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Sample records for genotype predicting phenotype

  1. The Face of Noonan Syndrome: Does Phenotype Predict Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allanson, Judith E.; Bohring, Axel; Dorr, Helmuth-Guenther; Dufke, Andreas; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabrielle; Horn, Denise; König, Rainer; Kratz, Christian P.; Kutsche, Kerstin; Pauli, Silke; Raskin, Salmo; Rauch, Anita; Turner, Anne; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Zenker, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The facial photographs of 81 individuals with Noonan syndrome, from infancy to adulthood, have been evaluated by two dysmorphologists (JA and MZ), each of whom has considerable experience with disorders of the Ras/MAPK pathway. Thirty-two of this cohort have PTPN11 mutations, 21 SOS1 mutations, 11 RAF1 mutations, and 17 KRAS mutations. The facial appearance of each person was judged to be typical of Noonan syndrome or atypical. In each gene category both typical and unusual faces were found. We determined that some individuals with mutations in the most commonly affected gene, PTPN11, which is correlated with the cardinal physical features, may have a quite atypical face. Conversely, some individuals with KRAS mutations, which may be associated with a less characteristic intellectual phenotype and a resemblance to Costello and cardio-facio-cutaneous syndromes, can have a very typical face. Thus, the facial phenotype, alone, is insufficient to predict the genotype, but certain facial features may facilitate an educated guess in some cases. PMID:20602484

  2. Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome: does genotype predict phenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allanson, Judith E; Annerén, Göran; Aoki, Yoki; Armour, Christine M; Bondeson, Marie-Louise; Cave, Helene; Gripp, Karen W; Kerr, Bronwyn; Nystrom, Anna-Maja; Sol-Church, Katia; Verloes, Alain; Zenker, Martin

    2011-05-15

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC) syndrome is a sporadic multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation condition principally caused by mutations in BRAF, MEK1, and MEK2. Mutations in KRAS and SHOC2 lead to a phenotype with overlapping features. In approximately 10–30% of individuals with a clinical diagnosis of CFC, a mutation in one of these causative genes is not found. Cardinal features of CFC include congenital heart defects, a characteristic facial appearance, and ectodermal abnormalities. Additional features include failure to thrive with severe feeding problems, moderate to severe intellectual disability and short stature with relative macrocephaly. First described in 1986, more than 100 affected individuals are reported. Following the discovery of the causative genes, more information has emerged on the breadth of clinical features. Little, however, has been published on genotype–phenotype correlations. This clinical study of 186 children and young adults with mutation-proven CFC syndrome is the largest reported to date. BRAF mutations are documented in 140 individuals (approximately 75%), while 46 (approximately 25%) have a mutation in MEK 1 or MEK 2. The age range is 6 months to 32 years, the oldest individual being a female from the original report [Reynolds et al. (1986); Am J Med Genet 25:413–427]. While some clinical data on 136 are in the literature, 50 are not previously published. We provide new details of the breadth of phenotype and discuss the frequency of particular features in each genotypic group. Pulmonary stenosis is the only anomaly that demonstrates a statistically significant genotype–phenotype correlation, being more common in individuals with a BRAF mutation.

  3. Predicting adaptive phenotypes from multilocus genotypes in Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis) using random forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Jason A; Wang, Tongli; Aitken, Sally

    2012-09-01

    Climate is the primary driver of the distribution of tree species worldwide, and the potential for adaptive evolution will be an important factor determining the response of forests to anthropogenic climate change. Although association mapping has the potential to improve our understanding of the genomic underpinnings of climatically relevant traits, the utility of adaptive polymorphisms uncovered by such studies would be greatly enhanced by the development of integrated models that account for the phenotypic effects of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and their interactions simultaneously. We previously reported the results of association mapping in the widespread conifer Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis). In the current study we used the recursive partitioning algorithm 'Random Forest' to identify optimized combinations of SNPs to predict adaptive phenotypes. After adjusting for population structure, we were able to explain 37% and 30% of the phenotypic variation, respectively, in two locally adaptive traits--autumn budset timing and cold hardiness. For each trait, the leading five SNPs captured much of the phenotypic variation. To determine the role of epistasis in shaping these phenotypes, we also used a novel approach to quantify the strength and direction of pairwise interactions between SNPs and found such interactions to be common. Our results demonstrate the power of Random Forest to identify subsets of markers that are most important to climatic adaptation, and suggest that interactions among these loci may be widespread.

  4. Evaluation of the genotypic prediction of HIV-1 coreceptor use versus a phenotypic assay and correlation with the virological response to maraviroc: the ANRS GenoTropism study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Soulié, Cathia; Flandre, Philippe; Descamps, Diane; Lazrek, Mouna; Charpentier, Charlotte; Montes, Brigitte; Trabaud, Mary-Anne; Cottalorda, Jacqueline; Schneider, Véronique; Morand-Joubert, Laurence; Tamalet, Catherine; Desbois, Delphine; Macé, Muriel; Ferré, Virginie; Vabret, Astrid; Ruffault, Annick; Pallier, Coralie; Raymond, Stéphanie; Izopet, Jacques; Reynes, Jacques; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Masquelier, Bernard

    2010-08-01

    Genotypic algorithms for prediction of HIV-1 coreceptor usage need to be evaluated in a clinical setting. We aimed at studying (i) the correlation of genotypic prediction of coreceptor use in comparison with a phenotypic assay and (ii) the relationship between genotypic prediction of coreceptor use at baseline and the virological response (VR) to a therapy including maraviroc (MVC). Antiretroviral-experienced patients were included in the MVC Expanded Access Program if they had an R5 screening result with Trofile (Monogram Biosciences). V3 loop sequences were determined at screening, and coreceptor use was predicted using 13 genotypic algorithms or combinations of algorithms. Genotypic predictions were compared to Trofile; dual or mixed (D/M) variants were considered as X4 variants. Both genotypic and phenotypic results were obtained for 189 patients at screening, with 54 isolates scored as X4 or D/M and 135 scored as R5 with Trofile. The highest sensitivity (59.3%) for detection of X4 was obtained with the Geno2pheno algorithm, with a false-positive rate set up at 10% (Geno2pheno10). In the 112 patients receiving MVC, a plasma viral RNA load of <50 copies/ml was obtained in 68% of cases at month 6. In multivariate analysis, the prediction of the X4 genotype at baseline with the Geno2pheno10 algorithm including baseline viral load and CD4 nadir was independently associated with a worse VR at months 1 and 3. The baseline weighted genotypic sensitivity score was associated with VR at month 6. There were strong arguments in favor of using genotypic coreceptor use assays for determining which patients would respond to CCR5 antagonist.

  5. Linking genotypes database with locus-specific database and genotype-phenotype correlation in phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wettstein, Sarah; Underhaug, Jarl; Perez, Belen; Marsden, Brian D; Yue, Wyatt W; Martinez, Aurora; Blau, Nenad

    2015-03-01

    The wide range of metabolic phenotypes in phenylketonuria is due to a large number of variants causing variable impairment in phenylalanine hydroxylase function. A total of 834 phenylalanine hydroxylase gene variants from the locus-specific database PAHvdb and genotypes of 4181 phenylketonuria patients from the BIOPKU database were characterized using FoldX, SIFT Blink, Polyphen-2 and SNPs3D algorithms. Obtained data was correlated with residual enzyme activity, patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness. A descriptive analysis of both databases was compiled and an interactive viewer in PAHvdb database was implemented for structure visualization of missense variants. We found a quantitative relationship between phenylalanine hydroxylase protein stability and enzyme activity (r(s) = 0.479), between protein stability and allelic phenotype (r(s) = -0.458), as well as between enzyme activity and allelic phenotype (r(s) = 0.799). Enzyme stability algorithms (FoldX and SNPs3D), allelic phenotype and enzyme activity were most powerful to predict patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin response. Phenotype prediction was most accurate in deleterious genotypes (≈ 100%), followed by homozygous (92.9%), hemizygous (94.8%), and compound heterozygous genotypes (77.9%), while tetrahydrobiopterin response was correctly predicted in 71.0% of all cases. To our knowledge this is the largest study using algorithms for the prediction of patients' phenotype and tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness in phenylketonuria patients, using data from the locus-specific and genotypes database.

  6. Deep Phenotyping: Deep Learning For Temporal Phenotype/Genotype Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Mohammad; Namin, Sarah; Esmaeilzadeh, Mohammad; Brown, Tim; Borevitz, Justin

    2017-01-01

    High resolution and high throughput, genotype to phenotype studies in plants are underway to accelerate breeding of climate ready crops. Complex developmental phenotypes are observed by imaging a variety of accessions in different environment conditions, however extracting the genetically heritable traits is challenging. In the recent years, deep learning techniques and in particular Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs), Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) and Long-Short Term Memories (LSTMs), h...

  7. The evolution of vertebrate eye size across an environmental gradient: phenotype does not predict genotype in a Trinidadian killifish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beston, Shannon M; Wostl, Elijah; Walsh, Matthew R

    2017-08-01

    Vertebrates exhibit substantial variation in eye size. Eye size correlates positively with visual capacity and behaviors that enhance fitness, such as predator avoidance. This foreshadows a connection between predation and eye size evolution. Yet, the conditions that favor evolutionary shifts in eye size, besides the well-known role for light availability, are unclear. We tested the influence of predation on the evolution of eye size in Trinidadian killifish, Rivulus hartii. Rivulus are located across a series of communities where they coexist with visually oriented piscivores ("high predation" sites), and no predators ("Rivulus-only" sites). Wild-caught Rivulus from high predation sites generally exhibited a smaller relative eye size than communities that lack predators. Yet, such differences were inconsistent across rivers. Second-generation common garden reared fish revealed repeatable decreases in eye size in Rivulus from high predation sites. We performed additional experiments that tested the importance of light and resources on eye size evolution. Sites that differ in light or resource availability did not differ in eye size. Our results argue that differences in predator-induced mortality underlie genetically-based shifts in vertebrate eye size. We discuss the drivers of eye size evolution in light of the nonparallel trends between the phenotypic and common garden results. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  8. The genotype-phenotype map of an evolving digital organism

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuna, Miguel A.; Zaman, Luis; Ofria, Charles; Wagner, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    To understand how evolving systems bring forth novel and useful phenotypes, it is essential to understand the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic change. Artificial evolving systems can help us understand whether the genotype-phenotype maps of natural evolving systems are highly unusual, and it may help create evolvable artificial systems. Here we characterize the genotype-phenotype map of digital organisms in Avida, a platform for digital evolution. We consider digital organisms fr...

  9. [Mexican phenotype and genotype Vibrio cholerae 01].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giono, S; Gutiérrez Cogno, L; Rodríguez Angeles, G; del Rio Zolezzi, A; Valdespino González, J L; Sepúlveda Amor, J

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the phenotypical and genotypical characterization of 26922 Vibrio cholerae 01 strains isolated in Mexico from 1991 to 1993. All strains isolated were El Tor biovar. Strains were sensitive to antibiotics excluding furazolidone, streptomycin and sulfisoxasole to which we found resistance in 97% and we are using this characteristic as epidemiological markers. We detected a marked change in frequency of Inaba serotype from 1991, when it was dominant, with 99.5%, until 1992 when Ogawa serotype turned to be dominant with 95% of isolates. All Vibrio cholerae 01 strains, except one Ogawa strain, were to igenic, and V. choleraeno 01 were not toxigenic by ELISA, PCR and cell culture tests. Dominant ribotype was 5, but we found some strains with 6a pattern and two with ribotype 12. We are searching for ribotype 2 among hemolytic strains in order to learn if there is any relation to Gulf Coast strains prevalent in the USA, but until now we have not found any V. cholerae ribotype 2 in our isolates. Even if rapid tests are recommended for immediate diagnosis of cholera, it is necessary to continue bacterial isolation in order to have strains for phenotyping and genotyping studies that may support epidemiological analysis.

  10. The genotype-phenotype map of an evolving digital organism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Fortuna

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available To understand how evolving systems bring forth novel and useful phenotypes, it is essential to understand the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic change. Artificial evolving systems can help us understand whether the genotype-phenotype maps of natural evolving systems are highly unusual, and it may help create evolvable artificial systems. Here we characterize the genotype-phenotype map of digital organisms in Avida, a platform for digital evolution. We consider digital organisms from a vast space of 10141 genotypes (instruction sequences, which can form 512 different phenotypes. These phenotypes are distinguished by different Boolean logic functions they can compute, as well as by the complexity of these functions. We observe several properties with parallels in natural systems, such as connected genotype networks and asymmetric phenotypic transitions. The likely common cause is robustness to genotypic change. We describe an intriguing tension between phenotypic complexity and evolvability that may have implications for biological evolution. On the one hand, genotypic change is more likely to yield novel phenotypes in more complex organisms. On the other hand, the total number of novel phenotypes reachable through genotypic change is highest for organisms with simple phenotypes. Artificial evolving systems can help us study aspects of biological evolvability that are not accessible in vastly more complex natural systems. They can also help identify properties, such as robustness, that are required for both human-designed artificial systems and synthetic biological systems to be evolvable.

  11. The genotype-phenotype map of an evolving digital organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Miguel A; Zaman, Luis; Ofria, Charles; Wagner, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    To understand how evolving systems bring forth novel and useful phenotypes, it is essential to understand the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic change. Artificial evolving systems can help us understand whether the genotype-phenotype maps of natural evolving systems are highly unusual, and it may help create evolvable artificial systems. Here we characterize the genotype-phenotype map of digital organisms in Avida, a platform for digital evolution. We consider digital organisms from a vast space of 10141 genotypes (instruction sequences), which can form 512 different phenotypes. These phenotypes are distinguished by different Boolean logic functions they can compute, as well as by the complexity of these functions. We observe several properties with parallels in natural systems, such as connected genotype networks and asymmetric phenotypic transitions. The likely common cause is robustness to genotypic change. We describe an intriguing tension between phenotypic complexity and evolvability that may have implications for biological evolution. On the one hand, genotypic change is more likely to yield novel phenotypes in more complex organisms. On the other hand, the total number of novel phenotypes reachable through genotypic change is highest for organisms with simple phenotypes. Artificial evolving systems can help us study aspects of biological evolvability that are not accessible in vastly more complex natural systems. They can also help identify properties, such as robustness, that are required for both human-designed artificial systems and synthetic biological systems to be evolvable.

  12. HFE genotype affects exosome phenotype in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrowczynski, Oliver D; Madhankumar, A B; Slagle-Webb, Becky; Lee, Sang Y; Zacharia, Brad E; Connor, James R

    2017-08-01

    Neuroblastoma is the third most common childhood cancer, and timely diagnosis and sensitive therapeutic monitoring remain major challenges. Tumor progression and recurrence is common with little understanding of mechanisms. A major recent focus in cancer biology is the impact of exosomes on metastatic behavior and the tumor microenvironment. Exosomes have been demonstrated to contribute to the oncogenic effect on the surrounding tumor environment and also mediate resistance to therapy. The effect of genotype on exosomal phenotype has not yet been explored. We interrogated exosomes from human neuroblastoma cells that express wild-type or mutant forms of the HFE gene. HFE, one of the most common autosomal recessive polymorphisms in the Caucasian population, originally associated with hemochromatosis, has also been associated with increased tumor burden, therapeutic resistance boost, and negative impact on patient survival. Herein, we demonstrate that changes in genotype cause major differences in the molecular and functional properties of exosomes; specifically, HFE mutant derived exosomes have increased expression of proteins relating to invasion, angiogenesis, and cancer therapeutic resistance. HFE mutant derived exosomes were also shown to transfer this cargo to recipient cells and cause an increased oncogenic functionality in those recipient cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The Phenotype/Genotype Correlation of Lactase Persistence among Omani Adults

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    Abdulrahim Al-Abri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine the correlation of lactase persistence phenotype with genotype in Omani adults.Methods: Lactase persistence phenotype was tested by hydrogen breath test in 52 Omani Adults using the Micro H2 analyzer. Results were checked against genotyping using direct DNA sequencing.Results: Forty one individuals with C/C-13910 and T/T-13915 genotypes had positive breath tests (≥20 ppm; while eight of nine individuals with T/C-13910 or T/G-13915 genotypes had negative breath tests (<20 ppm and two subjects were non-hydrogen producers. The agreement between phenotype and genotype using Kappa value was very good (0.93.Conclusion: Genotyping both T/C-13910 and T/G-13915 alleles can be used to assist diagnosis and predict lactose intolerance in the Omani population.

  14. Integrating Evolutionary Game Theory into Mechanistic Genotype-Phenotype Mapping.

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    Zhu, Xuli; Jiang, Libo; Ye, Meixia; Sun, Lidan; Gragnoli, Claudia; Wu, Rongling

    2016-05-01

    Natural selection has shaped the evolution of organisms toward optimizing their structural and functional design. However, how this universal principle can enhance genotype-phenotype mapping of quantitative traits has remained unexplored. Here we show that the integration of this principle and functional mapping through evolutionary game theory gains new insight into the genetic architecture of complex traits. By viewing phenotype formation as an evolutionary system, we formulate mathematical equations to model the ecological mechanisms that drive the interaction and coordination of its constituent components toward population dynamics and stability. Functional mapping provides a procedure for estimating the genetic parameters that specify the dynamic relationship of competition and cooperation and predicting how genes mediate the evolution of this relationship during trait formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Translation of Genotype to Phenotype by a Hierarchy of Cell Subsystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Michael Ku; Kramer, Michael; Dutkowski, Janusz; Srivas, Rohith; Licon, Katherine; Kreisberg, Jason; Ng, Cherie T; Krogan, Nevan; Sharan, Roded; Ideker, Trey

    2016-02-24

    Accurately translating genotype to phenotype requires accounting for the functional impact of genetic variation at many biological scales. Here we present a strategy for genotype-phenotype reasoning based on existing knowledge of cellular subsystems. These subsystems and their hierarchical organization are defined by the Gene Ontology or a complementary ontology inferred directly from previously published datasets. Guided by the ontology's hierarchical structure, we organize genotype data into an "ontotype," that is, a hierarchy of perturbations representing the effects of genetic variation at multiple cellular scales. The ontotype is then interpreted using logical rules generated by machine learning to predict phenotype. This approach substantially outperforms previous, non-hierarchical methods for translating yeast genotype to cell growth phenotype, and it accurately predicts the growth outcomes of two new screens of 2,503 double gene knockouts impacting DNA repair or nuclear lumen. Ontotypes also generalize to larger knockout combinations, setting the stage for interpreting the complex genetics of disease.

  16. Concepts of pathogenesis in psoriatic arthritis: genotype determines clinical phenotype.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    FitzGerald, Oliver

    2015-05-07

    This review focuses on the genetic features of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and their relationship to phenotypic heterogeneity in the disease, and addresses three questions: what do the recent studies on human leukocyte antigen (HLA) tell us about the genetic relationship between cutaneous psoriasis (PsO) and PsA - that is, is PsO a unitary phenotype; is PsA a genetically heterogeneous or homogeneous entity; and do the genetic factors implicated in determining susceptibility to PsA predict clinical phenotype? We first discuss the results from comparing the HLA typing of two PsO cohorts: one cohort providing the dermatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsO without evidence of arthritic disease; and the second cohort providing the rheumatologic perspective, consisting of patients with PsA. We show that these two cohorts differ considerably in their predominant HLA alleles, indicating the heterogeneity of the overall PsO phenotype. Moreover, the genotype of patients in the PsA cohort was shown to be heterogeneous with significant elevations in the frequency of haplotypes containing HLA-B*08, HLA-C*06:02, HLA-B*27, HLA-B*38 and HLA-B*39. Because different genetic susceptibility genes imply different disease mechanisms, and possibly different clinical courses and therapeutic responses, we then review the evidence for a phenotypic difference among patients with PsA who have inherited different HLA alleles. We provide evidence that different alleles and, more importantly, different haplotypes implicated in determining PsA susceptibility are associated with different phenotypic characteristics that appear to be subphenotypes. The implication of these findings for the overall pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in PsA is discussed with specific reference to their bearing on the discussion of whether PsA is conceptualised as an autoimmune process or one that is based on entheseal responses.

  17. Genotype-phenotype associations in obesity dependent on definition of the obesity phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, Sofia Inez Iqbal; Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup; Holst, Claus; Toubro, Søren; Hansen, Torben; Astrup, Arne; Pedersen, Oluf; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2008-01-01

    In previous studies of associations of variants in the genes UCP2, UCP3, PPARG2, CART, GRL, MC4R, MKKS, SHP, GHRL, and MCHR1 with obesity, we have used a case-control approach with cases defined by a threshold for BMI. In the present study, we assess the association of seven abdominal, peripheral, and overall obesity phenotypes, which were analyzed quantitatively, and thirteen candidate gene polymorphisms in these ten genes in the same cohort. Obese Caucasian men (n = 234, BMI >or= 31.0 kg/m(2)) and a randomly sampled non-obese group (n = 323), originally identified at the draft board examinations, were re-examined at median ages of 47.0 or 49.0 years by anthropometry and DEXA scanning. Obesity phenotypes included BMI, fat body mass index, waist circumference, waist for given BMI, intra-abdominal adipose tissue, hip circumference and lower body fat mass (%). Using logistic regression models, we estimated the odds for defined genotypes (dominant or recessive genetic transmission) in relation to z-scores of the phenotypes. The minor (rare) allele for SHP 512G>C (rs6659176) was associated with increased hip circumference. The minor allele for UCP2 Ins45bp was associated with increased BMI, increased abdominal obesity, and increased hip circumference. The minor allele for UCP2 -866G>A (rs6593669) was associated with borderline increased fat body mass index. The minor allele for MCHR1 100213G>A (rs133072) was associated with reduced abdominal obesity. None of the other genotype-phenotype combinations showed appreciable associations. If replicated in independent studies with focus on the specific phenotypes, our explorative studies suggest significant associations between some candidate gene polymorphisms and distinct obesity phenotypes, predicting beneficial and detrimental effects, depending on compartments for body fat accumulation. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Phenotypic and genotypic variation in Iranian Pistachios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Tayefeh Aliakbarkhani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As Iran is one of the richest pistachio germplasms a few studies have been conducted on different sexes of pistachio trees, in areas where this crop emerged. To this end, 40 male and female Iranian pistachio genotypes from Feizabad region, Khorasan, Iran; were evaluated using morphological characters and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers. For morphological assessments, 54 variables were considered to investigate similarities between and among the studied genotypes. Morphological data indicated relative superiority in some female genotypes (such as Sefid 1, Sefid Sabuni 2, Garmesiah, and Ghermezdorosht Z regarding characters such as halfcrackedness, the percentages of protein and fat content. 115 polymorphic bands were recorded with 92.83% average polymorphism among all primers. The total resolving power (Rp of the primers was 74.54. The range of genetic similarity varied from about 0.31 to about 0.70. Genotypes were segregated into eight groups at the similarity limit of 0.41. Results of present investigation could be helpful for strategic decisions for maintaining Iranian pistachio genotypes.

  19. Phenotype- and genotype-specific structural alterations in spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Serena; Battistella, Giovanni; Huddleston, Hailey; Scharf, Rebecca; Fleysher, Lazar; Rumbach, Anna F; Frucht, Steven J; Blitzer, Andrew; Ozelius, Laurie J; Simonyan, Kristina

    2017-04-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia is a focal dystonia characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles that occur selectively during speaking. Although hereditary trends have been reported in up to 16% of patients, the causative etiology of spasmodic dysphonia is unclear, and the influences of various phenotypes and genotypes on disorder pathophysiology are poorly understood. In this study, we examined structural alterations in cortical gray matter and white matter integrity in relationship to different phenotypes and putative genotypes of spasmodic dysphonia to elucidate the structural component of its complex pathophysiology. Eighty-nine patients with spasmodic dysphonia underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging to examine cortical thickness and white matter fractional anisotropy in adductor versus abductor forms (distinct phenotypes) and in sporadic versus familial cases (distinct genotypes). Phenotype-specific abnormalities were localized in the left sensorimotor cortex and angular gyrus and the white matter bundle of the right superior corona radiata. Genotype-specific alterations were found in the left superior temporal gyrus, supplementary motor area, and the arcuate portion of the left superior longitudinal fasciculus. Our findings suggest that phenotypic differences in spasmodic dysphonia arise at the level of the primary and associative areas of motor control, whereas genotype-related pathophysiological mechanisms may be associated with dysfunction of regions regulating phonological and sensory processing. Identification of structural alterations specific to disorder phenotype and putative genotype provides an important step toward future delineation of imaging markers and potential targets for novel therapeutic interventions for spasmodic dysphonia. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2017 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. NF1 Neuronal Genotype Phenotype Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    interesting results from the Drosophila functional assays, at present we have decided to focus our attention on selected NF1 patient missense mutations...complexity of NF1 disease phenotypes in different tissues, age and sex dependency of symptoms, impact of environmental factors and genetic heterogeneity...suggesting the role of modifier genes [12]. This work aims to shed light on this issue by studying the functional consequences of selected NF1

  1. Childhood asthma-predictive phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilbert, Theresa W; Mauger, David T; Lemanske, Robert F

    2014-01-01

    Wheezing is a fairly common symptom in early childhood, but only some of these toddlers will experience continued wheezing symptoms in later childhood. The definition of the asthma-predictive phenotype is in children with frequent, recurrent wheezing in early life who have risk factors associated with the continuation of asthma symptoms in later life. Several asthma-predictive phenotypes were developed retrospectively based on large, longitudinal cohort studies; however, it can be difficult to differentiate these phenotypes clinically as the expression of symptoms, and risk factors can change with time. Genetic, environmental, developmental, and host factors and their interactions may contribute to the development, severity, and persistence of the asthma phenotype over time. Key characteristics that distinguish the childhood asthma-predictive phenotype include the following: male sex; a history of wheezing, with lower respiratory tract infections; history of parental asthma; history of atopic dermatitis; eosinophilia; early sensitization to food or aeroallergens; or lower lung function in early life. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Diagnostic Challenges in Retinitis Pigmentosa: Genotypic Multiplicity and Phenotypic Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Susie; Vaccarella, Leah; Olatunji, Sunday; Cebulla, Colleen; Christoforidis, John

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a heterogeneous group of inherited retinal disorders. Diagnosis can be challenging as more than 40 genes are known to cause non-syndromic RP and phenotypic expression can differ significantly resulting in variations in disease severity, age of onset, rate of progression, and clinical findings. We describe the clinical manifestations of RP, the more commonly known causative gene mutations, and the genotypic-phenotypic correlation of RP. PMID:22131872

  3. Delineation of C12orf65-related phenotypes: a genotype-phenotype relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Ronen; Mandel, Hanna; Saada, Ann; Lerer, Issy; Burger, Ayala; Shaag, Avraham; Shalev, Stavit A; Jabaly-Habib, Haneen; Goldsher, Dorit; Gomori, John M; Lossos, Alex; Elpeleg, Orly; Meiner, Vardiella

    2014-08-01

    C12orf65 participates in the process of mitochondrial translation and has been shown to be associated with a spectrum of phenotypes, including early onset optic atrophy, progressive encephalomyopathy, peripheral neuropathy, and spastic paraparesis.We used whole-genome homozygosity mapping as well as exome sequencing and targeted gene sequencing to identify novel C12orf65 disease-causing mutations in seven affected individuals originating from two consanguineous families. In four family members affected with childhood-onset optic atrophy accompanied by slowly progressive peripheral neuropathy and spastic paraparesis, we identified a homozygous frame shift mutation c.413_417 delAACAA, which predicts a truncated protein lacking the C-terminal portion. In the second family, we studied three affected individuals who presented with early onset optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and spastic gait in addition to moderate intellectual disability. Muscle biopsy in two of the patients revealed decreased activities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes I and IV. In these patients, we identified a homozygous splice mutation, g.21043 T>A (c.282+2 T>A) which leads to skipping of exon 2. Our study broadens the phenotypic spectrum of C12orf65 defects and highlights the triad of optic atrophy, axonal neuropathy and spastic paraparesis as its key clinical features. In addition, a clear genotype-phenotype correlation is anticipated in which deleterious mutations which disrupt the GGQ-containing domain in the first coding exon are expected to result in a more severe phenotype, whereas down-stream C-terminal mutations may result in a more favorable phenotype, typically lacking cognitive impairment.

  4. The phenotype, psychotype and genotype of bruxism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Fierro, Norma; Martínez-Fierro, Margarita; Cerda-Flores, Ricardo M.; Gómez-Govea, Mayra A.; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Martínez-De-Villarreal, Laura E.; González-Ramírez, Mónica T.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Irám Pablo

    2018-01-01

    Bruxism is a jaw muscle activity that involves physio-pathological, psycho-social, hereditary and genetic factors. The purpose of this study was to determine the associations between self-reported bruxism, anxiety, and neuroticism personality trait with the rs6313 polymorphism in the gene HTR2A. A sample of 171 subjects of both sexes (14–53 years of age) was included. The control group (group 1, n=60) exhibited no signs or symptoms of bruxism. The case group had signs and symptoms of bruxism (n=112) and was subdivided into group 2, bruxism during sleep (n=22); group 3, awake bruxism (n=44); and group 4 combined bruxism (n=46). As diagnostic tools, the Self-Reported Bruxism Questionnaire (SBQ), the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised-Abbreviated (EPQR-A) were used. HTR2A (rs6313) SNPs were determined by qPCR for all the participants. The packages SPSS, maxLik and EPI-INFO were used for data analysis. The combined bruxism group reported higher scores in bruxism symptoms, mean = 32.21; anxiety symptoms, mean = 14.80; and neuroticism, mean = 3.26. Combined bruxism was associated with a higher degree of neuroticism (OR=15.0; CI 1.52–148.32) and anxiety in grade 3-moderate (OR=3.56; CI 1.27–10.03), and grade 4-severe (OR=8.40; CI 1.45–48.61), as determined using EPISODE computer software. Genotypic homogeneity analysis revealed no significant differences in allele frequency (P=0.612) among the four groups. The population was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (maxLik package). In conclusion, the three instruments confirm traits of bruxism, anxiety and neuroticism in individuals with bruxism. These data were ratified when the sample was divided by genotypic homogeneity. On the other hand, there was no significant difference between the groups in the SNPs rs6313 from the HTR2A gene. PMID:29599979

  5. Early-onset stargardt disease: phenotypic and genotypic characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambertus, S.; Huet, R.A.C. van; Bax, N.M.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Boon, C.J.F.; Klevering, B.J.; Hoyng, C.B.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the phenotype and genotype of patients with early-onset Stargardt disease. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Fifty-one Stargardt patients with age at onset

  6. Genotype-phenotype associations in children with congenital hyperinsulinism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikyan, Maria; Brusgaard, Klaus; Petraykina, Elena

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) is a heterogeneous disease in terms of clinical presentation, genetics and histology. Mutations in eight genes are known to be a cause of CHI, of which ABCC8, KCNJ11 and GCK are among the most common. We investigated genotype-phenotype associations in a cohort...

  7. Distribution of genotype network sizes in sequence-to-structure genotype-phenotype maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrubia, Susanna; Cuesta, José A

    2017-04-01

    An essential quantity to ensure evolvability of populations is the navigability of the genotype space. Navigability, understood as the ease with which alternative phenotypes are reached, relies on the existence of sufficiently large and mutually attainable genotype networks. The size of genotype networks (e.g. the number of RNA sequences folding into a particular secondary structure or the number of DNA sequences coding for the same protein structure) is astronomically large in all functional molecules investigated: an exhaustive experimental or computational study of all RNA folds or all protein structures becomes impossible even for moderately long sequences. Here, we analytically derive the distribution of genotype network sizes for a hierarchy of models which successively incorporate features of increasingly realistic sequence-to-structure genotype-phenotype maps. The main feature of these models relies on the characterization of each phenotype through a prototypical sequence whose sites admit a variable fraction of letters of the alphabet. Our models interpolate between two limit distributions: a power-law distribution, when the ordering of sites in the prototypical sequence is strongly constrained, and a lognormal distribution, as suggested for RNA, when different orderings of the same set of sites yield different phenotypes. Our main result is the qualitative and quantitative identification of those features of sequence-to-structure maps that lead to different distributions of genotype network sizes. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Integration of curated databases to identify genotype-phenotype associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jianrong

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to rapidly characterize an unknown microorganism is critical in both responding to infectious disease and biodefense. To do this, we need some way of anticipating an organism's phenotype based on the molecules encoded by its genome. However, the link between molecular composition (i.e. genotype and phenotype for microbes is not obvious. While there have been several studies that address this challenge, none have yet proposed a large-scale method integrating curated biological information. Here we utilize a systematic approach to discover genotype-phenotype associations that combines phenotypic information from a biomedical informatics database, GIDEON, with the molecular information contained in National Center for Biotechnology Information's Clusters of Orthologous Groups database (NCBI COGs. Results Integrating the information in the two databases, we are able to correlate the presence or absence of a given protein in a microbe with its phenotype as measured by certain morphological characteristics or survival in a particular growth media. With a 0.8 correlation score threshold, 66% of the associations found were confirmed by the literature and at a 0.9 correlation threshold, 86% were positively verified. Conclusion Our results suggest possible phenotypic manifestations for proteins biochemically associated with sugar metabolism and electron transport. Moreover, we believe our approach can be extended to linking pathogenic phenotypes with functionally related proteins.

  9. Wine Expertise Predicts Taste Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John E; Pickering, Gary J

    2012-03-01

    Taste phenotypes have long been studied in relation to alcohol intake, dependence, and family history, with contradictory findings. However, on balance - with appropriate caveats about populations tested, outcomes measured and psychophysical methods used - an association between variation in taste responsiveness and some alcohol behaviors is supported. Recent work suggests super-tasting (operationalized via propylthiouracil (PROP) bitterness) not only associates with heightened response but also with more acute discrimination between stimuli. Here, we explore relationships between food and beverage adventurousness and taste phenotype. A convenience sample of wine drinkers (n=330) were recruited in Ontario and phenotyped for PROP bitterness via filter paper disk. They also filled out a short questionnaire regarding willingness to try new foods, alcoholic beverages and wines as well as level of wine involvement, which was used to classify them as a wine expert (n=110) or wine consumer (n=220). In univariate logisitic models, food adventurousness predicted trying new wines and beverages but not expertise. Likewise, wine expertise predicted willingness to try new wines and beverages but not foods. In separate multivariate logistic models, willingness to try new wines and beverages was predicted by expertise and food adventurousness but not PROP. However, mean PROP bitterness was higher among wine experts than wine consumers, and the conditional distribution functions differed between experts and consumers. In contrast, PROP means and distributions did not differ with food adventurousness. These data suggest individuals may self-select for specific professions based on sensory ability (i.e., an active gene-environment correlation) but phenotype does not explain willingness to try new stimuli.

  10. GENOTYPE-PHENOTYPE STUDY OF FAMILIAL HEMOPHAGOCYTIC LYMPHOHISTIOCYTOSIS TYPE 3

    OpenAIRE

    Sieni , Elena; Cetica , Valentina; Santoro , Alessandra; Beutel , Karin; Mastrodicasa , Elena; Meeths , Marie; Ciambotti , Benedetta; Brugnolo , Francesca; Zur Stadt , Udo; Pende , Daniela; Moretta , Lorenzo; Griffiths , Gillian M.; Henter , Jan-Inge; Janka , Gritta; Arico , Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background: Mutations of UNC13D are causative for FHL3 (OMIM 608898). We present a genotype-phenotype study of 845 FHL3 patients. Methods: A consortium of 3 countries planned to pool in a common database data on presenting features and mutations from individual patients with biallelic UNC13D mutations. Results: 845 FHL3 patients (median age: 4.1 months) were reported from Florence, Italy (n=54), Hamburg, Germany (n=18), Stockholm, Sweden (n=123). Their ethnic origi...

  11. Phenotype, Genotype, and Drug Resistance in Subtype C HIV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derache, Anne; Wallis, Carole L; Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Bartlett, John; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Katzenstein, David

    2016-01-15

    Virologic failure in subtype C is characterized by high resistance to first-line antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, including efavirenz, nevirapine, and lamivudine, with nucleoside resistance including type 2 thymidine analog mutations, K65R, a T69del, and M184V. However, genotypic algorithms predicting resistance are mainly based on subtype B viruses and may under- or overestimate drug resistance in non-B subtypes. To explore potential treatment strategies after first-line failure, we compared genotypic and phenotypic susceptibility of subtype C human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) following first-line ARV failure. AIDS Clinical Trials Group 5230 evaluated patients failing an initial nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) regimen in Africa and Asia, comparing the genotypic drug resistance and phenotypic profile from the PhenoSense (Monogram). Site-directed mutagenesis studies of K65R and T69del assessed the phenotypic impact of these mutations. Genotypic algorithms overestimated resistance to etravirine and rilpivirine, misclassifying 28% and 32%, respectively. Despite K65R with the T69del in 9 samples, tenofovir retained activity in >60%. Reversion of the K65R increased susceptibility to tenofovir and other nucleosides, while reversion of the T69del showed increased resistance to zidovudine, with little impact on other NRTI. Although genotype and phenotype were largely concordant for first-line drugs, estimates of genotypic resistance to etravirine and rilpivirine may misclassify subtype C isolates compared to phenotype. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Molecular epidemiology, genotype-phenotype correlation and BH4 responsiveness in Spanish patients with phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldámiz-Echevarría, Luis; Llarena, Marta; Bueno, María A; Dalmau, Jaime; Vitoria, Isidro; Fernández-Marmiesse, Ana; Andrade, Fernando; Blasco, Javier; Alcalde, Carlos; Gil, David; García, María C; González-Lamuño, Domingo; Ruiz, Mónica; Ruiz, María A; Peña-Quintana, Luis; González, David; Sánchez-Valverde, Felix; Desviat, Lourdes R; Pérez, Belen; Couce, María L

    2016-08-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU), the most common inborn error of amino acid metabolism, is caused by mutations in the phenylalanine-4-hydroxylase (PAH) gene. This study aimed to assess the genotype-phenotype correlation in the PKU Spanish population and the usefulness in establishing genotype-based predictions of BH4 responsiveness in our population. It involved the molecular characterization of 411 Spanish PKU patients: mild hyperphenylalaninemia non-treated (mild HPA-NT) (34%), mild HPA (8.8%), mild-moderate (20.7%) and classic (36.5%) PKU. BH4 responsiveness was evaluated using a 6R-BH4 loading test. We assessed genotype-phenotype associations and genotype-BH4 responsiveness in our population according to literature and classification of the mutations. The mutational spectrum analysis showed 116 distinct mutations, most missense (70.7%) and located in the catalytic domain (62.9%). The most prevalent mutations were c.1066-11G>A (9.7%), p.Val388Met (6.6%) and p.Arg261Gln (6.3%). Three novel mutations (c.61-13del9, p.Ile283Val and p.Gly148Val) were reported. Although good genotype-phenotype correlation was observed, there was no exact correlation for some genotypes. Among the patients monitored for the 6R-BH4 loading test: 102 were responders (87, carried either one or two BH4-responsive alleles) and 194 non-responders (50, had two non-responsive mutations). More discrepancies were observed in non-responders. Our data reveal a great genetic heterogeneity in our population. Genotype is quite a good predictor of phenotype and BH4 responsiveness, which is relevant for patient management, treatment and follow-up.

  13. Phenotypes in defined genotypes including siblings with Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malm, Eva; Ponjavic, Vesna; Möller, Claes; Kimberling, William J; Andréasson, Sten

    2011-06-01

    To characterize visual function in defined genotypes including siblings with Usher syndrome. Thirteen patients with phenotypically different subtypes of Usher syndrome, including 3 families with affected siblings, were selected. Genetic analysis and ophthalmological examinations including visual fields, full-field electroretinography (ERG), multifocal electroretinography (mf ERG), and optical coherence tomography (OCT) were assessed. The patients' degree of visual handicap was evaluated by a questionnaire (ADL). Twelve of thirteen patients were genotyped as Usher 1B, 1D, 1F, 2A, 2C or 3A. In 12 of 13 patients examined with ERG the 30 Hz flickering light response revealed remaining cone function. In 3 of the patients with Usher type 1 mf ERG demonstrated a specific pattern, with a sharp distinction between the area with reduced function and the central area with remaining macular function and normal peak time. OCT demonstrated loss of foveal depression with distortion of the foveal architecture in the macula in all patients. The foveal thickness ranged from 159 to 384 µm and was not correlated to retinal function. Three siblings shared the same mutation for Usher 2C but in contrast to previous reports regarding this genotype, 1 of them diverged in phenotype with substantially normal visual fields, almost normal OCT and mf ERG findings, and only moderately reduced rod and cone function according to ERG. Evaluation of visual function comprising both the severity of the rod cone degeneration and the function in the macular region confirm phenotypical heterogeneity within siblings and between different genotypes of Usher syndrome.

  14. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix-Valenzuela, L; Guardiola-Avila, I; Burgara-Estrella, A; Ibarra-Zavala, M; Mata-Haro, V

    2015-10-01

    The fruit juice industry recognizes Alicyclobacillus as a major quality control target micro-organism. In this study, we analysed 19 bacterial isolates to identify Alicyclobacillus species by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing analyses. Phenotypic and genomic diversity among isolates were investigated by API 50CHB system and ERIC-PCR (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus-PCR) respectively. All bacterial isolates were identified as Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius, and almost all showed identical DNA sequences according to their 16S rRNA (rDNA) gene partial sequences. Only few carbohydrates were fermented by A. acidocaldarius isolates, and there was little variability in the biochemical profile. Genotypic fingerprinting of the A. acidocaldarius isolates showed high diversity, and clusters by ERIC-PCR were distinct to those obtained from the 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic tree. There was no correlation between phenotypic and genotypic variability in the A. acidocaldarius isolates analysed in this study. Detection of Alicyclobacillus strains is imperative in fruit concentrates and juices due to the production of guaiacol. Identification of the genera originates rejection of the product by processing industry. However, not all the Alicyclobacillus species are deteriorative and hence the importance to differentiate among them. In this study, partial 16S ribosomal RNA sequence alignment allowed the differentiation of species. In addition, ERIC-PCR was introduced for the genotypic characterization of Alicyclobacillus, as an alternative for differentiation among isolates from the same species. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Phenotype/genotype correlations in Gaucher disease type 1: Clinical and therapeutic implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibille, A.; Eng, C.M.; Kim, S.J.; Pastores, G. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)); Grabowski, G.A. (Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States) Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States))

    1993-06-01

    Gaucher disease is the most frequent lysosomal storage disease and the most prevalent genetic disease among Ashkenazi Jews. Gaucher disease type 1 is characterized by marked variability of the phenotype and by the absence of neuronopathic involvement. To test the hypothesis that this phenotypic variability was due to genetic compounds of several different mutant alleles, 161 symptomatic patients with Gaucher disease type 1 (> 90% Ashkenazi Jewish) were analyzed for clinical involvement, and their genotypes were determined. Qualitative and quantitative measures of disease involvement included age at onset of the disease manifestations, hepatic and splenic volumes, age at splenectomy, and severity of bony disease. High statistically significant differences (P < .005) were found in each clinical parameter in patients with the N370S/N370S genotype compared with those patients with the N370S/84GG, N370S/L444P, and N370/ genotypes. The symptomatic N370S homozygotes had onset of their disease two to three decades later than patients with the other genotypes. In addition, patients with the latter genotypes have much more severely involved livers, spleens, and bones and had a higher incidence of splenectomy at an earlier age. These predictive genotype analyses provide the basis for genetic care delivery and therapeutic recommendations in patients affected with Gaucher disease type 1. 38 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  16. Correlation between genotype and the tetrahydrobiopterin-responsive phenotype in Chinese patients with phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jing; Li, Nana; Jia, Haitao; Liu, Zhen; Li, Xiaohong; Song, Jiaping; Deng, Ying; Jin, Xi; Zhu, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A growing body of research has suggested that tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) responsive phenotype can be predicted by the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) genotype in patients with phenylketonuria (PKU), but data concerning the association between genotype and BH4 responsiveness are scarce in China. A total of 165 PKU patients from China who had undergone a 24-h loading test with BH4 administration were recruited. Genotyping was performed by the next-generation sequencing (NGS) technique. Using the predicted residual PAH activity, we analyzed the association between genotype and BH4-responsiveness. Among the 165 patients, 40 patients (24.24%) responded to BH4. A total of 74 distinct mutations were observed, including 13 novel mutations. The mutation p.R241C was most frequently associated with response. Two known mutations (p.A322T and p.Q419R) and two novel mutations (p.L98V and IVS3-2A>T) were first reported as responsive to BH4. Residual PAH activity of at least 12.5% was needed for responsive genotypes. Genotype-based predictions of BH4-responsiveness are only for selecting potential responders. Accordingly, it is necessary to test potential responders with a long-term BH4 challenge.

  17. Genotypic character relationship and phenotypic path coefficient analysis in chili pepper genotypes grown under tropical condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Magaji G; Rafii, Mohd Y; Martini, Mohammad Y; Oladosu, Yusuff; Kashiani, Pedram

    2017-03-01

    Studies on genotypic and phenotypic correlations among characters of crop plants are useful in planning, evaluating and setting selection criteria for the desired characters in a breeding program. The present study aimed to estimate the phenotypic correlation coefficients among yield and yield attributed characters and to work out the direct and indirect effects of yield-related characters on yield per plant using path coefficient analysis. Twenty-six genotypes of chili pepper were laid out in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Yield per plant showed positive and highly significant (P ≤ 0.01) correlations with most of the characters studied at both the phenotypic and genotypic levels. By contrast, disease incidence and days to flowering showed a significant negative association with yield. Fruit weight and number of fruits exerted positive direct effect on yield and also had a positive and significant (P ≤ 0.01) correlation with yield per plant. However, fruit length showed a low negative direct effect with a strong and positive indirect effect through fruit weight on yield and had a positive and significant association with yield. Longer fruits, heavy fruits and a high number of fruits are variables that are related to higher yields of chili pepper under tropical conditions and hence could be used as a reliable indicator in indirect selection for yield. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Cluster analysis in severe emphysema subjects using phenotype and genotype data: an exploratory investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Fernando J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Numerous studies have demonstrated associations between genetic markers and COPD, but results have been inconsistent. One reason may be heterogeneity in disease definition. Unsupervised learning approaches may assist in understanding disease heterogeneity. Methods We selected 31 phenotypic variables and 12 SNPs from five candidate genes in 308 subjects in the National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT Genetics Ancillary Study cohort. We used factor analysis to select a subset of phenotypic variables, and then used cluster analysis to identify subtypes of severe emphysema. We examined the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of each cluster. Results We identified six factors accounting for 75% of the shared variability among our initial phenotypic variables. We selected four phenotypic variables from these factors for cluster analysis: 1 post-bronchodilator FEV1 percent predicted, 2 percent bronchodilator responsiveness, and quantitative CT measurements of 3 apical emphysema and 4 airway wall thickness. K-means cluster analysis revealed four clusters, though separation between clusters was modest: 1 emphysema predominant, 2 bronchodilator responsive, with higher FEV1; 3 discordant, with a lower FEV1 despite less severe emphysema and lower airway wall thickness, and 4 airway predominant. Of the genotypes examined, membership in cluster 1 (emphysema-predominant was associated with TGFB1 SNP rs1800470. Conclusions Cluster analysis may identify meaningful disease subtypes and/or groups of related phenotypic variables even in a highly selected group of severe emphysema subjects, and may be useful for genetic association studies.

  19. Genotype-phenotype associations in French patients with phenylketonuria and importance of genotype for full assessment of tetrahydrobiopterin responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeannesson-Thivisol, Elise; Feillet, François; Chéry, Céline; Perrin, Pascal; Battaglia-Hsu, Shyue-Fang; Herbeth, Bernard; Cano, Aline; Barth, Magalie; Fouilhoux, Alain; Mention, Karine; Labarthe, François; Arnoux, Jean-Baptiste; Maillot, François; Lenaerts, Catherine; Dumesnil, Cécile; Wagner, Kathy; Terral, Daniel; Broué, Pierre; de Parscau, Loïc; Gay, Claire; Kuster, Alice; Bédu, Antoine; Besson, Gérard; Lamireau, Delphine; Odent, Sylvie; Masurel, Alice; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Namour, Fares

    2015-12-15

    Mutations in Phenylalanine Hydroxylase (PAH) gene cause phenylketonuria. Sapropterin (BH4), the enzyme cofactor, is an important therapeutical strategy in phenylketonuria. However, PAH is a highly polymorphic gene and it is difficult to identify BH4-responsive genotypes. We seek here to improve prediction of BH4-responsiveness through comparison of genotypes, BH4-loading test, predictions of responsiveness according to the literature and types and locations of mutations. A total of 364 French patients among which, 9 % had mild hyperphenylalaninemia, 17.7 % mild phenylketonuria and 73.1 % classical phenylketonuria, benefited from a 24-hour BH4-loading test and had the PAH gene sequenced and analyzed by Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification. Overall, 31.6 % of patients were BH4-responsive. The number of different mutations found was 127, including 26 new mutations. The mutations c.434A > T, c.500A > T, c.529G > C, c.1045 T > G and c.1196 T > C were newly classified as being BH4-responsive. We identified 261 genotypes, among which 46 were newly recognized as being BH4-responsive. Even though patients carry 2 responsive alleles, BH4-responsiveness cannot be predicted with certainty unless they present mild hyperphenylalaninemia. BH4-responsiveness cannot be predicted in patients carrying one responsive mutation only. In general, the milder the phenotype is, the stronger the BH4-response is. Almost exclusively missense mutations, particularly in exons 12, 11 and 8, are associated with BH4-responsiveness and any other type of mutation predicts a negative response. This study is the first of its kind, in a French population, to identify the phenotype associated with several combinations of PAH mutations. As others, it highlights the necessity of performing simultaneously BH4 loading test and molecular analysis in monitoring phenylketonuria patients.

  20. Genotypic and Phenotypic Analysis of Dairy Lactococcus lactis Biodiversity in Milk: Volatile Organic Compounds as Discriminating Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaisne, Amandine; Guellerin, Maeva; Laroute, Valérie; Laguerre, Sandrine; Le Bourgeois, Pascal; Loubiere, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The diversity of nine dairy strains of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis in fermented milk was investigated by both genotypic and phenotypic analyses. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and multilocus sequence typing were used to establish an integrated genotypic classification. This classification was coherent with discrimination of the L. lactis subsp. lactis bv. diacetylactis lineage and reflected clonal complex phylogeny and the uniqueness of the genomes of these strains. To assess phenotypic diversity, 82 variables were selected as important dairy features; they included physiological descriptors and the production of metabolites and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Principal-component analysis (PCA) demonstrated the phenotypic uniqueness of each of these genetically closely related strains, allowing strain discrimination. A method of variable selection was developed to reduce the time-consuming experimentation. We therefore identified 20 variables, all associated with VOCs, as phenotypic markers allowing discrimination between strain groups. These markers are representative of the three metabolic pathways involved in flavor: lipolysis, proteolysis, and glycolysis. Despite great phenotypic diversity, the strains could be divided into four robust phenotypic clusters based on their metabolic orientations. Inclusion of genotypic diversity in addition to phenotypic characters in the classification led to five clusters rather than four being defined. However, genotypic characters make a smaller contribution than phenotypic variables (no genetic distances selected among the most contributory variables). This work proposes an original method for the phenotypic differentiation of closely related strains in milk and may be the first step toward a predictive classification for the manufacture of starters. PMID:23709512

  1. Novel EDA mutation in X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia and genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, B; Lu, H; Xiao, X; Zhou, L; Lu, J; Zhu, L; Yu, D; Zhao, W

    2015-11-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED) is characterized by abnormalities of hair, teeth, and sweat glands, while non-syndromic hypodontia (NSH) affects only teeth. Mutations in Ectodysplasin A (EDA) underlie both XLHED and NSH. This study investigated the genetic causes of six hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED) patients and genotype-phenotype correlation. The EDA gene of six patients with HED was sequenced. Bioinformatics analysis and structural modeling for the mutations were performed. The records of 134 patients with XLHED and EDA-related NSH regarding numbers of missing permanent teeth from this study and 20 articles were reviewed. Nonparametric tests were used to analyze genotype-phenotype correlations. In four of the six patients, we identified a novel mutation c.852T>G (p.Phe284Leu) and three reported mutations: c.467G>A (p.Arg156His), c.776C>A (p.Ala259Glu), and c.871G>A (p.Gly291Arg). They were predicted to be pathogenic by bioinformatics analysis and structural modeling. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis revealed that truncating mutations were associated with more missing teeth. Missense mutations and the mutations affecting the TNF homology domain were correlated with fewer missing teeth. This study extended the mutation spectrum of XLHED and revealed the relationship between genotype and the number of missing permanent teeth. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Towards a database for genotype-phenotype association research: mining data from encyclopaedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pajić, V.S.; Pavlović-Lažetić, G.M.; Beljanski, M.V.; Brandt, B.W.; Pajić, M.B.

    2013-01-01

    To associate phenotypic characteristics of an organism to molecules encoded by its genome, there is a need for well-structured genotype and phenotype data. We use a novel method for extracting data on phenotype and genotype characteristics of microorganisms from text. As a resource, we use an

  3. Network Based Integrated Analysis of Phenotype-Genotype Data for Prioritization of Candidate Symptom Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Symptoms and signs (symptoms in brief are the essential clinical manifestations for individualized diagnosis and treatment in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM. To gain insights into the molecular mechanism of symptoms, we develop a computational approach to identify the candidate genes of symptoms. Methods. This paper presents a network-based approach for the integrated analysis of multiple phenotype-genotype data sources and the prediction of the prioritizing genes for the associated symptoms. The method first calculates the similarities between symptoms and diseases based on the symptom-disease relationships retrieved from the PubMed bibliographic database. Then the disease-gene associations and protein-protein interactions are utilized to construct a phenotype-genotype network. The PRINCE algorithm is finally used to rank the potential genes for the associated symptoms. Results. The proposed method gets reliable gene rank list with AUC (area under curve 0.616 in classification. Some novel genes like CALCA, ESR1, and MTHFR were predicted to be associated with headache symptoms, which are not recorded in the benchmark data set, but have been reported in recent published literatures. Conclusions. Our study demonstrated that by integrating phenotype-genotype relationships into a complex network framework it provides an effective approach to identify candidate genes of symptoms.

  4. The role of HFE genotype in macrophage phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Anne M; Neely, Elizabeth; Simpson, Ian A; Connor, James R

    2018-02-01

    Iron regulation is essential for cellular energy production. Loss of cellular iron homeostasis has critical implications for both normal function and disease progression. The H63D variant of the HFE gene is the most common gene variant in Caucasians. The resulting mutant protein alters cellular iron homeostasis and is associated with a number of neurological diseases and cancer. In the brain, microglial and infiltrating macrophages are critical to maintaining iron homeostasis and modulating inflammation associated with the pathogenic process in multiple diseases. This study addresses whether HFE genotype affects macrophage function and the implications of these findings for disease processes. Bone marrow macrophages were isolated from wildtype and H67D HFE knock-in mice. The H67D gene variant in mice is the human equivalent of the H63D variant. Upon differentiation, the macrophages were used to analyze iron regulatory proteins, cellular iron release, migration, phagocytosis, and cytokine expression. The results of this study demonstrate that the H67D HFE genotype significantly impacts a number of critical macrophage functions. Specifically, fundamental activities such as proliferation in response to iron exposure, L-ferritin expression in response to iron loading, secretion of BMP6 and cytokines, and migration and phagocytic activity were all found to be impacted by genotype. Furthermore, we demonstrated that exposure to apo-Tf (iron-poor transferrin) can increase the release of iron from macrophages. In normal conditions, 70% of circulating transferrin is unsaturated. Therefore, the ability of apo-Tf to induce iron release could be a major regulatory mechanism for iron release from macrophages. These studies demonstrate that the HFE genotype impacts fundamental components of macrophage phenotype that could alter their role in degenerative and reparative processes in neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Similar predictions of etravirine sensitivity regardless of genotypic testing method used: comparison of available scoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingerhoets, Johan; Nijs, Steven; Tambuyzer, Lotke; Hoogstoel, Annemie; Anderson, David; Picchio, Gaston

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to compare various genotypic scoring systems commonly used to predict virological outcome to etravirine, and examine their concordance with etravirine phenotypic susceptibility. Six etravirine genotypic scoring systems were assessed: Tibotec 2010 (based on 20 mutations; TBT 20), Monogram, Stanford HIVdb, ANRS, Rega (based on 37, 30, 27 and 49 mutations, respectively) and virco(®)TYPE HIV-1 (predicted fold change based on genotype). Samples from treatment-experienced patients who participated in the DUET trials and with both genotypic and phenotypic data (n=403) were assessed using each scoring system. Results were retrospectively correlated with virological response in DUET. κ coefficients were calculated to estimate the degree of correlation between the different scoring systems. Correlation between the five scoring systems and the TBT 20 system was approximately 90%. Virological response by etravirine susceptibility was comparable regardless of which scoring system was utilized, with 70-74% of DUET patients determined as susceptible to etravirine by the different scoring systems achieving plasma viral load <50 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. In samples classed as phenotypically susceptible to etravirine (fold change in 50% effective concentration ≤3), correlations with genotypic score were consistently high across scoring systems (≥70%). In general, the etravirine genotypic scoring systems produced similar results, and genotype-phenotype concordance was high. As such, phenotypic interpretations, and in their absence all genotypic scoring systems investigated, may be used to reliably predict the activity of etravirine.

  6. Elucidating the genotype-phenotype map by automatic enumeration and analysis of the phenotypic repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomnitz, Jason G; Savageau, Michael A

    The gap between genotype and phenotype is filled by complex biochemical systems most of which are poorly understood. Because these systems are complex, it is widely appreciated that quantitative understanding can only be achieved with the aid of mathematical models. However, formulating models and measuring or estimating their numerous rate constants and binding constants is daunting. Here we present a strategy for automating difficult aspects of the process. The strategy, based on a system design space methodology, is applied to a class of 16 designs for a synthetic gene oscillator that includes seven designs previously formulated on the basis of experimentally measured and estimated parameters. Our strategy provides four important innovations by automating: (1) enumeration of the repertoire of qualitatively distinct phenotypes for a system; (2) generation of parameter values for any particular phenotype; (3) simultaneous realization of parameter values for several phenotypes to aid visualization of transitions from one phenotype to another, in critical cases from functional to dysfunctional; and (4) identification of ensembles of phenotypes whose expression can be phased to achieve a specific sequence of functions for rationally engineering synthetic constructs. Our strategy, applied to the 16 designs, reproduced previous results and identified two additional designs capable of sustained oscillations that were previously missed. Starting with a system's relatively fixed aspects, its architectural features, our method enables automated analysis of nonlinear biochemical systems from a global perspective, without first specifying parameter values. The examples presented demonstrate the efficiency and power of this automated strategy.

  7. Genomic prediction when some animals are not genotyped

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Mogens S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of genomic selection in breeding programs may increase the rate of genetic improvement, reduce the generation time, and provide higher accuracy of estimated breeding values (EBVs. A number of different methods have been developed for genomic prediction of breeding values, but many of them assume that all animals have been genotyped. In practice, not all animals are genotyped, and the methods have to be adapted to this situation. Results In this paper we provide an extension of a linear mixed model method for genomic prediction to the situation with non-genotyped animals. The model specifies that a breeding value is the sum of a genomic and a polygenic genetic random effect, where genomic genetic random effects are correlated with a genomic relationship matrix constructed from markers and the polygenic genetic random effects are correlated with the usual relationship matrix. The extension of the model to non-genotyped animals is made by using the pedigree to derive an extension of the genomic relationship matrix to non-genotyped animals. As a result, in the extended model the estimated breeding values are obtained by blending the information used to compute traditional EBVs and the information used to compute purely genomic EBVs. Parameters in the model are estimated using average information REML and estimated breeding values are best linear unbiased predictions (BLUPs. The method is illustrated using a simulated data set. Conclusions The extension of the method to non-genotyped animals presented in this paper makes it possible to integrate all the genomic, pedigree and phenotype information into a one-step procedure for genomic prediction. Such a one-step procedure results in more accurate estimated breeding values and has the potential to become the standard tool for genomic prediction of breeding values in future practical evaluations in pig and cattle breeding.

  8. Stochastic switching in biology: from genotype to phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bressloff, Paul C

    2017-01-01

    There has been a resurgence of interest in non-equilibrium stochastic processes in recent years, driven in part by the observation that the number of molecules (genes, mRNA, proteins) involved in gene expression are often of order 1–1000. This means that deterministic mass-action kinetics tends to break down, and one needs to take into account the discrete, stochastic nature of biochemical reactions. One of the major consequences of molecular noise is the occurrence of stochastic biological switching at both the genotypic and phenotypic levels. For example, individual gene regulatory networks can switch between graded and binary responses, exhibit translational/transcriptional bursting, and support metastability (noise-induced switching between states that are stable in the deterministic limit). If random switching persists at the phenotypic level then this can confer certain advantages to cell populations growing in a changing environment, as exemplified by bacterial persistence in response to antibiotics. Gene expression at the single-cell level can also be regulated by changes in cell density at the population level, a process known as quorum sensing. In contrast to noise-driven phenotypic switching, the switching mechanism in quorum sensing is stimulus-driven and thus noise tends to have a detrimental effect. A common approach to modeling stochastic gene expression is to assume a large but finite system and to approximate the discrete processes by continuous processes using a system-size expansion. However, there is a growing need to have some familiarity with the theory of stochastic processes that goes beyond the standard topics of chemical master equations, the system-size expansion, Langevin equations and the Fokker–Planck equation. Examples include stochastic hybrid systems (piecewise deterministic Markov processes), large deviations and the Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin (WKB) method, adiabatic reductions, and queuing/renewal theory. The major aim of

  9. FTO genotype is associated with phenotypic variability of body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, J.; Loos, R.J.; Powell, J.E.; Medland, S.E.; Speliotes, E.K.; Chasman, D.I.; Rose, L.M.; Thorleifsson, G.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Mägi, R.; Waite, L.; Smith, A.V.; Yerges-Armstrong, L.M.; Monda, K.L.; Hadley, D.; Mahajan, A.; Li, G.; Kapur, K.; Vitart, V.; Huffman, J.E.; Wang, S.R.; Palmer, C.; Esko, T.; Fischer, K.; Zhao, J.H.; Demirkan, A.; Isaacs, A.; Feitosa, M.F.; Luan, J.; Heard-Costa, N.L.; White, C.; Jackson, A.U.; Preuss, M; Ziegler, A.; Eriksson, J.; Kutalik, Z.; Frau, F.; Nolte, I.M.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V.; Hottenga, J.J.; Jacobs, K.B.; Verweij, N.; Goel, A.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Estrada, K.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Sanna, S.; Sidore, C.; Tyrer, J.; Teumer, A.; Prokopenko, I.; Mangino, M.; Lindgren, C.M.; Assimes, T.L.; Shuldiner, A.R.; Hui, J.; Beilby, J.P.; McArdle, W.L.; Hall, P.; Haritunians, T.; Zgaga, L.; Kolcic, I.; Polasek, O.; Zemunik, T.; Oostra, B.A.; Junttila, M.J.; Grönberg, H.; Schreiber, S; Peters, A.; Hicks, A.A.; Stephens, J.; Foad, N.S.; Laitinen, J.; Pouta, A.; Kaakinen, M.; Willemsen, G.; Vink, J.M.; Wild, S.H.; Navis, G.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Homuth, G.; John, U.; Iribarren, C.; Harris, T.; Launer, L.J.; Gudnason, V.; O'Connell, J.R.; Boerwinkle, E.; Cadby, G.; Palmer, L.J.; James, A.L.; Musk, A.W.; Ingelsson, E.; Psaty, B.M.; Beckmann, J.S.; Waeber, G.; Vollenweider, P.; Hayward, C.; Wright, A.F.; Rudan, I.; Groop, L.C.; Metspalu, A.; Thee Khaw, K.; van Duijn, C.M.; Borecki, I.B.; Province, M.A.; Wareham, N.J.; Tardif, J.C.; Huikuri, H.V.; Cupples, L.A.; Atwood, L.D.; Fox, C.S.; Boehnke, M.; Collins, F.S.; Mohlke, K.L.; Erdmann, J.; Schunkert, H.; Hengstenberg, C.; Stark, K.; Lorentzon, M.; Ohlsson, C.; Cusi, D.; Staessen, J.A.; van der Klauw, M.M.; Pramstaller, P.P.; Kathiresan, S.; Jolley, D.J.; Ripatti, S.; Jarvelin, M.-R.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Boomsma, D.I.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Wilson, J.F.; Campbell, H.; Chanock, S.J.; van der Harst, P.; Hamsten, A.; Watkins, H.; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.; Zillikens, M.C.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Rivadeneira, F.; Kiemeney, L.A.; Vermeulen, S.H.; Abecasis, G.R.; Schlessinger, D.; Schipf, S.; Stumvoll, M.; Tönjes, A.; Spector, T.D.; North, K.E.; Lettre, G.; McCarthy, M.I.; Berndt, S.I.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Nyholt, DR; Montgomery, G.W.; Martin, N.G.; McKnight, B.; Strachan, D.P.; Hill, W.G.; Snieder, H.; Ridker, P.M.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Stefansson, K.; Frayling, T.M.; Hirschhorn, J.N.; Goddard, M.E.; Visscher, P.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is evidence across several species for genetic control of phenotypic variation of complex traits, such that the variance among phenotypes is genotype dependent. Understanding genetic control of variability is important in evolutionary biology, agricultural selection programmes and human

  10. IDH Mutations: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation and Prognostic Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available IDH1/2 mutation is the most frequent genomic alteration found in gliomas, affecting 40% of these tumors and is one of the earliest alterations occurring in gliomagenesis. We investigated a series of 1305 gliomas and showed that IDH mutation is almost constant in 1p19q codeleted tumors. We found that the distribution of IDH1R132H, IDH1nonR132H, and IDH2 mutations differed between astrocytic, mixed, and oligodendroglial tumors, with an overrepresentation of IDH2 mutations in oligodendroglial phenotype and an overrepresentation of IDH1nonR132H in astrocytic tumors. We stratified grade II and grade III gliomas according to the codeletion of 1p19q and IDH mutation to define three distinct prognostic subgroups: 1p19q and IDH mutated, IDH mutated—which contains mostly TP53 mutated tumors, and none of these alterations. We confirmed that IDH mutation with a hazard ratio = 0.358 is an independent prognostic factor of good outcome. These data refine current knowledge on IDH mutation prognostic impact and genotype-phenotype associations.

  11. Factor VII Deficiency: Clinical Phenotype, Genotype and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Mariasanta; Siragusa, Sergio; Mariani, Guglielmo

    2017-03-28

    Factor VII deficiency is the most common among rare inherited autosomal recessive bleeding disorders, and is a chameleon disease due to the lack of a direct correlation between plasma levels of coagulation Factor VII and bleeding manifestations. Clinical phenotypes range from asymptomatic condition-even in homozygous subjects-to severe life-threatening bleedings (central nervous system, gastrointestinal bleeding). Prediction of bleeding risk is thus based on multiple parameters that challenge disease management. Spontaneous or surgical bleedings require accurate treatment schedules, and patients at high risk of severe hemorrhages may need prophylaxis from childhood onwards. The aim of the current review is to depict an updated summary of clinical phenotype, laboratory diagnosis, and treatment of inherited Factor VII deficiency.

  12. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of Chikungunya virus of different genotypes from Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ching Sam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mosquito-borne Chikungunya virus (CHIKV has recently re-emerged globally. The epidemic East/Central/South African (ECSA strains have spread for the first time to Asia, which previously only had endemic Asian strains. In Malaysia, the ECSA strain caused an extensive nationwide outbreak in 2008, while the Asian strains only caused limited outbreaks prior to this. To gain insight into these observed epidemiological differences, we compared genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of CHIKV of Asian and ECSA genotypes isolated in Malaysia. METHODS AND FINDINGS: CHIKV of Asian and ECSA genotypes were isolated from patients during outbreaks in Bagan Panchor in 2006, and Johor in 2008. Sequencing of the CHIKV strains revealed 96.8% amino acid similarity, including an unusual 7 residue deletion in the nsP3 protein of the Asian strain. CHIKV replication in cells and Aedes mosquitoes was measured by virus titration. There were no differences in mammalian cell lines. The ECSA strain reached significantly higher titres in Ae. albopictus cells (C6/36. Both CHIKV strains infected Ae. albopictus mosquitoes at a higher rate than Ae. aegypti, but when compared to each other, the ECSA strain had much higher midgut infection and replication, and salivary gland dissemination, while the Asian strain infected Ae. aegypti at higher rates. CONCLUSIONS: The greater ability of the ECSA strain to replicate in Ae. albopictus may explain why it spread far more quickly and extensively in humans in Malaysia than the Asian strain ever did, particularly in rural areas where Ae. albopictus predominates. Intergenotypic genetic differences were found at E1, E2, and nsP3 sites previously reported to be determinants of host adaptability in alphaviruses. Transmission of CHIKV in humans is influenced by virus strain and vector species, which has implications for regions with more than one circulating CHIKV genotype and Aedes species.

  13. Translation of Genotype to Phenotype by a Hierarchy of Cell Subsystems

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Michael Ku; Kramer, Michael; Dutkowski, Janusz; Srivas, Rohith; Licon, Katherine; Kreisberg, Jason F.; Ng, Cherie T.; Krogan, Nevan; Sharan, Roded; Ideker, Trey

    2016-01-01

    Summary Accurately translating genotype to phenotype requires accounting for the functional impact of genetic variation at many biological scales. Here we present a strategy for genotype-phenotype reasoning based on existing knowledge of cellular subsystems. These subsystems and their hierarchical organization are defined by the Gene Ontology or a complementary ontology inferred directly from previously published datasets. Guided by the ontology?s hierarchical structure, we organize genotype ...

  14. Phenotypic and Genotypic Eligible Methods for Salmonella Typhimurium Source Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Rafaela G; Panzenhagen, Pedro H N; Conte-Junior, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common causes of foodborne infection and a leading cause of human gastroenteritis. Throughout the last decade, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (ST) has shown an increase report with the simultaneous emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates, as phage type DT104. Therefore, to successfully control this microorganism, it is important to attribute salmonellosis to the exact source. Studies of Salmonella source attribution have been performed to determine the main food/food-production animals involved, toward which, control efforts should be correctly directed. Hence, the election of a ST subtyping method depends on the particular problem that efforts must be directed, the resources and the data available. Generally, before choosing a molecular subtyping, phenotyping approaches such as serotyping, phage typing, and antimicrobial resistance profiling are implemented as a screening of an investigation, and the results are computed using frequency-matching models (i.e., Dutch, Hald and Asymmetric Island models). Actually, due to the advancement of molecular tools as PFGE, MLVA, MLST, CRISPR, and WGS more precise results have been obtained, but even with these technologies, there are still gaps to be elucidated. To address this issue, an important question needs to be answered: what are the currently suitable subtyping methods to source attribute ST. This review presents the most frequently applied subtyping methods used to characterize ST, analyses the major available microbial subtyping attribution models and ponders the use of conventional phenotyping methods, as well as, the most applied genotypic tools in the context of their potential applicability to investigates ST source tracking.

  15. Phenotypic and Genotypic Eligible Methods for Salmonella Typhimurium Source Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela G. Ferrari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Salmonellosis is one of the most common causes of foodborne infection and a leading cause of human gastroenteritis. Throughout the last decade, Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium (ST has shown an increase report with the simultaneous emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates, as phage type DT104. Therefore, to successfully control this microorganism, it is important to attribute salmonellosis to the exact source. Studies of Salmonella source attribution have been performed to determine the main food/food-production animals involved, toward which, control efforts should be correctly directed. Hence, the election of a ST subtyping method depends on the particular problem that efforts must be directed, the resources and the data available. Generally, before choosing a molecular subtyping, phenotyping approaches such as serotyping, phage typing, and antimicrobial resistance profiling are implemented as a screening of an investigation, and the results are computed using frequency-matching models (i.e., Dutch, Hald and Asymmetric Island models. Actually, due to the advancement of molecular tools as PFGE, MLVA, MLST, CRISPR, and WGS more precise results have been obtained, but even with these technologies, there are still gaps to be elucidated. To address this issue, an important question needs to be answered: what are the currently suitable subtyping methods to source attribute ST. This review presents the most frequently applied subtyping methods used to characterize ST, analyses the major available microbial subtyping attribution models and ponders the use of conventional phenotyping methods, as well as, the most applied genotypic tools in the context of their potential applicability to investigates ST source tracking.

