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Sample records for genomics tool gene

  1. Intervene: a tool for intersection and visualization of multiple gene or genomic region sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aziz; Mathelier, Anthony

    2017-05-31

    A common task for scientists relies on comparing lists of genes or genomic regions derived from high-throughput sequencing experiments. While several tools exist to intersect and visualize sets of genes, similar tools dedicated to the visualization of genomic region sets are currently limited. To address this gap, we have developed the Intervene tool, which provides an easy and automated interface for the effective intersection and visualization of genomic region or list sets, thus facilitating their analysis and interpretation. Intervene contains three modules: venn to generate Venn diagrams of up to six sets, upset to generate UpSet plots of multiple sets, and pairwise to compute and visualize intersections of multiple sets as clustered heat maps. Intervene, and its interactive web ShinyApp companion, generate publication-quality figures for the interpretation of genomic region and list sets. Intervene and its web application companion provide an easy command line and an interactive web interface to compute intersections of multiple genomic and list sets. They have the capacity to plot intersections using easy-to-interpret visual approaches. Intervene is developed and designed to meet the needs of both computer scientists and biologists. The source code is freely available at https://bitbucket.org/CBGR/intervene , with the web application available at https://asntech.shinyapps.io/intervene .

  2. CGUG: in silico proteome and genome parsing tool for the determination of "core" and unique genes in the analysis of genomes up to ca. 1.9 Mb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan Padmanabhan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses and small-genome bacteria (~2 megabases and smaller comprise a considerable population in the biosphere and are of interest to many researchers. These genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and require complementary computational tools to analyze. "CoreGenesUniqueGenes" (CGUG is an in silico genome data mining tool that determines a "core" set of genes from two to five organisms with genomes in this size range. Core and unique genes may reflect similar niches and needs, and may be used in classifying organisms. Findings CGUG is available at http://binf.gmu.edu/geneorder.html as a web-based on-the-fly tool that performs iterative BLASTP analyses using a reference genome and up to four query genomes to provide a table of genes common to these genomes. The result is an in silico display of genomes and their proteomes, allowing for further analysis. CGUG can be used for "genome annotation by homology", as demonstrated with Chlamydophila and Francisella genomes. Conclusion CGUG is used to reanalyze the ICTV-based classifications of bacteriophages, to reconfirm long-standing relationships and to explore new classifications. These genomes have been problematic in the past, due largely to horizontal gene transfers. CGUG is validated as a tool for reannotating small genome bacteria using more up-to-date annotations by similarity or homology. These serve as an entry point for wet-bench experiments to confirm the functions of these "hypothetical" and "unknown" proteins.

  3. GeneCodis3: a non-redundant and modular enrichment analysis tool for functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Nogales-Cadenas, Ruben; Pascual-Montano, Alberto

    2012-07-01

    Since its first release in 2007, GeneCodis has become a valuable tool to functionally interpret results from experimental techniques in genomics. This web-based application integrates different sources of information to finding groups of genes with similar biological meaning. This process, known as enrichment analysis, is essential in the interpretation of high-throughput experiments. The frequent feedbacks and the natural evolution of genomics and bioinformatics have allowed the growth of the tool and the development of this third release. In this version, a special effort has been made to remove noisy and redundant output from the enrichment results with the inclusion of a recently reported algorithm that summarizes significantly enriched terms and generates functionally coherent modules of genes and terms. A new comparative analysis has been added to allow the differential analysis of gene sets. To expand the scope of the application, new sources of biological information have been included, such as genetic diseases, drugs-genes interactions and Pubmed information among others. Finally, the graphic section has been renewed with the inclusion of new interactive graphics and filtering options. The application is freely available at http://genecodis.cnb.csic.es.

  4. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using GeneScan and BLAST

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andrew M. Lynn; Chakresh Kumar Jain; K. Kosalai; Pranjan Barman; Nupur Thakur; Harish Batra; Alok Bhattacharya

    2001-04-01

    Genomic sequence data are often available well before the annotated sequence is published. We present a method for analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by BLAST. The routines are used to develop a system for automated annotation of genome DNA sequences.

  5. FGF: a web tool for Fishing Gene Family in a whole genome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hongkun; Shi, Junjie; Fang, Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important process in evolution. The availability of genome sequences of a number of organisms has made it possible to conduct comprehensive searches for duplicated genes enabling informative studies of their evolution. We have established the FGF (Fishing Gene Family) program...... to efficiently search for and identify gene families. The FGF output displays the results as visual phylogenetic trees including information on gene structure, chromosome position, duplication fate and selective pressure. It is particularly useful to identify pseudogenes and detect changes in gene structure. FGF...... is freely available on a web server at http://fgf.genomics.org.cn/...

  6. FGF: A web tool for Fishing Gene Family in a whole genome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hongkun; Shi, Junjie; Fang, Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important process in evolution. The availability of genome sequences of a number of organisms has made it possible to conduct comprehensive searches for duplicated genes enabling informative studies of their evolution. We have established the FGF (Fishing Gene Family) program...... to efficiently search for and identify gene families. The FGF output displays the results as visual phylogenetic trees including information on gene structure, chromosome position, duplication fate and selective pressure. It is particularly useful to identify pseudogenes and detect changes in gene structure. FGF...... is freely available on a web server at http://fgf.genomics.org.cn/...

  7. FGF: A web tool for Fishing Gene Family in a whole genome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hongkun; Shi, Junjie; Fang, Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    to efficiently search for and identify gene families. The FGF output displays the results as visual phylogenetic trees including information on gene structure, chromosome position, duplication fate and selective pressure. It is particularly useful to identify pseudogenes and detect changes in gene structure. FGF......Gene duplication is an important process in evolution. The availability of genome sequences of a number of organisms has made it possible to conduct comprehensive searches for duplicated genes enabling informative studies of their evolution. We have established the FGF (Fishing Gene Family) program...

  8. Candidate fire blight resistance genes in Malus identified with the use of genomic tools and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this research is to utilize current advances in Rosaceae genomics to identify DNA markers for use in marker-assisted selection of durable resistance to fire blight. Candidate fire blight resistance genes were selected and ranked based upon differential expression after inoculation with ...

  9. MGAS: a powerful tool for multivariate gene-based genome-wide association analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Sluis, Sophie; Dolan, Conor V; Li, Jiang; Song, Youqiang; Sham, Pak; Posthuma, Danielle; Li, Miao-Xin

    2015-04-01

    Standard genome-wide association studies, testing the association between one phenotype and a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are limited in two ways: (i) traits are often multivariate, and analysis of composite scores entails loss in statistical power and (ii) gene-based analyses may be preferred, e.g. to decrease the multiple testing problem. Here we present a new method, multivariate gene-based association test by extended Simes procedure (MGAS), that allows gene-based testing of multivariate phenotypes in unrelated individuals. Through extensive simulation, we show that under most trait-generating genotype-phenotype models MGAS has superior statistical power to detect associated genes compared with gene-based analyses of univariate phenotypic composite scores (i.e. GATES, multiple regression), and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Re-analysis of metabolic data revealed 32 False Discovery Rate controlled genome-wide significant genes, and 12 regions harboring multiple genes; of these 44 regions, 30 were not reported in the original analysis. MGAS allows researchers to conduct their multivariate gene-based analyses efficiently, and without the loss of power that is often associated with an incorrectly specified genotype-phenotype models. MGAS is freely available in KGG v3.0 (http://statgenpro.psychiatry.hku.hk/limx/kgg/download.php). Access to the metabolic dataset can be requested at dbGaP (https://dbgap.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/). The R-simulation code is available from http://ctglab.nl/people/sophie_van_der_sluis. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Functional genomics tool: Gene silencing in Ixodes scapularis eggs and nymphs by electroporated dsRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troiano Emily

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ticks are blood-sucking arthropods responsible for transmitting a wide variety of disease-causing agents, and constitute important public health threats globally. Ixodes scapularis is the primary vector of the Lyme disease agent in the eastern and central U.S. RNAi is a mechanism by which gene-specific double-stranded RNA (dsRNA triggers degradation of homologous mRNA transcripts. Here, we describe an optimized protocol for effectively suppressing gene expression in the egg and nymphal stages of I. scapularis by electroporation. Results The genes encoding the putative Phospholipase A2 (PLA2, cytoplasmic Cystatin, Syntaxin-5, β-Actin and Calreticulin were targeted by delivering the dsRNA encoding the specific gene coding regions in the unfed nymphs. Silencing was measured using real time qRT-PCR. Electroporation as a mode of dsRNA delivery appears to be substantially efficient and less traumatic to the tick than dsRNA microinjection in the unfed nymphs. Using Cy3-labeled dsRNA to monitor the movement, electroporated dsRNA entered the nymphs and spread to salivary glands and other tissues. The significant disruption of β-actin and cytoplasmic Cystatin transcripts in tick eggs demonstrate the applicability of this technique. The PLA2, cytoplasmic Cystatin, Syntaxin-5, β-Actin and Calreticulin genes were also significantly silenced, suggesting that this method has the potential to introduce dsRNA in eggs and unfed nymphs. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that electroporation can be used as a simple dsRNA delivery tool in assessing the functional role of tick genes in the vector-host interactions. This technique represents a novel approach for specific gene suppression in immature stages of ticks.

  11. Development of functional genomic tools in trematodes: RNA interference and luciferase reporter gene activity in Fasciola hepatica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rinaldi

    Full Text Available The growing availability of sequence information from diverse parasites through genomic and transcriptomic projects offer new opportunities for the identification of key mediators in the parasite-host interaction. Functional genomics approaches and methods for the manipulation of genes are essential tools for deciphering the roles of genes and to identify new intervention targets in parasites. Exciting advances in functional genomics for parasitic helminths are starting to occur, with transgene expression and RNA interference (RNAi reported in several species of nematodes, but the area is still in its infancy in flatworms, with reports in just three species. While advancing in model organisms, there is a need to rapidly extend these technologies to other parasites responsible for several chronic diseases of humans and cattle. In order to extend these approaches to less well studied parasitic worms, we developed a test method for the presence of a viable RNAi pathway by silencing the exogenous reporter gene, firefly luciferase (fLUC. We established the method in the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni and then confirmed its utility in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. We transformed newly excysted juveniles of F. hepatica by electroporation with mRNA of fLUC and three hours later were able to detect luciferase enzyme activity, concentrated mainly in the digestive ceca. Subsequently, we tested the presence of an active RNAi pathway in F. hepatica by knocking down the exogenous luciferase activity by introduction into the transformed parasites of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA specific for fLUC. In addition, we tested the RNAi pathway targeting an endogenous F. hepatica gene encoding leucine aminopeptidase (FhLAP, and observed a significant reduction in specific mRNA levels. In summary, these studies demonstrated the utility of RNAi targeting reporter fLUC as a reporter gene assay to establish the presence of an intact RNAi pathway in helminth

  12. Tools to covisualize and coanalyze proteomic data with genomes and transcriptomes: validation of genes and alternative mRNA splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Chi; Tay, Aidan; Aya, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Direct links between proteomic and genomic/transcriptomic data are not frequently made, partly because of lack of appropriate bioinformatics tools. To help address this, we have developed the PG Nexus pipeline. The PG Nexus allows users to covisualize peptides in the context of genomes or genomic...... is open-source and available from https://github.com/IntersectAustralia/ap11_Samifier . It has been integrated into Galaxy and made available in the Galaxy tool shed....

  13. Application of DETECTER, an evolutionary genomic tool to analyze genetic variation, to the cystic fibrosis gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Kee Danny W

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The medical community requires computational tools that distinguish missense genetic differences having phenotypic impact within the vast number of sense mutations that do not. Tools that do this will become increasingly important for those seeking to use human genome sequence data to predict disease, make prognoses, and customize therapy to individual patients. Results An approach, termed DETECTER, is proposed to identify sites in a protein sequence where amino acid replacements are likely to have a significant effect on phenotype, including causing genetic disease. This approach uses a model-dependent tool to estimate the normalized replacement rate at individual sites in a protein sequence, based on a history of those sites extracted from an evolutionary analysis of the corresponding protein family. This tool identifies sites that have higher-than-average, average, or lower-than-average rates of change in the lineage leading to the sequence in the population of interest. The rates are then combined with sequence data to determine the likelihoods that particular amino acids were present at individual sites in the evolutionary history of the gene family. These likelihoods are used to predict whether any specific amino acid replacements, if introduced at the site in a modern human population, would have a significant impact on fitness. The DETECTER tool is used to analyze the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene family. Conclusion In this system, DETECTER retrodicts amino acid replacements associated with the cystic fibrosis disease with greater accuracy than alternative approaches. While this result validates this approach for this particular family of proteins only, the approach may be applicable to the analysis of polymorphisms generally, including SNPs in a human population.

  14. Tools to covisualize and coanalyze proteomic data with genomes and transcriptomes: validation of genes and alternative mRNA splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Chi; Tay, Aidan; Aya, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    contigs, along with RNA-seq reads. This is done in the Integrated Genome Viewer (IGV). A Results Analyzer reports the precise base position where LC-MS/MS-derived peptides cover genes or gene isoforms, on the chromosomes or contigs where this occurs. In prokaryotes, the PG Nexus pipeline facilitates...

  15. Genomic analysis and tools for the Septoria nodorum blotch susceptibility gene Snn2 in wheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septoria nodorum blotch of wheat is caused by Parastagonospora nodorum and leads to significant yield losses as well as reductions in grain quality and grain weight. The wheat Snn2 gene confers sensitivity to the necrotrophic effector SnTox2 of P. nodorum. A compatible Snn2-SnTox2 interaction is imp...

  16. Genome Exploitation and Bioinformatics Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Anne; van Heel, Auke J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    Bioinformatic tools can greatly improve the efficiency of bacteriocin screening efforts by limiting the amount of strains. Different classes of bacteriocins can be detected in genomes by looking at different features. Finding small bacteriocins can be especially challenging due to low homology and because small open reading frames (ORFs) are often omitted from annotations. In this chapter, several bioinformatic tools/strategies to identify bacteriocins in genomes are discussed.

  17. Uses of antimicrobial genes from microbial genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorek, Rotem; Rubin, Edward M.

    2013-08-20

    We describe a method for mining microbial genomes to discover antimicrobial genes and proteins having broad spectrum of activity. Also described are antimicrobial genes and their expression products from various microbial genomes that were found using this method. The products of such genes can be used as antimicrobial agents or as tools for molecular biology.

  18. RNAi-nanoparticulate manipulation of gene expression as a new functional genomics tool in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hao; Bogorad, Roman L; Barnes, Carmen; Walsh, Stephen; Zhuang, Iris; Nonaka, Hidenori; Ruda, Vera; Kuchimanchi, Satya; Nechev, Lubomir; Akinc, Akin; Xue, Wen; Zerial, Marino; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Koteliansky, Victor

    2016-04-01

    The Hippo pathway controls organ size through a negative regulation of the transcription co-activator Yap1. The overexpression of hyperactive mutant Yap1 or deletion of key components in the Hippo pathway leads to increased organ size in different species. Analysis of interactions of this pathway with other cellular signals corroborating organ size control is limited in part due to the difficulties associated with development of rodent models. Here, we develop a new model of reversible induction of the liver size in mice using siRNA-nanoparticles targeting two kinases of the Hippo pathway, namely, mammalian Ste20 family kinases 1 and 2 (Mst1 and Mst2), and an upstream regulator, neurofibromatosis type II (Nf2). The triple siRNAs nanoparticle-induced hepatomegaly in mice phenocopies one observed with Mst1(-/-)Mst2(-/-) liver-specific depletion, as shown by extensive proliferation of hepatocytes and activation of Yap1. The simultaneous co-treatment with a fourth siRNA nanoparticle against Yap1 fully blocked the liver growth. Hippo pathway-induced liver enlargement is associated with p53 activation, evidenced by its accumulation in the nuclei and upregulation of its target genes. Moreover, injections of the triple siRNAs nanoparticle in p53(LSL/LSL) mice shows that livers lacking p53 expression grow faster and exceed the size of livers in p53 wild-type animals, indicating a role of p53 in controlling Yap1-induced liver growth. Our data show that siRNA-nanoparticulate manipulation of gene expression can provide the reversible control of organ size in adult animals, which presents a new avenue for the investigation of complex regulatory networks in liver. Copyright © 2015 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Application of DETECTER, an evolutionary genomic tool to analyze genetic variation, to the cystic fibrosis gene family

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The medical community requires computational tools that distinguish missense genetic differences having phenotypic impact within the vast number of sense mutations that do not. Tools that do this will become increasingly important for those seeking to use human genome sequence data to predict disease, make prognoses, and customize therapy to individual patients. Results An approach, termed DETECTER, is proposed to identify sites in a protein sequence where amino acid repla...

  20. GEGEINTOOL: A Computer-Based Tool for Automated Analysis of Gene-Gene Interactions in Large Epidemiological Studies in Cardiovascular Genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Coltell

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Current methods of data analysis of gene-gene interactions in complex diseases, after taking into account environmental factors using traditional approaches, are inefficient. High-throughput methods of analysis in large scale studies including thousands of subjects and hundreds of SNPs should be implemented. We developed an integrative computer tool, GEGEINTOOL (GEne- GEne INTeraction tOOL, for large-scale analysis of gene-gene interactions, in human studies of complex diseases including a large number of subjects, SNPs, as well as environmental factors. That resource uses standard statistical packages (SPSS, etc. to build and fit the gene-gene interaction models by means of syntax scripts in predicting one or more continuous or dichotomic phenotypes. Codominant, dominant and recessive genetic interaction models including control for covariates are automatically created for each SNP in order to test the best model. From the standard outputs, GEGEINTOOL extracts a selected set of parameters (regression coefficients, p-values, adjusted means, etc., and groups them in a single MS Excel Spreadsheet. The tool allows editing the set of filter parameters, filtering the selected results depending on p-values, as well as plotting the selected gene-gene interactions to check consistency. In conclusion, GEGEINTOOL is a useful and friendly tool for exploring and identifying gene-gene interactions in complex diseases.

  1. VISTA - computational tools for comparative genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Pachter, Lior; Poliakov, Alexander; Rubin,Edward M.; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of DNA sequences from different species is a fundamental method for identifying functional elements in genomes. Here we describe the VISTA family of tools created to assist biologists in carrying out this task. Our first VISTA server at http://www-gsd.lbl.gov/VISTA/ was launched in the summer of 2000 and was designed to align long genomic sequences and visualize these alignments with associated functional annotations. Currently the VISTA site includes multiple comparative genomics tools and provides users with rich capabilities to browse pre-computed whole-genome alignments of large vertebrate genomes and other groups of organisms with VISTA Browser, submit their own sequences of interest to several VISTA servers for various types of comparative analysis, and obtain detailed comparative analysis results for a set of cardiovascular genes. We illustrate capabilities of the VISTA site by the analysis of a 180 kilobase (kb) interval on human chromosome 5 that encodes for the kinesin family member3A (KIF3A) protein.

  2. KEGG: kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanehisa, M; Goto, S

    2000-01-01

    KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) is a knowledge base for systematic analysis of gene functions, linking genomic information with higher order functional information. The genomic information is stored in the GENES database, which is a collection of gene catalogs for all the completely sequenced genomes and some partial genomes with up-to-date annotation of gene functions. The higher order functional information is stored in the PATHWAY database, which contains graphical representations of cellular processes, such as metabolism, membrane transport, signal transduction and cell cycle. The PATHWAY database is supplemented by a set of ortholog group tables for the information about conserved subpathways (pathway motifs), which are often encoded by positionally coupled genes on the chromosome and which are especially useful in predicting gene functions. A third database in KEGG is LIGAND for the information about chemical compounds, enzyme molecules and enzymatic reactions. KEGG provides Java graphics tools for browsing genome maps, comparing two genome maps and manipulating expression maps, as well as computational tools for sequence comparison, graph comparison and path computation. The KEGG databases are daily updated and made freely available (http://www. genome.ad.jp/kegg/).

  3. Bovine Genome Database: new tools for gleaning function from the Bos taurus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsik, Christine G; Unni, Deepak R; Diesh, Colin M; Tayal, Aditi; Emery, Marianne L; Nguyen, Hung N; Hagen, Darren E

    2016-01-01

    We report an update of the Bovine Genome Database (BGD) (http://BovineGenome.org). The goal of BGD is to support bovine genomics research by providing genome annotation and data mining tools. We have developed new genome and annotation browsers using JBrowse and WebApollo for two Bos taurus genome assemblies, the reference genome assembly (UMD3.1.1) and the alternate genome assembly (Btau_4.6.1). Annotation tools have been customized to highlight priority genes for annotation, and to aid annotators in selecting gene evidence tracks from 91 tissue specific RNAseq datasets. We have also developed BovineMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, to integrate the bovine genome, annotation, QTL, SNP and expression data with external sources of orthology, gene ontology, gene interaction and pathway information. BovineMine provides powerful query building tools, as well as customized query templates, and allows users to analyze and download genome-wide datasets. With BovineMine, bovine researchers can use orthology to leverage the curated gene pathways of model organisms, such as human, mouse and rat. BovineMine will be especially useful for gene ontology and pathway analyses in conjunction with GWAS and QTL studies.

  4. DCODE.ORG Anthology of Comparative Genomic Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I

    2005-01-11

    Comparative genomics provides the means to demarcate functional regions in anonymous DNA sequences. The successful application of this method to identifying novel genes is currently shifting to deciphering the noncoding encryption of gene regulation across genomes. To facilitate the use of comparative genomics to practical applications in genetics and genomics we have developed several analytical and visualization tools for the analysis of arbitrary sequences and whole genomes. These tools include two alignment tools: zPicture and Mulan; a phylogenetic shadowing tool: eShadow for identifying lineage- and species-specific functional elements; two evolutionary conserved transcription factor analysis tools: rVista and multiTF; a tool for extracting cis-regulatory modules governing the expression of co-regulated genes, CREME; and a dynamic portal to multiple vertebrate and invertebrate genome alignments, the ECR Browser. Here we briefly describe each one of these tools and provide specific examples on their practical applications. All the tools are publicly available at the http://www.dcode.org/ web site.

  5. Expanding the repertoire of gene tools for precise manipulation of the Clostridium difficile genome: allelic exchange using pyrE alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Kuan Ng

    Full Text Available Sophisticated genetic tools to modify essential biological processes at the molecular level are pivotal in elucidating the molecular pathogenesis of Clostridium difficile, a major cause of healthcare associated disease. Here we have developed an efficient procedure for making precise alterations to the C. difficile genome by pyrE-based allelic exchange. The robustness and reliability of the method was demonstrated through the creation of in-frame deletions in three genes (spo0A, cwp84, and mtlD in the non-epidemic strain 630Δerm and two genes (spo0A and cwp84 in the epidemic PCR Ribotype 027 strain, R20291. The system is reliant on the initial creation of a pyrE deletion mutant, using Allele Coupled Exchange (ACE, that is auxotrophic for uracil and resistant to fluoroorotic acid (FOA. This enables the subsequent modification of target genes by allelic exchange using a heterologous pyrE allele from Clostridium sporogenes as a counter-/negative-selection marker in the presence of FOA. Following modification of the target gene, the strain created is rapidly returned to uracil prototrophy using ACE, allowing mutant phenotypes to be characterised in a PyrE proficient background. Crucially, wild-type copies of the inactivated gene may be introduced into the genome using ACE concomitant with correction of the pyrE allele. This allows complementation studies to be undertaken at an appropriate gene dosage, as opposed to the use of multicopy autonomous plasmids. The rapidity of the 'correction' method (5-7 days makes pyrE(- strains attractive hosts for mutagenesis studies.

  6. PSAT: A web tool to compare genomic neighborhoods of multiple prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasnick Michael

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conservation of gene order among prokaryotic genomes can provide valuable insight into gene function, protein interactions, or events by which genomes have evolved. Although some tools are available for visualizing and comparing the order of genes between genomes of study, few support an efficient and organized analysis between large numbers of genomes. The Prokaryotic Sequence homology Analysis Tool (PSAT is a web tool for comparing gene neighborhoods among multiple prokaryotic genomes. Results PSAT utilizes a database that is preloaded with gene annotation, BLAST hit results, and gene-clustering scores designed to help identify regions of conserved gene order. Researchers use the PSAT web interface to find a gene of interest in a reference genome and efficiently retrieve the sequence homologs found in other bacterial genomes. The tool generates a graphic of the genomic neighborhood surrounding the selected gene and the corresponding regions for its homologs in each comparison genome. Homologs in each region are color coded to assist users with analyzing gene order among various genomes. In contrast to common comparative analysis methods that filter sequence homolog data based on alignment score cutoffs, PSAT leverages gene context information for homologs, including those with weak alignment scores, enabling a more sensitive analysis. Features for constraining or ordering results are designed to help researchers browse results from large numbers of comparison genomes in an organized manner. PSAT has been demonstrated to be useful for helping to identify gene orthologs and potential functional gene clusters, and detecting genome modifications that may result in loss of function. Conclusion PSAT allows researchers to investigate the order of genes within local genomic neighborhoods of multiple genomes. A PSAT web server for public use is available for performing analyses on a growing set of reference genomes through any

  7. GLANET: genomic loci annotation and enrichment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otlu, Burçak; Firtina, Can; Keles, Sündüz; Tastan, Oznur

    2017-09-15

    Genomic studies identify genomic loci representing genetic variations, transcription factor (TF) occupancy, or histone modification through next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Interpreting these loci requires evaluating them with known genomic and epigenomic annotations. We present GLANET as a comprehensive annotation and enrichment analysis tool which implements a sampling-based enrichment test that accounts for GC content and/or mappability biases, jointly or separately. GLANET annotates and performs enrichment analysis on these loci with a rich library. We introduce and perform novel data-driven computational experiments for assessing the power and Type-I error of its enrichment procedure which show that GLANET has attained high statistical power and well-controlled Type-I error rate. As a key feature, users can easily extend its library with new gene sets and genomic intervals. Other key features include assessment of impact of single nucleotide variants (SNPs) on TF binding sites and regulation based pathway enrichment analysis. GLANET can be run using its GUI or on command line. GLANET's source code is available at https://github.com/burcakotlu/GLANET . Tutorials are provided at https://glanet.readthedocs.org . burcak@ceng.metu.edu.tr or oznur.tastan@cs.bilkent.edu.tr. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  8. Bioinformatics Assisted Gene Discovery and Annotation of Human Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    As the sequencing stage of human genome project is near the end, the work has begun for discovering novel genes from genome sequences and annotating their biological functions. Here are reviewed current major bioinformatics tools and technologies available for large scale gene discovery and annotation from human genome sequences. Some ideas about possible future development are also provided.

  9. Scanning genomic areas under selection sweep and association mapping as tools to identify horticultural important genes in watermelon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watermelon (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus) contains 88% water, sugars, and several important health-related compounds, including lycopene, citrulline, arginine, and glutathione. The current genetic diversity study uses microsatellites with known map positions to identify genomic regions that under...

  10. Strategies and tools for whole genome alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couronne, Olivier; Poliakov, Alexander; Bray, Nicolas; Ishkhanov,Tigran; Ryaboy, Dmitriy; Rubin, Edward; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna

    2002-11-25

    The availability of the assembled mouse genome makespossible, for the first time, an alignment and comparison of two largevertebrate genomes. We have investigated different strategies ofalignment for the subsequent analysis of conservation of genomes that areeffective for different quality assemblies. These strategies were appliedto the comparison of the working draft of the human genome with the MouseGenome Sequencing Consortium assembly, as well as other intermediatemouse assemblies. Our methods are fast and the resulting alignmentsexhibit a high degree of sensitivity, covering more than 90 percent ofknown coding exons in the human genome. We have obtained such coveragewhile preserving specificity. With a view towards the end user, we havedeveloped a suite of tools and websites for automatically aligning, andsubsequently browsing and working with whole genome comparisons. Wedescribe the use of these tools to identify conserved non-coding regionsbetween the human and mouse genomes, some of which have not beenidentified by other methods.

  11. Gene finding in novel genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Ian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational gene prediction continues to be an important problem, especially for genomes with little experimental data. Results I introduce the SNAP gene finder which has been designed to be easily adaptable to a variety of genomes. In novel genomes without an appropriate gene finder, I demonstrate that employing a foreign gene finder can produce highly inaccurate results, and that the most compatible parameters may not come from the nearest phylogenetic neighbor. I find that foreign gene finders are more usefully employed to bootstrap parameter estimation and that the resulting parameters can be highly accurate. Conclusion Since gene prediction is sensitive to species-specific parameters, every genome needs a dedicated gene finder.

  12. The molecular genetic linkage map of the model legume Medicago truncatula: an essential tool for comparative legume genomics and the isolation of agronomically important genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ané Jean-Michel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The legume Medicago truncatula has emerged as a model plant for the molecular and genetic dissection of various plant processes involved in rhizobial, mycorrhizal and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions. Aiming to develop essential tools for such genetic approaches, we have established the first genetic map of this species. Two parental homozygous lines were selected from the cultivar Jemalong and from the Algerian natural population (DZA315 on the basis of their molecular and phenotypic polymorphism. Results An F2 segregating population of 124 individuals between these two lines was obtained using an efficient manual crossing technique established for M. truncatula and was used to construct a genetic map. This map spans 1225 cM (average 470 kb/cM and comprises 289 markers including RAPD, AFLP, known genes and isoenzymes arranged in 8 linkage groups (2n = 16. Markers are uniformly distributed throughout the map and segregation distortion is limited to only 3 linkage groups. By mapping a number of common markers, the eight linkage groups are shown to be homologous to those of diploid alfalfa (M. sativa, implying a good level of macrosynteny between the two genomes. Using this M. truncatula map and the derived F3 populations, we were able to map the Mtsym6 symbiotic gene on linkage group 8 and the SPC gene, responsible for the direction of pod coiling, on linkage group 7. Conclusions These results demonstrate that Medicago truncatula is amenable to diploid genetic analysis and they open the way to map-based cloning of symbiotic or other agronomically-important genes using this model plant.

  13. Gene functional similarity search tool (GFSST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo James J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the genome sequences of human, mouse, and other species and the advent of high throughput functional genomic research technologies such as biomicroarray chips, more and more genes and their products have been discovered and their functions have begun to be understood. Increasing amounts of data about genes, gene products and their functions have been stored in databases. To facilitate selection of candidate genes for gene-disease research, genetic association studies, biomarker and drug target selection, and animal models of human diseases, it is essential to have search engines that can retrieve genes by their functions from proteome databases. In recent years, the development of Gene Ontology (GO has established structured, controlled vocabularies describing gene functions, which makes it possible to develop novel tools to search genes by functional similarity. Results By using a statistical model to measure the functional similarity of genes based on the Gene Ontology directed acyclic graph, we developed a novel Gene Functional Similarity Search Tool (GFSST to identify genes with related functions from annotated proteome databases. This search engine lets users design their search targets by gene functions. Conclusion An implementation of GFSST which works on the UniProt (Universal Protein Resource for the human and mouse proteomes is available at GFSST Web Server. GFSST provides functions not only for similar gene retrieval but also for gene search by one or more GO terms. This represents a powerful new approach for selecting similar genes and gene products from proteome databases according to their functions.

  14. Cotton Genome Manipulations:Exploring Smart Tools,Novel Germplasm,and Elite Genes for Super Cotton Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xian-long

    2008-01-01

    @@ Plant regeneration is the first step to cotton biotechnology.We screened over 100 genotypes and found two genotypes,YZ-1 and Y668,which are very easy to regenerate.It takes about 5 to 6 months for the two genotypes from explant inoculation to plant regeneration.Meanwhile,we investigated the gene expression patterns during somatic embryogenesis (SE) in cotton.The results suggested that a complicated and concerted mechanism involving multiple pathways is responsible for cotton SE.We constructed a network to show the relationship between genes during SE.

  15. GREAT: a web portal for Genome Regulatory Architecture Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyioukos, Costas; Bucchini, François; Elati, Mohamed; Képès, François

    2016-07-08

    GREAT (Genome REgulatory Architecture Tools) is a novel web portal for tools designed to generate user-friendly and biologically useful analysis of genome architecture and regulation. The online tools of GREAT are freely accessible and compatible with essentially any operating system which runs a modern browser. GREAT is based on the analysis of genome layout -defined as the respective positioning of co-functional genes- and its relation with chromosome architecture and gene expression. GREAT tools allow users to systematically detect regular patterns along co-functional genomic features in an automatic way consisting of three individual steps and respective interactive visualizations. In addition to the complete analysis of regularities, GREAT tools enable the use of periodicity and position information for improving the prediction of transcription factor binding sites using a multi-view machine learning approach. The outcome of this integrative approach features a multivariate analysis of the interplay between the location of a gene and its regulatory sequence. GREAT results are plotted in web interactive graphs and are available for download either as individual plots, self-contained interactive pages or as machine readable tables for downstream analysis. The GREAT portal can be reached at the following URL https://absynth.issb.genopole.fr/GREAT and each individual GREAT tool is available for downloading.

  16. Healthcare, molecular tools and applied genome research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, M

    2000-11-01

    Biotechnology 2000 offered a rare opportunity for scientists from academia and industry to present and discuss data in fields as diverse as environmental biotechnology and applied genome research. The healthcare section of the meeting encompassed a number of gene therapy delivery systems that are successfully treating genetic disorders. Beta-thalassemia is being corrected in mice by continous erythropoeitin delivery from engineered muscles cells, and from naked DNA electrotransfer into muscles, as described by Dr JM Heard (Institut Pasteur, Paris, France). Dr Reszka (Max-Delbrueck-Centrum fuer Molekulare Medizin, Berlin, Germany), meanwhile, described a treatment for liver metastasis in the form of a drug carrier emolization system, DCES (Max-Delbrueck-Centrum fuer Molekulare Medizin), composed of surface modified liposomes and a substance for chemo-occlusion, which drastically reduces the blood supply to the tumor and promotes apoptosis, necrosis and antiangiogenesis. In the molecular tools section, Willem Stemmer (Maxygen Inc, Redwood City, CA, USA) gave an insight into the importance that techniques, such as molecular breeding (DNA shuffling), have in the evolution of molecules with improved function, over a range of fields including pharmaceuticals, vaccines, agriculture and chemicals. Technologies, such as ribosome display, which can incorporate the evolution and the specific enrichment of proteins/peptides in cycles of selection, could play an enormous role in the production of novel therapeutics and diagnostics in future years, as explained by Andreas Plückthun (Institute of Biochemistry, University of Zurich, Switzerland). Applied genome research offered technologies, such as the 'in vitro expression cloning', described by Dr Zwick (Promega Corp, Madison, WI, USA), are providing a functional analysis for the overwhelming flow of data emerging from high-throughput sequencing of genomes and from high-density gene expression microarrays (DNA chips). The

  17. BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal Matoq Saeed

    2015-08-18

    Background Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). Results The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACON’s utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27 %, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. Conclusions We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/

  18. BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkatawi, Manal; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-08-18

    Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACON's utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27%, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/ .

  19. Brief Guide to Genomics: DNA, Genes and Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Breve guía de genómica A Brief Guide to Genomics DNA, Genes and Genomes Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is ... genetic basis for health and disease. Implications of Genomics for Medical Science Virtually every human ailment has ...

  20. Genome editing for human gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Torsten B; Mandal, Pankaj K; Ferreira, Leonardo M R; Rossi, Derrick J; Cowan, Chad A

    2014-01-01

    The rapid advancement of genome-editing techniques holds much promise for the field of human gene therapy. From bacteria to model organisms and human cells, genome editing tools such as zinc-finger nucleases (ZNFs), TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9 have been successfully used to manipulate the respective genomes with unprecedented precision. With regard to human gene therapy, it is of great interest to test the feasibility of genome editing in primary human hematopoietic cells that could potentially be used to treat a variety of human genetic disorders such as hemoglobinopathies, primary immunodeficiencies, and cancer. In this chapter, we explore the use of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for the efficient ablation of genes in two clinically relevant primary human cell types, CD4+ T cells and CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. By using two guide RNAs directed at a single locus, we achieve highly efficient and predictable deletions that ablate gene function. The use of a Cas9-2A-GFP fusion protein allows FACS-based enrichment of the transfected cells. The ease of designing, constructing, and testing guide RNAs makes this dual guide strategy an attractive approach for the efficient deletion of clinically relevant genes in primary human hematopoietic stem and effector cells and enables the use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene therapy.

  1. Genomic variation in Salmonella enterica core genes for epidemiological typing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Lukjancenko, Oksana; Rundsten, Carsten Friis

    2012-01-01

    Background: Technological advances in high throughput genome sequencing are making whole genome sequencing (WGS) available as a routine tool for bacterial typing. Standardized procedures for identification of relevant genes and of variation are needed to enable comparison between studies and over...... genomes and evaluate their value as typing targets, comparing whole genome typing and traditional methods such as 16S and MLST. A consensus tree based on variation of core genes gives much better resolution than 16S and MLST; the pan-genome family tree is similar to the consensus tree, but with higher...... that there is a positive selection towards mutations leading to amino acid changes. Conclusions: Genomic variation within the core genome is useful for investigating molecular evolution and providing candidate genes for bacterial genome typing. Identification of genes with different degrees of variation is important...

  2. Molecular biology - New tool for genome surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oost, van der J.

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy is the holy grail of human medicine. Many diseases are caused by a defective gene, sometimes with a mutation as subtle as a single-nucleotide variation. Before restoration of such a mutation in a patient's genome can take place, the target nucleotide sequence has to be cleaved at a sing

  3. GenomePeek—an online tool for prokaryotic genome and metagenome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katelyn McNair

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As more and more prokaryotic sequencing takes place, a method to quickly and accurately analyze this data is needed. Previous tools are mainly designed for metagenomic analysis and have limitations; such as long runtimes and significant false positive error rates. The online tool GenomePeek (edwards.sdsu.edu/GenomePeek was developed to analyze both single genome and metagenome sequencing files, quickly and with low error rates. GenomePeek uses a sequence assembly approach where reads to a set of conserved genes are extracted, assembled and then aligned against the highly specific reference database. GenomePeek was found to be faster than traditional approaches while still keeping error rates low, as well as offering unique data visualization options.

  4. Genomic variation in Salmonella enterica core genes for epidemiological typing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leekitcharoenphon Pimlapas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Technological advances in high throughput genome sequencing are making whole genome sequencing (WGS available as a routine tool for bacterial typing. Standardized procedures for identification of relevant genes and of variation are needed to enable comparison between studies and over time. The core genes--the genes that are conserved in all (or most members of a genus or species--are potentially good candidates for investigating genomic variation in phylogeny and epidemiology. Results We identify a set of 2,882 core genes clusters based on 73 publicly available Salmonella enterica genomes and evaluate their value as typing targets, comparing whole genome typing and traditional methods such as 16S and MLST. A consensus tree based on variation of core genes gives much better resolution than 16S and MLST; the pan-genome family tree is similar to the consensus tree, but with higher confidence. The core genes can be divided into two categories: a few highly variable genes and a larger set of conserved core genes, with low variance. For the most variable core genes, the variance in amino acid sequences is higher than for the corresponding nucleotide sequences, suggesting that there is a positive selection towards mutations leading to amino acid changes. Conclusions Genomic variation within the core genome is useful for investigating molecular evolution and providing candidate genes for bacterial genome typing. Identification of genes with different degrees of variation is important especially in trend analysis.

  5. ECR Browser: A Tool For Visualizing And Accessing Data From Comparisons Of Multiple Vertebrate Genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I; Stubbs, L; Nobrega, M A

    2004-01-06

    The increasing number of vertebrate genomes being sequenced in draft or finished form provide a unique opportunity to study and decode the language of DNA sequence through comparative genome alignments. However, novel tools and strategies are required to accommodate this increasing volume of genomic information and to facilitate experimental annotation of genome function. Here we present the ECR Browser, a tool that provides an easy and dynamic access to whole genome alignments of human, mouse, rat and fish sequences. This web-based tool (http://ecrbrowser.dcode.org) provides the starting point for discovery of novel genes, identification of distant gene regulatory elements and prediction of transcription factor binding sites. The genome alignment portal of the ECR Browser also permits fast and automated alignment of any user-submitted sequence to the genome of choice. The interconnection of the ECR browser with other DNA sequence analysis tools creates a unique portal for studying and exploring vertebrate genomes.

  6. Genomic Tools and Animal Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Zanella

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Animals have been selected to improve their productivity in order to increase the profitability to the producer. In this scenario, not much attention was given to health traits. As a consequence of that, selection was made for animals with higher production and a shortened productive life. In addition to that, the intense production system used in livestock has forced animals to be exposed to higher pathogen loads, therefore predisposing them to infections. Infectious diseases are known to be caused by micro-organisms that are able to infect and colonize the host, affecting their physiological functions and causing problems in their production and on animal welfare. Even with the best management practices, diseases are still the most important cause of economic losses in the animal industry. In this review article we have addressed the new tools that could be used to select animals to better cope with diseases and pathogens.

  7. Genomic SELEX: a discovery tool for genomic aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Bob; Bilusic, Ivana; Lorenz, Christina; Schroeder, Renée

    2010-10-01

    Genomic SELEX is a discovery tool for genomic aptamers, which are genomically encoded functional domains in nucleic acid molecules that recognize and bind specific ligands. When combined with genomic libraries and using RNA-binding proteins as baits, Genomic SELEX used with high-throughput sequencing enables the discovery of genomic RNA aptamers and the identification of RNA-protein interaction networks. Here we describe how to construct and analyze genomic libraries, how to choose baits for selections, how to perform the selection procedure and finally how to analyze the enriched sequences derived from deep sequencing. As a control procedure, we recommend performing a "Neutral" SELEX experiment in parallel to the selection, omitting the selection step. This control experiment provides a background signal for comparison with the positively selected pool. We also recommend deep sequencing the initial library in order to facilitate the final in silico analysis of enrichment with respect to the initial levels. Counter selection procedures, using modified or inactive baits, allow strengthening the binding specificity of the winning selected sequences.

  8. Endonucleases: new tools to edit the mouse genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijshake, Tobias; Baker, Darren J; van de Sluis, Bart

    2014-10-01

    Mouse transgenesis has been instrumental in determining the function of genes in the pathophysiology of human diseases and modification of genes by homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells remains a widely used technology. However, this approach harbors a number of disadvantages, as it is time-consuming and quite laborious. Over the last decade a number of new genome editing technologies have been developed, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas). These systems are characterized by a designed DNA binding protein or RNA sequence fused or co-expressed with a non-specific endonuclease, respectively. The engineered DNA binding protein or RNA sequence guides the nuclease to a specific target sequence in the genome to induce a double strand break. The subsequent activation of the DNA repair machinery then enables the introduction of gene modifications at the target site, such as gene disruption, correction or insertion. Nuclease-mediated genome editing has numerous advantages over conventional gene targeting, including increased efficiency in gene editing, reduced generation time of mutant mice, and the ability to mutagenize multiple genes simultaneously. Although nuclease-driven modifications in the genome are a powerful tool to generate mutant mice, there are concerns about off-target cleavage, especially when using the CRISPR/Cas system. Here, we describe the basic principles of these new strategies in mouse genome manipulation, their inherent advantages, and their potential disadvantages compared to current technologies used to study gene function in mouse models. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From Genome to Function.

  9. The CGView Server: a comparative genomics tool for circular genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jason R; Stothard, Paul

    2008-07-01

    The CGView Server generates graphical maps of circular genomes that show sequence features, base composition plots, analysis results and sequence similarity plots. Sequences can be supplied in raw, FASTA, GenBank or EMBL format. Additional feature or analysis information can be submitted in the form of GFF (General Feature Format) files. The server uses BLAST to compare the primary sequence to up to three comparison genomes or sequence sets. The BLAST results and feature information are converted to a graphical map showing the entire sequence, or an expanded and more detailed view of a region of interest. Several options are included to control which types of features are displayed and how the features are drawn. The CGView Server can be used to visualize features associated with any bacterial, plasmid, chloroplast or mitochondrial genome, and can aid in the identification of conserved genome segments, instances of horizontal gene transfer, and differences in gene copy number. Because a collection of sequences can be used in place of a comparison genome, maps can also be used to visualize regions of a known genome covered by newly obtained sequence reads. The CGView Server can be accessed at http://stothard.afns.ualberta.ca/cgview_server/

  10. Skittle: A 2-Dimensional Genome Visualization Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanford John C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is increasingly evident that there are multiple and overlapping patterns within the genome, and that these patterns contain different types of information - regarding both genome function and genome history. In order to discover additional genomic patterns which may have biological significance, novel strategies are required. To partially address this need, we introduce a new data visualization tool entitled Skittle. Results This program first creates a 2-dimensional nucleotide display by assigning four colors to the four nucleotides, and then text-wraps to a user adjustable width. This nucleotide display is accompanied by a "repeat map" which comprehensively displays all local repeating units, based upon analysis of all possible local alignments. Skittle includes a smooth-zooming interface which allows the user to analyze genomic patterns at any scale. Skittle is especially useful in identifying and analyzing tandem repeats, including repeats not normally detectable by other methods. However, Skittle is also more generally useful for analysis of any genomic data, allowing users to correlate published annotations and observable visual patterns, and allowing for sequence and construct quality control. Conclusions Preliminary observations using Skittle reveal intriguing genomic patterns not otherwise obvious, including structured variations inside tandem repeats. The striking visual patterns revealed by Skittle appear to be useful for hypothesis development, and have already led the authors to theorize that imperfect tandem repeats could act as information carriers, and may form tertiary structures within the interphase nucleus.

