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Sample records for genotype modulates resting

  1. The MAO A genotype does not modulate resting brain metabolism in adults

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    Alia-Klein, Nelly; Kriplani, Aarti; Pradhan, Kith; Ma, Jim Yeming; Logan, Jean; Williams, Benjamin; Craig, Ian W.; Telang, Frank; Tomasi, Dardo; Goldstein, Rita Z.; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2008-01-01

    Variation in the monoamine-oxidase-A gene has been associated with volumetric changes in corticolimbic regions with differences in their response to relevant emotional tasks. Here we show no changes in baseline regional brain metabolism as a function of genotype indicating that, unchallenged, corticolimbic activity is not modulated by the MAOA genotype. PMID:18706791

  2. REST and CoREST modulate neuronal subtype specification, maturation and maintenance.

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    Joseph J Abrajano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF is a master regulator of neuronal gene expression. REST functions as a modular scaffold for dynamic recruitment of epigenetic regulatory factors including its primary cofactor, the corepressor for element-1-silencing transcription factor (CoREST, to genomic loci that contain the repressor element-1 (RE1 binding motif. While REST was initially believed to silence RE1 containing neuronal genes in neural stem cells (NSCs and non-neuronal cells, emerging evidence shows an increasingly complex cell type- and developmental stage-specific repertoire of REST target genes and functions that include regulation of neuronal lineage maturation and plasticity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we utilized chromatin immunoprecipitation on chip (ChIP-chip analysis to examine REST and CoREST functions during NSC-mediated specification of cholinergic neurons (CHOLNs, GABAergic neurons (GABANs, glutamatergic neurons (GLUTNs, and medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs. We identified largely distinct but overlapping profiles of REST and CoREST target genes during neuronal subtype specification including a disproportionately high percentage that are exclusive to each neuronal subtype. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that the differential deployment of REST and CoREST is an important regulatory mechanism that mediates neuronal subtype specification by modulating specific gene networks responsible for inducing and maintaining neuronal subtype identity. Our observations also implicate a broad array of factors in the generation of neuronal diversity including but not limited to those that mediate homeostasis, cell cycle dynamics, cell viability, stress responses and epigenetic regulation.

  3. Resting autonomic modulations and the heart rate response to exercise.

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    Nunan, David; Jakovljevic, Djordje G; Donovan, Gay; Singleton, Lynette D; Sandercock, Gavin R H; Brodie, David A

    2010-08-01

    Identify the underlying role of resting heart rate variability (HRV) in the hearts response to graded exercise testing (GXT). Resting 5-min HRV and heart rate (HR) measurements were made in 33 volunteers (19 males, median age 34, range 25-63 years and 14 females median age 48, range 21-63 years). Measures of VO2 peak and HR obtained during a maximal GXT and heart rate recovery (HRR) post-GXT were assessed for associations with resting HRV. Differences and effect size (d) for measures of HRV were assessed between groups based on established risk cut-points for resting, exercise and recovery HR responses. Small associations were observed for the majority of resting HRV and GXT HR responses (best r value = -0.27, P > 0.05). Measures of HRV demonstrated moderate associations with HRR (best r value = 0.46, P < 0.05) and were able to predict a negative risk HRR. In contrast to other dependent variables, measures of HRV were consistently able to demonstrate significant and moderate to large (d = 0.9-2.0) differences between groups based on literature defined prognostic HR cut-points. Small associations with HR responses to exercise prevent their accurate prediction from resting HRV. Data support the use of vagally mediated resting HRV in predicting better HRR. Lower resting autonomic modulations underlined high risk resting and exercise HR responses. Resting short-term HRV measurements should be considered when assessing cardiac autonomic health from the HR response before, during and/or after exercise.

  4. Modulation of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism on resting-state EEG power in postmenopausal healthy women

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    Silvia eSolis-Ortiz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT Val158Met polymorphism impacts cortical dopamine levels and may influence cortical electrical activity in the human brain. This study investigated whether COMT genotype influences resting-state electroencephalogram (EEG power in the frontal, parietal and midline regions in healthy volunteers. EEG recordings were conducted in the resting-state in 13 postmenopausal healthy woman carriers of the Val/Val genotype and 11 with the Met/Met genotype. The resting EEG spectral absolute power in the frontal (F3, F4, F7, F8, FC3 and FC4, parietal (CP3, CP4, P3 and P4 and midline (Fz, FCz, Cz, CPz, Pz and Oz was analyzed during the eyes-open and eyes-closed conditions. The frequency bands considered were the delta, theta, alpha1, alpha2, beta1 and beta2. EEG data of the Val/Val and Met/Met genotypes, brain regions and conditions were analyzed using a general linear model analysis. In the individuals with the Met/Met genotype, delta activity was increased in the eyes-closed condition, theta activity was increased in the eyes-closed and in the eyes-open conditions, and alpha1 band, alpha2 band and beta1band activity was increased in the eyes-closed condition.A significant interaction between COMT genotypes and spectral bands was observed. Met homozygote individuals exhibited more delta, theta and beta1 activity than individuals with the Val/Val genotype. No significant interaction between COMT genotypes and the resting-state EEG regional power and conditions were observed for the three brain regions studied. Our findings indicate that the COMT Val158Met polymorphism does not directly impact resting-state EEG regional power, but instead suggest that COMT genotype can modulate resting-state EEG spectral power in postmenopausal healthy women.

  5. ADORA2A genotype modulates interoceptive and exteroceptive processing in a fronto-insular network.

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    Geiger, Maximilian J; Domschke, Katharina; Homola, György A; Schulz, Stefan M; Nowak, Johannes; Akhrif, Atae; Pauli, Paul; Deckert, Jürgen; Neufang, Susanne

    2016-08-01

    Facilitated processing of interoceptive and exteroceptive information in the salience network is suggested to promote the development of anxiety and anxiety disorders. Here, it was investigated whether the adenosine 2 A receptor gene (ADORA2A) 1976T/C (rs5751876) variant - previously associated with anxiety disorders and anxiety-related phenotypes as well as general attentional efficiency -was involved in the regulation of this network. In detail, fMRI recordings of 65 healthy participants (female=35) were analyzed regarding ADORA2A genotype effects on brain connectivity related to (1) interoceptive processing in terms of functional connectivity resting-state fMRI, and (2) exteroceptive processing using dynamic causal modeling in task-based fMRI. In a subsample, cardiac interoceptive accuracy was furthermore measured via the Mental Tracking Task. ADORA2A genotype was found to modulate a fronto-insular network at rest (interoceptive processing) and while performing an executive control task (exteroceptive processing). Across both modalities, the ADORA2A TT risk genotype was associated with increased connectivity between the insula and the prefrontal cortex. The strength in connectivity correlated with interoceptive accuracy. It is concluded that alterations in fronto-insular connectivity are modulated by both the adenosinergic system and interoceptive accuracy. Thus, fronto-insular connectivity in synopsis with ADORA2A genotypic information could serve as combined biomarkers for personalized treatment approaches in anxiety disorders targeting exteroceptive and interoceptive dysfunction.

  6. Resting-state network disruption and APOE genotype in Alzheimer's disease: a lagged functional connectivity study.

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    Leonides Canuet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The apolipoprotein E epsilon 4 (APOE-4 is associated with a genetic vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease (AD and with AD-related abnormalities in cortical rhythms. However, it is unclear whether APOE-4 is linked to a specific pattern of intrinsic functional disintegration of the brain after the development of the disease or during its different stages. This study aimed at identifying spatial patterns and effects of APOE genotype on resting-state oscillations and functional connectivity in patients with AD, using a physiological connectivity index called "lagged phase synchronization". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Resting EEG was recorded during awake, eyes-closed state in 125 patients with AD and 60 elderly controls. Source current density and functional connectivity were determined using eLORETA. Patients with AD exhibited reduced parieto-occipital alpha oscillations compared with controls, and those carrying the APOE-4 allele had reduced alpha activity in the left inferior parietal and temporo-occipital cortex relative to noncarriers. There was a decreased alpha2 connectivity pattern in AD, involving the left temporal and bilateral parietal cortex. Several brain regions exhibited increased lagged phase synchronization in low frequencies, specifically in the theta band, across and within hemispheres, where temporal lobe connections were particularly compromised. Areas with abnormal theta connectivity correlated with cognitive scores. In patients with early AD, we found an APOE-4-related decrease in interhemispheric alpha connectivity in frontal and parieto-temporal regions. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In addition to regional cortical dysfunction, as indicated by abnormal alpha oscillations, there are patterns of functional network disruption affecting theta and alpha bands in AD that associate with the level of cognitive disturbance or with the APOE genotype. These functional patterns of nonlinear connectivity may potentially

  7. Genotype and ancestry modulate brain's DAT availability in healthy humans.

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    Elena Shumay

    Full Text Available The dopamine transporter (DAT is a principal regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission and its gene (the SLC6A3 is a strong biological candidate gene for various behavioral- and neurological disorders. Intense investigation of the link between the SLC6A3 polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes yielded inconsistent and even contradictory results. Reliance on objective brain phenotype measures, for example, those afforded by brain imaging, might critically improve detection of DAT genotype-phenotype association. Here, we tested the relationship between the DAT brain availability and the SLC6A3 genotypes using an aggregate sample of 95 healthy participants of several imaging studies. These studies employed positron emission tomography (PET with [¹¹C]cocaine wherein the DAT availability was estimated as Bmax/Kd; while the genotype values were obtained on two repeat polymorphisms--3-UTR- and intron 8--VNTRs. The main findings are the following: 1 both polymorphisms analyzed as single genetic markers and in combination (haplotype modulate DAT density in midbrain; 2 ethnic background and age influence the strength of these associations; and 3 age-related changes in DAT availability differ in the 3-UTR and intron 8--genotype groups.

  8. Parkinsonian Rest Tremor Is Associated With Modulations of Subthalamic High-Frequency Oscillations.

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    Hirschmann, Jan; Butz, Markus; Hartmann, Christian J; Hoogenboom, Nienke; Özkurt, Tolga E; Vesper, Jan; Wojtecki, Lars; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2016-10-01

    High frequency oscillations (>200 Hz) have been observed in the basal ganglia of PD patients and were shown to be modulated by the administration of levodopa and voluntary movement. The objective of this study was to test whether the power of high-frequency oscillations in the STN is associated with spontaneous manifestation of parkinsonian rest tremor. The electromyogram of both forearms and local field potentials from the STN were recorded in 11 PD patients (10 men, age 58 [9.4] years, disease duration 9.2 [6.3] years). Patients were recorded at rest and while performing repetitive hand movements before and after levodopa intake. High-frequency oscillation power was compared across epochs containing rest tremor, tremor-free rest, or voluntary movement and related to the tremor cycle. We observed prominent slow (200-300 Hz) and fast (300-400 Hz) high-frequency oscillations. The ratio between slow and fast high-frequency oscillation power increased when tremor became manifest. This increase was consistent across nuclei (94%) and occurred in medication ON and OFF. The ratio outperformed other potential markers of tremor, such as power at individual tremor frequency, beta power, or low gamma power. For voluntary movement, we did not observe a significant difference when compared with rest or rest tremor. Finally, rhythmic modulations of high-frequency oscillation power occurred within the tremor cycle. Subthalamic high-frequency oscillation power is closely linked to the occurrence of parkinsonian rest tremor. The balance between slow and fast high-frequency oscillation power combines information on motor and medication state. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  9. Task-Rest Modulation of Basal Ganglia Connectivity in Mild to Moderate Parkinson’s Disease

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    Müller-Oehring, Eva M.; Sullivan, Edith V.; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Huang, Neng C.; Poston, Kathleen L.; Bronte-Stewart, Helen M.; Schulte, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is associated with abnormal synchronization in basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical loops. We tested whether early PD patients without demonstrable cognitive impairment exhibit abnormal modulation of functional connectivity at rest, while engaged in a task, or both. PD and healthy controls underwent two functional MRI scans: a resting-state scan and a Stroop Match-to-Sample task scan. Rest-task modulation of basal ganglia (BG) connectivity was tested using seed-to-voxel connectivity analysis with task and rest time series as conditions. Despite substantial overlap of BG–cortical connectivity patterns in both groups, connectivity differences between groups had clinical and behavioral correlates. During rest, stronger putamen–medial parietal and pallidum–occipital connectivity in PD than controls was associated with worse task performance and more severe PD symptoms suggesting that abnormalities in resting-state connectivity denote neural network dedifferentiation. During the executive task, PD patients showed weaker BG-cortical connectivity than controls, i.e., between caudate–supramarginal gyrus and pallidum–inferior prefrontal regions, that was related to more severe PD symptoms and worse task performance. Yet, task processing also evoked stronger striatal–cortical connectivity, specifically between caudate–prefrontal, caudate–precuneus, and putamen–motor/premotor regions in PD relative to controls, which was related to less severe PD symptoms and better performance on the Stroop task. Thus, stronger task-evoked striatal connectivity in PD demonstrated compensatory neural network enhancement to meet task demands and improve performance levels. fMRI-based network analysis revealed that despite resting-state BG network compromise in PD, BG connectivity to prefrontal, premotor, and precuneus regions can be adequately invoked during executive control demands enabling near normal task performance. PMID:25280970

  10. miR-29a modulates neuronal differentiation through targeting REST in mesenchymal stem cells.

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    Ping Duan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the modulation of microRNAs (miRNAs upon the neuronal differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs through targeting RE-1 Silencing Factor (REST, a mature neuronal gene suppressor in neuronal and un-neuronal cells. METHODS: Rat bone marrow derived-MSCs were induced into neuron-like cells (MSC-NCs by DMSO and BHA in vitro. The expression of neuron specific enolase (NSE, microtubule-associated protein tau (Tau, REST and its target genes, including synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25 and L1 cell adhesion molecular (L1CAM, were detected in MSCs and MSC-NCs. miRNA array analysis was conducted to screen for the upregulated miRNAs after neuronal differentiation. TargetScan was used to predict the relationship between these miRNAs and REST gene, and dual luciferase reporter assay was applied to validate it. Gain and loss of function experiments were used to study the role of miR-29a upon neuronal differentiation of MSCs. The knockdown of REST was conducted to show that miR-29a affected this process through targeting REST. RESULTS: MSCs were induced into neuron-like cells which presented neuronal cell shape and expressed NSE and Tau. The expression of REST declined and the expression of SNAP25 and L1CAM increased upon the neuronal differentiation of MSCs. Among 14 upregulated miRNAs, miR-29a was validated to target REST gene. During the neuronal differentiation of MSCs, miR-29a inhibition blocked the downregulation of REST, as well as the upregulation of SNAP25, L1CAM, NSE and Tau. REST knockdown rescued the effect of miR-29a inhibition on the expression of NSE and Tau. Meanwhile, miR-29a knockin significantly decreased the expression of REST and increased the expression of SNAP25 and L1CMA in MSCs, but did not significantly affect the expression of NSE and Tau. CONCLUSION: miR-29a regulates neurogenic markers through targeting REST in mesenchymal stem cells, which provides advances in neuronal differentiation research

  11. The Unity connecting module rests inside the payload bay of Endeavour

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    1998-01-01

    The Unity connecting module rests inside the payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. The first U.S. element of the International Space Station (ISS), Unity is scheduled for launch Dec. 3, 1998, on Mission STS-88. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time. The mission is expected to last nearly 12 days, landing back at the Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 14.

  12. Resting-state striato-frontal functional connectivity is sensitive to DAT1 genotype and predicts executive function.

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    Gordon, Evan M; Devaney, Joseph M; Bean, Stephanie; Vaidya, Chandan J

    2015-02-01

    Individual differences in striatal dopamine (DA) signaling have been associated both with individual differences in executive function in healthy individuals and with risk for psychiatric disorders defined by executive dysfunction. We used resting-state functional connectivity in 50 healthy adults to examine whether a polymorphism of the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1), which regulates striatal DA function, affects striatal functional connectivity in healthy adults, and whether that connectivity predicts executive function. We found that 9/10 heterozygotes, who are believed to have higher striatal DA signaling, demonstrated stronger connectivity between dorsal caudate (DC) and insular, dorsal anterior cingulate, and dorsolateral prefrontal regions, as well as between ventral striatum and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, than 10/10 homozygotes. Across subjects, stronger DC-seeded connectivity predicted superior N-back working memory performance, while stronger ventral striatum-seeded connectivity predicted reduced impulsivity in everyday life. Further, mediation analysis suggested that connectivity strength mediated relationships between DAT1 genotype and behavior. These findings suggest that resting-state striato-frontal connectivity may be an endophenotype for executive function in healthy individuals. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Effect of mild cognitive impairment and APOE genotype on resting cerebral blood flow and its association with cognition.

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    Wierenga, Christina E; Dev, Sheena I; Shin, David D; Clark, Lindsay R; Bangen, Katherine J; Jak, Amy J; Rissman, Robert A; Liu, Thomas T; Salmon, David P; Bondi, Mark W

    2012-08-01

    Using whole-brain pulsed arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging, resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured in 20 mild cognitive impairment (MCI; 11 ɛ3 and 9 ɛ4) and 40 demographically matched cognitively normal (CN; 27 ɛ3 and 13 ɛ4) participants. An interaction of apolipoprotein (APOE) genotype (ɛ3 and ɛ4) and cognitive status (CN and MCI) on quantified gray-matter CBF corrected for partial volume effects was found in the left parahippocampal and fusiform gyri (PHG/FG), right middle frontal gyrus, and left medial frontal gyrus. In the PHG/FG, CBF was elevated for CN ɛ4 carriers but decreased for MCI ɛ4 carriers. The opposite pattern was seen in frontal regions: CBF was decreased for CN ɛ4 carriers but increased for MCI ɛ4 carriers. Cerebral blood flow in the PHG/FG was positively correlated with verbal memory for CN ɛ4 adults (r=0.67, P=0.01). Cerebral blood flow in the left medial frontal gyrus was positively correlated with verbal memory for MCI ɛ4 adults (r=0.70, P=0.05). Findings support dynamic pathophysiologic processes in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease risk and indicate that cognitive status and APOE genotype have interactive effects on CBF. Correlations between CBF and verbal memory suggest a differential neurovascular compensatory response in posterior and anterior cortices with cognitive decline in ɛ4 adults.

  14. Characterizing Alzheimer's disease severity via resting-awake EEG amplitude modulation analysis.

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    Francisco J Fraga

    Full Text Available Changes in electroencephalography (EEG amplitude modulations have recently been linked with early-stage Alzheimer's disease (AD. Existing tools available to perform such analysis (e.g., detrended fluctuation analysis, however, provide limited gains in discriminability power over traditional spectral based EEG analysis. In this paper, we explore the use of an innovative EEG amplitude modulation analysis technique based on spectro-temporal signal processing. More specifically, full-band EEG signals are first decomposed into the five well-known frequency bands and the envelopes are then extracted via a Hilbert transform. Each of the five envelopes are further decomposed into four so-called modulation bands, which were chosen to coincide with the delta, theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. Experiments on a resting-awake EEG dataset collected from 76 participants (27 healthy controls, 27 diagnosed with mild-AD, and 22 with moderate-AD showed significant differences in amplitude modulations between the three groups. Most notably, i delta modulation of the beta frequency band disappeared with an increase in disease severity (from mild to moderate AD, ii delta modulation of the theta band appeared with an increase in severity, and iii delta modulation of the beta frequency band showed to be a reliable discriminant feature between healthy controls and mild-AD patients. Taken together, it is hoped that the developed tool can be used to assist clinicians not only with early detection of Alzheimer's disease, but also to monitor its progression.

  15. The Unity connecting module rests inside the payload bay of Endeavour

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    1998-01-01

    The Unity connecting module rests inside the open payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour at Launch Pad 39A. At the top of bay is the docking mechanism first used with launches to Mir, the Russian space station. Unity is the first U.S. element of the International Space Station (ISS) and is scheduled for launch Dec. 3, 1998, on Mission STS-88. The Unity is a connecting passageway to the living and working areas of ISS. While on orbit, the flight crew will deploy Unity from the payload bay and attach it to the Russian-built Zarya control module which will be in orbit at that time. The mission is expected to last nearly 12 days, landing back at the Kennedy Space Center on Dec. 14.

  16. The neurosteroids allopregnanolone and dehydroepiandrosterone modulate resting-state amygdala connectivity.

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    Sripada, Rebecca K; Welsh, Robert C; Marx, Christine E; Liberzon, Israel

    2014-07-01

    The neurosteroids allopregnanolone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are integral components of the stress response and exert positive modulatory effects on emotion in both human and animal studies. Although these antidepressant and anxiolytic effects have been well established, to date, little research has examined their neural correlates, and no research has been conducted into the effects of neurosteroids on large-scale networks at rest. To investigate the neurosteroid impact on intrinsic connectivity networks, participants were administered 400 mg of pregnenolone (N = 16), 400 mg of DHEA (N = 14), or placebo (N = 15) and underwent 3T fMRI. Resting-state brain connectivity was measured using amygdala as a seed region. When compared with placebo, pregnenolone administration reduced connectivity between amygdala and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex, between amygdala and precuneus, and between amygdala and hippocampus. DHEA reduced connectivity between amygdala and periamygdala and between amygdala and insula. Reductions in amygdala to precuneus connectivity were associated with less self-reported negative affect. These results demonstrate that neurosteroids modulate amygdala functional connectivity during resting state and may be a target for pharmacological intervention. Additionally, allopregnanolone and DHEA may shift the balance between salience network and default network, a finding that could provide insight into the neurocircuitry of anxiety psychopathology.

  17. The Neurosteroids Allopregnanolone and DHEA Modulate Resting-State Amygdala Connectivity

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    Sripada, Rebecca K.; Welsh, Robert C.; Marx, Christine E.; Liberzon, Israel

    2016-01-01

    The neurosteroids allopregnanolone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are integral components of the stress response and exert positive modulatory effects on emotion in both human and animal studies. Though these antidepressant and anxiolytic effects have been well established, little research to date has examined their neural correlates, and no research has been conducted into the effects of neurosteroids on large-scale networks at rest. To investigate the neurosteroid impact on intrinsic connectivity networks, participants were administered 400 mg of pregnenolone (N = 16), 400 mg of DHEA (N = 14), or placebo (N = 15) and underwent 3T fMRI. Resting-state brain connectivity was measured using amygdala as a seed region. Compared to placebo, pregnenolone administration reduced connectivity between amygdala and dmPFC, between amygdala and precuneus, and between amygdala and hippocampus. DHEA reduced connectivity between amygdala and peri-amygdala and between amygdala and insula. Reductions in amygdala to precuneus connectivity were associated with less self-reported negative affect. These results demonstrate that neurosteroids modulate amygdala functional connectivity during resting-state, and may be a target for pharmacological intervention. Additionally, allopregnanolone and DHEA may shift the balance between salience network and default network, a finding that could provide insight into the neurocircuitry of anxiety psychopathology. PMID:24302681

  18. Insulin modulation of magnetoencephalographic resting state dynamics in lean and obese subjects

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    Krunoslav T Stingl

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Lean and obese subjects can exhibit differences in neuronal activity during resting state and tasks. Changes in hormonal status and their action related to increased body weight may be the determining factor for these differences. One prime candidate is insulin, which until recently, was mainly related to its metabolic function for the transport and regulation of glucose in the periphery. However insulin also acts as an anorexic signal in the central nervous system (CNS contributing to the termination of food-intake in the postprandial state. In our study, we examined with whole head magnetoencephalography (MEG effect of intranasal insulin on the dynamics of the resting state network in a placebo controlled study. Weighted clustering coefficient C, which describes local interconnectedness, and weighted path length L, a measure of global interconnectedness, were computed. These parameters showed high intraindividual reliability. However, no difference for the network dynamics was found between lean and obese subjects in the basal state. The application of insulin led to subject specific changes and we found a statistically significant positive correlation between the insulin induced change in path length in the theta band (4-8 Hz and body mass index. The change in pathway length after insulin administration indicates a strong insulin modulation on global communication efficiency, which is probably related to the signaling between different regions involved in satiation and homeostatic control.

  19. Single pulse TMS-induced modulations of resting brain neurodynamics encoded in EEG phase.

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    Stamoulis, Catherine; Oberman, Lindsay M; Praeg, Elke; Bashir, Shahid; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2011-06-01

    Integration of electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) provides a useful framework for quantifying stimulation-induced modulations of neural dynamics. Amplitude and frequency modulations by different TMS protocols have been previously investigated, but the study of stimulation-induced effects on EEG phase has been more limited. We examined changes in resting brain dynamics following single TMS pulses, focusing on measures in the phase domain, to assess their sensitivity to stimulation effects. We observed a significant, approximately global increase in EEG relative phase following prolonged (>20 min) single-pulse TMS. In addition, we estimated higher rates of phase fluctuation from the slope of estimated phase curves, and higher numbers of phase resetting intervals following TMS over motor cortex, particularly in frontal and centro-parietal/parietal channels. Phase changes were only significantly different from their pre-TMS values at the end of the stimulation session, which suggests that prolonged single-pulse TMS may result in cumulative changes in neural activity reflected in the phase of the EEG. This is a novel result, as prior studies have reported only transient stimulation-related effects in the amplitude and frequency domains following single-pulse TMS.

  20. Pain Perception Can Be Modulated by Mindfulness Training: A Resting-state fMRI Study

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    I-Wen Su

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The multi-dimensional nature of pain renders difficult a holistic understanding of it. The conceptual framework of pain is said to be cognitive-evaluative, in addition to being sensory-discriminative and affective-motivational. To compare participants’ brain-behavior response before and after a six-week mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR training course on mindfulness in relation to pain modulation, three questionnaires (the Dallas Pain Questionnaire, Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire-SFMPQ, and Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness as well as resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI were administered to participants, divided into a pain-afflicted group (N=18 and a control group (N=16. Our results showed that the pain-afflicted group experienced significantly less pain after the mindfulness treatment than before, as measured by the SFMPQ. In conjunction, an increased connection from the anterior insular cortex (AIC to the dorsal anterior midcingulate cortex (daMCC was observed in the post-training pain-afflicted group and a significant correlation was found between AIC-daMCC connectivity and SFMPQ scores. The results suggest that mindfulness training can modulate the brain network dynamics underlying the subjective experience of pain.

  1. Pain Perception Can Be Modulated by Mindfulness Training: A Resting-State fMRI Study

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    Su, I-Wen; Wu, Fang-Wei; Liang, Keng-Chen; Cheng, Kai-Yuan; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang; Sun, Wei-Zen; Chou, Tai-Li

    2016-01-01

    The multi-dimensional nature of pain renders difficult a holistic understanding of it. The conceptual framework of pain is said to be cognitive-evaluative, in addition to being sensory-discriminative and affective-motivational. To compare participants’ brain-behavior response before and after a 6-week mindfulness-based stress reduction training course on mindfulness in relation to pain modulation, three questionnaires (the Dallas Pain Questionnaire, Short Form McGill Pain Questionnaire-SFMPQ, and Kentucky Inventory of Mindfulness) as well as resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging were administered to participants, divided into a pain-afflicted group (N = 18) and a control group (N = 16). Our results showed that the pain-afflicted group experienced significantly less pain after the mindfulness treatment than before, as measured by the SFMPQ. In conjunction, an increased connection from the anterior insular cortex (AIC) to the dorsal anterior midcingulate cortex (daMCC) was observed in the post-training pain-afflicted group and a significant correlation was found between AIC-daMCC connectivity and SFMPQ scores. The results suggest that mindfulness training can modulate the brain network dynamics underlying the subjective experience of pain. PMID:27891085

  2. Resting-state brain and the FTO obesity risk allele: default mode, sensorimotor and salience network connectivity underlying different somatosensory integration and reward processing between genotypes.

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    Gaia eOlivo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of the fat mass and obesity associated (FTO gene are linked to obesity, but how these SNPs influence resting-state neural activation is unknown. Few brain-imaging studies have investigated the influence of obesity-related SNPs on neural activity, and no study has investigated resting-state connectivity patterns. We tested connectivity within three, main resting-state networks: default mode (DMN, sensorimotor (SMN, and salience network (SN in thirty male participants, grouped based on genotype for the rs9939609 FTO SNP, as well as punishment and reward sensitivity measured by the Behavioral Inhibition (BIS and Behavioral Activation System (BAS questionnaires. Because obesity is associated with anomalies in both systems, we calculated a BIS/BAS ratio (BBr accounting for features of both scores. A prominence of BIS over BAS (higher BBr resulted in increased connectivity in frontal and paralimbic regions. These alterations were more evident in the obesity-associated AA genotype, where a high BBr was also associated with increased SN connectivity in dopaminergic circuitries, and in a subnetwork involved in somatosensory integration regarding food. Participants with AA genotype and high BBr, compared to corresponding participants in the TT genotype, also showed greater DMN connectivity in regions involved in the processing of food cues, and in the SMN for regions involved in visceral perception and reward-based learning. These findings suggest that neural connectivity patterns influence the sensitivity toward punishment and reward more closely in the AA carriers, predisposing them to developing obesity. Our work explains a complex interaction between genetics, neural patterns, and behavioral measures in determining the risk for obesity and may help develop individually-tailored strategies for obesity prevention.

  3. Serotonergic modulation of resting state default mode network connectivity in healthy women.

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    Helmbold, K; Zvyagintsev, M; Dahmen, B; Biskup, C S; Bubenzer-Busch, S; Gaber, T J; Klasen, M; Eisert, A; Konrad, K; Habel, U; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Zepf, F D

    2016-04-01

    The default mode network (DMN) plays a central role in intrinsic thought processes. Altered DMN connectivity has been linked to diminished cerebral serotonin synthesis. Diminished brain serotonin synthesis is further associated with a lack of impulse control and various psychiatric disorders. Here, we investigated the serotonergic modulation of intrinsic functional connectivity (FC) within the DMN in healthy adult females, controlling for the menstrual cycle phase. Eighteen healthy women in the follicular phase (aged 20-31 years) participated in a double-blind controlled cross-over study of serotonin depletion. Acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) and a balanced amino acid load (BAL), used as the control condition, were applied on two separate days of assessment. Neural resting state data using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and individual trait impulsivity scores were obtained. ATD compared with BAL significantly reduced FC with the DMN in the precuneus (associated with self-referential thinking) and enhanced FC with the DMN in the frontal cortex (associated with cognitive reasoning). Connectivity differences with the DMN between BAL and ATD in the precentral gyrus were significantly correlated with the magnitude of serotonin depletion. Right medial frontal gyrus and left superior frontal gyrus connectivity differences with the DMN were inversely correlated with trait impulsivity. These findings partially deviate from previous findings obtained in males and underline the importance of gender-specific studies and controlling for menstrual cycle to further elucidate the mechanism of ATD-induced changes within intrinsic thought processes.

  4. Genotype and ancestry modulate brain's DAT availability in healthy humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shumay, E.; Shumay, E.; Chen, J.; Fowler, J.S.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-08-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a principal regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission and its gene (the SLC6A3) is a strong biological candidate gene for various behavioral- and neurological disorders. Intense investigation of the link between the SLC6A3 polymorphisms and behavioral phenotypes yielded inconsistent and even contradictory results. Reliance on objective brain phenotype measures, for example, those afforded by brain imaging, might critically improve detection of DAT genotype-phenotype association. Here, we tested the relationship between the DAT brain availability and the SLC6A3 genotypes using an aggregate sample of 95 healthy participants of several imaging studies. These studies employed positron emission tomography (PET) with [{sup 11}C] cocaine wherein the DAT availability was estimated as Bmax/Kd; while the genotype values were obtained on two repeat polymorphisms - 3-UTR- and intron 8- VNTRs. The main findings are the following: (1) both polymorphisms analyzed as single genetic markers and in combination (haplotype) modulate DAT density in midbrain; (2) ethnic background and age influence the strength of these associations; and (3) age-related changes in DAT availability differ in the 3-UTR and intron8 - genotype groups.

  5. Arterial CO2 Fluctuations Modulate Neuronal Rhythmicity: Implications for MEG and fMRI Studies of Resting-State Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Joseph R.; Bright, Molly G.; Muthukumaraswamy, Suresh D.; Murphy, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    A fast emerging technique for studying human resting state networks (RSNs) is based on spontaneous temporal fluctuations in neuronal oscillatory power, as measured by magnetoencephalography. However, it has been demonstrated recently that this power is sensitive to modulations in arterial CO2 concentration. Arterial CO2 can be modulated by natural fluctuations in breathing pattern, as might typically occur during the acquisition of an RSN experiment. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the fine-scale dependence of neuronal oscillatory power on arterial CO2 concentration, showing that reductions in alpha, beta, and gamma power are observed with even very mild levels of hypercapnia (increased arterial CO2). We use a graded hypercapnia paradigm and participant feedback to rule out a sensory cause, suggesting a predominantly physiological origin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that natural fluctuations in arterial CO2, without administration of inspired CO2, are of a sufficient level to influence neuronal oscillatory power significantly in the delta-, alpha-, beta-, and gamma-frequency bands. A more thorough understanding of the relationship between physiological factors and cortical rhythmicity is required. In light of these findings, existing results, paradigms, and analysis techniques for the study of resting-state brain data should be revisited. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we show for the first time that neuronal oscillatory power is intimately linked to arterial CO2 concentration down to the fine-scale modulations that occur during spontaneous breathing. We extend these results to demonstrate a correlation between neuronal oscillatory power and spontaneous arterial CO2 fluctuations in awake humans at rest. This work identifies a need for studies investigating resting-state networks in the human brain to measure and account for the impact of spontaneous changes in arterial CO2 on the neuronal signals of interest. Changes in breathing pattern that are

  6. Morphological brain plasticity induced by musical expertise is accompanied by modulation of functional connectivity at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvel, Baptiste; Groussard, Mathilde; Chételat, Gaël; Fouquet, Marine; Landeau, Brigitte; Eustache, Francis; Desgranges, Béatrice; Platel, Hervé

    2014-04-15

    The aim of this study was to explore whether musical practice-related gray matter increases in brain regions are accompanied by modifications in their resting-state functional connectivity. 16 young musically experienced adults and 17 matched nonmusicians underwent an anatomical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI). A whole-brain two-sample t test run on the T1-weighted structural images revealed four clusters exhibiting significant increases in gray matter (GM) volume in the musician group, located within the right posterior and middle cingulate gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus and right inferior orbitofrontal gyrus. Each cluster was used as a seed region to generate and compare whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity maps. The two clusters within the cingulate gyrus exhibited greater connectivity for musicians with the right prefrontal cortex and left temporal pole, which play a role in autobiographical and semantic memory, respectively. The cluster in the left superior temporal gyrus displayed enhanced connectivity with several language-related areas (e.g., left premotor cortex, bilateral supramarginal gyri). Finally, the cluster in the right inferior frontal gyrus displayed more synchronous activity at rest with claustrum, areas thought to play a role in binding sensory and motor information. We interpreted these findings as the consequence of repeated collaborative use in general networks supporting some of the memory, perceptual-motor and emotional features of musical practice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Negative mood-induction modulates default mode network resting-state functional connectivity in chronic depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renner, F.; Siep, N.; Arntz, A.; van de Ven, V.; Peeters, F.P.M.L.; Quaedflieg, C.W.E.M.; Huibers, M.J.H.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of sad mood on default mode network (DMN) resting-state connectivity in persons with chronic major depressive disorder (cMDD). METHODS: Participants with a diagnosis of cMDD (n=18) and age, gender and education level matched

  8. DLEC1 Expression Is Modulated by Epigenetic Modifications in Hepatocelluar Carcinoma Cells: Role of HBx Genotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Dandan; Feng, Huixing; Chen, Wei Ning, E-mail: WNChen@ntu.edu.sg [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2010-09-16

    Deleted in Lung and Esophageal Cancer 1 (DLEC1) is a functional tumor suppressor gene (TSG). It has been found to be silenced in a variety of human cancers including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The silencing of DLEC1 can be modulated by epigenetic modifications, such as DNA hypermethylation and histone hypoacetylation. In the case of HCC, hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) has been implicated in methylation of target promoters resulting in the down-regulation of tumor suppressor genes, which in turn contributes to the development of HCC. In the present study, we first established a cell system in which epigenetic modifications can be modulated using inhibitors of either DNA methylation or histone deacetylation. The cell system was used to reveal that the expression of DLEC1 was upregulated by HBx in a genotype-dependent manner. In particular, HBx genotype A was found to decrease DNA methylation of the DLEC1 promoter. Our results have provided new insights on the impact of HBx in HCC development by epigenetic modifications.

  9. Modulation of brain resting-state networks by sad mood induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben J Harrison

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is growing interest in the nature of slow variations of the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal observed in functional MRI resting-state studies. In humans, these slow BOLD variations are thought to reflect an underlying or intrinsic form of brain functional connectivity in discrete neuroanatomical systems. While these 'resting-state networks' may be relatively enduring phenomena, other evidence suggest that dynamic changes in their functional connectivity may also emerge depending on the brain state of subjects during scanning. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we examined healthy subjects (n = 24 with a mood induction paradigm during two continuous fMRI recordings to assess the effects of a change in self-generated mood state (neutral to sad on the functional connectivity of these resting-state networks (n = 24. Using independent component analysis, we identified five networks that were common to both experimental states, each showing dominant signal fluctuations in the very low frequency domain (approximately 0.04 Hz. Between the two states, we observed apparent increases and decreases in the overall functional connectivity of these networks. Primary findings included increased connectivity strength of a paralimbic network involving the dorsal anterior cingulate and anterior insula cortices with subjects' increasing sadness and decreased functional connectivity of the 'default mode network'. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings support recent studies that suggest the functional connectivity of certain resting-state networks may, in part, reflect a dynamic image of the current brain state. In our study, this was linked to changes in subjective mood.

  10. Inspiratory loading and limb blood flow in COPD: The modulating effects of resting lung hyperinflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berton, Danilo C; de Castro, Marina A; Merola, Pietro; Benedetto, Igor; Castilho, Mariah; Vieira, Paulo J C; Knorst, Marli M; Neder, J Alberto

    2016-07-01

    Inspiratory resistive loading (IRL) may have deleterious cardiocirculatory effects leading to poor peripheral perfusion in severely-hyperinflated patients with COPD. Nineteen patients (13 severely-hyperinflated with inspiratory capacity/total lung capacity ratio≤0.28) underwent calf blood flow (CBF) measurements by venous occlusion plethysmography at rest and during IRL at 60% maximal inspiratory pressure. Severely-hyperinflated patients had lower resting CBF and greater calf vascular resistance (CVR) than moderately-hyperinflated patients (phyperinflated patients had markedly reduced CBF (p=0.01). Opposite to our main hypothesis, however, IRL did not further reduce CBF in these patients (p>0.05). Conversely, it significantly decreased CBF and increased CVR in moderately-hyperinflated patients; in fact, end-trial CBF and CVR did not differ between the groups (p>0.05). In conclusion, marked impairments in resting appendicular blood flow in severely-hyperinflated patients with COPD were seen only after acute IRL in less hyperinflated patients. These findings set the stage for studies investigating the effects of lung deflation on peripheral hemodynamics in patients with severe hyperinflation.

  11. Self-regulation of circumscribed brain activity modulates spatially selective and frequency specific connectivity of distributed resting state networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias eVukelić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of learning involved in brain self-regulation have still to be unveiled to exploit the full potential of this methodology for therapeutic interventions. This skill of volitionally changing brain activity presumably resembles motor skill learning which in turn is accompanied by plastic changes modulating resting state networks. Along these lines, we hypothesized that brain regulation and neurofeedback would similarly modify intrinsic networks at rest while presenting a distinct spatio-temporal pattern. High-resolution EEG preceded and followed a single neurofeedback training intervention of modulating circumscribed sensorimotor low β -activity by motor imagery in eleven healthy participants. They were kept in the deliberative phase of skill acquisition with high demands for learning self-regulation through stepwise increases of task difficulty. By applying the corrected imaginary part of the coherency function, we observed increased functional connectivity of both the primary motor and the primary somatosensory cortex with their respective contralateral homologous cortices in the low β-frequency band which was self-regulated during feedback. At the same time, the primary motor cortex - but none of the surrounding cortical areas - showed connectivity to contralateral supplementary motor and dorsal premotor areas in the high β-band. Simultaneously, the neurofeedback target displayed a specific increase of functional connectivity with an ipsilateral fronto-parietal network in the α-band while presenting a de-coupling with contralateral primary and secondary sensorimotor areas in the very same frequency band.Brain self-regulating modifies resting state connections spatially selective to the neurofeedback target of the dominant hemisphere. These are anatomically distinct with regard to the cortico-cortical connectivity pattern and are functionally specific with regard to the time domain of coherent activity consistent with a Hebbian

  12. Long-term meditation training induced changes in the operational synchrony of default mode network modules during a resting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingelkurts, Andrew A; Fingelkurts, Alexander A; Kallio-Tamminen, Tarja

    2016-02-01

    Using theoretical analysis of self-consciousness concept and experimental evidence on the brain default mode network (DMN) that constitutes the neural signature of self-referential processes, we hypothesized that the anterior and posterior subnets comprising the DMN should show differences in their integrity as a function of meditation training. Functional connectivity within DMN and its subnets (measured by operational synchrony) has been measured in ten novice meditators using an electroencephalogram (EEG) recording in a pre-/post-meditation intervention design. We have found that while the whole DMN was clearly suppressed, different subnets of DMN responded differently after 4 months of meditation training: The strength of EEG operational synchrony in the right and left posterior modules of the DMN decreased in resting post-meditation condition compared to a pre-meditation condition, whereas the frontal DMN module on the contrary exhibited an increase in the strength of EEG operational synchrony. These findings combined with published data on functional-anatomic heterogeneity within the DMN and on trait subjective experiences commonly found following meditation allow us to propose that the first-person perspective and the sense of agency (the witnessing observer) are presented by the frontal DMN module, while the posterior modules of the DMN are generally responsible for the experience of the continuity of 'I' as embodied and localized within bodily space. Significance of these findings is discussed.

  13. Music therapy modulates fronto-temporal activity in rest-EEG in depressed clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fachner, Jörg; Gold, Christian; Erkkilä, Jaakko

    2013-04-01

    Fronto-temporal areas process shared elements of speech and music. Improvisational psychodynamic music therapy (MT) utilizes verbal and musical reflection on emotions and images arising from clinical improvisation. Music listening is shifting frontal alpha asymmetries (FAA) in depression, and increases frontal midline theta (FMT). In a two-armed randomized controlled trial (RCT) with 79 depressed clients (with comorbid anxiety), we compared standard care (SC) versus MT added to SC at intake and after 3 months. We found that MT significantly reduced depression and anxiety symptoms. The purpose of this study is to test whether or not MT has an impact on anterior fronto-temporal resting state alpha and theta oscillations. Correlations between anterior EEG, Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety Subscale (HADS-A), power spectral analysis (topography, means, asymmetry) and normative EEG database comparisons were explored. After 3 month of MT, lasting changes in resting EEG were observed, i.e., significant absolute power increases at left fronto-temporal alpha, but most distinct for theta (also at left fronto-central and right temporoparietal leads). MT differed to SC at F7-F8 (z scored FAA, p effects on cortical activity in depression, suggesting an impact of MT on anxiety reduction.

  14. Impact of Diabetes Type 1 in Children on Autonomic Modulation at Rest and in Response to the Active Orthostatic Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacon, Thais Roque; Vanderlei, Franciele Marques; Christofaro, Diego Giulliano Destro; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus type 1 (DM1), of which one of the first subclinical manifestations is changes in heart rate variability (HRV). Thus, analysis of HRV associated with the autonomic active orthostatic test is important in this population. Objectives To analyze the autonomic modulation responses induced by the implementation of the active orthostatic test, in children with DM1, and study the autonomic modulation by means of HRV indices. Method Data of 35 children were analyzed, of both sexes, aged between 7 and 15 years, who were divided into two groups: Diabetic (n = 16) and Control (n = 19). The following variables were collected initially: weight, height, body fat percentage, heart rate, blood pressure and casual blood glucose. Subsequently, for analysis of autonomic modulation, the beat-to-beat heart rate was captured by a heart rate monitor in the supine position for 30 minutes and after 10 minutes standing during performance of the active orthostatic test. HRV indices were calculated in the time and frequency domains. For data analysis, covariance analysis was used to compare groups and ANOVA for repeated measures to compare the effects of the active orthostatic test. These data were adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, body fat percentage and casual blood glucose, with a 5% significance level. Results The results suggested that diabetic children at rest present a decrease in SDNN (50.4 vs. 75.2), rMSSD (38.7 vs 57.6) and LF [ms2] (693.6 vs 1874.6). During the active orthostatic test the children in both groups demonstrated a reduction in SDNN, RMSSD and LF [ms2] compared to the resting position, and this response was less pronounced in the diabetic group. Conclusion We conclude that regardless of age, sex, ethnicity, body fat percentage and casual blood glucose, performing the active orthostatic test promoted increased sympathetic modulation and reduced parasympathetic

  15. Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswal, Ashwini; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Litvak, Vladimir; Brown, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Chronic dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease leads to progressive motor and cognitive impairment, which is associated with the emergence of characteristic patterns of synchronous oscillatory activity within cortico-basal-ganglia circuits. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an effective treatment for Parkinson's disease, but its influence on synchronous activity in cortico-basal-ganglia loops remains to be fully characterized. Here, we demonstrate that deep brain stimulation selectively suppresses certain spatially and spectrally segregated resting state subthalamic nucleus-cortical networks. To this end we used a validated and novel approach for performing simultaneous recordings of the subthalamic nucleus and cortex using magnetoencephalography (during concurrent subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation). Our results highlight that clinically effective subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation suppresses synchrony locally within the subthalamic nucleus in the low beta oscillatory range and furthermore that the degree of this suppression correlates with clinical motor improvement. Moreover, deep brain stimulation relatively selectively suppressed synchronization of activity between the subthalamic nucleus and mesial premotor regions, including the supplementary motor areas. These mesial premotor regions were predominantly coupled to the subthalamic nucleus in the high beta frequency range, but the degree of deep brain stimulation-associated suppression in their coupling to the subthalamic nucleus was not found to correlate with motor improvement. Beta band coupling between the subthalamic nucleus and lateral motor areas was not influenced by deep brain stimulation. Motor cortical coupling with subthalamic nucleus predominantly involved driving of the subthalamic nucleus, with those drives in the higher beta frequency band having much shorter net delays to subthalamic nucleus than those in the lower beta band. These observations raise the

  16. Blood pressure and cardiac autonomic modulation at rest, during exercise and recovery time in the young overweight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Alves de Araújo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to assess the blood pressure (BP, cardiac autonomic modulation at rest, in physical exercise and in the recovery in untrained eutrophic (E and overweight (O youth. The body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, systolic BP-SBP (E: 109.80 ± 10.05; O: 121.85 ± 6.98 mmHg and diastolic BP - DBP (E: 65.90 ± 7.28; O: 73.14 ± 12.22 mmHg were higher in overweight and the heart rate recovery (%HRR was lower as compared with E volunteers. The BMI was associated with SBP (r= 0.54, DBP (r= 0.65, load on the heart rate variability threshold - HRVT (r= -0.46, %HRR 2' (r= -0.48 and %HRR 5' (r= -0.48, and WC was associated with SBP (r= 0.54, DBP (r= 0.64 and HRR 2' (r= -0.49. The %HRR was associated to SBP, DBP and HRVT. In summary, the anthropometric variables, BP and cardiac autonomic modulation in the recovery are altered in overweight youth.

  17. Reduced fractional anisotropy of corpus callosum modulates inter-hemispheric resting state functional connectivity in migraine patients without aura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai; Qin, Wei; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Ling; Yu, Dahua; Zhao, Limei; Dong, Minghao; Liu, Jixin; Yang, Xuejuan; von Deneen, Karen M; Liang, Fanrong; Tian, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study revealed reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) values in the corpus callosum (CC) in migraine patients without aura. Abnormalities in white matter integrity, particularly in the CC, may affect inter-hemispheric resting state functional connectivity (RSFC). Unfortunately, relatively little is known about the alterations in functional interactions between the cerebral hemispheres during resting state in migraine patients without aura, and even less about how the inter-hemispheric RSFC are affected by the abnormalities of the CC. Twenty-one migraine patients without aura and 21 healthy controls participated in this study, age-, sex-, and education-matched. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) was employed to investigate the white matter alterations of the CC. Meanwhile, voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) was used to compare the inter-hemispheric RSFC differences between the patients and controls. TBSS analysis revealed reduced FA values in the genu and the splenium of CC in patient group. VMHC analysis showed decreased inter-hemispheric RSFC of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in migraine patients without aura relative to that of the controls. Furthermore, in migraine patients without aura, the reduced FA values of the genu of CC correlated with the decreased inter-hemispheric RSFC of the ACC. Our findings demonstrated that the migraine patients without aura showed reduced FA values of the genu of CC and decreased inter-hemispheric RSFC of the ACC. The correlation between the above structural and functional changes suggested that the reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) of CC modulates inter-hemispheric VMHC in migraine patients without aura. Our results demonstrated that the VMHC alterations of ACC can reflect the FA changes of the genu of CC in migraine patients without aura.

  18. Serotonin transporter genotype modulates the association between depressive symptoms and amygdala activity among psychiatrically healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillihan, Seth J; Rao, Hengyi; Brennan, Lauretta; Wang, Danny J J; Detre, John A; Sankoorikal, Geena Mary V; Brodkin, Edward S; Farah, Martha J

    2011-09-30

    Recent attempts to understand the biological bases of depression vulnerability have revealed that both the short allele of the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) and activity in the amygdala are associated with depression. Other studies have reported amygdala hyperactivity associated with the 5-HTTLPR short allele, linking the genetic and neuroimaging lines of research and suggesting a mechanism whereby the short allele confers depression risk. However, fewer investigations have examined the associations among depression, 5-HTTLPR variability, and amygdala activation in a single study. The current study thus investigated whether 5-HTTLPR genotype modulates the association between depressive symptoms and amygdala activity among psychiatrically healthy adults. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured with perfusion fMRI during a task-free scan. We hypothesized differential associations between depressive symptoms and amygdala activity among individuals homozygous for the short allele and individuals homozygous for the long allele. Both whole brain analyses and region-of-interest analyses confirmed this prediction, revealing a significant negative association among the long allele group and a trend of positive association among the short allele group. These results complement existing reports of short allele related amygdala hyperactivity and suggest an additional neurobiological mechanism whereby the 5-HTTLPR is associated with psychiatric outcomes.

  19. Aerobic fitness modulates the association between APOE genotypes and serum lipemia in adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fátima Glaner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the association between APOE alleles and serum lipemia in adolescents with low and adequate aerobic fitness. The sample was comprised of 105 boys and 151 girls (49% and 46% from rural area of European ancestry, aged 11 to 17 years, and classified according to: 1 APOE genotype: group ε2 (ε2/3+ε2/2, ε3 (ε3/3, and ε4 (ε3/4+ε4/4; 2 aerobic fitness: adequate or low; 3 serum lipemia: elevated total cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL and triglycerides, and low high-density lipoprotein (HDL. The results showed that aerobic fitness modulates the association between APOE alleles and serum lipemia in adolescents, suggesting that adequate aerobic fitness levels exert a greater effect of reducing TC and LDL in ε2 carriers, as well as of increasing HDL and reducing triglycerides in ε3 and ε4 carriers.

  20. Expertise modulates local regional homogeneity of spontaneous brain activity in the resting brain: an fMRI study using the model of skilled acupuncturists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Minghao; Qin, Wei; Zhao, Ling; Yang, Xuejuan; Yuan, Kai; Zeng, Fang; Sun, Jinbo; Yu, Dahua; von Deneen, Karen M; Liang, Fanrong; Tian, Jie

    2014-03-01

    Studies on training/expertise-related effects on human brain in context of neuroplasticity have revealed that plastic changes modulate not only task activations but also patterns and strength of internetworks and intranetworks functional connectivity in the resting state. Much has known about plastic changes in resting state on global level; however, how training/expertise-related effect affects patterns of local spontaneous activity in resting brain remains elusive. We investigated the homogeneity of local blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations in the resting state using a regional homogeneity (ReHo) analysis among 16 acupuncturists and 16 matched nonacupuncturists (NA). To prove acupuncturists' expertise, we used a series of psychophysical tests. Our results demonstrated that, acupuncturists significantly outperformed NA in tactile-motor and emotional regulation domain and the acupuncturist group showed increased coherence in local BOLD signal fluctuations in the left primary motor cortex (MI), the left primary somatosensory cortex (SI) and the left ventral medial prefrontal cortex/orbitofrontal cortex (VMPFC/OFC). Regression analysis displayed that, in the acupuncturists group, ReHo of VMPFC/OFC could predict behavioral outcomes, evidenced by negative correlation between unpleasantness ratings and ReHo of VMPFC/OFC and ReHo of SI and MI positively correlated with the duration of acupuncture practice. We suggest that expertise could modulate patterns of local resting state activity by increasing regional clustering strength, which is likely to contribute to advanced local information processing efficiency. Our study completes the understanding of neuroplasticity changes by adding the evidence of local resting state activity alterations, which is helpful for elucidating in what manner training effect extends beyond resting state.

  1. Base excision repair pathway: PARP1 genotypes as modulators of therapy response in cervical cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Augusto; Assis, Joana; Faustino, Ilda; Pereira, Deolinda; Catarino, Raquel; Medeiros, Rui

    2017-02-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in genes of the base excision repair (BER) pathway appear to modulate the therapy response of cancer patients. PARP1 protein recognizes the DNA strand damage and facilitates the subsequent recruitment of BER proteins. Few studies have reported an association between PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism (rs1136410) and cancer therapy response. The purpose of our study was to determine whether PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism have prognostic value in patients with cervical cancer. Two hundred and sixty adult patients, with histologically confirmed cervical cancer, at FIGO-stages IB2-IVA, primarily treated with concurrent chemotherapy (cisplatin) and radiotherapy. Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were the primary end points of the analysis. The PARP1 Val762Ala genetic variants were analyzed by allelic discrimination by real-time PCR. We observed that peri- and postmenopausal women carrying the C-allele present a statistically significant lower OS and DFS (log-rank test, p = 0.008 and p = 0.006, respectively) among those with early stage cervical cancer. Cox regression analysis confirmed these results, after adjustment for other prognostic factors (for OS: HR, 3.70; 95%CI, 1.32-10.38; p = 0.013 and for DFS: HR, 3.97; 95%CI, 1.59-9.93; p = 0.003). This is the first study evaluating the effect of PARP1 Val762Ala polymorphism in treatment response in cervical cancer patients. PARP1 genotypes may contribute as an independent prognostic factor in cervical cancer, being useful in predicting the clinical outcome.

  2. Increased resting intracellular calcium modulates NF-κB-dependent inducible nitric-oxide synthase gene expression in dystrophic mdx skeletal myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamirano, Francisco; López, Jose R; Henríquez, Carlos; Molinski, Tadeusz; Allen, Paul D; Jaimovich, Enrique

    2012-06-15

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a genetic disorder caused by dystrophin mutations, characterized by chronic inflammation and severe muscle wasting. Dystrophic muscles exhibit activated immune cell infiltrates, up-regulated inflammatory gene expression, and increased NF-κB activity, but the contribution of the skeletal muscle cell to this process has been unclear. The aim of this work was to study the pathways that contribute to the increased resting calcium ([Ca(2+)](rest)) observed in mdx myotubes and its possible link with up-regulation of NF-κB and pro-inflammatory gene expression in dystrophic muscle cells. [Ca(2+)](rest) was higher in mdx than in WT myotubes (308 ± 6 versus 113 ± 2 nm, p < 0.001). In mdx myotubes, both the inhibition of Ca(2+) entry (low Ca(2+) solution, Ca(2+)-free solution, and Gd(3+)) and blockade of either ryanodine receptors or inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors reduced [Ca(2+)](rest). Basal activity of NF-κB was significantly up-regulated in mdx versus WT myotubes. There was an increased transcriptional activity and p65 nuclear localization, which could be reversed when [Ca(2+)](rest) was reduced. Levels of mRNA for TNFα, IL-1β, and IL-6 were similar in WT and mdx myotubes, whereas inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) expression was increased 5-fold. Reducing [Ca(2+)](rest) using different strategies reduced iNOS gene expression presumably as a result of decreased activation of NF-κB. We propose that NF-κB, modulated by increased [Ca(2+)](rest), is constitutively active in mdx myotubes, and this mechanism can account for iNOS overexpression and the increase in reactive nitrogen species that promote damage in dystrophic skeletal muscle cells.

  3. ADRA2B genotype differentially modulates stress-induced neural activity in the amygdala and hippocampus during emotional memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shijia; Weerda, Riklef; Milde, Christopher; Wolf, Oliver T; Thiel, Christiane M

    2015-02-01

    Noradrenaline interacts with stress hormones in the amygdala and hippocampus to enhance emotional memory consolidation, but the noradrenergic-glucocorticoid interaction at retrieval, where stress impairs memory, is less understood. We used a genetic neuroimaging approach to investigate whether a genetic variation of the noradrenergic system impacts stress-induced neural activity in amygdala and hippocampus during recognition of emotional memory. This study is based on genotype-dependent reanalysis of data from our previous publication (Li et al. Brain Imaging Behav 2014). Twenty-two healthy male volunteers were genotyped for the ADRA2B gene encoding the α2B-adrenergic receptor. Ten deletion carriers and 12 noncarriers performed an emotional face recognition task, while their brain activity was measured with fMRI. During encoding, 50 fearful and 50 neutral faces were presented. One hour later, they underwent either an acute stress (Trier Social Stress Test) or a control procedure which was followed immediately by the retrieval session, where participants had to discriminate between 100 old and 50 new faces. A genotype-dependent modulation of neural activity at retrieval was found in the bilateral amygdala and right hippocampus. Deletion carriers showed decreased neural activity in the amygdala when recognizing emotional faces in control condition and increased amygdala activity under stress. Noncarriers showed no differences in emotional modulated amygdala activation under stress or control. Instead, stress-induced increases during recognition of emotional faces were present in the right hippocampus. The genotype-dependent effects of acute stress on neural activity in amygdala and hippocampus provide evidence for noradrenergic-glucocorticoid interaction in emotional memory retrieval.

  4. Suppression of Foxo1 activity and down-modulation of CD62L (L-selectin) in HIV-1 infected resting CD4 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinité, Benjamin; Chan, Chi N; Lee, Caroline S; Mahajan, Saurabh; Luo, Yang; Muesing, Mark A; Folkvord, Joy M; Pham, Michael; Connick, Elizabeth; Levy, David N

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 hijacks and disrupts many processes in the cells it infects in order to suppress antiviral immunity and to facilitate its replication. Resting CD4 T cells are important early targets of HIV-1 infection in which HIV-1 must overcome intrinsic barriers to viral replication. Although resting CD4 T cells are refractory to infection in vitro, local environmental factors within lymphoid and mucosal tissues such as cytokines facilitate viral replication while maintaining the resting state. These factors can be utilized in vitro to study HIV-1 replication in resting CD4 T cells. In vivo, the migration of resting naïve and central memory T cells into lymphoid tissues is dependent upon expression of CD62L (L-selectin), a receptor that is subsequently down-modulated following T cell activation. CD62L gene transcription is maintained in resting T cells by Foxo1 and KLF2, transcription factors that maintain T cell quiescence and which regulate additional cellular processes including survival, migration, and differentiation. Here we report that HIV-1 down-modulates CD62L in productively infected naïve and memory resting CD4 T cells while suppressing Foxo1 activity and the expression of KLF2 mRNA. Partial T cell activation was further evident as an increase in CD69 expression. Several other Foxo1- and KLF2-regulated mRNA were increased or decreased in productively infected CD4 T cells, including IL-7rα, Myc, CCR5, Fam65b, S1P1 (EDG1), CD52, Cyclin D2 and p21CIP1, indicating a profound reprogramming of these cells. The Foxo1 inhibitor AS1842856 accelerated de novo viral gene expression and the sequella of infection, supporting the notion that HIV-1 suppression of Foxo1 activity may be a strategy to promote replication in resting CD4 T cells. As Foxo1 is an investigative cancer therapy target, the development of Foxo1 interventions may assist the quest to specifically suppress or activate HIV-1 replication in vivo.

  5. Suppression of Foxo1 activity and down-modulation of CD62L (L-selectin in HIV-1 infected resting CD4 T cells.

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    Benjamin Trinité

    Full Text Available HIV-1 hijacks and disrupts many processes in the cells it infects in order to suppress antiviral immunity and to facilitate its replication. Resting CD4 T cells are important early targets of HIV-1 infection in which HIV-1 must overcome intrinsic barriers to viral replication. Although resting CD4 T cells are refractory to infection in vitro, local environmental factors within lymphoid and mucosal tissues such as cytokines facilitate viral replication while maintaining the resting state. These factors can be utilized in vitro to study HIV-1 replication in resting CD4 T cells. In vivo, the migration of resting naïve and central memory T cells into lymphoid tissues is dependent upon expression of CD62L (L-selectin, a receptor that is subsequently down-modulated following T cell activation. CD62L gene transcription is maintained in resting T cells by Foxo1 and KLF2, transcription factors that maintain T cell quiescence and which regulate additional cellular processes including survival, migration, and differentiation. Here we report that HIV-1 down-modulates CD62L in productively infected naïve and memory resting CD4 T cells while suppressing Foxo1 activity and the expression of KLF2 mRNA. Partial T cell activation was further evident as an increase in CD69 expression. Several other Foxo1- and KLF2-regulated mRNA were increased or decreased in productively infected CD4 T cells, including IL-7rα, Myc, CCR5, Fam65b, S1P1 (EDG1, CD52, Cyclin D2 and p21CIP1, indicating a profound reprogramming of these cells. The Foxo1 inhibitor AS1842856 accelerated de novo viral gene expression and the sequella of infection, supporting the notion that HIV-1 suppression of Foxo1 activity may be a strategy to promote replication in resting CD4 T cells. As Foxo1 is an investigative cancer therapy target, the development of Foxo1 interventions may assist the quest to specifically suppress or activate HIV-1 replication in vivo.

  6. Intermittent θ burst stimulation modulates resting-state functional connectivity in the attention network and promotes behavioral recovery in patients with visual spatial neglect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Fu, Wei; Zhang, Yanming; Huo, Su; Du, JuBao; Zhu, Lin; Song, Weiqun

    2016-12-07

    Functional connectivity changes in the attention network are viewed as a physiological signature of visual spatial neglect (VSN). The left dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex (LDLPFC) is known to initiate and monitor top-down attentional control and dynamically adjust behavioral performance. This study aimed to investigate whether increasing the activity of the LDLPFC through intermittent θ burst stimulation (iTBS) could modulate the resting-state functional connectivity in the attention network and facilitate recovery from VSN. Patients with right hemisphere stroke and VSN were randomly assigned to two groups matched for clinical characteristics and given a 10-day treatment. On each day, all patients underwent visual scanning training and motor function training and received iTBS over the LDLPFC either at 80% resting motor threshold (RMT) or at 40% RMT before the trainings. MRI, the line bisection test, and the star cancelation test were performed before and after treatment. Patients who received iTBS at 80% RMT showed a large-scale reduction in the resting-state functional connectivity extent, largely in the right attention network, and more significant improvement of behavioral performance compared with patients who received iTBS at 40% RMT. These results support that the LDLPFC potentially plays a key role in the modulation of attention networks in neglect. Increasing the activity of the LDPLPFC through iTBS can facilitate recovery from VSN in patients with stroke.

  7. Understanding Factors That Modulate the Establishment of HIV Latency in Resting CD4+ T-Cells In Vitro.

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    Jenny L Anderson

    Full Text Available Developing robust in vitro models of HIV latency is needed to better understand how latency is established, maintained and reversed. In this study, we examined the effects of donor variability, HIV titre and co-receptor usage on establishing HIV latency in vitro using two models of HIV latency. Using the CCL19 model of HIV latency, we found that in up to 50% of donors, CCL19 enhanced latent infection of resting CD4+ T-cells by CXCR4-tropic HIV in the presence of low dose IL-2. Increasing the infectious titre of CXCR4-tropic HIV increased both productive and latent infection of resting CD4+ T-cells. In a different model where myeloid dendritic cells (mDC were co-cultured with resting CD4+ T-cells, we observed a higher frequency of latently infected cells in vitro than CCL19-treated or unstimulated CD4+ T-cells in the presence of low dose IL-2. In the DC-T-cell model, latency was established with both CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic virus but higher titres of CCR5-tropic virus was required in most donors. The establishment of latency in vitro through direct infection of resting CD4+ T-cells is significantly enhanced by CCL19 and mDC, but the efficiency is dependent on virus titre, co-receptor usage and there is significant donor variability.