  16. Genotypic and Phenotypic Diversity Does Not Affect Productivity and Drought Response in Competitive Stands of Trifolium repens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Heidrun; During, Heinjo J; Bruine de Bruin, Fabienne; Vermeulen, Peter J; Anten, Niels P R

    2016-01-01

    Clonal plants can form dense canopies in which plants of different genetic origin are competing for the uptake of essential resources. The competitive relationships among these clones are likely to be affected by extreme environmental conditions, such as prolonged drought spells, which are predicted to occur more frequently due to global climate change. This, in turn, may alter characteristics of the ecological system and its associated functioning. We hypothesized that the relative success of individual clones will depend on the size of the ramets as ramets with larger leaves and longer petioles (large ramets) were predicted to have a competitive advantage in terms of increased light interception over smaller-sized ramets. Under drier conditions the relative performances of genotypes were expected to change leading to a change in genotype ranking. We also hypothesized that increased genotypic and phenotypic diversity will increase stand performance and resistance to drought. These hypotheses and the mechanisms responsible for shifts in competitive relationships were investigated by subjecting genotypes of the important pasture legume Trifolium repens to competition with either genetically identical clones, genetically different but similarly sized clones, or genetically as well as morphologically different clones under well-watered and dry conditions. Competitive relationships were affected by ramet size with large genotypes outperforming small genotypes in diverse stands in terms of biomass production. However, large genotypes also produced relatively fewer ramets than small genotypes and could not benefit in terms of clonal reproduction from competing with smaller genotypes, indicating that evolutionary shifts in genotype composition will depend on whether ramet size or ramet number is under selection. In contrast to our hypotheses, diversity did not increase stand performance under different selection regimes and genotype ranking was hardly affected by soil

  17. Exploring causal networks underlying fat deposition and muscularity in pigs through the integration of phenotypic, genotypic and transcriptomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñagaricano, Francisco; Valente, Bruno D; Steibel, Juan P; Bates, Ronald O; Ernst, Catherine W; Khatib, Hasan; Rosa, Guilherme J M

    2015-09-16

    Joint modeling and analysis of phenotypic, genotypic and transcriptomic data have the potential to uncover the genetic control of gene activity and phenotypic variation, as well as shed light on the manner and extent of connectedness among these variables. Current studies mainly report associations, i.e. undirected connections among variables without causal interpretation. Knowledge regarding causal relationships among genes and phenotypes can be used to predict the behavior of complex systems, as well as to optimize management practices and selection strategies. Here, we performed a multistep procedure for inferring causal networks underlying carcass fat deposition and muscularity in pigs using multi-omics data obtained from an F2 Duroc x Pietrain resource pig population. We initially explored marginal associations between genotypes and phenotypic and expression traits through whole-genome scans, and then, in genomic regions with multiple significant hits, we assessed gene-phenotype network reconstruction using causal structural learning algorithms. One genomic region on SSC6 showed significant associations with three relevant phenotypes, off-midline10th-rib backfat thickness, loin muscle weight, and average intramuscular fat percentage, and also with the expression of seven genes, including ZNF24, SSX2IP, and AKR7A2. The inferred network indicated that the genotype affects the three phenotypes mainly through the expression of several genes. Among the phenotypes, fat deposition traits negatively affected loin muscle weight. Our findings shed light on the antagonist relationship between carcass fat deposition and lean meat content in pigs. In addition, the procedure described in this study has the potential to unravel gene-phenotype networks underlying complex phenotypes.

  18. The effects of stabilizing and directional selection on phenotypic and genotypic variation in a population of RNA enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Eric J; Bratulic, Sinisa; Koenig, Iwo; Ferrada, Evandro; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    The distribution of variation in a quantitative trait and its underlying distribution of genotypic diversity can both be shaped by stabilizing and directional selection. Understanding either distribution is important, because it determines a population's response to natural selection. Unfortunately, existing theory makes conflicting predictions about how selection shapes these distributions, and very little pertinent experimental evidence exists. Here we study a simple genetic system, an evolving RNA enzyme (ribozyme) in which a combination of high throughput genotyping and measurement of a biochemical phenotype allow us to address this question. We show that directional selection, compared to stabilizing selection, increases the genotypic diversity of an evolving ribozyme population. In contrast, it leaves the variance in the phenotypic trait unchanged.

  19. Systems Biology for Mapping Genotype-Phenotype Relations in Yeast

    KAUST Repository

    Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-25

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is widely used for production of fuels, chemicals, pharmaceuticals and materials. Through metabolic engineering of this yeast a number of novel new industrial processes have been developed over the last 10 years. Besides its wide industrial use, S. cerevisiae serves as an eukaryal model organism, and many systems biology tools have therefore been developed for this organism. Among these genome-scale metabolic models have shown to be most successful as they easy integrate with omics data and at the same time have been shown to have excellent predictive power. Despite our extensive knowledge of yeast metabolism and its regulation we are still facing challenges when we want to engineer complex traits, such as improved tolerance to toxic metabolites like butanol and elevated temperatures or when we want to engineer the highly complex protein secretory pathway. In this presentation it will be demonstrated how we can combine directed evolution with systems biology analysis to identify novel targets for rational design-build-test of yeast strains that have improved phenotypic properties. In this lecture an overview of systems biology of yeast will be presented together with examples of how genome-scale metabolic modeling can be used for prediction of cellular growth at different conditions. Examples will also be given on how adaptive laboratory evolution can be used for identifying targets for improving tolerance towards butanol, increased temperature and low pH and for improving secretion of heterologous proteins.

  20. Clustering high-dimensional mixed data to uncover sub-phenotypes: joint analysis of phenotypic and genotypic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McParland, D; Phillips, C M; Brennan, L; Roche, H M; Gormley, I C

    2017-12-10

    The LIPGENE-SU.VI.MAX study, like many others, recorded high-dimensional continuous phenotypic data and categorical genotypic data. LIPGENE-SU.VI.MAX focuses on the need to account for both phenotypic and genetic factors when studying the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a complex disorder that can lead to higher risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Interest lies in clustering the LIPGENE-SU.VI.MAX participants into homogeneous groups or sub-phenotypes, by jointly considering their phenotypic and genotypic data, and in determining which variables are discriminatory. A novel latent variable model that elegantly accommodates high dimensional, mixed data is developed to cluster LIPGENE-SU.VI.MAX participants using a Bayesian finite mixture model. A computationally efficient variable selection algorithm is incorporated, estimation is via a Gibbs sampling algorithm and an approximate BIC-MCMC criterion is developed to select the optimal model. Two clusters or sub-phenotypes ('healthy' and 'at risk') are uncovered. A small subset of variables is deemed discriminatory, which notably includes phenotypic and genotypic variables, highlighting the need to jointly consider both factors. Further, 7 years after the LIPGENE-SU.VI.MAX data were collected, participants underwent further analysis to diagnose presence or absence of the MetS. The two uncovered sub-phenotypes strongly correspond to the 7-year follow-up disease classification, highlighting the role of phenotypic and genotypic factors in the MetS and emphasising the potential utility of the clustering approach in early screening. Additionally, the ability of the proposed approach to define the uncertainty in sub-phenotype membership at the participant level is synonymous with the concepts of precision medicine and nutrition. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Flavobacterium psychrophilum from Finnish fish farms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madetoja, J.; Hanninen, M.L.; Hirvela-Koski, V.

    2001-01-01

    Finnish isolates (n = 37) of Flavobacterium psychrophilum isolated from farmed salmonids were studied using phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. The characteristics of isolates were compared with the characteristics of Swedish and Estonian F. psychrophilum isolates and the type strain, F...

  2. The importance of environment on respiratory genotype/phenotype relationships in the Inuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candelaria, P V; Backer, Vibeke; Khoo, S-K

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and environmental influences and their interactions are central to asthma pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the effects of different macro-environments on asthma genotype-phenotype associations in two geographically separated populations with common ancestry....

  3. Genotypes in relation to phenotypic appearance and exposure to environmental factors in Graves' hyperthyroidism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Xander G.; Endert, Erik; Tijssen, Jan G. P.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Genetic polymorphisms and environmental factors are both involved in the pathogenesis of Graves' disease, but their interaction and effect on Graves' phenotypes have scarcely been investigated. Objective: To test the hypothesis that subjects with susceptibility genotypes develop more

  4. Thiopurine methyltransferase genotype-phenotype discordance and thiopurine active metabolite formation in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennard, Lynne; Cartwright, Cher Suzanne; Wade, Rachel; Richards, Susan M; Vora, Ajay

    2013-07-01

    In children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) bone marrow activity can influence red blood cell (RBC) kinetics, the surrogate tissue for thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT) measurements. The aim of this study was to investigate TPMT phenotype-genotype concordance in ALL, and the influence of TPMT on thiopurine metabolite formation. We measured TPMT (activity, as units ml(-1) packed RBCs and genotype) at diagnosis (n = 1150) and TPMT and thioguanine nucleotide (TGN) and methylmercaptopurine nucleotide (MeMPN) metabolites (pmol/8 × 10(8) RBCs) during chemotherapy (n = 1131) in children randomized to thioguanine or mercaptopurine on the United Kingdom trial ALL97. Median TPMT activity at diagnosis (8.5 units) was significantly lower than during chemotherapy (13.8 units, median difference 5.1 units, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.8, 5.4, P mercaptopurine, median TGNs were higher in TPMT heterozygous genotype (754 pmol) than wild-type (360 pmol) patients (median difference 406 pmol, 95% CI 332, 478, P products of the TPMT reaction, were higher in wild-type (10 650 pmol) than heterozygous patients (3868 pmol) (P < 0.0001). In TPMT intermediate activity patients with a wild-type genotype, TGN (median 366 pmol) and MeMPN (median 8590 pmol) concentrations were similar to those in wild-type, high activity patients. In childhood ALL, TPMT activity should not be used to predict heterozygosity particularly in blood samples obtained at disease diagnosis. Genotype is a better predictor of TGN accumulation during chemotherapy. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  5. The importance of environment on respiratory genotype/phenotype relationships in the Inuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Candelaria, P V; Backer, V; Khoo, S-K

    2010-01-01

    Genetic and environmental influences and their interactions are central to asthma pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the effects of different macro-environments on asthma genotype-phenotype associations in two geographically separated populations with common ancestry.......Genetic and environmental influences and their interactions are central to asthma pathogenesis. This study aimed to investigate the effects of different macro-environments on asthma genotype-phenotype associations in two geographically separated populations with common ancestry....

  6. [Software for performing a global phenotypic and genotypic nutritional assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García de Diego, L; Cuervo, M; Martínez, J A

    2013-01-01

    The nutritional assessment of a patient needs the simultaneous managing a extensive information and a great number of databases, as both aspects of the process of nutrition and the clinical situation of the patient are analyzed. The introduction of computers in the nutritional area constitutes an extraordinary advance in the administration of nutrition information, providing a complete assessment of nutritional aspects in a quick and easy way. To develop a computer program that can be used as a tool for assessing the nutritional status of the patient, the education of clinical staff, for epidemiological studies and for educational purposes. Based on a computer program which assists the health specialist to perform a full nutritional evaluation of the patient, through the registration and assessment of the phenotypic and genotypic features. The application provides nutritional prognosis based on anthropometric and biochemical parameters, images of states of malnutrition, questionnaires to characterize diseases, diagnostic criteria, identification of alleles associated with the development of specific metabolic illnesses and questionnaires of quality of life, for a custom actuation. The program includes, as part of the nutritional assessment of the patient, food intake analysis, design of diets and promotion of physical activity, introducing food frequency questionnaires, dietary recalls, healthy eating indexes, model diets, fitness tests, and recommendations, recalls and questionnaires of physical activity. A computer program performed under Java Swing, using SQLite database and some external libraries such as JfreeChart for plotting graphs. This brand new designed software is composed of five blocks categorized into ten modules named: Patients, Anthropometry, Clinical History, Biochemistry, Dietary History, Diagnostic (with genetic make up), Quality of life, Physical activity, Energy expenditure and Diets. Each module has a specific function which evaluates a

  7. Diabetes and neurodegeneration in Wolfram syndrome: a multicenter study of phenotype and genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohayem, Julia; Ehlers, Christian; Wiedemann, Bärbel; Holl, Reinhard; Oexle, Konrad; Kordonouri, Olga; Salzano, Giuseppina; Meissner, Thomas; Burger, Walter; Schober, Edith; Huebner, Angela; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2011-07-01

    To describe the diabetes phenotype in Wolfram syndrome compared with type 1 diabetes, to investigate the effect of glycemic control on the neurodegenerative process, and to assess the genotype-phenotype correlation. The clinical data of 50 patients with Wolfram syndrome-related diabetes (WSD) were reviewed and compared with the data of 24,164 patients with type 1 diabetes. Patients with a mean HbA1c during childhood and adolescence of ≤7.5 and >7.5% were compared with respect to the occurrence of additional Wolfram syndrome symptoms. The wolframin (WFS1) gene was screened for mutations in 39 patients. WFS1 genotypes were examined for correlation with age at onset of diabetes. WSD was diagnosed earlier than type 1 diabetes (5.4±3.8 vs. 7.9±4.2 years; P7.5% (P=0.031). Thirteen novel WSF1 mutations were identified. Predicted functional consequence of WFS1 mutations correlated with age at WSD onset (P=0.028). Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated decline of β-cells in WSD occurs earlier in life than autoimmune-mediated β-cell destruction in type 1 diabetes. This study establishes a role for WFS1 in determining the age at onset of diabetes in Wolfram syndrome and identifies glucose toxicity as an accelerating feature in the progression of disease.

  8. Phenotype prediction for mucopolysaccharidosis type I by in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Li; Przybilla, Michael J; Whitley, Chester B

    2017-07-04

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is an autosomal recessive disease due to deficiency of α-L-iduronidase (IDUA), a lysosomal enzyme that degrades glycosaminoglycans (GAG) heparan and dermatan sulfate. To achieve optimal clinical outcomes, early and proper treatment is essential, which requires early diagnosis and phenotype severity prediction. To establish a genotype/phenotype correlation of MPS I disease, a combination of bioinformatics tools including SIFT, PolyPhen, I-Mutant, PROVEAN, PANTHER, SNPs&GO and PHD-SNP are utilized. Through analyzing single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) by these in silico approaches, 28 out of 285 missense SNPs were predicted to be damaging. By integrating outcomes from these in silico approaches, a prediction algorithm (sensitivity 94%, specificity 80%) was thereby developed. Three dimensional structural analysis of 5 candidate SNPs (P533R, P496R, L346R, D349G, T374P) were performed by SWISS PDB viewer, which revealed specific structural changes responsible for the functional impacts of these SNPs. Additionally, SNPs in the untranslated region were analyzed by UTRscan and PolymiRTS. Moreover, by investigating known pathogenic mutations and relevant patient phenotypes in previous publications, phenotype severity (severe, intermediate or mild) of each mutation was deduced. Collectively, these results identified potential candidate SNPs with functional significance for studying MPS I disease. This study also demonstrates the effectiveness, reliability and simplicity of these in silico approaches in addressing complexity of underlying genetic basis of MPS I disease. Further, a step-by-step guideline for phenotype prediction of MPS I disease is established, which can be broadly applied in other lysosomal diseases or genetic disorders.

  9. Genotypic and phenotypic aspects of primary immunodeficiency diseases of the lymphoid system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Noordzij

    2002-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the immunological phenotype, the mutation analysis, and the residual activity of mutated proteins in patients with PID of the lymphoid system. During this project, we have investigated possible genotype-(immuno)phenotype relationships in patients with antibody

  10. Genotype-Phenotype Aspects of Type 2 Long QT Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shimizu, Wataru; Moss, Arthur J.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Towbin, Jeffrey A.; Ackerman, Michael J.; January, Craig T.; Tester, David J.; Zareba, Wojciech; Robinson, Jennifer L.; Qi, Ming; Vincent, G. Michael; Kaufman, Elizabeth S.; Hofman, Nynke; Noda, Takashi; Kamakura, Shiro; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Shah, Samit; Amin, Vinit; Goldenberg, Ilan; Andrews, Mark L.; McNitt, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of location, coding type, and topology of KCNH2(hERG) mutations on clinical phenotype in type 2 long QT syndrome (LQTS). Background Previous studies were limited by population size in their ability to examine phenotypic effect of

  11. Phenotypes and genotypes in individuals with SMC1A variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huisman, Sylvia; Mulder, Paul A; Redeker, Egbert

    2017-01-01

    , stereotypic movements, and (in some) regression. Their missense, nonsense, and frameshift mutations are evenly spread over the gene. We conclude that SMC1A variants can result in a phenotype resembling CdLS and a phenotype resembling Rett syndrome. Resemblances between the SMC1A group and the NIPBL group...

  12. Primer in Genetics and Genomics, Article 5-Further Defining the Concepts of Genotype and Phenotype and Exploring Genotype-Phenotype Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Fay; Fessele, Kristen

    2017-10-01

    As nurses begin to incorporate genetic and genomic sciences into clinical practice, education, and research, it is essential that they have a working knowledge of the terms foundational to the science. The first article in this primer series provided brief definitions of the basic terms (e.g., genetics and genomics) and introduced the concept of phenotype during the discussion of Mendelian inheritance. These terms, however, are inconsistently used in publications and conversations, and the linkage between genotype and phenotype requires clarification. The goal of this fifth article in the series is to elucidate these terms, provide an overview of the research methods used to determine genotype-phenotype associations, and discuss their significance to nursing through examples from the current nursing literature.

  13. eCOMPAGT – efficient Combination and Management of Phenotypes and Genotypes for Genetic Epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Specht Günther

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput genotyping and phenotyping projects of large epidemiological study populations require sophisticated laboratory information management systems. Most epidemiological studies include subject-related personal information, which needs to be handled with care by following data privacy protection guidelines. In addition, genotyping core facilities handling cooperative projects require a straightforward solution to monitor the status and financial resources of the different projects. Description We developed a database system for an efficient combination and management of phenotypes and genotypes (eCOMPAGT deriving from genetic epidemiological studies. eCOMPAGT securely stores and manages genotype and phenotype data and enables different user modes with different rights. Special attention was drawn on the import of data deriving from TaqMan and SNPlex genotyping assays. However, the database solution is adjustable to other genotyping systems by programming additional interfaces. Further important features are the scalability of the database and an export interface to statistical software. Conclusion eCOMPAGT can store, administer and connect phenotype data with all kinds of genotype data and is available as a downloadable version at http://dbis-informatik.uibk.ac.at/ecompagt.

  14. Expansion of phenotype and genotypic data in CRB2-related syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Ryan E; Tan, Wen-Hann; Innes, A Micheil; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Schneidman-Duhovny, Dina; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Pappas, John; Altschwager, Pablo; DeWard, Stephanie; Fulton, Anne; Gray, Kathryn J; Krall, Max; Mehta, Lakshmi; Rodan, Lance H; Saller, Devereux N; Steele, Deanna; Stein, Deborah; Yatsenko, Svetlana A; Bernier, François P; Slavotinek, Anne M

    2016-10-01

    Sequence variants in CRB2 cause a syndrome with greatly elevated maternal serum alpha-fetoprotein and amniotic fluid alpha-fetoprotein levels, cerebral ventriculomegaly and renal findings similar to Finnish congenital nephrosis. All reported patients have been homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for sequence variants in the Crumbs, Drosophila, Homolog of, 2 (CRB2) genes. Variants affecting CRB2 function have also been identified in four families with steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome, but without any other known systemic findings. We ascertained five, previously unreported individuals with biallelic variants in CRB2 that were predicted to affect function. We compiled the clinical features of reported cases and reviewed available literature for cases with features suggestive of CRB2-related syndrome in order to better understand the phenotypic and genotypic manifestations. Phenotypic analyses showed that ventriculomegaly was a common clinical manifestation (9/11 confirmed cases), in contrast to the original reports, in which patients were ascertained due to renal disease. Two children had minor eye findings and one was diagnosed with a B-cell lymphoma. Further genetic analysis identified one family with two affected siblings who were both heterozygous for a variant in NPHS2 predicted to affect function and separate families with sequence variants in NPHS4 and BBS7 in addition to the CRB2 variants. Our report expands the clinical phenotype of CRB2-related syndrome and establishes ventriculomegaly and hydrocephalus as frequent manifestations. We found additional sequence variants in genes involved in kidney development and ciliopathies in patients with CRB2-related syndrome, suggesting that these variants may modify the phenotype.

  15. Phenotypic characterization of papaya genotypes to determine powdery mildew resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Vivas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In support of breeding of papaya (Carica papaya, the disease incidence and severity of powdery mildew (Ovulariopsis caricicola were evaluated in papaya genotypes. Two experiments in complete randomized blocks were carried out, one in the field and the other in a greenhouse. In field experiments, the lowest mean disease incidence was observed on the genotypes ‘Costa Rica’ and ‘Baixinho Super’, and the lowest mean disease severity on ‘Caliman M5’, ‘GTF’, ‘SH 11-08’, and ‘JS 11’. In the greenhouse experiment, the genotypes ‘Caliman M5’, ‘Golden’, ‘Kapoho Solo’, ‘Waimanalo’, ‘Mamão Bené’, ‘SH 12-07’, ‘JS 12’, and ‘GTF’ had the lowest mean incidence in at least one evaluation. On the other hand, for severity, the genotypes ‘Diva’, ‘Sunrise Solo 72/12’, ‘Kapoho Solo PA’, ‘Waimanalo’, ‘Maradol’, ‘Maradol GL’, ‘SH 15-04’, ‘FMV, ‘JS 12-4’, ‘SH 12-07’ and ‘Sekati FLM’ had the lowest means. These results indicate these genotypes for a possible use in breeding for reduction of powdery mildew intensity

  16. AMMI analysis to evaluate the adaptability and phenotypic stability of sugarcane genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Cláudio Inácio da Silveira

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugarcane (Saccharum sp. is one of the most important crops in Brazil. The high demand for sugarcane-derived products has stimulated the expansion of sugarcane cultivation in recent years, exploring different environments. The adaptability and the phenotypic stability of sugarcane genotypes in the Minas Gerais state, Brazil, were evaluated based on the additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI method. We evaluated 15 genotypes (13 clones and two checks: RB867515 and RB72454 in nine environments. The average of two cuttings for the variable tons of pol per hectare (TPH measure was used to discriminate genotypes. Besides the check RB867515 (20.44 t ha-1, the genotype RB987935 showed a high average TPH (20.71 t ha-1, general adaptability and phenotypic stability, and should be suitable for cultivation in the target region. The AMMI method allowed for easy visual identification of superior genotypes for each set of environments.

  17. Effects of using phenotypic means and genotypic values in GGE biplot analyses on genotype by environment studies on tropical maize (Zea mays).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granato, I S C; Fritsche-Neto, R; Resende, M D V; Silva, F F

    2016-10-05

    The objective of this study was to examine the effects of the type and intensity of nutritional stress, and of the statistical treatment of the data, on the genotype x environment (G x E) interaction for tropical maize (Zea mays). For this purpose, 39 hybrid combinations were evaluated under low- and high-nitrogen and -phosphorus availability. The plants were harvested at the V6 stage, and the shoot dry mass was estimated. The variance components and genetic values were assessed using the restricted maximum likelihood/best linear unbiased prediction method, and subsequently analyzed using the GGE biplot method. We observed differences in the performances of the hybrids depending on both the type and intensity of nutritional stress. The results of relationship between environments depended on whether genotypic values or phenotypic means were used. The selection of tropical maize genotypes against nutritional stress should be performed for each nutrient availability level within each type of nutritional stress. The use of phenotypic means for this purpose provides greater reliability than do genotypic values for the analysis of the G x E interaction using GGE biplot.

  18. Genetic parameters, phenotypic, genotypic and environmental correlations and genetic variability on sunflower in the Brazilian Savannah

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Grippi Lira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. is an annual crop that stands out for its production of high quality oil and for an efficient selection, being necessary to estimate the components of genetic and phenotypic variance. This study aimed to estimate genetic parameters, phenotypic, genotypic and environmental correlations and genetic variability on sunflower in the Brazilian Savannah, evaluating the characters grain yield (YIELD, days to start flowering (DFL based on flowering date in R5, chapter length (CL, weight of a thousand achenes (WTA, plant height (H and oil content (OilC of 16 sunflower genotypes. The experiment was conducted at Embrapa Cerrados, Planaltina, DF, situated at 15º 35’ 30”S latitude, 47º 42’ 30”W longitude and 1.007m above sea level, in soil classified as dystroferric Oxisol. The experimental design used was a complete randomized block with four replicates. The nature for the effects of genotypes and blocks was fixed. Except for the character chapter length, genetic variance was the main component of the phenotypic variance among the genotypes, indicating high genetic variability and experimental efficiency with proper environmental control. In absolute terms, the genetic correlations were superior to phenotypic and environmental. The high values reported for heritability and selective accuracy indicated efficiency of phenotypic selection. Results showed high genetic variability among genotypes, which may contribute to the genetic improvement of sunflower.

  19. Maneuvering in the Complex Path from Genotype to Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohman, Richard

    2002-04-01

    Human disease phenotypes are controlled not only by genes but by lawful self-organizing networks that display system-wide dynamics. These networks range from metabolic pathways to signaling pathways that regulate hormone action. When perturbed, networks alter their output of matter and energy which, depending on the environmental context, can produce either a pathological or a normal phenotype. Study of the dynamics of these networks by approaches such as metabolic control analysis may provide new insights into the pathogenesis and treatment of complex diseases.

  20. Stargardt disease: towards developing a model to predict phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathfield, Laura; Lacerda, Miguel; Nossek, Christel; Roberts, Lisa; Ramesar, Rajkumar S

    2013-10-01

    Stargardt disease is an ABCA4-associated retinopathy, which generally follows an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern and is a frequent cause of macular degeneration in childhood. ABCA4 displays significant allelic heterogeneity whereby different mutations can cause retinal diseases with varying severity and age of onset. A genotype-phenotype model has been proposed linking ABCA4 mutations, purported ABCA4 functional protein activity and severity of disease, as measured by degree of visual loss and the age of onset. It has, however, been difficult to verify this model statistically in observational studies, as the number of individuals sharing any particular mutation combination is typically low. Seven founder mutations have been identified in a large number of Caucasian Afrikaner patients in South Africa, making it possible to test the genotype-phenotype model. A generalised linear model was developed to predict and assess the relative pathogenic contribution of the seven mutations to the age of onset of Stargardt disease. It is shown that the pathogenicity of an individual mutation can differ significantly depending on the genetic context in which it occurs. The results reported here may be used to identify suitable candidates for inclusion in clinical trials, as well as guide the genetic counselling of affected individuals and families.

  1. Chlorophyll a fluorescence to phenotype wheat genotypes for heat tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Dew Kumari; Andersen, Sven Bode; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    In prospects of global climate change, heat stress is a rising constraint for the productivity of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). It is a heat-susceptible crop beyond 17-23oC temperature throughout its phenological stages, flowering phase being the most sensitive stage. Chlorophyll a fluorescence...... parameter, maximum quantum yield efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) is used as a physiological marker for early stress detection in PSII in plants. We established a reproducible protocol to measure response of wheat genotypes to high temperature based on Fv/Fm. The heat treatment of 40°C in 300 µmol m-2s-1 PAR...... enabled the identification of contrasting wheat genotypes that can be used to study the genetic and physiological nature of heat stress tolerance to dissect quantitative traits into simpler and more heritable traits....

  2. Relevance and costs of RHD genotyping in women with a weak D phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laget, L; Izard, C; Durieux-Roussel, E; Gouvitsos, J; Dettori, I; Chiaroni, J; Ferrera-Tourenc, V

    2018-06-01

    For pregnant women, the serologic test results of D antigen will determine the frequency of RBC antibody detection as well as the indication for RhIG prophylaxis. RHD genotyping is the only method that may provide clear guidance on prophylaxis for women with a weak D phenotype. This analysis evaluated the economical implications of using RHD genotyping to guide RhIG prophylaxis among pregnant women with a serological weak D phenotype. We compared the costs of 2 strategies in a cohort of 273 women with weak D phenotype. In the first strategy, we did not perform genotyping and all women with weak D phenotypes were treated as if they were D-, thus considered to be a risk of RhD alloimmunization. These women all received the prophylactic follow up. In the second strategy, RHD genotyping was performed on all women with a serologic weak D phenotype. Then, the follow-up will be determined by phenotype deduced from genotype. On the studied cohort, the additional expense occurred by genotyping is 26,536 €. RHD Genotyping has highlighted 162 weak D Type 1, 2 3, that could safely be managed as D+ and 111 partial D to consider as D-. By comparing the 2 strategies, the savings generated by genotyping the patients of our cohort are € 12,046 for the follow up of one pregnancy. Knowing that in France, a woman has on average 2 pregnancies and that the genotyping is carried out only once, the savings generated for the following pregnancies would be € 38,581. Performing RHD genotyping for pregnant women with a weak D phenotype enables to clearly identify weak D type 1, 2 or 3 from the other variants at risk of alloimmunization. This analysis generates savings in terms of follow-up schedule of pregnant women and RhIG prophylaxis. It also allows saving of D- products for patient with a weak D type 1, 2 or 3 in case of a transfusion need. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity among Bacillus species isolated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DIRECTOR

    2013-03-20

    Mar 20, 2013 ... 1Department of Food Engineering and Quality Control, University Institute of Technology,. P. O. Box 454 Ngaoundere, Cameroon. 2Department of ... potentially help in maintaining consumer health. (Mohamadou et ... used to this effect. Phenotypic ..... However, the detection of B. cereus, a food poisoning,.

  4. Predictable Phenotypes of Antibiotic Resistance Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, M; Andersson, D I

    2018-05-15

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria represent a major threat to our ability to treat bacterial infections. Two factors that determine the evolutionary success of antibiotic resistance mutations are their impact on resistance level and the fitness cost. Recent studies suggest that resistance mutations commonly show epistatic interactions, which would complicate predictions of their stability in bacterial populations. We analyzed 13 different chromosomal resistance mutations and 10 host strains of Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli to address two main questions. (i) Are there epistatic interactions between different chromosomal resistance mutations? (ii) How does the strain background and genetic distance influence the effect of chromosomal resistance mutations on resistance and fitness? Our results show that the effects of combined resistance mutations on resistance and fitness are largely predictable and that epistasis remains rare even when up to four mutations were combined. Furthermore, a majority of the mutations, especially target alteration mutations, demonstrate strain-independent phenotypes across different species. This study extends our understanding of epistasis among resistance mutations and shows that interactions between different resistance mutations are often predictable from the characteristics of the individual mutations. IMPORTANCE The spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria imposes an urgent threat to public health. The ability to forecast the evolutionary success of resistant mutants would help to combat dissemination of antibiotic resistance. Previous studies have shown that the phenotypic effects (fitness and resistance level) of resistance mutations can vary substantially depending on the genetic context in which they occur. We conducted a broad screen using many different resistance mutations and host strains to identify potential epistatic interactions between various types of resistance mutations and to determine the effect of strain

  5. Epidemiological markers in Neisseria meningitidis: an estimate of the performance of genotyping vs phenotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, N; Lind, I

    1998-01-01

    In order to estimate the performance of genotypic vs phenotypic characterization of Neisseria meningitidis, 2 methods, DNA fingerprinting and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE), were assessed as regards applicability, reproducibility and discriminating capacity. 50 serogroup B and 52 serogro......, and as applied in the study MEE was superior to DNA fingerprinting. Clusters of invasive strains were reliably identified by phenotyping alone, whereas determination of identity of carrier strains and an invasive strain required genotyping.......In order to estimate the performance of genotypic vs phenotypic characterization of Neisseria meningitidis, 2 methods, DNA fingerprinting and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE), were assessed as regards applicability, reproducibility and discriminating capacity. 50 serogroup B and 52 serogroup...... C Neisseria meningitidis strains from 96 patients with meningococcal disease and 22 serogroup C strains from healthy carriers were investigated. Both methods were 100% applicable to meningococcal strains and results of DNA fingerprinting as well as of MEE were reproducible. The number of types...

  6. The Triticeae Toolbox: Combining Phenotype and Genotype Data to Advance Small-Grains Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria C. Blake

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Triticeae Toolbox (; T3 is the database schema enabling plant breeders and researchers to combine, visualize, and interrogate the wealth of phenotype and genotype data generated by the Triticeae Coordinated Agricultural Project (TCAP. T3 enables users to define specific data sets for download in formats compatible with the external tools TASSEL, Flapjack, and R; or to use by software residing on the T3 server for operations such as Genome Wide Association and Genomic Prediction. New T3 tools to assist plant breeders include a Selection Index Generator, analytical tools to compare phenotype trials using common or user-defined indices, and a histogram generator for nursery reports, with applications using the Android OS, and a Field Plot Layout Designer in development. Researchers using T3 will soon enjoy the ability to design training sets, define core germplasm sets, and perform multivariate analysis. An increased collaboration with GrainGenes and integration with the small grains reference sequence resources will place T3 in a pivotal role for on-the-fly data analysis, with instant access to the knowledge databases for wheat and barley. T3 software is available under the GNU General Public License and is freely downloadable.

  7. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation of Maternally Inherited Disorders due to Mutations in Mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peterus Thajeb

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disorders are heterogeneous systemic ailments that are most often caused by maternal inheritance of a variety of mutations of the mitochondrial (mt DNA. Paternal inheritance and somatic mutation are rare. The disorders are well recognized not only for the genotypic heterogeneity, but also the phenotypic variation among the affected members of a single family. The genotype-phenotype correlation of the diversity of the syndromic and non-syndromic features of mitochondrial disorders are discussed. Some aspects of the molecular mechanisms of this heterogeneity, and the histopathologic findings are highlighted.

  8. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity does not affect productivity and drought response in competitive stands of Trifolium repens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidrun eHuber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clonal plants can form dense canopies in which plants of different genetic origin are competing for the uptake of essential resources. The competitive relationships among these clones are likely to be affected by extreme environmental conditions, such as prolonged drought spells, which are predicted to occur more frequently due to global climate change. This, in turn, may alter characteristics of the ecological system and its associated functioning.We hypothesized that the relative success of individual clones will depend on the size of the ramets as ramets with larger leaves and longer petioles (large ramets were predicted to have a competitive advantage in terms of increased light interception over smaller-sized ramets. Under drier conditions the relative performances of genotypes were expected to change leading to a change in genotype ranking. We also hypothesized that increased genotypic and phenotypic diversity will increase stand performance and resistance to drought. These hypotheses and the mechanisms responsible for shifts in competitive relationships were investigated by subjecting genotypes of the important pasture legume Trifolium repens to competition with either genetically identical clones, genetically different but similarly sized clones, or genetically as well as morphologically different clones under well-watered and dry conditions.Competitive relationships were affected by ramet size with large genotypes outperforming small genotypes in diverse stands in terms of biomass production. However, large genotypes also produced relatively fewer ramets than small genotypes and could not benefit in terms of clonal reproduction from competing with smaller genotypes, indicating that evolutionary shifts in genotype composition will depend on whether ramet size or ramet number is under selection. In contrast to our hypotheses, diversity did not increase stand performance under different selection regimes and genotype ranking was hardly

  9. Genotype-phenotype correlations in neurogenetics: Lesch-Nyhan disease as a model disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Rong; Ceballos-Picot, Irene; Torres, Rosa J; Larovere, Laura E; Yamada, Yasukazu; Nguyen, Khue V; Hegde, Madhuri; Visser, Jasper E; Schretlen, David J; Nyhan, William L; Puig, Juan G; O'Neill, Patrick J; Jinnah, H A

    2014-05-01

    Establishing meaningful relationships between genetic variations and clinical disease is a fundamental goal for all human genetic disorders. However, these genotype-phenotype correlations remain incompletely characterized and sometimes conflicting for many diseases. Lesch-Nyhan disease is an X-linked recessive disorder that is caused by a wide variety of mutations in the HPRT1 gene. The gene encodes hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase, an enzyme involved in purine metabolism. The fine structure of enzyme has been established by crystallography studies, and its function can be measured with very precise biochemical assays. This rich knowledge of genetic alterations in the gene and their functional effect on its protein product provides a powerful model for exploring factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. The present study summarizes 615 known genetic mutations, their influence on the gene product, and their relationship to the clinical phenotype. In general, the results are compatible with the concept that the overall severity of the disease depends on how mutations ultimately influence enzyme activity. However, careful evaluation of exceptions to this concept point to several additional genetic and non-genetic factors that influence genotype-phenotype correlations. These factors are not unique to Lesch-Nyhan disease, and are relevant to most other genetic diseases. The disease therefore serves as a valuable model for understanding the challenges associated with establishing genotype-phenotype correlations for other disorders.

  10. A “Forward Genomics” Approach Links Genotype to Phenotype using Independent Phenotypic Losses among Related Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hiller

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Genotype-phenotype mapping is hampered by countless genomic changes between species. We introduce a computational “forward genomics” strategy that—given only an independently lost phenotype and whole genomes—matches genomic and phenotypic loss patterns to associate specific genomic regions with this phenotype. We conducted genome-wide screens for two metabolic phenotypes. First, our approach correctly matches the inactivated Gulo gene exactly with the species that lost the ability to synthesize vitamin C. Second, we attribute naturally low biliary phospholipid levels in guinea pigs and horses to the inactivated phospholipid transporter Abcb4. Human ABCB4 mutations also result in low phospholipid levels but lead to severe liver disease, suggesting compensatory mechanisms in guinea pig and horse. Our simulation studies, counts of independent changes in existing phenotype surveys, and the forthcoming availability of many new genomes all suggest that forward genomics can be applied to many phenotypes, including those relevant for human evolution and disease.

  11. THE EVOLUTION OF OPSINS AND COLOR VISION: CONNECTING GENOTYPE TO A COMPLEX PHENOTYPE

    OpenAIRE

    BLOCH, Natasha I

    2016-01-01

    Dissecting the genetic basis of adaptive traits is key to our understanding of evolutionary processes. A major and essential step in the study of evolutionary genetics is drawing link between genotype and phenotype, which depends on the difficult process of defining the phenotype at different levels, from functional to organismal. Visual pigments are a key component of the visual system and their evolution could also provide important clues on the evolution of visual sensory system in respons...

  12. Progress toward a genotype/phenotype correlation in galactosemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichardt, J.K.V.; Lin, Hsien-Chin; Ng, Won G. [Univ. of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Galactosemia is secondary to deficiency of the enzyme galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT). If untreated this condition results in severe neonatal symptoms and can be fatal. Most symptoms disappear upon the institution of a galactose-restricted diet. Therefore, most states in the US and many developed countries have implemented newborn screening programs for galactosemia. We have characterized thus far twelve disease-causing point mutations, four protein polymorphisms, one silent nucleotide substitution and a RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) in over 200 patients. The most common galactosemia mutation, Q188R, is present on about 64% of Caucasian galactosemia alleles in the US. This mutation is present on 67% of {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} Caucasian alleles with severe neonatal symptoms and undetectable crythrocytic GALT activity. Thus, Q188R almost defines the {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} phenotype in Caucasian galactosemia patients. This mutation, however, is present on only 16% of the milder {open_quotes}variant{close_quotes} alleles and never in the homozygous state. Variant patients have up to 10% residual GALT activity in their red cells. Therefore, one or more as of yet uncharacterized mutations other than Q188R must be present in {open_quotes}variant{close_quotes} patients. The Q188R mutations is very rare in other ethnic and racial groups. Thus, Galactosemia is panethnic but the mutational basis of this disease differs among human populations. The frequency of Q188R is intermediate in Hispanic-American patients, probably reflecting the Spanish contribution to the gene pool in this population. We conclude that the Q188R mutation encodes the severe {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes}galactosemia phenotype in Caucasians and that other mutations produce the {open_quotes}variant{close_quotes} galactosemia phenotype.

  13. The evolution of opsins and color vision: connecting genotype to a complex phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha I Bloch

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Dissecting the genetic basis of adaptive traits is key to our understanding of evolutionary processes. A major and essential step in the study of evolutionary genetics is drawing link between genotype and phenotype, which depends on the difficult process of defining the phenotype at different levels, from functional to organismal. Visual pigments are a key component of the visual system and their evolution could also provide important clues on the evolution of visual sensory system in response to sexual and natural selection. As a system in which genotype can be linked to phenotype, I will use visual pigments and color vision, particularly in birds, as a case of a complex phenotype. I aim to emphasize the difficulties in drawing the genotype-phenotype relationship for complex phenotypes and to highlight the challenges of doing so for color vision. The use of vision-based receiver models to quantify animal colors and patterns is increasingly important in many fields of evolutionary research, spanning studies of mate choice, predation, camouflage and sensory ecology. Given these models impact on evolution and ecology, it is important to provide other researchers with the opportunity to better understand animal vision and the corresponding advantages and limitations of these models.

  14. The Monarch Initiative: an integrative data and analytic platform connecting phenotypes to genotypes across species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mungall, Christopher J.; McMurry, Julie A.; Köhler, Sebastian; Balhoff, James P.; Borromeo, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The correlation of phenotypic outcomes with genetic variation and environmental factors is a core pursuit in biology and biomedicine. Numerous challenges impede our progress: patient phenotypes may not match known diseases, candidate variants may be in genes that have not been characterized, model organisms may not recapitulate human or veterinary diseases, filling evolutionary gaps is difficult, and many resources must be queried to find potentially significant genotype-phenotype associations. Nonhuman organisms have proven instrumental in revealing biological mechanisms. Advanced informatics tools can identify phenotypically relevant disease models in research and diagnostic contexts. Large-scale integration of model organism and clinical research data can provide a breadth of knowledge not available from individual sources and can provide contextualization of data back to these sources. The Monarch Initiative (monarchinitiative.org) is a collaborative, open science effort that aims to semantically integrate genotype-phenotype data from many species and sources in order to support precision medicine, disease modeling, and mechanistic exploration. Our integrated knowledge graph, analytic tools, and web services enable diverse users to explore relationships between phenotypes and genotypes across species.

  15. PURA syndrome: clinical delineation and genotype-phenotype study in 32 individuals with review of published literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Margot R F; Janowski, Robert; Alvi, Mohsan; Self, Jay E; van Essen, Ton J; Vreeburg, Maaike; Rouhl, Rob P W; Stevens, Servi J C; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Schieving, Jolanda; Pfundt, Rolph; van Dijk, Katinke; Smeets, Eric; Stumpel, Connie T R M; Bok, Levinus A; Cobben, Jan Maarten; Engelen, Marc; Mansour, Sahar; Whiteford, Margo; Chandler, Kate E; Douzgou, Sofia; Cooper, Nicola S; Tan, Ene-Choo; Foo, Roger; Lai, Angeline H M; Rankin, Julia; Green, Andrew; Lönnqvist, Tuula; Isohanni, Pirjo; Williams, Shelley; Ruhoy, Ilene; Carvalho, Karen S; Dowling, James J; Lev, Dorit L; Sterbova, Katalin; Lassuthova, Petra; Neupauerová, Jana; Waugh, Jeff L; Keros, Sotirios; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Smithson, Sarah F; Brunner, Han G; van Hoeckel, Ceciel; Anderson, Mel; Clowes, Virginia E; Siu, Victoria Mok; DDD study, The; Selber, Paulo; Leventer, Richard J; Nellaker, Christoffer; Niessing, Dierk; Hunt, David; Baralle, Diana

    2018-01-01

    Background De novo mutations in PURA have recently been described to cause PURA syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder characterised by severe intellectual disability (ID), epilepsy, feeding difficulties and neonatal hypotonia. Objectives To delineate the clinical spectrum of PURA syndrome and study genotype-phenotype correlations. Methods Diagnostic or research-based exome or Sanger sequencing was performed in individuals with ID. We systematically collected clinical and mutation data on newly ascertained PURA syndrome individuals, evaluated data of previously reported individuals and performed a computational analysis of photographs. We classified mutations based on predicted effect using 3D in silico models of crystal structures of Drosophila-derived Pur-alpha homologues. Finally, we explored genotype-phenotype correlations by analysis of both recurrent mutations as well as mutation classes. Results We report mutations in PURA (purine-rich element binding protein A) in 32 individuals, the largest cohort described so far. Evaluation of clinical data, including 22 previously published cases, revealed that all have moderate to severe ID and neonatal-onset symptoms, including hypotonia (96%), respiratory problems (57%), feeding difficulties (77%), exaggerated startle response (44%), hypersomnolence (66%) and hypothermia (35%). Epilepsy (54%) and gastrointestinal (69%), ophthalmological (51%) and endocrine problems (42%) were observed frequently. Computational analysis of facial photographs showed subtle facial dysmorphism. No strong genotype-phenotype correlation was identified by subgrouping mutations into functional classes. Conclusion We delineate the clinical spectrum of PURA syndrome with the identification of 32 additional individuals. The identification of one individual through targeted Sanger sequencing points towards the clinical recognisability of the syndrome. Genotype-phenotype analysis showed no significant correlation between mutation classes and

  16. Genotype-phenotype correlations in a mountain population community with high prevalence of Wilson's disease: genetic and clinical homogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Relu Cocoş

    Full Text Available Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by more than 500 mutations in ATP7B gene presenting considerably clinical manifestations heterogeneity even in patients with a particular mutation. Previous findings suggested a potential role of additional genetic modifiers and environment factors on phenotypic expression among the affected patients. We conducted clinical and genetic investigations to perform genotype-phenotype correlation in two large families living in a socio-culturally isolated community with the highest prevalence of Wilson's disease ever reported of 1 ∶ 1130. Sequencing of ATP7B gene in seven affected individuals and 43 family members identified a common compound heterozygous genotype, H1069Q/M769H-fs, in five symptomatic and two asymptomatic patients and detected the presence of two out of seven identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in all affected patients. Symptomatic patients had similar clinical phenotype and age at onset (18 ± 1 years showing dysarthria and dysphagia as common clinical features at the time of diagnosis. Moreover, all symptomatic patients presented Kayser-Fleischer rings and lack of dystonia accompanied by unfavourable clinical outcomes. Our findings add value for understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations in Wilson's disease based on a multifamily study in an isolated population with high extent of genetic and environmental homogeneity as opposed to majority of reports. We observed an equal influence of presumed other genetic modifiers and environmental factors on clinical presentation and age at onset of Wilson's disease in patients with a particular genotype. These data provide valuable inferences that could be applied for predicting clinical management in asymptomatic patients in such communities.

  17. Improving accuracy of genomic prediction in Brangus cattle by adding animals with imputed low-density SNP genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, F B; Wu, X-L; Li, H; Xu, J; Perkins, T; Genho, J; Ferretti, R; Tait, R G; Bauck, S; Rosa, G J M

    2018-02-01

    Reliable genomic prediction of breeding values for quantitative traits requires the availability of sufficient number of animals with genotypes and phenotypes in the training set. As of 31 October 2016, there were 3,797 Brangus animals with genotypes and phenotypes. These Brangus animals were genotyped using different commercial SNP chips. Of them, the largest group consisted of 1,535 animals genotyped by the GGP-LDV4 SNP chip. The remaining 2,262 genotypes were imputed to the SNP content of the GGP-LDV4 chip, so that the number of animals available for training the genomic prediction models was more than doubled. The present study showed that the pooling of animals with both original or imputed 40K SNP genotypes substantially increased genomic prediction accuracies on the ten traits. By supplementing imputed genotypes, the relative gains in genomic prediction accuracies on estimated breeding values (EBV) were from 12.60% to 31.27%, and the relative gain in genomic prediction accuracies on de-regressed EBV was slightly small (i.e. 0.87%-18.75%). The present study also compared the performance of five genomic prediction models and two cross-validation methods. The five genomic models predicted EBV and de-regressed EBV of the ten traits similarly well. Of the two cross-validation methods, leave-one-out cross-validation maximized the number of animals at the stage of training for genomic prediction. Genomic prediction accuracy (GPA) on the ten quantitative traits was validated in 1,106 newly genotyped Brangus animals based on the SNP effects estimated in the previous set of 3,797 Brangus animals, and they were slightly lower than GPA in the original data. The present study was the first to leverage currently available genotype and phenotype resources in order to harness genomic prediction in Brangus beef cattle. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Inactivating mutations in ESCO2 cause SC phocomelia and Roberts syndrome: no phenotype-genotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüle, Birgitt; Oviedo, Angelica; Johnston, Kathreen; Pai, Shashidhar; Francke, Uta

    2005-12-01

    The rare, autosomal recessive Roberts syndrome (RBS) is characterized by tetraphocomelia, profound growth deficiency of prenatal onset, craniofacial anomalies, microcephaly, and mental deficiency. SC phocomelia (SC) has a milder phenotype, with a lesser degree of limb reduction and with survival to adulthood. Since heterochromatin repulsion (HR) is characteristic for both disorders and is not complemented in somatic-cell hybrids, it has been hypothesized that the disorders are allelic. Recently, mutations in ESCO2 (establishment of cohesion 1 homolog 2) on 8p21.1 have been reported in RBS. To determine whether ESCO2 mutations are also responsible for SC, we studied three families with SC and two families in which variable degrees of limb and craniofacial abnormalities, detected by fetal ultrasound, led to pregnancy terminations. All cases were positive for HR. We identified seven novel mutations in exons 3-8 of ESCO2. In two families, affected individuals were homozygous--for a 5-nucleotide deletion in one family and a splice-site mutation in the other. In three nonconsanguineous families, probands were compound heterozygous for a single-nucleotide insertion or deletion, a nonsense mutation, or a splice-site mutation. Abnormal splice products were characterized at the RNA level. Since only protein-truncating mutations were identified, regardless of clinical severity, we conclude that genotype does not predict phenotype. Having established that RBS and SC are caused by mutations in the same gene, we delineated the clinical phenotype of the tetraphocomelia spectrum that is associated with HR and ESCO2 mutations and differentiated it from other types of phocomelia that are negative for HR.

  19. Glucokinase gene mutations: structural and genotype-phenotype analyses in MODY children from South Italy.

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    Nadia Tinto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Maturity onset diabetes of the young type 2 (or GCK MODY is a genetic form of diabetes mellitus provoked by mutations in the glucokinase gene (GCK. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened the GCK gene by direct sequencing in 30 patients from South Italy with suspected MODY. The mutation-induced structural alterations in the protein were analyzed by molecular modeling. The patients' biochemical, clinical and anamnestic data were obtained. Mutations were detected in 16/30 patients (53%; 9 of the 12 mutations identified were novel (p.Glu70Asp, p.Phe123Leu, p.Asp132Asn, p.His137Asp, p.Gly162Asp, p.Thr168Ala, p.Arg392Ser, p.Glu290X, p.Gln106_Met107delinsLeu and are in regions involved in structural rearrangements required for catalysis. The prevalence of mutation sites was higher in the small domain (7/12: approximately 59% than in the large (4/12: 33% domain or in the connection (1/12: 8% region of the protein. Mild diabetic phenotypes were detected in almost all patients [mean (SD OGTT = 7.8 mMol/L (1.8] and mean triglyceride levels were lower in mutated than in unmutated GCK patients (p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of GCK MODY is high in southern Italy, and the GCK small domain is a hot spot for MODY mutations. Both the severity of the GCK mutation and the genetic background seem to play a relevant role in the GCK MODY phenotype. Indeed, a partial genotype-phenotype correlation was identified in related patients (3 pairs of siblings but not in two unrelated children bearing the same mutation. Thus, the molecular approach allows the physician to confirm the diagnosis and to predict severity of the mutation.

  20. Plant phenomics and the need for physiological phenotyping across scales to narrow the genotype-to-phenotype knowledge gap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grosskinsky, Dominik Kilian; Svensgaard, Jesper; Christensen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    Plants are affected by complex genome×environment×management interactions which determine phenotypic plasticity as a result of the variability of genetic components. Whereas great advances have been made in the cost-efficient and high-throughput analyses of genetic information and non-invasive ph......Plants are affected by complex genome×environment×management interactions which determine phenotypic plasticity as a result of the variability of genetic components. Whereas great advances have been made in the cost-efficient and high-throughput analyses of genetic information and non......-invasive phenotyping, the large-scale analyses of the underlying physiological mechanisms lag behind. The external phenotype is determined by the sum of the complex interactions of metabolic pathways and intracellular regulatory networks that is reflected in an internal, physiological, and biochemical phenotype......, ultimately enabling the in silico assessment of responses under defined environments with advanced crop models. This will allow generation of robust physiological predictors also for complex traits to bridge the knowledge gap between genotype and phenotype for applications in breeding, precision farming...

  1. Application of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) for phenotypic mapping of white spruce genotypes along environmental gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Odorico, P.; Wong, C. Y.; Besik, A.; Earon, E.; Isabel, N.; Ensminger, I.

    2017-12-01

    Rapid climate change is expected to cause a mismatch between locally adapted tree populations and the optimal climatic conditions to which they have adapted. Plant breeding and reforestation programs will increasingly need to rely on high-throughput precision phenotyping tools for the selection of genotypes with increased drought and stress tolerance. In this work, we present the possibilities offered by Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) carrying optical sensors to monitor and assess differences in performance among white spruce genotypes. While high-throughput precision phenotyping using UAS has gained traction in agronomic crop research during the last few years, to our knowledge it is still at its infancy in forestry applications. UAS surveys were performed at different times during the growing season over large white spruce common garden experiments established by the Canadian Forest Service at four different sites, each characterized by 2000 clonally replicated genotypes. Sites are distributed over a latitudinal gradient, in Ontario and Quebec, Canada. The UAS payload consisted of a custom-bands multispectral sensor acquiring radiation at wavelength at which the reflectance spectrum of vegetation is known to capture physiological change under disturbance and stress. Ground based tree-top spectral reflectances and leaf level functional traits were also acquired for validation purposes parallel to UAS surveys. We will discuss the potential and the challenges of using optical sensors on UAS to infer genotypic variation in tree response to stress events and show how spectral data can function as the link between large-scale phenotype and genotype data.

  2. Phenotypic, Genotypic, and Antibiotic Sensitivity Patterns of Strains Isolated from the Cholera Epidemic in Zimbabwe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Islam, Mohammad S.; Mahmud, Zahid H.; Ansaruzzaman, Mohammad; Faruque, Shah M.; Talukder, Kaisar A.; Qadri, Firdausi; Alam, Munirul; Islam, Shafiqul; Bardhan, Pradip K.; Mazumder, Ramendra N.; Khan, Azharul I.; Ahmed, Sirajuddin; Iqbal, Anwarul; Chitsatso, Owen; Mudzori, James; Patel, Sheetal; Midzi, Stanley M.; Charimari, Lincoln; Endtz, Hubert P.; Cravioto, Alejandro

    This paper details the phenotypic, genotypic, and antibiotic sensitivity patterns of 88 Vibrio cholerae strains from Zimbabwe. Of the 88 strains, 83 were classified as "altered El Tor" and 5 as "hybrid El Tor" strains. All of the strains were susceptible to tetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin,

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic variability of disc flower corolla length and nectar content in sunflower

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joksimović Jovan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The nectar content and disc flower corolla length are the two most important parameters of attractiveness to pollinators in sunflower. The phenotypic and genotypic variability of these two traits was studied in four commercially important hybrids and their parental components in a trial with three fertilizer doses over two years. The results showed that, looking at individual genotypes, the variability of disc flower corolla length was affected the most by year (85.38-97.46%. As the study years were extremely different, the phenotypic variance of the hybrids and parental components was calculated for each year separately. In such conditions, looking at all of the crossing combinations, the largest contribution to phenotypic variance of the corolla length was that of genotype: 57.27-61.11% (NS-H-45 64.51-84.84% (Velja; 96.74-97.20% (NS-H-702 and 13.92-73.17% (NS-H-111. A similar situation was observed for the phenotypic variability of nectar content, where genotype also had the largest influence, namely 39.77-48.25% in NS-H-45; 39.06-42.51% in Velja; 31.97-72.36% in NS-H-702; and 62.13-94.96% in NS-H-111.

  4. Genotype-phenotype correlation in patients suspected of having Sotos syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Lonneke; Kant, Sarina G.; Karperien, Marcel; van Beers, Lotte; Tjon, Jennifer; Vink, Geraldine R.; van Tol, Dewy; Dauwerse, Hans; le Cessie, Saskia; Beemer, Frits A.; van der Burgt, Ineke; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Kuhnle, Ursula; Mathijssen, Inge B.; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E.; Stumpel, Connie T. Schrander; Breuning, Martijn H.; Wit, Jan M.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Deletions and mutations in the NSD1 gene are the major cause of Sotos syndrome. We wanted to evaluate the genotype-phenotype correlation in patients suspected of having Sotos syndrome and determine the best discriminating parameters for the presence of a NSD1 gene alteration. Methods:

  5. Genotype-phenotype correlation in patients suspected of having sotos syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L. de; Kant, S.; Karperien, M.; Beers, L. van; Tjon, J.; Vink, G.R.; Tol, D. van; Dauwerse, H.G.; Cessie, S. le; Beemer, F.A.; Burgt, C.J.A.M. van der; Hamel, B.C.J.; Hennekam, R.C.M.; Kuhnle, U.; Mathijssen, I.B.; Veenstra-Knol, H.E.; Stumpel, C.T.; Breuning, M.H.; Wit, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Deletions and mutations in the NSD1 gene are the major cause of Sotos syndrome. We wanted to evaluate the genotype-phenotype correlation in patients suspected of having Sotos syndrome and determine the best discriminating parameters for the presence of a NSD1 gene alteration. METHODS:

  6. Genotype and Phenotype of 101 Dutch Patients with Congenital Stationary Night Blindness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijveld, M.M.C.; Florijn, R.J.; Bergen, A.A.B.; van den Born, L.I.; Kamermans, M.; Prick, L.; Riemslag, F.C.C.; van Schooneveld, M.J.; Kappers, A.M.L.; van Genderen, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relative frequency of the genetic causes of the Schubert-Bornschein type of congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) and to determine the genotype-phenotype correlations in CSNB1 and CSNB2. Design: Clinic-based, longitudinal, multicenter study. Participants: A total

  7. Mapping phenotypic plasticity and genotype-environment interactions affecting life-history traits in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutteling, E.W.; Riksen, J.A.G.; Bakker, J.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2007-01-01

    Phenotypic plasticity and genotype-environment interactions (GEI) play an important role in the evolution of life histories. Knowledge of the molecular genetic basis of plasticity and GEI provides insight into the underlying mechanisms of life-history changes in different environments. We used a

  8. Methods of developing core collections based on the predicted genotypic value of rice ( Oryza sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C T; Shi, C H; Wu, J G; Xu, H M; Zhang, H Z; Ren, Y L

    2004-04-01

    The selection of an appropriate sampling strategy and a clustering method is important in the construction of core collections based on predicted genotypic values in order to retain the greatest degree of genetic diversity of the initial collection. In this study, methods of developing rice core collections were evaluated based on the predicted genotypic values for 992 rice varieties with 13 quantitative traits. The genotypic values of the traits were predicted by the adjusted unbiased prediction (AUP) method. Based on the predicted genotypic values, Mahalanobis distances were calculated and employed to measure the genetic similarities among the rice varieties. Six hierarchical clustering methods, including the single linkage, median linkage, centroid, unweighted pair-group average, weighted pair-group average and flexible-beta methods, were combined with random, preferred and deviation sampling to develop 18 core collections of rice germplasm. The results show that the deviation sampling strategy in combination with the unweighted pair-group average method of hierarchical clustering retains the greatest degree of genetic diversities of the initial collection. The core collections sampled using predicted genotypic values had more genetic diversity than those based on phenotypic values.

  9. Genetic analyses, phenotypic adaptability and stability in sugarcane genotypes for commercial cultivation in Pernambuco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra Filho, J A; Junior, T C; Simões Neto, D E

    2015-10-05

    In the present study, we assessed the agro-industrial performance of 22 sugarcane genotypes adaptable to edaphoclimatic conditions in production microregions in the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, and we recommended the commercial cultivation of select genotypes. The variables analyzed were as follows: sucrose percentage in cane juice, tonnage of saccharose per hectare (TPH), sugarcane tonnage per hectare (TCH), fiber, solid soluble contents, total recoverable sugar tonnage (ATR), and total recoverable sugar tonnage per hectare (ATR t/ha). A randomized block design with 4 repeats was used. Combined variance of the experiments, genetic parameter estimates, and environment stratification were analyzed. Phenotypic adaptability and stability were analyzed using the Annicchiarico and Wricke methods and analysis of variance. Genetic gain was estimated using the classic index and sum of ranks. Genotype selection was efficient for TPH, TCH, and ATR t/ha. Genotypes presented a great potential for improvement and a similar response pattern in Litoral Norte and Mata Sul microregions for TPH and TCH and Litoral Norte and Litoral Sul microregions for ATR t/ha. Genotypes SP78-4764, RB813804, and SP79-101 showed better productivity and phenotypic adaptability and stability, according to the Wricke and Annicchiarico methods. These genotypes can be recommended for cultivation in the sugarcane belt in the State of Pernambuco.

  10. Gaucher disease: molecular heterogeneity and phenotype-genotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theophilus, B; Latham, T; Grabowski, G A; Smith, F I

    1989-08-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is the most prevalent lysosomal storage disease. This autosomal recessive trait results from the defective activity of acid beta-glucosidase (beta-Glc). Four different exonic point mutations have been identified as causal alleles for GD. To facilitate screening for these alleles, assays were developed using allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization to amplified genomic DNA sequences. Specifically, intron bases flanking exons 5, 9, and 10 were determined, and conditions for PCR amplification of these exons were obtained. Two different procedures were developed to distinguish signals obtained from the structural beta-Glc gene exons and those from the pseudogene. These procedures were used to determine the distribution of all known GD alleles in a population of 44 affected patients of varying phenotypes and ethnicity. The high frequency of one of the exon 9 mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish GD type 1 patients was confirmed, and, in addition, this mutation was present in ethnically diverse non-Jewish type 1 GD patients. Homozygotes (N = 5) for this allele were midly affected older individuals, and this mutant allele was not found in any patient with neuronopathic disease. The exon 10 mutation was confirmed as the predominant allele in types 2 and 3 GD. However, several type 1 GD patients, including one of Ashkenazi-Jewish heritage, also were heterozygous for this allele. The presence of this allele in type 1 patients did not correlate with the severity of clinical symptoms. The second exon 9 mutation and the exon 5 mutation were rare, since they occurred only heterozygously either in one type 2 GD patient or in two related Ashkenazi-Jewish GD patients, respectively. Although most GD patients (38 of 44) had at least one of the known mutant alleles, 57% were heterozygotes for only one of these mutations. Fourteen percent of patients were negative for all mutations. A total of 73% of GD patients had at least one unknown allele. The varying clinical

  11. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Wah Wah; Ei, Phyu Win; Nyunt, Wint Wint; Swe, Thyn Lei; Lwin, Thandar; Htwe, Mi Mi; Kim, Kyung Jun; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Chang Ki; Cho, Sang Nae; Song, Sun Dae; Chang, Chulhun L

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is one of the most serious health problems in Myanmar. Because TB drug resistance is associated with genetic mutation(s) relevant to responses to each drug, genotypic methods for detecting these mutations have been proposed to overcome the limitations of classic phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST). We explored the current estimates of drug-resistant TB and evaluated the usefulness of genotypic DST in Myanmar. We determined the drug susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolated from sputum smear-positive patients with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB at two main TB centers in Myanmar during 2013 by using conventional phenotypic DST and the GenoType MTBDRplus assay (Hain Lifescience, Germany). Discrepant results were confirmed by sequencing the genes relevant to each type of resistance (rpoB for rifampicin; katG and inhA for isoniazid). Of 191 isolates, phenotypic DST showed that 27.7% (n=53) were resistant to at least one first-line drug and 20.9% (n=40) were resistant to two or more, including 18.3% (n=35) multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) strains. Monoresistant strains accounted for 6.8% (n=13) of the samples. Genotypic assay of 189 isolates showed 17.5% (n=33) MDR-TB and 5.3% (n=10) isoniazid-monoresistant strains. Genotypic susceptibility results were 99.5% (n=188) concordant and agreed almost perfectly with phenotypic DST (kappa=0.99; 95% confidence interval 0.96-1.01). The results highlight the burden of TB drug resistance and prove the usefulness of the genotypic DST in Myanmar.

  12. Phenotype-genotype correlation in β-thalassemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Galanello

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestations of β-thalassemia are extremely heterogeneous, ranging from severe transfusion-dependent anemia, to the mild non transfusion dependent thalassemia intermedia and to the asymptomatic carrier state. The remarkable phenotypic variability is primary due to variations in the different globin genes (primary gene modifiers. The main pathophysiological determinant of the severity of β-thalassemia syndromes is the extent of a/non-a globin chain imbalance. Therefore, any factor capable of reducing the globin chain imbalance may have an ameliorating effect on the clinical picture. The most common mechanisms responsible of the amelioration of the phenotype are mild or silent β thalassemia alleles, coinheritance of a thalassemia, or of genetic determinants associated with increased g globin chain production. Rarely, other complex mechanisms including dominantly inherited β thalassemia, somatic deletion of β globin gene and coinheritance of extra a globin genes with heterozygous β thalassemia have been reported. In addition to the variability of the phenotype resulting from primary gene modifiers, other genetic factors (secondary gene modifiers, mapping outside the β and a globin cluster, may influence the disease complications. Among these factors the ones best so far defined are those affecting bilirubin, iron and bone metabolism. However, the new methods of DNA analysis (i.e. GWAS and related methods are expect expand the number of genes or gene variants involved in the phenotypic variability and in the response to treatment of β thalassemia. 从严重的输液依赖型贫血症到轻度非输液依赖性中间型地中海贫血,再到无症状携带状态,β地中海贫血的临床表现极度异源性。 由于不同珠蛋白基因(初级基因修饰因子)发生各种变异,主要表现为显著的表型变异。 α/非α珠蛋白链不平衡程度是加重β地中海贫血综合症

  13. Using whole-genome sequence data to predict quantitative trait phenotypes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Ober

    Full Text Available Predicting organismal phenotypes from genotype data is important for plant and animal breeding, medicine, and evolutionary biology. Genomic-based phenotype prediction has been applied for single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping platforms, but not using complete genome sequences. Here, we report genomic prediction for starvation stress resistance and startle response in Drosophila melanogaster, using ∼2.5 million SNPs determined by sequencing the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel population of inbred lines. We constructed a genomic relationship matrix from the SNP data and used it in a genomic best linear unbiased prediction (GBLUP model. We assessed predictive ability as the correlation between predicted genetic values and observed phenotypes by cross-validation, and found a predictive ability of 0.239±0.008 (0.230±0.012 for starvation resistance (startle response. The predictive ability of BayesB, a Bayesian method with internal SNP selection, was not greater than GBLUP. Selection of the 5% SNPs with either the highest absolute effect or variance explained did not improve predictive ability. Predictive ability decreased only when fewer than 150,000 SNPs were used to construct the genomic relationship matrix. We hypothesize that predictive power in this population stems from the SNP-based modeling of the subtle relationship structure caused by long-range linkage disequilibrium and not from population structure or SNPs in linkage disequilibrium with causal variants. We discuss the implications of these results for genomic prediction in other organisms.

  14. GGCX-Associated Phenotypes: An Overview in Search of Genotype-Phenotype Correlations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Y. G. De Vilder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-carboxylation, performed by gamma-glutamyl carboxylase (GGCX, is an enzymatic process essential for activating vitamin K-dependent proteins (VKDP with important functions in various biological processes. Mutations in the encoding GGCX gene are associated with multiple phenotypes, amongst which vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor deficiency (VKCFD1 is best known. Other patients have skin, eye, heart or bone manifestations. As genotype–phenotype correlations were never described, literature was systematically reviewed in search of patients with at least one GGCX mutation with a phenotypic description, resulting in a case series of 47 patients. Though this number was too low for statistically valid correlations—a frequent problem in orphan diseases—we demonstrate the crucial role of the horizontally transferred transmembrane domain in developing cardiac and bone manifestations. Moreover, natural history suggests ageing as the principal determinant to develop skin and eye symptoms. VKCFD1 symptoms seemed more severe in patients with both mutations in the same protein domain, though this could not be linked to a more perturbed coagulation factor function. Finally, distinct GGCX functional domains might be dedicated to carboxylation of very specific VKDP. In conclusion, this systematic review suggests that there indeed may be genotype–phenotype correlations for GGCX-related phenotypes, which can guide patient counseling and management.

  15. Predictive genomics: a cancer hallmark network framework for predicting tumor clinical phenotypes using genome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Edwin; Zaman, Naif; Mcgee, Shauna; Milanese, Jean-Sébastien; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen

    2015-02-01

    Tumor genome sequencing leads to documenting thousands of DNA mutations and other genomic alterations. At present, these data cannot be analyzed adequately to aid in the understanding of tumorigenesis and its evolution. Moreover, we have little insight into how to use these data to predict clinical phenotypes and tumor progression to better design patient treatment. To meet these challenges, we discuss a cancer hallmark network framework for modeling genome sequencing data to predict cancer clonal evolution and associated clinical phenotypes. The framework includes: (1) cancer hallmarks that can be represented by a few molecular/signaling networks. 'Network operational signatures' which represent gene regulatory logics/strengths enable to quantify state transitions and measures of hallmark traits. Thus, sets of genomic alterations which are associated with network operational signatures could be linked to the state/measure of hallmark traits. The network operational signature transforms genotypic data (i.e., genomic alterations) to regulatory phenotypic profiles (i.e., regulatory logics/strengths), to cellular phenotypic profiles (i.e., hallmark traits) which lead to clinical phenotypic profiles (i.e., a collection of hallmark traits). Furthermore, the framework considers regulatory logics of the hallmark networks under tumor evolutionary dynamics and therefore also includes: (2) a self-promoting positive feedback loop that is dominated by a genomic instability network and a cell survival/proliferation network is the main driver of tumor clonal evolution. Surrounding tumor stroma and its host immune systems shape the evolutionary paths; (3) cell motility initiating metastasis is a byproduct of the above self-promoting loop activity during tumorigenesis; (4) an emerging hallmark network which triggers genome duplication dominates a feed-forward loop which in turn could act as a rate-limiting step for tumor formation; (5) mutations and other genomic alterations have

  16. Genotype-Phenotype Relationship in Patients and Relatives with SHOX Region Anomalies in the French Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Julie; Baptiste, Amandine; Benabbad, Imane; Thierry, Gaëlle; Costa, Jean-Marc; Amouyal, Mélanie; Kottler, Marie-Laure; Leheup, Bruno; Touraine, Renaud; Schmitt, Sébastien; Lebrun, Marine; Cormier Daire, Valérie; Bonnefont, Jean-Paul; de Roux, Nicolas; Elie, Caroline; Rosilio, Myriam

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to describe a large population with anomalies involving the SHOX region, responsible for idiopathic short stature and Léri-Weill dyschondrosteosis (LWD), and to identify a possible genotype/phenotype correlation. We performed a retrospective multicenter study on French subjects with a SHOX region anomaly diagnosed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification or Sanger sequencing. Phenotypes were collected in each of the 7 genetic laboratories practicing this technique for SHOX analysis. Among 205 index cases and 100 related cases, 91.3% had LWD. For index cases, median age at evaluation was 11.7 (9.0; 15.9) years and mean height standard deviation score was -2.3 ± 1.1. A deletion of either SHOX or PAR1 or both was found in 74% of patients. Duplications and point mutations/indels affected 8 and 18% of the population, respectively. Genotype-phenotype correlation showed that deletions were more frequently associated with Madelung deformity and mesomelic shortening in girls, as well as with presence of radiologic anomalies, than duplications. Our results highlight genotype-phenotype relationships in the French population with a SHOX defect and provide new information showing that clinical expression is milder in cases of duplication compared to deletions. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Phenotypic and Genotypic Detection of Campylobacter jejuni at Local Chicken and Chicken Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rosyidi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The Objective of this study was to identify the existence of Campylobacter jejuni based on phenotypic and genotypic characteristic in local chicken and chicken meats. Samples of local chicken intestine and meat were tested for the bacterial existence. Phenotypic examination was carried out by means of cultivation followed by gram staining and biochemical tests. Genotypic examination was conducted by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using genus specific16S rRNA gene at 816 bp and membrane-associated protein A (mapA gene at 589 bp as Campylobacter jejuni species-specific gene. The result of phenotypic detection revealed the existence of Campylobacter spp as gram negative, curved rod shape, oxidase positive, urease negative and motile. Genotypic examination also indicated the existence of bacteria using both primers. However, no Campylobacter jejuni detected from meat of the chickens. The results suggest that the method of PCR using a primer detecting species-specific gene of Campylobacter jejuni gives a rapid and accurate detection of the bacteria as compared to that using phenotypic and biochemical test. Identification of Campylobacter spp from chicken meats should be improved with enrichment method and sample collection. (Animal Production 12(2: 128-134 (2010Key Words: Campylobacter jejuni, mapA gene, local chicken

  18. Mining for genotype-phenotype relations in Saccharomyces using partial least squares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sæbø Solve

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multivariate approaches are important due to their versatility and applications in many fields as it provides decisive advantages over univariate analysis in many ways. Genome wide association studies are rapidly emerging, but approaches in hand pay less attention to multivariate relation between genotype and phenotype. We introduce a methodology based on a BLAST approach for extracting information from genomic sequences and Soft- Thresholding Partial Least Squares (ST-PLS for mapping genotype-phenotype relations. Results Applying this methodology to an extensive data set for the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found that the relationship between genotype-phenotype involves surprisingly few genes in the sense that an overwhelmingly large fraction of the phenotypic variation can be explained by variation in less than 1% of the full gene reference set containing 5791 genes. These phenotype influencing genes were evolving 20% faster than non-influential genes and were unevenly distributed over cellular functions, with strong enrichments in functions such as cellular respiration and transposition. These genes were also enriched with known paralogs, stop codon variations and copy number variations, suggesting that such molecular adjustments have had a disproportionate influence on Saccharomyces yeasts recent adaptation to environmental changes in its ecological niche. Conclusions BLAST and PLS based multivariate approach derived results that adhere to the known yeast phylogeny and gene ontology and thus verify that the methodology extracts a set of fast evolving genes that capture the phylogeny of the yeast strains. The approach is worth pursuing, and future investigations should be made to improve the computations of genotype signals as well as variable selection procedure within the PLS framework.