  11. The Switchgrass Genome: Tools and Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Casler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Switchgrass ( L. is a perennial grass species receiving significant focus as a potential bioenergy crop. In the last 5 yr the switchgrass research community has produced a genetic linkage map, an expressed sequence tag (EST database, a set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers that are distributed across the 18 linkage groups, 4x sampling of the AP13 genome in 400-bp reads, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries containing over 200,000 clones. These studies have revealed close collinearity of the switchgrass genome with those of sorghum [ (L. Moench], rice ( L., and (L. P. Beauv. Switchgrass researchers have also developed several microarray technologies for gene expression studies. Switchgrass genomic resources will accelerate the ability of plant breeders to enhance productivity, pest resistance, and nutritional quality. Because switchgrass is a relative newcomer to the genomics world, many secrets of the switchgrass genome have yet to be revealed. To continue to efficiently explore basic and applied topics in switchgrass, it will be critical to capture and exploit the knowledge of plant geneticists and breeders on the next logical steps in the development and utilization of genomic resources for this species. To this end, the community has established a switchgrass genomics executive committee and work group ( [verified 28 Oct. 2011].

  12. The Candida genome database incorporates multiple Candida species: multispecies search and analysis tools with curated gene and protein information for Candida albicans and Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, Diane O; Arnaud, Martha B; Binkley, Jonathan; Shah, Prachi; Skrzypek, Marek S; Wymore, Farrell; Binkley, Gail; Miyasato, Stuart R; Simison, Matt; Sherlock, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    The Candida Genome Database (CGD, http://www.candidagenome.org/) is an internet-based resource that provides centralized access to genomic sequence data and manually curated functional information about genes and proteins of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans and other Candida species. As the scope of Candida research, and the number of sequenced strains and related species, has grown in recent years, the need for expanded genomic resources has also grown. To answer this need, CGD has expanded beyond storing data solely for C. albicans, now integrating data from multiple species. Herein we describe the incorporation of this multispecies information, which includes curated gene information and the reference sequence for C. glabrata, as well as orthology relationships that interconnect Locus Summary pages, allowing easy navigation between genes of C. albicans and C. glabrata. These orthology relationships are also used to predict GO annotations of their products. We have also added protein information pages that display domains, structural information and physicochemical properties; bibliographic pages highlighting important topic areas in Candida biology; and a laboratory strain lineage page that describes the lineage of commonly used laboratory strains. All of these data are freely available at http://www.candidagenome.org/. We welcome feedback from the research community at candida-curator@lists.stanford.edu.

  13. Bioinformatics tools for analysing viral genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, R J; Gu, Q; Hughes, J; Maabar, M; Modha, S; Vattipally, S B; Wilkie, G S; Davison, A J

    2016-04-01

    The field of viral genomics and bioinformatics is experiencing a strong resurgence due to high-throughput sequencing (HTS) technology, which enables the rapid and cost-effective sequencing and subsequent assembly of large numbers of viral genomes. In addition, the unprecedented power of HTS technologies has enabled the analysis of intra-host viral diversity and quasispecies dynamics in relation to important biological questions on viral transmission, vaccine resistance and host jumping. HTS also enables the rapid identification of both known and potentially new viruses from field and clinical samples, thus adding new tools to the fields of viral discovery and metagenomics. Bioinformatics has been central to the rise of HTS applications because new algorithms and software tools are continually needed to process and analyse the large, complex datasets generated in this rapidly evolving area. In this paper, the authors give a brief overview of the main bioinformatics tools available for viral genomic research, with a particular emphasis on HTS technologies and their main applications. They summarise the major steps in various HTS analyses, starting with quality control of raw reads and encompassing activities ranging from consensus and de novo genome assembly to variant calling and metagenomics, as well as RNA sequencing.

  14. Genephony: a knowledge management tool for genome-wide research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Angelo; Riva, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the consequences of the rapid and widespread adoption of high-throughput experimental technologies is an exponential increase of the amount of data produced by genome-wide experiments. Researchers increasingly need to handle very large volumes of heterogeneous data, including both the data generated by their own experiments and the data retrieved from publicly available repositories of genomic knowledge. Integration, exploration, manipulation and interpretation of data and information therefore need to become as automated as possible, since their scale and breadth are, in general, beyond the limits of what individual researchers and the basic data management tools in normal use can handle. This paper describes Genephony, a tool we are developing to address these challenges. Results We describe how Genephony can be used to manage large datesets of genomic information, integrating them with existing knowledge repositories. We illustrate its functionalities with an example of a complex annotation task, in which a set of SNPs coming from a genotyping experiment is annotated with genes known to be associated to a phenotype of interest. We show how, thanks to the modular architecture of Genephony and its user-friendly interface, this task can be performed in a few simple steps. Conclusion Genephony is an online tool for the manipulation of large datasets of genomic information. It can be used as a browser for genomic data, as a high-throughput annotation tool, and as a knowledge discovery tool. It is designed to be easy to use, flexible and extensible. Its knowledge management engine provides fine-grained control over individual data elements, as well as efficient operations on large datasets. PMID:19728881

  15. Genome display tool: visualizing features in complex data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Yue

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The enormity of the information contained in large data sets makes it difficult to develop intuitive understanding. It would be useful to have software that allows visualization of possible correlations between properties that can be associated with a core data set. In the case of bacterial genomes, existing visualization tools focus on either global properties such as variations in composition or detailed local displays of the features that comprise the annotation. It is not easy to visualize other information in the context of this core information. Results A Java based software known as the Genome Display Tool (GDT, allows the user to simultaneously view the distribution of multiple attributes pertaining to genes and intragenic regions in a single bacterial genome using different colours and shapes on a single screen. The display represents each gene by small boxes that correlate with physical position in the genome. The size of the boxes is dynamically allocated based on the number of genes and a zoom feature allows close-up inspection of regions of interest. The display is interfaced with a MS-Access relational database and can display any feature in the database that can be represented by discrete values. Data is readily added to the database from an MS-Excel spread sheet. The functionality of GDT is demonstrated by comparing the results of two predictions of recent horizontal transfer events in the genome of Synechocystis PCC-6803. The resulting display allows the user to immediately see how much agreement exists between the two methods and also visualize how genes in various categories (e.g. predicted in both methods, one method etc are distributed in the genome. Conclusion The GDT software provides the user with a powerful tool that allows development of an intuitive understanding of the relative distribution of features in a large data set. As additional features are added to the data set, the number of possible

  16. Targeted array comparative genomic hybridization--a new diagnostic tool for the detection of large copy number variations in nemaline myopathy-causing genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiiski, K; Laari, L; Lehtokari, V-L; Lunkka-Hytönen, M; Angelini, C; Petty, R; Hackman, P; Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Pelin, K

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) constitutes a heterogeneous group of congenital myopathies. Mutations in the nebulin gene (NEB) are the main cause of recessively inherited NM. NEB is one of the most largest genes in human. To date, 68 NEB mutations, mainly small deletions or point mutations have been published. The only large mutation characterized is the 2.5 kb deletion of exon 55 in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. To investigate any copy number variations in this enormous gene, we designed a novel custom comparative genomic hybridization microarray, NM-CGH, targeted towards the seven known genes causative for NM. During the validation of the NM-CGH array we identified two novel deletions in two different families. The first is the largest deletion characterized in NEB to date, (∼53 kb) encompassing 24 exons. The second deletion (1 kb) covers two exons. In both families, the copy number change was the second mutation to be characterized and shown to have been inherited from one of the healthy carrier parents. In addition to these novel mutations, copy number variation was identified in four samples in three families in the triplicate region of NEB. We conclude that this method appears promising for the detection of copy number variations in NEB. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic tools for manipulating Acinetobacter baumannii genome: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Indranil

    2015-07-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an emerging nosocomial pathogen involved in a variety of infections ranging from minor soft-tissue infections to more severe infections such as ventilator-associated pneumonia and bacteraemia. A. baumannii has become resistant to most of the commonly used antibiotics and multidrug-resistant isolates are becoming a severe problem in the healthcare setting. In the past few years, whole-genome sequences of >200 A. baumannii isolates have been generated. Several methods and molecular tools have been used for genetic manipulation of various Acinetobacter spp. Here, we review recent developments of various genetic tools used for modification of the A. baumannii genome, including various ways to inactivate gene function, chromosomal integration and transposon mutagenesis.

  18. [Genome Editing Tools and their Application in Experimental Ophthalmology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, M; Wende, W; Stieger, K

    2017-01-23

    New genome editing tools in molecular biology are revolutionising precise genome surgery and have greatly influenced experimental ophthalmology too. Aside from the commonly used nuclease-based platforms, such as the zinc-finger nucleases (ZFN) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN), CRISPR/Cas systems, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) genes, perform very efficiently in site-specific DNA cleavage within living cells. DNA double strand breaks (DSB) are repaired through two different conserved repair pathways: NHEJ (non-homologous end joining) and HDR (homology directed repair). By using the correct DNA templates, these repair pathways can be used to knock out defective genes or to repair mutations. Genome editing technology lays the ground for new strategies in basic science, biotechnology, and biomedical science, as well as clinical studies with genome editing. Therapeutic gene editing strategies are now concentrating on diseases in the retina, due to the comparatively easy accessibility of the eye and with local application in vivo.

  19. Comparative genomic analysis of eutherian kallikrein genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Premzl

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study made attempts to update and revise eutherian kallikrein genes implicated in major physiological and pathological processes and in medical molecular diagnostics. Using eutherian comparative genomic analysis protocol and free available genomic sequence assemblies, the tests of reliability of eutherian public genomic sequences annotated most comprehensive curated third party data gene data set of eutherian kallikrein genes including 121 complete coding sequences among 335 potential coding sequences. The present analysis first described 13 major gene clusters of eutherian kallikrein genes, and explained their differential gene expansion patterns. One updated classification and nomenclature of eutherian kallikrein genes was proposed, as new framework of future experiments.

  20. Functional genomics tools applied to plant metabolism: a survey on plant respiration, its connections and the annotation of complex gene functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner L. Araújo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The application of post-genomic techniques in plant respiration studies has greatly improved our ability to assign functions to gene products. In addition it has also revealed previously unappreciated interactions between distal elements of metabolism. Such results have reinforced the need to consider plant respiratory metabolism as part of a complex network and making sense of such interactions will ultimately require the construction of predictive and mechanistic models. Transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and the quantification of metabolic flux will be of great value in creating such models both by facilitating the annotation of complex gene function, determining their structure and by furnishing the quantitative data required to test them. In this review we highlight how these experimental approaches have contributed to our current understanding of plant respiratory metabolism and its interplay with associated process (e.g. photosynthesis, photorespiration and nitrogen metabolism. We also discuss how data from these techniques may be integrated, with the ultimate aim of identifying mechanisms that control and regulate plant respiration and discovering novel gene functions with potential biotechnological implications.

  1. Comparative genomics using data mining tools

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tannistha Nandi; Chandrika B-Rao; Srinivasan Ramachandran

    2002-02-01

    We have analysed the genomes of representatives of three kingdoms of life, namely, archaea, eubacteria and eukaryota using data mining tools based on compositional analyses of the protein sequences. The representatives chosen in this analysis were Methanococcus jannaschii, Haemophilus influenzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have identified the common and different features between the three genomes in the protein evolution patterns. M. jannaschii has been seen to have a greater number of proteins with more charged amino acids whereas S. cerevisiae has been observed to have a greater number of hydrophilic proteins. Despite the differences in intrinsic compositional characteristics between the proteins from the different genomes we have also identified certain common characteristics. We have carried out exploratory Principal Component Analysis of the multivariate data on the proteins of each organism in an effort to classify the proteins into clusters. Interestingly, we found that most of the proteins in each organism cluster closely together, but there are a few ‘outliers’. We focus on the outliers for the functional investigations, which may aid in revealing any unique features of the biology of the respective organisms.

  2. Comparative genomic analysis of sixty mycobacteriophage genomes: Genome clustering, gene acquisition and gene size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfull, Graham F.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Lawrence, Jeffrey G.; Pope, Welkin H.; Russell, Daniel A.; Ko, Ching-Chung; Weber, Rebecca J.; Patel, Manisha C.; Germane, Katherine L.; Edgar, Robert H.; Hoyte, Natasha N.; Bowman, Charles A.; Tantoco, Anthony T.; Paladin, Elizabeth C.; Myers, Marlana S.; Smith, Alexis L.; Grace, Molly S.; Pham, Thuy T.; O'Brien, Matthew B.; Vogelsberger, Amy M.; Hryckowian, Andrew J.; Wynalek, Jessica L.; Donis-Keller, Helen; Bogel, Matt W.; Peebles, Craig L.; Cresawn, Steve G.; Hendrix, Roger W.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacteriophages are viruses that infect mycobacterial hosts. Expansion of a collection of sequenced phage genomes to a total of sixty – all infecting a common bacterial host – provides further insight into their diversity and evolution. Of the sixty phage genomes, 55 can be grouped into nine clusters according to their nucleotide sequence similarities, five of which can be further divided into subclusters; five genomes do not cluster with other phages. The sequence diversity between genomes within a cluster varies greatly; for example, the six genomes in cluster D share more than 97.5% average nucleotide similarity with each other. In contrast, similarity between the two genomes in Cluster I is barely detectable by diagonal plot analysis. The total of 6,858 predicted ORFs have been grouped into 1523 phamilies (phams) of related sequences, 46% of which possess only a single member. Only 18.8% of the phams have sequence similarity to non-mycobacteriophage database entries and fewer than 10% of all phams can be assigned functions based on database searching or synteny. Genome clustering facilitates the identification of genes that are in greatest genetic flux and are more likely to have been exchanged horizontally in relatively recent evolutionary time. Although mycobacteriophage genes exhibit smaller average size than genes of their host (205 residues compared to 315), phage genes in higher flux average only ∼100 amino acids, suggesting that the primary units of genetic exchange correspond to single protein domains. PMID:20064525

  3. The integrated microbial genomes (IMG) system in 2007: datacontent and analysis tool extensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, Victor M.; Szeto, Ernest; Palaniappan, Krishna; Grechkin, Yuri; Chu, Ken; Chen, I-Min A.; Dubchak, Inna; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2007-08-01

    The Integrated Microbial Genomes (IMG) system is a data management, analysis and annotation platform for all publicly available genomes. IMG contains both draft and complete JGI microbial genomes integrated with all other publicly available genomes from all three domains of life, together with a large number of plasmids and viruses. IMG provides tools and viewers for analyzing and annotating genomes, genes and functions, individually or in a comparative context. Since its first release in 2005, IMG's data content and analytical capabilities have been constantly expanded through quarterly releases. IMG is provided by the DOE-Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and is available from http://img.jgi.doe.gov.

  4. Genomics of local adaptation with gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tigano, Anna; Friesen, Vicki L

    2016-05-01

    Gene flow is a fundamental evolutionary force in adaptation that is especially important to understand as humans are rapidly changing both the natural environment and natural levels of gene flow. Theory proposes a multifaceted role for gene flow in adaptation, but it focuses mainly on the disruptive effect that gene flow has on adaptation when selection is not strong enough to prevent the loss of locally adapted alleles. The role of gene flow in adaptation is now better understood due to the recent development of both genomic models of adaptive evolution and genomic techniques, which both point to the importance of genetic architecture in the origin and maintenance of adaptation with gene flow. In this review, we discuss three main topics on the genomics of adaptation with gene flow. First, we investigate selection on migration and gene flow. Second, we discuss the three potential sources of adaptive variation in relation to the role of gene flow in the origin of adaptation. Third, we explain how local adaptation is maintained despite gene flow: we provide a synthesis of recent genomic models of adaptation, discuss the genomic mechanisms and review empirical studies on the genomics of adaptation with gene flow. Despite predictions on the disruptive effect of gene flow in adaptation, an increasing number of studies show that gene flow can promote adaptation, that local adaptations can be maintained despite high gene flow, and that genetic architecture plays a fundamental role in the origin and maintenance of local adaptation with gene flow.

  5. Gene calling and bacterial genome annotation with BG7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobes, Raquel; Pareja-Tobes, Pablo; Manrique, Marina; Pareja-Tobes, Eduardo; Kovach, Evdokim; Alekhin, Alexey; Pareja, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    New massive sequencing technologies are providing many bacterial genome sequences from diverse taxa but a refined annotation of these genomes is crucial for obtaining scientific findings and new knowledge. Thus, bacterial genome annotation has emerged as a key point to investigate in bacteria. Any efficient tool designed specifically to annotate bacterial genomes sequenced with massively parallel technologies has to consider the specific features of bacterial genomes (absence of introns and scarcity of nonprotein-coding sequence) and of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies (presence of errors and not perfectly assembled genomes). These features make it convenient to focus on coding regions and, hence, on protein sequences that are the elements directly related with biological functions. In this chapter we describe how to annotate bacterial genomes with BG7, an open-source tool based on a protein-centered gene calling/annotation paradigm. BG7 is specifically designed for the annotation of bacterial genomes sequenced with NGS. This tool is sequence error tolerant maintaining their capabilities for the annotation of highly fragmented genomes or for annotating mixed sequences coming from several genomes (as those obtained through metagenomics samples). BG7 has been designed with scalability as a requirement, with a computing infrastructure completely based on cloud computing (Amazon Web Services).

  6. KAIKObase: An integrated silkworm genome database and data mining tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraju Javaregowda

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The silkworm, Bombyx mori, is one of the most economically important insects in many developing countries owing to its large-scale cultivation for silk production. With the development of genomic and biotechnological tools, B. mori has also become an important bioreactor for production of various recombinant proteins of biomedical interest. In 2004, two genome sequencing projects for B. mori were reported independently by Chinese and Japanese teams; however, the datasets were insufficient for building long genomic scaffolds which are essential for unambiguous annotation of the genome. Now, both the datasets have been merged and assembled through a joint collaboration between the two groups. Description Integration of the two data sets of silkworm whole-genome-shotgun sequencing by the Japanese and Chinese groups together with newly obtained fosmid- and BAC-end sequences produced the best continuity (~3.7 Mb in N50 scaffold size among the sequenced insect genomes and provided a high degree of nucleotide coverage (88% of all 28 chromosomes. In addition, a physical map of BAC contigs constructed by fingerprinting BAC clones and a SNP linkage map constructed using BAC-end sequences were available. In parallel, proteomic data from two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in various tissues and developmental stages were compiled into a silkworm proteome database. Finally, a Bombyx trap database was constructed for documenting insertion positions and expression data of transposon insertion lines. Conclusion For efficient usage of genome information for functional studies, genomic sequences, physical and genetic map information and EST data were compiled into KAIKObase, an integrated silkworm genome database which consists of 4 map viewers, a gene viewer, and sequence, keyword and position search systems to display results and data at the level of nucleotide sequence, gene, scaffold and chromosome. Integration of the

  7. Genome editing strategies: potential tools for eradicating HIV-1/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Kamel; Kaminski, Rafal; Gordon, Jennifer; Cosentino, Laura; Hu, Wenhui

    2015-06-01

    Current therapy for controlling human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection and preventing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) progression has profoundly decreased viral replication in cells susceptible to HIV-1 infection, but it does not eliminate the low level of viral replication in latently infected cells, which contain integrated copies of HIV-1 proviral DNA. There is an urgent need for the development of HIV-1 genome eradication strategies that will lead to a permanent or "sterile" cure of HIV-1/AIDS. In the past few years, novel nuclease-initiated genome editing tools have been developing rapidly, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. These surgical knives, which can excise any genome, provide a great opportunity to eradicate the HIV-1 genome by targeting highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 long terminal repeats or essential viral genes. Given the time consuming and costly engineering of target-specific ZFNs and TALENs, the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 technology has emerged as a simpler and more versatile technology to allow permanent removal of integrated HIV-1 proviral DNA in eukaryotic cells, and hopefully animal models or human patients. The major unmet challenges of this approach at present include inefficient nuclease gene delivery, potential off-target cleavage, and cell-specific genome targeting. Nanoparticle or lentivirus-mediated delivery of next generation Cas9 technologies including nickase or RNA-guided FokI nuclease (RFN) will further improve the potential for genome editing to become a promising approach for curing HIV-1/AIDS.

  8. Pichia stipitis genomics, transcriptomics, and gene clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas W. Jeffries; Jennifer R. Headman Van Vleet

    2009-01-01

    Genome sequencing and subsequent global gene expression studies have advanced our understanding of the lignocellulose-fermenting yeast Pichia stipitis. These studies have provided an insight into its central carbon metabolism, and analysis of its genome has revealed numerous functional gene clusters and tandem repeats. Specialized physiological traits are often the...

  9. Genomics and Public Health: Development of Web-based Training Tools for Increasing Genomic Awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Kardia, Sharon LR; Bodzin, Jennifer; Goldenberg, Aaron; Citrin, Toby; Raup, Sarah F; Bach, Janice V

    2005-01-01

    In 2001, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded three Centers for Genomics and Public Health to develop training tools for increasing genomic awareness. Over the past three years, the centers, working together with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office of Genomics and Disease Prevention, have developed tools to increase awareness of the impact genomics will have on public health practice, to provide a foundation for understanding basic genomic advances, and to...

  10. Genome engineering and gene expression control for bacterial strain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chan Woo; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of techniques and tools have been developed for genome engineering and gene expression control to achieve desired phenotypes of various bacteria. Here we review and discuss the recent advances in bacterial genome manipulation and gene expression control techniques, and their actual uses with accompanying examples. Genome engineering has been commonly performed based on homologous recombination. During such genome manipulation, the counterselection systems employing SacB or nucleases have mainly been used for the efficient selection of desired engineered strains. The recombineering technology enables simple and more rapid manipulation of the bacterial genome. The group II intron-mediated genome engineering technology is another option for some bacteria that are difficult to be engineered by homologous recombination. Due to the increasing demands on high-throughput screening of bacterial strains having the desired phenotypes, several multiplex genome engineering techniques have recently been developed and validated in some bacteria. Another approach to achieve desired bacterial phenotypes is the repression of target gene expression without the modification of genome sequences. This can be performed by expressing antisense RNA, small regulatory RNA, or CRISPR RNA to repress target gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. All of these techniques allow efficient and rapid development and screening of bacterial strains having desired phenotypes, and more advanced techniques are expected to be seen.

  11. Evolution of genes and genomes on the Drosophila phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Andrew G; Eisen, Michael B; Smith, Douglas R; Bergman, Casey M; Oliver, Brian; Markow, Therese A; Kaufman, Thomas C; Kellis, Manolis; Gelbart, William; Iyer, Venky N; Pollard, Daniel A; Sackton, Timothy B; Larracuente, Amanda M; Singh, Nadia D; Abad, Jose P; Abt, Dawn N; Adryan, Boris; Aguade, Montserrat; Akashi, Hiroshi; Anderson, Wyatt W; Aquadro, Charles F; Ardell, David H; Arguello, Roman; Artieri, Carlo G; Barbash, Daniel A; Barker, Daniel; Barsanti, Paolo; Batterham, Phil; Batzoglou, Serafim; Begun, Dave; Bhutkar, Arjun; Blanco, Enrico; Bosak, Stephanie A; Bradley, Robert K; Brand, Adrianne D; Brent, Michael R; Brooks, Angela N; Brown, Randall H; Butlin, Roger K; Caggese, Corrado; Calvi, Brian R; Bernardo de Carvalho, A; Caspi, Anat; Castrezana, Sergio; Celniker, Susan E; Chang, Jean L; Chapple, Charles; Chatterji, Sourav; Chinwalla, Asif; Civetta, Alberto; Clifton, Sandra W; Comeron, Josep M; Costello, James C; Coyne, Jerry A; Daub, Jennifer; David, Robert G; Delcher, Arthur L; Delehaunty, Kim; Do, Chuong B; Ebling, Heather; Edwards, Kevin; Eickbush, Thomas; Evans, Jay D; Filipski, Alan; Findeiss, Sven; Freyhult, Eva; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Garcia, Ana C L; Gardiner, Anastasia; Garfield, David A; Garvin, Barry E; Gibson, Greg; Gilbert, Don; Gnerre, Sante; Godfrey, Jennifer; Good, Robert; Gotea, Valer; Gravely, Brenton; Greenberg, Anthony J; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Gross, Samuel; Guigo, Roderic; Gustafson, Erik A; Haerty, Wilfried; Hahn, Matthew W; Halligan, Daniel L; Halpern, Aaron L; Halter, Gillian M; Han, Mira V; Heger, Andreas; Hillier, LaDeana; Hinrichs, Angie S; Holmes, Ian; Hoskins, Roger A; Hubisz, Melissa J; Hultmark, Dan; Huntley, Melanie A; Jaffe, David B; Jagadeeshan, Santosh; Jeck, William R; Johnson, Justin; Jones, Corbin D; Jordan, William C; Karpen, Gary H; Kataoka, Eiko; Keightley, Peter D; Kheradpour, Pouya; Kirkness, Ewen F; Koerich, Leonardo B; Kristiansen, Karsten; Kudrna, Dave; Kulathinal, Rob J; Kumar, Sudhir; Kwok, Roberta; Lander, Eric; Langley, Charles H; Lapoint, Richard; Lazzaro, Brian P; Lee, So-Jeong; Levesque, Lisa; Li, Ruiqiang; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Lin, Michael F; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Llopart, Ana; Long, Manyuan; Low, Lloyd; Lozovsky, Elena; Lu, Jian; Luo, Meizhong; Machado, Carlos A; Makalowski, Wojciech; Marzo, Mar; Matsuda, Muneo; Matzkin, Luciano; McAllister, Bryant; McBride, Carolyn S; McKernan, Brendan; McKernan, Kevin; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Minx, Patrick; Mollenhauer, Michael U; Montooth, Kristi; Mount, Stephen M; Mu, Xu; Myers, Eugene; Negre, Barbara; Newfeld, Stuart; Nielsen, Rasmus; Noor, Mohamed A F; O'Grady, Patrick; Pachter, Lior; Papaceit, Montserrat; Parisi, Matthew J; Parisi, Michael; Parts, Leopold; Pedersen, Jakob S; Pesole, Graziano; Phillippy, Adam M; Ponting, Chris P; Pop, Mihai; Porcelli, Damiano; Powell, Jeffrey R; Prohaska, Sonja; Pruitt, Kim; Puig, Marta; Quesneville, Hadi; Ram, Kristipati Ravi; Rand, David; Rasmussen, Matthew D; Reed, Laura K; Reenan, Robert; Reily, Amy; Remington, Karin A; Rieger, Tania T; Ritchie, Michael G; Robin, Charles; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Rohde, Claudia; Rozas, Julio; Rubenfield, Marc J; Ruiz, Alfredo; Russo, Susan; Salzberg, Steven L; Sanchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Saranga, David J; Sato, Hajime; Schaeffer, Stephen W; Schatz, Michael C; Schlenke, Todd; Schwartz, Russell; Segarra, Carmen; Singh, Rama S; Sirot, Laura; Sirota, Marina; Sisneros, Nicholas B; Smith, Chris D; Smith, Temple F; Spieth, John; Stage, Deborah E; Stark, Alexander; Stephan, Wolfgang; Strausberg, Robert L; Strempel, Sebastian; Sturgill, David; Sutton, Granger; Sutton, Granger G; Tao, Wei; Teichmann, Sarah; Tobari, Yoshiko N; Tomimura, Yoshihiko; Tsolas, Jason M; Valente, Vera L S; Venter, Eli; Venter, J Craig; Vicario, Saverio; Vieira, Filipe G; Vilella, Albert J; Villasante, Alfredo; Walenz, Brian; Wang, Jun; Wasserman, Marvin; Watts, Thomas; Wilson, Derek; Wilson, Richard K; Wing, Rod A; Wolfner, Mariana F; Wong, Alex; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wu, Chung-I; Wu, Gabriel; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Yang, Hsiao-Pei; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Yorke, James A; Yoshida, Kiyohito; Zdobnov, Evgeny; Zhang, Peili; Zhang, Yu; Zimin, Aleksey V; Baldwin, Jennifer; Abdouelleil, Amr; Abdulkadir, Jamal; Abebe, Adal; Abera, Brikti; Abreu, Justin; Acer, St Christophe; Aftuck, Lynne; Alexander, Allen; An, Peter; Anderson, Erica; Anderson, Scott; Arachi, Harindra; Azer, Marc; Bachantsang, Pasang; Barry, Andrew; Bayul, Tashi; Berlin, Aaron; Bessette, Daniel; Bloom, Toby; Blye, Jason; Boguslavskiy, Leonid; Bonnet, Claude; Boukhgalter, Boris; Bourzgui, Imane; Brown, Adam; Cahill, Patrick; Channer, Sheridon; Cheshatsang, Yama; Chuda, Lisa; Citroen, Mieke; Collymore, Alville; Cooke, Patrick; Costello, Maura; D'Aco, Katie; Daza, Riza; De Haan, Georgius; DeGray, Stuart; DeMaso, Christina; Dhargay, Norbu; Dooley, Kimberly; Dooley, Erin; Doricent, Missole; Dorje, Passang; Dorjee, Kunsang; Dupes, Alan; Elong, Richard; Falk, Jill; Farina, Abderrahim; Faro, Susan; Ferguson, Diallo; Fisher, Sheila; Foley, Chelsea D; Franke, Alicia; Friedrich, Dennis; Gadbois, Loryn; Gearin, Gary; Gearin, Christina R; Giannoukos, Georgia; Goode, Tina; Graham, Joseph; Grandbois, Edward; Grewal, Sharleen; Gyaltsen, Kunsang; Hafez, Nabil; Hagos, Birhane; Hall, Jennifer; Henson, Charlotte; Hollinger, Andrew; Honan, Tracey; Huard, Monika D; Hughes, Leanne; Hurhula, Brian; Husby, M Erii; Kamat, Asha; Kanga, Ben; Kashin, Seva; Khazanovich, Dmitry; Kisner, Peter; Lance, Krista; Lara, Marcia; Lee, William; Lennon, Niall; Letendre, Frances; LeVine, Rosie; Lipovsky, Alex; Liu, Xiaohong; Liu, Jinlei; Liu, Shangtao; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Lokyitsang, Yeshi; Lubonja, Rakela; Lui, Annie; MacDonald, Pen; Magnisalis, Vasilia; Maru, Kebede; Matthews, Charles; McCusker, William; McDonough, Susan; Mehta, Teena; Meldrim, James; Meneus, Louis; Mihai, Oana; Mihalev, Atanas; Mihova, Tanya; Mittelman, Rachel; Mlenga, Valentine; Montmayeur, Anna; Mulrain, Leonidas; Navidi, Adam; Naylor, Jerome; Negash, Tamrat; Nguyen, Thu; Nguyen, Nga; Nicol, Robert; Norbu, Choe; Norbu, Nyima; Novod, Nathaniel; O'Neill, Barry; Osman, Sahal; Markiewicz, Eva; Oyono, Otero L; Patti, Christopher; Phunkhang, Pema; Pierre, Fritz; Priest, Margaret; Raghuraman, Sujaa; Rege, Filip; Reyes, Rebecca; Rise, Cecil; Rogov, Peter; Ross, Keenan; Ryan, Elizabeth; Settipalli, Sampath; Shea, Terry; Sherpa, Ngawang; Shi, Lu; Shih, Diana; Sparrow, Todd; Spaulding, Jessica; Stalker, John; Stange-Thomann, Nicole; Stavropoulos, Sharon; Stone, Catherine; Strader, Christopher; Tesfaye, Senait; Thomson, Talene; Thoulutsang, Yama; Thoulutsang, Dawa; Topham, Kerri; Topping, Ira; Tsamla, Tsamla; Vassiliev, Helen; Vo, Andy; Wangchuk, Tsering; Wangdi, Tsering; Weiand, Michael; Wilkinson, Jane; Wilson, Adam; Yadav, Shailendra; Young, Geneva; Yu, Qing; Zembek, Lisa; Zhong, Danni; Zimmer, Andrew; Zwirko, Zac; Jaffe, David B; Alvarez, Pablo; Brockman, Will; Butler, Jonathan; Chin, CheeWhye; Gnerre, Sante; Grabherr, Manfred; Kleber, Michael; Mauceli, Evan; MacCallum, Iain

    2007-11-08

    Comparative analysis of multiple genomes in a phylogenetic framework dramatically improves the precision and sensitivity of evolutionary inference, producing more robust results than single-genome analyses can provide. The genomes of 12 Drosophila species, ten of which are presented here for the first time (sechellia, simulans, yakuba, erecta, ananassae, persimilis, willistoni, mojavensis, virilis and grimshawi), illustrate how rates and patterns of sequence divergence across taxa can illuminate evolutionary processes on a genomic scale. These genome sequences augment the formidable genetic tools that have made Drosophila melanogaster a pre-eminent model for animal genetics, and will further catalyse fundamental research on mechanisms of development, cell biology, genetics, disease, neurobiology, behaviour, physiology and evolution. Despite remarkable similarities among these Drosophila species, we identified many putatively non-neutral changes in protein-coding genes, non-coding RNA genes, and cis-regulatory regions. These may prove to underlie differences in the ecology and behaviour of these diverse species.

  12. Gene hunting : molecular analysis of the chicken genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.

    2000-01-01

    This dissertation describes the development of molecular tools to identify genes that are involved in production and health traits in poultry. To unravel the chicken genome, fluorescent molecular markers (microsatellite markers) were developed and optimized to perform high throughput screening of re

  13. MAKER2: an annotation pipeline and genome-database management tool for second-generation genome projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holt Carson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Second-generation sequencing technologies are precipitating major shifts with regards to what kinds of genomes are being sequenced and how they are annotated. While the first generation of genome projects focused on well-studied model organisms, many of today's projects involve exotic organisms whose genomes are largely terra incognita. This complicates their annotation, because unlike first-generation projects, there are no pre-existing 'gold-standard' gene-models with which to train gene-finders. Improvements in genome assembly and the wide availability of mRNA-seq data are also creating opportunities to update and re-annotate previously published genome annotations. Today's genome projects are thus in need of new genome annotation tools that can meet the challenges and opportunities presented by second-generation sequencing technologies. Results We present MAKER2, a genome annotation and data management tool designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 is a multi-threaded, parallelized application that can process second-generation datasets of virtually any size. We show that MAKER2 can produce accurate annotations for novel genomes where training-data are limited, of low quality or even non-existent. MAKER2 also provides an easy means to use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality; and it can use these data to update legacy annotations, significantly improving their quality. We also show that MAKER2 can evaluate the quality of genome annotations, and identify and prioritize problematic annotations for manual review. Conclusions MAKER2 is the first annotation engine specifically designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 scales to datasets of any size, requires little in the way of training data, and can use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality. It can also update and manage legacy genome annotation datasets.

  14. MAKER2: an annotation pipeline and genome-database management tool for second-generation genome projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Carson; Yandell, Mark

    2011-12-22

    Second-generation sequencing technologies are precipitating major shifts with regards to what kinds of genomes are being sequenced and how they are annotated. While the first generation of genome projects focused on well-studied model organisms, many of today's projects involve exotic organisms whose genomes are largely terra incognita. This complicates their annotation, because unlike first-generation projects, there are no pre-existing 'gold-standard' gene-models with which to train gene-finders. Improvements in genome assembly and the wide availability of mRNA-seq data are also creating opportunities to update and re-annotate previously published genome annotations. Today's genome projects are thus in need of new genome annotation tools that can meet the challenges and opportunities presented by second-generation sequencing technologies. We present MAKER2, a genome annotation and data management tool designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 is a multi-threaded, parallelized application that can process second-generation datasets of virtually any size. We show that MAKER2 can produce accurate annotations for novel genomes where training-data are limited, of low quality or even non-existent. MAKER2 also provides an easy means to use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality; and it can use these data to update legacy annotations, significantly improving their quality. We also show that MAKER2 can evaluate the quality of genome annotations, and identify and prioritize problematic annotations for manual review. MAKER2 is the first annotation engine specifically designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 scales to datasets of any size, requires little in the way of training data, and can use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality. It can also update and manage legacy genome annotation datasets.

  15. Gene enrichment in plant genomic shotgun libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowicz, Pablo D; McCombie, W Richard; Martienssen, Robert A

    2003-04-01

    The Arabidopsis genome (about 130 Mbp) has been completely sequenced; whereas a draft sequence of the rice genome (about 430 Mbp) is now available and the sequencing of this genome will be completed in the near future. The much larger genomes of several important crop species, such as wheat (about 16,000 Mbp) or maize (about 2500 Mbp), may not be fully sequenced with current technology. Instead, sequencing-analysis strategies are being developed to obtain sequencing and mapping information selectively for the genic fraction (gene space) of complex plant genomes.

  16. Reproduction-related genes in the pearl oyster genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Toshie; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Fujiwara, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yoji; Satoh, Nori; Awaji, Masahiko

    2013-10-01

    Molluscan reproduction has been a target of biological research because of the various reproductive strategies that have evolved in this phylum. It has also been studied for the development of fisheries technologies, particularly aquaculture. Although fundamental processes of reproduction in other phyla, such as vertebrates and arthropods, have been well studied, information on the molecular mechanisms of molluscan reproduction remains limited. The recently released draft genome of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata provides a novel and powerful platform for obtaining structural information on the genes and proteins involved in bivalve reproduction. In the present study, we analyzed the pearl oyster draft genome to screen reproduction-related genes. Analysis was mainly conducted for genes reported from other molluscs for encoding orthologs of reproduction-related proteins in other phyla. The gene search in the P. fucata gene models (version 1.1) and genome assembly (version 1.0) were performed using Genome Browser and BLAST software. The obtained gene models were then BLASTP searched against a public database to confirm the best-hit sequences. As a result, more than 40 gene models were identified with high accuracy to encode reproduction-related genes reported for P. fucata and other molluscs. These include vasa, nanos, doublesex- and mab-3-related transcription factor, 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptors, vitellogenin, estrogen receptor, and others. The set of reproduction-related genes of P. fucata identified in the present study constitute a new tool for research on bivalve reproduction at the molecular level.

  17. Genetic resources offer efficient tools for rice functional genomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Shuen-Fang; Fan, Ming-Jen; Hsing, Yue-Ie; Chen, Liang-Jwu; Chen, Shu; Wen, Ien-Chie; Liu, Yi-Lun; Chen, Ku-Ting; Jiang, Mirng-Jier; Lin, Ming-Kuang; Rao, Meng-Yen; Yu, Lin-Chih; Ho, Tuan-Hua David; Yu, Su-May

    2016-05-01

    Rice is an important crop and major model plant for monocot functional genomics studies. With the establishment of various genetic resources for rice genomics, the next challenge is to systematically assign functions to predicted genes in the rice genome. Compared with the robustness of genome sequencing and bioinformatics techniques, progress in understanding the function of rice genes has lagged, hampering the utilization of rice genes for cereal crop improvement. The use of transfer DNA (T-DNA) insertional mutagenesis offers the advantage of uniform distribution throughout the rice genome, but preferentially in gene-rich regions, resulting in direct gene knockout or activation of genes within 20-30 kb up- and downstream of the T-DNA insertion site and high gene tagging efficiency. Here, we summarize the recent progress in functional genomics using the T-DNA-tagged rice mutant population. We also discuss important features of T-DNA activation- and knockout-tagging and promoter-trapping of the rice genome in relation to mutant and candidate gene characterizations and how to more efficiently utilize rice mutant populations and datasets for high-throughput functional genomics and phenomics studies by forward and reverse genetics approaches. These studies may facilitate the translation of rice functional genomics research to improvements of rice and other cereal crops.

  18. Methods for identifying and mapping recent segmental and gene duplications in eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaja, Razi; MacDonald, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Junjun; Scherer, Stephen W

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to provide instruction for analyzing and mapping recent segmental and gene duplications in eukaryotic genomes. We describe a bioinformatics-based approach utilizing computational tools to manage eukaryotic genome sequences to characterize and understand the evolutionary fates and trajectories of duplicated genes. An introduction to bioinformatics tools and programs such as BLAST, Perl, BioPerl, and the GFF specification provides the necessary background to complete this analysis for any eukaryotic genome of interest.

  19. Gene conversion in the rice genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shuqing; Clark, Terry; Zheng, Hongkun;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene conversion causes a non-reciprocal transfer of genetic information between similar sequences. Gene conversion can both homogenize genes and recruit point mutations thereby shaping the evolution of multigene families. In the rice genome, the large number of duplicated genes...... is not tightly linked to natural selection in the rice genome. To assess the contribution of segmental duplication on gene conversion statistics, we determined locations of conversion partners with respect to inter-chromosomal segment duplication. The number of conversions associated with segmentation is less...

  20. Clustering of gene ontology terms in genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiirikka, Timo; Siermala, Markku; Vihinen, Mauno

    2014-10-25

    Although protein coding genes occupy only a small fraction of genomes in higher species, they are not randomly distributed within or between chromosomes. Clustering of genes with related function(s) and/or characteristics has been evident at several different levels. To study how common the clustering of functionally related genes is and what kind of functions the end products of these genes are involved, we collected gene ontology (GO) terms for complete genomes and developed a method to detect previously undefined gene clustering. Exhaustive analysis was performed for seven widely studied species ranging from human to Escherichia coli. To overcome problems related to varying gene lengths and densities, a novel method was developed and a fixed number of genes were analyzed irrespective of the genome span covered. Statistically very significant GO term clustering was apparent in all the investigated genomes. The analysis window, which ranged from 5 to 50 consecutive genes, revealed extensive GO term clusters for genes with widely varying functions. Here, the most interesting and significant results are discussed and the complete dataset for each analyzed species is available at the GOme database at http://bioinf.uta.fi/GOme. The results indicated that clusters of genes with related functions are very common, not only in bacteria, in which operons are frequent, but also in all the studied species irrespective of how complex they are. There are some differences between species but in all of them GO term clusters are common and of widely differing sizes. The presented method can be applied to analyze any genome or part of a genome for which descriptive features are available, and thus is not restricted to ontology terms. This method can also be applied to investigate gene and protein expression patterns. The results pave a way for further studies of mechanisms that shape genome structure and evolutionary forces related to them. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All

  1. Bioinformatics Tools for Small Genomes, Such as Hepatitis B Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor G. Bell

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available DNA sequence analysis is undertaken in many biological research laboratories. The workflow consists of several steps involving the bioinformatic processing of biological data. We have developed a suite of web-based online bioinformatic tools to assist with processing, analysis and curation of DNA sequence data. Most of these tools are genome-agnostic, with two tools specifically designed for hepatitis B virus sequence data. Tools in the suite are able to process sequence data from Sanger sequencing, ultra-deep amplicon resequencing (pyrosequencing and chromatograph (trace files, as appropriate. The tools are available online at no cost and are aimed at researchers without specialist technical computer knowledge. The tools can be accessed at http://hvdr.bioinf.wits.ac.za/SmallGenomeTools, and the source code is available online at https://github.com/DrTrevorBell/SmallGenomeTools.

  2. JGI Plant Genomics Gene Annotation Pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Shengqiang; Rokhsar, Dan; Goodstein, David; Hayes, David; Mitros, Therese

    2014-07-14

    Plant genomes vary in size and are highly complex with a high amount of repeats, genome duplication and tandem duplication. Gene encodes a wealth of information useful in studying organism and it is critical to have high quality and stable gene annotation. Thanks to advancement of sequencing technology, many plant species genomes have been sequenced and transcriptomes are also sequenced. To use these vastly large amounts of sequence data to make gene annotation or re-annotation in a timely fashion, an automatic pipeline is needed. JGI plant genomics gene annotation pipeline, called integrated gene call (IGC), is our effort toward this aim with aid of a RNA-seq transcriptome assembly pipeline. It utilizes several gene predictors based on homolog peptides and transcript ORFs. See Methods for detail. Here we present genome annotation of JGI flagship green plants produced by this pipeline plus Arabidopsis and rice except for chlamy which is done by a third party. The genome annotations of these species and others are used in our gene family build pipeline and accessible via JGI Phytozome portal whose URL and front page snapshot are shown below.

  3. Genomic evidence for adaptation by gene duplication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Wenfeng; Zhang, Jianzhi

    2014-08-01

    Gene duplication is widely believed to facilitate adaptation, but unambiguous evidence for this hypothesis has been found in only a small number of cases. Although gene duplication may increase the fitness of the involved organisms by doubling gene dosage or neofunctionalization, it may also result in a simple division of ancestral functions into daughter genes, which need not promote adaptation. Hence, the general validity of the adaptation by gene duplication hypothesis remains uncertain. Indeed, a genome-scale experiment found similar fitness effects of deleting pairs of duplicate genes and deleting individual singleton genes from the yeast genome, leading to the conclusion that duplication rarely results in adaptation. Here we contend that the above comparison is unfair because of a known duplication bias among genes with different fitness contributions. To rectify this problem, we compare homologous genes from the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We discover that simultaneously deleting a duplicate gene pair in S. cerevisiae reduces fitness significantly more than deleting their singleton counterpart in S. pombe, revealing post-duplication adaptation. The duplicates-singleton difference in fitness effect is not attributable to a potential increase in gene dose after duplication, suggesting that the adaptation is owing to neofunctionalization, which we find to be explicable by acquisitions of binary protein-protein interactions rather than gene expression changes. These results provide genomic evidence for the role of gene duplication in organismal adaptation and are important for understanding the genetic mechanisms of evolutionary innovation.

  4. Microfluidic gene arrays for rapid genomic profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jay A.; Hukari, Kyle W.; Hux, Gary A.; Shepodd, Timothy J.