  8. Affect-modulated startle: interactive influence of catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met genotype and childhood trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Benedikt; Winter, Bernward; Gajewska, Agnes; Zwanzger, Peter; Reif, Andreas; Herrmann, Martin J; Dlugos, Andrea; Warrings, Bodo; Jacob, Christian; Mühlberger, Andreas; Arolt, Volker; Pauli, Paul; Deckert, Jürgen; Domschke, Katharina

    2012-01-01

    The etiology of emotion-related disorders such as anxiety or affective disorders is considered to be complex with an interaction of biological and environmental factors. Particular evidence has accumulated for alterations in the dopaminergic and noradrenergic system--partly conferred by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene variation--for the adenosinergic system as well as for early life trauma to constitute risk factors for those conditions. Applying a multi-level approach, in a sample of 95 healthy adults, we investigated effects of the functional COMT Val158Met polymorphism, caffeine as an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist (300 mg in a placebo-controlled intervention design) and childhood maltreatment (CTQ) as well as their interaction on the affect-modulated startle response as a neurobiologically founded defensive reflex potentially related to fear- and distress-related disorders. COMT val/val genotype significantly increased startle magnitude in response to unpleasant stimuli, while met/met homozygotes showed a blunted startle response to aversive pictures. Furthermore, significant gene-environment interaction of COMT Val158Met genotype with CTQ was discerned with more maltreatment being associated with higher startle potentiation in val/val subjects but not in met carriers. No main effect of or interaction effects with caffeine were observed. Results indicate a main as well as a GxE effect of the COMT Val158Met variant and childhood maltreatment on the affect-modulated startle reflex, supporting a complex pathogenetic model of the affect-modulated startle reflex as a basic neurobiological defensive reflex potentially related to anxiety and affective disorders.

  9. Affect-modulated startle: interactive influence of catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met genotype and childhood trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Klauke

    Full Text Available The etiology of emotion-related disorders such as anxiety or affective disorders is considered to be complex with an interaction of biological and environmental factors. Particular evidence has accumulated for alterations in the dopaminergic and noradrenergic system--partly conferred by catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT gene variation--for the adenosinergic system as well as for early life trauma to constitute risk factors for those conditions. Applying a multi-level approach, in a sample of 95 healthy adults, we investigated effects of the functional COMT Val158Met polymorphism, caffeine as an adenosine A2A receptor antagonist (300 mg in a placebo-controlled intervention design and childhood maltreatment (CTQ as well as their interaction on the affect-modulated startle response as a neurobiologically founded defensive reflex potentially related to fear- and distress-related disorders. COMT val/val genotype significantly increased startle magnitude in response to unpleasant stimuli, while met/met homozygotes showed a blunted startle response to aversive pictures. Furthermore, significant gene-environment interaction of COMT Val158Met genotype with CTQ was discerned with more maltreatment being associated with higher startle potentiation in val/val subjects but not in met carriers. No main effect of or interaction effects with caffeine were observed. Results indicate a main as well as a GxE effect of the COMT Val158Met variant and childhood maltreatment on the affect-modulated startle reflex, supporting a complex pathogenetic model of the affect-modulated startle reflex as a basic neurobiological defensive reflex potentially related to anxiety and affective disorders.

  10. The Unexpected Effects of Beneficial and Adverse Social Experiences during Adolescence on Anxiety and Aggression and Their Modulation by Genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Neele; Richter, S. Helene; Schreiber, Rebecca S.; Kloke, Vanessa; Kaiser, Sylvia; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Sachser, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety and aggression are part of the behavioral repertoire of humans and animals. However, in their exaggerated form both can become maladaptive and result in psychiatric disorders. On the one hand, genetic predisposition has been shown to play a crucial modulatory role in anxiety and aggression. On the other hand, social experiences have been implicated in the modulation of these traits. However, so far, mainly experiences in early life phases have been considered crucial for shaping anxiety-like and aggressive behavior, while the phase of adolescence has largely been neglected. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to elucidate how levels of anxiety-like and aggressive behavior are shaped by social experiences during adolescence and serotonin transporter (5-HTT) genotype. For this purpose, male mice of a 5-HTT knockout mouse model including all three genotypes (wildtype, heterozygous and homozygous 5-HTT knockout mice) were either exposed to an adverse social situation or a beneficial social environment during adolescence. This was accomplished in a custom-made cage system where mice experiencing the adverse environment were repeatedly introduced to the territory of a dominant opponent but had the possibility to escape to a refuge cage. Mice encountering beneficial social conditions had free access to a female mating partner. Afterwards, anxiety-like and aggressive behavior was assessed in a battery of tests. Surprisingly, unfavorable conditions during adolescence led to a decrease in anxiety-like behavior and an increase in exploratory locomotion. Additionally, aggressive behavior was augmented in animals that experienced social adversity. Concerning genotype, homozygous 5-HTT knockout mice were more anxious and less aggressive than heterozygous 5-HTT knockout and wildtype mice. In summary, adolescence is clearly an important phase in which anxiety-like and aggressive behavior can be shaped. Furthermore, it seems that having to cope with challenge during

  11. Electrophysiological responses of feedback processing are modulated by MAOA genotype in healthy male adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ren; Jia, Huiqiao; Yi, Fei; Ming, Qingsen; Wang, Xiang; Gao, Yidian; Yi, Jinyao; Yao, Shuqiao

    2016-01-01

    A functional polymorphism in the promoter region of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene is closely related to aggression. Although previous studies suggested that impaired ability of feedback processing might be associated with aggressive behaviour, studies concerning the MAOA gene-related aggression rarely focused on the link between MAOA gene and feedback processing. We therefore sought to investigate the effect of MAOA genotype on electrophysiological responses of feedback processing in 72 healthy male adolescents during a simple monetary gambling task. Feedback processing was investigated by measuring the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the P300 as electrophysiological markers. We observed a decreased electrophysiological response of the loss-gain difference waves from 250 to 350 ms (dFRN) in individuals with the lower activity alleles (MAOA-L) during the task, an effect that was driven primarily by the considerably altered response to monetary gains. The reduced dFRN in MAOA-L group might indicate poor ability to learn from feedback, which is followed by adjusting future behaviour. And MAOA-L carriers exhibited lower P300 compared with subjects with higher activity alleles (MAOA-H), which suggested fewer attentional resources were allocated to feedback processing. In addition, MAOA-L carriers demonstrated higher aggression and the aggression were inversely correlated with dFRN across two groups; further analyses suggested that dFRN mediated the MAOA genotype-aggression relationship. Consequently, we concluded that it might be the altered feedback processing that makes MAOA-L carriers more vulnerable to aggressive behaviour.

  12. The Effect of Nicotine on HPA Axis Activity in Females is Modulated by the FKBP5 Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmann, Anne; Bez, Jennifer; Lemenager, Tagrid; Hermann, Derik; Dinter, Christina; Reinhard, Iris; Schuster, Rilana; Wiedemann, Klaus; Winterer, Georg; Kiefer, Falk

    2016-05-01

    Tobacco smoking modulates activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and is used to cope with stress, especially by females. The single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs1360780, linked to FK506-binding protein 51 (FKBP5), has been shown to affect HPA axis functioning, and has thus been suggested as a promising candidate for indicating vulnerability to stress-related disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the interaction between nicotine consumption and rs1360780 on cortisol plasma levels in females. A total of 296 female smokers (assessed by the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence; FTND) were genotyped for the SNP rs1360780. We measured participants' cortisol plasma concentration in blood plasma collected 3 h after standardized tobacco smoking exposure. In the 36 TT-homozygotes, we found a significant negative correlation between the FTND sum score and cortisol plasma concentrations. Using linear regression analysis, we found that the FTND sum score accounted for 12.4% of the variance of cortisol plasma levels. This association was not detected in C-allele carriers. Our results suggest that nicotine is an important confounder in the modulation of HPA axis activity by FKBP5. In light of these findings, future studies on FKBP5 should seek to include data on nicotine consumption as a covariate.

  13. RESTful NET

    CERN Document Server

    Flanders, Jon

    2008-01-01

    RESTful .NET is the first book that teaches Windows developers to build RESTful web services using the latest Microsoft tools. Written by Windows Communication Foundation (WFC) expert Jon Flanders, this hands-on tutorial demonstrates how you can use WCF and other components of the .NET 3.5 Framework to build, deploy and use REST-based web services in a variety of application scenarios. RESTful architecture offers a simpler approach to building web services than SOAP, SOA, and the cumbersome WS- stack. And WCF has proven to be a flexible technology for building distributed systems not necessa

  14. Resting and Task-Modulated High-Frequency Brain Rhythms Measured by Scalp Encephalography in Infants with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Degregorio, Geneva; Jeste, Shafali S.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    The electrophysiological correlates of cognitive deficits in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are not well understood, and modulations of neural dynamics by neuroanatomical abnormalities that characterize the disorder remain elusive. Neural oscillations (rhythms) are a fundamental aspect of brain function, and have dominant frequencies in a wide…

  15. Resting and Task-Modulated High-Frequency Brain Rhythms Measured by Scalp Encephalography in Infants with Tuberous Sclerosis Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamoulis, Catherine; Vogel-Farley, Vanessa; Degregorio, Geneva; Jeste, Shafali S.; Nelson, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    The electrophysiological correlates of cognitive deficits in tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) are not well understood, and modulations of neural dynamics by neuroanatomical abnormalities that characterize the disorder remain elusive. Neural oscillations (rhythms) are a fundamental aspect of brain function, and have dominant frequencies in a wide…

  16. ABCA7 Genotypes Confer Alzheimer's Disease Risk by Modulating Amyloid-β Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qing-Fei; Wan, Yu; Wang, Hui-Fu; Sun, Fu-Rong; Hao, Xiao-Ke; Tan, Meng-Shan; Tan, Chen-Chen; Zhang, Dao-Qiang; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2016-03-21

    ABCA7 gene has been identified as a strong genetic locus for Alzheimer's disease (AD) susceptibility in genome wide association studies (GWAS). However, the possible roles of ABCA7 variants in AD pathology were not specifically assessed. Using tagger methods, we extracted 15 targeted ABCA7 loci to investigate their associations with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neuroimaging markers in Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset. Finally, although we did not detect any significant associations of previously published GWAS SNPs (rs3764650 and rs78117248) with all the CSF (Aβ1 - 42, T-tau, and P-tau) and neuroimaging markers, three other variants (rs3752242, rs3752240, and rs4147912) at ABCA7 loci were detected to show significant associations with amyloid deposition on AV-45 PET in brain. Moreover, haplotype and subgroup analysis confirmed these significant findings. Furthermore, there were no remarkable correlations between ABCA7 variants and neuronal degeneration biomarkers (elevated CSF tau, brain structure atrophy, and hypometabolism on imaging) in this study. Thus, our study suggested that ABCA7 genotypes contribute to the AD risk through involvement in amyloid-β deposition on in vivo imaging, but not in tau pathology, brain atrophy, or decreased glucose metabolism.

  17. VNTR-DAT1 and COMTVal158Met Genotypes Modulate Mental Flexibility and Adaptive Behavior Skills in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hoyo, Laura; Xicota, Laura; Langohr, Klaus; Sánchez-Benavides, Gonzalo; de Sola, Susana; Cuenca-Royo, Aida; Rodriguez, Joan; Rodríguez-Morató, Jose; Farré, Magí; Dierssen, Mara; de la Torre, Rafael; Cuenca-Royo, Aida

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is an aneuploidy syndrome that is caused by trisomy for human chromosome 21 resulting in a characteristic cognitive and behavioral phenotype, which includes executive functioning and adaptive behavior difficulties possibly due to prefrontal cortex (PFC) deficits. DS also present a high risk for early onset of Alzheimer Disease-like dementia. The dopamine (DA) system plays a neuromodulatory role in the activity of the PFC. Several studies have implicated trait differences in DA signaling on executive functioning based on genetic polymorphisms in the genes encoding for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMTVal158Met) and the dopamine transporter (VNTR-DAT1). Since it is known that the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants are modulated by the genetic background in which they occur, we here explore whether these polymorphisms variants interact with the trisomic genetic background to influence gene expression, and how this in turn mediates DS phenotype variability regarding PFC cognition. We genotyped 69 young adults of both genders with DS, and found that VNTR-DAT1 was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium but COMTVal158Met had a reduced frequency of Met allele homozygotes. In our population, genotypes conferring higher DA availability, such as Met allele carriers and VNTR-DAT1 10-repeat allele homozygotes, resulted in improved performance in executive function tasks that require mental flexibility. Met allele carriers showed worse adaptive social skills and self-direction, and increased scores in the social subscale of the Dementia Questionnaire for People with Intellectual Disabilities than Val allele homozygotes. The VNTR-DAT1 was not involved in adaptive behavior or early dementia symptoms. Our results suggest that genetic variants of COMTVal158Met and VNTR-DAT1 may contribute to PFC-dependent cognition, while only COMTVal158Met is involved in behavioral phenotypes of DS, similar to euploid population. PMID:27799900

  18. VNTR-DAT1 and COMTVal158Met genotypes modulate mental flexibility and adaptive behavior skills in Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Del Hoyo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is an aneuploidy syndrome that is caused by trisomy for human chromosome 21 resulting in a characteristic cognitive and behavioral phenotype, which includes executive functioning and adaptive behavior difficulties possibly due to prefrontal cortex (PFC deficits. DS also present a high risk for early onset of Alzheimer Disease (AD-like dementia. The dopamine (DA system plays a neuromodulatory role in the activity of the PFC. Several studies have implicated trait differences in DA signaling on executive functioning based on genetic polymorphisms in the genes encoding for the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMTVal158Met and the dopamine transporter (VNTR-DAT1. Since it is known that the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants are modulated by the genetic background in which they occur, we here explore whether these polymorphisms variants interact with the trisomic genetic background to influence gene expression, and how this in turn mediates DS phenotype variability regarding PFC cognition. We genotyped 69 young adults of both genders with DS, and found that VNTR-DAT1 was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium but COMTVal158Met had a reduced frequency of Met allele homozygotes. In our population, genotypes conferring higher DA availability, such as Met allele carriers and VNTR-DAT1 10-repeat allele homozygotes, resulted in improved performance in executive function tasks that require mental flexibility. Met allele carriers showed worse adaptive social skills and self-direction, and increased scores in the social subscale of the Dementia Questionnaire for People with Intellectual Disabilities than Val allele homozygotes. The VNTR-DAT1 was not involved in adaptive behavior or early dementia symptoms. Our results suggest that genetic variants of COMTVal158Met and VNTR-DAT1 may contribute to PFC-dependent cognition, while only COMTVal158Met is involved in behavioral phenotypes of DS, similar to euploid population.

  19. COMT polymorphism modulates the resting-state EEG alpha oscillatory response to acute nicotine in male non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, H; Smith, D; de la Salle, S; Choueiry, J; Impey, D; Philippe, T; Dort, H; Millar, A; Daigle, M; Albert, P R; Beaudoin, A; Knott, V

    2015-07-01

    Performance improvements in cognitive tasks requiring executive functions are evident with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) agonists, and activation of the underlying neural circuitry supporting these cognitive effects is thought to involve dopamine neurotransmission. As individual difference in response to nicotine may be related to a functional polymorphism in the gene encoding catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme that strongly influences cortical dopamine metabolism, this study examined the modulatory effects of the COMT Val158Met polymorphism on the neural response to acute nicotine as measured with resting-state electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations. In a sample of 62 healthy non-smoking adult males, a single dose (6 mg) of nicotine gum administered in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled design was shown to affect α oscillatory activity, increasing power of upper α oscillations in frontocentral regions of Met/Met homozygotes and in parietal/occipital regions of Val/Met heterozygotes. Peak α frequency was also found to be faster with nicotine (vs. placebo) treatment in Val/Met heterozygotes, who exhibited a slower α frequency compared to Val/Val homozygotes. The data tentatively suggest that interindividual differences in brain α oscillations and their response to nicotinic agonist treatment are influenced by genetic mechanisms involving COMT. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  20. Genotypes and pathogenicity of cellulitis isolates reveal traits that modulate APEC virulence.

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    Nicolle Lima Barbieri

    Full Text Available We characterized 144 Escherichia coli isolates from severe cellulitis lesions in broiler chickens from South Brazil. Analysis of susceptibility to 15 antimicrobials revealed frequencies of resistance of less than 30% for most antimicrobials except tetracycline (70% and sulphonamides (60%. The genotyping of 34 virulence-associated genes revealed that all the isolates harbored virulence factors related to adhesion, iron acquisition and serum resistance, which are characteristic of the avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC pathotype. ColV plasmid-associated genes (cvi/cva, iroN, iss, iucD, sitD, traT, tsh were especially frequent among the isolates (from 66.6% to 89.6%. According to the Clermont method of ECOR phylogenetic typing, isolates belonged to group D (47.2%, to group A (27.8%, to group B2 (17.4% and to group B1 (7.6%; the group B2 isolates contained the highest number of virulence-associated genes. Clonal relationship analysis using the ARDRA method revealed a similarity level of 57% or higher among isolates, but no endemic clone. The virulence of the isolates was confirmed in vivo in one-day-old chicks. Most isolates (72.9% killed all infected chicks within 7 days, and 65 isolates (38.1% killed most of them within 24 hours. In order to analyze differences in virulence among the APEC isolates, we created a pathogenicity score by combining the times of death with the clinical symptoms noted. By looking for significant associations between the presence of virulence-associated genes and the pathogenicity score, we found that the presence of genes for invasins ibeA and gimB and for group II capsule KpsMTII increased virulence, while the presence of pic decreased virulence. The fact that ibeA, gimB and KpsMTII are characteristic of neonatal meningitis E. coli (NMEC suggests that genes of NMEC in APEC increase virulence of strains.

  1. Synchronization modulation of Na/K pump molecules can hyperpolarize the membrane resting potential in intact fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Dando, Robin

    2007-02-01

    Previously, we have theoretically studied the possibility of electrical rhythmic entrainment of carrier-mediated ion transporters, and experimentally realized synchronization and acceleration of the Na/K pumping rate in the cell membrane of skeletal muscle fibers by a specially designed synchronization modulation electric field. In these studies we either used cut fibers under a voltage clamp or intact fibers, but in the presence of ion channels blockers. A question remained as to whether the field-induced activation observed in the pump molecules could effectively increase the intracellular ionic concentration and the membrane potential at physiological conditions. In this paper, we studied the effects of the field on intact fibers without any channel blockers. We monitored the field-induced changes in the ionic concentration gradient across the cell membrane and the membrane potential non-invasively by using a fluorescent probe and confocal microscopic imaging techniques. The results clearly show that the entrainment of the pump molecules by the synchronization modulation electric field can effectively increase the ionic concentration gradient, and hence, hyperpolarize the membrane potential.

  2. Brain-Gut Axis Modulation of Acupuncture in Functional Dyspepsia: A Preliminary Resting-State fcMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiliang Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore acupuncture effects on brain functional connectivity in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD. Methods. Eight patients in an acupuncture treatment group and ten healthy adults in the control group participated in the study. Acupuncture effectiveness was evaluated based on changes of the gastrointestinal symptoms, gastric motility measurements, and gastrin levels and comparisons with the control group when appropriate. To investigate functional connectivity changes related to FD and potential modulation after acupuncture, a set of regions of interest (ROIs were selected according to previous fMRI reports of acupuncture. Results. Patients showed significant improvements of FD signs and symptoms after acupuncture treatments. For all of the ROIs, we identified subportions of the networks showing reduced connectivity in patients with FD. Connectivity between the ROIs and corresponding disease targets showed significant improvement after acupuncture treatment (P<0.05 in all ROIs except for right medial temporal lobe-hippocampus and right inferior parietal lobule. Conclusion. Functional connectivity of the brain is changed in patients with FD but approximates that in healthy control after acupuncture treatment. The relief of gastrointestinal signs and symptoms by acupuncture is likely due to the normalization of brain-gut axis associated with FD.

  3. Dopamine D4 receptors modulate brain metabolic activity in the prefrontal cortex and cerebellum at rest and in response to methylphenidate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelides, M.; Wang, G.; Michaelides, M.; Pascau, J.; Gispert, J.-D.; Delis, F.; Grandy, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Desco, M.; Rubinstein, M.; Volkow, N.D.; Thanos, P.K.

    2010-07-16

    Methylphenidate (MP) is widely used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Variable number of tandem repeats polymorphisms in the dopamine D4 receptor (D{sub 4}) gene have been implicated in vulnerability to ADHD and the response to MP. Here we examined the contribution of dopamine D4 receptors (D4Rs) to baseline brain glucose metabolism and to the regional metabolic responses to MP. We compared brain glucose metabolism (measured with micro-positron emission tomography and [{sup 18}F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose) at baseline and after MP (10 mg/kg, i.p.) administration in mice with genetic deletion of the D{sub 4}. Images were analyzed using a novel automated image registration procedure. Baseline D{sub 4}{sup -/-} mice had lower metabolism in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and greater metabolism in the cerebellar vermis (CBV) than D{sub 4}{sup +/+} and D{sub 4}{sup +/-} mice; when given MP, D{sub 4}{sup -/-} mice increased metabolism in the PFC and decreased it in the CBV, whereas in D{sub 4}{sup +/+} and D{sub 4}{sup +/-} mice, MP decreased metabolism in the PFC and increased it in the CBV. These findings provide evidence that D4Rs modulate not only the PFC, which may reflect the activation by dopamine of D4Rs located in this region, but also the CBV, which may reflect an indirect modulation as D4Rs are minimally expressed in this region. As individuals with ADHD show structural and/or functional abnormalities in these brain regions, the association of ADHD with D4Rs may reflect its modulation of these brain regions. The differential response to MP as a function of genotype could explain differences in brain functional responses to MP between patients with ADHD and healthy controls and between patients with ADHD with different D{sub 4} polymorphisms.

  4. DAT genotype modulates striatal processing and long-term memory for items associated with reward and punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Bianca C; Tan, Geoffrey C; Lisman, John E; Dolan, Raymond J; Düzel, Emrah

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that appetitive motivation enhances episodic memory formation via a network including the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA), striatum and hippocampus. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study now contrasted the impact of aversive and appetitive motivation on episodic long-term memory. Cue pictures predicted monetary reward or punishment in alternating experimental blocks. One day later, episodic memory for the cue pictures was tested. We also investigated how the neural processing of appetitive and aversive motivation and episodic memory were modulated by dopaminergic mechanisms. To that end, participants were selected on the basis of their genotype for a variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism of the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene. The resulting groups were carefully matched for the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene. Recognition memory for cues from both motivational categories was enhanced in participants homozygous for the 10-repeat allele of the DAT, the functional effects of which are not known yet, but not in heterozygous subjects. In comparison with heterozygous participants, 10-repeat homozygous participants also showed increased striatal activity for anticipation of motivational outcomes compared to neutral outcomes. In a subsequent memory analysis, encoding activity in striatum and hippocampus was found to be higher for later recognized items in 10-repeat homozygotes compared to 9/10-repeat heterozygotes. These findings suggest that processing of appetitive and aversive motivation in the human striatum involve the dopaminergic system and that dopamine plays a role in memory for both types of motivational information. In accordance with animal studies, these data support the idea that encoding of motivational events depends on dopaminergic processes in the hippocampus.

  5. Reprint of: DAT genotype modulates striatal processing and long-term memory for items associated with reward and punishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Bianca C; Tan, Geoffrey C; Lisman, John E; Dolan, Raymond J; Düzel, Emrah

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that appetitive motivation enhances episodic memory formation via a network including the substantia nigra/ventral tegmental area (SN/VTA), striatum and hippocampus. This functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study now contrasted the impact of aversive and appetitive motivation on episodic long-term memory. Cue pictures predicted monetary reward or punishment in alternating experimental blocks. One day later, episodic memory for the cue pictures was tested. We also investigated how the neural processing of appetitive and aversive motivation and episodic memory were modulated by dopaminergic mechanisms. To that end, participants were selected on the basis of their genotype for a variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism of the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene. The resulting groups were carefully matched for the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene. Recognition memory for cues from both motivational categories was enhanced in participants homozygous for the 10-repeat allele of the DAT, the functional effects of which are not known yet, but not in heterozygous subjects. In comparison with heterozygous participants, 10-repeat homozygous participants also showed increased striatal activity for anticipation of motivational outcomes compared to neutral outcomes. In a subsequent memory analysis, encoding activity in striatum and hippocampus was found to be higher for later recognized items in 10-repeat homozygotes compared to 9/10-repeat heterozygotes. These findings suggest that processing of appetitive and aversive motivation in the human striatum involve the dopaminergic system and that dopamine plays a role in memory for both types of motivational information. In accordance with animal studies, these data support the idea that encoding of motivational events depends on dopaminergic processes in the hippocampus.

  6. Nitric Oxide Synthase Genotype Modulation of Impulsivity and Ventral Striatal Activity in Adult ADHD Patients and Healthy Comparison Subjects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoogman, Martine; Aarts, Esther; Zwiers, Marcel; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine; Naber, Marlies; Onnink, Marten; Cools, Roshan; Kan, Cornelis; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Since ADHD and, in particular, impulsivity are related to decreased ventral striatal activity, it was hypothesized that the NOS1 genotype itself might also be related to decreased ventral striatal activity...

  7. Arsenate and arsenite exposure modulate antioxidants and amino acids in contrasting arsenic accumulating rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Richa; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Tripathi, Preeti; Dixit, Garima; Sharma, Yogesh Kumar; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B; Chakrabarty, Debasis

    2013-11-15

    Carcinogenic arsenic (As) concentrations are found in rice due to irrigation with contaminated groundwater in South-East Asia. The present study evaluates comparative antioxidant property and specific amino acid accumulation in contrasting rice genotypes corresponding to differential As accumulation during arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) exposures. The study was conducted on two contrasting As accumulating rice genotypes selected from 303 genotype accessions, in hydroponic conditions. Maximum As accumulation was up to 1181 μg g(-1) dw in the roots of high As accumulating genotype (HARG), and 89 μg g(-1) dw in low As accumulating genotype (LARG) under As(III) exposures. The inorganic As was correlated more significantly upon exposures to As(III) than As(V). In the presence of As(V) various antioxidant enzymes guiacol peroxidase (GPX), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were highly stimulated in HARG. The stress responsive amino acids proline, cysteine, glycine, glutamic acid and methionine showed higher accumulation in HARG than LARG. A clear correlation was found between stress responsive amino acids, As accumulation and antioxidative response. The comparisons between the contrasting genotypes helped to determine the significance of antioxidants and specific amino acid response to As stress.

  8. The glutathione-S-transferase Mu 1 null genotype modulates ozone-induced airway inflammation in humans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The Glutathione-S-Transferase Mu 1 null genotype has been reported to be a risk factor for acute respiratory disease associated with increases in ambient air ozone. Ozone is known to cause an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. Howev...

  9. Nitric oxide synthase genotype modulation of impulsivity and ventral striatal activity in adult ADHD patients and healthy comparison subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogman, Martine; Aarts, Esther; Zwiers, Marcel; Slaats-Willemse, Dorine; Naber, Marlies; Onnink, Marten; Cools, Roshan; Kan, Cornelis; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara

    2011-10-01

    Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable disorder. The NOS1 gene encoding nitric oxide synthase is a candidate gene for ADHD and has been previously linked with impulsivity. In the present study, the authors investigated the effect of a functional variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism in NOS1 (NOS1 exon 1f-VNTR) on the processing of rewards, one of the cognitive deficits in ADHD. A sample of 136 participants, consisting of 87 adult ADHD patients and 49 healthy comparison subjects, completed a reward-related impulsivity task. A total of 104 participants also underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging during a reward anticipation task. The effect of the NOS1 exon 1f-VNTR genotype on reward-related impulsivity and reward-related ventral striatal activity was examined. ADHD patients had higher impulsivity scores and lower ventral striatal activity than healthy comparison subjects. The association between the short allele and increased impulsivity was confirmed. However, independent of disease status, homozygous carriers of the short allele of NOS1, the ADHD risk genotype, demonstrated higher ventral striatal activity than carriers of the other NOS1 VNTR genotypes. The authors suggest that the NOS1 genotype influences impulsivity and its relation with ADHD is mediated through effects on this behavioral trait. Increased ventral striatal activity related to NOS1 may be compensatory for effects in other brain regions.

  10. The glutathione-S-transferase Mu 1 null genotype modulates ozone-induced airway inflammation in humans*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The Glutathione-S-Transferase Mu 1 null genotype has been reported to be a risk factor for acute respiratory disease associated with increases in ambient air ozone. Ozone is known to cause an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. Howev...

  11. Polyamines as biomarkers for plant regeneration capacity: improvement of regeneration by modulation of polyamine metabolism in different genotypes of indica rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoeb, F; Yadav, J S.; Bajaj, S; Rajam, M V.

    2001-05-01

    The importance of cellular polyamine (PA) levels and the ratio of putrescine (Put) to spermidine (Spd) for plant regeneration ability via somatic embryogenesis in several commercially grown indica rice varieties is reported here. The genotypes namely NDR-624, IR-20, IR-36, BJ-1 (having Put:Spd ratio approximately 2.3) showed superior plant regeneration while KL, PB-1 and TN-1 (having Put:Spd ratio approximately 3.8) showed moderate plant regeneration ability. The genotypes namely HS, Bindli, DV-85, ACB-72, IR-64 and IR-72 (having Put:Spd ratio approximately 5.0) showed poor plant regeneration ability. In contrast KH-7 (Put:Spd ratio approximately 10.0) showed no response at all. Favorable modification of cellular PA titers and their Put:Spd ratio by the addition of exogenous PAs (Put, Spd) or their biosynthesis inhibitor, difluoromethylarginine (DFMA) led to the induction/promotion of plant regeneration in poorly responding genotypes. These results showed a close relationship between cellular PA levels and their Put:Spd ratio with in vitro morphogenetic capacity in indica rice and suggest that the cellular PAs and Put:Spd ratios are important determinants (biomarkers) of plant regeneration ability in indica rice, and the improvement/induction of plant regeneration in morphogenetically poor and recalcitrant species could be achieved by modulating PA metabolism.

  12. The association between dietary vitamin K intake and serum undercarboxylated osteocalcin is modulated by vitamin K epoxide reductase genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Nieters, Alexandra; Hailer, Susanne; Wolfram, Günther; Linseisen, Jakob

    2009-06-01

    Vitamin K acts as a cofactor during the gamma-carboxylation of vitamin K-dependent proteins. Undercarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) is a suggested biomarker of vitamin K status. The +2255 polymorphism of the vitamin K epoxide reductase gene (VKORC1) was shown to be associated with the recycling rate of the active form of vitamin K. We investigated the association between dietary vitamin K intake and serum ucOC and hypothesized that this association might vary by VKORC1 genotype. ucOC and total intact osteocalcin (iOC) concentrations were quantified using specific ELISA tests in serum samples of 548 male and female participants (aged 18-81 years) of the Bavarian Food Consumption Survey II. ucOC was expressed relative to iOC (ucOC/iOC ratio). Dietary intake of vitamin K (phylloquinone and menaquinones) was estimated from three 24 h dietary recalls using previously published food composition data. The association between dietary vitamin K intake and ucOC/iOC ratio was analysed using linear and non-linear regression models. Median intakes of phylloquinone/menaquinones were 83.4/37.6 microg/d in men and 79.6/29.8 microg/d in women, respectively. As expected, vitamin K intake was significantly inversely associated with the ucOC/iOC ratio. The ucOC/iOC ratio differed significantly across variants of the +2255 polymorphism in the VKORC1 gene. Stratification by VKORC1+2255 genotype revealed that only in carriers of the GG genotype (39 % of all participants) did the ucOC/iOC ratio significantly decrease with increasing intake of vitamin K. Thus, the results show that the inverse association between dietary vitamin K intake and serum ucOC depends on a functionally relevant allelic variant of the VKORC1 gene.

  13. The Non-Linear Child: Ontogeny, Isoniazid Concentration, and NAT2 Genotype Modulate Enzyme Reaction Kinetics and Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Rogers

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 catalyzes the acetylation of isoniazid to N-acetylisoniazid. NAT2 polymorphism explains 88% of isoniazid clearance variability in adults. We examined the effects of clinical and genetic factors on Michaelis-Menten reaction kinetic constants of maximum velocity (Vmax and affinity (Km in children 0–10 years old. We measured the rates of isoniazid elimination and N-acetylisoniazid production in the blood of 30 children. Since maturation effects could be non-linear, we utilized a pharmacometric approach and the artificial intelligence method, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS, to identify factors predicting NAT2 Vmax and Km by examining clinical, genetic, and laboratory factors in toto. Isoniazid concentration predicted both Vmax and Km and superseded the contribution of NAT2 genotype. Age non-linearly modified the NAT2 genotype contribution until maturation at ≥5.3 years. Thus, enzyme efficiency was constrained by substrate concentration, genes, and age. Since MARS output is in the form of basis functions and equations, it allows multiscale systems modeling from the level of cellular chemical reactions to whole body physiological parameters, by automatic selection of significant predictors by the algorithm.

  14. Bed rest during pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000581.htm Bed rest during pregnancy To use the sharing features on ... few days or weeks. This is called bed rest. Bed rest used to be recommended routinely for ...

  15. Gender differences in association between serotonin transporter gene polymorphism and resting-state EEG activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volf, N V; Belousova, L V; Knyazev, G G; Kulikov, A V

    2015-01-22

    Human brain oscillations represent important features of information processing and are highly heritable. Gender has been observed to affect association between the 5-HTTLPR (serotonin-transporter-linked polymorphic region) polymorphism and various endophenotypes. This study aimed to investigate the effects of 5-HTTLPR on the spontaneous electroencephalography (EEG) activity in healthy male and female subjects. DNA samples extracted from buccal swabs and resting EEG recorded at 60 standard leads were collected from 210 (101 men and 109 women) volunteers. Spectral EEG power estimates and cortical sources of EEG activity were investigated. It was shown that effects of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism on electrical activity of the brain vary as a function of gender. Women with the S/L genotype had greater global EEG power compared to men with the same genotype. In men, current source density was markedly different among genotype groups in only alpha 2 and alpha 3 frequency ranges: S/S allele carriers had higher current source density estimates in the left inferior parietal lobule in comparison with the L/L group. In women, genotype difference in global power asymmetry was found in the central-temporal region. Contrasting L/L and S/L genotype carriers also yielded significant effects in the right hemisphere inferior parietal lobule and the right postcentral gyrus with L/L genotype carriers showing lower current source density estimates than S/L genotype carriers in all but gamma bands. So, in women, the effects of 5-HTTLPR polymorphism were associated with modulation of the EEG activity in a wide range of EEG frequencies. The significance of the results lies in the demonstration of gene by sex interaction with resting EEG that has implications for understanding sex-related differences in affective states, emotion and cognition.

  16. Pro REST API development with nodejs

    CERN Document Server

    Doglio, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Pro REST API Development with Node.js is your guide to managing and understanding the full capabilities of successful REST development. API design is a hot topic in the programming world, but not many resources exist for developers to really understand how you can leverage the advantages. This book will provide a brief background on REST and the tools it provides (well known and not so well known). Understand how there is more to REST than just JSON and URLs. You will then cover and compare the maintained modules currently available in the npm community, including Express, Restify, Vatican,

  17. REST based mobile applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambow, Mark; Preuss, Thomas; Berdux, Jörg; Conrad, Marc

    2008-02-01

    Simplicity is the major advantage of REST based webservices. Whereas SOAP is widespread in complex, security sensitive business-to-business aplications, REST is widely used for mashups and end-user centric applicatons. In that context we give an overview of REST and compare it to SOAP. Furthermore we apply the GeoDrawing application as an example for REST based mobile applications and emphasize on pros and cons for the use of REST in mobile application scenarios.

  18. Individual Differences in Asymmetric Resting-State Frontal Cortical Activity Modulate ERPs and Performance in a Global-Local Attention Task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boksem, Maarten A. S.; Kostermans, Evelien; Tops, Mattie; De Cremer, David

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that individual differences in approach motivation modulate attentional scope. In turn, approach and inhibition have been related to different neural systems that are associated with asymmetries in relative frontal activity (RFA). Here, we investigated whether such i

  19. Modulation of glycogen and breast meat processing ability by nutrition in chickens: effect of crude protein level in 2 chicken genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jlali, M; Gigaud, V; Métayer-Coustard, S; Sellier, N; Tesseraud, S; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Berri, C

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of 2 isoenergetic growing diets with different CP (17 vs. 23%) on the performance and breast meat quality of 2 lines of chicken divergently selected for abdominal fatness [i.e., fat and lean (LL) lines]. Growth performance, breast and abdominal fat yields, breast meat quality parameters (pH, color, drip loss), and muscle glycogen storage at death were measured. Increased dietary CP resulted in increased BW, increased breast meat yield, and reduced abdominal fatness at slaughter regardless of genotype (P muscle glycogen (P muscle glycogen content observed in LL receiving the low-CP diet compared with the high-CP diet occurred concomitantly with greater phosphorylation amount for the α-catalytic subunit of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and glycogen synthase. This was consistent with the reduced muscle glycogen content observed in LL fed the low-CP diet because adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase inhibits glycogen synthesis through its action on glycogen synthase. Our results demonstrated that nutrition is an effective means of modulating breast meat properties in the chicken. The results also highlighted the need to take into account interaction with the genetic background of the animal to select nutritional strategies to improve meat quality traits in poultry.

  20. Effects of acute O3 stress on PSII and PSI photochemistry of sensitive and resistant snap bean genotypes (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), probed by prompt chlorophyll "a" fluorescence and 820 nm modulated reflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatori, Elisabetta; Fusaro, Lina; Strasser, Reto J; Bussotti, Filippo; Manes, Fausto

    2015-12-01

    The response of PSII and PSI photochemistry to acute ozone (O3) stress was tested in a "model plant system", namely the O3 sensitive (S156) and O3 resistant (R123) genotype pairs of Phaseolus vulgaris L., during a phenological phase of higher O3 sensitivity (pod formation). The modulation of the photosynthetic activity during O3 stress was analysed by measuring gas exchanges, Prompt Fluorescence (PF, JIP-test) and 820 nm Modulated Reflectance (MR), a novel techniques which specifically detects the changes in the redox state of P700 and plastocyanin. The results showed that, coherently with genotypic-specific O3 sensitivity, the response of the two snap bean genotypes differed for the intensity and time of onset of the considered physiological changes. In fact, despite leaf injury and gas exchanges reduction appeared concurrently in both genotypes, S156 showed a PSII down regulation already after the first day of fumigation (DOF), and an enhancement of Cyclic Electron Flow of PSI after the second DOF, whereas R123 showed only slight adjustments until the third DOF, when the activity of both photosystems was down-regulated. Despite these differences, it is possible to distinguish in both genotypes an early O3 response of the photochemical apparatus, involving PSII only, and a following response, in which PSI activity and content are also modulated. The measurement of the MR signal, performed simultaneously with the PF measurements and the JIP-test analysis, has allowed a better understanding of the role that PSI plays in the O3 stress response of the S156/R123 model plant system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. The Resting Motor Threshold - Restless or Resting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabanov, Anke Ninija; Raffin, Estelle Emeline; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2015-01-01

    Background The resting motor threshold (RMT) is used to individually adjust the intensity of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) intensity and is assumed to be stable. Here we challenge this notion by showing that RMT expresses acute context-dependent fluctuations. Method In twelve participants...

  2. Differential deployment of REST and CoREST promotes glial subtype specification and oligodendrocyte lineage maturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J Abrajano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The repressor element-1 (RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF is a master transcriptional regulator that binds to numerous genomic RE1 sites where it acts as a molecular scaffold for dynamic recruitment of modulatory and epigenetic cofactors, including corepressor for element-1-silencing transcription factor (CoREST. CoREST also acts as a hub for various cofactors that play important roles in epigenetic remodeling and transcriptional regulation. While REST can recruit CoREST to its macromolecular complex, CoREST complexes also function at genomic sites independently of REST. REST and CoREST perform a broad array of context-specific functions, which include repression of neuronal differentiation genes in neural stem cells (NSCs and other non-neuronal cells as well as promotion of neurogenesis. Despite their involvement in multiple aspects of neuronal development, REST and CoREST are not believed to have any direct modulatory roles in glial cell maturation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We challenged this view by performing the first study of REST and CoREST in NSC-mediated glial lineage specification and differentiation. Utilizing ChIP on chip (ChIP-chip assays, we identified distinct but overlapping developmental stage-specific profiles for REST and CoREST target genes during astrocyte (AS and oligodendrocyte (OL lineage specification and OL lineage maturation and myelination, including many genes not previously implicated in glial cell biology or linked to REST and CoREST regulation. Amongst these factors are those implicated in macroglial (AS and OL cell identity, maturation, and maintenance, such as members of key developmental signaling pathways and combinatorial transcription factor codes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results imply that REST and CoREST modulate not only neuronal but also glial lineage elaboration. These factors may therefore mediate critical developmental processes

  3. Modulation of exogenous glutathione in phytochelatins and photosynthetic performance against cd stress in the two rice genotypes differing in Cd tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yue; Cao, Fangbin; Cheng, Wangda; Zhang, Guoping; Wu, Feibo

    2011-11-01

    Greenhouse hydroponic experiments were conducted using Cd-sensitive (Xiushui63) and tolerant (Bing97252) rice genotypes to evaluate genotypic differences in response of photosynthesis and phytochelatins to Cd toxicity in the presence of exogenous glutathione (GSH). Plant height, chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate (Pn), and biomass decreased in 5 and 50 μM Cd treatments, and Cd-sensitive genotype showed more severe reduction than the tolerant one. Cadmium stress caused decrease in maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) and effective PSII quantum yield [Y(II)] and increase in quantum yield of regulated energy dissipation [Y(NPQ)], with changes in Cd-sensitive genotype being more evident. Cadmium-induced phytochelatins (PCs), GSH, and cysteine accumulation was observed in roots of both genotypes, with markedly higher level in PCs and GSH on day 5 in Bing97252 compared with that measured in Xiushui63. Exogenous GSH significantly alleviated growth inhibition in Xiushui63 under 5 μM Cd and in both genotypes in 50 μM Cd. External GSH significantly increased chlorophyll content, Pn, Fv/Fm, and Y(II) of plants exposed to Cd, but decreased Y(NPQ) and the coefficient of non-photochemical quenching (qN). GSH addition significantly increased root GSH content in plants under Cd exposure (except day 5 of 50 μM Cd) and induced up-regulation in PCs of 5 μM-Cd-treated Bing97252 throughout the 15-day and Xiushui63 of 5-day exposure. The results suggest that genotypic difference in the tolerance to Cd stress was positively linked to the capacity in elevation of GSH and PCs, and that alleviation of Cd toxicity by GSH is related to significant improvement in chlorophyll content, photosynthetic performance, and root GSH levels.

  4. RESTful Web Services Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Allamaraju, Subbu

    2010-01-01

    While the REST design philosophy has captured the imagination of web and enterprise developers alike, using this approach to develop real web services is no picnic. This cookbook includes more than 100 recipes to help you take advantage of REST, HTTP, and the infrastructure of the Web. You'll learn ways to design RESTful web services for client and server applications that meet performance, scalability, reliability, and security goals, no matter what programming language and development framework you use. Each recipe includes one or two problem statements, with easy-to-follow, step-by-step i

  5. FRS REST Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    FRS exposes several REST services that allows developers to utilize a live feed of data from the FRS database. This web page is intended for a technical audience and describes the content and purpose of each service available.

  6. Desmanthus GENOTYPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ HENRIQUE DE ALBUQUERQUE RANGEL

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmanthus is a genus of forage legumes with potential to improve pastures and livestock produc-tion on clay soils of dry tropical and subtropical regions such as the existing in Brazil and Australia. Despite this patterns of natural or enforced after-ripening of Desmanthus seeds have not been well established. Four year old seed banks of nine Desmanthus genotypes at James Cook University were accessed for their patterns of seed softe-ning in response to a range of temperatures. Persistent seed banks were found to exist under all of the studied ge-notypes. The largest seeds banks were found in the genotypes CPI 78373 and CPI 78382 and the smallest in the genotypes CPI’s 37143, 67643, and 83563. An increase in the percentage of softened seeds was correlated with higher temperatures, in two patterns of response: in some accessions seeds were not significantly affected by tempe-ratures below 80º C; and in others, seeds become soft when temperature rose to as little as 60 ºC. At 80 °C the heat started to depress germination. High seed production of Desmanthus associated with dependence of seeds on eleva-ted temperatures to softening can be a very important strategy for plants to survive in dry tropical regions.

  7. Temperature rise after peginterferon alfa-2a injection in patients with chronic hepatitis C is associated with virological response and is modulated by IL28B genotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hwalih; Noureddin, Mazen; Witthaus, Michael; Park, Yoon J.; Hoofnagle, Jay H.; Liang, T. Jake; Rotman, Yaron

    2013-01-01

    Background & Aims Interferon treatment for chronic hepatitis C is associated with non-specific symptoms including fever. We aimed to determine the association of temperature changes with interferon antiviral activity. Methods 60 treatment-naïve patients with chronic hepatitis C (67% genotype 1/4/6, 33% genotype 2/3) were admitted to start peginterferon alfa-2a and ribavirin in a clinical trial. Temperature was measured at baseline and 3 times daily for the first 24 h and the maximal increase from baseline during that time (Δ Tmax) was determined. Serum HCV-RNA, interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10 (IP-10) and expression of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs – CD274, ISG15, RSAD2, IRF7, CXCL10) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were measured at very early time points, and response kinetics calculated. The IL28B single nucleotide polymorphism, rs12979860, was genotyped. Results Temperatures rose by 1.2 ± 0.8 °C, peaking after 12.5 h. ΔTmax was strongly associated with 1st phase virological decline (r = 0.59, p Elsevier B.V. on behalf of the European Association for the Study of the Liver. PMID:23850879

  8. T3SS-dependent differential modulations of the jasmonic acid pathway in susceptible and resistant genotypes of Malus spp. challenged with Erwinia amylovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugé De Bernonville, Thomas; Gaucher, Matthieu; Flors, Victor; Gaillard, Sylvain; Paulin, Jean-Pierre; Dat, James F; Brisset, Marie-Noëlle

    2012-06-01

    Fire blight is a bacterial disease of Maloideae caused by Erwinia amylovora (Ea). This necrogenic enterobacterium uses a type III secretion system (T3SS) to inject type III effectors into the plant cells to cause disease on its susceptible hosts, including economically important crops like apple and pear. The expressions of marker genes of the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense regulation pathways were monitored by RT-qPCR in leaves of two apple genotypes, one susceptible and one resistant, challenged with a wild type strain, a T3SS-deficient strain or water. The transcriptional data taken together with hormone level measurements indicated that the SA pathway was similarly induced in both apple genotypes during infection by Ea. On the contrary, the data clearly showed a strong T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway in leaves of the susceptible genotype but not in those of the resistant one. Accordingly, methyl-jasmonate treated susceptible plants displayed an increased resistance to Ea. Bacterial mutant analysis indicated that JA manipulation by Ea mainly relies on the type III effector DspA/E. Taken together, our data suggest that the T3SS-dependent down-regulation of the JA pathway is a critical step in the infection process of Malus spp. by Ea.

  9. REST based service composition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grönvall, Erik; Ingstrup, Mads; Pløger, Morten

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an ongoing work developing and testing a Service Composition framework based upon the REST architecture named SECREST. A minimalistic approach have been favored instead of a creating a complete infrastructure. One focus has been on the system's interaction model. Indeed, an aim...

  10. Surviving Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your pregnancy — and your bed rest start a family tree that you can share with your child someday firm up your baby-name choices; use books and websites for ideas organize photo albums read anything — ... people (friends and family) whom you know will probably give gifts build ...

  11. Rest mutant zebrafish swim erratically and display atypical spatial preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moravec, Cara E; Li, Edward; Maaswinkel, Hans; Kritzer, Mary F; Weng, Wei; Sirotkin, Howard I

    2015-05-01

    The Rest/Nrsf transcriptional repressor modulates expression of a large set of neural specific genes. Many of these target genes have well characterized roles in nervous system processes including development, plasticity and synaptogenesis. However, the impact of Rest-mediated transcriptional regulation on behavior has been understudied due in part to the embryonic lethality of the mouse knockout. To investigate the requirement for Rest in behavior, we employed the zebrafish rest mutant to explore a range of behaviors in adults and larva. Adult rest mutants of both sexes showed abnormal behaviors in a novel environment including increased vertical swimming, erratic swimming patterns and a proclivity for the tank walls. Adult males also had diminished reproductive success. At 6 days post fertilization (dpf), rest mutant larva were hypoactive, but displayed normal evoked responses to light and sound stimuli. Overall, these results provide evidence that rest dysfunction produces atypical swimming patterns and preferences in adults, and reduced locomotor activity in larvae. This study provides the first behavioral analysis of rest mutants and reveals specific behaviors that are modulated by Rest.

  12. Rest mass or inertial mass?

    OpenAIRE

    Khrapko, R. I.

    2001-01-01

    Rest mass takes the place of inertial mass in modern physics textbooks. It seems to be wrong. But this phenomenon is hidden away by the facts that rest mass adherents busily call rest mass "mass", not rest mass, and the word "mass" is associated with a measure of inertia. This topic has been considered by the author in the article "What is mass?" [1, 2, 3]. Additional arguments to a confirmation of such a thesis are presented here.

  13. Cholinergic modulation of auditory P3 event-related potentials as indexed by CHRNA4 and CHRNA7 genotype variation in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Molly; Choueiry, Joëlle; Smith, Dylan; de la Salle, Sara; Nelson, Renee; Impey, Danielle; Baddeley, Ashley; Aidelbaum, Robert; Millar, Anne; Knott, Verner

    2016-06-03

    Schizophrenia (SZ) is a psychiatric disorder characterized by cognitive dysfunction within the realm of attentional processing. Reduced P3a and P3b event-related potentials (ERPs), indexing involuntary and voluntary attentional processing respectively, have been consistently observed in SZ patients who also express prominent cholinergic deficiencies. The involvement of the brain's cholinergic system in attention has been examined for several decades; however, further inquiry is required to further comprehend how abnormalities in this system affect neighbouring neurotransmitter systems and contribute to neurocognitive deficits. The objective of this pilot study was to examine the moderating role of the CHRNA4 (rs1044396), CHRNA7 (rs3087454), and SLC5A7 (rs1013940) genes on ERP indices of attentional processing in healthy volunteers (N=99; Caucasians and non-Caucasians) stratified by genotype and assessed using the auditory P300 "oddball" paradigm. Results indicated significantly greater P3a and P3b-indexed attentional processing for CT (vs. CC) CHRNA4 carriers and greater P3b for AA (vs. CC) CHRNA7 carriers. SLC5A7 allelic variants did not show significant differences in P3a and P3b processing. These findings expand our knowledge on the moderating effect of cholinergic genes on attention and could help inform targeted drug developments aimed at restoring attention deficits in SZ patients.

  14. F7 gene variants modulate protein levels in a large cohort of patients with factor VII deficiency. Results from a genotype-phenotype study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintavalle, Gabriele; Riccardi, Federica; Rivolta, Gianna Franca; Martorana, Davide; Di Perna, Caterina; Percesepe, Antonio; Tagliaferri, Annarita

    2017-08-01

    Congenital factor VII (FVII) deficiency is a rare bleeding disorder caused by mutations in F7 gene with autosomal recessive inheritance. A clinical heterogeneity with poor correlation with FVII:C levels has been described. It was the objective of this study to identify genetic defects and to evaluate their relationships with phenotype in a large cohort of patients with FVII:CF7 mutations and three polymorphic variants and classified according to recently published clinical scores. Forty out of 123 patients (33 %) were symptomatic (43 bleedings). A severe bleeding tendency was observed only in patients with FVII:CF7 international databases. Most mutations (62 %) were missense, large deletions were 6.2 %. Compound heterozygotes/homozygotes for mutations presented lower FVII:C levels compared to the other classes (Chi(2)=43.709, pF7 genotypic groups (Chi(2)=72.289, pF7 mutation and/or polymorphisms and FVII:C levels, without a direct link between FVII:C and bleeding tendency. The results suggest that large deletions are underestimated and that they represent a common mechanism of F7 gene inactivation which should always be investigated in the diagnostic testing for FVII deficiency.

  15. Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayhan Azadmanesh

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionHepatitis C virus (HCV is an important cause of chronic liver disease. HCV causes 20% of acute hepatitis cases, 70% of all chronic hepatitis cases, 40% of all cases of liver cirrhosis, 60% of hepatocellular carcinomas, and 30% of liver transplants in Europe(1. It is also recognized as the leading cause of liver transplantation in the world(2. Only 20% of infected individuals will recover from this viral infection, while the rest become chronically infected(3. While the majority of chronically infected individuals never exhibit symptoms, approximately 10-30% of these patients will eventually develop cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma, both of which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality(4.More than 170 million people worldwide are chronically infected with HCV. According to WHO report in 2002, chronic liver diseases were responsible for 1.4 million deaths, including 796,000 due to cirrhosis and 616,000 due to primary liver cancer. At least 20% of these deaths are probably attributable to HCV infection- more than 280,000 deaths(5, 6. The prevalence of chronic HCV infection in general population varies greatly in different parts of the world, being estimated between 0.1 and 5%, with a peak prevalence of 20- 25% in Egypt. HCV prevalence seems to be less than 1% in Iran, which is much lower than most of the neighboring countries(7. HCV was the first virus discovered by molecular cloning method without the direct use of biologic or biophysical methods. This was accomplished by extracting, copying into cDNA, and cloning all the nucleic acid from the plasma of a chimpanzee infected with non- A, non-B hepatitis by contaminated factor XIII concentrate(8. The HCV genome is a positive-sense, singlestranded RNA genome approximately 10 kb long. It has marked similarities to those of members of the genera Pestivirus and Flavivirus. Different HCV isolates from around the world show substantial nucleotide sequence variability

  16. Removable partial dentures without rests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinig, D A

    1994-04-01

    Ever since Bonwill recommended the use of rests on removable partial dentures in 1899, rests have been universally considered inviolate and have gone unchallenged and untested. The author claims that removable partial dentures without rests may not cause the adverse conditions usually predicted, such as gingival stripping, gingival inflammation, mutilated residual ridges, or extensive and rapid resorption of the alveolar ridges. In removable partial dentures made by the author for several patients, the residual ridge remained stable and in physiologic equilibrium when rests were not used. A history of the long-term effect on patients wearing partial dentures with and without rests is presented.

  17. Resting cerebral blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ances, B M.; Sisti, D; Vaida, F; Liang, C L.; Leontiev, O; Perthen, J E.; Buxton, R B.; Benson, D; Smith, D M.; Little, S J.; Richman, D D.; Moore, D J.; Ellis, R J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: HIV enters the brain soon after infection causing neuronal damage and microglial/astrocyte dysfunction leading to neuropsychological impairment. We examined the impact of HIV on resting cerebral blood flow (rCBF) within the lenticular nuclei (LN) and visual cortex (VC). Methods: This cross-sectional study used arterial spin labeling MRI (ASL-MRI) to measure rCBF within 33 HIV+ and 26 HIV− subjects. Nonparametric Wilcoxon rank sum test assessed rCBF differences due to HIV serostatus. Classification and regression tree (CART) analysis determined optimal rCBF cutoffs for differentiating HIV serostatus. The effects of neuropsychological impairment and infection duration on rCBF were evaluated. Results: rCBF within the LN and VC were significantly reduced for HIV+ compared to HIV− subjects. A 2-tiered CART approach using either LN rCBF ≤50.09 mL/100 mL/min or LN rCBF >50.09 mL/100 mL/min but VC rCBF ≤37.05 mL/100 mL/min yielded an 88% (29/33) sensitivity and an 88% (23/26) specificity for differentiating by HIV serostatus. HIV+ subjects, including neuropsychologically unimpaired, had reduced rCBF within the LN (p = 0.02) and VC (p = 0.001) compared to HIV− controls. A temporal progression of brain involvement occurred with LN rCBF significantly reduced for both acute/early (<1 year of seroconversion) and chronic HIV-infected subjects, whereas rCBF in the VC was diminished for only chronic HIV-infected subjects. Conclusion: Resting cerebral blood flow (rCBF) using arterial spin labeling MRI has the potential to be a noninvasive neuroimaging biomarker for assessing HIV in the brain. rCBF reductions that occur soon after seroconversion possibly reflect neuronal or vascular injury among HIV+ individuals not yet expressing neuropsychological impairment. GLOSSARY AEH = acute/early HIV infection; ANOVA = analysis of variance; ASL-MRI = arterial spin labeling MRI; CART = classification and regression tree; CBF = cerebral blood flow; CH = chronic HIV

  18. Genotypic Variation for Salinity Tolerance in Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench Genotypes at Early Growth Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigabu, Endalew

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L. Moench is the fifth most economically important crop among cereals in the world. Salinity is an abiotic factor which reduces productivity of sorghum. Exploiting genetic variability to identify salt tolerant genotype is one of the strategies used to overcome salinity. Pot experiment was carried out to evaluate the genetic variation of eleven sorghum genotypes for NaCl salinity response at germination and early seedling stages. The experimental treatments were five NaCl salinity levels (0, 2, 4, 8, and 16 dS m-1 and eleven sorghum genotypes (Gambella1107, Melkam, S-35, ESH-2, Gobye, 97MW6130, Meko, 76T1#23, ICSV-111, Abshir and Teshale. The experimental design was completely randomized design with three replicates.Data was analyzed using SAS (version 9.0 statistical software and means were separated by LSD. Germination rate, final germination percentage, seedling shoot length and seedling root length were measured. The ANOVA for treatments, genotypes and their interaction was found to be highly significant (p<0.001 with regard to all parameters. Genotypes Meko, Gambella1107, ICSV-111 and Melkam were found salt tolerant during germination and seedling growth stages. However, genotypes ESH-2 and Gobye were salt sensitive during both stages. The rest sorghum genotypes were intermediate in their salt tolerance. The study affirmed the presence of wide genotypic variation among the sorghum genotypes for NaCl salt tolerance.

  19. Interactive effects of silicon and arbuscular mycorrhiza in modulating ascorbate-glutathione cycle and antioxidant scavenging capacity in differentially salt-tolerant Cicer arietinum L. genotypes subjected to long-term salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Neera; Bhandari, Purnima

    2016-09-01

    Salinity is the major environmental constraint that affects legume productivity by inducing oxidative stress. Individually, both silicon (Si) nutrition and mycorrhization have been reported to alleviate salt stress. However, the mechanisms adopted by both in mediating stress responses are poorly understood. Thus, pot trials were undertaken to evaluate comparative as well as interactive effects of Si and/or arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) in alleviating NaCl toxicity in modulating oxidative stress and antioxidant defence mechanisms in two Cicer arietinum L. (chickpea) genotypes-HC 3 (salt-tolerant) and CSG 9505 (salt-sensitive). Plants subjected to different NaCl concentrations (0-100 mM) recorded a substantial increase in the rate of superoxide radical (O2 (·-)), H2O2, lipoxygenase (LOX) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, which induced leakage of ions and disturbed Ca(2+)/Na(+) ratio in roots and leaves. Individually, Si and AM reduced oxidative burst by strengthening antioxidant enzymatic activities (superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and guaiacol peroxidase (GPOX)). Si was relatively more efficient in reducing accumulation of stress metabolites, while mycorrhization significantly up-regulated antioxidant machinery and modulated ascorbate-glutathione (ASA-GSH) cycle. Combined applications of Si and AM complemented each other in reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) build-up by further enhancing the antioxidant defence responses. Magnitude of ROS-mediated oxidative burden was lower in HC 3 which correlated strongly with more effective AM symbiosis, better capacity to accumulate Si and stronger defence response when compared with CSG 9505. Study indicated that Si and/or AM fungal amendments upgraded salt tolerance through a dynamic shift from oxidative destruction towards favourable antioxidant defence system in stressed chickpea plants.

  20. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  1. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  2. Restful Web Service in Java%Java与Restful Web Service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁赟

    2007-01-01

    近年来Web服务领域发生着翻天覆地的变化,继传统的XML-RPC风格的Web Service之后,一种新的风格,REST被应用于Web Service.本文主要介绍了Rest构架风格,以及现在Java开发Restful Web Service的主要方式,以及如何实现Restful Web Service的Java和Ajax客户端,最后介绍了Restful Web Service的描述语言WADL.

  3. Exercise-induced pyruvate dehydrogenase activation is not affected by 7 days of bed rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich, Kristian; Jørgensen, Stine Ringholm; Biensø, Rasmus Sjørup

    2011-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that physical inactivity impairs the exercise-induced modulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), 6 healthy normally physically active male subjects completed 7 days of bed rest. Before and immediately after the bed rest, the subjects completed an OGTT and a one-legged knee...... after bed rest than before, indicating glucose intolerance. There were no differences in lactate release/uptake across the exercising muscle before and after bed rest, but glucose uptake after 40min of exercise was larger (P=0.05) before bed rest than after. Muscle glycogen content tended to be higher...

  4. RESTful Web Services at BNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casella, R.

    2011-06-14

    RESTful (REpresentational State Transfer) web services are an alternative implementation to SOAP/RPC web services in a client/server model. BNLs IT Division has started deploying RESTful Web Services for enterprise data retrieval and manipulation. Data is currently used by system administrators for tracking configuration information and as it is expanded will be used by Cyber Security for vulnerability management and as an aid to cyber investigations. This talk will describe the implementation and outstanding issues as well as some of the reasons for choosing RESTful over SOAP/RPC and future directions.

  5. Java与Restful Web Service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁赟

    2007-01-01

    近年来Web服务领域发生着翻天覆地的变化,继传统的XML-RPC风格的Web Service之后,一种新的风格,REST被应用于Web Service.本文主要介绍了Rest构架风格,以及现在Java开发Restful Web Service的主要方式,以及如何实现Restful Web Service的Java和Ajax客户端,最后介绍了Restful Web Service的描述语言WADL.

  6. Do resting brain dynamics predict oddball evoked-potential?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Tien-Wen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oddball paradigm is widely applied to the investigation of cognitive function in neuroscience and in neuropsychiatry. Whether cortical oscillation in the resting state can predict the elicited oddball event-related potential (ERP is still not clear. This study explored the relationship between resting electroencephalography (EEG and oddball ERPs. The regional powers of 18 electrodes across delta, theta, alpha and beta frequencies were correlated with the amplitude and latency of N1, P2, N2 and P3 components of oddball ERPs. A multivariate analysis based on partial least squares (PLS was applied to further examine the spatial pattern revealed by multiple correlations. Results Higher synchronization in the resting state, especially at the alpha spectrum, is associated with higher neural responsiveness and faster neural propagation, as indicated by the higher amplitude change of N1/N2 and shorter latency of P2. None of the resting quantitative EEG indices predict P3 latency and amplitude. The PLS analysis confirms that the resting cortical dynamics which explains N1/N2 amplitude and P2 latency does not show regional specificity, indicating a global property of the brain. Conclusions This study differs from previous approaches by relating dynamics in the resting state to neural responsiveness in the activation state. Our analyses suggest that the neural characteristics carried by resting brain dynamics modulate the earlier/automatic stage of target detection.