  19. Network-based analysis of genotype-phenotype correlations between different inheritance modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Dapeng; Li, Chuanxing; Zhang, Shaojun; Lu, Jianping; Jiang, Yongshuai; Wang, Shiyuan; Zhou, Meng

    2014-11-15

    Recent studies on human disease have revealed that aberrant interaction between proteins probably underlies a substantial number of human genetic diseases. This suggests a need to investigate disease inheritance mode using interaction, and based on which to refresh our conceptual understanding of a series of properties regarding inheritance mode of human disease. We observed a strong correlation between the number of protein interactions and the likelihood of a gene causing any dominant diseases or multiple dominant diseases, whereas no correlation was observed between protein interaction and the likelihood of a gene causing recessive diseases. We found that dominant diseases are more likely to be associated with disruption of important interactions. These suggest inheritance mode should be understood using protein interaction. We therefore reviewed the previous studies and refined an interaction model of inheritance mode, and then confirmed that this model is largely reasonable using new evidences. With these findings, we found that the inheritance mode of human genetic diseases can be predicted using protein interaction. By integrating the systems biology perspectives with the classical disease genetics paradigm, our study provides some new insights into genotype-phenotype correlations. haodapeng@ems.hrbmu.edu.cn or biofomeng@hotmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Genotypic and phenotypic analysis of 396 individuals with mutations in Sonic Hedgehog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Benjamin D; Bear, Kelly A; Wyllie, Adrian; Keaton, Amelia A; Dubourg, Christele; David, Veronique; Mercier, Sandra; Odent, Sylvie; Hehr, Ute; Paulussen, Aimee; Clegg, Nancy J; Delgado, Mauricio R; Bale, Sherri J; Lacbawan, Felicitas; Ardinger, Holly H; Aylsworth, Arthur S; Bhengu, Ntombenhle Louisa; Braddock, Stephen; Brookhyser, Karen; Burton, Barbara; Gaspar, Harald; Grix, Art; Horovitz, Dafne; Kanetzke, Erin; Kayserili, Hulya; Lev, Dorit; Nikkel, Sarah M; Norton, Mary; Roberts, Richard; Saal, Howard; Schaefer, G B; Schneider, Adele; Smith, Erika K; Sowry, Ellen; Spence, M Anne; Shalev, Stavit A; Steiner, Carlos E; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Winder, Thomas L; Balog, Joan Z; Hadley, Donald W; Zhou, Nan; Pineda-Alvarez, Daniel E; Roessler, Erich; Muenke, Maximilian

    2012-07-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE), the most common malformation of the human forebrain, may result from mutations in over 12 genes. Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) was the first such gene discovered; mutations in SHH remain the most common cause of non-chromosomal HPE. The severity spectrum is wide, ranging from incompatibility with extrauterine life to isolated midline facial differences. To characterise genetic and clinical findings in individuals with SHH mutations. Through the National Institutes of Health and collaborating centres, DNA from approximately 2000 individuals with HPE spectrum disorders were analysed for SHH variations. Clinical details were examined and combined with published cases. This study describes 396 individuals, representing 157 unrelated kindreds, with SHH mutations; 141 (36%) have not been previously reported. SHH mutations more commonly resulted in non-HPE (64%) than frank HPE (36%), and non-HPE was significantly more common in patients with SHH than in those with mutations in the other common HPE related genes (pC-terminus (including accounting for the relative size of the coding regions, p=0.00010), no specific genotype-phenotype correlations could be established regarding mutation location. SHH mutations overall result in milder disease than mutations in other common HPE related genes. HPE is more frequent in individuals with truncating mutations, but clinical predictions at the individual level remain elusive.

  1. Personalized medicine: from genotypes, molecular phenotypes and the quantified self, towards improved medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Joel T; Listgarten, Jennifer; Stegle, Oliver; Brenner, Steven E; Parts, Leopold

    2015-01-01

    Advances in molecular profiling and sensor technologies are expanding the scope of personalized medicine beyond genotypes, providing new opportunities for developing richer and more dynamic multi-scale models of individual health. Recent studies demonstrate the value of scoring high-dimensional microbiome, immune, and metabolic traits from individuals to inform personalized medicine. Efforts to integrate multiple dimensions of clinical and molecular data towards predictive multi-scale models of individual health and wellness are already underway. Improved methods for mining and discovery of clinical phenotypes from electronic medical records and technological developments in wearable sensor technologies present new opportunities for mapping and exploring the critical yet poorly characterized "phenome" and "envirome" dimensions of personalized medicine. There are ambitious new projects underway to collect multi-scale molecular, sensor, clinical, behavioral, and environmental data streams from large population cohorts longitudinally to enable more comprehensive and dynamic models of individual biology and personalized health. Personalized medicine stands to benefit from inclusion of rich new sources and dimensions of data. However, realizing these improvements in care relies upon novel informatics methodologies, tools, and systems to make full use of these data to advance both the science and translational applications of personalized medicine.

  2. Phenotype/genotype correlation in a case series of Stargardt's patients identifies novel mutations in the ABCA4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2013-11-01

    To investigate phenotypic variability in terms of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in patients with Stargardt disease (STGD) and confirmed ABCA4 mutations. Entire coding region analysis of the ABCA4 gene by direct sequencing of seven patients with clinical findings of STGD seen in the Retina Clinics of Southampton Eye Unit between 2002 and 2011.Phenotypic variables recorded were BCVA, fluorescein angiographic appearance, electrophysiology, and visual fields. All patients had heterozygous amino acid-changing variants (missense mutations) in the ABCA4 gene. A splice sequence change was found in a 30-year-old patient with severly affected vision. Two novel sequence changes were identified: a missense mutation in a mildly affected 44-year-old patient and a frameshift mutation in a severly affected 34-year-old patient. The identified ABCA4 mutations were compatible with the resulting phenotypes in terms of BCVA. Higher BCVAs were recorded in patients with missense mutations. Sequence changes, predicted to have more deleterious effect on protein function, resulted in a more severe phenotype. This case series of STGD patients demonstrates novel genotype/phenotype correlations, which may be useful to counselling of patients. This information may prove useful in selection of candidates for clinical trials in ABCA4 disease.

  3. Population FBA predicts metabolic phenotypes in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Labhsetwar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Using protein counts sampled from single cell proteomics distributions to constrain fluxes through a genome-scale model of metabolism, Population flux balance analysis (Population FBA successfully described metabolic heterogeneity in a population of independent Escherichia coli cells growing in a defined medium. We extend the methodology to account for correlations in protein expression arising from the co-regulation of genes and apply it to study the growth of independent Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in two different growth media. We find the partitioning of flux between fermentation and respiration predicted by our model agrees with recent 13C fluxomics experiments, and that our model largely recovers the Crabtree effect (the experimentally known bias among certain yeast species toward fermentation with the production of ethanol even in the presence of oxygen, while FBA without proteomics constraints predicts respirative metabolism almost exclusively. The comparisons to the 13C study showed improvement upon inclusion of the correlations and motivated a technique to systematically identify inconsistent kinetic parameters in the literature. The minor secretion fluxes for glycerol and acetate are underestimated by our method, which indicate a need for further refinements to the metabolic model. For yeast cells grown in synthetic defined (SD medium, the calculated broad distribution of growth rates matches experimental observations from single cell studies, and we characterize several metabolic phenotypes within our modeled populations that make use of diverse pathways. Fast growing yeast cells are predicted to perform significant amount of respiration, use serine-glycine cycle and produce ethanol in mitochondria as opposed to slow growing cells. We use a genetic algorithm to determine the proteomics constraints necessary to reproduce the growth rate distributions seen experimentally. We find that a core set of 51 constraints are essential but

  4. Using Dendritic Heat Maps to Simultaneously Display Genotype Divergence with Phenotype Divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellom, Matthew; Raymond, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The advancement of techniques to visualize and analyze large-scale sequencing datasets is an area of active research and is rooted in traditional techniques such as heat maps and dendrograms. We introduce dendritic heat maps that display heat map results over aligned DNA sequence clusters for a range of clustering cutoffs. Dendritic heat maps aid in visualizing the effects of group differences on clustering hierarchy and relative abundance of sampled sequences. Here, we artificially generate two separate datasets with simplified mutation and population growth procedures with GC content group separation to use as example phenotypes. In this work, we use the term phenotype to represent any feature by which groups can be separated. These sequences were clustered in a fractional identity range of 0.75 to 1.0 using agglomerative minimum-, maximum-, and average-linkage algorithms, as well as a divisive centroid-based algorithm. We demonstrate that dendritic heat maps give freedom to scrutinize specific clustering levels across a range of cutoffs, track changes in phenotype inequity across multiple levels of sequence clustering specificity, and easily visualize how deeply rooted changes in phenotype inequity are in a dataset. As genotypes diverge in sample populations, clusters are shown to break apart into smaller clusters at higher identity cutoff levels, similar to a dendrogram. Phenotype divergence, which is shown as a heat map of relative abundance bin response, may or may not follow genotype divergences. This joined view highlights the relationship between genotype and phenotype divergence for treatment groups. We discuss the minimum-, maximum-, average-, and centroid-linkage algorithm approaches to building dendritic heat maps and make a case for the divisive "top-down" centroid-based clustering methodology as being the best option visualize the effects of changing factors on clustering hierarchy and relative abundance.

  5. Using Dendritic Heat Maps to Simultaneously Display Genotype Divergence with Phenotype Divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Kellom

    Full Text Available The advancement of techniques to visualize and analyze large-scale sequencing datasets is an area of active research and is rooted in traditional techniques such as heat maps and dendrograms. We introduce dendritic heat maps that display heat map results over aligned DNA sequence clusters for a range of clustering cutoffs. Dendritic heat maps aid in visualizing the effects of group differences on clustering hierarchy and relative abundance of sampled sequences. Here, we artificially generate two separate datasets with simplified mutation and population growth procedures with GC content group separation to use as example phenotypes. In this work, we use the term phenotype to represent any feature by which groups can be separated. These sequences were clustered in a fractional identity range of 0.75 to 1.0 using agglomerative minimum-, maximum-, and average-linkage algorithms, as well as a divisive centroid-based algorithm. We demonstrate that dendritic heat maps give freedom to scrutinize specific clustering levels across a range of cutoffs, track changes in phenotype inequity across multiple levels of sequence clustering specificity, and easily visualize how deeply rooted changes in phenotype inequity are in a dataset. As genotypes diverge in sample populations, clusters are shown to break apart into smaller clusters at higher identity cutoff levels, similar to a dendrogram. Phenotype divergence, which is shown as a heat map of relative abundance bin response, may or may not follow genotype divergences. This joined view highlights the relationship between genotype and phenotype divergence for treatment groups. We discuss the minimum-, maximum-, average-, and centroid-linkage algorithm approaches to building dendritic heat maps and make a case for the divisive "top-down" centroid-based clustering methodology as being the best option visualize the effects of changing factors on clustering hierarchy and relative abundance.

  6. Exploring links between genotypes, phenotypes, and clinical predictors of response to early intensive behavioural intervention in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valsamma eEapen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD is amongst the most familial of psychiatric disorders. Twin and family studies have demonstrated a monozygotic concordance rate of 70–90%, dizygotic concordance of around 10% and more than a 20-fold increase in risk for first-degree relatives. Despite major advances in the genetics of autism, the relationship between different aspects of the behavioural and cognitive phenotype and their underlying genetic liability is still unclear. This is complicated by the heterogeneity of autism, which exists at both genetic and phenotypic levels. Given this heterogeneity, one method to find homogeneous entities and link these with specific genotypes would be to pursue endophenotypes. Evidence from neuroimaging, eye tracking and electrophysiology studies supports the hypothesis that, building on genetic vulnerability, ASD emerges from a developmental cascade in which a deficit in attention to social stimuli leads to impaired interactions with primary caregivers. This results in abnormal development of the neurocircuitry responsible for social cognition, which in turn adversely affects later behavioural and functional domains dependent on these early processes, such as language development. Such a model begets a heterogeneous clinical phenotype, and is also supported by studies demonstrating better clinical outcomes with earlier treatment. Treatment response following intensive early behavioural intervention in ASD is also distinctly variable; however, relatively little is known about specific elements of the clinical phenotype that may predict response to current behavioural treatments. This paper overviews the literature regarding genotypes, phenotypes and predictors of response to behavioural intervention in ASD and presents suggestions for future research to explore linkages between these that would enable better identification of, and increased treatment efficacy for, ASD.

  7. Phenotype and genotype in 103 patients with tricho-rhino-phalangeal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maas, Saskia M; Shaw, Adam C; Bikker, Hennie

    2015-01-01

    it remained uncertain whether TRPS1 was partially or completely deleted. Main features defining the facial phenotype include fine and sparse hair, thick and broad eyebrows, especially the medial portion, a broad nasal ridge and tip, underdeveloped nasal alae, and a broad columella. The facial manifestations......, but haploinsufficiency of RAD21 is also likely to contribute. Genotype-phenotype studies showed that mutations located in exon 6 may have somewhat more pronounced facial characteristics and more marked shortening of hands and feet compared to mutations located elsewhere in TRPS1, but numbers are too small to allow firm...

  8. Genotype-phenotype associations in obesity dependent on definition of the obesity phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kring, Sofia Inez Iqbal; Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup; Holst, Claus

    2008-01-01

    In previous studies of associations of variants in the genes UCP2, UCP3, PPARG2, CART, GRL, MC4R, MKKS, SHP, GHRL, and MCHR1 with obesity, we have used a case-control approach with cases defined by a threshold for BMI. In the present study, we assess the association of seven abdominal, peripheral......, and overall obesity phenotypes, which were analyzed quantitatively, and thirteen candidate gene polymorphisms in these ten genes in the same cohort....

  9. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium clinical isolates from two hospitals in Mexico: First detection of VanB phenotype-vanA genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocanegra-Ibarias, Paola; Flores-Treviño, Samantha; Camacho-Ortiz, Adrián; Morfin-Otero, Rayo; Villarreal-Treviño, Licet; Llaca-Díaz, Jorge; Martínez-Landeros, Erik Alan; Rodríguez-Noriega, Eduardo; Calzada-Güereca, Andrés; Maldonado-Garza, Héctor Jesús; Garza-González, Elvira

    2016-01-01

    Enterococcus faecium has emerged as a multidrug-resistant nosocomial pathogen involved in outbreaks worldwide. Our aim was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility, biofilm production, and clonal relatedness of vancomycin-resistant E. faecium (VREF) clinical isolates from two hospitals in Mexico. Consecutive clinical isolates (n=56) were collected in two tertiary care hospitals in Mexico from 2011 to 2014. VREF isolates were characterized by phenotypic and molecular methods including pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). VREF isolates were highly resistant to vancomycin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, high-level streptomycin, and teicoplanin, and showed lower resistance to tetracycline, nitrofurantoin and quinupristin-dalfopristin. None of the isolates were resistant to linezolid. The vanA gene was detected in all isolates. Two VanB phenotype-vanA genotype isolates, highly resistant to vancomycin and susceptible to teicoplanin, were detected. Furthermore, 17.9% of the isolates were classified as biofilm producers, and the espfm gene was found in 98.2% of the isolates. A total of 37 distinct PFGE patterns and 6 clones (25% of the isolates as clone A, 5.4% as clone B, and 3.6% each as clone C, D, E, and F) were detected. Clone A was detected in 5 different wards of the same hospital during 14 months of surveillance. The high resistance to most antimicrobial agents and the moderate cross-transmission of VREF detected accentuates the need for continuous surveillance of E. faecium in the hospital setting. This is also the first reported incidence of the E. faecium VanB phenotype-vanA genotype in the Americas. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  10. Cortical sensorimotor alterations classify clinical phenotype and putative genotype of spasmodic dysphonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, Giovanni; Fuertinger, Stefan; Fleysher, Lazar; Ozelius, Laurie J.; Simonyan, Kristina

    2017-01-01

    Background Spasmodic dysphonia (SD), or laryngeal dystonia, is a task-specific isolated focal dystonia of unknown causes and pathophysiology. Although functional and structural abnormalities have been described in this disorder, the influence of its different clinical phenotypes and genotypes remains scant, making it difficult to explain SD pathophysiology and to identify potential biomarkers. Methods We used a combination of independent component analysis and linear discriminant analysis of resting-state functional MRI data to investigate brain organization in different SD phenotypes (abductor vs. adductor type) and putative genotypes (familial vs. sporadic cases) and to characterize neural markers for genotype/phenotype categorization. Results We found abnormal functional connectivity within sensorimotor and frontoparietal networks in SD patients compared to healthy individuals as well as phenotype- and genotype-distinct alterations of these networks, involving primary somatosensory, premotor and parietal cortices. The linear discriminant analysis achieved 71% accuracy classifying SD and healthy individuals using connectivity measures in the left inferior parietal and sensorimotor cortex. When categorizing between different forms of SD, the combination of measures from left inferior parietal, premotor and right sensorimotor cortices achieved 81% discriminatory power between familial and sporadic SD cases, whereas the combination of measures from the right superior parietal, primary somatosensory and premotor cortices led to 71% accuracy in the classification of adductor and abductor SD forms. Conclusions Our findings present the first effort to identify and categorize isolated focal dystonia based on its brain functional connectivity profile, which may have a potential impact on the future development of biomarkers for this rare disorder. PMID:27346568

  11. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated From Dairy and Meat Products

    OpenAIRE

    Bahador; Sadeghi Kalani; Valian; Irajian; Lotfollahi

    2015-01-01

    Background Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen and a serious threat to the public health in the world. Consumption of traditional foods such as dairy and meat products can be a major reason for relative abundance and isolation of these bacteria. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from dairy and meat products. ...

  12. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity in populations of plant-probiotic Pseudomonas spp. colonizing roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Christine; Bosco, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Several soil microorganisms colonizing roots are known to naturally promote the health of plants by controlling a range of plant pathogens, including bacteria, fungi, and nematodes. The use of theses antagonistic microorganisms, recently named plant-probiotics, to control plant-pathogenic fungi is receiving increasing attention, as they may represent a sustainable alternative to chemical pesticides. Many years of research on plant-probiotic microorganisms (PPM) have indicated that fluorescent pseudomonads producing antimicrobial compounds are largely involved in the suppression of the most widespread soilborne pathogens. Phenotype and genotype analysis of plant-probiotic fluorescent pseudomonads (PFP) have shown considerable genetic variation among these types of strains. Such variability plays an important role in the rhizosphere competence and the biocontrol ability of PFP strains. Understanding the mechanisms by which genotypic and phenotypic diversity occurs in natural populations of PFP could be exploited to choose those agricultural practices which best exploit the indigenous PFP populations, or to isolate new plant-probiotic strains for using them as inoculants. A number of different methods have been used to study diversity within PFP populations. Because different resolutions of the existing microbial diversity can be revealed depending on the approach used, this review first describes the most important methods used for the assessment of fluorescent Pseudomonas diversity. Then, we focus on recent data relating how differences in genotypic and phenotypic diversity within PFP communities can be attributed to geographic location, climate, soil type, soil management regime, and interactions with other soil microorganisms and host plants. It becomes evident that plant-related parameters exert the strongest influence on the genotypic and phenotypic variations in PFP populations.

  13. Cortical sensorimotor alterations classify clinical phenotype and putative genotype of spasmodic dysphonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistella, G; Fuertinger, S; Fleysher, L; Ozelius, L J; Simonyan, K

    2016-10-01

    Spasmodic dysphonia (SD), or laryngeal dystonia, is a task-specific isolated focal dystonia of unknown causes and pathophysiology. Although functional and structural abnormalities have been described in this disorder, the influence of its different clinical phenotypes and genotypes remains scant, making it difficult to explain SD pathophysiology and to identify potential biomarkers. We used a combination of independent component analysis and linear discriminant analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data to investigate brain organization in different SD phenotypes (abductor versus adductor type) and putative genotypes (familial versus sporadic cases) and to characterize neural markers for genotype/phenotype categorization. We found abnormal functional connectivity within sensorimotor and frontoparietal networks in patients with SD compared with healthy individuals as well as phenotype- and genotype-distinct alterations of these networks, involving primary somatosensory, premotor and parietal cortices. The linear discriminant analysis achieved 71% accuracy classifying SD and healthy individuals using connectivity measures in the left inferior parietal and sensorimotor cortices. When categorizing between different forms of SD, the combination of measures from the left inferior parietal, premotor and right sensorimotor cortices achieved 81% discriminatory power between familial and sporadic SD cases, whereas the combination of measures from the right superior parietal, primary somatosensory and premotor cortices led to 71% accuracy in the classification of adductor and abductor SD forms. Our findings present the first effort to identify and categorize isolated focal dystonia based on its brain functional connectivity profile, which may have a potential impact on the future development of biomarkers for this rare disorder. © 2016 EAN.

  14. Phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity of Lynch syndrome: a complex diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Henry T; Lanspa, Stephen; Shaw, Trudy; Casey, Murray Joseph; Rendell, Marc; Stacey, Mark; Townley, Theresa; Snyder, Carrie; Hitchins, Megan; Bailey-Wilson, Joan

    2018-07-01

    Lynch syndrome is the hereditary disorder that most frequently predisposes to colorectal cancer as well as predisposing to a number of extracolonic cancers, most prominently endometrial cancer. It is caused by germline mutations in the mismatch repair genes. Both its phenotype and genotype show marked heterogeneity. This review gives a historical overview of the syndrome, its heterogeneity, its genomic landscape, and its implications for complex diagnosis, genetic counseling and putative implications for immunotherapy.

  15. Evaluation of rice genotypes under salt stress at the seedling and reproductive stages using phenotypic and molecular markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubel, M.H.; Hassan, L.

    2014-01-01

    Salinity screening for 27 rice genotypes was performed at the seedling and reproductive stages respectively, in the hydroponic system and in sustained water bath. Three selected SSR markers were used to determine salinity tolerance in rice genotypes. Phenotyping of the germplasm was done at EC 12dS/m and 6dS/m at seedling and reproductive stages, respectively. Based on modified standard evaluation score for visual salt injury at seedling stage, eight genotypes were salt tolerant, four were moderately tolerant and the rest fifteen were susceptible. At the reproductive stage, six genotypes were tolerant to EC 6dS/m whereas eleven of them were susceptible. SSR based marker identified seven genotypes as tolerant but ten of them were susceptible for all three markers compared to two checks. Six genotypes were tolerant in both phenotypic and SSR screening. The indentified salt tolerant genotypes can be potential germplasm sources for future breeding program. (author)

  16. An XML-based interchange format for genotype-phenotype data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whirl-Carrillo, M; Woon, M; Thorn, C F; Klein, T E; Altman, R B

    2008-02-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput genotyping and phenotyping have accelerated the creation of pharmacogenomic data. Consequently, the community requires standard formats to exchange large amounts of diverse information. To facilitate the transfer of pharmacogenomics data between databases and analysis packages, we have created a standard XML (eXtensible Markup Language) schema that describes both genotype and phenotype data as well as associated metadata. The schema accommodates information regarding genes, drugs, diseases, experimental methods, genomic/RNA/protein sequences, subjects, subject groups, and literature. The Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Base (PharmGKB; www.pharmgkb.org) has used this XML schema for more than 5 years to accept and process submissions containing more than 1,814,139 SNPs on 20,797 subjects using 8,975 assays. Although developed in the context of pharmacogenomics, the schema is of general utility for exchange of genotype and phenotype data. We have written syntactic and semantic validators to check documents using this format. The schema and code for validation is available to the community at http://www.pharmgkb.org/schema/index.html (last accessed: 8 October 2007). (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Ambient temperature and genotype differentially affect developmental and phenotypic plasticity in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibañez, Carla; Poeschl, Yvonne; Peterson, Tom; Bellstädt, Julia; Denk, Kathrin; Gogol-Döring, Andreas; Quint, Marcel; Delker, Carolin

    2017-07-06

    Global increase in ambient temperatures constitute a significant challenge to wild and cultivated plant species. Forward genetic analyses of individual temperature-responsive traits have resulted in the identification of several signaling and response components. However, a comprehensive knowledge about temperature sensitivity of different developmental stages and the contribution of natural variation is still scarce and fragmented at best. Here, we systematically analyze thermomorphogenesis throughout a complete life cycle in ten natural Arabidopsis thaliana accessions grown under long day conditions in four different temperatures ranging from 16 to 28 °C. We used Q 10 , GxE, phenotypic divergence and correlation analyses to assess temperature sensitivity and genotype effects of more than 30 morphometric and developmental traits representing five phenotype classes. We found that genotype and temperature differentially affected plant growth and development with variing strengths. Furthermore, overall correlations among phenotypic temperature responses was relatively low which seems to be caused by differential capacities for temperature adaptations of individual accessions. Genotype-specific temperature responses may be attractive targets for future forward genetic approaches and accession-specific thermomorphogenesis maps may aid the assessment of functional relevance of known and novel regulatory components.

  18. A Multidisciplinary Phenotyping and Genotyping Analysis of a Mapping Population Enables Quality to Be Combined with Yield in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariafe Calingacion

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study a mapping population (F8 of ca 200 progeny from a cross between the commercial rice varieties Apo and IR64 has been both genotyped and phenotyped. A genotyping-by-sequencing approach was first used to identify 2,681 polymorphic SNP markers which gave dense coverage of the genome with a good distribution across all 12 chromosomes. The coefficient of parentage was also low, at 0.13, confirming that the parents are genetically distant from each other. The progeny, together with both parents, were grown under irrigated and water restricted conditions in a randomised block design. All grain was harvested to determine variation in yield across the population. The grains were then polished following standard procedures prior to performing the phenotyping analyses. A Gas Chromatography—Mass Spectrometry approach was used to determine the volatile biochemical profiles of each line and after data curation and processing, discriminatory metabolites were putatively identified based on in-house and commercial spectral libraries. These data were used to predict the potential role of these metabolites in determining differences in aroma between genotypes. A number of QTLs for yield and for individual metabolites have been identified. Following these combined multi-disciplinary analyses, it proved possible to identify a number of lines which appeared to combine the favourable aroma attributes of IR64 with the favourable (higher yield potential of Apo. As such, these lines are excellent candidates to assess further as potential genotypes to work up into a new variety of rice which has both good yield and good quality, thus meeting the needs of both farmer and consumer alike.

  19. New insights into genotype-phenotype correlation for GLI3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Démurger, Florence; Ichkou, Amale; Mougou-Zerelli, Soumaya; Le Merrer, Martine; Goudefroye, Géraldine; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Quélin, Chloé; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Baujat, Geneviève; Fradin, Mélanie; Pasquier, Laurent; Megarbané, André; Faivre, Laurence; Baumann, Clarisse; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Roume, Joëlle; Isidor, Bertrand; Lacombe, Didier; Delrue, Marie-Ange; Mercier, Sandra; Philip, Nicole; Schaefer, Elise; Holder, Muriel; Krause, Amanda; Laffargue, Fanny; Sinico, Martine; Amram, Daniel; André, Gwenaelle; Liquier, Alain; Rossi, Massimiliano; Amiel, Jeanne; Giuliano, Fabienne; Boute, Odile; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Afenjar, Alexandra; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Lackmy-Port-Lis, Marylin; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Chauvet, Marie-Liesse; Cormier-Daire, Valérie; Devisme, Louise; Geneviève, David; Munnich, Arnold; Viot, Géraldine; Raoul, Odile; Romana, Serge; Gonzales, Marie; Encha-Razavi, Ferechte; Odent, Sylvie; Vekemans, Michel; Attie-Bitach, Tania

    2015-01-01

    The phenotypic spectrum of GLI3 mutations includes autosomal dominant Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS). PHS was first described as a lethal condition associating hypothalamic hamartoma, postaxial or central polydactyly, anal atresia and bifid epiglottis. Typical GCPS combines polysyndactyly of hands and feet and craniofacial features. Genotype-phenotype correlations have been found both for the location and the nature of GLI3 mutations, highlighting the bifunctional nature of GLI3 during development. Here we report on the molecular and clinical study of 76 cases from 55 families with either a GLI3 mutation (49 GCPS and 21 PHS), or a large deletion encompassing the GLI3 gene (6 GCPS cases). Most of mutations are novel and consistent with the previously reported genotype-phenotype correlation. Our results also show a correlation between the location of the mutation and abnormal corpus callosum observed in some patients with GCPS. Fetal PHS observations emphasize on the possible lethality of GLI3 mutations and extend the phenotypic spectrum of malformations such as agnathia and reductional limbs defects. GLI3 expression studied by in situ hybridization during human development confirms its early expression in target tissues.

  20. Dental management of amelogenesis imperfecta patients: a primer on genotype-phenotype correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, F K; Messer, L B

    2009-01-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) represents a group of hereditary conditions which affects enamel formation in the primary and permanent dentitions. Mutations in genes critical for amelogenesis result in diverse phenotypes characterized by variably thin and/or defective enamel. To date, mutations in 5 genes are known to cause AI in humans. Understanding the molecular etiologies and associated inheritance patterns can assist in the early diagnosis of this condition. Recognition of genotype-phenotype correlations will allow clinicians to guide genetic testing and select appropriate management strategies for patients who express different phenotypes. The purpose of this paper was to provide a narrative review of the current literature on amelogenesis imperfecta, particularly regarding recent advances in the identification of candidate genes and the patterns of inheritance.

  1. Adaptability and phenotypic stability of common bean genotypes through Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, A M; Teodoro, P E; Gonçalves, M C; Barroso, L M A; Nascimento, M; Santos, A; Torres, F E

    2016-04-27

    This study used Bayesian inference to investigate the genotype x environment interaction in common bean grown in Mato Grosso do Sul State, and it also evaluated the efficiency of using informative and minimally informative a priori distributions. Six trials were conducted in randomized blocks, and the grain yield of 13 common bean genotypes was assessed. To represent the minimally informative a priori distributions, a probability distribution with high variance was used, and a meta-analysis concept was adopted to represent the informative a priori distributions. Bayes factors were used to conduct comparisons between the a priori distributions. The Bayesian inference was effective for the selection of upright common bean genotypes with high adaptability and phenotypic stability using the Eberhart and Russell method. Bayes factors indicated that the use of informative a priori distributions provided more accurate results than minimally informative a priori distributions. According to Bayesian inference, the EMGOPA-201, BAMBUÍ, CNF 4999, CNF 4129 A 54, and CNFv 8025 genotypes had specific adaptability to favorable environments, while the IAPAR 14 and IAC CARIOCA ETE genotypes had specific adaptability to unfavorable environments.

  2. Investigating genotype-phenotype relationships in Rett syndrome using an international data set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebbington, A; Anderson, A; Ravine, D; Fyfe, S; Pineda, M; de Klerk, N; Ben-Zeev, B; Yatawara, N; Percy, A; Kaufmann, W E; Leonard, H

    2008-03-11

    Rett syndrome is an uncommon neurodevelopmental disorder with an incidence of 1:9,000 live female births. The principal genetic cause was first reported in 1999 when the association with mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (or MECP2) gene was identified. This study uses data from a large international database, InterRett, to examine genotype-phenotype relationships and compares these with previous findings in a population-based cohort. The data set for these analyses was derived from a subset of InterRett cases with subject information collected from the family, the clinician, or both. Individual phenotypic characteristics and clinical severity using three scales were compared among those with eight known recurrent pathogenic MECP2 mutations as well as those with C-terminal deletions (n = 272). Overall, p.R270X and p.R255X were the most severe and p.R133C and p.R294X were the mildest mutations. Significant differences by mutation were seen for individual phenotypic characteristics such as hand use, ambulation, and language. This multicenter investigation into the phenotypic correlates of MECP2 mutations in Rett syndrome has provided a greater depth of understanding than hitherto available about the specific phenotypic characteristics associated with commonly occurring mutations. Although the modifying influence of X inactivation on clinical severity could not be included in the analysis, the findings confirm clear genotype-phenotype relationships in Rett syndrome and show the benefits of collaboration crucial to effective research in rare disorders.

  3. Same MSH2 Gene Mutation But Variable Phenotypes in 2 Families With Lynch Syndrome: Two Case Reports and Review of Genotype-Phenotype Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liccardo, Raffaella; De Rosa, Marina; Duraturo, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome that can be subdivided into Lynch syndrome I, or site-specific colonic cancer, and Lynch syndrome II, or extracolonic cancers, particularly carcinomas of the stomach, endometrium, biliary and pancreatic systems, and urinary tract. Lynch syndrome is associated with point mutations and large rearrangements in DNA MisMatch Repair ( MMR ) genes. This syndrome shows a variable phenotypic expression in people who carry pathogenetic mutations. So far, a correlation in genotype-phenotype has not been definitely established. In this study, we describe 2 Lynch syndrome cases presenting with the same genotype but different phenotypes and discuss possible reasons for this.

  4. A prospective study to assess the association between genotype, phenotype and Prakriti in individuals on phenytoin monotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saket J. Thaker

    2017-01-01

    Conclusions: We did not find any association between Prakriti and either phenotype or genotypes suggesting that Prakriti assessment would be of limited utility in individualizing phenytoin therapy in epilepsy patients.

  5. Phenotype determination guides swift genotyping of a DFNA2/KCNQ4 family with a hot spot mutation (W276S).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topsakal, V.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Brinke, H. te; Hamel, B.C.J.; Huygen, P.L.M.; Kremer, J.M.J.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Genotype a family trait with autosomal dominant nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing impairment guided only by the phenotype. STUDY DESIGN: Family study. SETTING: Tertiary referral center. PATIENTS: Fifteen family members. METHODS: In the first phase, sequence analysis was performed on DNA

  6. Mutation frequency and genotype/phenotype correlation among phenylketonuria patients from Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, S.L.C.; Martinez, D.; Kuozmine, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). To determine the molecular basis of PKU in the state of Georgia, thirty-five Georgian PKU patients representing sixty independent alleles were examined by a combination of DGGE and direct sequence analysis. At present, this approach has led to the identification of 55/60 or about 92% of all mutant alleles. The relatively high frequencies of mutations common to the British Isles (R408W, I65T and L348V) are compatible with 1990 census data showing that 34% of the general Georgian population claim Irish, English or Scottish ancestors. Three new mutations, E76A (1/60), R241L (2/60), and R400R (2/60), were also detected in this study. Although the nucleotide substitution in codon 400 (AGG{r_arrow}CGG) did not change the amino acid sequence, it was the only base change detected in a scan of all 13 exons of two independent alleles. Since codon 400 is split between exons 11 and 12, this change may exert some effect on splicing, as has previously been seen in the PAH gene for the silent mutation Q304Q and the nonsense mutation Y356X, each of which effect codons immediately adjacent to splicing signals. This hypothesis remains to be tested by expression analysis or studies of ectopic transcripts. The remaining 19 characterized alleles contained one of 15 previously identified mutations. Twenty-five of the thirty non-related patients examined in this study were completely genotyped, and there was a strong correlation between mutant PAH genotype, PAH activity predicted from in vitro expression studies where known, and PKU or HPA phenotype. For mutations not yet studied by expression analysis, this correlation suggests that L213P, R241L, Y277D may drastically reduce residual PAH activity while F39L and E76A may retain significant amounts of PAH activity.

  7. A probabilistic model to predict clinical phenotypic traits from genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Ching; Douville, Christopher; Wang, Cheng; Niknafs, Noushin; Yeo, Grace; Beleva-Guthrie, Violeta; Carter, Hannah; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Li, Biao; Mooney, Sean; Karchin, Rachel

    2014-09-01

    Genetic screening is becoming possible on an unprecedented scale. However, its utility remains controversial. Although most variant genotypes cannot be easily interpreted, many individuals nevertheless attempt to interpret their genetic information. Initiatives such as the Personal Genome Project (PGP) and Illumina's Understand Your Genome are sequencing thousands of adults, collecting phenotypic information and developing computational pipelines to identify the most important variant genotypes harbored by each individual. These pipelines consider database and allele frequency annotations and bioinformatics classifications. We propose that the next step will be to integrate these different sources of information to estimate the probability that a given individual has specific phenotypes of clinical interest. To this end, we have designed a Bayesian probabilistic model to predict the probability of dichotomous phenotypes. When applied to a cohort from PGP, predictions of Gilbert syndrome, Graves' disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and various blood groups were accurate, as individuals manifesting the phenotype in question exhibited the highest, or among the highest, predicted probabilities. Thirty-eight PGP phenotypes (26%) were predicted with area-under-the-ROC curve (AUC)>0.7, and 23 (15.8%) of these were statistically significant, based on permutation tests. Moreover, in a Critical Assessment of Genome Interpretation (CAGI) blinded prediction experiment, the models were used to match 77 PGP genomes to phenotypic profiles, generating the most accurate prediction of 16 submissions, according to an independent assessor. Although the models are currently insufficiently accurate for diagnostic utility, we expect their performance to improve with growth of publicly available genomics data and model refinement by domain experts.

  8. Genotypic Diversity Is Associated with Clinical Outcome and Phenotype in Cryptococcal Meningitis across Southern Africa.

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    Mathew A Beale

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is a major cause of mortality throughout the developing world, yet little is known about the genetic markers underlying Cryptococcal virulence and patient outcome. We studied a cohort of 230 Cryptococcus neoformans (Cn isolates from HIV-positive South African clinical trial patients with detailed clinical follow-up using multi-locus sequence typing and in vitro phenotypic virulence assays, correlating these data with clinical and fungal markers of disease in the patient. South African Cn displayed high levels of genetic diversity and locus variability compared to globally distributed types, and we identified 50 sequence types grouped within the main molecular types VNI, VNII and VNB, with 72% of isolates typed into one of seven 'high frequency' sequence types. Spatial analysis of patients' cryptococcal genotype was not shown to be clustered geographically, which might argue against recent local acquisition and in favour of reactivation of latent infection. Through comparison of MLST genotyping data with clinical parameters, we found a relationship between genetic lineage and clinical outcome, with patients infected with the VNB lineage having significantly worse survival (n=8, HR 3.35, CI 1.51-7.20, p=0.003, and this was maintained even after adjustment for known prognostic indicators and treatment regimen. Comparison of fungal genotype with in vitro phenotype (phagocytosis, laccase activity and CSF survival performed on a subset of 89 isolates revealed evidence of lineage-associated virulence phenotype, with the VNII lineage displaying increased laccase activity (p=0.001 and ex vivo CSF survival (p=0.0001. These findings show that Cryptococcus neoformans is a phenotypically heterogeneous pathogen, and that lineage plays an important role in cryptococcal virulence during human infection. Furthermore, a detailed understanding of the genetic diversity in Southern Africa will support further investigation into how genetic

  9. Correlation of Lactobacillus rhamnosus Genotypes and Carbohydrate Utilization Signatures Determined by Phenotype Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceapa, Corina; Lambert, Jolanda; van Limpt, Kees; Wels, Michiel; Smokvina, Tamara; Knol, Jan; Kleerebezem, Michiel

    2015-08-15

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus is a bacterial species commonly colonizing the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humans and also frequently used in food products. While some strains have been studied extensively, physiological variability among isolates of the species found in healthy humans or their diet is largely unexplored. The aim of this study was to characterize the diversity of carbohydrate utilization capabilities of human isolates and food-derived strains of L. rhamnosus in relation to their niche of isolation and genotype. We investigated the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of 25 out of 65 L. rhamnosus strains from various niches, mainly human feces and fermented dairy products. Genetic fingerprinting of the strains by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) identified 11 distinct subgroups at 70% similarity and suggested niche enrichment within particular genetic clades. High-resolution carbohydrate utilization profiling (OmniLog) identified 14 carbon sources that could be used by all of the strains tested for growth, while the utilization of 58 carbon sources differed significantly between strains, enabling the stratification of L. rhamnosus strains into three metabolic clusters that partially correlate with the genotypic clades but appear uncorrelated with the strain's origin of isolation. Draft genome sequences of 8 strains were generated and employed in a gene-trait matching (GTM) analysis together with the publicly available genomes of L. rhamnosus GG (ATCC 53103) and HN001 for several carbohydrates that were distinct for the different metabolic clusters: l-rhamnose, cellobiose, l-sorbose, and α-methyl-d-glucoside. From the analysis, candidate genes were identified that correlate with l-sorbose and α-methyl-d-glucoside utilization, and the proposed function of these genes could be confirmed by heterologous expression in a strain lacking the genes. This study expands our insight into the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of the species L. rhamnosus

  10. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of four factor VII deficiency patients from central China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Hua-Fang; Cheng, Zhi-peng; Wang, Qing-yun; Hu, Bei; Zeng, Wei; Wu, Ying-ying; Guo, Tao; Tang, Liang; Hu, Yu

    2015-06-01

    Hereditary coagulation factor VII deficiency (FVIID) is a rare autosomal, recessive inherited hemorrhagic disorder related to a variety of mutations or polymorphisms throughout the factor VII (FVII) gene (F7). The aims of this study were to characterize the molecular defect of the F7 gene in four unrelated patients with FVIID and to find the genotype-phenotype correlation. All nine exons, exon-intron boundaries, and 5' and 3'-untranslated regions of the F7 gene were amplified by PCR and the purified PCR products were sequenced directly. Suspected mutations were confirmed by another PCR and sequencing of the opposite strand. Family studies were also performed. A total of five unique lesions were identified, including three missense mutations (c.384A>G, c.839A>C, c.1163T>G, predicting p.Tyr128Cys, p.Glu280Ala and p.Phe388Cys substitution, respectively) and two splice junction mutations (c.572-1G>A, c.681+1G>T), among which two (p.Glu280Ala, p.Phe388Cys) were novel. A previously reported mutation p.Tyr128Cys was seen in the homozygous state in two unrelated patients. The other two cases were both compound heterozygotes of a missense mutation and a splicing site mutation. Multiple sequence alignment using DNAMAN analysis showed that all the missense mutations were found in residues that highly conserved across species and vitamin K-dependent serine proteases. Online software Polyphen and SIFT were used to confirm the pathogenic of the missense mutation. p.Tyr128Cys seems to be a hotspot of the F7 gene in ethnic Han Chinese population.

  11. Phenotype prediction using regularized regression on genetic data in the DREAM5 Systems Genetics B Challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Ru Loh

    Full Text Available A major goal of large-scale genomics projects is to enable the use of data from high-throughput experimental methods to predict complex phenotypes such as disease susceptibility. The DREAM5 Systems Genetics B Challenge solicited algorithms to predict soybean plant resistance to the pathogen Phytophthora sojae from training sets including phenotype, genotype, and gene expression data. The challenge test set was divided into three subcategories, one requiring prediction based on only genotype data, another on only gene expression data, and the third on both genotype and gene expression data. Here we present our approach, primarily using regularized regression, which received the best-performer award for subchallenge B2 (gene expression only. We found that despite the availability of 941 genotype markers and 28,395 gene expression features, optimal models determined by cross-validation experiments typically used fewer than ten predictors, underscoring the importance of strong regularization in noisy datasets with far more features than samples. We also present substantial analysis of the training and test setup of the challenge, identifying high variance in performance on the gold standard test sets.

  12. Relation between genotype, phenotype and therapeutic drug concentrations of nortriptyline or venlafaxine users in old age psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berm, E.J.J.; Kok, R.M.; Hak, E.; Wilffert, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background The relationship between phenotype and genotype of the polymorphic cytochrome P450 2D6 enzyme (CYP2D6) has been intensively studied, however few studies are conducted among older persons. In a study among 900 relatively young venlafaxine users (mean age 45 years), 83% were genotyped as an

  13. Phenotype and genotype in 52 patients with Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome caused by EP300 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fergelot, Patricia; Van Belzen, Martine; Van Gils, Julien; Afenjar, Alexandra; Armour, Christine M; Arveiler, Benoit; Beets, Lex; Burglen, Lydie; Busa, Tiffany; Collet, Marie; Deforges, Julie; de Vries, Bert B A; Dominguez Garrido, Elena; Dorison, Nathalie; Dupont, Juliette; Francannet, Christine; Garciá-Minaúr, Sixto; Gabau Vila, Elisabeth; Gebre-Medhin, Samuel; Gener Querol, Blanca; Geneviève, David; Gérard, Marion; Gervasini, Cristina Giovanna; Goldenberg, Alice; Josifova, Dragana; Lachlan, Katherine; Maas, Saskia; Maranda, Bruno; Moilanen, Jukka S; Nordgren, Ann; Parent, Philippe; Rankin, Julia; Reardon, Willie; Rio, Marlène; Roume, Joëlle; Shaw, Adam; Smigiel, Robert; Sojo, Amaia; Solomon, Benjamin; Stembalska, Agnieszka; Stumpel, Constance; Suarez, Francisco; Terhal, Paulien; Thomas, Simon; Touraine, Renaud; Verloes, Alain; Vincent-Delorme, Catherine; Wincent, Josephine; Peters, Dorien J M; Bartsch, Oliver; Larizza, Lidia; Lacombe, Didier; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2016-12-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS) is a developmental disorder characterized by a typical face and distal limbs abnormalities, intellectual disability, and a vast number of other features. Two genes are known to cause RSTS, CREBBP in 60% and EP300 in 8-10% of clinically diagnosed cases. Both paralogs act in chromatin remodeling and encode for transcriptional co-activators interacting with >400 proteins. Up to now 26 individuals with an EP300 mutation have been published. Here, we describe the phenotype and genotype of 42 unpublished RSTS patients carrying EP300 mutations and intragenic deletions and offer an update on another 10 patients. We compare the data to 308 individuals with CREBBP mutations. We demonstrate that EP300 mutations cause a phenotype that typically resembles the classical RSTS phenotype due to CREBBP mutations to a great extent, although most facial signs are less marked with the exception of a low-hanging columella. The limb anomalies are more similar to those in CREBBP mutated individuals except for angulation of thumbs and halluces which is very uncommon in EP300 mutated individuals. The intellectual disability is variable but typically less marked whereas the microcephaly is more common. All types of mutations occur but truncating mutations and small rearrangements are most common (86%). Missense mutations in the HAT domain are associated with a classical RSTS phenotype but otherwise no genotype-phenotype correlation is detected. Pre-eclampsia occurs in 12/52 mothers of EP300 mutated individuals versus in 2/59 mothers of CREBBP mutated individuals, making pregnancy with an EP300 mutated fetus the strongest known predictor for pre-eclampsia. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Genotypic and Phenotypic Diversity of Cryptococcus gattii VGII Clinical Isolates and Its Impact on Virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa A. Barcellos

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Cryptococcus gattii species complex harbors the main etiological agents of cryptococcosis in immunocompetent patients. C. gattii molecular type VGII predominates in the north and northeastern regions of Brazil, leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. C. gattii VGII isolates have a strong clinical relevance and phenotypic variations. These phenotypic variations among C. gattii species complex isolates suggest that some strains are more virulent than others, but little information is available related to the pathogenic properties of those strains. In this study, we analyzed some virulence determinants of C. gattii VGII strains (CG01, CG02, and CG03 isolated from patients in the state of Piauí, Brazil. The C. gattii R265 VGIIa strain, which was isolated from the Vancouver outbreak, differed from C. gattii CG01, CG02 and CG03 isolates (also classified as VGII when analyzed the capsular dimensions, melanin production, urease activity, as well as the glucuronoxylomannan (GXM secretion. Those differences directly reflected in their virulence potential. In addition, CG02 displayed higher virulence compared to R265 (VGIIa strain in a cryptococcal murine model of infection. Lastly, we examined the genotypic diversity of these strains through Multilocus Sequence Type (MLST and one new subtype was described for the CG02 isolate. This study confirms the presence and the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of highly virulent strains in the Northeast region of Brazil.

  15. CYP2D6 genotype and phenotype relationship in South Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Genotypes of the drug-metabolizing enzyme CYP2D6 influence plasma levels of 25% of commonlyprescribed drugs. This is the first study in India to investigate the genotype-phenotype relationship of CYP2D6. Aim : To study the influence of some CYP2D6 genotypes on the metabolism of its substrate dextromethorphanin healthy South Indian volunteers and to assess the contribution of the CYP2D6FNx0110 and CYP2D6FNx014 alleles. Materials and Methods : Twenty-six subjects from a previous CYP2D6 genotyping study of healthy volunteerswere included for phenotyping in this study. Selected volunteers belonged to any one of three genotype groups:Group I - two normal activity alleles, Group II - one reduced activity allele and one normal activity allele andGroup III - one loss of function allele along with either a wild type or reduced activity allele. Volunteers werephenotyped for the CYP2D6 enzyme using dextromethorphan as probe drug. Concentrations of the parent drugand metabolite dextrorphan were estimated using high performance liquid chromatography. Metabolic ratioswere calculated as the ratio of parent drug to metabolite in 0-8h urine samples. Statistical Analysis : Metabolic ratios from each genotype group were compared using the Mann-Whitney testat 5% significance, to observe their difference between genotype groups. Results : The mean metabolic ratios±SD in Groups I, II and III were 0.0039±0.0031, 0.0032±0.0017 and0.0391±0.0331 respectively. The mean metabolic ratio of Group III was significantly higher when comparedwith Groups I or II. In heterozygous individuals, the FNx011 or FNx012 alleles compensated for the reduced enzymeactivity due to the FNx0110 allele. However, if a heterozygous individual had a FNx014 allele, the reduced enzyme activitycould not be compensated by the FNx011 or FNx012 alleles. Conclusions : The CYP2D6 enzyme activity was found to be decreased in individuals carrying FNx014 or FNx015 alleles.The FNx011 or FNx

  16. Severe Enterovirus Infections in Hospitalized Children in the South of England: Clinical Phenotypes and Causative Genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, Hans; Pelosi, Emanuela; Cooper, Andrea; Pappachan, John; Sykes, Kim; MacIntosh, Iain; Gbesemete, Diane; Clark, Tristan W; Patel, Sanjay V; Faust, Saul N; Tebruegge, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Most enterovirus surveillance studies lack detailed clinical data, which limits their clinical usefulness. This study aimed to describe the clinical spectrum and outcome of severe enterovirus infections in children, and to determine whether there are associations between causative enterovirus genotypes and clinical phenotypes. Retrospective analysis of microbiological and clinical data from a tertiary children's hospital in the South of England over a 17-month period (2012-2013). In total, 30 patients were identified, comprising sepsis (n = 9), myocarditis (n = 8), meningitis (n = 8) and encephalitis (n = 5). Cases with sepsis or myocarditis were significantly younger than those with central nervous system disease (median age 21 and 15 days vs. 79 days; P = 0.0244 and P = 0.0310, respectively). There was considerable diversity in the causative genotypes in each of the clinical phenotypes, with some predominance of echoviruses in the meningitis group, and coxsackie B viruses in the myocarditis group. Thirteen cases required mechanical ventilation, 11 cases inotropic support, 3 cases dialysis and 3 cases extracorporal membrane oxygenation. The overall mortality was 10% (sepsis group, n = 1; myocarditis group, n = 2). Of the survivors, 5 (19%) had long-term sequelae (myocardial dysfunction, n = 2; neurological sequelae, n = 3). Patients with encephalitis had the longest hospital stay (median: 16 days), compared with 9, 6 and 3 days in patients with myocarditis, sepsis and meningitis, respectively (P = 0.005). Enterovirus infections, particularly enteroviral myocarditis and encephalitis, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. The results show that there are currently no strong associations between clinical phenotypes and particular causative enterovirus genotypes in the South of England.

  17. Phenotype and genotype in 17 patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, S M; Lombardi, M P; van Essen, A J; Wakeling, E L; Castle, B; Temple, I K; Kumar, V K A; Writzl, K; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2009-10-01

    Goltz-Gorlin syndrome or focal dermal hypoplasia is a highly variable, X-linked dominant syndrome with abnormalities of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. In 2007, mutations in the PORCN gene were found to be causative in Goltz-Gorlin syndrome. A series of 17 patients with Goltz-Gorlin syndrome is reported on, and their phenotype and genotype are described. In 14 patients (13 females and one male), a PORCN mutation was found. Mutations included nonsense (n = 5), frameshift (n = 2), aberrant splicing (n = 2) and missense (n = 5) mutations. No genotype-phenotype correlation was found. All patients with the classical features of the syndrome had a detectable mutation. In three females with atypical signs, no mutation was found. The male patient had classical features and showed mosaicism for a PORCN nonsense mutation in fibroblasts. Two affected sisters had a mutation not detectable in their parents, supporting germline mosaicism. Their father had undergone radiation for testicular cancer in the past. Two classically affected females had three severely affected female fetuses which all had midline thoracic and abdominal wall defects, resembling the pentalogy of Cantrell and the limb-body wall complex. Thoracic and abdominal wall defects were also present in two surviving patients. PORCN mutations can possibly cause pentalogy of Cantrell and limb-body wall complexes as well. Therefore, particularly in cases with limb defects, it seems useful to search for these. PORCN mutations can be found in all classically affected cases of Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, including males. Somatic and germline mosaicism occur. There is no evident genotype-phenotype correlation.

  18. Validation and discovery of genotype-phenotype associations in chronic diseases using linked data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Jyotishman; Kiefer, Richard; Freimuth, Robert; Chute, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates federated SPARQL queries over Linked Open Data (LOD) in the Semantic Web to validate existing, and potentially discover new genotype-phenotype associations from public datasets. In particular, we report our preliminary findings for identifying such associations for commonly occurring chronic diseases using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) and Database for SNPs (dbSNP) within the LOD knowledgebase and compare them with Gene Wiki for coverage and completeness. Our results indicate that Semantic Web technologies can play an important role for in-silico identification of novel disease-gene-SNP associations, although additional verification is required before such information can be applied and used effectively.

  19. Genotype, Phenotype and Outcomes of Nine Patients with T-B+NK+ SCID

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Grace P; Nadeau, Kari C; Berk, David R; de Saint Basile, Geneviève; Lambert, Nathalie; Knapnougel, Perrine; Roberts, Joseph; Kavanau, Kristina; Dunn, Elizabeth; Stiehm, E. Richard; Lewis, David B; Umetsu, Dale T; Puck, Jennifer M; Cowan, Morton J

    2011-01-01

    There are few reports of clinical presentation, genotype, and hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) outcomes for T-B+NK+ SCID patients. Between 1981 and 2007, 8 of 84 SCID patients who received and/or were followed after HCT at UCSF had the T-B+NK+ phenotype. One additional T-B+NK+ SCID patient was identified as the sibling of a patient treated at UCSF. Chart reviews were performed. Molecular analyses of IL7R, IL2RG, JAK3 and the genes encoding the CD3 T-cell receptor components δ (CD3D), ε (CD...

  20. Epidemiological markers in Neisseria meningitidis: an estimate of the performance of genotyping vs phenotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, N; Lind, I

    1998-01-01

    In order to estimate the performance of genotypic vs phenotypic characterization of Neisseria meningitidis, 2 methods, DNA fingerprinting and multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MEE), were assessed as regards applicability, reproducibility and discriminating capacity. 50 serogroup B and 52 serogroup...... C Neisseria meningitidis strains from 96 patients with meningococcal disease and 22 serogroup C strains from healthy carriers were investigated. Both methods were 100% applicable to meningococcal strains and results of DNA fingerprinting as well as of MEE were reproducible. The number of types...... defined by DNA fingerprinting and MEE as compared to that defined by phenotypic characteristics (serogroup, serotype, serosubtype and sulphonamide resistance) was as follows: for serogroup B strains from patients, 11 and 12 vs 8; for serogroup C strains from patients, 10 and 15 vs 8; and for serogroup C...

  1. PHENOTYPIC AND GENOTYPIC ANALYSIS OF AN ARCANOBACTERIUM PLURANIMALIUM ISOLATED FROM A MUSKOX (OVIBOS MOSCHATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Gusti Ningrum

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to characterize an Arcanobacterium pluranimalium strain isolated from a muskox (Ovibos moschatus phenotypically, by MALDI-TOF MS analysis and genotypically using various molecular targets. The phenotypic properties, the MALDI-TOF MS analysis and sequencing the 16S rRNA gene, the β subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase encoding gene rpoB, the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoding gene gap, the elongation factor tu encoding gene tuf and the pluranimaliumlysin encoding gene pla allowed a successful identification of the isolated strain as A. pluranimalium. Gene pla could also be detected by a previously described loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay. This is first report on the isolation and characterization of A. pluranimalium originated from a Muskox.

  2. Audiological and vestibular features in affected subjects with USH3: a genotype/phenotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Cohn, Edward S; Kimberling, William J; Tranebjaerg, Lisbeth; Möller, Claes

    2005-05-01

    The aims were to compare the genotype/phenotype relationship between USH3 mutations and the consequent hearing and vestibular phenotype; and to compare hearing loss (HL) progression between Usher syndrome types IB, IIA and USH3. Genetic, audiometric and vestibular examinations were performed in 28 subjects with USH3. Five different mutations in USH3 were identified. Severe HL was present from an early age (4 to 6 years) in 35% of subjects with USH3. Progression of HL begins in the first decade, and approximately 50% of subjects with USH3 become profoundly deaf by age 40. Various vestibular abnormalities were found in about half (10/22) of the tested subjects with USH3. Depending on the severity of HL, subjects with USH3 might be misdiagnosed as either Usher type IB or IIA. The results from this study can be used as discriminatory features in differential diagnosis of this syndrome.

  3. Towards systems genetic analyses in barley: Integration of phenotypic, expression and genotype data into GeneNetwork

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Druka Arnis

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A typical genetical genomics experiment results in four separate data sets; genotype, gene expression, higher-order phenotypic data and metadata that describe the protocols, processing and the array platform. Used in concert, these data sets provide the opportunity to perform genetic analysis at a systems level. Their predictive power is largely determined by the gene expression dataset where tens of millions of data points can be generated using currently available mRNA profiling technologies. Such large, multidimensional data sets often have value beyond that extracted during their initial analysis and interpretation, particularly if conducted on widely distributed reference genetic materials. Besides quality and scale, access to the data is of primary importance as accessibility potentially allows the extraction of considerable added value from the same primary dataset by the wider research community. Although the number of genetical genomics experiments in different plant species is rapidly increasing, none to date has been presented in a form that allows quick and efficient on-line testing for possible associations between genes, loci and traits of interest by an entire research community. Description Using a reference population of 150 recombinant doubled haploid barley lines we generated novel phenotypic, mRNA abundance and SNP-based genotyping data sets, added them to a considerable volume of legacy trait data and entered them into the GeneNetwork http://www.genenetwork.org. GeneNetwork is a unified on-line analytical environment that enables the user to test genetic hypotheses about how component traits, such as mRNA abundance, may interact to condition more complex biological phenotypes (higher-order traits. Here we describe these barley data sets and demonstrate some of the functionalities GeneNetwork provides as an easily accessible and integrated analytical environment for exploring them. Conclusion By

  4. Tumour risks and genotype-phenotype correlations associated with germline variants in succinate dehydrogenase subunit genes SDHB, SDHC and SDHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Katrina A; Ascher, David B; Pires, Douglas Eduardo Valente; Barnes, Daniel R; Vialard, Lindsey; Casey, Ruth T; Bradshaw, Nicola; Adlard, Julian; Aylwin, Simon; Brennan, Paul; Brewer, Carole; Cole, Trevor; Cook, Jackie A; Davidson, Rosemarie; Donaldson, Alan; Fryer, Alan; Greenhalgh, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley V; Irving, Richard; Lalloo, Fiona; McConachie, Michelle; McConnell, Vivienne P M; Morrison, Patrick J; Murday, Victoria; Park, Soo-Mi; Simpson, Helen L; Snape, Katie; Stewart, Susan; Tomkins, Susan E; Wallis, Yvonne; Izatt, Louise; Goudie, David; Lindsay, Robert S; Perry, Colin G; Woodward, Emma R; Antoniou, Antonis C; Maher, Eamonn R

    2018-06-01

    Germline pathogenic variants in SDHB/SDHC / SDHD are the most frequent causes of inherited phaeochromocytomas/paragangliomas. Insufficient information regarding penetrance and phenotypic variability hinders optimum management of mutation carriers. We estimate penetrance for symptomatic tumours and elucidate genotype-phenotype correlations in a large cohort of SDHB/SDHC / SDHD mutation carriers. A retrospective survey of 1832 individuals referred for genetic testing due to a personal or family history of phaeochromocytoma/paraganglioma. 876 patients (401 previously reported) had a germline mutation in SDHB/SDHC / SDHD (n=673/43/160). Tumour risks were correlated with in silico structural prediction analyses. Tumour risks analysis provided novel penetrance estimates and genotype-phenotype correlations. In addition to tumour type susceptibility differences for individual genes, we confirmed that the SDHD: p.Pro81Leu mutation has a distinct phenotype and identified increased age-related tumour risks with highly destabilising SDHB missense mutations. By Kaplan-Meier analysis, the penetrance (cumulative risk of clinically apparent tumours) in SDHB and (paternally inherited) SDHD mutation-positive non-probands (n=371/67 with detailed clinical information) by age 60 years was 21.8% (95% CI 15.2% to 27.9%) and 43.2% (95% CI 25.4% to 56.7%), respectively. Risk of malignant disease at age 60 years in non-proband SDHB mutation carriers was 4.2%(95% CI 1.1% to 7.2%). With retrospective cohort analysis to adjust for ascertainment, cumulative tumour risks for SDHB mutation carriers at ages 60 years and 80 years were 23.9% (95% CI 20.9% to 27.4%) and 30.6% (95% CI 26.8% to 34.7%). Overall risks of clinically apparent tumours for SDHB mutation carriers are substantially lower than initially estimated and will improve counselling of affected families. Specific genotype-tumour risk associations provides a basis for novel investigative strategies into succinate dehydrogenase

  5. (Epi)genotype-Phenotype Analysis in 69 Japanese Patients With Pseudohypoparathyroidism Type I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Shinichiro; Nakamura, Akie; Matsubara, Keiko; Nagasaki, Keisuke; Fukami, Maki; Kagami, Masayo

    2018-01-01

    Context: Pseudohypoparathyroidism type I (PHP-I) is divided into PHP-Ia with Albright hereditary osteodystrophy and PHP-Ib, which usually shows no Albright hereditary osteodystrophy features. Although PHP-Ia and PHP-Ib are typically caused by genetic defects involving α subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsα)–coding GNAS exons and methylation defects of the GNAS differentially methylated regions (DMRs) on the maternal allele, respectively, detailed phenotypic characteristics still remains to be examined. Objective: To clarify phenotypic characteristics according to underlying (epi)genetic causes. Patients and Methods: We performed (epi)genotype-phenotype analysis in 69 Japanese patients with PHP-I; that is, 28 patients with genetic defects involving Gsα-coding GNAS exons (group 1) consisting of 12 patients with missense variants (subgroup A) and 16 patients with null variants (subgroup B), as well as 41 patients with methylation defects (group 2) consisting of 21 patients with broad methylation defects of the GNAS-DMRs (subgroup C) and 20 patients with an isolated A/B-DMR methylation defect accompanied by the common STX16 microdeletion (subgroup D). Results: Although (epi)genotype-phenotype findings were grossly similar to those reported previously, several important findings were identified, including younger age at hypocalcemic symptoms and higher frequencies of hyperphosphatemia in subgroup C than in subgroup D, development of brachydactyly in four patients of subgroup C, predominant manifestation of subcutaneous ossification in subgroup B, higher frequency of thyrotropin resistance in group 1 than in group 2, and relatively low thyrotropin values in four patients with low T4 values and relatively low luteinizing hormone/follicle-stimulating hormone values in five adult females with ovarian dysfunction. Conclusion: The results imply the presence of clinical findings characteristic of each underlying cause and provide useful information on the imprinting

  6. Coffin-Siris syndrome and the BAF complex: genotype-phenotype study in 63 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Gijs W E; Aten, Emmelien; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Pottinger, Caroline; van Bon, Bregje W M; van Minderhout, Ivonne J H M; Snowdowne, Ronelle; van der Lans, Christian A C; Boogaard, Merel; Linssen, Margot M L; Vijfhuizen, Linda; van der Wielen, Michiel J R; Vollebregt, M J Ellen; Breuning, Martijn H; Kriek, Marjolein; van Haeringen, Arie; den Dunnen, Johan T; Hoischen, Alexander; Clayton-Smith, Jill; de Vries, Bert B A; Hennekam, Raoul C M; van Belzen, Martine J

    2013-11-01

    De novo germline variants in several components of the SWI/SNF-like BAF complex can cause Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS), Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (NCBRS), and nonsyndromic intellectual disability. We screened 63 patients with a clinical diagnosis of CSS for these genes (ARID1A, ARID1B, SMARCA2, SMARCA4, SMARCB1, and SMARCE1) and identified pathogenic variants in 45 (71%) patients. We found a high proportion of variants in ARID1B (68%). All four pathogenic variants in ARID1A appeared to be mosaic. By using all variants from the Exome Variant Server as test data, we were able to classify variants in ARID1A, ARID1B, and SMARCB1 reliably as being pathogenic or nonpathogenic. For SMARCA2, SMARCA4, and SMARCE1 several variants in the EVS remained unclassified, underlining the importance of parental testing. We have entered all variant and clinical information in LOVD-powered databases to facilitate further genotype-phenotype correlations, as these will become increasingly important because of the uptake of targeted and untargeted next generation sequencing in diagnostics. The emerging phenotype-genotype correlation is that SMARCB1 patients have the most marked physical phenotype and severe cognitive and growth delay. The variability in phenotype seems most marked in ARID1A and ARID1B patients. Distal limbs anomalies are most marked in ARID1A patients and least in SMARCB1 patients. Numbers are small however, and larger series are needed to confirm this correlation. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  7. Generation of New Genotypic and Phenotypic Features in Artificial and Natural Yeast Hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter P. Pfliegler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Evolution and genome stabilization have mostly been studied on the Saccharomyces hybrids isolated from natural and alcoholic fermentation environments. Genetic and phenotypic properties have usually been compared to the laboratory and reference strains, as the true ancestors of the natural hybrid yeasts are unknown. In this way the exact impact of different parental fractions on the genome organization or metabolic activity of the hybrid yeasts is difficult to resolve completely. In the present work the evolution of geno- and phenotypic properties is studied in the interspecies hybrids created by the cross-breeding of S. cerevisiae with S. uvarum or S. kudriavzevii auxotrophic mutants. We hypothesized that the extent of genomic alterations in S. cerevisiae × S. uvarum and S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii should affect the physiology of their F1 offspring in different ways. Our results, obtained by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP genotyping and karyotyping analyses, showed that both subgenomes of the S. cerevisiae x S. uvarum and of S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids experienced various modifications. However, the S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii F1 hybrids underwent more severe genomic alterations than the S. cerevisiae × S. uvarum ones. Generation of the new genotypes also influenced the physiological performances of the hybrids and the occurrence of novel phenotypes. Significant differences in carbohydrate utilization and distinct growth dynamics at increasing concentrations of sodium chloride, urea and miconazole were observed within and between the S. cerevisiae × S. uvarum and S. cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids. Parental strains also demonstrated different contributions to the final metabolic outcomes of the hybrid yeasts. A comparison of the genotypic properties of the artificial hybrids with several hybrid isolates from the wine-related environments and wastewater demonstrated a greater genetic variability of

  8. Genotype-phenotype variations in five Spanish families with Norrie disease or X-linked FEVR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Trujillo-Tiebas, Maria José; Gimenez-Pardo, Ascension; Garcia-Hoyos, Maria; Cantalapiedra, Diego; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Rodriguez de Alba, Marta; Ramos, Carmen; Ayuso, Carmen

    2005-09-02

    Norrie disease (OMIM 310600) is a rare X-linked disorder characterized by congenital blindness in males. Approximately 40 to 50% of the cases develop deafness and mental retardation. X-linked familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (XL-FEVR) is a hereditary ocular disorder characterized by a failure of peripheral retinal vascularization. Both X-linked disorders are due to mutations in the NDP gene, which encodes a 133 amino acid protein called Norrin, but autosomal recessive (AR) and autosomal dominant (AD) forms of FEVR have also been described. In this study, we report the molecular findings and the related phenotype in five Spanish families affected with Norrie disease or XL-FEVR due to mutations of the NDP gene. The study was conducted in 45 subjects from five Spanish families. These families were clinically diagnosed with Norrie disease or similar conditions. The three exons of the NDP gene were analyzed by automatic DNA sequencing. Haplotype analyses were also performed. Two new nonsense mutations, apart from other mutations previously described in the NDP gene, were found in those patients affected with ND or X-linked FEVR. An important genotype-phenotype variation was found in relation to the different mutations of the NDP gene. In fact, the same mutation may be responsible for different phenotypes. We speculate that there might be other molecular factors that interact in the retina with Norrin, which contribute to the resultant phenotypes.

  9. Phenotypic and Genotypic Analysis of Newly Obtained Interspecific Hybrids in the Campanula Genus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Catharina Röper

    Full Text Available Interspecific hybridisation creates new phenotypes within several ornamental plant species including the Campanula genus. We have employed phenotypic and genotypic methods to analyse and evaluate interspecific hybridisation among cultivars of four Campanula species, i.e. C. cochleariifolia, C. isophylla, C. medium and C. formanekiana. Hybrids were analysed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP, flow cytometry and biometrical measurements. Results of correlation matrices demonstrated heterogeneous phenotypes for the parental species, which confirmed our basic premise for new phenotypes of interspecific hybrids. AFLP assays confirmed the hybridity and identified self-pollinated plants. Limitation of flow cytometry analysis detection was observed while detecting the hybridity status of two closely related parents, e.g. C. cochleariiafolia × C. isophylla. Phenotypic characteristics such as shoot habitus and flower colour were strongly influenced by one of the parental species in most crosses. Rooting analysis revealed that inferior rooting quality occurred more often in interspecific hybrids than in the parental species. Only interspecific hybrid lines of C. formanekiana 'White' × C. medium 'Pink' showed a high rooting level. Phenotype analyses demonstrated a separation from the interspecific hybrid lines of C. formanekiana 'White' × C. medium 'Pink' to the other clustered hybrids of C. formanekiana and C. medium. In our study we demonstrated that the use of correlation matrices is a suitable tool for identifying suitable cross material. This study presents a comprehensive overview for analysing newly obtained interspecific hybrids. The chosen methods can be used as guidance for analyses for further interspecific hybrids in Campanula, as well as in other ornamental species.

  10. Predicting genotypes environmental range from genome-environment associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manel, Stéphanie; Andrello, Marco; Henry, Karine; Verdelet, Daphné; Darracq, Aude; Guerin, Pierre-Edouard; Desprez, Bruno; Devaux, Pierre

    2018-05-17

    Genome-environment association methods aim to detect genetic markers associated with environmental variables. The detected associations are usually analysed separately to identify the genomic regions involved in local adaptation. However, a recent study suggests that single-locus associations can be combined and used in a predictive way to estimate environmental variables for new individuals on the basis of their genotypes. Here, we introduce an original approach to predict the environmental range (values and upper and lower limits) of species genotypes from the genetic markers significantly associated with those environmental variables in an independent set of individuals. We illustrate this approach to predict aridity in a database constituted of 950 individuals of wild beets and 299 individuals of cultivated beets genotyped at 14,409 random Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs). We detected 66 alleles associated with aridity and used them to calculate the fraction (I) of aridity-associated alleles in each individual. The fraction I correctly predicted the values of aridity in an independent validation set of wild individuals and was then used to predict aridity in the 299 cultivated individuals. Wild individuals had higher median values and a wider range of values of aridity than the cultivated individuals, suggesting that wild individuals have higher ability to resist to stress-aridity conditions and could be used to improve the resistance of cultivated varieties to aridity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Function and Phenotype prediction through Data and Knowledge Fusion

    KAUST Repository

    Vespoor, Karen

    2016-01-01

    I will introduce the use of text mining techniques to support analysis of biological data sets, and will specifically discuss applications in protein function and phenotype prediction, as well as analysis of genetic variants that are supported

  12. Comparing the predictive abilities of phenotypic and marker-assisted selection methods in a biparental lettuce population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding and selection for the traits with polygenic inheritance is a challenging task that can be done by phenotypic selection, by marker-assisted selection or by genome wide selection. We tested predictive ability of four selection models in a biparental population genotyped with 95 SNP markers an...

  13. Evaluation of genotype-phenotype relationships in patients referred for endocrine assessment in suspected Pendred syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Lip Min; Druce, Maralyn; Grossman, Ashley B; Differ, Ann-Marie; Rajput, Liala; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; Korbonits, Márta

    2015-02-01

    Patients with Pendred syndrome have genotypic and phenotypic variability, leading to challenges in definitive diagnosis. Deaf children with enlarged vestibular aqueducts are often subjected to repeated investigations when tests for mutations in SLC26A4 are abnormal. This study provides genotype and phenotype information from patients with suspected Pendred syndrome referred to a single clinical endocrinology unit. A retrospective analysis of 50 patients with suspected Pendred syndrome to investigate the correlation between genetic, perchlorate discharge test (PDT) and endocrine status. Eight patients with monoallelic SLC26A4 mutations had normal PDT. Of the 33 patients with biallelic mutations, ten of 12 patients with >30% discharge developed hypothyroidism. In our cohort, c.626G>T and c.3-2A>G result in milder clinical presentations with lower median perchlorate discharge of 9.3% (interquartile range 4-15%) compared with 40% (interquartile range 21-60%) for the remaining mutations. Eight novel mutations were detected. All patients with PDT 30% have a high risk of developing goitre and hypothyroidism, and should have lifelong monitoring. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  14. Phenotypic and Genotypic Antibiotic Resistance of Salmonella from Chicken Carcasses Marketed at Ibague, Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Cortes Vélez

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Salmonella enterica is responsible for alimentary toxic infections associated with the consumption of contaminated poultry products and the antimicrobial resistant patterns of Salmonella circulating in the Tolima region are currently unknown. To address this issue, both the phenotype and genotype antibiotic resistance patterns of 47 Salmonella isolated from raw chicken carcasses sold at the Ibague city were analyzed by the disc diffusion, microdilution and PCR assays. All 47 Salmonella isolates showed resistance to five or more antimicrobial agents. Resistance to Ampicillin (AMP, Amikacin (AMK, Gentamicin (GEN, Tobramycin (TOB, Cefazoline (CFZ, Cefoxitin (FOX, Nitrofurantoin (NIT, Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (SXT, Tetracycline (TET, Ciprofloxacin (CIP and Enrofloxacin (ENR was observed in 42.35% of Salmonella isolates. All tested S. Paratyphi B var Java isolates showed resistance to at least 12 antibiotics. S. Hvittingfoss showed resistance to 5 antibiotics, whereas S. Muenster showed resistance to seven antibiotics. Amplification of a number of antibiotic resistance genes showed that blaTEM (100% correlated well with resistance to Ampicilin and Cephalosporin, whereas aadB (87% correlated well with resistance to Aminoglycosides. It is concluded that Salmonella isolated from raw chicken meat marketed at Ibague showed MDR by both phenotypic and genotypic methods and they may represent an important threat to human health. Additional studies are needed to establish the relationship between antibiotic resistance in Salmonella from poultry products and clinical isolates.