    2004-12-01

    Genomic analysis tools have recently become an indispensable tool for the evaluation of gene expression in a variety of experiment protocols. Two of the main drawbacks to this technology are the labor and time intensive process for sample preparation and the relatively long times required for target/probe hybridization. In order to overcome these two technological barriers we have developed a microfluidic chip to perform on chip sample purification and labeling, integrated with a high density genearray. Sample purification was performed using a porous polymer monolithic material functionalized with an oligo dT nucleotide sequence for the isolation of high purity mRNA. These purified mRNA"s can then rapidly labeled using a covalent fluorescent molecule which forms a selective covalent bond at the N7 position of guanine residues. These labeled mRNA"s can then released from the polymer monolith to allow for direct hybridization with oligonucletide probes deposited in microfluidic channel. To allow for rapid target/probe hybridization high density microarray were printed in microchannels. The channels can accommodate array densities as high as 4000 probes. When oligonucleotide deposition is complete, these channels are sealed using a polymer film which forms a pressure tight seal to allow sample reagent flow to the arrayed probes. This process will allow for real time target to probe hybridization monitoring using a top mounted CCD fiber bundle combination. Using this process we have been able to perform a multi-step sample preparation to labeled target/probe hybridization in less than 30 minutes. These results demonstrate the capability to perform rapid genomic screening on a high density microfluidic microarray of oligonucleotides.

  5. Gene finding in the chicken genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonarakis Stylianos E

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the continuous production of genome sequence for a number of organisms, reliable, comprehensive, and cost effective gene prediction remains problematic. This is particularly true for genomes for which there is not a large collection of known gene sequences, such as the recently published chicken genome. We used the chicken sequence to test comparative and homology-based gene-finding methods followed by experimental validation as an effective genome annotation method. Results We performed experimental evaluation by RT-PCR of three different computational gene finders, Ensembl, SGP2 and TWINSCAN, applied to the chicken genome. A Venn diagram was computed and each component of it was evaluated. The results showed that de novo comparative methods can identify up to about 700 chicken genes with no previous evidence of expression, and can correctly extend about 40% of homology-based predictions at the 5' end. Conclusions De novo comparative gene prediction followed by experimental verification is effective at enhancing the annotation of the newly sequenced genomes provided by standard homology-based methods.

  6. The genome BLASTatlas-a GeneWiz extension for visualization of whole-genome homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallin, Peter F; Binnewies, Tim T; Ussery, David W

    2008-05-01

    The development of fast and inexpensive methods for sequencing bacterial genomes has led to a wealth of data, often with many genomes being sequenced of the same species or closely related organisms. Thus, there is a need for visualization methods that will allow easy comparison of many sequenced genomes to a defined reference strain. The BLASTatlas is one such tool that is useful for mapping and visualizing whole genome homology of genes and proteins within a reference strain compared to other strains or species of one or more prokaryotic organisms. We provide examples of BLASTatlases, including the Clostridium tetani plasmid p88, where homologues for toxin genes can be easily visualized in other sequenced Clostridium genomes, and for a Clostridium botulinum genome, compared to 14 other Clostridium genomes. DNA structural information is also included in the atlas to visualize the DNA chromosomal context of regions. Additional information can be added to these plots, and as an example we have added circles showing the probability of the DNA helix opening up under superhelical tension. The tool is SOAP compliant and WSDL (web services description language) files are located on our website: (http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/ws/BLASTatlas), where programming examples are available in Perl. By providing an interoperable method to carry out whole genome visualization of homology, this service offers bioinformaticians as well as biologists an easy-to-adopt workflow that can be directly called from the programming language of the user, hence enabling automation of repeated tasks. This tool can be relevant in many pangenomic as well as in metagenomic studies, by giving a quick overview of clusters of insertion sites, genomic islands and overall homology between a reference sequence and a data set.

  7. Comparative genomic analysis of soybean flowering genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chol-Hee Jung

    Full Text Available Flowering is an important agronomic trait that determines crop yield. Soybean is a major oilseed legume crop used for human and animal feed. Legumes have unique vegetative and floral complexities. Our understanding of the molecular basis of flower initiation and development in legumes is limited. Here, we address this by using a computational approach to examine flowering regulatory genes in the soybean genome in comparison to the most studied model plant, Arabidopsis. For this comparison, a genome-wide analysis of orthologue groups was performed, followed by an in silico gene expression analysis of the identified soybean flowering genes. Phylogenetic analyses of the gene families highlighted the evolutionary relationships among these candidates. Our study identified key flowering genes in soybean and indicates that the vernalisation and the ambient-temperature pathways seem to be the most variant in soybean. A comparison of the orthologue groups containing flowering genes indicated that, on average, each Arabidopsis flowering gene has 2-3 orthologous copies in soybean. Our analysis highlighted that the CDF3, VRN1, SVP, AP3 and PIF3 genes are paralogue-rich genes in soybean. Furthermore, the genome mapping of the soybean flowering genes showed that these genes are scattered randomly across the genome. A paralogue comparison indicated that the soybean genes comprising the largest orthologue group are clustered in a 1.4 Mb region on chromosome 16 of soybean. Furthermore, a comparison with the undomesticated soybean (Glycine soja revealed that there are hundreds of SNPs that are associated with putative soybean flowering genes and that there are structural variants that may affect the genes of the light-signalling and ambient-temperature pathways in soybean. Our study provides a framework for the soybean flowering pathway and insights into the relationship and evolution of flowering genes between a short-day soybean and the long-day plant

  8. Pathway Tools version 19.0 update: software for pathway/genome informatics and systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Peter D; Latendresse, Mario; Paley, Suzanne M; Krummenacker, Markus; Ong, Quang D; Billington, Richard; Kothari, Anamika; Weaver, Daniel; Lee, Thomas; Subhraveti, Pallavi; Spaulding, Aaron; Fulcher, Carol; Keseler, Ingrid M; Caspi, Ron

    2016-09-01

    Pathway Tools is a bioinformatics software environment with a broad set of capabilities. The software provides genome-informatics tools such as a genome browser, sequence alignments, a genome-variant analyzer and comparative-genomics operations. It offers metabolic-informatics tools, such as metabolic reconstruction, quantitative metabolic modeling, prediction of reaction atom mappings and metabolic route search. Pathway Tools also provides regulatory-informatics tools, such as the ability to represent and visualize a wide range of regulatory interactions. This article outlines the advances in Pathway Tools in the past 5 years. Major additions include components for metabolic modeling, metabolic route search, computation of atom mappings and estimation of compound Gibbs free energies of formation; addition of editors for signaling pathways, for genome sequences and for cellular architecture; storage of gene essentiality data and phenotype data; display of multiple alignments, and of signaling and electron-transport pathways; and development of Python and web-services application programming interfaces. Scientists around the world have created more than 9800 Pathway/Genome Databases by using Pathway Tools, many of which are curated databases for important model organisms.

  9. Genomic disorders: A window into human gene and genome evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Claudia M. B.; Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Gene duplications alter the genetic constitution of organisms and can be a driving force of molecular evolution in humans and the great apes. In this context, the study of genomic disorders has uncovered the essential role played by the genomic architecture, especially low copy repeats (LCRs) or segmental duplications (SDs). In fact, regardless of the mechanism, LCRs can mediate or stimulate rearrangements, inciting genomic instability and generating dynamic and unstable regions prone to rapid molecular evolution. In humans, copy-number variation (CNV) has been implicated in common traits such as neuropathy, hypertension, color blindness, infertility, and behavioral traits including autism and schizophrenia, as well as disease susceptibility to HIV, lupus nephritis, and psoriasis among many other clinical phenotypes. The same mechanisms implicated in the origin of genomic disorders may also play a role in the emergence of segmental duplications and the evolution of new genes by means of genomic and gene duplication and triplication, exon shuffling, exon accretion, and fusion/fission events. PMID:20080665

  10. In-silico human genomics with GeneCards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelzer Gil

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since 1998, the bioinformatics, systems biology, genomics and medical communities have enjoyed a synergistic relationship with the GeneCards database of human genes (http://www.genecards.org. This human gene compendium was created to help to introduce order into the increasing chaos of information flow. As a consequence of viewing details and deep links related to specific genes, users have often requested enhanced capabilities, such that, over time, GeneCards has blossomed into a suite of tools (including GeneDecks, GeneALaCart, GeneLoc, GeneNote and GeneAnnot for a variety of analyses of both single human genes and sets thereof. In this paper, we focus on inhouse and external research activities which have been enabled, enhanced, complemented and, in some cases, motivated by GeneCards. In turn, such interactions have often inspired and propelled improvements in GeneCards. We describe here the evolution and architecture of this project, including examples of synergistic applications in diverse areas such as synthetic lethality in cancer, the annotation of genetic variations in disease, omics integration in a systems biology approach to kidney disease, and bioinformatics tools.

  11. Technology developments in biological tools for targeted genome surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teimourian, Shahram; Abdollahzadeh, Rasoul

    2015-01-01

    Different biological tools for targeted genome engineering have recently appeared and these include tools like meganucleases, zinc-finger nucleases and newer technologies including TALENs and CRISPR/Cas systems. transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) have greatly improved genome editing efficiency by making site-specific DNA double-strand breaks. Several studies have shown the prominence of TALENs in comparison to the meganucleases and zinc-finger nucleases. The most important feature of TALENs that makes them suitable tools for targeted genome editing is the modularity of central repeat domains, meaning that they can be designed to recognize any desirable DNA sequence. In this review, we present a comprehensive and concise description of TALENs technology developments for targeted genome surgery with to the point description and comparison of other tools.

  12. Genome-based genetic tool development for Bacillus methanolicus: theta- and rolling circle-replicating plasmids for inducible gene expression and application to methanol-based cadaverine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Irla

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus methanolicus is a thermophilic methylotroph able to overproduce amino acids from methanol, a substrate not used for human or animal nutrition. Based on our previous RNA-seq analysis a mannitol inducible promoter and a putative mannitol activator gene mtlR were identified. The mannitol inducible promoter was applied for controlled gene expression using fluorescent reporter proteins and a flow cytometry analysis, and improved by changing the -35 promoter region and by co-expression of the mtlR regulator gene. For independent complementary gene expression control, the heterologous xylose-inducible system from B. megaterium was employed and a two-plasmid gene expression system was developed. Four different replicons for expression vectors were compared with respect to their copy number and stability. As an application example, methanol-based production of cadaverine was shown to be improved from 11.3 g/L to 17.5 g/L when a heterologous lysine decarboxylase gene cadA was expressed from a theta-replicating rather than a rolling-circle replicating vector. The current work on inducible promoter systems and compatible theta- or rolling circle-replicating vectors is an important extension of the poorly developed B. methanolicus genetic toolbox, valuable for genetic engineering and further exploration of this bacterium.

  13. Tools for Extracting Actionable Medical Knowledge from Genomic Big Data

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, Theodore Charles

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is an ideal target for personal genomics-based medicine that uses high-throughput genome assays such as DNA sequencing, RNA sequencing, and expression analysis (collectively called omics); however, researchers and physicians are overwhelmed by the quantities of big data from these assays and cannot interpret this information accurately without specialized tools. To address this problem, I have created software methods and tools called OCCAM (OmiC data Cancer Analytic Model) and DIPSC (...

  14. Genomics and public health: development of Web-based training tools for increasing genomic awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Jennifer; Kardia, Sharon L R; Goldenberg, Aaron; Raup, Sarah F; Bach, Janice V; Citrin, Toby

    2005-04-01

    In 2001, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded three Centers for Genomics and Public Health to develop training tools for increasing genomic awareness. Over the past three years, the centers, working together with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office of Genomics and Disease Prevention, have developed tools to increase awareness of the impact genomics will have on public health practice, to provide a foundation for understanding basic genomic advances, and to translate the relevance of that information to public health practitioners' own work. These training tools serve to communicate genomic advances and their potential for integration into public heath practice. This paper highlights two of these training tools: 1) Genomics for Public Health Practitioners: The Practical Application of Genomics in Public Health Practice, a Web-based introduction to genomics, and 2) Six Weeks to Genomic Awareness, an in-depth training module on public health genomics. This paper focuses on the processes and collaborative efforts by which these live presentations were developed and delivered as Web-based training sessions.

  15. Bcheck: a wrapper tool for detecting RNase P RNA genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler Peter F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective bioinformatics solutions are needed to tackle challenges posed by industrial-scale genome annotation. We present Bcheck, a wrapper tool which predicts RNase P RNA genes by combining the speed of pattern matching and sensitivity of covariance models. The core of Bcheck is a library of subfamily specific descriptor models and covariance models. Results Scanning all microbial genomes in GenBank identifies RNase P RNA genes in 98% of 1024 microbial chromosomal sequences within just 4 hours on single CPU. Comparing to existing annotations found in 387 of the GenBank files, Bcheck predictions have more intact structure and are automatically classified by subfamily membership. For eukaryotic chromosomes Bcheck could identify the known RNase P RNA genes in 84 out of 85 metazoan genomes and 19 out of 21 fungi genomes. Bcheck predicted 37 novel eukaryotic RNase P RNA genes, 32 of which are from fungi. Gene duplication events are observed in at least 20 metazoan organisms. Scanning of meta-genomic data from the Global Ocean Sampling Expedition, comprising over 10 million sample sequences (18 Gigabases, predicted 2909 unique genes, 98% of which fall into ancestral bacteria A type of RNase P RNA and 66% of which have no close homolog to known prokaryotic RNase P RNA. Conclusions The combination of efficient filtering by means of a descriptor-based search and subsequent construction of a high-quality gene model by means of a covariance model provides an efficient method for the detection of RNase P RNA genes in large-scale sequencing data. Bcheck is implemented as webserver and can also be downloaded for local use from http://rna.tbi.univie.ac.at/bcheck

  16. Genome-wide Analysis of Gene Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun

    cells are capable of regulating their gene expression, so that each cell can only express a particular set of genes yielding limited numbers of proteins with specialized functions. Therefore a rigid control of differential gene expression is necessary for cellular diversity. On the other hand, aberrant...... gene regulation will disrupt the cell’s fundamental processes, which in turn can cause disease. Hence, understanding gene regulation is essential for deciphering the code of life. Along with the development of high throughput sequencing (HTS) technology and the subsequent large-scale data analysis......, genome-wide assays have increased our understanding of gene regulation significantly. This thesis describes the integration and analysis of HTS data across different important aspects of gene regulation. Gene expression can be regulated at different stages when the genetic information is passed from gene...

  17. PseudoGeneQuest – Service for identification of different pseudogene types in the human genome

    OpenAIRE

    Vihinen Mauno; Ortutay Csaba

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Pseudogenes, nonfunctional copies of genes, evolve fast due the lack of evolutionary pressures and thus appear in several different forms. PseudoGeneQuest is an online tool to search the human genome for a given query sequence and to identify different types of pseudogenes as well as novel genes and gene fragments. Description The service can detect pseudogenes, that have arisen either by retrotransposition or segmental genome duplication, many of which are not listed in t...

  18. Serine recombinases as tools for genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William R A; Lee, Nicholas C O; Xu, Zhengyao; Smith, Margaret C M

    2011-04-01

    The serine recombinases differ mechanistically from the tyrosine recombinases and include proteins such as ϕC31 integrase which, unlike Cre and Flp, promote unidirectional reactions. The serine recombinase family is large and includes many other proteins besides ϕC31 integrase with the potential to be widely used in genome engineering. Here we review the details of the mechanism of the reactions promoted by the serine recombinases and discuss how these not only limit the utility of this class of recombinase but also creates opportunities for the engineering of new enzymes. We discuss the unanswered questions posed by genome engineering experiments in a variety of systems in which the serine recombinases have been used and finally describe more recently discovered serine recombinases that have the potential to be used in genome engineering.

  19. The capsicum transcriptome DB: a "hot" tool for genomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góngora-Castillo, Elsa; Fajardo-Jaime, Rubén; Fernández-Cortes, Araceli; Jofre-Garfias, Alba E; Lozoya-Gloria, Edmundo; Martínez, Octavio; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí; Rivera-Bustamante, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Chili pepper (Capsicum annuum) is an economically important crop with no available public genome sequence. We describe a genomic resource to facilitate Capsicum annuum research. A collection of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) derived from five C. annuum organs (root, stem, leaf, flower and fruit) were sequenced using the Sanger method and multiple leaf transcriptomes were deeply sampled using with GS-pyrosequencing. A hybrid assembly of 1,324,516 raw reads yielded 32,314 high quality contigs as validated by coverage and identity analysis with existing pepper sequences. Overall, 75.5% of the contigs had significant sequence similarity to entries in nucleic acid and protein databases; 23% of the sequences have not been previously reported for C. annuum and expand sequence resources for this species. A MySQL database and a user-friendly Web interface were constructed with search-tools that permit queries of the ESTs including sequence, functional annotation, Gene Ontology classification, metabolic pathways, and assembly information. The Capsicum Transcriptome DB is free available from http://www.bioingenios.ira.cinvestav.mx:81/Joomla/

  20. Genome-Enabled Molecular Tools for Reductive Dehalogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    operon , vcrABC, of Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS is embedded in a horizontally-acquired genomic island that integrated at the single-copy gene ssrA. The...vinyl chloride reductase operon , vcrABC, of Dehalococcoides sp. strain VS is embedded in a horizontally-acquired genomic island that integrated at

  1. Identification of neural outgrowth genes using genome-wide RNAi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine J Sepp

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available While genetic screens have identified many genes essential for neurite outgrowth, they have been limited in their ability to identify neural genes that also have earlier critical roles in the gastrula, or neural genes for which maternally contributed RNA compensates for gene mutations in the zygote. To address this, we developed methods to screen the Drosophila genome using RNA-interference (RNAi on primary neural cells and present the results of the first full-genome RNAi screen in neurons. We used live-cell imaging and quantitative image analysis to characterize the morphological phenotypes of fluorescently labelled primary neurons and glia in response to RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. From the full genome screen, we focused our analysis on 104 evolutionarily conserved genes that when downregulated by RNAi, have morphological defects such as reduced axon extension, excessive branching, loss of fasciculation, and blebbing. To assist in the phenotypic analysis of the large data sets, we generated image analysis algorithms that could assess the statistical significance of the mutant phenotypes. The algorithms were essential for the analysis of the thousands of images generated by the screening process and will become a valuable tool for future genome-wide screens in primary neurons. Our analysis revealed unexpected, essential roles in neurite outgrowth for genes representing a wide range of functional categories including signalling molecules, enzymes, channels, receptors, and cytoskeletal proteins. We also found that genes known to be involved in protein and vesicle trafficking showed similar RNAi phenotypes. We confirmed phenotypes of the protein trafficking genes Sec61alpha and Ran GTPase using Drosophila embryo and mouse embryonic cerebral cortical neurons, respectively. Collectively, our results showed that RNAi phenotypes in primary neural culture can parallel in vivo phenotypes, and the screening technique can be used to identify many new

  2. Supplementary Material for: BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal Matoq Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). Results The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACONâ s utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27 %, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. Conclusions We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/ .

  3. Gene discovery in the Entamoeba invadens genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zheng; Samuelson, John; Clark, C Graham; Eichinger, Daniel; Paul, Jaishree; Van Dellen, Katrina; Hall, Neil; Anderson, Iain; Loftus, Brendan

    2003-06-01

    Entamoeba invadens, a parasite of reptiles, is a model for the study of encystation by the human enteric pathogen Entamoeba histolytica, because E. invadens form cysts in axenic culture. With approximately 0.5-fold sequence coverage of the genome, we were able to get insights into E. invadens gene and genome features. Overall, the E. invadens genome displays many of the features that are emerging from ongoing genome sequencing efforts in E. histolytica. At the nucleotide level the E. invadens genome has on average 60% sequence identity with that of E. histolytica. The presence of introns in E. invadens was predicted with similar consensus (GTTTGT em leader A/TAG) sequences to those identified in E. histolytica and Entamoeba dispar. Sequences highly repeated in the genome of E. histolytica (rRNAs, tRNAs, CXXC-rich proteins, and Leu-rich repeat proteins) were found to be highly repeated in the E. invadens genome. Numerous proteins homologous to those implicated in amoebic virulence, (Gal/GalNAc lectins, amoebapores, and cysteine proteinases) and drug resistance (p-glycoproteins) were identified. Homologs of proteins involved in cell cycle, vesicular trafficking and signal transduction were identified, which may be involved in en/excystation and cell growth of E. invadens. Finally, multiple copies of a number of E. invadens genes coding for predicted enzymes involved in core metabolism and the targets of anti-amoebic drugs were identified.

  4. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of "domestication" of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, partial functional release, and further mutation-driven reshaping of TFBS in tight coevolution with the enclosing genomic loci.

  5. CRISPR-Cas9: tool for qualitative and quantitative plant genome editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Noman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing advancements have made many unachievable ideas practical. Increased adoption of genome editing has been geared by swiftly developing CRISPR-Cas9 technology. This technique is appearing as driving force for innovative utilization in diverse branches of plant biology. CRISPR mediated genome editing is being used for rapid, easy and efficient alteration of indigenous genes among diverse plant species. With approximate completion of conceptual work about CRISPR/Cas9, plant scientists are applying this genome editing tool for crop attributes enhancement. The capability of CRISPR-Cas9 systems for performing targeted and efficient modifications in genome sequence as well as gene expression will certainly spur novel developments not only in model plants but also in crop plants. Additionally, due to non-involvement of foreign DNA, this technique may help alleviating regulatory issues associated with GM Plants. We expect that prevailing challenges in plant science like genomic region manipulation, crop specific vectors etc. will be addressed along with sustained growth of this genome editing tool. In this review, recent progress of CRISPR/Cas9 technology in plants has been summarized and discussed. We review potential of CRISPR/Cas9 for different aspects of plant life. It also covers strengths of this technique in comparison with other genome editing techniques e.g. ZFNs and TALENs and potential challenges in coming decades have been described.

  6. The "one-step" Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV)-derived vector is a functional genomics tool for efficient overexpression of heterologous protein, virus-induced gene silencing and genetic mapping of BPMV R-gene in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflieger, Stéphanie; Blanchet, Sophie; Meziadi, Chouaib; Richard, Manon M S; Thareau, Vincent; Mary, Fanny; Mazoyer, Céline; Geffroy, Valérie

    2014-08-29

    Over the last two years, considerable advances have been made in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genomics, especially with the completion of the genome sequence and the availability of RNAseq data. However, as common bean is recalcitrant to stable genetic transformation, much work remains to be done for the development of functional genomics tools adapted to large-scale studies. Here we report the successful implementation of an efficient viral vector system for foreign gene expression, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and genetic mapping of a BPMV resistance gene in common bean, using a "one-step" BPMV vector originally developed in soybean. With the goal of developing this vector for high-throughput VIGS studies in common bean, we optimized the conditions for rub-inoculation of infectious BPMV-derived plasmids in common bean cv. Black Valentine. We then tested the susceptibility to BPMV of six cultivars, and found that only Black Valentine and JaloEEP558 were susceptible to BPMV. We used a BPMV-GFP construct to detect the spatial and temporal infection patterns of BPMV in vegetative and reproductive tissues. VIGS of the PHYTOENE DESATURASE (PvPDS) marker gene was successfully achieved with recombinant BPMV vectors carrying fragments ranging from 132 to 391 bp. Finally, we mapped a gene for resistance to BPMV (R-BPMV) at one end of linkage group 2, in the vicinity of a locus (I locus) previously shown to be involved in virus resistance. The "one-step" BPMV vector system therefore enables rapid and simple functional studies in common bean, and could be suitable for large-scale analyses. In the post-genomic era, these advances are timely for the common bean research community.

  7. Bootstrap, Bayesian probability and maximum likelihood mapping: exploring new tools for comparative genome analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogarten J Peter

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT played an important role in shaping microbial genomes. In addition to genes under sporadic selection, HGT also affects housekeeping genes and those involved in information processing, even ribosomal RNA encoding genes. Here we describe tools that provide an assessment and graphic illustration of the mosaic nature of microbial genomes. Results We adapted the Maximum Likelihood (ML mapping to the analyses of all detected quartets of orthologous genes found in four genomes. We have automated the assembly and analyses of these quartets of orthologs given the selection of four genomes. We compared the ML-mapping approach to more rigorous Bayesian probability and Bootstrap mapping techniques. The latter two approaches appear to be more conservative than the ML-mapping approach, but qualitatively all three approaches give equivalent results. All three tools were tested on mitochondrial genomes, which presumably were inherited as a single linkage group. Conclusions In some instances of interphylum relationships we find nearly equal numbers of quartets strongly supporting the three possible topologies. In contrast, our analyses of genome quartets containing the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. indicate that a large part of the cyanobacterial genome is related to that of low GC Gram positives. Other groups that had been suggested as sister groups to the cyanobacteria contain many fewer genes that group with the Synechocystis orthologs. Interdomain comparisons of genome quartets containing the archaeon Halobacterium sp. revealed that Halobacterium sp. shares more genes with Bacteria that live in the same environment than with Bacteria that are more closely related based on rRNA phylogeny . Many of these genes encode proteins involved in substrate transport and metabolism and in information storage and processing. The performed analyses demonstrate that relationships among prokaryotes cannot be accurately

  8. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gadea Jose; Forment Javier; Santiago Julia; Marques M Carmen; Juarez Jose; Mauri Nuria; Martinez-Godoy M Angeles

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genome-wide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. Results We have designed and constructed a publicly available genome-...

  9. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Godoy, M Angeles; Mauri, Nuria; Juarez, Jose; Marques, M Carmen; Santiago, Julia; Forment, Javier; Gadea, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genome-wide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. Results We have designed and constructed a publicly available genome-wide cDNA...

  10. Computational Tools and Algorithms for Designing Customized Synthetic Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan eGould

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Advances in DNA synthesis have enabled the construction of artificial genes, gene circuits, and genomes of bacterial scale. Freedom in de-novo design of synthetic constructs provides significant power in studying the impact of mutations in sequence features, and verifying hypotheses on the functional information that is encoded in nucleic and amino acids. To aid this goal, a large number of software tools of variable sophistication have been implemented, enabling the design of synthetic genes for sequence optimization based on rationally defined properties. The first generation of tools dealt predominantly with singular objectives such as codon usage optimization and unique restriction site incorporation. Recent years have seen the emergence of sequence design tools that aim to evolve sequences toward combinations of objectives. The design of optimal protein coding sequences adhering to multiple objectives is computationally hard, and most tools rely on heuristics to sample the vast sequence design space. In this review we study some of the algorithmic issues behind gene optimization and the approaches that different tools have adopted to redesign genes and optimize desired coding features. We utilize test cases to demonstrate the efficiency of each approach, as well as identify their strengths and limitations.

  11. Mining Bacterial Genomes for Secondary Metabolite Gene Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamek, Martina; Spohn, Marius; Stegmann, Evi; Ziemert, Nadine

    2017-01-01

    With the emergence of bacterial resistance against frequently used antibiotics, novel antibacterial compounds are urgently needed. Traditional bioactivity-guided drug discovery strategies involve laborious screening efforts and display high rediscovery rates. With the progress in next generation sequencing methods and the knowledge that the majority of antibiotics in clinical use are produced as secondary metabolites by bacteria, mining bacterial genomes for secondary metabolites with antimicrobial activity is a promising approach, which can guide a more time and cost-effective identification of novel compounds. However, what sounds easy to accomplish, comes with several challenges. To date, several tools for the prediction of secondary metabolite gene clusters are available, some of which are based on the detection of signature genes, while others are searching for specific patterns in gene content or regulation.Apart from the mere identification of gene clusters, several other factors such as determining cluster boundaries and assessing the novelty of the detected cluster are important. For this purpose, comparison of the predicted secondary metabolite genes with different cluster and compound databases is necessary. Furthermore, it is advisable to classify detected clusters into gene cluster families. So far, there is no standardized procedure for genome mining; however, different approaches to overcome all of these challenges exist and are addressed in this chapter. We give practical guidance on the workflow for secondary metabolite gene cluster identification, which includes the determination of gene cluster boundaries, addresses problems occurring with the use of draft genomes, and gives an outlook on the different methods for gene cluster classification. Based on comprehensible examples a protocol is set, which should enable the readers to mine their own genome data for interesting secondary metabolites.

  12. Tandemly Arrayed Genes in Vertebrate Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Pan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Tandemly arrayed genes (TAGs are duplicated genes that are linked as neighbors on a chromosome, many of which have important physiological and biochemical functions. Here we performed a survey of these genes in 11 available vertebrate genomes. TAGs account for an average of about 14% of all genes in these vertebrate genomes, and about 25% of all duplications. The majority of TAGs (72–94% have parallel transcription orientation (i.e., they are encoded on the same strand in contrast to the genome, which has about 50% of its genes in parallel transcription orientation. The majority of tandem arrays have only two members. In all species, the proportion of genes that belong to TAGs tends to be higher in large gene families than in small ones; together with our recent finding that tandem duplication played a more important role than retroposition in large families, this fact suggests that among all types of duplication mechanisms, tandem duplication is the predominant mechanism of duplication, especially in large families. Finally, several species have a higher proportion of large tandem arrays that are species-specific than random expectation.

  13. Global Metabolic Reconstruction and Metabolic Gene Evolution in the Cattle Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woonsu; Park, Hyesun; Seo, Seongwon

    2016-01-01

    The sequence of cattle genome provided a valuable opportunity to systematically link genetic and metabolic traits of cattle. The objectives of this study were 1) to reconstruct genome-scale cattle-specific metabolic pathways based on the most recent and updated cattle genome build and 2) to identify duplicated metabolic genes in the cattle genome for better understanding of metabolic adaptations in cattle. A bioinformatic pipeline of an organism for amalgamating genomic annotations from multiple sources was updated. Using this, an amalgamated cattle genome database based on UMD_3.1, was created. The amalgamated cattle genome database is composed of a total of 33,292 genes: 19,123 consensus genes between NCBI and Ensembl databases, 8,410 and 5,493 genes only found in NCBI or Ensembl, respectively, and 266 genes from NCBI scaffolds. A metabolic reconstruction of the cattle genome and cattle pathway genome database (PGDB) was also developed using Pathway Tools, followed by an intensive manual curation. The manual curation filled or revised 68 pathway holes, deleted 36 metabolic pathways, and added 23 metabolic pathways. Consequently, the curated cattle PGDB contains 304 metabolic pathways, 2,460 reactions including 2,371 enzymatic reactions, and 4,012 enzymes. Furthermore, this study identified eight duplicated genes in 12 metabolic pathways in the cattle genome compared to human and mouse. Some of these duplicated genes are related with specific hormone biosynthesis and detoxifications. The updated genome-scale metabolic reconstruction is a useful tool for understanding biology and metabolic characteristics in cattle. There has been significant improvements in the quality of cattle genome annotations and the MetaCyc database. The duplicated metabolic genes in the cattle genome compared to human and mouse implies evolutionary changes in the cattle genome and provides a useful information for further research on understanding metabolic adaptations of cattle.

  14. Synaptotagmin gene content of the sequenced genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craxton Molly

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synaptotagmins exist as a large gene family in mammals. There is much interest in the function of certain family members which act crucially in the regulated synaptic vesicle exocytosis required for efficient neurotransmission. Knowledge of the functions of other family members is relatively poor and the presence of Synaptotagmin genes in plants indicates a role for the family as a whole which is wider than neurotransmission. Identification of the Synaptotagmin genes within completely sequenced genomes can provide the entire Synaptotagmin gene complement of each sequenced organism. Defining the detailed structures of all the Synaptotagmin genes and their encoded products can provide a useful resource for functional studies and a deeper understanding of the evolution of the gene family. The current rapid increase in the number of sequenced genomes from different branches of the tree of life, together with the public deposition of evolutionarily diverse transcript sequences make such studies worthwhile. Results I have compiled a detailed list of the Synaptotagmin genes of Caenorhabditis, Anopheles, Drosophila, Ciona, Danio, Fugu, Mus, Homo, Arabidopsis and Oryza by examining genomic and transcript sequences from public sequence databases together with some transcript sequences obtained by cDNA library screening and RT-PCR. I have compared all of the genes and investigated the relationship between plant Synaptotagmins and their non-Synaptotagmin counterparts. Conclusions I have identified and compared 98 Synaptotagmin genes from 10 sequenced genomes. Detailed comparison of transcript sequences reveals abundant and complex variation in Synaptotagmin gene expression and indicates the presence of Synaptotagmin genes in all animals and land plants. Amino acid sequence comparisons indicate patterns of conservation and diversity in function. Phylogenetic analysis shows the origin of Synaptotagmins in multicellular eukaryotes and their

  15. Coral Reef Genomics: Developing tools for functional genomics ofcoral symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Jodi; Brokstein, Peter; Manohar, Chitra; Coffroth, MaryAlice; Szmant, Alina; Medina, Monica

    2005-03-01

    Symbioses between cnidarians and dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are widespread in the marine environment. The importance of this symbiosis to reef-building corals and reef nutrient and carbon cycles is well documented, but little is known about the mechanisms by which the partners establish and regulate the symbiosis. Because the dinoflagellate symbionts live inside the cells of their host coral, the interactions between the partners occur on cellular and molecular levels, as each partner alters the expression of genes and proteins to facilitate the partnership. These interactions can examined using high-throughput techniques that allow thousands of genes to be examined simultaneously. We are developing the groundwork so that we can use DNA microarray profiling to identify genes involved in the Montastraea faveolata and Acropora palmata symbioses. Here we report results from the initial steps in this microarray initiative, that is, the construction of cDNA libraries from 4 of 16 target stages, sequencing of 3450 cDNA clones to generate Expressed Sequenced Tags (ESTs), and annotation of the ESTs to identify candidate genes to include in the microarrays. An understanding of how the coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis is regulated will have implications for atmospheric and ocean sciences, conservation biology, the study and diagnosis of coral bleaching and disease, and comparative studies of animal-protest interactions.

  16. Genomics of the human carnitine acyltransferase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Leij, FR; Huijkman, NCA; Boomsma, C; Kuipers, JRG; Bartelds, B

    2000-01-01

    Five genes in the human genome are known to encode different active forms of related carnitine acyltransferases: CPT1A for liver-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT1B for muscle-type carnitine palmitoyltransferase I, CPT2 for carnitine palmitoyltransferase II, CROT for carnitine octanoyltrans

  17. GeneViTo: Visualizing gene-product functional and structural features in genomic datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promponas Vasilis J

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of increasing amounts of sequence data from completely sequenced genomes boosts the development of new computational methods for automated genome annotation and comparative genomics. Therefore, there is a need for tools that facilitate the visualization of raw data and results produced by bioinformatics analysis, providing new means for interactive genome exploration. Visual inspection can be used as a basis to assess the quality of various analysis algorithms and to aid in-depth genomic studies. Results GeneViTo is a JAVA-based computer application that serves as a workbench for genome-wide analysis through visual interaction. The application deals with various experimental information concerning both DNA and protein sequences (derived from public sequence databases or proprietary data sources and meta-data obtained by various prediction algorithms, classification schemes or user-defined features. Interaction with a Graphical User Interface (GUI allows easy extraction of genomic and proteomic data referring to the sequence itself, sequence features, or general structural and functional features. Emphasis is laid on the potential comparison between annotation and prediction data in order to offer a supplement to the provided information, especially in cases of "poor" annotation, or an evaluation of available predictions. Moreover, desired information can be output in high quality JPEG image files for further elaboration and scientific use. A compilation of properly formatted GeneViTo input data for demonstration is available to interested readers for two completely sequenced prokaryotes, Chlamydia trachomatis and Methanococcus jannaschii. Conclusions GeneViTo offers an inspectional view of genomic functional elements, concerning data stemming both from database annotation and analysis tools for an overall analysis of existing genomes. The application is compatible with Linux or Windows ME-2000-XP operating

  18. Functional Genomics of Allergen Gene Families in Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Maghuly

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Fruit consumption is encouraged for health reasons; however, fruits may harbour a series of allergenic proteins that may cause discomfort or even represent serious threats to certain individuals. Thus, the identification and characterization of allergens in fruits requires novel approaches involving genomic and proteomic tools. Since avoidance of fruits also negatively affects the quality of patients’ lives, biotechnological interventions are ongoing to produce low allergenic fruits by down regulating specific genes. In this respect, the control of proteins associated with allergenicity could be achieved by fine tuning the spatial and temporal expression of the relevant genes.

  19. Tools for the Validation of Genomes and Transcriptomes with Proteomics data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Aya, Carlos; Tay, Aidan

    Aims With the large amount of genomics and proteomics data currently available, there remains a lack of tools to integrate data from these two fields. This project aims to provide a ‘nexus’ for integrating genomics and transcriptomics data generated from next-generation sequencing with proteomics...... data generated from protein mass spectrometry. We are developing a set of tools which allow users to: •Co-visualise genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics data using the Integrated Genomics Viewer (IGV).1 •Validate the existence of genes and mRNAs using peptides identified from mass spectrometry...... experiments. •Validate alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms by searching for peptides that span across exon-exon junctions....

  20. Gene Ontology-Based Analysis of Zebrafish Omics Data Using the Web Tool Comparative Gene Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimie, Esmaeil; Fruzangohar, Mario; Moussavi Nik, Seyyed Hani; Newman, Morgan

    2017-09-05

    Gene Ontology (GO) analysis is a powerful tool in systems biology, which uses a defined nomenclature to annotate genes/proteins within three categories: "Molecular Function," "Biological Process," and "Cellular Component." GO analysis can assist in revealing functional mechanisms underlying observed patterns in transcriptomic, genomic, and proteomic data. The already extensive and increasing use of zebrafish for modeling genetic and other diseases highlights the need to develop a GO analytical tool for this organism. The web tool Comparative GO was originally developed for GO analysis of bacterial data in 2013 ( www.comparativego.com ). We have now upgraded and elaborated this web tool for analysis of zebrafish genetic data using GOs and annotations from the Gene Ontology Consortium.

  1. BACs as tools for the study of genomic imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunster, S J; Van De Pette, M; John, R M

    2011-01-01

    Genomic imprinting in mammals results in the expression of genes from only one parental allele. Imprinting occurs as a consequence of epigenetic marks set down either in the father's or the mother's germ line and affects a very specific category of mammalian gene. A greater understanding of this distinctive phenomenon can be gained from studies using large genomic clones, called bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs). Here, we review the important applications of BACs to imprinting research, covering physical mapping studies and the use of BACs as transgenes in mice to study gene expression patterns, to identify imprinting centres, and to isolate the consequences of altered gene dosage. We also highlight the significant and unique advantages that rapid BAC engineering brings to genomic imprinting research.

  2. BACs as Tools for the Study of Genomic Imprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Tunster

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting in mammals results in the expression of genes from only one parental allele. Imprinting occurs as a consequence of epigenetic marks set down either in the father's or the mother's germ line and affects a very specific category of mammalian gene. A greater understanding of this distinctive phenomenon can be gained from studies using large genomic clones, called bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs. Here, we review the important applications of BACs to imprinting research, covering physical mapping studies and the use of BACs as transgenes in mice to study gene expression patterns, to identify imprinting centres, and to isolate the consequences of altered gene dosage. We also highlight the significant and unique advantages that rapid BAC engineering brings to genomic imprinting research.

  3. Integrative genomic analysis by interoperation of bioinformatics tools in GenomeSpace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorvaldsdottir, Helga; Liefeld, Ted; Ocana, Marco; Borges-Rivera, Diego; Pochet, Nathalie; Robinson, James T.; Demchak, Barry; Hull, Tim; Ben-Artzi, Gil; Blankenberg, Daniel; Barber, Galt P.; Lee, Brian T.; Kuhn, Robert M.; Nekrutenko, Anton; Segal, Eran; Ideker, Trey; Reich, Michael; Regev, Aviv; Chang, Howard Y.; Mesirov, Jill P.

    2015-01-01

    Integrative analysis of multiple data types to address complex biomedical questions requires the use of multiple software tools in concert and remains an enormous challenge for most of the biomedical research community. Here we introduce GenomeSpace (http://www.genomespace.org), a cloud-based, cooperative community resource. Seeded as a collaboration of six of the most popular genomics analysis tools, GenomeSpace now supports the streamlined interaction of 20 bioinformatics tools and data resources. To facilitate the ability of non-programming users’ to leverage GenomeSpace in integrative analysis, it offers a growing set of ‘recipes’, short workflows involving a few tools and steps to guide investigators through high utility analysis tasks. PMID:26780094

  4. Next generation tools for genomic data generation, distribution, and visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nix David A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapidly falling cost and availability of high throughput sequencing and microarray technologies, the bottleneck for effectively using genomic analysis in the laboratory and clinic is shifting to one of effectively managing, analyzing, and sharing genomic data. Results Here we present three open-source, platform independent, software tools for generating, analyzing, distributing, and visualizing genomic data. These include a next generation sequencing/microarray LIMS and analysis project center (GNomEx; an application for annotating and programmatically distributing genomic data using the community vetted DAS/2 data exchange protocol (GenoPub; and a standalone Java Swing application (GWrap that makes cutting edge command line analysis tools available to those who prefer graphical user interfaces. Both GNomEx and GenoPub use the rich client Flex/Flash web browser interface to interact with Java classes and a relational database on a remote server. Both employ a public-private user-group security model enabling controlled distribution of patient and unpublished data alongside public resources. As such, they function as genomic data repositories that can be accessed manually or programmatically through DAS/2-enabled client applications such as the Integrated Genome Browser. Conclusions These tools have gained wide use in our core facilities, research laboratories and clinics and are freely available for non-profit use. See http://sourceforge.net/projects/gnomex/, http://sourceforge.net/projects/genoviz/, and http://sourceforge.net/projects/useq.

  5. DHPC: a new tool to express genome structural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xuegong; Deng, Xuemei; Rayner, Simon; Liu, Xiangdong; Zhang, Qingling; Yang, Yupu; Li, Ning

    2008-05-01

    The DHPC (DNA Hilbert-Peano curve) is a new tool for visualizing large-scale genome sequences by mapping sequences into a two-dimensional square. It utilizes the space-filling function of Hilbert-Peano mapping. By applying a Gauss smoothing technique and a user-defined color function, a large-scale genome sequence can be mapped into a two-dimensional color image. In the calculated DHPCs, many genome characteristics are revealed. In this article we introduce the method and show how DHPCs may be used to identify regions of different base composition. The power of the method is demonstrated by presenting multiple examples such as repeating sequences, degree of base bias, regions of homogeneity and their boundaries, and mark of annotated segments. We also present several genome curves generated by DHPC to demonstrate how DHPC can be used to find previously unidentified sequence features in these genomes.

  6. Gene Chips: A New Tool for Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botstein, David

    2005-03-01

    The knowledge of many complete genomic sequences has led to a ``grand unification of biology,'' consisting of direct evidence that most of the basic cellular functions of all organisms are carried out by genes and proteins whose primary sequences are directly related by descent (i.e. orthologs). Further, genome sequences have made it possible to study all the genes of a single organism simultaneously. We have been using DNA microarrays (sometime referred to as ``gene chips'') to study patterns of gene expression and genome rearrangement in yeast and human cells under a variety of conditions and in human tumors and normal tissues. These experiments produce huge volumes of data; new computational and statistical methods are required to analyze them properly. Examples from this work will be presented to illustrate how genome-scale experiments and analysis can result in new biological insights not obtainable by traditional analyses of genes and proteins one by one. For lymphomas, breast tumors, lung tumors, liver tumors, gastric tumors, brain tumors and soft tissue tumors we have been able, by the application of clustering algorithms, to subclassify tumors of similar anatomical origin on the basis of their gene expression patterns. These subclassifications appear to be reproducible and clinically as well as biologically meaningful. By studying synchronized cells growing in culture, we have identified many hundreds of yeast and human genes that are expressed periodically, at characteristically different points in the cell division cycle. In humans, it turns out that most of these genes are the same genes that comprise the ``proliferation cluster,'' i.e. the genes whose expression is specifically associated with the proliferativeness of tumors and tumor cell lines. Finally, we have been applying a variant of our DNA microarray technology (which we call ``array comparative hybridization'') to follow the DNA copy number of genes, both in tumors and in yeast cells

  7. The Aspergillus Genome Database, a curated comparative genomics resource for gene, protein and sequence information for the Aspergillus research community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Martha B; Chibucos, Marcus C; Costanzo, Maria C; Crabtree, Jonathan; Inglis, Diane O; Lotia, Adil; Orvis, Joshua; Shah, Prachi; Skrzypek, Marek S; Binkley, Gail; Miyasato, Stuart R; Wortman, Jennifer R; Sherlock, Gavin

    2010-01-01

    The Aspergillus Genome Database (AspGD) is an online genomics resource for researchers studying the genetics and molecular biology of the Aspergilli. AspGD combines high-quality manual curation of the experimental scientific literature examining the genetics and molecular biology of Aspergilli, cutting-edge comparative genomics approaches to iteratively refine and improve structural gene annotations across multiple Aspergillus species, and web-based research tools for accessing and exploring the data. All of these data are freely available at http://www.aspgd.org. We welcome feedback from users and the research community at aspergillus-curator@genome.stanford.edu.