  7. Clustering of resting state networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan H Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The goal of the study was to demonstrate a hierarchical structure of resting state activity in the healthy brain using a data-driven clustering algorithm. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The fuzzy-c-means clustering algorithm was applied to resting state fMRI data in cortical and subcortical gray matter from two groups acquired separately, one of 17 healthy individuals and the second of 21 healthy individuals. Different numbers of clusters and different starting conditions were used. A cluster dispersion measure determined the optimal numbers of clusters. An inner product metric provided a measure of similarity between different clusters. The two cluster result found the task-negative and task-positive systems. The cluster dispersion measure was minimized with seven and eleven clusters. Each of the clusters in the seven and eleven cluster result was associated with either the task-negative or task-positive system. Applying the algorithm to find seven clusters recovered previously described resting state networks, including the default mode network, frontoparietal control network, ventral and dorsal attention networks, somatomotor, visual, and language networks. The language and ventral attention networks had significant subcortical involvement. This parcellation was consistently found in a large majority of algorithm runs under different conditions and was robust to different methods of initialization. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The clustering of resting state activity using different optimal numbers of clusters identified resting state networks comparable to previously obtained results. This work reinforces the observation that resting state networks are hierarchically organized.

  8. Genotype adaptability and stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Miodrag

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the primary concerns in breeding programs is a small genotype reaction to environmental factor variation for better usage of yield genetic potential. Particularly if one takes in consideration that yield could van greatly because of more and more variable meteorological conditions. Studies conducted to observe genotype and environmental relations relay on numerous mathematical models, but genotype behavior in various ecological conditions is not, still, precisely defined Major sources of variation influencing genotype behavior in different environments are genotype/environment interaction, genetic background and environmental conditions. These factors could play an important role in establishing growth regions for maximal realization of genotype genetic potential, as well as in selection of genotypes having better response to complex requirements of particular growth region. Stability, the genotype ability to perform high, uniform yield no meter of different environmental conditions, and adaptability, genotype ability to give uniform yield in a different environmental conditions, are two common terms used to define genotype reaction in a consequence of environmental changes. Most of the models dealing with stability and adaptability are based on variation sources appearing under the influence of treatment, multivariate effects and residue. No meter which statistical model is used for GE interaction estimation, there is an opinion that no solid proof for the existence of stable genotypes obtained in breeding programs, which make some space for further investigations. There are still questions to answer dealing with definitions, sources of variation, usage value of existent models and interpretation of the results. .

  9. RESTful Java web services security

    CERN Document Server

    Enríquez, René

    2014-01-01

    A sequential and easy-to-follow guide which allows you to understand the concepts related to securing web apps/services quickly and efficiently, since each topic is explained and described with the help of an example and in a step-by-step manner, helping you to easily implement the examples in your own projects. This book is intended for web application developers who use RESTful web services to power their websites. Prior knowledge of RESTful is not mandatory, but would be advisable.

  10. [Rest for safety: which stakes?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mion, G; Ricouard, S

    2007-01-01

    In 2003 were promulgated the texts regulating rest and safety, in the USA (approved by the ACGME) and in France (January 9th, 2001 and September 14th, 2001). The institution of the "rest for safety", an eleven hours duration interruption of activity, immediately after a night-call, can be viewed as a progress in the search for safety. Several studies showed a link between excessive work hours and occurrence of medical incidents related to tiredness. However published data do not show a link between tiredness and patients endangering. The tiredness resulting from sleep deprivation and disturbances in circadian rhythms is a cumulative phenomenon erased by a period of rest. In spite of a large individual variability, tiredness increases anxiety scores, irritability, depression and it deteriorates cognitive performances. The concept of "prophylactic" rest considers that a subject cannot start, rested, a work if he did not sleep at least 5 hours the previous night, or 12 hours during the previous 48 hours. The second important aspect of the rest for safety is the long-term prevention of potential pathologies in medical staff, in particular burnout syndrome. In our profession, night calls are considered most stressful; the psychological stress related to anticipation and night context causes measurable cardiovascular disturbances in anesthesiologists. Shift-work sleep disorders may induce gastric ulcers, heart attacks, metabolic syndrome, depression and accidents related to somnolence. Long duration work-hours, accompanied by sleep deprivation, may double the risk of car accidents in junior physicians, in whom vigilance levels can compare with those of patients concerned by narcolepsy or with the cognitive disturbances induced by alcohol intoxication. Reduced work-hours improve vigilance and divide by three the rate of serious medical errors. True opportunities of sleep and control of sleep duration at the individual level could be suggested. The idea that taking the

  11. Java与Restful Web Service、

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁赟

    2007-01-01

    近年来Web服务领域发生着翻天覆地的变化,继传统的XML-RPC风格的Web Service之后,一种新的风格,REST被应用于WebService。本文主要介绍了Rest构架风格,以及现在Java开发Restful Web Service的主要方式,以及如何实现Resfful Web Service的Java和Ajax客户端,最后介绍了Restful Web Service的描述语言WADL。

  12. Ballasted photovoltaic module and module arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Danning, Matt

    2011-11-29

    A photovoltaic (PV) module assembly including a PV module and a ballast tray. The PV module includes a PV device and a frame. A PV laminate is assembled to the frame, and the frame includes an arm. The ballast tray is adapted for containing ballast and is removably associated with the PV module in a ballasting state where the tray is vertically under the PV laminate and vertically over the arm to impede overt displacement of the PV module. The PV module assembly can be installed to a flat commercial rooftop, with the PV module and the ballast tray both resting upon the rooftop. In some embodiments, the ballasting state includes corresponding surfaces of the arm and the tray being spaced from one another under normal (low or no wind) conditions, such that the frame is not continuously subjected to a weight of the tray.

  13. Is prepulse modification altered by continuous theta burst stimulation? DAT1 genotype and motor threshold interact on prepulse modification following brain stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notzon, S; Vennewald, N; Gajewska, A; Klahn, A L; Diemer, J; Winter, B; Fohrbeck, I; Arolt, V; Pauli, P; Domschke, K; Zwanzger, P

    2017-03-24

    Previous studies suggest an inhibitory top-down control of the amygdala by the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Both brain regions play a role in the modulation of prepulse modification (PPM) of the acoustic startle response by a pre-stimulus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) can modulate the activity of the PFC and might thus affect PPM. This study tested the effect of inhibitory rTMS on PPM accounting for a genetic variant of the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1). Healthy participants (N = 102) were stimulated with continuous theta burst stimulation (cTBS, an intense form of inhibitory rTMS) or sham treatment over the right PFC. Afterwards, during continuous presentation of a background white noise a louder noise burst was presented either alone (control startle) or preceded by a prepulse. Participants were genotyped for a DAT1 variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism. Two succeeding sessions of cTBS over the right PFC (2 × 600 stimuli with a time lag of 15 min) attenuated averaged prepulse inhibition (PPI) in participants with a high resting motor threshold. An attenuation of PPI induced by prepulses with great distances to the pulse (480, 2000 ms) was observed following active cTBS in participants that were homozygous carriers of the 10-repeat-allele of the DAT1 genotype and had a high resting motor threshold. Our results confirm the importance of the prefrontal cortex for the modulation of PPM. The effects were observed in participants with a high resting motor threshold only, probably because they received a higher dose of cTBS. The effects in homozygous carriers of the DAT1 10-repeat allele confirm the relevance of dopamine for PPM. Conducting an exploratory study we decided against the use of a correction for multiple testing.

  14. 29 CFR 785.18 - Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rest. 785.18 Section 785.18 Labor Regulations Relating to... INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS HOURS WORKED Application of Principles Rest and Meal Periods § 785.18 Rest. Rest periods of short duration, running from 5 minutes to about 20 minutes, are common in...

  15. Genome-wide association studies and resting heart rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the search for genetic variants regulating resting heart rate. In the last 10 years, GWASs have led to the identification of at least 21 novel heart rate loci. These discoveries have provided valuable insights into the mechanisms...... and pathways that regulate heart rate and link heart rate to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. GWASs capture majority of genetic variation in a population sample by utilizing high-throughput genotyping chips measuring genotypes for up to several millions of SNPs across the genome in thousands...... of individuals. This allows the identification of the strongest heart rate associated signals at genome-wide level. While GWASs provide robust statistical evidence of the association of a given genetic locus with heart rate, they are only the starting point for detailed follow-up studies to locate the causal...

  16. Analysis list: REST [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available REST Blood,Breast,Digestive tract,Liver,Neural,Others,Pancreas,Pluripotent stem cel...l,Uterus + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/REST.1.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscienc...edbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/REST.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/REST.10.tsv h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/REST.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchi...ve.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/REST.Breast.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/REST

  17. Disrupted small-world brain networks in moderate Alzheimer's disease: a resting-state FMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohu Zhao

    Full Text Available The small-world organization has been hypothesized to reflect a balance between local processing and global integration in the human brain. Previous multimodal imaging studies have consistently demonstrated that the topological architecture of the brain network is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD. However, these studies have reported inconsistent results regarding the topological properties of brain alterations in AD. One potential explanation for these inconsistent results lies with the diverse homogeneity and distinct progressive stages of the AD involved in these studies, which are thought to be critical factors that might affect the results. We investigated the topological properties of brain functional networks derived from resting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI of carefully selected moderate AD patients and normal controls (NCs. Our results showed that the topological properties were found to be disrupted in AD patients, which showing increased local efficiency but decreased global efficiency. We found that the altered brain regions are mainly located in the default mode network, the temporal lobe and certain subcortical regions that are closely associated with the neuropathological changes in AD. Of note, our exploratory study revealed that the ApoE genotype modulates brain network properties, especially in AD patients.

  18. RESTful web services with Dropwizard

    CERN Document Server

    Dallas, Alexandros

    2014-01-01

    A hands-on focused step-by-step tutorial to help you create Web Service applications using Dropwizard. If you are a software engineer or a web developer and want to learn more about building your own Web Service application, then this is the book for you. Basic knowledge of Java and RESTful Web Service concepts is assumed and familiarity with SQL/MySQL and command-line scripting would be helpful.

  19. Analysis list: Rest [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Rest Muscle,Pluripotent stem cell + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Rest....1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Rest.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bios...ciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Rest.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Rest.Muscle....tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Rest.Pluripotent_stem_ce...ll.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Muscle.gml,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Pluripotent_stem_cell.gml ...

  20. Rest requirements and rest management of personnel in shift work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammell, B.D. [PDG Environmental, Melbourne, FL (United States); Scheuerle, A. [Univ. of Texas, Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A difficulty-weighted shift assignment scheme is proposed for use in prolonged and strenuous field operations such as emergency response, site testing, and short term hazardous waste remediation projects. The purpose of the work rotation plan is to increase productivity, safety, and moral of workers. Job weighting is accomplished by assigning adjustments to the mental and physical intensity of the task, the protective equipment worn, and the climatic conditions. The plan is based on medical studies of sleep deprivation, the effects of rest adjustments, and programs to reduce sleep deprivation and normalize shift schedules.

  1. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also ... of choice to decrease the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) . However, there is a wide variability in ...

  2. Variation in toxicity of a current-use insecticide among resurrected Daphnia pulicaria genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Adam M; Jeyasingh, Punidan D; Belden, Jason B

    2015-04-01

    This study examined how genotypes of Daphnia pulicaria from a single population, separated by thousands of generations of evolution in the wild, differ in their sensitivity to a novel anthropogenic stressor. These genotypes were resurrected from preserved resting eggs isolated from sediments belonging to three time periods: 2002-2008, 1967-1977, and 1301-1646 A.D. Toxicity of the organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos was determined through a series of acute toxicity tests. There was a significant dose-response effect in all genotypes studied. Moreover, significant variation in toxicity among genotypes within each time period was detected. Importantly, a significant effect of time period on sensitivity to chlorpyrifos was found. Analysis of the median effect concentrations (EC50s) for genotypes within each time period indicated that the 1301-1646 genotypes were 2.7 times more sensitive than the 1967-1977 genotypes. This trend may be partially explained by microevolutionary shifts in response to cultural eutrophication.

  3. 75 FR 80746 - Interpretation of Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-23

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 135 Interpretation of Rest Requirements AGENCY: Federal... proposes to interpret the application of 14 CFR 135.263 and the rest requirements of Sec. 135.267(d) to... they will not receive the 10 hours of rest required in a 24-hour period by section 135.267(d...

  4. 78 FR 66865 - Interpretation of Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 135 Interpretation of Rest Requirements AGENCY... application of certain rest requirements during on-demand operations. Section 346 of the FAA Modernization and... finalize the interpretation proposed in Docket No. FAA-2010-1259, relating to rest requirements, and...

  5. The role of resting frontal EEG asymmetry in psychopathology: afferent or efferent filter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatzke-Kopp, Lisa M; Jetha, Michelle K; Segalowitz, Sidney J

    2014-01-01

    Resting EEG asymmetry evident early in life is thought to bias affective behaviors and contribute to the development of psychopathology. However, it remains unclear at what stage of information processing this bias occurs. Asymmetry may serve as an afferent filter, modulating emotional reactivity to incoming stimuli; or as an efferent filter, modulating behavioral response tendencies under emotional conditions. This study examines 209 kindergarten children (M = 6.03 years old) to test predictions put forth by the two models. Resting asymmetry was examined in conjunction with electrodermal and cardiac measures of physiological reactivity to four emotion-inducing film clips (fear, sad, happy, anger) and teacher ratings of psychopathology. Results confirm an association between increased right side cortical activation and internalizing symptom severity as well as left activation and externalizing symptom severity. Significant interactions between resting asymmetry and physiological reactivity to emotion indicate that physiological reactivity moderates the association between resting asymmetry and symptoms of psychopathology.

  6. Intrasellar Symptomatic Salivary Gland Rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Chen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic salivary gland tissue in sellar turcica is frequently observed in microscopic examination at autopsy. This tissue is considered clinically silent. Only 2 symptomatic cases have been previously reported. Here we report a 28-year-old woman presenting with galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 6×5-mm nodule in the posterior aspect of the pituitary gland. This nodule showed isointensity on T1- and T2-weighted images and less enhancement on post-contrast T1-weighted images. Transsphenoidal exploration revealed a cystic lesion within the pituitary gland, which consisted of a grayish gelatinous content. The pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of salivary gland rest.

  7. TCR trafficking in resting and stimulated T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geisler, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    constants, the molecular mechanisms, and the proposed physiological roles of TCR trafficking in resting and stimulated T cells. In resting T cells, the TCR slowly and constitutively cycles between the plasma membrane and the intracellular compartment. Constitutive TCR cycling is dependent on the di......Dynamic regulation of TCR expression levels plays important roles in modulating T-cell responses during T-cell development and in mature T cells. TCR expression levels are determined by the rate constants for synthesis, endocytosis, recycling, and degradation. This review examines the rate....../or might ensure an internal store of TCR that can be rerouted to the immunological synapse during the encounter with an antigen-presenting cell....

  8. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  9. (Brassica napus L.) genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-10-05

    Oct 5, 2009 ... The genetic diversity and relationships among rapeseed genotypes were ... dent of environment and plant growth stage, unlimited ..... interactions that lead to the expression of particular traits .... thesis, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Novi Sad. ... in the U.S. hard red winter wheat cultivars as reveled by.

  10. Resting Heart Rate and Auditory Evoked Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Fiuza Regaçone

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between rest heart rate (HR and the components of the auditory evoked-related potentials (ERPs at rest in women. We investigated 21 healthy female university students between 18 and 24 years old. We performed complete audiological evaluation and measurement of heart rate for 10 minutes at rest (heart rate monitor Polar RS800CX and performed ERPs analysis (discrepancy in frequency and duration. There was a moderate negative correlation of the N1 and P3a with rest HR and a strong positive correlation of the P2 and N2 components with rest HR. Larger components of the ERP are associated with higher rest HR.

  11. The cause of ischaemic nocturnal rest pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelnes, Rolf; Bülow, J; Tønnesen, K H

    1988-01-01

    of symptomatology. In two limbs, with a normal peripheral circulation, blood flow decreased by 8 +/- 7%. In five limbs with arterial insufficiency, but no rest pain, blood flow decreased by 16 +/- 8% and in eight limbs with ischaemic nocturnal rest pain blood flow was reduced by 32 +/- 12% during sleep....... It is concluded that nocturnal hypotension is a major factor in the production of nocturnal ischaemic rest pain....

  12. Modulation of human serum glutathione S-transferase A1/2 concentration by cruciferous vegetables in a controlled feeding study is influenced by GSTM1 and GSTT1 genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Sandi L; Chang, Jyh-Lurn; Peterson, Sabrina; Chen, Chu; King, Irena B; Schwarz, Yvonne; Li, Shuying S; Li, Lin; Potter, John D; Lampe, Johanna W

    2009-11-01

    Glutathione S-transferases (GST) detoxify a wide range of carcinogens. Isothiocyanates (ITC), from cruciferous vegetables, are substrates for and inducers of GST. GST variants may alter ITC clearance such that response to crucifers varies by genotype. In a randomized cross-over trial, we tested the hypothesis that changes in serum GSTA1/2 concentration in response to cruciferous vegetable feeding depends on GSTM1/GSTT1 genotype. Thirty-three men and 34 women (age 20-40 years) ate four 14-day controlled diets--basal (vegetable-free), basal supplemented with two different doses of crucifers ("single dose" and "double dose"), and single-dose cruciferous-plus-apiaceous vegetables--fed per kilogram of body weight. Fasting bloods from days 0, 7, 11, and 14 of each diet period were analyzed for serum GSTA1/2 by ELISA. GSTA1/2 increased with single- and double-dose cruciferous compared with basal diet (10% and 13%, respectively; P = 0.02 and 0.004), but cruciferous-plus-apiaceous did not differ from basal (P = 0.59). Overall, GSTA1/2 was higher in GSTM1-null/GSTT1-null than GSTM1+/GSTT1+ individuals (4,198 +/- 338 and 3,372 +/- 183 pg/mL; P = 0.03). The formal interaction of genotype-by-diet was not statistically significant, but the GSTA1/2 increase during the single-dose cruciferous diet was among GSTM1-null/GSTT1-null individuals (by 28%; P = 0.008), largely explained by GSTM1-null/GSTT1-null men (by 41%; P = 0.01). GSTA1/2 increased during the double-dose cruciferous diet in both GSTM1-null/GSTT1-null men (by 35%; P = 0.04) and GSTM1+/GSTT1+ men (by 26%; P = 0.01) but not in women. In summary, cruciferous vegetable supplementation increased GSTA1/2, but the effect was most marked in GSTM1-null/GSTT1-null men.

  13. Resting-state functional connectivity changes in aging apoE4 and apoE-KO mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zerbi, V.; Wiesmann, M.; Emmerzaal, T.L.; Jansen, D.; Beek, M. van; Mutsaers, M.P.C.; Beckmann, C.F.; Heerschap, A.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the cholesterol-transporter apolipoprotein epsilon (APOE) genotype is associated with the risk of developing neuro-degenerative diseases. Recently, brain functional connectivity (FC) in apoE-epsilon 4 carriers has been investigated by means of resting-state fMRI, showing

  14. Resting-state functional connectivity changes in aging apoE4 and apoE-KO mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zerbi, V.; Wiesmann, M.; Emmerzaal, T.L.; Jansen, D.; Beek, M. van; Mutsaers, M.P.; Beckmann, C.F.; Heerschap, A.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the cholesterol-transporter apolipoprotein epsilon (APOE) genotype is associated with the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, brain functional connectivity (FC) in apoE-epsilon4 carriers has been investigated by means of resting-state fMRI, showing a

  15. Resting-state functional connectivity changes in aging apoE4 and apoE-KO mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zerbi, V.; Wiesmann, M.; Emmerzaal, T.L.; Jansen, D.; Beek, M. van; Mutsaers, M.P.C.; Beckmann, C.F.; Heerschap, A.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the cholesterol-transporter apolipoprotein epsilon (APOE) genotype is associated with the risk of developing neuro-degenerative diseases. Recently, brain functional connectivity (FC) in apoE-epsilon 4 carriers has been investigated by means of resting-state fMRI, showing

  16. Resting-state functional connectivity changes in aging apoE4 and apoE-KO mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zerbi, V.; Wiesmann, M.; Emmerzaal, T.L.; Jansen, D.; Beek, M. van; Mutsaers, M.P.; Beckmann, C.F.; Heerschap, A.; Kiliaan, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the cholesterol-transporter apolipoprotein epsilon (APOE) genotype is associated with the risk of developing neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, brain functional connectivity (FC) in apoE-epsilon4 carriers has been investigated by means of resting-state fMRI, showing a

  17. Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Kayhan Azadmanesh; Safie Amini; Seyed-Moayed Alavian; Malek Hossein Ahmadipour

    2005-01-01

    IntroductionHepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important cause of chronic liver disease. HCV causes 20% of acute hepatitis cases, 70% of all chronic hepatitis cases, 40% of all cases of liver cirrhosis, 60% of hepatocellular carcinomas, and 30% of liver transplants in Europe(1). It is also recognized as the leading cause of liver transplantation in the world(2). Only 20% of infected individuals will recover from this viral infection, while the rest become chronically infected(3). While the majorit...

  18. SNP genotyping technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studer, Bruno; Kölliker, Roland

    2013-01-01

    for this is the availability of high-throughput platforms for multiplexed SNP genotyping. Advancements in these technologies have enabled increased flexibility and throughput, allowing for the generation of adequate SNP marker data at very competitive cost per data point.......In the recent years, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have emerged as the marker technology of choice for plant genetics and breeding applications. Besides the efficient technologies available for SNP discovery even in complex genomes, one of the main reasons...

  19. SNP genotyping technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Studer, Bruno; Kölliker, Roland

    2013-01-01

    In the recent years, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers have emerged as the marker technology of choice for plant genetics and breeding applications. Besides the efficient technologies available for SNP discovery even in complex genomes, one of the main reasons...... for this is the availability of high-throughput platforms for multiplexed SNP genotyping. Advancements in these technologies have enabled increased flexibility and throughput, allowing for the generation of adequate SNP marker data at very competitive cost per data point....

  20. Cognitive Rest: An Integrated Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Kathleen H.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive rest has been suggested as a treatment for school athletes who have sustained a concussion, but the concept has rarely been defined. The purpose of this article is to provide a comprehensive definition of cognitive rest, based on an integrative literature review. The method of synthesis was guided by Avant and Walker's concept analysis…

  1. International Standardization of Bed Rest Standard Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation gives an overview of the standardization of bed rest measures. The International Countermeasures Working Group attempted to define and agree internationally on standard measurements for spaceflight based bed rest studies. The group identified the experts amongst several stakeholder agencys. It included information on exercise, muscle, neurological, psychological, bone and cardiovascular measures.

  2. DPABI: Data Processing & Analysis for (Resting-State) Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chao-Gan; Wang, Xin-Di; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2016-07-01

    Brain imaging efforts are being increasingly devoted to decode the functioning of the human brain. Among neuroimaging techniques, resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) is currently expanding exponentially. Beyond the general neuroimaging analysis packages (e.g., SPM, AFNI and FSL), REST and DPARSF were developed to meet the increasing need of user-friendly toolboxes for R-fMRI data processing. To address recently identified methodological challenges of R-fMRI, we introduce the newly developed toolbox, DPABI, which was evolved from REST and DPARSF. DPABI incorporates recent research advances on head motion control and measurement standardization, thus allowing users to evaluate results using stringent control strategies. DPABI also emphasizes test-retest reliability and quality control of data processing. Furthermore, DPABI provides a user-friendly pipeline analysis toolkit for rat/monkey R-fMRI data analysis to reflect the rapid advances in animal imaging. In addition, DPABI includes preprocessing modules for task-based fMRI, voxel-based morphometry analysis, statistical analysis and results viewing. DPABI is designed to make data analysis require fewer manual operations, be less time-consuming, have a lower skill requirement, a smaller risk of inadvertent mistakes, and be more comparable across studies. We anticipate this open-source toolbox will assist novices and expert users alike and continue to support advancing R-fMRI methodology and its application to clinical translational studies.

  3. Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Genotypes in Pediatric Migraine Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygi, Semra; Erol, İlknur; Alehan, Füsun; Yalçın, Yaprak Yılmaz; Kubat, Gözde; Ataç, Fatma Belgin

    2015-10-01

    This study compared superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) alleles in 97 consecutive children and adolescents with migraine to 96 healthy children and adolescents. Isolated genomic DNA was used as a template for SOD1 (35 A/C), SOD2 16 C/T, and CAT2 [(-262 C/T) and (-21 A/T)] allele genotyping. The SOD2 16 C/T genotype and C allele frequency differed significantly between controls and migraine (P = .047; P = .038). CAT -21 AA genotype and A allele frequency were significantly higher in both migraine with aura patients (P = .013; P = .004) and migraine without aura patients (P = .003; P = .001) compared to controls. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of differences in SOD and CAT genotypes between pediatric migraine patients and age-matched controls. Further studies on the functional implications of these genetic variants on neural antioxidant capacity and the use of antioxidant modulators for migraine treatment are warranted.

  4. Susceptibility of biallelic haplotype and genotype frequencies to genotyping error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskvina, Valentina; Schmidt, Karl Michael

    2006-12-01

    With the availability of fast genotyping methods and genomic databases, the search for statistical association of single nucleotide polymorphisms with a complex trait has become an important methodology in medical genetics. However, even fairly rare errors occurring during the genotyping process can lead to spurious association results and decrease in statistical power. We develop a systematic approach to study how genotyping errors change the genotype distribution in a sample. The general M-marker case is reduced to that of a single-marker locus by recognizing the underlying tensor-product structure of the error matrix. Both method and general conclusions apply to the general error model; we give detailed results for allele-based errors of size depending both on the marker locus and the allele present. Multiple errors are treated in terms of the associated diffusion process on the space of genotype distributions. We find that certain genotype and haplotype distributions remain unchanged under genotyping errors, and that genotyping errors generally render the distribution more similar to the stable one. In case-control association studies, this will lead to loss of statistical power for nondifferential genotyping errors and increase in type I error for differential genotyping errors. Moreover, we show that allele-based genotyping errors do not disturb Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in the genotype distribution. In this setting we also identify maximally affected distributions. As they correspond to situations with rare alleles and marker loci in high linkage disequilibrium, careful checking for genotyping errors is advisable when significant association based on such alleles/haplotypes is observed in association studies.

  5. Anterior Thalamic High Frequency Band Activity Is Coupled with Theta Oscillations at Rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Sweeney-Reed

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cross-frequency coupling (CFC between slow and fast brain rhythms, in the form of phase–amplitude coupling (PAC, is proposed to enable the coordination of neural oscillatory activity required for cognitive processing. PAC has been identified in the neocortex and mesial temporal regions, varying according to the cognitive task being performed and also at rest. PAC has also been observed in the anterior thalamic nucleus (ATN during memory processing. The thalamus is active during the resting state and has been proposed to be involved in switching between task-free cognitive states such as rest, in which attention is internally-focused, and externally-focused cognitive states, in which an individual engages with environmental stimuli. It is unknown whether PAC is an ongoing phenomenon during the resting state in the ATN, which is modulated during different cognitive states, or whether it only arises during the performance of specific tasks. We analyzed electrophysiological recordings of ATN activity during rest from seven patients who received thalamic electrodes implanted for treatment of pharmacoresistant focal epilepsy. PAC was identified between theta (4–6 Hz phase and high frequency band (80–150 Hz amplitude during rest in all seven patients, which diminished during engagement in tasks involving an external focus of attention. The findings are consistent with the proposal that theta–gamma coupling in the ATN is an ongoing phenomenon, which is modulated by task performance.

  6. Resting-State Alpha in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Alpha Associations with Thalamic Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, J. Christopher; Heiken, Kory; Chen, Yu-Han; Herrington, John D.; Chow, Vivian; Liu, Song; Bloy, Luke; Huang, Mingxiong; Pandey, Juhi; Cannon, Katelyn M.; Qasmieh, Saba; Levy, Susan E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Roberts, Timothy P. L.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha circuits (8-12 Hz), necessary for basic and complex brain processes, are abnormal in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study obtained estimates of resting-state (RS) alpha activity in children with ASD and examined associations between alpha activity, age, and clinical symptoms. Given that the thalamus modulates cortical RS alpha…

  7. Visible Genotype Sensor Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Imai

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A visible sensor array system for simultaneous multiple SNP genotyping has been developed using a new plastic base with specific surface chemistry. Discrimination of SNP alleles is carried out by an allele-specific extension reaction using immobilized oligonucleotide primers. The 3’-ends of oligonucleotide primers are modified with a locked nucleic acid to enhance their efficiency in allelic discrimination. Biotin-dUTPs included in the reaction mixture are selectively incorporated into extending primer sequences and are utilized as tags for alkaline phosphatase-mediated precipitation of colored chemical substrates onto the surface of the plastic base. The visible precipitates allow immediate inspection of typing results by the naked eye and easy recording by a digital camera equipped on a commercial mobile phone. Up to four individuals can be analyzed on a single sensor array and multiple sensor arrays can be handled in a single operation. All of the reactions can be performed within one hour using conventional laboratory instruments. This visible genotype sensor array is suitable for “focused genomics” that follows “comprehensive genomics”.

  8. Elegants ja eklektika - Rest Art / Lylian Meister

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Meister, Lylian, 1966-

    2007-01-01

    Tallinnas Mustika keskuses asuvas sisustussalongis Rest Art pakutavast. Asjade müümise kõrval pakutakse kodudele ja hotellidele-restoranidele terviklahendusi. Salongi kujundas Kard Männil. 4 värv. vaadet

  9. RESTful Java patterns and best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Mehta, Bhakti

    2014-01-01

    This book is aimed at novice developers who want to gain insights into building RESTful services and improve productivity, as well as for advanced developers who want to delve into more complicated topics.

  10. Elegants ja eklektika - Rest Art / Lylian Meister

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Meister, Lylian, 1966-

    2007-01-01

    Tallinnas Mustika keskuses asuvas sisustussalongis Rest Art pakutavast. Asjade müümise kõrval pakutakse kodudele ja hotellidele-restoranidele terviklahendusi. Salongi kujundas Kard Männil. 4 värv. vaadet

  11. Rest Areas in the Western United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Rest areas in the western United States. Data was collected from various data sources including georeferenced locations obtained from other agencies, digitizied...

  12. Is bed rest following embryo transfer necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, K; Afnan, M; Lashen, H; Elgendy, M; Morgan, C; Sinclair, L

    1998-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of no bed rest following ET on the results of an IVF program. Historical cohort-control study. A University-based assisted conception unit. One thousand and nineteen (1019) IVF cycles were performed at our unit from June 1994 to August 1996. The historical control consisted of all the 19,697 IVF cycles reported in the United Kingdom national database from April 1994 to March 1995. No bed rest following ET in our patients. Pregnancy rate (PR) and clinical PR per cycles started and per ET procedure. The clinical PR per ET was significantly higher in our patients than in the national data (30% versus 22.9%), as was the clinical PR per cycle (23.5% versus 18.6%). The implantation rate in our patients was 17.2%. The favorable PR in our patients despite no bed rest following ET suggests the bed rest is not necessary.

  13. Resting heart rate estimation using PIR sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapu, Hemanth; Saraswat, Kavisha; Ozturk, Yusuf; Cetin, A. Enis

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a non-invasive and non-contact system of estimating resting heart rate (RHR) using a pyroelectric infrared (PIR) sensor. This infrared system monitors and records the chest motion of a subject using the analog output signal of the PIR sensor. The analog output signal represents the composite motion due to inhale-exhale process with magnitude much larger than the minute vibrations of heartbeat. Since the acceleration of the heart activity is much faster than breathing the second derivative of the PIR sensor signal monitoring the chest of the subject is used to estimate the resting heart rate. Experimental results indicate that this ambient sensor can measure resting heart rate with a chi-square significance level of α = 0.05 compared to an industry standard PPG sensor. This new system provides a low cost and an effective way to estimate the resting heart rate, which is an important biological marker.

  14. USAJOBS Job Opportunity Announcements (JOA) REST API

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — This REST-based API is designed to support lightweight Federal Job Opportunity Announcement (JOA) content consumption by consumers. It is anticipated that this API...

  15. REST advanced research topics and practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wilde, Erik; Alarcon, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This book serves as a starting point for people looking for a deeper principled understanding of REST, its applications, its limitations, and current research work in the area and as an architectural style. The authors focus on applying REST beyond Web applications (i.e., in enterprise environments), and in reusing established and well-understood design patterns. The book examines how RESTful systems can be designed and deployed, and what the results are in terms of benefits and challenges encountered in the process. This book is intended for information and service architects and designers who are interested in learning about REST, how it is applied, and how it is being advanced.

  16. Human papillomavirus infections in women seeking cervical Papanicolaou cytology of Durango, Mexico: prevalence and genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyes-Romero Miguel

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HPV infection in women from developing countries is an important public health problem. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalences of HPV infection and HPV genotypes in a female population of Durango City, Mexico. Also to determine whether any socio-demographic characteristic from the women associated with HPV infection exists. Methods Four hundred and ninety eight women seeking cervical Papanicolaou examination in three public Health Centers were examined for HPV infection. All women were tested for HPV DNA PCR by using HPV universal primers. In addition, all positive HPV DNA PCR samples were further analyzed for genotyping of HPV genotype 16, 18 and 33. Socio-demographic characteristics from each participant were also obtained. Results Twenty-four out of four hundred and ninety-eight (4.8% women were found infected by HPV. HPV genotype 16 was found in 18 out of the 24 (75% infected women. Two of them were also coinfected by HPV genotype 18 (8.3%. In the rest 6 PCR positive women, genotyping for HPV genotypes 16, 18 and 33 were negative. Conclusion The prevalence of HPV in women of Durango City is low; however, most infected women have high risk HPV genotype. The women who were studied showed low frequency of risk factors for HPV infection and this may explain the low prevalence of HPV infection. The high frequency of high risk HPV genotypes observed might explain the high rate of mortality for cervical cancer in our region.

  17. ReSTful OSGi Web Applications Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Khawaja; Norris, Jeff

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation accompanies a tutorial on the ReSTful (Representational State Transfer) web application. Using Open Services Gateway Initiative (OSGi), ReST uses HTTP protocol to enable developers to offer services to a diverse variety of clients: from shell scripts to sophisticated Java application suites. It also uses Eclipse for the rapid development, the Eclipse debugger, the test application, and the ease of export to production servers.

  18. Laboratory Information Management Software for genotyping workflows: applications in high throughput crop genotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanth VP

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the advances in DNA sequencer-based technologies, it has become possible to automate several steps of the genotyping process leading to increased throughput. To efficiently handle the large amounts of genotypic data generated and help with quality control, there is a strong need for a software system that can help with the tracking of samples and capture and management of data at different steps of the process. Such systems, while serving to manage the workflow precisely, also encourage good laboratory practice by standardizing protocols, recording and annotating data from every step of the workflow. Results A laboratory information management system (LIMS has been designed and implemented at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT that meets the requirements of a moderately high throughput molecular genotyping facility. The application is designed as modules and is simple to learn and use. The application leads the user through each step of the process from starting an experiment to the storing of output data from the genotype detection step with auto-binning of alleles; thus ensuring that every DNA sample is handled in an identical manner and all the necessary data are captured. The application keeps track of DNA samples and generated data. Data entry into the system is through the use of forms for file uploads. The LIMS provides functions to trace back to the electrophoresis gel files or sample source for any genotypic data and for repeating experiments. The LIMS is being presently used for the capture of high throughput SSR (simple-sequence repeat genotyping data from the legume (chickpea, groundnut and pigeonpea and cereal (sorghum and millets crops of importance in the semi-arid tropics. Conclusion A laboratory information management system is available that has been found useful in the management of microsatellite genotype data in a moderately high throughput genotyping

  19. STR MARKERS. GENOTYPING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. O. Sirbu

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available STR (short tandem repeats loci consist of short, repetitive sequence elements of 2-8 bp in length. These abundant repeats are well distributed throughout the human genome and are rich source of highly polymorphic markers. There are literally hundreds of STR systems which have been mapped throughout the human genome. Several dozen have been investigated for application to human identity testing. These STR loci are found on almost every chromosome in the genome. They may be amplified using a variety of PCR primers. Tetranucleotide repeats have been most popular among forensic scientists due to their fidelity in PCR amplification although some tri- and pentanucleotide repeats are also in use. In this paper we intend (far from being exhaustive to present a synthesis of the characteristics of these genetic markers and their applications in genotyping, giving as an example the use of the STRs in a paternity testing case.

  20. Never resting brain: simultaneous representation of two alpha related processes in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eti Ben-Simon

    Full Text Available Brain activity is continuously modulated, even at "rest". The alpha rhythm (8-12 Hz has been known as the hallmark of the brain's idle-state. However, it is still debated if the alpha rhythm reflects synchronization in a distributed network or focal generator and whether it occurs spontaneously or is driven by a stimulus. This EEG/fMRI study aimed to explore the source of alpha modulations and their distribution in the resting brain. By serendipity, while computing the individually defined power modulations of the alpha-band, two simultaneously occurring components of these modulations were found. An 'induced alpha' that was correlated with the paradigm (eyes open/ eyes closed, and a 'spontaneous alpha' that was on-going and unrelated to the paradigm. These alpha components when used as regressors for BOLD activation revealed two segregated activation maps: the 'induced map' included left lateral temporal cortical regions and the hippocampus; the 'spontaneous map' included prefrontal cortical regions and the thalamus. Our combined fMRI/EEG approach allowed to computationally untangle two parallel patterns of alpha modulations and underpin their anatomical basis in the human brain. These findings suggest that the human alpha rhythm represents at least two simultaneously occurring processes which characterize the 'resting brain'; one is related to expected change in sensory information, while the other is endogenous and independent of stimulus change.

  1. Differential activation of dendritic cells by Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Martínez, Juana Elizabeth; Nieto-Patlán, Erik; Nieto-Patlán, Alejandro; Gonzaga-Bernachi, Job; Santos-Mendoza, Teresa; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Chávez-Blanco, Alma; Sandoval-Montes, Claudia; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) inhibits dendritric cells (DC) function in order to delay T cell response. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence that genetic diversity of Mtb strains can affect their interaction with the immune system. Beijing genotype has attracted attention because of its high prevalence and multi-drug resistance. Although it is known that this genotype is hypervirulent and differentially activates macrophages when compared to other genotypes, little is known about its interaction with DC. In order to address this issue, murine bone marrow derived DC (BMDC) were stimulated with soluble extracts (SE) from BCG, H37Rv, Canetti and Beijing genotypes. We observed that unlike other mycobacteria strains, SE-Beijing was unable to induce maturation of DC as assessed by cell surface MHC-II expression. DC stimulated with SE-Beijing failed to produce IL-12 and TNF-α, but did secrete IL-10. Interestingly, SE-Beijing induced CCR7 and PDL-1 on BMDC, but did not induce the expression of CD86. When BMDC stimulated with SE-Beijing were used to activate CD4+ cells they were unable to induce a Th1 response when compared with less virulent genotypes. These results indicate that Beijing is able to modulate DC activation and function, which may be related to the pathogenesis induced by this genotype.

  2. HBV genotypic variability in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Carmen L; Aguilar, Julio C; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions.

  3. HBV Genotypic Variability in Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loureiro, Carmen L.; Aguilar, Julio C.; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions. PMID:25742179

  4. Hepatitis C virus genotypes distribution and transmission risk factors in Luxembourg from 1991 to 2006

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype distribution and transmission risk factors in a population of unselected patients in Luxembourg. METHODS: Epidemiological information (gender, age and transmission risks) were collected from 802patients newly diagnosed for hepatitis C and living in Luxembourg, among whom 228 patients referred from prison. Genotyping using 5'noncoding (5'NC) sequencing was performed. We compared categorical data using the Fisher's exact F-test and odds ratios (OR) were calculated for evaluating association of HCV genotype and risk factors. RESULTS: The sex ratio was predominantly male (2.2) and individuals aged less than 40 years represented 49.6% of the population. Genotype l was predominant (53.4%) followed by genotype 3 (33%). Among risk factors, intravenous drug usage (IVDU) was the most frequently reported (71.4%) followed by medical-related transmission (17.6%) including haernophilia, transfusion recipients and other nosocomial reasons. Genotype 3was significantly associated to IVDU (OR=4.84,P<0.0001= whereas genotype l was significantly associated with a medical procedure (OR = 2.42,P<0.001=.The HCV genotype distribution from inmate patients differed significantly from the rest of the population (Chi-square test with four degrees of freedom, P<0.0001= with a higher frequency of genotype 3 (46.5% vs 27.5%) and a lower frequency of genotype 1 and 4 (44.7% vs 56.8%and 5.3% vs 9.6%,respectively).IVDU was nearly exclusively reported as a risk factor in prison. CONCLUSION: We report the first description of the HCV genotype distribution in Luxembourg. The repartition is similar to other European countries, with one of the highest European prevalence rates of genotype 3 (33%). Since serology screening became available in 1991,IVDU remains the most common way of HCV transmission in Luxembourg.

  5. Local synchronization of resting-state dynamics encodes Gray's trait Anxiety.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Hahn

    Full Text Available The Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS as defined within the Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST modulates reactions to stimuli indicating aversive events. Gray's trait Anxiety determines the extent to which stimuli activate the BIS. While studies have identified the amygdala-septo-hippocampal circuit as the key-neural substrate of this system in recent years and measures of resting-state dynamics such as randomness and local synchronization of spontaneous BOLD fluctuations have recently been linked to personality traits, the relation between resting-state dynamics and the BIS remains unexplored. In the present study, we thus examined the local synchronization of spontaneous fMRI BOLD fluctuations as measured by Regional Homogeneity (ReHo in the hippocampus and the amygdala in twenty-seven healthy subjects. Correlation analyses showed that Gray's trait Anxiety was significantly associated with mean ReHo in both the amygdala and the hippocampus. Specifically, Gray's trait Anxiety explained 23% and 17% of resting-state ReHo variance in the left amygdala and the left hippocampus, respectively. In summary, we found individual differences in Gray's trait Anxiety to be associated with ReHo in areas previously associated with BIS functioning. Specifically, higher ReHo in resting-state neural dynamics corresponded to lower sensitivity to punishment scores both in the amygdala and the hippocampus. These findings corroborate and extend recent findings relating resting-state dynamics and personality while providing first evidence linking properties of resting-state fluctuations to Gray's BIS.

  6. Resting heart rate variability after yogic training and swimming: A prospective randomized comparative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawane, Manish Vinayak; Gupta, Shilpa Sharad

    2015-01-01

    Resting heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of the modulation of autonomic nervous system (ANS) at rest. Increased HRV achieved by the exercise is good for the cardiovascular health. However, prospective studies with comparison of the effects of yogic exercises and those of other endurance exercises like walking, running, and swimming on resting HRV are conspicuous by their absence. Study was designed to assess and compare the effects of yogic training and swimming on resting HRV in normal healthy young volunteers. Study was conducted in Department of Physiology in a medical college. Study design was prospective randomized comparative trial. One hundred sedentary volunteers were randomly ascribed to either yoga or swimming group. Baseline recordings of digital electrocardiogram were done for all the subjects in cohorts of 10. After yoga training and swimming for 12 weeks, evaluation for resting HRV was done again. Percentage change for each parameter with yoga and swimming was compared using unpaired t-test for data with normal distribution and using Mann-Whitney U test for data without normal distribution. Most of the HRV parameters improved statistically significantly by both modalities of exercise. However, some of the HRV parameters showed statistically better improvement with yoga as compared to swimming. Practicing yoga seems to be the mode of exercise with better improvement in autonomic functions as suggested by resting HRV.

  7. Exercise countermeasures for bed-rest deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose for this 30-day bed rest study was to investigate the effects of short-term, high intensity isotonic and isokinetic exercise training on maintenance of working capacity (peak oxygen uptake), muscular strength and endurance, and on orthostatic tolerance, posture and gait. Other data were collected on muscle atrophy, bone mineralization and density, endocrine analyses concerning vasoactivity and fluid-electrolyte balance, muscle intermediary metabolism, and on performance and mood of the subjects. It was concluded that: The subjects maintained a relatively stable mood, high morale, and high esprit de corps throughout the study. Performance improved in nearly all tests in almost all the subjects. Isotonic training, as opposed to isokinetic exercise training, was associated more with decreasing levels of psychological tension, concentration, and motivation; and improvement in the quality of sleep. Working capacity (peak oxygen uptake) was maintained during bed rest with isotonic exercise training; it was not maintained with isokinetic or no exercise training. In general, there was no significant decrease in strength or endurance of arm or leg muscles during bed rest, in spite of some reduction in muscle size (atrophy) of some leg muscles. There was no effect of isotonic exercise training on orthostasis, since tilt-table tolerance was reduced similarly in all three groups following bed rest. Bed rest resulted in significant decreases of postural stability and self-selected step length, stride length, and walking velocity, which were not influenced by either exercise training regimen. Most pre-bed rest responses were restored by the fourth day of recovery.

  8. Dose and effect of inhaled ozone in resting versus exercising human subjects: comparison with resting rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose and effect of inhaled ozone in resting versus exercising human subjects: comparison with resting rats Authors: Gary E. Hatch, John McKee, James Brown, Bill McDonnell, Elston Seal, Joleen Soukup, Ralph Slade, Kay Crissman and Robert Devlin, National Health and Environmental...

  9. REST in practice Hypermedia and systems architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Webber, Jim; Robinson, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Why don't typical enterprise projects go as smoothly as projects you develop for the Web? Does the REST architectural style really present a viable alternative for building distributed systems and enterprise-class applications? In this insightful book, three SOA experts provide a down-to-earth explanation of REST and demonstrate how you can develop simple and elegant distributed hypermedia systems by applying the Web's guiding principles to common enterprise computing problems. You'll learn techniques for implementing specific Web technologies and patterns to solve the needs of a typical com

  10. The impact of stimulus valence and emotion regulation on sustained brain activation: task-rest switching in emotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamke, Jan-Peter; Daniels, Judith K; Dörfel, Denise; Gaebler, Michael; Abdel Rahman, Rasha; Hummel, Falk; Erk, Susanne; Walter, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    Task-rest interactions, defined as the modulation of brain activation during fixation periods depending on the preceding stimulation and experimental manipulation, have been described repeatedly for different cognitively demanding tasks in various regions across the brain. However, task-rest interactions in emotive paradigms have received considerably less attention. In this study, we therefore investigated task-rest interactions evoked by the induction and instructed regulation of negative emotion. Whole-brain, functional MRI data were acquired from 55 healthy participants. Two-level general linear model statistics were computed to test for differences between conditions, separately for stimulation and for fixation periods, as well as for interactions between stimulation and fixation (task-rest interactions). Results showed that the regulation of negative emotion led to reverse task-rest interactions (decreased activation during stimulation but increased activation during fixation) in the amygdala as well as in visual cortex regions and to concordant task-rest interactions (increased activation during both, stimulation and fixation) in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex as well as in a number of brain regions at the intersection of the default mode and the dorsal attention networks. Thus, this first whole-brain investigation of task-rest interactions following the induction and regulation of negative emotion identified a widespread specific modulation of brain activation in regions subserving emotion generation and regulation as well as regions implicated in attention and default mode.

  11. Genotype transposer: automated genotype manipulation for linkage disequilibrium analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D G; Canzian, F

    2001-08-01

    The purpose of this work is to provide the modern molecular geneticist with tools to perform more efficient and more accurate analysis of the genotype data they produce. By using Microsoft Excel macros written in Visual Basic, we can translate genotype data into a form readable by the versatile software 'Arlequin', read the Arlequin output, calculate statistics of linkage disequilibrium, and put the results in a format for viewing with the software 'GOLD'. The software is available by FTP at: ftp://xcsg.iarc.fr/cox/Genotype_Transposer/. Detailed instruction and examples are available at: ftp://xcsg.iarc.fr/cox/Genotype&_Transposer/. Arlequin is available at: http://lgb.unige.ch/arlequin/. GOLD is available at: http://www.well.ox.ac.uk/asthma/GOLD/.

  12. The Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire reveals multiple phenotypes of resting-state cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, B Alexander; Van Der Sluis, Sophie; Moens, Sarah; Benjamins, Jeroen S; Migliorati, Filippo; Stoffers, Diederick; Den Braber, Anouk; Poil, Simon-Shlomo; Hardstone, Richard; Van't Ent, Dennis; Boomsma, Dorret I; De Geus, Eco; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Van Someren, Eus J W; Linkenkaer-Hansen, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Resting-state neuroimaging is a dominant paradigm for studying brain function in health and disease. It is attractive for clinical research because of its simplicity for patients, straightforward standardization, and sensitivity to brain disorders. Importantly, non-sensory experiences like mind wandering may arise from ongoing brain activity. However, little is known about the link between ongoing brain activity and cognition, as phenotypes of resting-state cognition-and tools to quantify them-have been lacking. To facilitate rapid and structured measurements of resting-state cognition we developed a 50-item self-report survey, the Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ). Based on ARSQ data from 813 participants assessed after 5 min eyes-closed rest in their home, we identified seven dimensions of resting-state cognition using factor analysis: Discontinuity of Mind, Theory of Mind, Self, Planning, Sleepiness, Comfort, and Somatic Awareness. Further, we showed that the structure of cognition was similar during resting-state fMRI and EEG, and that the test-retest correlations were remarkably high for all dimensions. To explore whether inter-individual variation of resting-state cognition is related to health status, we correlated ARSQ-derived factor scores with psychometric scales measuring depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Mental health correlated positively with Comfort and negatively with Discontinuity of Mind. Finally, we show that sleepiness may partially explain a resting-state EEG profile previously associated with Alzheimer's disease. These findings indicate that the ARSQ readily provides information about cognitive phenotypes and that it is a promising tool for research on the neural correlates of resting-state cognition in health and disease.

  13. The Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire reveals multiple phenotypes of resting-state cognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Alexander eDiaz

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Resting-state neuroimaging is a dominant paradigm for studying brain function in health and disease. It is attractive for clinical research because of its simplicity for patients, straightforward standardization, and sensitivity to brain disorders. Importantly, non-sensory experiences like mind wandering may arise from ongoing brain activity. However, little is known about the link between ongoing brain activity and cognition, as phenotypes of resting-state cognition—and tools to quantify them—have been lacking. To facilitate rapid and structured measurements of resting-state cognition we developed a 50-item self-report survey, the Amsterdam Resting-State Questionnaire (ARSQ. Based on ARSQ data from 813 participants assessed after five minutes eyes-closed rest in their home, we identified seven dimensions of resting-state cognition using factor analysis: Discontinuity of Mind, Theory of Mind, Self, Planning, Sleepiness, Comfort, and Somatic Awareness. Further, we showed that the structure of cognition was similar during resting-state fMRI and EEG, and that the test-retest correlations were remarkably high for all dimensions. To explore whether inter-individual variation of resting-state cognition is related to health status, we correlated ARSQ-derived factor scores with psychometric scales measuring depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Mental health correlated positively with Comfort and negatively with Discontinuity of Mind. Finally, we show that sleepiness may partially explain a resting-state EEG profile previously associated with Alzheimer’s disease. These findings indicate that the ARSQ readily provides information about cognitive phenotypes and that it is a promising tool for research on the neural correlates of resting-state cognition in health and disease.

  14. Resting EEG asymmetry and spider phobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merckelbach, H; Muris, P; Pool, K; de Jong, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This study examined whether resting EEG asymmetries are related to symptom severity and treatment outcome in spider phobia. Prior to treatment, EEG was recorded in a sample of spider phobic patients (N = 16). Correlations between frontal and parietal asymmetries in alpha power, on the one hand, and

  15. Wakeful rest alleviates interference-based forgetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Retroactive interference (RI)--the disruptive influence of events occurring after the formation of a new memory--is one of the primary causes of forgetting. Placing individuals within an environment that postpones interference should, therefore, greatly reduce the likelihood of information being lost from memory. For example, a short period of wakeful rest should diminish interference-based forgetting. To test this hypothesis, participants took part in a foreign language learning activity and were shown English translations of 20 Icelandic words for immediate recall. Half of the participants were then given an 8-min rest before completing a similar or dissimilar interfering distractor task. The other half did not receive a rest until after the distractor task, at which point interference had already taken place. All participants were then asked to translate the Icelandic words for a second time. Results revealed that retention was significantly worse at the second recall test, but being allowed a brief rest before completing the distractor task helped reduce the amount of forgetting. Taking a short, passive break can shield new memories from RI and alleviate forgetting.

  16. Positive pressure breathing during rest and exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, E.A. den; Heus, R.

    2003-01-01

    The requirements to maintain a positive pressure with respiratory protection during heavy exercise and the effects on ventilation and feelings of discomfort were investigated. Eight male subjects participated, using the respirator system during rest and exercise at about 80% of their individual

  17. 1 SHORT COMMUNICATION Resting behaviour of Anopheles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-10-04

    Oct 4, 2011 ... resting and feeding behaviour, adult longevity and density as they determine the degree of .... Table 1: Number and density of An.gambiae per room collected using mechanical aspirator and exit trap ... This is the first report on.

  18. Positive pressure breathing during rest and exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartog, E.A. den; Heus, R.

    2003-01-01

    The requirements to maintain a positive pressure with respiratory protection during heavy exercise and the effects on ventilation and feelings of discomfort were investigated. Eight male subjects participated, using the respirator system during rest and exercise at about 80% of their individual maxi

  19. Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    A 30-day 6 deg. head-down bed rest study was conducted to evaluate high-intensity, short-duration, alternating isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regiments designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (acclimation) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (a) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (b) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40%, but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regiments, and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  20. 46 CFR 15.1111 - Work hours and rest periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Work hours and rest periods. 15.1111 Section 15.1111... REQUIREMENTS Vessels Subject to Requirements of STCW § 15.1111 Work hours and rest periods. (a) Each person... shall receive a minimum of 10 hours of rest in any 24-hour period. (b) The hours of rest required under...

  1. 23 CFR 752.5 - Safety rest areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Safety rest areas. 752.5 Section 752.5 Highways FEDERAL... DEVELOPMENT § 752.5 Safety rest areas. (a) Safety rest areas should provide facilities reasonably necessary... may be provided in conjunction with a safety rest area at such locations where accommodations...

  2. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  3. Cardiac atrophy after bed rest and spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhonen, M. A.; Franco, F.; Lane, L. D.; Buckey, J. C.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Peshock, R. M.; Weatherall, P. T.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiac muscle adapts well to changes in loading conditions. For example, left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy may be induced physiologically (via exercise training) or pathologically (via hypertension or valvular heart disease). If hypertension is treated, LV hypertrophy regresses, suggesting a sensitivity to LV work. However, whether physical inactivity in nonathletic populations causes adaptive changes in LV mass or even frank atrophy is not clear. We exposed previously sedentary men to 6 (n = 5) and 12 (n = 3) wk of horizontal bed rest. LV and right ventricular (RV) mass and end-diastolic volume were measured using cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2, 6, and 12 wk of bed rest; five healthy men were also studied before and after at least 6 wk of routine daily activities as controls. In addition, four astronauts were exposed to the complete elimination of hydrostatic gradients during a spaceflight of 10 days. During bed rest, LV mass decreased by 8.0 +/- 2.2% (P = 0.005) after 6 wk with an additional atrophy of 7.6 +/- 2.3% in the subjects who remained in bed for 12 wk; there was no change in LV mass for the control subjects (153.0 +/- 12.2 vs. 153.4 +/- 12.1 g, P = 0.81). Mean wall thickness decreased (4 +/- 2.5%, P = 0.01) after 6 wk of bed rest associated with the decrease in LV mass, suggesting a physiological remodeling with respect to altered load. LV end-diastolic volume decreased by 14 +/- 1.7% (P = 0.002) after 2 wk of bed rest and changed minimally thereafter. After 6 wk of bed rest, RV free wall mass decreased by 10 +/- 2.7% (P = 0.06) and RV end-diastolic volume by 16 +/- 7.9% (P = 0.06). After spaceflight, LV mass decreased by 12 +/- 6.9% (P = 0.07). In conclusion, cardiac atrophy occurs during prolonged (6 wk) horizontal bed rest and may also occur after short-term spaceflight. We suggest that cardiac atrophy is due to a physiological adaptation to reduced myocardial load and work in real or simulated microgravity and demonstrates the plasticity

  4. Cardiac atrophy in women following bed rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Todd A; Levine, Benjamin D; Tillery, Tommy; Peshock, Ronald M; Hastings, Jeff L; Schneider, Suzanne M; Macias, Brandon R; Biolo, Gianni; Hargens, Alan R

    2007-07-01

    Both chronic microgravity exposure and long-duration bed rest induce cardiac atrophy, which leads to reduced standing stroke volume and orthostatic intolerance. However, despite the fact that women appear to be more susceptible to postspaceflight presyncope and orthostatic hypotension than male astronauts, most previous high-resolution studies of cardiac morphology following microgravity have been performed only in men. Because female athletes have less physiological hypertrophy than male athletes, we reasoned that they also might have altered physiological cardiac atrophy after bed rest. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 24 healthy young women (32.1 +/- 4 yr) to measure left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular (RV) mass, volumes, and morphology accurately before and after 60 days of 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest. Subjects were matched and then randomly assigned to sedentary bed rest (controls, n = 8) or two treatment groups consisting of 1) exercise training using supine treadmill running within lower body negative pressure plus resistive training (n = 8), or 2) protein (0.45 g x kg(-1) x day(-1) increase) plus branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) (7.2 g/day) supplementation (n = 8). After sedentary bed rest without nutritional supplementation, there were significant reductions in LV (96 +/- 26 to 77 +/- 25 ml; P = 0.03) and RV volumes (104 +/- 33 to 86 +/- 25 ml; P = 0.02), LV (2.2 +/- 0.2 to 2.0 +/- 0.2 g/kg; P = 0.003) and RV masses (0.8 +/- 0.1 to 0.6 +/- 0.1 g/kg; P men (8.0%; Perhonen MA, Franco F, Lane LD, Buckey JC, Blomqvist Zerwekh JE, Peshock RM, Weatherall PT, Levine BD. J Appl Physiol 91: 645-653, 2001). In contrast, there were no significant reductions in LV or RV volumes in the exercise-trained group, and the length of the major axis was preserved. Moreover, there were significant increases in LV (1.9 +/- 0.4 to 2.3 +/- 0.3 g/kg; P women similar to men following sedentary 60 days HDT bed rest. However, exercise training and, to a

  5. REST: a toolkit for resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Wei; Dong, Zhang-Ye; Long, Xiang-Yu; Li, Su-Fang; Zuo, Xi-Nian; Zhu, Chao-Zhe; He, Yong; Yan, Chao-Gan; Zang, Yu-Feng

    2011-01-01

    Resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI) has been drawing more and more attention in recent years. However, a publicly available, systematically integrated and easy-to-use tool for RS-fMRI data processing is still lacking. We developed a toolkit for the analysis of RS-fMRI data, namely the RESting-state fMRI data analysis Toolkit (REST). REST was developed in MATLAB with graphical user interface (GUI). After data preprocessing with SPM or AFNI, a few analytic methods can be performed in REST, including functional connectivity analysis based on linear correlation, regional homogeneity, amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF), and fractional ALFF. A few additional functions were implemented in REST, including a DICOM sorter, linear trend removal, bandpass filtering, time course extraction, regression of covariates, image calculator, statistical analysis, and slice viewer (for result visualization, multiple comparison correction, etc.). REST is an open-source package and is freely available at http://www.restfmri.net.

  6. Smart: Semantically Mashup Rest Web Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Kilany

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A mashup is a combination of information from more than one source, mixed up in a way to create something new, or at least useful. Anyone can find mashups on the internet, but these are always specifically designed for a predefined purpose. To change that fact, we implemented a new platform we called the SMART platform. SMART enables the user to make his own choices as for the REST web services he needs to call in order to build an intelligent personalized mashup, from a Google-like simple search interface, without needing any programming skills. In order to achieve this goal, we defined an ontology that can hold REST web services descriptions. These descriptions encapsulate mainly, the input type needed for a service, its output type, and the kind of relation that ties the input to the output. Then, by matching the user input query keywords, with the REST web services definitions in our ontology, we can find registered services individuals in this ontology, and construct the raw REST query for each service found. The wrap up from the keywords, into semantic definitions, in order to find the matching service individual, then the wrap down from the semantic service description of the found individual, to the raw REST call, and finally the wrap up of the result again into semantic individuals, is done for two main purposes: the first to let the user use simple keywords in order to build complex mashups, and the second to benefit from the ontology’s inference engine in a way, where services instances can be tied together into an intelligent mashup, simply by making each service output individuals, stand as the next service input.

  7. Solar energy estimation using REST2 model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rizwan, Majid Jamil, D. P. Kothari

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The network of solar energy measuring stations is relatively rare through out the world. In India, only IMD (India Meteorological Department Pune provides data for quite few stations, which is considered as the base data for research purposes. However, hourly data of measured energy is not available, even for those stations where measurement has already been done. Due to lack of hourly measured data, the estimation of solar energy at the earth’s surface is required. In the proposed study, hourly solar energy is estimated at four important Indian stations namely New Delhi, Mumbai, Pune and Jaipur keeping in mind their different climatic conditions. For this study, REST2 (Reference Evaluation of Solar Transmittance, 2 bands, a high performance parametric model for the estimation of solar energy is used. REST2 derivation uses the two-band scheme as used in the CPCR2 (Code for Physical Computation of Radiation, 2 bands but CPCR2 does not include NO2 absorption, which is an important parameter for estimating solar energy. In this study, using ground measurements during 1986-2000 as reference, a MATLAB program is written to evaluate the performance of REST2 model at four proposed stations. The solar energy at four stations throughout the year is estimated and compared with CPCR2. The results obtained from REST2 model show the good agreement against the measured data on horizontal surface. The study reveals that REST2 models performs better and evaluate the best results as compared to the other existing models under cloudless sky for Indian climatic conditions.

  8. Effects of acute electromagnetic fields exposure on the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity during resting state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bin; Shao, Qing; Chen, Zhiye; Ma, Lin; Wu, Tongning

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we aimed to investigate the possible effects of acute radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity with resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technique. We designed a controllable LTE-related EMF exposure environment at 2.573 GHz and performed the 30 min real/sham exposure experiments on human brain under the safety limits. The resting state fMRI signals were collected before and after EMF exposure. Then voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity method was utilized to evaluate the acute effects of LTE EMF exposure on the homotopic functional connectivity between two human hemispheres. Based on our previous research, we further demonstrated that the 30 min short-term LTE EMF exposure would modulate the interhemispheric homotopic functional connectivity in resting state around the medial frontal gyrus and the paracentral lobule during the real exposure.

  9. Transforming microbial genotyping: a robotic pipeline for genotyping bacterial strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian O'Farrell

    Full Text Available Microbial genotyping increasingly deals with large numbers of samples, and data are commonly evaluated by unstructured approaches, such as spread-sheets. The efficiency, reliability and throughput of genotyping would benefit from the automation of manual manipulations within the context of sophisticated data storage. We developed a medium- throughput genotyping pipeline for MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST of bacterial pathogens. This pipeline was implemented through a combination of four automated liquid handling systems, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS consisting of a variety of dedicated commercial operating systems and programs, including a Sample Management System, plus numerous Python scripts. All tubes and microwell racks were bar-coded and their locations and status were recorded in the LIMS. We also created a hierarchical set of items that could be used to represent bacterial species, their products and experiments. The LIMS allowed reliable, semi-automated, traceable bacterial genotyping from initial single colony isolation and sub-cultivation through DNA extraction and normalization to PCRs, sequencing and MLST sequence trace evaluation. We also describe robotic sequencing to facilitate cherrypicking of sequence dropouts. This pipeline is user-friendly, with a throughput of 96 strains within 10 working days at a total cost of 200,000 items were processed by two to three people. Our sophisticated automated pipeline can be implemented by a small microbiology group without extensive external support, and provides a general framework for semi-automated bacterial genotyping of large numbers of samples at low cost.

  10. ACE I/D genotype, adiposity, and blood pressure in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rothschild Max

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE is a possible candidate gene that may influence both body fatness and blood pressure. Although several genetic studies have been conducted in adults, relatively few studies have examined the contribution of potential candidate genes, and specifically ACE I/D, on adiposity and BP phenotypes in childhood. Such studies may prove insightful for the development of the obesity-hypertension phenotype early in life. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in body fatness and resting blood pressure (BP by ACE I/D genotype, and determine if the association between adiposity and BP varies by ACE I/D genotype in children. Methods 152 children (75 girls, 77 boys were assessed for body composition (% body fat using dual energy x-ray absorbtiometry and resting BP according to American Heart Association recommendations. Buccal cell samples were genotyped using newly developed PCR-RFLP tests for two SNPs (rs4341 and rs4343 in complete linkage disequilibrium with the ACE I/D polymorphism. Partial correlations were computed to assess the ociations between % body fat and BP in the total sample and by genotype. ANCOVA was used to examine differences in resting BP by ACE I/D genotype and fatness groups. Results Approximately 39% of youth were overfat based on % body fat (>30% fat in girls, 25% fat in boys. Body mass, body mass index, and fat-free mass were significantly higher in the ACE D-carriers compared to the II group (p Conclusion ACE D-carriers are heavier than ACE II children; however, BP did not differ by ACE I/D genotype but was adversely influenced in the overfat D-carriers. Further studies are warranted to investigate the genetics of fatness and BP phenotypes in children.