  15. Can genotype determine the sports phenotype? A paradigm shift in sports medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Amit; Mahajan, Preetam B

    2016-06-01

    In last two decades, there has been an evolution in sports medicine. Several researchers have worked on different domains of sports medicine, like strength, endurance, sports injury, and psychology. Besides this, several groups have explored the changes at cellular and molecular levels during exercise, which has led to the development of the new domain in sports science known as genetic medicine. Genetic medicine deals with the genotypic basis of sports phenotype. In this article, we try to provide an up-to-date review on genetic determinants of sports performance, which will be like a journey from the nostalgic past towards the traditional present and the romantic future of sports medicine. Endurance and power performance are two important domains of athletes. They vary in individuals, even among trained athletes. Researches indicate that the genetic makeup of sportsmen play a vital role in their performance. Several genetic factors are reported to be responsible for endurance, power, susceptibility to injury, and even psychology of the individual. Besides this, proper training, nutrition, and environment are also important in shaping their potential. The aim of this discussion is to understand the influence of the environment and the genetic makeup on the performance of the athletes. There is sufficient evidence to suggest that genotype determines the sports phenotype in an athlete. Choosing the right sports activity based on genetic endowment is the key for achieving excellence in sports.

  16. The genotype-phenotype landscape of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, E P; Williams, K L; Fifita, J A; Tarr, I S; O'Connor, J; Rowe, D B; Nicholson, G A; Blair, I P

    2017-09-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous fatal neurodegenerative disease. Around 10% of ALS cases are hereditary. ALS gene discoveries have provided most of our understanding of disease pathogenesis. We aimed to describe the genetic landscape of ALS in Australia by assessing 1013 Australian ALS patients for known ALS mutations by direct sequencing, whole exome sequencing or repeat primed polymerase chain reaction. Age of disease onset and disease duration were used for genotype-phenotype correlations. We report 60.8% of Australian ALS families in this cohort harbour a known ALS mutation. Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 accounted for 40.6% of families and 2.9% of sporadic patients. We also report ALS families with mutations in SOD1 (13.7%), FUS (2.4%), TARDBP (1.9%), UBQLN2 (.9%), OPTN (.5%), TBK1 (.5%) and CCNF (.5%). We present genotype-phenotype correlations between these genes as well as between gene mutations. Notably, C9orf72 hexanucleotide repeat expansion positive patients experienced significantly later disease onset than ALS mutation patients. Among SOD1 families, p.I114T positive patients had significantly later onset and longer survival. Our report highlights a unique spectrum of ALS gene frequencies among patients from the Australian population, and further, provides correlations between specific ALS mutations with disease onset and/or duration. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Phenotype-Genotype Analysis of Chinese Patients with Early-Onset LMNA-Related Muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandan Tan

    Full Text Available This study aimed to analyze the correlation between the phenotype and genotype of Chinese patients with early-onset lamin A (LMNA-related muscular dystrophy (MD. The clinical and myopathological data of 21 Chinese pediatric patients with early-onset LMNA-related MD were collected and analyzed. LMNA gene mutation analysis was performed by direct sequencing of genomic DNA. Sublocalization of wild-type and mutant proteins were observed by immunofluorescence using cultured fibroblasts and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293 cell. Seven patients were diagnosed with Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy (EDMD and 14 were diagnosed with LMNA-associated congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD. Four biopsy specimens from the L-CMD cases exhibited inflammatory changes. Abnormal nuclear morphology was observed with both transmission electron microscopy and lamin A/C staining. We identified 10 novel and nine known LMNA gene mutations in the 21 patients. Some mutations (c.91G>A, c.94_96delAAG, c.116A>G, c.745C>T, c.746G>A, and c.1580G>C were well correlated with EDMD or L-CMD. LMNA-related MD has a common symptom triad of muscle weakness, joint contractures, and cardiac involvement, but the severity of symptoms and disease progression differ greatly. Inflammatory change in biopsied muscle is a characteristic of early-stage L-CMD. Phenotype-genotype analysis determines that some mutations are well correlated with LMNA-related MD.

  18. Impact of QTL minor allele frequency on genomic evaluation using real genotype data and simulated phenotypes in Japanese Black cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uemoto, Yoshinobu; Sasaki, Shinji; Kojima, Takatoshi; Sugimoto, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Toshio

    2015-11-19

    Genetic variance that is not captured by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is due to imperfect linkage disequilibrium (LD) between SNPs and quantitative trait loci (QTLs), and the extent of LD between SNPs and QTLs depends on different minor allele frequencies (MAF) between them. To evaluate the impact of MAF of QTLs on genomic evaluation, we performed a simulation study using real cattle genotype data. In total, 1368 Japanese Black cattle and 592,034 SNPs (Illumina BovineHD BeadChip) were used. We simulated phenotypes using real genotypes under different scenarios, varying the MAF categories, QTL heritability, number of QTLs, and distribution of QTL effect. After generating true breeding values and phenotypes, QTL heritability was estimated and the prediction accuracy of genomic estimated breeding value (GEBV) was assessed under different SNP densities, prediction models, and population size by a reference-test validation design. The extent of LD between SNPs and QTLs in this population was higher in the QTLs with high MAF than in those with low MAF. The effect of MAF of QTLs depended on the genetic architecture, evaluation strategy, and population size in genomic evaluation. In genetic architecture, genomic evaluation was affected by the MAF of QTLs combined with the QTL heritability and the distribution of QTL effect. The number of QTL was not affected on genomic evaluation if the number of QTL was more than 50. In the evaluation strategy, we showed that different SNP densities and prediction models affect the heritability estimation and genomic prediction and that this depends on the MAF of QTLs. In addition, accurate QTL heritability and GEBV were obtained using denser SNP information and the prediction model accounted for the SNPs with low and high MAFs. In population size, a large sample size is needed to increase the accuracy of GEBV. The MAF of QTL had an impact on heritability estimation and prediction accuracy. Most genetic variance can be captured

  19. Characterization of G6PD genotypes and phenotypes on the northwestern Thailand-Myanmar border.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Bancone

    Full Text Available Mutations in the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD gene result in red blood cells with increased susceptibility to oxidative damage. Significant haemolysis can be caused by primaquine and other 8-aminoquinoline antimalarials used for the radical treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria. The distribution and phenotypes of mutations causing G6PD deficiency in the male population of migrants and refugees in a malaria endemic region on the Thailand-Myanmar border were characterized. Blood samples for G6PD fluorescent spot test (FST, G6PD genotyping, and malaria testing were taken from 504 unrelated males of Karen and Burman ethnicities presenting to the outpatient clinics. The overall frequency of G6PD deficiency by the FST was 13.7%. Among the deficient subjects, almost 90% had the Mahidol variant (487G>A genotype. The remaining subjects had Chinese-4 (392G>T, Viangchan (871G>A, Açores (595A>G, Seattle (844G>C and Mediterranean (563C>T variants. Quantification of G6PD activity was performed using a modification of the standard spectrophotometric assay on a subset of 24 samples with Mahidol, Viangchan, Seattle and Chinese-4 mutations; all samples showed a residual enzymatic activity below 10% of normal and were diagnosed correctly by the FST. Further studies are needed to characterise the haemolytic risk of using 8-aminoquinolines in patients with these genotypes.

  20. Examining genotypic variation in autism spectrum disorder and its relationship to parental age and phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geier DA

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available David A Geier,1,2 Janet K Kern,1,3 Lisa K Sykes,2 Mark R Geier1,2 1Research Department, The Institute of Chronic Illnesses, Inc, 2Research Department, CoMeD, Inc, Silver Spring, MD, 3Research Department, CONEM US Autism Research Group, Allen, TX, USA Background: Previous studies on genetic testing of chromosomal abnormalities in individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD found that ~80% have negative genetic test results (NGTRs and ~20% have positive genetic test results (PGTRs, of which ~7% were probable de novo mutations (PDNMs. Research suggests that parental age is a risk factor for an ASD diagnosis. This study examined genotypic variation in ASD and its relationship to parental age and phenotype.Methods: Phenotype was derived from detailed clinical information, and genotype was derived from high-resolution blood chromosome and blood whole-genome copy number variant genetic testing on a consecutive cohort (born: 1983–2009 of subjects diagnosed with ASD (N=218.Results: Among the subjects examined, 80.3% had NGTRs and 19.7% had PGTRs, of which 6.9% had PDNMs. NGTR subjects were born more recently (the risk of PDNMs decreasing by 12% per more recent birth year and tended to have an increased male–female ratio compared to PDNM subjects. PDNM subjects had significantly increased mean parental age and paternal age at subject’s birth (the risk of a PDNM increasing by 7%–8% per year of parental or paternal age compared to NGTR subjects. PGTR and NGTR subjects showed significant improvements in speech/language/communication with increasing age. PGTR subjects showed significant improvements in sociability, a core feature of an ASD diagnosis, with increasing age, whereas NGTR subjects showed significant worsening in sociability with increasing age.Conclusion: This study helps to elucidate different phenotypic ASD subtypes and may even indicate the need for differential diagnostic classifications. Keywords: genotype, phenotype

  1. Genotype-phenotype correlation in boys with X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Kristin; Schneider, Anne-Theres; Wohlfart, Sigrun; Kiesewetter, Franklin; Huttner, Kenneth; Johnson, Ramsey; Schneider, Holm

    2014-10-01

    X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (XLHED), the most frequent form of ectodermal dysplasia, is a genetic disorder of ectoderm development characterized by malformation of multiple ectodermal structures such as skin, hair, sweat and sebaceous glands, and teeth. The disease is caused by a broad spectrum of mutations in the gene EDA. Although XLHED symptoms show inter-familial and intra-familial variability, genotype-phenotype correlation has been demonstrated with respect to sweat gland function. In this study, we investigated to which extent the EDA genotype correlates with the severity of XLHED-related skin and hair signs. Nineteen male children with XLHED (age range 3-14 years) and seven controls (aged 6-14 years) were examined by confocal microscopy of the skin, quantification of pilocarpine-induced sweating, semi-quantitative evaluation of full facial photographs with respect to XLHED-related skin issues, and phototrichogram analysis. All eight boys with known hypomorphic EDA mutations were able to produce at least some sweat and showed less severe cutaneous signs of XLHED than the anhidrotic XLHED patients (e.g., perioral and periorbital eczema or hyperpigmentation, regional hyperkeratosis, characteristic wrinkles under the eyes). As expected, individuals with XLHED had significantly less and thinner hair than healthy controls. However, there were also significant differences in hair number, diameter, and other hair characteristics between the group with hypomorphic EDA mutations and the anhidrotic patients. In summary, this study indicated a remarkable genotype-phenotype correlation of skin and hair findings in prepubescent males with XLHED. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Genotype-phenotype correlations of dyshormonogenetic goiter in children and adolescents from South India

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    Bangaraiah Gari Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dyshormonogenetic goiter is one of the most common causes of hypothyroidism in children and adolescents in iodine nonendemic areas. The exact genotype-phenotypic correlations (GPCs and risk categorization of hypothyroid phenotypes of dyshormonogenetic mutations are largely speculative. The genetic studies in pediatric dyshormonogenesis are very sparse from Indian sub-continent. In this context, we analyzed the implications of TPO, NIS, and DUOX2 gene mutations in hypothyroid children with dyshormonogenetic hypothyroidism (DH from South India. Materials and Methods: This is interdisciplinary prospective study, we employed eight sets of primers and screened for 142 known single nucleotide polymorphisms in TPO, NIS, and DUOX2 genes. The subjects were children and adolescents with hypothyroidism due to dyshormonogenetic goiter. Congenital hypothyroidism, iodine deficiency, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis cases were excluded. Results: We detected nine mutations in 8/22 (36% children. All the mutations were observed in the intronic regions of NIS gene and none in TPO or DUOX2 genes. Except for bi-allelic, synonymous polymorphism of TPO gene in child number 14, all other mutations were heterozygous in nature. GPCs show that our mutations significantly expressed the phenotypic traits such as overt hypothyroidism, goiter, and existence of family history. Other phenotypic characters such as sex predilection, the age of onset and transitory nature of hypothyroidism were not significantly affected by these mutations. Conclusion: NIS gene mutations alone appears to be most prevalent mutations in DH among South Indian children and these mutations significantly influenced phenotypic expressions such as severity of hypothyroidism, goiter rates, and familial clustering.

  3. Recurrent mutations in the CDKL5 gene: genotype-phenotype relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Villeneuve, Nathalie; Caietta, Emilie; Jacquette, Aurélia; Maurey, Helene; Matthijs, Gert; Van Esch, Hilde; Delahaye, Andrée; Moncla, Anne; Milh, Mathieu; Zufferey, Flore; Diebold, Bertrand; Bienvenu, Thierry

    2012-07-01

    Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5) have been described in epileptic encephalopathies in females with infantile spasms with features that overlap with Rett syndrome. With more than 80 reported patients, the phenotype of CDKL5-related encephalopathy is well-defined. The main features consist of seizures starting before 6 months of age, severe intellectual disability with absent speech and hand stereotypies and deceleration of head growth, which resembles Rett syndrome. However, some clinical discrepancies suggested the influence of genetics and/or environmental factors. No genotype-phenotype correlation has been defined and thus there is a need to examine individual mutations. In this study, we analyzed eight recurrent CDKL5 mutations to test whether the clinical phenotype of patients with the same mutation is similar and whether patients with specific CDKL5 mutations have a milder phenotype than those with other CDKL5 mutations. Patients bearing missense mutations in the ATP binding site such as the p.Ala40Val mutation typically walked unaided, had normocephaly, better hand use ability, and less frequent refractory epilepsy when compared to girls with other CDKL5 mutations. In contrast, patients with mutations in the kinase domain (such as p.Arg59X, p.Arg134X, p.Arg178Trp/Pro/Gln, or c.145 + 2T > C) and frameshift mutations in the C-terminal region (such as c.2635_2636delCT) had a more severe phenotype with infantile spasms, refractory epileptic encephalopathy, absolute microcephaly, and inability to walk. It is important for clinicians to have this information when such patients are diagnosed. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Bacillus spp. isolated from steel plant waste

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    Chartone-Souza Edmar

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular studies of Bacillus diversity in various environments have been reported. However, there have been few investigations concerning Bacillus in steel plant environments. In this study, genotypic and phenotypic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among 40 bacterial isolates recovered from steel plant waste were investigated using classical and molecular methods. Results 16S rDNA partial sequencing assigned all the isolates to the Bacillus genus, with close genetic relatedness to the Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus cereus groups, and to the species Bacillus sphaericus. tDNA-intergenic spacer length polymorphisms and the 16S–23S intergenic transcribed spacer region failed to identify the isolates at the species level. Genomic diversity was investigated by molecular typing with rep (repetitive sequence based PCR using the primer sets ERIC2 (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus, (GTG5, and BOXAIR. Genotypic fingerprinting of the isolates reflected high intraspecies and interspecies diversity. Clustering of the isolates using ERIC-PCR fingerprinting was similar to that obtained from the 16S rRNA gene phylogenetic tree, indicating the potential of the former technique as a simple and useful tool for examining relationships among unknown Bacillus spp. Physiological, biochemical and heavy metal susceptibility profiles also indicated considerable phenotypic diversity. Among the heavy metal compounds tested Zn, Pb and Cu were least toxic to the bacterial isolates, whereas Ag inhibited all isolates at 0.001 mM. Conclusion Isolates with identical 16S rRNA gene sequences had different genomic fingerprints and differed considerably in their physiological capabilities, so the high levels of phenotypic diversity found in this study are likely to have ecological relevance.

  5. Serotonin Transporter Genotype (5-HTTLPR) Predicts Utilitarian Moral Judgments

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, Abigail A.; Crowe, Samantha L.; Yu, Henry H.; Gorodetsky, Elena K.; Goldman, David; Blair, R. J. R.

    2011-01-01

    Background The psychological and neurobiological processes underlying moral judgment have been the focus of extensive recent research. Here we show that serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) genotype predicts responses to moral dilemmas featuring foreseen harm to an innocent. Methodology/Principal Findings Participants in this study judged the acceptability of actions that would unintentionally or intentionally harm an innocent victim in order to save others' lives. An analysis of variance reveale...

  6. A rare CYP21A2 mutation in a congenital adrenal hyperplasia kindred displaying genotype-phenotype nonconcordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Ahmed; Yuen, Tony; Al-Malki, Sultan; Yau, Mabel; Kazmi, Diya; Sun, Li; Harbison, Madeleine; Haider, Shozeb; Zaidi, Mone; New, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) owing to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is caused by the autosomal recessive inheritance of mutations in the gene CYP21A2. CYP21A2 mutations lead to variable impairment of the 21-hydroxylase enzyme, which, in turn, is associated with three clinical phenotypes, namely, salt wasting, simple virilizing, and nonclassical CAH. However, it is known that a given mutation can associate with different clinical phenotypes, resulting in a high rate of genotype-phenotype nonconcordance. We aimed to study the genotype-phenotype nonconcordance in a family with three siblings affected with nonclassical CAH. All had hormonal evidence of nonclassical CAH, but this phenotype could not be explained by the genotype obtained from commercial CYP21A2 genetic testing, which revealed heterozygosity for the maternal 30 kb deletion mutation. We performed Sanger sequencing of the entire CYP21A2 gene in this family to search for a rare mutation that was not covered by commercial testing and found in the three siblings a second, rare c.1097G>A (p.R366H) mutation in exon 8. Computational modeling confirmed that this was a mild mutation consistent with nonclassical CAH. We recommend that sequencing of entire genes for rare mutations should be carried out when genotype-phenotype nonconcordance is observed in patients with autosomal recessive monogenic disorders, including CAH. © 2015 New York Academy of Sciences.

  7. Clinical spectrum and genotype-phenotype associations of KCNA2-related encephalopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masnada, Silvia; Hedrich, Ulrike B S; Gardella, Elena; Schubert, Julian; Kaiwar, Charu; Klee, Eric W; Lanpher, Brendan C; Gavrilova, Ralitza H; Synofzik, Matthis; Bast, Thomas; Gorman, Kathleen; King, Mary D; Allen, Nicholas M; Conroy, Judith; Ben Zeev, Bruria; Tzadok, Michal; Korff, Christian; Dubois, Fanny; Ramsey, Keri; Narayanan, Vinodh; Serratosa, Jose M; Giraldez, Beatriz G; Helbig, Ingo; Marsh, Eric; O'Brien, Margaret; Bergqvist, Christina A; Binelli, Adrian; Porter, Brenda; Zaeyen, Eduardo; Horovitz, Dafne D; Wolff, Markus; Marjanovic, Dragan; Caglayan, Hande S; Arslan, Mutluay; Pena, Sergio D J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Balestrini, Simona; Syrbe, Steffen; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Lemke, Johannes R; Møller, Rikke S; Lerche, Holger; Rubboli, Guido

    2017-09-01

    Recently, de novo mutations in the gene KCNA2, causing either a dominant-negative loss-of-function or a gain-of-function of the voltage-gated K+ channel Kv1.2, were described to cause a new molecular entity within the epileptic encephalopathies. Here, we report a cohort of 23 patients (eight previously described) with epileptic encephalopathy carrying either novel or known KCNA2 mutations, with the aim to detail the clinical phenotype associated with each of them, to characterize the functional effects of the newly identified mutations, and to assess genotype-phenotype associations. We identified five novel and confirmed six known mutations, three of which recurred in three, five and seven patients, respectively. Ten mutations were missense and one was a truncation mutation; de novo occurrence could be shown in 20 patients. Functional studies using a Xenopus oocyte two-microelectrode voltage clamp system revealed mutations with only loss-of-function effects (mostly dominant-negative current amplitude reduction) in eight patients or only gain-of-function effects (hyperpolarizing shift of voltage-dependent activation, increased amplitude) in nine patients. In six patients, the gain-of-function was diminished by an additional loss-of-function (gain-and loss-of-function) due to a hyperpolarizing shift of voltage-dependent activation combined with either decreased amplitudes or an additional hyperpolarizing shift of the inactivation curve. These electrophysiological findings correlated with distinct phenotypic features. The main differences were (i) predominant focal (loss-of-function) versus generalized (gain-of-function) seizures and corresponding epileptic discharges with prominent sleep activation in most cases with loss-of-function mutations; (ii) more severe epilepsy, developmental problems and ataxia, and atrophy of the cerebellum or even the whole brain in about half of the patients with gain-of-function mutations; and (iii) most severe early-onset phenotypes

  8. Novel SOX2 mutations and genotype-phenotype correlation in anophthalmia and microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Adele; Bardakjian, Tanya; Reis, Linda M; Tyler, Rebecca C; Semina, Elena V

    2009-12-01

    SOX2 represents a High Mobility Group domain containing transcription factor that is essential for normal development in vertebrates. Mutations in SOX2 are known to result in a spectrum of severe ocular phenotypes in humans, also typically associated with other systemic defects. Ocular phenotypes include anophthalmia/microphthalmia (A/M), optic nerve hypoplasia, ocular coloboma and other eye anomalies. We screened 51 unrelated individuals with A/M and identified SOX2 mutations in the coding region of the gene in 10 individuals. Seven of the identified mutations are novel alterations, while the remaining three individuals carry the previously reported recurrent 20-nucleotide deletion in SOX2, c.70del20. Among the SOX2-positive cases, seven patients had bilateral A/M and mutations resulting in premature termination of the normal protein sequence (7/38; 18% of all bilateral cases), one patient had bilateral A/M associated with a single amino acid insertion (1/38; 3% of bilateral cases), and the final two patients demonstrated unilateral A/M associated with missense mutations (2/13; 15% of all unilateral cases). These findings and review of previously reported cases suggest a potential genotype/phenotype correlation for SOX2 mutations with missense changes generally leading to less severe ocular defects. In addition, we report a new familial case of affected siblings with maternal mosaicism for the identified SOX2 mutation, which further underscores the importance of parental testing to provide accurate genetic counseling to families.

  9. Genotype to phenotype mapping and the fitness landscape of the E. coli lac promoter.

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    Jakub Otwinowski

    Full Text Available Genotype-to-phenotype maps and the related fitness landscapes that include epistatic interactions are difficult to measure because of their high dimensional structure. Here we construct such a map using the recently collected corpora of high-throughput sequence data from the 75 base pairs long mutagenized E. coli lac promoter region, where each sequence is associated with its phenotype, the induced transcriptional activity measured by a fluorescent reporter. We find that the additive (non-epistatic contributions of individual mutations account for about two-thirds of the explainable phenotype variance, while pairwise epistasis explains about 7% of the variance for the full mutagenized sequence and about 15% for the subsequence associated with protein binding sites. Surprisingly, there is no evidence for third order epistatic contributions, and our inferred fitness landscape is essentially single peaked, with a small amount of antagonistic epistasis. There is a significant selective pressure on the wild type, which we deduce to be multi-objective optimal for gene expression in environments with different nutrient sources. We identify transcription factor (CRP and RNA polymerase binding sites in the promotor region and their interactions without difficult optimization steps. In particular, we observe evidence for previously unexplored genetic regulatory mechanisms, possibly kinetic in nature. We conclude with a cautionary note that inferred properties of fitness landscapes may be severely influenced by biases in the sequence data.

  10. Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in NF1: Evidence for a More Severe Phenotype Associated with Missense Mutations Affecting NF1 Codons 844–848

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koczkowska, M. (Magdalena); Chen, Y. (Yunjia); Callens, T. (Tom); Gomes, A. (Alicia); Sharp, A. (Angela); Johnson, S. (Sherrell); Hsiao, M.-C. (Meng-Chang); Chen, Z. (Zhenbin); Balasubramanian, M. (Meena); Barnett, C.P. (Christopher P.); Becker, T.A. (Troy A.); Ben-Shachar, S. (Shay); D.R. Bertola (Débora Romeo); J.O. Blakeley (Jaishri O.); Burkitt-Wright, E.M.M. (Emma M.M.); Callaway, A. (Alison); Crenshaw, M. (Melissa); Cunha, K.S. (Karin S.); Cunningham, M. (Mitch); M.D. D'Agostino (Maria Daniela); K. Dahan (Karin); De Luca, A. (Alessandro); A. Destrée (Anne); Dhamija, R. (Radhika); Eoli, M. (Marica); Evans, D.G.R. (D. Gareth R.); Galvin-Parton, P. (Patricia); George-Abraham, J.K. (Jaya K.); K.W. Gripp (Karen); Guevara-Campos, J. (Jose); Hanchard, N.A. (Neil A.); Hernández-Chico, C. (Concepcion); Immken, L. (LaDonna); S. Janssens (Sandra); K.J. Jones (Kristi); Keena, B.A. (Beth A.); Kochhar, A. (Aaina); Liebelt, J. (Jan); Martir-Negron, A. (Arelis); Mahoney, M.J. (Maurice J.); I. Maystadt (Isabelle); McDougall, C. (Carey); M. McEntagart (Meriel); N.J. Mendelsohn; Miller, D.T. (David T.); G. Mortier (Geert); J. Morton (Jenny); Pappas, J. (John); S.R. Plotkin (Scott R.); Pond, D. (Dinel); Rosenbaum, K. (Kenneth); Rubin, K. (Karol); Russell, L. (Laura); Rutledge, L.S. (Lane S.); Saletti, V. (Veronica); Schonberg, R. (Rhonda); Schreiber, A. (Allison); Seidel, M. (Meredith); Siqveland, E. (Elizabeth); D.W. Stockton (David); Trevisson, E. (Eva); N.J. Ullrich (Nicole J.); M. Upadhyaya (Meena); A.S. Thornton (Andrew); H. Verhelst (H.); M.R. Wallace (Margaret); Yap, Y.-S. (Yoon-Sim); Zackai, E. (Elaine); Zonana, J. (Jonathan); Zurcher, V. (Vickie); K. Claes (Kathleen); Martin, Y. (Yolanda); B. Korf (Bruce); E. Legius (Eric); L.M. Messiaen (Ludwine)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractNeurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), a common genetic disorder with a birth incidence of 1:2,000–3,000, is characterized by a highly variable clinical presentation. To date, only two clinically relevant intragenic genotype-phenotype correlations have been reported for NF1 missense mutations

  11. Comparison phenotypic and genotypic identification of Staphylococcus species isolated from bovine mastitis

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    Felipe Freitas Guimarães

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: In addition to Staphylococcus aureus nowadays other coagulase-positive staphylococci (CoPS and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS, earlier considered of minor importance, are now accepted as relevant pathogens for humans and animals. The involvement of these microorganisms in bovine mastitis etiology and the possibility their transmission through milk to humans justify the requirement of developing reliable methods for identification of the most frequent species among them. The purpose of this study was to compare the phenotypic techniques with the genotypic method carried out by sequencing of the rpoB gene in identification of several species of the genus Staphylococcus isolated from bovine mastitis. A total of 300 staphylococci isolates of bovine mastitis cases from several Brazilian dairy herds were studied by phenotypic and genotypic techniques, respectively: 150 CoPS and 150 CoNS strains. A total of 18 CoNS different species and 4 CoPS species were identified. Among the CoNS the following species were recognized: 48 (32% Staphylococcus warneri, 22(15% S. epidermidis, 20(13% S. hyicus, 10(7% S. xylosus, 7(5% S. haemolyticus, 6(4% S. simulans, 6(4% S. schleiferi subsp schleiferi, 6(4% S. hominis, 5(3% S. pasteuri, 4(2.7% S. cohnii, 3(2% S. saprophyticus subsp. saprophyticus 3(2% S. chromogenes 3(2% S. sciuri, 2(1% S. saccharolyticus, 2(1% S. lugdunensi, 1(0,7% S. auricularis, 1(70% S. saprophyticus subsp. bovis, 1(0.7% S. capitis. And among the 150 CoPS were identified respectively: 105 (70% S. aureus, 21(14%, S. hyicus, 19(13% S. intermedius e 5(3% S. schleiferi subsp coagulans. Considering the 150 CoNS isolates, the identifications performed by phenotypic and genotypic tests presented 96.7% of concordance, kappa coefficient of agreement = 0.933, SE (standard error of kappa=0.021 (95% confidence interval: 0.893 to 0.974, Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r = 0.9977, (confidence interval 95%: 0.9938 a 0.9992 and in relation

  12. Identity of the xerophilic species Aspergillus penicillioides: Integrated analysis of the genotypic and phenotypic characters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Miki; Kawasaki, Hiroko; Sugiyama, Junta

    1999-02-01

    We examined the identity of Aspergillus penicillioides, the typical xerophilic and strictly anamorphic species, using an integrated analysis of the genotypic and phenotypic characters. Our experimental methods on two genotypic characters, i.e., DNA base composition using the HPLC method and DNA relatedness using the nitrocellulose filter hybridization technique between A. flavus, A. oryzae, and their close relations revealed a good agreement with the values by buoyant density (for DNA base composition) and spectrophotometric determination (for DNA relatedness) reported by Kurtzman et al. in 1986. On the basis of these comparisons, we examined DNA base composition and DNA relatedness of six selected strains of A. penicillioides, including IFO 8155 (originally described as A. vitricola), one strain of A. restrictus, and the respective strains from Eurotium amstelodami, E. repens, and E. rubrum. As a result, five strains within A. penicillioides, including the neotype strain NRRL 4548, had G+C contents of 46 to 49 mol%, whereas IFO 8155 had 50 mol%. A. restrictus had 52 mol%, and three Eurotium species ranged from 46 to 49 mol%. The DNA relatedness between A. penicillioides (five strains), except for IFO 8155, exhibited values greater than 70%, but the DNA complementarity between four strains and IFO 8155 in A. penicillioides revealed values of less than 40%. DNA relatedness values between three species of Eurotium were 65 to 72%. We determined 18S, 5.8S, and ITS rDNA sequences as other genotypic characters from A. penicillioides (six strains), A. restrictus, and related teleomorphic species of Eurotium. In three phylogenetic trees inferred from these sequences, five strains of A. penicillioides, including the neotype strain, were closely related to each other, whereas IFO 8155 was distantly related and grouped with other xerophilic species. Our results have suggested that A. penicillioides typified by NRRL 4548 and A. penicillioides IFO 8155 (ex holotype of A

  13. Genotype, phenotype and in silico pathogenicity analysis of HEXB mutations: Panel based sequencing for differential diagnosis of gangliosidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdieh, Nejat; Mikaeeli, Sahar; Tavasoli, Ali Reza; Rezaei, Zahra; Maleki, Majid; Rabbani, Bahareh

    2018-04-01

    Gangliosidosis is an inherited metabolic disorder causing neurodegeneration and motor regression. Preventive diagnosis is the first choice for the affected families due to lack of straightforward therapy. Genetic studies could confirm the diagnosis and help families for carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis. An update of HEXB gene variants concerning genotype, phenotype and in silico analysis are presented. Panel based next generation sequencing and direct sequencing of four cases were performed to confirm the clinical diagnosis and for reproductive planning. Bioinformatic analyses of the HEXB mutation database were also performed. Direct sequencing of HEXA and HEXB genes showed recurrent homozygous variants at c.509G>A (p.Arg170Gln) and c.850C>T (p.Arg284Ter), respectively. A novel variant at c.416T>A (p.Leu139Gln) was identified in the GLB1 gene. Panel based next generation sequencing was performed for an undiagnosed patient which showed a novel mutation at c.1602C>A (p.Cys534Ter) of HEXB gene. Bioinformatic analysis of the HEXB mutation database showed 97% consistency of in silico genotype analysis with the phenotype. Bioinformatic analysis of the novel variants predicted to be disease causing. In silico structural and functional analysis of the novel variants showed structural effect of HEXB and functional effect of GLB1 variants which would provide fast analysis of novel variants. Panel based studies could be performed for overlapping symptomatic patients. Consequently, genetic testing would help affected families for patients' management, carrier detection, and family planning's. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Poor phenotype-genotype association in a large series of patients with Type III Bartter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Castaño, Alejandro; Pérez de Nanclares, Gustavo; Madariaga, Leire; Aguirre, Mireia; Madrid, Álvaro; Chocrón, Sara; Nadal, Inmaculada; Navarro, Mercedes; Lucas, Elena; Fijo, Julia; Espino, Mar; Espitaletta, Zilac; García Nieto, Víctor; Barajas de Frutos, David; Loza, Reyner; Pintos, Guillem; Castaño, Luis; Ariceta, Gema

    2017-01-01

    Type III Bartter syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubule disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CLCNKB gene, which encodes the chloride channel protein ClC-Kb. In this study, we carried out a complete clinical and genetic characterization in a cohort of 30 patients, one of the largest series described. By comparing with other published populations, and considering that 80% of our patients presented the p.Ala204Thr Spanish founder mutation presumably associated with a common phenotype, we aimed to test the hypothesis that allelic differences could explain the wide phenotypic variability observed in patients with type III BS. Clinical data were retrieved from the referral centers. The exon regions and flanking intronic sequences of the CLCNKB gene were screened for mutations by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by direct Sanger sequencing. Presence of gross deletions or duplications in the region was checked for by MLPA and QMPSF analyses. Polyuria, polydipsia and dehydration were the main common symptoms. Metabolic alkalosis and hypokalemia of renal origin were detected in all patients at diagnosis. Calciuria levels were variable: hypercalciuria was detected in 31% of patients, while 23% had hypocalciuria. Nephrocalcinosis was diagnosed in 20% of the cohort. Two novel CLCNKB mutations were identified: a small homozygous deletion (c.753delG) in one patient and a small deletion (c.1026delC) in another. The latter was present in compound heterozygosis with the already previously described p.Glu442Gly mutation. No phenotypic association was obtained regarding the genotype. A poor correlation was found between a specific type of mutation in the CLCNKB gene and type III BS phenotype. Importantly, two CLCNKB mutations not previously described were found in our cohort.

  15. Poor phenotype-genotype association in a large series of patients with Type III Bartter syndrome.

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    Alejandro García Castaño

    Full Text Available Type III Bartter syndrome (BS is an autosomal recessive renal tubule disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CLCNKB gene, which encodes the chloride channel protein ClC-Kb. In this study, we carried out a complete clinical and genetic characterization in a cohort of 30 patients, one of the largest series described. By comparing with other published populations, and considering that 80% of our patients presented the p.Ala204Thr Spanish founder mutation presumably associated with a common phenotype, we aimed to test the hypothesis that allelic differences could explain the wide phenotypic variability observed in patients with type III BS.Clinical data were retrieved from the referral centers. The exon regions and flanking intronic sequences of the CLCNKB gene were screened for mutations by polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by direct Sanger sequencing. Presence of gross deletions or duplications in the region was checked for by MLPA and QMPSF analyses.Polyuria, polydipsia and dehydration were the main common symptoms. Metabolic alkalosis and hypokalemia of renal origin were detected in all patients at diagnosis. Calciuria levels were variable: hypercalciuria was detected in 31% of patients, while 23% had hypocalciuria. Nephrocalcinosis was diagnosed in 20% of the cohort. Two novel CLCNKB mutations were identified: a small homozygous deletion (c.753delG in one patient and a small deletion (c.1026delC in another. The latter was present in compound heterozygosis with the already previously described p.Glu442Gly mutation. No phenotypic association was obtained regarding the genotype.A poor correlation was found between a specific type of mutation in the CLCNKB gene and type III BS phenotype. Importantly, two CLCNKB mutations not previously described were found in our cohort.

  16. Associations of MC1R Genotype and Patient Phenotypes with BRAF and NRAS Mutations in Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nancy E; Edmiston, Sharon N; Kanetsky, Peter A; Busam, Klaus J; Kricker, Anne; Armstrong, Bruce K; Cust, Anne E; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Gruber, Stephen B; Luo, Li; Orlow, Irene; Reiner, Anne S; Gallagher, Richard P; Zanetti, Roberto; Rosso, Stefano; Sacchetto, Lidia; Dwyer, Terence; Parrish, Eloise A; Hao, Honglin; Gibbs, David C; Frank, Jill S; Ollila, David W; Begg, Colin B; Berwick, Marianne; Conway, Kathleen

    2017-12-01

    Associations of MC1R with BRAF mutations in melanoma have been inconsistent between studies. We sought to determine for 1,227 participants in the international population-based Genes, Environment, and Melanoma (GEM) study whether MC1R and phenotypes were associated with melanoma BRAF/NRAS subtypes. We used logistic regression adjusted by age, sex, and study design features and examined effect modifications. BRAF + were associated with younger age, blond/light brown hair, increased nevi, and less freckling, and NRAS + with older age relative to the wild type (BRAF - /NRAS - ) melanomas (all P < 0.05). Comparing specific BRAF subtypes to the wild type, BRAF V600E was associated with younger age, blond/light brown hair, and increased nevi and V600K with increased nevi and less freckling (all P < 0.05). MC1R was positively associated with BRAF V600E cases but only among individuals with darker phototypes or darker hair (P interaction < 0.05) but inversely associated with BRAF V600K (P trend  = 0.006) with no significant effect modification by phenotypes. These results support distinct etiologies for BRAF V600E, BRAF V600K, NRAS + , and wild-type melanomas. MC1R's associations with BRAF V600E cases limited to individuals with darker phenotypes indicate that MC1R genotypes specifically provide information about BRAF V600E melanoma risk in those not considered high risk based on phenotype. Our results also suggest that melanin pathways deserve further study in BRAF V600E melanomagenesis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Factor VII deficiency: a novel missense variant and genotype-phenotype correlation in patients from Southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscia, Giovanni; Favuzzi, Giovanni; Chinni, Elena; Colaizzo, Donatella; Fischetti, Lucia; Intrieri, Mariano; Margaglione, Maurizio; Grandone, Elvira

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed at attempting to correlate genotype and phenotype in factor VII deficiency. Here, we present molecular and clinical findings of 10 patients with factor VII deficiency. From 2013 to 2016, 10 subjects were referred to our center because of a prolonged prothrombin time identified during routine or presurgery examinations or after a laboratory assessment of a bleeding episode. Mutation characterization was performed using the bioinformatics applications PROMO, SIFT, and Polyphen-2. Structural changes in the factor VII protein were analyzed using the SPDB viewer tool. Of the 10 variants we identified, 1 was responsible for a novel missense change (c.1199G>C, p.Cys400Ser); in 2 cases we identified the c.-54G>A and c.509G>A (p.Arg170His) polymorphic variants in the 5'-upstream region of the factor VII gene and exon 6, respectively. To our knowledge, neither of these polymorphic variants has been described previously in factor VII-deficient patients. In silico predictions showed differences in binding sites for transcription factors caused by the c.-54G>A variant and a probable damaging effect of the p.Cys400Ser missense change on factor VII active conformation, leading to breaking of the Cys400-Cys428 disulfide bridge. Our findings further suggest that, independently of factor VII levels and of variants potentially affecting factor VII levels, environmental factors, e.g., trauma, could heavily influence the clinical phenotype of factor VII-deficient patients.

  18. Phenotype adaptability and stability of sugarcane genotypes in the sugarcane belt of the state of Pernambuco, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutra Filho, J A; Junior, T C; Simões Neto, D E

    2014-08-29

    We assessed the agroindustrial performance of 25 sugarcane genotypes adapted to the edaphoclimatic conditions of the State of Pernambuco, Brazil, within the microregions Mata Norte, Mata Sul, Região Central, Litoral Norte, and Litoral Sul. The variables analyzed were POL tonnage per hectare, sugarcane tonnage per hectare, fiber and total recoverable sugar tonnage per hectare, using a randomized block design with four repetitions. Combined variance of experiments, genetic parameter estimates, decomposition of the genotype-environment interaction, and environment stratification were analyzed. Phenotype adaptability and stability were also analyzed. The various genotypes presented great potential for improvement and a similar response pattern to the microregions Centro and Mata Sul of the state of Pernambuco. Genotypes RB863129, RB867515, RB92579, RB953180, SP81-3250, RB75126, and RB942520 were better in productivity and phenotype adaptability and stability compared to genotypes RB892700, RB943365, SP79-1011, Q138, RB943538, SP78-4764, RB953281, RB943066, RB928064, RB93509, RB72454, RB952675, RB952991, RB943161, RB942898, RB872552, RB952900, and RB942849. These genotypes are recommended as cultivation options in the sugarcane belt in the state of Pernambuco, since they stand out in terms of phenotype adaptability and stability as evaluated using the method by Annicchiarico, Lin and Bins, and the method by Eberhart and Russel.

  19. Current V3 genotyping algorithms are inadequate for predicting X4 co-receptor usage in clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Andrew J; Dong, Winnie; Chan, Dennison; Sing, Tobias; Swanstrom, Ronald; Jensen, Mark; Pillai, Satish; Good, Benjamin; Harrigan, P Richard

    2007-09-12

    Integrating CCR5 antagonists into clinical practice would benefit from accurate assays of co-receptor usage (CCR5 versus CXCR4) with fast turnaround and low cost. Published HIV V3-loop based predictors of co-receptor usage were compared with actual phenotypic tropism results in a large cohort of antiretroviral naive individuals to determine accuracy on clinical samples and identify areas for improvement. Aligned HIV envelope V3 loop sequences (n = 977), derived by bulk sequencing were analyzed by six methods: the 11/25 rule; a neural network (NN), two support vector machines, and two subtype-B position specific scoring matrices (PSSM). Co-receptor phenotype results (Trofile Co-receptor Phenotype Assay; Monogram Biosciences) were stratified by CXCR4 relative light unit (RLU) readout and CD4 cell count. Co-receptor phenotype was available for 920 clinical samples with V3 genotypes having fewer than seven amino acid mixtures (n = 769 R5; n = 151 X4-capable). Sensitivity and specificity for predicting X4 capacity were evaluated for the 11/25 rule (30% sensitivity/93% specificity), NN (44%/88%), PSSM(sinsi) (34%/96%), PSSM(x4r5) (24%/97%), SVMgenomiac (22%/90%) and SVMgeno2pheno (50%/89%). Quantitative increases in sensitivity could be obtained by optimizing the cut-off for methods with continuous output (PSSM methods), and/or integrating clinical data (CD4%). Sensitivity was directly proportional to strength of X4 signal in the phenotype assay (P < 0.05). Current default implementations of co-receptor prediction algorithms are inadequate for predicting HIV X4 co-receptor usage in clinical samples, particularly those X4 phenotypes with low CXCR4 RLU signals. Significant improvements can be made to genotypic predictors, including training on clinical samples, using additional data to improve predictions and optimizing cutoffs and increasing genotype sensitivity.

  20. Mining Genotype-Phenotype Associations from Public Knowledge Sources via Semantic Web Querying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Richard C; Freimuth, Robert R; Chute, Christopher G; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2013-01-01

    Gene Wiki Plus (GeneWiki+) and the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) are publicly available resources for sharing information about disease-gene and gene-SNP associations in humans. While immensely useful to the scientific community, both resources are manually curated, thereby making the data entry and publication process time-consuming, and to some degree, error-prone. To this end, this study investigates Semantic Web technologies to validate existing and potentially discover new genotype-phenotype associations in GWP and OMIM. In particular, we demonstrate the applicability of SPARQL queries for identifying associations not explicitly stated for commonly occurring chronic diseases in GWP and OMIM, and report our preliminary findings for coverage, completeness, and validity of the associations. Our results highlight the benefits of Semantic Web querying technology to validate existing disease-gene associations as well as identify novel associations although further evaluation and analysis is required before such information can be applied and used effectively.

  1. Investigating genotype-phenotype relationships in Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network through stoichiometric modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochado, Ana Rita

    processes. Metabolism is an extensively studied and characterised subcellular system, for which several modeling approaches have been proposed over the last 20 years. Nowadays, stoichiometric modeling of metabolism is done at the genome scale and it has diverse applications, many of them for helping....... This chapter aims at providing the reader with relevant state-of-the-art information concerning Systems Biology, Genome-Scale Metabolic Modeling and Metabolic Engineering. Particular attention is given to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the eukaryotic model organism used thought the thesis.......A holistic view of the cell is fundamental for gaining insights into genotype to phenotype relationships. Systems Biology is a discipline within Biology, which uses such holistic approach by focusing on the development and application of tools for studying the structure and dynamics of cellular...

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Thai isolates of Plasmodium falciparum after an artemisinin resistance containment project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thita, Thunyapit; Jadsri, Pimrat; Thamkhantho, Jarupatr; Ruang-Areerate, Toon; Suwandittakul, Nantana; Sitthichot, Naruemon; Mahotorn, Kittiya; Tan-Ariya, Peerapan; Mungthin, Mathirut

    2018-05-15

    In Thailand, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been used to treat uncomplicated falciparum malaria since 1995. Unfortunately, artemisinin resistance has been reported from Thailand and other Southeast Asian countries since 2003. Malarone ® , a combination of atovaquone-proguanil (ATQ-PG), has been used to cease artemisinin pressure in some areas along Thai-Cambodia border, as part of an artemisinin resistance containment project since 2009. This study aimed to determine genotypes and phenotypes of Plasmodium falciparum isolates collected from the Thai-Cambodia border after the artemisinin resistance containment project compared with those collected before. One hundred and nine of P. falciparum isolates collected from Thai-Cambodia border from Chanthaburi and Trat provinces during 1988-2016 were used in this study. Of these, 58 isolates were collected after the containment. These parasite isolates were characterized for in vitro antimalarial sensitivities including chloroquine (CQ), quinine (QN), mefloquine (MQ), piperaquine (PPQ), artesunate (AS), dihydroartemisinin (DHA), ATQ and PG and genetic markers for drug resistance including the Kelch13 (k13), Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt), P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) and cytochrome b (cytb) genes. Mean CQ, QN, MQ, PPQ and AS IC 50 s of the parasite isolates collected from 2009 to 2016 exhibited significantly higher than those of parasites collected before 2009. Approximately 57% exhibited in vitro MQ resistance. Approximately 94% of the isolates collected from 2009 to 2016 contained the pfmdr1 184F allele. Mutations of the k13 gene were detected in approximately 90% of the parasites collected from 2009 to 2016 which were significantly higher than the parasite isolates collected before. No ATQ-resistant genotype and phenotype of P. falciparum were found among the isolates collected after the containment project. Although the containment project had been

  3. Genotype-phenotype correlation of xeroderma pigmentosum in a Chinese Han population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Z; Zhang, J; Guo, Y; Ni, C; Liang, J; Cheng, R; Li, M; Yao, Z

    2015-04-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by extreme sensitivity to sunlight, freckle-like pigmentation and a greatly increased incidence of skin cancers. Genetic mutation detection and genotype-phenotype analysis of XP are rarely reported in the Chinese Han population. To investigate the mutational spectrum of XP in a Chinese Han population, to discover any genotype-phenotype correlation and, consequently, to propose a simple and effective tool for the molecular diagnosis of XP. This study was carried out on 12 unrelated Chinese families that included 13 patients with clinically suspected XP. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples. Mutation screening was performed by direct sequencing of exons and flanking intron-exon boundaries for the entire coding region of eight XP genes. In 12 patients, direct sequencing of the whole coding region of eight XP genes revealed pathogenic mutations, including seven compound heterozygous mutations, three homozygous mutations and a Japanese founder mutation. Thirteen mutations have not been previously identified. This cohort was composed of four patients with XP-C (XPC), two with XP-G (ERCC5), three with XP-A (XPA) and three with XP-V (POLH). This study identified 13 novel mutations and extended the mutation spectrum of XP in the Chinese Han population. In this cohort, we found that patients with XP-G have no neurological symptoms, and patients with XP-A and XP-V have a high incidence of malignancy. Furthermore, lack of stringent protection against sunlight, late diagnosis and long duration of disease play an important role. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  4. The Bone Dysplasia Ontology: integrating genotype and phenotype information in the skeletal dysplasia domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groza Tudor

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skeletal dysplasias are a rare and heterogeneous group of genetic disorders affecting skeletal development. Patients with skeletal dysplasias suffer from many complex medical issues including degenerative joint disease and neurological complications. Because the data and expertise associated with this field is both sparse and disparate, significant benefits will potentially accrue from the availability of an ontology that provides a shared conceptualisation of the domain knowledge and enables data integration, cross-referencing and advanced reasoning across the relevant but distributed data sources. Results We introduce the design considerations and implementation details of the Bone Dysplasia Ontology. We also describe the different components of the ontology, including a comprehensive and formal representation of the skeletal dysplasia domain as well as the related genotypes and phenotypes. We then briefly describe SKELETOME, a community-driven knowledge curation platform that is underpinned by the Bone Dysplasia Ontology. SKELETOME enables domain experts to use, refine and extend and apply the ontology without any prior ontology engineering experience--to advance the body of knowledge in the skeletal dysplasia field. Conclusions The Bone Dysplasia Ontology represents the most comprehensive structured knowledge source for the skeletal dysplasias domain. It provides the means for integrating and annotating clinical and research data, not only at the generic domain knowledge level, but also at the level of individual patient case studies. It enables links between individual cases and publicly available genotype and phenotype resources based on a community-driven curation process that ensures a shared conceptualisation of the domain knowledge and its continuous incremental evolution.

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of mastocytosis according to the age of onset.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Lanternier

    Full Text Available Adult's mastocytosis is usually associated with persistent systemic involvement and c-kit 816 mutation, while pediatrics disease is mostly limited to the skin and often resolves spontaneously. We prospectively included 142 adult patients with histologically proven mastocytosis. We compared phenotypic and genotypic features of adults patients whose disease started during childhood (Group 1, n = 28 with those of patients whose disease started at adult's age (Group 2, n = 114. Genotypic analysis was performed on skin biopsy by sequencing of c-kit exons 17 and 8 to 13. According to WHO classification, the percentage of systemic disease was similar (75 vs. 73% in 2 groups. C-kit 816 mutation was found in 42% and 77% of patients in groups 1 and 2, respectively (p<0.001. 816 c-kit mutation was associated with systemic mastocytosis in group 2 (87% of patients with systemic mastocytosis vs. 45% with cutaneous mastocytosis, p = 0.0001. Other c-kit activating mutations were found in 23% of patients with mastocytosis' onset before the age of 5, 0% between 6 and 15 years and 2% at adults' age (p<0.001. In conclusion, pathogenesis of mastocytosis significantly differs according to the age of disease's onset. Our data may have major therapeutic relevance when considering c-kit-targeted therapy.

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic profile of clinical and animal multidrug-resistant Salmonella enterica isolates from Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Montes de Oca, S; Talavera-Rojas, M; Soriano-Vargas, E; Barba-León, J; Vázquez-Navarrete, J; Acosta-Dibarrat, J; Salgado-Miranda, C

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain a phenotypic and genotypic profile of Salmonella enterica including multidrug-resistant (MDR) isolates from food-producing animals and clinical isolates, as well as their genetic relatedness in two different States of Mexico (Jalisco and State of Mexico). A total of 243 isolates were evaluated in terms of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and related genes through a disk diffusion method and PCR respectively; we found 16 MDR isolates, all of them harbouring the bla CMY gene but not qnr genes, these isolates represent less than 10% of the collection. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed a higher genotypic similitude within isolates of State of Mexico than Jalisco. A low percentage of Salmonella isolates were resistant to relevant antibiotics in human health, nevertheless, the AMR and involved genes were similar despite the different serovars and origin of the isolates. This investigation provided an insight of the current status of AMR of Salmonella isolates in two States of Mexico and pinpoint the genes involved in AMR and their epidemiological relationship, the information could help to determine an adequate therapy in human and veterinary medicine. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus in bovine mastitis and correlation to phenotypic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artursson, Karin; Söderlund, Robert; Liu, Lihong; Monecke, Stefan; Schelin, Jenny

    2016-09-25

    Reducing the prevalence of mastitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is essential to improve animal health and reduce economic losses for farmers. The clinical outcome of acute mastitis and risk of progression to persistent mastitis can, at least to some extent, be related to genetic variants of the strain causing the infection. In the present study we have used microarrays to investigate the presence of virulence genes in S. aureus isolates from dairy cows with acute clinical mastitis (n=70) and correlated the findings to other genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. Among the most commonly found virulence factors were genes encoding several hemolysin types, leukocidins D and lukM/lukF-P83, clumping factors A and B, fibrinogen binding protein and fibronectin-binding protein A. Some virulence factors e.g. fibronectin-binding protein B and Staphylococcus aureus surface protein G were less common. Genes coding for several staphylococcal enterotoxins and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) were commonly found, especially in one major pulsotype. No beta-lactamase genes were found in any common pulsotype, while present in some rare pulsotypes, indicated to be of human origin. Production of TSST-1, enterotoxins, hemolysins and beta-lactamase could all be positively correlated to presence of the corresponding genes. This study reveals a number of genotypic differences and similarities among common and rare pulsotypes of S. aureus from cases of mastitis in Sweden. The results could help the design of diagnostic tools to guide on-farm interventions according to the expected impact on udder health from a specific S. aureus genotype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. MLL2 mutation detection in 86 patients with Kabuki syndrome: a genotype-phenotype study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrythanasis, P; van Bon, B W; Steehouwer, M; Rodríguez-Santiago, B; Simpson, M; Dias, P; Anderlid, B M; Arts, P; Bhat, M; Augello, B; Biamino, E; Bongers, E M H F; Del Campo, M; Cordeiro, I; Cueto-González, A M; Cuscó, I; Deshpande, C; Frysira, E; Izatt, L; Flores, R; Galán, E; Gener, B; Gilissen, C; Granneman, S M; Hoyer, J; Yntema, H G; Kets, C M; Koolen, D A; Marcelis, C l; Medeira, A; Micale, L; Mohammed, S; de Munnik, S A; Nordgren, A; Psoni, S; Reardon, W; Revencu, N; Roscioli, T; Ruiterkamp-Versteeg, M; Santos, H G; Schoumans, J; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, J H M; Silengo, M C; Toledo, L; Vendrell, T; van der Burgt, I; van Lier, B; Zweier, C; Reymond, A; Trembath, R C; Perez-Jurado, L; Dupont, J; de Vries, B B A; Brunner, H G; Veltman, J A; Merla, G; Antonarakis, S E; Hoischen, A

    2013-12-01

    Recently, pathogenic variants in the MLL2 gene were identified as the most common cause of Kabuki (Niikawa-Kuroki) syndrome (MIM#147920). To further elucidate the genotype-phenotype correlation, we studied a large cohort of 86 clinically defined patients with Kabuki syndrome (KS) for mutations in MLL2. All patients were assessed using a standardized phenotype list and all were scored using a newly developed clinical score list for KS (MLL2-Kabuki score 0-10). Sequencing of the full coding region and intron-exon boundaries of MLL2 identified a total of 45 likely pathogenic mutations (52%): 31 nonsense, 10 missense and four splice-site mutations, 34 of which were novel. In five additional patients, novel, i.e. non-dbSNP132 variants of clinically unknown relevance, were identified. Patients with likely pathogenic nonsense or missense MLL2 mutations were usually more severely affected (median 'MLL2-Kabuki score' of 6) as compared to the patients without MLL2 mutations (median 'MLL2-Kabuki score' of 5), a significant difference (p < 0.0014). Several typical facial features such as large dysplastic ears, arched eyebrows with sparse lateral third, blue sclerae, a flat nasal tip with a broad nasal root, and a thin upper and a full lower lip were observed more often in mutation positive patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Genetic diversity in soybean genotypes using phenotypic characters and enzymatic markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambiazzi, E V; Bruzi, A T; Sales, A P; Borges, I M M; Guilherme, S R; Zuffo, A M; Lima, J G; Ribeiro, F O; Mendes, A E S; Godinho, S H M; Carvalho, M L M

    2017-09-21

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity of soybean cultivars by adopting phenotypic traits and enzymatic markers, the relative contribution of agronomic traits to diversity, as well as diversity between the level of technology used in soybean cultivars and genetic breeding programs in which cultivars were inserted. The experiments were conducted on the field at the Center for Scientific and Technological Development in crop-livestock production and the Electrophoresis Laboratory of Lavras Federal University. The agronomic traits adopted were grain yield, plant height, first legume insertion, plant lodging, the mass of one thousand seeds, and days for complete maturation, in which the Euclidean distance, grouped by Tocher and UPGMA criteria, was obtained. After electrophorese gels for enzymatic systems, dehydrogenase alcohol, esterase, superoxide dismutase, and peroxidase were performed. The genetic similarity estimative was also obtained between genotypes by the Jaccard coefficient with subsequent grouping by the UPGMA method. The formation of two groups was shown using phenotypic characters in the genetic diversity study and individually discriminating the cultivar 97R73 RR. The character with the greatest contribution to the genetic divergence was grain yield with contribution higher than 90.0%. To obtain six different groups, individually discriminating the cultivars CG 8166 RR, FPS Jupiter RR, and BRS MG 780 RR, enzymatic markers were used. Cultivars carrying the RR technology presented more divergence than conventional cultivars and IPRO cultivars.

  10. Revisiting genotype-phenotype overlap in neurogenetics: triplet-repeat expansions mimicking spastic paraplegias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettencourt, Conceição; Quintáns, Beatriz; Ros, Raquel; Ampuero, Israel; Yáñez, Zuleima; Pascual, Samuel Ignacio; de Yébenes, Justo García; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2012-09-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs) constitute a heterogeneous group of neurological disorders, characterized primarily by progressive spasticity and weakness of the lower limbs. HSPs are caused by mutations in multiple genes (at least 48 loci and 28 causative genes). The clinical spectrum of HSPs is wide and important differences have been reported between patients with distinct mutations in the same gene, or even between different family members bearing the same mutation. Many patients with HSP present clinical deficits related to the involvement of neuronal systems other than corticospinal tracts, namely, peripheral nerves, sensory, or cerebellar pathways. These cases may be difficult to differentiate from other neurological diseases (e.g., hereditary ataxias), also genetically and clinically heterogeneous. As an illustration of how overlapping this genotype-phenotype relationship is, and the difficulties that it brings upon the development of neurogenetic algorithms and databases, we review the main clinical and genetic features of HSPs, and summarize reports on cases of triplet-repeat spinocerebellar ataxias that can mimic HSP phenotypes. This complex scenario makes the necessity of high-quality, curated mutation databases even more urgent, in order to develop adequate diagnostic guidelines, correct interpretation of genetic testing, and appropriate genetic counseling. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Phenotypic and genotypic studies of ALS cases in ALS-SMA families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcia, Philippe; Vourc'h, Patrick; Blasco, Helene; Couratier, Philippe; Dangoumau, Audrey; Bellance, Remi; Desnuelle, Claude; Viader, Fausto; Pautot, Vivien; Millecamps, Stephanie; Bakkouche, Salah; Salachas, FranÇois; Andres, Christian R; Meininger, Vincent; Camu, William

    2018-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are the most frequent motor neuron disorders in adulthood and infancy, respectively. There is a growing literature supporting common pathophysiological patterns between those disorders. One important clinical issue for that is the co-occurrence of both diseases within a family. To collect families in which ALS and SMA patients co-exist and describe the phenotype and the genotype of ALS patients. Nine families with co-occurrence of SMA and ALS have been gathered over the last 15 years. Epidemiological, phenotype and genetic status were collected. Out of the nine families, six corresponded to the criteria of familial ALS (FALS). Clinical data were available for 11 patients out of the 15 ALS cases. Mean age of onset was 58.5 years, site of onset was lower limbs in nine cases (81.8%), median duration was 22 months. Four ALS patients carried a mutation: three mutations in SOD1 gene (G147N in two cases and one with E121G) and one repeat expansion in the C9ORF72 gene. Three patients had abnormal SMN1 copy numbers. While the high proportion of familial history of ALS cases in these ALS-SMA pedigrees could have suggested that these familial clusters of the two most frequent MND rely on a genetic background, we failed to exclude that this occurred by chance.

  12. Population structure and genotype-phenotype associations in a collection of oat landraces and historic cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louisa Rosemarie Winkler

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Population structure and genetic architecture of phenotypic traits in oat (Avena sativa L. remain relatively under-researched compared to other small grain species. This study explores the historic context of current elite germplasm, including phenotypic and genetic characterization, with a particular focus on identifying under-utilized areas. A diverse panel of cultivated oat accessions was assembled from the USDA National Small Grains Collection to represent a gene pool relatively unaffected by twentieth century breeding activity and unlikely to have been included in recent molecular studies. The panel was genotyped using an oat iSelect 6K beadchip SNP array. The final dataset included 759 unique individuals and 2,715 polymorphic markers. Some population structure was apparent; with the first three principal components accounting for 38.8% of variation and 73% of individuals belonging to one of three clusters. One cluster with high genetic distinctness appears to have been largely overlooked in twentieth century breeding. Classification and phenotype data provided by the Germplasm Resources Information Network were evaluated for their relationship to population structure. Of the structuring variables evaluated, improvement status (cultivar or landrace was relatively unimportant, indicating that landraces and cultivars included in the panel were all sampled from a similar underlying population. Instead, lemma color and region of origin showed the strongest explanatory power. An exploratory association mapping study of the panel using a subset of 2,588 mapped markers generated novel indications of genomic regions associated with awn frequency, kernels per spikelet, lemma color and panicle type. Further results supported previous findings of loci associated with barley yellow dwarf virus tolerance, crown rust (caused by Puccinia coronata f. sp. avenae resistance, days to anthesis and growth habit (winter/spring. In addition, two novel loci were

  13. Phenotypic and genotypic evaluation of 18 Nocardia isolates from human clinical samples in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Herrera, K; Sandoval, H; Couble, A; Mouniee, D; Ramírez-Durán, N; Uzcategui de Morillo, M; Serrano, J A; Bergeron, E; Boiron, P; Rodríguez-Nava, V

    2012-03-01

    Mexico has the largest number of clinical cases of actinomycetoma in North and South America. Species originally identified by less specific methods have been recently reclassified as other known species or as new species. To assess, by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and phenotypic methods, the species distribution of 18 human clinical isolates originally identified as N. brasiliensis, some of them isolated between 1947 and 1959 in Mexico City. Clinical isolates came from the Hospital General, "Dr. Manuel Gea Gonzalez", and Instituto Nacional de Diagnóstico y Referencia Epidemiológica (INDRE) in Mexico, D.F. The strains used in this study included 15 clinical strains isolated between 1947 and 1959 that were originally identified as N. brasiliensis and three more strains obtained in 2007 identified as Nocardia spp. The isolates were identified genotypically by sequencing the 16S rRNA gene, and their phenotypic profiles were obtained with the API Coryne(®) system. Antibiotic susceptibility patterns were tested according to the protocol of the Comité de l'antibiogramme de la Société française de microbiologie[4]. According to 16S rRNA gene, sequencing were identified among 18 human clinical isolates as Nocardia farcinica (n=11) and Nocardia brasiliensis (n=7). A high number of the strains were susceptible to the majority of the antibiotics tested. The phenotypic profiles of the strains were quite uniform for N. farcinica and some variability was observed for N. brasiliensis strains. N. farcinica was the most prevalent species identified. Modern methodologies should be applied in clinical laboratories to accurately identify etiological agents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. A preliminary candidate genotype-intermediate phenotype study of satiation and gastric motor function in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanasopoulos, Athanasios; Camilleri, Michael; Carlson, Paula J; Vella, Adrian; Nord, Sara J Linker; Burton, Duane D; Odunsi, Suwebatu T; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2010-06-01

    Stomach motility contributes significantly to fullness sensation while eating and cessation of food intake in humans. Genes controlling adrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms (ADRA2A, GNB3, and SLC6A4) affect gastric emptying (GE), volume (GV), and satiation. Fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) is linked with satiety. Our aim was to examine the association of these candidate genes with stomach functions that signal postprandial fullness: GE, GV, and maximum tolerated volume (MTV). These biomarkers constitute a component of the intermediate phenotype of satiation. A total of 62 overweight or obese participants underwent genotyping of the candidate genes, and validated measurements of GE of solids and liquids by scintigraphy, fasting and postprandial change in GV by SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography), and MTV by nutrient drink test. These markers of satiation were compared for 38 genetic variants in ADRA2A, ADR2C, ADRB3, uncoupling protein (UCP)-2 and -3, GNB3, FTO, and SLC6A4 using a recessive model of inheritance. ADRA2A, ADR2C, UCP-3, GNB3, and FTO loci were significantly associated with the intermediate phenotype markers of satiation: ADR2C (Ins-Del322_325) with accelerated GE; GNB3 (rs1047776) with delayed GE; ADRA2A (rs491589 and rs553668) and GNB3 (rs2269355, rs10849527, and rs3759348) with decreased postprandial GV; ADRA2A (rs3750625) and GNB3 (rs4963517 and rs1129649) with increased postprandial GV; UCP-3 (rs1685356) with increased MTV, and FTO (rs9939609) decreased MTV. Genetic susceptibility to postprandial satiation can be identified through intermediate phenotype markers. With independent validation, these markers may guide patient selection of weight-loss therapies directed at gastric motor functions.

  15. Plant phenomics and the need for physiological phenotyping across scales to narrow the genotype-to-phenotype knowledge gap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grosskinsky, D. K.; Svensgaard, J.; Christensen, S.; Roitsch, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 18 (2015), s. 5429-5440 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : External phenotype * genome–environment–management interaction * genome–phenome map * internal phenotype * phenomics * physiological traits * physiology * plant phenotyping * predictors Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.677, year: 2015

  16. Prediction of Phenotypic Antimicrobial Resistance Profiles From Whole Genome Sequences of Non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuert, Saskia; Nair, Satheesh; Day, Martin R; Doumith, Michel; Ashton, Philip M; Mellor, Kate C; Jenkins, Claire; Hopkins, Katie L; Woodford, Neil; de Pinna, Elizabeth; Godbole, Gauri; Dallman, Timothy J

    2018-01-01

    Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in non-typhoidal Salmonella enterica (NTS), is essential for monitoring transmission of resistance from the food chain to humans, and for establishing effective treatment protocols. We evaluated the prediction of phenotypic resistance in NTS from genotypic profiles derived from whole genome sequencing (WGS). Genes and chromosomal mutations responsible for phenotypic resistance were sought in WGS data from 3,491 NTS isolates received by Public Health England's Gastrointestinal Bacteria Reference Unit between April 2014 and March 2015. Inferred genotypic AMR profiles were compared with phenotypic susceptibilities determined for fifteen antimicrobials using EUCAST guidelines. Discrepancies between phenotypic and genotypic profiles for one or more antimicrobials were detected for 76 isolates (2.18%) although only 88/52,365 (0.17%) isolate/antimicrobial combinations were discordant. Of the discrepant results, the largest number were associated with streptomycin (67.05%, n = 59). Pan-susceptibility was observed in 2,190 isolates (62.73%). Overall, resistance to tetracyclines was most common (26.27% of isolates, n = 917) followed by sulphonamides (23.72%, n = 828) and ampicillin (21.43%, n = 748). Multidrug resistance (MDR), i.e., resistance to three or more antimicrobial classes, was detected in 848 isolates (24.29%) with resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, sulphonamides and tetracyclines being the most common MDR profile ( n = 231; 27.24%). For isolates with this profile, all but one were S . Typhimurium and 94.81% ( n = 219) had the resistance determinants bla TEM-1, strA-strB, sul2 and tet (A). Extended-spectrum β-lactamase genes were identified in 41 isolates (1.17%) and multiple mutations in chromosomal genes associated with ciprofloxacin resistance in 82 isolates (2.35%). This study showed that WGS is suitable as a rapid means of determining AMR patterns of NTS for public health surveillance.

  17. Phenotypic and genotypic changes in a new clone complex of Neisseria meningitidis causing disease in The Netherlands, 1958-1990

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, R. J.; Poolman, J. T.; Valkenburg, H. A.; Bijlmer, H. A.; Dankert, J.; Caugant, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    To characterize the phenotypic and genotypic changes that occurred in a new clone lineage of Neisseria meningitidis (lineage III) in the Netherlands, the electrophoretic type (ET) was determined for 79 serogroup B isolates of serotype 4 or subtype P1.4 (or both) obtained between 1958 and 1990 from

  18. An optimized methodology for combined phenotyping and genotyping on CYP2D6 and CYP2C19

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamminga, C.A; Wemer, J; Oosterhuis, B; Brakenhoff, J.P G; Gerrits, M.G F; de Zeeuw, R.A; de Leij, Lou; Jonkman, J.H.G.

    A method for simultaneous phenotyping and genotyping for CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 was tested. Six healthy volunteers were selected (three extensive and three poor metabolisers for CYP2D6). CYP2D6 was probed with dextromethorphan and metoprolol and CYP2C19 was probed with omeprazole. Blood samples were

  19. Genotypic classification of patients with Wolfram syndrome: insights into the natural history of the disease and correlation with phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heredia, Miguel López; Clèries, Ramón; Nunes, Virginia

    2013-07-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a degenerative, recessive rare disease with an onset in childhood. It is caused by mutations in WFS1 or CISD2 genes. More than 200 different variations in WFS1 have been described in patients with Wolfram syndrome, which complicates the establishment of clear genotype-phenotype correlation. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of WFS1 mutations and update the natural history of the disease. This study analyzed clinical and genetic data of 412 patients with Wolfram syndrome published in the last 15 years. (i) 15% of published patients do not fulfill the current -inclusion criterion; (ii) genotypic prevalence differences may exist among countries; (iii) diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy might not be the first two clinical features in some patients; (iv) mutations are nonuniformly distributed in WFS1; (v) age at onset of diabetes mellitus, hearing defects, and diabetes insipidus may depend on the patient's genotypic class; and (vi) disease progression rate might depend on genotypic class. New genotype-phenotype correlations were established, disease progression rate for the general population and for the genotypic classes has been calculated, and new diagnostic criteria have been proposed. The conclusions raised could be important for patient management and counseling as well as for the development of treatments for Wolfram syndrome.

  20. Characteristic cardiac phenotypes are detected by cardiovascular magnetic resonance in patients with different clinical phenotypes and genotypes of mitochondrial myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florian, Anca; Ludwig, Anna; Stubbe-Dräger, Bianca; Boentert, Matthias; Young, Peter; Waltenberger, Johannes; Rösch, Sabine; Sechtem, Udo; Yilmaz, Ali

    2015-05-22

    Mitochondrial myopathies (MM) are a heterogeneous group of inherited conditions resulting from a primary defect in the mitochondrial respiratory chain with consecutively impaired cellular energy metabolism. Small sized studies using mainly electrocardiography (ECG) and echocardiography have revealed cardiac abnormalities ranging from conduction abnormalities and arrhythmias to hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy in these patients. Recently, characteristic patterns of cardiac involvement were documented by cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) in patients with chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia (CPEO)/Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS) and with mitochondrial encephalopathy with lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS). The present study aimed to characterize the prevalence and pattern of cardiac abnormalities and to test the additional diagnostic value of CMR in this patient population. The hypothesis that different neuromuscular MM syndromes present with different cardiac disease phenotypes was evaluated. Sixty-four MM patients (50 ± 15 years, 44% male) and 25 matched controls (52 ± 14 years, 36% male) prospectively underwent cardiac evaluations including CMR (comprising cine- and late-gadolinium-enhancement (LGE) imaging). Based on the neuromuscular phenotype and genotype, the patients were grouped: (a) CPEO/KSS (N = 33); (b) MELAS/-like (N = 11); c) myoclonic epilepsy with ragged-red fibers (MERRF) (N = 3) and d) other non-specific MM forms (N = 17). Among the 64 MM patients, 34 (53%) had at least one abnormal CMR finding: 18 (28%) demonstrated an impaired left ventricular ejection-fraction (LV-EF patients showed significantly higher maximal wall thickness (10 ± 3 vs. 8 ± 2 mm, p = 0.005) and concentricity (LV mass to end-diastolic volume: 0.84 ± 0.27 vs. 0.67 ± 0.11, p patients showed the highest frequency of cardiac disease (in 10/11 (91%)), a mostly concentric LV hypertrophy (6/9; 67%) with or

  1. Gravimetric phenotyping of whole plant transpiration responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit identifies genotypic variation in water use efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Annette C; Dodd, Ian C; Rothwell, Shane A; Jones, Ros; Tardieu, Francois; Draye, Xavier; Davies, William J

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing interest in rapidly identifying genotypes with improved water use efficiency, exemplified by the development of whole plant phenotyping platforms that automatically measure plant growth and water use. Transpirational responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and whole plant water use efficiency (WUE, defined as the accumulation of above ground biomass per unit of water used) were measured in 100 maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes. Using a glasshouse based phenotyping platform with naturally varying VPD (1.5-3.8kPa), a 2-fold variation in WUE was identified in well-watered plants. Regression analysis of transpiration versus VPD under these conditions, and subsequent whole plant gas exchange at imposed VPDs (0.8-3.4kPa) showed identical responses in specific genotypes. Genotype response of transpiration versus VPD fell into two categories: 1) a linear increase in transpiration rate with VPD with low (high WUE) or high (low WUE) transpiration rate at all VPDs, 2) a non-linear response with a pronounced change point at low VPD (high WUE) or high VPD (low WUE). In the latter group, high WUE genotypes required a significantly lower VPD before transpiration was restricted, and had a significantly lower rate of transpiration in response to VPD after this point, when compared to low WUE genotypes. Change point values were significantly positively correlated with stomatal sensitivity to VPD. A change point in stomatal response to VPD may explain why some genotypes show contradictory WUE rankings according to whether they are measured under glasshouse or field conditions. Furthermore, this novel use of a high throughput phenotyping platform successfully reproduced the gas exchange responses of individuals measured in whole plant chambers, accelerating the identification of plants with high WUE. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Streptococcus uberis isolated from bovine subclinical mastitis in Argentinean dairy farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirta C Lasagno

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of Streptococcus uberis isolated from subclinical mastitis (SCM cases, and to examine the possible association between both characteristics. A total of 32 S. uberis were isolated from 772 quarter milk samples (SCM > 250,000 cells/ml collected from 195 cows selected randomly from 18 dairy farms located in Argentina. The S. uberis strains were characterized phenotypically by the presence of virulence factors as plasminogen activator factor (PAF, hyaluronidase (HYA, capsule (CAP and CAMP factor, and were further characterized genotypically by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. S. uberis strains expressed plasminogen activator factor, hyaluronidase or capsule (65.5 %, 56.3 %, 59.4 %, respectively, but only 25 % of isolates were CAMP factor positive. Thirteen different virulence profiles were identified on the basis of the combination of virulence factors. Eighteen PFGE patterns with 90% of similarity were identified among 32 S. uberis. A great diversity of virulence profiles and PFGE patterns were present among dairy farms. S. uberis strains with the same PFGE pattern showed different virulence profiles. Bovine S. uberis strains causing SCM included in the present study showed heterogeneity in regard to their phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, and the PFGE patterns are not associated with the virulence profiles.Caracterización fenotípica y genotípica de Streptococcus uberis aislados de mastitis bovina subclínica en tambos de Argentina. El objetivo de este estudio fue investigar las características fenotípicas y genotípicas de Streptococcus uberis aislados de casos de mastitis subclínica (MSC y examinar la posible asociación entre ambas características. Un total de 32 cepas de S. uberis fueron aisladas de 772 muestras de leche de cuartos mamarios (MSC > 25 0000 células/ml colectadas de 195 vacas seleccionadas al azar pertenecientes a 18 tambos

  3. Human Paraoxonase1 Hydrolysis of Nanomolar Chlorpyrifos-oxon Concentrations is Unaffected by Phenotype or Q192R Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombes, R. Hunter; Meek, Edward C.; Dail, Mary Beth; Chambers, Howard W.; Chambers, Janice E.