  8. Multidimensional gene set analysis of genomic data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Montaner

    Full Text Available Understanding the functional implications of changes in gene expression, mutations, etc., is the aim of most genomic experiments. To achieve this, several functional profiling methods have been proposed. Such methods study the behaviour of different gene modules (e.g. gene ontology terms in response to one particular variable (e.g. differential gene expression. In spite to the wealth of information provided by functional profiling methods, a common limitation to all of them is their inherent unidimensional nature. In order to overcome this restriction we present a multidimensional logistic model that allows studying the relationship of gene modules with different genome-scale measurements (e.g. differential expression, genotyping association, methylation, copy number alterations, heterozygosity, etc. simultaneously. Moreover, the relationship of such functional modules with the interactions among the variables can also be studied, which produces novel results impossible to be derived from the conventional unidimensional functional profiling methods. We report sound results of gene sets associations that remained undetected by the conventional one-dimensional gene set analysis in several examples. Our findings demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach for the discovery of new cell functionalities with complex dependences on more than one variable.

  9. GenomicScape: an easy-to-use web tool for gene expression data analysis. Application to investigate the molecular events in the differentiation of B cells into plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassambara, Alboukadel; Rème, Thierry; Jourdan, Michel; Fest, Thierry; Hose, Dirk; Tarte, Karin; Klein, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    DNA microarrays have considerably helped to improve the understanding of biological processes and diseases. Large amounts of publicly available microarray data are accumulating, but are poorly exploited due to a lack of easy-to-use bioinformatics resources. The aim of this study is to build a free and convenient data-mining web site (www.genomicscape.com). GenomicScape allows mining dataset from various microarray platforms, identifying genes differentially expressed between populations, clustering populations, visualizing expression profiles of large sets of genes, and exporting results and figures. We show how easily GenomicScape makes it possible to construct a molecular atlas of the B cell differentiation using publicly available transcriptome data of naïve B cells, centroblasts, centrocytes, memory B cells, preplasmablasts, plasmablasts, early plasma cells and bone marrow plasma cells. Genes overexpressed in each population and the pathways encoded by these genes are provided as well as how the populations cluster together. All the analyses, tables and figures can be easily done and exported using GenomicScape and this B cell to plasma cell atlas is freely available online. Beyond this B cell to plasma cell atlas, the molecular characteristics of any biological process can be easily and freely investigated by uploading the corresponding transcriptome files into GenomicScape.

  10. BRED: a simple and powerful tool for constructing mutant and recombinant bacteriophage genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J Marinelli

    Full Text Available Advances in DNA sequencing technology have facilitated the determination of hundreds of complete genome sequences both for bacteria and their bacteriophages. Some of these bacteria have well-developed and facile genetic systems for constructing mutants to determine gene function, and recombineering is a particularly effective tool. However, generally applicable methods for constructing defined mutants of bacteriophages are poorly developed, in part because of the inability to use selectable markers such as drug resistance genes during viral lytic growth. Here we describe a method for simple and effective directed mutagenesis of bacteriophage genomes using Bacteriophage Recombineering of Electroporated DNA (BRED, in which a highly efficient recombineering system is utilized directly on electroporated phage DNA; no selection is required and mutants can be readily detected by PCR. We describe the use of BRED to construct unmarked gene deletions, in-frame internal deletions, base substitutions, precise gene replacements, and the addition of gene tags.

  11. Genome Calligrapher: A Web Tool for Refactoring Bacterial Genome Sequences for de Novo DNA Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Matthias; Deutsch, Samuel; Christen, Beat

    2015-08-21

    Recent advances in synthetic biology have resulted in an increasing demand for the de novo synthesis of large-scale DNA constructs. Any process improvement that enables fast and cost-effective streamlining of digitized genetic information into fabricable DNA sequences holds great promise to study, mine, and engineer genomes. Here, we present Genome Calligrapher, a computer-aided design web tool intended for whole genome refactoring of bacterial chromosomes for de novo DNA synthesis. By applying a neutral recoding algorithm, Genome Calligrapher optimizes GC content and removes obstructive DNA features known to interfere with the synthesis of double-stranded DNA and the higher order assembly into large DNA constructs. Subsequent bioinformatics analysis revealed that synthesis constraints are prevalent among bacterial genomes. However, a low level of codon replacement is sufficient for refactoring bacterial genomes into easy-to-synthesize DNA sequences. To test the algorithm, 168 kb of synthetic DNA comprising approximately 20 percent of the synthetic essential genome of the cell-cycle bacterium Caulobacter crescentus was streamlined and then ordered from a commercial supplier of low-cost de novo DNA synthesis. The successful assembly into eight 20 kb segments indicates that Genome Calligrapher algorithm can be efficiently used to refactor difficult-to-synthesize DNA. Genome Calligrapher is broadly applicable to recode biosynthetic pathways, DNA sequences, and whole bacterial genomes, thus offering new opportunities to use synthetic biology tools to explore the functionality of microbial diversity. The Genome Calligrapher web tool can be accessed at https://christenlab.ethz.ch/GenomeCalligrapher  .

  12. TF Target Mapper: a BLAST search tool for the identification of Transcription Factor target genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsman, S.; Moorhouse, M.J.; Jager, V.C.L. de; Spek, P. van der; Grosveld, F.; Strouboulis, J.; Katsantoni, E.Z.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the current era of high throughput genomics a major challenge is the genome-wide identification of target genes for specific transcription factors. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) allows the isolation of in vivo binding sites of transcription factors and provides a powerful tool

  13. Semiconservative replication, genetic repair, and many-gened genomes: Extending the quasispecies paradigm to living systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2005-12-01

    Quasispecies theory has emerged as an important tool for modeling the evolutionary dynamics of biological systems. We review recent advances in the field, with an emphasis on the quasispecies dynamics of semiconservatively replicating genomes. Applications to cancer and adult stem cell growth are discussed. Additional topics, such as genetic repair and many-gene genomes, are covered as well.

  14. Ori-Finder 2, an integrated tool to predict replication origins in the archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao eLuo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA replication is one of the most basic processes in all three domains of cellular life. With the advent of the post-genomic era, the increasing number of complete archaeal genomes has created an opportunity for exploration of the molecular mechanisms for initiating cellular DNA replication by in vivo experiments as well as in silico analysis. However, the location of replication origins (oriCs in many sequenced archaeal genomes remains unknown. We present a web-based tool Ori-Finder 2 to predict oriCs in the archaeal genomes automatically, based on the integrated method comprising the analysis of base composition asymmetry using the Z-curve method, the distribution of Origin Recognition Boxes (ORBs identified by FIMO tool, and the occurrence of genes frequently close to oriCs. The web server is also able to analyze the unannotated genome sequences by integrating with gene prediction pipelines and BLAST software for gene identification and function annotation. The result of the predicted oriCs is displayed as an HTML table, which offers an intuitive way to browse the result in graphical and tabular form. The software presented here is accurate for the genomes with single oriC, but it does not necessarily find all the origins of replication for the genomes with multiple oriCs. Ori-Finder 2 aims to become a useful platform for the identification and analysis of oriCs in the archaeal genomes, which would provide insight into the replication mechanisms in archaea. The web server is freely available at http://tubic.tju.edu.cn/Ori-Finder2/.

  15. Genomic tools in pearl millet breeding for drought tolerance: Status and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desalegn Debelo Serba

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pearl millet (Penisetum glaucum (L R. Br. is a hardy cereal crop grown in the arid and semiarid tropics where other cereals are likely to fail to produce economic yields due to drought and heat stresses. Adaptive evolution, a form of natural selection shaped the crop to grow and yield satisfactorily with limited moisture supply or under periodic water deficits in the soil. Drought tolerance is a complex polygenic trait that various morphological and physiological responses are controlled by hundreds of genes and significantly influenced by the environment. The development of genomic tools will have enormous potential to improve the efficiency and precision of conventional breeding. The apparent independent domestication events, highly outcrossing nature and traditional cultivation in stressful environments maintained tremendous amount of polymorphism in pearl millet. This high polymorphism of the crop has been revealed by genome mapping that in turn stimulated the mapping and tagging of genomic regions controlling important traits such as drought tolerance. Mapping of a major QTL for terminal drought tolerance in independent populations envisaged the prospect for the development of molecular breeding in pearl millet. To accelerate genetic gains for drought tolerance targeted novel approaches such as establishment of marker-trait associations, genomic selection tools, genome sequence and genotyping-by-sequencing are still limited. Development and application of high throughput genomic tools need to be intensified to improve the breeding efficiency of pearl millet to minimize the impact of climate change on its production.

  16. Spatial Genome Organization and its emerging role as a Potential Diagnosis Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Meaburn

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells the genome is highly spatially organized. Functional relevance of higher order genome organization is implied by the fact that specific genes, and even whole chromosomes, alter spatial position in concert with functional changes within the nucleus, for example with modifications to chromatin or transcription. The exact molecular pathways that regulate spatial genome organization and the full implication to the cell of such an organization remain to be determined. However, there is a growing realization that the spatial organization of the genome can be used as a marker of disease. While global genome organization patterns remain largely conserved in disease, some genes and chromosomes occupy distinct nuclear positions in diseased cells compared to their normal counterparts, with the patterns of reorganization differing between diseases. Importantly, mapping the spatial positioning patterns of specific genomic loci can distinguish cancerous tissue from benign with high accuracy. Genome positioning is an attractive novel biomarker since additional quantitative biomarkers are urgently required in many cancer types. Current diagnostic techniques are often subjective and generally lack the ability to identify aggressive cancer from indolent, which can lead to over- or under-treatment of patients. Proof-of-principle for the use of genome positioning as a diagnostic tool has been provided based on small scale retrospective studies. Future large-scale studies are required to assess the feasibility of bringing spatial genome organization-based diagnostics to the clinical setting and to determine if the positioning patterns of specific loci can be useful biomarkers for cancer prognosis. Since spatial reorganization of the genome has been identified in multiple human diseases, it is likely that spatial genome positioning patterns as a diagnostic biomarker may be applied to many diseases.

  17. Plant MITEs: Useful Tools for Plant Genetics and Genomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Feng

    2003-01-01

    MITEs (Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements) are reminiscence of non-autonomous DNA (class Ⅱ) elements, which are distinguished from other transpos-able elements by their small size, short terminal inverted repeats (TIRs), high copynumbers, genic preference, and DNA sequence identity among family members. Al-though MITEs were first discovered in plants and still actively reshaping genomes,they have been isolated from a wide range of eukaryotic organisms. MITEs canbe divided into Tourist-like, Stowaway-like, and pogo-like groups, according tosimilarities of their TIRs and TSDs (target site duplications). In despite of sev-eral models to explain the origin and amplification of MITEs, their mechanisms oftransposition and accumulation in eukaryotic genomes remain poorly understoodowing to insufficient experimental data. The unique properties of MITEs have beenexploited as useful genetic tools for plant genome analysis. Utilization of MITEsas effective and informative genomic markers and potential application of MITEsin plants systematic, phylogenetic, and genetic studies are discussed.

  18. A Probabilistic Genome-Wide Gene Reading Frame Sequence Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Christian Theil; Mørk, Søren

    We introduce a new type of probabilistic sequence model, that model the sequential composition of reading frames of genes in a genome. Our approach extends gene finders with a model of the sequential composition of genes at the genome-level -- effectively producing a sequential genome annotation...... and are evaluated by the effect on prediction performance. Since bacterial gene finding to a large extent is a solved problem it forms an ideal proving ground for evaluating the explicit modeling of larger scale gene sequence composition of genomes. We conclude that the sequential composition of gene reading frames...... as output. The model can be used to obtain the most probable genome annotation based on a combination of i: a gene finder score of each gene candidate and ii: the sequence of the reading frames of gene candidates through a genome. The model --- as well as a higher order variant --- is developed and tested...

  19. Decoding the genome with an integrative analysis tool: combinatorial CRM Decoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Keunsoo; Kim, Joomyeong; Chung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Daeyoup

    2011-09-01

    The identification of genome-wide cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) and characterization of their associated epigenetic features are fundamental steps toward the understanding of gene regulatory networks. Although integrative analysis of available genome-wide information can provide new biological insights, the lack of novel methodologies has become a major bottleneck. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis tool called combinatorial CRM decoder (CCD), which utilizes the publicly available information to identify and characterize genome-wide CRMs in a species of interest. CCD first defines a set of the epigenetic features which is significantly associated with a set of known CRMs as a code called 'trace code', and subsequently uses the trace code to pinpoint putative CRMs throughout the genome. Using 61 genome-wide data sets obtained from 17 independent mouse studies, CCD successfully catalogued ∼12 600 CRMs (five distinct classes) including polycomb repressive complex 2 target sites as well as imprinting control regions. Interestingly, we discovered that ∼4% of the identified CRMs belong to at least two different classes named 'multi-functional CRM', suggesting their functional importance for regulating spatiotemporal gene expression. From these examples, we show that CCD can be applied to any potential genome-wide datasets and therefore will shed light on unveiling genome-wide CRMs in various species.

  20. OCPAT: an online codon-preserved alignment tool for evolutionary genomic analysis of protein coding sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossman Lawrence I

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapidly accumulating genome sequence data from multiple species offer powerful opportunities for the detection of DNA sequence evolution. Phylogenetic tree construction and codon-based tests for natural selection are the prevailing tools used to detect functionally important evolutionary change in protein coding sequences. These analyses often require multiple DNA sequence alignments that maintain the correct reading frame for each collection of putative orthologous sequences. Since this feature is not available in most alignment tools, codon reading frames often must be checked manually before evolutionary analyses can commence. Results Here we report an online codon-preserved alignment tool (OCPAT that generates multiple sequence alignments automatically from the coding sequences of any list of human gene IDs and their putative orthologs from genomes of other vertebrate tetrapods. OCPAT is programmed to extract putative orthologous genes from genomes and to align the orthologs with the reading frame maintained in all species. OCPAT also optimizes the alignment by trimming the most variable alignment regions at the 5' and 3' ends of each gene. The resulting output of alignments is returned in several formats, which facilitates further molecular evolutionary analyses by appropriate available software. Alignments are generally robust and reliable, retaining the correct reading frame. The tool can serve as the first step for comparative genomic analyses of protein-coding gene sequences including phylogenetic tree reconstruction and detection of natural selection. We aligned 20,658 human RefSeq mRNAs using OCPAT. Most alignments are missing sequence(s from at least one species; however, functional annotation clustering of the ~1700 transcripts that were alignable to all species shows that genes involved in multi-subunit protein complexes are highly conserved. Conclusion The OCPAT program facilitates large-scale evolutionary and

  1. RiceGeneThresher: a web-based application for mining genes underlying QTL in rice genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongjuea, Supat; Ruanjaichon, Vinitchan; Bruskiewich, Richard; Vanavichit, Apichart

    2009-01-01

    RiceGeneThresher is a public online resource for mining genes underlying genome regions of interest or quantitative trait loci (QTL) in rice genome. It is a compendium of rice genomic resources consisting of genetic markers, genome annotation, expressed sequence tags (ESTs), protein domains, gene ontology, plant stress-responsive genes, metabolic pathways and prediction of protein-protein interactions. RiceGeneThresher system integrates these diverse data sources and provides powerful web-based applications, and flexible tools for delivering customized set of biological data on rice. Its system supports whole-genome gene mining for QTL by querying using DNA marker intervals or genomic loci. RiceGeneThresher provides biologically supported evidences that are essential for targeting groups or networks of genes involved in controlling traits underlying QTL. Users can use it to discover and to assign the most promising candidate genes in preparation for the further gene function validation analysis. The web-based application is freely available at http://rice.kps.ku.ac.th.

  2. Adenoviral vectors as genome editing tools : repairing defective DMD alleles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggio, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdVs) constitute powerful gene delivery vehicles. However, so far, their potential for genome editing has not been extensively investigated. By tailoring AdVs as carriers of designer nucleases and donor DNA sequences, the research presented in this thesis expands the utility of

  3. Genome editing: The efficient tool CRISPR–Cpf1

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2017-03-01

    The novel features of the CRISPR–Cpf1 RNA-guided endonuclease system facilitate precise and efficient genome engineering. Application of CRISPR–Cpf1 in plants shows promise for robust gene editing and regulation, opening exciting possibilities for targeted trait improvement in crops.

  4. Whole genome multilocus sequence typing as an epidemiologic tool for Yersinia pestis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingry, Luke C; Rowe, Lori A; Respicio-Kingry, Laurel B; Beard, Charles B; Schriefer, Martin E; Petersen, Jeannine M

    2016-04-01

    Human plague is a severe and often fatal zoonotic disease caused by Yersinia pestis. For public health investigations of human cases, nonintensive whole genome molecular typing tools, capable of defining epidemiologic relationships, are advantageous. Whole genome multilocus sequence typing (wgMLST) is a recently developed methodology that simplifies genomic analyses by transforming millions of base pairs of sequence into character data for each gene. We sequenced 13 US Y. pestis isolates with known epidemiologic relationships. Sequences were assembled de novo, and multilocus sequence typing alleles were assigned by comparison against 3979 open reading frames from the reference strain CO92. Allele-based cluster analysis accurately grouped the 13 isolates, as well as 9 publicly available Y. pestis isolates, by their epidemiologic relationships. Our findings indicate wgMLST is a simplified, sensitive, and scalable tool for epidemiologic analysis of Y. pestis strains.

  5. The GATO gene annotation tool for research laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fujita

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale genome projects have generated a rapidly increasing number of DNA sequences. Therefore, development of computational methods to rapidly analyze these sequences is essential for progress in genomic research. Here we present an automatic annotation system for preliminary analysis of DNA sequences. The gene annotation tool (GATO is a Bioinformatics pipeline designed to facilitate routine functional annotation and easy access to annotated genes. It was designed in view of the frequent need of genomic researchers to access data pertaining to a common set of genes. In the GATO system, annotation is generated by querying some of the Web-accessible resources and the information is stored in a local database, which keeps a record of all previous annotation results. GATO may be accessed from everywhere through the internet or may be run locally if a large number of sequences are going to be annotated. It is implemented in PHP and Perl and may be run on any suitable Web server. Usually, installation and application of annotation systems require experience and are time consuming, but GATO is simple and practical, allowing anyone with basic skills in informatics to access it without any special training. GATO can be downloaded at [http://mariwork.iq.usp.br/gato/]. Minimum computer free space required is 2 MB.

  6. Databases and web tools for cancer genomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yadong; Dong, Xunong; Xie, Bingbing; Ding, Nan; Chen, Juan; Li, Yongjun; Zhang, Qian; Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    Publicly-accessible resources have promoted the advance of scientific discovery. The era of genomics and big data has brought the need for collaboration and data sharing in order to make effective use of this new knowledge. Here, we describe the web resources for cancer genomics research and rate them on the basis of the diversity of cancer types, sample size, omics data comprehensiveness, and user experience. The resources reviewed include data repository and analysis tools; and we hope such introduction will promote the awareness and facilitate the usage of these resources in the cancer research community.

  7. Databases and Web Tools for Cancer Genomics Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yadong Yang; Xunong Dong; Bingbing Xie; Nan Ding; Juan Chen; Yongjun Li; Qian Zhang; Hongzhu Qu; Xiangdong Fang

    2015-01-01

    Publicly-accessible resources have promoted the advance of scientific discovery. The era of genomics and big data has brought the need for collaboration and data sharing in order to make effective use of this new knowledge. Here, we describe the web resources for cancer genomics research and rate them on the basis of the diversity of cancer types, sample size, omics data com-prehensiveness, and user experience. The resources reviewed include data repository and analysis tools;and we hope such introduction will promote the awareness and facilitate the usage of these resources in the cancer research community.

  8. G-NEST: a gene neighborhood scoring tool to identify co-conserved, co-expressed genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemay Danielle G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In previous studies, gene neighborhoods—spatial clusters of co-expressed genes in the genome—have been defined using arbitrary rules such as requiring adjacency, a minimum number of genes, a fixed window size, or a minimum expression level. In the current study, we developed a Gene Neighborhood Scoring Tool (G-NEST which combines genomic location, gene expression, and evolutionary sequence conservation data to score putative gene neighborhoods across all possible window sizes simultaneously. Results Using G-NEST on atlases of mouse and human tissue expression data, we found that large neighborhoods of ten or more genes are extremely rare in mammalian genomes. When they do occur, neighborhoods are typically composed of families of related genes. Both the highest scoring and the largest neighborhoods in mammalian genomes are formed by tandem gene duplication. Mammalian gene neighborhoods contain highly and variably expressed genes. Co-localized noisy gene pairs exhibit lower evolutionary conservation of their adjacent genome locations, suggesting that their shared transcriptional background may be disadvantageous. Genes that are essential to mammalian survival and reproduction are less likely to occur in neighborhoods, although neighborhoods are enriched with genes that function in mitosis. We also found that gene orientation and protein-protein interactions are partially responsible for maintenance of gene neighborhoods. Conclusions Our experiments using G-NEST confirm that tandem gene duplication is the primary driver of non-random gene order in mammalian genomes. Non-essentiality, co-functionality, gene orientation, and protein-protein interactions are additional forces that maintain gene neighborhoods, especially those formed by tandem duplicates. We expect G-NEST to be useful for other applications such as the identification of core regulatory modules, common transcriptional backgrounds, and chromatin domains. The

  9. CONTIGuator: a bacterial genomes finishing tool for structural insights on draft genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazzicalupo Marco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent developments in sequencing technologies have given the opportunity to sequence many bacterial genomes with limited cost and labor, compared to previous techniques. However, a limiting step of genome sequencing is the finishing process, needed to infer the relative position of each contig and close sequencing gaps. An additional degree of complexity is given by bacterial species harboring more than one replicon, which are not contemplated by the currently available programs. The availability of a large number of bacterial genomes allows geneticists to use complete genomes (possibly from the same species as templates for contigs mapping. Here we present CONTIGuator, a software tool for contigs mapping over a reference genome which allows the visualization of a map of contigs, underlining loss and/or gain of genetic elements and permitting to finish multipartite genomes. The functionality of CONTIGuator was tested using four genomes, demonstrating its improved performances compared to currently available programs. Our approach appears efficient, with a clear visualization, allowing the user to perform comparative structural genomics analysis on draft genomes. CONTIGuator is a Python script for Linux environments and can be used on normal desktop machines and can be downloaded from http://contiguator.sourceforge.net.

  10. Biological Database of Images and Genomes: tools for community annotations linking image and genomic information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberlin, Andrew T; Jurkovic, Dominika A; Balish, Mitchell F; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    Genomic data and biomedical imaging data are undergoing exponential growth. However, our understanding of the phenotype–genotype connection linking the two types of data is lagging behind. While there are many types of software that enable the manipulation and analysis of image data and genomic data as separate entities, there is no framework established for linking the two. We present a generic set of software tools, BioDIG, that allows linking of image data to genomic data. BioDIG tools can be applied to a wide range of research problems that require linking images to genomes. BioDIG features the following: rapid construction of web-based workbenches, community-based annotation, user management and web services. By using BioDIG to create websites, researchers and curators can rapidly annotate a large number of images with genomic information. Here we present the BioDIG software tools that include an image module, a genome module and a user management module. We also introduce a BioDIG-based website, MyDIG, which is being used to annotate images of mycoplasmas. Database URL: BioDIG website: http://biodig.org BioDIG source code repository: http://github.com/FriedbergLab/BioDIG The MyDIG database: http://mydig.biodig.org/ PMID:23550062

  11. CRISPR-Cas9: Tool for Qualitative and Quantitative Plant Genome Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noman, Ali; Aqeel, Muhammad; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in genome editing techniques have aroused substantial excitement among agricultural scientists. These techniques offer new opportunities for developing improved plant lines with addition of important traits or removal of undesirable traits. Increased adoption of genome editing has been geared by swiftly developing Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). This is appearing as driving force for innovative utilization in diverse branches of plant biology. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated genome editing is being used for rapid, easy and efficient alteration of genes among diverse plant species. With approximate completion of conceptual work about CRISPR-Cas9, plant scientists are applying this genome editing tool for crop attributes enhancement. The capability of this system for performing targeted and efficient modifications in genome sequence as well as gene expression will certainly spur novel developments not only in model plants but in crop and ornamental plants as well. Additionally, due to non-involvement of foreign DNA, this technique may help alleviating regulatory issues associated with genetically modified plants. We expect that prevailing challenges in plant science like genomic region manipulation, crop specific vectors etc. will be addressed along with sustained growth of this genome editing tool. In this review, recent progress of CRISPR-Cas9 technology in plants has been summarized and discussed. We reviewed significance of CRISPR-Cas9 for specific and non-traditional aspects of plant life. It also covers strengths of this technique in comparison with other genome editing techniques, e.g., Zinc finger nucleases, Transcription activator-like effector nucleases and potential challenges in coming decades have been described. PMID:27917188

  12. CRISPR-Cas9: Tool for Qualitative and Quantitative Plant Genome Editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noman, Ali; Aqeel, Muhammad; He, Shuilin

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in genome editing techniques have aroused substantial excitement among agricultural scientists. These techniques offer new opportunities for developing improved plant lines with addition of important traits or removal of undesirable traits. Increased adoption of genome editing has been geared by swiftly developing Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR). This is appearing as driving force for innovative utilization in diverse branches of plant biology. CRISPR-Cas9 mediated genome editing is being used for rapid, easy and efficient alteration of genes among diverse plant species. With approximate completion of conceptual work about CRISPR-Cas9, plant scientists are applying this genome editing tool for crop attributes enhancement. The capability of this system for performing targeted and efficient modifications in genome sequence as well as gene expression will certainly spur novel developments not only in model plants but in crop and ornamental plants as well. Additionally, due to non-involvement of foreign DNA, this technique may help alleviating regulatory issues associated with genetically modified plants. We expect that prevailing challenges in plant science like genomic region manipulation, crop specific vectors etc. will be addressed along with sustained growth of this genome editing tool. In this review, recent progress of CRISPR-Cas9 technology in plants has been summarized and discussed. We reviewed significance of CRISPR-Cas9 for specific and non-traditional aspects of plant life. It also covers strengths of this technique in comparison with other genome editing techniques, e.g., Zinc finger nucleases, Transcription activator-like effector nucleases and potential challenges in coming decades have been described.

  13. Inheritable and precise large genomic deletions of non-coding RNA genes in zebrafish using TALENs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Liu

    Full Text Available Transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs have so far been applied to disrupt protein-coding genes which constitute only 2-3% of the genome in animals. The majority (70-90% of the animal genome is actually transcribed as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, yet the lack of efficient tools to knockout ncRNA genes hinders studies on their in vivo functions. Here we have developed novel strategies using TALENs to achieve precise and inheritable large genomic deletions and knockout of ncRNA genes in zebrafish. We have demonstrated that individual miRNA genes could be disrupted using one pair of TALENs, whereas large microRNA (miRNA gene clusters and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA genes could be precisely deleted using two pairs of TALENs. We have generated large genomic deletions of two miRNA clusters (the 1.2 kb miR-17-92 cluster and the 79.8 kb miR-430 cluster and one long non-coding RNA (lncRNA gene (the 9.0 kb malat1, and the deletions are transmitted through the germline. Taken together, our results establish TALENs as a robust tool to engineer large genomic deletions and knockout of ncRNA genes, thus opening up new avenues in the application of TALENs to study the genome in vivo.

  14. Genomic tools development for Aquilegia: construction of a BAC-based physical map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodges Scott A

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Aquilegia, consisting of approximately 70 taxa, is a member of the basal eudicot lineage, Ranuculales, which is evolutionarily intermediate between monocots and core eudicots, and represents a relatively unstudied clade in the angiosperm phylogenetic tree that bridges the gap between these two major plant groups. Aquilegia species are closely related and their distribution covers highly diverse habitats. These provide rich resources to better understand the genetic basis of adaptation to different pollinators and habitats that in turn leads to rapid speciation. To gain insights into the genome structure and facilitate gene identification, comparative genomics and whole-genome shotgun sequencing assembly, BAC-based genomics resources are of crucial importance. Results BAC-based genomic resources, including two BAC libraries, a physical map with anchored markers and BAC end sequences, were established from A. formosa. The physical map was composed of a total of 50,155 BAC clones in 832 contigs and 3939 singletons, covering 21X genome equivalents. These contigs spanned a physical length of 689.8 Mb (~2.3X of the genome suggesting the complex heterozygosity of the genome. A set of 197 markers was developed from ESTs induced by drought-stress, or involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis or floral development, and was integrated into the physical map. Among these were 87 genetically mapped markers that anchored 54 contigs, spanning 76.4 Mb (25.5% across the genome. Analysis of a selection of 12,086 BAC end sequences (BESs from the minimal tiling path (MTP allowed a preview of the Aquilegia genome organization, including identification of transposable elements, simple sequence repeats and gene content. Common repetitive elements previously reported in both monocots and core eudicots were identified in Aquilegia suggesting the value of this genome in connecting the two major plant clades. Comparison with sequenced plant genomes

  15. The CRISPR/Cas Genome-Editing Tool: Application in Improvement of Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatodia, Surender; Bhatotia, Kirti; Passricha, Nishat; Khurana, S M P; Tuteja, Narendra

    2016-01-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats associated Cas9/sgRNA system is a novel targeted genome-editing technique derived from bacterial immune system. It is an inexpensive, easy, most user friendly and rapidly adopted genome editing tool transforming to revolutionary paradigm. This technique enables precise genomic modifications in many different organisms and tissues. Cas9 protein is an RNA guided endonuclease utilized for creating targeted double-stranded breaks with only a short RNA sequence to confer recognition of the target in animals and plants. Development of genetically edited (GE) crops similar to those developed by conventional or mutation breeding using this potential technique makes it a promising and extremely versatile tool for providing sustainable productive agriculture for better feeding of rapidly growing population in a changing climate. The emerging areas of research for the genome editing in plants include interrogating gene function, rewiring the regulatory signaling networks and sgRNA library for high-throughput loss-of-function screening. In this review, we have described the broad applicability of the Cas9 nuclease mediated targeted plant genome editing for development of designer crops. The regulatory uncertainty and social acceptance of plant breeding by Cas9 genome editing have also been described. With this powerful and innovative technique the designer GE non-GM plants could further advance climate resilient and sustainable agriculture in the future and maximizing yield by combating abiotic and biotic stresses.

  16. Stacks: an analysis tool set for population genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catchen, Julian; Hohenlohe, Paul A; Bassham, Susan; Amores, Angel; Cresko, William A

    2013-06-01

    Massively parallel short-read sequencing technologies, coupled with powerful software platforms, are enabling investigators to analyse tens of thousands of genetic markers. This wealth of data is rapidly expanding and allowing biological questions to be addressed with unprecedented scope and precision. The sizes of the data sets are now posing significant data processing and analysis challenges. Here we describe an extension of the Stacks software package to efficiently use genotype-by-sequencing data for studies of populations of organisms. Stacks now produces core population genomic summary statistics and SNP-by-SNP statistical tests. These statistics can be analysed across a reference genome using a smoothed sliding window. Stacks also now provides several output formats for several commonly used downstream analysis packages. The expanded population genomics functions in Stacks will make it a useful tool to harness the newest generation of massively parallel genotyping data for ecological and evolutionary genetics.

  17. Molecular tools for functional genomics in filamentous fungi: recent advances and new strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Dewei; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Yunchuan; Sun, Chang; Zhang, Ke-Qin; Yang, Jinkui

    2013-12-01

    Advances in genetic transformation techniques have made important contributions to molecular genetics. Various molecular tools and strategies have been developed for functional genomic analysis of filamentous fungi since the first DNA transformation was successfully achieved in Neurospora crassa in 1973. Increasing amounts of genomic data regarding filamentous fungi are continuously reported and large-scale functional studies have become common in a wide range of fungal species. In this review, various molecular tools used in filamentous fungi are compared and discussed, including methods for genetic transformation (e.g., protoplast transformation, electroporation, and microinjection), the construction of random mutant libraries (e.g., restriction enzyme mediated integration, transposon arrayed gene knockout, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation), and the analysis of gene function (e.g., RNA interference and transcription activator-like effector nucleases). We also focused on practical strategies that could enhance the efficiency of genetic manipulation in filamentous fungi, such as choosing a proper screening system and marker genes, assembling target-cassettes or vectors effectively, and transforming into strains that are deficient in the nonhomologous end joining pathway. In summary, we present an up-to-date review on the different molecular tools and latest strategies that have been successfully used in functional genomics in filamentous fungi. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2014-02-01

    Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis.

  19. Plant DNA barcoding: from gene to genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiwen; Yang, Yang; Henry, Robert J; Rossetto, Maurizio; Wang, Yitao; Chen, Shilin

    2015-02-01

    DNA barcoding is currently a widely used and effective tool that enables rapid and accurate identification of plant species; however, none of the available loci work across all species. Because single-locus DNA barcodes lack adequate variations in closely related taxa, recent barcoding studies have placed high emphasis on the use of whole-chloroplast genome sequences which are now more readily available as a consequence of improving sequencing technologies. While chloroplast genome sequencing can already deliver a reliable barcode for accurate plant identification it is not yet resource-effective and does not yet offer the speed of analysis provided by single-locus barcodes to unspecialized laboratory facilities. Here, we review the development of candidate barcodes and discuss the feasibility of using the chloroplast genome as a super-barcode. We advocate a new approach for DNA barcoding that, for selected groups of taxa, combines the best use of single-locus barcodes and super-barcodes for efficient plant identification. Specific barcodes might enhance our ability to distinguish closely related plants at the species and population levels.

  20. Putative essential and core-essential genes in Mycoplasma genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Zhang, Randy Ren

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma, which was used to create the first "synthetic life", has been an important species in the emerging field, synthetic biology. However, essential genes, an important concept of synthetic biology, for both M. mycoides and M. capricolum, as well as 14 other Mycoplasma with available genomes, are still unknown. We have developed a gene essentiality prediction algorithm that incorporates information of biased gene strand distribution, homologous search and codon adaptation index. The algorithm, which achieved an accuracy of 80.8% and 78.9% in self-consistence and cross-validation tests, respectively, predicted 5880 essential genes in the 16 Mycoplasma genomes. The intersection set of essential genes in available Mycoplasma genomes consists of 153 core essential genes. The predicted essential genes (available from pDEG, tubic.tju.edu.cn/pdeg) and the proposed algorithm can be helpful for studying minimal Mycoplasma genomes as well as essential genes in other genomes.

  1. Gene and genome parameters of mammalian liver circadian genes (LCGs.

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    Gang Wu

    Full Text Available The mammalian circadian system controls various physiology processes and behavior responses by regulating thousands of circadian genes with rhythmic expressions. In this study, we redefined circadian-regulated genes based on published results in the mouse liver and compared them with other gene groups defined relative to circadian regulations, especially the non-circadian-regulated genes expressed in liver at multiple molecular levels from gene position to protein expression based on integrative analyses of different datasets from the literature. Based on the intra-tissue analysis, the liver circadian genes or LCGs show unique features when compared to other gene groups. First, LCGs in general have less neighboring genes and larger in both genomic and 3'-UTR lengths but shorter in CDS (coding sequence lengths. Second, LCGs have higher mRNA and protein abundance, higher temporal expression variations, and shorter mRNA half-life. Third, more than 60% of LCGs form major co-expression clusters centered in four temporal windows: dawn, day, dusk, and night. In addition, larger and smaller LCGs are found mainly expressed in the day and night temporal windows, respectively, and we believe that LCGs are well-partitioned into the gene expression regulatory network that takes advantage of gene size, expression constraint, and chromosomal architecture. Based on inter-tissue analysis, more than half of LCGs are ubiquitously expressed in multiple tissues but only show rhythmical expression in one or limited number of tissues. LCGs show at least three-fold lower expression variations across the temporal windows than those among different tissues, and this observation suggests that temporal expression variations regulated by the circadian system is relatively subtle as compared with the tissue expression variations formed during development. Taken together, we suggest that the circadian system selects gene parameters in a cost effective way to improve tissue

  2. The SeqWord Genome Browser: an online tool for the identification and visualization of atypical regions of bacterial genomes through oligonucleotide usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tümmler Burkhard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data mining in large DNA sequences is a major challenge in microbial genomics and bioinformatics. Oligonucleotide usage (OU patterns provide a wealth of information for large scale sequence analysis and visualization. The purpose of this research was to make OU statistical analysis available as a novel web-based tool for functional genomics and annotation. The tool is also available as a downloadable package. Results The SeqWord Genome Browser (SWGB was developed to visualize the natural compositional variation of DNA sequences. The applet is also used for identification of divergent genomic regions both in annotated sequences of bacterial chromosomes, plasmids, phages and viruses, and in raw DNA sequences prior to annotation by comparing local and global OU patterns. The applet allows fast and reliable identification of clusters of horizontally transferred genomic islands, large multi-domain genes and genes for ribosomal RNA. Within the majority of genomic fragments (also termed genomic core sequence, regions enriched with housekeeping genes, ribosomal proteins and the regions rich in pseudogenes or genetic vestiges may be contrasted. Conclusion The SWGB applet presents a range of comprehensive OU statistical parameters calculated for a range of bacterial species, plasmids and phages. It is available on the Internet at http://www.bi.up.ac.za/SeqWord/mhhapplet.php.

  3. The "one-step" Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV)derived vector is a functional genomics tool for efficient overexpression of heterologous protein, virus-induced gene silencing and genetic mapping of BPMV R-gene in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Pflieger, Stéphanie; Blanchet, Sophie; Meziadi, Chouaïb; Richard, Manon; Thareau, Vincent; Mary, Fanny; Mazoyer, Céline; Geffroy, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Background Over the last two years, considerable advances have been made in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genomics, especially with the completion of the genome sequence and the availability of RNAseq data. However, as common bean is recalcitrant to stable genetic transformation, much work remains to be done for the development of functional genomics tools adapted to large-scale studies. Results Here we report the successful implementation of an efficient viral vector system for foreign...

  4. Human gene correlation analysis (HGCA): a tool for the identification of transcriptionally co-expressed genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalopoulos, Ioannis; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Malatras, Apostolos; Karelas, Alexandros; Kostadima, Myrto-Areti; Schneider, Reinhard; Kossida, Sophia

    2012-06-06

    Bioinformatics and high-throughput technologies such as microarray studies allow the measure of the expression levels of large numbers of genes simultaneously, thus helping us to understand the molecular mechanisms of various biological processes in a cell. We calculate the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (r-value) between probe set signal values from Affymetrix Human Genome Microarray samples and cluster the human genes according to the r-value correlation matrix using the Neighbour Joining (NJ) clustering method. A hyper-geometric distribution is applied on the text annotations of the probe sets to quantify the term overrepresentations. The aim of the tool is the identification of closely correlated genes for a given gene of interest and/or the prediction of its biological function, which is based on the annotations of the respective gene cluster. Human Gene Correlation Analysis (HGCA) is a tool to classify human genes according to their coexpression levels and to identify overrepresented annotation terms in correlated gene groups. It is available at: http://biobank-informatics.bioacademy.gr/coexpression/.

  5. Construction of the BAC Library of Small Abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) for Gene Screening and Genome Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Likun; You, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiaojun; Xu, Jian; Jiang, Yanliang; Wang, Kai; Zhao, Zixia; Chen, Baohua; Zhao, Yunfeng; Mahboob, Shahid; Al-Ghanim, Khalid A; Ke, Caihuan; Xu, Peng

    2016-02-01

    The small abalone (Haliotis diversicolor) is one of the most important aquaculture species in East Asia. To facilitate gene cloning and characterization, genome analysis, and genetic breeding of it, we constructed a large-insert bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library, which is an important genetic tool for advanced genetics and genomics research. The small abalone BAC library includes 92,610 clones with an average insert size of 120 Kb, equivalent to approximately 7.6× of the small abalone genome. We set up three-dimensional pools and super pools of 18,432 BAC clones for target gene screening using PCR method. To assess the approach, we screened 12 target genes in these 18,432 BAC clones and identified 16 positive BAC clones. Eight positive BAC clones were then sequenced and assembled with the next generation sequencing platform. The assembled contigs representing these 8 BAC clones spanned 928 Kb of the small abalone genome, providing the first batch of genome sequences for genome evaluation and characterization. The average GC content of small abalone genome was estimated as 40.33%. A total of 21 protein-coding genes, including 7 target genes, were annotated into the 8 BACs, which proved the feasibility of PCR screening approach with three-dimensional pools in small abalone BAC library. One hundred fifty microsatellite loci were also identified from the sequences for marker development in the future. The BAC library and clone pools provided valuable resources and tools for genetic breeding and conservation of H. diversicolor.

  6. Genomic-based-breeding tools for tropical maize improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakradhar, Thammineni; Hindu, Vemuri; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar

    2017-09-05

    Maize has traditionally been the main staple diet in the Southern Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa and widely grown by millions of resource poor small scale farmers. Approximately, 35.4 million hectares are sown to tropical maize, constituting around 59% of the developing worlds. Tropical maize encounters tremendous challenges besides poor agro-climatic situations with average yields recorded <3 tones/hectare that is far less than the average of developed countries. On the contrary to poor yields, the demand for maize as food, feed, and fuel is continuously increasing in these regions. Heterosis breeding introduced in early 90 s improved maize yields significantly, but genetic gains is still a mirage, particularly for crop growing under marginal environments. Application of molecular markers has accelerated the pace of maize breeding to some extent. The availability of array of sequencing and genotyping technologies offers unrivalled service to improve precision in maize-breeding programs through modern approaches such as genomic selection, genome-wide association studies, bulk segregant analysis-based sequencing approaches, etc. Superior alleles underlying complex traits can easily be identified and introgressed efficiently using these sequence-based approaches. Integration of genomic tools and techniques with advanced genetic resources such as nested association mapping and backcross nested association mapping could certainly address the genetic issues in maize improvement programs in developing countries. Huge diversity in tropical maize and its inherent capacity for doubled haploid technology offers advantage to apply the next generation genomic tools for accelerating production in marginal environments of tropical and subtropical world. Precision in phenotyping is the key for success of any molecular-breeding approach. This article reviews genomic technologies and their application to improve agronomic traits in tropical maize breeding has been reviewed in

  7. A salmonid EST genomic study: genes, duplications, phylogeny and microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahmbhatt Sonal

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonids are of interest because of their relatively recent genome duplication, and their extensive use in wild fisheries and aquaculture. A comprehensive gene list and a comparison of genes in some of the different species provide valuable genomic information for one of the most widely studied groups of fish. Results 298,304 expressed sequence tags (ESTs from Atlantic salmon (69% of the total, 11,664 chinook, 10,813 sockeye, 10,051 brook trout, 10,975 grayling, 8,630 lake whitefish, and 3,624 northern pike ESTs were obtained in this study and have been deposited into the public databases. Contigs were built and putative full-length Atlantic salmon clones have been identified. A database containing ESTs, assemblies, consensus sequences, open reading frames, gene predictions and putative annotation is available. The overall similarity between Atlantic salmon ESTs and those of rainbow trout, chinook, sockeye, brook trout, grayling, lake whitefish, northern pike and rainbow smelt is 93.4, 94.2, 94.6, 94.4, 92.5, 91.7, 89.6, and 86.2% respectively. An analysis of 78 transcript sets show Salmo as a sister group to Oncorhynchus and Salvelinus within Salmoninae, and Thymallinae as a sister group to Salmoninae and Coregoninae within Salmonidae. Extensive gene duplication is consistent with a genome duplication in the common ancestor of salmonids. Using all of the available EST data, a new expanded salmonid cDNA microarray of 32,000 features was created. Cross-species hybridizations to this cDNA microarray indicate that this resource will be useful for studies of all 68 salmonid species. Conclusion An extensive collection and analysis of salmonid RNA putative transcripts indicate that Pacific salmon, Atlantic salmon and charr are 94–96% similar while the more distant whitefish, grayling, pike and smelt are 93, 92, 89 and 86% similar to salmon. The salmonid transcriptome reveals a complex history of gene duplication that is

  8. SpectroGene: A Tool for Proteogenomic Annotations Using Top-Down Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmogorov, Mikhail; Liu, Xiaowen; Pevzner, Pavel A

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, proteogenomics has emerged as a valuable technique that contributes to the state-of-the-art in genome annotation; however, previous proteogenomic studies were limited to bottom-up mass spectrometry and did not take advantage of top-down approaches. We show that top-down proteogenomics allows one to address the problems that remained beyond the reach of traditional bottom-up proteogenomics. In particular, we show that top-down proteogenomics leads to the discovery of previously unannotated genes even in extensively studied bacterial genomes and present SpectroGene, a software tool for genome annotation using top-down tandem mass spectra. We further show that top-down proteogenomics searches (against the six-frame translation of a genome) identify nearly all proteoforms found in traditional top-down proteomics searches (against the annotated proteome). SpectroGene is freely available at http://github.com/fenderglass/SpectroGene .

  9. The CRISPR/Cas genome-editing tool: application in improvement of crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURENDER eKHATODIA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR associated Cas9/sgRNA system is a novel fledgling targeted genome-editing technique from bacterial immune system, which is a cheap, easy and most rapidly adopted genome editing tool transforming to revolutionary paradigm. Cas9 protein is an RNA guided endonuclease utilized for creating targeted double stranded breaks with only a short RNA sequence to confer recognition of the target in animals and plants. Development of genetically edited (GE crops similar to those developed by conventional or mutation breeding using this potential technique makes it a promising and extremely versatile tool for providing sustainable productive agriculture for better feeding of rapidly growing population in changing climate. The emerging areas of research for the genome editing in plants are like, interrogating gene function, rewiring the regulatory signaling networks, sgRNA library for high-throughput loss-of-function screening. In this review, we will discuss the broad applicability of the Cas9 nuclease mediated targeted plant genome editing for development of designer crops. The regulatory uncertainty and social acceptance of plant breeding by Cas9 genome editing have also been discussed. The non-GM designer genetically edited plants could prospect climate resilient and sustainable energy agriculture in coming future for maximizing the yield by combating abiotic and biotic stresses with this new innovative plant breeding technique.