  11. 解析Restful Web Service架构%Analysis of Restful Web Service Architecture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵博文

    2008-01-01

    本文展示了Http协议的强大能力,如何定义什么是Restful Web Service架构以及以当今RPC式Web服务的对比,并解析了Restful Web Service架构的四个特征:可寻址性、无状态性、连通性和统一接口.

  12. "Let It Rest:" Reflecting on Instructional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontichiaro, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Top Chef is one of America's top food television shows. In one episode, lead judge Tom Colicchio, chef and restaurant owner, chides a contestant for hurriedly slicing a piece of meat as soon as it had emerged from the oven. The meat was fully cooked, but the competitor had not "let it rest," or let it steep in its own juices outside the oven for…

  13. "Let It Rest:" Reflecting on Instructional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontichiaro, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Top Chef is one of America's top food television shows. In one episode, lead judge Tom Colicchio, chef and restaurant owner, chides a contestant for hurriedly slicing a piece of meat as soon as it had emerged from the oven. The meat was fully cooked, but the competitor had not "let it rest," or let it steep in its own juices outside the oven for…

  14. If I Rest,I Rust

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Orison; Swett; Marden; 陆小丫

    2003-01-01

    选注者言:流水不腐,户枢不蠹。人的才干又何尝不是如此?If I Rest,I Rust 的标题就让我们玩味再三!思之再三,权译:吾“休”则“锈”。宝剑锋从磨砺出, 梅花香自苦寒来。此言非虚!

  15. Infraslow LFP correlates to resting-state fMRI BOLD signals

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The slow fluctuations of the blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal in resting-state fMRI are widely utilized as a surrogate marker of ongoing neural activity. Spontaneous neural activity includes a broad range of frequencies, from infraslow (< 0.5 Hz) fluctuations to fast action potentials. Recent studies have demonstrated a correlative relationship between the BOLD fluctuations and power modulations of the local field potential (LFP), particularly in the gamma band. However, the re...

  16. Group-level spatial independent component analysis of Fourier envelopes of resting-state MEG data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramkumar, Pavan; Parkkonen, Lauri; Hyvärinen, Aapo

    2014-02-01

    We developed a data-driven method to spatiotemporally and spectrally characterize the dynamics of brain oscillations in resting-state magnetoencephalography (MEG) data. The method, called envelope spatial Fourier independent component analysis (eSFICA), maximizes the spatial and spectral sparseness of Fourier energies of a cortically constrained source current estimate. We compared this method using a simulated data set against 5 other variants of independent component analysis and found that eSFICA performed on par with its temporal variant, eTFICA, and better than other ICA variants, in characterizing dynamics at time scales of the order of minutes. We then applied eSFICA to real MEG data obtained from 9 subjects during rest. The method identified several networks showing within- and cross-frequency inter-areal functional connectivity profiles which resemble previously reported resting-state networks, such as the bilateral sensorimotor network at ~20Hz, the lateral and medial parieto-occipital sources at ~10Hz, a subset of the default-mode network at ~8 and ~15Hz, and lateralized temporal lobe sources at ~8Hz. Finally, we interpreted the estimated networks as spatiospectral filters and applied the filters to obtain the dynamics during a natural stimulus sequence presented to the same 9 subjects. We observed occipital alpha modulation to visual stimuli, bilateral rolandic mu modulation to tactile stimuli and video clips of hands, and the temporal lobe network modulation to speech stimuli, but no modulation of the sources in the default-mode network. We conclude that (1) the proposed method robustly detects inter-areal cross-frequency networks at long time scales, (2) the functional relevance of the resting-state networks can be probed by applying the obtained spatiospectral filters to data from measurements with controlled external stimulation.

  17. Nuclear capture at rest of Ξ hyperons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, S.; Bahk, S. Y.; Chung, S. H.; Funahashi, H.; Hahn, C. H.; Hanabata, M.; Hara, T.; Hirata, S.; Hoshino, K.; Ieiri, M.; Iijima, T.; Imai, K.; Itow, Y.; Jin-ya, T.; Kazuno, M.; Kim, C. O.; Kim, J. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kodama, K.; Kuze, T.; Maeda, Y.; Masaike, A.; Masuoka, A.; Matsuda, Y.; Matsui, A.; Nagase, Y.; Nagoshi, C.; Nakamura, M.; Nakanishi, S.; Nakano, T.; Nakazawa, K.; Niwa, K.; Oda, H.; Okabe, H.; Ono, S.; Ozaki, R.; Park, B. D.; Park, I. G.; Sakai, K.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, Y.; Shibuya, H.; Shimizu, H. M.; Song, J. S.; Sugimoto, M.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeutchi, F.; Tanaka, K. H.; Teranaka, M.; Tezuka, I.; Togawa, H.; Tsunemi, T.; Ukai, M.; Ushida, N.; Watanabe, T.; Yasuda, N.; Yokota, J.; Yoon, C. S.; KEK E176 Collaboration

    2009-09-01

    An emulsion-counter hybrid experiment (KEK E176) was carried out to search for double strangeness systems such as double- Λ hypernuclei and H-dibaryons. More than 10% of Ξ hyperons produced in the (K -, K +) reaction were brought to rest in the nuclear emulsion. We have obtained 98 candidate events of nuclear capture at rest of Ξ hyperons which are described in this report. Among those, four events were identified as sequential weak decay of double- Λ hypernuclei. The binding energies of Ξ-( 12C, 14N and 16O) states have been estimated for two events which emit twin single- Λ hypernuclei back to back from the capture point. The Σp decay vertex of an H-dibaryon was searched for near the capture point and no evidence was observed. Upper limits for the branching ratio of H emission are 5-10% for a lifetime less than 0.1 ns at the 90% confidence level. The trapping probabilities of single and double strangeness to a nuclear fragment following Ξ capture at rest have been studied.

  18. Watching the fetal brain at 'rest'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöpf, V; Kasprian, G; Brugger, P C; Prayer, D

    2012-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has allowed insights into the spatiotemporal distribution of human brain networks. According to the neurophysiological property of the fetal brain to generate spontaneous activity, we aimed to determine the feasibility of investigating the maturation of intrinsic networks, beginning at gestational week 20 in healthy human fetuses by combining resting-state fMRI and an analytical approach, independent component analysis (ICA). In this study, functional images of 16 fetuses with morphologically normal brain development, from 20 to 36 gestational weeks of age, were acquired on a 1.5T unit (Philips Medical Systems, Best, The Netherlands) using single-shot, gradient-recalled echo-planar imaging. After preprocessing (motion correction, brain extraction), images were analyzed using single-subject ICA. We visualized a bilateral occipital network and medial and lateral prefrontal activity pattern that involved the future Brodmann areas 9-11. Furthermore, there was one either predominantly right (3/7 cases) or left (4/7 cases) hemispheric lateralized network that involved the superior temporal cortical regions (Brodmann areas 22 and 39). Frequency oscillations were in the range of 0.01-0.06Hz for all networks. This study shows that resting-state networks (RSNs) are shaped and are detectable in utero. Further investigations of resting-state measurements in the fetus may therefore allow developmental brain activity monitoring and may provide insights into early brain function. Copyright © 2011 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Dismissing Attachment Characteristics Dynamically Modulate Brain Networks Subserving Social Aversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krause, Anna Linda; Borchardt, Viola; Li, Meng; van Tol, Marie-José; Demenescu, L.R.; Strauss, Bernhard; Kirchmann, Helmut; Buchheim, Anna; Metzger, Coraline D; Nolte, Tobias; Walter, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Attachment patterns influence actions, thoughts and feeling through a person's "inner working model". Speech charged with attachment-dependent content was proposed to modulate the activation of cognitive-emotional schemata in listeners. We performed a 7 Tesla rest-task-rest functional magnetic reson

  20. Catechol-O-methyltransferase Val158Met polymorphism modulates gray matter volume and functional connectivity of the default mode network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Tian

    Full Text Available The effect of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT Val158Met polymorphism on brain structure and function has been previously investigated separately and regionally; this prevents us from obtaining a full picture of the effect of this gene variant. Additionally, gender difference must not be overlooked because estrogen exerts an interfering effect on COMT activity. We examined 323 young healthy Chinese Han subjects and analyzed the gray matter volume (GMV differences between Val/Val individuals and Met carriers in a voxel-wise manner throughout the whole brain. We were interested in genotype effects and genotype × gender interactions. We then extracted these brain regions with GMV differences as seeds to compute resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC with the rest of the brain; we also tested the genotypic differences and gender interactions in the rsFCs. Val/Val individuals showed decreased GMV in the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC compared with Met carriers; decreased GMV in the medial superior frontal gyrus (mSFG was found only in male Val/Val subjects. The rsFC analysis revealed that both the PCC and mSFG were functionally correlated with brain regions of the default mode network (DMN. Both of these regions showed decreased rsFCs with different parts of the frontopolar cortex of the DMN in Val/Val individuals than Met carriers. Our findings suggest that the COMT Val158Met polymorphism modulates both the structure and functional connectivity within the DMN and that gender interactions should be considered in studies of the effect of this genetic variant, especially those involving prefrontal morphology.

  1. Haplotypes versus genotypes on pedigrees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkpatrick Bonnie B

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing will soon produce haplotype data for individuals. For pedigrees of related individuals, sequencing appears to be an attractive alternative to genotyping. However, methods for pedigree analysis with haplotype data have not yet been developed, and the computational complexity of such problems has been an open question. Furthermore, it is not clear in which scenarios haplotype data would provide better estimates than genotype data for quantities such as recombination rates. Results To answer these questions, a reduction is given from genotype problem instances to haplotype problem instances, and it is shown that solving the haplotype problem yields the solution to the genotype problem, up to constant factors or coefficients. The pedigree analysis problems we will consider are the likelihood, maximum probability haplotype, and minimum recombination haplotype problems. Conclusions Two algorithms are introduced: an exponential-time hidden Markov model (HMM for haplotype data where some individuals are untyped, and a linear-time algorithm for pedigrees having haplotype data for all individuals. Recombination estimates from the general haplotype HMM algorithm are compared to recombination estimates produced by a genotype HMM. Having haplotype data on all individuals produces better estimates. However, having several untyped individuals can drastically reduce the utility of haplotype data.

  2. The transcription factor REST is lost in aggressive breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew P Wagoner

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The function of the tumor suppressor RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST is lost in colon and small cell lung cancers and is known to induce anchorage-independent growth in human mammary epithelial cells. However, nothing is currently known about the role of this tumor suppressor in breast cancer. Here, we test the hypothesis that loss of REST function plays a role in breast cancer. To assay breast tumors for REST function, we developed a 24-gene signature composed of direct targets of the transcriptional repressor. Using the 24- gene signature, we identified a previously undefined RESTless breast tumor subtype. Using gene set enrichment analysis, we confirmed the aberrant expression of REST target genes in the REST-less tumors, including neuronal gene targets of REST that are normally not expressed outside the nervous system. Examination of REST mRNA identified a truncated splice variant of REST present in the REST-less tumor population, but not other tumors. Histological analysis of 182 outcome-associated breast tumor tissues also identified a subpopulation of tumors that lack full-length, functional REST and over-express the neuroendocrine marker and REST target gene Chromogranin A. Importantly, patients whose tumors were found to be REST-less using either the 24-gene signature or histology had significantly poorer prognosis and were more than twice as likely to undergo disease recurrence within the first 3 years after diagnosis. We show here that REST function is lost in breast cancer, at least in part via an alternative splicing mechanism. Patients with REST-less breast cancer undergo significantly more early disease recurrence than those with fully functional REST, regardless of estrogen receptor or HER2 status. Importantly, REST status may serve as a predictor of poor prognosis, helping to untangle the heterogeneity inherent in disease course and response to treatment. Additionally, the alternative splicing observed in REST

  3. What is the best?: simple versus visitor restricted rest period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvius-Byron, Stephanie A; Florimonte, Christine; Panganiban, Elizabeth G; Ulmer, Janice Fitzgerald

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a highly structured planned rest protocol that includes visitor and healthcare personnel restrictions with a simple planned rest period that encourages patients to rest during a designated time without restriction of visitors and healthcare personnel. Many hospitals acute care have begun to restrict visitors and nonessential health team interventions during specific times despite the lack of experimentally designed studies. Using a convenience sample of 52 intermediate care unit patients, a randomized experimental design study compared a highly structured planned rest protocol with restriction of visitors/healthcare personnel to a simple planned rest period without restrictions. The primary outcome variable was the patient's perceived quality of rest after a 2-hour rest period. Intermediate care patients' perception of rest and sleep during a designated rest period was similar whether elaborate rest strategies were used, including visitor and healthcare personnel restrictions, or if it was only suggested they rest and the door to their room closed. The restriction of visitors and healthcare personnel during a 2-hour rest period did not improve the patient's perception of rest or how long it took them to go to sleep.

  4. Population samples and genotyping technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, S J; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Single, R M; Meyer, D; Hill, J; Dron, H A; Jani, A J; Thomson, G; Erlich, H A

    2007-04-01

    The 14th International HLA (human leukocyte antigen) Immunogenetics Workshop (14th-IHIWS) Biostatistics and Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity project continues the population sampling, genotype data generation, and biostatistic analyses of the 13th International Histocompatibility Workshop Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity Component, with the overall goal of further characterizing global HLA allele and haplotype diversity and better describing the relationships between major histocompatibility complex diversity, geography, linguistics, and population history. Since the 13th Workshop, new investigators have and continue to be recruited to the project and new high-resolution class I and class II genotype data are being generated for 112 population samples from around the world.

  5. -Regular Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej M. Abduldaim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduced and studied -regular modules as a generalization of -regular rings to modules as well as regular modules (in the sense of Fieldhouse. An -module is called -regular if for each and , there exist and a positive integer such that . The notion of -pure submodules was introduced to generalize pure submodules and proved that an -module is -regular if and only if every submodule of is -pure iff   is a -regular -module for each maximal ideal of . Many characterizations and properties of -regular modules were given. An -module is -regular iff is a -regular ring for each iff is a -regular ring for finitely generated module . If is a -regular module, then .

  6. Pooled DNA genotyping on Affymetrix SNP genotyping arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen Michael J

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotyping technology has advanced such that genome-wide association studies of complex diseases based upon dense marker maps are now technically feasible. However, the cost of such projects remains high. Pooled DNA genotyping offers the possibility of applying the same technologies at a fraction of the cost, and there is some evidence that certain ultra-high throughput platforms also perform with an acceptable accuracy. However, thus far, this conclusion is based upon published data concerning only a small number of SNPs. Results In the current study we prepared DNA pools from the parents and from the offspring of 30 parent-child trios that have been extensively genotyped by the HapMap project. We analysed the two pools with Affymetrix 10 K Xba 142 2.0 Arrays. The availability of the HapMap data allowed us to validate the performance of 6843 SNPs for which we had both complete individual and pooled genotyping data. Pooled analyses averaged over 5–6 microarrays resulted in highly reproducible results. Moreover, the accuracy of estimating differences in allele frequency between pools using this ultra-high throughput system was comparable with previous reports of pooling based upon lower throughput platforms, with an average error for the predicted allelic frequencies differences between the two pools of 1.37% and with 95% of SNPs showing an error of Conclusion Genotyping thousands of SNPs with DNA pooling using Affymetrix microarrays produces highly accurate results and can be used for genome-wide association studies.

  7. Psychometric properties of startle and corrugator response in NPU, affective picture viewing, and resting state tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Jesse T; Bradford, Daniel E; Curtin, John J

    2016-08-01

    The current study provides a comprehensive evaluation of critical psychometric properties of commonly used psychophysiology laboratory tasks/measures within the NIMH RDoC. Participants (N = 128) completed the no-shock, predictable shock, unpredictable shock (NPU) task, affective picture viewing task, and resting state task at two study visits separated by 1 week. We examined potentiation/modulation scores in NPU (predictable or unpredictable shock vs. no-shock) and affective picture viewing tasks (pleasant or unpleasant vs. neutral pictures) for startle and corrugator responses with two commonly used quantification methods. We quantified startle potentiation/modulation scores with raw and standardized responses. We quantified corrugator potentiation/modulation in the time and frequency domains. We quantified general startle reactivity in the resting state task as the mean raw startle response during the task. For these three tasks, two measures, and two quantification methods, we evaluated effect size robustness and stability, internal consistency (i.e., split-half reliability), and 1-week temporal stability. The psychometric properties of startle potentiation in the NPU task were good, but concerns were noted for corrugator potentiation in this task. Some concerns also were noted for the psychometric properties of both startle and corrugator modulation in the affective picture viewing task, in particular, for pleasant picture modulation. Psychometric properties of general startle reactivity in the resting state task were good. Some salient differences in the psychometric properties of the NPU and affective picture viewing tasks were observed within and across quantification methods. © 2016 The Authors. Psychophysiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  8. Bed Rest and Immobilization: Risk Factors for Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... browser. Home Osteoporosis Osteoporosis and Other Conditions Bed Rest and Immobilization: Risk Factors for Bone Loss Publication ... Line For Your Information The Impact of Bed Rest and Inactivity Some people can’t perform weight- ...

  9. In vivo delivery of DN:REST improves transcriptional changes of REST-regulated genes in HD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conforti, P; Mas Monteys, A; Zuccato, C; Buckley, N J; Davidson, B; Cattaneo, E

    2013-06-01

    Current therapeutic strategies for Huntington's disease (HD) are focused on symptom management of disease progression. Transcriptional dysregulation is one of the major characteristics in HD. REST is a transcriptional repressor that silences gene expression through binding to RE1/NRSE sites found in the regulatory regions of numerous neuronal genes. Dysregulation of REST and its targeted genes has been reported in different cell and mouse HD models, as well as in biopsies from human patients. In this work, we characterized transcriptional dysregulation associated with REST in two different HD mouse models and assessed the therapeutic effect of interfering with REST function by overexpressing a dominant-negative form (DN:REST). We show that delivery of DN:REST in the motor cortex restores brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA and protein levels by reducing endogenous REST occupancy at the Bdnf locus. Similarly, expression of other REST-regulated genes such as Synapsin I (Syn1), Proenkephalin (Penk1) and Cholinergic receptor muscarinic 4 (Chrm4) were restored to normal levels while non-REST-regulated genes were unaffected. This is the first study conducted to investigate REST's role in vivo in a neurodegenerative disease. Our data show that DN:REST in motor cortex reversed RESTs repressive effects on target genes. However, the lack of therapeutic effect on motor function suggests that a more widespread rescue of REST-regulated sites in the affected brain regions may be necessary.

  10. Framework for ReSTful Web Services in OSGi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Khawaja S.; Norris, Jeffrey S.; Powell, Mark W.; Crockett, Thomas M.; Mittman, David S.; Fox, Jason M.; Joswig, Joseph C.; Wallick, Michael N.; Torres, Recaredo J.; Rabe, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Ensemble ReST is a software system that eases the development, deployment, and maintenance of server-side application programs to perform functions that would otherwise be performed by client software. Ensemble ReST takes advantage of the proven disciplines of ReST (Representational State Transfer. ReST leverages the standardized HTTP protocol to enable developers to offer services to a diverse variety of clients: from shell scripts to sophisticated Java application suites

  11. FTO genotype and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Papandonatos, George D

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the FTO genotype on weight loss after dietary, physical activity, or drug based interventions in randomised controlled trials. DESIGN: Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURC...

  12. FTO genotype and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Papandonatos, George D;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the FTO genotype on weight loss after dietary, physical activity, or drug based interventions in randomised controlled trials. DESIGN: Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURC...

  13. Microsatellite genotyping of carnation varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smulders, M.J.M.; Noordijk, Y.; Rus-Kortekaas, W.; Bredemeijer, G.M.M.; Vosman, B.

    2003-01-01

    A set of 11 sequence-tagged microsatellite markers for carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) was developed using a DNA library enriched for microsatellites. Supplemented with three markers derived from sequence database entries, these were used to genotype carnation varieties using a semi-automated fluo

  14. Genotyping with TaqMAMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baohui; Kadura, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Watson, David E

    2004-02-01

    TaqMAMA combines the quantitative strengths of TaqMan with the allele-specific PCR of MAMA. In this article we develop TaqMAMA as a technique for screening human DNA samples for known genetic polymorphisms. In the first set of experiments, plasmids that model all types of genetic polymorphisms were used to understand the relationship between TaqMAMA primer/template mismatches and their strength of allelic discrimination. These data can be used to improve allelic discrimination of other primer extension genotyping methodologies through directed use of nucleotide mismatches. We used the data to derive a guide for TaqMAMA primer design and DNA strand selection for TaqMAMA genotyping assays. The guide was then used to develop assays for 11 known and novel human genetic polymorphisms. Genotypes were assigned quickly and accurately in all cases. TaqMAMA genotyping assays require minimal development time, have a high probability of success, produce reliable data that are straightforward to analyze, and are very cost-competitive.

  15. 77 FR 73911 - Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-12

    ... and Rest Requirements AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Availability of... Regulatory Impact Analysis of its final rule amending its existing flight, duty and rest regulations... Register as Flight Crew Member Duty and Rest Requirements on January 4, 2012. 77 FR 330. The regulations...

  16. 75 FR 63424 - Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 117 and 121 RIN 2120-AJ58 Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest..., to amend its existing flight, duty and rest regulations applicable to certificate holders and their... and Rest Requirements.'' The proposed regulation recognizes the growing similarities between the types...

  17. 75 FR 62486 - Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 117 and 121 RIN 2120-AJ58 Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest... flight, duty and rest regulations applicable to certificate holders and their flightcrew members. The FAA... and Rest Requirements'' (75 FR 55852). The proposed regulation recognizes the growing similarities...

  18. 46 CFR 401.451 - Pilot rest periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pilot rest periods. 401.451 Section 401.451 Shipping... Rates, Charges, and Conditions for Pilotage Services § 401.451 Pilot rest periods. (a) Except as... assignments totaling more than 10 hours with no more than 2 hours rest between assignments, shall not perform...

  19. 78 FR 14166 - Clarification of Flight, Duty, and Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-05

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 117 and 121 Clarification of Flight, Duty, and Rest... published a final rule on January 4, 2012, that amends the existing flight, duty and rest regulations... questions about the new flight, duty, and rest rule. This is a response to those questions. FOR FURTHER...

  20. 49 CFR 37.201 - Intermediate and rest stops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Intermediate and rest stops. 37.201 Section 37.201... DISABILITIES (ADA) Over-the-Road Buses (OTRBs) § 37.201 Intermediate and rest stops. (a) Whenever an OTRB makes an intermediate or rest stop, a passenger with a disability, including an individual using a...

  1. Frequency domain analysis of heart rate variability in horses at rest and during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physick-Sheard, P W; Marlin, D J; Thornhill, R; Schroter, R C

    2000-05-01

    The pattern of variation in heart rate on a beat-to-beat basis contains information concerning sympathetic (SNS) and parasympathetic (PNS) contributions to autonomic nervous system (ANS) modulation of heart rate (HR). In the present study, heart period (RR interval) time series data were collected at rest and during 3 different treadmill exercise protocols from 6 Thoroughbred horses. Frequency and spectral power were determined in 3 frequency bands: very low (VLF) 0-0.01-0.07-< or = 0.5 cycles/beat. Indicators of sympathetic (SNSI = LO/HI) and parasympathetic (PNSI = HI/TOTAL) activity were calculated. Power in all bands fell progressively with increasing exercise intensity from rest to trot. At the gallop VLF and LO power continued to fall but HI power rose. SNSI rose from rest to walk, then fell with increasing effort and was lowest at the gallop. PNSI fell from rest to walk, then rose and was highest at the gallop. Normalised HI power exceeded combined VLF and LO power at all gaits, with the ratio HI to LO power being lowest at the walk and highest at the gallop. ANS indicators showed considerable inter-horse variation, and varied less consistently than raw power with increasing physical effort. In the horses studied, the relationship between power and HR changed at exercise intensities associated with heart rates above approximately 120-130 beats/min. At this level, humoral and other non-neural mechanisms may become more important than autonomic modulation in influencing heart rate and heart rate variability (HRV). HRV at intense effort may be influenced by respiratory-gait entrainment, energetics of locomotion and work of breathing. HRV analysis in the frequency domain would appear to be of potential value as a noninvasive means of assessing autonomic modulation of heart rate at low exercise intensities, only. The technique may be a sensitive method for assessing exercise response to experimental manipulations and disease states.

  2. A RESTful way to Manage Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, R. K.; Lawrence, B. N.

    2009-04-01

    In 2005 BODC implemented the first version of a vocabulary server developed as a contribution to the NERC DataGrid project. Vocabularies were managed within an RDBMS environment and accessed through a SOAP Web Service API. This was designed as a database query interface with operations targeted at designated database fields and results returned as strings. At the end of 2007 a new version of the server was released capable of serving thesauri and ontologies as well as vocabularies. The SOAP API functionality was enhanced and the output format changed to XML. In addition, a pseudo-RESTful query interface was developed directly addressing terms and lists by URLs. This is in full operational use by projects such as SeaDataNet and will run for the foreseeable future. However, operational experience has exposed shortcomings in both the API and its document payload. Other ontology servers, notably at MMI and CSIRO, are coming on-line making now the time to unify ontology management. This paper presents a RESTful API and payload document schema. It is based on the lessons learned in four years of operational vocabulary serving, provides full ontology management functionality and has the potential to form the basis for an interoperable network of distributed ontologies.

  3. Respiration patterns of resting wasps (Vespula sp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käfer, Helmut; Kovac, Helmut; Stabentheiner, Anton

    2013-04-01

    We investigated the respiration patterns of wasps (Vespula sp.) in their viable temperature range (2.9-42.4°C) by measuring CO2 production and locomotor and endothermic activity. Wasps showed cycles of an interburst-burst type at low ambient temperatures (Ta31°C, CO2 emission became cyclic. With rising Ta they enhanced CO2-emission primarily by an exponential increase in respiration frequency, from 2.6 mHz at 4.7°C to 74 mHz at 39.7°C. In the same range of Ta CO2 release per cycle decreased from 38.9 to 26.4 μl g(-1)cycle(-1). A comparison of wasps with other insects showed that they are among the insects with a low respiratory frequency at a given resting metabolic rate (RMR), and a relatively flat increase of respiratory frequency with RMR. CO2 emission was always accompanied by abdominal respiration movements in all open phases and in 71.4% of the flutter phases, often accompanied by body movements. Results suggest that resting wasps gain their highly efficient gas exchange to a considerable extent via the length and type of respiration movements.

  4. Genotype × genotype interactions between the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis and its grazer, the waterflea Daphnia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Veerle; Brusciotti, Silvia; van Gremberghe, Ineke; Vyverman, Wim; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Toxic algal blooms are an important problem worldwide. The literature on toxic cyanobacteria blooms in inland waters reports widely divergent results on whether zooplankton can control cyanobacteria blooms or cyanobacteria suppress zooplankton by their toxins. Here we test whether this may be due to genotype × genotype interactions, in which interactions between the large-bodied and efficient grazer Daphnia and the widespread cyanobacterium Microcystis are not only dependent on Microcystis strain or Daphnia genotype but are specific to genotype × genotype combinations. We show that genotype × genotype interactions are important in explaining mortality in short-time exposures of Daphnia to Microcystis. These genotype × genotype interactions may result in local coadaptation and a geographic mosaic of coevolution. Genotype × genotype interactions can explain why the literature on zooplankton–cyanobacteria interactions is seemingly inconsistent, and provide hope that zooplankton can contribute to the suppression of cyanobacteria blooms in restoration projects. PMID:25568039

  5. The GL service: Web service to exchange GL string encoded HLA & KIR genotypes with complete and accurate allele and genotype ambiguity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milius, Robert P; Heuer, Michael; George, Mike; Pollack, Jane; Hollenbach, Jill A; Mack, Steven J; Maiers, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Genotype list (GL) Strings use a set of hierarchical character delimiters to represent allele and genotype ambiguity in HLA and KIR genotypes in a complete and accurate fashion. A RESTful web service called genotype list service was created to allow users to register a GL string and receive a unique identifier for that string in the form of a URI. By exchanging URIs and dereferencing them through the GL service, users can easily transmit HLA genotypes in a variety of useful formats. The GL service was developed to be secure, scalable, and persistent. An instance of the GL service is configured with a nomenclature and can be run in strict or non-strict modes. Strict mode requires alleles used in the GL string to be present in the allele database using the fully qualified nomenclature. Non-strict mode allows any GL string to be registered as long as it is syntactically correct. The GL service source code is free and open source software, distributed under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) version 3 or later.

  6. The GL Service: Web Service to Exchange GL String Encoded HLA & KIR Genotypes With Complete and Accurate Allele and Genotype Ambiguity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milius, Robert P.; Heuer, Michael; George, Mike; Pollack, Jane; Hollenbach, Jill A.; Mack, Steven J.; Maiers, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Genotype List (GL) Strings use a set of hierarchical character delimiters to represent allele and genotype ambiguity in HLA and KIR genotypes in a complete and accurate fashion. A RESTful web service called Genotype List Service was created to allow users to register a GL String and receive a unique identifier for that string in the form of a URI. By exchanging URIs and dereferencing them through the GL Service, users can easily transmit HLA genotypes in a variety of useful formats. The GL Service was developed to be secure, scalable, and persistent. An instance of the GL Service is configured with a nomenclature and can be run in strict or non-strict modes. Strict mode requires alleles used in the GL String to be present in the allele database using the fully qualified nomenclature. Non-strict mode allows any GL String to be registered as long as it is syntactically correct. The GL Service source code is free and open source software, distributed under the GNU Lesser General Public License (LGPL) version 3 or later. PMID:26621609

  7. Markers of bone resorption and calcium metabolism are related to dietary intake patterns in male and female bed rest subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, S. R.; Hargens, A. r.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary potassium and protein intakes predict net endogenous acid production in humans. Intracellular buffers, including exchangeable bone mineral, play a crucial role in balancing chronic acid-base perturbations in the body; subsequently, chronic acid loads can potentially contribute to bone loss. Bone is lost during space flight, and a dietary countermeasure would be desirable for many reasons. We studied the ability of diet protein and potassium to predict levels of bone resorption markers in males and females. Identical twin pairs (8 M, 7 F) were assigned to 2 groups: bed rest (sedentary, SED) or bed rest with supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (EX). Diet was controlled for 3 d before and 30 d of bed rest (BR). Urinary Ca, N-telopeptide (NTX), and pyridinium crosslinks (PYD) were measured before and on days 5, 12, 19, and 26 of BR. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation (Pdietary animal protein/potassium intake was not correlated with NTX before BR for males or females, but they were positively correlated in both groups of males during bed rest. Dietary animal protein/potassium and urine Ca were correlated before and during bed rest for the males, and only during bed rest for the females. Conversely, the ratio of dietary vegetable protein/potassium intake was negatively correlated with urinary calcium during bed rest for the females, but there was no relationship between vegetable protein/potassium intake and bone markers for the males. These data suggest that the ratio of animal protein/potassium intake may affect bone, particularly in bed rest subjects. These data show that the type of protein and gender may be additional factors that modulate the effect of diet on bone metabolism during bed rest. Altering this ratio may help prevent bone loss on Earth and during space flight.

  8. Markers of bone resorption and calcium metabolism are related to dietary intake patterns in male and female bed rest subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, S. R.; Hargens, A. r.

    2006-01-01

    Dietary potassium and protein intakes predict net endogenous acid production in humans. Intracellular buffers, including exchangeable bone mineral, play a crucial role in balancing chronic acid-base perturbations in the body; subsequently, chronic acid loads can potentially contribute to bone loss. Bone is lost during space flight, and a dietary countermeasure would be desirable for many reasons. We studied the ability of diet protein and potassium to predict levels of bone resorption markers in males and females. Identical twin pairs (8 M, 7 F) were assigned to 2 groups: bed rest (sedentary, SED) or bed rest with supine treadmill exercise in a lower body negative pressure chamber (EX). Diet was controlled for 3 d before and 30 d of bed rest (BR). Urinary Ca, N-telopeptide (NTX), and pyridinium crosslinks (PYD) were measured before and on days 5, 12, 19, and 26 of BR. Data were analyzed by Pearson correlation (P<0.05). The ratio of dietary animal protein/potassium intake was not correlated with NTX before BR for males or females, but they were positively correlated in both groups of males during bed rest. Dietary animal protein/potassium and urine Ca were correlated before and during bed rest for the males, and only during bed rest for the females. Conversely, the ratio of dietary vegetable protein/potassium intake was negatively correlated with urinary calcium during bed rest for the females, but there was no relationship between vegetable protein/potassium intake and bone markers for the males. These data suggest that the ratio of animal protein/potassium intake may affect bone, particularly in bed rest subjects. These data show that the type of protein and gender may be additional factors that modulate the effect of diet on bone metabolism during bed rest. Altering this ratio may help prevent bone loss on Earth and during space flight.

  9. The Ensembl REST API: Ensembl Data for Any Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Andrew; Beal, Kathryn; Keenan, Stephen; McLaren, William; Pignatelli, Miguel; Ritchie, Graham R S; Ruffier, Magali; Taylor, Kieron; Vullo, Alessandro; Flicek, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We present a Web service to access Ensembl data using Representational State Transfer (REST). The Ensembl REST server enables the easy retrieval of a wide range of Ensembl data by most programming languages, using standard formats such as JSON and FASTA while minimizing client work. We also introduce bindings to the popular Ensembl Variant Effect Predictor tool permitting large-scale programmatic variant analysis independent of any specific programming language. The Ensembl REST API can be accessed at http://rest.ensembl.org and source code is freely available under an Apache 2.0 license from http://github.com/Ensembl/ensembl-rest. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror

    2015-01-01

    To contribute to devise successful beta-cell differentiation strategies for the cure of Type 1 diabetes we sought to uncover barriers that restrict endocrine fate acquisition by studying the role of the transcriptional repressor REST in the developing pancreas. Rest expression is prevented...... in neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic...... endocrine cells, which are molecularly close to neurons. We show that Rest is widely expressed in pancreas progenitors and that it is down-regulated in differentiated endocrine cells. Sustained expression of REST in Pdx1(+) progenitors impairs the differentiation of endocrine-committed Neurog3...

  11. Resting state brain activity and functional brain mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Xiaohu; Wang Peijun; Tang Xiaowei

    2007-01-01

    Functional brain imaging studies commonly use either resting or passive task states as their control conditions, and typically identify the activation brain region associated with a specific task by subtracting the resting from the active task conditions. Numerous studies now suggest, however, that the resting state may not reflect true mental "rest" conditions. The mental activity that occurs during"rest" might therefore greatly influence the functional neuroimaging observations that are collected through the usual subtracting analysis strategies. Exploring the ongoing mental processes that occur during resting conditions is thus of particular importance for deciphering functional brain mapping results and obtaining a more comprehensive understanding of human brain functions. In this review article, we will mainly focus on the discussion of the current research background of functional brain mapping at resting state and the physiological significance of the available neuroimaging data.

  12. Recreational resources - basement for active rest of a man.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaytzev V.P.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical aspects of active rest resources of Ukraine, their classification and ball estimation are presented: medical and biological, psychological, technological. The special complication in the estimation of active rest resources consists of that they are necessary to be examined both from position of organizers of rest and from position of holiday-makers. Importance of active rest a man (student is shown in sanatorium-resort terms. Therefore two basic tasks cost before counsels: medical service of patients (second prophylaxis and health rest. The active rest resources of Crimea are as an example considered, Zakarpatskoy and Kharkov areas. In every region there are the features of active rest resources which lift the physical and psychical health of man.

  13. Exercise thermoregulation after 14 days of bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Reese, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of bed rest and exercise training during bed rest on body temperature and thermoregulatory responses at rest and during exercise are investigated. Seven male subjects underwent three two-week periods of bed rest during which isometric, isotonic, or no exercises were performed, separated by two ambulatory control periods and preceded by a two-week control period, during which they exercised regularly. Rectal and mean skin temperatures and sweating responses were determined during 70-min submaximal supine exercise during the bed rest and recovery periods. Measurements reveal a reduction in basal oral temperature during the control-recovery periods, with a relatively constant level during bed rest periods, and a significant increase in the rectal temperature elavation brought on by exercise following all three bed-rest regimes. It is concluded that the excessive increase in rectal temperature could be influenced by changes in skin heat conductance or the inhibition of sweating.

  14. Study on the Back Rest System of Looms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈革; 毛立民; 周亚勤; 袁立新

    2004-01-01

    Periodic variations of warp tension during a weaving cycle result in corresponding change of back rest position, and the oscillation of back rest affects the fluctuation of warp yarn in return. A mechanical model of back rest system of looms is presented on basis of auto control theory, and the factors affecting the dynamic performance of the back rest are analyzed. In the model, warp yarn is regarded as a viscoelastic medium, and the adjustable parameters and the adjusting range of the back rest system are increased, so the ioom's applicability for the fabric's variety is enlanced.Finally, the methods of designing and adjusting the back rest are discussed, and a trend of back rest system development is given.

  15. Posterior resting state EEG asymmetries are associated with hedonic valuation of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bochove, Marlies E; Ketel, Eva; Wischnewski, Miles; Wegman, Joost; Aarts, Esther; de Jonge, Benjamin; Medendorp, W Pieter; Schutter, Dennis J L G

    2016-12-01

    Research on the hedonic value of food has been important in understanding the motivational and emotional correlates of normal and abnormal eating behaviour. The aim of the present study was to explore associations between hemispheric asymmetries recorded during resting state electroencephalogram (EEG) and hedonic valuation of food. Healthy adult volunteers were recruited and four minutes of resting state EEG were recorded from the scalp. Hedonic food valuation and reward sensitivity were assessed with the hedonic attitude to food and behavioural activation scale. Results showed that parieto-occipital resting state EEG asymmetries in the alpha (8-12Hz) and beta (13-30Hz) frequency range correlate with the hedonic valuation of food. Our findings suggest that self-reported sensory-related attitude towards food is associated with interhemispheric asymmetries in resting state oscillatory activity. Our findings contribute to understanding the electrophysiological correlates of hedonic valuation, and may provide an opportunity to modulate the cortical imbalance by using non-invasive brain stimulation methods to change food consumption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Predicting risk-taking behavior from prefrontal resting-state activity and personality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Studer

    Full Text Available Risk-taking is subject to considerable individual differences. In the current study, we tested whether resting-state activity in the prefrontal cortex and trait sensitivity to reward and punishment can help predict risk-taking behavior. Prefrontal activity at rest was assessed in seventy healthy volunteers using electroencephalography, and compared to their choice behavior on an economic risk-taking task. The Behavioral Inhibition System/Behavioral Activation System scale was used to measure participants' trait sensitivity to reward and punishment. Our results confirmed both prefrontal resting-state activity and personality traits as sources of individual differences in risk-taking behavior. Right-left asymmetry in prefrontal activity and scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System scale, reflecting trait sensitivity to punishment, were correlated with the level of risk-taking on the task. We further discovered that scores on the Behavioral Inhibition System scale modulated the relationship between asymmetry in prefrontal resting-state activity and risk-taking. The results of this study demonstrate that heterogeneity in risk-taking behavior can be traced back to differences in the basic physiology of decision-makers' brains, and suggest that baseline prefrontal activity and personality traits might interplay in guiding risk-taking behavior.

  17. Differentiating closed-loop cortical intention from rest: building an asynchronous electrocorticographic BCI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jordan J.; Rouse, Adam G.; Thongpang, Sanitta; Williams, Justin C.; Moran, Daniel W.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Recent experiments have shown that electrocorticography (ECoG) can provide robust control signals for a brain-computer interface (BCI). Strategies that attempt to adapt a BCI control algorithm by learning from past trials often assume that the subject is attending to each training trial. Likewise, automatic disabling of movement control would be desirable during resting periods when random brain fluctuations might cause unintended movements of a device. To this end, our goal was to identify ECoG differences that arise between periods of active BCI use and rest. Approach. We examined spectral differences in multi-channel, epidural micro-ECoG signals recorded from non-human primates when rest periods were interleaved between blocks of an active BCI control task. Main Results. Post-hoc analyses demonstrated that these states can be decoded accurately on both a trial-by-trial and real-time basis, and this discriminability remains robust over a period of weeks. In addition, high gamma frequencies showed greater modulation with desired movement direction, while lower frequency components demonstrated greater amplitude differences between task and rest periods, suggesting possible specialized BCI roles for these frequencies. Significance. The results presented here provide valuable insight into the neurophysiology of BCI control as well as important considerations toward the design of an asynchronous BCI system.

  18. The potential of iRest in measuring the hand function performance of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Hisyam; Khor, Kang Xiang; Yeong, Che Fai; Su, Eileen Lee Ming; Narayanan, Aqilah Leela T

    2017-01-01

    Clinical scales such as Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) and Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) are widely used to evaluate stroke patient's motor performance. However, there are several limitations with these assessment scales such as subjectivity, lack of repeatability, time-consuming and highly depend on the ability of the physiotherapy. In contrast, robot-based assessments are objective, repeatable, and could potentially reduce the assessment time. However, robot-based assessments are not as well established as conventional assessment scale and the correlation to conventional assessment scale is unclear. This study was carried out to identify important parameters in designing tasks that efficiently assess hand function of stroke patients and to quantify potential benefits of robotic assessment modules to predict the conventional assessment score with iRest. Twelve predictive variables were explored, relating to movement time, velocity, strategy, accuracy and smoothness from three robotic assessment modules which are Draw I, Draw Diamond and Draw Circle. Regression models using up to four predictors were developed to describe the MAS. Results show that the time given should be not too long and it would affect the trajectory error. Besides, result also shows that it is possible to use iRest in predicting MAS score. There is a potential of using iRest, a non-motorized device in predicting MAS score.

  19. Infraslow LFP correlates to resting-state fMRI BOLD signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Wen-Ju; Thompson, Garth John; Magnuson, Matthew Evan; Jaeger, Dieter; Keilholz, Shella

    2013-07-01

    The slow fluctuations of the blood-oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) signal in resting-state fMRI are widely utilized as a surrogate marker of ongoing neural activity. Spontaneous neural activity includes a broad range of frequencies, from infraslow (<0.5 Hz) fluctuations to fast action potentials. Recent studies have demonstrated a correlative relationship between the BOLD fluctuations and power modulations of the local field potential (LFP), particularly in the gamma band. However, the relationship between the BOLD signal and the infraslow components of the LFP, which are directly comparable in frequency to the BOLD fluctuations, has not been directly investigated. Here we report a first examination of the temporal relation between the resting-state BOLD signal and infraslow LFPs using simultaneous fMRI and full-band LFP recording in rat. The spontaneous BOLD signal at the recording sites exhibited significant localized correlation with the infraslow LFP signals as well as with the slow power modulations of higher-frequency LFPs (1-100 Hz) at a delay comparable to the hemodynamic response time under anesthesia. Infraslow electrical activity has been postulated to play a role in attentional processes, and the findings reported here suggest that infraslow LFP coordination may share a mechanism with the large-scale BOLD-based networks previously implicated in task performance, providing new insight into the mechanisms contributing to the resting state fMRI signal.

  20. [Resting heart rate and cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Díaz, Buenaventura; Alemán Sánchez, José Juan; Cabrera de León, Antonio

    2014-07-07

    Heart rate reflects autonomic nervous system activity. Numerous studies have demonstrated that an increased heart rate at rest is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality as an independent risk factor. It has been shown a link between cardiac autonomic balance and inflammation. Thus, an elevated heart rate produces a micro-inflammatory response and is involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction. In turn, decrease in heart rate produces benefits in congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, atrial fibrillation, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Alteration of other heart rate-related parameters, such as their variability and recovery after exercise, is associated with risk of cardiovascular events. Drugs reducing the heart rate (beta-blockers, calcium antagonists and inhibitors of If channels) have the potential to reduce cardiovascular events. Although not recommended in healthy subjects, interventions for reducing heart rate constitute a reasonable therapeutic goal in certain pathologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Online Learning of Rested and Restless Bandits

    CERN Document Server

    Tekin, Cem

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study the online learning problem involving rested and restless multiarmed bandits with multiple plays. The system consists of a single player/user and a set of K finite-state discrete-time Markov chains (arms) with unknown state spaces and statistics. At each time step the player can play M arms. The objective of the user is to decide for each step which M of the K arms to play over a sequence of trials so as to maximize its long term reward. The restless multiarmed bandit is particularly relevant to the application of opportunistic spectrum access (OSA), where a (secondary) user has access to a set of K channels, each of time-varying condition as a result of random fading and/or certain primary users' activities.

  2. FTO genotype and weight loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livingstone, Katherine M; Celis-Morales, Carlos; Papandonatos, George D;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of the FTO genotype on weight loss after dietary, physical activity, or drug based interventions in randomised controlled trials. DESIGN: Systematic review and random effects meta-analysis of individual participant data from randomised controlled trials. DATA SOURCES...... well to dietary, physical activity, or drug based weight loss interventions and thus genetic predisposition to obesity associated with the FTO minor allele can be at least partly counteracted through such interventions. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: PROSPERO CRD42015015969.......: Ovid Medline, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane from inception to November 2015. ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA FOR STUDY SELECTION: Randomised controlled trials in overweight or obese adults reporting reduction in body mass index, body weight, or waist circumference by FTO genotype (rs9939609 or a proxy) after...

  3. Two-mode clustering of genotype by trait and genotype by environment data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, J.A.; Malosetti, M.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the use of two-mode clustering for genotype by trait and genotype by environment data. In contrast to two separate (one mode) clusterings on genotypes or traits/environments, two-mode clustering simultaneously produces homogeneous groups of genotypes and traits/environm

  4. Selection of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genotypes using a genotype plus genotype x environment interaction biplot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, A M; Teodoro, P E; Gonçalves, M C; Santos, A; Torres, F E

    2016-08-05

    Recently, the genotype plus genotype x environment interaction (GGE) biplot methodology has been used to investigate genotype x environment interactions in several crop species, but has not been applied to the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) crop in Brazil. The aim of this study was to identify common bean genotypes that exhibit high grain yield and stability in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. We conducted 12 trials from 2000 to 2006 in the municipalities of Aquidauana and Dourados, and evaluated 13 genotypes in a randomized block design with three replications. Grain yield data were subjected to individual and joint analyses of variance. After analyzing the GE interaction, the adaptability and phenotypic stability of the common bean genotypes were analyzed using GGE biplot methodology. The genotypes EMGOPA-201, Xamego, and Aporé are recommended for growing in Mato Grosso do Sul, because they exhibited high grain yield and phenotypic stability.

  5. Tempat Kedudukan Rest Lingual dalam Pembuatan Gigi Tiruan Sebagian Lepas Kerangka Logam Lingual Rest Seat in Removable Partial Denture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armida Sofyanis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In certain cases, lingual rest is needed to provide better retention for RPD. Lingual rest is a cingulum rest placed on the lower jaw in RPD design. It is used as an indirect retainer. To make the rest fit best, a good rest seat should be prepared in the cingulum. The outline form of the lingual rest is a half moon shaped with a smooth curve from one marginal ridge to the other, crossing the center of the tooth. The rest seat itself should be V shaped, and the depth is 1 - 1 1/2mm. In this situation, one of four options should be considered i.e.: fabricate a cast veneer crown, or a three quarter crown to place a lingual pin-lay, or put a small amalgam restoration in the base of the preparation when the dentin has been touched.  

  6. Distribution and diversity of hepatitis B virus genotypes in Yunnan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Binghui; Feng, Yue; Li, Zheng; Duan, Haiping; Zhao, Ting; Zhang, Amei; Liu, Li; Baloch, Zulqarnain; Xia, Xueshan

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most prevalent pathogens in the world, and infection with this virus is a serious threat for public health. Yunnan is considered as an important endemic center for blood-borne viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus, in China. However, the distribution and diversity of HBV subgenotypes remain unclear in Yunnan province. In the current study, HBV positive samples were collected from different prefectures of Yunnan province and their molecular epidemiological characters were determined. Phylogenetic analysis on the pre-S/S gene (865 bps) showed the prevalence of four HBV genotypes, including genotype B (24 cases, 33.3%), genotype C (45 cases, 62.5%), genotype I (two cases, 2.78%) and C/D recombinants (one case, 1.39%). The most prevalent genotypes B and C could be sub classified into subgenotype B2 and C1, C2, C5, and C7, respectively. Clusters of subgenotype B2 and C2 consisted of strains from China and other East Asian countries, while subgenotype C1, C5, and C7 and genotype I formed a cluster together with strains from Southeast Asia. Using Bayesian inference from phylogenetic, HBV genotypes B and C were estimated to have originated in 1860s and 1910s with an evolutionary rate of 3.26 and 8.01 × 10(-4) substitutions/site/year, respectively. These findings indicate that the distribution of HBV genotypes in Yunnan was influenced by strains from the rest of China and the neighboring countries.

  7. Genetic Diversity Assessment Across Different Genotypes Of Mungbean And Urdbean Using Molecular Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Narasimhan , B.R.Patil and S. Datta, M. Kaashyap

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Pulses compliment the daily diet of Indians along with cereals. They are rich in proteins with satisfactory proportion ofcarbohydrates. Mungbean, Vigna radiata and Urd bean, Vigna mungo are the important grain legume crops in agriculture,particularly in India. MYMV (Mungbean Yellow vein Mosaic Virus is a virus transmitted by whitefly, Bemesia tabaci, themost serious disease of Mungbean and Urdbean. In this study, six each of MYMV resistant and susceptible genotypes inMungbean and Urbean respectively were selected for the diversity analysis using molecular markers. Twenty four RGAprimers from cowpea were used to screen the twenty four genotypes. Dendrogram generated clearly indicated two bigclusters at 15% similarity. All mungbean genotypes made one cluster (cluster A except PS16, which was included in othercluster made by Urdbean genotypes (cluster B. Cluster A contained eleven genotypes while cluster B contained thirteengenotypes. Cluster A and B were further classified into two sub clusters namely A1 and A2, B1 and B2 respectively. A1consisted of seven genotypes of which five were resistant (PANT MUNG 1, PANT MUNG 5, HUM 12, PUSA 9531, HUM1 and two were susceptible (TARM 2, KOPERGAON 3, while A2 comprised of remaining four genotypes in which threewere susceptible (TAP 7, SML 134 and SML 668, and one (AKM 8803 was resistant. Further, it was found that fourmungbean resistant genotypes of A1 namely Pant Mung1, Pant Mung5, HUM 12, and PUSA 9531 made one cluster at 55%similarity. Cluster B, again was subdivided into B1 and B2. B1 consisted a single genotype which was a cross between IPU99-25* SPS5 while, B2 consisted of the rest of the twelve genotypes. It was interesting to see that two resistant (IPU 02-33and IPU 6-02 and two susceptible (LBG 20 and T9 genotypes of Urd bean made separate cluster with a similarity of 99 percent and which indicated that though genotypes are differing at resistant locus, they are highly similar at all other loci.

  8. REST and stress resistance in ageing and Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Aron, Liviu; Zullo, Joseph; Pan, Ying; Kim, Haeyoung; Chen, Yiwen; Yang, Tun-Hsiang; Kim, Hyun-Min; Drake, Derek; Liu, X. Shirley; Bennett, David A.; Colaiácovo, Monica P.; Yankner, Bruce A.

    2014-03-01

    Human neurons are functional over an entire lifetime, yet the mechanisms that preserve function and protect against neurodegeneration during ageing are unknown. Here we show that induction of the repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST; also known as neuron-restrictive silencer factor, NRSF) is a universal feature of normal ageing in human cortical and hippocampal neurons. REST is lost, however, in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with deep sequencing and expression analysis show that REST represses genes that promote cell death and Alzheimer's disease pathology, and induces the expression of stress response genes. Moreover, REST potently protects neurons from oxidative stress and amyloid β-protein toxicity, and conditional deletion of REST in the mouse brain leads to age-related neurodegeneration. A functional orthologue of REST, Caenorhabditis elegans SPR-4, also protects against oxidative stress and amyloid β-protein toxicity. During normal ageing, REST is induced in part by cell non-autonomous Wnt signalling. However, in Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies, REST is lost from the nucleus and appears in autophagosomes together with pathological misfolded proteins. Finally, REST levels during ageing are closely correlated with cognitive preservation and longevity. Thus, the activation state of REST may distinguish neuroprotection from neurodegeneration in the ageing brain.

  9. Resting-State Connectivity Predicts Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesias in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Nielsen, Silas H.;

    2016-01-01

    dyskinesias emerged. Levodopa-induced modulation of cortico-striatal resting-state connectivity was assessed between the putamen and the following 3 cortical regions of interest: supplementary motor area, primary sensorimotor cortex, and right inferior frontal gyrus. These functional connectivity measures......-state connectivity between the putamen and primary sensorimotor cortex in the most affected hemisphere predicted whether patients would develop dyskinesias with a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 91% (P putamen...... predicted interindividual differences in dyskinesia severity (R2 = 0.627, P = .004). Resting-state connectivity between the right inferior frontal gyrus and putamen neither predicted dyskinesia status nor dyskinesia severity. Conclusions: The results corroborate the notion that altered dopaminergic...

  10. Progress in genotyping of Chlamydia trachomatis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xia Yong; Xiong Likuan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the common genotyping techniques of Chlamydia trachomatis in terms of their principles,characteristics,applications and limitations.Data sources Data used in this review were mainly from English literatures of PubMed database.The search terms were "Chlamydia trachomatis" and "genotyping".Meanwhile,data from World Health Organization were also cited.Study selection Original articles and reviews relevant to present review's theme were selected.Results Different genotyping techniques were applied on different occasions according to their characteristics,especially in epidemiological studies worldwide,which pushed the study of Chlamydia trachomatis forward greatly.In addition,summaries of some epidemiological studies by genotyping were also included in this work for reference and comparison.Conclusions A clear understanding of common genotyping techniques could be helpful to genotype C.trachomatis more appropriately and effectively.Furthermore,more studies on the association of genotypes of Ch/amydia trachomatis with clinical manifestations should be performed.

  11. CD-REST: a system for extracting chemical-induced disease relation in literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Yonghui; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wang, Jingqi; Lee, Hee-Jin; Xu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Mining chemical-induced disease relations embedded in the vast biomedical literature could facilitate a wide range of computational biomedical applications, such as pharmacovigilance. The BioCreative V organized a Chemical Disease Relation (CDR) Track regarding chemical-induced disease relation extraction from biomedical literature in 2015. We participated in all subtasks of this challenge. In this article, we present our participation system Chemical Disease Relation Extraction SysTem (CD-REST), an end-to-end system for extracting chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. CD-REST consists of two main components: (1) a chemical and disease named entity recognition and normalization module, which employs the Conditional Random Fields algorithm for entity recognition and a Vector Space Model-based approach for normalization; and (2) a relation extraction module that classifies both sentence-level and document-level candidate drug–disease pairs by support vector machines. Our system achieved the best performance on the chemical-induced disease relation extraction subtask in the BioCreative V CDR Track, demonstrating the effectiveness of our proposed machine learning-based approaches for automatic extraction of chemical-induced disease relations in biomedical literature. The CD-REST system provides web services using HTTP POST request. The web services can be accessed from http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr. The online CD-REST demonstration system is available at http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html. Database URL: http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr; http://clinicalnlptool.com/cdr/cdr.html PMID:27016700

  12. Parsing the intrinsic networks underlying attention: a resting state study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visintin, Eleonora; De Panfilis, Chiara; Antonucci, Camilla; Capecci, Cinzia; Marchesi, Carlo; Sambataro, Fabio

    2015-02-01

    The attention system functionally modulates brain activity to exert control over thoughts, feelings and actions. Three distinct but mutually interacting components of attention have been hypothesized: alerting, which mediates the maintenance of a state of vigilance toward an upcoming stimulus; orienting, which supports the selection of sensory information, and executive control that is involved in detecting and resolving cognitive conflicts. The performance of tasks probing these components engages fronto-parietal and thalamic regions. Also, general attention has been associated with the activity of resting-state networks (RSNs), which are sets of brain regions with synchronous temporal fluctuations. Importantly, the association between the intrinsic brain activity of RSNs and the efficiency and integration of the specific attentional components remains largely unexplored. For this aim, we recruited twenty healthy volunteers who performed the Attention Network Test-Revised (ANT-R), assessing the alerting, orienting and executive control components as well as their interactions, and underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. For each participant RSNs were estimated using double regression. The RSNs spanning across areas previously implicated in attentional processing were correlated with ANT-R scores using multiple regressions. Significant brain behavior correlations emerged between ANT-R scores and RSNs comprising the regions relevant for attentional processing, i.e., left and right prefronto-parietal (PFC-PC), dorsal attentional (DAN), salience (SN), and default mode (DMN) networks. The activity of PFC-PC networks was correlated with alerting in parietal and frontal regions, and with location conflict in the frontal regions. The DAN connectivity was correlated with flanker, location conflict, and their interaction in parietal regions. SN was associated with flanker by location and flanker by orienting interactions in the inferior frontal

  13. The Effects of Long Duration Bed Rest on Functional Mobility and Balance: Relationship to Resting State Motor Cortex Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdeniz, B.; Koppelmans, V.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Kofman, I. S.; DeDios, Y. E.; Riascos-Castaneda, R. F.; Wood, S. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Seidler, R. D.

    2014-01-01

    NASA offers researchers from a variety of backgrounds the opportunity to study bed rest as an experimental analog for space flight. Extended exposure to a head-down tilt position during long duration bed rest can resemble many of the effects of a low-gravity environment such as reduced sensory inputs, body unloading and increased cephalic fluid distribution. The aim of our study is to a) identify changes in brain function that occur with prolonged bed rest and characterize their recovery time course; b) assess whether and how these changes impact behavioral and neurocognitive performance. Thus far, we completed data collection from six participants that include task based and resting state fMRI. The data have been acquired through the bed rest facility located at the University of Texas Medical Branch (Galveston, TX). Subjects remained in bed with their heads tilted down 6 degrees below their feet for 70 consecutive days. Behavioral measures and neuroimaging assessments were obtained at seven time points: a) 7 and 12 days before bed rest; b) 7, 30, and 65 days during bed rest; and c) 7 and 12 days after bed rest. Functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (FcMRI) analysis was performed to assess the connectivity of motor cortex in and out of bed rest. We found a decrease in motor cortex connectivity with vestibular cortex and the cerebellum from pre bed rest to in bed rest. We also used a battery of behavioral measures including the functional mobility test and computerized dynamic posturography collected before and after bed rest. We will report the preliminary results of analyses relating brain and behavior changes. Furthermore, we will also report the preliminary results of a spatial working memory task and vestibular stimulation during in and out of bed rest.

  14. CyREST: Turbocharging Cytoscape Access for External Tools via a RESTful API.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Keiichiro; Muetze, Tanja; Kolishovski, Georgi; Shannon, Paul; Demchak, Barry

    2015-01-01

    As bioinformatic workflows become increasingly complex and involve multiple specialized tools, so does the difficulty of reliably reproducing those workflows. Cytoscape is a critical workflow component for executing network visualization, analysis, and publishing tasks, but it can be operated only manually via a point-and-click user interface. Consequently, Cytoscape-oriented tasks are laborious and often error prone, especially with multistep protocols involving many networks. In this paper, we present the new cyREST Cytoscape app and accompanying harmonization libraries. Together, they improve workflow reproducibility and researcher productivity by enabling popular languages (e.g., Python and R, JavaScript, and C#) and tools (e.g., IPython/Jupyter Notebook and RStudio) to directly define and query networks, and perform network analysis, layouts and renderings. We describe cyREST's API and overall construction, and present Python- and R-based examples that illustrate how Cytoscape can be integrated into large scale data analysis pipelines. cyREST is available in the Cytoscape app store (http://apps.cytoscape.org) where it has been downloaded over 1900 times since its release in late 2014.

  15. Resting state functional MRI in Parkinson's disease: the impact of deep brain stimulation on 'effective' connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Joshua; Urner, Maren; Moran, Rosalyn; Flandin, Guillaume; Marreiros, Andre; Mancini, Laura; White, Mark; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Limousin, Patricia; Friston, Karl; Foltynie, Tom

    2014-04-01

    Depleted of dopamine, the dynamics of the parkinsonian brain impact on both 'action' and 'resting' motor behaviour. Deep brain stimulation has become an established means of managing these symptoms, although its mechanisms of action remain unclear. Non-invasive characterizations of induced brain responses, and the effective connectivity underlying them, generally appeals to dynamic causal modelling of neuroimaging data. When the brain is at rest, however, this sort of characterization has been limited to correlations (functional connectivity). In this work, we model the 'effective' connectivity underlying low frequency blood oxygen level-dependent fluctuations in the resting Parkinsonian motor network-disclosing the distributed effects of deep brain stimulation on cortico-subcortical connections. Specifically, we show that subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation modulates all the major components of the motor cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical loop, including the cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical, direct and indirect basal ganglia pathways, and the hyperdirect subthalamic nucleus projections. The strength of effective subthalamic nucleus afferents and efferents were reduced by stimulation, whereas cortico-striatal, thalamo-cortical and direct pathways were strengthened. Remarkably, regression analysis revealed that the hyperdirect, direct, and basal ganglia afferents to the subthalamic nucleus predicted clinical status and therapeutic response to deep brain stimulation; however, suppression of the sensitivity of the subthalamic nucleus to its hyperdirect afferents by deep brain stimulation may subvert the clinical efficacy of deep brain stimulation. Our findings highlight the distributed effects of stimulation on the resting motor network and provide a framework for analysing effective connectivity in resting state functional MRI with strong a priori hypotheses.

  16. Semiprecision rest system for distal-extension removable partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, I D

    1979-07-01

    The history of the nonlocking type of intracoronal semiprecision rest has been traced from its origins with Neurohr in 1930, up to its present use as the Thompson dowel rest. The advantages of the use of this deep rest design and the clasp arm design for primary retention have been discussed. The Blatterfein modification of the lingual clasp arm has been introduced to overcome the problems of breakage and lack of stabilization which are present with the Thompson, Van Dam, and Wands designs.

  17. Differences among Elite Female Rowers Regarding Carbohydrate Consumption at Rest

    OpenAIRE

    BADAU, Dana; TOMESCU, VALERIU; BADAU, Adela; MARTIN, Ștefan Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Backround: The objective of this study was interpreting the reported differences within carbohydrate consumption at rest, in female rowing groups. Method: We conducted a cross-sectional study, on a group of elite rowing athletes, monitoring carbohydrate consumption at rest. 34 subjects, divided in 3 groups of activities (senior, youth, junior) took part in this study being monitored through Cosmed Quark CPET device. Results: The average amount of carbohydrates consumed at rest among the group...

  18. Developing RESTful web services with Jersey 2.0

    CERN Document Server

    Gulabani, Sunil

    2013-01-01

    The book will follow a standard tutorial approach and will teach readers how to use the Jersey API for creating RESTful web services.This book is intended for Java EE developers who are building applications on the REST architecture. This is a quick, hands-on guide for learning JAX-RS 2.0. Developers should have some knowledge about RESTful web services but it's not essential to know JAX-RS 1.0.

  19. Resting metabolic requirements of men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, O E

    1988-05-01

    The resting metabolic rates (RMRs) of 44 lean and obese women, 8 of whom were trained athletes, and of 60 lean and obese men were measured by indirect calorimetry. These healthy humans, ranging from 18 to 82 years old and from 43 to 171 kg in weight, were mentally and physically active. Body composition was determined by densitometry and skinfold thickness. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to determine whether one or several variables best predicted RMR. Body compositional variables reflecting active protoplasmic tissue were all highly interrelated. Body weight alone yielded prediction values for RMR comparable to those of other variables of active protoplasmic tissue mass. Among these mentally and physically active women and men, the influence of age on RMR was trivial, and regional distribution of fat had no influence on the RMR. The 95% confidence limits for RMR in both lean and obese subjects were broad. Thus, metabolic efficiency is not necessarily or exclusively related to obesity. In fact, the caloric requirements of humans, based on body weight or active protoplasmic tissue mass, may vary twofold. With the exception of the elderly men, the classic prediction equations and tables developed during the first half of this century greatly overestimated the RMR of healthy lean and obese humans. Therefore, new regression equations for predicting the RMR based on weight and fat-free mass were developed.