    2016-01-01

    The organophosphorus insecticide chlorpyrifos has been widely used. Its active metabolite chlorpyrifos-oxon (CPO) is a potent anticholinesterase and is detoxified by paraoxonase-1 (PON1). PON1 activity is influenced by numerous factors including a Q192R polymorphism. Using forty human blood samples bearing homozygous genotypes and either high or low activity phenotypes (as determined by high concentration assays of paraoxon and diazoxon hydrolysis) the serum PON1 hydrolysis of high (320 μM) and low (178 nM) CPO concentrations was assessed using direct or indirect spectrophotometric methods, respectively. PON1 activity at high CPO concentration reflected the phenotype and genotype differences; subjects with the high activity phenotype and homozygous for the PON1R192 alloform hydrolyzed significantly more CPO than subjects with the low activity phenotype and/or PON1Q192 alloform (High RR=11023±722, Low RR=9467±798, High QQ=8809±672, Low QQ=6030±1015 μmoles CPO hydrolyzed/min/L serum). However, PON1 hydrolysis of CPO at the lower, more environmentally relevant concentration showed no significant differences between the PON1192 genotypes and/or between high and low activity phenotypes (High RR=231±27, Low RR=219±52, High QQ=193±59, Low QQ=185±43 nmoles CPO/min/L serum). Low CPO concentrations were probably not saturating, so PON1 did not display maximal velocity and the PON1 genotype/phenotype might not influence the extent of metabolism at environmental exposures. PMID:25093614

  4. Integrative Genomics: Quantifying significance of phenotype-genotype relationships from multiple sources of high-throughput data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric eGamazon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Given recent advances in the generation of high-throughput data such as whole genome genetic variation and transcriptome expression, it is critical to come up with novel methods to integrate these heterogeneous datasets and to assess the significance of identified phenotype-genotype relationships. Recent studies show that genome-wide association findings are likely to fall in loci with gene regulatory effects such as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs, demonstrating the utility of such integrative approaches. When genotype and gene expression data are available on the same individuals, we developed methods wherein top phenotype-associated genetic variants are prioritized if they are associated, as eQTLs, with gene expression traits that are themselves associated with the phenotype. Yet there has been no method to determine an overall p-value for the findings that arise specifically from the integrative nature of the approach. We propose a computationally feasible permutation method that accounts for the assimilative nature of the method and the correlation structure among gene expression traits and among genotypes. We apply the method to data from a study of cellular sensitivity to etoposide, one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic drugs. To our knowledge, this study is the first statistically sound quantification of the significance of the genotype-phenotype relationships resulting from applying an integrative approach. This method can be easily extended to cases in which gene expression data are replaced by other molecular phenotypes of interest, e.g., microRNA or proteomic data. This study has important implications for studies seeking to expand on genetic association studies by the use of omics data. Finally, we provide an R code to compute the empirical FDR when p-values for the observed and simulated phenotypes are available.

  5. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characterization of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Strains from a Pediatric Tertiary Care Hospital in Serbia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haowa Madi

    Full Text Available Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is an environmental bacterium and an opportunistic pathogen usually associated with healthcare-associated infections, which has recently been recognized as a globally multi-drug resistant organism. The aim of this study was genotyping and physiological characterization of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolated in a large, tertiary care pediatric hospital in Belgrade, Serbia, hosting the national reference cystic fibrosis (CF center for pediatric and adult patients.We characterized 42 strains of cystic fibrosis (CF and 46 strains of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF origin isolated from 2013 to 2015 in order to investigate their genetic relatedness and phenotypic traits. Genotyping was performed using sequencing of 16S rRNA gene, Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and Multi locus sequencing typing (MLST analysis. Sensitivity to five relevant antimicrobial agents was determined, namely trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and tetracycline. Surface characteristics, motility, biofilm formation and adhesion to mucin were tested in all strains. Statistical approach was used to determine correlations between obtained results.Most of the isolates were not genetically related. Six new sequence types were determined. Strains were uniformly sensitive to all tested antimicrobial agents. The majority of isolates (89.8% were able to form biofilm with almost equal representation in both CF and non-CF strains. Swimming motility was observed in all strains, while none of them exhibited swarming motility. Among strains able to adhere to mucin, no differences between CF and non-CF isolates were observed.High genetic diversity among isolates implies the absence of clonal spread within the hospital. Positive correlation between motility, biofilm formation and adhesion to mucin was demonstrated. Biofilm formation and motility were more pronounced among non-CF than CF isolates.

  6. Genotype and Phenotype of Echinococcus granulosus Derived from Wild Sheep (Ovis orientalis) in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Ali; Meshgi, Behnam; Jalousian, Fatemeh; Rahmani, Shima; Salari, Mohammad Ali

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the characteristics of genotype and phenotype of Echinococcus granulosus derived from wild sheep and to compare them with the strains of E. granulosus sensu stricto (sheep-dog) and E. granulosus camel strain (camel-dog) in Iran. In Khojir National Park, near Tehran, Iran, a fertile hydatid cyst was recently found in the liver of a dead wild sheep (Ovis orientalis). The number of protoscolices (n=6,000) proved enough for an experimental infection in a dog. The characteristics of large and small hooks of metacestode were statistically determined as the sensu stricto strain but not the camel strain (P=0.5). To determine E. granulosus genotype, 20 adult worms of this type were collected from the infected dog. The second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of the nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) and cytochrome c oxidase 1 subunit (COX1) of the mitochondrial DNA were amplified from individual adult worm by PCR. Subsequently, the PCR product was sequenced by Sanger method. The lengths of ITS2 and COX1 sequences were 378 and 857 bp, respectively, for all the sequenced samples. The amplified DNA sequences from both ribosomal and mitochondrial genes were highly similar (99% and 98%, respectively) to that of the ovine strain in the GenBank database. The results of the present study indicate that the morpho-molecular features and characteristics of E. granulosus in the Iranian wild sheep are the same as those of the sheep-dog E. granulosus sensu stricto strain.

  7. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Indigenous Lactobacillus Community from Traditional Istrian Ewe's Cheese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Mrkonjić Fuka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to describe the diversity of indigenous cultivable community of the lactobacilli associated with the production of traditional Istrian cheese and to get a collection of well characterized strains. Raw milk and cheese samples were collected from three different farms in Istria during ripening. A total of 212 mesophilic and thermophilic Lactobacillus isolates as well as bulk colonies (consortia were investigated using culture-dependent approach combining phenotyping and genotyping. Biochemical fingerprinting with PhenePlate-LB system preliminary grouped 212 isolates in 16 distinct PhP types. Only one representative isolate from each PhP cluster was further analyzed by genotyping for a reliable identification at the genus and species level by employing PCR techniques and sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Sequence analysis of 16S rRNA revealed the presence of Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus paracasei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus. Lactobacilli were screened for possible resistance against seven selected antibiotics: ampicillin, tetracycline, penicillin, rifampin, clindamycin, erythromycin and vancomycin. Although there was no clear pattern of antimicrobial susceptibility to most tested antibiotics, all representative isolates were resistant to vancomycin. The analysis of bulk colonies by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE identified Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus brevis as predominant members of Lactobacillus population. Pediococcus pentosaceus, Pediococcus acidilactici, Streptococcus sp. and Leuconostoc mesenteroides were also detected as part of the analysed consortia. The prevalence of identified species and community members of lactobacilli agrees with other studies of raw milk cheese and represents a useful base for further selection.

  8. Predictive genomics: A cancer hallmark network framework for predicting tumor clinical phenotypes using genome sequencing data

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Edwin; Zaman, Naif; Mcgee, Shauna; Milanese, Jean-Sébastien; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali; O'Connor, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a cancer hallmark network framework for modelling genome-sequencing data to predict cancer clonal evolution and associated clinical phenotypes. Strategies of using this framework in conjunction with genome sequencing data in an attempt to predict personalized drug targets, drug resistance, and metastasis for a cancer patient, as well as cancer risks for a healthy individual are discussed. Accurate prediction of cancer clonal evolution and clinical phenotypes will have substantial i...

  9. Phenotype, genotype, and antibiotic susceptibility of Swedish and Thai oral isolates of Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Blomqvist

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study investigated phenotypes, virulence genotypes, and antibiotic susceptibility of oral Staphylococcus aureus strains in order to get more information on whether oral infections with this bacterium are associated with certain subtypes or related to an over-growth of the S. aureus variants normally found in the oral cavity of healthy carriers. Materials and methods: A total number of 157 S. aureus strains were investigated. Sixty-two strains were isolated from Swedish adults with oral infections, 25 strains were from saliva of healthy Swedish dental students, and 45 strains were from tongue scrapings of HIV-positive subjects in Thailand, and 25 Thai strains from non-HIV controls. The isolates were tested for coagulase, nitrate, arginine, and hemolysin, and for the presence of the virulence genes: hlg, clfA, can, sdrC, sdrD, sdrE, map/eap (adhesins and sea, seb, sec, tst, eta, etb, pvl (toxins. MIC90 and MIC50 were determined by E-test against penicillin V, oxacillin, amoxicillin, clindamycin, vancomycin, fusidic acid, and cefoxitin. Results: While the hemolytic phenotype was significantly (p<0.001 more common among the Thai strains compared to Swedish strains, the virulence genes were found in a similar frequency in the S. aureus strains isolated from all four subject groups. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL genotype was found in 73–100% of the strains. More than 10% of the strains from Swedish oral infections and from Thai HIV-positives showed low antibiotic susceptibility, most commonly for clindamycin. Only three methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA strains were identified, two from oral infections and one from a Thai HIV patient. Conclusions: S. aureus is occasionally occurring in the oral cavity in both health and disease in Sweden and Thailand. It is therefore most likely that S. aureus in opportunistic oral infections originate from the oral microbiota. S. aureus should be considered in case of oral

  10. Novel mutations of RPGR in Chinese retinitis pigmentosa patients and the genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Yang

    Full Text Available X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP accounts for 10-20% of all RP cases, and represents the most severe subtype of this disease. Mutations in the Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR gene are the most common causes of XLRP, accounting for over 70-75% of all XLRP cases. In this work, we analyzed all the exons of RPGR gene with Sanger sequencing in seven Chinese XLRP families, two of these with a provisional diagnosis of adRP but without male-to-male transmission. Three novel deletions (c.2233_34delAG; c.2236_37delGA and c.2403_04delAG and two known nonsense mutations (c.851C→G and c.2260G→T were identified in five families. Two novel deletions (c.2233_34delAG and c.2236_37delGA resulted in the same frame shift (p.E746RfsX22, created similar phenotype in Family 3 and 4. The novel deletion (c.2403_04delAG; p.E802GfsX31 resulted in both XLRP and x-linked cone-rod dystrophy within the male patients of family 5, which suggested the presence of either genetic or environmental modifiers, or both, play a substantial role in disease expression. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggested that (1 both patients and female carriers with mutation in Exon 8 (Family 1 manifest more severe disease than did those with ORF15 mutations (Family 2&3&4; (2 mutation close to downstream of ORF15 (Family 5 demonstrate the early preferential loss of cone function with moderate loss of rod function.

  11. Novel mutations of RPGR in Chinese retinitis pigmentosa patients and the genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liping; Yin, Xiaobei; Feng, Lina; You, Debo; Wu, Lemeng; Chen, Ningning; Li, Aijun; Li, Genlin; Ma, Zhizhong

    2014-01-01

    X-linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) accounts for 10-20% of all RP cases, and represents the most severe subtype of this disease. Mutations in the Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR) gene are the most common causes of XLRP, accounting for over 70-75% of all XLRP cases. In this work, we analyzed all the exons of RPGR gene with Sanger sequencing in seven Chinese XLRP families, two of these with a provisional diagnosis of adRP but without male-to-male transmission. Three novel deletions (c.2233_34delAG; c.2236_37delGA and c.2403_04delAG) and two known nonsense mutations (c.851C→G and c.2260G→T) were identified in five families. Two novel deletions (c.2233_34delAG and c.2236_37delGA) resulted in the same frame shift (p.E746RfsX22), created similar phenotype in Family 3 and 4. The novel deletion (c.2403_04delAG; p.E802GfsX31) resulted in both XLRP and x-linked cone-rod dystrophy within the male patients of family 5, which suggested the presence of either genetic or environmental modifiers, or both, play a substantial role in disease expression. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggested that (1) both patients and female carriers with mutation in Exon 8 (Family 1) manifest more severe disease than did those with ORF15 mutations (Family 2&3&4); (2) mutation close to downstream of ORF15 (Family 5) demonstrate the early preferential loss of cone function with moderate loss of rod function.

  12. Cerebral and non-cerebral coenurosis: on the genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Taenia multiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulopoulos, Georgios; Dinkel, Anke; Romig, Thomas; Ebi, Dennis; Mackenstedt, Ute; Loos-Frank, Brigitte

    2016-12-01

    We characterised the causative agents of cerebral and non-cerebral coenurosis in livestock by determining the mitochondrial genotypes and morphological phenotypes of 52 Taenia multiceps isolates from a wide geographical range in Europe, Africa, and western Asia. Three studies were conducted: (1) a morphological comparison of the rostellar hooks of cerebral and non-cerebral cysts of sheep and goats, (2) a morphological comparison of adult worms experimentally produced in dogs, and (3) a molecular analysis of three partial mitochondrial genes (nad1, cox1, and 12S rRNA) of the same isolates. No significant morphological or genetic differences were associated with the species of the intermediate host. Adult parasites originating from cerebral and non-cerebral cysts differed morphologically, e.g. the shape of the small hooks and the distribution of the testes in the mature proglottids. The phylogenetic analysis of the mitochondrial haplotypes produced three distinct clusters: one cluster including both cerebral isolates from Greece and non-cerebral isolates from tropical and subtropical countries, and two clusters including cerebral isolates from Greece. The majority of the non-cerebral specimens clustered together but did not form a monophyletic group. No monophyletic groups were observed based on geography, although specimens from the same region tended to cluster. The clustering indicates high intraspecific diversity. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that all variants of T. multiceps can cause cerebral coenurosis in sheep (which may be the ancestral phenotype), and some variants, predominantly from one genetic cluster, acquired the additional capacity to produce non-cerebral forms in goats and more rarely in sheep.

  13. Electroretinographic genotype-phenotype correlations for mouse and man at the dmd/DMD locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millers, D.M.; Weleber, R.G.; Woodward, W.R. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Reduced or absent b-waves in the dark-adapted electroretinogram (ERG) of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD) patients led to the identification of dystrophin in human retina and the proposal that it plays a role in retinal electrophysiology. Study of a large group of Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy males to determine their ocular characteristics indicated that there were position-specific effects of deletions, with 3{prime} defects associated with severe electroretinographic changes, whereas some 5{prime} patients demonstrated less severe, or even normal, ERGs. We studied the mdx mouse, a model with X-linked muscular dystrophy and defective full-length dystrophin, which failed to show any ERG abnormalities. Given the presence of alternate isoforms of dystrophin in retina, and the 5{prime} deletion DMD/BMD patients with normal ERGs, we studied mouse models with differing dystrophin mutations (mdx{sup Cv3}, mdx{sup Cv5}) to determine the usefulness of alternate strains as models for the visual effects of dystropin. Abnormal ERGs similar to those seen in DMD/BMS patients exist in the mdx{sup Cv3} strain of muscular dystrophy mice. Normal ERGs were found the mdx{sup Cv5} strain. The mutations in the mdx and mdx{sup Cv5} mice have been mapped to the 5{prime} end of the dmd gene, while the mutation in the mdx{sup Cv3} mouse is in the 3{prime} end. Thus, there are position effects of the gene defect on the ERG phenotype that are conserved in the mouse. Such genotype-phenotype correlations may reflect differential expression of shorter isoforms of dystrophin.

  14. Predicting Bevirimat resistance of HIV-1 from genotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maturation inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral drugs. Bevirimat (BVM was the first substance in this class of inhibitors entering clinical trials. While the inhibitory function of BVM is well established, the molecular mechanisms of action and resistance are not well understood. It is known that mutations in the regions CS p24/p2 and p2 can cause phenotypic resistance to BVM. We have investigated a set of p24/p2 sequences of HIV-1 of known phenotypic resistance to BVM to test whether BVM resistance can be predicted from sequence, and to identify possible molecular mechanisms of BVM resistance in HIV-1. Results We used artificial neural networks and random forests with different descriptors for the prediction of BVM resistance. Random forests with hydrophobicity as descriptor performed best and classified the sequences with an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC curve of 0.93 ± 0.001. For the collected data we find that p2 sequence positions 369 to 376 have the highest impact on resistance, with positions 370 and 372 being particularly important. These findings are in partial agreement with other recent studies. Apart from the complex machine learning models we derived a number of simple rules that predict BVM resistance from sequence with surprising accuracy. According to computational predictions based on the data set used, cleavage sites are usually not shifted by resistance mutations. However, we found that resistance mutations could shorten and weaken the α-helix in p2, which hints at a possible resistance mechanism. Conclusions We found that BVM resistance of HIV-1 can be predicted well from the sequence of the p2 peptide, which may prove useful for personalized therapy if maturation inhibitors reach clinical practice. Results of secondary structure analysis are compatible with a possible route to BVM resistance in which mutations weaken a six-helix bundle discovered in recent experiments

  15. Responses of nitrogen metabolism and seed nutrition to drought stress in soybean genotypes differing in slow-wilting phenotype

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    Nacer eBellaloui

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in soybean breeding have resulted in genotypes that express the slow-wilting phenotype (trait under drought stress conditions. The physiological mechanisms of this trait remain unknown due to the complexity of trait × environment interactions. The objective of this research was to investigate nitrogen metabolism and leaf and seed nutrients composition of the slow-wilting soybean genotypes under drought stress conditions. A repeated greenhouse experiment was conducted using check genotypes: NC-Roy (fast wilting, Boggs (intermediate in wilting; and NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 (slow-wilting, SLW genotypes. Plants were either well-watered or drought stressed. Results showed that under well-watered conditions, nitrogen fixation (NF, nitrogen assimilation (NA, and leaf and seed composition differed between genotypes. Under drought stress, NF and NA were higher in NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 than in NC-Roy and Boggs. Under severe water stress, however, NA was low in all genotypes. Leaf water potential was significantly lower in checks (-2.00 MPa than in the SLW genotypes (-1.68 MPa. Leaf and seed concentrations of K, P, Ca, Cu, Na, B were higher in SLW genotypes than in the checks under drought stress conditions. Seed protein, oleic acid, and sugars were higher in SLW genotypes, and oil, linoleic and linolenic acids were lower in SLW genotypes. This research demonstrated that K, P, Ca, Cu, Na, and B may be involved in SLW trait by maintaining homeostasis and osmotic regulation. Maintaining higher leaf water potential in NTCPR94-5157 and N04-9646 under drought stress could be a possible water conservation mechanism to maintain leaf turgor pressure. The increase in osmoregulators such as minerals, raffinose and stachyose, and oleic acid could be beneficial for soybean breeders in selecting for drought stress tolerance.

  16. Correlation between Waardenburg syndrome phenotype and genotype in a population of individuals with identified PAX3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStefano, A L; Cupples, L A; Arnos, K S; Asher, J H; Baldwin, C T; Blanton, S; Carey, M L; da Silva, E O; Friedman, T B; Greenberg, J; Lalwani, A K; Milunsky, A; Nance, W E; Pandya, A; Ramesar, R S; Read, A P; Tassabejhi, M; Wilcox, E R; Farrer, L A

    1998-05-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) type 1 is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, pigmentary abnormalities of the eye, hair, and skin, and dystopia canthorum. The phenotype is variable and affected individuals may exhibit only one or a combination of several of the associated features. To assess the relationship between phenotype and gene defect, clinical and genotype data on 48 families (271 WS individuals) collected by members of the Waardenburg Consortium were pooled. Forty-two unique mutations in the PAX3 gene, previously identified in these families, were grouped in five mutation categories: amino acid (AA) substitution in the paired domain, AA substitution in the homeodomain, deletion of the Ser-Thr-Pro-rich region, deletion of the homeodomain and the Ser-Thr-Pro-rich region, and deletion of the entire gene. These mutation classes are based on the structure of the PAX3 gene and were chosen to group mutations predicted to have similar defects in the gene product. Association between mutation class and the presence of hearing loss, eye pigment abnormality, skin hypopigmentation, or white forelock was evaluated using generalized estimating equations, which allowed for incorporation of a correlation structure that accounts for potential similarity among members of the same family. Odds for the presence of eye pigment abnormality, white forelock, and skin hypopigmentation were 2, 8, and 5 times greater, respectively, for individuals with deletions of the homeodomain and the Pro-Ser-Thr-rich region compared to individuals with an AA substitution in the homeodomain. Odds ratios that differ significantly from 1.0 for these traits may indicate that the gene products resulting from different classes of mutations act differently in the expression of WS. Although a suggestive association was detected for hearing loss with an odds ratio of 2.6 for AA substitution in the paired domain compared with AA substitution in the homeodomain, this odds

  17. Genotypes and clinical phenotypes in children with cytochrome-c oxidase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darin, N; Moslemi, A-R; Lebon, S; Rustin, P; Holme, E; Oldfors, A; Tulinius, M

    2003-12-01

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) deficiency has been associated with a wide spectrum of clinical features and may be caused by mutations in different genes of both the mitochondrial and the nuclear DNA. In an attempt to correlate the clinical phenotype with the genotype in 16 childhood cases, mtDNA was analysed for deletion, depletion, and mutations in the three genes encoding COX subunits and the 22 tRNA genes. Furthermore, nuclear DNA was analysed for mutations in the SURF1, SCO2, COX10, and COX17 genes and cases with mtDNA depletion were analysed for mutations in the TK2 gene. SURF1-mutations were identified in three out of four cases with Leigh syndrome while a mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA (trp) gene was identified in the fourth. One case with mtDNA depletion had mutations in the TK2 gene. In two cases with leukoencephalopathy, one case with encephalopathy, five cases with fatal infantile myopathy and cardiomyopathy, two cases with benign infantile myopathy, and one case with mtDNA depletion, no mutations were identified. We conclude that COX deficiency in childhood should be suspected in a wide range of clinical settings and although an increasing number of genetic defects have been identified, the underlying mutations remain unclear in the majority of the cases.

  18. Mining Genotype-Phenotype Associations from Public Knowledge Sources via Semantic Web Querying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiefer, Richard C.; Freimuth, Robert R.; Chute, Christopher G; Pathak, Jyotishman

    Gene Wiki Plus (GeneWiki+) and the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) are publicly available resources for sharing information about disease-gene and gene-SNP associations in humans. While immensely useful to the scientific community, both resources are manually curated, thereby making the data entry and publication process time-consuming, and to some degree, error-prone. To this end, this study investigates Semantic Web technologies to validate existing and potentially discover new genotype-phenotype associations in GWP and OMIM. In particular, we demonstrate the applicability of SPARQL queries for identifying associations not explicitly stated for commonly occurring chronic diseases in GWP and OMIM, and report our preliminary findings for coverage, completeness, and validity of the associations. Our results highlight the benefits of Semantic Web querying technology to validate existing disease-gene associations as well as identify novel associations although further evaluation and analysis is required before such information can be applied and used effectively. PMID:24303249

  19. Phenotypic- and Genotypic-Resistance Detection for Adaptive Resistance Management in Tetranychus urticae Koch.

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    Deok Ho Kwon

    Full Text Available Rapid resistance detection is necessary for the adaptive management of acaricide-resistant populations of Tetranychus urticae. Detection of phenotypic and genotypic resistance was conducted by employing residual contact vial bioassay (RCV and quantitative sequencing (QS methods, respectively. RCV was useful for detecting the acaricide resistance levels of T. urticae, particularly for on-site resistance detection; however, it was only applicable for rapid-acting acaricides (12 out of 19 tested acaricides. QS was effective for determining the frequencies of resistance alleles on a population basis, which corresponded to 12 nonsynonymous point mutations associated with target-site resistance to five types of acaricides [organophosphates (monocrotophos, pirimiphos-methyl, dimethoate and chlorpyrifos, pyrethroids (fenpropathrin and bifenthrin, abamectin, bifenazate and etoxazole]. Most field-collected mites exhibited high levels of multiple resistance, as determined by RCV and QS data, suggesting the seriousness of their current acaricide resistance status in rose cultivation areas in Korea. The correlation analyses revealed moderate to high levels of positive relationships between the resistance allele frequencies and the actual resistance levels in only five of the acaricides evaluated, which limits the general application of allele frequency as a direct indicator for estimating actual resistance levels. Nevertheless, the resistance allele frequency data alone allowed for the evaluation of the genetic resistance potential and background of test mite populations. The combined use of RCV and QS provides basic information on resistance levels, which is essential for choosing appropriate acaricides for the management of resistant T. urticae.

  20. From genotype to phenotype; clinical variability in Lesch-Nyhan disease. The role of epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigueros Genao, M; Torres, R J

    2014-11-01

    Lesch-Nyhan disease is a rare genetic disease characterized by a deficiency in the function of the enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). Patients affected by this disease experience hyperuricemia, motor disorders, mental retardation and, in the most severe cases, self-mutilation. Its clinical manifestations depend on the enzymatic activity of HGPRT, which is classically linked to the type of alteration in the HGPRT gene. More than 400 mutations of this gene have been found. At present, one of the controversial aspects of the disease is the relationship between the genotype and phenotype; cases have been described lacking a mutation, such as the patient presented in this article, as well as families who despite sharing the same genetic defect show disorders with differing severity. Epigenetic processes, which modify the genetic expression without changing the sequence of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), could explain the clinical variability observed in this disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. The importance of genotype-phenotype correlation in the clinical management of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra-Muñoz, Víctor Manuel; Gómez-Doblas, Juan José; Porras-Martín, Carlos; Such-Martínez, Miguel; Crespo-Leiro, María Generosa; Barriales-Villa, Roberto; de Teresa-Galván, Eduardo; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Cabrera-Bueno, Fernando

    2018-01-22

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance, in which aortic root dilation is the main cause of morbidity and mortality. Fibrillin-1 (FBN-1) gene mutations are found in more than 90% of MFS cases. The aim of our study was to summarise variants in FBN-1 and establish the genotype-phenotype correlation, with particular interest in the onset of aortic events, in a broad population of patients with an initial clinical suspicion of MFS. This single centre prospective cohort study included all patients presenting variants in the FBN-1 gene who visited a Hereditary Aortopathy clinic between September 2010 and October 2016. The study included 90 patients with FBN-1 variants corresponding to 58 non-interrelated families. Of the 57 FBN-1 variants found, 25 (43.9%) had previously been described, 23 of which had been identified as associated with MFS, while the the remainder are described for the first time. For 84 patients (93.3%), it was possible to give a definite diagnosis of Marfan syndrome in accordance with Ghent criteria. 44 of them had missense mutations, 6 of whom had suffered an aortic event (with either prophylactic surgery for aneurysm or dissection), whereas 20 of the 35 patients with truncating mutations had suffered an event (13.6% vs. 57.1%, p importance not only in the diagnosis, but also in risk stratification and clinical management of patients with suspected MFS.

  2. Phenotypic and Genotypic Analysis of Antimicrobial Resistance among Listeria monocytogenes Isolated from Australian Food Production Chains

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    Annaleise Wilson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The current global crisis of antimicrobial resistance (AMR among important human bacterial pathogens has been amplified by an increased resistance prevalence. In recent years, a number of studies have reported higher resistance levels among Listeria monocytogenes isolates, which may have implications for treatment of listeriosis infection where resistance to key treatment antimicrobials is noted. This study examined the genotypic and phenotypic AMR patterns of 100 L. monocytogenes isolates originating from food production supplies in Australia and examined this in the context of global population trends. Low levels of resistance were noted to ciprofloxacin (2% and erythromycin (1%; however, no resistance was observed to penicillin G or tetracycline. Resistance to ciprofloxacin was associated with a mutation in the fepR gene in one isolate; however, no genetic basis for resistance in the other isolate was identified. Resistance to erythromycin was correlated with the presence of the ermB resistance gene. Both resistant isolates belonged to clonal complex 1 (CC1, and analysis of these in the context of global CC1 isolates suggested that they were more similar to isolates from India rather than the other CC1 isolates included in this study. This study provides baseline AMR data for L. monocytogenes isolated in Australia, identifies key genetic markers underlying this resistance, and highlights the need for global molecular surveillance of resistance patterns to maintain control over the potential dissemination of AMR isolates.

  3. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes Isolated From Dairy and Meat Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Listeria monocytogenes is a foodborne pathogen and a serious threat to the public health in the world. Consumption of traditional foods such as dairy and meat products can be a major reason for relative abundance and isolation of these bacteria. Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of L. monocytogenes strains isolated from dairy and meat products. Materials and Methods A total of 317 dairy products and meat-processed samples were collected. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed on each sample by the disk diffusion method (Kirby Bauer. Five reference loci were used for typing of L. monocytogenes strains by MLVA (Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis Technique. Results A total of 24 L. monocytogenes isolates were collected from the dairy and meat products. Resistance of isolated L. monocytogenes strains to penicillin G were 54.54% (from dairy products and 46.15% (from processed meat. Genetic relatedness of isolates were assessed by MLVA. Out of 13 different types, type 2 with 6 strains and type 3 with 4 strains, were the most common types. Conclusions MLVA analysis showed that samples obtained from different sources could have similar genetic profile. As a result, administration of penicillin in patients with listeriosis (especially pregnant women and antibiotic susceptibility test are recommended. The fast and accurate methods such as MLVA for tracking of pollution sources of L. monocytogenes are recommended during outbreaks.

  4. In-host microevolution of Aspergillus fumigatus: A phenotypic and genotypic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, Eloise; Melchers, Willem J G; Zoll, Jan; Brown, Alistair J P; Verweij, Paul E; Warris, Adilia

    2018-04-01

    In order to survive, Aspergillus fumigatus must adapt to specific niche environments. Adaptation to the human host includes modifications facilitating persistent colonisation and the development of azole resistance. The aim of this study is to advance understanding of the genetic and physiological adaptation of A. fumigatus in patients during infection and treatment. Thirteen A. fumigatus strains were isolated from a single chronic granulomatous disease patient suffering from persistent and recurrent invasive aspergillosis over a period of 2 years. All strains had identical microsatellite genotypes and were considered isogenic. Whole genome comparisons identified 248 non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms. These non-synonymous mutations have potential to play a role in in-host adaptation. The first 2 strains isolated were azole susceptible, whereas later isolates were itraconazole, voriconazole and/or posaconazole resistant. Growth assays in the presence and absence of various antifungal stressors highlighted minor changes in growth rate and stress resistance, with exception of one isolate showing a significant growth defect. Poor conidiation was observed in later isolates. In certain drug resistant isolates conidiation was restored in the presence of itraconazole. Differences in virulence were observed as demonstrated in a Galleria mellonella infection model. We conclude that the microevolution of A. fumigatus in this patient has driven the emergence of both Cyp51A-independent and Cyp51A-dependent, azole resistance mechanisms, and additional phenotypes that are likely to have promoted fungal persistence. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Matchmaker Exchange API: automating patient matching through the exchange of structured phenotypic and genotypic profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buske, Orion J; Schiettecatte, François; Hutton, Benjamin; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Misyura, Andriy; Huang, Lijia; Hartley, Taila; Girdea, Marta; Sobreira, Nara; Mungall, Chris; Brudno, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of clinical sequencing, the difficulty of identifying additional affected families is a key obstacle to solving many rare diseases. There may only be a handful of similar patients worldwide, and their data may be stored in diverse clinical and research databases. Computational methods are necessary to enable finding similar patients across the growing number of patient repositories and registries. We present the Matchmaker Exchange Application Programming Interface (MME API), a protocol and data format for exchanging phenotype and genotype profiles to enable matchmaking among patient databases, facilitate the identification of additional cohorts, and increase the rate with which rare diseases can be researched and diagnosed. We designed the API to be straightforward and flexible in order to simplify its adoption on a large number of data types and workflows. We also provide a public test data set, curated from the literature, to facilitate implementation of the API and development of new matching algorithms. The initial version of the API has been successfully implemented by three members of the Matchmaker Exchange and was immediately able to reproduce previously identified matches and generate several new leads currently being validated. The API is available at https://github.com/ga4gh/mme-apis. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  6. Bartter Syndrome Type 3: Phenotype-Genotype Correlation and Favorable Response to Ibuprofen

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    Xuejun Yang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the phenotype-genotype correlation in different genetic kinds of Bartter syndrome type 3 in children.Methods: Clinical and genetic data of 2 patients with different mutations in Bartter syndrome type 3 was analyzed while the prognosis was compared after a 6-year follow-up or 2-year follow-up, respectively.Results: Bartter syndrome is a kind of autosomal recessive inherited renal disorder. The manifestation and prognosis of Bartter syndrome change with mutation types, and severe mutation were often accompanied with unfavorable prognosis. Comprehensive therapy with ibuprofen, antisterone, captopril, and potassium have remarkable effect, while ibuprofen may improve growth retardation partly.Conclusion: Bartter syndrome should be considered when children have unreasonable continuous electrolyte disturbance, metabolic alkalosis and growth retardation.As a genetic disease, its clinical features depend on the mutation type. It can be ameliorated by electrolyte supplementation, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and potassium-sparing diuretic. Considering the following electrolyte disturbances, infections, growth retardation, kidney failure and even death, Bartter syndrome need lifelong treatment, early diagnosis and treatment is the most important.

  7. Different renal phenotypes in related adult males with Fabry disease with the same classic genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignani, Renzo; Moschella, Mariarita; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Donati, Ilaria; Flachi, Marta; Grimaldi, Daniela; Cerretani, Davide; Giovanni, Paola De; Montevecchi, Marcello; Rigotti, Angelo; Ravasio, Alessandro

    2017-07-01

    Fabry disease related patients with classical mutation usually exhibit similar severe phenotype especially concerning renal manifestation. A dry blood spot screening (DBS) and the DNA analysis has been performed in a 48-year-old man (Patient 1) because of paresthesia. The DBS revealed absent leukocyte α -Gal A enzyme activity while DNA analysis identified the I354K mutation. Serum creatinine and e-GFR were in normal range and also albuminuria and proteinuria were absent. The brain MRI showed ischemic lesions and a diffuse focus of gliosis in the white matter, while the echocardiogram showed a left ventricular hypertrophy. The renal biopsy performed in the case index showed a massive deposition of zebra bodies. By a familiar investigation, it was recognized that his brother (Patient 2) died 2 years before from sudden death syndrome at the age of 49. He had suffered sporadic and undiagnosed pain at the extremities, a prior cataract, bilateral neurosensorial hearing loss and left ventricular hypertrophy on Echocardiogram. His previous laboratory examinations revealed a normal serum creatinine and the absence of proteinuria. Pedigree analysis of the brothers revealed a high disease burden among family members, with an affected cousin (Patient 3) who progressed early to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) that required renal transplantation. Here we describe the clinical history of three adult male members of the same family with the same genotype who manifested different presentation and progression of the disease, particularly concerning the renal involvement.

  8. A web-based collection of genotype-phenotype associations in hereditary recurrent fevers from the Eurofever registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Riccardo; Doglio, Matteo; Lachmann, Helen J; Ozen, Seza; Frenkel, Joost; Simon, Anna; Neven, Bénédicte; Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Ozgodan, Huri; Caorsi, Roberta; Federici, Silvia; Finetti, Martina; Trachana, Maria; Brunner, Jurgen; Bezrodnik, Liliana; Pinedo Gago, Mari Carmen; Maggio, Maria Cristina; Tsitsami, Elena; Al Suwairi, Wafaa; Espada, Graciela; Shcherbina, Anna; Aksu, Guzide; Ruperto, Nicolino; Martini, Alberto; Ceccherini, Isabella; Gattorno, Marco

    2017-10-18

    Hereditary recurrent fevers (HRF) are a group of rare monogenic diseases leading to recurrent inflammatory flares. A large number of variants has been described for the four genes associated with the best known HRF, namely MEFV, NLRP3, MVK, TNFRSF1A. The Infevers database ( http://fmf.igh.cnrs.fr/ISSAID/infevers ) is a large international registry collecting variants reported in these genes. However, no genotype-phenotype associations are provided, but only the clinical phenotype of the first patient(s) described for each mutation. The aim of this study is to develop a registry of genotype-phenotype associations observed in patients with HRF, enrolled and validated in the Eurofever registry. Genotype-phenotype associations observed in all the patients with HRF enrolled in the Eurofever registry were retrospectively analyzed. For autosomal dominant diseases (CAPS and TRAPS), all mutations were individually analyzed. For autosomal recessive diseases (FMF and MKD), homozygous and heterozygous combinations were described. Mean age of onset, disease course (recurrent or chronic), mean duration of fever episodes, clinical manifestations associated with fever episodes, atypical manifestations, complications and response to treatment were also studied. Data observed in 751 patients (346 FMF, 133 CAPS, 114 MKD, 158 TRAPS) included in the Eurofever registry and validated by experts were summarized in Tables. A total of 149 variants were described: 46 TNFRSF1A and 27 NLRP3 variants, as well as various combinations of 48 MVK and 28 MEFV variants were available. We provide a potentially useful tool for physicians dealing with HRF, namely a registry of genotype-phenotype associations for patients enrolled in the Eurofever registry. This tool is complementary to the Infevers database and will be available at the Eurofever and Infevers websites.

  9. The Genotype and Phenotype (GaP) registry: a living biobank for the analysis of quantitative traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Peter K; Klein, Gila; Keogh, Mary; Kern, Marlena; DeFranco, Margaret; Simpfendorfer, Kim R; Kim, Sun Jung; Diamond, Betty

    2015-12-01

    We describe the development of the Genotype and Phenotype (GaP) Registry, a living biobank of normal volunteers who are genotyped for genetic markers related to human disease. Participants in the GaP can be recalled for hypothesis driven study of disease associated genetic variants. The GaP has facilitated functional studies of several autoimmune disease associated loci including Csk, Blk, PDRM1 (Blimp-1) and PTPN22. It is likely that expansion of such living biobank registries will play an important role in studying and understanding the function of disease associated alleles in complex disease.

  10. Bayesian Genomic Prediction with Genotype × Environment Interaction Kernel Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Jaime; Crossa, José; Montesinos-López, Osval A.; Burgueño, Juan; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; de los Campos, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of genotype × environment (G × E) interaction in plant breeding decreases selection accuracy, thereby negatively affecting genetic gains. Several genomic prediction models incorporating G × E have been recently developed and used in genomic selection of plant breeding programs. Genomic prediction models for assessing multi-environment G × E interaction are extensions of a single-environment model, and have advantages and limitations. In this study, we propose two multi-environment Bayesian genomic models: the first model considers genetic effects (u) that can be assessed by the Kronecker product of variance–covariance matrices of genetic correlations between environments and genomic kernels through markers under two linear kernel methods, linear (genomic best linear unbiased predictors, GBLUP) and Gaussian (Gaussian kernel, GK). The other model has the same genetic component as the first model (u) plus an extra component, f, that captures random effects between environments that were not captured by the random effects u. We used five CIMMYT data sets (one maize and four wheat) that were previously used in different studies. Results show that models with G × E always have superior prediction ability than single-environment models, and the higher prediction ability of multi-environment models with u and f over the multi-environment model with only u occurred 85% of the time with GBLUP and 45% of the time with GK across the five data sets. The latter result indicated that including the random effect f is still beneficial for increasing prediction ability after adjusting by the random effect u. PMID:27793970

  11. Bayesian Genomic Prediction with Genotype × Environment Interaction Kernel Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Cuevas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of genotype × environment (G × E interaction in plant breeding decreases selection accuracy, thereby negatively affecting genetic gains. Several genomic prediction models incorporating G × E have been recently developed and used in genomic selection of plant breeding programs. Genomic prediction models for assessing multi-environment G × E interaction are extensions of a single-environment model, and have advantages and limitations. In this study, we propose two multi-environment Bayesian genomic models: the first model considers genetic effects ( u that can be assessed by the Kronecker product of variance–covariance matrices of genetic correlations between environments and genomic kernels through markers under two linear kernel methods, linear (genomic best linear unbiased predictors, GBLUP and Gaussian (Gaussian kernel, GK. The other model has the same genetic component as the first model ( u plus an extra component, f, that captures random effects between environments that were not captured by the random effects u . We used five CIMMYT data sets (one maize and four wheat that were previously used in different studies. Results show that models with G × E always have superior prediction ability than single-environment models, and the higher prediction ability of multi-environment models with u   and   f over the multi-environment model with only u occurred 85% of the time with GBLUP and 45% of the time with GK across the five data sets. The latter result indicated that including the random effect f is still beneficial for increasing prediction ability after adjusting by the random effect u .

  12. Bayesian Genomic Prediction with Genotype × Environment Interaction Kernel Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, Jaime; Crossa, José; Montesinos-López, Osval A; Burgueño, Juan; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; de Los Campos, Gustavo

    2017-01-05

    The phenomenon of genotype × environment (G × E) interaction in plant breeding decreases selection accuracy, thereby negatively affecting genetic gains. Several genomic prediction models incorporating G × E have been recently developed and used in genomic selection of plant breeding programs. Genomic prediction models for assessing multi-environment G × E interaction are extensions of a single-environment model, and have advantages and limitations. In this study, we propose two multi-environment Bayesian genomic models: the first model considers genetic effects [Formula: see text] that can be assessed by the Kronecker product of variance-covariance matrices of genetic correlations between environments and genomic kernels through markers under two linear kernel methods, linear (genomic best linear unbiased predictors, GBLUP) and Gaussian (Gaussian kernel, GK). The other model has the same genetic component as the first model [Formula: see text] plus an extra component, F: , that captures random effects between environments that were not captured by the random effects [Formula: see text] We used five CIMMYT data sets (one maize and four wheat) that were previously used in different studies. Results show that models with G × E always have superior prediction ability than single-environment models, and the higher prediction ability of multi-environment models with [Formula: see text] over the multi-environment model with only u occurred 85% of the time with GBLUP and 45% of the time with GK across the five data sets. The latter result indicated that including the random effect f is still beneficial for increasing prediction ability after adjusting by the random effect [Formula: see text]. Copyright © 2017 Cuevas et al.

  13. Querying phenotype-genotype relationships on patient datasets using semantic web technology: the example of Cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, María; Martínez, Diego; Pilo, Belén; Jiménez-Escrig, Adriano; Robinson, Peter N; Sobrido, María J

    2012-07-31

    Semantic Web technology can considerably catalyze translational genetics and genomics research in medicine, where the interchange of information between basic research and clinical levels becomes crucial. This exchange involves mapping abstract phenotype descriptions from research resources, such as knowledge databases and catalogs, to unstructured datasets produced through experimental methods and clinical practice. This is especially true for the construction of mutation databases. This paper presents a way of harmonizing abstract phenotype descriptions with patient data from clinical practice, and querying this dataset about relationships between phenotypes and genetic variants, at different levels of abstraction. Due to the current availability of ontological and terminological resources that have already reached some consensus in biomedicine, a reuse-based ontology engineering approach was followed. The proposed approach uses the Ontology Web Language (OWL) to represent the phenotype ontology and the patient model, the Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL) to bridge the gap between phenotype descriptions and clinical data, and the Semantic Query Web Rule Language (SQWRL) to query relevant phenotype-genotype bidirectional relationships. The work tests the use of semantic web technology in the biomedical research domain named cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX), using a real dataset and ontologies. A framework to query relevant phenotype-genotype bidirectional relationships is provided. Phenotype descriptions and patient data were harmonized by defining 28 Horn-like rules in terms of the OWL concepts. In total, 24 patterns of SWQRL queries were designed following the initial list of competency questions. As the approach is based on OWL, the semantic of the framework adapts the standard logical model of an open world assumption. This work demonstrates how semantic web technologies can be used to support flexible representation and computational inference mechanisms

  14. Using artificial neural networks to select upright cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) genotypes with high productivity and phenotypic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, L M A; Teodoro, P E; Nascimento, M; Torres, F E; Nascimento, A C C; Azevedo, C F; Teixeira, F R F

    2016-11-03

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) is grown in three Brazilian regions: the Midwest, North, and Northeast, and is consumed by people on low incomes. It is important to investigate the genotype x environment (GE) interaction to provide accurate recommendations for farmers. The aim of this study was to identify cowpea genotypes with high adaptability and phenotypic stability for growing in the Brazilian Cerrado, and to compare the use of artificial neural networks with the Eberhart and Russell (1966) method. Six trials with upright cowpea genotypes were conducted in 2005 and 2006 in the States of Mato Grosso do Sul and Mato Grosso. The data were subjected to adaptability and stability analysis by the Eberhart and Russell (1966) method and artificial neural networks. The genotypes MNC99-537F-4 and EVX91-2E-2 provided grain yields above the overall environment means, and exhibited high stability according to both methods. Genotype IT93K-93-10 was the most suitable for unfavorable environments. There was a high correlation between the results of both methods in terms of classifying the genotypes by their adaptability and stability. Therefore, this new approach would be effective in quantifying the GE interaction in upright cowpea breeding programs.

  15. Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease: phenotypic characterization and genotypic correlations in 21 affected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudorfer, Orit; Pastores, Gregory M; Zeng, Bai J; Gianutsos, John; Zaroff, Charles M; Kolodny, Edwin H

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the phenotype (and corresponding genotype) of adult patients with late-onset Tay-Sachs disease, a clinical variant of the GM2-gangliosidoses. A comprehensive physical examination, including neurological assessments, was performed to establish the current disease pattern and severity. In addition, the patients' past medical histories were reviewed. The patients' alpha-subunit mutations (beta-Hexosaminidase A genotype) were determined and correlated with their corresponding clinical findings and disease course. Twenty-one patients (current mean age: 27.0 years; range: 14-47 years) were identified. The pedigree revealed a relative with the "classic" infantile or late-onset form of Tay-Sachs disease in four (out of 18) unrelated families. The patients were predominantly male (15/21 individuals) and of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry (15/18 families). Mean age at onset was 18.1 years; balance problems and difficulty climbing stairs were the most frequent presenting complaints. In several cases, the diagnosis was delayed (mean age at diagnosis: 27.0 years). Analysis of the beta-hex A gene revealed the G269S mutation as the most common disease allele; found in homozygosity (N = 1) or heterozygosity (N = 18; including 2 sib pairs). Disease onset (age 36 years) was delayed and progression relatively slower in the homozygous G269S patient. Two siblings (ages 28 and 31 years), of non-Jewish ancestry, were compound heterozygotes (TATC1278/W474C); their clinical course is dominated by psychiatric problems. Brain imaging studies revealed marked cerebellar atrophy in all patients (N = 18) tested, regardless of disease stage. Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease is an infrequent disorder and the diagnosis is often missed or delayed (by approximately 8 years). Early on, the majority of patients develop signs of either cerebellar or anterior motor neuron involvement. Affected individuals may also develop psychotic episodes. In most cases, the later

  16. Paranormal experience and the COMT dopaminergic gene: a preliminary attempt to associate phenotype with genotype using an underlying brain theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz, Amir; Hines, Terence; Fossella, John; Castro, Daniella

    2008-01-01

    Paranormal belief and suggestibility seem related. Given our recent findings outlining a putative association between suggestibility and a specific dopaminergic genetic polymorphism, we hypothesized that similar exploratory genetic data may offer supplementary insights into a similar correlation with paranormal belief. With more affordable costs and better technology in the aftermath of the human genome project, genotyping is increasingly ubiquitous. Compelling brain theories guide specific research hypotheses as scientists begin to unravel tentative relationships between phenotype and genotype. In line with a dopaminergic brain theory, we tried to correlate a specific phenotype concerning paranormal belief with a dopaminergic gene (COMT) known for its involvement in prefrontal executive cognition and for a polymorphism that is positively correlated with suggestibility. Although our preliminary findings are inconclusive, the research approach we outline should pave the road to a more scientific account of elucidating paranormal belief.

  17. Defining the Relationship Between Phenotypic and Genotypic Resistance Profiles of Multidrug-Resistant Enterobacterial Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Lamis; Abdel Aziz, Neveen A; Hassan, Walaa M

    2018-05-11

    Fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides offer effective therapy for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing enterobacterial infections, but their usefulness is threatened by increasing resistant strains. This study was conducted to demonstrate the phenotypic outcomes of the coexistence of genetic determinants mediating resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins and quinolones in enterobacterial isolates collected from patients with health-care-associated infections in Egypt. ESBL phenotype was determined using double-disk synergy test (DDST). The PCR technique was used to detect the presence of the genes mediating quinolone resistance (qnr and aac(6')-Ib-cr) and coexistence with ESBL genes. We also examined the association between the genetic makeup of the isolates and their resistance profiles including effect on MIC results. Phenotypically ESBLs were detected in 60-82% of the enterobacterial isolates. ESBL, qnr and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were detected with the following percentages in Citrobacter isolates (69%, 69%, and 43%, respectively), E.coli isolates (65%, 70%, and 45%, respectively), Enterobacter isolates (56%, 67%, and 33%, respectively), and finally Klebsiella isolates (42%, 66%, and 25%, respectively). The coexistence of these multiresistant genetic elements significantly increased the MIC values of the tested antibiotics from different classes. We suggest using blaTEM, blaCTX-M-15, qnr, and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes for better and faster prediction of suitable antibiotic therapy with effective doses against ESBL-producing isolates harboring plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants. Amikacin, meropenem, gentamicin, and imipenem seem to be better choices of treatment for such life-threatening infections, because of their remaining highest activity.

  18. Genotype-phenotype correlation in FMF patients: A "non classic" recessive autosomal or "atypical" dominant autosomal inheritance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procopio, V; Manti, S; Bianco, G; Conti, G; Romeo, A; Maimone, F; Arrigo, T; Cutrupi, M C; Salpietro, C; Cuppari, C

    2018-01-30

    Uncertainty remains on the pathogenetic mechanisms, model of inheritance as well as genotype-phenotype correlation of FMF disease. To investigate the impact of genetic factors on the FMF phenotype and the disease inheritance model. A total of 107 FMF patients were enrolled. Patients were diagnosed clinically. All patients underwent genetic analysis of the FMF locus on 16p13.3. 9 distinct mutations were detected. Specifically, the 85.98% of patients showed a heterozygous genotype. The most common genotypes were p.Met680Ile/wt and p.Met694Val/wt. The most frequent clinical findings were fever, abdominal pain, joint pain, thoracic pain, and erysipelas-like erythema. Analysis of clinical data did not detect any significant difference in clinical phenotype among heterozygous, homozygous as well as compound homozygous subjects, further supporting the evidence that, contrary to the recessive autosomal inheritance, heterozygous patients fulfilled the criteria of clinical FMF. Moreover, subjects with p.Met694Val/wt and p.Met680Ile/wt genotype reported the most severe clinical phenotype. p.Ala744Ser/wt, p.Glu148Gln/Met680Ile, p.Met680Ile/Met680Ile, p.Met680Ile/Met694Val, p.Pro369Ser/wt, p.Met694Ile/wt, p.Glu148Gln/Glu148Gln, p.Lys695Arg/wt resulted in 100% pathogenicity. The existence of a "non classic" autosomal recessive inheritance as well as of an "atypical" dominant autosomal inheritance with incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity cannot be excluded in FMF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Genotypic and Phenotypic Markers of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC9 in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Xiaohua; Wang, Xiaolin; Fan, Yanping; Peng, Yang; Li, Ling; Li, Shunming; Huang, Jingya; Yao, Zhenjiang; Chen, Sidong

    2016-01-01

    Use of antimicrobials in industrial food animal production is associated with the presence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among animals and humans. The livestock-associated (LA) methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 9 (CC9) is associated with animals and related workers in Asia. This study aimed to explore the genotypic and phenotypic markers of LA-MRSA CC9 in humans. We conducted a cross-sectional study of livestock workers and controls in Guangdong, China. The ...

  20. DMD Mutations in 576 Dystrophinopathy Families: A Step Forward in Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Juan-Mateu

    Full Text Available Recent advances in molecular therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD require precise genetic diagnosis because most therapeutic strategies are mutation-specific. To understand more about the genotype-phenotype correlations of the DMD gene we performed a comprehensive analysis of the DMD mutational spectrum in a large series of families. Here we provide the clinical, pathological and genetic features of 576 dystrophinopathy patients. DMD gene analysis was performed using the MLPA technique and whole gene sequencing in blood DNA and muscle cDNA. The impact of the DNA variants on mRNA splicing and protein functionality was evaluated by in silico analysis using computational algorithms. DMD mutations were detected in 576 unrelated dystrophinopathy families by combining the analysis of exonic copies and the analysis of small mutations. We found that 471 of these mutations were large intragenic rearrangements. Of these, 406 (70.5% were exonic deletions, 64 (11.1% were exonic duplications, and one was a deletion/duplication complex rearrangement (0.2%. Small mutations were identified in 105 cases (18.2%, most being nonsense/frameshift types (75.2%. Mutations in splice sites, however, were relatively frequent (20%. In total, 276 mutations were identified, 85 of which have not been previously described. The diagnostic algorithm used proved to be accurate for the molecular diagnosis of dystrophinopathies. The reading frame rule was fulfilled in 90.4% of DMD patients and in 82.4% of Becker muscular dystrophy patients (BMD, with significant differences between the mutation types. We found that 58% of DMD patients would be included in single exon-exon skipping trials, 63% from strategies directed against multiexon-skipping exons 45 to 55, and 14% from PTC therapy. A detailed analysis of missense mutations provided valuable information about their impact on the protein structure.

  1. [Tuberous sclerosis: clinical characteristics and their relationship to genotype/phenotype].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, T; Garrido, C; Pina, S; Chorão, R; Carrilho, I; Figueiroa, S; Santos, M; Temudo, T

    2014-11-01

    Tuberous sclerosis (TS) is an inherited disorder with multisystemic involvement and a high phenotypic variability. There are two genes that cause this condition: TSC1 and TSC2. Our goal was to clinically characterize patients with TS followed up in the Pediatric Neurology Clinic of a tertiary hospital during the last 10 years, and correlate the genotype with the severity of neurological manifestations and imaging studies. Retrospective analysis of patients with TS, including review of medical records and available MRI imaging. We studied 35 cases with a median age at diagnosis of ten months. Seizures were the first manifestation in 91.4% of cases, with a predominance of epileptic spasms. Over 50% had cognitive impairment and 49% behavioral disorders. A genetic study was performed on 24 children, and TSC2 mutations identified in 58.3% of them. Of the 11 cases of refractory epilepsy, six had the TSC2 gene mutation. In the group of eight patients with moderate/severe cognitive deficits, five had TSC2 mutations. We reviewed 26 MRI scans, in which it was observed that 76.9% had diffuse involvement of cerebral lobes, which reflects a greater burden of injury. Of the patients who had an MRI scan performed and had TSC2 mutations, all had a high tuber load, and5 of them had refractory epilepsy. In our sample we observe a high percentage of mutations in the TSC2 gene. This mutation carries a worse neurological prognosis, with drug-resistant epilepsy and a more severe cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel Conserved Genotypes Correspond to Antibiotic Resistance Phenotypes of E. coli Clinical Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Michelle C; Evangelista, Michael A; Bodine, Truston J; Easton-Marks, Jeremy R; Barth, Patrick; Shah, Minita J; Bormann Chung, Christina A; Stanley, Sarah; McLaughlin, Stephen F; Lee, Clarence C; Sheth, Vrunda; Doan, Quynh; Hamill, Richard J; Steffen, David; Becnel, Lauren B; Sucgang, Richard; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Current efforts to understand antibiotic resistance on the whole genome scale tend to focus on known genes even as high throughput sequencing strategies uncover novel mechanisms. To identify genomic variations associated with antibiotic resistance, we employed a modified genome-wide association study; we sequenced genomic DNA from pools of E. coli clinical isolates with similar antibiotic resistance phenotypes using SOLiD technology to uncover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) unanimously conserved in each pool. The multidrug-resistant pools were genotypically similar to SMS-3-5, a previously sequenced multidrug-resistant isolate from a polluted environment. The similarity was evenly spread across the entire genome and not limited to plasmid or pathogenicity island loci. Among the pools of clinical isolates, genomic variation was concentrated adjacent to previously reported inversion and duplication differences between the SMS-3-5 isolate and the drug-susceptible laboratory strain, DH10B. SNPs that result in non-synonymous changes in gyrA (encoding the well-known S83L allele associated with fluoroquinolone resistance), mutM, ligB, and recG were unanimously conserved in every fluoroquinolone-resistant pool. Alleles of the latter three genes are tightly linked among most sequenced E. coli genomes, and had not been implicated in antibiotic resistance previously. The changes in these genes map to amino acid positions in alpha helices that are involved in DNA binding. Plasmid-encoded complementation of null strains with either allelic variant of mutM or ligB resulted in variable responses to ultraviolet light or hydrogen peroxide treatment as markers of induced DNA damage, indicating their importance in DNA metabolism and revealing a potential mechanism for fluoroquinolone resistance. Our approach uncovered evidence that additional DNA binding enzymes may contribute to fluoroquinolone resistance and further implicate environmental bacteria as a reservoir for

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of bio-serotypes of Yersinia enterocolitica from various sources in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusak, Leonardo Alves; dos Reis, Cristhiane Moura Falavina; Barbosa, André Victor; Santos, André Felipe Mercês; Paixão, Renata; Hofer, Ernesto; Vallim, Deyse Christina; Asensi, Marise Dutra

    2014-12-15

    Yersinia enterocolitica is a well-known foodborne pathogen widely distributed in nature with high public health relevance, especially in Europe. This study aimed to analyze the pathogenic potential of Y. enterocolitica isolated strains from human, animal, food, and environmental sources and from different regions of Brazil by detecting virulence genes inv, ail, ystA, and virF through polymerase chain reaction (PCR), phenotypic tests, and antimicrobial susceptibility analysis. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used for the assessment of phylogenetic diversity. All virulence genes were detected in 11/60 (18%) strains of serotype O:3, biotype 4 isolated from human and animal sources. Ten human strains (4/O:3) presented three chromosomal virulence genes, and nine strains of biotype 1A presented the inv gene. Six (10%) strains were resistant to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, seven (12%) to tetracycline, and one (2%) to amikacin, all of which are used to treat yersiniosis. AMP-CEF-SXT was the predominant resistance profile. PFGE analysis revealed 36 unique pulsotypes, grouped into nine clusters (A to I) with similarity ≥ 85%, generating a diversity discriminatory index of 0.957. Cluster A comprised all bio-serotype 4/O:3 strains isolated from animal and humans sources. This study shows the existence of strains with the same genotypic profiles, bearing all virulence genes, from human and animal sources, circulating among several Brazilian states. This supports the hypothesis that swine is likely to serve as a main element in Y. enterocolitica transmission to humans in Brazil, and it could become a potential threat to public health as in Europe.

  4. The Chado Natural Diversity module: a new generic database schema for large-scale phenotyping and genotyping data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sook; Menda, Naama; Redmond, Seth; Buels, Robert M; Friesen, Maren; Bendana, Yuri; Sanderson, Lacey-Anne; Lapp, Hilmar; Lee, Taein; MacCallum, Bob; Bett, Kirstin E; Cain, Scott; Clements, Dave; Mueller, Lukas A; Main, Dorrie

    2011-01-01

    Linking phenotypic with genotypic diversity has become a major requirement for basic and applied genome-centric biological research. To meet this need, a comprehensive database backend for efficiently storing, querying and analyzing large experimental data sets is necessary. Chado, a generic, modular, community-based database schema is widely used in the biological community to store information associated with genome sequence data. To meet the need to also accommodate large-scale phenotyping and genotyping projects, a new Chado module called Natural Diversity has been developed. The module strictly adheres to the Chado remit of being generic and ontology driven. The flexibility of the new module is demonstrated in its capacity to store any type of experiment that either uses or generates specimens or stock organisms. Experiments may be grouped or structured hierarchically, whereas any kind of biological entity can be stored as the observed unit, from a specimen to be used in genotyping or phenotyping experiments, to a group of species collected in the field that will undergo further lab analysis. We describe details of the Natural Diversity module, including the design approach, the relational schema and use cases implemented in several databases.

  5. New Insights into Genotype-phenotype Correlations in Chinese Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy: A Retrospective Analysis of 178 Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Lin; Zhi-Qiang Wang; Min-Ting Lin; Shen-Xing Murong; Ning Wang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD),a common autosomal dominant muscular disorder,is caused by contraction of the D4Z4 repeats on 4q35.The complicated genotype-phenotype correlation among different ethnic population remains a controversial subject.We aimed to refine this correlation in order to provide new information for genetic counseling.Methods:Here,a cohort of 136 Chinese families including 178 affected individuals and 137 unaffected members were investigated.Genetic analyses were performed using the pl3E-11,4qA and 4qB probes after pulsed field gel electrophoresis separation and southern blotting.A 10-grade FSHD clinical severity scale was adopted for clinical assessment.The genotype-phenotype correlation was established by linear regression analyses.Results:We observed a roughly inversed correlation between the short EcoRI fragment size and age-corrected clinical severity score in 154 symptomatic patients (P < 0.05).Compared to male patients,a significant higher proportion of females in both asymptomatic carriers and severe patients showed larger variation in the size of short EcoRI fragment.A high incidence (19/42,45.2%) of asymptomatic (or minimally affected) carriers was found in familial members.Conclusions:Although the number of D4Z4 repeats is known as one of the critical influences on genotype-phenotype correlation,a majority of phenotypic spectrum was still incompatible with their heterozygous contraction of the D4Z4 repeat,especial in female cases.Our results suggest that there are multi-factors synergistically modulating the phenotypic expression.

  6. Prediction of male-pattern baldness from genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; Hamer, Merel A; Heilmann, Stefanie; Herold, Christine; Moebus, Susanne; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Nöthen, Markus M; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Nijsten, Tamar Ec; Kayser, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    The global demand for products that effectively prevent the development of male-pattern baldness (MPB) has drastically increased. However, there is currently no established genetic model for the estimation of MPB risk. We conducted a prediction analysis using single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified from previous GWASs of MPB in a total of 2725 German and Dutch males. A logistic regression model considering the genotypes of 25 SNPs from 12 genomic loci demonstrates that early-onset MPB risk is predictable at an accuracy level of 0.74 when 14 SNPs were included in the model, and measured using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUC). Considering age as an additional predictor, the model can predict normal MPB status in middle-aged and elderly individuals at a slightly lower accuracy (AUC 0.69-0.71) when 6-11 SNPs were used. A variance partitioning analysis suggests that 55.8% of early-onset MPB genetic liability can be explained by common autosomal SNPs and 23.3% by X-chromosome SNPs. For normal MPB status in elderly individuals, the proportion of explainable variance is lower (42.4% for autosomal and 9.8% for X-chromosome SNPs). The gap between GWAS findings and the variance partitioning results could be explained by a large body of common DNA variants with small effects that will likely be identified in GWAS of increased sample sizes. Although the accuracy obtained here has not reached a clinically desired level, our model was highly informative for up to 19% of Europeans, thus may assist decision making on early MPB intervention actions and in forensic investigations.

  7. Skin reaction and regeneration after single sodium lauryl sulfate exposure stratified by filaggrin genotype and atopic dermatitis phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandier, J; Carlsen, B C; Rasmussen, M A; Petersen, L J; Johansen, J D

    2015-06-01

    Filaggrin is key for the integrity of the stratum corneum. Mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLGnull) play a prominent role in atopic dermatitis (AD) pathogenesis. People with AD have increased susceptibility to irritants. However, little is known about the effect of filaggrin genotype and AD phenotype on irritant response and skin regeneration. To investigate the role of FLGnull and AD groups for skin reaction and recovery after sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) irritation. This is a case-control study comprising 67 subjects, including healthy controls and patients with and without FLGnull and AD. Reactivity to different doses of SLS at 24, 48, 72 and 145 h after SLS application was measured by transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Reactivity was assessed univariately and by pattern analysis. All patient groups showed a higher degree of skin-barrier disruption and inflammation than did controls in response to SLS. Assessing reactivity by the delta value of the area under the curve for both TEWL and LDF showed significant differences between healthy controls and those with the AD phenotype, irrespective of filaggrin mutation. The poorest regeneration was among those with the AD phenotype. The two AD phenotype groups were separated by multivariate technique, due to earlier inflammatory reactivity among subjects with FLGnullplus AD compared with the AD phenotype alone. Both skin reaction and regeneration were significantly different between the patient population and the healthy controls. Additionally, response severity and regeneration depended more on AD phenotype than on filaggrin genotype, whereas the response was more rapid among the FLGnullplus AD individuals. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  8. Local connectome phenotypes predict social, health, and cognitive factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Powell

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The unique architecture of the human connectome is defined initially by genetics and subsequently sculpted over time with experience. Thus, similarities in predisposition and experience that lead to similarities in social, biological, and cognitive attributes should also be reflected in the local architecture of white matter fascicles. Here we employ a method known as local connectome fingerprinting that uses diffusion MRI to measure the fiber-wise characteristics of macroscopic white matter pathways throughout the brain. This fingerprinting approach was applied to a large sample (N = 841 of subjects from the Human Connectome Project, revealing a reliable degree of between-subject correlation in the local connectome fingerprints, with a relatively complex, low-dimensional substructure. Using a cross-validated, high-dimensional regression analysis approach, we derived local connectome phenotype (LCP maps that could reliably predict a subset of subject attributes measured, including demographic, health, and cognitive measures. These LCP maps were highly specific to the attribute being predicted but also sensitive to correlations between attributes. Collectively, these results indicate that the local architecture of white matter fascicles reflects a meaningful portion of the variability shared between subjects along several dimensions. The local connectome is the pattern of fiber systems (i.e., number of fibers, orientation, and size within a voxel, and it reflects the proximal characteristics of white matter fascicles distributed throughout the brain. Here we show how variability in the local connectome is correlated in a principled way across individuals. This intersubject correlation is reliable enough that unique phenotype maps can be learned to predict between-subject variability in a range of social, health, and cognitive attributes. This work shows, for the first time, how the local connectome has both the sensitivity and the specificity to

  9. Genotype-phenotype correlation in a large population of muscular dystrophy patients with LAMA2 mutations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Geranmayeh, Fatemeh

    2010-04-01

    Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy 1A (MDC1A) results from mutations in the LAMA2 gene. We report 51 patients with MDC1A and examine the relationship between degree of merosin expression, genotype and clinical features. Thirty-three patients had absence of merosin and 13 showed some residual merosin. Compared to the residual merosin group, patients with absent merosin had an earlier presentation (<7days) (P=0.0073), were more likely to lack independent ambulation (P=0.0215), or require enteral feeding (P=0.0099) and ventilatory support (P=0.0354). We identified 33 novel LAMA2 mutations; these were distributed throughout the gene in patients with absent merosin, with minor clusters in exon 27, 14, 25 and 26 (55% of mutations). Patients with residual merosin often carried at least one splice site mutation and less frequently frameshift mutations. This large study identified novel LAMA2 mutations and highlights the role of immunohistochemical studies for merosin status in predicting clinical severity of MDC1A.

  10. Genotypic and phenotypic β-lactam resistance and presence of PVL gene in Staphylococci from dry bovine udder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasailam, Asok; Sasidharan, Suchithra; Kollannur, Justin Davis; Syam, Radhika

    2017-01-01

    Dairy cows affected with subclinical mastitis can be sources of virulent, antimicrobial-resistant Staphylococci to humans because of the excretion of the bacteria through their milk. This study focussed on the phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance patterns of Staphylococci isolated from dairy cows in early dry period. Among 96 isolates of Gram positive cocci from 157 cows, 76 were identified as Coagulase Negative Staphylococci and the remaining 20 were Staphylococcus aureus. Typical amplicons of coagulase gene were obtained for all 20 samples of S. aureus with three major coagulase types being identified as giving 627 bp (40%), 910 bp (35%) and 710 bp (25%) long PCR products. The groEL gene was amplified in PCR of all 76 isolates of Coagulase Negative Staphylococci, and incubation of PCR products with restriction enzyme PvuII yielded three distinct PCR-RFLP fragment patterns bearing resemblance to S. chromogenes and S. hyicus. Highest sensitivity of Coagulase Negative Staphylococci was noted for Azithromycin (92.5%) and the least to Tetracyclines (76.3%), whereas for S. aureus, it was Cefoperazone (95%) and Azithromycin (72.2%) respectively. Phenotypic resistance to Oxacillin (25 isolates), and Cefoxitin (11 isolates) was detected by dilution method with a commercial strip (Ezy MICTM). Genotypic resistance to β-Lactam antibiotics was found in 65 (34 with mecA gene and 31 with blaZ gene) isolates. Eighteen isolates possessed both the genes, with the PVL gene for virulence being detected in five of them. Nine isolates which had mecA gene were phenotypically susceptible to oxacillin while phenotypic resistance to oxacillin was observed in seven isolates that did not have either mecA or blaZ gene. This is the first report of persistent Staphylococcal infections possessing PVL gene and high level of genotypic resistance to β-Lactam antibiotics in small- holder dairy cattle from India. PMID:29091956

  11. Genotypic and phenotypic β-lactam resistance and presence of PVL gene in Staphylococci from dry bovine udder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodkumar Kulangara

    Full Text Available Dairy cows affected with subclinical mastitis can be sources of virulent, antimicrobial-resistant Staphylococci to humans because of the excretion of the bacteria through their milk. This study focussed on the phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance patterns of Staphylococci isolated from dairy cows in early dry period. Among 96 isolates of Gram positive cocci from 157 cows, 76 were identified as Coagulase Negative Staphylococci and the remaining 20 were Staphylococcus aureus. Typical amplicons of coagulase gene were obtained for all 20 samples of S. aureus with three major coagulase types being identified as giving 627 bp (40%, 910 bp (35% and 710 bp (25% long PCR products. The groEL gene was amplified in PCR of all 76 isolates of Coagulase Negative Staphylococci, and incubation of PCR products with restriction enzyme PvuII yielded three distinct PCR-RFLP fragment patterns bearing resemblance to S. chromogenes and S. hyicus. Highest sensitivity of Coagulase Negative Staphylococci was noted for Azithromycin (92.5% and the least to Tetracyclines (76.3%, whereas for S. aureus, it was Cefoperazone (95% and Azithromycin (72.2% respectively. Phenotypic resistance to Oxacillin (25 isolates, and Cefoxitin (11 isolates was detected by dilution method with a commercial strip (Ezy MICTM. Genotypic resistance to β-Lactam antibiotics was found in 65 (34 with mecA gene and 31 with blaZ gene isolates. Eighteen isolates possessed both the genes, with the PVL gene for virulence being detected in five of them. Nine isolates which had mecA gene were phenotypically susceptible to oxacillin while phenotypic resistance to oxacillin was observed in seven isolates that did not have either mecA or blaZ gene. This is the first report of persistent Staphylococcal infections possessing PVL gene and high level of genotypic resistance to β-Lactam antibiotics in small- holder dairy cattle from India.

  12. Appraising the performance of genotyping tools in the prediction of coreceptor tropism in HIV-1 subtype C viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crous Saleema

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection, transmitted viruses generally use the CCR5 chemokine receptor as a coreceptor for host cell entry. In more than 50% of subtype B infections, a switch in coreceptor tropism from CCR5- to CXCR4-use occurs during disease progression. Phenotypic or genotypic approaches can be used to test for the presence of CXCR4-using viral variants in an individual’s viral population that would result in resistance to treatment with CCR5-antagonists. While genotyping approaches for coreceptor-tropism prediction in subtype B are well established and verified, they are less so for subtype C. Methods Here, using a dataset comprising V3 loop sequences from 349 CCR5-using and 56 CXCR4-using HIV-1 subtype C viruses we perform a comparative analysis of the predictive ability of 11 genotypic algorithms in their prediction of coreceptor tropism in subtype C. We calculate the sensitivity and specificity of each of the approaches as well as determining their overall accuracy. By separating the CXCR4-using viruses into CXCR4-exclusive (25 sequences and dual-tropic (31 sequences we evaluate the effect of the possible conflicting signal from dual-tropic viruses on the ability of a of the approaches to correctly predict coreceptor phenotype. Results We determined that geno2pheno with a false positive rate of 5% is the best approach for predicting CXCR4-usage in subtype C sequences with an accuracy of 94% (89% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Contrary to what has been reported for subtype B, the optimal approaches for prediction of CXCR4-usage in sequence from viruses that use CXCR4 exclusively, also perform best at predicting CXCR4-use in dual-tropic viral variants. Conclusions The accuracy of genotyping approaches at correctly predicting the coreceptor usage of V3 sequences from subtype C viruses is very high. We suggest that genotyping approaches can be used to test for coreceptor tropism in HIV-1

  13. The vigour of glasshouse roses : scion - rootstock relationships : effects of phenotypic and genotypic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de D.P.