  10. Plant MITEs: useful tools for plant genetics and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Ying

    2003-05-01

    MITEs (Miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements) are reminiscence of non-autonomous DNA (class II) elements, which are distinguished from other transposable elements by their small size, short terminal inverted repeats (TIRs), high copy numbers, genic preference, and DNA sequence identity among family members. Although MITEs were first discovered in plants and still actively reshaping genomes, they have been isolated from a wide range of eukaryotic organisms. MITEs can be divided into Tourist-like, Stowaway-like, and pogo-like groups, according to similarities of their TIRs and TSDs (target site duplications). In despite of several models to explain the origin and amplification of MITEs, their mechanisms of transposition and accumulation in eukaryotic genomes remain poorly understood owing to insufficient experimental data. The unique properties of MITEs have been exploited as useful genetic tools for plant genome analysis. Utilization of MITEs as effective and informative genomic markers and potential application of MITEs in plants systematic, phylogenetic, and genetic studies are discussed.

  11. Genomic tools in pea breeding programs: status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim eTAYEH

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. is an annual cool-season legume and one of the oldest domesticated crops. Dry pea seeds contain 22-25 percent protein, complex starch and fibre constituents and a rich array of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals which make them a valuable source for human consumption and livestock feed. Dry pea ranks third to common bean and chickpea as the most widely grown pulse in the world with more than 11 million tonnes produced in 2013. Pea breeding has achieved great success since the time of Mendel’s experiments in the mid-1800s. However, several traits still require significant improvement for better yield stability in a larger growing area. Key breeding objectives in pea include improving biotic and abiotic stress resistance and enhancing yield components and seed quality. Taking advantage of the diversity present in the pea genepool, many mapping populations have been constructed in the last decades and efforts have been deployed to identify loci involved in the control of target traits and further introgress them into elite breeding materials. Pea now benefits from next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies that are paving the way for genome-wide association studies and genomic selection approaches. This review covers the significant development and deployment of genomic tools for pea breeding in recent years. Future prospects are discussed especially in light of current progress towards deciphering the pea genome.

  12. Genomic tools to profile antibiotic mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Silvia T; Selin, Carrie; Gislason, April S

    2015-01-01

    The increasing emergence of antimicrobial multiresistant bacteria is of great concern to public health. While these bacteria are becoming an ever more prominent cause of nosocomial and community-acquired infections worldwide, the antibiotic discovery pipeline has been stalled in the last few years with very few efforts in the research and development of novel antibacterial therapies. Some of the root causes that have hampered current antibiotic drug development are the lack of understanding of the mode of action (MOA) of novel antibiotic molecules and the poor characterization of the bacterial physiological response to antibiotics that ultimately causes resistance. Here, we review how bacterial genetic tools can be applied at the genomic level with the goal of profiling resistance to antibiotics and elucidating antibiotic MOAs. Specifically, we highlight how chemical genomic detection of the MOA of novel antibiotic molecules and antibiotic profiling by next-generation sequencing are leveraging basic antibiotic research to unprecedented levels with great opportunities for knowledge translation.

  13. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: genome structure, evolutionary aspects, gene content and SSR detection.

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    Leila do Nascimento Vieira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR. It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU, which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara. Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. CONCLUSION: The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of

  14. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: Genome Structure, Evolutionary Aspects, Gene Content and SSR Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Faoro, Helisson; Rogalski, Marcelo; Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Cardoso, Rodrigo Luis Alves; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae) is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp) genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. Methodology/Principal Findings The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR). It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU), which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi) and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara). Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. Conclusion The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of this genus. PMID

  15. Progress in TILLING as a tool for functional genomics and improvement of crops

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Chen; Liugen Hao; Martin A.J.Parry; Andrew L. Phillips; Yin-Gang Hu

    2014-01-01

    Food security is a global concern and substantial yield increases in crops are required to feed the growing world population. Mutagenesis is an important tool in crop improve-ment and is free of the regulatory restrictions imposed on genetical y modified organisms. Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes (TILLING), which combines traditional chemical mutagenesis with high-throughput genome-wide screening for point mutations in desired genes, offers a powerful way to create novel mutant al eles for both functional genomics and improvement of crops. TILLING is general y applicable to genomes whether smal or large, diploid or even al ohexaploid, and shows great potential to address the major chal enge of linking sequence information to the function of genes and to modulate key traits for plant breeding. TILLING has been successful y applied in many crop species and recent progress in TILLING is summarized below, especial y on the developments in mutation detection technology, application of TILLING in gene functional studies and crop breeding. The potential of TILLING/EcoTILLING for functional genetics and crop improvement is also discussed. Furthermore, a smal-scale forward strategy including backcross and selfing was con-ducted to release the potential mutant phenotypes masked in M2 (or M3) plants.

  16. Insular organization of gene space in grass genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Andrea; Müller, Hans-Georg; Massa, Alicia N; Wanjugi, Humphrey; Deal, Karin R; You, Frank M; Xu, Xiangyang; Gu, Yong Q; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Anderson, Olin D; Chan, Agnes P; Rabinowicz, Pablo; Devos, Katrien M; Dvorak, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Wheat and maize genes were hypothesized to be clustered into islands but the hypothesis was not statistically tested. The hypothesis is statistically tested here in four grass species differing in genome size, Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolor, and Aegilops tauschii. Density functions obtained under a model where gene locations follow a homogeneous Poisson process and thus are not clustered are compared with a model-free situation quantified through a non-parametric density estimate. A simple homogeneous Poisson model for gene locations is not rejected for the small O. sativa and B. distachyon genomes, indicating that genes are distributed largely uniformly in those species, but is rejected for the larger S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii genomes, providing evidence for clustering of genes into islands. It is proposed to call the gene islands "gene insulae" to distinguish them from other types of gene clustering that have been proposed. An average S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii insula is estimated to contain 3.7 and 3.9 genes with an average intergenic distance within an insula of 2.1 and 16.5 kb, respectively. Inter-insular distances are greater than 8 and 81 kb and average 15.1 and 205 kb, in S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii, respectively. A greater gene density observed in the distal regions of the Ae. tauschii chromosomes is shown to be primarily caused by shortening of inter-insular distances. The comparison of the four grass genomes suggests that gene locations are largely a function of a homogeneous Poisson process in small genomes. Nonrandom insertions of LTR retroelements during genome expansion creates gene insulae, which become less dense and further apart with the increase in genome size. High concordance in relative lengths of orthologous intergenic distances among the investigated genomes including the maize genome suggests functional constraints on gene distribution in the grass genomes.

  17. Insular organization of gene space in grass genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gottlieb

    Full Text Available Wheat and maize genes were hypothesized to be clustered into islands but the hypothesis was not statistically tested. The hypothesis is statistically tested here in four grass species differing in genome size, Brachypodium distachyon, Oryza sativa, Sorghum bicolor, and Aegilops tauschii. Density functions obtained under a model where gene locations follow a homogeneous Poisson process and thus are not clustered are compared with a model-free situation quantified through a non-parametric density estimate. A simple homogeneous Poisson model for gene locations is not rejected for the small O. sativa and B. distachyon genomes, indicating that genes are distributed largely uniformly in those species, but is rejected for the larger S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii genomes, providing evidence for clustering of genes into islands. It is proposed to call the gene islands "gene insulae" to distinguish them from other types of gene clustering that have been proposed. An average S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii insula is estimated to contain 3.7 and 3.9 genes with an average intergenic distance within an insula of 2.1 and 16.5 kb, respectively. Inter-insular distances are greater than 8 and 81 kb and average 15.1 and 205 kb, in S. bicolor and Ae. tauschii, respectively. A greater gene density observed in the distal regions of the Ae. tauschii chromosomes is shown to be primarily caused by shortening of inter-insular distances. The comparison of the four grass genomes suggests that gene locations are largely a function of a homogeneous Poisson process in small genomes. Nonrandom insertions of LTR retroelements during genome expansion creates gene insulae, which become less dense and further apart with the increase in genome size. High concordance in relative lengths of orthologous intergenic distances among the investigated genomes including the maize genome suggests functional constraints on gene distribution in the grass genomes.

  18. Synthetic RNAs for gene regulation: design principles and computational tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro eLaganà

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of synthetic non-coding RNAs for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has not only become a standard laboratory tool for gene functional studies, but it has also opened up new perspectives in the design of new and potentially promising therapeutic strategies. Bioinformatics has provided researchers with a variety of tools for the design, the analysis and the evaluation of RNAi agents such as small-interfering RNA (siRNA, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA, artificial microRNA (a-miR and microRNA sponges. More recently, a new system for genome engineering based on the bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 system (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, was shown to have the potential to also regulate gene expression at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional level in a more specific way. In this mini review, we present RNAi and CRISPRi design principles and discuss the advantages and limitations of the current design approaches.

  19. SyntenyTracker: a tool for defining homologous synteny blocks using radiation hybrid maps and whole-genome sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Harris A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent availability of genomic sequences and BAC libraries for a large number of mammals provides an excellent opportunity for identifying comparatively-anchored markers that are useful for creating high-resolution radiation-hybrid (RH and BAC-based comparative maps. To use these maps for multispecies genome comparison and evolutionary inference, robust bioinformatic tools are required for the identification of chromosomal regions shared between genomes and to localize the positions of evolutionary breakpoints that are the signatures of chromosomal rearrangements. Here we report an automated tool for the identification of homologous synteny blocks (HSBs between genomes that tolerates errors common in RH comparative maps and can be used for automated whole-genome analysis of chromosome rearrangements that occur during evolution. Findings We developed an algorithm and software tool (SyntenyTracker that can be used for automated definition of HSBs using pair-wise RH or gene-based comparative maps as input. To verify correct implementation of the underlying algorithm, SyntenyTracker was used to identify HSBs in the cattle and human genomes. Results demonstrated 96% agreement with HSBs defined manually using the same set of rules. A comparison of SyntenyTracker with the AutoGRAPH synteny tool was performed using identical datasets containing 14,380 genes with 1:1 orthology in human and mouse. Discrepancies between the results using the two tools and advantages of SyntenyTracker are reported. Conclusion SyntenyTracker was shown to be an efficient and accurate automated tool for defining HSBs using datasets that may contain minor errors resulting from limitations in map construction methodologies. The utility of SyntenyTracker will become more important for comparative genomics as the number of mapped and sequenced genomes increases.

  20. SyntenyTracker: a tool for defining homologous synteny blocks using radiation hybrid maps and whole-genome sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donthu, Ravikiran; Lewin, Harris A; Larkin, Denis M

    2009-07-23

    The recent availability of genomic sequences and BAC libraries for a large number of mammals provides an excellent opportunity for identifying comparatively-anchored markers that are useful for creating high-resolution radiation-hybrid (RH) and BAC-based comparative maps. To use these maps for multispecies genome comparison and evolutionary inference, robust bioinformatic tools are required for the identification of chromosomal regions shared between genomes and to localize the positions of evolutionary breakpoints that are the signatures of chromosomal rearrangements. Here we report an automated tool for the identification of homologous synteny blocks (HSBs) between genomes that tolerates errors common in RH comparative maps and can be used for automated whole-genome analysis of chromosome rearrangements that occur during evolution. We developed an algorithm and software tool (SyntenyTracker) that can be used for automated definition of HSBs using pair-wise RH or gene-based comparative maps as input. To verify correct implementation of the underlying algorithm, SyntenyTracker was used to identify HSBs in the cattle and human genomes. Results demonstrated 96% agreement with HSBs defined manually using the same set of rules. A comparison of SyntenyTracker with the AutoGRAPH synteny tool was performed using identical datasets containing 14,380 genes with 1:1 orthology in human and mouse. Discrepancies between the results using the two tools and advantages of SyntenyTracker are reported. SyntenyTracker was shown to be an efficient and accurate automated tool for defining HSBs using datasets that may contain minor errors resulting from limitations in map construction methodologies. The utility of SyntenyTracker will become more important for comparative genomics as the number of mapped and sequenced genomes increases.

  1. GeneWiz browser: An Interactive Tool for Visualizing Sequenced Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Peter Fischer; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik; Rotenberg, Eva;

    2009-01-01

    We present an interactive web application for visualizing genomic data of prokaryotic chromosomes. The tool (GeneWiz browser) allows users to carry out various analyses such as mapping alignments of homologous genes to other genomes, mapping of short sequencing reads to a reference chromosome......, and calculating DNA properties such as curvature or stacking energy along the chromosome. The GeneWiz browser produces an interactive graphic that enables zooming from a global scale down to single nucleotides, without changing the size of the plot. Its ability to disproportionally zoom provides optimal...

  2. A cricket Gene Index: a genomic resource for studying neurobiology, speciation, and molecular evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quackenbush John

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the developmental costs of genomic tools decline, genomic approaches to non-model systems are becoming more feasible. Many of these systems may lack advanced genetic tools but are extremely valuable models in other biological fields. Here we report the development of expressed sequence tags (EST's in an orthopteroid insect, a model for the study of neurobiology, speciation, and evolution. Results We report the sequencing of 14,502 EST's from clones derived from a nerve cord cDNA library, and the subsequent construction of a Gene Index from these sequences, from the Hawaiian trigonidiine cricket Laupala kohalensis. The Gene Index contains 8607 unique sequences comprised of 2575 tentative consensus (TC sequences and 6032 singletons. For each of the unique sequences, an attempt was made to assign a provisional annotation and to categorize its function using a Gene Ontology-based classification through a sequence-based comparison to known proteins. In addition, a set of unique 70 base pair oligomers that can be used for DNA microarrays was developed. All Gene Index information is posted at the DFCI Gene Indices web page Conclusion Orthopterans are models used to understand the neurophysiological basis of complex motor patterns such as flight and stridulation. The sequences presented in the cricket Gene Index will provide neurophysiologists with many genetic tools that have been largely absent in this field. The cricket Gene Index is one of only two gene indices to be developed in an evolutionary model system. Species within the genus Laupala have speciated recently, rapidly, and extensively. Therefore, the genes identified in the cricket Gene Index can be used to study the genomics of speciation. Furthermore, this gene index represents a significant EST resources for basal insects. As such, this resource is a valuable comparative tool for the understanding of invertebrate molecular evolution. The sequences presented here will

  3. Comparative genomics of the relationship between gene structure and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, X.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the structure of genes and their expression is a relatively new aspect of genome organization and regulation. With more genome sequences and expression data becoming available, bioinformatics approaches can help the further elucidation of the relationships between gene struc

  4. CMIP: a software package capable of reconstructing genome-wide regulatory networks using gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guangyong; Xu, Yaochen; Zhang, Xiujun; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Zhuo; Chen, Luonan; Zhu, Xin-Guang

    2016-12-23

    A gene regulatory network (GRN) represents interactions of genes inside a cell or tissue, in which vertexes and edges stand for genes and their regulatory interactions respectively. Reconstruction of gene regulatory networks, in particular, genome-scale networks, is essential for comparative exploration of different species and mechanistic investigation of biological processes. Currently, most of network inference methods are computationally intensive, which are usually effective for small-scale tasks (e.g., networks with a few hundred genes), but are difficult to construct GRNs at genome-scale. Here, we present a software package for gene regulatory network reconstruction at a genomic level, in which gene interaction is measured by the conditional mutual information measurement using a parallel computing framework (so the package is named CMIP). The package is a greatly improved implementation of our previous PCA-CMI algorithm. In CMIP, we provide not only an automatic threshold determination method but also an effective parallel computing framework for network inference. Performance tests on benchmark datasets show that the accuracy of CMIP is comparable to most current network inference methods. Moreover, running tests on synthetic datasets demonstrate that CMIP can handle large datasets especially genome-wide datasets within an acceptable time period. In addition, successful application on a real genomic dataset confirms its practical applicability of the package. This new software package provides a powerful tool for genomic network reconstruction to biological community. The software can be accessed at http://www.picb.ac.cn/CMIP/ .

  5. Weeding out the genes: the Arabidopsis genome project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martienssen, R A

    2000-05-01

    The Arabidopsis genome sequence is scheduled for completion at the end of this year (December 2000). It will be the first higher plant genome to be sequenced, and will allow a detailed comparison with bacterial, yeast and animal genomes. Already, two of the five chromosomes have been sequenced, and we have had our first glimpse of higher eukaryotic centromeres, and the structure of heterochromatin. The implications for understanding plant gene function, genome structure and genome organization are profound. In this review, the lessons learned for future genome projects are reviewed as well as a summary of the initial findings in Arabidopsis.

  6. The genome BLASTatlas - a GeneWiz extension for visualization of whole-genome homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallin, Peter Fischer; Binnewies, Tim Terence; Ussery, David

    2008-01-01

    the Clostridium tetani plasmid p88, where homologues for toxin genes can be easily visualized in other sequenced Clostridium genomes, and for a Clostridium botulinum genome, compared to 14 other Clostridium genomes. DNA structural information is also included in the atlas to visualize the DNA chromosomal context...

  7. Concepts and tools for gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josa, Santiago; Seruggia, Davide; Fernández, Almudena; Montoliu, Lluis

    2016-01-01

    Gene editing is a relatively recent concept in the molecular biology field. Traditional genetic modifications in animals relied on a classical toolbox that, aside from some technical improvements and additions, remained unchanged for many years. Classical methods involved direct delivery of DNA sequences into embryos or the use of embryonic stem cells for those few species (mice and rats) where it was possible to establish them. For livestock, the advent of somatic cell nuclear transfer platforms provided alternative, but technically challenging, approaches for the genetic alteration of loci at will. However, the entire landscape changed with the appearance of different classes of genome editors, from initial zinc finger nucleases, to transcription activator-like effector nucleases and, most recently, with the development of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas). Gene editing is currently achieved by CRISPR-Cas-mediated methods, and this technological advancement has boosted our capacity to generate almost any genetically altered animal that can be envisaged.

  8. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Godoy, M. Ángeles; Mauri, Nuria; Juárez, José; Marqués, M. Carmen; Santiago, Julia; Forment, Javier; Gadea Vacas, José

    2008-01-01

    Background: Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genomewide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. Results: We have designed and constructed a publicly available ...

  9. High-Diversity Genes in the Arabidopsis Genome

    OpenAIRE

    Cork, Jennifer M.; Purugganan, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    High-diversity genes represent an important class of loci in organismal genomes. Since elevated levels of nucleotide variation are a key component of the molecular signature for balancing selection or local adaptation, high-diversity genes may represent loci whose alleles are selectively maintained as balanced polymorphisms. Comparison of 4300 random shotgun sequence fragments of the Arabidopsis thaliana Ler ecotype genome with the whole genomic sequence of the Col-0 ecotype identified 60 gen...

  10. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  11. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  12. MED: a new non-supervised gene prediction algorithm for bacterial and archaeal genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yi-Fan

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite a remarkable success in the computational prediction of genes in Bacteria and Archaea, a lack of comprehensive understanding of prokaryotic gene structures prevents from further elucidation of differences among genomes. It continues to be interesting to develop new ab initio algorithms which not only accurately predict genes, but also facilitate comparative studies of prokaryotic genomes. Results This paper describes a new prokaryotic genefinding algorithm based on a comprehensive statistical model of protein coding Open Reading Frames (ORFs and Translation Initiation Sites (TISs. The former is based on a linguistic "Entropy Density Profile" (EDP model of coding DNA sequence and the latter comprises several relevant features related to the translation initiation. They are combined to form a so-called Multivariate Entropy Distance (MED algorithm, MED 2.0, that incorporates several strategies in the iterative program. The iterations enable us to develop a non-supervised learning process and to obtain a set of genome-specific parameters for the gene structure, before making the prediction of genes. Conclusion Results of extensive tests show that MED 2.0 achieves a competitive high performance in the gene prediction for both 5' and 3' end matches, compared to the current best prokaryotic gene finders. The advantage of the MED 2.0 is particularly evident for GC-rich genomes and archaeal genomes. Furthermore, the genome-specific parameters given by MED 2.0 match with the current understanding of prokaryotic genomes and may serve as tools for comparative genomic studies. In particular, MED 2.0 is shown to reveal divergent translation initiation mechanisms in archaeal genomes while making a more accurate prediction of TISs compared to the existing gene finders and the current GenBank annotation.

  13. Directed evolution combined with synthetic biology strategies expedite semi-rational engineering of genes and genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhen; Zhang, Junli; Jin, Peng; Yang, Sen

    2015-01-01

    Owing to our limited understanding of the relationship between sequence and function and the interaction between intracellular pathways and regulatory systems, the rational design of enzyme-coding genes and de novo assembly of a brand-new artificial genome for a desired functionality or phenotype are difficult to achieve. As an alternative approach, directed evolution has been widely used to engineer genomes and enzyme-coding genes. In particular, significant developments toward DNA synthesis, DNA assembly (in vitro or in vivo), recombination-mediated genetic engineering, and high-throughput screening techniques in the field of synthetic biology have been matured and widely adopted, enabling rapid semi-rational genome engineering to generate variants with desired properties. In this commentary, these novel tools and their corresponding applications in the directed evolution of genomes and enzymes are discussed. Moreover, the strategies for genome engineering and rapid in vitro enzyme evolution are also proposed.

  14. PseudoGeneQuest – Service for identification of different pseudogene types in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vihinen Mauno

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pseudogenes, nonfunctional copies of genes, evolve fast due the lack of evolutionary pressures and thus appear in several different forms. PseudoGeneQuest is an online tool to search the human genome for a given query sequence and to identify different types of pseudogenes as well as novel genes and gene fragments. Description The service can detect pseudogenes, that have arisen either by retrotransposition or segmental genome duplication, many of which are not listed in the public pseudogene databases. The service has a user-friendly web interface and uses a powerful computer cluster in order to perform parallel searches and provide relatively fast runtimes despite exhaustive database searches and analyses. Conclusion PseudoGeneQuest is a versatile tool for detecting novel pseudogene candidates from the human genome. The service searches human genome sequences for five types of pseudogenes and provides an output that allows easy further analysis of observations. In addition to the result file the system provides visualization of the results linked to Ensembl Genome Browser. PseudoGeneQuest service is freely available.

  15. Evolution of closely linked gene pairs in vertebrate genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franck, E.; Hulsen, T.; Huynen, M.A.; Jong, de W.W.; Lunsen, N.H.; Madsen, O.

    2008-01-01

    The orientation of closely linked genes in mammalian genomes is not random: there are more head-to-head (h2h) gene pairs than expected. To understand the origin of this enrichment in h2h gene pairs, we have analyzed the phylogenetic distribution of gene pairs separated by less than 600 bp of interge

  16. Recognizing genes and other components of genomic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Myers, E. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Stormo, G.D. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Dept. of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology)

    1991-01-01

    The Aspen Center for Physics (ACP) sponsored a three-week workshop, with 26 scientists participating, from 28 May to 15 June, 1990. The workshop, entitled Recognizing Genes and Other Components of Genomic Structure, focussed on discussion of current needs and future strategies for developing the ability to identify and predict the presence of complex functional units on sequenced, but otherwise uncharacterized, genomic DNA. We addressed the need for computationally-based, automatic tools for synthesizing available data about individual consensus sequences and local compositional patterns into the composite objects (e.g., genes) that are -- as composite entities -- the true object of interest when scanning DNA sequences. The workshop was structured to promote sustained informal contact and exchange of expertise between molecular biologists, computer scientists, and mathematicians. No participant stayed for less than one week, and most attended for two or three weeks. Computers, software, and databases were available for use as electronic blackboards'' and as the basis for collaborative exploration of ideas being discussed and developed at the workshop. 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. Missing genes in the annotation of prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Wu-chun

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-coding gene detection in prokaryotic genomes is considered a much simpler problem than in intron-containing eukaryotic genomes. However there have been reports that prokaryotic gene finder programs have problems with small genes (either over-predicting or under-predicting. Therefore the question arises as to whether current genome annotations have systematically missing, small genes. Results We have developed a high-performance computing methodology to investigate this problem. In this methodology we compare all ORFs larger than or equal to 33 aa from all fully-sequenced prokaryotic replicons. Based on that comparison, and using conservative criteria requiring a minimum taxonomic diversity between conserved ORFs in different genomes, we have discovered 1,153 candidate genes that are missing from current genome annotations. These missing genes are similar only to each other and do not have any strong similarity to gene sequences in public databases, with the implication that these ORFs belong to missing gene families. We also uncovered 38,895 intergenic ORFs, readily identified as putative genes by similarity to currently annotated genes (we call these absent annotations. The vast majority of the missing genes found are small (less than 100 aa. A comparison of select examples with GeneMark, EasyGene and Glimmer predictions yields evidence that some of these genes are escaping detection by these programs. Conclusions Prokaryotic gene finders and prokaryotic genome annotations require improvement for accurate prediction of small genes. The number of missing gene families found is likely a lower bound on the actual number, due to the conservative criteria used to determine whether an ORF corresponds to a real gene.

  18. BFAST: an alignment tool for large scale genome resequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Homer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The new generation of massively parallel DNA sequencers, combined with the challenge of whole human genome resequencing, result in the need for rapid and accurate alignment of billions of short DNA sequence reads to a large reference genome. Speed is obviously of great importance, but equally important is maintaining alignment accuracy of short reads, in the 25-100 base range, in the presence of errors and true biological variation. METHODOLOGY: We introduce a new algorithm specifically optimized for this task, as well as a freely available implementation, BFAST, which can align data produced by any of current sequencing platforms, allows for user-customizable levels of speed and accuracy, supports paired end data, and provides for efficient parallel and multi-threaded computation on a computer cluster. The new method is based on creating flexible, efficient whole genome indexes to rapidly map reads to candidate alignment locations, with arbitrary multiple independent indexes allowed to achieve robustness against read errors and sequence variants. The final local alignment uses a Smith-Waterman method, with gaps to support the detection of small indels. CONCLUSIONS: We compare BFAST to a selection of large-scale alignment tools -- BLAT, MAQ, SHRiMP, and SOAP -- in terms of both speed and accuracy, using simulated and real-world datasets. We show BFAST can achieve substantially greater sensitivity of alignment in the context of errors and true variants, especially insertions and deletions, and minimize false mappings, while maintaining adequate speed compared to other current methods. We show BFAST can align the amount of data needed to fully resequence a human genome, one billion reads, with high sensitivity and accuracy, on a modest computer cluster in less than 24 hours. BFAST is available at (http://bfast.sourceforge.net.

  19. Evolution of paralogous genes: Reconstruction of genome rearrangements through comparison of multiple genomes within Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuru, Takeshi; Kawai, Mikihiko; Mizutani-Ui, Yoko; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2006-06-01

    Analysis of evolution of paralogous genes in a genome is central to our understanding of genome evolution. Comparison of closely related bacterial genomes, which has provided clues as to how genome sequences evolve under natural conditions, would help in such an analysis. With species Staphylococcus aureus, whole-genome sequences have been decoded for seven strains. We compared their DNA sequences to detect large genome polymorphisms and to deduce mechanisms of genome rearrangements that have formed each of them. We first compared strains N315 and Mu50, which make one of the most closely related strain pairs, at the single-nucleotide resolution to catalogue all the middle-sized (more than 10 bp) to large genome polymorphisms such as indels and substitutions. These polymorphisms include two paralogous gene sets, one in a tandem paralogue gene cluster for toxins in a genomic island and the other in a ribosomal RNA operon. We also focused on two other tandem paralogue gene clusters and type I restriction-modification (RM) genes on the genomic islands. Then we reconstructed rearrangement events responsible for these polymorphisms, in the paralogous genes and the others, with reference to the other five genomes. For the tandem paralogue gene clusters, we were able to infer sequences for homologous recombination generating the change in the repeat number. These sequences were conserved among the repeated paralogous units likely because of their functional importance. The sequence specificity (S) subunit of type I RM systems showed recombination, likely at the homology of a conserved region, between the two variable regions for sequence specificity. We also noticed novel alleles in the ribosomal RNA operons and suggested a role for illegitimate recombination in their formation. These results revealed importance of recombination involving long conserved sequence in the evolution of paralogous genes in the genome.

  20. Annotating the Function of the Human Genome with Gene Ontology and Disease Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhou, Wenyang; Ren, Jun; Dong, Lixiang; Wang, Yadong; Jin, Shuilin; Cheng, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences indicated that function annotation of human genome in molecular level and phenotype level is very important for systematic analysis of genes. In this study, we presented a framework named Gene2Function to annotate Gene Reference into Functions (GeneRIFs), in which each functional description of GeneRIFs could be annotated by a text mining tool Open Biomedical Annotator (OBA), and each Entrez gene could be mapped to Human Genome Organisation Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) gene symbol. After annotating all the records about human genes of GeneRIFs, 288,869 associations between 13,148 mRNAs and 7,182 terms, 9,496 associations between 948 microRNAs and 533 terms, and 901 associations between 139 long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) and 297 terms were obtained as a comprehensive annotation resource of human genome. High consistency of term frequency of individual gene (Pearson correlation = 0.6401, p = 2.2e - 16) and gene frequency of individual term (Pearson correlation = 0.1298, p = 3.686e - 14) in GeneRIFs and GOA shows our annotation resource is very reliable.

  1. Gene and genome duplication in Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhre, Karsten

    2005-11-01

    Gene duplication is key to molecular evolution in all three domains of life and may be the first step in the emergence of new gene function. It is a well-recognized feature in large DNA viruses but has not been studied extensively in the largest known virus to date, the recently discovered Acanthamoeba polyphaga Mimivirus. Here, I present a systematic analysis of gene and genome duplication events in the mimivirus genome. I found that one-third of the mimivirus genes are related to at least one other gene in the mimivirus genome, either through a large segmental genome duplication event that occurred in the more remote past or through more recent gene duplication events, which often occur in tandem. This shows that gene and genome duplication played a major role in shaping the mimivirus genome. Using multiple alignments, together with remote-homology detection methods based on Hidden Markov Model comparison, I assign putative functions to some of the paralogous gene families. I suggest that a large part of the duplicated mimivirus gene families are likely to interfere with important host cell processes, such as transcription control, protein degradation, and cell regulatory processes. My findings support the view that large DNA viruses are complex evolving organisms, possibly deeply rooted within the tree of life, and oppose the paradigm that viral evolution is dominated by lateral gene acquisition, at least in regard to large DNA viruses.

  2. SigmoID: a user-friendly tool for improving bacterial genome annotation through analysis of transcription control signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaichik, Yevgeny; Damienikan, Aliaksandr U

    2016-01-01

    The majority of bacterial genome annotations are currently automated and based on a 'gene by gene' approach. Regulatory signals and operon structures are rarely taken into account which often results in incomplete and even incorrect gene function assignments. Here we present SigmoID, a cross-platform (OS X, Linux and Windows) open-source application aiming at simplifying the identification of transcription regulatory sites (promoters, transcription factor binding sites and terminators) in bacterial genomes and providing assistance in correcting annotations in accordance with regulatory information. SigmoID combines a user-friendly graphical interface to well known command line tools with a genome browser for visualising regulatory elements in genomic context. Integrated access to online databases with regulatory information (RegPrecise and RegulonDB) and web-based search engines speeds up genome analysis and simplifies correction of genome annotation. We demonstrate some features of SigmoID by constructing a series of regulatory protein binding site profiles for two groups of bacteria: Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium and Dickeya spp.) and Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, we inferred over 900 transcription factor binding sites and alternative sigma factor promoters in the annotated genome of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. These regulatory signals control putative transcription units covering about 40% of the P. atrosepticum chromosome. Reviewing the annotation in cases where it didn't fit with regulatory information allowed us to correct product and gene names for over 300 loci.

  3. MobilomeFINDER: Web-Based Tools for In Silico and Experimental Discovery of Bacterial Genomic Islands

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Hong-Yu; He, Xinyi; Harrison, Ewan M.; Kulasekara, Bridget R.; Thani, Ali Bin; Kadioglu, Aras; Hinton, Jay C. D.; Barer, Michael R.; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar; Lory, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    MobilomeFINDER (http://mml.sjtu.edu.cn/MobilomeFINDER) is an interactive online tool that facilitates bacterial genomic island or ‘mobile genome’ (mobilome) discovery; it integrates the ArrayOme and tRNAcc software packages. ArrayOme utilizes a microarray-derived comparative genomic hybridization input data set to generate ‘inferred contigs’ produced by merging adjacent genes classified as ‘present’. Collectively these ‘fragments’ represent a hypothetical ‘microarray-visualized genome (MVG)’....

  4. Microarray-based genomic profiling as a diagnostic tool in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Annet; Stevens-Kroef, Marian; El Idrissi-Zaynoun, Najat; van Gessel, Sabine; Weghuis, Daniel Olde; van den Berg, Eva; Waanders, Esmé; Hoogerbrugge, Peter; Kuiper, Roland; van Kessel, Ad Geurts

    2011-12-01

    In acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) specific genomic abnormalities provide important clinical information. In most routine clinical diagnostic laboratories conventional karyotyping, in conjunction with targeted screens using e.g., fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), is currently considered as the gold standard to detect such aberrations. Conventional karyotyping, however, is limited in its resolution and yield, thus hampering the genetic diagnosis of ALL. We explored whether microarray-based genomic profiling would be feasible as an alternative strategy in a routine clinical diagnostic setting. To this end, we compared conventional karyotypes with microarray-deduced copy number aberration (CNA) karyotypes in 60 ALL cases. Microarray-based genomic profiling resulted in a CNA detection rate of 90%, whereas for conventional karyotyping this was 61%. In addition, many small (< 5 Mb) genetic lesions were encountered, frequently harboring clinically relevant ALL-related genes such as CDKN2A/B, ETV6, PAX5, and IKZF1. From our data we conclude that microarray-based genomic profiling serves as a robust tool in the genetic diagnosis of ALL, outreaching conventional karyotyping in CNA detection both in terms of sensitivity and specificity. We also propose a practical workflow for a comprehensive and objective interpretation of CNAs obtained through microarray-based genomic profiling, thereby facilitating its application in a routine clinical diagnostic setting.

  5. CRISPR as a strong gene editing tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shengfu; Loh, Tiing Jen; Shen, Hongling; Zheng, Xuexiu; Shen, Haihong

    2017-01-01

    Clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) is a new and effective genetic editing tool. CRISPR was initially found in bacteria to protect it from virus invasions. In the first step, specific DNA strands of virus are identified by guide RNA that is composed of crRNA and tracrRNA. Then RNAse III is required for producing crRNA from pre-crRNA. In The second step, a crRNA:tracrRNA:Cas9 complex guides RNase III to cleave target DNA. After cleavage of DNA by CRISPR-Cas9, DNA can be fixed by Non- Homologous End Joining (NHEJ) and Homology Directed Repair (HDR). Whereas NHEJ is simple and random, HDR is much more complex and accurate. Gene editing by CRISPR is able to be applied to various biological field such as agriculture and treating genetic diseases in human. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(1): 20-24].

  6. Evidence-based gene models for structural and functional annotations of the oil palm genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kuang-Lim; Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Rosli, Rozana; Amiruddin, Nadzirah; Azizi, Norazah; Halim, Mohd Amin Ab; Sanusi, Nik Shazana Nik Mohd; Jayanthi, Nagappan; Ponomarenko, Petr; Triska, Martin; Solovyev, Victor; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi; Murphy, Denis; Low, Eng-Ti Leslie

    2017-09-08

    Oil palm is an important source of edible oil. The importance of the crop, as well as its long breeding cycle (10-12 years) has led to the sequencing of its genome in 2013 to pave the way for genomics-guided breeding. Nevertheless, the first set of gene predictions, although useful, had many fragmented genes. Classification and characterization of genes associated with traits of interest, such as those for fatty acid biosynthesis and disease resistance, were also limited. Lipid-, especially fatty acid (FA)-related genes are of particular interest for the oil palm as they specify oil yields and quality. This paper presents the characterization of the oil palm genome using different gene prediction methods and comparative genomics analysis, identification of FA biosynthesis and disease resistance genes, and the development of an annotation database and bioinformatics tools. Using two independent gene-prediction pipelines, Fgenesh++ and Seqping, 26,059 oil palm genes with transcriptome and RefSeq support were identified from the oil palm genome. These coding regions of the genome have a characteristic broad distribution of GC3 (fraction of cytosine and guanine in the third position of a codon) with over half the GC3-rich genes (GC3 ≥ 0.75286) being intronless. In comparison, only one-seventh of the oil palm genes identified are intronless. Using comparative genomics analysis, characterization of conserved domains and active sites, and expression analysis, 42 key genes involved in FA biosynthesis in oil palm were identified. For three of them, namely EgFABF, EgFABH and EgFAD3, segmental duplication events were detected. Our analysis also identified 210 candidate resistance genes in six classes, grouped by their protein domain structures. We present an accurate and comprehensive annotation of the oil palm genome, focusing on analysis of important categories of genes (GC3-rich and intronless), as well as those associated with important functions, such as FA

  7. Cross-family translational genomics of abiotic stress-responsive genes between Arabidopsis and Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daejin Hyung

    Full Text Available Cross-species translation of genomic information may play a pivotal role in applying biological knowledge gained from relatively simple model system to other less studied, but related, genomes. The information of abiotic stress (ABS-responsive genes in Arabidopsis was identified and translated into the legume model system, Medicago truncatula. Various data resources, such as TAIR/AtGI DB, expression profiles and literatures, were used to build a genome-wide list of ABS genes. tBlastX/BlastP similarity search tools and manual inspection of alignments were used to identify orthologous genes between the two genomes. A total of 1,377 genes were finally collected and classified into 18 functional criteria of gene ontology (GO. The data analysis according to the expression cues showed that there was substantial level of interaction among three major types (i.e., drought, salinity and cold stress of abiotic stresses. In an attempt to translate the ABS genes between these two species, genomic locations for each gene were mapped using an in-house-developed comparative analysis platform. The comparative analysis revealed that fragmental colinearity, represented by only 37 synteny blocks, existed between Arabidopsis and M. truncatula. Based on the combination of E-value and alignment remarks, estimated translation rate was 60.2% for this cross-family translation. As a prelude of the functional comparative genomic approaches, in-silico gene network/interactome analyses were conducted to predict key components in the ABS responses, and one of the sub-networks was integrated with corresponding comparative map. The results demonstrated that core members of the sub-network were well aligned with previously reported ABS regulatory networks. Taken together, the results indicate that network-based integrative approaches of comparative and functional genomics are important to interpret and translate genomic information for complex traits such as abiotic stresses.

  8. JAG: A Computational Tool to Evaluate the Role of Gene-Sets in Complex Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, Esther S; Kooyman, Maarten; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Posthuma, Danielle

    2015-05-14

    Gene-set analysis has been proposed as a powerful tool to deal with the highly polygenic architecture of complex traits, as well as with the small effect sizes typically found in GWAS studies for complex traits. We developed a tool, Joint Association of Genetic variants (JAG), which can be applied to Genome Wide Association (GWA) data and tests for the joint effect of all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located in a user-specified set of genes or biological pathway. JAG assigns SNPs to genes and incorporates self-contained and/or competitive tests for gene-set analysis. JAG uses permutation to evaluate gene-set significance, which implicitly controls for linkage disequilibrium, sample size, gene size, the number of SNPs per gene and the number of genes in the gene-set. We conducted a power analysis using the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) Crohn's disease data set and show that JAG correctly identifies validated gene-sets for Crohn's disease and has more power than currently available tools for gene-set analysis. JAG is a powerful, novel tool for gene-set analysis, and can be freely downloaded from the CTG Lab website.

  9. JAG: A Computational Tool to Evaluate the Role of Gene-Sets in Complex Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther S. Lips

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gene-set analysis has been proposed as a powerful tool to deal with the highly polygenic architecture of complex traits, as well as with the small effect sizes typically found in GWAS studies for complex traits. We developed a tool, Joint Association of Genetic variants (JAG, which can be applied to Genome Wide Association (GWA data and tests for the joint effect of all single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located in a user-specified set of genes or biological pathway. JAG assigns SNPs to genes and incorporates self-contained and/or competitive tests for gene-set analysis. JAG uses permutation to evaluate gene-set significance, which implicitly controls for linkage disequilibrium, sample size, gene size, the number of SNPs per gene and the number of genes in the gene-set. We conducted a power analysis using the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC Crohn’s disease data set and show that JAG correctly identifies validated gene-sets for Crohn’s disease and has more power than currently available tools for gene-set analysis. JAG is a powerful, novel tool for gene-set analysis, and can be freely downloaded from the CTG Lab website.

  10. Identification and Categorization of Horizontally Transferred Genes in Prokaryotic Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuo-Yong SHI; Xiao-Hui CAI; Da-fu DING

    2005-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), a process through which genomes acquire genetic materials from distantly related organisms, is believed to be one of the major forces in prokaryotic genome evolution.However, systematic investigation is still scarce to clarify two basic issues about HGT: (1) what types of genes are transferred; and (2) what influence HGT events over the organization and evolution of biological pathways. Genome-scale investigations of these two issues will advance the systematical understanding of HGT in the context of prokaryotic genome evolution. Having investigated 82 genomes, we constructed an HGT database across broad evolutionary timescales. We identified four function categories containing a high proportion of horizontally transferred genes: cell envelope, energy metabolism, regulatory functions, and transport/binding proteins. Such biased function distribution indicates that HGT is not completely random;instead, it is under high selective pressure, required by function restraints in organisms. Furthermore, we mapped the transferred genes onto the connectivity structure map of organism-specific pathways listed in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). Our results suggest that recruitment of transferred genes into pathways is also selectively constrained because of the tuned interaction between original pathway members. Pathway organization structures still conserve well through evolution even with the recruitment of horizontally transferred genes. Interestingly, in pathways whose organization were significantly affected by HGT events, the operon-like arrangement of transferred genes was found to be prevalent. Such results suggest that operon plays an essential and directional role in the integration of alien genes into pathways.

  11. 1-Mb resolution array-based comparative genomic hybridization using a BAC clone set optimized for cancer gene analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greshock, J; Naylor, TL; Margolin, A; Diskin, S; Cleaver, SH; Futreal, PA; deJong, PJ; Zhao, SY; Liebman, M; Weber, BL

    2004-01-01

    Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) is a recently developed tool for genome-wide determination of DNA copy number alterations. This technology has tremendous potential for disease-gene discovery in cancer and developmental disorders as well as numerous other applications. However, w

  12. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Godoy, M Angeles; Mauri, Nuria; Juarez, Jose; Marques, M Carmen; Santiago, Julia; Forment, Javier; Gadea, Jose

    2008-07-03

    Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genome-wide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. We have designed and constructed a publicly available genome-wide cDNA microarray that include 21,081 putative unigenes of citrus. As a functional companion to the microarray, a web-browsable database 1 was created and populated with information about the unigenes represented in the microarray, including cDNA libraries, isolated clones, raw and processed nucleotide and protein sequences, and results of all the structural and functional annotation of the unigenes, like general description, BLAST hits, putative Arabidopsis orthologs, microsatellites, putative SNPs, GO classification and PFAM domains. We have performed a Gene Ontology comparison with the full set of Arabidopsis proteins to estimate the genome coverage of the microarray. We have also performed microarray hybridizations to check its usability. This new cDNA microarray replaces the first 7K microarray generated two years ago and allows gene expression analysis at a more global scale. We have followed a rational design to minimize cross-hybridization while maintaining its utility for different citrus species. Furthermore, we also provide access to a website with full structural and functional annotation of the unigenes represented in the microarray, along with the ability to use this site to directly perform gene expression analysis using standard tools at different publicly available servers. Furthermore, we show how this microarray offers a good representation of the citrus genome and present the usefulness of this genomic tool for global studies in citrus by using it to catalogue genes expressed in

  13. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadea Jose

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genome-wide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. Results We have designed and constructed a publicly available genome-wide cDNA microarray that include 21,081 putative unigenes of citrus. As a functional companion to the microarray, a web-browsable database 1 was created and populated with information about the unigenes represented in the microarray, including cDNA libraries, isolated clones, raw and processed nucleotide and protein sequences, and results of all the structural and functional annotation of the unigenes, like general description, BLAST hits, putative Arabidopsis orthologs, microsatellites, putative SNPs, GO classification and PFAM domains. We have performed a Gene Ontology comparison with the full set of Arabidopsis proteins to estimate the genome coverage of the microarray. We have also performed microarray hybridizations to check its usability. Conclusion This new cDNA microarray replaces the first 7K microarray generated two years ago and allows gene expression analysis at a more global scale. We have followed a rational design to minimize cross-hybridization while maintaining its utility for different citrus species. Furthermore, we also provide access to a website with full structural and functional annotation of the unigenes represented in the microarray, along with the ability to use this site to directly perform gene expression analysis using standard tools at different publicly available servers. Furthermore, we show how this microarray offers a good representation of the citrus genome and present the usefulness of this genomic tool for global

  14. Genome classification by gene distribution: An overlapping subspace clustering approach

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    Halgamuge Saman K

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes of lower organisms have been observed with a large amount of horizontal gene transfers, which cause difficulties in their evolutionary study. Bacteriophage genomes are a typical example. One recent approach that addresses this problem is the unsupervised clustering of genomes based on gene order and genome position, which helps to reveal species relationships that may not be apparent from traditional phylogenetic methods. Results We propose the use of an overlapping subspace clustering algorithm for such genome classification problems. The advantage of subspace clustering over traditional clustering is that it can associate clusters with gene arrangement patterns, preserving genomic information in the clusters produced. Additionally, overlapping capability is desirable for the discovery of multiple conserved patterns within a single genome, such as those acquired from different species via horizontal gene transfers. The proposed method involves a novel strategy to vectorize genomes based on their gene distribution. A number of existing subspace clustering and biclustering algorithms were evaluated to identify the best framework upon which to develop our algorithm; we extended a generic subspace clustering algorithm called HARP to incorporate overlapping capability. The proposed algorithm was assessed and applied on bacteriophage genomes. The phage grouping results are consistent overall with the Phage Proteomic Tree and showed common genomic characteristics among the TP901-like, Sfi21-like and sk1-like phage groups. Among 441 phage genomes, we identified four significantly conserved distribution patterns structured by the terminase, portal, integrase, holin and lysin genes. We also observed a subgroup of Sfi21-like phages comprising a distinctive divergent genome organization and identified nine new phage members to the Sfi21-like genus: Staphylococcus 71, phiPVL108, Listeria A118, 2389, Lactobacillus phi AT3, A2

  15. A GeneTrek analysis of the maize genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renyi; Vitte, Clémentine; Ma, Jianxin; Mahama, A Assibi; Dhliwayo, Thanda; Lee, Michael; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2007-07-10

    Analysis of the sequences of 74 randomly selected BACs demonstrated that the maize nuclear genome contains approximately 37,000 candidate genes with homologues in other plant species. An additional approximately 5,500 predicted genes are severely truncated and probably pseudogenes. The distribution of genes is uneven, with approximately 30% of BACs containing no genes. BAC gene density varies from 0 to 7.9 per 100 kb, whereas most gene islands contain only one gene. The average number of genes per gene island is 1.7. Only 72% of these genes show collinearity with the rice genome. Particular LTR retrotransposon families (e.g., Gyma) are enriched on gene-free BACs, most of which do not come from pericentromeres or other large heterochromatic regions. Gene-containing BACs are relatively enriched in different families of LTR retrotransposons (e.g., Ji). Two major bursts of LTR retrotransposon activity in the last 2 million years are responsible for the large size of the maize genome, but only the more recent of these is well represented in gene-containing BACs, suggesting that LTR retrotransposons are more efficiently removed in these domains. The results demonstrate that sample sequencing and careful annotation of a few randomly selected BACs can provide a robust description of a complex plant genome.