  20. Differences in resting EEG related to ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jausovec, N; Jausovec, K

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between different EEG measures (mean power, mean frequency, approximated entropy and coherence), and ability (creativity and intelligence). For that purpose the EEG of 115 student-teachers (Intelligence: M= 115.17; SD = 12.78; IQ(min)= 82; IQ(max)= 136; Creativity - standardized scores: M = 55.97; SD = 10.67; C(min)= 38; C(max)= 84) was recorded while they were resting with eyes open and closed. The study showed only weak correlations between measures based on the level of activity in different areas (mean power, mean frequency and approximated entropy) and creativity. The correlations with IQ scores were even less pronounced. On the other hand, coherence measures showed a much more intense relationship both with creativity as well as with intelligence. In the eyes-open state these differences were mainly distributed over the right hemisphere. The results are discussed in the light of different theories relating brain functioning and ability.

  1. Relation of visual creative imagery manipulation to resting-state brain oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuxuan; Zhang, Delong; Liang, Bishan; Wang, Zengjian; Li, Junchao; Gao, Zhenni; Gao, Mengxia; Chang, Song; Jiao, Bingqing; Huang, Ruiwang; Liu, Ming

    2017-03-07

    Visual creative imagery (VCI) manipulation is the key component of visual creativity; however, it remains largely unclear how it occurs in the brain. The present study investigated the brain neural response to VCI manipulation and its relation to intrinsic brain activity. We collected functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) datasets related to a VCI task and a control task as well as pre- and post-task resting states in sequential sessions. A general linear model (GLM) was subsequently used to assess the specific activation of the VCI task compared with the control task. The changes in brain oscillation amplitudes across the pre-, on-, and post-task states were measured to investigate the modulation of the VCI task. Furthermore, we applied a Granger causal analysis (GCA) to demonstrate the dynamic neural interactions that underlie the modulation effect. We determined that the VCI task specifically activated the left inferior frontal gyrus pars triangularis (IFGtriang) and the right superior frontal gyrus (SFG), as well as the temporoparietal areas, including the left inferior temporal gyrus, right precuneus, and bilateral superior parietal gyrus. Furthermore, the VCI task modulated the intrinsic brain activity of the right IFGtriang (0.01-0.08 Hz) and the left caudate nucleus (0.2-0.25 Hz). Importantly, an inhibitory effect (negative) may exist from the left SFG to the right IFGtriang in the on-VCI task state, in the frequency of 0.01-0.08 Hz, whereas this effect shifted to an excitatory effect (positive) in the subsequent post-task resting state. Taken together, the present findings provide experimental evidence for the existence of a common mechanism that governs the brain activity of many regions at resting state and whose neural activity may engage during the VCI manipulation task, which may facilitate an understanding of the neural substrate of visual creativity.

  2. Isolation and Genotyping of Acanthamoeba spp. as Neglected Parasites in North of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Azar; Sarvi, Shahabeddin; Daryani, Ahmad; Sharif, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Acanthamoeba, a free-living amoeba, is widely distributed in the environment, water sources, soil, dust, and air. It can cause keratitis in contact lens wearers with poor hygiene and also fatal granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) in immunocompromised hosts. The aim of this study was to gain some insights into the distribution and genotypes of the potentially pathogenic species of Acanthamoeba present in water sources in north of Iran. Total 43 Acanthamoeba species were isolated from 77 water samples taken from different water sources within the Mazandaran province in Northern Iran (Sari city and suburbs). Isolates were identified based on cyst and trophozoite morphological characteristics as well genetics. PCR fragments corresponding to the small-subunit 18S rRNA gene were sequenced for 20 of 43 positive isolates. The results revealed that 83.3% of sequenced isolates belonged to the T4 genotype and the rest belonged to the T2 genotype. Our results indicated that Acanthamoeba is widely distributed in Sari city. As the incidence in Iran of amoebic keratitis has increased in recent years, the exact estimation of the prevalence of this amoeba and its predominant genotype may play a crucial role in prevention of the disease. Sari city has several rivers, seashores, and natural recreational amenities, which attract visitors during the year. This is the first report of Acanthamoeba genotypes from water sources in Sari city, Mazandaran province of Iran, and the results suggest that more attention is needed to protect the visiting population and immunocompromised individuals. PMID:27658596

  3. Isolation and Genotyping of Acanthamoeba spp. as Neglected Parasites in North of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokri, Azar; Sarvi, Shahabeddin; Daryani, Ahmad; Sharif, Mehdi

    2016-08-01

    Acanthamoeba, a free-living amoeba, is widely distributed in the environment, water sources, soil, dust, and air. It can cause keratitis in contact lens wearers with poor hygiene and also fatal granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) in immunocompromised hosts. The aim of this study was to gain some insights into the distribution and genotypes of the potentially pathogenic species of Acanthamoeba present in water sources in north of Iran. Total 43 Acanthamoeba species were isolated from 77 water samples taken from different water sources within the Mazandaran province in Northern Iran (Sari city and suburbs). Isolates were identified based on cyst and trophozoite morphological characteristics as well genetics. PCR fragments corresponding to the small-subunit 18S rRNA gene were sequenced for 20 of 43 positive isolates. The results revealed that 83.3% of sequenced isolates belonged to the T4 genotype and the rest belonged to the T2 genotype. Our results indicated that Acanthamoeba is widely distributed in Sari city. As the incidence in Iran of amoebic keratitis has increased in recent years, the exact estimation of the prevalence of this amoeba and its predominant genotype may play a crucial role in prevention of the disease. Sari city has several rivers, seashores, and natural recreational amenities, which attract visitors during the year. This is the first report of Acanthamoeba genotypes from water sources in Sari city, Mazandaran province of Iran, and the results suggest that more attention is needed to protect the visiting population and immunocompromised individuals.

  4. GPi Oscillatory Activity Differentiates Tics from the Resting State, Voluntary Movements, and the Unmedicated Parkinsonian State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Telkes, Ilknur; Viswanathan, Ashwin; Ince, Nuri F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an emerging treatment strategy for severe, medication-refractory Tourette syndrome (TS). Thalamic (Cm-Pf) and pallidal (including globus pallidus interna, GPi) targets have been the most investigated. While the neurophysiological correlates of Parkinson's disease (PD) in the GPi and subthalamic nucleus (STN) are increasingly recognized, these patterns are not well characterized in other disease states. Recent findings indicate that the cross-frequency coupling (CFC) between beta band and high frequency oscillations (HFOs) within the STN in PD patients is pathologic. Methods: We recorded intraoperative local field potentials (LFPs) from the postero-ventrolateral GPi in three adult patients with TS at rest, during voluntary movements, and during tic activity and compared them to the intraoperative GPi-LFP activity recorded from four unmedicated PD patients at rest. Results: In all PD patients, we noted excessive beta band activity (13–30 Hz) at rest which consistently modulated the amplitude of the co-existent HFOs observed between 200 and 400 Hz, indicating the presence of beta-HFO CFC. In all 3TS patients at rest, we observed theta band activity (4–7 Hz) and HFOs. Two patients had beta band activity, though at lower power than theta oscillations. Tic activity was associated with increased high frequency (200–400 Hz) and gamma band (35–200 Hz) activity. There was no beta-HFO CFC in TS patients at rest. However, CFC between the phase of 5–10 Hz band activity and the amplitude of HFOs was found in two TS patients. During tics, this shifted to CFC between the phase of beta band activity and the amplitude of HFOs in all subjects. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the first study that shows that beta-HFO CFC exists in the GPi of TS patients during tics and at rest in PD patients, and suggests that this pattern might be specific to pathologic/involuntary movements. Furthermore, our findings suggest that during tics

  5. GPi oscillatory activity differentiates tics from the resting state, voluntary movements, and the unmedicated parkinsonian state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joohi Jimenez-Shahed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Deep brain stimulation (DBS is an emerging treatment strategy for severe, medication-refractory Tourette syndrome (TS. Thalamic (Cm-Pf and pallidal (including globus pallidus interna, GPi targets have been the most investigated. While the neurophysiological correlates of Parkinson’s disease (PD in the GPi and subthalamic nucleus (STN are increasingly recognized, these patterns are not well characterized in other disease states. Recent findings indicate that the cross-frequency coupling (CFC between beta band and high frequency oscillations (HFOs within the STN in PD patients is pathologic. Methods: We recorded intraoperative local field potentials (LFPs from the postero-ventrolateral GPi in three adult patients with TS at rest, during voluntary movements, and during tic activity and compared them to the intraoperative GPi-LFP activity recorded from four unmedicated PD patients at rest. Results: In all PD patients, we noted excessive beta band activity (13-30Hz at rest which consistently modulated the amplitude of the co-existent HFOs observed between 200-400Hz, indicating the presence of beta-HFO CFC. In all 3 TS patients at rest, we observed theta band activity (4-7Hz and HFOs. Two patients had beta band activity, though at lower power than theta oscillations. Tic activity was associated with increased high frequency (200-400Hz and gamma band (35-200Hz activity. There was no beta-HFO CFC in TS patients at rest. However, CFC between the phase of 5-10Hz band activity and the amplitude of HFOs was found in two TS patients. During tics, this shifted to CFC between the phase of beta band activity and the amplitude of HFOs in all subjects. Conclusions: To our knowledge this is the first study that shows that beta-HFO CFC exists in the GPi of TS patients during tics and at rest in PD patients, and suggests that this pattern might be specific to pathologic/involuntary movements. Furthermore, our findings suggest that during tics, resting

  6. REST is up-regulated by epidermal growth factor in HeLa cells and inhibits apoptosis by influencing histone H3 acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiula, Monica; Carbonari, Gioia; Dattoli, Samantha D; Calienni, Maria; Bedini, Andrea; Spampinato, Santi

    2012-08-01

    REST (repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor) is a transcription factor that recruits histone deacetylases to silence gene transcription. REST appears to play a paradoxical role in cancer cells: it exhibits tumor suppressor activity or promotes tumorigenesis, depending upon the setting. The extracellular signaling molecules that control REST gene expression in cancer cells remain poorly understood. In this study, we report that REST expression in HeLa cells is elevated in cells exposed to epidermal growth factor or serum, whereas the rate of cell apoptosis is low. Apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal is significantly increased in HeLa cells treated with an antisense phosphorothioate oligodeoxynucleotide (AS ODN) capable of down-regulating REST expression, whereas in HeLa cells transfected with a REST expressing plasmid, REST overexpression reduces the marked apoptosis caused, in absence of serum, by exposure to an anti-Fas receptor antibody imitating the Fas ligand activity plus PD 98059, a blocker of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. REST knockdown also reduces mRNA levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-X(L) whereas in HeLa cells overexpressing REST, the reduction of Bcl-X(L) mRNA caused by the anti-Fas receptor antibody plus PD 98059 is significantly decreased. Finally, we report that acetylation of histone H3 is increased in HeLa cells exposed to AS ODN or anti-Fas receptor antibody, whereas it is reduced in cells transfected with the REST expressing plasmid. Our findings indicate that REST is a novel gene regulated by EGF in HeLa cells that potentially contributes to the modulation of apoptosis via epigenetic mechanisms.

  7. Padre Pio Rest Home, Cappoquin, Waterford.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, J

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Orthostatic hypotension (OH) is associated with troublesome symptoms and increased mortality. It is treatable and deserving of accurate diagnosis. This can be time consuming. The current reference standard for its diagnosis is head-up tilt (HUT) testing with continuous beat-to-beat plethysmography. Our objective was to assess the accuracy of sit-stand testing with semi-automatic sphygmomanometry for the diagnosis of OH. DESIGN: Retrospective test of diagnostic accuracy. METHODS: This was a retrospective study performed using a database maintained by a busy syncope unit. HUT testing was performed using an automated tilt table with Finometer monitoring. A 3 min 70 degrees HUT was performed following 5 min supine. Sitting blood pressure (BP) was measured following 3 min rest. Standing BP was measured within 30 s of assuming the upright posture. The results of sit-stand testing were compared with HUT testing as a reference standard. Both tests happened within 5 min of each other and patients underwent no intervention between tests. RESULTS: From a total of 1452 consecutive HUTs, we identified 730 with pre-test measures of sitting and standing BP. The mean age of this group was 70.57 years (SD = 15.1), 62% were female. The sensitivity of sit-stand testing was calculated as 15.5%, specificity as 89.9%, positive predictive value as 61.7%, negative predictive value as 50.2% and the likelihood ratio as 1.6. The area under the Receiver Operator Curve was 0.564. CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated that sit-stand testing for OH has very low diagnostic accuracy. We recommend that the more time-consuming reference standard method of diagnosis be used if the condition is suspected.

  8. Resting-state functional connectivity of the human hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Stephanie; Heni, Martin; Linder, Katarzyna; Zipfel, Stephan; Häring, Hans-Ulrich; Veit, Ralf; Fritsche, Andreas; Preissl, Hubert

    2014-12-01

    The hypothalamus is of enormous importance for multiple bodily functions such as energy homeostasis. Especially, rodent studies have greatly contributed to our understanding how specific hypothalamic subregions integrate peripheral and central signals into the brain to control food intake. In humans, however, the neural circuitry of the hypothalamus, with its different subregions, has not been delineated. Hence, the aim of this study was to map the hypothalamus network using resting-state functional connectivity (FC) analyses from the medial hypothalamus (MH) and lateral hypothalamus (LH) in healthy normal-weight adults (n = 49). Furthermore, in a separate sample, we examined differences within the LH and MH networks between healthy normal-weight (n = 25) versus overweight/obese adults (n = 23). FC patterns from the LH and MH revealed significant connections to the striatum, thalamus, brainstem, orbitofrontal cortex, middle and posterior cingulum and temporal brain regions. However, our analysis revealed subtler distinctions within hypothalamic subregions. The LH was functionally stronger connected to the dorsal striatum, anterior cingulum, and frontal operculum, while the MH showed stronger functional connections to the nucleus accumbens and medial orbitofrontal cortex. Furthermore, overweight/obese participants revealed heightened FC in the orbitofrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens within the MH network. Our results indicate that the MH and LH network are tapped into different parts of the dopaminergic circuitry of the brain, potentially modulating food reward based on the functional connections to the ventral and dorsal striatum, respectively. In obese adults, FC changes were observed in the MH network. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Rotavirus genotypes in Belarus, 2008-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeiko, Galina V; Yermalovich, Marina A; Poliakova, Nadezhda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Kerin, Tara K; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D; Samoilovich, Elena O

    2014-12-01

    This study describes group A rotavirus (RVA) genotype prevalence in Belarus from 2008 to 2012. In 2008, data from 3 sites in Belarus (Brest, Mogilev, Minsk) indicated that G4P[8] was the predominant genotype. Data from Minsk (2008-2012) showed that G4P[8] was the predominant RVA genotype in all years except in 2011 when G3P[8] was most frequently detected. Other RVA genotypes common in Europe (G1P[8], G2P[4]) were detected each year of the study. This study reveals the dominance of genotype G4P[8] in Belarus and helps to establish the baseline genotype prevalence prior to RVA vaccine introduction in the country.

  10. Grain yield stability of early maize genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Bahadur Kunwar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to estimate grain yield stability of early maize genotypes. Five early maize genotypes namely Pool-17, Arun1EV, Arun-4, Arun-2 and Farmer’s variety were evaluated using Randomized Complete Block Design along with three replications at four different locations namely Rampur, Rajahar, Pakhribas and Kabre districts of Nepal during summer seasons of three consecutive years from 2010 to 2012 under farmer’s fields. Genotype and genotype × environment (GGE biplot was used to identify superior genotype for grain yield and stability pattern. The genotypes Arun-1 EV and Arun-4 were better adapted for Kabre and Pakhribas where as pool-17 for Rajahar environments. The overall findings showed that Arun-1EV was more stable followed by Arun-2 therefore these two varieties can be recommended to farmers for cultivation in both environments.

  11. Identification of a natural intergenotypic recombinant hepatitis delta virus genotype 1 and 2 in Vietnamese HBsAg-positive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sy, B T; Nguyen, H M; Toan, N L; Song, L H; Tong, H V; Wolboldt, C; Binh, V Q; Kremsner, P G; Velavan, T P; Bock, C-T

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis D virus (HDV) infection is acquired as a co- /superinfection of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and can modulate the pathophysiology of chronic hepatitis B and related liver diseases including hepatocellular carcinoma. Among the eight distinct HDV genotypes reported, relatively few studies have attempted to investigate the prevalence of HDV mixed genotypes and RNA recombination of HDV. With a recorded prevalence of 10-20% HBV infection in Vietnam, this study investigated the HDV variability, HDV genotypes and HDV recombination among twenty-one HDV isolates in Vietnamese HBsAg-positive patients. HDV subgenomic and full-length genome sequences were obtained using newly established HDV-specific RT-PCR techniques. The nucleotide homology was observed from 74.6% to 99.4% among the investigated full-length genome of the HDV isolates. We observed HDV genotype 1 and HDV genotype 2 in the investigated Vietnamese patients. Although no HDV genotype mixtures were observed, we report here a newly identified recombinant of HDV genotypes (HDV 1 and HDV 2). The identified recombinant HDV isolate C03 revealed sequence homology to both HDV genotype 1 (nt1 to nt907) and HDV genotype 2 (nt908 to nt1675; HDAg coding region) with a breakpoint at nt908. Our findings demonstrate the prevalence of intergenotypic recombination between HDV genotypes 1 and 2 in a Vietnamese HBsAg-positive patient. Extended investigation on the distribution and prevalence of HDV, HDV mixed genotypes and recombinant HDV genotypes in a larger Vietnamese population offers vital insights into understanding of the micro-epidemiology of HDV and subsequent pathophysiology in chronic HBV- /HDV-related liver diseases.

  12. Entry into Midgut Epithelial Cells is a Key Step in the Selection of Genotypes in a Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriel Clavijo; Trevor Williams; Delia Mu(n)oz; Miguel L(o)pez-Ferber; Primitivo Caballero

    2009-01-01

    An isolate of the Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus comprises a stable proportion of deletion genotypes (e.g., SfNIC-C), that lack pif1 and pif2 rendering them noninfectious per os, and that survive by complementation with a complete genotype (SfNIC-B) in coinfected cells. To determine whether selection for particular ratios of complete and deletion genotypes occurs mainly during the establishment of the primary infection in insect midgut cells or during subsequent systemic infection, we examined genotype frequencies in insects that fed on OBs comprising different co-occluded mixtures of genotypes. Dramatic changes in genotype frequencies were observed between the OB inoculum and budded virus (BV) samples taken from larvae inoculated with OBs comprising 10% SfNIC-B + 90% SfNIC-C indicating that a marked reduction of SfNIC-C genotype had occurred in the insect midgut due to the immediate elimination of all OBs that originated from cells that had been infected only by SfNIC-C. In contrast, immediate changes were not observed in OBs comprising mixtures of 50% SfNIC-B + 50% SfNIC-C or those comprising 10% SfNIC-B + 90% SfNIC-C as most of the OBs in these mixtures originated from cells that had been infected by both genotypes. Subsequent changes in genotypic frequencies during five days of systemic infection were fairly small in magnitude for all genotypic mixtures. We conclude that the prevalence of defective genotypes in the SfNIC population is likely determined by a balance between host selection against OBs produced in cells infected by SfNIC-C alone and within-host selection for fast-replicating deletion genotypes. The strength of intra-host selection is likely modulated by changes in MOI during the infection period.

  13. A REST-ful interpretation for embedded modular systems based on open architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyke, James

    2016-05-01

    The much-anticipated revolution of the "Internet of things" (IoT) is expected to generate one trillion internet devices within the next 15 years, mostly in the form of simple wireless sensor devices. While this revolution promises to transform silicon markets and drive a number of disruptive changes in society, it is also the case that the protocols, complexity, and security issues of extremely large dynamic, co-mingled networks is still poorly understood. Furthermore, embedded system developers, to include military and aerospace users, have largely ignored the potential (good and bound) of the cloudlike, possibly intermingling networks having variable structure to how future systems might be engineered. In this paper, we consider a new interpretation of IoT inspired modular architecture strategies involving the representational state transfer (REST) model, in which dynamic networks with variable structure employ stateless application programming interface (API) concepts. The power of the method, which extends concepts originally developed for space plug-and-play avionics, is that it allows for the fluid co-mingling of hardware and software in networks whose structure can overlap and evolve. Paradoxically, these systems may have the most stringent determinism and fault-tolerant needs. In this paper we review how RESTful APIs can potentially be used to design, create, test, and deploy systems rapidly while addressing security and referential integrity even when the nodes of many systems might physically co-mingle. We will also explore ways to take advantage of the RESTful paradigm for fault tolerance and what extensions might be necessary to deal with high-performance and determinism.

  14. The clinical utility of vocal dosimetry for assessing voice rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misono, Stephanie; Banks, Kathryn; Gaillard, Philippe; Goding, George S; Yueh, Bevan

    2015-01-01

    Voice rest is frequently recommended following surgical disruption of vocal fold epithelium, but patients report variable adherence to voice rest recommendations. The objective of this study was to assess the clinical utility of an ambulatory vocal dosimeter for measuring adherence to voice rest recommendations. Outcomes research. Part 1: To determine the utility of the dosimeter in nonclinical use, the relationship between self-reported voice use and dosimeter measurements was examined in normal subjects (n = 11) who prospectively logged voice use while wearing the dosimeter. Part 2: To determine clinical utility of the dosimeter, patients undergoing vocal fold surgery for which postoperative voice rest was recommended (n = 11) wore a dosimeter for 2 days prior to and 2 days after surgery. Phonation percent and sound level were compared at baseline and during voice rest. The dosimeter performed as hypothesized with both normal subjects and patients. A moderate correlation (r = 0.62) was noted between self-reported voice use and dosimeter measurements in normal subjects. In patients on voice rest, a statistically and clinically significant decrease was observed in measured voice use, both in phonation time (P = .002) and intensity of phonation (P = .004). Ambulatory vocal dosimetry may have clinical utility for assessing adherence to voice rest recommendations. This information will be useful for the design of future studies on voice rest. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Voice rest after vocal fold surgery: current practice and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, A C; Carswell, A J; Tierney, P A

    2013-08-01

    Voice rest is commonly recommended after vocal fold surgery, but there is a lack of evidence base and no standard protocol. The aim of this study was to establish common practice regarding voice rest following vocal fold surgery. An online survey was circulated via e-mail invitation to members of the ENT UK Expert Panel between October and November 2011. The survey revealed that 86.5 per cent of respondents agreed that 'complete voice rest' means no sound production at all, but there was variability in how 'relative voice rest' was defined. There was no dominant type of voice rest routinely recommended after surgery for laryngeal papillomatosis or intermediate pathologies. There was considerable variability in the duration of voice rest recommended, with no statistically significant, most popular response (except for malignant lesions). Surgeons with less than 10 years of experience were more likely to recommend fewer days of voice rest. There is a lack of consistency in advice given to patients after vocal fold surgery, in terms of both type and length of voice rest. This may arise from an absence of robust evidence on which to base practice.

  16. Atypical Laterality of Resting Gamma Oscillations in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Christina R.; Villalobos, Michele E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin; Kohls, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal brain oscillatory activity has been found in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and proposed as a potential biomarker. While several studies have investigated gamma oscillations in ASD, none have examined resting gamma power across multiple brain regions. This study investigated resting gamma power using EEG in 15 boys with ASD and 18 age…

  17. 75 FR 55851 - Flightcrew Member Duty and Rest Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-14

    ... proposal recognizes the growing similarities between the types of operations and the universality of.... Pre-Flight Duty Period Rest 2. Cumulative Rest Requirements L. Fatigue Risk Management Systems M... extensive certificate holder management, direct operational experience, or both. \\6\\ See...

  18. Atypical Laterality of Resting Gamma Oscillations in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Christina R.; Villalobos, Michele E.; Schultz, Robert T.; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin; Kohls, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal brain oscillatory activity has been found in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and proposed as a potential biomarker. While several studies have investigated gamma oscillations in ASD, none have examined resting gamma power across multiple brain regions. This study investigated resting gamma power using EEG in 15 boys with ASD and 18 age…

  19. Restful Implementation of Catalogue Service for Geospatial Data Provenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L. C.; Yue, P.; Lu, X. C.

    2013-10-01

    Provenance, also known as lineage, is important in understanding the derivation history of data products. Geospatial data provenance helps data consumers to evaluate the quality and reliability of geospatial data. In a service-oriented environment, where data are often consumed or produced by distributed services, provenance could be managed by following the same service-oriented paradigm. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Catalogue Service for the Web (CSW) is used for the registration and query of geospatial data provenance by extending ebXML Registry Information Model (ebRIM). Recent advance of the REpresentational State Transfer (REST) paradigm has shown great promise for the easy integration of distributed resources. RESTful Web Service aims to provide a standard way for Web clients to communicate with servers based on REST principles. The existing approach for provenance catalogue service could be improved by adopting the RESTful design. This paper presents the design and implementation of a catalogue service for geospatial data provenance following RESTful architecture style. A middleware named REST Converter is added on the top of the legacy catalogue service to support a RESTful style interface. The REST Converter is composed of a resource request dispatcher and six resource handlers. A prototype service is developed to demonstrate the applicability of the approach.

  20. REST regulates oncogenic properties of glioblastoma stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Mohamed M.; Sathyan, Pratheesh; Singh, Sanjay K.; Zinn, Pascal O.; Marisetty, Anantha L.; Liang, Shoudan; Gumin, Joy; El-Mesallamy, Hala Osman; Suki, Dima; Colman, Howard; Fuller, Gregory N.; Lang, Frederick F.; Majumder, Sadhan

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors are the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults. Although many GBM tumors are believed to be caused by self-renewing, glioblastoma-derived stem-like cells (GSCs), the mechanisms that regulate self-renewal and other oncogenic properties of GSCs are only now being unraveled. Here we showed that GSCs derived from GBM patient specimens express varying levels of the transcriptional repressor REST, suggesting heterogeneity across different GSC lines. Loss- and gain-of-function experiments indicated that REST maintains self-renewal of GSCs. High REST-expressing GSCs (HR-GSCs) produced tumors histopathologically distinct from those generated by low REST-expressing GSCs (LR-GSCs) in orthotopic mouse brain tumor models. Knockdown of REST in HR-GSCs resulted in increased survival in GSC-transplanted mice and produced tumors with higher apoptotic and lower invasive properties. Conversely, forced expression of exogenous REST in LR-GSCs produced decreased survival in mice and produced tumors with lower apoptotic and higher invasive properties, similar to HR-GSCs. Thus, based on our results, we propose that a novel function of REST is to maintain self-renewal and other oncogenic properties of GSCs and that REST can play a major role in mediating tumorigenicity in GBM. PMID:22228704

  1. War exposure, 5-HTTLPR genotype and lifetime risk of depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artero, Sylvaine; Touchon, Jacques; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Malafosse, Alain; Ritchie, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Background in 1962, during the Algerian war, approximately one and a half million French people living in Algeria were repatriated to France in very poor and often life-threatening conditions. These subjects constitute a cohort for the study of the long term impact of gene-environment interaction on depression. Aims To examine the interaction between a highly stressful life event and subsequent depression, and its modulation by the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR). Method A community sample of elderly persons aged 65 years and over residing in the Montpellier region of the South of France was randomly recruited from electoral rolls. Genotyping was performed on 248 repatriated persons and 632 controls. Current and lifetime major and minor depressions were assessed according to DSM-IV criteria. Results A significant relationship was observed between exposure to repatriation and subsequent depression (pwar repatriation is significantly modulated by 5-HTTLPR genotype but this appears to occur only in persons who were younger at the time of exposure. PMID:21593514

  2. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Nan Nwe; Kanda, Tatsuo; Nakamoto, Shingo; Yokosuka, Osamu; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-21

    Myanmar is adjacent to India, Bangladesh, Thailand, Laos and China. In Myanmar, the prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is 2%, and HCV infection accounts for 25% of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this study, we reviewed the prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar. HCV genotypes 1, 3 and 6 were observed in volunteer blood donors in and around the Myanmar city of Yangon. Although there are several reports of HCV genotype 6 and its variants in Myanmar, the distribution of the HCV genotypes has not been well documented in areas other than Yangon. Previous studies showed that treatment with peginterferon and a weight-based dose of ribavirin for 24 or 48 wk could lead to an 80%-100% sustained virological response (SVR) rates in Myanmar. Current interferon-free treatments could lead to higher SVR rates (90%-95%) in patients infected with almost all HCV genotypes other than HCV genotype 3. In an era of heavy reliance on direct-acting antivirals against HCV, there is an increasing need to measure HCV genotypes, and this need will also increase specifically in Myanmar. Current available information of HCV genotypes were mostly from Yangon and other countries than Myanmar. The prevalence of HCV genotypes in Myanmar should be determined.

  3. OPTIMAL WORK-REST SCHEDULE FOR COMPUTER USERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervat Abdelrahman Mohamed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Musculoskeletal disorders are the most common health problems for computer users who work for an extended period. The aim of this study was to identify the best work-rest schedule with the three different work-rest groups: no rest break, mid-rest break, and multiple- rest breaks, which was associated with the least EMG activities of the upper trapezius muscle and would be beneficial for musculoskeletal health. Methods: Forty-five right-handed females complaining of neck discomfort were randomly assigned into three equal groups, Group1 (no rest break they were be engaged in sixty minutes of typing followed by ten minutes break (60-10, group 2 (mid-rest break thirty minutes of typing followed by five minutes break (30-5, and group 3 (multiple rest breaks fifteen minutes of typing followed by 2.5 minutes break (15-2.5. Surface EMG was used to pick up the electrical activity of right and left upper trapezius throughout the computer typing task. Results: There was a statistically significant reduction of normalized RMS (p<0.05 between the three groups for both right and left upper trapezius. Also, our results demonstrated a positive effect of mid and multiple rest breaks regarding reduced muscle activity in the upper trapezius muscle during a computer work. Conclusion: There is a positive effect of mid and multiple rest breaks regarding reduced muscle activity in the upper trapezius muscle throughout a computer work in subjects with neck and shoulder discomfort.

  4. Mitochondrial functional state impacts spontaneous neocortical activity and resting state FMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basavaraju G Sanganahalli

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake, central to neural metabolism and function, is diminished in aging whereas enhanced after acute/sub-acute traumatic brain injury. To develop relevant translational models for these neuropathologies, we determined the impact of perturbed mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacities on intrinsic brain activity using clinically relevant markers. From a multi-compartment estimate of probable baseline Ca(2+ ranges in the brain, we hypothesized that reduced or enhanced mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacity would decrease or increase spontaneous neuronal activity respectively. As resting state fMRI-BOLD fluctuations and stimulus-evoked BOLD responses have similar physiological origins [1] and stimulus-evoked neuronal and hemodynamic responses are modulated by mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacity [2], [3] respectively, we tested our hypothesis by measuring hemodynamic fluctuations and spontaneous neuronal activities during normal and altered mitochondrial functional states. Mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacity was perturbed by pharmacologically inhibiting or enhancing the mitochondrial Ca(2+ uniporter (mCU activity. Neuronal electrical activity and cerebral blood flow (CBF fluctuations were measured simultaneously and integrated with fMRI-BOLD fluctuations at 11.7T. mCU inhibition reduced spontaneous neuronal activity and the resting state functional connectivity (RSFC, whereas mCU enhancement increased spontaneous neuronal activity but reduced RSFC. We conclude that increased or decreased mitochondrial Ca(2+ uptake capacities lead to diminished resting state modes of brain functional connectivity.

  5. Effects of Physical Exercise on Individual Resting State EEG Alpha Peak Frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Gutmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous research has shown that both acute and chronic physical exercises can induce positive effects on brain function and this is associated with improvements in cognitive performance. However, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise on cognitive processing are not well understood. This study examined the effects of an acute bout of physical exercise as well as four weeks of exercise training on the individual resting state electroencephalographic (EEG alpha peak frequency (iAPF, a neurophysiological marker of the individual’s state of arousal and attention, in healthy young adults. The subjects completed a steady state exercise (SSE protocol or an exhaustive exercise (EE protocol, respectively, on two separate days. EEG activity was recorded for 2 min before exercise, immediately after exercise, and after 10 min of rest. All assessments were repeated following four weeks of exercise training to investigate whether an improvement in physical fitness modulates the resting state iAPF and/or the iAPF response to an acute bout of SSE and EE. The iAPF was significantly increased following EE (P=0.012 but not following SSE. It is concluded that the iAPF is increased following intense exercise, indicating a higher level of arousal and preparedness for external input.

  6. A comparison of resting images from two myocardial perfusion tracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anagnostopoulos, C. [Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Laney, R. [Royal Brompton Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Pennell, D. [National Heart and Lung Inst., London (United Kingdom); Proukakis, H. [University of Athens Medical School (Greece); Underwood, R. [National Heart and Lung Inst., London (United Kingdom)

    1995-09-01

    We have compared stress-redistribution and delayed rest thallium-201 with rest technetium-99m methoxyisobutylisonitrile (MIBI) tomograms in order to compare the tracers for the assessment of myocardial viability and to validate a rapid protocol combining the two tracers. We studied 30 consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease [group 1: 16 with normal left ventricular function, mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 55%, SD 6%; group 2: 14 with abnormal function, mean LVEF 28%, SD 8%]. {sup 201}Tl was injected during infusion of adenosine followed by acquisition of conventional stress and redistribution tomograms. On a separate day, {sup 201}Tl was injected at rest with imaging 4 h later. {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI was then given at rest and imaging was performed. Three images were compared: redistribution {sup 201}Tl, rest {sup 201}Tl, and rest {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI. Tracer activity was classified visually and quantitatively in nine segments and segments with>50% activity were defined as containing clinically significant viable myocardium. Mean global tracer uptake as a percentage of maximum was similar in group 1 (rest {sup 201}Tl 69%{+-}12%, redistribution {sup 201}Tl 69%{+-}15%, rest {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI 70%{+-}13%), but in group 2 mean tracer uptake was significantly greater in the rest {sup 201}Tl images (59%{+-}16%) than in redistribution {sup 201}Tl images (53%{+-}17%) or rest {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI images (53%{+-}19%). Overall agreement for regional uptake score was excellent ({kappa} from 0.79 to 0.84), although there were a significant number of segments with less uptake shown by redistribution {sup 201}Tl and by rest {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI than by rest {sup 201}Tl in group 2. The number of segments with significant viable myocardium in group 1 was very similar between the three images but in group 2 rest {sup 201}Tl identified significantly more segments as viable than the other images. (orig./MG) (orig.). With 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  7. Differences in CYP2C9 Genotype and Enzyme Activity Between Swedes and Koreans of Relevance for Personalized Medicine: Role of Ethnicity, Genotype, Smoking, Age, and Sex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatta, Fazleen H M; Lundblad, Mia; Ramsjo, Margareta; Kang, Ju-Hee; Roh, Hyung-Keun; Bertilsson, Leif; Eliasson, Erik; Aklillu, Eleni

    2015-06-01

    Global personalized medicine demands the characterization of person-to-person and between-population differences in drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. CYP2C9 pharmacokinetic pathway is subject to modulation by both genetic and environmental factors. CYP2C9 genotype-based dose recommendations (e.g., for warfarin) is advocated. However, the overall contribution of genotype for variation in enzyme activity may differ between populations. We evaluated the importance of ethnicity, genotype, smoking, body weight, age, and sex for CYP2C9 enzyme activity. CYP2C9 genotype and phenotype was determined in 148 Swedes and 146 Koreans using losartan as a probe. CYP2C9 enzyme activity was assessed using urinary losartan/metabolite E-3174 ratio. The frequency of CYP2C9 defective variant alleles (*2 and *3) was significantly higher in Swedes (10.8% and 12.5%) than in Koreans (0% and 5.8%). In matched genotypes, CYP2C9 enzyme activity was significantly lower in Swedes compared to Koreans (paccounting for 50% of the total variance. In both study populations, CYP2C9 genotype was a significant predictor of CYP2C9 enzyme activity, but its contribution in explaining the total variance was lower in Koreans (26.6%) than Swedes (40%). In conclusion, we report significantly lower CYP2C9 enzyme activity in Swedes compared to Koreans, partly but not exclusively due to CYP2C9 pharmacogenetic variations. Ethnicity and environment factors need to be considered together with genotype for population-specific dose optimization and global personalized medicine.

  8. Altered resting state cortico-striatal connectivity in mild to moderate stage Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngbin Kwak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by dopamine depletion in the striatum. One consistent pathophysiological hallmark of PD is an increase in spontaneous oscillatory activity in the basal ganglia thalamocortical networks. We evaluated these effects using resting state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI in mild to moderate stage Parkinson’s patients on and off L-DOPA and age-matched controls using six different striatal seed regions. We observed an overall increase in the strength of cortico-striatal functional connectivity in PD patients off L-DOPA compared to controls. This enhanced connectivity was down-regulated by L-DOPA as shown by an overall decrease in connectivity strength, particularly within motor cortical regions. We also performed a frequency content analysis of the BOLD signal time course extracted from the six striatal seed regions. PD off L-DOPA exhibited increased power in the frequency band 0.02 – 0.05 Hz compared to controls and to PD on L-DOPA. The L-DOPA associated decrease in the power of this frequency range modulated the L-DOPA associated decrease in connectivity strength between striatal seeds and the thalamus. In addition, the L-DOPA associated decrease in power in this frequency band also correlated with the L-DOPA associated improvement in cognitive performance. Our results demonstrate that PD and L-DOPA modulate striatal resting state BOLD signal oscillations and corticostriatal network coherence.

  9. Resting heart rate variability and heart rate recovery after submaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danieli, Aljoša; Lusa, Lara; Potočnik, Nejka; Meglič, Bernard; Grad, Anton; Bajrović, Fajko F

    2014-04-01

    Aerobic training accelerates Heart Rate Recovery after exercise in healthy subjects and in patients with coronary disease. As shown by pharmacological autonomic blockade, HRR early after exercise is dependent primarily on parasympathetic reactivation. Thus, accelerated HRR early after exercise in endurance-trained athletes may be attributed to augmented parasympathetic reactivation. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that the HRR early after submaximal exercise is related to the pre-exercise parasympathetic modulation. Thirty endurance-trained athletes (20 males, 50 ± 7 years) and thirty control subjects (20 males, 52 ± 6 years) performed a submaximal exercise on a cyclo-ergometer. Pre-exercise resting short-term heart rate variability (HRV) parameters in time and frequency-domains were correlated with HRR during the first 30 s, 1 and 2 min after cessation of exercise. We found that HRR was statistically significantly faster in athletes than in controls at all examination time points (p exercise is related to resting parasympathetic modulation in the middle-aged subjects. In addition, they suggested an optimal range of HRV for maximal HRR after exercise.

  10. Long-duration bed rest as an analog to microgravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, Alan R; Vico, Laurence

    2016-04-15

    Long-duration bed rest is widely employed to simulate the effects of microgravity on various physiological systems, especially for studies of bone, muscle, and the cardiovascular system. This microgravity analog is also extensively used to develop and test countermeasures to microgravity-altered adaptations to Earth gravity. Initial investigations of bone loss used horizontal bed rest with the view that this model represented the closest approximation to inactivity and minimization of hydrostatic effects, but all Earth-based analogs must contend with the constant force of gravity by adjustment of the G vector. Later concerns about the lack of similarity between headward fluid shifts in space and those with horizontal bed rest encouraged the use of 6 degree head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest as pioneered by Russian investigators. Headward fluid shifts in space may redistribute bone from the legs to the head. At present, HDT bed rest with normal volunteers is the most common analog for microgravity simulation and to test countermeasures for bone loss, muscle and cardiac atrophy, orthostatic intolerance, and reduced muscle strength/exercise capacity. Also, current physiologic countermeasures are focused on long-duration missions such as Mars, so in this review we emphasize HDT bed rest studies with durations of 30 days and longer. However, recent results suggest that the HDT bed rest analog is less representative as an analog for other important physiological problems of long-duration space flight such as fluid shifts, spinal dysfunction and radiation hazards.

  11. REST-MapReduce: An Integrated Interface but Differentiated Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hyuk Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the fast deployment of cloud computing, MapReduce architectures are becoming the major technologies for mobile cloud computing. The concept of MapReduce was first introduced as a novel programming model and implementation for a large set of computing devices. In this research, we propose a novel concept of REST-MapReduce, enabling users to use only the REST interface without using the MapReduce architecture. This approach provides a higher level of abstraction by integration of the two types of access interface, REST API and MapReduce. The motivation of this research stems from the slower response time for accessing simple RDBMS on Hadoop than direct access to RDMBS. This is because there is overhead to job scheduling, initiating, starting, tracking, and management during MapReduce-based parallel execution. Therefore, we provide a good performance for REST Open API service and for MapReduce, respectively. This is very useful for constructing REST Open API services on Hadoop hosting services, for example, Amazon AWS (Macdonald, 2005 or IBM Smart Cloud. For evaluating performance of our REST-MapReduce framework, we conducted experiments with Jersey REST web server and Hadoop. Experimental result shows that our approach outperforms conventional approaches.

  12. Seasonal and geographical impact on human resting periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Daniel; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Ghosh, Asim; Dunbar, Robin I M; Kaski, Kimmo

    2017-09-06

    We study the influence of seasonally and geographically related daily dynamics of daylight and ambient temperature on human resting or sleeping patterns using mobile phone data of a large number of individuals. We observe two daily inactivity periods in the people's aggregated mobile phone calling patterns and infer these to represent the resting times of the population. We find that the nocturnal resting period is strongly influenced by the length of daylight, and that its seasonal variation depends on the latitude, such that for people living in two different cities separated by eight latitudinal degrees, the difference in the resting periods of people between the summer and winter in southern cities is almost twice that in the northern cities. We also observe that the duration of the afternoon resting period is influenced by the temperature, and that there is a threshold from which this influence sets in. Finally, we observe that the yearly dynamics of the afternoon and nocturnal resting periods appear to be counterbalancing each other. This also lends support to the notion that the total daily resting time of people is more or less conserved across the year.

  13. Cardiovascular consequences of bed rest: effect on maximal oxygen uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is reduced in healthy individuals confined to bed rest, suggesting it is independent of any disease state. The magnitude of reduction in VO2max is dependent on duration of bed rest and the initial level of aerobic fitness (VO2max), but it appears to be independent of age or gender. Bed rest induces an elevated maximal heart rate which, in turn, is associated with decreased cardiac vagal tone, increased sympathetic catecholamine secretion, and greater cardiac beta-receptor sensitivity. Despite the elevation in heart rate, VO2max is reduced primarily from decreased maximal stroke volume and cardiac output. An elevated ejection fraction during exercise following bed rest suggests that the lower stroke volume is not caused by ventricular dysfunction but is primarily the result of decreased venous return associated with lower circulating blood volume, reduced central venous pressure, and higher venous compliance in the lower extremities. VO2max, stroke volume, and cardiac output are further compromised by exercise in the upright posture. The contribution of hypovolemia to reduced cardiac output during exercise following bed rest is supported by the close relationship between the relative magnitude (% delta) and time course of change in blood volume and VO2max during bed rest, and also by the fact that retention of plasma volume is associated with maintenance of VO2max after bed rest. Arteriovenous oxygen difference during maximal exercise is not altered by bed rest, suggesting that peripheral mechanisms may not contribute significantly to the decreased VO2max. However reduction in baseline and maximal muscle blood flow, red blood cell volume, and capillarization in working muscles represent peripheral mechanisms that may contribute to limited oxygen delivery and, subsequently, lowered VO2max. Thus, alterations in cardiac and vascular functions induced by prolonged confinement to bed rest contribute to diminution of maximal oxygen uptake

  14. Dihydropyridine receptors actively control gating of ryanodine receptors in resting mouse skeletal muscle fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Gaëlle; Allard, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Contraction of skeletal muscle is triggered by the release of Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in response to depolarization of the muscle membrane. Depolarization is known to elicit a conformational change of the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) in the tubular membrane that controls in a time- and voltage-dependent manner the opening of the ryanodine receptor (RyR), the SR Ca2+ release channel. At rest, it is assumed that RyRs are kept in a closed state imposed by the repressive action of DHPRs; however, a direct control of the RyR gating by the DHPR has up to now never been demonstrated in resting adult muscle. In this study, we monitored slow changes in SR Ca2+ content using the Ca2+ indicator fluo-5N loaded in the SR of voltage-clamped mouse muscle fibres. We first show that external Ca2+ removal induced a reversible SR Ca2+ efflux at −80 mV and prevented SR Ca2+ refilling following depolarization-evoked SR Ca2+ depletion. The dihydropyridine compound nifedipine induced similar effects. The rate of SR Ca2+ efflux was also shown to be controlled in a time- and voltage-dependent manner within a membrane potential range more negative than −50 mV. Finally, intracellular addition of ryanodine produced an irreversible SR Ca2+ efflux and kept the SR in a highly depleted state following depolarization-evoked SR Ca2+ depletion. The fact that resting SR Ca2+ efflux is modulated by conformational changes of DHPRs induced by external Ca2+, nifedipine and voltage demonstrates that DHPRs exert an active control on gating of RyRs in resting skeletal muscle. PMID:23006480

  15. Hubs of Anticorrelation in High-Resolution Resting-State Functional Connectivity Network Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Kaundinya; Krishnamurthy, Venkatagiri; Cabanban, Romeo; Crosson, Bruce A

    2015-06-01

    A major focus of brain research recently has been to map the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) network architecture of the normal brain and pathology through functional magnetic resonance imaging. However, the phenomenon of anticorrelations in resting-state signals between different brain regions has not been adequately examined. The preponderance of studies on resting-state fMRI (rsFMRI) have either ignored anticorrelations in rsFC networks or adopted methods in data analysis, which have rendered anticorrelations in rsFC networks uninterpretable. The few studies that have examined anticorrelations in rsFC networks using conventional methods have found anticorrelations to be weak in strength and not very reproducible across subjects. Anticorrelations in rsFC network architecture could reflect mechanisms that subserve a number of important brain processes. In this preliminary study, we examined the properties of anticorrelated rsFC networks by systematically focusing on negative cross-correlation coefficients (CCs) among rsFMRI voxel time series across the brain with graph theory-based network analysis. A number of methods were implemented to enhance the neuronal specificity of resting-state functional connections that yield negative CCs, although at the cost of decreased sensitivity. Hubs of anticorrelation were seen in a number of cortical and subcortical brain regions. Examination of the anticorrelation maps of these hubs indicated that negative CCs in rsFC network architecture highlight a number of regulatory interactions between brain networks and regions, including reciprocal modulations, suppression, inhibition, and neurofeedback.

  16. Hepatitis B virus genotypes:an overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mamun-Al Mahtab; Salimur Rahman; Mobin Khan; Fazal Karim

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of mortality and morbidity globally. The quest continues to identify viral factors that inlfuence disease progression and severity as well as responses to treatment of HBV infection. Based on variations in HBV, the virus has been divided into a number of genotypes. DATA SOURCES: Review of published literature on HBV genotypes. RESULTS: HBV genotypes are likely to be important in determining the severity and progression of HBV-induced liver disease as well as responses to different anti-viral agents. CONCLUSION: Although HBV genotyping is not yet recommended for routine use in treating HBV infection, available data suggest that, as in hepatitis C virus infection, HBV genotyping is also likely to become a routine investigation for HBV treatment, perhaps in the not too distant future.

  17. Toward fully automated genotyping: Genotyping microsatellite markers by deconvolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlin, M.W.; Lancia, G.; See-Kiong, Ng [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    Dense genetic linkage maps have been constructed for the human and mouse genomes, with average densities of 2.9 cM and 0.35 cM, respectively. These genetic maps are crucial for mapping both Mendelian and complex traits and are useful in clinical genetic diagnosis. Current maps are largely comprised of abundant, easily assayed, and highly polymorphic PCR-based microsatellite markers, primarily dinucleotide (CA){sub n} repeats. One key limitation of these length polymorphisms is the PCR stutter (or slippage) artifact that introduces additional stutter bands. With two (or more) closely spaced alleles, the stutter bands overlap, and it is difficult to accurately determine the correct alleles; this stutter phenomenon has all but precluded full automation, since a human must visually inspect the allele data. We describe here novel deconvolution methods for accurate genotyping that mathematically remove PCR stutter artifact from microsatellite markers. These methods overcome the manual interpretation bottleneck and thereby enable full automation of genetic map construction and use. New functionalities, including the pooling of DNAs and the pooling of markers, are described that may greatly reduce the associated experimentation requirements. 32 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. The effects of sustained cognitive task performance on subsequent resting state functional connectivity in healthy young and middle-aged male schoolteachers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, E.A.T.; Klaassen, E.B.; Rombouts, S.A.; Backes, W.H.; Jolles, J.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that functional connectivity (FC) within resting state (RS) networks is modulated by previous experience. In this study the effects of sustained cognitive performance on subsequent RS FC were investigated in healthy young (25-30 years; n=15) and middle-aged (50-60 years; n=14

  19. Resting state functional connectivity in perfusion imaging: correlation maps with BOLD connectivity and resting state perfusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Viviani

    Full Text Available Functional connectivity is a property of the resting state that may provide biomarkers of brain function and individual differences. Classically, connectivity is estimated as the temporal correlation of spontaneous fluctuations of BOLD signal. We investigated differences in connectivity estimated from the BOLD and CBF signal present in volumes acquired with arterial spin labeling technique in a large sample (N = 265 of healthy individuals. Positive connectivity was observable in both BOLD and CBF signal, and was present in the CBF signal also at frequencies lower than 0.009 Hz, here investigated for the first time. Negative connectivity was more variable. The validity of positive connectivity was confirmed by the existence of correlation across individuals in its intensity estimated from the BOLD and CBF signal. In contrast, there was little or no correlation across individuals between intensity of connectivity and mean perfusion levels, suggesting that these two biomarkers correspond to distinct sources of individual differences.

  20. Identification of Mislabeled Samples and Sample Mix-ups in Genotype Data using Barcode Genotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Christian Theil; Appel, Emil Vincent Rosenbaum; Grarup, Niels

    2014-01-01

    barcode genotypes. To detect mislabeled samples we calculate the probability that the discordance between genotypes in the data and in the independent genotypes can be attributed to random (non-mislabeling) genotyping errors. To identify mix-ups we calculate the probability of identifying the set...... of identical genotypes between sample x and sample y by chance. Based on this we calculate a mix-up confidence score with penalization for introducing mismatches in the proposed new label and adjustment for independency among the genotypes. This confidence score is used to identify probable mix-ups.......Abstract—Undetected mislabeled samples may affect the results of genotype studies, particular when rare genetic variants are investigated. Mislabeled samples are often not detected during quality control and if they are detected, they are normally discarded due to a lack of a reliable method...

  1. Attitude Control System Design for Fast Rest-to-Rest Attitude Maneuver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, S.-I.; Bando, N.; Hashimoto, T.; Murata, Y.; Mochizuki, N.; Nakamura, T.; Kamiya, T.; Ogura, N.; Maeda, K.

    2009-08-01

    The VSOP-2 project is a new space VLBI (very long baseline interferometer) radio astronomy mission, proposed to inherit the fruitful success of the VSOP mission with the HALCA satellite. One of the most important advances of VSOP-2 is the use of higher observation frequency, which requires fast alternating observation of a target and calibrator in order to remove the phase changes caused by the atmosphere. Typically, both sources must be observed within 60 sec, and this switching must be carried out over many hours. ``ASTRO-G" is a satellite planned for this VSOP-2 project, and one of technical challenges is to achieve such fast rest-to-rest maneuvers, and the proper hardware must be selected to account for this fast attitude maneuver. The controlled momentum gyro (CMG) is an actuator that provides high torque with small power consumption, and the fiber optical gyro is a sensor able to measure the high angular velocity with excellent accuracy. This paper first describes these components for attitude control. Another challenge of the ASTRO-G's attitude control system is to design the switching for the flexible mode of the satellite structure, containing a large deployable reflector and a large solar panel. These produce resonances with fast switching and these must be attenuated. To achieve high agility in a flexible satellite, the controller design is crucial. One design feature is a novel robust input shaper named ``nil mode exciting profiler". Another feature is the feedback controller design. The paper describes these features and other potential problems with fast switching..

  2. 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 polymorphism and neuroticism are linked by resting state functional connectivity of amygdala and fusiform gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruschwitz, J D; Walter, M; Varikuti, D; Jensen, J; Plichta, M M; Haddad, L; Grimm, O; Mohnke, S; Pöhland, L; Schott, B; Wold, A; Mühleisen, T W; Heinz, A; Erk, S; Romanczuk-Seiferth, N; Witt, S H; Nöthen, M M; Rietschel, M; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Walter, H

    2015-07-01

    The s/s-genotype of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism and the personality trait of neuroticism have both been associated with experiences of negative affect, anxiety and mood disorders, as well as an emotional processing bias towards negative facial emotions. On a neural level, this bias can be characterized by altered amygdala and fusiform gyrus (FFG) activity during perception of negative facial expressions. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in a multi-center-sample of 178 healthy subjects of European descent, this study investigated the association of 5-HTTLPR (short s- and long l-allele) including the genotype of the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs25531 (A/G) within this region polymorphism, and trait neuroticism on resting-state functional connectivity (rs-FC) between amygdala and the FFG. Moreover, we aimed to identify additional brain regions with associations of 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 (combined according to its expression; low: s/s; high: l(A)/l(A); intermediate: s/l(A), s/l(G), l(G)/l(G), l(A)/l(G)) and trait neuroticism to amygdala rs-FC. Separate analyses for 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 and neuroticism (controlling for age, gender, handedness, and research site) revealed that s/s-homozygotes and individuals high in neuroticism obtained altered amygdala rs-FC in the right occipital face area, which is considered to be a "core component" of the face processing system. Importantly, effects of neuroticism were replicated across three independent research sites. Additionally, associations of 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 genotype and amygdala rs-FC were observed in the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex, whereas neuroticism was not related to rs-FC in these areas. The presented data implies that 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 variants and neuroticism are linked by resting state functional connectivity of amygdala and fusiform gyrus and suggests that variants of 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 genotype and different levels of neuroticism may partly account for altered processing of

  3. Irreducible Specht modules are signed Young modules

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmer, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Recently Donkin defined signed Young modules as a simultaneous generalization of Young and twisted Young modules for the symmetric group. We show that in odd characteristic, if a Specht module $S^\\lambda$ is irreducible, then $S^\\lambda$ is a signed Young module. Thus the set of irreducible Specht modules coincides with the set of irreducible signed Young modules. This provides evidence for our conjecture that the signed Young modules are precisely the class of indecomposable self-dual module...

  4. Genomic evaluations with many more genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiggans George R

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic evaluations in Holstein dairy cattle have quickly become more reliable over the last two years in many countries as more animals have been genotyped for 50,000 markers. Evaluations can also include animals genotyped with more or fewer markers using new tools such as the 777,000 or 2,900 marker chips recently introduced for cattle. Gains from more markers can be predicted using simulation, whereas strategies to use fewer markers have been compared using subsets of actual genotypes. The overall cost of selection is reduced by genotyping most animals at less than the highest density and imputing their missing genotypes using haplotypes. Algorithms to combine different densities need to be efficient because numbers of genotyped animals and markers may continue to grow quickly. Methods Genotypes for 500,000 markers were simulated for the 33,414 Holsteins that had 50,000 marker genotypes in the North American database. Another 86,465 non-genotyped ancestors were included in the pedigree file, and linkage disequilibrium was generated directly in the base population. Mixed density datasets were created by keeping 50,000 (every tenth of the markers for most animals. Missing genotypes were imputed using a combination of population haplotyping and pedigree haplotyping. Reliabilities of genomic evaluations using linear and nonlinear methods were compared. Results Differing marker sets for a large population were combined with just a few hours of computation. About 95% of paternal alleles were determined correctly, and > 95% of missing genotypes were called correctly. Reliability of breeding values was already high (84.4% with 50,000 simulated markers. The gain in reliability from increasing the number of markers to 500,000 was only 1.6%, but more than half of that gain resulted from genotyping just 1,406 young bulls at higher density. Linear genomic evaluations had reliabilities 1.5% lower than the nonlinear evaluations with 50

  5. Cold tolerance evaluation in Chilean rice genotypes at the germination stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Donoso Ñanculao

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Low temperature is the most important abiotic stress affecting rice (Oryza sativa L. yield in Chile. Rice in Chile is usually planted when the minimum air temperatures are below 12 °C. This temperature is lower than the optimum needed for normal rice germination. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate cold tolerance in 20 experimental lines from the Rice Breeding Program of the Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (INIA, Chile, at the germination stage. Coleoptile length reduction (CRED, coleoptile length after cold treatment (CLEN, coleoptile length recovery (CREC, and coleoptile regrowth (CREG were evaluated at 13 °C for 4 d using 'Diamante-INIA' as the cold-tolerant control. To find genotypes with cold tolerance (low CRED value and high CLEN, CREC, and CREG values, genotypes were ranked, a biplot of principal components, and cluster analysis were performed. No differences were found among genotypes in the ranking based on CREC value so this trait was not considered. Analysis showed that only three experimental lines had cold tolerance similar to that of 'Diamante-INIA'; all other experimental lines exhibited intermediate to low cold tolerance. These results showed low cold tolerance of some Chilean genotypes at the germination stage, thus confirming the need to evaluate the rest of the germplasm from the Rice Breeding Program.

  6. The glutathione-S-transferase mu 1 (GSTM1) null genotype and increased neutrophil response to low-level ozone (0.06 ppm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Exposure of healthy young adults to 03 modulates immune cell biology in the airways and causes a significant increase in neutrophilic inflammation which can vary considerably in magnitude across individuals. The GSTM1null genotype modulates Oj-induced inflammation, bu...

  7. The glutathione-S-transferase mu 1 (GSTM1) null genotype and increased neutrophil response to low-level ozone (0.06 ppm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Exposure of healthy young adults to 03 modulates immune cell biology in the airways and causes a significant increase in neutrophilic inflammation which can vary considerably in magnitude across individuals. The GSTM1null genotype modulates Oj-induced inflammation, bu...

  8. SOAP vs REST: Comparing a master-slave GA implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo, P A; Arenas, M G; Merelo, J J; Garcia-Sanchez, P

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a high-level comparison of both SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol) and REST (Representational State Transfer) is made. These are the two main approaches for interfacing to the web with web services. Both approaches are different and present some advantages and disadvantages for interfacing to web services: SOAP is conceptually more difficult (has a steeper learning curve) and more "heavy-weight" than REST, although it lacks of standards support for security. In order to test their eficiency (in time), two experiments have been performed using both technologies: a client-server model implementation and a master-slave based genetic algorithm (GA). The results obtained show clear differences in time between SOAP and REST implementations. Although both techniques are suitable for developing parallel systems, SOAP is heavier than REST, mainly due to the verbosity of SOAP communications (XML increases the time taken to parse the messages).

  9. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in Subjects ... Results: Findings of the study revealed significant effect of exercise training program on HR. Also, changes in V02max negatively correlated with changes in HR (r= ...

  10. Effects of Interval Training Programme on Resting Heart Rate in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    significant effect of exercise training program on HR. Also ... diseases, with a major impact on morbidity and. [1] mortality . ... Type of Article: Original. Page 26 ... Resting Heart Rate in Subjects with Hypertension — Lamina S. et al investigate ...

  11. Resting energy expenditure is not influenced by classical music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slinde Frode

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Obesity shows an increasing prevalence worldwide and a decrease in energy expenditure has been suggested to be one of the risk factors for developing obesity. An increase in resting energy expenditure would have a great impact on total energy expenditure. This study shows that classical music do not influence resting energy expenditure compared to complete silence. Further studies should be performed including other genres of music and other types of stress-inductors than music.

  12. Performance Evaluation of RESTful Web Services for Mobile Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Hatem Hamad; Motaz Saad; Ramzi Abed

    2010-01-01

    Smart Mobile devices and web services are becoming very popular. Mobile devices are physically constraineddevices; low processor speed, limited memory, limited battery, and slow intermit wireless connection. This implies to take inconsideration these factors when implementing web services for mobile devices. In this paper, we evaluate the RESTful webservice for mobile devices against conventional SOAP web services. The experimental results show that RESTful web servicesoutperform conventional...

  13. RESTful web API design with Node.js

    CERN Document Server

    Bojinov, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    If you are a web developer wanting to enrich your development skills to create scalable, server-side, RESTful applications based on the Node.js platform, this book is for you. You also need to be aware of HTTP communication concepts and should have a working knowledge of JavaScript. Knowledge of REST would be an added advantage but is definitely not a necessity.

  14. Flavonoid profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Alventosa, J M; Jaramillo, S; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, G; Cermeño, P; Espejo, J A; Jiménez-Araujo, A; Guillén-Bejarano, R; Fernández-Bolaños, J; Rodríguez-Arcos, R

    2008-08-27

    The determination of flavonoid profiles from different genotypes of triguero asparagus and their comparison to those from green asparagus commercial hybrids was the main goal of this study. The samples consisted of 32 commercial hybrids and 65 genotypes from the Huetor-Tajar population variety (triguero). The analysis of individual flavonoids by HPLC-DAD-MS has allowed the determination of eight naturally occurring flavonol derivatives in several genotypes of triguero asparagus. Those compounds included mono-, di-, and triglycosides of three flavonols, that is, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and kaempferol. The detailed analysis of the flavonoid profiles revealed significant differences among the distinct genotypes. These have been classified in three distinct groups as the result of a k-means clustering analysis, two of them containing both commercial hybrids and triguero asparagus and another cluster constituted by 21 genotypes of triguero asparagus, which contain several key flavonol derivatives able to differentiate them. Hence, the triglycosides tentatively identified as quercetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, isorhamnetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, and isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside have been detected only in the genotypes grouped in the above-mentioned cluster. On the other hand, the compound tentatively identified as isorhamnetin-3-glucosyl-rutinoside was present in most genotypes of triguero asparagus, whereas it has not been detected in any of the commercial hybrids.

  15. HPV Genotyping 9G Membrane Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danishmalik Rafiq Sayyed

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The results of the genital human papillomavirus (HPV detection in 439 cervical samples by cervical cytology were compared with sequencing analysis and a newly developed HPV genotyping 9G membrane test. The excellent sensitivity and specificity of the HPV genotyping 9G membrane test was assured by a signal to noise ratio of more than 300 and a target hybridization to non-target hybridization ratio of 300 ~ 400 at 25 °C. The final results can be obtained in 29 min by simple loading of the hybridization and washing solutions and scanning the membranes without any drying steps or special handling. The 100% identical results of the HPV genotyping 9G membrane test with sequencing results in 439 clinical samples demonstrate significant clinical application for this test. HPV genotyping 9G membrane tests can identify and discriminate five HR-HPV genotypes which are prevalent in almost 87% of cervical cancer cases. Its simple handling makes the HPV genotyping 9G membrane test a very convenient platform for accurate HPV genotyping.

  16. Normalized cut group clustering of resting-state FMRI data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn van den Heuvel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional brain imaging studies have indicated that distinct anatomical brain regions can show coherent spontaneous neuronal activity during rest. Regions that show such correlated behavior are said to form resting-state networks (RSNs. RSNs have been investigated using seed-dependent functional connectivity maps and by using a number of model-free methods. However, examining RSNs across a group of subjects is still a complex task and often involves human input in selecting meaningful networks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report on a voxel based model-free normalized cut graph clustering approach with whole brain coverage for group analysis of resting-state data, in which the number of RSNs is computed as an optimal clustering fit of the data. Inter-voxel correlations of time-series are grouped at the individual level and the consistency of the resulting networks across subjects is clustered at the group level, defining the group RSNs. We scanned a group of 26 subjects at rest with a fast BOLD sensitive fMRI scanning protocol on a 3 Tesla MR scanner. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: An optimal group clustering fit revealed 7 RSNs. The 7 RSNs included motor/visual, auditory and attention networks and the frequently reported default mode network. The found RSNs showed large overlap with recently reported resting-state results and support the idea of the formation of spatially distinct RSNs during rest in the human brain.