    1993-01-01

    Glasshouse roses commonly are combination plants, consisting of a scion variety and a rootstock of different genotypes. In this study, various environmental and genotypic factors have been investigated that influence the vigour of rootstocks and scion varieties, separately and in graft

  14. Assessing the value of phenotypic information from non-genotyped animals for QTL mapping of complex traits in real and simulated populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Thaise P; Takada, Luciana; Baldi, Fernando; Oliveira, Henrique N; Dias, Marina M; Neves, Haroldo H R; Schenkel, Flavio S; Albuquerque, Lucia G; Carvalheiro, Roberto

    2016-06-21

    QTL mapping through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) is challenging, especially in the case of low heritability complex traits and when few animals possess genotypic and phenotypic information. When most of the phenotypic information is from non-genotyped animals, GWAS can be performed using the weighted single-step GBLUP (WssGBLUP) method, which permits to combine all available information, even that of non-genotyped animals. However, it is not clear to what extent phenotypic information from non-genotyped animals increases the power of QTL detection, and whether factors such as the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the population and weighting SNPs in WssGBLUP affect the importance of using information from non-genotyped animals in GWAS. These questions were investigated in this study using real and simulated data. Analysis of real data showed that the use of phenotypes of non-genotyped animals affected SNP effect estimates and, consequently, QTL mapping. Despite some coincidence, the most important genomic regions identified by the analyses, either using or ignoring phenotypes of non-genotyped animals, were not the same. The simulation results indicated that the inclusion of all available phenotypic information, even that of non-genotyped animals, tends to improve QTL detection for low heritability complex traits. For populations with low levels of LD, this trend of improvement was less pronounced. Stronger shrinkage on SNPs explaining lower variance was not necessarily associated with better QTL mapping. The use of phenotypic information from non-genotyped animals in GWAS may improve the ability to detect QTL for low heritability complex traits, especially in populations in which the level of LD is high.

  15. Genotype-phenotype correlation and functional studies in patients with cystic fibrosis bearing CFTR complex alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlizzi, Vito; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Salvatore, Donatello; Lucarelli, Marco; Raia, Valeria; Angioni, Adriano; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Cirilli, Natalia; Casciaro, Rosaria; Colombo, Carla; Di Lullo, Antonella Miriam; Elce, Ausilia; Iacotucci, Paola; Comegna, Marika; Scorza, Manuela; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Perfetti, Anna; Cimino, Roberta; Quattrucci, Serena; Seia, Manuela; Sofia, Valentina Maria; Zarrilli, Federica; Amato, Felice

    2017-04-01

    The effect of complex alleles in cystic fibrosis (CF) is poorly defined for the lack of functional studies. To describe the genotype-phenotype correlation and the results of either in vitro and ex vivo studies performed on nasal epithelial cells (NEC) in a cohort of patients with CF carrying cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ( CFTR ) complex alleles. We studied 70 homozygous, compound heterozygous or heterozygous for CFTR mutations: p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn], n=8; p.[Ile148Thr;Ile1023_Val1024del], n=5; p.[Arg117Leu;Leu997Phe], n=6; c.[1210-34TG[12];1210-12T[5];2930C>T], n=3; p.[Arg74Trp;Asp1270Asn], n=4; p.Asp1270Asn, n=2; p.Ile148Thr, n=6; p.Leu997Phe, n=36. In 39 patients, we analysed the CFTR gating activity on NEC in comparison with patients with CF (n=8) and carriers (n=4). Finally, we analysed in vitro the p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] complex allele. The p.[Ile148Thr;Ile1023_Val1024del] caused severe CF in five compound heterozygous with a class I-II mutation. Their CFTR activity on NEC was comparable with patients with two class I-II mutations (mean 7.3% vs 6.9%). The p.[Arg74Trp;Asp1270Asn] and the p.Asp1270Asn have scarce functional effects, while p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] caused mild CF in four of five subjects carrying a class I-II mutation in trans , or CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RD) in three having in trans a class IV-V mutation. The p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] causes significantly (pT] and a class I-II mutation had mild CF or CFTR-RD (gating activity: 18.5-19.0%). The effect of complex alleles partially depends on the mutation in trans . Although larger studies are necessary, the CFTR activity on NEC is a rapid contributory tool to classify patients with CFTR dysfunction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Phenotype-Genotype Association Analysis of ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma and Its Molecular Link to Patient Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzhi Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma, also known as Cushing disease (CD, is rare and causes metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis due to hypercortisolism. However, the molecular pathogenesis of CD is still unclear because of a lack of human cell lines and animal models. Here, we study 106 clinical characteristics and gene expression changes from 118 patients, the largest cohort of CD in a single-center. RNA deep sequencing is used to examine genotypic changes in nine paired female ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas and adjacent nontumorous pituitary tissues (ANPT. We develop a novel analysis linking disease clinical characteristics and whole transcriptomic changes, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient to discover a molecular network mechanism. We report that osteoporosis is distinguished from the phenotype and genotype analysis. A cluster of genes involved in osteoporosis is identified using Pearson correlation coefficient analysis. Most of the genes are reported in the bone related literature, confirming the feasibility of phenotype-genotype association analysis, which could be used in the analysis of almost all diseases. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1, collagen type I α 1 chain (COL1A1, 5′-nucleotidase ecto (NT5E, HtrA serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1 and angiopoietin 1 (ANGPT1 and their signalling pathways are shown to be involved in osteoporosis in CD patients. Our discoveries provide a molecular link for osteoporosis in CD patients, and may open new potential avenues for osteoporosis intervention and treatment.

  17. Clonal expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans genotype in North America is accompanied by significant variation in phenotypic expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Khankhet

    Full Text Available Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causative agent of an emerging infectious disease that threatens populations of several North American bat species. The fungal disease was first observed in 2006 and has since caused the death of nearly six million bats. The disease, commonly known as white-nose syndrome, is characterized by a cutaneous infection with P. destructans causing erosions and ulcers in the skin of nose, ears and/or wings of bats. Previous studies based on sequences from eight loci have found that isolates of P. destructans from bats in the US all belong to one multilocus genotype. Using the same multilocus sequence typing method, we found that isolates from eastern and central Canada also had the same genotype as those from the US, consistent with the clonal expansion of P. destructans into Canada. However, our PCR fingerprinting revealed that among the 112 North American isolates we analyzed, three, all from Canada, showed minor genetic variation. Furthermore, we found significant variations among isolates in mycelial growth rate; the production of mycelial exudates; and pigment production and diffusion into agar media. These phenotypic differences were influenced by culture medium and incubation temperature, indicating significant variation in environmental condition--dependent phenotypic expression among isolates of the clonal P. destructans genotype in North America.

  18. Clonal expansion of the Pseudogymnoascus destructans genotype in North America is accompanied by significant variation in phenotypic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankhet, Jordan; Vanderwolf, Karen J; McAlpine, Donald F; McBurney, Scott; Overy, David P; Slavic, Durda; Xu, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is the causative agent of an emerging infectious disease that threatens populations of several North American bat species. The fungal disease was first observed in 2006 and has since caused the death of nearly six million bats. The disease, commonly known as white-nose syndrome, is characterized by a cutaneous infection with P. destructans causing erosions and ulcers in the skin of nose, ears and/or wings of bats. Previous studies based on sequences from eight loci have found that isolates of P. destructans from bats in the US all belong to one multilocus genotype. Using the same multilocus sequence typing method, we found that isolates from eastern and central Canada also had the same genotype as those from the US, consistent with the clonal expansion of P. destructans into Canada. However, our PCR fingerprinting revealed that among the 112 North American isolates we analyzed, three, all from Canada, showed minor genetic variation. Furthermore, we found significant variations among isolates in mycelial growth rate; the production of mycelial exudates; and pigment production and diffusion into agar media. These phenotypic differences were influenced by culture medium and incubation temperature, indicating significant variation in environmental condition--dependent phenotypic expression among isolates of the clonal P. destructans genotype in North America.

  19. Genotypic versus phenotypic identification of staphylococcal species of canine origin with special reference to Staphylococcus schleiferi subsp. coagulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousson, Olivier; Di Bello, Domenica; Vanni, Michele; Cardini, Giovanni; Soldani, Giulio; Pretti, Carlo; Intorre, Luigi

    2007-07-20

    A comparative study was performed to examine the respective accuracy of 16S rDNA sequencing and of the commercial biochemical assay ID32 STAPH (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) in the identification of 232 staphylococcal samples representing 20 species and subspecies isolated from 367 dogs. Notable differences in species distribution were observed by comparing genotypic and phenotypic data. Partial sequencing of 16S rDNA resulted in an unambiguous identification of 226 (97.4%) of the isolates, whereas the phenotypic approach resulted in a correct diagnosis of 162 (69.8%) of the isolates. Statistical agreement between genotypic and phenotypic identification of staphylococci was substantial (Kappa coefficient of 0.6-0.8) for Staphylococcus aureus, S. hominis, S. warneri, S. cohnii subsp. urealyticus, and S. simulans, and "almost perfect" (Kappa coefficient of 0.8-1) for S. intermedius, S. epidermidis, S. equorum, S. haemolyticus, S. sciuri, and S. kloosi. No agreement above that expected by chance (Kappa coefficient=0) was observed for S. schleiferi subsp. coagulans, which was either confounded with S. intermedius and S. capitis, or categorized as unacceptable by the biochemical assay. Given the growing importance of this pathogen in veterinary medicine and its frequent misidentification with related staphylococci, a PCR-RFLP approach producing a S. schleiferi-specific restriction profile was developed. This fast and reliable assay represents a valuable tool in assisting in the monitoring of this pathogen.

  20. Sweet Taste Perception is Associated with Body Mass Index at the Phenotypic and Genotypic Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Liang-Dar; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Ong, Jue-Sheng; Breslin, Paul A S; Reed, Danielle R; MacGregor, Stuart; Gharahkhani, Puya; Martin, Nicholas G; Rentería, Miguel E

    2016-10-01

    Investigations on the relationship between sweet taste perception and body mass index (BMI) have been inconclusive. Here, we report a longitudinal analysis using a genetically informative sample of 1,576 adolescent Australian twins to explore the relationship between BMI and sweet taste. First, we estimated the phenotypic correlations between perception scores for four different sweet compounds (glucose, fructose, neohesperidine dihydrochalcone (NHDC), and aspartame) and BMI. Then, we computed the association between adolescent taste perception and BMI in early adulthood (reported 9 years later). Finally, we used twin modeling and polygenic risk prediction analysis to investigate the genetic overlap between BMI and sweet taste perception. Our findings revealed that BMI in early adulthood was significantly associated with each of the sweet perception scores, with the strongest correlation observed in aspartame with r = 0.09 (p = .007). However, only limited evidence of association was observed between sweet taste perception and BMI that was measured at the same time (in adolescence), with the strongest evidence of association observed for glucose with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.06 (p = .029) and for aspartame with r = 0.06 (p = .035). We found a significant (p sweet taste perception in adolescence can be a potential indicator of BMI in early adulthood. This association is further supported by evidence of genetic overlap between the traits, suggesting that some BMI genes may be acting through biological pathways of taste perception.

  1. Two Siblings With a CDKL5 Mutation: Genotype and Phenotype Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagebeuk, Eveline E O; Marcelis, Carlo L; Alders, Mariëlle; Kaspers, Ageeth; de Weerd, Al W

    2015-10-01

    This is the second report of a family with a recurrence of a CDKL5 mutation (c. 283-3_290del) in 2 sisters. Both parents tested negative for the mutation in all tissues, but germline mosaicism is likely. Clinically CDKL5 patients resemble those with Rett syndrome, caused by a MECP2 mutation, who experience a regression, after an initial normal development. Even though both siblings showed a typical CDKL5 phenotype, their presentation is different. From birth, the oldest daughter had a severe developmental delay, feeding problems, and hypotonia and experienced daily refractory seizures. The youngest daughter appeared to be normal until age 3 months. At that age seizures started, deterioration and regression became evident, and an epileptic encephalopathy developed. This report of familial recurrence, with suspected germline mosaicism in a healthy parent, has important consequences for genetic counseling. Although it is not possible to predict an exact recurrence risk, it is likely to be increased. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Identification of associations between genotypes and longitudinal phenotypes via temporally-constrained group sparse canonical correlation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaoke; Li, Chanxiu; Yan, Jingwen; Yao, Xiaohui; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Zhang, Daoqiang

    2017-07-15

    Neuroimaging genetics identifies the relationships between genetic variants (i.e., the single nucleotide polymorphisms) and brain imaging data to reveal the associations from genotypes to phenotypes. So far, most existing machine-learning approaches are widely used to detect the effective associations between genetic variants and brain imaging data at one time-point. However, those associations are based on static phenotypes and ignore the temporal dynamics of the phenotypical changes. The phenotypes across multiple time-points may exhibit temporal patterns that can be used to facilitate the understanding of the degenerative process. In this article, we propose a novel temporally constrained group sparse canonical correlation analysis (TGSCCA) framework to identify genetic associations with longitudinal phenotypic markers. The proposed TGSCCA method is able to capture the temporal changes in brain from longitudinal phenotypes by incorporating the fused penalty, which requires that the differences between two consecutive canonical weight vectors from adjacent time-points should be small. A new efficient optimization algorithm is designed to solve the objective function. Furthermore, we demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm on both synthetic and real data (i.e., the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative cohort, including progressive mild cognitive impairment, stable MCI and Normal Control participants). In comparison with conventional SCCA, our proposed method can achieve strong associations and discover phenotypic biomarkers across multiple time-points to guide disease-progressive interpretation. The Matlab code is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/ibrain-cn/files/ . dqzhang@nuaa.edu.cn or shenli@iu.edu. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  3. Relation between CYP2D6 Genotype, Phenotype and Therapeutic Drug Concentrations among Nortriptyline and Venlafaxine Users in Old Age Psychiatry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berm, E; Kok, R.; Hak, E; Wilffert, B

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To determine relations between drug concentrations and the cytochrome P450-CYP2D6 genotype or phenotype among elderly patients treated with nortriptyline or venlafaxine. Methods: A post-hoc analysis of a clinical trial was performed. Patients were grouped into phenotypes according to the

  4. Evaluation of lansoprazole as a probe for assessing cytochrome P450 2C19 activity and genotype-phenotype correlation in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Ersin; Karaca, Ozgur; Babaoglu, Melih O; Baysoy, Gökhan; Balamtekin, Necati; Demir, Hulya; Uslu, Nuray; Bozkurt, Atilla; Yuce, Aysel; Yasar, Umit

    2012-05-01

    Lansoprazole, a cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) substrate, has been widely used in children to manage acid-related diseases. CYP2C19 exhibits marked genetic polymorphisms, and distribution of these polymorphisms varies among different ethnic groups. There is limited data regarding the use of probe drugs for determining CYP2C19 activity in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate lansoprazole as an in vivo phenotyping probe for assessing CYP2C19 activity in children. The CYP2C19*2, *3, and *17 variants were determined in 244 children. Three hours after a single oral dose of lansoprazole (n = 94) or omeprazole (n = 19), plasma lansoprazole and 5-hydroxy lansoprazole or omeprazole and 5-hydroxy omeprazole concentrations were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. The CYP2C19*17 was the most frequent variant allele (24.4%). The group of patients with CYP2C19*17*17 genotype had a 70% lower (p lansoprazole plasma concentration compared with the CYP2C19*1*1 genotype group, whereas the CYP2C19*2*2 group had 6.9-fold higher (p lansoprazole plasma concentration. Lansoprazole metabolic ratios (lansoprazole/5-hydroxy-lansoprazole) were found to be significantly lower in the *17*17 [mean ± standard deviation (SD); 2.8 ± 2.1] group and higher in the *2*2 group (63.5 ± 12.2) compared with that of the *1*1 genotype group (6.1 ± 4.5). According to our results from a Turkish pediatric population, lansoprazole is a suitable probe drug for phenotyping CYP2C19. The CYP2C19*2 and *17 variants should be taken into consideration in predicting the clinical outcome of therapy with lansoprazole in the pediatric population.

  5. Genotype-phenotype associations in filaggrin loss-of-function mutation carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landeck, Lilla; Visser, Maaike; Kezic, Sanja; John, Swen M.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in the filaggrin gene (FLG) have been reported to be associated with specific phenotypic characteristics such as hyperlinearity and keratosis pilaris. To study phenotypic features in patients with occupational irritant contact eczema of the hands in relation to FLG

  6. Novel mutations and their genotype-phenotype correlations in patients with Noonan syndrome, using next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafazoli, Alireza; Eshraghi, Peyman; Pantaleoni, Francesca; Vakili, Rahim; Moghaddassian, Morteza; Ghahraman, Martha; Muto, Valentina; Paolacci, Stefano; Golyan, Fatemeh Fardi; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2018-03-01

    Noonan Syndrome (NS) is an autosomal dominant disorder with many variable and heterogeneous conditions. The genetic basis for 20-30% of cases is still unknown. This study evaluates Iranian Noonan patients both clinically and genetically for the first time. Mutational analysis of PTPN11 gene was performed in 15 Iranian patients, using PCR and Sanger sequencing at phase one. Then, as phase two, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) in the form of targeted resequencing was utilized for analysis of exons from other related genes. Homology modelling for the novel founded mutations was performed as well. The genotype, phenotype correlation was done according to the molecular findings and clinical features. Previously reported mutation (p.N308D) in some patients and a novel mutation (p.D155N) in one of the patients were identified in phase one. After applying NGS methods, known and new variants were found in four patients in other genes, including: CBL (p. V904I), KRAS (p. L53W), SOS1 (p. I1302V), and SOS1 (p. R552G). Structural studies of two deduced novel mutations in related genes revealed deficiencies in the mutated proteins. Following genotype, phenotype correlation, a new pattern of the presence of intellectual disability in two patients was registered. NS shows strong variable expressivity along the high genetic heterogeneity especially in distinct populations and ethnic groups. Also possibly unknown other causative genes may be exist. Obviously, more comprehensive and new technologies like NGS methods are the best choice for detection of molecular defects in patients for genotype, phenotype correlation and disease management. Copyright © 2017 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Design of Biomedical Robots for Phenotype Prediction Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deAndrés-Galiana, Enrique J; Fernández-Martínez, Juan Luis; Sonis, Stephen T

    2016-08-01

    Genomics has been used with varying degrees of success in the context of drug discovery and in defining mechanisms of action for diseases like cancer and neurodegenerative and rare diseases in the quest for orphan drugs. To improve its utility, accuracy, and cost-effectiveness optimization of analytical methods, especially those that translate to clinically relevant outcomes, is critical. Here we define a novel tool for genomic analysis termed a biomedical robot in order to improve phenotype prediction, identifying disease pathogenesis and significantly defining therapeutic targets. Biomedical robot analytics differ from historical methods in that they are based on melding feature selection methods and ensemble learning techniques. The biomedical robot mathematically exploits the structure of the uncertainty space of any classification problem conceived as an ill-posed optimization problem. Given a classifier, there exist different equivalent small-scale genetic signatures that provide similar predictive accuracies. We perform the sensitivity analysis to noise of the biomedical robot concept using synthetic microarrays perturbed by different kinds of noises in expression and class assignment. Finally, we show the application of this concept to the analysis of different diseases, inferring the pathways and the correlation networks. The final aim of a biomedical robot is to improve knowledge discovery and provide decision systems to optimize diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. This analysis shows that the biomedical robots are robust against different kinds of noises and particularly to a wrong class assignment of the samples. Assessing the uncertainty that is inherent to any phenotype prediction problem is the right way to address this kind of problem.

  8. Genotype and Phenotype Predictors of Relapse of Graves’ Disease after Antithyroid Drug Withdrawal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei-Wen; Chen, I-Ya; Juo, Suh-Hang Hank; Hsi, Edward; Liu, Rue-Tsuan; Hsieh, Ching-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Background For patients with Graves’ disease (GD), the primary goal of antithyroid drug therapy is to temporarily restore the patient to the euthyroid state and wait for a subsequent remission of the disease. This study sought to identify the predictive markers for the relapse of disease. Methods To do this, we studied 262 GD patients with long enough follow-up after drug withdrawal to determine treatment outcome. The patients were divided into three groups by time of relapse: early relapse group (n = 91) had an early relapse within 9 months, late relapse group (n = 65) had a relapse between 10 and 36 months, and long-term remission group (n = 106) were either still in remission after at least 3 years or relapsed after 3 years of drug withdrawal. We assessed the treatment outcome of 23 SNPs of costimulatory genes, phenotype and smoking habits. We used permutation to obtain p values for each SNP as an adjustment for multiple testing. Cox proportional hazards models was performed to assess the strength of association between the treatment outcome and clinical and laboratory variables. Results Four SNPs were significantly associated with disease relapse: rs231775 (OR 1.96, 95% CI 1.18–3.26) at CTLA-4 and rs745307 (OR 7.97, 95% CI 1.01–62.7), rs11569309 (OR 8.09, 95% CI 1.03–63.7), and rs3765457 (OR 2.60, 95% CI 1.08–6.28) at CD40. Combining risk alleles at CTLA-4 and CD40 improved the predictability of relapse. Using 3 years as the cutoff point for multivariate analysis, we found several independent predictors of disease relapse: number of risk alleles (HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.09–1.56), a large goiter size at the end of the treatment (HR 1.30, 95% CI 1.05–1.61), persistent TSH-binding inhibitory Ig (HR 1.64, 95% CI 1.15–2.35), and smoking habit (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.05–2.42). Conclusion Genetic polymorphism of costimulatory genes, smoking status, persistent goiter, and TSH-binding inhibitory Ig predict disease relapse. PMID:24783027

  9. Migration Phenotype of Brain-Cancer Cells Predicts Patient Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris L. Smith

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme is a heterogeneous and infiltrative cancer with dismal prognosis. Studying the migratory behavior of tumor-derived cell populations can be informative, but it places a high premium on the precision of in vitro methods and the relevance of in vivo conditions. In particular, the analysis of 2D cell migration may not reflect invasion into 3D extracellular matrices in vivo. Here, we describe a method that allows time-resolved studies of primary cell migration with single-cell resolution on a fibrillar surface that closely mimics in vivo 3D migration. We used this platform to screen 14 patient-derived glioblastoma samples. We observed that the migratory phenotype of a subset of cells in response to platelet-derived growth factor was highly predictive of tumor location and recurrence in the clinic. Therefore, migratory phenotypic classifiers analyzed at the single-cell level in a patient-specific way can provide high diagnostic and prognostic value for invasive cancers.

  10. Wnt signaling pathway involvement in genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg syndrome type 2 with MITF mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Ping; Liu, Ya-Lan; Mei, Ling-Yun; He, Chu-Feng; Niu, Zhi-Jie; Sun, Jie; Zhao, Yu-Lin; Feng, Yong; Zhang, Hua

    2018-05-01

    Mutation in the gene encoding microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) lead to Waardenburg syndrome 2 (WS2), an autosomal dominantly inherited syndrome with auditory-pigmentary abnormalities, which is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. Haploinsufficiency may be the underlying mechanism for WS2. However, the mechanisms explaining the genotypic and phenotypic variations in WS2 caused by MITF mutations are unclear. A previous study revealed that MITF interacts with LEF-1, an important factor in the Wnt signaling pathway, to regulate its own transcription through LEF-1-binding sites on the MITF promoter. In this study, four different WS2-associated MITF mutations (p.R217I, p.R217G, p.R255X, p.R217del) that are associated with highly variable clinical features were chosen. According to the results, LEF-1 can activate the expression of MITF on its own, but MITF proteins inhibited the activation. This inhibition weakens when the dosage of MITF is reduced. Except for p.R217I, p.R255X, p.R217G, and p.R217del lose the ability to activate TYR completely and do not inhibit the LEF-1-mediated activation of the MITF-M promoter, and the haploinsufficiency created by mutant MITF can be overcome; correspondingly, the mutants' associated phenotypes are less severe than that of p.R217I. The dominant negative of p.R217del made it have a second-most severe phenotype. This study's data imply that MITF has a negative feedback loop of regulation to stabilize MITF gene dosage that involves the Wnt signaling pathway and that the interaction of MITF mutants with this pathway drives the genotypic and phenotypic differences observed in Waardenburg syndrome type 2 associated with MITF mutations.

  11. On the nosology and pathogenesis of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: genotype-phenotype correlation analysis of 80 patients and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollino, Marcella; Murdolo, Marina; Marangi, Giuseppe; Pecile, Vanna; Galasso, Cinzia; Mazzanti, Laura; Neri, Giovanni

    2008-11-15

    Based on genotype-phenotype correlation analysis of 80 Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) patients, as well as on review of relevant literature, we add further insights to the following aspects of WHS: (1) clinical delineation and phenotypic categories; (2) characterization of the basic genomic defect, mechanisms of origin and familiarity; (3) identification of prognostic factors for mental retardation; (4) chromosome mapping of the distinctive clinical signs, in an effort to identify pathogenic genes. Clinically, we consider that minimal diagnostic criteria for WHS, defining a "core" phenotype, are typical facial appearance, mental retardation, growth delay and seizures (or EEG anomalies). Three different categories of the WHS phenotype were defined, generally correlating with the extent of the 4p deletion. The first one comprises a small deletion not exceeding 3.5 Mb, that is usually associated with a mild phenotype, lacking major malformations. This category is likely under-diagnosed. The second and by far the more frequent category is identified by large deletions, averaging between 5 and 18 Mb, and causes the widely recognizable WHS phenotype. The third clinical category results from a very large deletion exceeding 22-25 Mb causing a severe phenotype, that can hardly be defined as typical WHS. Genetically, de novo chromosome abnormalities in WHS include pure deletions but also complex rearrangements, mainly unbalanced translocations. With the exception of t(4p;8p), WHS-associated chromosome abnormalities are neither mediated by segmental duplications, nor associated with a parental inversion polymorphism on 4p16.3. Factors involved in prediction of prognosis include the extent of the deletion, the occurrence of complex chromosome anomalies, and the severity of seizures. We found that the core phenotype maps within the terminal 1.9 Mb region of chromosome 4p. Therefore, WHSCR-2 should be considered the critical region for this condition. We also confirmed that the

  12. Clear correlation of genotype with disease phenotype in very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, B S; Olpin, S; Poorthuis, B J

    1999-01-01

    Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) catalyzes the initial rate-limiting step in mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation. VLCAD deficiency is clinically heterogenous, with three major phenotypes: a severe childhood form, with early onset, high mortality, and high incidence of cardiomyop......Very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) catalyzes the initial rate-limiting step in mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation. VLCAD deficiency is clinically heterogenous, with three major phenotypes: a severe childhood form, with early onset, high mortality, and high incidence...... of cardiomyopathy; a milder childhood form, with later onset, usually with hypoketotic hypoglycemia as the main presenting feature, low mortality, and rare cardiomyopathy; and an adult form, with isolated skeletal muscle involvement, rhabdomyolysis, and myoglobinuria, usually triggered by exercise or fasting......-phenotype relationship is in sharp contrast to what has been observed in medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency, in which no correlation between genotype and phenotype can be established....

  13. Function and Phenotype prediction through Data and Knowledge Fusion

    KAUST Repository

    Vespoor, Karen

    2016-01-27

    The biomedical literature captures the most current biomedical knowledge and is a tremendously rich resource for research. With over 24 million publications currently indexed in the US National Library of Medicine’s PubMed index, however, it is becoming increasingly challenging for biomedical researchers to keep up with this literature. Automated strategies for extracting information from it are required. Large-scale processing of the literature enables direct biomedical knowledge discovery. In this presentation, I will introduce the use of text mining techniques to support analysis of biological data sets, and will specifically discuss applications in protein function and phenotype prediction, as well as analysis of genetic variants that are supported by analysis of the literature and integration with complementary structured resources.

  14. dbVOR: a database system for importing pedigree, phenotype and genotype data and exporting selected subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Robert V; Conley, Yvette P; Gorin, Michael B; Weeks, Daniel E

    2015-03-18

    When studying the genetics of a human trait, we typically have to manage both genome-wide and targeted genotype data. There can be overlap of both people and markers from different genotyping experiments; the overlap can introduce several kinds of problems. Most times the overlapping genotypes are the same, but sometimes they are different. Occasionally, the lab will return genotypes using a different allele labeling scheme (for example 1/2 vs A/C). Sometimes, the genotype for a person/marker index is unreliable or missing. Further, over time some markers are merged and bad samples are re-run under a different sample name. We need a consistent picture of the subset of data we have chosen to work with even though there might possibly be conflicting measurements from multiple data sources. We have developed the dbVOR database, which is designed to hold data efficiently for both genome-wide and targeted experiments. The data are indexed for fast retrieval by person and marker. In addition, we store pedigree and phenotype data for our subjects. The dbVOR database allows us to select subsets of the data by several different criteria and to merge their results into a coherent and consistent whole. Data may be filtered by: family, person, trait value, markers, chromosomes, and chromosome ranges. The results can be presented in columnar, Mega2, or PLINK format. dbVOR serves our needs well. It is freely available from https://watson.hgen.pitt.edu/register . Documentation for dbVOR can be found at https://watson.hgen.pitt.edu/register/docs/dbvor.html .

  15. Digest: Plants adapt under attack: genotypic selection and phenotypic plasticity under herbivore pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Nichola J

    2018-03-31

    Plant species adapt to changing environmental conditions through phenotypic plasticity and natural selection. Agrawal et al. (2018) found that dandelions responded to the presence of insect pests by producing higher levels of defensive compounds. This defensive response resulted both from phenotypic plasticity, with individual plants' defenses triggered by insect attack, and from evolution by natural selection acting on genetic variation in the plant population. © 2018 The Author(s). Evolution © 2018 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  16. Cafe Variome: general-purpose software for making genotype-phenotype data discoverable in restricted or open access contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Owen; Beck, Tim; Atlan, David; Swertz, Morris; Thangavelu, Dhiwagaran; Veal, Colin; Dalgleish, Raymond; Brookes, Anthony J

    2015-10-01

    Biomedical data sharing is desirable, but problematic. Data "discovery" approaches-which establish the existence rather than the substance of data-precisely connect data owners with data seekers, and thereby promote data sharing. Cafe Variome (http://www.cafevariome.org) was therefore designed to provide a general-purpose, Web-based, data discovery tool that can be quickly installed by any genotype-phenotype data owner, or network of data owners, to make safe or sensitive content appropriately discoverable. Data fields or content of any type can be accommodated, from simple ID and label fields through to extensive genotype and phenotype details based on ontologies. The system provides a "shop window" in front of data, with main interfaces being a simple search box and a powerful "query-builder" that enable very elaborate queries to be formulated. After a successful search, counts of records are reported grouped by "openAccess" (data may be directly accessed), "linkedAccess" (a source link is provided), and "restrictedAccess" (facilitated data requests and subsequent provision of approved records). An administrator interface provides a wide range of options for system configuration, enabling highly customized single-site or federated networks to be established. Current uses include rare disease data discovery, patient matchmaking, and a Beacon Web service. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  17. An investigation of classification algorithms for predicting HIV drug resistance without genotype resistance testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Brandt, P

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available is limited in low-resource settings. In this paper we investigate machine learning techniques for drug resistance prediction from routine treatment and laboratory data to help clinicians select patients for confirmatory genotype testing. The techniques...

  18. Large scale phenotyping and data analysis of pepper genotypes in the EU-SPICY project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dieleman, J.A.; Magán, J.J.; Wubs, A.M.; Palloix, A.; Lenk, S.; Glasbey, C.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.

    2012-01-01

    In breeding the best genotypes for diverse conditions, ideally the breeder should test all his crossings under all these conditions. Especially with complex physiological traits like yield, which exhibit large variation, this would require many expensive and large field trials. The EU project “Smart

  19. Subgrouping of patients with oral lichen planus according to cytochrome P450 enzyme phenotype and genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragelund, Camilla; Jensen, Siri Beier; Hansen, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to determine if the activity of the environmentally influenced cytochrome P450 enzyme CYP1A2, alone or in combination with CYP2D6*4 genotype, discriminates subgroups of oral lichen planus (OLP) according to lifestyle factors and clinical manifestations. Study Design...

  20. Phenotypic diversity of basic characteristics of genotypes from the Serbia onion collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gvozdanović-Varga Jelica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The onion is a widely distributed vegetable crop, which takes an important place in the vegetable production in Serbia. The traditional planting method is the one from sets. Old cultivars and populations and, in recent years, foreign cultivars are grown. The large variety of genotypes, including both domestic populations and cultivars, comprises the significant gene pool of this region. The onion collection of the Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad is based on the populations and cultivars from the territory of the former Yugoslavia. This paper reviews 30 onion genotypes on the basic IPGRI descriptors (ANNEX I. Variability of the reviewed characteristics was determined by PC analysis. High variability values have been established for bulb skin color, bulb flesh color, bulb hearting and bulb skin thickness. The genotypes varied in bulb skin color as well as in bulb flesh color from white to dark violet. These two characteristics had the largest impact on clustering, with a single genotype being heterogeneous exactly for these two characteristics. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 31030

  1. ACE genotype, phenotype and all-cause mortality in different cohorts of patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Louise H; Sejling, Anne-Sophie; Lajer, Maria

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Carrying the D-allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) I/D polymorphism and high ACE activity are prognostic factors in diabetic nephropathy, which predicts mortality in type 1 diabetes. We studied the association between the ACE D-allele and ACE phenotype and long-term all-cause ...

  2. One gene, many phenotypes | Shawky | Egyptian Journal of Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... mechanisms underlying genotype-phenotype discrepancies is important, as it will move clinical genetics towards predictive medicine, allowing better selection of therapeutic strategies and individualized counseling of persons affected with genetic disorders. Keywords: Gene, phenotype, mosaicism, epigenetics, pleiotropy ...

  3. Improving the phenotypic expression of rice genotypes: Rethinking “intensification” for production systems and selection practices for rice breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Uphoff

    2015-06-01

    expression of rice plants' genetic potential, thereby creating more productive and robust phenotypes from given rice genotypes. Data indicate that increased plant density does not necessarily enhance crop yield potential, as classical breeding methods suggest. Developing cultivars that can achieve their higher productivity under a wide range of plant densities—breeding for density-neutral cultivars using alternative selection strategies—will enable more effective exploitation of available crop growth resources. Density-neutral cultivars that achieve high productivity under ample environmental growth resources can also achieve optimal productivity under limited resources, where lower densities can avert crop failure due to overcrowding. This will become more important to the extent that climatic and other factors become more adverse to crop production. Focusing more on which management practices can evoke the most productive and robust phenotypes from given genotypes is important for rice breeding and improvement programs since it is phenotypes that feed our human populations.

  4. Genotypic and Phenotypic Characteristics Associated with Biofilm Formation by Human Clinical Escherichia coli Isolates of Different Pathotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebel, Juliane; Böhm, Alexander; Nitschke, Jörg; Burdukiewicz, Michał; Weinreich, Jörg; Ali, Aamir; Roggenbuck, Dirk; Rödiger, Stefan; Schierack, Peter

    2017-12-15

    Bacterial biofilm formation is a widespread phenomenon and a complex process requiring a set of genes facilitating the initial adhesion, maturation, and production of the extracellular polymeric matrix and subsequent dispersal of bacteria. Most studies on Escherichia coli biofilm formation have investigated nonpathogenic E. coli K-12 strains. Due to the extensive focus on laboratory strains in most studies, there is poor information regarding biofilm formation by pathogenic E. coli isolates. In this study, we genotypically and phenotypically characterized 187 human clinical E. coli isolates representing various pathotypes (e.g., uropathogenic, enteropathogenic, and enteroaggregative E. coli ). We investigated the presence of biofilm-associated genes ("genotype") and phenotypically analyzed the isolates for motility and curli and cellulose production ("phenotype"). We developed a new screening method to examine the in vitro biofilm formation ability. In summary, we found a high prevalence of biofilm-associated genes. However, we could not detect a biofilm-associated gene or specific phenotype correlating with the biofilm formation ability. In contrast, we did identify an association of increased biofilm formation with a specific E. coli pathotype. Enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC) was found to exhibit the highest capacity for biofilm formation. Using our image-based technology for the screening of biofilm formation, we demonstrated the characteristic biofilm formation pattern of EAEC, consisting of thick bacterial aggregates. In summary, our results highlight the fact that biofilm-promoting factors shown to be critical for biofilm formation in nonpathogenic strains do not reflect their impact in clinical isolates and that the ability of biofilm formation is a defined characteristic of EAEC. IMPORTANCE Bacterial biofilms are ubiquitous and consist of sessile bacterial cells surrounded by a self-produced extracellular polymeric matrix. They cause chronic and device

  5. Comparative phenotypic and genotypic analyses of Salmonella Rissen that originated from food animals in Thailand and United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornsukarom, S; Patchanee, P; Erdman, M; Cray, P F; Wittum, T; Lee, J; Gebreyes, W A

    2015-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Rissen has been recognized as one of the most common serovar among humans and pork production systems in different parts of the world, especially Asia. In the United States, this serovar caused outbreaks but its epidemiologic significance remains unknown. The objectives of this study were to compare the phenotypic (antimicrobial susceptibility) and genotypic attributes of Salmonella Rissen isolated in Thailand (Thai) and the United States (US). All the Thai isolates (n = 30) were recovered from swine faecal samples. The US isolates (n = 35) were recovered from swine faecal samples (n = 29), cattle (n = 2), chicken (n = 2), dog (n = 1) and a ready-to-eat product (n = 1). The antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates was determined using the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method with a panel of 12 antimicrobials. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to determine the genotypic diversity of isolates. All Thai isolates showed multidrug resistance (MDR) with the most frequent antibiotic resistance shown against ampicillin (100%), sulfisoxazole (96.7%), tetracycline (93.3%), streptomycin (90%) and chloramphenicol (30%). About half of the isolates of USA origin were pan-susceptible and roughly 30% were resistant to only tetracycline (R-type: Te). Salmonella Rissen isolated from Thailand and the USA in this study were found to be clonally unrelated. Genotypic analyses indicated that isolates were clustered primarily based on the geographic origin implying the limited clonality among the strains. Clonal relatedness among different host species within the same geography (USA) was found. We found genotypic similarity in Thai and US isolates in few instances but with no epidemiological link. Further studies to assess propensity for increased inter-regional transmission and dissemination is warranted. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of two Toxoplasma gondii isolates in free-range chickens from Uberlândia, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, C S; Franco, P S; Silva, N M; Silva, D A O; Ferro, E A V; Pena, H F J; Soares, R M; Gennari, S M; Mineo, J R

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii infection in free-range chickens from Uberlândia, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, and characterize the genotypic and phenotypic features of two isolates of this parasite, considering the importance of these hosts in the epidemiology of toxoplasmosis. Serum samples from 108 free-range chickens were obtained from ten different districts, and submitted to the modified agglutination test (MAT) for the presence of anti-T. gondii antibodies, and brain and heart tissue samples from infected chickens were processed for mouse bioassay. An overall seroprevalence of 71·3% was found and antibody titres ranged from 16 to 4096. After confirmation of seropositivity by mouse bioassay, the determination of the T. gondii genotypes of two isolates was performed by PCR-RFLP, using primers for the following markers: SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1, new SAG2, Apico and CS3. These T. gondii isolates, designated TgChBrUD1and TgChBrUD2, were obtained from heart samples of free-range chickens. The TgChBrUD1 isolate belonged to ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype 11 and the TgChBrUD2 isolate belonged to ToxoDB PCR-RFLP genotype 6. Both isolates demonstrated high virulence in a rodent model, with the TgChBrUD1 isolate able to induce brain cysts, in accord with its pattern of multiplication rates in human fibroblast culture. Taken together, these results reveal high prevalence of T. gondii infection in free-range chickens throughout Uberlândia, indicating an important degree of oocyst environmental contamination and the existence of considerable risk for T. gondii transmission to humans by consumption of free-range chicken as a food source.

  7. Gender is a major factor explaining discrepancies in eye colour prediction based on HERC2/OCA2 genotype and the IrisPlex model

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Cadenas, Conrado; Peña Chilet, María; Ibarrola-Villava, Maider; Ribas, Gloria

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, several studies have greatly increased our understanding of the genetic basis underlying human eye colour variation. A large percentage of the eye colour diversity present in humans can already be genetically explained, so much so that different DNA-based eye colour prediction models, such as IrisPlex, have been recently developed for forensic purposes. Though these models are already highly accurate, they are by no means perfect, with many genotype-phenotype discrepancies st...

  8. Whole exome sequencing of wild-derived inbred strains of mice improves power to link phenotype and genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Peter L; Kopania, Emily; Keeble, Sara; Sarver, Brice A J; Larson, Erica; Orth, Annie; Belkhir, Khalid; Boursot, Pierre; Bonhomme, François; Good, Jeffrey M; Dean, Matthew D

    2017-10-01

    The house mouse is a powerful model to dissect the genetic basis of phenotypic variation, and serves as a model to study human diseases. Despite a wealth of discoveries, most classical laboratory strains have captured only a small fraction of genetic variation known to segregate in their wild progenitors, and existing strains are often related to each other in complex ways. Inbred strains of mice independently derived from natural populations have the potential to increase power in genetic studies with the addition of novel genetic variation. Here, we perform exome-enrichment and high-throughput sequencing (~8× coverage) of 26 wild-derived strains known in the mouse research community as the "Montpellier strains." We identified 1.46 million SNPs in our dataset, approximately 19% of which have not been detected from other inbred strains. This novel genetic variation is expected to contribute to phenotypic variation, as they include 18,496 nonsynonymous variants and 262 early stop codons. Simulations demonstrate that the higher density of genetic variation in the Montpellier strains provides increased power for quantitative genetic studies. Inasmuch as the power to connect genotype to phenotype depends on genetic variation, it is important to incorporate these additional genetic strains into future research programs.

  9. Molecular etiology and genotype-phenotype correlation of Chinese Han deaf patients with type I and type II Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lianhua; Li, Xiaohua; Shi, Jun; Pang, Xiuhong; Hu, Yechen; Wang, Xiaowen; Wu, Hao; Yang, Tao

    2016-10-19

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities is genetically heterogeneous and phenotypically variable. This study investigated the molecular etiology and genotype-phenotype correlation of WS in 36 Chinese Han deaf probands and 16 additional family members that were clinically diagnosed with WS type I (WS1, n = 8) and type II (WS2, n = 42). Mutation screening of six WS-associated genes detected PAX3 mutations in 6 (86%) of the 7 WS1 probands. Among the 29 WS2 probands, 13 (45%) and 10 (34%) were identified with SOX10 and MITF mutations, respectively. Nineteen of the 26 detected mutations were novel. In WS2 probands whose parental DNA samples were available, de novo mutations were frequently seen for SOX10 mutations (7/8) but not for MITF mutations (0/5, P = 0.005). Excessive freckle, a common feature of WS2 in Chinese Hans, was frequent in WS2 probands with MITF mutations (7/10) but not in those with SOX10 mutations (0/13, P = 4.9 × 10 -4 ). Our results showed that mutations in SOX10 and MITF are two major causes for deafness associated with WS2. These two subtypes of WS2 can be distinguished by the high de novo rate of the SOX10 mutations and the excessive freckle phenotype exclusively associated with the MITF mutations.

  10. Familial Case of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disorder Detected by Oligoarray Comparative Genomic Hybridization: Genotype-to-Phenotype Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimia Najafi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD is an X-linked recessive hypomyelinating leukodystrophy characterized by nystagmus, spastic quadriplegia, ataxia, and developmental delay. It is caused by mutation in the PLP1 gene. Case Description. We report a 9-year-old boy referred for oligoarray comparative genomic hybridization (OA-CGH because of intellectual delay, seizures, microcephaly, nystagmus, and spastic paraplegia. Similar clinical findings were reported in his older brother and maternal uncle. Both parents had normal phenotypes. OA-CGH was performed and a 436 Kb duplication was detected and the diagnosis of PMD was made. The mother was carrier of this 436 Kb duplication. Conclusion. Clinical presentation has been accepted as being the mainstay of diagnosis for most conditions. However, recent developments in genetic diagnosis have shown that, in many congenital and sporadic disorders lacking specific phenotypic manifestations, a genotype-to-phenotype approach can be conclusive. In this case, a diagnosis was reached by universal genomic testing, namely, whole genomic array.

  11. Context matters — the complex interplay between resistome genotypes and resistance phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantas, Gautam; Sommer, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Application of metagenomic functional selections to study antibiotic resistance genes is revealing a highly diverse and complex network of genetic exchange between bacterial pathogens and environmental reservoirs, which likely contributes significantly to increasing resistance levels in pathogens...... the resistome genotype, and we highlight examples of genes and their hosts where this distinction becomes important in order to understand the relevance of environmental niches that contribute most to clinical problems associated with antibiotic resistance....

  12. Genotype and Phenotype Characterization of Indonesian Phytophthora infestans Isolates Collected From Java and Outside Java Island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwinita Wikan Utami

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Phytophthora infestans, the cause of late blight disease, is a worldwide problem in potato and tomato production. To understand the biology and ecology of P. infestans and the mechanism of spatial and temporal factors for the variation in P. infestans, the population diversity is required to be fully characterized. The objective of this research is to characterize the diversity of P. infestans. Surveys and collection of P. infestans isolates were performed on many locations of potato's production center in Indonesia, as in Java (West Java, Central Java, and East Java and outside of Java islands (Medan, Jambi, and Makassar. The collected isolates were then analyzed for their virulence diversity via plant disease bioassays on differential varieties and genotype diversity based on fragment analysis genotypes profile using the multiplexing 20 simple sequence repeat markers. The virulence characterization showed that the isolates group from Makassar, South Sulawesi, have the broad spectrum virulence pathotype to R1, R2, R3, R4, and R5 differential plants. Simple sequence repeat genotype characterization showed that in general, the population structure of P. infestans grouping is accordance to the origin of the sampling locations. The diversity between populations is lower than diversity between isolates in one location population groups. The characters of P. infestans population showed that the population diversity of P. infestans more occurs on individual isolates in one location compared with the diversity between the population location sampling.

  13. CYP2C9 Genotype vs. Metabolic Phenotype for Individual Drug Dosing—A Correlation Analysis Using Flurbiprofen as Probe Drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Silvia; Lutz, Roman W.; Schönfelder, Gilbert; Lutz, Werner K.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, genotyping of patients for polymorphic enzymes responsible for metabolic elimination is considered a possibility to adjust drug dose levels. For a patient to profit from this procedure, the interindividual differences in drug metabolism within one genotype should be smaller than those between different genotypes. We studied a large cohort of healthy young adults (283 subjects), correlating their CYP2C9 genotype to a simple phenotyping metric, using flurbiprofen as probe drug. Genotyping was conducted for CYP2C9*1, *2, *3. The urinary metabolic ratio MR (concentration of CYP2C9-dependent metabolite divided by concentration of flurbiprofen) determined two hours after flurbiprofen (8.75 mg) administration served as phenotyping metric. Linear statistical models correlating genotype and phenotype provided highly significant allele-specific MR estimates of 0.596 for the wild type allele CYP2C9*1, 0.405 for CYP2C9*2 (68 % of wild type), and 0.113 for CYP2C9*3 (19 % of wild type). If these estimates were used for flurbiprofen dose adjustment, taking 100 % for genotype *1/*1, an average reduction to 84 %, 60 %, 68 %, 43 %, and 19 % would result for genotype *1/*2, *1/*3, *2/*2, *2/*3, and *3/*3, respectively. Due to the large individual variation within genotypes with coefficients of variation ≥ 20 % and supposing the normal distribution, one in three individuals would be out of the average optimum dose by more than 20 %, one in 20 would be 40 % off. Whether this problem also applies to other CYPs and other drugs has to be investigated case by case. Our data for the given example, however, puts the benefit of individual drug dosing to question, if it is exclusively based on genotype. PMID:25775139

  14. CYP2C9 genotype vs. metabolic phenotype for individual drug dosing--a correlation analysis using flurbiprofen as probe drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Silvia; Lutz, Roman W; Schönfelder, Gilbert; Lutz, Werner K

    2015-01-01

    Currently, genotyping of patients for polymorphic enzymes responsible for metabolic elimination is considered a possibility to adjust drug dose levels. For a patient to profit from this procedure, the interindividual differences in drug metabolism within one genotype should be smaller than those between different genotypes. We studied a large cohort of healthy young adults (283 subjects), correlating their CYP2C9 genotype to a simple phenotyping metric, using flurbiprofen as probe drug. Genotyping was conducted for CYP2C9*1, *2, *3. The urinary metabolic ratio MR (concentration of CYP2C9-dependent metabolite divided by concentration of flurbiprofen) determined two hours after flurbiprofen (8.75 mg) administration served as phenotyping metric. Linear statistical models correlating genotype and phenotype provided highly significant allele-specific MR estimates of 0.596 for the wild type allele CYP2C9*1, 0.405 for CYP2C9*2 (68 % of wild type), and 0.113 for CYP2C9*3 (19 % of wild type). If these estimates were used for flurbiprofen dose adjustment, taking 100 % for genotype *1/*1, an average reduction to 84 %, 60 %, 68 %, 43 %, and 19 % would result for genotype *1/*2, *1/*3, *2/*2, *2/*3, and *3/*3, respectively. Due to the large individual variation within genotypes with coefficients of variation ≥ 20 % and supposing the normal distribution, one in three individuals would be out of the average optimum dose by more than 20 %, one in 20 would be 40 % off. Whether this problem also applies to other CYPs and other drugs has to be investigated case by case. Our data for the given example, however, puts the benefit of individual drug dosing to question, if it is exclusively based on genotype.

  15. CYP2C9 genotype vs. metabolic phenotype for individual drug dosing--a correlation analysis using flurbiprofen as probe drug.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Vogl

    Full Text Available Currently, genotyping of patients for polymorphic enzymes responsible for metabolic elimination is considered a possibility to adjust drug dose levels. For a patient to profit from this procedure, the interindividual differences in drug metabolism within one genotype should be smaller than those between different genotypes. We studied a large cohort of healthy young adults (283 subjects, correlating their CYP2C9 genotype to a simple phenotyping metric, using flurbiprofen as probe drug. Genotyping was conducted for CYP2C9*1, *2, *3. The urinary metabolic ratio MR (concentration of CYP2C9-dependent metabolite divided by concentration of flurbiprofen determined two hours after flurbiprofen (8.75 mg administration served as phenotyping metric. Linear statistical models correlating genotype and phenotype provided highly significant allele-specific MR estimates of 0.596 for the wild type allele CYP2C9*1, 0.405 for CYP2C9*2 (68 % of wild type, and 0.113 for CYP2C9*3 (19 % of wild type. If these estimates were used for flurbiprofen dose adjustment, taking 100 % for genotype *1/*1, an average reduction to 84 %, 60 %, 68 %, 43 %, and 19 % would result for genotype *1/*2, *1/*3, *2/*2, *2/*3, and *3/*3, respectively. Due to the large individual variation within genotypes with coefficients of variation ≥ 20 % and supposing the normal distribution, one in three individuals would be out of the average optimum dose by more than 20 %, one in 20 would be 40 % off. Whether this problem also applies to other CYPs and other drugs has to be investigated case by case. Our data for the given example, however, puts the benefit of individual drug dosing to question, if it is exclusively based on genotype.

  16. Expanding the genotype-phenotype spectrum in hereditary colorectal cancer by gene panel testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohlin, Anna; Rambech, Eva; Kvist, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary syndromes causing colorectal cancer include both polyposis and non-polyposis syndromes. Overlapping phenotypes between the syndromes have been recognized and this make targeted molecular testing for single genes less favorable, instead there is a gaining interest for multi-gene panel...

  17. New insights into mitral valve dystrophy : A Filamin-A genotype-phenotype and outcome study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Tourneau, Thierry; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Cueff, Caroline; Bernstein, Daniel; Aalberts, Jan J J; Lecointe, Simon; Mérot, Jean; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Oomen, Toon; Dina, Christian; Karakachoff, Matilde; Desal, Hubert; Al Habash, Ousama; Delling, Francesca N; Capoulade, Romain; Suurmeijer, Albert J H; Milan, David; Norris, Russell A; Markwald, Roger; Aikawa, Elena; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Hagège, Albert; Roussel, Jean-Christian; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Levine, Robert A; Kyndt, Florence; Probst, Vincent; Le Marec, Hervé; Schott, Jean-Jacques

    2018-01-01

    Aims: Filamin-A (FLNA) was identified as the first gene of non-syndromic mitral valve dystrophy (FLNA-MVD). We aimed to assess the phenotype of FLNA-MVD and its impact on prognosis. Methods and results: We investigated the disease in 246 subjects (72 mutated) from four FLNA-MVD families harbouring

  18. Early-onset parkinsonism associated with PINK1 mutations: frequency, genotypes, and phenotypes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonifati, V.; Rohe, C.F.; Breedveld, G.J.; Fabrizio, E.; Mari, M. De; Tassorelli, C.; Tavella, A.; Marconi, R.; Nicholl, D.; Chien, H.F.; Fincati, E.; Abbruzzese, G.; Marini, P.; Gaetano, A. De; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Maat-Kievit, J.A.; Sampaio, C.; Antonini, A.; Stocchi, F.; Montagna, P.; Toni, V.; Guidi, M.; Dalla Libera, A.; Tinazzi, M.; Pandis, F. De; Goldwurm, S.; Klein, A. de; Barbosa, E.; Lopiano, L.; Martignoni, E.; Lamberti, P.; Vanacore, N.; Meco, G.; Oostra, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence, nature, and associated phenotypes of PINK1 gene mutations in a large series of patients with early-onset (<50 years) parkinsonism. METHODS: The authors studied 134 patients (116 sporadic and 18 familial; 77% Italian) and 90 Italian controls. The whole PINK1

  19. Genotype and phenotype in Klinefelter syndrome - impact of androgen receptor polymorphism and skewed X inactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, A; Hertz, J M; Gravholt, C H

    2011-01-01

    The phenotypic variation of Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is wide and may by caused by various genetic and epigenetic effects. Skewed inactivation of the supra-numerical X chromosome and polymorphism in the androgen receptor (AR) have been suggested as plausible causes. We wanted to describe X...

  20. Phenotype and genotype of 87 patients with Mowat-Wilson syndrome and recommendations for care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanovski, Ivan; Djuric, Olivera; Caraffi, Stefano Giuseppe

    2018-01-01

    PurposeMowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS) is a rare intellectual disability/multiple congenital anomalies syndrome caused by heterozygous mutation of the ZEB2 gene. It is generally underestimated because its rarity and phenotypic variability sometimes make it difficult to recognize. Here, we aimed to be...

  1. Trisomy 12p and monosomy 4p: phenotype-genotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benussi, Daniela Gambel; Costa, Paola; Zollino, Marcella; Murdolo, Marina; Petix, Vincenzo; Carrozzi, Marco; Pecile, Vanna

    2009-04-01

    4p Monosomy and 12p trisomy have been discussed and redefined along with recently reviewed chromosomal syndromes. 12p Trisomy syndrome is characterized by normal or increased birth weight, developmental delay with early hypotonia, psychomotor delay, and typical facial appearance. Most likely, the observed phenotypic variability depends on the type and extent of the associated partial monosomy. Partial deletions of the short arm of one chromosome 4 cause the Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS). Affected patients present Greek helmet face, growth and mental retardation, hypotonia, and seizures. The combination of these characteristics constitutes the phenotypic core of WHS. We present a clinical and molecular cytogenetic characterization of a 4-year old mentally retarded girl with macrosomy, facial dysmorphisms, and epilepsy, in whom an unbalanced t(4;12)(p16.3;p13.3) translocation was detected, giving rise to partial 4p monosomy and partial 12p trisomy. Because the patient shows most of the phenotypic characteristics of 12p trisomy, this case could contribute to a better definition of the duplicate critical region that determines the phenotype of the 12p trisomy syndrome.

  2. Host Genotype and Gut Microbiome Modulate Insulin Secretion and Diet-Induced Metabolic Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreznar, Julia H; Keller, Mark P; Traeger, Lindsay L; Rabaglia, Mary E; Schueler, Kathryn L; Stapleton, Donald S; Zhao, Wen; Vivas, Eugenio I; Yandell, Brian S; Broman, Aimee Teo; Hagenbuch, Bruno; Attie, Alan D; Rey, Federico E

    2017-02-14

    Genetic variation drives phenotypic diversity and influences the predisposition to metabolic disease. Here, we characterize the metabolic phenotypes of eight genetically distinct inbred mouse strains in response to a high-fat/high-sucrose diet. We found significant variation in diabetes-related phenotypes and gut microbiota composition among the different mouse strains in response to the dietary challenge and identified taxa associated with these traits. Follow-up microbiota transplant experiments showed that altering the composition of the gut microbiota modifies strain-specific susceptibility to diet-induced metabolic disease. Animals harboring microbial communities with enhanced capacity for processing dietary sugars and for generating hydrophobic bile acids showed increased susceptibility to metabolic disease. Notably, differences in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion between different mouse strains were partially recapitulated via gut microbiota transfer. Our results suggest that the gut microbiome contributes to the genetic and phenotypic diversity observed among mouse strains and provide a link between the gut microbiome and insulin secretion. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Alzheimer's Disease Phenotypes and Genotypes Associated with Mutations in Presenilin 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayadev, Suman; Leverenz, James B.; Steinbart, Ellen; Stahl, Justin; Klunk, William; Yu, Cheng-En; Bird, Thomas D.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in presenilin 2 are rare causes of early onset familial Alzheimer's disease. Eighteen presenilin 2 mutations have been reported, although not all have been confirmed pathogenic. Much remains to be learned about the range of phenotypes associated with these mutations. We have analysed our unique collection of 146 affected cases in 11…

  4. Tension and Transformation in Pancreas Cancer: Can Phenotype Break Free from the Chrysalis of Genotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFort, Christopher C; Hingorani, Sunil R

    2016-06-13

    A recent study finds that impaired TGFβ signaling can initiate a positive feedback loop between increasing ECM stiffness and epithelial cell contractility in pancreas cancer. Even more surprising is the possibility that this phenotype can liberate the epithelium from dependence on the genetic events that transformed it. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Klebsiella pneumonia recovered from nonhuman primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a zoonotic, Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae and is the causative agent of nosocomial septicemic, pneumonic, and urinary tract infections. Recently, pathogenic strains of K. pneumoniae sharing a hypermucoviscosity (HMV) phenotype have been attributed to ...

  6. Novel mutations in the CDKL5 gene in complex genotypes associated with West syndrome with variable phenotype: First description of somatic mosaic state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jdila, Marwa Ben; Issa, Abir Ben; Khabou, Boudour; Rhouma, Bochra Ben; Kamoun, Fatma; Ammar-Keskes, Leila; Triki, Chahnez; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2017-10-01

    West syndrome is a rare epileptic encephalopathy of early infancy, characterized by epileptic spasms, hypsarrhythmia, and psychomotor retardation beginning in the first year of life. The present study reports the clinical, molecular and bioinformatic investigation in the three studied West patients. The results revealed a complex genotype with more than one mutation in each patient including the known mutations c.1910C>G (P2, P3); c.2372A>C in P3 and c.2395C>G in P1 and novel variants including c.616G>A, shared by the three patients P1, P2 and P3; c.1403G>C shared by P2 and P3 and c.2288A>G in patient P1. All the mutations were at somatic mosaic state and were de novo in the patients except ones (c.2372A>C). To our knowledge; the somatic mosaic state is described for the first time in patients with West syndrome. Five identified mutations were located in the C-terminal domain of the protein, while the novel mutation (c.616G>A) was in the catalytic domain. Bioinformatic tools predicted that this latter is the most pathogenic substitution affecting 3D protein structure and the secondary mRNA structure. Complex genotype composed of different combinations of mutations in each patient seems to be related to the phenotype variability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Inflammatory bowel diseases phenotype, C. difficile and NOD2 genotype are associated with shifts in human ileum associated microbial composition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Li

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that Crohn's disease (CD-related genetic polymorphisms involved in host innate immunity are associated with shifts in human ileum-associated microbial composition in a cross-sectional analysis of human ileal samples. Sanger sequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA gene and 454 sequencing of 16S rRNA gene hypervariable regions (V1-V3 and V3-V5, were conducted on macroscopically disease-unaffected ileal biopsies collected from 52 ileal CD, 58 ulcerative colitis and 60 control patients without inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD undergoing initial surgical resection. These subjects also were genotyped for the three major NOD2 risk alleles (Leu1007fs, R708W, G908R and the ATG16L1 risk allele (T300A. The samples were linked to clinical metadata, including body mass index, smoking status and Clostridia difficile infection. The sequences were classified into seven phyla/subphyla categories using the Naïve Bayesian Classifier of the Ribosome Database Project. Centered log ratio transformation of six predominant categories was included as the dependent variable in the permutation based MANCOVA for the overall composition with stepwise variable selection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR assays were conducted to measure the relative frequencies of the Clostridium coccoides - Eubacterium rectales group and the Faecalibacterium prausnitzii spp. Empiric logit transformations of the relative frequencies of these two microbial groups were included in permutation-based ANCOVA. Regardless of sequencing method, IBD phenotype, Clostridia difficile and NOD2 genotype were selected as associated (FDR ≤ 0.05 with shifts in overall microbial composition. IBD phenotype and NOD2 genotype were also selected as associated with shifts in the relative frequency of the C. coccoides--E. rectales group. IBD phenotype, smoking and IBD medications were selected as associated with shifts in the relative frequency of F. prausnitzii spp. These

  8. Inflammatory bowel diseases phenotype, C. difficile and NOD2 genotype are associated with shifts in human ileum associated microbial composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ellen; Hamm, Christina M; Gulati, Ajay S; Sartor, R Balfour; Chen, Hongyan; Wu, Xiao; Zhang, Tianyi; Rohlf, F James; Zhu, Wei; Gu, Chi; Robertson, Charles E; Pace, Norman R; Boedeker, Edgar C; Harpaz, Noam; Yuan, Jeffrey; Weinstock, George M; Sodergren, Erica; Frank, Daniel N

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that Crohn's disease (CD)-related genetic polymorphisms involved in host innate immunity are associated with shifts in human ileum-associated microbial composition in a cross-sectional analysis of human ileal samples. Sanger sequencing of the bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene and 454 sequencing of 16S rRNA gene hypervariable regions (V1-V3 and V3-V5), were conducted on macroscopically disease-unaffected ileal biopsies collected from 52 ileal CD, 58 ulcerative colitis and 60 control patients without inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) undergoing initial surgical resection. These subjects also were genotyped for the three major NOD2 risk alleles (Leu1007fs, R708W, G908R) and the ATG16L1 risk allele (T300A). The samples were linked to clinical metadata, including body mass index, smoking status and Clostridia difficile infection. The sequences were classified into seven phyla/subphyla categories using the Naïve Bayesian Classifier of the Ribosome Database Project. Centered log ratio transformation of six predominant categories was included as the dependent variable in the permutation based MANCOVA for the overall composition with stepwise variable selection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays were conducted to measure the relative frequencies of the Clostridium coccoides - Eubacterium rectales group and the Faecalibacterium prausnitzii spp. Empiric logit transformations of the relative frequencies of these two microbial groups were included in permutation-based ANCOVA. Regardless of sequencing method, IBD phenotype, Clostridia difficile and NOD2 genotype were selected as associated (FDR ≤ 0.05) with shifts in overall microbial composition. IBD phenotype and NOD2 genotype were also selected as associated with shifts in the relative frequency of the C. coccoides--E. rectales group. IBD phenotype, smoking and IBD medications were selected as associated with shifts in the relative frequency of F. prausnitzii spp. These results indicate

  9. Short communication prevalence of susceptibility to etravirine by genotype and phenotype in samples received for routine HIV type 1 resistance testing in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchio, Gaston; Vingerhoets, Johan; Tambuyzer, Lotke; Coakley, Eoin; Haddad, Mojgan; Witek, James

    2011-12-01

    Abstract The prevalence of susceptibility to etravirine was investigated among clinical samples submitted for routine clinical testing in the United States using two separate weighted genotypic scoring systems. The presence of etravirine mutations and susceptibility to etravirine by phenotype of clinical samples from HIV-1-infected patients, submitted to Monogram Biosciences for routine resistance testing between June 2008 and June 2009, were analyzed. Susceptibility by genotype was determined using the Monogram and Tibotec etravirine-weighted genotypic scoring systems, with scores of ≤3 and ≤2, respectively, indicating full susceptibility. Susceptibility by phenotype was determined using the PhenoSense HIV assay, with lower and higher clinical cut-offs of 2.9 and 10, respectively. The frequency of individual etravirine mutations and the impact of the K103N mutation on susceptibility to etravirine by genotype were also determined. Among the 5482 samples with ≥1 defined nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) mutations associated with resistance, 67% were classed as susceptible to etravirine by genotype by both scoring systems. Susceptibility to etravirine by phenotype was higher (76%). The proportion of first-generation NNRTI-resistant samples with (n=3598) and without (n=1884) K103N with susceptibility to etravirine by genotype was 77% and 49%, respectively. Among samples susceptible to first-generation NNRTIs (n=9458), >99% of samples were susceptible to etravirine by phenotype (FC <2.9); the remaining samples had FC ≥2.9-10. In summary, among samples submitted for routine clinical testing in the United States, a high proportion of samples with first-generation NNRTI resistance was susceptible to etravirine by genotype and phenotype. A higher proportion of NNRTI-resistant samples with K103N than without was susceptible to etravirine.

  10. Shift Work in Nurses: Contribution of Phenotypes and Genotypes to Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Karen L.; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A.; Hida, Akiko; Borsetti, Hugo M.; Servick, Stein V.; Ciarleglio, Christopher M.; Robbins, Sam; Hicks, Jennifer; Carver, Krista; Hamilton, Nalo; Wells, Nancy; Summar, Marshall L.; McMahon, Douglas G.; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2011-01-01

    Background Daily cycles of sleep/wake, hormones, and physiological processes are often misaligned with behavioral patterns during shift work, leading to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular/metabolic/gastrointestinal disorders, some types of cancer, and mental disorders including depression and anxiety. It is unclear how sleep timing, chronotype, and circadian clock gene variation contribute to adaptation to shift work. Methods Newly defined sleep strategies, chronotype, and genotype for polymorphisms in circadian clock genes were assessed in 388 hospital day- and night-shift nurses. Results Night-shift nurses who used sleep deprivation as a means to switch to and from diurnal sleep on work days (∼25%) were the most poorly adapted to their work schedule. Chronotype also influenced efficacy of adaptation. In addition, polymorphisms in CLOCK, NPAS2, PER2, and PER3 were significantly associated with outcomes such as alcohol/caffeine consumption and sleepiness, as well as sleep phase, inertia and duration in both single- and multi-locus models. Many of these results were specific to shift type suggesting an interaction between genotype and environment (in this case, shift work). Conclusions Sleep strategy, chronotype, and genotype contribute to the adaptation of the circadian system to an environment that switches frequently and/or irregularly between different schedules of the light-dark cycle and social/workplace time. This study of shift work nurses illustrates how an environmental “stress” to the temporal organization of physiology and metabolism can have behavioral and health-related consequences. Because nurses are a key component of health care, these findings could have important implications for health-care policy. PMID:21533241

  11. Shift work in nurses: contribution of phenotypes and genotypes to adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Karen L; Motsinger-Reif, Alison A; Hida, Akiko; Borsetti, Hugo M; Servick, Stein V; Ciarleglio, Christopher M; Robbins, Sam; Hicks, Jennifer; Carver, Krista; Hamilton, Nalo; Wells, Nancy; Summar, Marshall L; McMahon, Douglas G; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2011-04-13

    Daily cycles of sleep/wake, hormones, and physiological processes are often misaligned with behavioral patterns during shift work, leading to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular/metabolic/gastrointestinal disorders, some types of cancer, and mental disorders including depression and anxiety. It is unclear how sleep timing, chronotype, and circadian clock gene variation contribute to adaptation to shift work. Newly defined sleep strategies, chronotype, and genotype for polymorphisms in circadian clock genes were assessed in 388 hospital day- and night-shift nurses. Night-shift nurses who used sleep deprivation as a means to switch to and from diurnal sleep on work days (∼25%) were the most poorly adapted to their work schedule. Chronotype also influenced efficacy of adaptation. In addition, polymorphisms in CLOCK, NPAS2, PER2, and PER3 were significantly associated with outcomes such as alcohol/caffeine consumption and sleepiness, as well as sleep phase, inertia and duration in both single- and multi-locus models. Many of these results were specific to shift type suggesting an interaction between genotype and environment (in this case, shift work). Sleep strategy, chronotype, and genotype contribute to the adaptation of the circadian system to an environment that switches frequently and/or irregularly between different schedules of the light-dark cycle and social/workplace time. This study of shift work nurses illustrates how an environmental "stress" to the temporal organization of physiology and metabolism can have behavioral and health-related consequences. Because nurses are a key component of health care, these findings could have important implications for health-care policy.

  12. Shift work in nurses: contribution of phenotypes and genotypes to adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L Gamble

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Daily cycles of sleep/wake, hormones, and physiological processes are often misaligned with behavioral patterns during shift work, leading to an increased risk of developing cardiovascular/metabolic/gastrointestinal disorders, some types of cancer, and mental disorders including depression and anxiety. It is unclear how sleep timing, chronotype, and circadian clock gene variation contribute to adaptation to shift work.Newly defined sleep strategies, chronotype, and genotype for polymorphisms in circadian clock genes were assessed in 388 hospital day- and night-shift nurses.Night-shift nurses who used sleep deprivation as a means to switch to and from diurnal sleep on work days (∼25% were the most poorly adapted to their work schedule. Chronotype also influenced efficacy of adaptation. In addition, polymorphisms in CLOCK, NPAS2, PER2, and PER3 were significantly associated with outcomes such as alcohol/caffeine consumption and sleepiness, as well as sleep phase, inertia and duration in both single- and multi-locus models. Many of these results were specific to shift type suggesting an interaction between genotype and environment (in this case, shift work.Sleep strategy, chronotype, and genotype contribute to the adaptation of the circadian system to an environment that switches frequently and/or irregularly between different schedules of the light-dark cycle and social/workplace time. This study of shift work nurses illustrates how an environmental "stress" to the temporal organization of physiology and metabolism can have behavioral and health-related consequences. Because nurses are a key component of health care, these findings could have important implications for health-care policy.

  13. TBC1D24 genotype-phenotype correlation: Epilepsies and other neurologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Simona; Milh, Mathieu; Castiglioni, Claudia; Lüthy, Kevin; Finelli, Mattea J; Verstreken, Patrik; Cardon, Aaron; Stražišar, Barbara Gnidovec; Holder, J Lloyd; Lesca, Gaetan; Mancardi, Maria M; Poulat, Anne L; Repetto, Gabriela M; Banka, Siddharth; Bilo, Leonilda; Birkeland, Laura E; Bosch, Friedrich; Brockmann, Knut; Cross, J Helen; Doummar, Diane; Félix, Temis M; Giuliano, Fabienne; Hori, Mutsuki; Hüning, Irina; Kayserili, Hulia; Kini, Usha; Lees, Melissa M; Meenakshi, Girish; Mewasingh, Leena; Pagnamenta, Alistair T; Peluso, Silvio; Mey, Antje; Rice, Gregory M; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Taylor, Jenny C; Troester, Matthew M; Stanley, Christine M; Ville, Dorothee; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Falace, Antonio; Fassio, Anna; Lemke, Johannes R; Biskup, Saskia; Tardif, Jessica; Ajeawung, Norbert F; Tolun, Aslihan; Corbett, Mark; Gecz, Jozef; Afawi, Zaid; Howell, Katherine B; Oliver, Karen L; Berkovic, Samuel F; Scheffer, Ingrid E; de Falco, Fabrizio A; Oliver, Peter L; Striano, Pasquale; Zara, Federico; Campeau, Phillipe M; Sisodiya, S M

    2016-07-05

    To evaluate the phenotypic spectrum associated with mutations in TBC1D24. We acquired new clinical, EEG, and neuroimaging data of 11 previously unreported and 37 published patients. TBC1D24 mutations, identified through various sequencing methods, can be found online (http://lovd.nl/TBC1D24). Forty-eight patients were included (28 men, 20 women, average age 21 years) from 30 independent families. Eighteen patients (38%) had myoclonic epilepsies. The other patients carried diagnoses of focal (25%), multifocal (2%), generalized (4%), and unclassified epilepsy (6%), and early-onset epileptic encephalopathy (25%). Most patients had drug-resistant epilepsy. We detail EEG, neuroimaging, developmental, and cognitive features, treatment responsiveness, and physical examination. In silico evaluation revealed 7 different highly conserved motifs, with the most common pathogenic mutation located in the first. Neuronal outgrowth assays showed that some TBC1D24 mutations, associated with the most severe TBC1D24-associated disorders, are not necessarily the most disruptive to this gene function. TBC1D24-related epilepsy syndromes show marked phenotypic pleiotropy, with multisystem involvement and severity spectrum ranging from isolated deafness (not studied here), benign myoclonic epilepsy restricted to childhood with complete seizure control and normal intellect, to early-onset epileptic encephalopathy with severe developmental delay and early death. There is no distinct correlation with mutation type or location yet, but patterns are emerging. Given the phenotypic breadth observed, TBC1D24 mutation screening is indicated in a wide variety of epilepsies. A TBC1D24 consortium was formed to develop further research on this gene and its associated phenotypes. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  14. MTL genotypes, phenotypic switching, and susceptibility profiles of Candida parapsilosis species group compared to Lodderomyces elongisporus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aylin Döğen

    Full Text Available Reference isolates of Candida parapsilosis (n = 8, Candida metapsilosis (n = 6, Candida orthopsilosis (n = 7, and Lodderomyces elongisporus (n = 11 were analyzed to gain insight into their pathobiology and virulence mechanisms. Initial evaluation using BBL Chromagar Candida medium misidentified L. elongisporus isolates as C. albicans. Polymerase chain reaction analysis of isolate MTL idiomorphs revealed that all C. parapsilosis isolates were MTLa homozygous and no MTL α1, α2, a1, or a2 gene was detected in L. elongisporus isolates. For C. orthopsilosis, two isolates were MTLa homozygous and five were MTL-heterozygous. Similarly, one C. metapsilosis isolate was MTLα homozygous whereas five were MTL-heterozygous. Isolate phenotypic switching analysis revealed potential phenotypic switching in the MTLα homozygous C. metapsilosis isolate, resulting in concomitant elongated cell formation. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of fluconazole (FLC and FK506, alone or in combination, were determined by checkerboard assay, with data analyzed using the fractional inhibitory concentration index model. Synergistic or additive effects of these compounds were commonly observed in C. parapsilosis and L. elongisporus isolates. No killer activity was observed in the studied isolates, as determined phenotypically. No significant difference in virulence was seen for the four species in a Galleria mellonella model (P > 0.05. In conclusion, our results demonstrated phenotypic switching of C. metapsilosis CBS 2315 and that FLC and FK506 represent a promising drug combination against C. parapsilosis and L. elongisporus. The findings of the present study contribute to our understanding of the biology, diagnosis, and new possible treatments of the C. parapsilosis species group and L. elongisporus.