  16. A Method for Identification of Selenoprotein Genes in Archaeal Genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingfeng Li; Yanzhao Huang; Yi Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The genetic codon UGA has a dual function: serving as a terminator and encoding selenocysteine. However, most popular gene annotation programs only take it as a stop signal, resulting in misannotation or completely missing selenoprotein genes. We developed a computational method named Asec-Prediction that is specific for the prediction of archaeal selenoprotein genes. To evaluate its effectiveness, we first applied it to 14 archaeal genomes with previously known selenoprotein genes, and Asec-Prediction identified all reported selenoprotein genes without redundant results. When we applied it to 12 archaeal genomes that had not been researched for selenoprotein genes, Asec-Prediction detected a novel selenoprotein gene in Methanosarcina acetivorans. Further evidence was also collected to support that the predicted gene should be a real selenoprotein gene. The result shows that Asec-Prediction is effective for the prediction of archaeal selenoprotein genes.

  17. The Centers for Mendelian Genomics: a new large-scale initiative to identify the genes underlying rare Mendelian conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamshad, Michael J; Shendure, Jay A; Valle, David; Hamosh, Ada; Lupski, James R; Gibbs, Richard A; Boerwinkle, Eric; Lifton, Richard P; Gerstein, Mark; Gunel, Murat; Mane, Shrikant; Nickerson, Deborah A

    2012-07-01

    Next generation exome sequencing (ES) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) are new powerful tools for discovering the gene(s) that underlie Mendelian disorders. To accelerate these discoveries, the National Institutes of Health has established three Centers for Mendelian Genomics (CMGs): the Center for Mendelian Genomics at the University of Washington; the Center for Mendelian Genomics at Yale University; and the Baylor-Johns Hopkins Center for Mendelian Genomics at Baylor College of Medicine and Johns Hopkins University. The CMGs will provide ES/WGS and extensive analysis expertise at no cost to collaborating investigators where the causal gene(s) for a Mendelian phenotype has yet to be uncovered. Over the next few years and in collaboration with the global human genetics community, the CMGs hope to facilitate the identification of the genes underlying a very large fraction of all Mendelian disorders; see http://mendelian.org. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. SigmoID: a user-friendly tool for improving bacterial genome annotation through analysis of transcription control signals

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    Yevgeny Nikolaichik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The majority of bacterial genome annotations are currently automated and based on a ‘gene by gene’ approach. Regulatory signals and operon structures are rarely taken into account which often results in incomplete and even incorrect gene function assignments. Here we present SigmoID, a cross-platform (OS X, Linux and Windows open-source application aiming at simplifying the identification of transcription regulatory sites (promoters, transcription factor binding sites and terminators in bacterial genomes and providing assistance in correcting annotations in accordance with regulatory information. SigmoID combines a user-friendly graphical interface to well known command line tools with a genome browser for visualising regulatory elements in genomic context. Integrated access to online databases with regulatory information (RegPrecise and RegulonDB and web-based search engines speeds up genome analysis and simplifies correction of genome annotation. We demonstrate some features of SigmoID by constructing a series of regulatory protein binding site profiles for two groups of bacteria: Soft Rot Enterobacteriaceae (Pectobacterium and Dickeya spp. and Pseudomonas spp. Furthermore, we inferred over 900 transcription factor binding sites and alternative sigma factor promoters in the annotated genome of Pectobacterium atrosepticum. These regulatory signals control putative transcription units covering about 40% of the P. atrosepticum chromosome. Reviewing the annotation in cases where it didn’t fit with regulatory information allowed us to correct product and gene names for over 300 loci.

  19. Coelacanth genome sequence reveals the evolutionary history of vertebrate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, James P; Grimwood, Jane; Danke, Joshua; Schmutz, Jeremy; Dickson, Mark; Amemiya, Chris T; Myers, Richard M

    2004-12-01

    The coelacanth is one of the nearest living relatives of tetrapods. However, a teleost species such as zebrafish or Fugu is typically used as the outgroup in current tetrapod comparative sequence analyses. Such studies are complicated by the fact that teleost genomes have undergone a whole-genome duplication event, as well as individual gene-duplication events. Here, we demonstrate the value of coelacanth genome sequence by complete sequencing and analysis of the protocadherin gene cluster of the Indonesian coelacanth, Latimeria menadoensis. We found that coelacanth has 49 protocadherin cluster genes organized in the same three ordered subclusters, alpha, beta, and gamma, as the 54 protocadherin cluster genes in human. In contrast, whole-genome and tandem duplications have generated two zebrafish protocadherin clusters comprised of at least 97 genes. Additionally, zebrafish protocadherins are far more prone to homogenizing gene conversion events than coelacanth protocadherins, suggesting that recombination- and duplication-driven plasticity may be a feature of teleost genomes. Our results indicate that coelacanth provides the ideal outgroup sequence against which tetrapod genomes can be measured. We therefore present L. menadoensis as a candidate for whole-genome sequencing.

  20. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed. PMID:26755333

  1. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed.

  2. A unified gene catalog for the laboratory mouse reference genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Richardson, J E; Hale, P; Baldarelli, R M; Reed, D J; Recla, J M; Sinclair, R; Reddy, T B K; Bult, C J

    2015-08-01

    We report here a semi-automated process by which mouse genome feature predictions and curated annotations (i.e., genes, pseudogenes, functional RNAs, etc.) from Ensembl, NCBI and Vertebrate Genome Annotation database (Vega) are reconciled with the genome features in the Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) database (http://www.informatics.jax.org) into a comprehensive and non-redundant catalog. Our gene unification method employs an algorithm (fjoin--feature join) for efficient detection of genome coordinate overlaps among features represented in two annotation data sets. Following the analysis with fjoin, genome features are binned into six possible categories (1:1, 1:0, 0:1, 1:n, n:1, n:m) based on coordinate overlaps. These categories are subsequently prioritized for assessment of annotation equivalencies and differences. The version of the unified catalog reported here contains more than 59,000 entries, including 22,599 protein-coding coding genes, 12,455 pseudogenes, and 24,007 other feature types (e.g., microRNAs, lincRNAs, etc.). More than 23,000 of the entries in the MGI gene catalog have equivalent gene models in the annotation files obtained from NCBI, Vega, and Ensembl. 12,719 of the features are unique to NCBI relative to Ensembl/Vega; 11,957 are unique to Ensembl/Vega relative to NCBI, and 3095 are unique to MGI. More than 4000 genome features fall into categories that require manual inspection to resolve structural differences in the gene models from different annotation sources. Using the MGI unified gene catalog, researchers can easily generate a comprehensive report of mouse genome features from a single source and compare the details of gene and transcript structure using MGI's mouse genome browser.

  3. Genomic Prediction of Gene Bank Wheat Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Crossa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study examines genomic prediction within 8416 Mexican landrace accessions and 2403 Iranian landrace accessions stored in gene banks. The Mexican and Iranian collections were evaluated in separate field trials, including an optimum environment for several traits, and in two separate environments (drought, D and heat, H for the highly heritable traits, days to heading (DTH, and days to maturity (DTM. Analyses accounting and not accounting for population structure were performed. Genomic prediction models include genotype × environment interaction (G × E. Two alternative prediction strategies were studied: (1 random cross-validation of the data in 20% training (TRN and 80% testing (TST (TRN20-TST80 sets, and (2 two types of core sets, “diversity” and “prediction”, including 10% and 20%, respectively, of the total collections. Accounting for population structure decreased prediction accuracy by 15–20% as compared to prediction accuracy obtained when not accounting for population structure. Accounting for population structure gave prediction accuracies for traits evaluated in one environment for TRN20-TST80 that ranged from 0.407 to 0.677 for Mexican landraces, and from 0.166 to 0.662 for Iranian landraces. Prediction accuracy of the 20% diversity core set was similar to accuracies obtained for TRN20-TST80, ranging from 0.412 to 0.654 for Mexican landraces, and from 0.182 to 0.647 for Iranian landraces. The predictive core set gave similar prediction accuracy as the diversity core set for Mexican collections, but slightly lower for Iranian collections. Prediction accuracy when incorporating G × E for DTH and DTM for Mexican landraces for TRN20-TST80 was around 0.60, which is greater than without the G × E term. For Iranian landraces, accuracies were 0.55 for the G × E model with TRN20-TST80. Results show promising prediction accuracies for potential use in germplasm enhancement and rapid introgression of exotic germplasm

  4. Genomics: Tool to predict and prevent male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Ashutosh; Kumar, Prashant; Jain, Manish; Kalsi, Amanpreet Kaur

    2017-06-01

    A large number of human diseases arise as a result of genetic abnormalities. With the advent of improved molecular biology techniques, the genetic etiology of male infertility is increasing. The common genetic factors responsible for male infertility are chromosomal abnormalities, Yq microdeletion and cystic fibrosis. These are responsible for approximately 30 percent cases of male infertility. About 40 percent cases of male infertility are categorized as idiopathic. These cases may be associated with genetic and genomic abnormalities. During last few years more and more genes are implicated in male infertility leading to decline in prevalence of idiopathic etiology. In this review we will summarize up to date published works on genetic etiologies of male infertility including our own works. We also briefly describe reproductive technologies used to overcome male infertility, dangers of transmitting genetic disorders to offspring and ways to prevent transmission of genetic disorders during assisted reproduction. At the end we will provide our points on how genomic information can be utilized for prediction and prevention of male infertility in coming years.

  5. A draft genome of field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense) provides tools for the domestication of a new winter biofuel crop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Kevin M; Fankhauser, Johnathon D; Wyse, Donald L; Marks, M David

    2015-04-01

    Field pennycress (Thlaspi arvense L.) is being domesticated as a new winter cover crop and biofuel species for the Midwestern United States that can be double-cropped between corn and soybeans. A genome sequence will enable the use of new technologies to make improvements in pennycress. To generate a draft genome, a hybrid sequencing approach was used to generate 47 Gb of DNA sequencing reads from both the Illumina and PacBio platforms. These reads were used to assemble 6,768 genomic scaffolds. The draft genome was annotated using the MAKER pipeline, which identified 27,390 predicted protein-coding genes, with almost all of these predicted peptides having significant sequence similarity to Arabidopsis proteins. A comprehensive analysis of pennycress gene homologues involved in glucosinolate biosynthesis, metabolism, and transport pathways revealed high sequence conservation compared with other Brassicaceae species, and helps validate the assembly of the pennycress gene space in this draft genome. Additional comparative genomic analyses indicate that the knowledge gained from years of basic Brassicaceae research will serve as a powerful tool for identifying gene targets whose manipulation can be predicted to result in improvements for pennycress.

  6. Gene coexpression as Hebbian learning in prokaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vey, Gregory

    2013-12-01

    Biological interaction networks represent a powerful tool for characterizing intracellular functional relationships, such as transcriptional regulation and protein interactions. Although artificial neural networks are routinely employed for a broad range of applications across computational biology, their underlying connectionist basis has not been extensively applied to modeling biological interaction networks. In particular, the Hopfield network offers nonlinear dynamics that represent the minimization of a system energy function through temporally distinct rewiring events. Here, a scaled energy minimization model is presented to test the feasibility of deriving a composite biological interaction network from multiple constituent data sets using the Hebbian learning principle. The performance of the scaled energy minimization model is compared against the standard Hopfield model using simulated data. Several networks are also derived from real data, compared to one another, and then combined to produce an aggregate network. The utility and limitations of the proposed model are discussed, along with possible implications for a genomic learning analogy where the fundamental Hebbian postulate is rendered into its genomic equivalent: Genes that function together junction together.

  7. Genes but not genomes reveal bacterial domestication of Lactococcus lactis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Passerini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The population structure and diversity of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis, a major industrial bacterium involved in milk fermentation, was determined at both gene and genome level. Seventy-six lactococcal isolates of various origins were studied by different genotyping methods and thirty-six strains displaying unique macrorestriction fingerprints were analyzed by a new multilocus sequence typing (MLST scheme. This gene-based analysis was compared to genomic characteristics determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The MLST analysis revealed that L. lactis subsp. lactis is essentially clonal with infrequent intra- and intergenic recombination; also, despite its taxonomical classification as a subspecies, it displays a genetic diversity as substantial as that within several other bacterial species. Genome-based analysis revealed a genome size variability of 20%, a value typical of bacteria inhabiting different ecological niches, and that suggests a large pan-genome for this subspecies. However, the genomic characteristics (macrorestriction pattern, genome or chromosome size, plasmid content did not correlate to the MLST-based phylogeny, with strains from the same sequence type (ST differing by up to 230 kb in genome size. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The gene-based phylogeny was not fully consistent with the traditional classification into dairy and non-dairy strains but supported a new classification based on ecological separation between "environmental" strains, the main contributors to the genetic diversity within the subspecies, and "domesticated" strains, subject to recent genetic bottlenecks. Comparison between gene- and genome-based analyses revealed little relationship between core and dispensable genome phylogenies, indicating that clonal diversification and phenotypic variability of the "domesticated" strains essentially arose through substantial genomic flux within the dispensable

  8. FilooT: a visualization tool for exploring genomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeinaly, Mahshid; Soltangheis, Mina; Shaw, Chris D.

    2013-12-01

    In order to enhance analysis of synthetic health data of the IEEE VAST Challenge 2010, we introduce an interactive Visual Analytics tool called FilooT designed as a part of the Interactive Multi-genomic Analysis System (IMAS) project. In this paper, we describe different interactive views of FilooT: the Tabular View for exploring and comparing genetic sequences, the Matrix View for sorting sequences according to the values of different characteristics, the P-value View for finding the most important mutations across a family of sequences, the Graph View for finding related sequences and the Group View to group them for further investigation. We followed the Nested Process Model framework throughout the design process and the evaluation. To understand the tool's design capabilities for target domain analysts, we conducted a User Experience scenario-based study followed by an informal interview. The findings indicated how analysts employ each of the visualization and interaction designs in their Bioinformatics task-analysis process. The critical analysis of the results inspired design informing suggestions.

  9. Application of next generation sequencing to human gene fusion detection: computational tools, features and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qingguo; Xia, Junfeng; Jia, Peilin; Pao, William; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-07-01

    Gene fusions are important genomic events in human cancer because their fusion gene products can drive the development of cancer and thus are potential prognostic tools or therapeutic targets in anti-cancer treatment. Major advancements have been made in computational approaches for fusion gene discovery over the past 3 years due to improvements and widespread applications of high-throughput next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. To identify fusions from NGS data, existing methods typically leverage the strengths of both sequencing technologies and computational strategies. In this article, we review the NGS and computational features of existing methods for fusion gene detection and suggest directions for future development.

  10. E-TALEN: a web tool to design TALENs for genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heigwer, Florian; Kerr, Grainne; Walther, Nike; Glaeser, Kathrin; Pelz, Oliver; Breinig, Marco; Boutros, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Use of transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) is a promising new technique in the field of targeted genome engineering, editing and reverse genetics. Its applications span from introducing knockout mutations to endogenous tagging of proteins and targeted excision repair. Owing to this wide range of possible applications, there is a need for fast and user-friendly TALEN design tools. We developed E-TALEN (http://www.e-talen.org), a web-based tool to design TALENs for experiments of varying scale. E-TALEN enables the design of TALENs against a single target or a large number of target genes. We significantly extended previously published design concepts to consider genomic context and different applications. E-TALEN guides the user through an end-to-end design process of de novo TALEN pairs, which are specific to a certain sequence or genomic locus. Furthermore, E-TALEN offers a functionality to predict targeting and specificity for existing TALENs. Owing to the computational complexity of many of the steps in the design of TALENs, particular emphasis has been put on the implementation of fast yet accurate algorithms. We implemented a user-friendly interface, from the input parameters to the presentation of results. An additional feature of E-TALEN is the in-built sequence and annotation database available for many organisms, including human, mouse, zebrafish, Drosophila and Arabidopsis, which can be extended in the future.

  11. Genome Variability and Gene Content in Chordopoxviruses: Dependence on Microsatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Eneida L.; Wang, Chunlin; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate gene loss in poxviruses belonging to the Chordopoxvirinae subfamily, we assessed the gene content of representative members of the subfamily, and determined whether individual genes present in each genome were intact, truncated, or fragmented. When nonintact genes were identified, the early stop mutations (ESMs) leading to gene truncation or fragmentation were analyzed. Of all the ESMs present in these poxvirus genomes, over 65% co-localized with microsatellites—simple sequence nucleotide repeats. On average, microsatellites comprise 24% of the nucleotide sequence of these poxvirus genomes. These simple repeats have been shown to exhibit high rates of variation, and represent a target for poxvirus protein variation, gene truncation, and reductive evolution. PMID:25912716

  12. Development of Genomic and Genetic Tools for Foxtail Millet, and Use of These Tools in the Improvement of Biomass Production for Bioenergy Crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doust, Andrew, N.

    2011-11-11

    The overall aim of this research was to develop genomic and genetic tools in foxtail millet that will be useful in improving biomass production in bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napier grass, and pearl millet. A variety of approaches have been implemented, and our lab has been primarily involved in genome analysis and quantitative genetic analysis. Our progress in these activities has been substantially helped by the genomic sequence of foxtail millet produced by the Joint Genome Institute (Bennetzen et al., in prep). In particular, the annotation and analysis of candidate genes for architecture, biomass production and flowering has led to new insights into the control of branching and flowering time, and has shown how closely related flowering time is to vegetative architectural development and biomass accumulation. The differences in genetic control identified at high and low density plantings have direct relevance to the breeding of bioenergy grasses that are tolerant of high planting densities. The developmental analyses have shown how plant architecture changes over time and may indicate which genes may best be manipulated at various times during development to obtain required biomass characteristics. This data contributes to the overall aim of significantly improving genetic and genomic tools in foxtail millet that can be directed to improvement of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, where it is important to maximize vegetative growth for greatest biomass production.

  13. Identification of a novel gene by whole human genome tiling array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hirokazu; Yagi, Tomohito; Tanaka, Masami; Tokuda, Yuichi; Kamoi, Kazumi; Hongo, Fumiya; Kawauchi, Akihiro; Nakano, Masakazu; Miki, Tsuneharu; Tashiro, Kei

    2013-03-01

    When the whole human genome sequence was determined by the Human Genome Project, the number of identified genes was fewer than expected. However, recent studies suggest that undiscovered transcripts still exist in the human genome. Furthermore, a new technology, the DNA microarray, which can simultaneously characterize huge amounts of genome sequence data, has become a useful tool for analyzing genetic changes in various diseases. A version of this tool, the tiling DNA microarray, was designed to search all the transcripts of the entire human genome, and provides huge amounts of data, including both exon and intron sequences, by a simple process. Although some previous studies using tiling DNA microarray analysis have indicated that numerous novel transcripts can be found in the human genome, none of them has reported any novel full-length human genes. Here, to find novel genes, we analyzed all the transcripts expressed in normal human prostate cells using this microarray. Because the optimal analytical parameters for using tiling DNA microarray data for this purpose had not been established, we established parameters for extracting the most likely regions for novel transcripts. The three parameters we optimized were the threshold for positive signal intensity, the Max gap, and the Min run, which we set to detect all transcriptional regions that were above the average length of known exons and had a signal intensity in the top 5%. We succeeded in obtaining the full-length sequence of one novel gene, located on chromosome 12q24.13. We named the novel gene "POTAGE". Its 5841-bp mRNA consists of 26 exons. We detected part of exon 2 in the tiling data analysis. The full-length sequence was then obtained by RT-PCR and RACE. Although the function of POTAGE is unclear, its sequence showed high homology with genes in other species, suggesting it might have an important or essential function. This study demonstrates that the tiling DNA microarray can be useful for

  14. Maximum likelihood for genome phylogeny on gene content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Gu, Xun

    2004-01-01

    With the rapid growth of entire genome data, reconstructing the phylogenetic relationship among different genomes has become a hot topic in comparative genomics. Maximum likelihood approach is one of the various approaches, and has been very successful. However, there is no reported study for any applications in the genome tree-making mainly due to the lack of an analytical form of a probability model and/or the complicated calculation burden. In this paper we studied the mathematical structure of the stochastic model of genome evolution, and then developed a simplified likelihood function for observing a specific phylogenetic pattern under four genome situation using gene content information. We use the maximum likelihood approach to identify phylogenetic trees. Simulation results indicate that the proposed method works well and can identify trees with a high correction rate. Real data application provides satisfied results. The approach developed in this paper can serve as the basis for reconstructing phylogenies of more than four genomes.

  15. Recent Achievement in Gene Cloning and Functional Genomics in Soybean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjun Xia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean is a model plant for photoperiodism as well as for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. However, a rather low efficiency in soybean transformation hampers functional analysis of genes isolated from soybean. In comparison, rapid development and progress in flowering time and photoperiodic response have been achieved in Arabidopsis and rice. As the soybean genomic information has been released since 2008, gene cloning and functional genomic studies have been revived as indicated by successfully characterizing genes involved in maturity and nematode resistance. Here, we review some major achievements in the cloning of some important genes and some specific features at genetic or genomic levels revealed by the analysis of functional genomics of soybean.

  16. Advancing Eucalyptus genomics: identification and sequencing of lignin biosynthesis genes from deep-coverage BAC libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudrna David

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eucalyptus species are among the most planted hardwoods in the world because of their rapid growth, adaptability and valuable wood properties. The development and integration of genomic resources into breeding practice will be increasingly important in the decades to come. Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries are key genomic tools that enable positional cloning of important traits, synteny evaluation, and the development of genome framework physical maps for genetic linkage and genome sequencing. Results We describe the construction and characterization of two deep-coverage BAC libraries EG_Ba and EG_Bb obtained from nuclear DNA fragments of E. grandis (clone BRASUZ1 digested with HindIII and BstYI, respectively. Genome coverages of 17 and 15 haploid genome equivalents were estimated for EG_Ba and EG_Bb, respectively. Both libraries contained large inserts, with average sizes ranging from 135 Kb (Eg_Bb to 157 Kb (Eg_Ba, very low extra-nuclear genome contamination providing a probability of finding a single copy gene ≥ 99.99%. Libraries were screened for the presence of several genes of interest via hybridizations to high-density BAC filters followed by PCR validation. Five selected BAC clones were sequenced and assembled using the Roche GS FLX technology providing the whole sequence of the E. grandis chloroplast genome, and complete genomic sequences of important lignin biosynthesis genes. Conclusions The two E. grandis BAC libraries described in this study represent an important milestone for the advancement of Eucalyptus genomics and forest tree research. These BAC resources have a highly redundant genome coverage (> 15×, contain large average inserts and have a very low percentage of clones with organellar DNA or empty vectors. These publicly available BAC libraries are thus suitable for a broad range of applications in genetic and genomic research in Eucalyptus and possibly in related species of Myrtaceae

  17. From Gene Targeting to Genome Editing: Transgenic animals applications and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAURÍCIO ROCHA-MARTINS

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTGenome modification technologies are powerful tools for molecular biology and related areas. Advances in animal transgenesis and genome editing technologies during the past three decades allowed systematic interrogation of gene function that can help model how the genome influences cellular physiology. Genetic engineering via homologous recombination (HR has been the standard method to modify genomic sequences. Nevertheless, nuclease-guided genome editing methods that were developed recently, such as ZFN, TALEN and CRISPR/Cas, opened new perspectives for biomedical research. Here, we present a brief historical perspective of genome modification methods, focusing on transgenic mice models. Moreover, we describe how new techniques were discovered and improved, present the paradigm shifts and discuss their limitations and applications for biomedical research as well as possible future directions.

  18. LEMONS – A Tool for the Identification of Splice Junctions in Transcriptomes of Organisms Lacking Reference Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouskila, Amos; Chorev, Michal; Carmel, Liran; Mishmar, Dan

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq is becoming a preferred tool for genomics studies of model and non-model organisms. However, DNA-based analysis of organisms lacking sequenced genomes cannot rely on RNA-seq data alone to isolate most genes of interest, as DNA codes both exons and introns. With this in mind, we designed a novel tool, LEMONS, that exploits the evolutionary conservation of both exon/intron boundary positions and splice junction recognition signals to produce high throughput splice-junction predictions in the absence of a reference genome. When tested on multiple annotated vertebrate mRNA data, LEMONS accurately identified 87% (average) of the splice-junctions. LEMONS was then applied to our updated Mediterranean chameleon transcriptome, which lacks a reference genome, and predicted a total of 90,820 exon-exon junctions. We experimentally verified these splice-junction predictions by amplifying and sequencing twenty randomly selected genes from chameleon DNA templates. Exons and introns were detected in 19 of 20 of the positions predicted by LEMONS. To the best of our knowledge, LEMONS is currently the only experimentally verified tool that can accurately predict splice-junctions in organisms that lack a reference genome. PMID:26606265

  19. Genome-wide gene-gene interaction analysis for next-generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinying; Zhu, Yun; Xiong, Momiao

    2016-03-01

    The critical barrier in interaction analysis for next-generation sequencing (NGS) data is that the traditional pairwise interaction analysis that is suitable for common variants is difficult to apply to rare variants because of their prohibitive computational time, large number of tests and low power. The great challenges for successful detection of interactions with NGS data are (1) the demands in the paradigm of changes in interaction analysis; (2) severe multiple testing; and (3) heavy computations. To meet these challenges, we shift the paradigm of interaction analysis between two SNPs to interaction analysis between two genomic regions. In other words, we take a gene as a unit of analysis and use functional data analysis techniques as dimensional reduction tools to develop a novel statistic to collectively test interaction between all possible pairs of SNPs within two genome regions. By intensive simulations, we demonstrate that the functional logistic regression for interaction analysis has the correct type 1 error rates and higher power to detect interaction than the currently used methods. The proposed method was applied to a coronary artery disease dataset from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) study and the Framingham Heart Study (FHS) dataset, and the early-onset myocardial infarction (EOMI) exome sequence datasets with European origin from the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project. We discovered that 6 of 27 pairs of significantly interacted genes in the FHS were replicated in the independent WTCCC study and 24 pairs of significantly interacted genes after applying Bonferroni correction in the EOMI study.

  20. PentaPlot: A software tool for the illustration of genome mosaicism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaxybayeva Olga

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dekapentagonal maps depict the phylogenetic relationships of five genomes in a visually appealing diagram and can be viewed as an alternative to a single evolutionary consensus tree. In particular, the generated maps focus attention on those gene families that significantly deviate from the consensus or plurality phylogeny. PentaPlot is a software tool that computes such dekapentagonal maps given an appropriate probability support matrix. Results The visualization with dekapentagonal maps critically depends on the optimal layout of unrooted tree topologies representing different evolutionary relationships among five organisms along the vertices of the dekapentagon. This is a difficult optimization problem given the large number of possible layouts. At its core our tool utilizes a genetic algorithm with demes and a local search strategy to search for the optimal layout. The hybrid genetic algorithm performs satisfactorily even in those cases where the chosen genomes are so divergent that little phylogenetic information has survived in the individual gene families. Conclusion PentaPlot is being made publicly available as an open source project at http://pentaplot.sourceforge.net.

  1. GenePRIMP: A GENE PRediction IMprovement Pipeline for Prokaryotic genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Hooper, Sean D.; Lykidis, Athanasios; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2010-04-01

    We present 'gene prediction improvement pipeline' (GenePRIMP; http://geneprimp.jgi-psf.org/), a computational process that performs evidence-based evaluation of gene models in prokaryotic genomes and reports anomalies including inconsistent start sites, missed genes and split genes. We found that manual curation of gene models using the anomaly reports generated by GenePRIMP improved their quality, and demonstrate the applicability of GenePRIMP in improving finishing quality and comparing different genome-sequencing and annotation technologies.

  2. Genomic location and characterisation of MIC genes in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, James; De Juan Sanjuan, Cristina; Guzman, Efrain; Ellis, Shirley A

    2008-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I chain-related (MIC) genes have been previously identified and characterised in human. They encode polymorphic class I-like molecules that are stress-inducible, and constitute one of the ligands of the activating natural killer cell receptor NKG2D. We have identified three MIC genes within the cattle genome, located close to three non-classical MHC class I genes. The genomic position relative to other genes is very similar to the arrangement reported in the pig MHC region. Analysis of MIC cDNA sequences derived from a range of cattle cell lines suggest there may be four MIC genes in total. We have investigated the presence of the genes in distinct and well-defined MHC haplotypes, and show that one gene is consistently present, while configuration of the other three genes appears variable.

  3. Distinct gene number-genome size relationships for eukaryotes and non-eukaryotes: gene content estimation for dinoflagellate genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Hou

    Full Text Available The ability to predict gene content is highly desirable for characterization of not-yet sequenced genomes like those of dinoflagellates. Using data from completely sequenced and annotated genomes from phylogenetically diverse lineages, we investigated the relationship between gene content and genome size using regression analyses. Distinct relationships between log(10-transformed protein-coding gene number (Y' versus log(10-transformed genome size (X', genome size in kbp were found for eukaryotes and non-eukaryotes. Eukaryotes best fit a logarithmic model, Y' = ln(-46.200+22.678X', whereas non-eukaryotes a linear model, Y' = 0.045+0.977X', both with high significance (p0.91. Total gene number shows similar trends in both groups to their respective protein coding regressions. The distinct correlations reflect lower and decreasing gene-coding percentages as genome size increases in eukaryotes (82%-1% compared to higher and relatively stable percentages in prokaryotes and viruses (97%-47%. The eukaryotic regression models project that the smallest dinoflagellate genome (3x10(6 kbp contains 38,188 protein-coding (40,086 total genes and the largest (245x10(6 kbp 87,688 protein-coding (92,013 total genes, corresponding to 1.8% and 0.05% gene-coding percentages. These estimates do not likely represent extraordinarily high functional diversity of the encoded proteome but rather highly redundant genomes as evidenced by high gene copy numbers documented for various dinoflagellate species.

  4. Modeling chromosomes in mouse to explore the function of genes, genomic disorders, and chromosomal organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Brault

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the challenges of genomic research after the completion of the human genome project is to assign a function to all the genes and to understand their interactions and organizations. Among the various techniques, the emergence of chromosome engineering tools with the aim to manipulate large genomic regions in the mouse model offers a powerful way to accelerate the discovery of gene functions and provides more mouse models to study normal and pathological developmental processes associated with aneuploidy. The combination of gene targeting in ES cells, recombinase technology, and other techniques makes it possible to generate new chromosomes carrying specific and defined deletions, duplications, inversions, and translocations that are accelerating functional analysis. This review presents the current status of chromosome engineering techniques and discusses the different applications as well as the implication of these new techniques in future research to better understand the function of chromosomal organization and structures.

  5. Analysis of pan-genome to identify the core genes and essential genes of Brucella spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaowen; Li, Yajie; Zang, Juan; Li, Yexia; Bie, Pengfei; Lu, Yanli; Wu, Qingmin

    2016-04-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular pathogens, that cause a contagious zoonotic disease, that can result in such outcomes as abortion or sterility in susceptible animal hosts and grave, debilitating illness in humans. For deciphering the survival mechanism of Brucella spp. in vivo, 42 Brucella complete genomes from NCBI were analyzed for the pan-genome and core genome by identification of their composition and function of Brucella genomes. The results showed that the total 132,143 protein-coding genes in these genomes were divided into 5369 clusters. Among these, 1710 clusters were associated with the core genome, 1182 clusters with strain-specific genes and 2477 clusters with dispensable genomes. COG analysis indicated that 44 % of the core genes were devoted to metabolism, which were mainly responsible for energy production and conversion (COG category C), and amino acid transport and metabolism (COG category E). Meanwhile, approximately 35 % of the core genes were in positive selection. In addition, 1252 potential essential genes were predicted in the core genome by comparison with a prokaryote database of essential genes. The results suggested that the core genes in Brucella genomes are relatively conservation, and the energy and amino acid metabolism play a more important role in the process of growth and reproduction in Brucella spp. This study might help us to better understand the mechanisms of Brucella persistent infection and provide some clues for further exploring the gene modules of the intracellular survival in Brucella spp.

  6. FSim: A Novel Functional Similarity Search Algorithm and Tool for Discovering Functionally Related Gene Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. During the analysis of genomics data, it is often required to quantify the functional similarity of genes and their products based on the annotation information from gene ontology (GO with hierarchical structure. A flexible and user-friendly way to estimate the functional similarity of genes utilizing GO annotation is therefore highly desired. Results. We proposed a novel algorithm using a level coefficient-weighted model to measure the functional similarity of gene products based on multiple ontologies of hierarchical GO annotations. The performance of our algorithm was evaluated and found to be superior to the other tested methods. We implemented the proposed algorithm in a software package, FSim, based on R statistical and computing environment. It can be used to discover functionally related genes for a given gene, group of genes, or set of function terms. Conclusions. FSim is a flexible tool to analyze functional gene groups based on the GO annotation databases.

  7. Genomic tools in cowpea breeding programs: status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ousmane eBoukar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea is one of the most important grain legumes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. It provides strong support to the livelihood of small-scale farmers through its contributions to their nutritional security, income generation and soil fertility enhancement. Worldwide about 6.5 million metric tons of cowpea are produced annually on about 14.5 million hectares. The low productivity of cowpea is attributable to numerous abiotic and biotic constraints. The abiotic stress factors comprise drought, low soil fertility, and heat while biotic constraints include insects, diseases, parasitic weeds and nematodes. Cowpea farmers also have limited access to quality seeds of improved varieties for planting. Some progress has been made through conventional breeding at international and national research institutions in the last three decades. Cowpea improvement could also benefit from modern breeding methods based on molecular genetic tools. A number of advances in cowpea genetic linkage maps, and quantitative trait loci associated with some desirable traits such as resistance to Striga, Macrophomina, Fusarium wilt, bacterial blight, root-knot nematodes, aphids and foliar thrips have been reported. An improved consensus genetic linkage map has been developed and used to identify QTLs of additional traits. In order to take advantage of these developments single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping is being streamlined to establish an efficient workflow supported by genotyping support service (GSS-client interactions. About 1100 SNPs mapped on the cowpea genome were converted by LGC Genomics to KASP assays. Several cowpea breeding programs have been exploiting these resources to implement molecular breeding, especially for MARS and MABC, to accelerate cowpea variety improvement. The combination of conventional breeding and molecular breeding strategies, with workflow managed through the CGIAR breeding management system (BMS, promises an increase in the number of

  8. Genomic Tools in Cowpea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukar, Ousmane; Fatokun, Christian A; Huynh, Bao-Lam; Roberts, Philip A; Close, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Cowpea is one of the most important grain legumes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It provides strong support to the livelihood of small-scale farmers through its contributions to their nutritional security, income generation and soil fertility enhancement. Worldwide about 6.5 million metric tons of cowpea are produced annually on about 14.5 million hectares. The low productivity of cowpea is attributable to numerous abiotic and biotic constraints. The abiotic stress factors comprise drought, low soil fertility, and heat while biotic constraints include insects, diseases, parasitic weeds, and nematodes. Cowpea farmers also have limited access to quality seeds of improved varieties for planting. Some progress has been made through conventional breeding at international and national research institutions in the last three decades. Cowpea improvement could also benefit from modern breeding methods based on molecular genetic tools. A number of advances in cowpea genetic linkage maps, and quantitative trait loci associated with some desirable traits such as resistance to Striga, Macrophomina, Fusarium wilt, bacterial blight, root-knot nematodes, aphids, and foliar thrips have been reported. An improved consensus genetic linkage map has been developed and used to identify QTLs of additional traits. In order to take advantage of these developments single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is being streamlined to establish an efficient workflow supported by genotyping support service (GSS)-client interactions. About 1100 SNPs mapped on the cowpea genome were converted by LGC Genomics to KASP assays. Several cowpea breeding programs have been exploiting these resources to implement molecular breeding, especially for MARS and MABC, to accelerate cowpea variety improvement. The combination of conventional breeding and molecular breeding strategies, with workflow managed through the CGIAR breeding management system (BMS), promises an increase in the number of improved

  9. Use of designer nucleases for targeted gene and genome editing in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Donald P; Spalding, Martin H; Yang, Bing

    2016-02-01

    The ability to efficiently inactivate or replace genes in model organisms allowed a rapid expansion of our understanding of many of the genetic, biochemical, molecular and cellular mechanisms that support life. With the advent of new techniques for manipulating genes and genomes that are applicable not only to single-celled organisms, but also to more complex organisms such as animals and plants, the speed with which scientists and biotechnologists can expand fundamental knowledge and apply that knowledge to improvements in medicine, industry and agriculture is set to expand in an exponential fashion. At the heart of these advancements will be the use of gene editing tools such as zinc finger nucleases, modified meganucleases, hybrid DNA/RNA oligonucleotides, TAL effector nucleases and modified CRISPR/Cas9. Each of these tools has the ability to precisely target one specific DNA sequence within a genome and (except for DNA/RNA oligonucleotides) to create a double-stranded DNA break. DNA repair to such breaks sometimes leads to gene knockouts or gene replacement by homologous recombination if exogenously supplied homologous DNA fragments are made available. Genome rearrangements are also possible to engineer. Creation and use of such genome rearrangements, gene knockouts and gene replacements by the plant science community is gaining significant momentum. To document some of this progress and to explore the technology's longer term potential, this review highlights present and future uses of designer nucleases to greatly expedite research with model plant systems and to engineer genes and genomes in major and minor crop species for enhanced food production.

  10. GACT: a Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool for SNP imputation and meta-analysis in genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulovari, Arvis; Li, Dawei

    2014-07-19

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genes associated with complex human diseases. Although much of the heritability remains unexplained, combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes from multiple studies for meta-analysis will increase the statistical power to identify new disease-associated variants. Meta-analysis requires same allele definition (nomenclature) and genome build among individual studies. Similarly, imputation, commonly-used prior to meta-analysis, requires the same consistency. However, the genotypes from various GWAS are generated using different genotyping platforms, arrays or SNP-calling approaches, resulting in use of different genome builds and allele definitions. Incorrect assumptions of identical allele definition among combined GWAS lead to a large portion of discarded genotypes or incorrect association findings. There is no published tool that predicts and converts among all major allele definitions. In this study, we have developed a tool, GACT, which stands for Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool, that predicts and inter-converts between any of the common SNP allele definitions and between the major genome builds. In addition, we assessed several factors that may affect imputation quality, and our results indicated that inclusion of singletons in the reference had detrimental effects while ambiguous SNPs had no measurable effect. Unexpectedly, exclusion of genotypes with missing rate > 0.001 (40% of study SNPs) showed no significant decrease of imputation quality (even significantly higher when compared to the imputation with singletons in the reference), especially for rare SNPs. GACT is a new, powerful, and user-friendly tool with both command-line and interactive online versions that can accurately predict, and convert between any of the common allele definitions and between genome builds for genome-wide meta-analysis and imputation of genotypes from SNP-arrays or deep

  11. Genome-Wide Detection and Analysis of Multifunctional Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritykin, Yuri; Ghersi, Dario; Singh, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Many genes can play a role in multiple biological processes or molecular functions. Identifying multifunctional genes at the genome-wide level and studying their properties can shed light upon the complexity of molecular events that underpin cellular functioning, thereby leading to a better understanding of the functional landscape of the cell. However, to date, genome-wide analysis of multifunctional genes (and the proteins they encode) has been limited. Here we introduce a computational approach that uses known functional annotations to extract genes playing a role in at least two distinct biological processes. We leverage functional genomics data sets for three organisms—H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, and S. cerevisiae—and show that, as compared to other annotated genes, genes involved in multiple biological processes possess distinct physicochemical properties, are more broadly expressed, tend to be more central in protein interaction networks, tend to be more evolutionarily conserved, and are more likely to be essential. We also find that multifunctional genes are significantly more likely to be involved in human disorders. These same features also hold when multifunctionality is defined with respect to molecular functions instead of biological processes. Our analysis uncovers key features about multifunctional genes, and is a step towards a better genome-wide understanding of gene multifunctionality. PMID:26436655

  12. Human Ageing Genomic Resources: integrated databases and tools for the biology and genetics of ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacutu, Robi; Craig, Thomas; Budovsky, Arie; Wuttke, Daniel; Lehmann, Gilad; Taranukha, Dmitri; Costa, Joana; Fraifeld, Vadim E; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The Human Ageing Genomic Resources (HAGR, http://genomics.senescence.info) is a freely available online collection of research databases and tools for the biology and genetics of ageing. HAGR features now several databases with high-quality manually curated data: (i) GenAge, a database of genes associated with ageing in humans and model organisms; (ii) AnAge, an extensive collection of longevity records and complementary traits for >4000 vertebrate species; and (iii) GenDR, a newly incorporated database, containing both gene mutations that interfere with dietary restriction-mediated lifespan extension and consistent gene expression changes induced by dietary restriction. Since its creation about 10 years ago, major efforts have been undertaken to maintain the quality of data in HAGR, while further continuing to develop, improve and extend it. This article briefly describes the content of HAGR and details the major updates since its previous publications, in terms of both structure and content. The completely redesigned interface, more intuitive and more integrative of HAGR resources, is also presented. Altogether, we hope that through its improvements, the current version of HAGR will continue to provide users with the most comprehensive and accessible resources available today in the field of biogerontology.

  13. Human Ageing Genomic Resources: Integrated databases and tools for the biology and genetics of ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacutu, Robi; Craig, Thomas; Budovsky, Arie; Wuttke, Daniel; Lehmann, Gilad; Taranukha, Dmitri; Costa, Joana; Fraifeld, Vadim E.; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The Human Ageing Genomic Resources (HAGR, http://genomics.senescence.info) is a freely available online collection of research databases and tools for the biology and genetics of ageing. HAGR features now several databases with high-quality manually curated data: (i) GenAge, a database of genes associated with ageing in humans and model organisms; (ii) AnAge, an extensive collection of longevity records and complementary traits for >4000 vertebrate species; and (iii) GenDR, a newly incorporated database, containing both gene mutations that interfere with dietary restriction-mediated lifespan extension and consistent gene expression changes induced by dietary restriction. Since its creation about 10 years ago, major efforts have been undertaken to maintain the quality of data in HAGR, while further continuing to develop, improve and extend it. This article briefly describes the content of HAGR and details the major updates since its previous publications, in terms of both structure and content. The completely redesigned interface, more intuitive and more integrative of HAGR resources, is also presented. Altogether, we hope that through its improvements, the current version of HAGR will continue to provide users with the most comprehensive and accessible resources available today in the field of biogerontology. PMID:23193293

  14. GeneChip Resequencing of the Smallpox Virus Genome Can Identify Novel Strains: a Biodefense Application▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Tang, Kevin; Osborne, John; Sammons, Scott; Wohlhueter, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    We developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips, based on the complete genome sequences of 24 strains of smallpox virus (variola virus), for rapid characterization of this human-pathogenic virus. Each GeneChip was designed to analyze a divergent segment of approximately 30,000 bases of the smallpox virus genome. This study includes the hybridization results of 14 smallpox virus strains. Of the 14 smallpox virus strains hybridized, only 7 had sequence information included in the design of the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips; similar information for the remaining strains was not tiled as a reference in these GeneChips. By use of variola virus-specific primers and long-range PCR, 22 overlapping amplicons were amplified to cover nearly the complete genome and hybridized with the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChip set. These GeneChips were successful in generating nucleotide sequences for all 14 of the smallpox virus strains hybridized. Analysis of the data indicated that the GeneChip resequencing by hybridization was fast and reproducible and that the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips could differentiate the 14 smallpox virus strains characterized. This study also suggests that high-density resequencing GeneChips have potential biodefense applications and may be used as an alternate tool for rapid identification of smallpox virus in the future. PMID:17182757

  15. Pinpointing disease genes through phenomic and genomic data fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rui; Wu, Mengmeng; Li, Lianshuo

    2015-01-01

    Pinpointing genes involved in inherited human diseases remains a great challenge in the post-genomics era. Although approaches have been proposed either based on the guilt-by-association principle or making use of disease phenotype similarities, the low coverage of both diseases and genes in existing methods has been preventing the scan of causative genes for a significant proportion of diseases at the whole-genome level. To overcome this limitation, we proposed a rigorous statistical method called pgFusion to prioritize candidate genes by integrating one type of disease phenotype similarity derived from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and seven types of gene functional similarities calculated from gene expression, gene ontology, pathway membership, protein sequence, protein domain, protein-protein interaction and regulation pattern, respectively. Our method covered a total of 7,719 diseases and 20,327 genes, achieving the highest coverage thus far for both diseases and genes. We performed leave-one-out cross-validation experiments to demonstrate the superior performance of our method and applied it to a real exome sequencing dataset of epileptic encephalopathies, showing the capability of this approach in finding causative genes for complex diseases. We further provided the standalone software and online services of pgFusion at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/jianglab/pgfusion. pgFusion not only provided an effective way for prioritizing candidate genes, but also demonstrated feasible solutions to two fundamental questions in the analysis of big genomic data: the comparability of heterogeneous data and the integration of multiple types of data. Applications of this method in exome or whole genome sequencing studies would accelerate the finding of causative genes for human diseases. Other research fields in genomics could also benefit from the incorporation of our data fusion methodology.