  17. EEG Resting-State Networks: microstates' source localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custo, Anna; van der Ville, Dimitri; Wells, William M; Tomescu, Ioana M; Michel, Christoph

    2017-09-22

    Using EEG to elucidate the spontaneous activation of brain resting state networks is non trivial as the signal of interest is of low amplitude and it is difficult to distinguish the underlying neural sources. Using the principles of electric field topographical analysis, it is possible to estimate the meta-stable states of the brain (i.e., the resting state topographies, so-called microstates). We estimated seven resting state topographies explaining the EEG dataset with k-means clustering (N=164, 256 electrodes). Using a method specifically designed to localize the sources of broadband EEG scalp topographies by matching sensor and source space temporal patterns, we demonstrated that we can estimate the EEG resting state networks reliably by measuring the reproducibility of our findings. After subtracting their mean from the seven EEG resting state networks, we identified seven state-specific networks. The mean map includes regions known to be densely anatomically and functionally connected (superior frontal, superior parietal, insula, and anterior cingulate cortices). While the mean map can be interpreted as a "router", cross-linking multiple functional networks, the seven state-specific resting state networks partly resemble and extend previous fMRI-based networks estimated as the hemodynamic correlates of four canonical EEG microstates.

  18. Regional Homogeneity of Resting-State Brain Activity Suppresses the Effect of Dopamine-Related Genes on Sensory Processing Sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui Chen

    Full Text Available Sensory processing sensitivity (SPS is an intrinsic personality trait whose genetic and neural bases have recently been studied. The current study used a neural mediation model to explore whether resting-state brain functions mediated the effects of dopamine-related genes on SPS. 298 healthy Chinese college students (96 males, mean age = 20.42 years, SD = 0.89 were scanned with magnetic resonance imaging during resting state, genotyped for 98 loci within the dopamine system, and administered the Highly Sensitive Person Scale. We extracted a "gene score" that summarized the genetic variations representing the 10 loci that were significantly linked to SPS, and then used path analysis to search for brain regions whose resting-state data would help explain the gene-behavior association. Mediation analysis revealed that temporal homogeneity of regional spontaneous activity (ReHo in the precuneus actually suppressed the effect of dopamine-related genes on SPS. The path model explained 16% of the variance of SPS. This study represents the first attempt at using a multi-gene voxel-based neural mediation model to explore the complex relations among genes, brain, and personality.

  19. Resting heart rate variability and exercise capacity in Type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Luke C; Peebles, Karen C; Hoye, Neil A; Manning, Patrick; Sheat, Catherine; Williams, Michael J A; Wilkins, Gerard T; Wilson, Genevieve A; Baldi, James C

    2017-04-01

    People with type 1 diabetes (T1D) have lower exercise capacity (V̇O2max) than their age-matched nondiabetic counterparts (CON), which might be related to cardiac autonomic dysfunction. We examined whether Heart Rate Variability (HRV; indicator of cardiac autonomic modulation) was associated with exercise capacity in those with and without T1D. Twenty-three participants with uncomplicated T1D and 17 matched CON were recruited. Heart rate (HR; ECG), blood pressure (BP; finger photo-plethysmography), and respiratory rate (respiratory belt) were measured during baseline, paced-breathing and clinical autonomic reflex tests (CARTs); deep breathing, lying-to-stand, and Valsalva maneuver. Baseline and paced-breathing ECG were analyzed for HRV (frequency-domain). Exercise capacity was determined during an incremental cycle ergometer test while V̇O2, 12-lead ECG, and BP were measured. In uncomplicated T1D, resting HR was elevated and resting HRV metrics were reduced, indicative of altered cardiac parasympathetic modulation; this was generally undetected by the CARTs. However, BP and plasma catecholamines were not different between groups. In T1D, V̇O2max tended to be lower (P = 0.07) and HR reserve was lower (P exercise (R(2 )= 0.042-0.3) in both T1D and CON Alterations in cardiac autonomic modulation are an early manifestation of uncomplicated T1D. Total Power was associated with reduced exercise capacity regardless of group, and these associations were generally stronger than traditional indicators. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  20. *-Modules, co-*-modules and cotilting modules over Noetherian rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪明义; 许永华

    1996-01-01

    Let R be a Noetherian ring. The projectivity and injectivity of modules over R are discussed. The concept of modules is introduced and the descriptions for co-*-modules over R are given. At last, cotilting modules over R are characterized by means of co-*-modules.

  1. Deep brain stimulation modulates synchrony within spatially and spectrally distinct resting state networks in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oswal, Ashwini; Beudel, Martijn; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Litvak, Vladimir; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Chronic dopamine depletion in Parkinson's disease leads to progressive motor and cognitive impairment, which is associated with the emergence of characteristic patterns of synchronous oscillatory activity within cortico-basal-ganglia circuits. Deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus is an

  2. Modulation of brain resting-state networks by sad mood induction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harrison, Ben J; Pujol, Jesus; Ortiz, Hector; Fornito, Alex; Pantelis, Christos; Yücel, Murat

    2008-01-01

    ... of subjects during scanning. In this study, we examined healthy subjects (n = 24) with a mood induction paradigm during two continuous fMRI recordings to assess the effects of a change in self-generated mood state (neutral to sad...

  3. Thruster Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, G.

    2015-09-01

    The thruster module described in this paper provides a low but controlled acceleration in a mission which would normally be labelled “microgravity”. The first mission was Cryofenix, where tanks containing liquid hydrogen were used in the experiment. The experiment utilizing the low acceleration is using liquids and requires a precise acceleration profile throughout the mission. Acceleration obtained by payload rotation is not feasible due to that the transversal forces required to change the acceleration will cause undesired liquid turbulence. In order to satisfy the experiment requirements a thruster module was developed by SSC for the Cryofenix mission funded by CNES. The Cryofenix mission had a payload weight of 380 kg and an apogee of about 260 km. The module produces a controlled thrust in flight direction by means of a cold gas system.

  4. HCV genotype-specific correlation with serum markers: Higher predictability for genotype 4a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asad Sultan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several factors have been proposed to assess the clinical outcome of HCV infection. The correlation of HCV genotypes to possible serum markers in clinical prediction is still controversial. The main objective of this study was to determine the existence of any correlation between HCV genotypes to viral load and different clinical serum markers. Methods We performed a prospective cross-sectional and observational study. About 3160 serum HCV RNA positive patients were chosen from 4020 randomly selected anti-HCV positive patients. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 16 software package. ROC (receiver operating characteristics curves were used to compare diagnostic values of serum markers to predict genotypes. Results The most prevalent genotype was 3a (73.9% followed by 1a (10.7%, 4a (6.4% and 3b (6.1% in Pakistani population. No correlation was found between viral load and serum markers for genotype 3a in a large no. of sample (n = 2336. While significant correlation was observed between viral load and AST in genotype 3b, ALP with viral load and ALT for genotype 1a. Patients with genotype 4a showed a significant inverse correlation with viral load and Hb level and AST with ALP. For genotype 4a, AUC (area under the curve of ALT, ALP, AST, bilirubin, Hb level and viral load was 0.790, 0.763, 0.454, 0.664, 0.458 and 0.872 respectively. Conclusions In conclusion, there was a significant variable response of HCV genotypes with serum markers. Severity of disease is independent of serum marker level in genotype 3a, while the liver damage in genotype 4a may associate with viral cytopathic effect as well as the immune-mediated process. An index using six serum markers may correctly predict genotype 4a in patients with ≥75% accuracy.

  5. "I am resting but rest less well with you." The moderating effect of anxious attachment style on alpha power during EEG resting state in a social context

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeke, W.J.M.I.; Pozharliev, R.; van Strien, J.W.; Belschak, F.; Bagozzi, R.P.

    2014-01-01

    We took EEG recordings to measure task-free resting-state cortical brain activity in 35 participants under two conditions, alone (A) or together (T). We also investigated whether psychological attachment styles shape human cortical activity differently in these two settings. The results indicate tha

  6. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in Pakistan: a systemic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ijaz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and aim Phylogenetic analysis has led to the classification of hepatitis C virus (HCV into 1-6 major genotypes. HCV genotypes have different biological properties, clinical outcome and response to antiviral treatment and provide important clues for studying the epidemiology, transmission and pathogenesis. This article deepens the current molecular information about the geographical distribution of HCV genotypes and subgenotypes in population of four provinces of Pakistan. 34 published papers (1996-2011 related to prevalence of HCV genotypes/serotypes and subgenotypes in Pakistan were searched. Result HCV genotype/s distribution from all 34 studies was observed in 28,400 HCV infected individuals in the following pattern: 1,999 (7.03% cases of genotype 1; 1,085 (3.81% cases of genotype 2; 22,429 (78.96% cases of genotype 3; 453 (1.59% cases of genotype 4; 29 (0.10% cases of genotype 5; 37 (0.13% cases of genotype 6; 1,429 (5.03% cases of mixed genotypes, and 939 (3.30% cases of untypeable genotypes. Overall, genotype 3a was the predominant genotype with a rate of 55.10%, followed by genotype 1a, 3b and mixed genotype with a rate of 10.25%, 8.20%, and 5.08%, respectively; and genotypes 4, 5 and 6 were rare. Genotype 3 occurred predominately in all the provinces of Pakistan. Second more frequently genotype was genotype 1 in Punjab province and untypeable genotypes in Sindh, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa and Balochistan provinces.

  7. What goes on in the resting state? A qualitative glimpse into resting-state experience in the scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell Thomas Hurlburt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The brain’s resting state has attracted considerable interest in recent years, but currently little is known either about typical experience during the resting state or about whether there are inter-individual differences in resting state phenomenology. We used Descriptive Experience Sampling (DES in an attempt to apprehend high fidelity glimpses of the inner experience of five participants in an extended fMRI study. Results showed that the inner experiences and the neural activation patterns (as quantified by Amplitude of Low Frequency Fluctuations (ALFF analysis of the five participants were largely consistent across time, suggesting that our extended-duration scanner sessions were broadly similar to typical resting state sessions. However, there were very large individual differences in inner phenomena, suggesting that the resting state itself may differ substantially from one participant to the next. We describe these individual differences in experiential characteristics and display some typical moments of resting-state experience. We also show that retrospective characterizations of phenomena can often be very different from moment-by-moment reports. We discuss implications for the assessment of inner experience in neuroimaging studies more generally, concluding that it may be possible to use fMRI to investigate neural correlates of phenomena apprehended in high fidelity.

  8. Study on Resource-Oriented RESTful Web Application%面向资源的RESTful Web应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘冰

    2010-01-01

    作为Web应用技术的探索与实践,提出了面向资源的RESTful Web应用设计思路.通过对Rails框架下RESTful Web的实现原理进行分析,从资源的规划、控制器的设计、模型的建立、表间关联以及RESTful URI的设计等方面对RESTful Web应用进行了研究,给出了Rails框架下RESTful Web应用的开发步骤.最后,通过一个实例实现了面向资源的RESTful Web应用.这种基于资源的设计将所有功能转化为资源,完全打破了传统的基于动作的设计思路,同时说明了REST思想从Web服务到Web应用是可行的.

  9. Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Brazil: molecular characterization of genotype F isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgolino Helaine A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV isolates have been classified in eight genotypes, A to H, which exhibit distinct geographical distributions. Genotypes A, D and F are predominant in Brazil, a country formed by a miscegenated population, where the proportion of individuals from Caucasian, Amerindian and African origins varies by region. Genotype F, which is the most divergent, is considered indigenous to the Americas. A systematic molecular characterization of HBV isolates from different parts of the world would be invaluable in establishing HBV evolutionary origins and dispersion patterns. A large-scale study is needed to map the region-by-region distribution of the HBV genotypes in Brazil. Results Genotyping by PCR-RFLP of 303 HBV isolates from HBsAg-positive blood donors showed that at least two of the three genotypes, A, D, and F, co-circulate in each of the five geographic regions of Brazil. No other genotypes were identified. Overall, genotype A was most prevalent (48.5%, and most of these isolates were classified as subgenotype A1 (138/153; 90.2%. Genotype D was the most common genotype in the South (84.2% and Central (47.6% regions. The prevalence of genotype F was low (13% countrywide. Nucleotide sequencing of the S gene and a phylogenetic analysis of 32 HBV genotype F isolates showed that a great majority (28/32; 87.5% belonged to subgenotype F2, cluster II. The deduced serotype of 31 of 32 F isolates was adw4. The remaining isolate showed a leucine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 127. Conclusion The presence of genotypes A, D and F, and the absence of other genotypes in a large cohort of HBV infected individuals may reflect the ethnic origins of the Brazilian population. The high prevalence of isolates from subgenotype A1 (of African origin indicates that the African influx during the colonial slavery period had a major impact on the circulation of HBV genotype A currently found in Brazil. Although most genotype F

  10. Spatially distributed effects of mental exhaustion on resting-state FMRI networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esposito, Fabrizio; Otto, Tobias; Zijlstra, Fred R H; Goebel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Brain activity during rest is spatially coherent over functional connectivity networks called resting-state networks. In resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging, independent component analysis yields spatially distributed network representations reflecting distinct mental processes, such

  11. Signed Young Modules and Simple Specht Modules

    OpenAIRE

    Danz, Susanne; Lim, Kay Jin

    2015-01-01

    By a result of Hemmer, every simple Specht module of a finite symmetric group over a field of odd characteristic is a signed Young module. While Specht modules are parametrized by partitions, indecomposable signed Young modules are parametrized by certain pairs of partitions. The main result of this article establishes the signed Young module labels of simple Specht modules. Along the way we prove a number of results concerning indecomposable signed Young modules that are of independent inter...

  12. Counsel the genotype, treat the phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwaag, Paul A.; van Tintelen, J. Peter

    2011-01-01

    This editorial refers to 'Novel correlations between the genotype and the phenotype of hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy: results from the German Competence Network Heart Failure' by S. Waldmuller et al., published in this issue on pages 1185-1192.

  13. Global distribution of novel rhinovirus genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briese, Thomas; Renwick, Neil; Venter, Marietjie

    2008-01-01

    Global surveillance for a novel rhinovirus genotype indicated its association with community outbreaks and pediatric respiratory disease in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America. Molecular dating indicates that these viruses have been circulating for at least 250 years Udgivelsesdato...

  14. Global distribution of novel rhinovirus genotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briese, Thomas; Renwick, Neil; Venter, Marietjie

    2008-01-01

    Global surveillance for a novel rhinovirus genotype indicated its association with community outbreaks and pediatric respiratory disease in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America. Molecular dating indicates that these viruses have been circulating for at least 250 years....

  15. HPV genotypes concordance between sex partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevolo, M; Mottolese, M; Marandino, F; Carosi, M; Diodoro, M G; Sentinelli, S; Visca, P; Rollo, F; Mariani, L; Vocaturo, G; Sindico, R; Di Giannuario, D; Perrone Donnorso, R; Pellicciotta, M; Vocaturo, A

    2007-12-01

    The HPV genotype concordance in the sexual couples could support the sexual viral transmission of HPV infection. The present study contains a case-report of a stable Italian sex couple harbouring the same five HPV genotypes in their genital samples. The female partner, affected by vulvar condilomatosis, evidenced positivity in her cervicovaginal scraping with high risk HPV DNA Hybrid Capture 2 test and was negative at liquid-based performed Pap Test and at colposcopic examination. The male partner was clinically healthy regarding his external genitalia. In both male and female genital scrapings, the following HPV genotypes were detected by means of a PCR-based assay: 6, 16, 53, 73 and 84. This considerably high genotype concordance does not appear to be casual and supports, in our opinion, the hypothesis that genital HPV types are sexually transmitted agents

  16. ApoE (Apolipoprotein E) Genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? APOE Genotyping, Alzheimer Disease Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal ... help in the diagnosis of probable late onset Alzheimer disease (AD) in symptomatic adults. It is called susceptibility ...

  17. Forensic SNP genotyping with SNaPshot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fondevila, M; Børsting, C; Phillips, C

    2017-01-01

    This review explores the key factors that influence the optimization, routine use, and profile interpretation of the SNaPshot single-base extension (SBE) system applied to forensic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. Despite being a mainly complimentary DNA genotyping technique...... to routine STR profiling, use of SNaPshot is an important part of the development of SNP sets for a wide range of forensic applications with these markers, from genotyping highly degraded DNA with very short amplicons to the introduction of SNPs to ascertain the ancestry and physical characteristics...... of an unidentified contact trace donor. However, this technology, as resourceful as it is, displays several features that depart from the usual STR genotyping far enough to demand a certain degree of expertise from the forensic analyst before tackling the complex casework on which SNaPshot application provides...

  18. Can Clustering in Genotype Space Reveal "Niches"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, Rafael; Ostling, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Community ecology lacks the success enjoyed by population genetics to quantify the relative roles played by deterministic and stochastic processes. It has been proposed that clustered patterns of abundance in genotype space provide evidence of selection in microbial communities, since no such clustering would arise in the absence of selection. We critique this test for its unrealistic null hypothesis. We show mathematically and with simulations that point mutations alone lead to clustering in genotype space by causing correlations between abundances of similar genotypes. We also show potential deviations from the mutation-only pattern caused by immigration from a source pool. Clustered patterns in genotype space may still be revealing of selection if analyzed quantitatively but only if neutral and selective regimes can be distinguished once mutation and immigration are included in the null model.

  19. AFLP analysis among Ethiopian arabica coffee genotypes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-09-17

    Sep 17, 2008 ... sequence information, produces a large number of infor- mative polymorphic markers per primer, requires a small amount of ..... and 53 were monomorphic across all coffee genotypes collected from .... molecular markers.

  20. Early seedling development of Medicago truncatula genotypes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    adel

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... germinated on filter papers imbibed in distilled water or in sodium .... Wards minimum variance method as a clustering algorithm. ... Mean values of plumule: radicle ratio of M. truncatula genotypes under different salt stress ...

  1. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Microsatellite Genotypes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Currently ~2,400 Hawaiian monk seal specimens have been analyzed genetically, providing genotypes at 18 microsatellite loci. These data are organized by individual,...

  2. Characterization of optimal resting tension in human pulmonary arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Azar; Bennett, Robert T; Chaudhry, Mubarak A; Qadri, Syed S; Cowen, Mike; Morice, Alyn H; Loubani, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the optimum resting tension (ORT) for in vitro human pulmonary artery (PA) ring preparations. METHODS Pulmonary arteries were dissected from disease free sections of the resected lung in the operating theatre and tissue samples were directly sent to the laboratory in Krebs-Henseleit solution (Krebs). The pulmonary arteries were then cut into 2 mm long rings. PA rings were mounted in 25 mL organ baths or 8 mL myograph chambers containing Krebs compound (37 °C, bubbled with 21% O2: 5% CO2) to measure changes in isometric tension. The resting tension was set at 1-gram force (gf) with vessels being left static to equilibrate for duration of one hour. Baseline contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were obtained from a resting tension of 1 gf. Contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were then obtained from stepwise increases in resting tension (1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 gf). RESULTS Twenty PA rings of internal diameter between 2-4 mm were prepared from 4 patients. In human PA rings incrementing the tension during rest stance by 0.6 gf, up to 1.6 gf significantly augmented the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated tension. Further enhancement of active tension by 0.4 gf, up to 2.0 gf mitigate the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated reaction. Both Myograph and the organ bath demonstrated identical conclusions, supporting that the radial optimal resting tension for human PA ring was 1.61 g. CONCLUSION The radial optimal resting tension in our experiment is 1.61 gf (15.78 mN) for human PA rings. PMID:27721938

  3. Memory Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive evi

  4. Distributed effects of methylphenidate on the network structure of the resting brain: a connectomic pattern classification analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Chandra Sekhar; Kessler, Daniel; Welsh, Robert; Angstadt, Michael; Liberzon, Israel; Phan, K Luan; Scott, Clayton

    2013-11-01

    Methylphenidate is a psychostimulant medication that produces improvements in functions associated with multiple neurocognitive systems. To investigate the potentially distributed effects of methylphenidate on the brain's intrinsic network architecture, we coupled resting state imaging with multivariate pattern classification. In a within-subject, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, counterbalanced, cross-over design, 32 healthy human volunteers received either methylphenidate or placebo prior to two fMRI resting state scans separated by approximately one week. Resting state connectomes were generated by placing regions of interest at regular intervals throughout the brain, and these connectomes were submitted for support vector machine analysis. We found that methylphenidate produces a distributed, reliably detected, multivariate neural signature. Methylphenidate effects were evident across multiple resting state networks, especially visual, somatomotor, and default networks. Methylphenidate reduced coupling within visual and somatomotor networks. In addition, default network exhibited decoupling with several task positive networks, consistent with methylphenidate modulation of the competitive relationship between these networks. These results suggest that connectivity changes within and between large-scale networks are potentially involved in the mechanisms by which methylphenidate improves attention functioning.

  5. Coupling between intrinsic prefrontal HbO2 and central EEG beta power oscillations in the resting brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gert Pfurtscheller

    Full Text Available There is increasing interest in the intrinsic activity in the resting brain, especially that of ultraslow and slow oscillations. Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, electroencephalography (EEG, blood pressure (BP, respiration and heart rate recordings during 5 minutes of rest, combined with cross spectral and sliding cross correlation calculations, we identified a short-lasting coupling (duration [Formula: see text] s between prefrontal oxyhemoglobin (HbO2 in the frequency band between 0.07 and 0.13 Hz and central EEG alpha and/or beta power oscillations in 8 of the 9 subjects investigated. The HbO2 peaks preceded the EEG band power peaks by 3.7 s in 6 subjects, with moderate or no coupling between BP and HbO2 oscillations. HbO2 and EEG band power oscillations were approximately in phase with BP oscillations in the 2 subjects with an extremely high coupling (squared coherence [Formula: see text] between BP and HbO2 oscillation. No coupling was identified in one subject. These results indicate that slow precentral (deoxyhemoglobin concentration oscillations during awake rest can be temporarily coupled with EEG fluctuations in sensorimotor areas and modulate the excitability level in the brains' motor areas, respectively. Therefore, this provides support for the idea that resting state networks fluctuate with frequencies of between 0.01 and 0.1 Hz (Mantini et.al. PNAS 2007.

  6. Coupling between intrinsic prefrontal HbO2 and central EEG beta power oscillations in the resting brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfurtscheller, Gert; Daly, Ian; Bauernfeind, Günther; Müller-Putz, Gernot R

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the intrinsic activity in the resting brain, especially that of ultraslow and slow oscillations. Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), electroencephalography (EEG), blood pressure (BP), respiration and heart rate recordings during 5 minutes of rest, combined with cross spectral and sliding cross correlation calculations, we identified a short-lasting coupling (duration [Formula: see text] s) between prefrontal oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) in the frequency band between 0.07 and 0.13 Hz and central EEG alpha and/or beta power oscillations in 8 of the 9 subjects investigated. The HbO2 peaks preceded the EEG band power peaks by 3.7 s in 6 subjects, with moderate or no coupling between BP and HbO2 oscillations. HbO2 and EEG band power oscillations were approximately in phase with BP oscillations in the 2 subjects with an extremely high coupling (squared coherence [Formula: see text]) between BP and HbO2 oscillation. No coupling was identified in one subject. These results indicate that slow precentral (de)oxyhemoglobin concentration oscillations during awake rest can be temporarily coupled with EEG fluctuations in sensorimotor areas and modulate the excitability level in the brains' motor areas, respectively. Therefore, this provides support for the idea that resting state networks fluctuate with frequencies of between 0.01 and 0.1 Hz (Mantini et.al. PNAS 2007).

  7. Scrapie prevalence in sheep of susceptible genotype is declining in a population subject to breeding for resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hagenaars, T.H.J.; Melchior, M.B.; Bossers, A.; Davidse, A.; Engel, B.; Zijderveld, van F.G.

    2010-01-01

    Background - Susceptibility of sheep to scrapie infection is known to be modulated by the PrP genotype of the animal. In the Netherlands an ambitious scrapie control programme was started in 1998, based on genetic selection of animals for breeding. From 2002 onwards EU regulations required intensive

  8. Association between Gc genotype and susceptibility to TB is dependent on vitamin D status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martineau, A R; Leandro, A C C S; Anderson, S T; Newton, S M; Wilkinson, K A; Nicol, M P; Pienaar, S M; Skolimowska, K H; Rocha, M A; Rolla, V C; Levin, M; Davidson, R N; Bremner, S A; Griffiths, C J; Eley, B S; Bonecini-Almeida, M G; Wilkinson, R J

    2010-05-01

    Group-specific component (Gc) variants of vitamin D binding protein differ in their affinity for vitamin D metabolites that modulate antimycobacterial immunity. We conducted studies to determine whether Gc genotype associates with susceptibility to tuberculosis (TB). The following subjects were recruited into case-control studies: in the UK, 123 adult TB patients and 140 controls, all of Gujarati Asian ethnic origin; in Brazil, 130 adult TB patients and 78 controls; and in South Africa, 281 children with TB and 182 controls. Gc genotypes were determined and their frequency was compared between cases versus controls. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were obtained retrospectively for 139 Gujarati Asians, and case-control analysis was stratified by vitamin D status. Interferon (IFN)-gamma release assays were also performed on 36 Gujarati Asian TB contacts. The Gc2/2 genotype was strongly associated with susceptibility to active TB in Gujarati Asians, compared with Gc1/1 genotype (OR 2.81, 95% CI 1.19-6.66; p = 0.009). This association was preserved if serum 25(OH)D was or =20 nmol.L(-1) (p = 0.36). Carriage of the Gc2 allele was associated with increased PPD of tuberculin-stimulated IFN-gamma release in Gujarati Asian TB contacts (p = 0.02). No association between Gc genotype and susceptibility to TB was observed in other ethnic groups studied.

  9. Influence of COMT genotype and affective distractors on the processing of self-generated thought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilford, Emma J; Dumontheil, Iroise; Wood, Nicholas W; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2015-06-01

    The catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) enzyme is a major determinant of prefrontal dopamine levels. The Val(158)Met polymorphism affects COMT enzymatic activity and has been associated with variation in executive function and affective processing. This study investigated the effect of COMT genotype on the flexible modulation of the balance between processing self-generated and processing stimulus-oriented information, in the presence or absence of affective distractors. Analyses included 124 healthy adult participants, who were also assessed on standard working memory (WM) tasks. Relative to Val carriers, Met homozygotes made fewer errors when selecting and manipulating self-generated thoughts. This effect was partly accounted for by an association between COMT genotype and visuospatial WM performance. We also observed a complex interaction between the influence of affective distractors, COMT genotype and sex on task accuracy: male, but not female, participants showed a sensitivity to the affective distractors that was dependent on COMT genotype. This was not accounted for by WM performance. This study provides novel evidence of the role of dopaminergic genetic variation on the ability to select and manipulate self-generated thoughts. The results also suggest sexually dimorphic effects of COMT genotype on the influence of affective distractors on executive function. © The Author (2014). Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Phenotypic and genotypic data integration and exploration through a web-service architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Angelo; Riva, Alberto; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Background Linking genotypic and phenotypic information is one of the greatest challenges of current genetics research. The definition of an Information Technology infrastructure to support this kind of studies, and in particular studies aimed at the analysis of complex traits, which require the definition of multifaceted phenotypes and the integration genotypic information to discover the most prevalent diseases, is a paradigmatic goal of Biomedical Informatics. This paper describes the use of Information Technology methods and tools to develop a system for the management, inspection and integration of phenotypic and genotypic data. Results We present the design and architecture of the Phenotype Miner, a software system able to flexibly manage phenotypic information, and its extended functionalities to retrieve genotype information from external repositories and to relate it to phenotypic data. For this purpose we developed a module to allow customized data upload by the user and a SOAP-based communications layer to retrieve data from existing biomedical knowledge management tools. In this paper we also demonstrate the system functionality by an example application of the system in which we analyze two related genomic datasets. Conclusion In this paper we show how a comprehensive, integrated and automated workbench for genotype and phenotype integration can facilitate and improve the hypothesis generation process underlying modern genetic studies. PMID:19828081

  11. SNPflow: a lightweight application for the processing, storing and automatic quality checking of genotyping assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansi Weissensteiner

    Full Text Available Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs play a prominent role in modern genetics. Current genotyping technologies such as Sequenom iPLEX, ABI TaqMan and KBioscience KASPar made the genotyping of huge SNP sets in large populations straightforward and allow the generation of hundreds of thousands of genotypes even in medium sized labs. While data generation is straightforward, the subsequent data conversion, storage and quality control steps are time-consuming, error-prone and require extensive bioinformatic support. In order to ease this tedious process, we developed SNPflow. SNPflow is a lightweight, intuitive and easily deployable application, which processes genotype data from Sequenom MassARRAY (iPLEX and ABI 7900HT (TaqMan, KASPar systems and is extendible to other genotyping methods as well. SNPflow automatically converts the raw output files to ready-to-use genotype lists, calculates all standard quality control values such as call rate, expected and real amount of replicates, minor allele frequency, absolute number of discordant replicates, discordance rate and the p-value of the HWE test, checks the plausibility of the observed genotype frequencies by comparing them to HapMap/1000-Genomes, provides a module for the processing of SNPs, which allow sex determination for DNA quality control purposes and, finally, stores all data in a relational database. SNPflow runs on all common operating systems and comes as both stand-alone version and multi-user version for laboratory-wide use. The software, a user manual, screenshots and a screencast illustrating the main features are available at http://genepi-snpflow.i-med.ac.at.

  12. SNPflow: A Lightweight Application for the Processing, Storing and Automatic Quality Checking of Genotyping Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, Sebastian; Neuner, Mathias; Forer, Lukas; Specht, Günther; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Kronenberg, Florian; Coassin, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) play a prominent role in modern genetics. Current genotyping technologies such as Sequenom iPLEX, ABI TaqMan and KBioscience KASPar made the genotyping of huge SNP sets in large populations straightforward and allow the generation of hundreds of thousands of genotypes even in medium sized labs. While data generation is straightforward, the subsequent data conversion, storage and quality control steps are time-consuming, error-prone and require extensive bioinformatic support. In order to ease this tedious process, we developed SNPflow. SNPflow is a lightweight, intuitive and easily deployable application, which processes genotype data from Sequenom MassARRAY (iPLEX) and ABI 7900HT (TaqMan, KASPar) systems and is extendible to other genotyping methods as well. SNPflow automatically converts the raw output files to ready-to-use genotype lists, calculates all standard quality control values such as call rate, expected and real amount of replicates, minor allele frequency, absolute number of discordant replicates, discordance rate and the p-value of the HWE test, checks the plausibility of the observed genotype frequencies by comparing them to HapMap/1000-Genomes, provides a module for the processing of SNPs, which allow sex determination for DNA quality control purposes and, finally, stores all data in a relational database. SNPflow runs on all common operating systems and comes as both stand-alone version and multi-user version for laboratory-wide use. The software, a user manual, screenshots and a screencast illustrating the main features are available at http://genepi-snpflow.i-med.ac.at. PMID:23527209

  13. Genotypic Variation in the Phytoremediation Potential of Indian Mustard for Chromium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Hema; Ahmad, Altaf; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2008-05-01

    The term “phytoremediation” is used to describe the cleanup of heavy metals from contaminated sites by plants. This study demonstrates phytoremediation potential of Indian mustard ( Brasicca juncea (L.) Czern. & Coss.) genotypes for chromium (Cr). Seedlings of 10 genotypes were grown hydroponically in artificially contaminated water over a range of environmentally relevant concentrations of Cr (VI), and the responses of genotypes in the presence of Cr, with reference to Cr accumulation, its phytotoxity and anti-oxidative system were investigated. The Cr accumulation potential varied largely among Indian mustard genotypes. At 100 μM Cr treatment, Pusa Jai Kisan accumulated the maximum amount of Cr (1680 μg Cr g-1 DW) whereas Vardhan accumulated the minimum (107 μg Cr g-1 DW). As the tolerance of metals is a key plant characteristic required for phytoremediation purpose, effects of various levels of Cr on biomass were evaluated as the gross effect. The extent of oxidative stress caused by Cr stress was measured as rate of lipid peroxidation. The level of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) was enhanced at all Cr treatments when compared to the control. Inductions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants were monitored as metal-detoxifying responses. All the genotypes responded to Cr-induced oxidative stress by modulating nonenzymatic antioxidants [glutathione (GSH) and ascorbate (Asc)] and enzymatic antioxidants [superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), and glutathione reductase (GR)]. The level of induction, however, differed among the genotypes, being at its maximum in Pusa Jai Kisan and its minimum in Vardhan. Pusa Jai Kisan was grown under natural field conditions with various Cr treatments, and Cr-accumulation capacity was studied. The results confirmed that Pusa Jai Kisan is a hyperaccumulator of Cr and hypertolerant to Cr-induced stress, which makes this genotype a viable candidate for use in the development of

  14. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of salinity stressed japonica and indica rice genotypes during panicle initiation stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Harkamal; Wilson, Clyde; Zeng, Linghe; Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Condamine, Pascal; Close, Timothy J

    2007-03-01

    Rice yield is most sensitive to salinity stress imposed during the panicle initiation (PI) stage. In this study, we have focused on physiological and transcriptional responses of four rice genotypes exposed to salinity stress during PI. The genotypes selected included a pair of indicas (IR63731 and IR29) and a pair of japonica (Agami and M103) rice subspecies with contrasting salt tolerance. Physiological characterization showed that tolerant genotypes maintained a much lower shoot Na+ concentration relative to sensitive genotypes under salinity stress. Global gene expression analysis revealed a strikingly large number of genes which are induced by salinity stress in sensitive genotypes, IR29 and M103 relative to tolerant lines. We found 19 probe sets to be commonly induced in all four genotypes. We found several salinity modulated, ion homeostasis related genes from our analysis. We also studied the expression of SKC1, a cation transporter reported by others as a major source of variation in salt tolerance in rice. The transcript abundance of SKC1 did not change in response to salinity stress at PI stage in the shoot tissue of all four genotypes. However, we found the transcript abundance of SKC1 to be significantly higher in tolerant japonica Agami relative to sensitive japonica M103 under control and stressed conditions during PI stage.

  15. Dopamine transporter 3'UTR VNTR genotype is a marker of performance on executive function tasks in children with ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polotskaia Anna

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a heterogeneous disorder from both clinical and pathogenic viewpoints. Executive function deficits are considered among the most important pathogenic pathways leading to ADHD and may index part of the heterogeneity in this disorder. Methods To investigate the relationship between the dopamine transporter gene (SLC6A3 3'-UTR VNTR genotypes and executive function in children with ADHD, 196 children diagnosed with ADHD were sequentially recruited, genotyped, and tested using a battery of three neuropsychological tests aimed at assessing the different aspects of executive functioning. Results Taking into account a correction for multiple comparisons, the main finding of this study is a significant genotype effect on performances on the Tower of London (F = 6.902, p = 0.009 and on the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Third Edition (WISC-III Freedom From Distractibility Index (F = 7.125, p = 0.008, as well as strong trends on Self Ordered Pointing Task error scores (F = 4,996 p = 0.026 and WISC-III Digit Span performance (F = 6.28, p = 0.023. Children with the 9/10 genotype exhibited, on average, a poorer performance on all four measures compared to children with the 10/10 genotype. No effect of genotype on Wisconsin Card Sorting Test measures of performance was detected. Conclusion Results are compatible with the view that SLC6A3 genotype may modulate components of executive function performance in children with ADHD.

  16. War exposure, 5-HTTLPR genotype and lifetime risk of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artero, Sylvaine; Touchon, Jacques; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Malafosse, Alain; Ritchie, Karen

    2011-07-01

    In 1962 approximately 1.5 million French people living in Algeria were repatriated to France in very poor and often life-threatening conditions. These people constitute a cohort for the study of the long-term impact of gene-environment interaction on depression. To examine the interaction between a highly stressful life event and subsequent depression, and its modulation by a length polymorphism of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR). A community sample of people aged 65 years and over residing in the Montpellier region of the south of France was randomly recruited from electoral rolls. Genotyping was performed on 248 repatriated persons and 632 controls. Current and lifetime major and minor depressive disorders were assessed according to DSM-IV criteria. A significant relationship was observed between exposure to repatriation and subsequent depression (Peducation, disability, recent life events and cognitive function, the gene-environment interaction (repatriation × 5-HTTLPR) was globally significant (P<0.002; OR = 3.21, 95% CI 2.48-5.12). Individuals carrying the two short (s) alleles of 5-HTTLPR were observed to be at higher risk (P<0.005; OR = 2.34, 95% CI 1.24-4.32), particularly when repatriation occurred before age 35 years (P<0.002; OR = 2.91, 95% CI 1.44-5.88), but this did not reach significance in those who were older at the time of the event (P = 0.067). The association between depression and war repatriation was significantly modulated by 5-HTTLPR genotype but this appeared to occur only in people who were younger at the time of exposure.

  17. Non-coding RNAs in neural networks, REST-assured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eROSSBACH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In the nervous system, several key steps in cellular complexity and development are regulated by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs and the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor (REST/NRSF. REST recruits gene regulatory complexes to regulatory sequences, among them the repressor element-1/neuron restrictive silencer element (RE1/NRSE, and mediates developmental stage-specific gene expression or repression, chromatin (re-orga-nization or silencing for protein-coding genes as well as for several ncRNAs like microRNAs (miRNAs, short interfering RNAs (siRNAs or long ncRNAs. NcRNAs are far from being just transcriptional noise and are involved in chromatin accessibility, transcription and post-transcriptional processing, trafficking or RNA editing. REST and its cofactor CoREST are both highly regulated through various ncRNAs. The importance of the correct regulation within the ncRNA network, the ncRNAome, is demonstrated when it comes to a deregulation of REST and/or ncRNAs associated with molecular pathophysiology underlying diverse disorders including neurodegenerative diseases or brain tumors.

  18. Effects of eugenol on resting tension of rat atria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivoto, R R; Damiani, C E N; Kassouf Silva, I; Lofrano-Alves, M S; Oliveira, M A; Fogaça, R T H

    2014-04-01

    In cardiac and skeletal muscle, eugenol (μM range) blocks excitation-contraction coupling. In skeletal muscle, however, larger doses of eugenol (mM range) induce calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. The effects of eugenol are therefore dependent on its concentration. In this study, we evaluated the effects of eugenol on the contractility of isolated, quiescent atrial trabeculae from male Wistar rats (250-300 g; n=131) and measured atrial ATP content. Eugenol (1, 3, 5, 7, and 10 mM) increased resting tension in a dose-dependent manner. Ryanodine [100 µM; a specific ryanodine receptor (RyR) blocker] and procaine (30 mM; a nonspecific RyR blocker) did not block the increased resting tension induced by eugenol regardless of whether extracellular calcium was present. The myosin-specific inhibitor 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), however, reversed the increase in resting tension induced by eugenol. In Triton-skinned atrial trabeculae, in which all membranes were solubilized, eugenol did not change resting tension, maximum force produced, or the force vs pCa relationship (pCa=-log [Ca2+]). Given that eugenol reduced ATP concentration, the increase in resting tension observed in this study may have resulted from cooperative activation of cardiac thin filaments by strongly attached cross-bridges (rigor state).

  19. Harnessing the master transcriptional repressor REST to reciprocally regulate neurogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesti, Edmund

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenesis begins in embryonic development and continues at a reduced rate into adulthood in vertebrate species, yet the signaling cascades regulating this process remain poorly understood. Plasma membrane-initiated signaling cascades regulate neurogenesis via downstream pathways including components of the transcriptional machinery. A nuclear factor that temporally regulates neurogenesis by repressing neuronal differentiation is the repressor element 1 (RE1) silencing transcription (REST) factor. We have recently discovered a regulatory site on REST that serves as a molecular switch for neuronal differentiation. Specifically, C-terminal domain small phosphatase 1, CTDSP1, present in non-neuronal cells, maintains REST activity by dephosphorylating this site. Reciprocally, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, ERK, activated by growth factor signaling in neural progenitors, and peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1, decrease REST activity through phosphorylation-dependent degradation. Our findings further resolve the mechanism for temporal regulation of REST and terminal neuronal differentiation. They also provide new potential therapeutic targets to enhance neuronal regeneration after injury. PMID:27535341

  20. Effect of prolonged bed rest on the anterior hip muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilani Mendis, M; Hides, Julie A; Wilson, Stephen J; Grimaldi, Alison; Belavý, Daniel L; Stanton, Warren; Felsenberg, Dieter; Rittweger, Joern; Richardson, Carolyn

    2009-11-01

    Prolonged bed rest and inactivity is known to cause muscular atrophy with previous research indicating that muscles involved in joint stabilisation are more susceptible. The anterior hip muscles are important for hip joint function and stability but little is known about the effects of prolonged inactivity on their function. This study investigated the effect of prolonged bed rest on the size of the anterior hip muscles and their pattern of recovery. The effect of resistive vibration exercise (RVE) as a countermeasure to muscle atrophy was also investigated. 12 male participants, randomly assigned to either a control or an exercise group, underwent 8 weeks of bed rest with 6 months follow-up. Changes in muscle cross-sectional area (CSA) of the iliacus, psoas, iliopsoas, sartorius and rectus femoris muscles were measured by magnetic resonance imaging at regular intervals during bed rest and recovery phases. CSAs of iliopsoas and sartorius decreased at the hip joint (piliacus, psoas, and rectus femoris CSAs were unchanged (p>0.05). No significant difference was found between the two groups for all muscles (all p>0.1), suggesting inefficacy of the countermeasure in this sample. These findings suggest that prolonged bed rest can result in the atrophy of specific muscles across the hip joint which may affect its stability and function.

  1. Blood Group ABO Genotyping in Paternity Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugert, Peter; Rink, Gabriele; Kemp, Katharina; Klüter, Harald

    2012-06-01

    BACKGROUND: The ABO blood groups result from DNA sequence variations, predominantly single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms (SNPs and indels), in the ABO gene encoding a glycosyltransferase. The ABO blood groups A(1), A(2), B and O predominantly result from the wild type allele A1 and the major gene variants that are characterized by four diallelic markers (261G>del, 802G>A, 803G>C, 1061C>del). Here, we were interested to evaluate the impact of ABO genotyping compared to ABO phenotyping in paternity testing. METHODS: The major ABO alleles were determined by PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in a representative sample of 1,335 blood donors. The genotypes were compared to the ABO blood groups registered in the blood donor files. Then, the ABO phenotypes and genotypes were determined in 95 paternity trio cases that have been investigated by 12 short tandem repeat (STR) markers before. We compared statistical parameters (PL, paternity likelihood; PE, power of exclusion) of both blood grouping approaches. RESULTS: The prevalence of the major ABO alleles and genotypes corresponded to the expected occurrence of ABO blood groups in a Caucasian population. The low resolution genotyping of 4 diallelic markers revealed a correct genotype-phenotype correlation in 1,331 of 1,335 samples (99.7%). In 60 paternity trios with confirmed paternity of the alleged father based on STR analysis both PL and PE of the ABO genotype was significantly higher than of the ABO phenotype. In 12 of 35 exclusion cases (34.3%) the ABO genotype also excluded the alleged father, whereas the ABO phenotype excluded the alleged father only in 7 cases (20%). CONCLUSION: In paternity testing ABO genotyping is superior to ABO phenotyping with regard to PL and PE, however, ABO genotyping is not sufficient for valid paternity testing. Due to the much lower mutation rate compared to STR markers, blood group SNPs in addition to anonymous SNPs could be considered for

  2. Blood Group ABO Genotyping in Paternity Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugert, Peter; Rink, Gabriele; Kemp, Katharina; Klüter, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Background The ABO blood groups result from DNA sequence variations, predominantly single nucleotide and insertion/deletion polymorphisms (SNPs and indels), in the ABO gene encoding a glycosyltransferase. The ABO blood groups A1, A2, B and O predominantly result from the wild type allele A1 and the major gene variants that are characterized by four diallelic markers (261G>del, 802G>A, 803G>C, 1061C>del). Here, we were interested to evaluate the impact of ABO genotyping compared to ABO phenotyping in paternity testing. Methods The major ABO alleles were determined by PCR amplification with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP) in a representative sample of 1,335 blood donors. The genotypes were compared to the ABO blood groups registered in the blood donor files. Then, the ABO phenotypes and genotypes were determined in 95 paternity trio cases that have been investigated by 12 short tandem repeat (STR) markers before. We compared statistical parameters (PL, paternity likelihood; PE, power of exclusion) of both blood grouping approaches. Results The prevalence of the major ABO alleles and genotypes corresponded to the expected occurrence of ABO blood groups in a Caucasian population. The low resolution genotyping of 4 diallelic markers revealed a correct genotype-phenotype correlation in 1,331 of 1,335 samples (99.7%). In 60 paternity trios with confirmed paternity of the alleged father based on STR analysis both PL and PE of the ABO genotype was significantly higher than of the ABO phenotype. In 12 of 35 exclusion cases (34.3%) the ABO genotype also excluded the alleged father, whereas the ABO phenotype excluded the alleged father only in 7 cases (20%). Conclusion In paternity testing ABO genotyping is superior to ABO phenotyping with regard to PL and PE, however, ABO genotyping is not sufficient for valid paternity testing. Due to the much lower mutation rate compared to STR markers, blood group SNPs in addition to anonymous SNPs could be considered for future

  3. Expression of REST4 in human gliomas in vivo and influence of pioglitazone on REST in vitro

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    Ren, Huan [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China); Gao, Zhangfeng [Department of Neurosurgery, Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Wu, Nayiyuan; Zeng, Liu; Tang, Xinyue; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Zhaoqian; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Liansheng [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China); Li, Zhi, E-mail: lizhi489@163.com [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan Key Laboratory of Pharmacogenetics, Changsha 410078 (China)

    2015-08-07

    The repressor element-1 (RE1) silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF) has an irreplaceable role during the differentiation of neurons. REST has multiple splice variants which link to various types of cancer. Previous work had highlighted the role of REST in glioma, where the expression of REST is enhanced. But whether alternative splicing of REST is expressed in glioma has not been described. Here, we show that a specific isoform REST4 is expressed in glioma specimens, and will influence the mRNA level of REST in vivo. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) agonists have a role of antineoplastic in various tumor cells, which including glioma cells. Moreover, study indicated that PPARγ agonist pioglitazone can promote alternative splicing of REST pre-mRNA. In this study, we selected pioglitazone as a tool drug to explore whether the role of pioglitazone in anti-glioma is mediated by regulating REST expression or promoting alternative splicing of REST in glioma cells. Results show that pioglitazone can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of glioma cell in vitro, which may be mediated by down-regulating REST mRNA level but not by inducing alternative splicing of REST pre-mRNA. Our study firstly reports the expression of REST4 in glioma tissue samples. And we recommend that pioglitazone, which can reduce the expression level of REST, represents a promising drug for therapy of glioma. - Highlights: • A specific isoform REST4 is expressed in glioma specimens in vivo. • REST4 will influence the mRNA level of REST in vivo. • Pioglitazone can inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis of glioma cells. • The role of pioglitazone in anti-glioma may be mediated by down-regulating REST.

  4. Assessment of OGC Web Processing Services for REST principles

    CERN Document Server

    Granell, Carlos; Tamayo, Alain; Huerta, Joaquín

    2012-01-01

    Recent distributed computing trends advocate the use of Representational State Transfer (REST), which aligns to the same principles than shape the Web, to alleviate the inherent complexity of the Web services standards in building service-oriented web applications. In this paper, we focus on the particular case of geospatial services interfaced by the OGC Web Processing Service (WPS) specification, geoprocessing services on top of service oriented architectures, in order to assess whether WPS-based geoprocessing services can be viewed from the architectural principles exposed in REST. Our concluding remarks suggest that the adoption of REST principles, to specially harness the built-in mechanisms of the HTTP application protocol, may be beneficial in scenarios where ad hoc composition of geoprocessing services are required, common for most non-expert users of geospatial information infrastructures.

  5. I am resting but rest less well with you. The Moderating Effect of Anxious Attachment Style on Alpha Power during EEG Resting State in a Social Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem J.M.I. Verbeke

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We took EEG recordings to measure task-free resting-state cortical brain activity in 35 participants under two conditions, alone (A or together (T. We also investigated whether psychological attachment styles shape human cortical activity differently in these two settings. The results indicate that social context matters and that participants’ cortical activity is moderated by the anxious, but not avoidant attachment style. We found enhanced alpha, beta and theta band activity in the T rather than the A resting-state condition, which was more pronounced in posterior brain regions. We further found a positive correlation between anxious attachment style and enhanced alpha power in the T versus A condition over frontal and parietal scalp regions. There was no significant correlation between the absolute powers registered in the other two frequency bands and the participants’ anxious attachment style.

  6. "I am resting but rest less well with you." The moderating effect of anxious attachment style on alpha power during EEG resting state in a social context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Willem J M I; Pozharliev, Rumen; Van Strien, Jan W; Belschak, Frank; Bagozzi, Richard P

    2014-01-01

    We took EEG recordings to measure task-free resting-state cortical brain activity in 35 participants under two conditions, alone (A) or together (T). We also investigated whether psychological attachment styles shape human cortical activity differently in these two settings. The results indicate that social context matters and that participants' cortical activity is moderated by the anxious, but not avoidant attachment style. We found enhanced alpha, beta and theta band activity in the T rather than the A resting-state condition, which was more pronounced in posterior brain regions. We further found a positive correlation between anxious attachment style and enhanced alpha power in the T vs. A condition over frontal and parietal scalp regions. There was no significant correlation between the absolute powers registered in the other two frequency bands and the participants' anxious attachment style.

  7. A spatial individual-based model predicting a great impact of copious sugar sources and resting sites on survival of Anopheles gambiae and malaria parasite transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Qualls, Whitney A.; Marshall, John M; Arheart, Kris L.; DeAngelis, Don; McManus, John W.; Traore, Sekou F.; Doumbia, Seydou; Schlein, Yosef; Muller, Gunter C.; Beier, John C.

    2015-01-01

    distributed in the whole village compared to clustering around outdoor resting sites or houses.ConclusionsIncreases in densities of sugar sources or outdoor resting sites significantly increase the survival and human biting rates of An. gambiae mosquitoes. Survival of An. gambiae is more supported by random distribution of sugar sources than clustering of sugar sources around resting sites or houses. Density and spatial distribution of natural sugar sources and outdoor resting sites modulate vector populations and human biting rates, and thus malaria parasite transmission.

  8. Tinnitus- and Task-Related Differences in Resting-State Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanting, Cris; Woźniak, Aron; van Dijk, Pim; Langers, Dave R M

    2016-01-01

    We investigated tinnitus-related differences in functional networks in adults with tinnitus by means of a functional connectivity study. Previously it was found that various networks show differences in connectivity in patients with tinnitus compared to controls. How this relates to patients' ongoing tinnitus and whether the ecological sensory environment modulates connectivity remains unknown.Twenty healthy controls and twenty patients suffering from chronic tinnitus were enrolled in this study. Except for the presence of tinnitus in the patient group, all subjects were selected to have normal or near-normal hearing. fMRI data were obtained in two different functional states. In one set of runs, subjects freely viewed emotionally salient movie fragments ("fixed-state") while in the other they were not performing any task ("resting-state"). After data pre-processing, Principal Component Analysis was performed to obtain 25 components for all datasets. These were fed into an Independent Component Analysis (ICA), concatenating the data across both groups and both datasets, to obtain group-level networks of neural origin, each consisting of spatial maps with their respective time-courses. Subject-specific maps and their time-course were obtained by back-projection (Dual Regression). For each of the components a mixed-effects linear model was composed with factors group (tinnitus vs. controls), task (fixed-state vs. resting state) and their interaction. The neural components comprised the visual, sensorimotor, auditory, and limbic systems, the default mode, dorsal attention, executive-control, and frontoparietal networks, and the cerebellum. Most notably, the default mode network (DMN) was less extensive and shows significantly less connectivity in tinnitus patients than in controls. This group difference existed in both paradigms. At the same time, the DMN was stronger during resting-state than during fixed-state in the controls but not the patients. We attribute this

  9. A decrease in aquaporin 2 excretion is associated with bed rest induced high calciuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Grazia; Di Mise, Annarita; Ranieri, Marianna; Svelto, Maria; Pisot, Rado; Bilancio, Giancarlo; Cavallo, Pierpaolo; De Santo, Natale G; Cirillo, Massimo; Valenti, Giovanna

    2014-05-19

    Exposure to microgravity or immobilization results in alterations of renal function, fluid redistribution and bone loss, which couples to a rise of urinary calcium excretion. We recently demonstrated that high calcium delivery to the collecting duct reduces local Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) mediated water reabsorption under vasopressin action, thus limiting the maximal urinary concentration and reducing calcium saturation. To investigate renal water balance adaptation during bed rest, a model to mimic the effects of microgravity on earth, the effect of changes in urinary calcium on urinary AQP2 excretion were assessed. Ten healthy men (aged 21-28 years) participated in the experiment. Study design included 7 days of adaptation and 35 days of continuous bed rest (days -6 to 0 and 1 to 35, respectively) under controlled diet. Food records and 24-hour urine samples were collected daily from day -3 to 35. Changes in blood hematocrit were used as an indirect index of plasma volume changes. AQP2 excretion was measured by ELISA. Bed rest induced bone demineralization and a transient increase in urinary calcium followed by transient decrease in AQP2 excretion, which can reduce the urine concentrating ability causing plasma volume reduction. The return of calciuria to baseline was followed by a recovery of AQP2 excretion, which allows for a partial restoration of plasma volume. These results further support the view that urinary calcium can modulate the vasopressin-dependent urine concentration through a down-regulation of AQP2 expression/trafficking. This mechanism could have a key role in the prevention of urine super-saturation due to hypercalciuria.

  10. Estimating the distribution of rest-frame time-scales for blazar jets: a statistical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liodakis, I.; Blinov, D.; Papadakis, I.; Pavlidou, V.

    2017-03-01

    In any flux-density limited sample of blazars, the distribution of the time-scale modulation factor Δt΄/Δt, which quantifies the change in observed time-scales compared to the rest-frame ones due to redshift and relativistic compression follows an exponential distribution with a mean depending on the flux limit of the sample. In this work, we produce the mathematical formalism that allows us to use this information in order to uncover the underlining rest-frame probability density function of measurable time-scales of blazar jets. We extensively test our proposed methodology using a simulated Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar population with a 1.5 Jy flux-density limit in the simple case (where all blazars share the same intrinsic time-scale), in order to identify limits of applicability and potential biases due to observational systematics and sample selection. We find that for monitoring with time intervals between observations longer than ∼30 per cent of the intrinsic time-scale under investigation the method loses its ability to produce robust results. For time intervals of ∼3 per cent of the intrinsic time-scale, the error of the method is as low as 1 per cent in recovering the intrinsic rest-frame time-scale. We applied our method to rotations of the optical polarization angle of blazars observed by RoboPol. We found that the intrinsic time-scales of the longest duration rotation event in each blazar follows a narrow distribution, well described by a normal distribution with mean 87 d and standard deviation 5 d. We discuss possible interpretations of this result.

  11. Module Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-02-01

    MODULES IN LIFE TEST CHAMBER (LEFT SIDE) 68 MODULE TRANSMIT TEMP CA1 54.8°C CB1 65.3°C CC1 70.5°C CD1 75.2°C CE1 68.5°C CA2 72.1°C CB2 ...NO. PA (Contractor) PA (MELTS) DRV (Contractor) DRV (MELTS) CA1 058 +11.0 VOLTS +10.3 VOLTS + 7.5 VOLTS + 3.64 VOLTS CB1 085 +11.0 VOLTS +10.13...CE1 032 +11.0 VOLTS + 7.02 VOLTS + 7.5 VOLTS + 4.23 VOLTS CA2 065 +11.0 VOLTS +11.03 VOLTS + 7.5 VOLTS + 7.53 VOLTS CB2 057 +11.0 VOLTS + 9.49

  12. Tendon collagen synthesis at rest and after exercise in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin F; Hansen, Mette; Olesen, Jens L; Schwarz, Peter; Babraj, John A; Smith, Kenneth; Rennie, Michael J; Kjaer, Michael

    2007-02-01

    In general, there is a higher incidence of musculoskeletal injuries during physical activity in women than in men. We hypothesized that in women rates of tendon collagen synthesis would be lower than in men at rest and after exercise, especially in the later luteal phase when estrogen and progesterone concentrations are higher than the early follicular phase. We studied tendon collagen fractional synthesis rate (FSR) in 15 young, healthy female subjects in either the early follicular (n = 8) or the late luteal phase (n = 7) 72 h after an acute bout of one-legged exercise (60 min kicking at 67% workload maximum) (72 h) and compared the results with those previously obtained for men. Samples were taken from the patellar tendon in both the exercised and rested legs to determine collagen FSR by the incorporation of [15N]proline into tendon collagen hydroxyproline. There was no effect of menstrual phase on tendon collagen synthesis either at rest or after exercise. However, there was a significant difference between women and men at rest (women = 0.025 +/- 0.002%/h, men = 0.045 +/- 0.008%/h; P exercise (women = 0.027 +/- 0.005%/h; men = 0.058 +/- 0.008%/h). Furthermore, rest and 72-h tendon collagen synthesis were not different in women, whereas in men tendon collagen synthesis remained significantly elevated 72 h after exercise. It is concluded that both in the resting state and after exercise, tendon collagen FSR is lower in women than in men, which may contribute to a lower rate of tissue repair after exercise.

  13. Exercise thermoregulation with bed rest, confinement, and immersion deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1997-01-01

    Altered thermoregulation following exposure to prolonged (12-14 days) of bed rest and 6 hr of head-down thermoneutral water immersion in humans, and cage confinement (8 weeks) in male, mongrel dogs resulted in occasional increased core temperature (Tcore) at rest, but consistent "excessive" increase in Tcore during submaximal exercise. This excessive increase in Tcore in nonexercising and exercising subjects was independent of the mode (isometric or isotonic) of exercise training during bed rest, and was associated with the consistent hypovolemia in men but not in women taking estrogen supplementation (1.25 mg premarin/ day) which restored plasma volume during bed rest to ambulatory control levels. Post-bed rest exercise sweating (evaporative heat loss) was unchanged or higher than control levels; however, calculated tissue heat conductance was significantly lower in men, and forearm venoconstriction was greater (venous volume was reduced) in women during exercise after bed rest. Because sweating appeared proportional to the increased level of Tcore, these findings suggest that one major factor for the excessive hyperthermia is decreased core to periphery heat conduction. Exercising dogs respond like humans with excessive increase in both rectal (Tre) and exercising muscle temperatures (Tmu) after confinement and, after eight weeks of exercise training on a treadmill following confinement, they had an attenuated rate of increase of Tre even below ambulatory control levels. Intravenous infusion of glucose also attenuated not only the rise in Tre during exercise in normal dogs, but also the excessive rise in Tre and exercising Tmu after confinement. Oral glucose also appeared to reduce the rate of increase in excessive Tre in men after immersion deconditioning. There was a greater rate of rise in Tcore in two cosmonauts during supine submaximal exercise (65% VO2 max) on the fifth recovery day after the 115-day Mir 18 mission. Thus, the excessive rise in core

  14. Social support reduces resting cardiovascular function in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Brian M; Howard, Siobhan

    2009-10-01

    Social support is believed to benefit cardiovascular health in part by buffering recipients from life stress. Classically, this has been investigated by exploring the relationship between support and cardiovascular reactivity to laboratory stress. Such research customarily emphasizes stress responses and downplays the relevance of resting cardiovascular levels. However, it is now appreciated that resting cardiovascular function is associated with disease risk independently of reactivity. Moreover, such mechanisms are known to be relevant to female members of the population, despite the fact that much previous research has focused on males. Reactivity research rests on the assumption that stress promotes gradual hypertension over time. As such, it is important to establish the relationship between psychosocial factors and resting blood pressure. In a cross-sectional biopsychosocial screening study, we examined resting cardiovascular levels in 211 healthy non-smoking women, using regression to assess associations with psychometric indices of social support (namely, perceived network size and perceived satisfaction with support) while controlling for a range of potential biometric and psychometric confounds. Overall, social support was found to be associated with reduced resting cardiovascular function independently of, and to a greater extent than, biometric variables, anxiety, and depression. Benchmarking these effects against the differences in cardiovascular function between the present sample and a group of 92 similarly aged males revealed that social support accounted for as much variance as gender, which is widely assumed to be an important biomedical determinant of blood pressure. Such findings corroborate assertions that social support influences disease risk in ways that involve direct psychosomatic mechanisms.

  15. Cotton genotypes selection through artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Júnior, E G Silva; Cardoso, D B O; Reis, M C; Nascimento, A F O; Bortolin, D I; Martins, M R; Sousa, L B

    2017-09-27

    Breeding programs currently use statistical analysis to assist in the identification of superior genotypes at various stages of a cultivar's development. Differently from these analyses, the computational intelligence approach has been little explored in genetic improvement of cotton. Thus, this study was carried out with the objective of presenting the use of artificial neural networks as auxiliary tools in the improvement of the cotton to improve fiber quality. To demonstrate the applicability of this approach, this research was carried out using the evaluation data of 40 genotypes. In order to classify the genotypes for fiber quality, the artificial neural networks were trained with replicate data of 20 genotypes of cotton evaluated in the harvests of 2013/14 and 2014/15, regarding fiber length, uniformity of length, fiber strength, micronaire index, elongation, short fiber index, maturity index, reflectance degree, and fiber quality index. This quality index was estimated by means of a weighted average on the determined score (1 to 5) of each characteristic of the HVI evaluated, according to its industry standards. The artificial neural networks presented a high capacity of correct classification of the 20 selected genotypes based on the fiber quality index, so that when using fiber length associated with the short fiber index, fiber maturation, and micronaire index, the artificial neural networks presented better results than using only fiber length and previous associations. It was also observed that to submit data of means of new genotypes to the neural networks trained with data of repetition, provides better results of classification of the genotypes. When observing the results obtained in the present study, it was verified that the artificial neural networks present great potential to be used in the different stages of a genetic improvement program of the cotton, aiming at the improvement of the fiber quality of the future cultivars.

  16. Module descriptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincenti, Gordon; Klausen, Bodil; Kjær Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The Module Descriptor including a Teacher’s Guide explains and describes how to work innovatively and co-creatively with wicked problems and young people. The descriptor shows how interested educators and lecturers in Europe can copy the lessons of the Erasmus+ project HIP when teaching their own...... students how to include marginalized young people and practitioners in the education of future social workers and social educators....

  17. Module descriptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincenti, Gordon; Klausen, Bodil; Kjær Jensen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    The Module Descriptor including a Teacher’s Guide explains and describes how to work innovatively and co-creatively with wicked problems and young people. The descriptor shows how interested educators and lecturers in Europe can copy the lessons of the Erasmus+ project HIP when teaching their own...... students how to include marginalized young people and practitioners in the education of future social workers and social educators....

  18. Resting state networks and consciousness: alterations of multiple resting state network connectivity in physiological, pharmacological, and pathological consciousness States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, Lizette; Soddu, Andrea; Gómez, Francisco; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Tshibanda, Luaba; Thonnard, Marie; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Kirsch, Murielle; Laureys, Steven; Demertzi, Athena

    2012-01-01

    In order to better understand the functional contribution of resting state activity to conscious cognition, we aimed to review increases and decreases in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) functional connectivity under physiological (sleep), pharmacological (anesthesia), and pathological altered states of consciousness, such as brain death, coma, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, and minimally conscious state. The reviewed resting state networks were the DMN, left and right executive control, salience, sensorimotor, auditory, and visual networks. We highlight some methodological issues concerning resting state analyses in severely injured brains mainly in terms of hypothesis-driven seed-based correlation analysis and data-driven independent components analysis approaches. Finally, we attempt to contextualize our discussion within theoretical frameworks of conscious processes. We think that this "lesion" approach allows us to better determine the necessary conditions under which normal conscious cognition takes place. At the clinical level, we acknowledge the technical merits of the resting state paradigm. Indeed, fast and easy acquisitions are preferable to activation paradigms in clinical populations. Finally, we emphasize the need to validate the diagnostic and prognostic value of fMRI resting state measurements in non-communicating brain damaged patients.