  15. DRD4 genotype predicts longevity in mouse and human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Deborah L; Thanos, Panayotis K; Corrada, Maria M; Barnett, Jeffrey C; Ciobanu, Valentina; Shustarovich, Diana; Napoli, Anthony; Moyzis, Alexandra G; Grandy, David; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Kawas, Claudia H; Chen, Chuansheng; Dong, Qi; Wang, Eric; Volkow, Nora D; Moyzis, Robert K

    2013-01-02

    Longevity is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. The brain's dopamine system may be particularly relevant, since it modulates traits (e.g., sensitivity to reward, incentive motivation, sustained effort) that impact behavioral responses to the environment. In particular, the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) has been shown to moderate the impact of environments on behavior and health. We tested the hypothesis that the DRD4 gene influences longevity and that its impact is mediated through environmental effects. Surviving participants of a 30-year-old population-based health survey (N = 310; age range, 90-109 years; the 90+ Study) were genotyped/resequenced at the DRD4 gene and compared with a European ancestry-matched younger population (N = 2902; age range, 7-45 years). We found that the oldest-old population had a 66% increase in individuals carrying the DRD4 7R allele relative to the younger sample (p = 3.5 × 10(-9)), and that this genotype was strongly correlated with increased levels of physical activity. Consistent with these results, DRD4 knock-out mice, when compared with wild-type and heterozygous mice, displayed a 7-9.7% decrease in lifespan, reduced spontaneous locomotor activity, and no lifespan increase when reared in an enriched environment. These results support the hypothesis that DRD4 gene variants contribute to longevity in humans and in mice, and suggest that this effect is mediated by shaping behavioral responses to the environment.

  16. Genotypic and Phenotypic Markers of Livestock-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus CC9 in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaohua; Wang, Xiaolin; Fan, Yanping; Peng, Yang; Li, Ling; Li, Shunming; Huang, Jingya; Yao, Zhenjiang; Chen, Sidong

    2016-07-01

    Use of antimicrobials in industrial food animal production is associated with the presence of multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among animals and humans. The livestock-associated (LA) methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 9 (CC9) is associated with animals and related workers in Asia. This study aimed to explore the genotypic and phenotypic markers of LA-MRSA CC9 in humans. We conducted a cross-sectional study of livestock workers and controls in Guangdong, China. The study participants responded to a questionnaire and provided a nasal swab for S. aureus analysis. The resulting isolates were assessed for antibiotic susceptibility, multilocus sequence type, and immune evasion cluster (IEC) genes. Livestock workers had significantly higher rates of S. aureus CC9 (odds ratio [OR] = 30.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.06 to 236.39) and tetracycline-resistant S. aureus (OR = 3.26; 95% CI, 2.12 to 5.00) carriage than controls. All 19 S. aureus CC9 isolates from livestock workers were MRSA isolates and also exhibited the characteristics of resistance to several classes of antibiotics and absence of the IEC genes. Notably, the interaction analyses indicated phenotype-phenotype (OR = 525.7; 95% CI, 60.0 to 4,602.1) and gene-environment (OR = 232.3; 95% CI, 28.7 to 1,876.7) interactions associated with increased risk for livestock-associated S. aureus CC9 carriage. These findings suggest that livestock-associated S. aureus and MRSA (CC9, IEC negative, and tetracycline resistant) in humans are associated with occupational livestock contact, raising questions about the potential for occupational exposure to opportunistic S. aureus This study adds to existing knowledge by giving insight into the genotypic and phenotypic markers of LA-MRSA. Our findings suggest that livestock-associated S. aureus and MRSA (CC9, IEC negative, and tetracycline resistant) in humans are associated with occupational livestock contact. Future studies should direct more

  17. Clear relationship between ETF/ETFDH genotype and phenotype in patients with multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Andresen, Brage S; Christensen, Ernst

    2003-01-01

    activity, we have investigated the molecular genetic basis for disease development in nine patients representing the phenotypic spectrum of MADD. We report the genomic structures of the ETFA, ETFB, and ETFDH genes and the identification and characterization of seven novel and three previously reported...... disease-causing mutations. Our molecular genetic investigations of these nine patients are consistent with three clinical forms of MADD showing a clear relationship between the nature of the mutations and the severity of disease. Interestingly, our data suggest that homozygosity for two null mutations...... mutation identified in a patient with type III disease showed that the residual activity of the mutant enzyme could be rescued up to 59% of that of wild-type activity when ETFB-D128N-transformed E. coli cells were grown at low temperature. This indicates that the effect of the ETF/ETFDH genotype...

  18. Genotype phenotype correlations of cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain mutations in Indian patients with hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rai, Taranjit Singh; Ahmad, Shamim; Bahl, Ajay

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to determine the frequency of mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene (MYH7) in a cohort of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and their families, and to investigate correlations between genotype and phenotype. About 130...... consecutive patients diagnosed with HCM or DCM (69 with HCM and 61 with DCM) attending the cardiology clinic of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research were screened for mutations in the MYH7 gene. The control group for genetic studies consisted of 100 healthy subjects. We report 14...... mutations in 6 probands (5 probands in HCM and 1 proband in DCM) and their family members. Out of these 6 mutations, 3 are new and are being reported for the first time. One known mutation (p.Gly716Arg) was found to be "de novo" which resulted in severe asymmetric septal hypertrophy (31 mm) and resulted...

  19. Estimation of Genetic and Phenotypic Parameters for Udder Morphology Traits in Different Dairy Sheep Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavol Makovický

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of genetic parameters is the basis of sound livestock improvement programmes. Genetic parameters have been estimated for linear udder traits: Udder depth (UD, Cistern depth (CD, Teat position (TP, Teat size (TS and external udder measurements: Rear udder depth (RUD, Cistern depth (CDe, Teat length (TL and Teat angle (TA – 1275 linear assessments (381 ewes and 1185 external udder measurements (355 ewes were included in the analysis for each character of 9 genotypes. Nine breeds and genotypes were included in these experiments: purebred Improved Valachian (IV, Tsigai (T, Lacaune (LC ewes, and IV and T crosses with genetic portion of Lacaune and East Friesian (EF – 25 %, 50 % and 75 %. Primary data were processed using restricted maximum likelihood (REML methodology and the multiple‑trait animal model, using programs REMLF90 and VCE 4.0. High genetic correlations were found between UD and RUD (0.86, CD and CD(e (0.93, TP and TA (0.90, TS and TL (0.94. The highest heritabilities were estimated for exact measurements of TL and CD (0.35–0.39 and subjectively assessed TA and TS (0.32 – 0.33.

  20. Microarray and FISH-based genotype-phenotype analysis of 22 Japanese patients with Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kenji; Wakui, Keiko; Kosho, Tomoki; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Mizuno, Seiji; Itomi, Kazuya; Hattori, Shigeto; Nishio, Kimio; Samura, Osamu; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Kako, Yuko; Arai, Takashi; Tsutomu, Oh-ishi; Kawame, Hiroshi; Narumi, Yoko; Ohashi, Hirofumi; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2014-03-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a contiguous gene deletion syndrome of the distal 4p chromosome, characterized by craniofacial features, growth impairment, intellectual disability, and seizures. Although genotype-phenotype correlation studies have previously been published, several important issues remain to be elucidated including seizure severity. We present detailed clinical and molecular-cytogenetic findings from a microarray and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)-based genotype-phenotype analysis of 22 Japanese WHS patients, the first large non-Western series. 4p deletions were terminal in 20 patients and interstitial in two, with deletion sizes ranging from 2.06 to 29.42 Mb. The new Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome critical region (WHSCR2) was deleted in all cases, and duplication of other chromosomal regions occurred in four. Complex mosaicism was identified in two cases: two different 4p terminal deletions; a simple 4p terminal deletion and an unbalanced translocation with the same 4p breakpoint. Seizures began in infancy in 33% (2/6) of cases with small (6 Mb). Status epilepticus occurred in 17% (1/6) with small deletions and in 87% (13/15) with larger deletions. Renal hypoplasia or dysplasia and structural ocular anomalies were more prevalent in those with larger deletions. A new susceptible region for seizure occurrence is suggested between 0.76 and 1.3 Mb from 4 pter, encompassing CTBP1 and CPLX1, and distal to the previously-supposed candidate gene LETM1. The usefulness of bromide therapy for seizures and additional clinical features including hypercholesterolemia are also described. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Genotype-phenotype analysis of recombinant chromosome 4 syndrome: an array-CGH study and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmat, Morteza; Hemmat, Omid; Anguiano, Arturo; Boyar, Fatih Z; El Naggar, Mohammed; Wang, Jia-Chi; Wang, Borris T; Sahoo, Trilochan; Owen, Renius; Haddadin, Mary

    2013-05-02

    Recombinant chromosome 4, a rare constitutional rearrangement arising from pericentric inversion, comprises a duplicated segment of 4p13~p15→4pter and a deleted segment of 4q35→4qter. To date, 10 cases of recombinant chromosome 4 have been reported. We describe the second case in which array-CGH was used to characterize recombinant chromosome 4 syndrome. The patient was a one-year old boy with consistent clinical features. Conventional cytogenetics and FISH documented a recombinant chromosome 4, derived from a paternal pericentric inversion, leading to partial trisomy 4p and partial monosomy of 4q. Array-CGH, performed to further characterize the rearranged chromosome 4 and delineate the breakpoints, documented a small (4.36 Mb) 4q35.1 terminal deletion and a large (23.81 Mb) 4p15.1 terminal duplication. Genotype-phenotype analysis of 10 previously reported cases and the present case indicated relatively consistent clinical features and breakpoints. This consistency was more evident in our case and another characterized by array-CGH, where both showed the common breakpoints of p15.1 and q35.1. A genotype-phenotype correlation study between rec(4), dup(4p), and del(4q) syndromes revealed that urogenital and cardiac defects are probably due to the deletion of 4q whereas the other clinical features are likely due to 4p duplication. Our findings support that the clinical features of patients with rec(4) are relatively consistent and specific to the regions of duplication or deletion. Recombinant chromosome 4 syndrome thus appears to be a discrete entity that can be suspected on the basis of clinical features or specific deleted and duplicated chromosomal regions.

  2. Genotype-phenotype analysis of a rare type of osteogenesis imperfecta in four Chinese families with WNT1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Song, Lijie; Ma, Doudou; Lv, Fang; Xu, Xiaojie; Wang, Jianyi; Xia, Weibo; Jiang, Yan; Wang, Ou; Song, Yuwen; Xing, Xiaoping; Asan; Li, Mei

    2016-10-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a rare inherited disease characterized by increased bone fragility and vulnerability to fractures. Recently, WNT1 is identified as a new candidate gene for OI, here we detect pathogenic mutations in WNT1 and analyze the genotype-phenotype association in four Chinese families with OI. We designed a targeted next generation sequencing panel with known fourteen OI-related genes. We applied the approach to detect pathogenic mutations in OI patients and confirmed the mutations with Sanger sequencing and cosegregation analysis. Clinical fractures, bone mineral density (BMD) and the other clinical manifestations were evaluated. We also observed the effects of bisphosphonates in OI patients with WNT1 mutations. Four compound heterozygous mutations (c.110T>C; c.505 G>T; c. 385G>A; c.506 G>A) in WNT1 were detected in three unrelated families. These four mutations had not been reported yet. A recurrent homozygous mutation (c.506dupG) was identified in the other two families. These patients had moderate to severe OI, white to blue sclera, absence of dentinogenesis imperfecta and no brain malformation. We did not observe clear genotype-phenotype correlation in WNT1 mutated OI patients. Though bisphosphonates increased BMD in WNT1 related OI patients, height did not increase and fracture continued. We reported four novel heterozygous variants and confirmed a previous reported WNT1 mutation in four Chinese families with a clinical diagnosis of OI. Our study expanded OI spectrum and confirmed moderate to severe bone fragility induced by WNT1 defects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Assessing the Efficiency of Phenotyping Early Traits in a Greenhouse Automated Platform for Predicting Drought Tolerance of Soybean in the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peirone, Laura S; Pereyra Irujo, Gustavo A; Bolton, Alejandro; Erreguerena, Ignacio; Aguirrezábal, Luis A N

    2018-01-01

    Conventional field phenotyping for drought tolerance, the most important factor limiting yield at a global scale, is labor-intensive and time-consuming. Automated greenhouse platforms can increase the precision and throughput of plant phenotyping and contribute to a faster release of drought tolerant varieties. The aim of this work was to establish a framework of analysis to identify early traits which could be efficiently measured in a greenhouse automated phenotyping platform, for predicting the drought tolerance of field grown soybean genotypes. A group of genotypes was evaluated, which showed variation in their drought susceptibility index (DSI) for final biomass and leaf area. A large number of traits were measured before and after the onset of a water deficit treatment, which were analyzed under several criteria: the significance of the regression with the DSI, phenotyping cost, earliness, and repeatability. The most efficient trait was found to be transpiration efficiency measured at 13 days after emergence. This trait was further tested in a second experiment with different water deficit intensities, and validated using a different set of genotypes against field data from a trial network in a third experiment. The framework applied in this work for assessing traits under different criteria could be helpful for selecting those most efficient for automated phenotyping.

  4. Assessing the Efficiency of Phenotyping Early Traits in a Greenhouse Automated Platform for Predicting Drought Tolerance of Soybean in the Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura S. Peirone

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Conventional field phenotyping for drought tolerance, the most important factor limiting yield at a global scale, is labor-intensive and time-consuming. Automated greenhouse platforms can increase the precision and throughput of plant phenotyping and contribute to a faster release of drought tolerant varieties. The aim of this work was to establish a framework of analysis to identify early traits which could be efficiently measured in a greenhouse automated phenotyping platform, for predicting the drought tolerance of field grown soybean genotypes. A group of genotypes was evaluated, which showed variation in their drought susceptibility index (DSI for final biomass and leaf area. A large number of traits were measured before and after the onset of a water deficit treatment, which were analyzed under several criteria: the significance of the regression with the DSI, phenotyping cost, earliness, and repeatability. The most efficient trait was found to be transpiration efficiency measured at 13 days after emergence. This trait was further tested in a second experiment with different water deficit intensities, and validated using a different set of genotypes against field data from a trial network in a third experiment. The framework applied in this work for assessing traits under different criteria could be helpful for selecting those most efficient for automated phenotyping.

  5. Genotypic and phenotypic properties of cattle-associated Campylobacter and their implications to public health in the USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser M Sanad

    Full Text Available Since cattle are a major source of food and the cattle industry engages people from farms to processing plants and meat markets, it is conceivable that beef-products contaminated with Campylobacter spp. would pose a significant public health concern. To better understand the epidemiology of cattle-associated Campylobacter spp. in the USA, we characterized the prevalence, genotypic and phenotypic properties of these pathogens. Campylobacter were detected in 181 (19.2% out of 944 fecal samples. Specifically, 71 C. jejuni, 132 C. coli, and 10 other Campylobacter spp. were identified. The prevalence of Campylobacter varied regionally and was significantly (P<0.05 higher in fecal samples collected from the South (32.8% as compared to those from the North (14.8%, Midwest (15.83%, and East (12%. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE analysis showed that C. jejuni and C. coli isolates were genotypically diverse and certain genotypes were shared across two or more of the geographic locations. In addition, 13 new C. jejuni and two C. coli sequence types (STs were detected by Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST. C. jejuni associated with clinically human health important sequence type, ST-61 which was not previously reported in the USA, was identified in the present study. Most frequently observed clonal complexes (CC were CC ST-21, CC ST-42, and CC ST-61, which are also common in humans. Further, the cattle associated C. jejuni strains showed varying invasion and intracellular survival capacity; however, C. coli strains showed a lower invasion and intracellular survival potential compared to C. jejuni strains. Furthermore, many cattle associated Campylobacter isolates showed resistance to several antimicrobials including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and gentamicin. Taken together, our results highlight the importance of cattle as a potential reservoir for clinically important Campylobacter.

  6. Genotypic and Phenotypic Properties of Cattle-Associated Campylobacter and Their Implications to Public Health in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanad, Yasser M.; Kassem, Issmat I.; Abley, Melanie; Gebreyes, Wondwossen; LeJeune, Jeffrey T.; Rajashekara, Gireesh

    2011-01-01

    Since cattle are a major source of food and the cattle industry engages people from farms to processing plants and meat markets, it is conceivable that beef-products contaminated with Campylobacter spp. would pose a significant public health concern. To better understand the epidemiology of cattle-associated Campylobacter spp. in the USA, we characterized the prevalence, genotypic and phenotypic properties of these pathogens. Campylobacter were detected in 181 (19.2%) out of 944 fecal samples. Specifically, 71 C. jejuni, 132 C. coli, and 10 other Campylobacter spp. were identified. The prevalence of Campylobacter varied regionally and was significantly (P<0.05) higher in fecal samples collected from the South (32.8%) as compared to those from the North (14.8%), Midwest (15.83%), and East (12%). Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) analysis showed that C. jejuni and C. coli isolates were genotypically diverse and certain genotypes were shared across two or more of the geographic locations. In addition, 13 new C. jejuni and two C. coli sequence types (STs) were detected by Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST). C. jejuni associated with clinically human health important sequence type, ST-61 which was not previously reported in the USA, was identified in the present study. Most frequently observed clonal complexes (CC) were CC ST-21, CC ST-42, and CC ST-61, which are also common in humans. Further, the cattle associated C. jejuni strains showed varying invasion and intracellular survival capacity; however, C. coli strains showed a lower invasion and intracellular survival potential compared to C. jejuni strains. Furthermore, many cattle associated Campylobacter isolates showed resistance to several antimicrobials including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and gentamicin. Taken together, our results highlight the importance of cattle as a potential reservoir for clinically important Campylobacter. PMID:22046247

  7. The phenotype, genotype, and outcome of infantile-onset Pompe disease in 18 Saudi patients

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    Zuhair N. Al-Hassnan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Infantile-Onset Pompe Disease (IOPD is an autosomal recessive disorder of glycogen metabolism resulting from deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase acid α-glucosidase encoded by GAA gene. Affected infants present before the age of 12 months with hypotonia, muscle weakness, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT has been shown to improve survival, cardiac mass, and motor skills. In this work, we aim to illustrate the genotypes of IOPD and the outcome of ERT in our population. The medical records of infants with confirmed diagnosis of IOPD who received ERT were reviewed. Eighteen infants (7 males, 11 females were included in the study. The median age at presentation was 2 months and the median age at the start of ERT was 4.5 months. Fifteen (83.3% infants died with a median age at death of 12 months. The 3 alive infants (whose current ages are 6½ years, 6 years, and 10 years, who were initiated on ERT at the age of 3 weeks, 5 months, and 8 months respectively, has had variable response with requirement of assisted ventilation in one child and tracheostomy in another child. All infants were homozygous for GAA mutations except one infant who was compound heterozygous. All infants (n = 8 with truncating mutations died. Our work provides insight into the correlation of genotypes and outcome of ERT in IOPD in Saudi Arabia. Our data suggest that early detection of cases, through newborn screening, and immunomodulation before the initiation of ERT may improve the outcome of ERT in Saudi infants with IOPD. Keywords: Pompe disease, Glycogen storage disease type II, Enzyme replacement therapy, GAA

  8. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Atypical Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria innocua Isolated from Swine Slaughterhouses and Meat Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Zanolli Moreno

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, atypical Listeria monocytogenes and L. innocua strains have been detected in food and the environment. Because of mutations in the major virulence genes, these strains have different virulence intensities in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we performed phenotypic and genotypic characterization of atypical L. monocytogenes and L. innocua isolates obtained from swine slaughterhouses and meat markets. Forty strains were studied, including isolates of L. monocytogenes and L. innocua with low-hemolytic activity. The isolates were characterized using conventional phenotypic Listeria identification tests and by the detection and analysis of L. monocytogenes-specific genes. Analysis of 16S rRNA was used for the molecular identification of the Listeria species. The L. monocytogenes isolates were positive for all of the virulence genes studied. The atypical L. innocua strains were positive for hly, plcA, and inlC. Mutations in the InlC, InlB, InlA, PI-PLC, PC-PLC, and PrfA proteins were detected in the atypical isolates. Further in vitro and transcriptomic studies are being developed to confirm the role of these mutations in Listeria virulence.

  9. Genotype-Phenotype Characterization of Novel Variants in Six Italian Patients with Familial Exudative Vitreoretinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarossi, Giancarlo; Bertelli, Matteo; Maltese, Paolo Enrico; Gusson, Elena; Marchini, Giorgio; Bruson, Alice; Benedetti, Sabrina; Volpetti, Sabrina; Catena, Gino; Buzzonetti, Luca; Ziccardi, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) is a complex disorder characterized by incomplete development of the retinal vasculature. Here, we report the results obtained on the spectrum of genetic variations and correlated phenotypes found in a cohort of Italian FEVR patients. Eight probands (age range 7-19 years) were assessed by genetic analysis and comprehensive age-appropriate ophthalmic examination. Genetic testing investigated the genes most widely associated in literature with FEVR: FZD4 , LRP5 , TSPAN12 , and NDP . Clinical and genetic evaluations were extended to relatives of probands positive to genetic testing. Six out of eight probands (75%) showed a genetic variation probably related to the phenotype. We identified four novel genetic variants, one variant already described in association with Norrie disease and one previously described linked to autosomal dominant FEVR. Pedigree analysis of patients led to the classification of four autosomal dominant cases of FEVR (caused by FZD4 and TSPAN12 variants) and two X-linked FEVR probands ( NDP variants). None of the patients showed variants in the LRP5 gene. This study represents the largest cohort study in Italian FEVR patients. Our findings are in agreement with the previous literature confirming that FEVR is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder, even when it manifests in the same family.

  10. Mutational analysis and genotype-phenotype relation in familial hypercholesterolemia: The SAFEHEART registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourbon, Mafalda; Alves, Ana Catarina; Alonso, Rodrigo; Mata, Nelva; Aguiar, Pedro; Padró, Teresa; Mata, Pedro

    2017-07-01

    Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant disease of cholesterol metabolism that confers an increased risk of premature atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Therefore, early identification and treatment of these patients can improve prognosis and reduce the burden of cardiovascular mortality. The aim of this work was to perform the mutational analysis of the SAFEHEART (Spanish Familial Hypercholesterolaemia Cohort Study) registry. The study recruited 2938 individuals with genetic diagnosis of FH belonging to 775 families. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS v23. A total of 194 variants have been detected in this study, 24 of them were never described before. About 88% of the patients have a pathogenic or likely pathogenic variant. Patients with null variants have a more severe phenotype than patients with defective variants, presenting with significantly higher levels of atherogenic particles (total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and apolipoprotein B). This study shows the molecular characteristics of the FH patients included in the SAFEHEART registry and the relationship with the phenotypic expression. The majority of the genetic variants are considered to be pathogenic or likely pathogenic, which confers a high level of confidence to the entry and follow-up data analysis performed with this registry concerning FH patients' prognosis, treatment and survival. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of some lactic Acid bacteria isolated from bee pollen: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belhadj, Hani; Harzallah, Daoud; Bouamra, Dalila; Khennouf, Seddik; Dahamna, Saliha; Ghadbane, Mouloud

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, five hundred and sixty-seven isolates of lactic acid bacteria were recovered from raw bee pollen grains. All isolates were screened for their antagonistic activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria. Neutralized supernatants of 54 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) cultures from 216 active isolates inhibited the growth of indicator bacteria. They were phenotypically characterized, based on the fermentation of 39 carbohydrates. Using the simple matching coefficient and unweighted pair group algorithm with arithmetic averages (UPGMA), seven clusters with other two members were defined at the 79% similarity level. The following species were characterized: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactococcus lactis, Pediococcus acidilactici, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and unidentified lactobacilli. Phenotypic characteristics of major and minor clusters were also identified. Partial sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene of representative isolates from each cluster was performed, and ten strains were assigned to seven species: Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactococcus lactis, Lactobacillus ingluviei, Pediococcus pentosaceus, Lactobacillus acidipiscis and Weissella cibaria. The molecular method used failed to determine the exact taxonomic status of BH0900 and AH3133.

  12. Genotype-Phenotype Characterization of Novel Variants in Six Italian Patients with Familial Exudative Vitreoretinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Iarossi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR is a complex disorder characterized by incomplete development of the retinal vasculature. Here, we report the results obtained on the spectrum of genetic variations and correlated phenotypes found in a cohort of Italian FEVR patients. Eight probands (age range 7–19 years were assessed by genetic analysis and comprehensive age-appropriate ophthalmic examination. Genetic testing investigated the genes most widely associated in literature with FEVR: FZD4, LRP5, TSPAN12, and NDP. Clinical and genetic evaluations were extended to relatives of probands positive to genetic testing. Six out of eight probands (75% showed a genetic variation probably related to the phenotype. We identified four novel genetic variants, one variant already described in association with Norrie disease and one previously described linked to autosomal dominant FEVR. Pedigree analysis of patients led to the classification of four autosomal dominant cases of FEVR (caused by FZD4 and TSPAN12 variants and two X-linked FEVR probands (NDP variants. None of the patients showed variants in the LRP5 gene. This study represents the largest cohort study in Italian FEVR patients. Our findings are in agreement with the previous literature confirming that FEVR is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous retinal disorder, even when it manifests in the same family.

  13. Clear relationship between ETF/ETFDH genotype and phenotype in patients with multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Rikke K J; Andresen, Brage S; Christensen, Ernst; Bross, Peter; Skovby, Flemming; Gregersen, Niels

    2003-07-01

    Mutations in electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and its dehydrogenase (ETFDH) are the molecular basis of multiple acyl-CoA dehydrogenation deficiency (MADD), an autosomal recessively inherited and clinically heterogeneous disease that has been divided into three clinical forms: a neonatal-onset form with congenital anomalies (type I), a neonatal-onset form without congenital anomalies (type II), and a late-onset form (type III). To examine whether these different clinical forms could be explained by different ETF/ETFDH mutations that result in different levels of residual ETF/ETFDH enzyme activity, we have investigated the molecular genetic basis for disease development in nine patients representing the phenotypic spectrum of MADD. We report the genomic structures of the ETFA, ETFB, and ETFDH genes and the identification and characterization of seven novel and three previously reported disease-causing mutations. Our molecular genetic investigations of these nine patients are consistent with three clinical forms of MADD showing a clear relationship between the nature of the mutations and the severity of disease. Interestingly, our data suggest that homozygosity for two null mutations causes fetal development of congenital anomalies resulting in a type I disease phenotype. Even minute amounts of residual ETF/ETFDH activity seem to be sufficient to prevent embryonic development of congenital anomalies giving rise to type II disease. Overexpression studies of an ETFB-D128N missense mutation identified in a patient with type III disease showed that the residual activity of the mutant enzyme could be rescued up to 59% of that of wild-type activity when ETFB-D128N-transformed E. coli cells were grown at low temperature. This indicates that the effect of the ETF/ETFDH genotype in patients with milder forms of MADD, in whom residual enzyme activity allows modulation of the enzymatic phenotype, may be influenced by environmental factors like cellular temperature. Copyright

  14. Identification of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis Species Isolated from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Samples Using Genotypic and Phenotypic Methods

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    Sahar Kianipour

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Candida dubliniensis is a newly diagnosed species very similar to Candida albicans phenotypically and first discovered in the mouth of people with AIDS in 1995. Among the different phenotypic and genotypic methods, a cost-effective method should be selected which makes it possible to differentiate these similar species. Materials and Methods: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism with MspI enzyme and the Duplex-PCR method were done by DNA extraction using boiling. The sequencing of the amplified ribosomal region was used to confirm the C. dubliniensis species. Direct examination and colony count of the yeasts were applied for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL samples and the growth rate of the yeasts were studied at 45°C. To understand the ability formation of chlamydoconidia in yeast isolates, they were separately cultured on the sunflower seed agar, wheat flour agar, and corn meal agar media. Results: Fifty-nine (49.2% yeast colonies were identified from the total of 120 BAL specimens. Twenty-nine isolated yeasts; including 17 (58.6% of C. albicans/dubliniensis complex and 12 (41.4% of nonalbicans isolates produced pseudohypha or blastoconidia in direct smear with a mean colony count of 42000 CFU/mL. C. albicans with the frequency of 15 (42.9% were the most common isolated yeasts, whereas C. dubliniensis was identified in two nonHIV patients. Conclusion: Sequencing of the replicated gene fragment is the best method for identifying the yeasts, but the determination of the species by phenotypic methods such as the creation of chlamydoconidia in sunflower seeds agar and wheat flour agar media can be cost-effective, have sensitivity and acceptable quality.

  15. Identification of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis Species Isolated from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Samples Using Genotypic and Phenotypic Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianipour, Sahar; Ardestani, Mohammad Emami; Dehghan, Parvin

    2018-01-01

    Candida dubliniensis is a newly diagnosed species very similar to Candida albicans phenotypically and first discovered in the mouth of people with AIDS in 1995. Among the different phenotypic and genotypic methods, a cost-effective method should be selected which makes it possible to differentiate these similar species. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-restriction fragment length polymorphism with MspI enzyme and the Duplex-PCR method were done by DNA extraction using boiling. The sequencing of the amplified ribosomal region was used to confirm the C. dubliniensis species. Direct examination and colony count of the yeasts were applied for bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples and the growth rate of the yeasts were studied at 45°C. To understand the ability formation of chlamydoconidia in yeast isolates, they were separately cultured on the sunflower seed agar, wheat flour agar, and corn meal agar media. Fifty-nine (49.2%) yeast colonies were identified from the total of 120 BAL specimens. Twenty-nine isolated yeasts; including 17 (58.6%) of C. albicans / dubliniensis complex and 12 (41.4%) of nonalbicans isolates produced pseudohypha or blastoconidia in direct smear with a mean colony count of 42000 CFU/mL. C. albicans with the frequency of 15 (42.9%) were the most common isolated yeasts, whereas C. dubliniensis was identified in two nonHIV patients. Sequencing of the replicated gene fragment is the best method for identifying the yeasts, but the determination of the species by phenotypic methods such as the creation of chlamydoconidia in sunflower seeds agar and wheat flour agar media can be cost-effective, have sensitivity and acceptable quality.

  16. Phenotypic and Genotypic Comparison of Epidemic and Non-Epidemic Strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Duong

    Full Text Available Epidemic strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa have been found worldwide among the cystic fibrosis (CF patient population. Using pulse-field gel electrophoresis, the Prairie Epidemic Strain (PES has recently been found in one-third of patients attending the Calgary Adult CF Clinic in Canada. Using multi-locus sequence typing, PES isolates from unrelated patients were found to consistently have ST192. Though most patients acquired PES prior to enrolling in the clinic, some patients were observed to experience strain replacement upon transitioning to the clinic whereby local non-epidemic P. aeruginosa isolates were displaced by PES. Here we genotypically and phenotypically compared PES to other P. aeruginosa epidemic strains (OES found around the world as well as local non-epidemic CF P. aeruginosa isolates in order to characterize PES. Since some epidemic strains are associated with worse clinical outcomes, we assessed the pathogenic potential of PES to determine if these isolates are virulent, shared properties with OES, and if its phenotypic properties may offer a competitive advantage in displacing local non-epidemic isolates during strain replacement. As such, we conducted a comparative analysis using fourteen phenotypic traits, including virulence factor production, biofilm formation, planktonic growth, mucoidy, and antibiotic susceptibility to characterize PES, OES, and local non-epidemic isolates. We observed that PES and OES could be differentiated from local non-epidemic isolates based on biofilm growth with PES isolates being more mucoid. Pairwise comparisons indicated that PES produced significantly higher levels of proteases and formed better biofilms than OES but were more susceptible to antibiotic treatment. Amongst five patients experiencing strain replacement, we found that super-infecting PES produced lower levels of proteases and elastases but were more resistant to antibiotics compared to the displaced non-epidemic isolates. This

  17. Oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome in three succeeding generations: genotypic data and phenotypic features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozić, B. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Ljubković, J. [Department of Pathology, Forensic Medicine and Cytology, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Gabrić Pandurić, D. [Department of Oral Surgery, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Saltvig, I. [Jessenius Faculty of Medicine of Commenius, University in Bratislava, Martin (Slovakia); Kutsche, K. [Institute of Human Genetics, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Krželj, V. [Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Split, Split (Croatia); Zemunik, T. [Department of Medical Biology, School of Medicine, University of Split, Split (Croatia)

    2012-09-21

    Oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome is a rare X-linked disorder mainly manifesting in females. Patients show ocular, facial, cardiac, and dental abnormalities. OFCD syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the BCOR gene, located in Xp11.4, encoding the BCL6 co-repressor. We report a Croatian family with four female members (grandmother, mother and monozygotic female twins) diagnosed with OFCD syndrome who carry the novel BCOR mutation c.4438C>T (p.R1480*). They present high intrafamilial phenotypic variability with special regard to cardiac defect and cataract that showed more severe disease expression in successive generations. Clinical and radiographic examination of the mother of the twins revealed a talon cusp involving the permanent maxillary right central incisor. This is the first known report of a talon cusp in OFCD syndrome with a novel mutation in the BCOR gene.

  18. Emerging understanding of the genotype-phenotype relationship in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutman, Stephen A; Chen, Kevin S; Paez-Colasante, Ximena; Feldman, Eva L

    2018-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, noncurable neurodegenerative disorder of the upper and lower motor neurons causing weakness and death within a few years of symptom onset. About 10% of patients with ALS have a family history of the disease; however, ALS-associated genetic mutations are also found in sporadic cases. There are over 100 ALS-associated mutations, and importantly, several genetic mutations, including C9ORF72, SOD1, and TARDBP, have led to mechanistic insight into this complex disease. In the clinical realm, knowledge of ALS genetics can also help explain phenotypic heterogeneity, aid in genetic counseling, and in the future may help direct treatment efforts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. DOORS syndrome: phenotype, genotype and comparison with Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campeau, Philippe M; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2014-09-01

    DOORS syndrome (Deafness, Onychodystrophy, Osteodystrophy, mental Retardation, Seizures) is characterized mainly by sensorineural deafness, shortened terminal phalanges with small nails of hands and feet, intellectual deficiency, and seizures. Half of the patients with all clinical features have mutations in TBC1D24. We review here the manifestations of patients clinically diagnosed with DOORS syndrome. In this cohort of 32 families (36 patients) we detected 13 individuals from 10 families with TBC1D24 mutations. Subsequent whole exome sequencing in the cohort showed the same de novoSMARCB1 mutation (c.1130G>A), known to cause Coffin-Siris syndrome, in two patients. Distinguishing features include retinal anomalies, Dandy-Walker malformation, scoliosis, rocker bottom feet, respiratory difficulties and absence of seizures, and 2-oxoglutaric aciduria in the patients with the SMARCB1 mutation. We briefly discuss the heterogeneity of the DOORS syndrome phenotype and the differential diagnosis of this condition. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome in three succeeding generations: genotypic data and phenotypic features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozić, B.; Ljubković, J.; Gabrić Pandurić, D.; Saltvig, I.; Kutsche, K.; Krželj, V.; Zemunik, T.

    2012-01-01

    Oculo-facio-cardio-dental (OFCD) syndrome is a rare X-linked disorder mainly manifesting in females. Patients show ocular, facial, cardiac, and dental abnormalities. OFCD syndrome is caused by heterozygous mutations in the BCOR gene, located in Xp11.4, encoding the BCL6 co-repressor. We report a Croatian family with four female members (grandmother, mother and monozygotic female twins) diagnosed with OFCD syndrome who carry the novel BCOR mutation c.4438C>T (p.R1480*). They present high intrafamilial phenotypic variability with special regard to cardiac defect and cataract that showed more severe disease expression in successive generations. Clinical and radiographic examination of the mother of the twins revealed a talon cusp involving the permanent maxillary right central incisor. This is the first known report of a talon cusp in OFCD syndrome with a novel mutation in the BCOR gene

  1. Galactosemia: A strategy to identify new biochemical phenotypes and molecular genotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsas, L.J.; Langley, S.; Steele, E.; Evinger, J.; Brown, A.; Singh, R.; Fernhoff, P.; Hjelm, L.N.; Dembure, P.P.; Fridovich-Keil, J.L. [Emory Univ. School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-03-01

    We describe a stratagem for identifying new mutations in the galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene. GALT enzyme activity and isoforms were defined in erythrocytes from probands and their first-degree relatives. If the biochemical phenotypes segregated in an autosomal recesssive pattern, we screened for common mutations by using multiplex PCR and restriction endonuclease digestions. If common mutant alleles were not present, the 11 exons of the GALT gene were amplified by PCR, and variations from the normal nucleotide sequences were identified by SSCP. The suspected region(s) was then analyzed by direct DNA sequencing. We identified 86 mutant GALT alleles that reduced erythrocyte GALT activity. Seventy-five of these GALT genomes had abnormal SSCP patterns, of which 41 were sequenced, yielding 12 new and 21 previously reported, rare mutations. Among the novel group of 12 new mutations, an unusual biochemical phenotype was found in a family whose newborn proband has classical galactosemia. He had inherited two mutations in cis (N314D-E204K) from his father, whose GALT activity was near normal, and an additional GALT mutation in the splice-acceptor site of intron C (IVSC) from his mother. The substitution of a positively charged E204K mutation created a unique isoform-banding pattern. An asymptomatic sister`s GALT genes carries three mutations (E203K-N314D/N314D) with eight distinct isoform bands. Surprisingly, her erythrocytes have normal GALT activity. We conclude that the synergism of pedigree, biochemical, SSCP, and direct GALT gene analyses is an efficient protocol for identifying new mutations and speculate that E203K and N314D codon changes produce intra-allelic complementation when in cis. 40 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Multiple Phenotypic and Genotypic Artemisinin Sensitivity Evaluation of Malian Plasmodium falciparum Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niaré, Karamoko; Paloque, Lucie; Ménard, Sandie; Tor, Pety; Ramadani, Arba P; Augereau, Jean-Michel; Dara, Antoine; Berry, Antoine; Benoit-Vical, Françoise; Doumbo, Ogobara K

    2018-04-01

    We assessed the ex vivo/in vitro sensitivity of 54 Malian Plasmodium falciparum isolates to artemisinin for the monitoring of drug resistance in this area. The artemisinin sensitivity of parasites was evaluated using 1) the ex vivo and in vitro parasite recrudescence detection after treatment of the ring stage with 1-200 nM artemisinin for 48 hours and 2) the in vitro parasite recrudescence kinetics assay over 7 days after 6-hour treatment of the ring stage with 700 nM dihydroartemisinin (DHA). In addition, as recommended by the World Health Organization for artemisinin resistance characterization, the ring-stage survival assay (RSA 0-3 h ) was performed and the parasite isolates were sequenced at the kelch 13 propeller locus. No clinical and molecular evidence of artemisinin resistance was observed. However, these isolates present different phenotypic profiles in response to artemisinin treatments. Despite all RSA 0-3 h values less than 1.5%, six out of 46 (13.0%) isolates tested ex vivo and four out of six (66.7%) isolates tested in vitro were able to multiply after 48-hour treatments with 100 nM artemisinin. Moreover, five out of eight isolates tested showed faster parasite recovery after DHA treatment in kinetic assays. The presence of such phenotypes needs to be taken into account in the assessment of the efficacy of artemisinins in Mali. The assays presented here appear as valuable tools for the monitoring of artemisinin sensitivity in the field and thus could help to evaluate the risk of emergence of artemisinin resistance in Africa.

  3. Genomic prediction in families of perennial ryegrass based on genotyping-by-sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashraf, Bilal

    In this thesis we investigate the potential for genomic prediction in perennial ryegrass using genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) data. Association method based on family-based breeding systems was developed, genomic heritabilities, genomic prediction accurancies and effects of some key factors wer...... explored. Results show that low sequencing depth caused underestimation of allele substitution effects in GWAS and overestimation of genomic heritability in prediction studies. Other factors susch as SNP marker density, population structure and size of training population influenced accuracy of genomic...... prediction. Overall, GBS allows for genomic prediction in breeding families of perennial ryegrass and holds good potential to expedite genetic gain and encourage the application of genomic prediction...

  4. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Ralstonia pickettii and Ralstonia insidiosa isolates from clinical and environmental sources including High-purity Water.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Michael P

    2011-08-30

    Abstract Background Ralstonia pickettii is a nosocomial infectious agent and a significant industrial contaminant. It has been found in many different environments including clinical situations, soil and industrial High Purity Water. This study compares the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of a selection of strains of Ralstonia collected from a variety of sources. Results Ralstonia isolates (fifty-nine) from clinical, industrial and environmental origins were compared genotypically using i) Species-specific-PCR, ii) PCR and sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA Interspatial region (ISR) iii) the fliC gene genes, iv) RAPD and BOX-PCR and v) phenotypically using biochemical testing. The species specific-PCR identified fifteen out of fifty-nine designated R. pickettii isolates as actually being the closely related species R. insidiosa. PCR-ribotyping of the 16S-23S rRNA ISR indicated few major differences between the isolates. Analysis of all isolates demonstrated different banding patterns for both the RAPD and BOX primers however these were found not to vary significantly. Conclusions R. pickettii species isolated from wide geographic and environmental sources appear to be reasonably homogenous based on genotypic and phenotypic characteristics. R. insidiosa can at present only be distinguished from R. pickettii using species specific PCR. R. pickettii and R. insidiosa isolates do not differ significantly phenotypically or genotypically based on environmental or geographical origin.

  5. Genotypic and Phenotypic Correlations of Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii-A. calcoaceticus Complex Strains Isolated from Patients at the National Naval Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acinetobacter baumannii-calcoaceticus complex (ABC) infections have complicated the care of U.S. combat casualties. In this study, 102 ABC isolates from wounded soldiers treated at National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) were characterized by phenotype and genotype to identify clones in this population...

  6. Phenotypic and genotypic variation of Phragmites australis: Comparison of populations in two human-made lakes of different age and history

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čurn, V.; Kubátová, B.; Vávřová, P.; Křiváčková; Suchá, O.; Čížková, Hana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 86, - (2007), s. 321-330 ISSN 0304-3770 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/06/0276 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Phragmites * Phenotypic variation * Genotypic variation * Lake * Clone Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.497, year: 2007

  7. Evaluation of Lactococcus lactis Isolates from Nondairy Sources with Potential Dairy Applications Reveals Extensive Phenotype-Genotype Disparity and Implications for a Revised Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Daniel; Casey, Aidan; Altermann, Eric; Cotter, Paul D; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; McAuliffe, Olivia

    2015-06-15

    Lactococcus lactis is predominantly associated with dairy fermentations, but evidence suggests that the domesticated organism originated from a plant niche. L. lactis possesses an unusual taxonomic structure whereby strain phenotypes and genotypes often do not correlate, which in turn has led to confusion in L. lactis classification. A bank of L. lactis strains was isolated from various nondairy niches (grass, vegetables, and bovine rumen) and was further characterized on the basis of key technological traits, including growth in milk and key enzyme activities. Phenotypic analysis revealed all strains from nondairy sources to possess an L. lactis subsp. lactis phenotype (lactis phenotype); however, seven of these strains possessed an L. lactis subsp. cremoris genotype (cremoris genotype), determined by two separate PCR assays. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that strains with lactis and cremoris genotypes clustered together regardless of habitat, but it highlighted the increased diversity that exists among "wild" strains. Calculation of average nucleotide identity (ANI) and tetranucleotide frequency correlation coefficients (TETRA), using the JSpecies software tool, revealed that L. lactis subsp. cremoris and L. lactis subsp. lactis differ in ANI values by ∼14%, below the threshold set for species circumscription. Further analysis of strain TIFN3 and strains from nonindustrial backgrounds revealed TETRA values of lactis taxonomy. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Screening of melon genotypes for resistance to vegetable leafminer and your phenotypic correlations with colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Frederico I C DE; Fiege, Leonardo B C; Celin, Elaine F; Innecco, Renato; Nunes, Glauber H S; Aragão, Fernando A S DE

    2017-01-01

    Melon is one of the most important vegetable crops in the world. With short cycle in a system of phased planting, phytosanitary control is compromised, and a great volume of agricultural chemicals is used to control vegetable leafminer. Genetic control is an ideal alternative to avoid the damage caused by this insect. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate Cucumis accessions in regard to resistance to leafminer and correlate the variables analyzed. Fifty-four accessions and four commercial hybrids of melon were tested. The study was divided into two experiments: with and with no choice. The following characteristics were evaluated: with choice, in field - subjective score based on the infestation and the number of mines per leaf; and with no choice, in cage - number of mines per leaf, chlorophyll content, and leaf colorimetry. The results showed variability among the accessions and some genotypes showed favorable results for resistance in both experiments. There was correlation between the two variables in the experiment in the field. The accessions CNPH 11-282, CNPH 06-1047, and CNPH 11-1077 are the most recommended for future breeding programs with aim on introgression of resistance to vegetable leafminer in melon.

  9. Influence of Genotype on Warfarin Maintenance Dose Predictions Produced Using a Bayesian Dose Individualization Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffian, Shamin M; Duffull, Stephen B; Roberts, Rebecca L; Tait, Robert C; Black, Leanne; Lund, Kirstin A; Thomson, Alison H; Wright, Daniel F B

    2016-12-01

    A previously established Bayesian dosing tool for warfarin was found to produce biased maintenance dose predictions. In this study, we aimed (1) to determine whether the biased warfarin dose predictions previously observed could be replicated in a new cohort of patients from 2 different clinical settings, (2) to explore the influence of CYP2C9 and VKORC1 genotype on predictive performance of the Bayesian dosing tool, and (3) to determine whether the previous population used to develop the kinetic-pharmacodynamic model underpinning the Bayesian dosing tool was sufficiently different from the test (posterior) population to account for the biased dose predictions. The warfarin maintenance doses for 140 patients were predicted using the dosing tool and compared with the observed maintenance dose. The impact of genotype was assessed by predicting maintenance doses with prior parameter values known to be altered by genetic variability (eg, EC50 for VKORC1 genotype). The prior population was evaluated by fitting the published kinetic-pharmacodynamic model, which underpins the Bayesian tool, to the observed data using NONMEM and comparing the model parameter estimates with published values. The Bayesian tool produced positively biased dose predictions in the new cohort of patients (mean prediction error [95% confidence interval]; 0.32 mg/d [0.14-0.5]). The bias was only observed in patients requiring ≥7 mg/d. The direction and magnitude of the observed bias was not influenced by genotype. The prior model provided a good fit to our data, which suggests that the bias was not caused by different prior and posterior populations. Maintenance doses for patients requiring ≥7 mg/d were overpredicted. The bias was not due to the influence of genotype nor was it related to differences between the prior and posterior populations. There is a need for a more mechanistic model that captures warfarin dose-response relationship at higher warfarin doses.

  10. Prediction of male-pattern baldness from genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Liu (Fan); M.A. Hamer (Merel); S. Heilmann (S.); C. Herold (Christine); S. Moebus (Susanne); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); T.E.C. Nijsten (Tamar); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe global demand for products that effectively prevent the development of male-pattern baldness (MPB) has drastically increased. However, there is currently no established genetic model for the estimation of MPB risk. We conducted a prediction analysis using single-nucleotide

  11. Dextromethorphan as a phenotyping test to predict endoxifen exposure in patients on tamoxifen treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graan, Anne-Joy M; Teunissen, Sebastiaan F; de Vos, Filip Y F L; Loos, Walter J; van Schaik, Ron H N; de Jongh, Felix E; de Vos, Aad I; van Alphen, Robbert J; van der Holt, Bronno; Verweij, Jaap; Seynaeve, Caroline; Beijnen, Jos H; Mathijssen, Ron H J

    2011-08-20

    Tamoxifen, a widely used agent for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, is mainly metabolized by CYP2D6 and CYP3A to form its most abundant active metabolite, endoxifen. Interpatient variability in toxicity and efficacy of tamoxifen is substantial. Contradictory results on the value of CYP2D6 genotyping to reduce the variable efficacy have been reported. In this pharmacokinetic study, we investigated the value of dextromethorphan, a known probe drug for both CYP2D6 and CYP3A enzymatic activity, as a potential phenotyping probe for tamoxifen pharmacokinetics. In this prospective study, 40 women using tamoxifen for invasive breast cancer received a single dose of dextromethorphan 2 hours after tamoxifen intake. Dextromethorphan, tamoxifen, and their respective metabolites were quantified. Exposure parameters of all compounds were estimated, log transformed, and subsequently correlated. A strong and highly significant correlation (r = -0.72; P dextromethorphan (0 to 6 hours) and endoxifen (0 to 24 hours). Also, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve of dextromethorphan (0 to 6 hours) and daily trough endoxifen concentration was strongly correlated (r = -0.70; P dextromethorphan exposure. Dextromethorphan exposure after a single administration adequately predicted endoxifen exposure in individual patients with breast cancer taking tamoxifen. This test could contribute to the personalization and optimization of tamoxifen treatment, but it needs additional validation and simplification before being applicable in future dosing strategies.

  12. [Phenotypic and genotypic identification of Candida strains isolated as nosocomial pathogens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahiner, Fatih; Ergünay, Koray; Ozyurt, Mustafa; Ardıç, Nurittin; Hoşbul, Tuğrul; Haznedaroğlu, Tunçer

    2011-07-01

    Over the last decade, there have been important changes in the epidemiology of Candida infections and antifungal agents used to treat these infections. In recent years, Candida species have emerged as important causes of invasive infections among patients in intensive care units. One of the main goals of this study was to evaluate the molecular epidemiology of infectious Candida species isolated in our hospital and accordingly supply data for hospital infection (HI) control. The other aim of this study was to evaluate effectiveness and practical applicability of traditional and molecular methods used to identify Candida isolates to the species level. A total of 77 Candida strains that were isolated from various clinical specimens of 60 hospitalized patients (29 male, 24 female; 7 were children) were included in the study. Fifty-seven (74%) of those isolates were defined as HI agents according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. The most common Candida species identified as agents of HI were C.albicans (22; 38.6%), followed by C.tropicalis (14; 24.6%), C.parapsilosis (13; 22.8%), C.glabrata (7; 12.3%) and Candida spp. (1; 1.75%). It was determined that bloodstream (26; 45.6%) and urinary tract infections (24; 42.1%) were the most frequently encountered nosocomial infections caused by Candida species. In addition it was detected that the most frequent causative agent of bloodstream infections was C.parapsilosis (10; 38.5%) and of urinary tract infections was C.albicans (12; 50%). The evaluation of advantages and disadvantages of traditional phenotypic methods [germ tube formation, chlamydospore formation in corn meal agar, growth at 45°C, colony characteristics on CHROMagar Candida medium, carbohydrate assimilation properties detected by API ID 32C (BioMerieux, France) system] and some molecular techniques [polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by using ITS-1, ITS-3 and ITS 4 primers, PCR-Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP), PCRRFLP

  13. Comparing simple root phenotyping methods on a core set of rice genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, R; Al-Shugeairy, Z; Al-Ogaidi, F; Munasinghe, M; Radermacher, M; Vandenhirtz, J; Price, A H

    2014-05-01

    Interest in belowground plant growth is increasing, especially in relation to arguments that shallow-rooted cultivars are efficient at exploiting soil phosphorus while deep-rooted ones will access water at depth. However, methods for assessing roots in large numbers of plants are diverse and direct comparisons of methods are rare. Three methods for measuring root growth traits were evaluated for utility in discriminating rice cultivars: soil-filled rhizotrons, hydroponics and soil-filled pots whose bottom was sealed with a non-woven fabric (a potential method for assessing root penetration ability). A set of 38 rice genotypes including the OryzaSNP set of 20 cultivars, additional parents of mapping populations and products of marker-assisted selection for root QTLs were assessed. A novel method of image analysis for assessing rooting angles from rhizotron photographs was employed. The non-woven fabric was the easiest yet least discriminatory method, while the rhizotron was highly discriminatory and allowed the most traits to be measured but required more than three times the labour of the other methods. The hydroponics was both easy and discriminatory, allowed temporal measurements, but is most likely to suffer from artefacts. Image analysis of rhizotrons compared favourably to manual methods for discriminating between cultivars. Previous observations that cultivars from the indica subpopulation have shallower rooting angles than aus or japonica cultivars were confirmed in the rhizotrons, and indica and temperate japonicas had lower maximum root lengths in rhizotrons and hydroponics. It is concluded that rhizotrons are the preferred method for root screening, particularly since root angles can be assessed. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  14. Characterization of Lactobacillus salivarius CECT 5713, a strain isolated from human milk: from genotype to phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langa, Susana; Maldonado-Barragán, Antonio; Delgado, Susana; Martín, Rebeca; Martín, Virginia; Jiménez, Esther; Ruíz-Barba, José L; Mayo, Baltasar; Connor, Ruth I; Suárez, Juan Evaristo; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2012-06-01

    Lactobacillus salivarius CECT 5713, isolated from human milk, has immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and antiinfectious properties, as revealed by several in vitro and in vivo assays, which suggests a strong potential as a probiotic strain. In this work, the relationships between several genetic features of L. salivarius CECT 5713 and the corresponding phenotypes were evaluated. Although it contains a plasmid-encoded bacteriocin cluster, no bacteriocin biosynthesis was observed, possibly due to a 4-bp deletion at the beginning of the histidine kinase determinant abpK. The genome of L. salivarius CECT 5713 harbours two apparently complete prophages of 39.6 and 48 kbp. Upon induction, the 48-kbp prophage became liberated from the bacterial genome, but no DNA replication took place, which resulted in lysis of the cultures but not in phage progeny generation. The strain was sensitive to most antibiotics tested and no transmissible genes potentially involved in antibiotic resistance were detected. Finally, the genome of L. salivarius CECT 5713 contained four ORFs potentially involved in human molecular mimetism. Among them, protein 1230 was considered of particular relevance because of its similarity with dendritic cell-related proteins. Subsequently, in vitro assays revealed the ability of L. salivarius CECT 5713 to stimulate the maturation of immature dendritic cells and to inhibit the in vitro infectivity of HIV-1.

  15. Cytochrome b5 and NADH cytochrome b5 reductase: genotype-phenotype correlations for hydroxylamine reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, James C; Trepanier, Lauren A

    2010-01-01

    NADH cytochrome b5 reductase (b5R) and cytochrome b5 (b5) catalyze the reduction of sulfamethoxazole hydroxylamine (SMX-HA), which can contribute to sulfonamide hypersensitivity, to the parent drug sulfamethoxazole. Variability in hydroxylamine reduction could thus play a role in adverse drug reactions. The aim of this study was to characterize variability in SMX-HA reduction in 111 human livers, and investigate its association with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in b5 and b5R cDNA. Liver microsomes were assayed for SMX-HA reduction activity, and b5 and b5R expression was semiquantified by immunoblotting. The coding regions of the b5 (CYB5A) and b5R (CYB5R3) genes were resequenced. Hepatic SMX-HA reduction displayed a 19-fold range of individual variability (0.06-1.11 nmol/min/mg protein), and a 17-fold range in efficiency (Vmax/Km) among outliers. SMX-HA reduction was positively correlated with b5 and b5R protein content (Phydroxylamine reduction activities, these low-frequency cSNPs seem to only minimally impact overall observed phenotypic variability. Work is underway to characterize polymorphisms in other regions of these genes to further account for individual variability in hydroxylamine reduction.

  16. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Strains from Italian Dairy Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Morandi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a known major cause of foodborne illnesses, and milk and dairy products are often contaminated by enterotoxigenic strains of this bacterium. In the present study, 122 S. aureus isolates collected from different dairy products were characterised by phenotypic properties, by the distribution of genes encoding staphylococcal enterotoxins (sea, sec, sed, seg, seh, sei, sej, and sel and by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA PCR (RAPD-PCR. Moreover, strain resistance to vancomycin and methicillin (oxacillin was studied. The differences in the RAPD-PCR profiles obtained with the primers M13 and AP4 revealed the presence of a great genetic heterogeneity among the different S. aureus strains. Using the primer AP4 and M13, eight groups were distinguished by RAPD-PCR cluster analysis, although, except in few cases, it was not possible to correlate the isolates of different animal species (cow or ovine with the presence of se genes. None of the isolates showed resistance to vancomycin or methicillin.

  17. Shifting the focus toward rare variants in schizophrenia to close the gap from genotype to phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, M Leonor; Herrera, Luisa; Gaspar, Pablo A; Nieto, Rodrigo; Maturana, Alejandro; Villar, María José; Salinas, Valeria; Silva, Hernán

    2017-10-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a disorder with a high heritability and a complex architecture. Several dozen genetic variants have been identified as risk factors through genome-wide association studies including large population-based samples. However, the bulk of the risk cannot be accounted for by the genes associated to date. Rare mutations have been historically seen as relevant only for some infrequent, Mendelian forms of psychosis. Recent findings, however, show that the subset of patients that present a mutation with major effect is larger than expected. We discuss some of the molecular findings of these studies. SZ is clinically and genetically heterogeneous. To identify the genetic variation underlying the disorder, research should be focused on features that are more likely a product of genetic heterogeneity. Based on the phenotypical correlations with rare variants, cognition emerges as a relevant domain to study. Cognitive disturbances could be useful in selecting cases that have a higher probability of carrying deleterious mutations, as well as on the correct ascertainment of sporadic cases for the identification of de novo variants. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM, TRICHOTHIODYSTROPHY AND COCKAYNE SYNDROME: A COMPLEX GENOTYPE-PHENOTYPE RELATIONSHIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Kenneth H.; Patronas, Nicholas J.; Schiffmann, Raphael; Brooks, Brian P.; Tamura, Deborah; DiGiovanna, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Patients with the rare genetic disorders, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), trichothiodystrophy (TTD) and Cockayne syndrome (CS) have defects in DNA nucleotide excision repair (NER). The NER pathway involves at least 28 genes. Three NER genes are also part of the basal transcription factor, TFIIH. Mutations in 11 NER genes have been associated with clinical diseases with at least 8 overlapping phenotypes. The clinical features of these patients have some similarities and but also have marked differences. NER is involved in protection against sunlight induced DNA damage. While XP patients have 1000-fold increase in susceptibility to skin cancer, TTD and CS patients have normal skin cancer risk. Several of the genes involved in NER also affect somatic growth and development. Some patients have short stature and immature sexual development. TTD patients have sulfur deficient brittle hair. Progressive sensorineural deafness is an early feature of XP and CS. Many of these clinical diseases are associated with developmental delay and progressive neurological degeneration. The main neuropathology of XP is a primary neuronal degeneration. In contrast, CS and TTD patients have reduced myelination of the brain. These complex neurological abnormalities are not related to sunlight exposure but may be caused by developmental defects as well as faulty repair of DNA damage to neuronal cells induced by oxidative metabolism or other endogenous processes. PMID:17276014

  19. Phenotype-genotype correlation in Wilson disease in a large Lebanese family: association of c.2299insC with hepatic and of p. Ala1003Thr with neurologic phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julnar Usta

    Full Text Available Genotype phenotype correlations in Wilson disease (WD are best established in homozygous patients or in compound heterozygous patients carrying the same set of mutations. We determined the clinical phenotype of patients with WD carrying the c.2298_2299insC in Exon 8 (c.2299insC or the p. Ala1003Thr missense substitution in Exon 13 mutations in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. We investigated 76 members of a single large Lebanese family. Their genotypes were determined, and clinical assessments were carried out for affected subjects. We also performed a literature search retrieving the phenotypes of patients carrying the same mutations of our patients in the homozygous or compound heterozygous state. There were 7 consanguineous marriages in this family and the prevalence of WD was 8.9% and of carriers of ATP7B mutation 44.7%. WD was confirmed in 9 out of 76 subjects. All 9 had the c.2299insC mutation, 5 homozygous and 4-compound heterozygous with p. Ala1003Thr. Six of our patients had hepatic, 2 had neurologic and 1 had asymptomatic phenotype. Based on our data and a literature review, clear phenotypes were reported for 38 patients worldwide carrying the c.2299insC mutation. About 53% of those have hepatic and 29% have neurologic phenotype. Furthermore, there were 10 compound heterozygous patients carrying the p. Ala1003Thr mutation. Among those, 80% having c.2299insC as the second mutation had hepatic phenotype, and all others had neurologic phenotype. We hereby report an association between the c.2299insC mutation and hepatic phenotype and between the p. Ala1003Thr mutation and neurologic phenotype.

  20. Phenotypic and Genotypic Detection of Metallo-beta-lactamases among Imipenem-Resistant Gram Negative Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mohammadzadeh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background:   Imipenem-resistant gram negative bacteria, resulting from metallo-beta-lactamase (MBLs-producing strains have been reported to be among the important causes of nosocomial infections and of serious therapeutic problem worldwide. Because of their broad range, potent carbapenemase activity and resistance to inhibitors, these enzymes can confer resistance to almost all beta-lactams. The prevalence of metallo-beta-lactamase among imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas spp. and Enerobacteriaceae isolates is determined.Methods:   In this descriptive study 864 clinical isolates of Acinetobacter spp., Pseudomonas spp. and Enterobacteriaceae, were initially tested for imipenem susceptibility. The metallo-beta-lactamase production was detected using combined disk diffusion, double disk synergy test, and Hodge test. Then all imipenem resistant isolates were tested by PCR for imp, vim and ndm genes. Results:   Among 864 isolates, 62 (7.17 % were imipenem-resistant. Positive phonetypic test for metallo-beta-lactamase was 40 (64.5%, of which 24 (17.1% and 16 (9.2% isolates were Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas spp., respectively. By PCR method 30 (48.4% of imipenem resistant Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas isolates were positive for MBL-producing genes. None of the Enterobacteriaceae isolates were positive for metallo-beta-lactamase activity. Conclusion:   The results of this study are indicative of the growing number of nosocomial infections associated with multidrug-resistant gram negative bacteria in this region leading to difficulties in antibiotic therapy. Thereby, using of phenotypic methods can be helpful for management of this problem.

  1. Tetracycline resistance phenotypes and genotypes of coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates from bubaline mastitis in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Razik, K A Abd; Arafa, A A; Hedia, R H; Ibrahim, E S

    2017-06-01

    This study was devoted to elucidate the tetracycline resistance of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) derived from normal and subclinical mastitic (SCM) buffaloes' milk in Egypt. A total of 81 milk samples from 46 normal buffalo milk samples and 35 SCM buffalo milk samples at private dairy farms of Egypt were used in this study. CNS were identified using phenotypic and molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction [PCR]). CNS isolates were tested for tetracycline resistance using routine methods and multiplex PCR targeting tetracycline ( tet ) resistance genes followed by sequencing of positive PCR products and phylogenetic analysis. Isolation and identification of 28 (34.5%) CNS from normal and SCM buffaloes' milk, namely, Staphylococcus intermedius (39.2%), Staphylococcus xylosus (25.0%), Staphylococcus epidermidis (10.7%), Staphylococcus hominis (10.7%), and 3.5% to each of Staphylococcus sciuri , Staphylococcus hyicus , Staphylococcus lugdunensis , and Staphylococcus simulans . Using nested PCR, all the 28 CNS isolates revealed positive for 16srRNA gene specific for genus staphylococci and negative for thermonuclease ( nuc ) gene specific for Staphylococcus aureus species. The presence of tetracycline resistance-encoding genes ( tet K, tet L, tet M, and tet O) was detected by multiplex PCR. All isolates were negative for tet L, M, and O genes while 14 (50%) CNS isolates were positive for tet K gene, namely, S. lugdunensis (100%), S. hominis (100%), S. epidermidis (66.6%), S. intermedius (45.4%), and S. xylosus (42.8%). Nucleotide sequencing of tet K gene followed by phylogenetic analysis showed the high homology between our CNS isolates genes of tetracycline resistance with S. aureus isolates including Egyptian ones. This proves the transfer of the tetracycline resistance encoding genes between coagulase-negative and coagulase positive Staphylococcus spp. CNS isolates have distinguishingly high resistance to tetracycline. Abundant tetracycline usage for

  2. The mechanistic basis for psoriasis immunopathogenesis: translating genotype to phenotype. Report of a workshop, Venice, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelez, H; Viguier, M; Tebbey, P W; Lowes, M; Suárez-Fariñas, M; Costanzo, A; Nestle, F O

    2013-08-01

    The International Psoriasis Council, a global nonprofit organization dedicated to advancing psoriasis research and treatment, led an initiative to better define the pathogenic mechanisms that constitute psoriasis. In September 2012, a workshop was held at the 42nd Annual European Society for Dermatological Research in Venice, Italy. By assembling a panel of global dermatology and immunology experts, the objective was to evaluate the current status of the science explaining the mechanism of disease in psoriasis, e.g. dysregulation of the skin immune system and perturbations of epidermal homeostasis. The workshop consisted of four oral presentations, which addressed key topics in psoriasis, delivered by Hervé Bachelez (Paris, France), Antonio Costanzo (Rome, Italy), Michelle Lowes (New York, NY, U.S.A.) and Frank Nestle (London, U.K.). A global expert panel was assembled to stimulate dialogue and debate: Kevin Cooper (Cleveland, OH, U.S.A.), Michel Gilliet (Lausanne, Switzerland), Joerg Prinz (Munich, Germany), Martin Röcken (Tubingen, Germany), Jens Schroeder (Kiel, Germany), Manuelle Viguier (Paris, France), Mayte Suárez-Fariñas (New York, NY, U.S.A.) and Cristina Zielinski (Berlin, Germany). Collectively, the presentations demonstrated the significant advances in understanding immune regulation that have occurred over the past decade by virtue of the study of psoriasis subtypes, phenotypic manifestations and genetic associations. Elucidating the pathogenic and genetic basis of psoriasis holds the promise of a complete understanding of disease mechanisms, predictors of treatment response, novel drug development strategies and customized therapeutic regimens for the individual patient. © 2013 The Authors BJD © 2013 British Association of Dermatologists.

  3. Genotypes and phenotypes of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC in Abeokuta, Southwestern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olowe OA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Olugbenga Adekunle Olowe,1 Bukola W Aboderin,1,2 Olayinka O Idris,3 Victor O Mabayoje,4 Oluyinka O Opaleye,1 O Catherine Adekunle,1 Rita Ayanbolade Olowe,1 Paul Akinniyi Akinduti,5 Olusola Ojurongbe1 1Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, College of Health Sciences, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 2Medical Microbiology Unit, Pathology Department, Federal Medical Centre, Abeokuta, Nigeria; 3Department of Microbiology, College of Sciences, Afe Babalola University, Ado Ekiti, Nigeria; 4Department of Haematology, College of Health Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University, Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria; 5Department of Medical Microbiology and Parasitology, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye, Ogun State, Nigeria Purpose: To characterize the prevalence of hemolytic Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC with a multidrug-resistant pattern in different age groups in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Methods: Nonrepetitive E. coli isolates were collected from 202 subjects with or without evidence of diarrhea. Each isolate was biochemically identified and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method. A sorbitol fermentation test of all the E. coli isolates was done and the minimum inhibitory concentration of suspected STEC was measured by the standard broth microdilution method to determine antibiotic resistance. The genotypes of stx1, stx2, and hlyA were determined by polymerase chain reaction assay. Results: The majority of subjects were aged ≥40 years (41.6% and were female (61.9%. Of the 202 subjects, 86.1% had STEC isolates (P<0.05. A high rate of STEC isolates resistant to amoxicillin (90.6%, cefotaxime (77.7%, and cefuroxime (75.7% was observed. Resistance to amoxicillin, gentamicin, and cefotaxime was demonstrated with a minimum inhibitory concentration >16 µg/mL in 13.9%, 11.4%, and 10.4% of the isolates, respectively. The prevalence of stx1, stx2, and hlyA was 13.9%, 6.9%, and 2.0%, respectively; 5.5% of

  4. Down syndrome and personalized medicine: changing paradigms from genotype to phenotype to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Linda L; McCabe, Edward R B

    2013-03-01

    Personalized Medicine represents a paradigm shift in the conceptual framework of research and clinical care. This shift argues that Down syndrome is a treatable condition, and therefore we must invest in research to improve outcomes. Individuals with Down syndrome have varying levels of increased risk for a number of co-morbidities, including infantile spasms and early onset Alzheimer's disease. We will review research in these associated conditions to show how investigators are attempting to identify biomarkers, including genomic, epigenomic, proteomic and metabolomic "signatures" that will predict who may be at risk to develop a specific co-morbidity prior to onset and will provide novel targets for therapeutic development. This Personalized Medicine approach will permit predictive and preventive approaches for individuals at increased risk for co-morbidities. The support for clinical trials among individuals with Down syndrome is beginning to overcome the "culture of intractability" that has surrounded this disorder. © 2012 The Authors. Congenital Anomalies © 2012 Japanese Teratology Society.

  5. Phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of Streptococcus spp. isolated from cases of clinical mastitis in dairy cattle in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczorek, E; Małaczewska, J; Wójcik, R; Rękawek, W; Siwicki, A K

    2017-08-01

    Mastitis of dairy cattle is one of the most frequently diagnosed diseases worldwide. The main etiological agents of mastitis are bacteria of the genus Streptococcus spp., in which several antibiotic resistance mechanisms have been identified. However, detailed studies addressing this problem have not been conducted in northeastern Poland. Therefore, the aim of our study was to analyze, on phenotypic and genotypic levels, the antibiotic resistance pattern of Streptococcus spp. isolated from clinical cases of mastitis from dairy cattle in this region of Poland. The research was conducted using 135 strains of Streptococcus (Streptococcus uberis, n = 53; Streptococcus dysgalactiae, n = 41; Streptococcus agalactiae, n = 27; other streptococci, n = 14). The investigation of the antimicrobial susceptibility to 8 active substances applied in therapy in the analyzed region, as well as a selected bacteriocin (nisin), was performed using the minimum inhibitory concentration method. The presence of selected resistance genes (n = 14) was determined via PCR. We also investigated the correlation between the presence of resistance genes and the antimicrobial susceptibility of the examined strains in vitro. The highest observed resistance of Streptococcus spp. was toward gentamicin, kanamycin, and tetracycline, whereas the highest susceptibility occurred toward penicillin, enrofloxacin, and marbofloxacin. Additionally, the tested bacteriocin showed high efficacy. The presence of 13 analyzed resistance genes was observed in the examined strains [gene mef(A) was not detected]. In most strains, at least one resistance gene, mainly responsible for resistance to tetracyclines [tet(M), tet(K), tet(L)], was observed. However, a relationship between the presence of a given resistance gene and antimicrobial susceptibility on the phenotypic level was not always observed. Copyright © 2017 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genotyping using whole-genome sequencing is a realistic alternative to surveillance based on phenotypic antimicrobial susceptibility testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zankari, Ea; Hasman, Henrik; Kaas, Rolf Sommer

    2013-01-01

    -genome sequencing (WGS) may soon be within reach even for routine surveillance and clinical diagnostics. The aim of this study was to evaluate WGS as a routine tool for surveillance of antimicrobial resistance compared with current phenotypic procedures. Methods: Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed...... to the categorizing of isolates as resistant and 2569 as susceptible. Seven cases of disagreement between tested and predicted susceptibility were observed, six of which were related to spectinomycin resistance in Escherichia coli. Correlation between MLST type and resistance profiles was only observed in Salmonella...