  16. Groundnut improvement: use of genetic and genomic tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janila ePasupuleti

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L., a self-pollinated legume is an important crop cultivated in 24 million ha world over for extraction of edible oil and food uses. The kernels are rich in oil (48-50% and protein (25-28%, and are source of several vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, biologically active polyphenols, flavonoids, and isoflavones. Improved varieties of groundnut with high yield potential were developed and released for cultivation world over. The improved varieties belong to different maturity durations and possess resistance to diseases, tolerance to drought, enhanced oil content, and improved quality traits for food uses. Conventional breeding procedures along with the tools for phenotyping were largely used in groundnut improvement programs. Mutations were used to induce variability and wide hybridization was attempted to tap variability from wild species. Low genetic variability has been a bottleneck for groundnut improvement. The vast potential of wild species, reservoir of new alleles remains under-utilized. Development of linkage maps of groundnut during the last decade was followed by identification of markers and QTLs for the target traits. Consequently, the last decade has witnessed the deployment of molecular breeding approaches to complement the ongoing groundnut improvement programs in USA, China, India, and Japan. The other potential advantages of molecular breeding are the feasibility to target multiple traits for improvement and provide tools to tap new alleles from wild species. The first groundnut variety developed through marker-assisted backcrossing (MABC is a root knot nematode resistant variety, NemaTAM in USA. The uptake of molecular breeding approaches in groundnut improvement programs by NARS partners in India and many African countries is slow or needs to be initiated in part due to inadequate infrastructure, high genotyping costs, and human capacities. Availability of draft genome sequence for diploid (AA & BB

  17. The cavefish genome reveals candidate genes for eye loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGaugh, Suzanne E.; Gross, Joshua B.; Aken, Bronwen; Blin, Maryline; Borowsky, Richard; Chalopin, Domitille; Hinaux, Hélène; Jeffery, William R.; Keene, Alex; Ma, Li; Minx, Patrick; Murphy, Daniel; O’Quin, Kelly E.; Rétaux, Sylvie; Rohner, Nicolas; Searle, Steve M. J.; Stahl, Bethany A.; Tabin, Cliff; Volff, Jean-Nicolas; Yoshizawa, Masato; Warren, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    Natural populations subjected to strong environmental selection pressures offer a window into the genetic underpinnings of evolutionary change. Cavefish populations, Astyanax mexicanus (Teleostei: Characiphysi), exhibit repeated, independent evolution for a variety of traits including eye degeneration, pigment loss, increased size and number of taste buds and mechanosensory organs, and shifts in many behavioural traits. Surface and cave forms are interfertile making this system amenable to genetic interrogation; however, lack of a reference genome has hampered efforts to identify genes responsible for changes in cave forms of A. mexicanus. Here we present the first de novo genome assembly for Astyanax mexicanus cavefish, contrast repeat elements to other teleost genomes, identify candidate genes underlying quantitative trait loci (QTL), and assay these candidate genes for potential functional and expression differences. We expect the cavefish genome to advance understanding of the evolutionary process, as well as, analogous human disease including retinal dysfunction. PMID:25329095

  18. Comparative genomics of the bacterial genus Listeria: Genome evolution is characterized by limited gene acquisition and limited gene loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Bakker, Henk C; Cummings, Craig A; Ferreira, Vania; Vatta, Paolo; Orsi, Renato H; Degoricija, Lovorka; Barker, Melissa; Petrauskene, Olga; Furtado, Manohar R; Wiedmann, Martin

    2010-12-02

    The bacterial genus Listeria contains pathogenic and non-pathogenic species, including the pathogens L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, both of which carry homologous virulence gene clusters such as the prfA cluster and clusters of internalin genes. Initial evidence for multiple deletions of the prfA cluster during the evolution of Listeria indicates that this genus provides an interesting model for studying the evolution of virulence and also presents practical challenges with regard to definition of pathogenic strains. To better understand genome evolution and evolution of virulence characteristics in Listeria, we used a next generation sequencing approach to generate draft genomes for seven strains representing Listeria species or clades for which genome sequences were not available. Comparative analyses of these draft genomes and six publicly available genomes, which together represent the main Listeria species, showed evidence for (i) a pangenome with 2,032 core and 2,918 accessory genes identified to date, (ii) a critical role of gene loss events in transition of Listeria species from facultative pathogen to saprotroph, even though a consistent pattern of gene loss seemed to be absent, and a number of isolates representing non-pathogenic species still carried some virulence associated genes, and (iii) divergence of modern pathogenic and non-pathogenic Listeria species and strains, most likely circa 47 million years ago, from a pathogenic common ancestor that contained key virulence genes. Genome evolution in Listeria involved limited gene loss and acquisition as supported by (i) a relatively high coverage of the predicted pan-genome by the observed pan-genome, (ii) conserved genome size (between 2.8 and 3.2 Mb), and (iii) a highly syntenic genome. Limited gene loss in Listeria did include loss of virulence associated genes, likely associated with multiple transitions to a saprotrophic lifestyle. The genus Listeria thus provides an example of a group of

  19. Comparative genomics of the bacterial genus Listeria: Genome evolution is characterized by limited gene acquisition and limited gene loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barker Melissa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterial genus Listeria contains pathogenic and non-pathogenic species, including the pathogens L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii, both of which carry homologous virulence gene clusters such as the prfA cluster and clusters of internalin genes. Initial evidence for multiple deletions of the prfA cluster during the evolution of Listeria indicates that this genus provides an interesting model for studying the evolution of virulence and also presents practical challenges with regard to definition of pathogenic strains. Results To better understand genome evolution and evolution of virulence characteristics in Listeria, we used a next generation sequencing approach to generate draft genomes for seven strains representing Listeria species or clades for which genome sequences were not available. Comparative analyses of these draft genomes and six publicly available genomes, which together represent the main Listeria species, showed evidence for (i a pangenome with 2,032 core and 2,918 accessory genes identified to date, (ii a critical role of gene loss events in transition of Listeria species from facultative pathogen to saprotroph, even though a consistent pattern of gene loss seemed to be absent, and a number of isolates representing non-pathogenic species still carried some virulence associated genes, and (iii divergence of modern pathogenic and non-pathogenic Listeria species and strains, most likely circa 47 million years ago, from a pathogenic common ancestor that contained key virulence genes. Conclusions Genome evolution in Listeria involved limited gene loss and acquisition as supported by (i a relatively high coverage of the predicted pan-genome by the observed pan-genome, (ii conserved genome size (between 2.8 and 3.2 Mb, and (iii a highly syntenic genome. Limited gene loss in Listeria did include loss of virulence associated genes, likely associated with multiple transitions to a saprotrophic lifestyle. The genus

  20. University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center: Functional Signature Ontology Tool: Triplicate Measurements of Reporter Gene Expression in Response to Individual Genetic and Chemical Perturbations in HCT116 Cells | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project is to use an eight-gene expression profile to define functional signatures for small molecules and natural products with heretofore undefined mechanism of action. Two genes in the eight gene set are used as internal controls and do not vary across gene expression array data collected from the public domain. The remaining six genes are found to vary independently across a large collection of publically available gene expression array datasets.  Read the abstract

  1. GAViT: Genome Assembly Visualization Tool for Short Read Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Aijazuddin; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Trong, Stephan

    2008-03-14

    It is a challenging job for genome analysts to accurately debug, troubleshoot, and validate genome assembly results. Genome analysts rely on visualization tools to help validate and troubleshoot assembly results, including such problems as mis-assemblies, low-quality regions, and repeats. Short read data adds further complexity and makes it extremely challenging for the visualization tools to scale and to view all needed assembly information. As a result, there is a need for a visualization tool that can scale to display assembly data from the new sequencing technologies. We present Genome Assembly Visualization Tool (GAViT), a highly scalable and interactive assembly visualization tool developed at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  2. A new analysis tool for individual-level allele frequency for genomic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Wen-Harn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Allele frequency is one of the most important population indices and has been broadly applied to genetic/genomic studies. Estimation of allele frequency using genotypes is convenient but may lose data information and be sensitive to genotyping errors. Results This study utilizes a unified intensity-measuring approach to estimating individual-level allele frequencies for 1,104 and 1,270 samples genotyped with the single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays of the Affymetrix Human Mapping 100K and 500K Sets, respectively. Allele frequencies of all samples are estimated and adjusted by coefficients of preferential amplification/hybridization (CPA, and large ethnicity-specific and cross-ethnicity databases of CPA and allele frequency are established. The results show that using the CPA significantly improves the accuracy of allele frequency estimates; moreover, this paramount factor is insensitive to the time of data acquisition, effect of laboratory site, type of gene chip, and phenotypic status. Based on accurate allele frequency estimates, analytic methods based on individual-level allele frequencies are developed and successfully applied to discover genomic patterns of allele frequencies, detect chromosomal abnormalities, classify sample groups, identify outlier samples, and estimate the purity of tumor samples. The methods are packaged into a new analysis tool, ALOHA (Allele-frequency/Loss-of-heterozygosity/Allele-imbalance. Conclusions This is the first time that these important genetic/genomic applications have been simultaneously conducted by the analyses of individual-level allele frequencies estimated by a unified intensity-measuring approach. We expect that additional practical applications for allele frequency analysis will be found. The developed databases and tools provide useful resources for human genome analysis via high-throughput single-nucleotide-polymorphism arrays. The ALOHA software was written in R and R GUI and

  3. The use of multiple hierarchically independent gene ontology terms in gene function prediction and genome annotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kourmpetis, Y.I.A.; Burgt, van der A.; Bink, M.C.A.M.; Braak, ter C.J.F.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    The Gene Ontology (GO) is a widely used controlled vocabulary for the description of gene function. In this study we quantify the usage of multiple and hierarchically independent GO terms in the curated genome annotations of seven well-studied species. In most genomes, significant proportions (6 -

  4. Genetic and genomic tools for the marine annelid Platynereis dumerilii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zantke, Juliane; Bannister, Stephanie; Rajan, Vinoth Babu Veedin; Raible, Florian; Tessmar-Raible, Kristin

    2014-05-01

    The bristle worm Platynereis dumerilii displays many interesting biological characteristics. These include its reproductive timing, which is synchronized to the moon phase, its regenerative capacity that is hormonally controlled, and a slow rate of evolution, which permits analyses of ancestral genes and cell types. As a marine annelid, Platynereis is also representative of the marine ecosystem, as well as one of the three large animal subphyla, the Lophotrochozoa. Here, we provide an overview of the molecular resources, functional techniques, and behavioral assays that have recently been established for the bristle worm. This combination of tools now places Platynereis in an excellent position to advance research at the frontiers of neurobiology, chronobiology, evo-devo, and marine biology.

  5. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of anguillid herpesvirus 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, van S.J.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Davison, A.A.; Engelsma, M.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Whereas temporal gene expression in mammalian herpesviruses has been studied extensively, little is known about gene expression in fish herpesviruses. Here we report a genome-wide transcription analysis of a fish herpesvirus, anguillid herpesvirus 1, in cell culture, studied during the

  6. Whole genome homology-based identification of candidate genes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Josephine Erhiakporeh

    2016-07-06

    Jul 6, 2016 ... identification of a set of 75 candidate genes (42, 22 and 11 from Arabidopsis, potato and tomato, ... understanding on the genetic basis of drought tolerance by using the .... Comparative genomics and genes expression assay ... Primer code ... physiological and molecular responses to drought stress.

  7. ECR Browser: a tool for visualizing and accessing data from comparisons of multiple vertebrate genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Ovcharenko, Ivan; Nobrega, Marcelo A.; Loots, Gabriela G.; Stubbs, Lisa

    2004-01-01

    With an increasing number of vertebrate genomes being sequenced in draft or finished form, unique opportunities for decoding the language of DNA sequence through comparative genome alignments have arisen. However, novel tools and strategies are required to accommodate this large volume of genomic information and to facilitate the transfer of predictions generated by comparative sequence alignment to researchers focused on experimental annotation of genome function. Here, we present the ECR Br...

  8. CSTminer: a web tool for the identification of coding and noncoding conserved sequence tags through cross-species genome comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrignanò, Tiziana; Canali, Alessandro; Grillo, Giorgio; Liuni, Sabino; Mignone, Flavio; Pesole, Graziano

    2004-07-01

    The identification and characterization of genome tracts that are highly conserved across species during evolution may contribute significantly to the functional annotation of whole-genome sequences. Indeed, such sequences are likely to correspond to known or unknown coding exons or regulatory motifs. Here, we present a web server implementing a previously developed algorithm that, by comparing user-submitted genome sequences, is able to identify statistically significant conserved blocks and assess their coding or noncoding nature through the measure of a coding potential score. The web tool, available at http://www.caspur.it/CSTminer/, is dynamically interconnected with the Ensembl genome resources and produces a graphical output showing a map of detected conserved sequences and annotated gene features.

  9. AssociationViewer: a scalable and integrated software tool for visualization of large-scale variation data in genomic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Olivier; Valsesia, Armand; Telenti, Amalio; Xenarios, Ioannis; Stevenson, Brian J

    2009-03-01

    We present a tool designed for visualization of large-scale genetic and genomic data exemplified by results from genome-wide association studies. This software provides an integrated framework to facilitate the interpretation of SNP association studies in genomic context. Gene annotations can be retrieved from Ensembl, linkage disequilibrium data downloaded from HapMap and custom data imported in BED or WIG format. AssociationViewer integrates functionalities that enable the aggregation or intersection of data tracks. It implements an efficient cache system and allows the display of several, very large-scale genomic datasets. The Java code for AssociationViewer is distributed under the GNU General Public Licence and has been tested on Microsoft Windows XP, MacOSX and GNU/Linux operating systems. It is available from the SourceForge repository. This also includes Java webstart, documentation and example datafiles.

  10. Gene therapy as a potential tool for treating neuroblastoma-a focused review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M D; Dravid, A; Kumar, A; Sen, D

    2016-05-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor caused by rapid division of undifferentiated neuroblasts, is the most common childhood malignancy affecting children aged genes is restored to normalcy. Gene therapy is a powerful tool with the potential to inhibit the deleterious effects of oncogenes by inserting corrected/normal genes into the genome. Both viral and non-viral vector-based gene therapies have been developed and adopted to deliver the target genes into neuroblastoma cells. These attempts have given hope to bringing in a new regime of treatment against neuroblastoma. A few gene-therapy-based treatment strategies have been tested in limited clinical trials yielding some positive results. This mini review is an attempt to provide an overview of the available options of gene therapy to treat neuroblastoma.

  11. LATERAL GENE TRANSFER AND THE HISTORY OF BACTERIAL GENOMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard Ochman

    2006-02-22

    The aims of this research were to elucidate the role and extent of lateral transfer in the differentiation of bacterial strains and species, and to assess the impact of gene transfer on the evolution of bacterial genomes. The ultimate goal of the project is to examine the dynamics of a core set of protein-coding genes (i.e., those that are distributed universally among Bacteria) by developing conserved primers that would allow their amplification and sequencing in any bacterial taxa. In addition, we adopted a bioinformatic approach to elucidate the extent of lateral gene transfer in sequenced genome.

  12. Building phylogenetic trees by using gene Nucleotide Genomic Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristea, Paul Dan

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide genomic signal (NuGS) methodology allows a molecular level approach to determine distances between homologous genes or between conserved equivalent non-coding genome regions in various species or individuals of the same species. Therefore, distances between the genes of species or individuals can be computed and phylogenetic trees can be built. The paper illustrates the use of the nucleotide imbalance (N) and nucleotide pair imbalance (P) signals to determine the distances between the genes of several Hominidae. The results are in accordance with those of other genetic or phylogenetic approaches to establish distances between Hominidae species.

  13. Zebrafish Expression Ontology of Gene Sets (ZEOGS): a tool to analyze enrichment of zebrafish anatomical terms in large gene sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Marsico, Annalisa; Meijsing, Sebastiaan H

    2013-09-01

    The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is an established model organism for developmental and biomedical research. It is frequently used for high-throughput functional genomics experiments, such as genome-wide gene expression measurements, to systematically analyze molecular mechanisms. However, the use of whole embryos or larvae in such experiments leads to a loss of the spatial information. To address this problem, we have developed a tool called Zebrafish Expression Ontology of Gene Sets (ZEOGS) to assess the enrichment of anatomical terms in large gene sets. ZEOGS uses gene expression pattern data from several sources: first, in situ hybridization experiments from the Zebrafish Model Organism Database (ZFIN); second, it uses the Zebrafish Anatomical Ontology, a controlled vocabulary that describes connected anatomical structures; and third, the available connections between expression patterns and anatomical terms contained in ZFIN. Upon input of a gene set, ZEOGS determines which anatomical structures are overrepresented in the input gene set. ZEOGS allows one for the first time to look at groups of genes and to describe them in terms of shared anatomical structures. To establish ZEOGS, we first tested it on random gene selections and on two public microarray datasets with known tissue-specific gene expression changes. These tests showed that ZEOGS could reliably identify the tissues affected, whereas only very few enriched terms to none were found in the random gene sets. Next we applied ZEOGS to microarray datasets of 24 and 72 h postfertilization zebrafish embryos treated with beclomethasone, a potent glucocorticoid. This analysis resulted in the identification of several anatomical terms related to glucocorticoid-responsive tissues, some of which were stage-specific. Our studies highlight the ability of ZEOGS to extract spatial information from datasets derived from whole embryos, indicating that ZEOGS could be a useful tool to automatically analyze gene expression

  14. Whole genome sequencing as the ultimate tool to diagnose tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick van Soolingen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, DNA techniques have been increasingly used in the laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB. The (sub species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex are usually identified using reverse line blot techniques. The resistance is predicted by the detection of mutations in genes associated with resistance. Nevertheless, all cases are still subjected to cumbersome phenotypic resistance testing. The production of a strain-characteristic DNA fingerprint, to investigate the epidemiology of TB, is done by the 24-locus variable number tandem repeat (VNTR typing. However, most of the molecular techniques in the diagnosis of TB can eventually be replaced by whole genome sequencing (WGS. Many international TB reference laboratories are currently working on the introduction of WGS; however, standardization in the international context is lacking. The European Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control in Stockholm, Sweden organizes a yearly round of quality control on VNTR typing and in 2015 for the first time also WGS. In this first proficiency study, only three out of eight international TB laboratories produced WGS results in line with those of the reference laboratory. The whole process of DNA isolation, purification, quantification, sequencing, and analysis/interpretation of data is still under development. In this presentation, many aspects will be covered that influence the quality and interpretation of WGS results. The turn-around-time, analysis, and utility of WGS will be discussed. Moreover, the experiences in the use of WGS in the molecular epidemiology of TB in The Netherlands are detailed. It can be concluded that many difficulties still have to be conquered. The state of the art is that bacteria still have to be cultured to have sufficient quality and quantity of DNA for succesful WGS. The quality of sequencing has improved significantly over the past 7 years, and the detection of mutations has, therefore

  15. cDNA2Genome: A tool for mapping and annotating cDNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhai Sandor

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the last years several high-throughput cDNA sequencing projects have been funded worldwide with the aim of identifying and characterizing the structure of complete novel human transcripts. However some of these cDNAs are error prone due to frameshifts and stop codon errors caused by low sequence quality, or to cloning of truncated inserts, among other reasons. Therefore, accurate CDS prediction from these sequences first require the identification of potentially problematic cDNAs in order to speed up the posterior annotation process. Results cDNA2Genome is an application for the automatic high-throughput mapping and characterization of cDNAs. It utilizes current annotation data and the most up to date databases, especially in the case of ESTs and mRNAs in conjunction with a vast number of approaches to gene prediction in order to perform a comprehensive assessment of the cDNA exon-intron structure. The final result of cDNA2Genome is an XML file containing all relevant information obtained in the process. This XML output can easily be used for further analysis such us program pipelines, or the integration of results into databases. The web interface to cDNA2Genome also presents this data in HTML, where the annotation is additionally shown in a graphical form. cDNA2Genome has been implemented under the W3H task framework which allows the combination of bioinformatics tools in tailor-made analysis task flows as well as the sequential or parallel computation of many sequences for large-scale analysis. Conclusions cDNA2Genome represents a new versatile and easily extensible approach to the automated mapping and annotation of human cDNAs. The underlying approach allows sequential or parallel computation of sequences for high-throughput analysis of cDNAs.

  16. From trees to the forest: genes to genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullighan, Charles; Petersdorf, Effie; Davies, Stella M; DiPersio, John

    2011-01-01

    Crick, Watson, and colleagues revealed the genetic code in 1953, and since that time, remarkable progress has been made in understanding what makes each of us who we are. Identification of single genes important in disease, and the development of a mechanistic understanding of genetic elements that regulate gene function, have cast light on the pathophysiology of many heritable and acquired disorders. In 1990, the human genome project commenced, with the goal of sequencing the entire human genome, and a "first draft" was published with astonishing speed in 2001. The first draft, although an extraordinary achievement, reported essentially an imaginary haploid mix of alleles rather than a true diploid genome. In the years since 2001, technology has further improved, and efforts have been focused on filling in the gaps in the initial genome and starting the huge task of looking at normal variation in the human genome. This work is the beginning of understanding human genetics in the context of the structure of the genome as a complete entity, and as more than simply the sum of a series of genes. We present 3 studies in this review that apply genomic approaches to leukemia and to transplantation to improve and extend therapies.

  17. Molecular Assemblies, Genes and Genomics Integrated Efficiently (MAGGIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baliga, Nitin S

    2011-05-26

    Final report on MAGGIE. We set ambitious goals to model the functions of individual organisms and their community from molecular to systems scale. These scientific goals are driving the development of sophisticated algorithms to analyze large amounts of experimental measurements made using high throughput technologies to explain and predict how the environment influences biological function at multiple scales and how the microbial systems in turn modify the environment. By experimentally evaluating predictions made using these models we will test the degree to which our quantitative multiscale understanding wilt help to rationally steer individual microbes and their communities towards specific tasks. Towards this end we have made substantial progress towards understanding evolution of gene families, transcriptional structures, detailed structures of keystone molecular assemblies (proteins and complexes), protein interactions, biological networks, microbial interactions, and community structure. Using comparative analysis we have tracked the evolutionary history of gene functions to understand how novel functions evolve. One level up, we have used proteomics data, high-resolution genome tiling microarrays, and 5' RNA sequencing to revise genome annotations, discover new genes including ncRNAs, and map dynamically changing operon structures of five model organisms: For Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough, Pyrococcus furiosis, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Methanococcus maripaludis and Haiobacterium salinarum NROL We have developed machine learning algorithms to accurately identify protein interactions at a near-zero false positive rate from noisy data generated using tagfess complex purification, TAP purification, and analysis of membrane complexes. Combining other genome-scale datasets produced by ENIGMA (in particular, microarray data) and available from literature we have been able to achieve a true positive rate as high as 65% at almost zero false positives

  18. Genome engineering using a synthetic gene circuit in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Da-Eun; Park, Seung-Hwan; Pan, Jae-Gu; Kim, Eui-Joong; Choi, Soo-Keun

    2015-03-31

    Genome engineering without leaving foreign DNA behind requires an efficient counter-selectable marker system. Here, we developed a genome engineering method in Bacillus subtilis using a synthetic gene circuit as a counter-selectable marker system. The system contained two repressible promoters (B. subtilis xylA (Pxyl) and spac (Pspac)) and two repressor genes (lacI and xylR). Pxyl-lacI was integrated into the B. subtilis genome with a target gene containing a desired mutation. The xylR and Pspac-chloramphenicol resistant genes (cat) were located on a helper plasmid. In the presence of xylose, repression of XylR by xylose induced LacI expression, the LacIs repressed the Pspac promoter and the cells become chloramphenicol sensitive. Thus, to survive in the presence of chloramphenicol, the cell must delete Pxyl-lacI by recombination between the wild-type and mutated target genes. The recombination leads to mutation of the target gene. The remaining helper plasmid was removed easily under the chloramphenicol absent condition. In this study, we showed base insertion, deletion and point mutation of the B. subtilis genome without leaving any foreign DNA behind. Additionally, we successfully deleted a 2-kb gene (amyE) and a 38-kb operon (ppsABCDE). This method will be useful to construct designer Bacillus strains for various industrial applications.

  19. Expression of a transferred nuclear gene in a mitochondrial genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus, and subsequent gain of regulatory elements for expression, is an ongoing evolutionary process in plants. Many examples have been characterized, which in some cases have revealed sources of mitochondrial targeting sequences and cis-regulatory elements. In contrast, there have been no reports of a nuclear gene that has undergone intracellular transfer to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed. Here we show that the orf164 gene in the mitochondrial genome of several Brassicaceae species, including Arabidopsis, is derived from the nuclear ARF17 gene that codes for an auxin responsive protein and is present across flowering plants. Orf164 corresponds to a portion of ARF17, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences are 79% and 81% identical, respectively. Orf164 is transcribed in several organ types of Arabidopsis thaliana, as detected by RT-PCR. In addition, orf164 is transcribed in five other Brassicaceae within the tribes Camelineae, Erysimeae and Cardamineae, but the gene is not present in Brassica or Raphanus. This study shows that nuclear genes can be transferred to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed, providing a new perspective on the movement of genes between the genomes of subcellular compartments.

  20. Whole genome phylogeny of Prochlorococcus marinus group of cyanobacteria: genome alignment and overlapping gene approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabha, Ratna; Singh, Dhananjaya P; Gupta, Shailendra K; Rai, Anil

    2014-06-01

    Prochlorococcus is the smallest known oxygenic phototrophic marine cyanobacterium dominating the mid-latitude oceans. Physiologically and genetically distinct P. marinus isolates from many oceans in the world were assigned two different groups, a tightly clustered high-light (HL)-adapted and a divergent low-light (LL-) adapted clade. Phylogenetic analysis of this cyanobacterium on the basis of 16S rRNA and other conserved genes did not show consistency with its phenotypic behavior. We analyzed phylogeny of this genus on the basis of complete genome sequences through genome alignment, overlapping-gene content and gene-order approach. Phylogenetic tree of P. marinus obtained by comparing whole genome sequences in contrast to that based on 16S rRNA gene, corresponded well with the HL/LL ecotypic distinction of twelve strains and showed consistency with phenotypic classification of P. marinus. Evidence for the horizontal descent and acquisition of genes within and across the genus was observed. Many genes involved in metabolic functions were found to be conserved across these genomes and many were continuously gained by different strains as per their needs during the course of their evolution. Consistency in the physiological and genetic phylogeny based on whole genome sequence is established. These observations improve our understanding about the adaptation and diversification of these organisms under evolutionary pressure.

  1. Putative essential and core-essential genes in Mycoplasma genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Yan; Zhang, Randy Ren

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma, which was used to create the first “synthetic life”, has been an important species in the emerging field, synthetic biology. However, essential genes, an important concept of synthetic biology, for both M. mycoides and M. capricolum, as well as 14 other Mycoplasma with available genomes, are still unknown. We have developed a gene essentiality prediction algorithm that incorporates information of biased gene strand distribution, homologous search and codon adaptation index. The al...

  2. Pathway Tools version 13.0: integrated software for pathway/genome informatics and systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Peter D; Paley, Suzanne M; Krummenacker, Markus; Latendresse, Mario; Dale, Joseph M; Lee, Thomas J; Kaipa, Pallavi; Gilham, Fred; Spaulding, Aaron; Popescu, Liviu; Altman, Tomer; Paulsen, Ian; Keseler, Ingrid M; Caspi, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Pathway Tools is a production-quality software environment for creating a type of model-organism database called a Pathway/Genome Database (PGDB). A PGDB such as EcoCyc integrates the evolving understanding of the genes, proteins, metabolic network and regulatory network of an organism. This article provides an overview of Pathway Tools capabilities. The software performs multiple computational inferences including prediction of metabolic pathways, prediction of metabolic pathway hole fillers and prediction of operons. It enables interactive editing of PGDBs by DB curators. It supports web publishing of PGDBs, and provides a large number of query and visualization tools. The software also supports comparative analyses of PGDBs, and provides several systems biology analyses of PGDBs including reachability analysis of metabolic networks, and interactive tracing of metabolites through a metabolic network. More than 800 PGDBs have been created using Pathway Tools by scientists around the world, many of which are curated DBs for important model organisms. Those PGDBs can be exchanged using a peer-to-peer DB sharing system called the PGDB Registry.

  3. Ab initio gene identification: prokaryote genome annotation with GeneScan and GLIMMER

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gautam Aggarwal; Ramakrishna Ramaswamy

    2002-02-01

    We compare the annotation of three complete genomes using the ab initio methods of gene identification GeneScan and GLIMMER. The annotation given in GenBank, the standard against which these are compared, has been made using GeneMark. We find a number of novel genes which are predicted by both methods used here, as well as a number of genes that are predicted by GeneMark, but are not identified by either of the nonconsensus methods that we have used. The three organisms studied here are all prokaryotic species with fairly compact genomes. The Fourier measure forms the basis for an efficient non-consensus method for gene prediction, and the algorithm GeneScan exploits this measure. We have bench-marked this program as well as GLIMMER using 3 complete prokaryotic genomes. An effort has also been made to study the limitations of these techniques for complete genome analysis. GeneScan and GLIMMER are of comparable accuracy insofar as gene-identification is concerned, with sensitivities and specificities typically greater than 0.9. The number of false predictions (both positive and negative) is higher for GeneScan as compared to GLIMMER, but in a significant number of cases, similar results are provided by the two techniques. This suggests that there could be some as-yet unidentified additional genes in these three genomes, and also that some of the putative identifications made hitherto might require re-evaluation. All these cases are discussed in detail.

  4. Genomic organization and sequence analysis of the vomeronasal receptor V2R genes in mouse genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hui; Zhang YaPing

    2007-01-01

    Two multigene superfamilies, named V1R and V2R, encoding seven-transmembrane-domain G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been identified as pheromone receptors in mammals. Three V2R gene families have been described in mouse and rat. Here we screened the updated mouse genome sequence database and finally retrieved 63 putative functional V2R genes including three newly identified genes which formed a new additional family. We described the genomic organization of these genes and also characterized the conservation of mouse V2R protein sequences. These genomic and sequence information we described are useful as part of the evidence to speculate the functional domain of V2Rs and should give aid to the functionality study in the future.

  5. Single gene-based distinction of individual microbial genomes from a mixed population of microbial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manu Valtteri Tamminen

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent progress in environmental microbiology has revealed vast populations of microbes in any given habitat that cannot be detected by conventional culturing strategies. The use of sensitive genetic detection methods such as CARD-FISH and in situ PCR have been limited by the cell wall permeabilization requirement that cannot be performed similarly on all cell types without lysing some and leaving some unpermeabilized. Furthermore, the detection of low copy targets such as genes present in single copies in the microbial genomes, has remained problematic. We describe an emulsion-based procedure to trap individual microbial cells into picoliter-volume polyacrylamide droplets that provide a rigid support for genetic material and therefore allow complete degradation of cellular material to expose the individual genomes. The polyacrylamide droplets are subsequently converted into picoliter-scale reactors for genome amplification. The amplified genomes are labelled based on the presence of a target gene and differentiated from those that do not contain the gene by flow cytometry. Using the Escherichia coli strains XL1 and MC1061, which differ with respect to the presence (XL1 or absence (MC1061 of a single copy of a tetracycline resistance gene per genome, we demonstrate that XL1 genomes present at 0.1% of MC1061 genomes can be differentiated using this method. Using a spiked sediment microbial sample, we demonstrate that the method is applicable to highly complex environmental microbial communities as a target gene-based screen for individual microbes. The method provides a novel tool for enumerating functional cell populations in complex microbial communities. We envision that the method could be optimized for fluorescence-activated cell sorting to enrich genetic material of interest from complex environmental samples.

  6. CRISPR/Cas9: an advanced tool for editing plant genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Milan Kumar; Dey, Avishek; Gayen, Srimonta

    2016-10-01

    To meet current challenges in agriculture, genome editing using sequence-specific nucleases (SSNs) is a powerful tool for basic and applied plant biology research. Here, we describe the principle and application of available genome editing tools, including zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat associated CRISPR/Cas9 system. Among these SSNs, CRISPR/Cas9 is the most recently characterized and rapidly developing genome editing technology, and has been successfully utilized in a wide variety of organisms. This review specifically illustrates the power of CRISPR/Cas9 as a tool for plant genome engineering, and describes the strengths and weaknesses of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology compared to two well-established genome editing tools, ZFNs and TALENs.

  7. Bacterial Cellular Engineering by Genome Editing and Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobutaka Nakashima

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing is an important technology for bacterial cellular engineering, which is commonly conducted by homologous recombination-based procedures, including gene knockout (disruption, knock-in (insertion, and allelic exchange. In addition, some new recombination-independent approaches have emerged that utilize catalytic RNAs, artificial nucleases, nucleic acid analogs, and peptide nucleic acids. Apart from these methods, which directly modify the genomic structure, an alternative approach is to conditionally modify the gene expression profile at the posttranscriptional level without altering the genomes. This is performed by expressing antisense RNAs to knock down (silence target mRNAs in vivo. This review describes the features and recent advances on methods used in genomic engineering and silencing technologies that are advantageously used for bacterial cellular engineering.

  8. Solving the molecular diagnostic testing conundrum for Mendelian disorders in the era of next-generation sequencing: single-gene, gene panel, or exome/genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yuan; Ankala, Arunkanth; Wilcox, William R; Hegde, Madhuri R

    2015-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing is changing the paradigm of clinical genetic testing. Today there are numerous molecular tests available, including single-gene tests, gene panels, and exome sequencing or genome sequencing. As a result, ordering physicians face the conundrum of selecting the best diagnostic tool for their patients with genetic conditions. Single-gene testing is often most appropriate for conditions with distinctive clinical features and minimal locus heterogeneity. Next-generation sequencing-based gene panel testing, which can be complemented with array comparative genomic hybridization and other ancillary methods, provides a comprehensive and feasible approach for heterogeneous disorders. Exome sequencing and genome sequencing have the advantage of being unbiased regarding what set of genes is analyzed, enabling parallel interrogation of most of the genes in the human genome. However, current limitations of next-generation sequencing technology and our variant interpretation capabilities caution us against offering exome sequencing or genome sequencing as either stand-alone or first-choice diagnostic approaches. A growing interest in personalized medicine calls for the application of genome sequencing in clinical diagnostics, but major challenges must be addressed before its full potential can be realized. Here, we propose a testing algorithm to help clinicians opt for the most appropriate molecular diagnostic tool for each scenario.

  9. The genomic environment around the Aromatase gene: evolutionary insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reis-Henriques Maria A

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytochrome P450 aromatase (CYP19, catalyses the aromatisation of androgens to estrogens, a key mechanism in vertebrate reproductive physiology. A current evolutionary hypothesis suggests that CYP19 gene arose at the origin of vertebrates, given that it has not been found outside this clade. The human CYP19 gene is located in one of the proposed MHC-paralogon regions (HSA15q. At present it is unclear whether this genomic location is ancestral (which would suggest an invertebrate origin for CYP19 or derived (genomic location with no evolutionary meaning. The distinction between these possibilities should help to clarify the timing of the CYP19 emergence and which taxa should be investigated. Results Here we determine the "genomic environment" around CYP19 in three vertebrate species Homo sapiens, Tetraodon nigroviridis and Xenopus tropicalis. Paralogy studies and phylogenetic analysis of six gene families suggests that the CYP19 gene region was structured through "en bloc" genomic duplication (as part of the MHC-paralogon formation. Four gene families have specifically duplicated in the vertebrate lineage. Moreover, the mapping location of the different paralogues is consistent with a model of "en bloc" duplication. Furthermore, we also determine that this region has retained the same gene content since the divergence of Actinopterygii and Tetrapods. A single inversion in gene order has taken place, probably in the mammalian lineage. Finally, we describe the first invertebrate CYP19 sequence, from Branchiostoma floridae. Conclusion Contrary to previous suggestions, our data indicates an invertebrate origin for the aromatase gene, given the striking conservation pattern in both gene order and gene content, and the presence of aromatase in amphioxus. We propose that CYP19 duplicated in the vertebrate lineage to yield four paralogues, followed by the subsequent loss of all but one gene in vertebrate evolution. Finally, we

  10. GeneBase 1.1: a tool to summarize data from NCBI gene datasets and its application to an update of human gene statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Allison; Caracausi, Maria; Antonaros, Francesca; Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Vitale, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    We release GeneBase 1.1, a local tool with a graphical interface useful for parsing, structuring and indexing data from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene data bank. Compared to its predecessor GeneBase (1.0), GeneBase 1.1 now allows dynamic calculation and summarization in terms of median, mean, standard deviation and total for many quantitative parameters associated with genes, gene transcripts and gene features (exons, introns, coding sequences, untranslated regions). GeneBase 1.1 thus offers the opportunity to perform analyses of the main gene structure parameters also following the search for any set of genes with the desired characteristics, allowing unique functionalities not provided by the NCBI Gene itself. In order to show the potential of our tool for local parsing, structuring and dynamic summarizing of publicly available databases for data retrieval, analysis and testing of biological hypotheses, we provide as a sample application a revised set of statistics for human nuclear genes, gene transcripts and gene features. In contrast with previous estimations strongly underestimating the length of human genes, a ‘mean’ human protein-coding gene is 67 kbp long, has eleven 309 bp long exons and ten 6355 bp long introns. Median, mean and extreme values are provided for many other features offering an updated reference source for human genome studies, data useful to set parameters for bioinformatic tools and interesting clues to the biomedical meaning of the gene features themselves. Database URL: http://apollo11.isto.unibo.it/software/ PMID:28025344

  11. GeneBase 1.1: a tool to summarize data from NCBI gene datasets and its application to an update of human gene statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Allison; Caracausi, Maria; Antonaros, Francesca; Pelleri, Maria Chiara; Vitale, Lorenza

    2016-01-01

    We release GeneBase 1.1, a local tool with a graphical interface useful for parsing, structuring and indexing data from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) Gene data bank. Compared to its predecessor GeneBase (1.0), GeneBase 1.1 now allows dynamic calculation and summarization in terms of median, mean, standard deviation and total for many quantitative parameters associated with genes, gene transcripts and gene features (exons, introns, coding sequences, untranslated regions). GeneBase 1.1 thus offers the opportunity to perform analyses of the main gene structure parameters also following the search for any set of genes with the desired characteristics, allowing unique functionalities not provided by the NCBI Gene itself. In order to show the potential of our tool for local parsing, structuring and dynamic summarizing of publicly available databases for data retrieval, analysis and testing of biological hypotheses, we provide as a sample application a revised set of statistics for human nuclear genes, gene transcripts and gene features. In contrast with previous estimations strongly underestimating the length of human genes, a 'mean' human protein-coding gene is 67 kbp long, has eleven 309 bp long exons and ten 6355 bp long introns. Median, mean and extreme values are provided for many other features offering an updated reference source for human genome studies, data useful to set parameters for bioinformatic tools and interesting clues to the biomedical meaning of the gene features themselves.Database URL: http://apollo11.isto.unibo.it/software/.

  12. Construction of gene targeting vectors from lambda KOS genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattler, S; Kelly, M; Nehls, M

    1999-06-01

    We describe a highly redundant murine genomic library in a new lambda phage, lambda knockout shuttle (lambda KOS) that facilitates the very rapid construction of replacement-type gene targeting vectors. The library consists of 94 individually amplified subpools, each containing an average of 40,000 independent genomic clones. The subpools are arrayed into a 96-well format that allows a PCR-based efficient recovery of independent genomic clones. The lambda KOS vector backbone permits the CRE-mediated conversion into high-copy number pKOS plasmids, wherein the genomic inserts are automatically flanked by negative-selection cassettes. The lambda KOS vector system exploits the yeast homologous recombination machinery to simplify the construction of replacement-type gene targeting vectors independent of restriction sites within the genomic insert. We outline procedures that allow the generation of simple and more sophisticated conditional gene targeting vectors within 3-4 weeks, beginning with the screening of the lambda KOS genomic library.

  13. Novel genome-editing tools to model and correct primary immunodeficiencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Ott De Bruin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID and other severe non-SCID primary immunodeficiencies (non-SCID PID can be treated by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but when HLA-matched donors are lacking, this can be a high-risk procedure. Correcting the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells with gene therapy offers an attractive alternative. Gene therapies currently being used in clinical settings insert a functional copy of the entire gene by means of a viral vector. With this treatment, severe complications may result due to integration within oncogenes. A promising alternative is the use of endonucleases such as ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 to introduce a double-stranded break in the DNA and thus induce homology-directed repair. With these genome-editing tools a correct copy can be inserted in a precisely targeted safe harbor. They can also be used to correct pathogenic mutations in situ and to develop cellular or animal models needed to study the pathogenic effects of specific genetic defects found in immunodeficient patients. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of these endonucleases in gene correction and modeling with an emphasis on CRISPR/Cas9, which offers the most promise due to its efficacy and versatility.

  14. Gene duplication in the genome of parasitic Giardia lamblia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flores Roberto

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giardia are a group of widespread intestinal protozoan parasites in a number of vertebrates. Much evidence from G. lamblia indicated they might be the most primitive extant eukaryotes. When and how such a group of the earliest branching unicellular eukaryotes developed the ability to successfully parasitize the latest branching higher eukaryotes (vertebrates is an intriguing question. Gene duplication has long been thought to be the most common mechanism in the production of primary resources for the origin of evolutionary novelties. In order to parse the evolutionary trajectory of Giardia parasitic lifestyle, here we carried out a genome-wide analysis about gene duplication patterns in G. lamblia. Results Although genomic comparison showed that in G. lamblia the contents of many fundamental biologic pathways are simplified and the whole genome is very compact, in our study 40% of its genes were identified as duplicated genes. Evolutionary distance analyses of these duplicated genes indicated two rounds of large scale duplication events had occurred in G. lamblia genome. Functional annotation of them further showed that the majority of recent duplicated genes are VSPs (Variant-specific Surface Proteins, which are essential for the successful parasitic life of Giardia in hosts. Based on evolutionary comparison with their hosts, it was found that the rapid expansion of VSPs in G. lamblia is consistent with the evolutionary radiation of placental mammals. Conclusions Based on the genome-wide analysis of duplicated genes in G. lamblia, we found that gene duplication was essential for the origin and evolution of Giardia parasitic lifestyle. The recent expansion of VSPs uniquely occurring in G. lamblia is consistent with the increment of its hosts. Therefore we proposed a hypothesis that the increment of Giradia hosts might be the driving force for the rapid expansion of VSPs.

  15. Evolutionary genomics of LysM genes in land plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Gary

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ubiquitous LysM motif recognizes peptidoglycan, chitooligosaccharides (chitin and, presumably, other structurally-related oligosaccharides. LysM-containing proteins were first shown to be involved in bacterial cell wall degradation and, more recently, were implicated in perceiving chitin (one of the established pathogen-associated molecular patterns and lipo-chitin (nodulation factors in flowering plants. However, the majority of LysM genes in plants remain functionally uncharacterized and the evolutionary history of complex LysM genes remains elusive. Results We show that LysM-containing proteins display a wide range of complex domain architectures. However, only a simple core architecture is conserved across kingdoms. Each individual kingdom appears to have evolved a distinct array of domain architectures. We show that early plant lineages acquired four characteristic architectures and progressively lost several primitive architectures. We report plant LysM phylogenies and associated gene, protein and genomic features, and infer the relative timing of duplications of LYK genes. Conclusion We report a domain architecture catalogue of LysM proteins across all kingdoms. The unique pattern of LysM protein domain architectures indicates the presence of distinctive evolutionary paths in individual kingdoms. We describe a comparative and evolutionary genomics study of LysM genes in plant kingdom. One of the two groups of tandemly arrayed plant LYK genes likely resulted from an ancient genome duplication followed by local genomic rearrangement, while the origin of the other groups of tandemly arrayed LYK genes remains obscure. Given the fact that no animal LysM motif-containing genes have been functionally characterized, this study provides clues to functional characterization of plant LysM genes and is also informative with regard to evolutionary and functional studies of animal LysM genes.