  19. Resting-state fMRI studies in epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wurina; Yu-Feng Zang; Shi-Gang Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease characterized by abnormal spontaneous activity in the brain.Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) is a powerful technique for exploring this activity.With good spatial and temporal resolution,RS-fMRI is a promising approach for accurate localization of the focus of seizure activity.Although simultaneous electroencephalogram-fMR1 has been performed with patients in the resting state,most studies focused on activation.This mini-review focuses on RS-fMRI alone,including its computational methods and its application to epilepsy.

  20. Frontostriatal circuits, resting state functional connectivity and cognitive control in internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Kai; Yu, Dahua; Cai, Chenxi; Feng, Dan; Li, Yangding; Bi, Yanzhi; Liu, Jixin; Zhang, Yi; Jin, Chenwang; Li, Linling; Qin, Wei; Tian, Jie

    2017-05-01

    Converging evidence has identified cognitive control deficits in internet gaming disorder (IGD). Recently, mounting evidence had revealed that resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) and structural connectivity of frontostriatal circuits could modulate cognitive control in healthy individuals. Unfortunately, relatively little is known about the thoroughly circuit-level characterization of the frontostriatal pathways (both the dorsal and ventral striatum) during resting-state and their association with cognitive control in IGD. In the current study, the differences of striatum volume and RSFC networks were investigated between 43 young IGD individuals and 44 healthy controls. Meanwhile, cognitive control deficits were assessed by Stroop task performances. The neuroimaging findings were then correlated with the Stroop task behaviors. In IGD subjects, we demonstrated an increased volume of right caudate and nucleus accumbens (NAc) as well as reduced RSFC strength of dorsal prefrontal cortex (DLPFC)-caudate and orbitofrontal cortex (OFC)-NAc. NAc volumes were positively correlated with internet addiction test scores in IGD. The caudate volume and DLPFC-caudate RSFC was correlated with the impaired cognitive control (more incongruent errors in Stroop task) in IGD. Consistent with substance use disorder (SUD) findings, we detected striatum volume and frontostriatal circuits RSFC differences between IGD and healthy controls, which provided evidence of some degree of the similarity between IGD and SUD. More importantly, the cognitive control deficits in IGD were correlated with the reduced frontostrital RSFC strength. It is hoped that our results could shed insight on the neurobiological mechanisms of IGD and suggest potential novel therapeutic targets for treatment.

  1. Alterations of the salience network in obesity: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Isabel; Jurado, María Ángeles; Garolera, Maite; Segura, Bàrbara; Sala-Llonch, Roser; Marqués-Iturria, Idoia; Pueyo, Roser; Sender-Palacios, María José; Vernet-Vernet, Maria; Narberhaus, Ana; Ariza, Mar; Junqué, Carme

    2013-11-01

    Obesity is a major health problem in modern societies. It has been related to abnormal functional organization of brain networks believed to process homeostatic (internal) and/or salience (external) information. This study used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis to delineate possible functional changes in brain networks related to obesity. A group of 18 healthy adult participants with obesity were compared with a group of 16 lean participants while performing a resting-state task, with the data being evaluated by independent component analysis. Participants also completed a neuropsychological assessment. Results showed that the functional connectivity strength of the putamen nucleus in the salience network was increased in the obese group. We speculate that this abnormal activation may contribute to overeating through an imbalance between autonomic processing and reward processing of food stimuli. A correlation was also observed in obesity between activation of the putamen nucleus in the salience network and mental slowness, which is consistent with the notion that basal ganglia circuits modulate rapid processing of information. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Boosting Norepinephrine Transmission Triggers Flexible Reconfiguration of Brain Networks at Rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedj, Carole; Monfardini, Elisabetta; Reynaud, Amélie J; Farnè, Alessandro; Meunier, Martine; Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila

    2016-09-06

    The locus coeruleus-norepinephrine (LC-NE) system is thought to act as a reset signal allowing brain network reorganization in response to salient information in the environment. However, no direct evidence of NE-dependent whole-brain reorganization has ever been described. We used resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging in monkeys to investigate the impact of NE-reuptake inhibition on whole-brain connectivity patterns. We found that boosting NE transmission changes functional connectivity between and within resting-state networks. It modulated the functional connectivity pattern of a brainstem network including the LC region and interactions between associative and sensory-motor networks as well as within sensory-motor networks. Among the observed changes, those involving the fronto-parietal attention network exhibited a unique pattern of uncoupling with other sensory-motor networks and correlation switching from negative to positive with the brainstem network that included the LC nucleus. These findings provide the first empirical evidence of NE-dependent large-scale brain network reorganization and further demonstrate that the fronto-parietal attention network represents a central feature within this reorganization. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Robust brain parcellation using sparse representation on resting-state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Caspers, Svenja; Fan, Lingzhong; Fan, Yong; Song, Ming; Liu, Cirong; Mo, Yin; Roski, Christian; Eickhoff, Simon; Amunts, Katrin; Jiang, Tianzi

    2015-11-01

    Resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) has been widely used to segregate the brain into individual modules based on the presence of distinct connectivity patterns. Many parcellation methods have been proposed for brain parcellation using rs-fMRI, but their results have been somewhat inconsistent, potentially due to various types of noise. In this study, we provide a robust parcellation method for rs-fMRI-based brain parcellation, which constructs a sparse similarity graph based on the sparse representation coefficients of each seed voxel and then uses spectral clustering to identify distinct modules. Both the local time-varying BOLD signals and whole-brain connectivity patterns may be used as features and yield similar parcellation results. The robustness of our method was tested on both simulated and real rs-fMRI datasets. In particular, on simulated rs-fMRI data, sparse representation achieved good performance across different noise levels, including high accuracy of parcellation and high robustness to noise. On real rs-fMRI data, stable parcellation of the medial frontal cortex (MFC) and parietal operculum (OP) were achieved on three different datasets, with high reproducibility within each dataset and high consistency across these results. Besides, the parcellation of MFC was little influenced by the degrees of spatial smoothing. Furthermore, the consistent parcellation of OP was also well corresponding to cytoarchitectonic subdivisions and known somatotopic organizations. Our results demonstrate a new promising approach to robust brain parcellation using resting-state fMRI by sparse representation.

  4. Phenotypic and genotypic variation in Iranian Pistachios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Tayefeh Aliakbarkhani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As Iran is one of the richest pistachio germplasms a few studies have been conducted on different sexes of pistachio trees, in areas where this crop emerged. To this end, 40 male and female Iranian pistachio genotypes from Feizabad region, Khorasan, Iran; were evaluated using morphological characters and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers. For morphological assessments, 54 variables were considered to investigate similarities between and among the studied genotypes. Morphological data indicated relative superiority in some female genotypes (such as Sefid 1, Sefid Sabuni 2, Garmesiah, and Ghermezdorosht Z regarding characters such as halfcrackedness, the percentages of protein and fat content. 115 polymorphic bands were recorded with 92.83% average polymorphism among all primers. The total resolving power (Rp of the primers was 74.54. The range of genetic similarity varied from about 0.31 to about 0.70. Genotypes were segregated into eight groups at the similarity limit of 0.41. Results of present investigation could be helpful for strategic decisions for maintaining Iranian pistachio genotypes.

  5. Photovoltaic module and module arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botkin, Jonathan; Graves, Simon; Lenox, Carl J. S.; Culligan, Matthew; Danning, Matt

    2012-07-17

    A photovoltaic (PV) module including a PV device and a frame. The PV device has a PV laminate defining a perimeter and a major plane. The frame is assembled to and encases the laminate perimeter, and includes leading, trailing, and side frame members, and an arm that forms a support face opposite the laminate. The support face is adapted for placement against a horizontal installation surface, to support and orient the laminate in a non-parallel or tilted arrangement. Upon final assembly, the laminate and the frame combine to define a unitary structure. The frame can orient the laminate at an angle in the range of 3.degree.-7.degree. from horizontal, and can be entirely formed of a polymeric material. Optionally, the arm incorporates integral feature(s) that facilitate interconnection with corresponding features of a second, identically formed PV module.

  6. Automated SNP Genotype Clustering Algorithm to Improve Data Completeness in High-Throughput SNP Genotyping Datasets from Custom Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Edward; M.; Smith; Jack; Littrell; Michael; Olivier

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput SNP genotyping platforms use automated genotype calling algo- rithms to assign genotypes. While these algorithms work efficiently for individual platforms, they are not compatible with other platforms, and have individual biases that result in missed genotype calls. Here we present data on the use of a second complementary SNP genotype clustering algorithm. The algorithm was originally designed for individual fluorescent SNP genotyping assays, and has been opti- mized to permit the clustering of large datasets generated from custom-designed Affymetrix SNP panels. In an analysis of data from a 3K array genotyped on 1,560 samples, the additional analysis increased the overall number of genotypes by over 45,000, significantly improving the completeness of the experimental data. This analysis suggests that the use of multiple genotype calling algorithms may be ad- visable in high-throughput SNP genotyping experiments. The software is written in Perl and is available from the corresponding author.

  7. Identification of Some Walnut Genotypes in Lorestan Province of Iran and Selection of 54 Superior Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohammadi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Identification and selection of superior genotypes is the first step in walnut breeding programs. For identifying superior genotypes in Lorestan province, Iran, 35000 seedling genotypes were evaluated during 2008-2009. 29 Phenological traits were evaluated using IPGIRI descriptors in 288 selected seedling genotypes. Finally 54 promising genotypes with 10 major phenological traits were evaluated and classified to five groups. Based on the results, The first group included B17 alone as a late leafing genotype. The second group included A11, J14, K20, H19, M13, J1, B14, E14, E6, G17, M7, O9, B7, L6, L10, F12, D6, J15, J16, N5 and N15 genotypes with high kernel percentage, very bright kernel colors, less shell thickness and medium basal fruit pore. M9 with the highest kernel percent among all of the genotypes and 80% of lateral bearing, closed basal fruit pore, less shell thickness and high fruit and kernel weight was classified in another groupe. A7, C5, N3, N18, A17, D1, N14, D4, I4, J6, K17, N4, N19, C10, E13, N13 and N16 genotypes with medium to high fruit diameter, less shell thickness, medium fruit and kernel weight and kernel percentage were classified in the next group. The fifth group included 10 promising genotypes consisting A1, A2, C12, D10, D11, D13, F3, D17, A3, N7, I13, J7, K9 and N11 with quite late leafing and lateral fruit bearing of more than 90% .

  8. STUDYING AND IMPLEMENTING RAILS-BASED RESTFUL WEB SERVICE%基于Rails的RESTful Web Service研究与实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘冰

    2010-01-01

    随着Web 服务的快速发展,基于REST(Representational State Transfer)风格的Web Service越来越受到业界的关注.在实现RESTful Web Service的众多框架中,Rails完整实现了MVC并对RESTful Web Service的开发作了极大的封装和简化,使得开发人员用Rails实现RESTful Web Service变得容易.对RESTful Web Service特征和Rails框架结构进行了概述,分析了Rails实现RESTful Web Service的原理,在此基础上结合实例给出了基于Rails的RESTful Web Service以及RESTful Web Service客户端的开发步骤和方法,并且利用Ruby进行了实现.

  9. Functional connectomics from resting-state fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, S.M.; Vidaurre, D.; Beckmann, C.F.; Jenkinson, M.; Nichols, T.E.; Robinson, E.C.; Woolrich, M.W.; Barch, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in activity in different parts of the brain can be used to study functional brain networks. We review the use of resting-state functional MRI (rfMRI) for the purpose of mapping the macroscopic functional connectome. After describing MRI acquisition and image-processing metho

  10. Phylogenetic placement of two species known only from resting spores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajek, Ann E; Gryganskyi, Andrii; Bittner, Tonya;

    2016-01-01

    Molecular methods were used to determine the generic placement of two species of Entomophthorales known only from resting spores. Historically, these species would belong in the form-genus Tarichium, but this classification provides no information about phylogenetic relationships. Using DNA from...

  11. Resting state FMRI research in child psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldehinkel, M.; Francx, W.; Beckmann, C.F.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Mennes, M.

    2013-01-01

    Concurring with the shift from linking functions to specific brain areas towards studying network integration, resting state FMRI (R-FMRI) has become an important tool for delineating the functional network architecture of the brain. Fueled by straightforward data collection, R-FMRI analysis methods

  12. Testicular adrenal rest tumours in congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claahsen-van der Grinten, H.L.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Otten, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    In adult patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), the presence of testicular adrenal rest tumours (TART) is an important complication leading to gonadal dysfunction and infertility. These tumours can be already found in childhood and puberty. In this paper, we review the embryological, hi

  13. Intrinsically organized resting state networks in the human spinal cord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kong, Y.; Eippert, F.; Beckmann, C.F.; Andersson, J.; Finsterbusch, J.; Büchel, C.; Tracey, I.; Brooks, J.C.W.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals of the brain have repeatedly been observed when no task or external stimulation is present. These fluctuations likely reflect baseline neuronal activity of the brain and correspond to functionally relevant resting-state

  14. Resting-State Oscillatory Activity in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornew, Lauren; Roberts, Timothy P. L.; Blaskey, Lisa; Edgar, J. Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Neural oscillatory anomalies in autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggest an excitatory/inhibitory imbalance; however, the nature and clinical relevance of these anomalies are unclear. Whole-cortex magnetoencephalography data were collected while 50 children (27 with ASD, 23 controls) underwent an eyes-closed resting-state exam. A Fast Fourier…

  15. Metabolic resting-state brain networks in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetsieris, Phoebe G; Ko, Ji Hyun; Tang, Chris C; Nazem, Amir; Sako, Wataru; Peng, Shichun; Ma, Yilong; Dhawan, Vijay; Eidelberg, David

    2015-02-24

    The delineation of resting state networks (RSNs) in the human brain relies on the analysis of temporal fluctuations in functional MRI signal, representing a small fraction of total neuronal activity. Here, we used metabolic PET, which maps nonfluctuating signals related to total activity, to identify and validate reproducible RSN topographies in healthy and disease populations. In healthy subjects, the dominant (first component) metabolic RSN was topographically similar to the default mode network (DMN). In contrast, in Parkinson's disease (PD), this RSN was subordinated to an independent disease-related pattern. Network functionality was assessed by quantifying metabolic RSN expression in cerebral blood flow PET scans acquired at rest and during task performance. Consistent task-related deactivation of the "DMN-like" dominant metabolic RSN was observed in healthy subjects and early PD patients; in contrast, the subordinate RSNs were activated during task performance. Network deactivation was reduced in advanced PD; this abnormality was partially corrected by dopaminergic therapy. Time-course comparisons of DMN loss in longitudinal resting metabolic scans from PD and Alzheimer's disease subjects illustrated that significant reductions appeared later for PD, in parallel with the development of cognitive dysfunction. In contrast, in Alzheimer's disease significant reductions in network expression were already present at diagnosis, progressing over time. Metabolic imaging can directly provide useful information regarding the resting organization of the brain in health and disease.

  16. Testicular Adrenal Rest Tumours in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otten BJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In adult patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH, the presence of testicular adrenal rest tumours (TART is an important complication leading to gonadal dysfunction and infertility. These tumours can be already found in childhood and puberty. In this paper, we review the embryological, histological, biochemical, and clinical features of TART and discuss treatment options.

  17. Testicular adrenal rest tumours in congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claahsen-van der Grinten, H.L.; Hermus, A.R.M.M.; Otten, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    In adult patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), the presence of testicular adrenal rest tumours (TART) is an important complication leading to gonadal dysfunction and infertility. These tumours can be already found in childhood and puberty. In this paper, we review the embryological,

  18. Simplifying cardiovascular risk estimation using resting heart rate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2010-09-01

    Elevated resting heart rate (RHR) is a known, independent cardiovascular (CV) risk factor, but is not included in risk estimation systems, including Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE). We aimed to derive risk estimation systems including RHR as an extra variable and assess the value of this addition.

  19. Functional connectivity during rested wakefulness predicts vulnerability to sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, B T Thomas; Tandi, Jesisca; Chee, Michael W L

    2015-05-01

    Significant inter-individual differences in vigilance decline following sleep deprivation exist. We characterized functional connectivity in 68 healthy young adult participants in rested wakefulness and following a night of total sleep deprivation. After whole brain signal regression, functionally connected cortical networks during the well-rested state exhibited reduced correlation following sleep deprivation, suggesting that highly integrated brain regions become less integrated during sleep deprivation. In contrast, anti-correlations in the well-rested state became less so following sleep deprivation, suggesting that highly segregated networks become less segregated during sleep deprivation. Subjects more resilient to vigilance decline following sleep deprivation showed stronger anti-correlations among several networks. The weaker anti-correlations overlapped with connectivity alterations following sleep deprivation. Resilient individuals thus evidence clearer separation of highly segregated cortical networks in the well-rested state. In contrast to corticocortical connectivity, subcortical-cortical connectivity was comparable across resilient and vulnerable groups despite prominent state-related changes in both groups. Because sleep deprivation results in a significant elevation of whole brain signal amplitude, the aforesaid signal changes and group contrasts may be masked in analyses omitting their regression, suggesting possible value in regressing whole brain signal in certain experimental contexts.

  20. Resting state FMRI research in child psychiatric disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oldehinkel, Marianne; Francx, Winke; Beckmann, Christian; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Mennes, Maarten

    2013-01-01

    Concurring with the shift from linking functions to specific brain areas towards studying network integration, resting state FMRI (R-FMRI) has become an important tool for delineating the functional network architecture of the brain. Fueled by straightforward data collection, R-FMRI analysis methods

  1. Hierarchical Functional Modularity in the Resting-State Human Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrarini, Luca; Veer, Ilya M.; Baerends, Evelinda; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Renken, Remco J.; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Veltman, Dirk. J.; Aleman, Andre; Zitman, Frans G.; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; van Buchem, Mark A.; Reiber, Johan H. C.; Rombouts, Serge A. R. B.; Milles, Julien

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown that anatomically distinct brain regions are functionally connected during the resting state. Basic topological properties in the brain functional connectivity (BFC) map have highlighted the BFC's small-world topology. Modularity, a mor

  2. Rest in Drosophila Is a Sleep-like State

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hendricks, Joan C; Finn, Stefanie M; Panckeri, Karen A; Chavkin, Jessica; Williams, Julie A; Sehgal, Amita; Pack, Allan I

    2000-01-01

    ..., is an obvious choice and has never been studied. In order to be considered sleep-like, an inactive state should have the following features ( Campbell and Tobler 1984; Hendricks et al. 2000 ): (1) consolidated circadian periods of immobility, (2) a species-specific posture and/or resting place, (3) an increased arousal threshol...

  3. Fuel utilization during exercise after 7 days of bed rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrows, Linda H.; Harris, Bernard A.; Moore, Alan D.; Siconolfi, Steven F.

    1992-01-01

    Energy yield from carbohydrate, fat, and protein during physical activity is partially dependent on an individual's fitness level. Prolonged exposure to microgravity causes musculoskeletal and cardiovascular deconditioning; these adaptations may alter fuel utilization during space flight. Carbohydrate and fat metabolism during exercise were analyzed before and after 7 days of horizontal bed rest.

  4. Improved correspondence of resting-state networks after macroanatomical alignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frost, Martin A; Esposito, Fabrizio; Goebel, R.

    2014-01-01

    Resting state brain activity, as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the absence of stimulation, is widely investigated in clinical, pharmacological, developmental and cross-species neuroscience research. However, despite the general and broad interest in understating the n

  5. Relationship between resting and action tremors in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Qayyum Rana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the relationship between resting tremor (RT and action tremor (AT in Parkinson's disease (PD patients. Methods: A retrospective study of RT and AT severity was conducted in 100 PD patients. The severity rating for each type of tremor in the upper extremities was assessed. The disparity in tremor severity between extremities for each tremor type was compared to that of the other two to identify commonalities in the laterality of the tremor manifestation. Results: Overall, RT is predictive of AT on the same side, but not the opposing side of the body. Patients with less intense resting right upper limb (RRU tremor and moderately intense RRU tremor were significantly more likely to have an action right upper limb (ARU tremor (−1.53, P = 0.020; −1.88, P = 0.005, respectively. Similarly, patients with less intense resting left upper limb (RLU tremor and moderately intense RLU tremors were significantly more likely to have an action left upper limb (ALU tremor (−3.49, P = 0.000; −1.86, P = 0.017, respectively. In addition, RRU and ALU tremors were associated with an increase in RLU and ARU tremors, respectively. Conclusion: Tremors are common findings in PD patients, and often impair quality of life. By identifying and classifying the relationship between resting and ATs in PD patients, our study sheds light onto the importance of better understanding and future management of this debilitating symptomology.

  6. 77 FR 19148 - Special Conditions: Airbus, A350-900 Series Airplane; Crew Rest Compartments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ...-900 Series Airplane; Crew Rest Compartments AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION... separate Crew Rest Compartments: a Flight Crew Rest Compartment (FCRC) intended to be occupied by flight crew members only, and a Cabin Crew Rest Compartment (CCRC) intended to be occupied by cabin crew...

  7. Saponin profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Castilla, Sara; Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Fuentes-Alventosa, Jose María; Jiménez-Araujo, Ana; Rodríguez-Arcos, Rocío; Cermeño-Sacristán, Pedro; Espejo-Calvo, Juan Antonio; Guillén-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-11-20

    The main goal of this study was to determine the saponin profiles of different "triguero" asparagus genotypes and to compare them to green asparagus commercial hybrids. The samples consisted of 31 commercial hybrids and 58 genotypes from the Huétor-Tájar (HT) population variety ("triguero"). The saponin analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed for the determination of 12 saponins derived from a furostan-type steroidal genin, 4 of which had never been described in the edible part of asparagus. The saponin profile of "triguero" asparagus was a combination of these new saponins and protodioscin. Although protodioscin was the major saponin found in commercial hybrids, some of these 12 saponins were detected as major components in some of the commercial hybrids. The total contents of saponins described in some of these HT genotypes reach values as high as 10-100 times higher than those found in commercial hybrids.

  8. ABO Genotyping of Complete Hydatidiform Moles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Fisher

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that the ABO blood group of a patient and her partner influence the clinical outcome for patients having a pregnancy with a complete hydatidiform mole (CHM. Since CHM lack red blood Cells, it has not previously been possible to type CHM serologically and investigate the relationship between the blood group of the CHM and that of the patient. In the present study we have demonstrated the feasibility of using molecular genotyping to determine the ABO genotype of CHM, the ABO genotype being consistent with the androgenetic origin of CHM in all cases. In the series of 48 cases of CHM, the requirement for chemotherapy was not significantly different in those patients with a CHM of like blood group compared with those with a CHM of unlike blood group.

  9. An Application of Molecular Genotyping in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Underkoffler Lara A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers are simple sequence repeats within the mammalian genome that can be used for identifying disease loci, mapping genes of interest as well as studying segregation patterns related to meiotic nondisjunction. Different strains of mice have variable CA repeat lengths and PCR based methods can be used to identify them, thus allowing for specific genotypes to be assigned. Molecular genotyping offers such identification at any developmental stage, which allows for a broad range of anomalies to be studied. We studied chromosomal segregation in relation to nondisjunction in early-gestation mouse embryos using molecular genotyping. Information on the parental origin as well as the number of chromosomes a given progeny carried was obtained in our analysis.

  10. Tree species, tree genotypes and tree genotypic diversity levels affect microbe-mediated soil ecosystem functions in a subtropical forest

    OpenAIRE

    Purahong, Witoon; Durka, Walter; Fischer, Markus; Dommert, Sven; Schöps, Ricardo; Buscot, François; Wubet, Tesfaye

    2016-01-01

    Tree species identity and tree genotypes contribute to the shaping of soil microbial communities. However, knowledge about how these two factors influence soil ecosystem functions is still lacking. Furthermore, in forest ecosystems tree genotypes co-occur and interact with each other, thus the effects of tree genotypic diversity on soil ecosystem functions merit attention. Here we investigated the effects of tree species, tree genotypes and genotypic diversity levels, alongside soil physicoch...

  11. A novel zoonotic genotype related to Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto from southern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Marion; Woldeyes, Daniel; Gerbi, Banchwosen Mechal; Ebi, Dennis; Zeyhle, Eberhard; Mackenstedt, Ute; Petros, Beyene; Tilahun, Getachew; Kern, Peter; Romig, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Complete mitochondrial and two nuclear gene sequences of a novel genotype (GOmo) related to Echinococcus granulosus sensu stricto are described from a metacestode isolate retrieved from a human patient in southwestern Ethiopia. Phylogenetically, the genotype is positioned within the E. granulosus sensu stricto/Echinococcus felidis cluster, but cannot easily be allocated to either species. Based on different mitochondrial DNA markers, it is closest to the haplotype cluster that currently defines the species E. granulosus sensu stricto (which includes variants showing the widely cited G1, G2 and G3 sequences), but is clearly not part of this cluster. Pairwise distances between GOmo and E. granulosus sensu stricto are in the range of those between the most distant members of the Echinococcus canadensis complex (G6-10) that were recently proposed as separate species. At this stage, we prefer to list GOmo informally as a genotype rather than giving it any taxonomic rank because our knowledge rests on a single isolate from a dead-end host (human), and its lifecycle is unknown. According to data on molecularly characterised Echinococcus isolates from this region, GOmo has never been found in the usual livestock species that carry cystic echinococcosis and the possibility of a wildlife source of this newly recognised zoonotic agent cannot be excluded. The discovery of GOmo adds complexity to the already diverse array of cystic echinococcosis agents in sub-Saharan Africa and challenges hypotheses on the biogeographical origin of the E. granulosus sensu stricto clade.

  12. Post-exercise heart-rate recovery correlates to resting heart-rate variability in healthy men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Guilherme Eckhardt; Fontana, Keila Elizabeth; Porto, Luiz Guilherme Grossi; Junqueira, Luiz Fernando

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between post-exercise heart-rate recovery (HRR) and resting cardiac autonomic modulation is an incompletely explored issue. To correlate HRR with resting supine and orthostatic autonomic status. HRR at the 1st, 3th, and 5th min following maximal treadmill exercise were correlated with 5-min time-domain (CV, pNN50 and rMSSD) and frequency-domain (TP, LF, HF, LFn, HFn, and LF/HF ratio) indices of heart-rate variability (HRV) in both supine and standing positions in 31 healthy physically active non-athletes men. Statistical analysis employed non-parametric tests with two-tailed p value set at 5 %. Absolute HRR and Δ %HRR at each post-exercise time did not correlated with HRV in supine position, as well as at 1st min in standing position. At the 3rd min and 5th min, these measures negatively correlated with pNN50, rMSSD, TP, and HF indices, and only in the 5th min, they showed negative correlation with HFn and positive correlation with LF, LFn, and LF/HF ratio in the standing position. Coefficient of HRR (CHRR) at the 1st min negatively correlated with pNN50 and rMSSD and at 3rd and 5th min showed positive correlation with LFn and LF/HF ratio in supine position. With HRV indices in standing position CHRR from the 1st to 5th min showed the same respective negative and positive correlations as the other measures. HRR from the 1st to 5th min post-exercise negatively correlated with parasympathetic modulation in resting orthostatic, but showed no correlation in supine position. At the 3rd and 5th min, a positive correlation with combined sympathetic-parasympathetic modulation in both positions was observed.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of Japanese encephalitis in northern Vietnam, 1964-2011: genotype replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Loan Phuong; Bui, Trang Minh; Hasebe, Futoshi; Morita, Kouichi; Phan, Nga Thi

    2015-04-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is an arthropod-borne virus causing serious public health issues in Asia. JEV consists of five genotypes and recent studies have shown the emergence of JEV genotype I (GI) and its replacement of genotype III (GIII). Using an archival JEV collection, we investigated the molecular evolution of JEV in Vietnam over the last 48 years (1964-2012) in humans, mosquitoes, and pigs, within the global context. The nine JEV isolates from humans, pigs, and mosquitoes sequenced in this study and 29 sequences available in GenBank were used to analyze the envelope (E) protein of the Vietnamese JEVs. A collection of 225 cerebrospinal fluid specimens from patients with suspected Japanese encephalitis (JE) was also tested and genotyped with real-time RT-PCR. The 38 E genes identified with sequencing and nine Vietnamese JEV strains genotyped with real-time RT-PCR, belonging to two lineages, evolved in accordance with those in the rest of the world. The first GIII strain was detected in humans in Vietnam in 1964, and in mosquitoes in 1979, whereas GI strains were first detected in humans and mosquitoes in 1990 and 1994, respectively. After 2004, GI was the only genotype detected in Vietnam, demonstrating that the GIIII strains had been displaced by GI strains. Five haplotypes were identified in the Vietnamese JEVs, with SKSS predominant. The S123N and S123R substitutions in the E protein were already present in the Vietnamese JEVs. This study describes the long evolutionary history of JEV in Vietnam over 34 years, which correlates well with the global evolution of JEV. The Vietnamese GIII strains have been replaced by GI strains in mosquitoes, pigs, and humans. The predominant haplotypes of the Vietnamese strains support this genotype displacement in Vietnam. Further surveillance is required to confirm the disappearance of the GIII strains in nature and the emergence of new pathogens causing encephalitis in Vietnam, after the long-term use of JEV

  14. Putting FLEXPART to REST: The Provision of Atmospheric Transport Modeling Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Don; Arnold, Dèlia

    2015-04-01

    We are developing a RESTful set of modeling services for the FLEXPART modeling system. FLEXPART (FLEXible PARTicle dispersion model) is a Lagrangian transport and dispersion model used by a growing international community. It has been used to simulate and forecast the atmospheric transport of wildfire smoke, volcanic ash and radionuclides and may be run in backwards mode to provide information for the determination of emission sources such as nuclear emissions and greenhouse gases. This open source software is distributed in source code form, and has several compiler and library dependencies that users need to address. Although well-documented, getting it compiled, set up, running, and post-processed is often tedious, making it difficult for the inexperienced or casual user. Well-designed modeling services lower the entry barrier for scientists to perform simulations, allowing them to create and execute their models from a variety of devices and programming environments. This world of Service Oriented Architectures (SOA) has progressed to a REpresentational State Transfer (REST) paradigm, in which the pervasive and mature HTTP environment is used as a foundation for providing access to model services. With such an approach, sound software engineering practises are adhered to in order to deploy service modules exhibiting very loose coupling with the clients. In short, services are accessed and controlled through the formation of properly-constructed Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI's), processed in an HTTP environment. In this way, any client or combination of clients - whether a bash script, Python program, web GUI, or even Unix command line - that can interact with an HTTP server, can run the modeling environment. This loose coupling allows for the deployment of a variety of front ends, all accessing a common modeling backend system. Furthermore, it is generally accepted in the cloud computing community that RESTful approaches constitute a sound approach towards

  15. Intensive Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Intensive exercise training during bed rest attenuates deconditioning. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 207-215, 1997. A 30-d 6 deg head-down bed rest project was conducted to evaluate variable high-intensity, short-duration, isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent resistive isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regimens designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (adaptive) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Major findings are summarized in this paper. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volumes, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (f) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (g) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40% but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (b) induced positive body water balance, (i) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and 0) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regimens and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  16. A Nap But Not Rest or Activity Consolidates Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Stefan; Klann, Juliane; Schattka, Kerstin I.; Bauhoff, Sonja; Borcherding, Gesa; Nosbüsch, Nicole; Struth, Linda; Binkofski, Ferdinand C.; Werner, Cornelius J.

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a period of sleep after a motor learning task is a relevant factor for memory consolidation. However, it is yet open whether this also holds true for language-related learning. Therefore, the present study compared the short- and long-term effects of a daytime nap, rest, or an activity task after vocabulary learning on learning outcome. Thirty healthy subjects were divided into three treatment groups. Each group received a pseudo-word learning task in which pictures of monsters were associated with unique pseudo-word names. At the end of the learning block a first test was administered. Then, one group went for a 90-min nap, one for a waking rest period, and one for a resting session with interfering activity at the end during which a new set of monster names was to be learned. After this block, all groups performed a first re-test of the names that they initially learned. On the morning of the following day, a second re-test was administered to all groups. The nap group showed significant improvement from test to re-test and a stable performance onto the second re-test. In contrast, the rest and the interference groups showed decline in performance from test to re-test, with persistently low performance at re-test 2. The 3 (GROUP) × 3 (TIME) ANOVA revealed a significant interaction, indicating that the type of activity (nap/rest/interfering action) after initial learning actually had an influence on the memory outcome. These data are discussed with respect to translation to clinical settings with suggestions for improvement of intervention outcome after speech-language therapy if it is followed by a nap rather than interfering activity. PMID:28559856

  17. A Nap But Not Rest or Activity Consolidates Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Heim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that a period of sleep after a motor learning task is a relevant factor for memory consolidation. However, it is yet open whether this also holds true for language-related learning. Therefore, the present study compared the short- and long-term effects of a daytime nap, rest, or an activity task after vocabulary learning on learning outcome. Thirty healthy subjects were divided into three treatment groups. Each group received a pseudo-word learning task in which pictures of monsters were associated with unique pseudo-word names. At the end of the learning block a first test was administered. Then, one group went for a 90-min nap, one for a waking rest period, and one for a resting session with interfering activity at the end during which a new set of monster names was to be learned. After this block, all groups performed a first re-test of the names that they initially learned. On the morning of the following day, a second re-test was administered to all groups. The nap group showed significant improvement from test to re-test and a stable performance onto the second re-test. In contrast, the rest and the interference groups showed decline in performance from test to re-test, with persistently low performance at re-test 2. The 3 (GROUP × 3 (TIME ANOVA revealed a significant interaction, indicating that the type of activity (nap/rest/interfering action after initial learning actually had an influence on the memory outcome. These data are discussed with respect to translation to clinical settings with suggestions for improvement of intervention outcome after speech-language therapy if it is followed by a nap rather than interfering activity.

  18. Intensive Exercise Training During Bed Rest Attenuates Deconditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    1997-01-01

    Intensive exercise training during bed rest attenuates deconditioning. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., Vol. 29, No. 2, pp. 207-215, 1997. A 30-d 6 deg head-down bed rest project was conducted to evaluate variable high-intensity, short-duration, isotonic cycle ergometer exercise (ITE) training and high-intensity intermittent resistive isokinetic exercise (IKE) training regimens designed to maintain peak VO2 and muscle mass, strength, and endurance at ambulatory control levels throughout prolonged bed rest. Other elements of the deconditioning (adaptive) syndrome, such as proprioception, psychological performance, hypovolemia, water balance, body composition, and orthostatic tolerance, were also measured. Major findings are summarized in this paper. Compared with response during bed rest of the no exercise (NOE) control group: the ITE training regimen (a) maintained work capacity (peak VO2), (b) maintained plasma and red cell volumes, (c) induced positive body water balance, (d) decreased quality of sleep and mental concentration, and (e) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance; the IKE training regimen (f) attenuated the decrease in peak VO2 by 50%, (g) attenuated loss of red cell volume by 40% but had no effect on loss of plasma volume, (b) induced positive body water balance, (i) had no adverse effect on quality of sleep or concentration, and 0) had no effect on the decrease in orthostatic tolerance. These findings suggest that various elements of the deconditioning syndrome can be manipulated by duration and intensity of ITE or IKE training regimens and that several different training protocols will be required to maintain or restore physiological and psychological performance of individuals confined to prolonged bed rest.

  19. Cerebral Blood Flow during Rest Associates with General Intelligence and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hikaru; Taki, Yasuyuki; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Sassa, Yuko; Nagase, Tomomi; Nouchi, Rui; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2011-01-01

    Recently, much scientific attention has been focused on resting brain activity and its investigation through such methods as the analysis of functional connectivity during rest (the temporal correlation of brain activities in different regions). However, investigation of the magnitude of brain activity during rest has focused on the relative decrease of brain activity during a task, rather than on the absolute resting brain activity. It is thus necessary to investigate the association between cognitive factors and measures of absolute resting brain activity, such as cerebral blood flow (CBF), during rest (rest-CBF). In this study, we examined this association using multiple regression analyses. Rest-CBF was the dependent variable and the independent variables included two essential components of cognitive functions, psychometric general intelligence and creativity. CBF was measured using arterial spin labeling and there were three analyses for rest-CBF; namely mean gray matter rest-CBF, mean white matter rest-CBF, and regional rest-CBF. The results showed that mean gray and white matter rest-CBF were significantly and positively correlated with individual psychometric intelligence. Furthermore, mean white matter rest-CBF was significantly and positively correlated with creativity. After correcting the effect of mean gray matter rest-CBF the significant and positive correlation between regional rest-CBF in the perisylvian anatomical cluster that includes the left superior temporal gyrus and insula and individual psychometric intelligence was found. Also, regional rest-CBF in the precuneus was significantly and negatively correlated with individual creativity. Significance of these results of regional rest-CBF did not change when the effect of regional gray matter density was corrected. The findings showed mean and regional rest-CBF in healthy young subjects to be correlated with cognitive functions. The findings also suggest that, even in young cognitively intact

  20. Resting state networks and consciousness.Alterations of multiple resting state network connectivity in physiological, pharmacological and pathological consciousness states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizette eHeine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to better understand the functional contribution of resting state activity to conscious cognition, we aimed to review increases and decreases in fMRI functional connectivity under physiological (sleep, pharmacological (anesthesia and pathological altered states of consciousness, such as brain death, coma, vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, and minimally conscious state. The reviewed RSNs were the DMN, left and right executive control, salience, sensorimotor, auditory and visual networks. We highlight some methodological issues concerning resting state analyses in severely injured brains mainly in terms of hypothesis-driven seed-based correlation analysis and data-driven independent components analysis approaches. Finally, we attempt to contextualize our discussion within theoretical frameworks of conscious processes. We think that this lesion approach allows us to better determine the necessary conditions under which normal conscious cognition takes place. At the clinical level, we acknowledge the technical merits of the resting state paradigm. Indeed, fast and easy acquisitions are preferable to activation paradigms in clinical populations. Finally, we emphasize the need to validate the diagnostic and prognostic value of fMRI resting state measurements in non-communicating brain damaged patients.

  1. Modular Reorganization of Brain Resting State Networks and Its Independent Validation in Alzheimer’s Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangyu eChen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have demonstrated disruption in structural and functional connectivity occurring in the Alzheimer’s Disease (AD. However, it is not known how these disruptions alter brain network reorganization. With the modular analysis method of graph theory, and datasets acquired by the resting-state functional connectivity MRI (R-fMRI method, we investigated and compared the brain organization patterns between the AD group and the cognitively normal control (CN group. Our main finding is that the largest homotopic module (defined as the insula module in the CN group was broken down to the pieces in the AD group. Specifically, it was discovered that the eight pairs of the bilateral regions (the opercular part of inferior frontal gyrus, area triangularis, insula, putamen, globus pallidus, transverse temporal gyri, superior temporal gyrus, and superior temporal pole of the insula module had lost symmetric functional connection properties, and the corresponding gray matter concentration (GMC was significant lower in AD group. We further quantified the functional connectivity changes with an index (index A and structural changes with the GMC index in the insula module to demonstrate their great potential as AD biomarkers. We further validated these results with six additional independent datasets (271 subjects in six groups. Our results demonstrated specific underlying structural and functional reorganization from young to old, and for diseased subjects. Further, it is suggested that by combining the structural GMC analysis and functional modular analysis in the insula module, a new biomarker can be developed at the single-subject level.

  2. Haptoglobin genotype predicts development of coronary artery calcification in a prospective cohort of patients with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson Melissa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronary artery disease has been linked with genotypes for haptoglobin (Hp which modulates extracorpuscular hemoglobin. We hypothesized that the Hp genotype would predict progression of coronary artery calcification (CAC, a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis. Methods CAC was measured three times in six years among 436 subjects with type 1 diabetes and 526 control subjects participating in the Coronary Artery Calcification in Type 1 Diabetes (CACTI study. Hp typing was performed on plasma samples by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Results The Hp 2-2 genotype predicted development of significant CAC only in subjects with diabetes who were free of CAC at baseline (OR: 1.95, 95% CI: 1.07-3.56, p = 0.03, compared to those without the Hp 2-2 genotype, controlling for age, sex, blood pressure and HDL-cholesterol. Hp 2 appeared to have an allele-dose effect on development of CAC. Hp genotype did not predict CAC progression in individuals without diabetes. Conclusions Hp genotype may aid prediction of accelerated coronary atherosclerosis in subjects with type 1 diabetes.

  3. Specificity of the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test for detecting human papillomavirus genotype 52 (HPV-52)

    OpenAIRE

    Kocjan, Boštjan; Poljak, Mario; Oštrbenk, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: HPV-52 is one of the most frequent human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes causing significant cervical pathology. The most widely used HPV genotyping assay, the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Linear Array), is unable to identify HPV- 52 status in samples containing HPV-33, HPV-35, and/or HPV-58. Methods: Linear Array HPV-52 analytical specificity was established by testing 100 specimens reactive with the Linear Array HPV- 33/35/52/58 cross-reactive probe, but not with the...

  4. Resting-state neuronal oscillatory correlates of working memory performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Heister

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Working memory (WM represents the brain's ability to maintain information in a readily available state for short periods of time. This study examines the resting-state cortical activity patterns that are most associated with performance on a difficult working-memory task. METHODS: Magnetoencephalographic (MEG band-passed (delta/theta (1-7 Hz, alpha (8-13 Hz, beta (14-30 Hz and sensor based regional power was collected in a population of adult men (18-28 yrs, n = 24 in both an eyes-closed and eyes-open resting state. The normalized power within each resting state condition as well as the normalized change in power between eyes closed and open (zECO were correlated with performance on a WM task. The regional and band-limited measures that were most associated with performance were then combined using singular value decomposition (SVD to determine the degree to which zECO power was associated with performance on the three-back verbal WM task. RESULTS: Changes in power from eyes closed to open revealed a significant decrease in power in all band-widths that was most pronounced in the posterior brain regions (delta/theta band. zECO right posterior frontal and parietal cortex delta/theta power were found to be inversely correlated with three-back working memory performance. The SVD evaluation of the most correlated zECO metrics then provided a singular measure that was highly correlated with three-back performance (r = -0.73, p<0.0001. CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that there is an association between WM performance and changes in resting-state power (right posterior frontal and parietal delta/theta power. Moreover, an SVD of the most associated zECO measures produces a composite resting-state metric of regional neural oscillatory power that has an improved association with WM performance. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation that has found that changes in resting state electromagnetic neural patterns are highly

  5. Use of supplementary genotypes in AMMI analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, R M; Duarte, J B; Vencovsky, R; Pinheiro, J B; Oliveira, A B

    2005-03-01

    Improving stability of crop yield in a target production environment is an important breeding objective. It is well known that selection for better stability generally results in lower mean yields and, conversely, that selection for higher mean yields may lead to poorer stability. This paper explores the equivalence between the singular value decomposition used in AMMI analysis and the spectral decomposition used in principal components analysis. This equivalence enables scores of a "supplementary genotype" made up of the highest yield value within each environment to be obtained, and these may serve as the ideal check treatment for selection purposes. These scores are used to (1) display this check in a biplot graph, thereby providing a qualitative comparison with the real genotypes related to their interaction with environments; (2) obtain estimates of the squared distances from the projection of each real genotype to the projection of the "supplementary treatment", thereby allowing conclusions to be made on the yield stability of each real genotype. This procedure was effective in identifying the most stable soybean cultivars in an example shown for illustration.

  6. Polyembryony in non-apomictic citrus genotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleza, Pablo; Juárez, José; Ollitrault, Patrick; Navarro, Luis

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Adventitious embryony from nucellar cells is the mechanism leading to apomixis in Citrus sp. However, singular cases of polyembryony have been reported in non-apomictic genotypes as a consequence of 2x × 4x hybridizations and in vitro culture of isolated nucelli. The origin of the plants arising from the aforementioned processes remains unclear. Methods The genetic structure (ploidy and allelic constitution with microsatellite markers) of plants obtained from polyembryonic seeds arising from 2x × 4x sexual hybridizations and those regenerated from nucellus culture in vitro was systematically analysed in different non-apomictic citrus genotypes. Histological studies were also conducted to try to identify the initiation process underlying polyembryony. Key Results All plants obtained from the same undeveloped seed in 2x × 4x hybridizations resulted from cleavage of the original zygotic embryo. Also, the plants obtained from in vitro nucellus culture were recovered by somatic embryogenesis from cells that shared the same genotype as the zygotic embryos of the same seed. Conclusions It appears that in non-apomictic citrus genotypes, proembryos or embryogenic cells are formed by cleavage of the zygotic embryos and that the development of these adventitious embryos, normally hampered, can take place in vivo or in vitro as a result of two different mechanisms that prevent the dominance of the initial zygotic embryo. PMID:20675656

  7. Phenotyping peanut genotypes for drought tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drought and heat stress can result in aflatoxin contamination of peanuts especially when this occurs during the last three to six weeks of the growing season. Identifying drought-tolerant genotypes may aid in development of peanuts that are less susceptible to aflatoxin contamination. This study w...

  8. MEMORY MODULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozendaal, Benno; McGaugh, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Our memories are not all created equally strong: Some experiences are well remembered while others are remembered poorly, if at all. Research on memory modulation investigates the neurobiological processes and systems that contribute to such differences in the strength of our memories. Extensive evidence from both animal and human research indicates that emotionally significant experiences activate hormonal and brain systems that regulate the consolidation of newly acquired memories. These effects are integrated through noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala which regulates memory consolidation via interactions with many other brain regions involved in consolidating memories of recent experiences. Modulatory systems not only influence neurobiological processes underlying the consolidation of new information, but also affect other mnemonic processes, including memory extinction, memory recall and working memory. In contrast to their enhancing effects on consolidation, adrenal stress hormones impair memory retrieval and working memory. Such effects, as with memory consolidation, require noradrenergic activation of the basolateral amygdala and interactions with other brain regions. PMID:22122145

  9. 6 HCV genotyping 9G test and its comparison with VERSANT HCV genotype 2.0 assay (LiPA) for the hepatitis C virus genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantratita, Wasun; Song, Keum-Soo; GunHo, Choi; Pongthanapisith, Viroj; Thongbaiphet, Nipa; Wongtabtim, Garanyuta; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Angkanavin, Kanokwan; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Sonawane, Mukesh Digambar; Warkad, Shrikant Dasharath; Kim, Taisun

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we describe the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test and its evaluation by using clinical samples and plasmid DNA standards. In tests with 981 plasmid DNA standards, the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test showed higher than 92.5% sensitivity and 99.4% specificity. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test was compared with the VERSANT HCV Genotype 2.0 assay (LiPA 2.0) for detection and discrimination of HCV genotypes in clinical samples. The results of both tests were verified by genomic sequencing. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test demonstrated a 100% agreement with the sequencing results, which was higher than LiPA 2.0. These results indicate that the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test can be a reliable, sensitive, and accurate diagnostic tool for the correct identification of HCV genotypes in clinical specimens. 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test can genotype six HCV types in 1 PCR in 30min after PCR amplification. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test, thus provide critical information to physicians and assist them to apply accurate drug regimen for the effective hepatitis C treatment.

  10. Identification of zoonotic genotypes of Giardia duodenalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprong, Hein; Cacciò, Simone M; van der Giessen, Joke W B

    2009-12-01

    Giardia duodenalis, originally regarded as a commensal organism, is the etiologic agent of giardiasis, a gastrointestinal disease of humans and animals. Giardiasis causes major public and veterinary health concerns worldwide. Transmission is either direct, through the faecal-oral route, or indirect, through ingestion of contaminated water or food. Genetic characterization of G. duodenalis isolates has revealed the existence of seven groups (assemblages A to G) which differ in their host distribution. Assemblages A and B are found in humans and in many other mammals, but the role of animals in the epidemiology of human infection is still unclear, despite the fact that the zoonotic potential of Giardia was recognised by the WHO some 30 years ago. Here, we performed an extensive genetic characterization of 978 human and 1440 animal isolates, which together comprise 3886 sequences from 4 genetic loci. The data were assembled into a molecular epidemiological database developed by a European network of public and veterinary health Institutions. Genotyping was performed at different levels of resolution (single and multiple loci on the same dataset). The zoonotic potential of both assemblages A and B is evident when studied at the level of assemblages, sub-assemblages, and even at each single locus. However, when genotypes are defined using a multi-locus sequence typing scheme, only 2 multi-locus genotypes (MLG) of assemblage A and none of assemblage B appear to have a zoonotic potential. Surprisingly, mixtures of genotypes in individual isolates were repeatedly observed. Possible explanations are the uptake of genetically different Giardia cysts by a host, or subsequent infection of an already infected host, likely without overt symptoms, with a different Giardia species, which may cause disease. Other explanations for mixed genotypes, particularly for assemblage B, are substantial allelic sequence heterogeneity and/or genetic recombination. Although the zoonotic

  11. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  12. The T-allele of TCF7L2 rs7903146 associates with a reduced compensation of insulin secretion for insulin resistance induced by 9 days of bed rest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alibegovic, Amra C; Sonne, Mette P; Højbjerre, Lise

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine whether the type 2 diabetes-associated T-allele of transcription factor 7-like 2 (TCF7L2) rs7903146 associates with impaired insulin secretion to compensate for insulin resistance induced by bed rest. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A total of 38...... of FPIR in response to insulin resistance induced by bed rest was lower in carriers of the T-allele (P resistance...... healthy young Caucasian men were studied before and after bed rest using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp technique combined with indirect calorimetry preceded by an intravenous glucose tolerance test. The TCF7L2 rs7903146 was genotyped using allelic discrimination performed with an ABI 7900 system...

  13. RESTFul based heterogeneous Geoprocessing workflow interoperation for Sensor Web Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Chen, Nengcheng; Di, Liping

    2012-10-01

    Advanced sensors on board satellites offer detailed Earth observations. A workflow is one approach for designing, implementing and constructing a flexible and live link between these sensors' resources and users. It can coordinate, organize and aggregate the distributed sensor Web services to meet the requirement of a complex Earth observation scenario. A RESTFul based workflow interoperation method is proposed to integrate heterogeneous workflows into an interoperable unit. The Atom protocols are applied to describe and manage workflow resources. The XML Process Definition Language (XPDL) and Business Process Execution Language (BPEL) workflow standards are applied to structure a workflow that accesses sensor information and one that processes it separately. Then, a scenario for nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from a volcanic eruption is used to investigate the feasibility of the proposed method. The RESTFul based workflows interoperation system can describe, publish, discover, access and coordinate heterogeneous Geoprocessing workflows.

  14. Pharmacological exploration of the resting membrane potential reserve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Heyden, Marcel A G; Jespersen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    to this potential, minor changes in the membrane potential have a relatively large impact on the atrial Na(+) current. The atrial resting membrane potential is established following ionic currents through the inwardly rectifying K(+) currents IK1, IK,ACh and IK,Ca and to a lesser extent by other ion channels......The cardiac action potential arises and spreads throughout the myocardium as a consequence of highly organized spatial and temporal expression of ion channels conducting Na(+), Ca(2+) or K(+) currents. The cardiac Na(+) current is responsible for the initiation and progression of the action...... potential. Altered Na(+) current has been found implicated in a number of different arrhythmias, including atrial fibrillation. In the atrium, the resting membrane potential is more depolarized than in the ventricles, and as cardiac Na(+) channels undergo voltage-dependent inactivation close...

  15. The dynamics of resting fluctuations in the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deco, Gustavo; Kringelbach, Morten L; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2017-01-01

    In the human brain, spontaneous activity during resting state consists of rapid transitions between functional network states over time but the underlying mechanisms are not understood. We use connectome based computational brain network modeling to reveal fundamental principles of how the human...... brain generates large-scale activity observable by noninvasive neuroimaging. We used structural and functional neuroimaging data to construct whole- brain models. With this novel approach, we reveal that the human brain during resting state operates at maximum metastability, i.e. in a state of maximum...... beyond correlational neuroimaging analysis and reveals non-trivial network mechanisms underlying non-invasive observations. Our novel findings significantly pertain to the important role of computational connectomics in understanding principles of brain function....

  16. Soundscape Ecology of Hawaiian Spinner Dolphin Resting Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heenehan, Heather Leigh

    Sound is a key sensory modality for Hawaiian spinner dolphins. Like many other marine animals, these dolphins rely on sound and their acoustic environment for many aspects of their daily lives, making it is essential to understand soundscape in areas that are critical to their survival. Hawaiian spinner dolphins rest during the day in shallow coastal areas and forage offshore at night. In my dissertation I focus on the soundscape of the bays where Hawaiian spinner dolphins rest taking a soundscape ecology approach. I primarily relied on passive acoustic monitoring using four DSG-Ocean acoustic loggers in four Hawaiian spinner dolphin resting bays on the Kona Coast of Hawai'i Island. 30-second recordings were made every four minutes in each of the bays for 20 to 27 months between January 8, 2011 and March 30, 2013. I also utilized concomitant vessel-based visual surveys in the four bays to provide context for these recordings. In my first chapter I used the contributions of the dolphins to the soundscape to monitor presence in the bays and found the degree of presence varied greatly from less than 40% to nearly 90% of days monitored with dolphins present. Having established these bays as important to the animals, in my second chapter I explored the many components of their resting bay soundscape and evaluated the influence of natural and human events on the soundscape. I characterized the overall soundscape in each of the four bays, used the tsunami event of March 2011 to approximate a natural soundscape and identified all loud daytime outliers. Overall, sound levels were consistently louder at night and quieter during the daytime due to the sounds from snapping shrimp. In fact, peak Hawaiian spinner dolphin resting time co-occurs with the quietest part of the day. However, I also found that humans drastically alter this daytime soundscape with sound from offshore aquaculture, vessel sound and military mid-frequency active sonar. During one recorded mid

  17. Intravenous nitroglycerin for rest angina. Potential pathophysiologic mechanisms of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, N L; Herling, I M; Kotler, M N; Hakki, A H; Spielman, S R; Segal, B L

    1982-10-01

    Twenty patients with refractory rest angina pectoris were treated with intravenously (IV) administered nitroglycerin (mean dosage, 72.4 micrograms/min; range, 15 to 226 micrograms/min). There was a considerable reduction or abolition in the number of ischemic episodes in 85% of patients without overall substantial changes in heart rate, mean arterial BP, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP), and pulmonary arterial mean pressure. However, those patients with an initial PCWP of more than 12 mm Hg or a systolic pressure of more than 130 mm Hg had a substantial reduction in PCWP and systolic BP following IV nitroglycerin. We conclude that IV nitroglycerin may relieve rest angina by different pathophysiologic mechanisms. In some patients, IV nitroglycerin favorably altered the hemodynamic determinants of myocardial oxygen consumption. In others, however, no change in these determinants occurred, suggesting a direct effect on the coronary circulation.

  18. Effect of sedentary activities on resting metabolic rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, W H; Bandini, L G; Morelli, J A; Peers, K F; Ching, P L

    1994-03-01

    We examined the effect of television viewing on resting metabolic rate (RMR) in a cohort of 9 obese and 18 nonobese girls aged 10.4 +/- 1.1 y. RMR was measured while girls watched television, read, or sat quietly for 15 min. Movement was assessed by using activity monitors and a manual count of movements observed on a videotape. Absolute RMR was greater for the obese girls, but no significant treatment effect existed for absolute RMR within either group. Although measured activity did not differ, observed movements were greater when the girls were sitting quietly. Total observed and measured movements were significantly correlated with the CV of the minute-by-minute RMR. These results suggest that television viewing does not alter RMR. Although children appear to fidget more when sitting quietly than when they read or watch television, fidgeting appears to affect the minute-to-minute variation of RMR rather than the level of resting energy expenditure.

  19. BIOSORPTION OF CR (VI BY RESTING CELLS OF ASPERGILLUS SP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sen , M. Ghosh Dastidar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosorption of Cr(VI from aqueous solution was studied in a batch bioreactor using the resting cells of filamentous fungal biomass (Aspergillus sp. isolated from industrial wastewaters. The specific Cr(VI removal (mg/g of dried biomass decreased with increase in pH and increased with increase in initial Cr(VI concentration, upto 500 mg/L. By increasing biomass concentration from 2.4 to 5.2 g/L, the specific metal removal remained almost constant. The studies carried out by using the resting cells from various stages of growth indicated maximum Cr(VI removal of 34.8 mg/g using the biomass from the beginning of the stationary phase. The adsorption equilibrium constants Qº (42.9 mg/g and b (0.0091/mg were obtained from the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model.

  20. EXPRESS: EXPressing REstful Semantic Services Using Domain Ontologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alowisheq, Areeb; Millard, David E.; Tiropanis, Thanassis

    Existing approaches to Semantic Web Services (SWS) require a domain ontology and a semantic description of the service. In the case of lightweight SWS approaches, such as SAWSDL, service description is achieved by semantically annotating existing web service interfaces. Other approaches such as OWL-S and WSMO describe services in a separate ontology. So, existing approaches separate service description from domain description, therefore increasing design efforts. We propose EXPRESS a lightweight approach to SWS that requires the domain ontology definition only. Its simplicity stems from the similarities between REST and the Semantic Web such as resource realization, self describing representations, and uniform interfaces. The semantics of a service is elicited from a resource's semantic description in the domain ontology and the semantics of the uniform interface, hence eliminating the need for ontologically describing services. We provide an example that illustrates EXPRESS and then discuss how it compares to SA-REST and WSMO.

  1. Are resting and/or reactive microglia macrophages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehmichen, M

    1982-04-01

    According to recent submicroscopic, cytokinetics, and functional (particularly cytoimmunologic) investigations, no relationship exists between "resting" microglia (the small argyrophilic cells appearing in undamaged brain tissue, first described by Rio Hortega) and "reactive" microglia (the argyrophilic cells appearing under pathologic conditions). While "resting" microglia are apparently cells of neuro-ectodermal origin, all observations tend to indicate that "reactive" microglia are derived from extravasated blood monocytes and should be called brain macrophages. In the intact brain parenchyma, no macrophages are demonstrable. Free subarachnoidal cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), perivascular cells, and epiplexus and/or supraependymal cells in the CSF-containing spaces of the normal central nervous system are cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system and must be considered as CSF macrophages. According to rough estimates, the normal adult central nervous system contains a maximum of 280,000 CSF macrophages.

  2. Hereditary Hemochromatosis (HFE genotypes in heart failure: Relation to etiology and prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torp-Pedersen Christian

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is believed that hereditary hemochromatosis (HH might play a role in cardiac disease (heart failure (HF and ischemia. Mutations within several genes are HH-associated, the most common being the HFE gene. In a large cohort of HF patients, we sought to determine the etiological role and the prognostic significance of HFE genotypes. Methods We studied 667 HF patients (72.7% men with depressed systolic function, enrolled in a multicentre trial with a follow-up period of up to 5 years. All were genotyped for the known HFE variants C282Y, H63D and S65C. Results The genotype and allele frequencies in the HF group were similar to the frequencies determined in the general Danish population. In multivariable analysis mortality was not predicted by C282Y-carrier status (HR 1.2, 95% CI: 0.8-1.7; H63D-carrier status (HR 1.0, 95% CI: 0.7-1.3; nor S65C-carrier status (HR 1.2, 95% CI: 0.7-2.0. We identified 27 (4.1% homozygous or compound heterozygous carriers of HFE variants. None of these carriers had a clinical presentation suggesting hemochromatosis, but hemoglobin and ferritin levels were higher than in the rest of the cohort. Furthermore, a trend towards reduced mortality was seen in this group in univariate analyses (HR 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2-0.9, p = 0.03, but not in multivariate (HR 0.5, 95% CI: 0.2-1.2. Conclusion HFE genotypes do not seem to be a significant contributor to the etiology of heart failure in Denmark. HFE variants do not affect mortality in HF.

  3. Clinical Characteristics of 5 Chinese LQTS Families and Phenotype-genotype Correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廉姜芳; 崔长琮; 薛小临; 黄辰; 崔翰斌

    2004-01-01

    Summary: In order to assess the clinical manifestations and electrocardiogram (ECG) characteristics of Chinese long QT syndrome (LQTS) patients and describe the phenotype-genotype correlation,the subjects from 5 congenital LQTS families underwent clinical detailed examination including resting body surface ECG. QT interval and transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) were manually measured. Five families were genotyped by linkage analysis (polymerase chain reacting-short tandem repeat, PCR-STR). The phenotype-genotype correlation was analyzed. Four families were LQT2, 1 family was LQT3. Twenty-eight gene carriers were (14 males and 14 females) identified from 5 families. The mean QTc and TDRc were 0. 56±0. 04 s (range 0.42 to 0.63) and 0.16±0.04 s (range 0. 09 to 0. 24) respectively. 35. 7 % (10/28) had normal to borderline QTc (≤0. 460 s). There was significant difference in QTc and TDRc between the patients with symptomatic LQTS and those with asymptomatic LQTS, and there was significant difference in TDRc between the asymptomatic patients and normal people also. A history of cardiac events was present in 50 %(14/28), including 9 with syncope, 2 with sudden death (SD) and occurred in the absence of β-blocker. Three SDs occurred prior to the diagnosis of LQTS and had no ECG record. Two out of 5 SDs (40 %) occurred as the first symptom. Typical LQT2 T wave pattern were found in 40 % (6/15) of all affected members. The appearing-normal T wave was found in one LQT3 family. Low penetrance of QTc and symptoms resulted in diagnostic challenge. ECG patterns and repolarization parameters may be used to predict the genotype in most families. Genetic test is very important for identification of gene carriers.

  4. The potential of plant viruses to promote genotypic diversity via genotype x environment interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Mölken, Tamara; Stuefer, Josef F.

    2011-01-01

    † Background and Aims Genotype by environment (G × E) interactions are important for the long-term persistence of plant species in heterogeneous environments. It has often been suggested that disease is a key factor for the maintenance of genotypic diversity in plant populations. However, empirical...... evidence for this contention is scarce. Here virus infection is proposed as a possible candidate for maintaining genotypic diversity in their host plants. † Methods The effects of White clover mosaic virus (WClMV) on the performance and development of different Trifolium repens genotypes were analysed...... and the G × E interactions were examined with respect to genotypespecific plant responses to WClMV infection. Thus, the environment is defined as the presence or absence of the virus. † Key Results WClMV had a negative effect on plant performance as shown by a decrease in biomass and number of ramets...

  5. Resting-associated vocalization emitted by captive Asian house shrews (Suncus murinus: acoustic structure and variability in an unusual mammalian vocalization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Schneiderová

    Full Text Available Shrews have rich vocal repertoires that include vocalizations within the human audible frequency range and ultrasonic vocalizations. Here, we recorded and analyzed in detail the acoustic structure of a vocalization with unclear functional significance that was spontaneously produced by 15 adult, captive Asian house shrews (Suncus murinus while they were lying motionless and resting in their nests. This vocalization was usually emitted repeatedly in a long series with regular intervals. It showed some structural variability; however, the shrews most frequently emitted a tonal, low-frequency vocalization with minimal frequency modulation and a low, non-vocal click that was clearly noticeable at its beginning. There was no effect of sex, but the acoustic structure of the analyzed vocalizations differed significantly between individual shrews. The encoded individuality was low, but it cannot be excluded that this individuality would allow discrimination of family members, i.e., a male and female with their young, collectively resting in a common nest. The question remains whether the Asian house shrews indeed perceive the presence of their mates, parents or young resting in a common nest via the resting-associated vocalization and whether they use it to discriminate among their family members. Additional studies are needed to explain the possible functional significance of resting-associated vocalizations emitted by captive Asian house shrews. Our study highlights that the acoustic communication of shrews is a relatively understudied topic, particularly considering that they are highly vocal mammals.