  7. Tetracycline resistance phenotypes and genotypes of coagulase-negative staphylococcal isolates from bubaline mastitis in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. A. Abd El-Razik

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was devoted to elucidate the tetracycline resistance of coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS derived from normal and subclinical mastitic (SCM buffaloes' milk in Egypt. Materials and Methods: A total of 81 milk samples from 46 normal buffalo milk samples and 35 SCM buffalo milk samples at private dairy farms of Egypt were used in this study. CNS were identified using phenotypic and molecular methods (polymerase chain reaction [PCR]. CNS isolates were tested for tetracycline resistance using routine methods and multiplex PCR targeting tetracycline (tet resistance genes followed by sequencing of positive PCR products and phylogenetic analysis. Results: Isolation and identification of 28 (34.5% CNS from normal and SCM buffaloes' milk, namely, Staphylococcus intermedius (39.2%, Staphylococcus xylosus (25.0%, Staphylococcus epidermidis (10.7%, Staphylococcus hominis (10.7%, and 3.5% to each of Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus hyicus, Staphylococcus lugdunensis, and Staphylococcus simulans. Using nested PCR, all the 28 CNS isolates revealed positive for 16srRNA gene specific for genus staphylococci and negative for thermonuclease (nuc gene specific for Staphylococcus aureus species. The presence of tetracycline resistance-encoding genes (tetK, tetL, tetM, and tetO was detected by multiplex PCR. All isolates were negative for tetL, M, and O genes while 14 (50% CNS isolates were positive for tetK gene, namely, S. lugdunensis (100%, S. hominis (100%, S. epidermidis (66.6%, S. intermedius (45.4%, and S. xylosus (42.8%. Nucleotide sequencing of tetK gene followed by phylogenetic analysis showed the high homology between our CNS isolates genes of tetracycline resistance with S. aureus isolates including Egyptian ones. This proves the transfer of the tetracycline resistance encoding genes between coagulase-negative and coagulase-positive Staphylococcus spp. Conclusion: CNS isolates have distinguishingly high resistance to tetracycline

  8. Lymnaea schirazensis, an Overlooked Snail Distorting Fascioliasis Data: Genotype, Phenotype, Ecology, Worldwide Spread, Susceptibility, Applicability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargues, María Dolores; Artigas, Patricio; Khoubbane, Messaoud; Flores, Rosmary; Glöer, Peter; Rojas-García, Raúl; Ashrafi, Keyhan; Falkner, Gerhard; Mas-Coma, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Background Lymnaeid snails transmit medical and veterinary important trematodiases, mainly fascioliasis. Vector specificity of fasciolid parasites defines disease distribution and characteristics. Different lymnaeid species appear linked to different transmission and epidemiological patterns. Pronounced susceptibility differences to absolute resistance have been described among lymnaeid populations. When assessing disease characteristics in different endemic areas, unexpected results were obtained in studies on lymnaeid susceptibility to Fasciola. We undertook studies to understand this disease transmission heterogeneity. Methodology/Principal Findings A ten-year study in Iran, Egypt, Spain, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Venezuela, Ecuador and Peru, demonstrated that such heterogeneity is not due to susceptibility differences, but to a hitherto overlooked cryptic species, Lymnaea schirazensis, confused with the main vector Galba truncatula and/or other Galba/Fossaria vectors. Nuclear rDNA and mtDNA sequences and phylogenetic reconstruction highlighted an old evolutionary divergence from other Galba/Fossaria species, and a low intraspecific variability suggesting a recent spread from one geographical source. Morphometry, anatomy and egg cluster analyses allowed for phenotypic differentiation. Selfing, egg laying, and habitat characteristics indicated a migration capacity by passive transport. Studies showed that it is not a vector species (n = 8572 field collected, 20 populations): snail finding and penetration by F. hepatica miracidium occur but never lead to cercarial production (n = 338 experimentally infected). Conclusions/Significance This species has been distorting fasciolid specificity/susceptibility and fascioliasis geographical distribution data. Hence, a large body of literature on G. truncatula should be revised. Its existence has henceforth to be considered in research. Genetic data on livestock, archeology and history along the 10,000-year

  9. Lymnaea schirazensis, an overlooked snail distorting fascioliasis data: genotype, phenotype, ecology, worldwide spread, susceptibility, applicability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Bargues

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lymnaeid snails transmit medical and veterinary important trematodiases, mainly fascioliasis. Vector specificity of fasciolid parasites defines disease distribution and characteristics. Different lymnaeid species appear linked to different transmission and epidemiological patterns. Pronounced susceptibility differences to absolute resistance have been described among lymnaeid populations. When assessing disease characteristics in different endemic areas, unexpected results were obtained in studies on lymnaeid susceptibility to Fasciola. We undertook studies to understand this disease transmission heterogeneity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A ten-year study in Iran, Egypt, Spain, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, Venezuela, Ecuador and Peru, demonstrated that such heterogeneity is not due to susceptibility differences, but to a hitherto overlooked cryptic species, Lymnaea schirazensis, confused with the main vector Galba truncatula and/or other Galba/Fossaria vectors. Nuclear rDNA and mtDNA sequences and phylogenetic reconstruction highlighted an old evolutionary divergence from other Galba/Fossaria species, and a low intraspecific variability suggesting a recent spread from one geographical source. Morphometry, anatomy and egg cluster analyses allowed for phenotypic differentiation. Selfing, egg laying, and habitat characteristics indicated a migration capacity by passive transport. Studies showed that it is not a vector species (n = 8572 field collected, 20 populations: snail finding and penetration by F. hepatica miracidium occur but never lead to cercarial production (n = 338 experimentally infected. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This species has been distorting fasciolid specificity/susceptibility and fascioliasis geographical distribution data. Hence, a large body of literature on G. truncatula should be revised. Its existence has henceforth to be considered in research. Genetic data on livestock, archeology and history

  10. Charting the genotype-phenotype map: lessons from the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Trudy F C; Huang, Wen

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the genetic architecture (causal molecular variants, their effects, and frequencies) of quantitative traits is important for precision agriculture and medicine and predicting adaptive evolution, but is challenging in most species. The Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) is a collection of 205 inbred strains with whole genome sequences derived from a single wild population in Raleigh, NC, USA. The large amount of quantitative genetic variation, lack of population structure, and rapid local decay of linkage disequilibrium in the DGRP and outbred populations derived from DGRP lines present a favorable scenario for performing genome-wide association (GWA) mapping analyses to identify candidate causal genes, polymorphisms, and pathways affecting quantitative traits. The many GWA studies utilizing the DGRP have revealed substantial natural genetic variation for all reported traits, little evidence for variants with large effects but enrichment for variants with low P-values, and a tendency for lower frequency variants to have larger effects than more common variants. The variants detected in the GWA analyses rarely overlap those discovered using mutagenesis, and often are the first functional annotations of computationally predicted genes. Variants implicated in GWA analyses typically have sex-specific and genetic background-specific (epistatic) effects, as well as pleiotropic effects on other quantitative traits. Studies in the DGRP reveal substantial genetic control of environmental variation. Taking account of genetic architecture can greatly improve genomic prediction in the DGRP. These features of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits are likely to apply to other species, including humans. WIREs Dev Biol 2018, 7:e289. doi: 10.1002/wdev.289 This article is categorized under: Invertebrate Organogenesis > Flies. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Comparison of HIV-1 genotypic resistance test interpretation systems in predicting virological outcomes over time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Frentz (Dineke); C.A.B. Boucher (Charles); M. Assel (Matthias); A. de Luca (Andrea); M. Fabbiani (Massimiliano); F. Incardona (Francesca); P. Libin (Pieter); N. Manca (Nino); V. Müller (Viktor); B.O. Nualláin (Breanndán); R. Paredes (Roger); M. Prosperi (Mattia); E. Quiros-Roldan (Eugenia); L. Ruiz (Lidia); P.M.A. Sloot (Peter); C. Torti (Carlo); A.M. Vandamme (Anne Mieke); K. Laethem (Kristel); M. Zazzi (Maurizio); D.A.M.C. van de Vijver (David)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Several decision support systems have been developed to interpret HIV-1 drug resistance genotyping results. This study compares the ability of the most commonly used systems (ANRS, Rega, and Stanford's HIVdb) to predict virological outcome at 12, 24, and 48 weeks.

  12. Combining quantitative trait loci analysis with physiological models to predict genotype-specific transpiration rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuning, Gretchen A; Bauerle, William L; Mullen, Jack L; McKay, John K

    2015-04-01

    Transpiration is controlled by evaporative demand and stomatal conductance (gs ), and there can be substantial genetic variation in gs . A key parameter in empirical models of transpiration is minimum stomatal conductance (g0 ), a trait that can be measured and has a large effect on gs and transpiration. In Arabidopsis thaliana, g0 exhibits both environmental and genetic variation, and quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been mapped. We used this information to create a genetically parameterized empirical model to predict transpiration of genotypes. For the parental lines, this worked well. However, in a recombinant inbred population, the predictions proved less accurate. When based only upon their genotype at a single g0 QTL, genotypes were less distinct than our model predicted. Follow-up experiments indicated that both genotype by environment interaction and a polygenic inheritance complicate the application of genetic effects into physiological models. The use of ecophysiological or 'crop' models for predicting transpiration of novel genetic lines will benefit from incorporating further knowledge of the genetic control and degree of independence of core traits/parameters underlying gs variation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. SNP-associations and phenotype predictions from hundreds of microbial genomes without genome alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Barry G

    2014-01-01

    SNP-association studies are a starting point for identifying genes that may be responsible for specific phenotypes, such as disease traits. The vast bulk of tools for SNP-association studies are directed toward SNPs in the human genome, and I am unaware of any tools designed specifically for such studies in bacterial or viral genomes. The PPFS (Predict Phenotypes From SNPs) package described here is an add-on to kSNP , a program that can identify SNPs in a data set of hundreds of microbial genomes. PPFS identifies those SNPs that are non-randomly associated with a phenotype based on the χ² probability, then uses those diagnostic SNPs for two distinct, but related, purposes: (1) to predict the phenotypes of strains whose phenotypes are unknown, and (2) to identify those diagnostic SNPs that are most likely to be causally related to the phenotype. In the example illustrated here, from a set of 68 E. coli genomes, for 67 of which the pathogenicity phenotype was known, there were 418,500 SNPs. Using the phenotypes of 36 of those strains, PPFS identified 207 diagnostic SNPs. The diagnostic SNPs predicted the phenotypes of all of the genomes with 97% accuracy. It then identified 97 SNPs whose probability of being causally related to the pathogenic phenotype was >0.999. In a second example, from a set of 116 E. coli genome sequences, using the phenotypes of 65 strains PPFS identified 101 SNPs that predicted the source host (human or non-human) with 90% accuracy.

  14. Highly prevalent LIPH founder mutations causing autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis in Japan and the genotype/phenotype correlations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Tanahashi

    Full Text Available Mutations in LIPH cause of autosomal recessive woolly hair/hypotrichosis (ARWH, and the 2 missense mutations c.736T>A (p.Cys246Ser and c.742C>A (p.His248Asn are considered prevalent founder mutations for ARWH in the Japanese population. To reveal genotype/phenotype correlations in ARWH cases in Japan and the haplotypes in 14 Japanese patients from 14 unrelated Japanese families. 13 patients had woolly hair, and 1 patient had complete baldness since birth. An LIPH mutation search revealed homozygous c.736T>A mutations in 10 of the patients. Compound heterozygous c.736T>A and c.742C>A mutations were found in 3 of the patients, and homozygous c.742C>A mutation in 1 patient. The phenotype of mild hypotrichosis with woolly hair was restricted to the patients with the homozygous c.736T>A mutation. The severe phenotype of complete baldness was seen in only 1 patient with homozygous c.742C>A. Haplotype analysis revealed that the alleles containing the LIPH c.736T>A mutation had a haplotype identical to that reported previously, although 4 alleles out of 5 chromosomes containing the LIPH c.742C>A mutation had a different haplotype from the previously reported founder allele. These alleles with c.742C>A are thought to be the third founder LIPH mutation causing ARWH. To accurately determine the prevalence of the founder mutations, we investigated allele frequencies of those mutations in 819 Japanese controls. Heterozygous c.736T>A mutations were found in 13 controls (allele frequency: 0.0079; carrier rate: 0.016, and heterozygous c.742C>A mutations were found in 2 controls (allele frequency: 0.0012; carrier rate: 0.0024. In conclusion, this study confirms the more accurate allele frequencies of the pathogenic founder mutations of LIPH and shows that there is a third founder mutation in Japan. In addition, the present findings suggest that the mutation patterns of LIPH might be associated with hypotrichosis severity in ARWH.

  15. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of multidrug resistant Salmonella Typhimurium and Salmonella Kentucky strains recovered from chicken carcasses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwana Tasmin

    Full Text Available Salmonella Typhimurium is the leading cause of human non-typhoidal gastroenteritis in the US. S. Kentucky is one the most commonly recovered serovars from commercially processed poultry carcasses. This study compared the genotypic and phenotypic properties of two Salmonella enterica strains Typhimurium (ST221_31B and Kentucky (SK222_32B recovered from commercially processed chicken carcasses using whole genome sequencing, phenotype characterizations and an intracellular killing assay. Illumina MiSeq platform was used for sequencing of two Salmonella genomes. Phylogenetic analysis employing homologous alignment of a 1,185 non-duplicated protein-coding gene in the Salmonella core genome demonstrated fully resolved bifurcating patterns with varying levels of diversity that separated ST221_31B and SK222_32B genomes into distinct monophyletic serovar clades. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP analysis identified 2,432 (ST19 SNPs within 13 Typhimurium genomes including ST221_31B representing Sequence Type ST19 and 650 (ST152 SNPs were detected within 13 Kentucky genomes including SK222_32B representing Sequence Type ST152. In addition to serovar-specific conserved coding sequences, the genomes of ST221_31B and SK222_32B harbor several genomic regions with significant genetic differences. These included phage and phage-like elements, carbon utilization or transport operons, fimbriae operons, putative membrane associated protein-encoding genes, antibiotic resistance genes, siderophore operons, and numerous hypothetical protein-encoding genes. Phenotype microarray results demonstrated that ST221_31B is capable of utilizing certain carbon compounds more efficiently as compared to SK222_3B; namely, 1,2-propanediol, M-inositol, L-threonine, α-D-lactose, D-tagatose, adonitol, formic acid, acetoacetic acid, and L-tartaric acid. ST221_31B survived for 48 h in macrophages, while SK222_32B was mostly eliminated. Further, a 3-fold growth of ST221_31B was

  16. Stargardt disease: towards developing a model to predict phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Heathfield, Laura; Lacerda, Miguel; Nossek, Christel; Roberts, Lisa; Ramesar, Rajkumar S

    2013-01-01

    Stargardt disease is an ABCA4-associated retinopathy, which generally follows an autosomal recessive inheritance pattern and is a frequent cause of macular degeneration in childhood. ABCA4 displays significant allelic heterogeneity whereby different mutations can cause retinal diseases with varying severity and age of onset. A genotype–phenotype model has been proposed linking ABCA4 mutations, purported ABCA4 functional protein activity and severity of disease, as measured by degree of visual...

  17. Phenotypic and Genotypic Resistance of Salmonella Isolates from Healthy and Diseased Pigs in China During 2008-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiu, Yueguang; Zhu, Shun; Khan, Sher Bahadar; Sun, Mengzhen; Zou, Geng; Meng, Xianrong; Wu, Bin; Zhou, Rui; Li, Shaowen

    2017-07-01

    The antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella strains is rapidly increasing worldwide, which poses significant threats to animal and public health. In this study, a total of 249 porcine Salmonella isolates collected in China during 2008-2015 were examined, including 155 clinical isolates from diseased pigs and 94 nonclinical isolates from healthy pigs. Based on the minimum inhibitory concentration of seven antimicrobial agents, 96.4% of the isolates were resistant to at least one of the tested antibiotics and 81.0% of them showed multidrug resistance. The highest antimicrobial resistance was observed for tetracycline (85.9%), and the lowest was found for cefotaxime (13.3%). The isolates from diseased pigs exhibited significantly higher levels of antimicrobial resistance than those from healthy pigs. Twenty-two isolates from healthy pigs were resistant to ciprofloxacin, which may inhibit the curative effectiveness of fluoroquinolones on bacterial food-borne poisoning and infections in humans caused by contaminated food. Moreover, cefotaxime resistance of the strains isolated from diseased pigs during 2013-2015 was significantly higher compared with the strains isolated during 2008-2010. Further study showed that the correlation between phenotypic and genotypic resistance varied among the isolates from different sources, and in many cases, the presence of resistance genes was not consistent with the resistance to the corresponding antimicrobials. These results are very significant for veterinary practice and public health.

  18. Targeted next-generation sequencing makes new molecular diagnoses and expands genotype-phenotype relationship in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakkody, Ruwan A; Vandrovcova, Jana; Kanonidou, Christina; Mueller, Michael; Gampawar, Piyush; Ibrahim, Yousef; Norsworthy, Penny; Biggs, Jennifer; Abdullah, Abdulshakur; Ross, David; Black, Holly A; Ferguson, David; Cheshire, Nicholas J; Kazkaz, Hanadi; Grahame, Rodney; Ghali, Neeti; Vandersteen, Anthony; Pope, F Michael; Aitman, Timothy J

    2016-11-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a group of overlapping hereditary disorders of connective tissue with significant morbidity and mortality, including major vascular complications. We sought to identify the diagnostic utility of a next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel in a mixed EDS cohort. We developed and applied PCR-based NGS assays for targeted, unbiased sequencing of 12 collagen and aortopathy genes to a cohort of 177 unrelated EDS patients. Variants were scored blind to previous genetic testing and then compared with results of previous Sanger sequencing. Twenty-eight pathogenic variants in COL5A1/2, COL3A1, FBN1, and COL1A1 and four likely pathogenic variants in COL1A1, TGFBR1/2, and SMAD3 were identified by the NGS assays. These included all previously detected single-nucleotide and other short pathogenic variants in these genes, and seven newly detected pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants leading to clinically significant diagnostic revisions. Twenty-two variants of uncertain significance were identified, seven of which were in aortopathy genes and required clinical follow-up. Unbiased NGS-based sequencing made new molecular diagnoses outside the expected EDS genotype-phenotype relationship and identified previously undetected clinically actionable variants in aortopathy susceptibility genes. These data may be of value in guiding future clinical pathways for genetic diagnosis in EDS.Genet Med 18 11, 1119-1127.

  19. Phenotypic and genotypic antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes of Salmonella enterica isolated from pet dogs and cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srisanga, Songsak; Angkititrakul, Sunpetch; Sringam, Patcharee; Le Ho, Phuong T.; Vo, An T. T.

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella enterica isolates (n = 122), including 32 serotypes from 113 dogs and 9 cats, were obtained from household dogs (n = 250) and cats (n = 50) during 2012–2015. The isolates were characterized by serotyping, antimicrobial resistance phenotyping and genotyping, and virulence gene screening. Serovars Weltevreden (15.6%) and Typhimurium (13.9%) were the most common. The majority (43%) of the isolates were multidrug resistant. The dog isolates (12.3%) harbored class 1 integrons, of which the dfrA12-aadA2 cassette was most frequent (66.7%). The only class integron in serovar Albany was located on a conjugative plasmid. Two ESBL-producing isolates (i.e., a serovar Krefeld and a serovar Enteritridis) carried blaTEM and blaCTX-M, and the blaTEM gene in both was horizontally transferred. Of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes tested, only qnrS (4.9%) was detected. Most Salmonella isolates harbored invA (100%), prgH (91.8%), and sipB (91%). Positive associations between resistance and virulence genes were observed for blaPSE-1/orgA, cmlA/spaN, tolC, and sul1/tolC (p resistance and virulence genes and that antimicrobial use in companion animals may select for the examined Salmonella virulence factors. PMID:27586467

  20. LORD: a phenotype-genotype semantically integrated biomedical data tool to support rare disease diagnosis coding in health information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Remy; Maaroufi, Meriem; Fonjallaz, Yannick; de Carrara, Albane; Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves; Dhombres, Ferdinand; Landais, Paul

    Characterizing a rare disease diagnosis for a given patient is often made through expert's networks. It is a complex task that could evolve over time depending on the natural history of the disease and the evolution of the scientific knowledge. Most rare diseases have genetic causes and recent improvements of sequencing techniques contribute to the discovery of many new diseases every year. Diagnosis coding in the rare disease field requires data from multiple knowledge bases to be aggregated in order to offer the clinician a global information space from possible diagnosis to clinical signs (phenotypes) and known genetic mutations (genotype). Nowadays, the major barrier to the coding activity is the lack of consolidation of such information scattered in different thesaurus such as Orphanet, OMIM or HPO. The Linking Open data for Rare Diseases (LORD) web portal we developed stands as the first attempt to fill this gap by offering an integrated view of 8,400 rare diseases linked to more than 14,500 signs and 3,270 genes. The application provides a browsing feature to navigate through the relationships between diseases, signs and genes, and some Application Programming Interfaces to help its integration in health information systems in routine.

  1. Phenotypic and genotypic detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hunting dogs in Maiduguri metropolitan, Borno State, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Muhammad; Bukar-Kolo, Yachilla Maryam; Geidam, Yaqub Ahmed; Gulani, Isa Adamu

    2016-05-01

    To determine the presence of MRSA in hunting dogs in Maiduguri metropolitan. Phenotypic methods used includes microscopic technique, colony morphology study, catalase-coagulase tests, and the use of mannitol salt agar test, oxacillin resistance screening agar base, and antibiotic susceptibility testing methods. Genotypic approach was used for deoxyribonucleic acid extraction, and the presence of nuc and mecA gene was detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. Examination of 416 swab samples from nasal and perineal region of dogs revealed a total of 79.5% of S. aureus, where 62.5% of the isolates were MRSA. Molecular analysis revealed that 7nuc genes specific for S. aureus from 20 presumptive MRSA assay were all mecA PCR negative. The isolates were sensitive to gentamicin and ciprofloxacin but proved resistant to cefoxitin and oxacillin. High isolation rate of MRSA was found in hunting dogs. Significant level (p<0.05) of MRSA was isolated in the nasal cavity of hunting dogs than its perineum. Only nuc genes were detected from the MRSA isolates.

  2. Phenotypic and genotypic Characterization of facultative and obligate Alkalophilic Bacillus sp. isolated from Saudi Arabia alkaline soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Assaeedi Abdulrahman

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Isolation and identification of new alkalophilic Bacillus strains have been increasing interest due to their possessing valuable and commercially interesting enzymes. In the present study, a total six obligate and facultative alkalophilic isolates were isolated from desert soil around the Al-qunfotha city, Saudi Arabia. All isolates were phenotypically and genotypically characterized. Among these isolates; AS3, AS4, AS5 and AS6 could grow at pH 9, 10, 11 and 12, but could not grow at pH 7, indicates that these isolates are obligate alkalophiles. While, isolates AS1 and AS2 grew at pH ranged from 7 to 10, but could not grow at pH 11 and 12, suggesting that they could be facultative alkalophiles. All isolates could hydrolyze casein and starch, indicating that they possess interesting amylase and protease enzymes. Based on 16S rDNA data, the phylogenetic analysis of these strains showed that all six alkalophilic Bacillus belonged to Bacillus cohnii with 99% similarity. The nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA gene for the six isolates were deposited in a Gene-bank under accession numbers; KP053301, KP053302, KP053303, KP053304, KP053305 and KP053306, respectively.

  3. Brief report: genotype, phenotype, and clinical course in five patients with PAPA syndrome (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidowich, Andrew P; Freeman, Alexandra F; Kuhns, Douglas B; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Gallin, John I; Turner, Maria L; Kastner, Daniel L; Holland, Steven M

    2012-06-01

    To describe the genotypes, phenotypes, immunophenotypes, and treatments of PAPA syndrome (pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne), a rare autoinflammatory disease, in 5 patients. Clinical information was gathered from medical records and through interviews with 5 patients from 4 kindreds. PSTPIP1 (CD2BP1) exon 10 and exon 11 sequencing was performed in each patient. Neutrophil granule content and cytokine levels were determined in plasma and stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients and controls. We identified 2 previously described PAPA syndrome-associated PSTPIP1 mutations, A230T and E250Q, and a novel change, E250K. Disease penetrance was incomplete, with variable expressivity. The cutaneous manifestations included pathergy, cystic acne, and pyoderma gangrenosum. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and circulating neutrophil granule enzyme levels were markedly elevated in patients compared to those in controls. PBMC stimulation studies demonstrated impaired production of IL-10 and enhanced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. Good resolution of pyoderma gangrenosum was achieved in 3 patients with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) blockade treatment. This analysis of 5 patients demonstrates that mutations in PSTPIP1 are incompletely penetrant and variably expressed in the PAPA syndrome. Neutrophil granule proteins are markedly elevated ex vivo and in the plasma, and elevated levels might be compatible with a diagnosis of PAPA syndrome. TNFα blockade appears to be effective in treating the cutaneous manifestations of PAPA syndrome. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hunting dogs in Maiduguri metropolitan, Borno State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Mustapha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the presence of MRSA in hunting dogs in Maiduguri metropolitan. Materials and Methods: Phenotypic methods used includes microscopic technique, colony morphology study, catalase-coagulase tests, and the use of mannitol salt agar test, oxacillin resistance screening agar base, and antibiotic susceptibility testing methods. Genotypic approach was used for deoxyribonucleic acid extraction, and the presence of nuc and mecA gene was detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques. Results: Examination of 416 swab samples from nasal and perineal region of dogs revealed a total of 79.5% of S. aureus, where 62.5% of the isolates were MRSA. Molecular analysis revealed that 7nuc genes specific for S. aureus from 20 presumptive MRSA assay were all mecA PCR negative. The isolates were sensitive to gentamicin and ciprofloxacin but proved resistant to cefoxitin and oxacillin. Conclusion: High isolation rate of MRSA was found in hunting dogs. Significant level (p<0.05 of MRSA was isolated in the nasal cavity of hunting dogs than its perineum. Only nuc genes were detected from the MRSA isolates.

  5. MinION Nanopore Sequencing Enables Correlation between Resistome Phenotype and Genotype of Coliform Bacteria in Municipal Sewage

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    Yu Xia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs functioned as the intersection between the human society and nature environment, are receiving increasingly more attention on risk assessment of the acquisition of environmental antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs by pathogenetic populations during treatment. However, because of the general lack of robust resistome profiling methods, genotype, and resistance phenotype is still poorly correlated in human pathogens of sewage samples. Here we applied MinION sequencing to quantify the resistance genes of multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR coliform bacteria, a common indicator for human enteric pathogens in sewage samples. Our pipeline could deliver the results within 30 h from sample collection and the resistome quantification was consistent to that based on the Illumina platform. Additionally, the long nanopore reads not only enabled a simultaneous identification of the carrier populations of ARGs detected, but also facilitated the genome reconstruction of a representative MAR strain, from which we identified an instance of chromosomal integration of environmental resistance gene obtained by plasmid exchange with a porcine pathogen. This study demonstrated the utilization of MinION sequencing in quick monitoring and simultaneous phylogenetic tracking of environmental ARGs to address potential health risk associated with them.

  6. MinION Nanopore Sequencing Enables Correlation between Resistome Phenotype and Genotype of Coliform Bacteria in Municipal Sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yu; Li, An-Dong; Deng, Yu; Jiang, Xiao-Tao; Li, Li-Guan; Zhang, Tong

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) functioned as the intersection between the human society and nature environment, are receiving increasingly more attention on risk assessment of the acquisition of environmental antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) by pathogenetic populations during treatment. However, because of the general lack of robust resistome profiling methods, genotype, and resistance phenotype is still poorly correlated in human pathogens of sewage samples. Here we applied MinION sequencing to quantify the resistance genes of multiple antibiotic resistant (MAR) coliform bacteria, a common indicator for human enteric pathogens in sewage samples. Our pipeline could deliver the results within 30 h from sample collection and the resistome quantification was consistent to that based on the Illumina platform. Additionally, the long nanopore reads not only enabled a simultaneous identification of the carrier populations of ARGs detected, but also facilitated the genome reconstruction of a representative MAR strain, from which we identified an instance of chromosomal integration of environmental resistance gene obtained by plasmid exchange with a porcine pathogen. This study demonstrated the utilization of MinION sequencing in quick monitoring and simultaneous phylogenetic tracking of environmental ARGs to address potential health risk associated with them.

  7. Genotype-phenotype correlations and expansion of the molecular spectrum of AP4M1-related hereditary spastic paraplegia

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    Conceição Bettencourt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autosomal recessive hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP due to AP4M1 mutations is a very rare neurodevelopmental disorder reported for only a few patients. Methods We investigated a Greek HSP family using whole exome sequencing (WES. Results A novel AP4M1A frameshift insertion, and a very rare missense variant were identified in all three affected siblings in the compound heterozygous state (p.V174fs and p.C319R; the unaffected parents were carriers of only one variant. Patients were affected with a combination of: (a febrile seizures with onset in the first year of life (followed by epileptic non-febrile seizures; (b distinctive facial appearance (e.g., coarse features, bulbous nose and hypomimia; (c developmental delay and intellectual disability; (d early-onset spastic weakness of the lower limbs; and (e cerebellar hypoplasia/atrophy on brain MRI. Conclusions We review genotype-phenotype correlations and discuss clinical overlaps between different AP4-related diseases. The AP4M1 belongs to a complex that mediates vesicle trafficking of glutamate receptors, being likely involved in brain development and neurotransmission.

  8. Genotype-Phenotype Analysis, Neuropsychological Assessment, and Growth Hormone Response in a Patient with 18p Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huihui; Wan, Naijun; Wang, Xinli; Chang, Liang; Cheng, Dazhi

    2018-01-01

    18p deletion syndrome is a rare chromosomal disease caused by deletion of the short arm of chromosome 18. By using cytogenetic and SNP array analysis, we identified a girl with 18p deletion syndrome exhibiting craniofacial anomalies, intellectual disability, and short stature. G-banding analysis of metaphase cells revealed an abnormal karyotype 46,XX,del(18)(p10). Further, SNP array detected a 15.3-Mb deletion at 18p11.21p11.32 (chr18:12842-15375878) including 61 OMIM genes. Genotype-phenotype correlation analysis showed that clinical manifestations of the patient were correlated with LAMA1, TWSG1, and GNAL deletions. Her neuropsychological assessment test demonstrated delay in most cognitive functions including impaired mathematics, linguistic skills, visual motor perception, respond speed, and executive function. Meanwhile, her integrated visual and auditory continuous performance test (IVA-CPT) indicated a severe comprehensive attention deficit. At age 7 and 1/12 years, her height was 110.8 cm (-2.5 SD height for age). Growth hormone (GH) treatment was initiated. After 27 months treatment, her height was increased to 129.6 cm (-1.0 SD height for age) at 9 and 4/12 years, indicating an effective response to GH treatment. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Genotype and phenotype report on patients with combined deficiency of factor V and factor VIII in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mehran; Cairo, Andrea; Safarpour, Mohammad M; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Ekramzadeh, Maryam; Afrasiabi, Abdolreza; Shahriari, Mahdi; Menegatti, Marzia

    2014-06-01

    Combined factor V (FV) and factor VIII (FVIII) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive bleeding disorder characterized by mild-to-moderate bleeding. Epistaxis, postsurgical bleeding and menorrhagia are the most common symptoms. The aim of this study is to report the phenotype-genotype characterization carried out in patients affected with combined FV and FVIII deficiency from Iran. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Shiraz Hemophilia Center, southern Iran. Twelve cases, seven men and five women coming from eight families were included in our study after taking consent form. Coagulation activity for all patients was measured. All exons and intron-exon junctions of lectin mannose binding protein 1 (LMAN1) gene and multiple coagulation factor deficiency 2 genes were amplified by PCR, and subsequently sequenced by the Sanger method. Patients[Combining Acute Accent] age ranged from 6 to 59 years mean ± SD: 23.8 ± 15.4 years and median: 22 years. No patient presented with severe bleeding symptom. Only one patient had severe FV and FVIII deficiency (both factor levels stop codon. Larger studies are needed to calculate the correlation between factor levels, genetic and bleeding symptoms.

  10. An IL28B genotype-based clinical prediction model for treatment of chronic hepatitis C.

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    Thomas R O'Brien

    Full Text Available Genetic variation in IL28B and other factors are associated with sustained virological response (SVR after pegylated-interferon/ribavirin treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CHC. Using data from the HALT-C Trial, we developed a model to predict a patient's probability of SVR based on IL28B genotype and clinical variables.HALT-C enrolled patients with advanced CHC who had failed previous interferon-based treatment. Subjects were re-treated with pegylated-interferon/ribavirin during trial lead-in. We used step-wise logistic regression to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aOR and create the predictive model. Leave-one-out cross-validation was used to predict a priori probabilities of SVR and determine area under the receiver operator characteristics curve (AUC.Among 646 HCV genotype 1-infected European American patients, 14.2% achieved SVR. IL28B rs12979860-CC genotype was the strongest predictor of SVR (aOR, 7.56; p10% (43.3% of subjects had an SVR rate of 27.9% and accounted for 84.8% of subjects actually achieving SVR. To verify that consideration of both IL28B genotype and clinical variables is required for treatment decisions, we calculated AUC values from published data for the IDEAL Study.A clinical prediction model based on IL28B genotype and clinical variables can yield useful individualized predictions of the probability of treatment success that could increase SVR rates and decrease the frequency of futile treatment among patients with CHC.

  11. Phenotypic and genotypic analysis of age at first calving in Iranian Holstein dairy cows

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    Atefeh Seyeddokht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Age at first calving (AFC has an important effect on profitability and reproductive management of dairy cattle. Every month increase in AFC beyond 24 months increases the cost of production. The time between birth and first calving represents a period in which replacement heifers are not generating income. Instead this rearing period requires considerable capital expenditures including feed, housing, and veterinary expenses. These expenses constitute 15% to 20% of the total expenses related to milk production. A basic approach to reduce this cost is to decrease the time between birth and her first freshening. Worldwide recommendations for one particular AFC might be an incorrect management goal for all of the cattle on all of the farms, since the recommendation might not represent the management goals and/or capabilities of a particular production system or farm. We realize that each dairy has its own set of unique management and environmental conditions, which makes a universal AFC and BW after first calving, a difficult goal to achieve. The AFC has a profound influence on the total cost of raising dairy replacements in which older calving heifers are more expensive to raise than younger ones. Materials and methods: A total of 19499 calving records belonged to 96 herd from 1996 to 2008 were used to estimate genetic components and genetic trend for age at first calving in Holstein dairy cows of Iran. Data were analyzed using a univariate model and Wombat software. Linear regression of estimated breeding values on calving year was used to estimate genetic trend. Results and Discussion: Estimated genetic trend was positive for some years and was negative for others and showed that reducing age at first calving has not been considered in the selection strategies; however, the phenotypic trend was decreased. The age at first calving for Yazd, Markazi, and southern Khorasan provinces were the highest and for Kermanshah, East Azarbayjan

  12. A comparison of computational models with and without genotyping for prediction of response to second-line HIV therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Revell, A. D.; Boyd, M. A.; Wang, D.; Emery, S.; Gazzard, B.; Reiss, P.; van Sighem, A. I.; Montaner, J. S.; Lane, H. C.; Larder, B. A.

    2014-01-01

    We compared the use of computational models developed with and without HIV genotype vs. genotyping itself to predict effective regimens for patients experiencing first-line virological failure. Two sets of models predicted virological response for 99 three-drug regimens for patients on a failing

  13. Genotype and phenotype relationships in 10 Pakistani unrelated patients with inherited factor VII deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhany, M; Boijout, H; Pellequer, J-L; Shamsi, T; Moulis, G; Aguilar-Martinez, P; Schved, J-F; Giansily-Blaizot, M

    2013-11-01

    Inherited factor VII (FVII) deficiency is one of the commonest rare bleeding disorders. It is characterized by a wide molecular and clinical heterogeneity and an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Factor VII-deficient patients are still scarcely explored in Pakistan although rare bleeding disorders became quite common as a result of traditional consanguineous marriages. The aim of the study was to give a first insight of F7 gene mutations in Pakistani population. Ten unrelated FVII-deficient patients living in Pakistan were investigated (median FVII:C = 2%; range = 2-37%). A clinical questionnaire was filled out for each patient and direct sequencing was performed on the coding regions, intron/exon boundaries and 5' and 3' untranslated regions of the F7 gene. Nine different mutations (eight missense mutations and one located within the F7 promoter) were identified on the F7 gene. Five of them were novel (p.Cys82Tyr, p.Cys322Ser, p.Leu357Phe, p.Thr410Ala, c-57C>T, the last being predicted to alter the binding site of transcription factor HNF-4). Half of the patients had single mutations in Cys residues involved in disulfide bridges. The p.Cys82Arg mutation was the most frequent in our series. Six of seven patients with FVII:C levels below 10% were homozygous in connection with the high percentage of consanguinity in our series. In addition, we graded the 10 patients according to three previously published classifications for rare bleeding disorders. The use of the bleeding score proposed by Tosetto and co-workers in 2006 appears to well qualify the bleeding tendency in our series. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. eCOMPAGT integrates mtDNA: import, validation and export of mitochondrial DNA profiles for population genetics, tumour dynamics and genotype-phenotype association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Specht Günther

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA is widely being used for population genetics, forensic DNA fingerprinting and clinical disease association studies. The recent past has uncovered severe problems with mtDNA genotyping, not only due to the genotyping method itself, but mainly to the post-lab transcription, storage and report of mtDNA genotypes. Description eCOMPAGT, a system to store, administer and connect phenotype data to all kinds of genotype data is now enhanced by the possibility of storing mtDNA profiles and allowing their validation, linking to phenotypes and export as numerous formats. mtDNA profiles can be imported from different sequence evaluation programs, compared between evaluations and their haplogroup affiliations stored. Furthermore, eCOMPAGT has been improved in its sophisticated transparency (support of MySQL and Oracle, security aspects (by using database technology and the option to import, manage and store genotypes derived from various genotyping methods (SNPlex, TaqMan, and STRs. It is a software solution designed for project management, laboratory work and the evaluation process all-in-one. Conclusions The extended mtDNA version of eCOMPAGT was designed to enable error-free post-laboratory data handling of human mtDNA profiles. This software is suited for small to medium-sized human genetic, forensic and clinical genetic laboratories. The direct support of MySQL and the improved database security options render eCOMPAGT a powerful tool to build an automated workflow architecture for several genotyping methods. eCOMPAGT is freely available at http://dbis-informatik.uibk.ac.at/ecompagt.

  15. eCOMPAGT integrates mtDNA: import, validation and export of mitochondrial DNA profiles for population genetics, tumour dynamics and genotype-phenotype association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissensteiner, Hansi; Schönherr, Sebastian; Specht, Günther; Kronenberg, Florian; Brandstätter, Anita

    2010-03-09

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is widely being used for population genetics, forensic DNA fingerprinting and clinical disease association studies. The recent past has uncovered severe problems with mtDNA genotyping, not only due to the genotyping method itself, but mainly to the post-lab transcription, storage and report of mtDNA genotypes. eCOMPAGT, a system to store, administer and connect phenotype data to all kinds of genotype data is now enhanced by the possibility of storing mtDNA profiles and allowing their validation, linking to phenotypes and export as numerous formats. mtDNA profiles can be imported from different sequence evaluation programs, compared between evaluations and their haplogroup affiliations stored. Furthermore, eCOMPAGT has been improved in its sophisticated transparency (support of MySQL and Oracle), security aspects (by using database technology) and the option to import, manage and store genotypes derived from various genotyping methods (SNPlex, TaqMan, and STRs). It is a software solution designed for project management, laboratory work and the evaluation process all-in-one. The extended mtDNA version of eCOMPAGT was designed to enable error-free post-laboratory data handling of human mtDNA profiles. This software is suited for small to medium-sized human genetic, forensic and clinical genetic laboratories. The direct support of MySQL and the improved database security options render eCOMPAGT a powerful tool to build an automated workflow architecture for several genotyping methods. eCOMPAGT is freely available at http://dbis-informatik.uibk.ac.at/ecompagt.

  16. Phenotypic plasticity as an adaptive response to predictable and unpredictable environmental changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manenti, Tommaso

    Phenotypic plasticity is the ability of a genotype to modify its phenotype in response to environmental changes as a consequence of an interaction between genes and environment (Bradshaw, 1965). Plasticity contributes to the vast phenotypic variation observed in natural populations. Many examples...... of a plastic response are expected to depend on the environmental conditions experienced by organisms. Thus, in populations exposed to a non-changing environment, the plastic machinery might be a waste of resources. Contrary, in populations experiencing varying environmental conditions, plasticity is expected...... such as anti-predator behaviours or the activation of mechanisms to prevent thermal stress injuries suggest that plasticity is an adaptive response, favoured by natural selection. At the same time, organisms do show limited plastic responses, indicating that this ability is not for free. Costs and benefits...

  17. NOD2/CARD15 Gene Polymorphisms in Crohn's Disease: A Genotype-Phenotype Analysis in Danish and Portuguese Patients and Controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vind, Ida; Vieira, A; Hougs, L

    2005-01-01

    to a healthy background population and to compare genotype-phenotype relations in the two countries. METHODS: 58 Danish patients and 29 Portuguese patients with CD were matched for age, sex and disease behaviour at time of diagnosis and compared with 200 healthy Danish and Portuguese controls. Phenotypes were...... recorded at year of diagnosis, 3 years after diagnosis and at end of follow-up. Patients were genotyped for Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg and Leu1007InsC. RESULTS: 22% of the Danish patients vs. 9% of Danish controls compared to 21% of the Portuguese patients vs. 16% had at least one mutation. Mutation rates...... in Danish patients were significantly different (p=0.02) compared with Danish controls, no difference (p=0.51) was found between Portuguese patients and controls. However, a possible relationship between CD and presence of genetic mutations was found when comparing the two countries (p=0.03) using...

  18. Genomic prediction of starch content and chipping quality in tetraploid potato using genotyping-by-sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sverrisdóttir, Elsa; Byrne, Stephen; Nielsen, Ea Høegh Riis

    2017-01-01

    continue to fall. In this study, we have generated genomic prediction models for starch content and chipping quality in tetraploid potato to facilitate varietal development. Chipping quality was evaluated as the colour of a potato chip after frying following cold induced sweetening. We used genotyping...... genomic estimated breeding values. Cross-validated prediction correlations of 0.56 and 0.73 were obtained within the training population for starch content and chipping quality, respectively, while correlations were lower when predicting performance in the test panel, at 0.30–0.31 and 0...

  19. Screening of salinity tolerant jute (corchorus capsularis and c. olitorius) genotypes via phenotypic and phsiology-assisted procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hongyu, M.A.; Wang, Z.; Wang, X.

    2011-01-01

    To obtain salt tolerant genotypes, salt tolerance of 10 jute genotypes of different origins was evaluated by relative salt harm rate at germination stage and by index of salt harm at seedling stage, respectively. The results indicated that salt tolerance of germination stage of jute was consistent with that of seedling stage, with a markedly significant (P < 0.01) correlation of 0.8432 (n =10). Two high salt tolerant genotypes (Huang No.1 and 9511) and two salt sensitive genotypes (Mengyuan and 07-21) were screened out by these methods. Further activity analysis of POD, SOD and CAT and determination of MDA content at seedling stage validated that genotypes Huang No.1 and 9511 were more salt tolerant than genotypes Mengyuan and 07-21. Our results indicated that the combination of relative salt harm rate at germination stage and index of salt harm at seedling stage can be used to evaluate salt tolerance of jute genotypes. (author)

  20. Mutation Analysis of 16 Mucolipidosis II and III Alpha/Beta Chinese Children Revealed Genotype-Phenotype Correlations.

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    Shuang Liu

    Full Text Available Mucolipidosis II and III alpha/beta are autosomal recessive diseases caused by mutations in the GNPTAB gene which encodes the α and β subunits of the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase. Clinically, mucolipidosis II (MLII is characterized by severe developmental delay, coarse facial features, skeletal deformities, and other systemic involvement. In contrast, MLIII alpha/beta is a much milder disorder, the symptoms of which include progressive joint stiffness, short stature, and scoliosis. To study the relationship between the genotypes and phenotypes of the MLII and MLIII alpha/beta patients, we analyzed the GNPTAB gene in 16 Chinese MLII and MLIII alpha/beta patients. We collected and analyzed the patients' available clinical data and all showed clinical features typical of MLII or MLIII alpha/beta. Moreover, the activity of several lysosomal enzymes was measured in the plasma and finally the GNPTAB gene was sequenced. We detected 30 mutant alleles out of 32 alleles in our patients. These include 10 new mutations (c.99delC, c.118-1G>A, c.523_524delAAinsG, c.1212C>G, c.2213C>A, c.2345C>T, c.2356C>T, c.2455G>T, c.2821dupA, and c.3136-2A>G and 5 previously reported mutations (c.1071G>A, c.1090C>T, c.2715+1G>A, c.2550_2554delGAAA, and c.3613C>T. The most frequent mutation was the splicing mutation c.2715+1G>A, which accounted for 28% of the mutations. The majority of the mutations reported in the Chinese patients (57% were located on exon 13 or in its intronic flanking regions.

  1. The BAG3 gene variants in Polish patients with dilated cardiomyopathy: four novel mutations and a genotype-phenotype correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franaszczyk, Maria; Bilinska, Zofia T; Sobieszczańska-Małek, Małgorzata; Michalak, Ewa; Sleszycka, Justyna; Sioma, Agnieszka; Małek, Łukasz A; Kaczmarska, Dorota; Walczak, Ewa; Włodarski, Paweł; Hutnik, Łukasz; Milanowska, Blanka; Dzielinska, Zofia; Religa, Grzegorz; Grzybowski, Jacek; Zieliński, Tomasz; Ploski, Rafal

    2014-07-09

    BAG3 gene mutations have been recently implicated as a novel cause of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Our aim was to evaluate the prevalence of BAG3 mutations in Polish patients with DCM and to search for genotype-phenotype correlations. We studied 90 unrelated probands by direct sequencing of BAG3 exons and splice sites. Large deletions/insertions were screened for by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). We found 5 different mutations in 6 probands and a total of 21 mutations among their relatives: the known p.Glu455Lys mutation (2 families), 4 novel mutations: p.Gln353ArgfsX10 (c.1055delC), p.Gly379AlafsX45 (c.1135delG), p.Tyr451X (c.1353C>A) and a large deletion of 17,990 bp removing BAG3 exons 3-4. Analysis of mutation positive relatives of the probands from this study pooled with those previously reported showed higher DCM prevalence among those with missense vs. truncating mutations (OR = 8.33, P = 0.0058) as well as a difference in age at disease onset between the former and the latter in Kaplan-Meier survival analysis (P = 0.006). Clinical data from our study suggested that in BAG3 mutation carriers acute onset DCM with hemodynamic compromise may be triggered by infection. BAG3 point mutations and large deletions are relatively frequent cause of DCM. Delayed DCM onset associated with truncating vs. non-truncating mutations may be important for genetic counseling.

  2. Variabilidade fenotípica em genótipos de acerola Phenotypic variability in West Indian cherry genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ EVERALDO GOMES

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available As medidas de variabilidade fenotípica, correlações, efeitos diretos e indiretos na aceroleira (Malpighia emarginata DC. da região de Itápolis, SP, objetivaram direcionar o processo seletivo de genótipos. Os parâmetros comprimento e largura média de folhas, altura de planta, diâmetro de copa, peso médio de fruto, peso médio de polpa/fruto, peso médio de 20 frutos e peso médio de polpa por 20 frutos mostraram diferenças quanto a genótipos e épocas. Em acidez, tamanho e largura média de fruto, as diferenças são exclusivas em relação a épocas, sugerindo ações de condições climáticas. A altura é um bom parâmetro tipificador na diferenciação e seleção de genótipos. As condições meteorológicas podem influenciar marcadamente em caracteres tecnológicos (acidez e em medidas dos frutos. Destacaram-se as associações positivas entre comprimento de folhas com tamanho e peso de frutos e as correlações negativas destes com vitamina C; seguida de correlações positivas e significativas de tamanho com largura de frutos. Dos efeitos diretos sobre vitamina C, relacionam-se os efeitos de Brix e diâmetro de copa como positivos. Contudo, nas condições estudadas, as medidas das folhas estão associadas positivamente com tamanho e peso dos frutos e negativamente com vitamina C. Além disso, observa-se que as medidas dos frutos associam-se positivamente com os caracteres de peso e rendimento, que estão negativamente associados com vitamina C. A seleção sobreBrix pode direcionar ganhos em polpa e em vitamina C.The measures in the phenotypic variability, correlation, direct and indirect effects in the West Indian cherry (Malpighia emarginata DC., from Itápolis, São Paulo State, Brazil, aimed to subsidize the management of the selective process in the genotypes. The parameters length and width of leaves, height of plant, diameter of canopy, weight medium of fruit, weight of pulp/fruit, weight medium of 20 fruits and weight

  3. Cluster-distinguishing genotypic and phenotypic diversity of carbapenem-resistant Gram-negative bacteria in solid-organ transplantation patients: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampatakis, Theodoros; Geladari, Anastasia; Politi, Lida; Antachopoulos, Charalampos; Iosifidis, Elias; Tsiatsiou, Olga; Karyoti, Aggeliki; Papanikolaou, Vasileios; Tsakris, Athanassios; Roilides, Emmanuel

    2017-07-31

    Solid-organ transplant recipients may display high rates of colonization and/or infection by multidrug-resistant bacteria. We analysed and compared the phenotypic and genotypic diversity of carbapenem-resistant (CR) strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from patients in the Solid Organ Transplantation department of our hospital. Between March 2012 and August 2013, 56 CR strains from various biological fluids underwent antimicrobial susceptibility testing with VITEK 2, molecular analysis by PCR amplification and genotypic analysis with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). They were clustered according to antimicrobial drug susceptibility and genotypic profiles. Diversity analyses were performed by calculating Simpson's diversity index and applying computed rarefaction curves.Results/Key findings. Among K. pneumoniae, KP-producers predominated (57.1 %). VIM and OXA-23 carbapenemases prevailed among P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii (89.4 and 88.9 %, respectively). KPC-producing K. pneumoniae and OXA-23 A. baumannii were assigned in single PFGE pulsotypes. VIM-producing P. aeruginosa generated multiple pulsotypes. CR K. pneumoniae strains displayed phenotypic diversity in tigecycline, colistin (CS), amikacin (AMK), gentamicin (GEN) and co-trimoxazole (SXT) (16 clusters); P. aeruginosa displayed phenotypic diversity in cefepime (FEP), ceftazidime, aztreonam, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, AMK, GEN and CS (9 clusters); and A. baumannii displayed phenotypic diversity in AMK, GEN, SXT, FEP, tobramycin and rifampicin (8 clusters). The Simpson diversity indices for the interpretative phenotype and PFGE analysis were 0.89 and 0.6, respectively, for K. pneumoniae strains (P<0.001); 0.77 and 0.6 for P. aeruginosa (P=0.22); and 0.86 and 0.19 for A. baumannii (P=0.004). The presence of different antimicrobial susceptibility profiles does not preclude the possibility that two CR K. pneumoniae or A. baumannii

  4. Immune phenotypes predict survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

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    Haouraa Mostafa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, a common primary malignant brain tumor, rarely disseminates beyond the central nervous system and has a very bad prognosis. The current study aimed at the analysis of immunological control in individual patients with GBM. Methods Immune phenotypes and plasma biomarkers of GBM patients were determined at the time of diagnosis using flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Results Using descriptive statistics, we found that immune anomalies were distinct in individual patients. Defined marker profiles proved highly relevant for survival. A remarkable relation between activated NK cells and improved survival in GBM patients was in contrast to increased CD39 and IL-10 in patients with a detrimental course and very short survival. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA and Cox proportional hazards models substantiated the relevance of absolute numbers of CD8 cells and low numbers of CD39 cells for better survival. Conclusions Defined alterations of the immune system may guide the course of disease in patients with GBM and may be prognostically valuable for longitudinal studies or can be applied for immune intervention.

  5. Genotypic and phenotypic evaluation of off-type grasses in hybrid Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. x C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy] putting greens using genotyping-by-sequencing and morphological characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasor, Eric H; Brosnan, James T; Staton, Margaret E; Lane, Thomas; Trigiano, Robert N; Wadl, Phillip A; Conner, Joann A; Schwartz, Brian M

    2018-01-01

    Interspecific hybrid bermudagrass [ Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. x C. transvaalensis Burtt-Davy] is one of the most widely used grasses on golf courses, with cultivars derived from 'Tifgreen' or 'Tifdwarf' particularly used for putting greens. Many bermudagrass cultivars established for putting greens can be genetically unstable and lead to the occurrence of undesirable off-type grasses that vary in phenotype. The objective of this research was to genetically and phenotypically differentiate off-type grasses and hybrid cultivars. Beginning in 2013, off-type and desirable hybrid bermudagrass samples were collected from golf course putting greens in the southeastern United States and genetically and phenotypically characterized using genotyping-by-sequencing and morphology. Genotyping-by-sequencing determined that 11% (5) of off-type and desirable samples from putting greens were genetically divergent from standard cultivars such as Champion, MiniVerde, Tifdwarf, TifEagle, and Tifgreen. In addition, genotyping-by-sequencing was unable to genetically distinguish all standard cultivars from one another due to their similar origin and clonal propagation; however, over 90,000 potentially informative nucleotide variants were identified among the triploid hybrid cultivars. Although few genetic differences were found in this research, samples harvested from golf course putting greens had variable morphology and were clustered into three distinct phenotypic groups. The majority of off-type grasses in hybrid bermudagrass putting greens were genetically similar with variable morphological traits. Off-type grasses within golf course putting greens have the potential to compromise putting surface functionality and aesthetics.

  6. Predicting biomaterial property-dendritic cell phenotype relationships from the multivariate analysis of responses to polymethacrylates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Peng Meng; Pallassana, Narayanan; Bowden, Rebeca; Cunningham, Barry; Joy, Abraham; Kohn, Joachim; Babensee, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play a critical role in orchestrating the host responses to a wide variety of foreign antigens and are essential in maintaining immune tolerance. Distinct biomaterials have been shown to differentially affect the phenotype of DCs, which suggested that biomaterials may be used to modulate immune response towards the biologic component in combination products. The elucidation of biomaterial property-DC phenotype relationships is expected to inform rational design of immuno-modulatory biomaterials. In this study, DC response to a set of 12 polymethacrylates (pMAs) was assessed in terms of surface marker expression and cytokine profile. Principal component analysis (PCA) determined that surface carbon correlated with enhanced DC maturation, while surface oxygen was associated with an immature DC phenotype. Partial square linear regression, a multivariate modeling approach, was implemented and successfully predicted biomaterial-induced DC phenotype in terms of surface marker expression from biomaterial properties with R2prediction = 0.76. Furthermore, prediction of DC phenotype was effective based on only theoretical chemical composition of the bulk polymers with R2prediction = 0.80. These results demonstrated that immune cell response can be predicted from biomaterial properties, and computational models will expedite future biomaterial design and selection. PMID:22136715

  7. De Novo and Inherited Loss-of-Function Variants in TLK2: Clinical and Genotype-Phenotype Evaluation of a Distinct Neurodevelopmental Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijnders, Margot R F; Miller, Kerry A; Alvi, Mohsan; Goos, Jacqueline A C; Lees, Melissa M; de Burca, Anna; Henderson, Alex; Kraus, Alison; Mikat, Barbara; de Vries, Bert B A; Isidor, Bertrand; Kerr, Bronwyn; Marcelis, Carlo; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; Deshpande, Charu; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A L; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Baralle, Diana; Blair, Edward M; Engels, Hartmut; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Eason, Jacqueline; Santen, Gijs W E; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Chandler, Kate; Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Payne, Katelyn; Helbig, Katherine; Radtke, Kelly; Nugent, Kimberly M; Cremer, Kirsten; Strom, Tim M; Bird, Lynne M; Sinnema, Margje; Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria; van Dooren, Marieke F; Alders, Marielle; Koopmans, Marije; Brick, Lauren; Kozenko, Mariya; Harline, Megan L; Klaassens, Merel; Steinraths, Michelle; Cooper, Nicola S; Edery, Patrick; Yap, Patrick; Terhal, Paulien A; van der Spek, Peter J; Lakeman, Phillis; Taylor, Rachel L; Littlejohn, Rebecca O; Pfundt, Rolph; Mercimek-Andrews, Saadet; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Kant, Sarina G; McLean, Scott; Joss, Shelagh; Swagemakers, Sigrid M A; Douzgou, Sofia; Wall, Steven A; Küry, Sébastien; Calpena, Eduardo; Koelling, Nils; McGowan, Simon J; Twigg, Stephen R F; Mathijssen, Irene M J; Nellaker, Christoffer; Brunner, Han G; Wilkie, Andrew O M

    2018-06-07

    Next-generation sequencing is a powerful tool for the discovery of genes related to neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Here, we report the identification of a distinct syndrome due to de novo or inherited heterozygous mutations in Tousled-like kinase 2 (TLK2) in 38 unrelated individuals and two affected mothers, using whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing technologies, matchmaker databases, and international collaborations. Affected individuals had a consistent phenotype, characterized by mild-borderline neurodevelopmental delay (86%), behavioral disorders (68%), severe gastro-intestinal problems (63%), and facial dysmorphism including blepharophimosis (82%), telecanthus (74%), prominent nasal bridge (68%), broad nasal tip (66%), thin vermilion of the upper lip (62%), and upslanting palpebral fissures (55%). Analysis of cell lines from three affected individuals showed that mutations act through a loss-of-function mechanism in at least two case subjects. Genotype-phenotype analysis and comparison of computationally modeled faces showed that phenotypes of these and other individuals with loss-of-function variants significantly overlapped with phenotypes of individuals with other variant types (missense and C-terminal truncating). This suggests that haploinsufficiency of TLK2 is the most likely underlying disease mechanism, leading to a consistent neurodevelopmental phenotype. This work illustrates the power of international data sharing, by the identification of 40 individuals from 26 different centers in 7 different countries, allowing the identification, clinical delineation, and genotype-phenotype evaluation of a distinct NDD caused by mutations in TLK2. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genomic-Enabled Prediction in Maize Using Kernel Models with Genotype × Environment Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira E Sousa, Massaine; Cuevas, Jaime; de Oliveira Couto, Evellyn Giselly; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paulino; Jarquín, Diego; Fritsche-Neto, Roberto; Burgueño, Juan; Crossa, Jose

    2017-06-07

    Multi-environment trials are routinely conducted in plant breeding to select candidates for the next selection cycle. In this study, we compare the prediction accuracy of four developed genomic-enabled prediction models: (1) single-environment, main genotypic effect model (SM); (2) multi-environment, main genotypic effects model (MM); (3) multi-environment, single variance G×E deviation model (MDs); and (4) multi-environment, environment-specific variance G×E deviation model (MDe). Each of these four models were fitted using two kernel methods: a linear kernel Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Predictor, GBLUP (GB), and a nonlinear kernel Gaussian kernel (GK). The eight model-method combinations were applied to two extensive Brazilian maize data sets (HEL and USP data sets), having different numbers of maize hybrids evaluated in different environments for grain yield (GY), plant height (PH), and ear height (EH). Results show that the MDe and the MDs models fitted with the Gaussian kernel (MDe-GK, and MDs-GK) had the highest prediction accuracy. For GY in the HEL data set, the increase in prediction accuracy of SM-GK over SM-GB ranged from 9 to 32%. For the MM, MDs, and MDe models, the increase in prediction accuracy of GK over GB ranged from 9 to 49%. For GY in the USP data set, the increase in prediction accuracy of SM-GK over SM-GB ranged from 0 to 7%. For the MM, MDs, and MDe models, the increase in prediction accuracy of GK over GB ranged from 34 to 70%. For traits PH and EH, gains in prediction accuracy of models with GK compared to models with GB were smaller than those achieved in GY. Also, these gains in prediction accuracy decreased when a more difficult prediction problem was studied. Copyright © 2017 Bandeira e Sousa et al.

  9. Genomic-Enabled Prediction in Maize Using Kernel Models with Genotype × Environment Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massaine Bandeira e Sousa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi-environment trials are routinely conducted in plant breeding to select candidates for the next selection cycle. In this study, we compare the prediction accuracy of four developed genomic-enabled prediction models: (1 single-environment, main genotypic effect model (SM; (2 multi-environment, main genotypic effects model (MM; (3 multi-environment, single variance G×E deviation model (MDs; and (4 multi-environment, environment-specific variance G×E deviation model (MDe. Each of these four models were fitted using two kernel methods: a linear kernel Genomic Best Linear Unbiased Predictor, GBLUP (GB, and a nonlinear kernel Gaussian kernel (GK. The eight model-method combinations were applied to two extensive Brazilian maize data sets (HEL and USP data sets, having different numbers of maize hybrids evaluated in different environments for grain yield (GY, plant height (PH, and ear height (EH. Results show that the MDe and the MDs models fitted with the Gaussian kernel (MDe-GK, and MDs-GK had the highest prediction accuracy. For GY in the HEL data set, the increase in prediction accuracy of SM-GK over SM-GB ranged from 9 to 32%. For the MM, MDs, and MDe models, the increase in prediction accuracy of GK over GB ranged from 9 to 49%. For GY in the USP data set, the increase in prediction accuracy of SM-GK over SM-GB ranged from 0 to 7%. For the MM, MDs, and MDe models, the increase in prediction accuracy of GK over GB ranged from 34 to 70%. For traits PH and EH, gains in prediction accuracy of models with GK compared to models with GB were smaller than those achieved in GY. Also, these gains in prediction accuracy decreased when a more difficult prediction problem was studied.

  10. Phenotyping of UGT1A1 Activity Using Raltegravir Predicts Pharmacokinetics and Toxicity of Irinotecan in FOLFIRI.

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    Lawrence Soon-U Lee

    Full Text Available Irinotecan toxicity correlates with UGT1A1 activity. We explored whether phenotyping UGT1A1 using a probe approach works better than current genotyping methods.Twenty-four Asian cancer patients received irinotecan as part of the FOLFIRI regimen. Subjects took raltegravir 400 mg orally and intravenous midazolam 1 mg. Pharmacokinetic analyses were performed using WinNonLin and NONMEM. Genomic DNA was isolated and screened for the known genetic variants in UGT1A1 and CYP3A4/5.SN-38G/SN-38 AUC ratio correlated well with Raltegravir glucuronide/ Raltegravir AUC ratio (r = 0.784 p<0.01. Midazolam clearance correlated well with irinotecan clearance (r = 0.563 p<0.01. SN-38 AUC correlated well with Log10Nadir Absolute Neutrophil Count (ANC (r = -0.397 p<0.05. Significant correlation was found between nadir ANC and formation rate constant of raltegravir glucuronide (r = 0.598, P<0.005, but not UGT1A1 genotype.Raltegravir glucuronide formation is a good predictor of nadir ANC, and can predict neutropenia in East Asian patients. Prospective studies with dose adjustments should be done to develop raltegravir as a probe to optimize irinotecan therapy.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00808184.

  11. PHENOstruct: Prediction of human phenotype ontology terms using heterogeneous data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahanda, Indika; Funk, Christopher; Verspoor, Karin; Ben-Hur, Asa

    2015-01-01

    The human phenotype ontology (HPO) was recently developed as a standardized vocabulary for describing the phenotype abnormalities associated with human diseases. At present, only a small fraction of human protein coding genes have HPO annotations. But, researchers believe that a large portion of currently unannotated genes are related to disease phenotypes. Therefore, it is important to predict gene-HPO term associations using accurate computational methods. In this work we demonstrate the performance advantage of the structured SVM approach which was shown to be highly effective for Gene Ontology term prediction in comparison to several baseline methods. Furthermore, we highlight a collection of informative data sources suitable for the problem of predicting gene-HPO associations, including large scale literature mining data.

  12. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Becker Muscular Dystrophy Confirmed by Multiplex Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification: Genotype-Phenotype Correlation in a Large Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengalil, Seena; Preethish-Kumar, Veeramani; Polavarapu, Kiran; Mahadevappa, Manjunath; Sekar, Deepha; Purushottam, Meera; Thomas, Priya Treesa; Nashi, Saraswathi; Nalini, Atchayaram

    2017-01-01

    Studies of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) confirmed by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) have determined the clinical characteristics, genotype, and relations between the reading frame and phenotype for different countries. This is the first such study from India. A retrospective genotype-phenotype analysis of 317 MLPA-confirmed patients with DMD or BMD who visited the neuromuscular clinic of a quaternary referral center in southern India. The 317 patients comprised 279 cases of DMD (88%), 32 of BMD (10.1%), and 6 of intermediate phenotype (1.9%). Deletions accounted for 91.8% of cases, with duplications causing the remaining 8.2%. There were 254 cases of DMD (91%) with deletions and 25 (9%) due to duplications, and 31 cases (96.8%) of BMD with deletions and 1 (3.2%) due to duplication. All six cases of intermediate type were due to deletions. The most-common mutation was a single-exon deletion. Deletions of six or fewer exons constituted 68.8% of cases. The deletion of exon 50 was the most common. The reading-frame rule held in 90% of DMD and 94% of BMD cases. A tendency toward a lower IQ and earlier wheelchair dependence was observed with distal exon deletions, though a significant correlation was not found. The reading-frame rule held in 90% to 94% of children, which is consistent with reports from other parts of the world. However, testing by MLPA is a limitation, and advanced sequencing methods including analysis of the structure of mutant dystrophin is needed for more-accurate assessments of the genotype-phenotype correlation.

  13. Prediction of quantitative phenotypes based on genetic networks: a case study in yeast sporulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Li

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An exciting application of genetic network is to predict phenotypic consequences for environmental cues or genetic perturbations. However, de novo prediction for quantitative phenotypes based on network topology is always a challenging task. Results Using yeast sporulation as a model system, we have assembled a genetic network from literature and exploited Boolean network to predict sporulation efficiency change upon deleting individual genes. We observe that predictions based on the curated network correlate well with the experimentally measured values. In addition, computational analysis reveals the robustness and hysteresis of the yeast sporulation network and uncovers several patterns of sporulation efficiency change caused by double gene deletion. These discoveries may guide future investigation of underlying mechanisms. We have also shown that a hybridized genetic network reconstructed from both temporal microarray data and literature is able to achieve a satisfactory prediction accuracy of the same quantitative phenotypes. Conclusions This case study illustrates the value of predicting quantitative phenotypes based on genetic network and provides a generic approach.

  14. Phenotypic and Genotypic Characterization and Treatment of a Cohort with Familial Tumoral Calcinosis/Hyperostosis-Hyperphosphatemia Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnitz, Mary Scott; Gourh, Pravitt; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Wodajo, Felasfa; Ichikawa, Shoji; Econs, Michael J.; White, Kenneth; Molinolo, Alfredo; Chen, Marcus Y.; Heller, Theo; Del Rivero, Jaydira; Seo-Mayer, Patricia; Arabshahi, Bita; Jackson, Malaka B.; Hatab, Sarah; McCarthy, Edward; Guthrie, Lori C.; Brillante, Beth A.; Gafni, Rachel I.; Collins, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Familial tumoral calcinosis (FTC)/hyperostosis-hyperphosphatemia syndrome (HHS) is a rare disorder caused by mutations in the genes encoding fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23), N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 3 (GALNT3), or KLOTHO. The result is functional deficiency of, or resistance to, intact FGF23 (iFGF23), causing hyperphosphatemia, increased renal tubular reabsorption of phosphorus (TRP), elevated or inappropriately normal 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), ectopic calcifications and/or diaphyseal hyperostosis. Eight subjects with FTC/HHS were studied and treated. Clinical manifestations varied, even within families, ranging from asymptomatic to large, disabling calcifications. All subjects had hyperphosphatemia, increased TRP, and elevated or inappropriately normal 1,25D. C-terminal FGF23 was markedly elevated while iFGF23 was comparatively low, consistent with increased FGF23 cleavage. Radiographs ranged from diaphyseal hyperostosis to massive calcification. Two subjects with severe calcifications also had overwhelming systemic inflammation and elevated C-reactive protein (CRP). GALNT3 mutations were identified in 7 subjects; no causative mutation was found in the eighth. Biopsies from 4 subjects showed ectopic calcification and chronic inflammation, with areas of heterotopic ossification observed in 1 subject. Treatment with low phosphate diet, phosphate binders, and phosphaturia-inducing therapies was prescribed with variable response. One subject experienced complete resolution of a calcific mass after 13 months of medical treatment. In the 2 subjects with systemic inflammation, interleukin-1 (IL-1) antagonists significantly decreased CRP levels with resolution of calcinosis cutis and peri-lesional inflammation in one subject and improvement of overall well-being in both subjects. This cohort expands the phenotype and genotype of FTC/HHS and demonstrates the range of clinical manifestations despite similar biochemical profiles and genetic mutations

  15. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in a tertiary-level reference hospital in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Irmak; Aksu, Neriman

    2016-04-06

    Enterobacteriaceae are among the most common pathogens that are responsible for serious community-acquired, hospital-acquired, and health-care associated infections. The emergence and spread of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) have become an increasing concern for healthcare services worldwide. Infections caused by these bacteria have been associated with significant morbidity and mortality and treatment options have been limited. The rapid and accurate detection of carbapenem resistance in these bacteria is important for infection control. The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic features of CRE strains isolated in a tertiary-level reference hospital in Turkey. A total of 181 CRE strains were included in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility rates were tested using Vitek 2 system. Modified Hodge test (MHT) was performed using meropenem and ertapenem discs. Metallo-β-lactamase antimicrobial gradient test (E-test MBL strips) were used for evaluation of metallo-β-lactamase production. A multiplex PCR was used for detection of carbapenems resistance genes (IMP, VIM, KPC, NDM-1 and OXA-48). The OXA-48 gene was detected in 86 strains, NDM-1 gene in six strains, VIM gene in one strain. IMP and KPC genes were not identified. Three strains produced both OXA-48 and NDM-1 and one strain produced both OXA-48 and VIM. In two patients more than one genus of OXA-48 positive CREs was isolated. Ninety-two of the isolates were multidrug-resistant. One hundred and ten isolates were MHT with meropenem (MEM-MHT) positive and 109 isolates were MHT with ertapenem (ERT-MHT) positive. Nine of the isolates were positive with E-test MBL strips. The sensitivity of MEM-MHT and ERT-MHT for detection of OXA-48 was 70.9 and 70.6 %, respectively. MEM-MHT was found highly discriminative for OXA-48 Escherichia coli (p Enterobacteriaceae in the hospital environment. While OXA-48 is still the most common source of carbapenem resistance in

  16. Root phenotypic differences across a historical gradient of wheat genotypes alter soil rhizosphere communities and their impact on nitrogen cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, C.; Junaidi, D.; Fonte, S.; Byrne, P. F.; Wallenstein, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Plants and soil microorganisms can exhibit coevolutionary relationships where, for example, in exchange for root carbon, rhizosphere microbes enhance plant fitness through improved plant nutrient availability. Organic agriculture relies heavily on these interactions to enhance crop nitrogen (N) availability. However, modern agriculture and breeding under high mineral N fertilization may have disrupted these interactions through alterations to belowground carbon inputs and associated impacts on the soil microbiome. As sustainability initiatives lead to a restoration of agricultural soil organic matter, modern crop cultivars may still be constrained by crop roots' ability to effectively support microbial-mediated N mineralization. We investigated how differences in root traits across a historical gradient of spring wheat genotypes influence the rhizosphere microbial community and effects on soil N and wheat yield. Five genotypes, representing wild (Wild), pre-Green Revolution (Old), and modern (Modern) wheat, were grown under greenhouse conditions in soils with and without compost to also compare genotype response to difference in native soil microbiomes and organic resource availability. We analyzed rhizosphere soils for microbial community composition, enzyme activities, inorganic N, and microbial biomass. Root length density, surface area, fine root volume and root:shoot ratio were higher in the Wild and Old genotype (Gypsum) compared to the two Modern genotypes (Psoil inorganic N, compared to Modern genotypes. However, under unamended soils, the microbial community and soil N were not affected by genotypes. We also relate how root traits and N cycling across genotypes correspond to microbial community composition. Our preliminary data suggest that the older wheat genotypes and their root traits are more effective at enhancing microbial N mineralization under organically managed soils. Thus, to optimize crop N availability from organic sources, breeding efforts

  17. Prediction of direct and indirect genetic gains and genotypic correlations in rubber tree progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecília Khusala Verardi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to estimate the genetic parameters, genotypic and phenotypic correlations, and direct and indirect genetic gains among and within rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis progenies. The experiment was set up at the Municipality of Jaú, SP, Brazil. A randomized complete block design was used, with 22 treatments (progenies, 6 replicates, and 10 plants per plot at a spacing of 3x3 m. Three‑year‑old progenies were assessed for girth, rubber yield, and bark thickness by direct and indirect gains and genotypic correlations. The number of latex vessel rings showed the best correlations, correlating positively and significantly with girth and bark thickness. Selection gains among progenies were greater than within progeny for all the variables analyzed. Total gains obtained were high, especially for girth increase and rubber yield, which were 93.38 and 105.95%, respectively. Young progeny selection can maximize the expected genetic gains, reducing the rubber tree selection cycle.

  18. Electroclinical presentation and genotype-phenotype relationships in patients with Unverricht-Lundborg disease carrying compound heterozygous CSTB point and indel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canafoglia, Laura; Gennaro, Elena; Capovilla, Giuseppe; Gobbi, Giuseppe; Boni, Antonella; Beccaria, Francesca; Viri, Maurizio; Michelucci, Roberto; Agazzi, Pamela; Assereto, Stefania; Coviello, Domenico A; Di Stefano, Maria; Rossi Sebastiano, Davide; Franceschetti, Silvana; Zara, Federico

    2012-12-01

    Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1A) is frequently due to an unstable expansion of a dodecamer repeat in the CSTB gene, whereas other types of mutations are rare. EPM1A due to homozygous expansion has a rather stereotyped presentation with prominent action myoclonus. We describe eight patients with five different compound heterozygous CSTB point or indel mutations in order to highlight their particular phenotypical presentations and evaluate their genotype-phenotype relationships. We screened CSTB mutations by means of Southern blotting and the sequencing of the genomic DNA of each proband. CSTB messenger RNA (mRNA) aberrations were characterized by sequencing the complementary DNA (cDNA) of lymphoblastoid cells, and assessing the protein concentrations in the lymphoblasts. The patient evaluations included the use of a simplified myoclonus severity rating scale, multiple neurophysiologic tests, and electroencephalography (EEG)-polygraphic recordings. To highlight the particular clinical features and disease time-course in compound heterozygous patients, we compared some of their characteristics with those observed in a series of 40 patients carrying the common homozygous expansion mutation observed at the C. Besta Foundation, Milan, Italy. The eight compound heterozygous patients belong to six EPM1A families (out of 52; 11.5%) diagnosed at the Laboratory of Genetics of the Galliera Hospitals in Genoa, Italy. They segregated five different heterozygous point or indel mutations in association with the common dodecamer expansion. Four patients from three families had previously reported CSTB mutations (c.67-1G>C and c.168+1_18del); one had a novel nonsense mutation at the first exon (c.133C>T) leading to a premature stop codon predicting a short peptide; the other three patients from two families had a complex novel indel mutation involving the donor splice site of intron 2 (c.168+2_169+21delinsAA) and leading to an aberrant transcript with a partially retained intron

  19. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L. L.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship. PMID:26217251

  20. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L L

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship.

  1. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajian eCai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In study 1, we surveyed narcissism and the impulsive buying tendency among an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive