induction tests, respectively

  2. An advanced uracil DNA glycosylase-supplemented loop-mediated isothermal amplification (UDG-LAMP) technique used in the sensitive and specific detection of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, and Cryptosporidium meleagridis in AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Shirzad; Moosavi, Seyedeh Fatemeh; Karimi, Azadeh; Chegeni, Ali Sharafi; Saki, Mohammad; Namdari, Parsa; Rashno, Mohammad Menati; Varzi, Ali Mohamad; Tarrahi, Mohammad Javad; Almasian, Mohammad

    2017-12-24

    The rapid and accurate detection of Cryptosporidium spp. is critically important for the prevention and timely treatment of cryptosporidiosis in AIDS patients (APs). This study was conducted to examine a UDG-LAMP technique for the first time to diagnose cryptosporidiosis in APs. After collecting demographic and clinical data, three stool samples were collected from the participants (120 volunteering APs). The microscopic examination of stained smears using the acid-fast method and the UDG-LAMP assay were performed for each sample. 10% of APs were infected with Cryptosporidium spp. The number of detected cryptosporidiosis cases using the acid-fast staining and UDG-LAMP methods were significantly different (P < 0.001). Diarrhea and weight loss were found to be significantly associated with cryptosporidiosis in patients (P < 0.05). The pretreatment of LAMP reagents with UDG successfully eliminated the likelihood of product re-amplification remaining from previous reactions. The UDG-LAMP technique could detect cryptosporidiosis in APs with high sensitivity and rapidity without carryover contamination. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Current status and future trends in Cryptosporidium and Giardia epidemiology in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Y A L; Ahmad, R A; Smith, H V

    2008-06-01

    Cryptosporidium and Giardia are major causes of diarrhoeal diseases of humans worldwide, and are included in the World Health Organisation's 'Neglected Diseases Initiative'. Cryptosporidium and Giardia occur commonly in Malaysian human and non-human populations, but their impact on disease, morbidity and cost of illness is not known. The commonness of contributions from human (STW effluents, indiscriminate defaecation) and non-human (calving, lambing, muck spreading, slurry spraying, pasturing/grazing of domestic animals, infected wild animals) hosts indicate that many Malaysian environments, particularly water and soil, are sufficiently contaminated to act as potential vehicles for the transmission of disease. To gain insight into the morbidity and mortality caused by human cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis, they should be included into differential diagnoses, and routine laboratory testing should be performed and (as for many infectious diseases) reported to a centralised public health agency. To understand transmission routes and the significance of environmental contamination better will require further multidisciplinary approaches and shared resources, including raising national perceptions of the parasitological quality of drinking water. Here, the detection of Cryptosporidium and Giardia should be an integral part of the water quality requirement. A multidisciplinary approach among public health professionals in the water industry and other relevant health- and environment-associated agencies is also required in order to determine the significance of Cryptosporidium and Giardia contamination of Malaysian drinking water. Lastly, adoption of validated methods to determine the species, genotype and subgenotype of Cryptosporidium and Giardia present in Malaysia will assist in developing effective risk assessment, management and communication models.

  4. Multilocus sequence typing and genetic structure of Cryptosporidium hominis from children in Kolkata, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatei, Wangeci; Das, Pradeep; Dutta, Phalguni; Sen, Abhik; Cama, Vitaliano; Lal, Altaf A; Xiao, Lihua

    2007-03-01

    Endemicity of cryptosporidiosis in India has been documented with little genetic characterization of the parasites. Fifty Cryptosporidium-positive specimens collected between 2001 and 2004 from pediatric patients in Kolkata, India were analyzed for parasite genetic structure using multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Genotype analyses showed the presence of Cryptosporidium hominis, Cryptosporidium meleagridis and Cryptosporidium felis in 49, 2 and 1 patients, respectively (two patients had mixed infections of C. hominis and C. meleagridis). To assess the extent of genetic heterogeneity of C. hominis, minisatellites, microsatellites and polymorphic markers in three different chromosomes were sequenced, including genes encoding the 60kDa glycoprotein (GP60), a 47kDa protein (CP47), a mucin-like protein (Mucin1), a serine repeat antigen (MSC6-7), and a 56kDa trans-membrane protein (CP56) in chromosome 6, the 70kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) in chromosome 2, and a T-rich gene fragment (Chrom3T) in chromosome 3. Population sub-structure of C. hominis based on multilocus gene sequences showed that there were 25 multilocus subtypes defined by combined sequence length and nucleotide polymorphism, which formed four distinct groups in this population. Significant intra- and inter-genic linkage disequilibria were observed with minimum recombination or expansion of limited subtypes, all indicative of a mostly clonal population structure. The results highlight the importance of high resolution MLST in studying Cryptosporidium population sub-structure especially when length polymorphism may be inadequate in identifying unique subtypes. The significance of the diverse MLST within C. hominis in relation to geographical and temporal factors and clinical manifestations of disease warrants further investigations.

  5. Intestinal immune response to human Cryptosporidium sp. infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Guerrant. 2007. Heavy cryptosporidial infections in children in northeast Brazil: comparison of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum...Asgharpour, C. T. Ng, D. P. Calfee, R. L. Guerrant, V. Maro, S. Ole-Nguyaine, and J. F. Shao. 2005. Short report: asymptomatic Cryptosporidium hominis ...JAN 2008 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Intestinal immune response to human Cryptosporidium sp. infection 5a

  6. Refractory and/or Relapsing Cryptococcosis Associated with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome: Clinical Features, Genotype, and Virulence Factors of Cryptococcus spp. Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Erika; Vitali, Lucia H; Tonani, Ludmilla; Kress, Marcia R Von Zeska; Takayanagui, Osvaldo M; Martinez, Roberto

    2016-05-04

    Refractory and relapsing crytocococcosis in acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients have a poor prognosis. The risk factors for this complicated infection course were evaluated by comparing refractory and/or relapsing cryptococcosis in human immunodeficiency virus-coinfected patients (cohort 1) with another group of AIDS patients who adequately responded to antifungals (cohort 2). Except for one isolate of Cryptococcus gattii from a cohort 2 case, all other isolates were identified as Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii, sex type α, genotype VNI, including Cryptococcus reisolated from the relapse or in the refractory state. No differences were observed with respect to Cryptococcus capsule size and in the melanin and phospholipase production. The cohort 1 patients presented higher prevalence of cryptococcemia, cerebral dissemination, chronic liver disease, and leucopenia, and have increased death rate. Apparently, the refractory and/or relapsing cryptococcosis in the AIDS patients were more related to the host and the extent of the infection than to the fungal characteristics. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  7. Cryptosporidium,Giardia, Cryptococcus, Pneumocystis genetic variability: cryptic biological species or clonal near-clades?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Tibayrenc

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available An abundant literature dealing with the population genetics and taxonomy of Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., Pneumocystis spp., and Cryptococcus spp., pathogens of high medical and veterinary relevance, has been produced in recent years. We have analyzed these data in the light of new population genetic concepts dealing with predominant clonal evolution (PCE recently proposed by us. In spite of the considerable phylogenetic diversity that exists among these pathogens, we have found striking similarities among them. The two main PCE features described by us, namely highly significant linkage disequilibrium and near-clading (stable phylogenetic clustering clouded by occasional recombination, are clearly observed in Cryptococcus and Giardia, and more limited indication of them is also present in Cryptosporidium and Pneumocystis. Moreover, in several cases, these features still obtain when the near-clades that subdivide the species are analyzed separately ("Russian doll pattern". Lastly, several sets of data undermine the notion that certain microbes form clonal lineages simply owing to a lack of opportunity to outcross due to low transmission rates leading to lack of multiclonal infections ("starving sex hypothesis". We propose that the divergent taxonomic and population genetic inferences advanced by various authors about these pathogens may not correspond to true evolutionary differences and could be, rather, the reflection of idiosyncratic practices among compartmentalized scientific communities. The PCE model provides an opportunity to revise the taxonomy and applied research dealing with these pathogens and others, such as viruses, bacteria, parasitic protozoa, and fungi.

  8. Cryptosporidium parvum: infectivity and pathogenicity of the 'porcine' genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Heidi L.; Ahrens, Peter; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    2003-01-01

    mild clinical signs in piglets despite the excretion of high numbers of oocysts. Concomitant infection with rotavirus, however, caused a dramatic aggravation of the clinical signs, and 5 of 6 experimentally infected piglets died. CPP-13 appeared to be adapted to porcine hosts as illustrated by the lack...

  9. Unreduced gamete formation in wheat × Aegilops spp. hybrids is genotype specific and prevented by shared homologous subgenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Zhaleh; Mirzaghaderi, Ghader; Ahmadian, Samira; Mason, Annaliese S

    2016-05-01

    The presence of homologous subgenomes inhibited unreduced gamete formation in wheat × Aegilops interspecific hybrids. Unreduced gamete rates were under the control of the wheat nuclear genome. Production of unreduced gametes is common among interspecific hybrids, and may be affected by parental genotypes and genomic similarity. In the present study, five cultivars of Triticum aestivum and two tetraploid Aegilops species (i.e. Ae. triuncialis and Ae. cylindrica) were reciprocally crossed to produce 20 interspecific hybrid combinations. These hybrids comprised two different types: T. aestivum × Aegilops triuncialis; 2n = ABDU(t)C(t) (which lack a common subgenome) and T. aestivum × Ae. cylindrica; 2n = ABDD(c)C(c) (which share a common subgenome). The frequency of unreduced gametes in F1 hybrids was estimated in sporads from the frequency of dyads, and the frequency of viable pollen, germinated pollen and seed set were recorded. Different meiotic abnormalities recorded in the hybrids included precocious chromosome migration to the poles at metaphase I and II, laggards in anaphase I and II, micronuclei and chromosome stickiness, failure in cell wall formation, premature cytokinesis and microspore fusion. The mean frequency of restitution meiosis was 10.1 %, and the mean frequency of unreduced viable pollen was 4.84 % in T. aestivum × Ae. triuncialis hybrids. By contrast, in T. aestivum × Ae. cylindrica hybrids no meiotic restitution was observed, and a low rate of viable gametes (0.3 %) was recorded. This study present evidence that high levels of homologous pairing between the D and D(c) subgenomes may interfere with meiotic restitution and the formation of unreduced gametes. Variation in unreduced gamete production was also observed between T. aestivum × Ae. triuncialis hybrid plants, suggesting genetic control of this trait.

  10. The Burden of Cryptosporidium Diarrheal Disease among Children < 24 Months of Age in Moderate/High Mortality Regions of Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, Utilizing Data from the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samba O Sow

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Cryptosporidium as a pediatric enteropathogen in developing countries is recognized.Data from the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS, a 3-year, 7-site, case-control study of moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD and GEMS-1A (1-year study of MSD and less-severe diarrhea [LSD] were analyzed. Stools from 12,110 MSD and 3,174 LSD cases among children aged <60 months and from 21,527 randomly-selected controls matched by age, sex and community were immunoassay-tested for Cryptosporidium. Species of a subset of Cryptosporidium-positive specimens were identified by PCR; GP60 sequencing identified anthroponotic C. parvum. Combined annual Cryptosporidium-attributable diarrhea incidences among children aged <24 months for African and Asian GEMS sites were extrapolated to sub-Saharan Africa and South Asian regions to estimate region-wide MSD and LSD burdens. Attributable and excess mortality due to Cryptosporidium diarrhea were estimated.Cryptosporidium was significantly associated with MSD and LSD below age 24 months. Among Cryptosporidium-positive MSD cases, C. hominis was detected in 77.8% (95% CI, 73.0%-81.9% and C. parvum in 9.9% (95% CI, 7.1%-13.6%; 92% of C. parvum tested were anthroponotic genotypes. Annual Cryptosporidium-attributable MSD incidence was 3.48 (95% CI, 2.27-4.67 and 3.18 (95% CI, 1.85-4.52 per 100 child-years in African and Asian infants, respectively, and 1.41 (95% CI, 0.73-2.08 and 1.36 (95% CI, 0.66-2.05 per 100 child-years in toddlers. Corresponding Cryptosporidium-attributable LSD incidences per 100 child-years were 2.52 (95% CI, 0.33-5.01 and 4.88 (95% CI, 0.82-8.92 in infants and 4.04 (95% CI, 0.56-7.51 and 4.71 (95% CI, 0.24-9.18 in toddlers. We estimate 2.9 and 4.7 million Cryptosporidium-attributable cases annually in children aged <24 months in the sub-Saharan Africa and India/Pakistan/Bangladesh/Nepal/Afghanistan regions, respectively, and ~202,000 Cryptosporidium-attributable deaths (regions combined. ~59

  11. The Burden of Cryptosporidium Diarrheal Disease among Children < 24 Months of Age in Moderate/High Mortality Regions of Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, Utilizing Data from the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasrin, Dilruba; Blackwelder, William C.; Wu, Yukun; Farag, Tamer H.; Panchalingam, Sandra; Sur, Dipika; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Saha, Debasish; Adegbola, Richard; Alonso, Pedro L.; Breiman, Robert F.; Bassat, Quique; Tamboura, Boubou; Sanogo, Doh; Onwuchekwa, Uma; Manna, Byomkesh; Ramamurthy, Thandavarayan; Kanungo, Suman; Ahmed, Shahnawaz; Qureshi, Shahida; Quadri, Farheen; Hossain, Anowar; Das, Sumon K.; Antonio, Martin; Hossain, M. Jahangir; Mandomando, Inacio; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Acácio, Sozinho; Omore, Richard; Oundo, Joseph O.; Ochieng, John B.; Mintz, Eric D.; O’Reilly, Ciara E.; Berkeley, Lynette Y.; Livio, Sofie; Tennant, Sharon M.; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Nataro, James P.; Ziv-Baran, Tomer; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Mishcherkin, Vladimir; Zhang, Jixian; Liu, Jie; Houpt, Eric R.; Kotloff, Karen L.; Levine, Myron M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The importance of Cryptosporidium as a pediatric enteropathogen in developing countries is recognized. Methods Data from the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS), a 3-year, 7-site, case-control study of moderate-to-severe diarrhea (MSD) and GEMS-1A (1-year study of MSD and less-severe diarrhea [LSD]) were analyzed. Stools from 12,110 MSD and 3,174 LSD cases among children aged Cryptosporidium. Species of a subset of Cryptosporidium-positive specimens were identified by PCR; GP60 sequencing identified anthroponotic C. parvum. Combined annual Cryptosporidium-attributable diarrhea incidences among children aged Cryptosporidium diarrhea were estimated. Findings Cryptosporidium was significantly associated with MSD and LSD below age 24 months. Among Cryptosporidium-positive MSD cases, C. hominis was detected in 77.8% (95% CI, 73.0%-81.9%) and C. parvum in 9.9% (95% CI, 7.1%-13.6%); 92% of C. parvum tested were anthroponotic genotypes. Annual Cryptosporidium-attributable MSD incidence was 3.48 (95% CI, 2.27–4.67) and 3.18 (95% CI, 1.85–4.52) per 100 child-years in African and Asian infants, respectively, and 1.41 (95% CI, 0.73–2.08) and 1.36 (95% CI, 0.66–2.05) per 100 child-years in toddlers. Corresponding Cryptosporidium-attributable LSD incidences per 100 child-years were 2.52 (95% CI, 0.33–5.01) and 4.88 (95% CI, 0.82–8.92) in infants and 4.04 (95% CI, 0.56–7.51) and 4.71 (95% CI, 0.24–9.18) in toddlers. We estimate 2.9 and 4.7 million Cryptosporidium-attributable cases annually in children aged Cryptosporidium-attributable deaths (regions combined). ~59,000 excess deaths occurred among Cryptosporidium-attributable diarrhea cases over expected if cases had been Cryptosporidium-negative. Conclusions The enormous African/Asian Cryptosporidium disease burden warrants investments to develop vaccines, diagnostics and therapies. PMID:27219054

  12. Leaf Surface Scanning Electron Microscopy of 16 Mulberry Genotypes (Morus spp. with Respect to their Feeding Value in Silkworm (Bombyx mori L. Rearing Microscopía Electrónica de Barrido de la Superficie Foliar de 16 Genotipos de Morus spp. en Relación a su Valor Alimenticio para Crianza del Gusano de la Seda (Bombyx mori L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.K Singhal

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Mulberry (Morus spp. is the only silkworm (Bombyx mori L. food plant. In Indian sub tropics, S-146 is the only popular and ruling mulberry genotype for silkworm rearing. As a result, mulberry leaf availability is always the limiting factor, and therefore, sub tropics are contributing less than 1% of the country’s total silk production compared with more than 60% under tropical conditions. Besides climatic conditions, this is due to a very limited number of mulberry genotypes available in this region for silkworm rearing. However, in the mean time, 15 mulberry genotypes viz. ‘Tr-10’,‘Chinese White’,‘K-2’,‘Sujanpur Local’,‘BC2-59’,‘S-1635’,‘C-1730’,‘Mandalaya’,‘S-30’‘(Vishala,‘RFS-175’,‘Anantha’,‘C-2016’,‘C-2017’,‘S-41’ and‘V-1’ were also introduced in the sub tropics, but remained unexplored. In sericulture, leaf surface is also an important parameter for, both, the silkworm’s acceptability of not having any feeding impediment and the mulberry improvement programs. The objective of this study was to explore the possibilities of using these 16 mulberry genotypes for their leaf surface characteristics by scanning electron microscopy and using them for sericulture. Based on leaf yield, stomatal size, stomatal number per unit of area and trichomes and idioblasts length, these genotypes were grouped into different categories. The mulberry genotype ‘Mandalaya’, in addition to the ruling genotype ‘S-146’ excelled because of their higher leaf yield and desired leaf surface characteristics. Furthermore, the genotypes ‘K-2’, ‘S-41’ and ‘Sujanpur Local’ are also suggested to develop high yield mulberry genotypes in the Indian sub tropics.La morera (Morus spp. es la única planta de alimento para el gusano de la seda (Bombyx mori L.. En los sub-trópicos de la India, ‘S-146’ es el único genotipo popular y predominante de morera para criarlo. Como resultado, la

  13. Evaluation of a magnetic microsphere antibody detection assay for the investigation of exposure to Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anti-Cryptosporidium IgA and IgG are useful markers of exposure to Cryptosporidium in human populations, but detection in saliva may be difficult. To evaluate a magnetic microsphere assay for detection of anti-Cryptosporidium IgA and IgG in saliva, recombinant sporozoite gp15 (1...

  14. Global modelling of Cryptosporidium in surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeulen, Lucie; Hofstra, Nynke

    2016-04-01

    Introduction Waterborne pathogens that cause diarrhoea, such as Cryptosporidium, pose a health risk all over the world. In many regions quantitative information on pathogens in surface water is unavailable. Our main objective is to model Cryptosporidium concentrations in surface waters worldwide. We present the GloWPa-Crypto model and use the model in a scenario analysis. A first exploration of global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface waters has been published by Hofstra et al. (2013). Further work has focused on modelling emissions of Cryptosporidium and Rotavirus to surface waters from human sources (Vermeulen et al 2015, Kiulia et al 2015). A global waterborne pathogen model can provide valuable insights by (1) providing quantitative information on pathogen levels in data-sparse regions, (2) identifying pathogen hotspots, (3) enabling future projections under global change scenarios and (4) supporting decision making. Material and Methods GloWPa-Crypto runs on a monthly time step and represents conditions for approximately the year 2010. The spatial resolution is a 0.5 x 0.5 degree latitude x longitude grid for the world. We use livestock maps (http://livestock.geo-wiki.org/) combined with literature estimates to calculate spatially explicit livestock Cryptosporidium emissions. For human Cryptosporidium emissions, we use UN population estimates, the WHO/UNICEF JMP sanitation country data and literature estimates of wastewater treatment. We combine our emissions model with a river routing model and data from the VIC hydrological model (http://vic.readthedocs.org/en/master/) to calculate concentrations in surface water. Cryptosporidium survival during transport depends on UV radiation and water temperature. We explore pathogen emissions and concentrations in 2050 with the new Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs) 1 and 3. These scenarios describe plausible future trends in demographics, economic development and the degree of global integration. Results and

  15. Policy, practice and decision making for zoonotic disease management: water and Cryptosporidium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Zoë; Alcock, Ruth E; Christley, Robert M; Haygarth, Philip M; Heathwaite, A Louise; Latham, Sophia M; Mort, Maggie; Oliver, David M; Pickup, Roger; Wastling, Jonathan M; Wynne, Brian

    2012-04-01

    Decision making for zoonotic disease management should be based on many forms of appropriate data and sources of evidence. However, the criteria and timing for policy response and the resulting management decisions are often altered when a disease outbreak occurs and captures full media attention. In the case of waterborne disease, such as the robust protozoa, Cryptosporidium spp, exposure can cause significant human health risks and preventing exposure by maintaining high standards of biological and chemical water quality remains a priority for water companies in the UK. Little has been documented on how knowledge and information is translated between the many stakeholders involved in the management of Cryptosporidium, which is surprising given the different drivers that have shaped management decisions. Such information, coupled with the uncertainties that surround these data is essential for improving future management strategies that minimise disease outbreaks. Here, we examine the interplay between scientific information, the media, and emergent government and company policies to examine these issues using qualitative and quantitative data relating to Cryptosporidium management decisions by a water company in the North West of England. Our results show that political and media influences are powerful drivers of management decisions if fuelled by high profile outbreaks. Furthermore, the strength of the scientific evidence is often constrained by uncertainties in the data, and in the way knowledge is translated between policy levels during established risk management procedures. In particular, under or over-estimating risk during risk assessment procedures together with uncertainty regarding risk factors within the wider environment, was found to restrict the knowledge-base for decision-making in Cryptosporidium management. Our findings highlight some key current and future challenges facing the management of such diseases that are widely applicable to other

  16. Cross sectional study of prevalence, genetic diversity and zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium parvum cycling in New Zealand dairy farms

    OpenAIRE

    Al Mawly, Julanda; Grinberg, Alex; Velathanthiri, Niluka; French, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    Background The estimation of the prevalence and zoonotic potential of Cryptosporidium parvum cycling in bovine populations requires the use of genotyping, as several morphologically similar non-parvum genetic variants of unproven clinical and public health impact are found in cattle. However, robust C. parvum prevalence estimates in cattle are lacking and comparative data of bovine and human isolates collected from the same regions are scarce. Thus, the relative contribution of the C. parvum ...

  17. Pathogenic Mechanisms of Cryptosporidium and Giardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Certad, Gabriela; Viscogliosi, Eric; Chabé, Magali; Cacciò, Simone M

    2017-07-01

    Intestinal protozoa are important etiological agents of diarrhea, particularly in children, yet the public health risk they pose is often neglected. Results from the Global Enteric Multicenter Study (GEMS) showed that Cryptosporidium is among the leading causes of moderate to severe diarrhea in children under 2 years. Likewise, Giardia infects approximately 200 million individuals worldwide, and causes acute diarrhea in children under 5 years. Despite this recognized role as pathogens, the question is why and how these parasites cause disease in some individuals but not in others. This review focuses on known pathogenic mechanisms of Cryptosporidium and Giardia, and infection progress towards disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Caracterización fenotípica y genotípica de la resistencia enzimática a las cefalosporinas de tercera generación en Enterobacter spp. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of resistance to third-generation cephalosporins in Enterobacter spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bertona

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Enterobacter spp. es un patógeno intrahospitalario que presenta múltiples mecanismos de resistencia a los antibióticos b-lactámicos. Se caracterizaron fenotípica y genotípicamente las diferentes b-lactamasas presentes en 27 aislamientos consecutivos e ininterrumpidos de Enterobacter spp. (25 Enterobacter cloacae y 2 Enterobacter aerogenes. También se evaluó la habilidad de diferentes métodos fenotípicos para detectar b-lactamasas de espectro extendido (BLEE en estos microorganismos. En 15/27 aislamientos (63% se observó resistencia a las cefalosporinas de tercera generación. En 12 de los aislamientos resistentes se detectó un alto nivel de producción de cefalosporinasa cromosómica, siendo 6 de ellos también productores de PER-2. Dicha resistencia en los 3 aislamientos restantes se debió exclusivamente a la presencia de BLEE, PER-2 en 2 de ellos y CTX-M-2 en un caso. Sólo CTX-M-2 se detectó con todas las cefalosporinas probadas en los ensayos de sinergia, utilizando el método de difusión, mientras que cefepima mejoró la detección de PER-2 en 7/8 aislamientos productores de esta BLEE, 4/8 utilizando la prueba de doble disco y 7/8 comparando discos de cefepima con y sin el agregado de ácido clavulánico. El método de dilución empleado solo detectó 1/9 BLEE al comparar las cefalosporinas con y sin el agregado de inhibidor.Enterobacter spp. are becoming increasingly frequent nosocomial pathogens with multiple resistance mechanism to b-lactam antibiotics. We carried out the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of beta-lactamases in 27 Enterobacter spp. (25 Enterobacter cloacae y 2 Enterobacter aerogenes, as well as the ability of different extended spectrum b-lactamase (ESBL screening methods. Resistance to third generation cephalosporins was observed in 15/27 (63% isolates. Twelve resistant isolates produced high level chromosomal encoded AmpC b-lactamase; 6 of them were also producers of PER-2. Resistance to third

  19. Cryptosporidium suis and Cryptosporidium scrofarum in Eurasian wild boars (Sus scrofa) in Central Europe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němejc, K.; Sak, Bohumil; Květoňová, Dana; Hanzal, V.; Janiszewski, P.; Forejtek, P.; Rajský, D.; Ravaszová, P.; McEvoy, J.; Kváč, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 197, 3-4 (2013), s. 504-508 ISSN 0304-4017 Grant - others:Jihočeská univerzita(CZ) 022/2010/Z; Jihočeská univerzita(CZ) 11/2013/Z Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Central Europe * Cryptosporidium scrofarum * Cryptosporidium suis * Eurasian wild boar * PCR * SSU Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.545, year: 2013

  20. Interaction of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum with Primary Human and Bovine Intestinal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hashim, Amna; Mulcahy, Grace; Bourke, Billy; Clyne, Marguerite

    2006-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis in humans is caused by the zoonotic pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum and the anthroponotic pathogen Cryptosporidium hominis. To what extent the recently recognized C. hominis species differs from C. parvum is unknown. In this study we compared the mechanisms of C. parvum and C. hominis invasion using a primary cell model of infection. Cultured primary bovine and human epithelial intestinal cells were infected with C. parvum or C. hominis. The effects of the carbohydrate lecti...

  1. Infection With Cryptosporidium hominis Provides Incomplete Protection of the Host Against Cryptosporidium parvum

    OpenAIRE

    Sheoran, Abhineet; Wiffin, Anthony; Widmer, Giovanni; Singh, Pradeep; Tzipori, Saul

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, which infect humans equally, are genetically/antigenically almost identical. It remains unclear, however, whether infection with C. hominis protects against C. parvum. Gnotobiotic piglets were used to investigate cross-protection. After ≥3 days of recovery from C. hominis infection, the piglets were completely protected against subsequent challenge with C. hominis but only partially against challenge with C. parvum, as compared with age-m...

  2. Detection of infectious Cryptosporidium oocysts by cell culture: applicability to environmental samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schets FM; Engels GB; During M; Roda Husman AM de; MGB

    2004-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is one of the important causative agents of gastrointestinal illness in humans. Cryptosporidium infections are often waterborne and can be transmitted through drinking water or recreational water. Estimation of the risk of infection with Cryptosporidium after exposure to drinking

  3. Análise fenotípica e genotípica da virulência de Staphylococcus spp. e de sua dispersão clonal como contribuição ao estudo da mastite bovina Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of virulence in Staphylococcus spp. and its clonal dispersion as a contribution to the study of bovine mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane F. Marques

    2013-02-01

    marcadores genéticos podem estar envolvidos com a expressão desta característica. Os demais genes detectados com frequência de 4% (10/250 para cap5 e para cap8, 32,8% (82/250 para fnbA, 4,4% (11/250 para fnbB, 19,2% (48/250 para hla e 18% (45/250 para hlb. O perfil circulante nas propriedades foi o 1: isolado produtor de "slime" e caseinase. O gene spaA foi positivo em todos os S. aureus, apresentando amplicons de tamanhos variados, sendo o tamanho prevalente o de 300pb. A amplificação do gene coa apresentou nove tipos polimórficos distintos, sendo prevalente o amplicon de 600pb. O gene agr foi detectado em todos os S. aureus, com amplicon de 200pb. Foi observado que os genes de virulência estudados estavam distribuídos de modo aleatório entreos 6 distintos perfis eletroforéticos obtidos através da Eletroforese em Gel de Campo Pulsado (PFGE.Mastitis is an inflammation of one or more mammary glands caused mainly by bacteria, among which the genus Staphylococcus plays an important role. Bacteria belonging to this genus are known to express virulence factors which allow their persistence and spread in the host. This study aimed to evaluate the phenotypic and genotypic aspects of virulence factors in Staphylococci spp. isolates from bovine mastitis clinical cases. A total of 272 milk samples from 8 farms in the South-Fluminense region of Rio de Janeiro were analyzed. The samples underwent conventional bacterial identification, yielding 250 Staphylococci spp. isolates. These were tested for the phenotypic detection of slime production by the microplate and Congo Red Agar methods. The hemolysins production, hemolytic synergism, caseinase and DNase production were also evaluated. The isolates were then assayed through the Polymerase Chain Reaction method to detect genes associated with virulence factors such as: capsule (cap5, cap8, fibronectin (fnbA, fnbB, slime (icaA, icaD and hemolysins (hla e hlb. Regarding the number of isolates assessed, 58% (145/250 were

  4. Diarrhea due to Cryptosporidium parvum in immunocompromised ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this study is to search for Cryptosporidium parvum in Sudanese immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients presenting with diarrhea. Methods: Two hundred and thirteen stool specimens were collected from different groups of patients presenting with diarrhea and healthy control ...

  5. Emissie van Cryptosporidium en Giardia door landbouwhuisdieren

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijven JF; Bruin HAM de; Engels GB; Leenen EJTM; MGB

    1999-01-01

    Het hier gepresenteerde deelonderzoek richt zich op de relatieve bijdrage van verschillende populaties landbouwhuisdieren via mest en afvalwater aan de totale emissie van Cryptosporidium en Giardia in Nederland. Vleeskalveren vormen per jaar in Nederland via hun mest een grote emissiebron van

  6. Cryptosporidium species and subtypes in diarrheal children and HIV-infected persons in Ebonyi and Nsukka, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwah, Boniface Nwofoke; Ezeonu, Ifeoma Maureen; Ezeonu, Chinonyelum Thecla; Roellig, Dawn; Xiao, Lihua

    2017-02-28

    Cryptosporidiosis is a common disease of children and immune-compromised persons. This study evaluated the diversity and distribution of Cryptosporidium species in diarrheal children and HIV-infected persons on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and those not on HAART. A total of 394 fecal specimens were collected from patients attending clinics in Nsukka and Ebonyi, Nigeria. Detection and identification of Cryptosporidium species were conducted by PCR-RFLP of the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene, whereas subtyping was done by sequence analysis of the 60 kDa glycoprotein (gp60) gene. Twenty-five (6.3%) specimens yielded four Cryptosporidium species, including C. hominis, C. parvum, C. felis, and C. viatorum. C. hominis was the most dominant species with 48.0% occurrence and three identified subtype families: Ia (six specimens), Ib (three specimens), Ie (two specimens), and one un-subtyped species. C. parvum had 44.0% occurrence and two subtype families: IIc (eight specimens) and IIe (three specimens), while C. felis and C. viatorum each had 4.0% occurrence. There were significant differences in Cryptosporidium species distribution between age groups in children and HIV-infected persons, between suburban and urban areas, and between low and high CD4+ cell counts in HIV-infected patients. There were no significant differences in infection rate and species distribution between HIV-infected patients on HAART and those not on HAART. The results from this study show that there is a high diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in humans in Ebonyi and Nsukka, Nigeria, and that all the C. parvum subtypes identified are most likely anthroponotic in origin.

  7. Detection and differentiation of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum by dual TaqMan assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothikumar, N; da Silva, A J; Moura, I; Qvarnstrom, Y; Hill, V R

    2008-09-01

    Rapid identification of the two major species of Cryptosporidium associated with human infections, Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, is important for investigating outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis. This study reports the development and validation of a real-time PCR TaqMan procedure for detection of Cryptosporidium species and identification of C. hominis and C. parvum in stool specimens. This procedure comprised a generic TaqMan assay targeting the 18S rRNA for sensitive detection of Cryptosporidium species, as well as two other TaqMan assays for identification of C. hominis and C. parvum. The generic Cryptosporidium species assay can be duplexed with the C. parvum-specific assay. The generic Cryptosporidium species assay was able to detect ten Cryptosporidium species and did not cross-react with a panel of ten other protozoan parasites. The generic Cryptosporidium species assay could detect 1-10 oocysts in a 300 microl stool specimen, whilst each of the species-specific TaqMan assays had detection sensitivities that were approximately tenfold higher. The 18S rRNA assay was found to detect Cryptosporidium species in 49/55 DNA extracts from stool specimens containing either C. hominis or C. parvum. The C. hominis TaqMan assay correctly identified C. hominis in 24/31 validation panel specimens containing this species. The C. parvum-specific assay correctly identified C. parvum in 21/24 validation panel specimens containing this species. This real-time PCR procedure was used to detect and identify C. hominis and C. parvum in stool specimens from outbreak investigations in the USA and Botswana, resulting in identification of C. hominis and/or C. parvum in 66/67 stool specimens shown to be positive for these species using other techniques. From the outbreak specimens tested, the TaqMan procedure was found to have a specificity of 94%. This TaqMan PCR procedure should be a valuable tool for the laboratory diagnosis of cryptosporidiosis caused by C

  8. Prevalence of intestinal parasites in companion dogs with diarrhea in Beijing, China, and genetic characteristics of Giardia and Cryptosporidium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhongjia; Ruan, Yang; Zhou, Mengjie; Chen, Siyuan; Zhang, Yinxin; Wang, Liya; Zhu, Guan; Yu, Yonglan

    2018-01-01

    Companion animals including dogs are one of the important components in One Health. Parasites may cause not only diseases in pet animals but also many zoonotic diseases infecting humans. In this study, we performed a survey of intestinal parasites in fecal specimens (n = 485) collected from outpatient pet dogs with diarrhea in Beijing, China, for the entire year of 2015 by microscopic examination (all parasites) and SSU rRNA-based nested PCR detection (Giardia and Cryptosporidium). We observed a total of 124 (25.6%) parasite-positive specimens that contained one or more parasites, including Giardia duodenalis (12.8%), Cryptosporidium spp. (4.9%), Cystoisospora spp. (4.3%), trichomonads (4.3%), Toxocara canis (3.5%), Trichuris vulpis (0.6%), and Dipylidium caninum (0.2%). Among the 55 dog breeds, infection rates were significantly higher in border collies and bulldogs, but lower in poodles (p Giardia-positive specimens, 21 were successfully assigned into assemblages using glutamate dehydrogenase (gdh) and/or beta-giardin (bg) genes, including assemblage D (n = 15), C (n = 5), and F (n = 1). Among the 24 Cryptosporidium-positive specimens by SSU rRNA PCR, 20 PCR amplicons could be sequenced and identified as Cryptosporidium canis (n = 20). Collectively, this study indicates that parasites are a significant group of pathogens in companion dogs in Beijing, and companion dogs may potentially transmit certain zoonotic parasites to humans, particularly those with weak or weakened immunity.

  9. Ocorrência de Giardia spp. em bezerros leiteiros no Brasil Occurrence of Giardia spp. in dairy calves in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Guimarães

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Fecal samples were collected from 50 female Holstein calves (1-90 days old from a commercial dairy cattle farm located in Lavras, Minas Gerais, Brazil and examined for presence of Giardia cysts using the zinc sulfate flotation method. A total of 120 samples were collected from March 1999 to April 2000, and fecal consistency (normal or diarrheic was noted prior to the examination for Giardia cysts. Giardia spp. cysts were found in 11 (9% of the 120 faecal samples of calves co-infected with Eimeria spp., in calves from 19 to 58 days of age (38±19. In 82% (9/11 calves assessed for mixed infections with Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia, oocysts of Cryptosporidium were found in three out of four diarrheic calves (75% positive for Giardia. Giardia cysts (n= 30 sized 13-16 x 10-12µm (mean of 15 x 11µm. They appeared to belong to the morphological group of G. intestinallis according to the size and morphological characteristic of the cysts. This is the first detection of Giardia spp. in calves in Brazil. Considering that Giardia has the potential to cause clinical disease in calves and that organisms infecting humans and domestic ruminants are morphologically and antigenically similar, and calves can shed Giardia cysts potentially infective for humans, the parasite in calves may be of major epidemiological significance, and suggests that naturally infected calves may be reservoirs of Giardia infections for man.

  10. Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium andersoni infection in naturally infected cattle of northwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Mirzai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The protozoan intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium commonly infects cattle throughout the world and Iran. The present study was undertaken to determine the abundance and associated risk factors of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle herds of northwestern Iran. A total number of 246 fecal samples from 138 (56.1% diarrheic (D and 108 (43.9% non-diarrheic (ND cattle were randomly collected and examined by fecal smears stained with Ziehl-Neelsen. For molecular specification, DNA was extracted from collected Cryptosporidium oocysts and a fragment of 1325 bp in size from 18S rRNA gene was amplified. The overall prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection was 22.3% (55/246. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in examined calves less than 6 month-old was significantly higher than adult cattle. C. parvum and C. andersoni were identified in 20.3% (50/246 and 2.03% (5/246 of examined cattle, respectively. The highest prevalence of C. parvum infection was found in D calves < 6 month-old (13.4%, 33/246, while C. andersoni was only detected in ND cattle (8.9%, 22/246. There was significant difference in the prevalence between male than female cattle. There was no significant difference between prevalence and seasons of investigation. It was concluded that C. parvum was the prevalent species in younger animals compared to older ones as a potentially zoonotic agent in the region.

  11. More productive in vitro culture of Cryptosporidium parvum for better study of the intra- and extracellular phases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Perez Cordón

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The great difficulties in treating people and animals suffering from cryptosporidiosis have prompted the development of in vitro experimental models. Due to the models of in vitro culture, new extracellular stages of Cryptosporidium have been demonstrated. The development of these extracellular phases depends on the technique of in vitro culture and on the species and genotype of Cryptosporidium used. Here, we undertake the molecular characterization by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment lenght polymorphism of different Cryptosporidium isolates from calves, concluding that all are C. parvum of cattle genotype, although differing in the nucleotide at positions 472 and 498. Using these parasites, modified the in vitro culture technique for HCT-8 cells achieving greater multiplication of parasites. The HCT-8 cell cultures, for which the culture had not been renewed in seven days, were infected with C. parvum sporozoites in RPMI-1640 medium with 10% IFBS, CaCl2 and MgCl2 1 mM at pH 7.2. Percentages of cell parasitism were increased with respect to control cultures (71% at 48 h vs 14.5%, even after two weeks (47% vs 1.9%. Also, the percentage of extracellular stages augmented (25.3% vs 1.1% at 96 h. This new model of in vitro culture of C. parvum will enable easier study of the developmental phases of C. parvum in performing new chemotherapeutic assays.

  12. Detection and molecular characterization of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in common dolphins (Delphinus delphis) stranded along the Galician coast (Northwest Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboredo-Fernández, A; Gómez-Couso, H; Martínez-Cedeira, J A; Cacciò, S M; Ares-Mazás, E

    2014-05-28

    The ubiquitous protozoan parasites Giardia and Cryptosporidium have been detected from many species of captive and free-living wildlife, representing most mammalian orders. Twenty species of marine mammals have been reported to inhabit Galician waters and the region has one of the highest rates of stranding in Europe. Evidence from stranding, reported by-catches and sightings, suggests that the common dolphin (Delphinus delphis) is the most abundant cetacean on the Galician coast (Northwest Spain). The objective of this study was to detect and molecularly characterize isolates of Giardia and Cryptosporidium obtained from common dolphins stranded in this area. Between 2005 and 2012, sections of large intestine from 133 common dolphins stranded along the Galician coast were collected by the personnel of the Galician Stranding Network (Coordinadora para o Estudo dos Mamíferos Mariños, CEMMA). Using direct immunofluorescence antibody test (IFAT) and PCR amplification and sequencing of the SSU-rDNA, β-giardin genes and the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region, Giardia and Cryptosporidium were detected in 8 (6.0%) and 12 samples (9.0%), respectively. In two samples, co-infection by both parasites was observed. The molecular characterization revealed the presence of Giardia duodenalis assemblages A (genotypes A1 and A2) and B and Cryptosporidium parvum in these samples. This constitutes the first study in which the presence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium has been investigated in common dolphins on the European Atlantic coast, and it is also the first report of C. parvum in this host. Our findings indicate that these animals could act as reservoir of these waterborne parasites or could be victims of the contamination originated by anthropogenic activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the BD MAX Enteric Parasite Panel for the detection of Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, Giardia duodenalis and Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Michael D; Corden, Sally A; Lewis White, P

    2017-08-01

    Conventional laboratory detection methods for gastrointestinal parasites are time consuming, require considerable technical expertise and may suffer from poor analytical sensitivity. This study sought to evaluate the automated BD MAX Enteric Parasite Panel (EPP) for the detection of Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis, Entamoeba histolytica and Giardia duodenalis.Methodolgy. A total of 104 known positive samples (43 Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis and 61 G. duodenalis), 15 simulated samples (E. histolytica and other Entamoeba species) and 745 patient stool samples, submitted for enteric pathogen culture and microscopy, were inoculated into BD MAX EPP sample buffer tubes (SBTs). All specimens were blinded and tested within 7 days of SBT inoculation using the BD MAX EPP assay with results compared to those generated by microscopy.Results/Key findings. Combining the results from the known positive samples and anonymously tested patient samples, the sensitivity of the BD MAX EPP assay was 100 % for both Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis. Specificities of 99.7 and 98.9 % were calculated for the detection of Cryptosporidium spp. and G. duodenalis respectively. Insufficient clinical specimen data was available to determine the performance of the assay for E. histolytica detection. The findings of this study indicate that the BD MAX EPP is suitable for the detection of Cryptosporidium parvum/hominis and G. duodenalis from clinical specimens with reduced hands-on time and complexity compared to microscopy. Results for the detection of E. histolytica were promising although further work is required to evaluate the assay for the detection of this pathogen.

  14. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis GP60 subtypes worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Avendaño V

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium is a zoonotic parasite very important in animal health as well as in public health. It is because this is one of the main causes of diarrhea in children, calves, lambs and other variety of youth mammalians in a lot of countries. The globalization has enabled the exchange of biological material in different regions worldwide, encouraging the spread of diseases and exposure to these biological agents to different environmental conditions, inducing adaptation through genetic changes. Based in the polymorphism of the gene for GP60, this review intended to present the distribution of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis in humans and calves worldwide. The subtype that affects cattle more frequently corresponds to IIaA15G2R; while the subtype most frequently isolated from human samples is IaA19G2.

  15. Potential cryptosporidium surrogates and evaluation of compressible oocysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, S.Y.; Goodrich, J.A.; Owens, J.H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    Cryptosporidium has been recognized as an important waterborne agent of gastroenteritis and a biological contaminant in drinking water. The widespread presence of Cryptosporidium in surface source water and either untreated or insufficiently treated drinking water has led to Cryptosporidium outbreaks in the United States and worldwide. Among the conventional control practices, filtration and high temperature distillation appear to be the potentially viable technologies for protection against Cryptosporidium in drinking water. As employed in many water plants, filtration is likely to be the most practical treatment technology utilized for Cryptosporidium removal in the near future. Consequently, accurate and reliable methods for evaluation of Cryptosporidium removal rates for filtration-based systems are necessary to assist States in determining drinking water quality and complying with the up-coming national standard for Cryptosporidium in drinking water. Furthermore, searching for reliable and non-hazardous surrogates for evaluation of treatment plant efficiency has been intensified because of the potential health risk associated with Cryptosporidium. Additionally, during the filtration procedure Cryptosporidium may squeeze and fold through pores size of the filtration systems that are smaller than the diameter of the organism; a fraction of these Cryptosporidium oocysts may still remain a certain degree of viability. These uncertainties are critical for the evaluation and optimization of filtration-based physical treatment systems. The in-house research studies described below consist of two parts. One is a potential surrogate study using bag filtration systems at the US EPA Test & Evaluation Facility in Cincinnati, Ohio. The second is Cryptosporidium compressibility and viability investigation.

  16. Geographic Linkage and Variation in Cryptosporidium hominis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadfield, Stephen J.; Jackson, Colin J.; Elwin, Kristin; Xiao, Lihua; Hunter, Paul

    2008-01-01

    UK Cryptosporidium hominis isolates have previously shown slight PCR fragment length polymorphism at multiple loci. To further investigate transmission, we conducted a case–control study and sequenced the GP60 locus from 115 isolates. Nine subtypes were identified; IbA10G2 predominated. Having a non-IbA10G2 subtype was significantly linked to recent travel outside Europe. PMID:18325272

  17. Infection with Cryptosporidium hominis provides incomplete protection of the host against Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheoran, Abhineet; Wiffin, Anthony; Widmer, Giovanni; Singh, Pradeep; Tzipori, Saul

    2012-03-15

    Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum, which infect humans equally, are genetically/antigenically almost identical. It remains unclear, however, whether infection with C. hominis protects against C. parvum. Gnotobiotic piglets were used to investigate cross-protection. After ≥3 days of recovery from C. hominis infection, the piglets were completely protected against subsequent challenge with C. hominis but only partially against challenge with C. parvum, as compared with age-matched control animals challenged with either species. In conclusion, C. hominis-specific immunity was sufficient to completely protect against challenge with the same species but insufficient to provide the same level of protection against C. parvum.

  18. Identification, antimicrobial resistance and genotypic characterization of Enterococcus spp. isolated in Porto Alegre, Brazil Identificação, resistência antimicrobiana e caracterização genotípica de Enterococcus spp. isolados em Porto Alegre, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo André Bender

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades the members of the genus Enterococcus have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens worldwide. In the present study, we evaluated the antimicrobial resistance and genotypic characteristics of 203 Enterococcus spp. recovered from different clinical sources from two hospitals in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. The species were identified by conventional biochemical tests and by an automated system. The genetic diversity of E. faecalis presenting high-level aminoglycoside resistance (HLAR was assessed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of chromosomal DNA after SmaI digestion. The E. faecalis was the most frequent specie (93.6%, followed by E. faecium (4.4%. The antimicrobial resistance profile was: 2.5% to ampicillin, 0.5% to vancomycin, 0.5% teicoplanin, 33% to chloramphenicol, 2% to nitrofurantoin, 66.1% to erythromycin, 66.5% to tetracycline, 24.6% to rifampicin, 30% to ciprofloxacin and 87.2% to quinupristin-dalfopristin. A total of 10.3% of the isolates proved to be HLAR to both gentamicin and streptomycin (HLRST/GE, with 23.6% resistant only to gentamicin (HLR-GE and 37.4% only to streptomycin (HLRST. One predominant clonal group was found among E. faecalis HLR-GE/ST. The prevalence of resistance among beta-lactam antibiotics and glycopeptides was very low. However, in this study there was an increased number of HLR Enterococcus which may be spreading intra and inter-hospital.Nas últimas duas décadas os membros do gênero Enterococcus emergiram como importantes patógenos nosocomiais ao redor do mundo. No presente estudo, nós avaliamos a resistência antimicrobiana e as características genotípicas de 203 Enterococcus spp. obtidos de diferentes fontes clínicas em dois hospitais de Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. As espécies foram identificadas por testes bioquímicos convencionais e por um sistema automatizado. A diversidade genética de E. faecalis demonstrando resistência à altos n

  19. Detection of Cryptosporidium species in feces or gastric contents from snakes and lizards as determined by polymerase chain reaction analysis and partial sequencing of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Maderner, Anton; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2011-05-01

    Cryptosporidiosis is a well-known gastrointestinal disease of snakes and lizards. In the current study, 672 samples (feces and/or gastric contents or regurgitated food items) of various snakes and lizards were examined for the presence of cryptosporidia by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay targeting a part of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene. A consecutive sequencing reaction was used to identify the cryptosporidian species present in PCR-positive samples. Cryptosporidium varanii (saurophilum) was detected in 17 out of 106 (16%) samples from corn snakes (Pantherophis guttatus) and in 32 out of 462 (7%) samples from leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius). Cryptosporidium serpentis was found in 8 out of 462 (2%) leopard gecko samples, but in no other reptile. The Cryptosporidium sp. "lizard genotype" was present in 1 leopard gecko sample, and 1 sample from a corn snake showed a single nucleotide mismatch to this genotype. Pseudoparasitic cryptosporidian species were identified in 5 out of 174 (3%) ophidian samples, but not in lizards. Other sequences did not show complete similarity to previously published Cryptosporidium sequences. The results stress the importance for diagnostic methods to be specific for Cryptosporidium species especially in snakes and show a relatively high prevalence of C. varanii in leopard geckos and corn snakes. © 2011 The Author(s)

  20. Application of a basic monitoring strategy for Cryptosporidium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Despite the health risks associated with exposure to Cryptosporidium and Giardia, there is no uniform approach to monitoring these protozoan parasites across the world. In the present study, a strategy for monitoring Cryptosporidium and Giardia in drinking water was developed in an effort to ensure that the risk of exposure ...

  1. Cryptosporidium infections in children in Durban Seasonal variation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and eleven of 1229 children (9%) aged < 10 years admitted to King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban, with gastro-enteritis over a period of 1 year were found to harbour Cryptosporidium. Of these, 96 (89,7%) were < 2 years of age. Cryptosporidium was the only potential pathogen identified in 80 of these patients ...

  2. Cryptosporidium infection in undernourished children with HIV/AIDS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: AIDS and Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) severely impair the immune system Cryptosporidium has over the last two decades emerged as a life threatening disease. The study attempts to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium infection in malnourished children with HIV/AIDS. Method: Blood and stool ...

  3. Ubiquity of the water-borne pathogens, Cryptosporidium and Giardia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of the diarrhoea disease caused by the water-borne pathogens Cryptosporidium and Giardia in KwaZulu-Natal, was determined from pathology laboratory data. Cryptosporidium and Giardia were found to be endemic in KwaZulu-Natal with laboratory-confirmed incidences ranging from 2.9 to 3.7% and 2.9 to ...

  4. Cryptosporidium species and cattle: Implication for public health and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cryptosporidium species and cattle: Implication for public health and water - Short Communication. VA Pam, COE Onwuliri, DA Dakul, ICJ Omalu. Abstract. This paper presents a brief summary of the ecology of Cryptosporidium species in Calves and humans and the existing scientific evidence that addresses the claim that ...

  5. Cryptosporidium and Cryptosporidiosis in Calves at Jos, Northern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cryptosporidium and Cryptosporidiosis in Calves at Jos, Northern Nigeria. VA Pam, DA Dakul, COE Onwuliri. Abstract. This study investigated the occurrence of cryptosporidium and cryptosporidiosis in calves from Jos, Northern Nigeria. Two hundred fecal samples were collected from the calves, recruited for an all year ...

  6. Prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts among children with acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was conducted to determine the prevalence of Cryptosporidium oocysts among children with acute gastroenteritis in Zaria, Nigeria by Kinyoun Modified Carbol-Fuchsin Staining (Modified Ziehl-Neelsen Staining) Technique. The results for the screening of Cryptosporidium oocysts showed that out of 372 stool ...

  7. Molecular Detection of Legionella spp. and their associations with Mycobacterium spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa and amoeba hosts in a drinking water distribution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J; Struewing, I; Vereen, E; Kirby, A E; Levy, K; Moe, C; Ashbolt, N

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated waterborne opportunistic pathogens (OPs) including potential hosts, and evaluated the use of Legionella spp. for indicating microbial water quality for OPs within a full-scale operating drinking water distribution system (DWDS). To investigate the occurrence of specific microbial pathogens within a major city DWDS we examined large volume (90 l drinking water) ultrafiltration (UF) concentrates collected from six sites between February, 2012 and June, 2013. The detection frequency and concentration estimates by qPCR were: Legionella spp. (57%/85 cell equivalent, CE l(-1) ), Mycobacterium spp. (88%/324 CE l(-1) ), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (24%/2 CE l(-1) ), Vermamoeba vermiformis (24%/2 CE l(-1) ) and Acanthamoeba spp. (42%/5 cyst equivalent, CE l(-1) ). There was no detection of the following microorganisms: human faecal indicator Bacteroides (HF183), Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter spp., Escherichia coli O157:H7, Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium spp. or Naegleria fowleri. There were significant correlations between the qPCR signals of Legionella spp. and Mycobacterium spp., and their potential hosts V. vermiformis and Acanthamoeba spp. Sequencing of Legionella spp. demonstrated limited diversity, with most sequences coming from two dominant groups, of which the larger dominant group was an unidentified species. Other known species including Legionella pneumophila were detected, but at low frequency. The densities of Legionella spp. and Mycobacterium spp. were generally higher (17 and 324 folds, respectively) for distal sites relative to the entry point to the DWDS. Legionella spp. occurred, had significant growth and were strongly associated with free-living amoebae (FLA) and Mycobacterium spp., suggesting that Legionella spp. could provide a useful DWDS monitoring role to indicate potential conditions for non-faecal OPs. The results provide insight into microbial pathogen detection that may aid in the monitoring of microbial water

  8. What is Cryptosporidium? Reappraising its biology and phylogenetic affinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, John R; Thompson, R C Andrew

    2006-10-01

    In raising the question "What is Cryptosporidium?", we aim to emphasize a growing need to re-evaluate the affinities of Cryptosporidium species within the phylum Apicomplexa so as to better understand the biology and ecology of these parasites. Here, we have compiled evidence from a variety of molecular and biological studies to build a convincing case for distancing Cryptosporidium species from the coccidia conceptually, biologically and taxonomically. We suggest that Cryptosporidium species must no longer be considered unusual or unique coccidia but rather seen for what they are--a distantly related lineage of apicomplexan parasites that are not in fact coccidia but that do occupy many of the same ecological niches. Looking at Cryptosporidium species without traditional coccidian blinders is likely to reveal new avenues of investigation into pathogenesis, epidemiology, treatment and control of these ubiquitous pathogens.

  9. Phylogenetic Analysis of Cryptosporidium Parasites Based on the Small-Subunit rRNA Gene Locus

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Lihua; Escalante, Lillian; Yang, Chunfu; Sulaiman, Irshad; Escalante, Anannias A.; Montali, Richard J.; Fayer, Ronald; Lal, Altaf A.

    1999-01-01

    Biological data support the hypothesis that there are multiple species in the genus Cryptosporidium, but a recent analysis of the available genetic data suggested that there is insufficient evidence for species differentiation. In order to resolve the controversy in the taxonomy of this parasite genus, we characterized the small-subunit rRNA genes of Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium baileyi, Cryptosporidium muris, and Cryptosporidium serpentis and performed a phylogenetic analysis of t...

  10. Occurrence of Giardia and Cryptosporidium in captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) and wild Zanzibar red colobus monkeys (Procolobus kirkii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debenham, John J; Atencia, Rebeca; Midtgaard, Fred; Robertson, Lucy J

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium spp. in primates and determine their zoonotic or anthropozoonotic potential. Direct immunofluorescence was used to identify Giardia and Cryptosporidium from faecal samples. PCR and DNA sequencing was performed on positive results. Giardia cysts were identified from 5.5% (5/90) of captive chimpanzees and 0% (0/11) of captive mandrills in the Republic of Congo; 0% (0/10) of captive chimpanzees in Norway; and 0% of faecal samples (n = 49) from wild Zanzibar red colobus monkeys. Two Giardia positive samples were also positive on PCR, and sequencing revealed identical isolates of Assemblage B. Cryptosporidium oocysts were not detected in any of the samples. In these primate groups, in which interactions with humans and human environments are quite substantial, Giardia and Cryptosporidium are rare pathogens. In chimpanzees, Giardia may have a zoonotic or anthropozoonotic potential. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Heavy cryptosporidial infections in children in northeast Brazil: comparison of Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushen, Oluma Y; Kohli, Anita; Pinkerton, Relana C; Dupnik, Kate; Newman, Robert D; Sears, Cynthia L; Fayer, Ronald; Lima, Aldo A M; Guerrant, Richard L

    2007-04-01

    Cryptosporidium is an important cause of infectious diarrhoea worldwide, but little is known about the course of illness when infected with different species. Over a period of 5 years, Cryptosporidium was identified in the stools of 58 of 157 children prospectively followed from birth in an urban slum (favela) in northeast Brazil. Forty isolates were available for quantification and 42 for speciation (24 Cryptosporidium hominis and 18 C. parvum). Children with C. hominis shed significantly more oocysts/ml of stool (3.5 x 10(6) vs. 1.7 x 10(6)perml; P=0.001), and oocyst counts were higher among symptomatic children (P=0.002). Heavier C. parvum shedding was significantly associated with symptoms (P=0.004), and symptomatic C. parvum-infected children were significantly more likely than asymptomatic children to be lactoferrin-positive (P=0.004). Height-for-age (HAZ) Z-scores showed significant declines within 3 months of infection for children infected with either C. hominis (P=0.028) or C. parvum (P=0.001). However, in the 3-6 month period following infection, only C. hominis-infected children continued to demonstrate declining HAZ score and asymptomatic children showed even greater decline (P=0.01). Cryptosporidium hominis is more common than C. parvum in favela children and is associated with heavier infections and greater growth shortfalls, even in the absence of symptoms.

  12. Detection of IgG antibodies in sera from patients with Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Rachel M; Elwin, Kristin; Cheesbrough, John; Hadfield, Stephen J; Beeching, Nicholas J

    2013-09-01

    Detection of anti-Cryptosporidium immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies in human sera has been used to demonstrate population exposure to this gastro-intestinal protozoan parasite. We characterised the dynamics of IgG antibody responses to two Cryptosporidium parvum (IOWA isolate) sporozoite antigens (15/17 kDa and 27 kDa) using longitudinal sera taken from laboratory-confirmed cryptosporidiosis cases in England and Wales. The effect of the infecting Cryptosporidium species was also investigated. A mini-gel Western blot was used to test sera from ten Cryptosporidium stool-positive diarrhoea patients, taken soon after diagnosis and at 3 month intervals. Overall responses to the 15/17 kDa antigen complex were stronger and over a greater range than those to the 27 kDa antigen, but declined between 181 and 240 days and were barely detectable thereafter. Responses to the 27 kDa antigen were much weaker but remained detectable for a greater length of time. No differences were detected in either antibody response to infection with C. hominis or C. parvum. The assay appears to be applicable for the study of recent exposure to C. parvum or C. hominis in the United Kingdom population, with strong responses to the 15/17 kDa antigen occurring within 6 months of infection. Copyright © 2013 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Rapid microsphere assay for identification of cryptosporidium hominis and cryptosporidium parvum in stool and environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Kakali; Kellar, Kathryn L; Moura, Iaci; Casaqui Carollo, Maria Cristina; Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Slemenda, Susan; Johnston, Stephanie P; da Silva, Alexandre J

    2007-09-01

    Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum are associated with massive disease outbreaks worldwide. Because these two species have different transmission cycles, identification of these parasites to the species level in clinical samples may provide laboratory data of crucial importance in epidemiologic investigations. To date, the most reliable way to differentiate C. hominis and C. parvum is based on DNA sequencing analysis of PCR amplicons. Although this approach is very effective for differentiation of Cryptosporidium species, it is labor-intensive and time-consuming compared with methods that do not require DNA sequencing analysis as an additional step and that have been successfully used for specific identification of a number of pathogens. In this study, we describe a novel Luminex-based assay that can differentiate C. hominis from C. parvum in a rapid and cost-effective manner. The assay was validated by testing a total of 143 DNA samples extracted from clinical specimens, environmental samples, or samples artificially spiked with Cryptosporidium oocysts. As few as 10 oocysts per 300 microl of stools could be detected with this assay. The assay format includes species-specific probes linked to carboxylated Luminex microspheres that hybridize to a Cryptosporidium microsatellite-2 region (ML-2) where C. hominis and C. parvum differ by one nucleotide substitution. The assay proved to be 100% specific when samples that had been characterized by direct fluorescent antibody test (DFA) and DNA sequencing analysis were tested. In addition, the assay was more sensitive than DFA and provided species identification, which is an advantage for epidemiologic studies.

  14. Prevalence of Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium ssp. in females of the Holstein breed during the post weaning phase in the herd in the southern state of Minas Gerais during the fall-winter season of 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Alves Demeu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of the species of Giardia duodenalis species and the genus Cryptosporidium spp. in dairy calves at different ages during the post-weaning phase in a herd located in Boa Esperança, South of Minas Gerais State, Brazil, during the fallwinter season. It were analyzed 254 samples from 37 cows of Holstein breed, aged between three and 10 months in the period from May to September 2008, collected directly from the rectum every 30 days. To search cysts or trophozoites of Giardia duodenalis was used the flotation in zinc sulfate solution to 33% technique, and for detection of Cryptosporidium was used the Ziehl-Neelsen modified technique. Of the 254 samples, 37.79% were positive for cysts or trophozoites of Giardia and 8.93% for Cryptosporidium spp. The comparison of age and positivity to G. duodenalis and Cryptosporidium, it was observed that for both parasites, the age between three and four months is the most affected in the post-weaning phase in cattle. Whereas the post-weaning is a critical point in the growing cattle, this would indicate the pathogenic potential for these parasites in dairy cattle in southern Minas Gerais.

  15. Intestinal Parasite Profile in the Stool of HIV Positive Patients in relation to Immune Status and Comparison of Various Diagnostic Techniques with Special Reference to Cryptosporidium at a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Kaniyarakkal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and related opportunistic infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in susceptible population. This study aims to negate the paucity of data regarding the relation between CD4 levels, prevalence of enteric parasites, and the outcome of treatment with HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy and Cotrimoxazole in Kerala, India. Multiple stool samples from 200 patients in a cross-sectional study were subjected to microscopy and Cryptosporidium stool antigen ELISA. Parasites were identified in 18 samples (9%. Cystoisospora and Cryptosporidium spp. were seen in 9 cases (4.5% and 5 cases (2.5%, respectively. Microsporidium spores and Chilomastix mesnili cysts were identified in 1 case each (0.5% each. Seven cases of Cystoisospora diarrhoea recovered after treatment with Cotrimoxazole. Diarrhoea due to Cryptosporidium spp. in all 5 cases subsided after immune reconstitution with HAART. This study concludes that a positive association was seen between low CD4 count (<200 cells/μL and overall parasite positivity (P value < 0.01. ELISA is a more sensitive modality for the diagnosis of Cryptosporidium diarrhoea. Chilomastix mesnili, generally considered a nonpathogen, may be a cause of diarrhoeal disease in AIDS. Immune reconstitution and Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis remain to be the best therapeutic approach in AIDS-related diarrhoea.

  16. Pilot-Scale Pulsed UV Light Irradiation of Experimentally Infected Raspberries Suppresses Cryptosporidium parvum Infectivity in Immunocompetent Suckling Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, L; Hubert, B; Favennec, L; Villena, I; Ballet, J J; Agoulon, A; Orange, N; Gargala, G

    2015-12-01

    Cryptosporidium spp., a significant cause of foodborne infection, have been shown to be resistant to most chemical food disinfectant agents and infective for weeks in irrigation waters and stored fresh vegetal produce. Pulsed UV light (PL) has the potential to inactivate Cryptosporidium spp. on surfaces of raw or minimally processed foods or both. The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of PL on viability and in vivo infectivity of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts present on raspberries, a known source of transmission to humans of oocyst-forming apicomplexan pathogens. The skin of each of 20 raspberries was experimentally inoculated with five 10-μl spots of an oocyst suspension containing 6 × 10(7) oocysts per ml (Nouzilly isolate). Raspberries were irradiated by PL flashes (4 J/cm(2) of total fluence). This dose did not affect colorimetric or organoleptic characteristics of fruits. After immunomagnetic separation from raspberries, oocysts were bleached and administered orally to neonatal suckling mice. Seven days after infection, mice were euthanized, and the number of oocysts in the entire small intestine was individually assessed by immunofluorescence flow cytometry. Three of 12 and 12 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10 and 100 oocysts isolated from nonirradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Four of 12 and 2 of 12 inoculated mice that received 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries, respectively, were found infected. Oocyst counts were lower in animals inoculated with 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts from irradiated raspberries (92 ± 144 and 38 ± 82, respectively) than in animals infected with 100 oocysts from nonirradiated raspberries (35,785 ± 66,221, P = 0.008). PL irradiation achieved oocyst reductions of 2 and 3 log for an inoculum of 10(3) and 10(4) oocysts, respectively. The present pilot-scale evaluation suggests that PL is an effective mode of decontamination for raspberries and prompts further applicability

  17. Molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium isolates from humans in Equatorial Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, María Alejandra; Iborra, Asunción; Vargas, Antonio; Nsie, Eugenia; Mbá, Luciano; Fuentes, Isabel

    2009-12-01

    The aim of the study was to perform a molecular characterization of clinical isolates of Cryptosporidium species from Equatorial Guinea. Standard laboratory methods were used to identify 35 cryptosporidiosis cases among 185 patients. PCR-RFLP successfully identified 34 Cryptosporidium species from these 35 cases, comprising C. parvum (52.9%), C. hominis (44.1%) and C. meleagridis (2.9%); over 90% of the species were isolated from HIV-positive patients. This is the first report of the molecular characterization of Cryptosporidium species isolated from humans in Equatorial Guinea and shows that zoonotic and anthroponotic transmission is present in this country.

  18. Acidithiobacillus caldus , Leptospirillum spp., Ferroplasma spp. and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acidithiobacillus caldus , Leptospirillum spp., Ferroplasma spp. and Sulphobacillus spp. mixed strains for use in cobalt and copper removal from water. ... Such findings suggest that if optimal conditions for biosorption of the metals by micro-organisms are achieved, this should afford a cost-effective method of removing metal ...

  19. Genetic diversity analysis of mustard ( Brassica spp.) germplasm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular characterization of 16 mustard (Brassica spp.) genotypes by using 12 RAPD markers revealed that three primers GLA-11, OPB-04 and OPD-02 showed good technical resolution and sufficient variations among different genotypes. A total of 40 RAPD bands were scored of which 38 (94.87%) polymorphic ...

  20. Exploring global Cryptosporidium emissions to surface water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstra, N; Bouwman, A F; Beusen, A H W; Medema, G J

    2013-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium is a major cause of diarrhoea worldwide. This paper presents the first model-based inventory with 0.5 by 0.5 degree resolution of global Cryptosporidium emissions for the year 2000 from humans and animals to surface water. The model is based on nutrient distribution modelling, because the sources and transport of oocysts and nutrients to the surface water are comparable. Total emissions consist of point source emissions from wastewater and nonpoint source emissions by runoff of oocysts in manure from agricultural lands. Results indicate a global emission of 3 × 10(17) oocysts per year, with comparable contributions from point and nonpoint sources. Hot-spot areas for point sources are big cities in China, India and Latin America, while the area with the largest nonpoint source emissions is in China. Uncertainties in the model are large. Main areas for further study are (i) excretion rates of oocysts by humans and animals, (ii) emissions of humans not connected to sewage systems, and (iii) retention of oocysts to determine surface water pathogen concentrations rather than emissions. Our results are useful to health organisations to identify priority areas for further study and intervention. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Giardia duodenalis and Cryptosporidium occurrence in Australian sea lions (Neophoca cinerea exposed to varied levels of human interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany C. Delport

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Giardia and Cryptosporidium are amongst the most common protozoan parasites identified as causing enteric disease in pinnipeds. A number of Giardia assemblages and Cryptosporidium species and genotypes are common in humans and terrestrial mammals and have also been identified in marine mammals. To investigate the occurrence of these parasites in an endangered marine mammal, the Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea, genomic DNA was extracted from faecal samples collected from wild populations (n = 271 in Southern and Western Australia and three Australian captive populations (n = 19. These were screened using PCR targeting the 18S rRNA of Giardia and Cryptosporidium. Giardia duodenalis was detected in 28 wild sea lions and in seven captive individuals. Successful sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene assigned 27 Giardia isolates to assemblage B and one to assemblage A, both assemblages commonly found in humans. Subsequent screening at the gdh and β-giardin loci resulted in amplification of only one of the 35 18S rRNA positive samples at the β-giardin locus. Sequencing at the β-giardin locus assigned the assemblage B 18S rRNA confirmed isolate to assemblage AI. The geographic distribution of sea lion populations sampled in relation to human settlements indicated that Giardia presence in sea lions was highest in populations less than 25 km from humans. Cryptosporidium was not detected by PCR screening in either wild colonies or captive sea lion populations. These data suggest that the presence of G. duodenalis in the endangered Australian sea lion is likely the result of dispersal from human sources. Multilocus molecular analyses are essential for the determination of G. duodenalis assemblages and subsequent inferences on transmission routes to endangered marine mammal populations.

  2. Application of a basic monitoring strategy for Cryptosporidium and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-02-27

    , 2006, South Africa ... applied in the United Kingdom and New. Zealand (DWI, 2008; NZ Ministry of Health, 2008). In South. Africa, Cryptosporidium and Giardia monitoring in drink- ...... Improvement plans implemented.

  3. Detection of Cryptosporidium parvum in environmental soil and vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Semie; Kim, Kyungjin; Yoon, Sejoung; Park, Woo-Yoon; Sim, Seobo; Yu, Jae-Ran

    2014-10-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a zoonotic protozoan parasite that causes cryptosporidial enteritis. Numerous outbreaks of cryptosporidiosis have been reported worldwide. Cryptosporidium is transmitted to hosts via consumption of contaminated water and food but also by direct contact with contaminated soil or infected hosts. The present study investigated farm soil collected from 34 locations along the western Korean peninsula and 24 vegetables purchased from local grocery markets in Seoul. The soil and vegetable samples were examined by real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to estimate the risk of infection. Eleven of 34 locations (32.4%) and 3 of 24 vegetable samples (12.5%) were contaminated with Cryptosporidium parvum, as confirmed by TaqI enzyme digestion of qPCR products and DNA sequencing. It is suggested that Cryptosporidium infection can be mediated via farm soil and vegetables. Therefore, it is necessary to reduce contamination of this organism in view of public health.

  4. Hypothesis: Cryptosporidium genetic diversity mirrors national disease notification rate

    OpenAIRE

    Takumi, Katsuhisa; Cacci?, Simone M.; van der Giessen, Joke; Xiao, Lihua; Sprong, Hein

    2015-01-01

    Background Cryptosporidiosis is a gastrointestinal disease affecting many people worldwide. Disease incidence is often unknown and surveillance of human cryptosporidiosis is installed in only a handful of developed countries. A genetic marker that mirrors disease incidence is potentially a powerful tool for monitoring the two primary human infected species of Cryptosporidium. Methods We used the molecular epidemiological database with Cryptosporidium isolates from ZoopNet, which currently con...

  5. [Erosive gastritis associated with cryptosporidium in 2 patients with AIDS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besasso, H R; Macías, J; Trombetta, L A; di Risio, C A; Argento, R; Besuschio, S C

    1994-01-01

    Occurrence of vomiting and diarrhea in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome was most frequently attributed to enteropathogens organism that invade the gastrointestinal tract because of the immunologic unbalance of the host... Among several causes the cryptosporidium has been detected quite often and its predominant localization was the gastrointestinal tract, although other extraintestinal sites has also been reported. In both cases, erosive congestive gastritis was found, while histological examination showed cryptosporidium in gastric biopsy specimens.

  6. Prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites and Cryptosporidium species in extensively managed pigs in Mekelle and urban areas of southern zone of Tigray region, Northern Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zewdneh Tomass

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites and Cryptosporidium species in extensively managed pigs in Mekelle and urban areas of southern zone of Tigray Region, Ethiopia during June - September, 2012. Material and methods: Seven hundred fourteen pigs of different ages and sexes were selected for fecal sample collection. Fecal samples were collected from the rectum of pigs with strict sanitation. A total of 25 soil samples were also collected from backyards of pig pens using clean zipped plastic bags. Both fecal and soil samples were examined for eggs and cysts of GIT parasites by flotation and sedimentation techniques. Modified Ziehl – Neelsen technique was used to examine oocysts of Cryptosporidium species from 276 randomly selected fecal samples. Results: Out of 714 pigs examined through flotation and sedimentation, 27.3% were infected by at least one gastrointestinal parasite. Ascaris suum (25.9% was the most prevalent parasite followed by Fasciola hepatica (1.8%, Eimeria spp. (1.7% and Trichuris suis (0.3%. There was no significant association between sex and prevalence of parasites ÷2[df 1] = 1.921; P=0.166. Contrary to this, age of pigs had effect on prevalence of parasites ÷2[df 2] = 8.376; P=0.015. About 7% of pigs examined were positive for oocysts of Cryptosporidium spp. Moreover, 72% of the soil samples found to be contaminated with eggs of Ascaris spp. in the study area. Apart from causing morbidity in the infected pigs, the potential of Ascaris of pigs to infect man and vice versa together with poor environmental hygiene, may complicate the epidemiology and control of Ascariasis in the study areas. Extensively managed pigs may also act as potential reservoirs for zoonoses of Cryptosporidium species. Conclusion: It is concluded that further investigations are crucial on molecular characterization of Ascaris and Cryptosporidium isolates of extensively managed pigs to determine the

  7. Detection of UV-induced thymine dimers in individual Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis oocysts by immunofluorescence microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Adhami, B.H.; Nichols, R.A.B.; Kusel, J.R.; O'Grady, J.; Smith, H.V.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the effect of UV light on Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis oocysts in vitro, we exposed intact oocysts to 4-, 10-, 20-, and 40-mJ·cm−2 doses of UV irradiation. Thymine dimers were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy using a monoclonal antibody against cyclobutyl thymine dimers (anti-TDmAb). Dimer-specific fluorescence within sporozoite nuclei was confirmed by colocalization with the nuclear fluorogen 4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI). Oocyst walls we...

  8. Cryptosporidium ubiquitum, C. muris and Cryptosporidium deer genotype in wild cervids and caprines in the Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kotková, Michaela; Němejc, K.; Sak, Bohumil; Hanzal, V.; Květoňová, Dana; Hlásková, Lenka; Čondlová, Šárka; McEvoy, J.; Kváč, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 63, 25 January (2016), č. článku 003. ISSN 1803-6465 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-01090S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Cryptosporidiidae * epidemiology * phylogeny * SSU * gp60 Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 1.082, year: 2016

  9. Campylobacter spp.: prevalencia y caracterización feno-genotípica de aislamientos de pacientes con diarrea y de sus mascotas en la provincia de La Pampa, Argentina Campylobacter spp.: prevalence and pheno-genotypic characterization of isolates recovered from patients suffering from diarrhea and their pets in La Pampa Province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L Tamborini

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se investigó la prevalencia de Campylobacter spp. en 327 pacientes con diarrea y en 36 animales (perros, gatos y pollos que convivían con pacientes en los que se detectó este patógeno; el estudio se llevó a cabo en Santa Rosa, La Pampa, Argentina. Se aisló Campylobacter spp. en 50/327 pacientes y en 12/36 animales, Campylobacter jejuni fue la especie más frecuente. Se detectó resistencia a ciprofoxacina (65 % y a tetraciclina (32 % en una selección de 35 aislamientos de origen humano. En el análisis por electroforesis de campo pulsado de 13 aislamientos de C. jejuni se identificaron siete subtipos genéticos. Dos subtipos agruparon aislamientos de pacientes y de sus respectivos perros, y un tercer subtipo agrupó 1 aislamiento humano y 2 de pollos de ese paciente. Si bien las aves son reconocidas como el principal reservorio, es importante fortalecer la vigilancia de Campylobacter spp. en mascotas, las cuales pueden ser portadores asintomáticos del patógeno.The prevalence of Campylobacter spp. was investigated in 327 patients suffering from diarrhea and in 36 animals (dogs, cats and chickens owned by the patients that presented infection by Campylobacter in Santa Rosa, La Pampa, Argentina. Campylobacter spp. was isolated in 50/327 patients and in 12/36 animals, being Campylobacter jejuni the most common species. Resistance to ciprofoxacin (65 % and tetracycline (32 % was found among 35 isolates of human origin studied. Seven genetic subtypes were observed among 13 C. jejuni isolates by pulsed feld gel electrophoresis. Two subtypes grouped isolates belonging to patients and their respective dogs whereas another subtype grouped one isolate of human origin and two isolates from the patient´s chickens. The results of this investigation highlight the need to strengthen surveillance of Campylobacter spp. not only in poultry, which is recognized as the main reservoir, but also in pets, which were shown to be asymptomatic carriers of the

  10. Molecular Characterization of Cryptosporidium Oocysts in Samples of Raw Surface Water and Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Lihua; Singh, Ajaib; Limor, Josef; Graczyk, Thaddeus K.; Gradus, Steve; Lal, Altaf

    2001-01-01

    Recent molecular characterizations of Cryptosporidium parasites make it possible to differentiate the human-pathogenic Cryptosporidium parasites from those that do not infect humans and to track the source of Cryptosporidium oocyst contamination in the environment. In this study, we used a small-subunit rRNA-based PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) technique to detect and characterize Cryptosporidium oocysts in 55 samples of raw surface water collected from several areas in t...

  11. Detection of infectious Cryptosporidium oocysts by cell culture: applicability to environmental samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schets FM; Engels GB; During M; de Roda Husman AM; MGB

    2004-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is een van de belangrijkste veroorzakers van gastro-enteritis bij de mens. Cryptosporidium-infecties worden vaak via water overgedragen, dit kan zowel drinkwater als recreatiewater zijn. Bij schatting van de kans op infectie met Cryptosporidium na blootstelling aan drinkwater is

  12. Evaluation of a Screening Test for Detection of Giardia and Cryptosporidium Parasites ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Youn, Sojin; Kabir, Mamun; Haque, Rashidul; Petri, William A.

    2008-01-01

    The Giardia/Cryptosporidium Chek test (TechLab, Inc.), a screening test for Giardia and Cryptosporidium, was evaluated with 136 fecal samples. Using the results of the Giardia II test and Cryptosporidium II test as gold standards, it was 98.4% sensitive and 100% specific and had positive and negative predictive values of 98.7% and 99.3%.

  13. Occurrence of Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba in wild rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta living in urban and semi-rural North-West India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Debenham

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba spp. are intestinal protozoa capable of infecting a range of host species, and are important causes of human morbidity and mortality. Understanding their epidemiology is important, both for public health and for the health of the animals they infect. This study investigated the occurrence of these protozoans in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta in India, with the aim of providing preliminary information on the potential for transmission of these pathogens between macaques and humans. Faecal samples (n = 170 were collected from rhesus macaques from four districts of North-West India. Samples were analysed for Giardia/Cryptosporidium using a commercially available direct immunofluorescent antibody test after purification via immunomagnetic separation. Positive samples were characterised by sequencing of PCR products. Occurrence of Entamoeba was investigated first by using a genus-specific PCR, and positive samples further investigated via species-specific PCRs for Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba moshkovskii. Giardia cysts were found in 31% of macaque samples, with all isolates belonging to Assemblage B. Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in 1 sample, however this sample did not result in amplification by PCR. Entamoeba spp. were found in 79% of samples, 49% of which were positive for E. coli. Multiplex PCR for E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii, did not result in amplification in any of the samples. Thus in 51% of the samples positive at the genus specific PCR, the Entamoeba species was not identified. This study provides baseline information on the potential for transmission of these zoonotic parasites at the wildlife-human interface.

  14. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Surface Water: A Case Study from Michigan, USA to Inform Management of Rural Water Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin A. Dreelin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium and Giardia pose a threat to human health in rural environments where water supplies are commonly untreated and susceptible to contamination from agricultural animal waste/manure, animal wastewater, septic tank effluents and septage. Our goals for this paper are to: (1 explore the prevalence of these protozoan parasites, where they are found, in what quantities, and which genotypes are present; (2 examine relationships between disease and land use comparing human health risks between rural and urban environments; and (3 synthesize available information to gain a better understanding of risk and risk management for rural water supplies. Our results indicate that Cryptosporidium and Giardia were more prevalent in rural versus urban environments based on the number of positive samples. Genotyping showed that both the human and animal types of the parasites are found in rural and urban environments. Rural areas had a higher incidence of disease compared to urban areas based on the total number of disease cases. Cryptosporidiosis and giardiasis were both positively correlated (p < 0.001 with urban area, population size, and population density. Finally, a comprehensive strategy that creates knowledge pathways for data sharing among multiple levels of management may improve decision-making for protecting rural water supplies.

  15. Cryptosporidium hominis gene catalog: a resource for the selection of novel Cryptosporidium vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifeonu, Olukemi O; Simon, Raphael; Tennant, Sharon M; Sheoran, Abhineet S; Daly, Maria C; Felix, Victor; Kissinger, Jessica C; Widmer, Giovanni; Levine, Myron M; Tzipori, Saul; Silva, Joana C

    2016-01-01

    Human cryptosporidiosis, caused primarily by Cryptosporidium hominis and a subset of Cryptosporidium parvum, is a major cause of moderate-to-severe diarrhea in children under 5 years of age in developing countries and can lead to nutritional stunting and death. Cryptosporidiosis is particularly severe and potentially lethal in immunocompromised hosts. Biological and technical challenges have impeded traditional vaccinology approaches to identify novel targets for the development of vaccines against C. hominis, the predominant species associated with human disease. We deemed that the existence of genomic resources for multiple species in the genus, including a much-improved genome assembly and annotation for C. hominis, makes a reverse vaccinology approach feasible. To this end, we sought to generate a searchable online resource, termed C. hominis gene catalog, which registers all C. hominis genes and their properties relevant for the identification and prioritization of candidate vaccine antigens, including physical attributes, properties related to antigenic potential and expression data. Using bioinformatic approaches, we identified ∼400 C. hominis genes containing properties typical of surface-exposed antigens, such as predicted glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchor motifs, multiple transmembrane motifs and/or signal peptides targeting the encoded protein to the secretory pathway. This set can be narrowed further, e.g. by focusing on potential GPI-anchored proteins lacking homologs in the human genome, but with homologs in the other Cryptosporidium species for which genomic data are available, and with low amino acid polymorphism. Additional selection criteria related to recombinant expression and purification include minimizing predicted post-translation modifications and potential disulfide bonds. Forty proteins satisfying these criteria were selected from 3745 proteins in the updated C. hominis annotation. The immunogenic potential of a few of these is

  16. Cryptosporidium infection in non-human hosts in Malawi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Banda

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Of 1 346 faecal samples from the Chikwawa and Thyolo districts of Malawi, analysed for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts between October 2001 and May 2003, 61.3 % were from cattle (29.8 % of these were from calves < 6 months old. Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected during all three seasons studied in Chikwawa and Thyolo. In Chikwawa, 13.6 % of adult cattle and 11.7 % of calves were infected, compared to 28.9 % of adult cattle and 36.7 % of calves in Thyolo. Dependent on season, between 7.8 % and 37.7 % (Chikwawa and 16.7 % and 39.3 % (Thyolo of cattle samples contained oocysts. In Chikwawa, the highest percentage of infections occurred in the cool season, whereas in Thyolo, the highest percentage of infections occurred in the dry season. Faecal samples from goats [n = 225], pigs [n = 92], sheep [n = 6], rabbits, guinea pigs, chickens, ducks, turkeys, doves and guinea fowls were also analysed. Up to 5.6 % of goat samples contained oocysts in Chikwawa, compared to between 16.7 % and 39.3 % in Thyolo. Again, in Chikwawa, the highest percentage of infections occurred in the cool season and the lowest in the rainy season, whereas, in Thyolo, the highest percentage of infections occurred in the dry season and the lowest in the cool season. In pigs, more infections were detected in the dry season in Chikwawa, but infections in the cool season were similar (17.7 %, whereas in Thyolo, infections occurred in all three seasons (17.9 % in the rainy season, 25 % in the cool season and 60 % in the dry season. Often diarrhoeic, oocyst positive cattle faecal samples collected from Chikwawa and subjected to PCR-RFLP, four oocyst positive samples (two from heifers, one from a cow and one unknown were amplified at an 18S rRNA and Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP loci. RFLP of the 18S rRNA locus indicated that Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, Cryptosporidium bovis and / or Cryptosporidium ryanae DNA, or a mixture of them was present

  17. Prevalence and associated risk factors for Giardia and Cryptosporidium infections among children of northwest Mexico: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quihui-Cota, Luis; Morales-Figueroa, Gloria Guadalupe; Javalera-Duarte, Aarón; Ponce-Martínez, José Antonio; Valbuena-Gregorio, Edith; López-Mata, Marco Antonio

    2017-10-30

    G. intestinalis and Cryptosporidium spp. are responsible for gastrointestinal infections worldwide. Contaminated food, feces, drinking water and predictors such as poverty, cultural and behavioral aspects have been involved in their transmission. Published studies about these infections are limited in Mexico. Cananea, Sonora is located in northwest Mexico and is one of the regions with the lowest marginalization index in the Sonora state. However, its rate of gastrointestinal infections increased from 48.7/1000 in 2003 to 77.9/1000 in 2010 in the general population. It was estimated that the prevalence of giardiasis can range from 20 to 30% in the Sonoran childhood population. However, the prevalence of giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis are unknown in Cananea, Sonora and they are likely contributing to its gastrointestinal infections rates. A total of 173 children (average age 8.8 ± 2.8 years) participated in this cross-sectional study. Anthropometric measurements and stool analysis were performed. Socioeconomic, cultural and symptomatology information were collected. The association between the risk factors and intestinal parasitic infections was analyzed by multivariate analysis using the STATA/SE package at a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. More than half of the children (n = 103, 60%) had intestinal parasitic infections. Cryptosporidium spp. showed the highest prevalence (n = 47, 27%), which was followed by G. intestinalis (n = 40, 23%). Children with giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis had lower H/A and BMI/A Z scores than children who were free of these infections. Children with giardiasis were at higher risk (OR = 4.0; 95%CI = 1.11-13.02; p = 0.030) of reporting abdominal pain, and children who drank tap water were at higher risk (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.41-17.20; p = 0.012) of cryptosporidiosis. This was the first epidemiological study conducted in children in the region of Cananea, Sonora in northwest Mexico. The

  18. Prevalence and associated risk factors for Giardia and Cryptosporidium infections among children of northwest Mexico: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Quihui-Cota

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background G. intestinalis and Cryptosporidium spp. are responsible for gastrointestinal infections worldwide. Contaminated food, feces, drinking water and predictors such as poverty, cultural and behavioral aspects have been involved in their transmission. Published studies about these infections are limited in Mexico. Cananea, Sonora is located in northwest Mexico and is one of the regions with the lowest marginalization index in the Sonora state. However, its rate of gastrointestinal infections increased from 48.7/1000 in 2003 to 77.9/1000 in 2010 in the general population. It was estimated that the prevalence of giardiasis can range from 20 to 30% in the Sonoran childhood population. However, the prevalence of giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis are unknown in Cananea, Sonora and they are likely contributing to its gastrointestinal infections rates. Methods A total of 173 children (average age 8.8 ± 2.8 years participated in this cross-sectional study. Anthropometric measurements and stool analysis were performed. Socioeconomic, cultural and symptomatology information were collected. The association between the risk factors and intestinal parasitic infections was analyzed by multivariate analysis using the STATA/SE package at a significance level of p ≤ 0.05. Results More than half of the children (n = 103, 60% had intestinal parasitic infections. Cryptosporidium spp. showed the highest prevalence (n = 47, 27%, which was followed by G. intestinalis (n = 40, 23%. Children with giardiasis and cryptosporidiosis had lower H/A and BMI/A Z scores than children who were free of these infections. Children with giardiasis were at higher risk (OR = 4.0; 95%CI = 1.11–13.02; p = 0.030 of reporting abdominal pain, and children who drank tap water were at higher risk (OR = 5.0; 95% CI = 1.41–17.20; p = 0.012 of cryptosporidiosis. Conclusions This was the first epidemiological study conducted in

  19. MLST subtypes and population genetic structure of Cryptosporidium andersoni from dairy cattle and beef cattle in northeastern China's Heilongjiang Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Rongjun; Zhang, Weizhe; Liu, Aiqin; Cao, Jianping; Shen, Yujuan; Yang, Fengkun; Zhang, Longxian

    2014-01-01

    Cattle are the main reservoir host of C. andersoni, which shows a predominance in yearlings and adults of cattle. To understand the subtypes of C. andersoni and the population genetic structure in Heilongjiang Province, fecal specimens were collected from 420 dairy cattle and 405 beef cattle at the age of 12-14 months in eight cattle farms in five areas within this province and were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts by microscopy after Sheather's sugar flotation technique. The average prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. was 19.15% (158/825) and all the Cryptosporidium isolates were identified as C. andersoni by the SSU rRNA gene nested PCR-RFLP using SspI, VspI and MboII restriction enzymes. A total of 50 C. andersoni isolates were randomly selected and sequenced to confirm the RFLP results before they were subtyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) at the four microsatellite/minisatellite loci (MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16). Four, one, two and one haplotypes were obtained at the four loci, respectively. The MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 showed an absolute predominance and a wide distribution among the six MLST subtypes obtained in the investigated areas. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed the presence of a clonal population genetic structure of C. andersoni in cattle, suggesting the absence of recombination among lineages. The finding of a clonal population genetic structure indicated that the prevalence of C. andersoni in cattle in Heilongjiang Province is not attributed to the introduction of cattle. Thus, prevention and control strategies should be focused on making stricter measures to avoid the occurrence of cross-transmission and re-infection between cattle individuals. These molecular data will also be helpful to explore the source attribution of infection/contamination of C. andersoni and to elucidate its transmission dynamics in Heilongjiang Province, even in China.

  20. MLST subtypes and population genetic structure of Cryptosporidium andersoni from dairy cattle and beef cattle in northeastern China's Heilongjiang Province.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Cattle are the main reservoir host of C. andersoni, which shows a predominance in yearlings and adults of cattle. To understand the subtypes of C. andersoni and the population genetic structure in Heilongjiang Province, fecal specimens were collected from 420 dairy cattle and 405 beef cattle at the age of 12-14 months in eight cattle farms in five areas within this province and were screened for the presence of Cryptosporidium oocysts by microscopy after Sheather's sugar flotation technique. The average prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. was 19.15% (158/825 and all the Cryptosporidium isolates were identified as C. andersoni by the SSU rRNA gene nested PCR-RFLP using SspI, VspI and MboII restriction enzymes. A total of 50 C. andersoni isolates were randomly selected and sequenced to confirm the RFLP results before they were subtyped by multilocus sequence typing (MLST at the four microsatellite/minisatellite loci (MS1, MS2, MS3 and MS16. Four, one, two and one haplotypes were obtained at the four loci, respectively. The MLST subtype A4,A4,A4,A1 showed an absolute predominance and a wide distribution among the six MLST subtypes obtained in the investigated areas. Linkage disequilibrium analysis showed the presence of a clonal population genetic structure of C. andersoni in cattle, suggesting the absence of recombination among lineages. The finding of a clonal population genetic structure indicated that the prevalence of C. andersoni in cattle in Heilongjiang Province is not attributed to the introduction of cattle. Thus, prevention and control strategies should be focused on making stricter measures to avoid the occurrence of cross-transmission and re-infection between cattle individuals. These molecular data will also be helpful to explore the source attribution of infection/contamination of C. andersoni and to elucidate its transmission dynamics in Heilongjiang Province, even in China.

  1. Epidemiology of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle in China: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chao; Cao, Xue-Feng; Deng, Lei; Li, Wei; Huang, Xiang-Ming; Lan, Jing-Chao; Xiao, Qi-Cheng; Zhong, Zhi-Jun; Feng, Fan; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Wen-Bo; Guo, Ping; Wu, Kong-Ju; Peng, Guang-Neng

    2017-01-01

    The present review discusses the findings of cryptosporidiosis research conducted in cattle in China and highlights the currently available information on Cryptosporidium epidemiology, genetic diversity, and distribution in China, which is critical to understanding the economic and public health importance of cryptosporidiosis transmission in cattle. To date, 10 Cryptosporidium species have been detected in cattle in China, with an overall infection rate of 11.9%. The highest rate of infection (19.5%) was observed in preweaned calves, followed by that in juveniles (10.69%), postweaned juveniles (9.0%), and adult cattle (4.94%). The dominant species were C. parvum in preweaned calves and C. andersoni in postweaned, juvenile, and adult cattle. Zoonotic Cryptosporidium species (C. parvum and C. hominis) were found in cattle, indicating the possibility of transmission between humans and cattle. Different cattle breeds had significant differences in the prevalence rate and species of Cryptosporidium. This review demonstrates an age-associated, breed-associated, and geographic-related occurrence of Cryptosporidium and provides references for further understanding of the epidemiological characteristics, and for preventing and controlling the disease. © C. Gong et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

  2. Interactions between Cryptosporidium parvum and the Intestinal Ecosystem

    KAUST Repository

    Douvropoulou, Olga

    2017-04-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an apicomplexan protozoan parasite commonly causing diarrhea, particularly in infants in developing countries. The research challenges faced in the development of therapies against Cryptosporidium slow down the process of drug discovery. However, advancement of knowledge towards the interactions of the intestinal ecosystem and the parasite could provide alternative approaches to tackle the disease. Under this perspective, the primary focus of this work was to study interactions between Cryptosporidium parvum and the intestinal ecosystem in a mouse model. Mice were treated with antibiotics with different activity spectra and the resulted perturbation of the native gut microbiota was identified by microbiome studies. In particular, 16S amplicon sequencing and Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) were used to determine the bacterial composition and the genetic repertoire of the fecal microbial communities in the mouse gut. Following alteration of the microbial communities of mice by application of antibiotic treatment, Cryptosporidium parasites were propagated in mice with perturbed microbiota and the severity of the infection was quantified. This approach enabled the prediction of the functional capacity of the microbial communities in the mouse gut and led to the identification of bacterial taxa that positively or negatively correlate in abundance with Cryptosporidium proliferation.

  3. Childhood Cryptosporidium infection among aboriginal communities in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mekhlafi, H M; Mahdy, M A K; ’Azlin, M Y; Fatmah, M S; Norhayati, M

    2011-01-01

    Cryptosporidium is a coccidian parasite that is prevalent worldwide, some species of which cause morbidity in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. The prevalence and predictors of Cryptosporidium infection, and its effect on nutritional status, have recently been explored among 276 children (141 boys and 135 girls, aged 2–15 years) in aboriginal (Orang Asli) villages in the Malaysian state of Selangor. Faecal smears were examined by the modified Ziehl–Neelsen staining technique while socio–economic data were collected using a standardized questionnaire. Nutritional status was assessed by anthropometric measurements. Cryptosporidium infection, which was detected in 7·2% of the aboriginal children, was found to be significantly associated with low birthweight (⩽2·5 kg), being part of a large household (with more than seven members) and prolonged breast feeding (>2 years). The output of a binary logistic regression confirmed that large household size was a significant predictor of Cryptosporidium infection (giving an odds ratio of 2·15, with a 95% confidence interval of 1·25–5·02). Cryptosporidium infection is clearly a public-health problem among the aboriginal children of Selangor, with person-to-person the most likely mode of transmission. PMID:21396250

  4. Epidemiology of Cryptosporidium infection in cattle in China: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Chao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present review discusses the findings of cryptosporidiosis research conducted in cattle in China and highlights the currently available information on Cryptosporidium epidemiology, genetic diversity, and distribution in China, which is critical to understanding the economic and public health importance of cryptosporidiosis transmission in cattle. To date, 10 Cryptosporidium species have been detected in cattle in China, with an overall infection rate of 11.9%. The highest rate of infection (19.5% was observed in preweaned calves, followed by that in juveniles (10.69%, postweaned juveniles (9.0%, and adult cattle (4.94%. The dominant species were C. parvum in preweaned calves and C. andersoni in postweaned, juvenile, and adult cattle. Zoonotic Cryptosporidium species (C. parvum and C. hominis were found in cattle, indicating the possibility of transmission between humans and cattle. Different cattle breeds had significant differences in the prevalence rate and species of Cryptosporidium. This review demonstrates an age-associated, breed-associated, and geographic-related occurrence of Cryptosporidium and provides references for further understanding of the epidemiological characteristics, and for preventing and controlling the disease.

  5. Cloaca prolapse and cystitis in green iguana (Iguana iguana) caused by a novel Cryptosporidium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kik, Marja J L; van Asten, Alphons J A M; Lenstra, Johannes A; Kirpensteijn, Jolle

    2011-01-10

    Cryptosporidium infection was associated with colitis and cystitis in 2 green iguanas (Iguana iguana). The disease was characterized by a chronic clinical course of cloacal prolapses and cystitis. Histological examination of the gut and urinary bladder showed numerous Cryptosporidium developmental stages on the surface of the epithelium with mixed inflammatory response in the lamina propria. Cryptosporidium oocysts were visualised in a cytological preparation of the faeces. Based on the small subunit ribosomal RNA gene the cryptosporidia were characterized as belonging to the intestinal cryptosporidial lineage, but not to Cryptosporidium saurophilum or Cryptosporidium serpentis species. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Antigenic differences within the Cryptosporidium hominis and Cryptosporidium parvum surface proteins P23 and GP900 defined by monoclonal antibody reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturbaum, Gregory D; Schaefer, Deborah A; Jost, B Helen; Sterling, Charles R; Riggs, Michael W

    2008-06-01

    The biological basis for the specificity of host infectivity patterns of Cryptosporidium spp., in particular C. hominis and C. parvum, has yet to be fully elucidated. Comparison of the C. parvum and C. hominis P23 and GP900 predicted amino acid sequences revealed 3 differences in P23 and 4 and 17 differences in GP900 domains 1 and 5, respectively. Using monoclonal antibodies developed against the surface (glyco)proteins P23 and GP900 of the C. parvum Iowa isolate, solubilized glycoprotein from three C. hominis isolates was screened for reactivity using Western immunoblots. One of ten P23 MAbs and three of 21 GP900 MAbs were not reactive with any of the three C. hominis isolates. The non-reactive P23 MAb binds to a peptide epitope, while the non-reactive GP900 MAbs bind to either carbohydrate/carbohydrate-dependent or peptide epitopes of C. parvum. These results demonstrate phenotypic differences between C. hominis and C. parvum within two (glyco)proteins that are involved in parasite gliding motility and attachment/invasion.

  7. Cryptosporidium: from laboratory diagnosis to surveillance and outbreaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalmers R.M.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The burden of disease caused by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium is unknown. However, routine laboratory diagnosis and surveillance enables the basic epidemiology to be described, changes to be monitored and under-ascertainment to be measured. Although the two main species involved in human disease in developed countries, Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis, have differing epidemiologies and risk factors, national surveillance is generally from isolates identified to the genus level only. Enhancing the data by typing, at least to identify the isolates to the species level, removes some of the noise generated and better identifies the risks than when reports are not species-specific. This level of identification is also valuable for outbreak investigations, but further investigation of the population genetics of C. parvum and C. hominis is required for the development of more readily applied subtyping tools.

  8. Simultaneous detection of the protozoan parasites Toxoplasma, Cryptosporidium and Giardia in food matrices and their persistence on basil leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohweyer, Jeanne; Cazeaux, Catherine; Travaillé, Emmanuelle; Languet, Emilie; Dumètre, Aurélien; Aubert, Dominique; Terryn, Christine; Dubey, Jitender P; Azas, Nadine; Houssin, Maryline; Loïc, Favennec; Villena, Isabelle; La Carbona, Stéphanie

    2016-08-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, Cryptosporidium spp. and Giardia intestinalis are emerging pathogen parasites in the food domain. However, without standardized methods for their detection in food matrices, parasitic foodborne outbreaks remain neglected. In this study, a new immunomagnetic separation assay (IMS Toxo) targeting the oocyst's wall of T. gondii was developed using a specific purified monoclonal antibody. Performance of this IMS Toxo coupled to microscopic and qPCR analyses was evaluated in terms of limit of detection (LOD) and recovery rate (RR) on: i) simple matrix (LOD = 5 oocysts; RR between 5 and 56%); ii) raspberries and basil (LOD = 33 oocysts/g; RR between 0.2 and 35%). Finally, to simultaneously extract the three protozoa from these food matrices, T. gondii oocysts were directly concentrated (without IMS Toxo) from the supernatant of the IMS of Cryptosporidium and Giardia (oo)cysts. This strategy associated to qPCR detection led to LOD <1 to 3 (oo)cysts/g and RR between 2 and 35%. This procedure was coupled to RT-qPCR analyses and showed that the three protozoa persisted on the leaves of basil and remained viable following storage at 4 °C for 8 days. These data strengthen the need to consider these protozoa in food safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fate of Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis oocysts and Giardia duodenalis cysts during secondary wastewater treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hui-Wen A; Lucy, Frances E; Graczyk, Thaddeus K; Broaders, Michael A; Tamang, Leena; Connolly, Michelle

    2009-09-01

    This study investigates the fate of Cryptosporidium parvum and C. hominis oocysts and Giardia duodenalis cysts at four Irish municipal wastewater treatment plants (i.e., Plant A, B, C, and D) that utilize sludge activation or biofilm-coated percolating filter systems for second