  6. Resting and exercise ventilatory chemosensitivity across the menstrual cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnutt, Meaghan J; De Souza, Mary Jane; Tomczak, Simone E; Homer, Jenna L; Sheel, A William

    2012-03-01

    We hypothesized that resting and exercise ventilatory chemosensitivity would be augmented in women when estrogen and progesterone levels are highest during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Healthy, young females (n = 10; age = 23 ± 5 yrs) were assessed across one complete cycle: during early follicular (EF), late follicular (LF), early luteal, and mid-luteal (ML) phases. We measured urinary conjugates of estrogen and progesterone daily. To compare values of ventilatory chemosensitivity and day-to-day variability of measures between sexes, males (n = 10; age = 26 ± 7 yrs) were assessed on 5 nonconsecutive days during a 1-mo period. Resting ventilation was measured and hypoxic chemosensitivity assessed using an isocapnic hypoxic ventilatory response (iHVR) test. The hypercapnic ventilatory response was assessed using the Read rebreathing protocol and modified rebreathing tests. Participants completed submaximal cycle exercise in normoxia and hypoxia. We observed a significant effect of menstrual-cycle phase on resting minute ventilation, which was elevated in the ML phase relative to the EF and LF phases. Compared with males, resting end-tidal CO(2) was reduced in females during the EF and ML phases but not in the LF phase. We found that iHVR was unaffected by menstrual-cycle phase and was not different between males and females. The sensitivity to chemical stimuli was unaffected by menstrual-cycle phase, meaning that any hormone-mediated effect is of insufficient magnitude to exceed the inherent variation in these chemosensitivity measures. The ventilatory recruitment threshold for CO(2) was generally lower in women, which is suggestive of a hormonally related lowering of the ventilatory recruitment threshold. We detected no effect of menstrual-cycle phase on submaximal exercise ventilation and found that the ventilatory response to normoxic and hypoxic exercise was quantitatively similar between males and females. This suggests that feed-forward and feed

  7. Gender Differences in Bed Rest: Preliminary Analysis of Vascular Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platts, Steven H.; Stenger, Michael B.; Martin, David S.; Freeman-Perez, Sondra A.; Phillips, Tiffany; Ribeiro, L. Christine

    2008-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is a recognized consequence of spaceflight. Numerous studies have shown that women are more susceptible to orthostatic intolerance following spaceflight as well as bed rest, the most commonly used ground-based analog for spaceflight. One of the possible mechanisms proposed to account for this is a difference in vascular responsiveness between genders. We hypothesized that women and men would have differing vascular responses to 90 days of 6-degree head down tilt bed rest. Additionally, we hypothesized that vessels in the upper and lower body would respond differently, as has been shown in the animal literature. Thirteen subjects were placed in bedrest for 90 days (8 men, 5 women) at the Flight Analogs Unit, UTMB. Direct arterial and venous measurements were made with ultrasound to evaluate changes in vascular structure and function. Arterial function was assessed, in the arm and leg, during a reactive hyperemia protocol and during sublingual nitroglycerin administration to gauge the contributions of endothelial dependent and independent dilator function respectively. Venous function was assessed in dorsal hand and foot veins during the administration of pharmaceuticals to assess constrictor and dilator function. Both gender and day effects are seen in arterial dilator function to reactive hyperemia, but none are seen with nitroglycerin. There are also differences in the wall thickness in the arm vs the leg during bed rest, which return toward pre-bed rest levels by day 90. More subjects are required, especially females as there is not sufficient power to properly analyze venous function. Day 90 data are most underpowered.

  8. Specific Circuit Training in Young Judokas: Effects of Rest Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, Stephane; Roux, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Ten adolescent judokas performed circuit training consisting of six 40-s periods of judo exercises separated by 40 s (CT1:1), 120 s (CT1:3), or 200 s (CT1:5) of rest. Heart rate, blood lactate concentration, and the number of repetitions were recorded. Heart rate reached [approximately]180 beats[middle dot]min-1 at the end of work periods, with…

  9. Altered Resting and Exercise Respiratory Physiology in Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Akshay

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis Obesity, particularly severe obesity, affects both resting and exercise-related respiratory physiology. Severe obesity classically produces a restrictive ventilatory abnormality, characterized by reduced expiratory reserve volume. However, obstructive ventilatory abnormality may also be associated with abdominal obesity. Decreased peak work rates are usually seen among obese subjects in a setting of normal or decreased ventilatory reserve and normal cardiovascular response to exercise. Weight loss may reverse many adverse physiological consequences of severe obesity on the respiratory system. PMID:19700043

  10. Resting-state beta and gamma activity in Internet addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Seok; Park, Su Mi; Lee, Jaewon; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Jung, Hee Yeon; Choi, Sam-Wook; Kim, Dai Jin; Oh, Sohee; Lee, Jun-Young

    2013-09-01

    Internet addiction is the inability to control one's use of the Internet and is related to impulsivity. Although a few studies have examined neurophysiological activity as individuals with Internet addiction engage in cognitive processing, no information on spontaneous EEG activity in the eyes-closed resting-state is available. We investigated resting-state EEG activities in beta and gamma bands and examined their relationships with impulsivity among individuals with Internet addiction and healthy controls. Twenty-one drug-naïve patients with Internet addiction (age: 23.33 ± 3.50 years) and 20 age-, sex-, and IQ-matched healthy controls (age: 22.40 ± 2.33 years) were enrolled in this study. Severity of Internet addiction was identified by the total score on Young's Internet Addiction Test. Impulsivity was measured with the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 and a stop-signal task. Resting-state EEG during eyes closed was recorded, and the absolute/relative power of beta and gamma bands was analyzed. The Internet addiction group showed high impulsivity and impaired inhibitory control. The generalized estimating equation showed that the Internet-addiction group showed lower absolute power on the beta band than did the control group (estimate = -3.370, p Internet-addiction group showed higher absolute power on the gamma band than did the control group (estimate = 0.434, p Internet addiction as well as with the extent of impulsivity. The present study suggests that resting-state fast-wave brain activity is related to the impulsivity characterizing Internet addiction. These differences may be neurobiological markers for the pathophysiology of Internet addiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antiproton-proton annihilation at rest into two mesons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noble, A.J.; Amsler, C.; Augustin, I.; Baker, C.A.; Barnett, B.M.; Batty, C.J.; Beuchert, K.; Birien, P.; Bistirlich, J.; Bluem, P.; Bossingham, R.; Bossy, H.; Braune, K.; Brose, J.; Bugg, D.V.; Burchell, M.; Case, T.; Chung, S.U.; Cooper, A.; Crowe, K.M.; Dietz, H.P.; Dombrowski, S. v.; Doser, M.; Duennweber, W.; Engelhardt, D.; Englert, M.; Faessler, M.A.; Felix, C.; Folger, G.; Hackmann, R.; Haddock, R.P.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hessey, N.P.; Hidas, P.; Illinger, P.; Jamnik, D.; Javorfi, Z.; Kalinowsky, H.; Kaemmle, B.; Kiel, T.; Kisiel, J.; Klempt, E.; Kobel, M.; Koch, H.; Kolo, C.; Koenigsmann, K.; Kunze, M.; Landua, R.; Luedemann, J.; Matthaey, H.; Merkel, M.; Merlo, J.P.; Meyer, C.A.; Meyer-Berkhout, U.; Montanet, L.; Noble, A.; Peters, K.; Pinter, G.; Ravndal, S.; Sanjari, A.H.; Schaefer, E.; Schmid, B.; Schmidt, P.; Spanier, S.; Strassburger, C.; Strohbusch, U.; Suffert, M.; Urner, D.; Voelcker, C.; Walter, F.; Walther, D.; Wiedner, U.; Winter, N.; Zoll, J.; Zupancic, C. (Physik-Inst; Crystal Barrel Collaboration

    1993-06-07

    Branching ratios for antiproton-proton annihilations at rest into two mesons are given. The data were obtained at LEAR by stopping antiprotons in a liquid hydrogen target. Both charged and neutral annihilation products were detected in the Crystal Barrel detector. Representative data are presented, and their bearing on the general picture of annihilation dynamics is discussed. In addition, preliminary branching ratios for two-body radiative annihilations are given. (orig.)

  12. Specific Circuit Training in Young Judokas: Effects of Rest Duration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudry, Stephane; Roux, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Ten adolescent judokas performed circuit training consisting of six 40-s periods of judo exercises separated by 40 s (CT1:1), 120 s (CT1:3), or 200 s (CT1:5) of rest. Heart rate, blood lactate concentration, and the number of repetitions were recorded. Heart rate reached [approximately]180 beats[middle dot]min-1 at the end of work periods, with…

  13. Effect of Integrated Cognitive Therapy on Hippocampal Functional Connectivity Patterns in Stroke Patients with Cognitive Dysfunction: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shanli Yang; Cai Jiang; Haicheng Ye; Jing Tao; Jia Huang; Yanling Gao; Zhicheng Lin; Lidian Chen

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to identify abnormal hippocampal functional connectivity (FC) following ischemic stroke using resting-state fMRI. We also explored whether abnormal hippocampal FC could be modulated by integrated cognitive therapy and tested whether these alterations were associated with cognitive performance. Methods. 18 right-handed cognitively impaired ischemic stroke patients and 18 healty control (HC) subjects were included in this study. Stroke subjects were scanned at baseli...

  14. Acetylcholine-induced neuronal differentiation: muscarinic receptor activation regulates EGR-1 and REST expression in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salani, Monica; Anelli, Tonino; Tocco, Gabriella Augusti; Lucarini, Elena; Mozzetta, Chiara; Poiana, Giancarlo; Tata, Ada Maria; Biagioni, Stefano

    2009-02-01

    Neurotransmitters are considered part of the signaling system active in nervous system development and we have previously reported that acetylcholine (ACh) is capable of enhancing neuronal differentiation in cultures of sensory neurons and N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells. To study the mechanism of ACh action, in this study, we demonstrate the ability of choline acetyltransferase-transfected N18TG2 clones (e.g. 2/4 clone) to release ACh. Analysis of muscarinic receptors showed the presence of M1-M4 subtypes and the activation of both IP(3) and cAMP signal transduction pathways. Muscarinic receptor activation increases early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1) levels and treatments with agonists, antagonists, and signal transduction enzyme inhibitors suggest a role for M3 subtype in EGR-1 induction. The role of EGR-1 in the enhancement of differentiation was investigated transfecting in N18TG2 cells a construct for EGR-1. EGR-1 clones show increased neurite extension and a decrease in Repressor Element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) expression: both these features have also been observed for the 2/4 clone. Transfection of this latter with EGR zinc-finger domain, a dominant negative inhibitor of EGR-1 action, increases REST expression, and decreases fiber outgrowth. The data reported suggest that progression of the clone 2/4 in the developmental program is dependent on ACh release and the ensuing activation of muscarinic receptors, which in turn modulate the level of EGR-1 and REST transcription factors.

  15. Dirac Matrices and Feynman’s Rest of the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young S. Kim

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available There are two sets of four-by-four matrices introduced by Dirac. The first set consists of fifteen Majorana matrices derivable from his four γ matrices. These fifteen matrices can also serve as the generators of the group SL(4, r. The second set consists of ten generators of the Sp(4 group which Dirac derived from two coupled harmonic oscillators. It is shown possible to extend the symmetry of Sp(4 to that of SL(4, r if the area of the phase space of one of the oscillators is allowed to become smaller without a lower limit. While there are no restrictions on the size of phase space in classical mechanics, Feynman’s rest of the universe makes this Sp(4-to-SL(4, r transition possible. The ten generators are for the world where quantum mechanics is valid. The remaining five generators belong to the rest of the universe. It is noted that the groups SL(4, r and Sp(4 are locally isomorphic to the Lorentz groups O(3, 3 and O(3, 2 respectively. This allows us to interpret Feynman’s rest of the universe in terms of space-time symmetry.

  16. Seamless Integration of RESTful Services into the Web of Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Lanthaler

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We live in an era of ever-increasing abundance of data. To cope with the information overload we suffer from every single day, more sophisticated methods are required to access, manipulate, and analyze these humongous amounts of data. By embracing the heterogeneity, which is unavoidable at such a scale, and accepting the fact that the data quality and meaning are fuzzy, more adaptable, flexible, and extensible systems can be built. RESTful services combined with Semantic Web technologies could prove to be a viable path to achieve that. Their combination allows data integration on an unprecedented scale and solves some of the problems Web developers are continuously struggling with. This paper introduces a novel approach to create machine-readable descriptions for RESTful services as a first step towards this ambitious goal. It also shows how these descriptions along with an algorithm to translate SPARQL queries to HTTP requests can be used to integrate RESTful services into a global read-write Web of Data.

  17. Nuclear capture at rest of {xi}{sup -} hyperons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, S. [Faculty of Human Development, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Bahk, S.Y. [Wonkwang University, Iksan 570-749 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, S.H. [Department of Physics and Research Institute of Natural Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Funahashi, H. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hahn, C.H. [Changwon National University, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Hanabata, M. [Physics Department, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Hara, T. [Faculty of Human Development, Kobe University, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Hirata, S. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Hoshino, K. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Physics Department, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan); Ieiri, M. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba 305-0801 (Japan); Iijima, T.; Imai, K.; Itow, Y. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Jin-ya, T.; Kazuno, M. [Department of Physics, Toho University, Funabashi 274-8510 (Japan); Kim, C.O. [Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.Y. [Chonnam National University, Kwangju 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.H. [Department of Physics and Research Institute of Natural Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kodama, K. [Aichi University of Education, Kariya 448-8542 (Japan); Kuze, T. [Physics Department, Gifu University, Gifu 501-1193 (Japan)] (and others)

    2009-09-15

    An emulsion-counter hybrid experiment (KEK E176) was carried out to search for double strangeness systems such as double-{lambda} hypernuclei and H-dibaryons. More than 10% of {xi}{sup -} hyperons produced in the (K{sup -}, K{sup +}) reaction were brought to rest in the nuclear emulsion. We have obtained 98 candidate events of nuclear capture at rest of {xi}{sup -} hyperons which are described in this report. Among those, four events were identified as sequential weak decay of double-{lambda} hypernuclei. The binding energies of {xi}{sup -}-({sup 12}C, {sup 14}N and {sup 16}O) states have been estimated for two events which emit twin single-{lambda} hypernuclei back to back from the capture point. The {sigma}{sup -}p decay vertex of an H-dibaryon was searched for near the capture point and no evidence was observed. Upper limits for the branching ratio of H emission are 5-10% for a lifetime less than 0.1 ns at the 90% confidence level. The trapping probabilities of single and double strangeness to a nuclear fragment following {xi}{sup -} capture at rest have been studied.

  18. Dirac Matrices and Feynman's Rest of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Young S

    2012-01-01

    There are two sets of four-by-four matrices introduced by Dirac. The first set consists of fifteen Majorana matrices derivable from his four $\\gamma$ matrices. These fifteen matrices can also serve as the generators of the group $SL(4,r)$. The second set consists of ten generators of the $Sp(4)$ group which he derived from two coupled harmonic oscillators. In classical mechanics, it is possible to extend the symmetry of the coupled oscillators to the SL(4,r) regime with fifteen Majorana matrices, while quantum mechanics allows only ten generators. This difference can serve as an illustrative example of Feynman's rest of the universe. The universe of the coupled oscillators consists of fifteen generators, and the ten generators are for the world where quantum mechanics is valid. The remaining five generators belong to the rest of the universe. It is noted that the groups $SL(4,r)$ and $Sp(4)$ are locally isomorphic to the Lorentz groups O(3,3) and O(3,2) respectively. This allows us to interpret Feynman's rest...

  19. Heart rate variability biofeedback improves cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakibara, Masahito; Hayano, Junichiro; Oikawa, Leo O; Katsamanis, Maria; Lehrer, Paul

    2013-12-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effect of heart rate variability (HRV) biofeedback on the cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep in daily life. Forty-five healthy young adults were randomly assigned to one of three groups: HRV biofeedback, Autogenic Training(AT), and no-treatment control. Participants in the HRV biofeedback were instructed to use a handheld HRV biofeedback device before their habitual bedtime, those in the AT were asked to listen to an audiotaped instruction before bedtime,and those in the control were asked to engage in their habitual activity before bedtime. Pulse wave signal during sleep at their own residences was measured continuously with a wrist watch-type transdermal photoelectric sensor for three time points. Baseline data were collected on the first night of measurements, followed by two successive nights for HRV biofeedback, AT, or control. Cardiorespiratory resting function was assessed quantitatively as the amplitude of high frequency(HF) component of pulse rate variability, a surrogate measure of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. HF component increased during sleep in the HRV biofeedback group,although it remained unchanged in the AT and control groups. These results suggest that HRV biofeedback before sleep may improve cardiorespiratory resting function during sleep.

  20. Behavioral, Brain Imaging and Genomic Measures to Predict Functional Outcomes Post - Bed Rest and Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulavara, A. P.; DeDios, Y. E.; Gadd, N. E.; Caldwell, E. E.; Batson, C. D.; Goel, R.; Seidler, R. D.; Oddsson, L.; Zanello, S.; Clarke, T.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H. S.; Reschke, M.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J. J.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor disturbances during their initial exposure to microgravity and during the re-adaptation phase following a return to an Earth-gravitational environment. These alterations may disrupt crewmembers' ability to perform mission critical functional tasks requiring ambulation, manual control and gaze stability. Interestingly, astronauts who return from spaceflight show substantial differences in their abilities to readapt to a gravitational environment. The ability to predict the manner and degree to which individual astronauts would be affected would improve the effectiveness of countermeasure training programs designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. For such an approach to succeed, we must develop predictive measures of sensorimotor adaptability that will allow us to foresee, before actual spaceflight, which crewmembers are likely to experience the greatest challenges to their adaptive capacities. The goals of this project are to identify and characterize this set of predictive measures. Our approach includes: 1) behavioral tests to assess sensory bias and adaptability quantified using both strategic and plastic-adaptive responses; 2) imaging to determine individual brain morphological and functional features, using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), diffusion tensor imaging, resting state functional connectivity MRI, and sensorimotor adaptation task-related functional brain activation; and 3) assessment of genotypic markers of genetic polymorphisms in the catechol-O-methyl transferase, dopamine receptor D2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genes and genetic polymorphisms of alpha2-adrenergic receptors that play a role in the neural pathways underlying sensorimotor adaptation. We anticipate that these predictive measures will be significantly correlated with individual differences in sensorimotor adaptability after long-duration spaceflight and exposure to an analog bed rest environment. We will be conducting a

  1. HPV genotypes in invasive cervical cancer in Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirschner, Benny; Junge, Jette; Holl, Katsiaryna

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in invasive cervical cancers may differ by geographic region. The primary objective of this study was to estimate HPV-genotype distribution in Danish women with a diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer....

  2. Agronomical and phytochemical evaluation of Stevia rebaudiana genotypes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vouillamoz, José F; Wolfram-Schilling, Evelyn; Carron, Claude-Alain; Baroffio, Catherine A

    2016-01-01

    The agronomical potential and the phytochemical variability of 18 genotypes of the Paraguayan plant Stevia rebaudiana have been investigated in Switzerland in order identify the best genotype for local cultivation...

  3. Resistance of corn genotypes to fall armyworm Spodoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuoyo Aghomotsegin

    2016-08-31

    Aug 31, 2016 ... The objective of this study was to evaluate resistance mechanisms in 12 corn genotypes (transgenic hybrids: ..... FAW that fed on GM corn genotypes exhibited lower ... preference for other food types, particularly given the.

  4. Comparison and suitability of genotype by environment analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    showed that genotype by environment interactions were significant at p<0.05 for grain .... Genotype by environment analysis methods for yield-related traits of pearl millet ...... PhD Thesis, Louisiana State ... set of sweet potato clones evaluated.

  5. Genotype W environment interaction effects on some physiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genotype W environment interaction effects on some physiological yield ... Ghana Journal of Agricultural Science ... study the yield basis and environmental effects on 31cowpea genotypes of early, medium and late maturities. ... Article Metrics.

  6. The Effect of the Arg389Gly Beta-1 Adrenoceptor Polymorphism on Plasma Renin Activity and Heart Rate and the Genotype-Dependent Response to Metoprolol Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Morten; Andersen, Jon T; Jimenez-Solem, Espen

    2012-01-01

    A gene-drug interaction has been indicated between beta-1 selective beta-blockers and the Arg389Gly polymorphism (rs1801253) in the adrenergic beta-1 receptor gene (ADRB1). We studied the effect of the ADRB1 Arg389Gly polymorphism on plasma renin activity (PRA) and heart rate (HR) and the genotype......(metoprolol concentration) varied significantly between genotypes (P = 0.024). In Gly/Gly subjects, PRA decreased significantly with metoprolol concentration before (P = 0.025) and after exercise (P effect on PRA. The effect of metoprolol concentration...... on PRA in Gly/Gly subjects was enhanced by exercise (P = 0.044). No significant differences in HR were seen between genotype groups. Resting PRA was lower in Gly/Gly than in Arg/Arg subjects, and the effect of exercise and metoprolol concentration on PRA was stronger in Gly/Gly subjects than...

  7. HCV genotyping from NGS short reads and its application in genotype detection from HCV mixed infected plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ping; Stevens, Richard; Wei, Bo; Lahser, Fred; Howe, Anita Y M; Klappenbach, Joel A; Marton, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Genotyping of hepatitis C virus (HCV) plays an important role in the treatment of HCV. As new genotype-specific treatment options become available, it has become increasingly important to have accurate HCV genotype and subtype information to ensure that the most appropriate treatment regimen is selected. Most current genotyping methods are unable to detect mixed genotypes from two or more HCV infections. Next generation sequencing (NGS) allows for rapid and low cost mass sequencing of viral genomes and provides an opportunity to probe the viral population from a single host. In this paper, the possibility of using short NGS reads for direct HCV genotyping without genome assembly was evaluated. We surveyed the publicly-available genetic content of three HCV drug target regions (NS3, NS5A, NS5B) in terms of whether these genes contained genotype-specific regions that could predict genotype. Six genotypes and 38 subtypes were included in this study. An automated phylogenetic analysis based HCV genotyping method was implemented and used to assess different HCV target gene regions. Candidate regions of 250-bp each were found for all three genes that have enough genetic information to predict HCV genotypes/subtypes. Validation using public datasets shows 100% genotyping accuracy. To test whether these 250-bp regions were sufficient to identify mixed genotypes, we developed a random primer-based method to sequence HCV plasma samples containing mixtures of two HCV genotypes in different ratios. We were able to determine the genotypes without ambiguity and to quantify the ratio of the abundances of the mixed genotypes in the samples. These data provide a proof-of-concept that this random primed, NGS-based short-read genotyping approach does not need prior information about the viral population and is capable of detecting mixed viral infection.

  8. HCV genotyping from NGS short reads and its application in genotype detection from HCV mixed infected plasma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Qiu

    Full Text Available Genotyping of hepatitis C virus (HCV plays an important role in the treatment of HCV. As new genotype-specific treatment options become available, it has become increasingly important to have accurate HCV genotype and subtype information to ensure that the most appropriate treatment regimen is selected. Most current genotyping methods are unable to detect mixed genotypes from two or more HCV infections. Next generation sequencing (NGS allows for rapid and low cost mass sequencing of viral genomes and provides an opportunity to probe the viral population from a single host. In this paper, the possibility of using short NGS reads for direct HCV genotyping without genome assembly was evaluated. We surveyed the publicly-available genetic content of three HCV drug target regions (NS3, NS5A, NS5B in terms of whether these genes contained genotype-specific regions that could predict genotype. Six genotypes and 38 subtypes were included in this study. An automated phylogenetic analysis based HCV genotyping method was implemented and used to assess different HCV target gene regions. Candidate regions of 250-bp each were found for all three genes that have enough genetic information to predict HCV genotypes/subtypes. Validation using public datasets shows 100% genotyping accuracy. To test whether these 250-bp regions were sufficient to identify mixed genotypes, we developed a random primer-based method to sequence HCV plasma samples containing mixtures of two HCV genotypes in different ratios. We were able to determine the genotypes without ambiguity and to quantify the ratio of the abundances of the mixed genotypes in the samples. These data provide a proof-of-concept that this random primed, NGS-based short-read genotyping approach does not need prior information about the viral population and is capable of detecting mixed viral infection.

  9. Genotype 3 is the predominant hepatitis C genotype in a multi-ethnic Asian population in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shiaw-Hooi; Ng, Kee-Peng; Kaur, Harvinder; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2015-06-01

    Genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) are distributed differently across the world. There is a paucity of such data in a multi-ethnic Asian population like Malaysia. The objectives of this study were to determine the distribution of HCV genotypes between major ethnic groups and to ascertain their association with basic demographic variables like age and gender. This was a cross-sectional prospective study conducted from September 2007 to September 2013. Consecutive patients who were detected to have anti-HCV antibodies in the University of Malaya Medical Centre were included and tested for the presence of HCV RNA using Roche Cobas Amplicor Analyzer and HCV genotype using Roche single Linear Array HCV Genotyping strip. Five hundred and ninety-six subjects were found to have positive anti-HCV antibodies during this period of time. However, only 396 (66.4%) were HCV RNA positive and included in the final analysis. Our results showed that HCV genotype 3 was the predominant genotype with overall frequency of 61.9% followed by genotypes 1 (35.9%), 2 (1.8%) and 6 (0.5%). There was a slightly higher prevalence of HCV genotype 3 among the Malays when compared to the Chinese (P=0.043). No other statistical significant differences were observed in the distribution of HCV genotypes among the major ethnic groups. There was also no association between the predominant genotypes and basic demographic variables. In a multi-ethnic Asian society in Malaysia, genotype 3 is the predominant genotype among all the major ethnic groups with genotype 1 as the second commonest genotype. Both genotypes 2 and 6 are uncommon. Neither genotype 4 nor 5 was detected. There is no identification of HCV genotype according to ethnic origin, age and gender.

  10. Phenotypic characteristics of isolates of Aspergillus section Fumigati from different geographic origins and their relationships with genotypic characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    del Rocío Reyes-Montes María

    2011-05-01

    with isolates from MX and AR. The dendrogram with phenotypic and genotypic data showed the same cluster, except for an isolate from FR that formed a separate cluster. This cluster was confirmed using PCoA. The correlation between the phenotypic and genotypic data of the isolates revealed a statistically significant association between these characteristics. Conclusions The PE isolates showed specific phenotypic characteristics that clearly differentiate them from the rest of the isolates, which matches the genotypic data. The correlation between the phenotypic and genotypic characteristics showed a statistically significant association. In conclusion, phenotypic and genotypic methods together increase the power of correlation between isolates.

  11. Angiotensin converting enzyme genotype in cardiovascular disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, K.M.; Huggard, P.R.; West, M.J. [Univ. of Queensland, Brisbane (Australia)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) catalyses formation of angiotensin II and degradation of bradykinin, vasoactive peptides with opposing properties. The result of ACE action is to promote vasoconstriction and cell growth. PCR is used to detect a common polymorphism due to the insertion of an Alu repeat element of 287 bp into intron 16. ACE genotype has been implicated in risk for myocardial infarction (MI) and hypertension in humans. We have studied a group of 640 patients (61% male aged 64 {plus_minus} 11 years) with myocardial ischaemic syndromes, followed for 12 months after initial hospital admission. In this group, the frequency of the insertion (I) allele was 0.47 (N=1170 chromosomes), not significantly higher than the frequency of 0.46 in 112 local blood donors (50% male aged 59 {plus_minus}5 years). In the 300 patients with diagnosed MI, I allele frequency was 0.48. This is significantly higher ({chi}{sup 2}=5.78, P=0.015) than the frequency of 0.42 reported in a multi-centre study of ACE genotype in 600 male European patients with MI . There was a non-significant increase in the frequency of a cardiac event within 6 months of hospital admission in those of II genotype (N=464, 47 events to date). These results suggest that in our population, the I allele and/or II genotype may be associated with risk of MI. This contrasts with the study cited above, where the D (deletion) allele and DD genotype frequency were raised in patients compared with controls. Hypertension is associated with the ACE D allele, and does not explain the heart disease risk, which may be associated with the I allele, in this group of survivors of myocardial ischaemic disease. The difference between our results and the previous study may be due to ascertainment or ethnic differences or to problems amplifying the I allele in some heterozygotes. Clearly, the role of ACE genotype in these diseases is complex.

  12. [Hepatitis B virus genotypes and the response to lamivudine therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewska, Małgorzata; Domagała, Małgorzata; Simon, Krzysztof; Gładysz, Andrzej

    2005-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) can be classified into eight major genotypes (A-H) that have mainly a geographic distribution. The HBV genotype may influence disease progression, HBeAg seroconversion rates, response to antiviral treatment. The aim of study was to analyze the distribution and frequency of genotypes in patients with chronic hepatitis B. Response to lamivudine 100 mg daily therapy was examined in respect to genotype. Sixty six patients (45 (68,2%) male, 21 (31,8%) female) with chronic hepatits B were enrolled. HBV genotypes were assigned before treatment with INNO-LiPA HBV Genotyping, Innogenetics, N. V., Ghent assay, which is a line probe test based on the reverse hybridization principle. In baseline and after 12 months of treatment serological markers of HBV infection, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activities and HBV DNA serum levels were tested. Patients with chronic hepatitis B were infected predominantly with genotype A. HBV genotype distribution was: 78,8% for genotype A, 13,6% for genotype D, 1,5% for mixed infection with genotypes A and D. Distribution of genotypes A and D was asymmetrically regardless of sex, HBeAg status, ALT and HBV DNA levels. Four (6,1%) specimens had indeterminate A results by LiPA. There were no significant differences between patients with genotypes A and D regarding age and sex. There were also no significant differences between these two groups regarding rates of HBeAg and anti-HBe positivity, ALT activity and viral load. Twenty months of lamivudine (100 mg daily) therapy resulted in significant decreases in serum HBV DNA and ALT activities in patients with genotype A as well as with genotype D. After 12 months of treatment there were no statistical differences in HBeAg seroconversion rates, ALT activities, viral loads, frequency of HBeAg and anti-HBe between genotypes A and D.

  13. Factors affecting high resting pulse rate in military pilots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minarma Siagian

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Pilot terpajan pada keadaan yang memerlukan kewaspadaan yang meningkatkan kegiatan sistem saraf simpatis. Hal ini dapat berdampak pada sistem kardiovaskular manusia, yang antara lain tercermin pada peningkatan frekuensi denyut jantung. Penelitian bertujuan untuk mengetahui pengaruh beberapa faktor yang meningkatkan frekuensi denyut jantung pada pilot. Metode:Penelitian nested case-control yang dilakukan pada pilot militer yang melakukan pemeriksaan fisik tahunan di Lembaga Kesehatan Penerbangan dan Ruang Angkasa (LAKESPRA Saryanto dari tahun 2003 sampai 2008. Data yang diperoleh dari rekam medik berupa umur, pangkat, jumlah jam terbang, rata-rata jam terbang per tahun, dan jenis pesawat. Hasil: Dari 539 pilot, terdapat 155 pilot dengan frekuensi nadi istirahat tinggi. Dibandingkan dengan pilot berumur 23-29 tahun, pilot berumur 30-39 tahun mempunyai risiko 66% lebih banyak untuk frekuensi nadi istirahat tinggi [rasio odds suaian (ORa = 1,66; 95% interval kepercayaan (CI = 1,17-2,35, P = 0,004], sedangkan yang berumur 40-49 tahun berisiko 2,4 kali (ORa = 2,40; P = 0,000]. Dibandingkan pilot pesawat transport, pilot pesawat tempur berisiko 59% lebih banyak dengan frekuensi nadi istirahat tinggi (ORa = 1,59; P = 0,002. Kesimpulan:Umur pilot yang semakin tua dan jenis pesawat tempur meningkatkan risiko frekuensi nadi istirahat pada pilot. (Health Science Indones 2013;2:51-4Kata kunci:umur, jenis pesawat terbang, frekuensi nadi istirahat, pilotAbstractBackground:Pilots are almost constantly exposed to emergency situations which increase sympathetic activity. This will affect the cardiovascular system, which among others will be reflected by increased resting pulse rate. The aim of this study was to investigate factors that increase resting pulse rate in pilots. Methods:A nested case-control study was conducted on Indonesian Air Force military pilots doing annual medical check-ups at the Saryanto Institute for Medical and Health

  14. Discovery of novel variants in genotyping arrays improves genotype retention and reduces ascertainment bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didion John P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-density genotyping arrays that measure hybridization of genomic DNA fragments to allele-specific oligonucleotide probes are widely used to genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in genetic studies, including human genome-wide association studies. Hybridization intensities are converted to genotype calls by clustering algorithms that assign each sample to a genotype class at each SNP. Data for SNP probes that do not conform to the expected pattern of clustering are often discarded, contributing to ascertainment bias and resulting in lost information - as much as 50% in a recent genome-wide association study in dogs. Results We identified atypical patterns of hybridization intensities that were highly reproducible and demonstrated that these patterns represent genetic variants that were not accounted for in the design of the array platform. We characterized variable intensity oligonucleotide (VINO probes that display such patterns and are found in all hybridization-based genotyping platforms, including those developed for human, dog, cattle, and mouse. When recognized and properly interpreted, VINOs recovered a substantial fraction of discarded probes and counteracted SNP ascertainment bias. We developed software (MouseDivGeno that identifies VINOs and improves the accuracy of genotype calling. MouseDivGeno produced highly concordant genotype calls when compared with other methods but it uniquely identified more than 786000 VINOs in 351 mouse samples. We used whole-genome sequence from 14 mouse strains to confirm the presence of novel variants explaining 28000 VINOs in those strains. We also identified VINOs in human HapMap 3 samples, many of which were specific to an African population. Incorporating VINOs in phylogenetic analyses substantially improved the accuracy of a Mus species tree and local haplotype assignment in laboratory mouse strains. Conclusion The problems of ascertainment bias and missing

  15. Discovery of novel variants in genotyping arrays improves genotype retention and reduces ascertainment bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didion, John P; Yang, Hyuna; Sheppard, Keith; Fu, Chen-Ping; McMillan, Leonard; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Churchill, Gary A

    2012-01-19

    High-density genotyping arrays that measure hybridization of genomic DNA fragments to allele-specific oligonucleotide probes are widely used to genotype single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genetic studies, including human genome-wide association studies. Hybridization intensities are converted to genotype calls by clustering algorithms that assign each sample to a genotype class at each SNP. Data for SNP probes that do not conform to the expected pattern of clustering are often discarded, contributing to ascertainment bias and resulting in lost information - as much as 50% in a recent genome-wide association study in dogs. We identified atypical patterns of hybridization intensities that were highly reproducible and demonstrated that these patterns represent genetic variants that were not accounted for in the design of the array platform. We characterized variable intensity oligonucleotide (VINO) probes that display such patterns and are found in all hybridization-based genotyping platforms, including those developed for human, dog, cattle, and mouse. When recognized and properly interpreted, VINOs recovered a substantial fraction of discarded probes and counteracted SNP ascertainment bias. We developed software (MouseDivGeno) that identifies VINOs and improves the accuracy of genotype calling. MouseDivGeno produced highly concordant genotype calls when compared with other methods but it uniquely identified more than 786000 VINOs in 351 mouse samples. We used whole-genome sequence from 14 mouse strains to confirm the presence of novel variants explaining 28000 VINOs in those strains. We also identified VINOs in human HapMap 3 samples, many of which were specific to an African population. Incorporating VINOs in phylogenetic analyses substantially improved the accuracy of a Mus species tree and local haplotype assignment in laboratory mouse strains. The problems of ascertainment bias and missing information due to genotyping errors are widely recognized as

  16. megasat: automated inference of microsatellite genotypes from sequence data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Luyao; Paterson, Ian G; Fraser, Bonnie A; Watson, Beth; Bradbury, Ian R; Nadukkalam Ravindran, Praveen; Reznick, David; Beiko, Robert G; Bentzen, Paul

    2017-03-01

    megasat is software that enables genotyping of microsatellite loci using next-generation sequencing data. Microsatellites are amplified in large multiplexes, and then sequenced in pooled amplicons. megasat reads sequence files and automatically scores microsatellite genotypes. It uses fuzzy matches to allow for sequencing errors and applies decision rules to account for amplification artefacts, including nontarget amplification products, replication slippage during PCR (amplification stutter) and differential amplification of alleles. An important feature of megasat is the generation of histograms of the length-frequency distributions of amplification products for each locus and each individual. These histograms, analogous to electropherograms traditionally used to score microsatellite genotypes, enable rapid evaluation and editing of automatically scored genotypes. megasat is written in Perl, runs on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux systems, and includes a simple graphical user interface. We demonstrate megasat using data from guppy, Poecilia reticulata. We genotype 1024 guppies at 43 microsatellites per run on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. We evaluated the accuracy of automatically called genotypes using two methods, based on pedigree and repeat genotyping data, and obtained estimates of mean genotyping error rates of 0.021 and 0.012. In both estimates, three loci accounted for a disproportionate fraction of genotyping errors; conversely, 26 loci were scored with 0-1 detected error (error rate ≤0.007). Our results show that with appropriate selection of loci, automated genotyping of microsatellite loci can be achieved with very high throughput, low genotyping error and very low genotyping costs.

  17. A genotype probability index for multiple alleles and haplotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, A; Kinghorn, B P

    2005-12-01

    We use linear algebra to calculate an index of information content in genotype probabilities which has previously been calculated using trigonometry. The new method can be generalized allowing the index to be calculated for loci with more than two alleles. Applications of this index include its use in genotyping strategies, strategies to manage genetic disorders and in estimation of genotype effects.

  18. 21 CFR 862.3360 - Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. 862... Test Systems § 862.3360 Drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system. (a) Identification. A drug metabolizing enzyme genotyping system is a device intended for use in testing deoxyribonucleic acid...

  19. Strongyloides stercoralis genotypes in humans in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schär, Fabian; Guo, Li; Streit, Adrian; Khieu, Virak; Muth, Sinuon; Marti, Hanspeter; Odermatt, Peter

    2014-06-01

    Little is known about the genetic variability of the soil-transmitted nematode, Strongyloides stercoralis, in humans. We sequenced portions of the small subunit rDNA (SSU), including the hyper variable regions (HVR) I and IV from S. stercoralis larvae derived from individuals living in a rural setting in Cambodia. We identified three polymorphic positions, including a previously reported one within the HVR I. HVR IV was invariable. Six different SSU alleles existed in our sample. Although different genotypes of S. stercoralis were found in the same individuals, no heterozygous larvae were found. This indicates that there is no or very little interbreeding between the different genotypes. Further studies are needed to examine if this is because sexual reproduction, which is facultative, is rare in our study area's S. stercoralis population or because what is considered to be S. stercoralis today is actually a complex of closely related species or subspecies.

  20. COMT genotype, gambling activity, and cognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, Jon E; Leppink, Eric W; Redden, Sarah A

    2015-01-01

    gambling. This study examined adults with varying levels of gambling behavior to determine whether COMT genotype was associated with differences in gambling symptoms and cognitive functioning. 260 non-treatment-seeking adults aged 18-29 years with varying degrees of gambling behavior provided saliva...... significantly different from the Val/Met (13.2%) group (p = 0.001). The Val/Val COMT group was also associated with significantly more gambling disorder diagnostic criteria being met, greater frequency of gambling behavior, and significantly worse cognitive performance on the Cambridge Gamble Task (risk...... adjustment and delay aversion) and the Spatial Working Memory task (total errors). This study adds to the growing literature on the role of COMT in impulsive behaviors by showing that the Val/Val genotype was associated with specific clinical and cognitive elements among young adults who gamble...

  1. Huntington's Disease: Relationship Between Phenotype and Genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Min; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Wu, Zhi-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant inherited neurodegenerative disease with the typical manifestations of involuntary movements, psychiatric and behavior disorders, and cognitive impairment. It is caused by the dynamic mutation in CAG triplet repeat number in exon 1 of huntingtin (HTT) gene. The symptoms of HD especially the age at onset are related to the genetic characteristics, both the CAG triplet repeat and the modified factors. Here, we reviewed the recent advancement on the genotype-phenotype relationship of HD, mainly focus on the characteristics of different expanded CAG repeat number, genetic modifiers, and CCG repeat number in the 3' end of CAG triplet repeat and their effects on the phenotype. We also reviewed the special forms of HD (juvenile HD, atypical onset HD, and homozygous HD) and their phenotype-genotype correlations. The review will aid clinicians to predict the onset age and disease course of HD, give the genetic counseling, and accelerate research into the HD mechanism.

  2. Indexing Finite Language Representation of Population Genotypes

    CERN Document Server

    Sirén, Jouni; Mäkinen, Veli

    2010-01-01

    We propose a way to index population genotype information together with the complete genome sequence so that one can use the index to efficiently align a given sequence to the genome with all plausible genotype recombinations taken into account. This is achieved through converting the multiple alignment of individual genomes into a finite automaton recognizing the language of all substrings read from the alignment by switching the row at any time. The finite automaton is then indexed with an extension of Burrows-Wheeler transform to allow pattern search inside the plausible recombinant sequences generated in this way. The size of the finite automaton and the index created from it stay limited because of the high similarity of the individual genomes in the multiple alignment. In our experiments, the index took even less space than previous ones designed for indexing just the individual genomes. On a short-read alignment experiment, we found about 1% of matches to novel recombinants.

  3. BCL2 genotypes and prostate cancer survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renner, Wilfried [Medical University of Graz, Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Graz (Austria); Langsenlehner, Uwe [GKK Outpatient Department, Division of Internal Medicine, Graz (Austria); Krenn-Pilko, Sabine; Langsenlehner, Tanja [Medical University of Graz, Department of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Graz (Austria); Eder, Petra [University Hospital Wuerzburg, Department of Internal Medicine I, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    The antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) gene is a key player in cancer development and progression. A functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (c.-938C>A, rs2279115) in the inhibitory P2 BCL2 gene promoter has been associated with clinical outcomes in various types of cancer. Aim of the present study was to analyze the role of BCL2-938C>A genotypes in prostate cancer mortality. The association between BCL2-938C>A (rs2279115) genotypes and prostate cancer outcome was studied within the prospective PROCAGENE study comprising 702 prostate cancer patients. During a median follow-up time of 92 months, 120 (17.1%) patients died. A univariate Cox regression model showed a significant association of the CC genotype with reduced cancer-specific survival (CSS; hazard ratio, HR, 2.13, 95% confidence interval, CI, 1.10-4.12; p = 0.024) and overall survival (OS; HR 2.34, 95% CI 1.58-3.47; p < 0.001). In a multivariate Cox regression model including age at diagnosis, risk group, and androgen deprivation therapy, the CC genotype remained a significant predictor of poor CSS (HR 2.05, 95% CI 1.05-3.99; p = 0.034) and OS (HR 2.25, 95% CI 1.51-3.36; p < 0.001). This study provides evidence that the homozygous BCL2-938 CC genotype is associated with OS and C in prostate cancer patients. (orig.) [German] Das antiapoptotische Gen B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) spielt eine Schluesselrolle in der Entstehung und Progression von Krebserkrankungen. Ein funktioneller Einzelnukleotid-Polymorphismus (c.-938C>A, rs2279115) im inhibitorischen P2-BCL2-Promotor wurde mit dem klinischen Outcome verschiedener Krebserkrankungen verknuepft. Ziel der vorliegenden Studie war die Untersuchung der Rolle von BCL2-938C>A-Genotypen fuer die Mortalitaet bei Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom. Der Zusammenhang zwischen BCL2-938C>A-Genotypen (rs2279115) und dem Outcome bei Prostatakrebs wurde in der prospektiven PROCAGENE-Studie, die 702 Patienten mit Prostatakarzinom umfasste, untersucht. Waehrend der medianen

  4. Identification of Zoonotic Genotypes of Giardia duodenalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sprong, H.; Cacciò, S.M.; van der Giessen, J.W.B

    2009-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis, originally regarded as a commensal organism, is the etiologic agent of giardiasis, a gastrointestinal disease of humans and animals. Giardiasis causes major public and veterinary health concerns worldwide. Transmission is either direct, through the faecal-oral route, or indirect....... The data were assembled into a molecular epidemiological database developed by a European network of public and veterinary health Institutions. Genotyping was performed at different levels of resolution (single and multiple loci on the same dataset). The zoonotic potential of both assemblages A and B......, mixtures of genotypes in individual isolates were repeatedly observed. Possible explanations are the uptake of genetically different Giardia cysts by a host, or subsequent infection of an already infected host, likely without overt symptoms, with a different Giardia species, which may cause disease. Other...

  5. Genome-wide association analysis identifies multiple loci related to resting heart rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eijgelsheim, Mark; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Sotoodehnia, Nona; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Müller, Martina; Morrison, Alanna C.; Smith, Albert V.; Isaacs, Aaron; Sanna, Serena; Dörr, Marcus; Navarro, Pau; Fuchsberger, Christian; Nolte, Ilja M.; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Estrada, Karol; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Bis, Joshua C.; Rückert, Ina-Maria; Alonso, Alvaro; Launer, Lenore J.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Noseworthy, Peter A.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Perz, Siegfried; Arking, Dan E.; Spector, Tim D.; Kors, Jan A.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Tarasov, Kirill V.; Homuth, Georg; Wild, Sarah H.; Marroni, Fabio; Gieger, Christian; Licht, Carmilla M.; Prineas, Ronald J.; Hofman, Albert; Rotter, Jerome I.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Ernst, Florian; Najjar, Samer S.; Wright, Alan F.; Peters, Annette; Fox, Ervin R.; Oostra, Ben A.; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Couper, David; Völzke, Henry; Campbell, Harry; Meitinger, Thomas; Uda, Manuela; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Harris, Tamara B.; Kääb, Stefan; Siscovick, David S.; Jamshidi, Yalda; Uitterlinden, André G.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Larson, Martin G.; Wilson, James F.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Snieder, Harold; Pramstaller, Peter P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Lakatta, Edward G.; Felix, Stephan B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Pfeufer, Arne; Heckbert, Susan R.; Stricker, Bruno H.Ch.; Boerwinkle, Eric; O'Donnell, Christopher J.

    2010-01-01

    Higher resting heart rate is associated with increased cardiovascular disease and mortality risk. Though heritable factors play a substantial role in population variation, little is known about specific genetic determinants. This knowledge can impact clinical care by identifying novel factors that influence pathologic heart rate states, modulate heart rate through cardiac structure and function or by improving our understanding of the physiology of heart rate regulation. To identify common genetic variants associated with heart rate, we performed a meta-analysis of 15 genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including 38 991 subjects of European ancestry, estimating the association between age-, sex- and body mass-adjusted RR interval (inverse heart rate) and ∼2.5 million markers. Results with P < 5 × 10−8 were considered genome-wide significant. We constructed regression models with multiple markers to assess whether results at less stringent thresholds were likely to be truly associated with RR interval. We identified six novel associations with resting heart rate at six loci: 6q22 near GJA1; 14q12 near MYH7; 12p12 near SOX5, c12orf67, BCAT1, LRMP and CASC1; 6q22 near SLC35F1, PLN and c6orf204; 7q22 near SLC12A9 and UfSp1; and 11q12 near FADS1. Associations at 6q22 400 kb away from GJA1, at 14q12 MYH6 and at 1q32 near CD34 identified in previously published GWAS were confirmed. In aggregate, these variants explain ∼0.7% of RR interval variance. A multivariant regression model including 20 variants with P < 10−5 increased the explained variance to 1.6%, suggesting that some loci falling short of genome-wide significance are likely truly associated. Future research is warranted to elucidate underlying mechanisms that may impact clinical care. PMID:20639392

  6. The influence of serotonin transporter polymorphisms on cortical activity: A resting EEG study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Chen-Jee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The serotonin transporter gene (5-HTT is a key regulator of serotonergic neurotransmission and has been linked to various psychiatric disorders. Among the genetic variants, polymorphisms in the 5-HTT gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR and variable-number-of-tandem-repeat in the second intron (5-HTTVNTR have functional consequences. However, their genetic impact on cortical oscillation remains unclear. This study examined the modulatory effects of 5-HTTLPR (L-allele carriers vs. non-carriers and 5-HTTVNTR (10-repeat allele carriers vs. non-carriers polymorphism on regional neural activity in a young female population. Methods Blood samples and resting state eyes-closed electroencephalography (EEG signals were collected from 195 healthy women and stratified into 2 sets of comparisons of 2 groups each: L-allele carriers (N = 91 vs. non-carriers for 5-HTTLPR and 10-repeat allele carriers (N = 25 vs. non-carriers for 5-HTTVNTR. The mean power of 18 electrodes across theta, alpha, beta, gamma, gamma1, and gamma2 frequencies was analyzed. Between-group statistics were performed by an independent t-test, and global trends of regional power were quantified by non-parametric analyses. Results Among 5-HTTVNTR genotypes, 10-repeat allele carriers showed significantly low regional power at gamma frequencies across the brain. We noticed a consistent global trend that carriers with low transcription efficiency of 5-HTT possessed low regional powers, regardless of frequency bands. The non-parametric analyses confirmed this observation, with P values of 3.071 × 10-8 and 1.459 × 10-12 for 5-HTTLPR and 5-HTTVNTR, respectively. Conclusions and Limitations Our analyses showed that genotypes with low 5-HTT activity are associated with less local neural synchronization during relaxation. The implication with respect to genetic vulnerability of 5-HTT across a broad range of psychiatric disorders is discussed. Given the low frequency of 10

  7. Human papillomaviruses genotyping in plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Planell-Mas, Elena; Martínez-Garriga, Blanca; Zalacain, Antonio Jesús; Vinuesa, Teresa; Viñas, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Plantar warts are caused by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and have been associated with several HPV genotypes. However, there are few studies focused exclusively on plantar warts. In this work, we aim to identify the HPV genotypes of plantar warts and explore their relation to demographic and clinical characteristics of patients. A total of 72 patients diagnosed with plantar warts were recruited at the Laser unit at Podiatric Hospital, University of Barcelona, Spain. Inner hyperkeratosis laminar sections of warts were collected and DNA of samples were extracted. Amplification of a conserved region of the HPV L1 gene was performed with the SK-Polymerase chain reaction method. DNA amplicons were sequenced and HPV types identified. The most prevalent genotypes detected among the 105 analyzed plantar warts were HPV-57 (37.1%), HPV-27 (23.8%), HPV-1a (20.9%), HPV-2 (15.2%), and HPV-65 (2.8%). The majority of patients (78%) presented one single plantar wart, whereas multiple warts were detected in 22.2% of patients. One patient with multiple warts presented HPV types from two different genera, suggesting the spread of warts by self-inoculation as well as by de novo infection. No significant differences between the number of warts in toes, midfoot and heel were found. The most prevalent HPV types detected in all areas belonged to the alpha genus. This work provides new insight on plantar warts and their associated HPV genotypes, and evidences the usefulness and reliability of both the sample collection procedure and the PCR method used for HPV detection and typing. J. Med. Virol. 89:902-907, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Hepatitis C virus genotyping in Greece: unexpected high prevalence of genotype 5a in a Greek island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karatapanis, Stylianos; Tsoplou, Panagiota; Papastergiou, Vasilios; Vasiageorgi, Aggeliki; Stampori, Maria; Saitis, Ioannis; Tsitsopoulos, Eustathios; Lisgos, Phillipos; Skorda, Lamprini; Ketikoglou, Ioannis; Goulis, Ioannis

    2012-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 5 (G5) is a rare genotype reported mainly in South Africa. However, increasing data suggest the sporadic presence of this genotype in different European countries. To assess the epidemiology of HCV-G5 in Greece, genotyping was performed in 973 consecutive patients infected with HCV, referred to 7 hepatology centers throughout Greece, from January 2005 to December 2009. Genotype 5a (19 patients, 1.9%) was the fifth most prevalent genotype after genotype 1 (408 patients, 41.9%), genotype 3 (318 patients, 32.7%), genotype 4 (158 patients, 16.2%), and genotype 2 (70 patients, 7.2%). The majority of patients infected with G5 (16/19,84.2%) were referred to the General Hospital of Rhodes, an island in south-east Greece. The HCV genotype distribution in that particular island, indicates a particularly high G5 prevalence of 12.8%, after genotype 1 (40%), genotype 3 (28%), and genotype 4 (15%). Among the patients from Rhodes infected with G5 (n = 16), 13 (81.2%) were females. The mean age was 62.3 ± 6.5 years, significantly older than the patients infected with other HCV genotypes (mean age 40.6 ± 7.2, P < 0.0001). Nine out of the 16 cases (56.2%) presented features of high pre-treatment viral loads. Advanced liver fibrosis (Metavir F3-F4) was found in four out of five performed liver biopsies. Ten patients received treatment with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin and a sustained viral response were achieved in six cases. The source of infection is unknown but parenteral iatrogenic routes of transmission seem to have contributed significantly to the spread of genotype 5a in this region.

  9. Module theory, extending modules and generalizations

    CERN Document Server

    Tercan, Adnan

    2016-01-01

    The main focus of this monograph is to offer a comprehensive presentation of known and new results on various generalizations of CS-modules and CS-rings. Extending (or CS) modules are generalizations of injective (and also semisimple or uniform) modules. While the theory of CS-modules is well documented in monographs and textbooks, results on generalized forms of the CS property as well as dual notions are far less present in the literature. With their work the authors provide a solid background to module theory, accessible to anyone familiar with basic abstract algebra. The focus of the book is on direct sums of CS-modules and classes of modules related to CS-modules, such as relative (injective) ejective modules, (quasi) continuous modules, and lifting modules. In particular, matrix CS-rings are studied and clear proofs of fundamental decomposition results on CS-modules over commutative domains are given, thus complementing existing monographs in this area. Open problems round out the work and establish the...

  10. Cofinitely weak supplemented modules

    OpenAIRE

    Alizade, Rafail; Büyükaşık, Engin

    2003-01-01

    We prove that a module M is cofinitely weak supplemented or briefly cws (i.e., every submodule N of M with M/N finitely generated, has a weak supplement) if and only if every maximal submodule has a weak supplement. If M is a cws-module then every M-generated module is a cws-module. Every module is cws if and only if the ring is semilocal. We study also modules, whose finitely generated submodules have weak supplements.

  11. Screening cotton genotypes for seedling drought tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penna Julio C. Viglioni

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to adapt a screening method previously used to assess seedling drought tolerance in cereals for use in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. and to identify tolerant accessions among a wide range of genotypes. Ninety genotypes were screened in seven growth chamber experiments. Fifteen-day-old seedlings were subjected to four 4-day drought cycles, and plant survival was evaluated after each cycle. Three cycles are probably the minimum required in cotton work. Significant differences (at the 0.05 level or lower among entries were obtained in four of the seven experiments. A "confirmation test" with entries previously evaluated as "tolerant" (high survival and "susceptible" (low survival was run. A number of entries duplicated their earlier performance, but others did not, which indicates the need to reevaluate selections. Germplasms considered tolerant included: `IAC-13-1', `IAC-RM4-SM5', `Minas Sertaneja', `Acala 1517E-1' and `4521'. In general, the technique is simple, though time-consuming, with practical value for screening a large number of genotypes. Results from the screening tests generally agreed with field information. The screening procedure is suitable to select tolerant accessions from among a large number of entries in germplasm collections as a preliminary step in breeding for drought tolerance. This research also demonstrated the need to characterize the internal lack of uniformity in growth chambers to allow for adequate designs of experiments.

  12. Hepatitis B virus genotypes and hepatocellular carcinoma in Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pisit Tangkijvanich; Varocha Mahachai; Piyawat Komolmit; Juthatip Fongsaru; Apiradee Theamboonlers; Yong Poovorawan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: The role of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotypes on the clinical features and prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently unknown. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the distribution of HBV genotypes and their clinical relevance in Thai patients.METHODS: HBV genotypes were determined by PCR-RFLP in stored sera of 93 asymptomatic carriers, 103 patients with chronic hepatitis, 60 patients with cirrhosis and 76patients with HCC. The clinical data were analyzed in relation to the HBV genotype.RESULTS: HBV genotypes C and B were predominant in Thailand, accounting for 73% and 21%, respectively. The distributions of genotypes B and C were similar in HCC patients compared to the other groups. Genotype C was significantly more common in HCC patients who were under 40 years old than genotype B (18% vs 0%, P= 0.03), but was significantly less common in patients older than 60 years (26% vs 56.5%, P= 0.01). The positive rate of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) in patients with genotype C was significantly higher than that in patients with genotype B (71.6% vs 44.4%, P = 0.03 in chronic hepatitis; 56.8% vs 11.1%,P = 0.01 in cirrhosis). There were no differences between HCC patients with genotypes B and C regarding tumor staging by CLIP criteria and the overall median survival. Multivariate analyses showed that HBV genotype was not an independent prognostic factor of survival in HCC patients.CONCLUSION: Patients with genotype C had a higher positive rate of HBeAg and exhibited earlier progression of cirrhosis and HCC than those with genotype B. However,there were no differences in the risk of developing HCC and its prognosis between patients with these genotypes.

  13. Differential expression of jasmonate biosynthesis genes in cacao genotypes contrasting for resistance against Moniliophthora perniciosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litholdo, Celso G; Leal, Gildemberg A; Albuquerque, Paulo S B; Figueira, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The resistance mechanism of cacao against M. perniciosa is likely to be mediated by JA/ET-signaling pathways due to the preferential TcAOS and TcSAM induction in a resistant genotype. The basidiomycete Moniliophthora perniciosa causes a serious disease in cacao (Theobroma cacao L.), and the use of resistant varieties is the only sustainable long-term solution. Cacao resistance against M. perniciosa is characterized by pathogen growth inhibition with reduced colonization and an attenuation of disease symptoms, suggesting a regulation by jasmonate (JA)/ethylene (ET) signaling pathways. The hypothesis that genes involved in JA biosynthesis would be active in the interaction of T. cacao and M. perniciosa was tested here. The cacao JA-related genes were evaluated for their relative quantitative expression in susceptible and resistant genotypes upon the exogenous application of ET, methyl-jasmonate (MJ), and salicylic acid (SA), or after M. perniciosa inoculation. MJ treatment triggered changes in the expression of genes involved in JA biosynthesis, indicating that the mechanism of positive regulation by exogenous MJ application occurs in cacao. However, a higher induction of these genes was observed in the susceptible genotype. Further, a contrast in JA-related transcriptional expression was detected between susceptible and resistant plants under M. perniciosa infection, with the induction of the allene oxide synthase gene (TcAOS), which encodes a key enzyme in the JA biosynthesis pathway in the resistant genotype. Altogether, this work provides additional evidences that the JA-dependent signaling pathway is modulating the defense response against M. perniciosa in a cacao-resistant genotype.

  14. On generalized extending modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Qing-yi

    2007-01-01

    A module M is called generalized extending if for any submodule N of M, there is a direct summand K of M such that N≤K and K/N is singular. Any extending module and any singular module are generalized extending. Any homomorphic image of a generalized extending module is generalized extending. Any direct sum of a singular (uniform) module and a semi-simple module is generalized extending. A ring R is a right Co-H-ring ifand only ifall right R modules are generalized extending modules.

  15. The Influence of Age on Hemodynamic Parameters During Rest and Exercise in Healthy Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Bakkestrøm, Rine; Thomsen, Jacob H

    2017-01-01

    . Participants had hemodynamic parameters measured using right heart catheterization during rest, passive leg raise, and incremental exercise. RESULTS: During rest, all hemodynamic parameters were similar between age groups, apart from blood pressure. During leg raise and incremental exercise...

  16. Increased heart rate variability but normal resting metabolic rate in hypocretin/orexin-deficient human narcolepsy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fronczek, R.; Overeem, S.; Reijntjes, R.; Lammers, G.J.; Dijk, J.G.M.; Pijl, H.

    2008-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: We investigated autonomic balance and resting metabolic rate to explore their possible involvement in obesity in hypocretin/orexin-deficient narcoleptic subjects. METHODS: Resting metabolic rate (using indirect calorimetry) and variability in heart rate and blood pressure were

  17. Exercise Thermoregulation Following 13 Days of Bed Rest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stuart M. C.; Williams, W. Jon; Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2001-01-01

    This investigation examined two potential mechanisms, altered skin blood flow (SBF) and sweating rate (SR) responses, that may be responsible for an elevated core temperature during exercise after bed rest (BR) and space flight. Seven healthy men (29 +/- 5 yr, 179.6 +/- 7.1 cm, 77.2 +/- 17.0kg; mean +/- SD) underwent 13 days of 6 deg head-down BR. Pre- and post-BR, subjects completed supine submaximal cycle ergometry (20 min at 40% and 20 min at 65% of pre-BR supine VO2pk) in a thermoneutral room (23.4 +/- 0.5 C, 56 +/- 8 %RH) during, heat production (VO2 ; indirect calorimetry), intestinal temperature (T(sub in) ; ingestible pill), SBF (laser Doppler velocimetry), local SR (dew point hygrometry), and total sweat loss (TSL; Delta body weight) were measured. Pre- and post- BR plasma volume (PV) was measured using I-125 dilution. After BR, T(sub in) was elevated at rest (36.99 +/- 0.14 vs. 37.30 +/- 0.06 C; p<_0.05) and at the end of exercise (37.57 +/- 0.13 vs. 37.90 +/- 0.09 C; P less than or equal to 0.05). However, the increase in T(sub in) from rest to the end of exercise was not different after BR (0.59 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.60 +/- 0.07 C). There was no difference in VO2 pre- to post-BR during rest (0.28 +/- 0.04 vs. 0.24 +/- 0.03 1 multiplied by min(exp -1) ) or 40% VO2pk (0.95 +/- 0.08 vs. 0.96 +/- 0.05 1 multiplied by min(exp -1)), but VO2 was significantly less at the end of the 65% VO2pk stage (1.53 +/- 0.09 vs. 1.42 +/- 0.11 1 multiplies by min(exp - 1); p less than or equal to 0.05). The percent change in SBF from rest to end of exercise was less after BR (211 +/- 53 vs. 96 +/- 31%; p less than or equal to 0.05), the threshold for the onset of SBF was greater (37.17 +/- 0.18vs. 37.51 +/- 0.17 C; p less than or equal to 0.05), and the slope of the response tended to be reduced (536 +/- 184 vs. 201 +/- 46 %A PC; p=0.08). TSL was not different after BR (0.42+0.06 vs. 0.44 +/- 0.08 kg), but the T in threshold at the onset of sweating was delayed significantly (37

  18. Bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunmei; Levin, Michael; Kaplan, David L.

    2016-02-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in regulating wound healing and tissue regeneration by changing their polarization state in response to local microenvironmental stimuli. The native roles of polarized macrophages encompass biomaterials and tissue remodeling needs, yet harnessing or directing the polarization response has been largely absent as a potential strategy to exploit in regenerative medicine to date. Recent data have revealed that specific alteration of cells’ resting potential (Vmem) is a powerful tool to direct proliferation and differentiation in a number of complex tissues, such as limb regeneration, craniofacial patterning and tumorigenesis. In this study, we explored the bioelectric modulation of macrophage polarization by targeting ATP sensitive potassium channels (KATP). Glibenclamide (KATP blocker) and pinacidil (KATP opener) treatment not only affect macrophage polarization, but also influence the phenotype of prepolarized macrophages. Furthermore, modulation of cell membrane electrical properties can fine-tune macrophage plasticity. Glibenclamide decreased the secretion and gene expression of selected M1 markers, while pinacidil augmented M1 markers. More interestingly, glibencalmide promoted macrophage alternative activation by enhancing certain M2 markers during M2 polarization. These findings suggest that control of bioelectric properties of macrophages could offer a promising approach to regulate macrophage phenotype as a useful tool in regenerative medicine.

  19. Genetic diversity in soybean genotypes with resistance to Heterodera glycines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Oliveira Nogueira

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity among soybean genotypes inoculated with Heteroderaglycines race 3. The experiments were conducted in a greenhouse. In two performance tests of morphological characteristics andresistance to the pathogen, 27 soybean genotypes were assessed. The coefficient of genotypic determination was estimated by themethod of analysis of variance and the genetic diversity analyzed based on dendrograms and optimization method. The estimatedcoefficients of determination indicated a predominantly genetic origin of the genotypic differences in the traits. The genetic variabilitywas maintained in the superior genotypes, which can be used in breeding programs for resistance to soybean cyst nematode

  20. Hepatitis B virus taxonomy and hepatitis B virus genotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a member of the hepadnavirus family. Hepadnaviruses can be found in both mammals (orthohepadnaviruses) and birds (avihepadnaviruses).The genetic variability of HBV is very high. There are eight genotypes of HBV and three clades of HBV isolates from apes that appear to be additional genotypes of HBV. Most genotypes are now divided into subgenotypes with distinct virological and epidemiological properties. In addition, recombination among HBV genotypes increases the variability of HBV. This review summarises current knowledge of the epidemiology of genetic variability in hepadnaviruses and, due to rapid progress in the field,updates several recent reviews on HBV genotypes and subgenotypes.