  16. Evolutionary genomics of LysM genes in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Cannon, Steven B; Stacey, Gary

    2009-08-03

    The ubiquitous LysM motif recognizes peptidoglycan, chitooligosaccharides (chitin) and, presumably, other structurally-related oligosaccharides. LysM-containing proteins were first shown to be involved in bacterial cell wall degradation and, more recently, were implicated in perceiving chitin (one of the established pathogen-associated molecular patterns) and lipo-chitin (nodulation factors) in flowering plants. However, the majority of LysM genes in plants remain functionally uncharacterized and the evolutionary history of complex LysM genes remains elusive. We show that LysM-containing proteins display a wide range of complex domain architectures. However, only a simple core architecture is conserved across kingdoms. Each individual kingdom appears to have evolved a distinct array of domain architectures. We show that early plant lineages acquired four characteristic architectures and progressively lost several primitive architectures. We report plant LysM phylogenies and associated gene, protein and genomic features, and infer the relative timing of duplications of LYK genes. We report a domain architecture catalogue of LysM proteins across all kingdoms. The unique pattern of LysM protein domain architectures indicates the presence of distinctive evolutionary paths in individual kingdoms. We describe a comparative and evolutionary genomics study of LysM genes in plant kingdom. One of the two groups of tandemly arrayed plant LYK genes likely resulted from an ancient genome duplication followed by local genomic rearrangement, while the origin of the other groups of tandemly arrayed LYK genes remains obscure. Given the fact that no animal LysM motif-containing genes have been functionally characterized, this study provides clues to functional characterization of plant LysM genes and is also informative with regard to evolutionary and functional studies of animal LysM genes.

  17. Biased distribution of DNA uptake sequences towards genome maintenance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, T.; Rodland, E.A.; Lagesen, K.

    2004-01-01

    coding regions are the DNA uptake sequences (DUS) required for natural genetic transformation. More importantly, we found a significantly higher density of DUS within genes involved in DNA repair, recombination, restriction-modification and replication than in any other annotated gene group......Repeated sequence signatures are characteristic features of all genomic DNA. We have made a rigorous search for repeat genomic sequences in the human pathogens Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae and found that by far the most frequent 9-10mers residing within...

  18. webMGR: an online tool for the multiple genome rearrangement problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi Ho; Zhao, Hao; Lowcay, Sean Harry; Shahab, Atif; Bourque, Guillaume

    2010-02-01

    The algorithm MGR enables the reconstruction of rearrangement phylogenies based on gene or synteny block order in multiple genomes. Although MGR has been successfully applied to study the evolution of different sets of species, its utilization has been hampered by the prohibitive running time for some applications. In the current work, we have designed new heuristics that significantly speed up the tool without compromising its accuracy. Moreover, we have developed a web server (webMGR) that includes elaborate web output to facilitate navigation through the results. webMGR can be accessed via http://www.gis.a-star.edu.sg/~bourque. The source code of the improved standalone version of MGR is also freely available from the web site. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  19. Rapid pair-wise synteny analysis of large bacterial genomes using web-based GeneOrder4.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan Padmanabhan

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growing whole genome sequence databases necessitate the development of user-friendly software tools to mine these data. Web-based tools are particularly useful to wet-bench biologists as they enable platform-independent analysis of sequence data, without having to perform complex programming tasks and software compiling. Findings GeneOrder4.0 is a web-based "on-the-fly" synteny and gene order analysis tool for comparative bacterial genomics (ca. 8 Mb. It enables the visualization of synteny by plotting protein similarity scores between two genomes and it also provides visual annotation of "hypothetical" proteins from older archived genomes based on more recent annotations. Conclusions The web-based software tool GeneOrder4.0 is a user-friendly application that has been updated to allow the rapid analysis of synteny and gene order in large bacterial genomes. It is developed with the wet-bench researcher in mind.

  20. Novel gene expression tools for rice biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotechnology is an effective and important method of improving both quality and agronomic traits in rice. We are developing novel molecular tools for genetic engineering, with a focus on developing novel transgene expression control elements (i.e. promoters) for rice. A suite of monocot grass promo...

  1. Current status and prospects for the study of Nicotiana genomics, genetics, and nicotine biosynthesis genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L

    2015-02-01

    Nicotiana, a member of the Solanaceae family, is one of the most important research model plants, and of high agricultural and economic value worldwide. To better understand the substantial and rapid research progress with Nicotiana in recent years, its genomics, genetics, and nicotine gene studies are summarized, with useful web links. Several important genetic maps, including a high-density map of N. tabacum consisting of ~2,000 markers published in 2012, provide tools for genetics research. Four whole genome sequences are from allotetraploid species, including N. benthamiana in 2012, and three N. tabacum cultivars (TN90, K326, and BX) in 2014. Three whole genome sequences are from diploids, including progenitors N. sylvestris and N. tomentosiformis in 2013 and N. otophora in 2014. These and additional studies provide numerous insights into genome evolution after polyploidization, including changes in gene composition and transcriptome expression in N. tabacum. The major genes involved in the nicotine biosynthetic pathway have been identified and the genetic basis of the differences in nicotine levels among Nicotiana species has been revealed. In addition, other progress on chloroplast, mitochondrial, and NCBI-registered projects on Nicotiana are discussed. The challenges and prospects for genomic, genetic and application research are addressed. Hence, this review provides important resources and guidance for current and future research and application in Nicotiana.

  2. Resequencing of the common marmoset genome improves genome assemblies and gene-coding sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kengo; Kuroki, Yoko; Kumita, Wakako; Fujiyama, Asao; Toyoda, Atsushi; Kawai, Jun; Iriki, Atsushi; Sasaki, Erika; Okano, Hideyuki; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2015-11-20

    The first draft of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) genome was published by the Marmoset Genome Sequencing and Analysis Consortium. The draft was based on whole-genome shotgun sequencing, and the current assembly version is Callithrix_jacches-3.2.1, but there still exist 187,214 undetermined gap regions and supercontigs and relatively short contigs that are unmapped to chromosomes in the draft genome. We performed resequencing and assembly of the genome of common marmoset by deep sequencing with high-throughput sequencing technology. Several different sequence runs using Illumina sequencing platforms were executed, and 181 Gbp of high-quality bases including mate-pairs with long insert lengths of 3, 8, 20, and 40 Kbp were obtained, that is, approximately 60× coverage. The resequencing significantly improved the MGSAC draft genome sequence. The N50 of the contigs, which is a statistical measure used to evaluate assembly quality, doubled. As a result, 51% of the contigs (total length: 299 Mbp) that were unmapped to chromosomes in the MGSAC draft were merged with chromosomal contigs, and the improved genome sequence helped to detect 5,288 new genes that are homologous to human cDNAs and the gaps in 5,187 transcripts of the Ensembl gene annotations were completely filled.

  3. Degrees of separation as a statistical tool for evaluating candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Ronald M; Pettersson, Mats E

    2014-12-01

    Selection of candidate genes is an important step in the exploration of complex genetic architecture. The number of gene networks available is increasing and these can provide information to help with candidate gene selection. It is currently common to use the degree of connectedness in gene networks as validation in Genome Wide Association (GWA) and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) mapping studies. However, it can cause misleading results if not validated properly. Here we present a method and tool for validating the gene pairs from GWA studies given the context of the network they co-occur in. It ensures that proposed interactions and gene associations are not statistical artefacts inherent to the specific gene network architecture. The CandidateBacon package provides an easy and efficient method to calculate the average degree of separation (DoS) between pairs of genes to currently available gene networks. We show how these empirical estimates of average connectedness are used to validate candidate gene pairs. Validation of interacting genes by comparing their connectedness with the average connectedness in the gene network will provide support for said interactions by utilising the growing amount of gene network information available.

  4. Kvik: three-tier data exploration tools for flexible analysis of genomic data in epidemiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjukstad, Bjørn; Standahl Olsen, Karina; Jareid, Mie; Lund, Eiliv; Bongo, Lars Ailo

    2015-01-01

    Kvik is an open-source framework that we developed for explorative analysis of functional genomics data from large epidemiological studies. Creating such studies requires a significant amount of time and resources. It is therefore usual to reuse the data from one study for several research projects. Often each project requires implementing new analysis code, integration with specific knowledge bases, and specific visualizations. Although existing data exploration tools are available for single study data exploration, no tool provides all the required functionality for multistudy data exploration. We have therefore used the Kvik framework to develop Kvik Pathways, an application for exploring gene expression data in the context of biological pathways. We have used Kvik Pathways to explore data from both a cross-sectional study design and a case-control study within the Norwegian Women and Cancer (NOWAC) cohort. Kvik Pathways follows the three-tier architecture in web applications using a powerful back-end for statistical analyses and retrieval of metadata.In this note, we describe how we used the Kvik framework to develop the Kvik Pathways application. Kvik Pathways was used by our team of epidemiologists toexplore gene expression data from healthy women with high and low plasma ratios of essential fatty acids. PMID:26425340

  5. A High-throughput Genomic Tool: Diversity Array Technology Complementary for Rice Genotyping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Xie; Kenneth McNally; Cheng-Yun Li; Hei Leung; You-Yong Zhu

    2006-01-01

    Diversity array technology (DArTTM) was a genotyping tool characterized gel-independent and high throughput.The main purpose of present study is to validate DArT for rice (Oryza sativa L.)genotyping in a high throughput manner. Technically, the main objective was to generate a rice general purpose gene pool, and optimize this genomic tool in order to evaluate rice germplasm genetic diversity. To achieve this, firstly, a generalpurpose DArT array was developed. Ten representatives from 24 varieties were hybridized with the general-purpose array to determine the informativeness of the clones printed on the array. The informative 1 152 clones were re-arrayed on a slide and used to fingerprint 17 of 24 germplasms. Hybridizing targets prepared from the germplasm to be assayed to the DNA array gave DNA fingerprints of germplasms. Raw data were normalized and transformed into binary data, which were then analyzed by using NTSYSpc (Numerical taxonomy system for cluster and ordination analysis, v. 2.02j) software package. The graphically displayed dendrogram derived from the array experimental data was matched with simple Sequence repeats genotyping outline and varieties' pedigree deviation of the different varieties. Considering DArT is a sequence-independent genotyping approach, it will be applied in studies of the genetic diversity and the gene mapping of diverse of organisms, especially for those crops with less-developed molecular markers.

  6. [Evolution of gene orders in genomes of cyanobacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, A V; Zakharov, I A

    2009-08-01

    Genomes of 23 strains of cyanobacteria were comparatively analyzed using quantitative methods of estimation of gene order similarity. It has been found that reconstructions of phylogenesis of cyanobacteria based on the comparison of the orders of genes in chromosomes and nucleotide sequences appear to be similar. This confirms the applicability of quantitative measures of similarity of gene orders for phylogenetic reconstructions. In the evolution of marine unicellular plankton cyanobacteria, genome rearrangements are fixed with a low rate (about 3% of gene order changes per 1% of 16S rRNA changes), whereas in other groups of cyanobacteria the gene order can change several times more rapidly. The gene orders in genomes of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts preserve a considerable degree of similarity. The closest relatives of chloroplasts among the analyzed cyanobacteria are likely to be strains from hot springs belonging to the genus Synechococcus. Comparative analysis of gene orders and nucleotide sequences strongly suggests that Synechococcus strains from diferent environments (sea, fresh waters, hot springs) are not related and belong to evolutionally distant lines.

  7. Gene mutations of acute myeloid leukemia in the genome era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoe, Tomoki; Kiyoi, Hitoshi

    2013-02-01

    Ten years ago, gene mutations found in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were conceptually grouped into class I mutation, which causes constitutive activation of intracellular signals that contribute to the growth and survival, and class II mutation, which blocks differentiation and/or enhance self-renewal by altered transcription factors. A cooperative model between two classes of mutations has been suggested by murine experiments and partly supported by epidemiological findings. In the last 5 years, comprehensive genomic analysis proceeded to find new gene mutations, which are found in the epigenome-associated enzymes and the molecules never noticed so far. These new mutations apparently increase the complexity and heterogeneity of AML. Although a long list of gene mutations might have been compiled, the entire picture of molecular pathogenesis in AML remains to be elucidated because gene rearrangement, gene copy number, DNA methylation and expression profiles are not fully studied in conjunction with gene mutations. Comprehensive genome research will deepen the understanding of AML to promote the development of new classification and treatment. This review focuses on gene mutations that were recently discovered by genome sequencing.

  8. Conservation of ribosomal protein gene ordering in 16 complete genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁; 陈润生; 王永雄

    2000-01-01

    The organization of ribosomal proteins in 16 prokaryotic genomes was studied as an example of comparative genome analyses of gene systems. Hypothetical ribosomal protein-containing operons were constructed. These operons also contained putative genes and other non-ribosomal genes. The correspondences among these genes across different organisms were clarified by sequence homology computations. In this way a cross tabulation of 70 ribosomal proteins genes was constructed. On average, these were organized into 9-14 operons in each genome. There were also 25 non-ribosomal or putative genes in these mainly ribosomal protein operons. Hence the table contains 95 genes in total. It was found that: (i) the conservation of the block of about 20 r-proteins in the L3 and L4 operons across almost the entire eubacteria and ar-chaebacteria is remarkable; (ii) some operons only belong to eubacteria or archaebacte-ria; (iii) although the ribosomal protein operons are highly conserved within domain, there are fine variat

  9. Conservation of ribosomal protein gene ordering in 16 complete genomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The organization of ribosomal proteins in 16 prokaryotic genomes was studied as an example of comparative genome analyses of gene systems. Hypothetical ribosomal protein-containing operons were constructed. These operons also contained putative genes and other non-ribosomal genes. The correspondences among these genes across different organisms were clarified by sequence homology computations. In this way a cross tabulation of 70 ribosomal proteins genes was constructed. On average, these were organized into 9-14 operons in each genome. There were also 25 non-ribosomal or putative genes in these mainly ribosomal protein operons. Hence the table contains 95 genes in total. It was found that: (i) the conservation of the block of about 20 r-proteins in the L3 and L4 operons across almost the entire eubacteria and archaebacteria is remarkable; (ii) some operons only belong to eubacteria or archaebacteria; (iii) although the ribosomal protein operons are highly conserved within domain, there are fine variations in some operons across different organisms within each domain, and these variations are informative on the evolutionary relations among the organisms. This method provides a new potential for studying the origin and evolution of old species.

  10. GeneTack database: genes with frameshifts in prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Ivan; Baranov, Pavel; Borodovsky, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Database annotations of prokaryotic genomes and eukaryotic mRNA sequences pay relatively low attention to frame transitions that disrupt protein-coding genes. Frame transitions (frameshifts) could be caused by sequencing errors or indel mutations inside protein-coding regions. Other observed frameshifts are related to recoding events (that evolved to control expression of some genes). Earlier, we have developed an algorithm and software program GeneTack for ab initio frameshift finding in intronless genes. Here, we describe a database (freely available at http://topaz.gatech.edu/GeneTack/db.html) containing genes with frameshifts (fs-genes) predicted by GeneTack. The database includes 206 991 fs-genes from 1106 complete prokaryotic genomes and 45 295 frameshifts predicted in mRNA sequences from 100 eukaryotic genomes. The whole set of fs-genes was grouped into clusters based on sequence similarity between fs-proteins (conceptually translated fs-genes), conservation of the frameshift position and frameshift direction (-1, +1). The fs-genes can be retrieved by similarity search to a given query sequence via a web interface, by fs-gene cluster browsing, etc. Clusters of fs-genes are characterized with respect to their likely origin, such as pseudogenization, phase variation, etc. The largest clusters contain fs-genes with programed frameshifts (related to recoding events).

  11. Floral gene resources from basal angiosperms for comparative genomics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xiaohong

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Floral Genome Project was initiated to bridge the genomic gap between the most broadly studied plant model systems. Arabidopsis and rice, although now completely sequenced and under intensive comparative genomic investigation, are separated by at least 125 million years of evolutionary time, and cannot in isolation provide a comprehensive perspective on structural and functional aspects of flowering plant genome dynamics. Here we discuss new genomic resources available to the scientific community, comprising cDNA libraries and Expressed Sequence Tag (EST sequences for a suite of phylogenetically basal angiosperms specifically selected to bridge the evolutionary gaps between model plants and provide insights into gene content and genome structure in the earliest flowering plants. Results Random sequencing of cDNAs from representatives of phylogenetically important eudicot, non-grass monocot, and gymnosperm lineages has so far (as of 12/1/04 generated 70,514 ESTs and 48,170 assembled unigenes. Efficient sorting of EST sequences into putative gene families based on whole Arabidopsis/rice proteome comparison has permitted ready identification of cDNA clones for finished sequencing. Preliminarily, (i proportions of functional categories among sequenced floral genes seem representative of the entire Arabidopsis transcriptome, (ii many known floral gene homologues have been captured, and (iii phylogenetic analyses of ESTs are providing new insights into the process of gene family evolution in relation to the origin and diversification of the angiosperms. Conclusion Initial comparisons illustrate the utility of the EST data sets toward discovery of the basic floral transcriptome. These first findings also afford the opportunity to address a number of conspicuous evolutionary genomic questions, including reproductive organ transcriptome overlap between angiosperms and gymnosperms, genome-wide duplication history, lineage

  12. Floral gene resources from basal angiosperms for comparative genomics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Victor A; Soltis, Douglas E; Carlson, John E; Farmerie, William G; Wall, P Kerr; Ilut, Daniel C; Solow, Teri M; Mueller, Lukas A; Landherr, Lena L; Hu, Yi; Buzgo, Matyas; Kim, Sangtae; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Frohlich, Michael W; Perl-Treves, Rafael; Schlarbaum, Scott E; Bliss, Barbara J; Zhang, Xiaohong; Tanksley, Steven D; Oppenheimer, David G; Soltis, Pamela S; Ma, Hong; dePamphilis, Claude W; Leebens-Mack, James H

    2005-01-01

    Background The Floral Genome Project was initiated to bridge the genomic gap between the most broadly studied plant model systems. Arabidopsis and rice, although now completely sequenced and under intensive comparative genomic investigation, are separated by at least 125 million years of evolutionary time, and cannot in isolation provide a comprehensive perspective on structural and functional aspects of flowering plant genome dynamics. Here we discuss new genomic resources available to the scientific community, comprising cDNA libraries and Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) sequences for a suite of phylogenetically basal angiosperms specifically selected to bridge the evolutionary gaps between model plants and provide insights into gene content and genome structure in the earliest flowering plants. Results Random sequencing of cDNAs from representatives of phylogenetically important eudicot, non-grass monocot, and gymnosperm lineages has so far (as of 12/1/04) generated 70,514 ESTs and 48,170 assembled unigenes. Efficient sorting of EST sequences into putative gene families based on whole Arabidopsis/rice proteome comparison has permitted ready identification of cDNA clones for finished sequencing. Preliminarily, (i) proportions of functional categories among sequenced floral genes seem representative of the entire Arabidopsis transcriptome, (ii) many known floral gene homologues have been captured, and (iii) phylogenetic analyses of ESTs are providing new insights into the process of gene family evolution in relation to the origin and diversification of the angiosperms. Conclusion Initial comparisons illustrate the utility of the EST data sets toward discovery of the basic floral transcriptome. These first findings also afford the opportunity to address a number of conspicuous evolutionary genomic questions, including reproductive organ transcriptome overlap between angiosperms and gymnosperms, genome-wide duplication history, lineage-specific gene duplication and

  13. Bacterial genes in the aphid genome: absence of functional gene transfer from Buchnera to its host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naruo Nikoh

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Genome reduction is typical of obligate symbionts. In cellular organelles, this reduction partly reflects transfer of ancestral bacterial genes to the host genome, but little is known about gene transfer in other obligate symbioses. Aphids harbor anciently acquired obligate mutualists, Buchnera aphidicola (Gammaproteobacteria, which have highly reduced genomes (420-650 kb, raising the possibility of gene transfer from ancestral Buchnera to the aphid genome. In addition, aphids often harbor other bacteria that also are potential sources of transferred genes. Previous limited sampling of genes expressed in bacteriocytes, the specialized cells that harbor Buchnera, revealed that aphids acquired at least two genes from bacteria. The newly sequenced genome of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, presents the first opportunity for a complete inventory of genes transferred from bacteria to the host genome in the context of an ancient obligate symbiosis. Computational screening of the entire A. pisum genome, followed by phylogenetic and experimental analyses, provided strong support for the transfer of 12 genes or gene fragments from bacteria to the aphid genome: three LD-carboxypeptidases (LdcA1, LdcA2,psiLdcA, five rare lipoprotein As (RlpA1-5, N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase (AmiD, 1,4-beta-N-acetylmuramidase (bLys, DNA polymerase III alpha chain (psiDnaE, and ATP synthase delta chain (psiAtpH. Buchnera was the apparent source of two highly truncated pseudogenes (psiDnaE and psiAtpH. Most other transferred genes were closely related to genes from relatives of Wolbachia (Alphaproteobacteria. At least eight of the transferred genes (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5, bLys appear to be functional, and expression of seven (LdcA1, AmiD, RlpA1-5 are highly upregulated in bacteriocytes. The LdcAs and RlpAs appear to have been duplicated after transfer. Our results excluded the hypothesis that genome reduction in Buchnera has been accompanied by gene transfer to the

  14. ErmineJ: Tool for functional analysis of gene expression data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braynen William

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is common for the results of a microarray study to be analyzed in the context of biologically-motivated groups of genes such as pathways or Gene Ontology categories. The most common method for such analysis uses the hypergeometric distribution (or a related technique to look for "over-representation" of groups among genes selected as being differentially expressed or otherwise of interest based on a gene-by-gene analysis. However, this method suffers from some limitations, and biologist-friendly tools that implement alternatives have not been reported. Results We introduce ErmineJ, a multiplatform user-friendly stand-alone software tool for the analysis of functionally-relevant sets of genes in the context of microarray gene expression data. ErmineJ implements multiple algorithms for gene set analysis, including over-representation and resampling-based methods that focus on gene scores or correlation of gene expression profiles. In addition to a graphical user interface, ErmineJ has a command line interface and an application programming interface that can be used to automate analyses. The graphical user interface includes tools for creating and modifying gene sets, visualizing the Gene Ontology as a table or tree, and visualizing gene expression data. ErmineJ comes with a complete user manual, and is open-source software licensed under the Gnu Public License. Conclusion The availability of multiple analysis algorithms, together with a rich feature set and simple graphical interface, should make ErmineJ a useful addition to the biologist's informatics toolbox. ErmineJ is available from http://microarray.cu.genome.org.

  15. Gene discovery in the Acanthamoeba castellanii genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain J.; Watkins, Russell F.; Samuelson, John; Spencer,David F.; Majoros, William H.; Gray, Michael W.; Loftus, Brendan J.

    2005-08-01

    Acanthamoeba castellanii is a free-living amoeba found in soil, freshwater, and marine environments and an important predator of bacteria. Acanthamoeba castellanii is also an opportunistic pathogen of clinical interest, responsible for several distinct diseases in humans. In order to provide a genomic platform for the study of this ubiquitous and important protist, we generated a sequence survey of approximately 0.5 x coverage of the genome. The data predict that A. castellanii exhibits a greater biosynthetic capacity than the free-living Dictyostelium discoideum and the parasite Entamoeba histolytica, providing an explanation for the ability of A. castellanii to inhabit adversity of environments. Alginate lyase may provide access to bacteria within biofilms by breaking down the biofilm matrix, and polyhydroxybutyrate depolymerase may facilitate utilization of the bacterial storage compound polyhydroxybutyrate as a food source. Enzymes for the synthesis and breakdown of cellulose were identified, and they likely participate in encystation and excystation as in D. discoideum. Trehalose-6-phosphate synthase is present, suggesting that trehalose plays a role in stress adaptation. Detection and response to a number of stress conditions is likely accomplished with a large set of signal transduction histidine kinases and a set of putative receptorserine/threonine kinases similar to those found in E. histolytica. Serine, cysteine and metalloproteases were identified, some of which are likely involved in pathogenicity.

  16. Genome-wide Analysis of Gene Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun

    IP-seq and small RNA-seq, we delineated the landscape of the promoters with bidirectional transcriptions that yield steady-state RNA in only one directions (Paper III). A subsequent motif analysis enabled us to uncover specific DNA signals – early polyA sites – that make RNA on the reverse strand sensitive...... they regulated or if the sites had global elevated usage rates by multiple TFs. Using RNA-seq, 5’end-seq in combination with depletion of 5’exonuclease as well as nonsensemediated decay (NMD) factors, we systematically analyzed NMD substrates as well as their degradation intermediates in human cells (Paper V......). Gene enrichment analysis on the detected NMD substrates revealed an unappreciated NMD-based regulatory mechanism of the genes hosting multiple intronic snoRNAs, which can facilitate differential expression of individual snoRNAs from a single host gene locus. Finally, supported by RNA-seq and small RNA-seq...

  17. RNA-guided genome editing for target gene mutations in wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Kumar, Jitesh; Alok, Anshu; Tuli, Rakesh

    2013-12-09

    The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) system has been used as an efficient tool for genome editing. We report the application of CRISPR-Cas-mediated genome editing to wheat (Triticum aestivum), the most important food crop plant with a very large and complex genome. The mutations were targeted in the inositol oxygenase (inox) and phytoene desaturase (pds) genes using cell suspension culture of wheat and in the pds gene in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. The expression of chimeric guide RNAs (cgRNA) targeting single and multiple sites resulted in indel mutations in all the tested samples. The expression of Cas9 or sgRNA alone did not cause any mutation. The expression of duplex cgRNA with Cas9 targeting two sites in the same gene resulted in deletion of DNA fragment between the targeted sequences. Multiplexing the cgRNA could target two genes at one time. Target specificity analysis of cgRNA showed that mismatches at the 3' end of the target site abolished the cleavage activity completely. The mismatches at the 5' end reduced cleavage, suggesting that the off target effects can be abolished in vivo by selecting target sites with unique sequences at 3' end. This approach provides a powerful method for genome engineering in plants.

  18. Genome-wide patterns of Arabidopsis gene expression in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Richards

    Full Text Available Organisms in the wild are subject to multiple, fluctuating environmental factors, and it is in complex natural environments that genetic regulatory networks actually function and evolve. We assessed genome-wide gene expression patterns in the wild in two natural accessions of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and examined the nature of transcriptional variation throughout its life cycle and gene expression correlations with natural environmental fluctuations. We grew plants in a natural field environment and measured genome-wide time-series gene expression from the plant shoot every three days, spanning the seedling to reproductive stages. We find that 15,352 genes were expressed in the A. thaliana shoot in the field, and accession and flowering status (vegetative versus flowering were strong components of transcriptional variation in this plant. We identified between ∼110 and 190 time-varying gene expression clusters in the field, many of which were significantly overrepresented by genes regulated by abiotic and biotic environmental stresses. The two main principal components of vegetative shoot gene expression (PC(veg correlate to temperature and precipitation occurrence in the field. The largest PC(veg axes included thermoregulatory genes while the second major PC(veg was associated with precipitation and contained drought-responsive genes. By exposing A. thaliana to natural environments in an open field, we provide a framework for further understanding the genetic networks that are deployed in natural environments, and we connect plant molecular genetics in the laboratory to plant organismal ecology in the wild.

  19. The CRISPR/Cas Genome-Editing Tool: Application in Improvement of Crops

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats associated Cas9/sgRNA system is a novel targeted genome-editing technique derived from bacterial immune system. It is an inexpensive, easy, most user friendly and rapidly adopted genome editing tool transforming to revolutionary paradigm. This technique enables precise genomic modifications in many different organisms and tissues. Cas9 protein is an RNA guided endonuclease utilized for creating targeted double-stranded breaks with ...

  20. Genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes from Mesobuthus martensii reveals Hox gene duplication in scorpions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Zhiyong; Yu, Yao; Wu, Yingliang; Hao, Pei; He, Yawen; Zhao, Huabin; Li, Yixue; Zhao, Guoping; Li, Xuan; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian

    2015-06-01

    Homeobox genes belong to a large gene group, which encodes the famous DNA-binding homeodomain that plays a key role in development and cellular differentiation during embryogenesis in animals. Here, one hundred forty-nine homeobox genes were identified from the Asian scorpion, Mesobuthus martensii (Chelicerata: Arachnida: Scorpiones: Buthidae) based on our newly assembled genome sequence with approximately 248 × coverage. The identified homeobox genes were categorized into eight classes including 82 families: 67 ANTP class genes, 33 PRD genes, 11 LIM genes, five POU genes, six SINE genes, 14 TALE genes, five CUT genes, two ZF genes and six unclassified genes. Transcriptome data confirmed that more than half of the genes were expressed in adults. The homeobox gene diversity of the eight classes is similar to the previously analyzed Mandibulata arthropods. Interestingly, it is hypothesized that the scorpion M. martensii may have two Hox clusters. The first complete genome-wide analysis of homeobox genes in Chelicerata not only reveals the repertoire of scorpion, arachnid and chelicerate homeobox genes, but also shows some insights into the evolution of arthropod homeobox genes.

  1. Comparative genomics of Mycoplasma: analysis of conserved essential genes and diversity of the pan-genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma, the smallest self-replicating organism with a minimal metabolism and little genomic redundancy, is expected to be a close approximation to the minimal set of genes needed to sustain bacterial life. This study employs comparative evolutionary analysis of twenty Mycoplasma genomes to gain an improved understanding of essential genes. By analyzing the core genome of mycoplasmas, we finally revealed the conserved essential genes set for mycoplasma survival. Further analysis showed that the core genome set has many characteristics in common with experimentally identified essential genes. Several key genes, which are related to DNA replication and repair and can be disrupted in transposon mutagenesis studies, may be critical for bacteria survival especially over long period natural selection. Phylogenomic reconstructions based on 3,355 homologous groups allowed robust estimation of phylogenetic relatedness among mycoplasma strains. To obtain deeper insight into the relative roles of molecular evolution in pathogen adaptation to their hosts, we also analyzed the positive selection pressures on particular sites and lineages. There appears to be an approximate correlation between the divergence of species and the level of positive selection detected in corresponding lineages.

  2. FDA Bioinformatics Tool for Microbial Genomics Research on Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Foodborne Pathogens Using Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Advances in microbial genomics and bioinformatics are offering greater insights into the emergence and spread of foodborne pathogens in outbreak scenarios. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has developed the genomics tool ArrayTrackTM, which provides extensive functionalities to man...

  3. Tools for the Validation of Genomes and Transcriptomes with Proteomics data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Aya, Carlos; Tay, Aidan;

    Aims With the large amount of genomics and proteomics data currently available, there remains a lack of tools to integrate data from these two fields. This project aims to provide a ‘nexus’ for integrating genomics and transcriptomics data generated from next-generation sequencing with proteomics...

  4. B.E.A.R. GeneInfo: A tool for identifying gene-related biomedical publications through user modifiable queries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Guohui

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Once specific genes are identified through high throughput genomics technologies there is a need to sort the final gene list to a manageable size for validation studies. The triaging and sorting of genes often relies on the use of supplemental information related to gene structure, metabolic pathways, and chromosomal location. Yet in disease states where the genes may not have identifiable structural elements, poorly defined metabolic pathways, or limited chromosomal data, flexible systems for obtaining additional data are necessary. In these situations having a tool for searching the biomedical literature using the list of identified genes while simultaneously defining additional search terms would be useful. Results We have built a tool, BEAR GeneInfo, that allows flexible searches based on the investigators knowledge of the biological process, thus allowing for data mining that is specific to the scientist's strengths and interests. This tool allows a user to upload a series of GenBank accession numbers, Unigene Ids, Locuslink Ids, or gene names. BEAR GeneInfo takes these IDs and identifies the associated gene names, and uses the lists of gene names to query PubMed. The investigator can add additional modifying search terms to the query. The subsequent output provides a list of publications, along with the associated reference hyperlinks, for reviewing the identified articles for relevance and interest. An example of the use of this tool in the study of human prostate cancer cells treated with Selenium is presented. Conclusions This tool can be used to further define a list of genes that have been identified through genomic or genetic studies. Through the use of targeted searches with additional search terms the investigator can limit the list to genes that match their specific research interests or needs. The tool is freely available on the web at http://prostategenomics.org1, and the authors will provide scripts and

  5. A One-Step PCR-Based Assay to Evaluate the Efficiency and Precision of Genomic DNA-Editing Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germini, Diego; Bou Saada, Yara; Tsfasman, Tatiana; Osina, Kristina; Robin, Chloé; Lomov, Nikolay; Rubtsov, Mikhail; Sjakste, Nikolajs; Lipinski, Mar; Vassetzky, Yegor

    2017-06-16

    Despite rapid progress, many problems and limitations persist and limit the applicability of gene-editing techniques. Making use of meganucleases, TALENs, or CRISPR/Cas9-based tools requires an initial step of pre-screening to determine the efficiency and specificity of the designed tools. This step remains time consuming and material consuming. Here we propose a simple, cheap, reliable, time-saving, and highly sensitive method to evaluate a given gene-editing tool based on its capacity to induce chromosomal translocations when combined with a reference engineered nuclease. In the proposed technique, designated engineered nuclease-induced translocations (ENIT), a plasmid coding for the DNA-editing tool to be tested is co-transfected into carefully chosen target cells along with that for an engineered nuclease of known specificity and efficiency. If the new enzyme efficiently cuts within the desired region, then specific chromosomal translocations will be generated between the two targeted genomic regions and be readily detectable by a one-step PCR or qPCR assay. The PCR product thus obtained can be directly sequenced, thereby determining the exact position of the double-strand breaks induced by the gene-editing tools. As a proof of concept, ENIT was successfully tested in different cell types and with different meganucleases, TALENs, and CRISPR/Cas9-based editing tools.

  6. GENOME-ENABLED DISCOVERY OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION GENES IN POPLAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVIS J M

    2007-10-11

    Plants utilize carbon by partitioning the reduced carbon obtained through photosynthesis into different compartments and into different chemistries within a cell and subsequently allocating such carbon to sink tissues throughout the plant. Since the phytohormones auxin and cytokinin are known to influence sink strength in tissues such as roots (Skoog & Miller 1957, Nordstrom et al. 2004), we hypothesized that altering the expression of genes that regulate auxin-mediated (e.g., AUX/IAA or ARF transcription factors) or cytokinin-mediated (e.g., RR transcription factors) control of root growth and development would impact carbon allocation and partitioning belowground (Fig. 1 - Renewal Proposal). Specifically, the ARF, AUX/IAA and RR transcription factor gene families mediate the effects of the growth regulators auxin and cytokinin on cell expansion, cell division and differentiation into root primordia. Invertases (IVR), whose transcript abundance is enhanced by both auxin and cytokinin, are critical components of carbon movement and therefore of carbon allocation. Thus, we initiated comparative genomic studies to identify the AUX/IAA, ARF, RR and IVR gene families in the Populus genome that could impact carbon allocation and partitioning. Bioinformatics searches using Arabidopsis gene sequences as queries identified regions with high degrees of sequence similarities in the Populus genome. These Populus sequences formed the basis of our transgenic experiments. Transgenic modification of gene expression involving members of these gene families was hypothesized to have profound effects on carbon allocation and partitioning.

  7. CRISPR-Cpf1: A New Tool for Plant Genome Editing

    KAUST Repository

    Zaidi, Syed Shan-e-Ali

    2017-05-19

    Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated proteins (CRISPR-Cas), a groundbreaking genome-engineering tool, has facilitated targeted trait improvement in plants. Recently, CRISPR-CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella 1 (Cpf1) has emerged as a new tool for efficient genome editing, including DNA-free editing in plants, with higher efficiency, specificity, and potentially wider applications than CRISPR-Cas9.

  8. Daysleeper : from genomic parasite to indispensable gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knip, Marijn

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis the evolutionary background, function and localization of the domesticated transposase DAYSLEEPER are described. We found that DAYSLEEPER-like genes can be found in angiosperms, but not in lower plants. We also found that DAYSLEEPER interacts with several proteins and is probably

  9. Genome Binding and Gene Regulation by Stem Cell Transcription Factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. Brandsma (Johan)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractNearly all cells of an individual organism contain the same genome. However, each cell type transcribes a different set of genes due to the presence of different sets of cell type-specific transcription factors. Such transcription factors bind to regulatory regions such as promoters

  10. Biased distribution of DNA uptake sequences towards genome maintenance genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, T.; Rodland, E.A.; Lagesen, K.

    2004-01-01

    in these organisms. Pasteurella multocida also displayed high frequencies of a putative DUS identical to that previously identified in H. influenzae and with a skewed distribution towards genome maintenance genes, indicating that this bacterium might be transformation competent under certain conditions....

  11. Re-Examining the Gene in Personalized Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartol, Jordan

    2013-01-01

    Personalized genomics companies (PG; also called "direct-to-consumer genetics") are businesses marketing genetic testing to consumers over the Internet. While much has been written about these new businesses, little attention has been given to their roles in science communication. This paper provides an analysis of the gene concept…

  12. Comparison of gene expression in segregating families identifies genes and genomic regions involved in a novel adaptation, zinc hyperaccumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filatov, Victor; Dowdle, John; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Ford-Lloyd, Brian; Newbury, H John; Macnair, Mark R

    2006-09-01

    One of the challenges of comparative genomics is to identify specific genetic changes associated with the evolution of a novel adaptation or trait. We need to be able to disassociate the genes involved with a particular character from all the other genetic changes that take place as lineages diverge. Here we show that by comparing the transcriptional profile of segregating families with that of parent species differing in a novel trait, it is possible to narrow down substantially the list of potential target genes. In addition, by assuming synteny with a related model organism for which the complete genome sequence is available, it is possible to use the cosegregation of markers differing in transcription level to identify regions of the genome which probably contain quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the character. This novel combination of genomics and classical genetics provides a very powerful tool to identify candidate genes. We use this methodology to investigate zinc hyperaccumulation in Arabidopsis halleri, the sister species to the model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana. We compare the transcriptional profile of A. halleri with that of its sister nonaccumulator species, Arabidopsis petraea, and between accumulator and nonaccumulator F(3)s derived from the cross between the two species. We identify eight genes which consistently show greater expression in accumulator phenotypes in both roots and shoots, including two metal transporter genes (NRAMP3 and ZIP6), and cytoplasmic aconitase, a gene involved in iron homeostasis in mammals. We also show that there appear to be two QTLs for zinc accumulation, on chromosomes 3 and 7.

  13. Pan-genome sequence analysis using Panseq: an online tool for the rapid analysis of core and accessory genomic regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villegas Andre

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pan-genome of a bacterial species consists of a core and an accessory gene pool. The accessory genome is thought to be an important source of genetic variability in bacterial populations and is gained through lateral gene transfer, allowing subpopulations of bacteria to better adapt to specific niches. Low-cost and high-throughput sequencing platforms have created an exponential increase in genome sequence data and an opportunity to study the pan-genomes of many bacterial species. In this study, we describe a new online pan-genome sequence analysis program, Panseq. Results Panseq was used to identify Escherichia coli O157:H7 and E. coli K-12 genomic islands. Within a population of 60 E. coli O157:H7 strains, the existence of 65 accessory genomic regions identified by Panseq analysis was confirmed by PCR. The accessory genome and binary presence/absence data, and core genome and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of six L. monocytogenes strains were extracted with Panseq and hierarchically clustered and visualized. The nucleotide core and binary accessory data were also used to construct maximum parsimony (MP trees, which were compared to the MP tree generated by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST. The topology of the accessory and core trees was identical but differed from the tree produced using seven MLST loci. The Loci Selector module found the most variable and discriminatory combinations of four loci within a 100 loci set among 10 strains in 1 s, compared to the 449 s required to exhaustively search for all possible combinations; it also found the most discriminatory 20 loci from a 96 loci E. coli O157:H7 SNP dataset. Conclusion Panseq determines the core and accessory regions among a collection of genomic sequences based on user-defined parameters. It readily extracts regions unique to a genome or group of genomes, identifies SNPs within shared core genomic regions, constructs files for use in phylogeny programs

  14. ParameciumDB in 2011: new tools and new data for functional and comparative genomics of the model ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaiz, Olivier; Sperling, Linda

    2011-01-01

    ParameciumDB is a community model organism database built with the GMOD toolkit to integrate the genome and biology of the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia. Over the last four years, post-genomic data from proteome and transcriptome studies has been incorporated along with predicted orthologs in 33 species, annotations from the community and publications from the scientific literature. Available tools include BioMart for complex queries, GBrowse2 for genome browsing, the Apollo genome editor for expert curation of gene models, a Blast server, a motif finder, and a wiki for protocols, nomenclature guidelines and other documentation. In-house tools have been developed for ontology browsing and evaluation of off-target RNAi matches. Now ready for next-generation deep sequencing data and the genomes of other Paramecium species, this open-access resource is available at http://paramecium.cgm.cnrs-gif.fr.

  15. Motif-independent prediction of a secondary metabolism gene cluster using comparative genomics: application to sequenced genomes of Aspergillus and ten other filamentous fungal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Itaru; Umemura, Myco; Koike, Hideaki; Asai, Kiyoshi; Machida, Masayuki

    2014-08-01

    Despite their biological importance, a significant number of genes for secondary metabolite biosynthesis (SMB) remain undetected due largely to the fact that they are highly diverse and are not expressed under a variety of cultivation conditions. Several software tools including SMURF and antiSMASH have been developed to predict fungal SMB gene clusters by finding core genes encoding polyketide synthase, nonribosomal peptide synthetase and dimethylallyltryptophan synthase as well as several others typically present in the cluster. In this work, we have devised a novel comparative genomics method to identify SMB gene clusters that is independent of motif information of the known SMB genes. The method detects SMB gene clusters by searching for a similar order of genes and their presence in nonsyntenic blocks. With this method, we were able to identify many known SMB gene clusters with the core genes in the genomic sequences of 10 filamentous fungi. Furthermore, we have also detected SMB gene clusters without core genes, including the kojic acid biosynthesis gene cluster of Aspergillus oryzae. By varying the detection parameters of the method, a significant difference in the sequence characteristics was detected between the genes residing inside the clusters and those outside the clusters. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  16. A CRISPR/Cas9-based method and primer design tool for seamless genome editing in fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-López, María; Cotobal, Cristina; Fernández-Sánchez, Oscar; Borbarán Bravo, Natalia; Oktriani, Risky; Abendroth, Heike; Uka, Dardan; Hoti, Mimoza; Wang, Jin; Zaratiegui, Mikel; Bähler, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe the prevailing approach for gene manipulations is based on homologous recombination of a PCR product that contains genomic target sequences and a selectable marker. The CRISPR/Cas9 system has recently been implemented in fission yeast, which allows for seamless genome editing without integration of a selection marker or leaving any other genomic ‘scars’. The published method involves manual design of the single guide RNA (sgRNA), and digestion of a large plasmid with a problematic restriction enzyme to clone the sgRNA. To increase the efficiency of this approach, we have established and optimized a PCR-based system to clone the sgRNA without restriction enzymes into a plasmid with a dominant natMX6 (nourseothricin) selection marker. We also provide a web-tool, CRISPR4P, to support the design of the sgRNAs and the primers required for the entire process of seamless DNA deletion. Moreover, we report the preparation of G1-synchronized and cryopreserved S. pombe cells, which greatly increases the efficiency and speed for transformations, and may also facilitate standard gene manipulations. Applying this optimized CRISPR/Cas9-based approach, we have successfully deleted over 80 different non-coding RNA genes, which are generally lowly expressed, and have inserted 7 point mutations in 4 different genomic regions. PMID:28612052

  17. Accelerating genome editing in CHO cells using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a web-based target finding tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram; Kallehauge, Thomas Beuchert; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Nielsen, Alex Toftgaard; Kildegaard, Helene Faustrup

    2014-08-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells are widely used in the biopharmaceutical industry as a host for the production of complex pharmaceutical proteins. Thus genome engineering of CHO cells for improved product quality and yield is of great interest. Here, we demonstrate for the first time the efficacy of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved by applying lectin selection. All eight sgRNAs examined in this study resulted in relatively high indel frequencies, demonstrating that the Cas9 system is a robust and efficient genome-editing methodology in CHO cells. Deep sequencing revealed that 85% of the indels created by Cas9 resulted in frameshift mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named "CRISPy" for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27,553 genes and lists the number of off-target sites in the genome. In conclusion, the proven functionality of Cas9 to edit CHO genomes combined with our CRISPy database have the potential to accelerate genome editing and synthetic biology efforts in CHO cells.

  18. AnGeLi: A Tool for the Analysis of Gene Lists from Fission Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny A Bitton

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide assays and screens typically result in large lists of genes or proteins. Enrichments of functional or other biological properties within such lists can provide valuable insights and testable hypotheses. To systematically detect these enrichments can be challenging and time-consuming, because relevant data to compare against query gene lists are spread over many different sources. We have developed AnGeLi (Analysis of Gene Lists, an intuitive, integrated web-tool for comprehensive and customized interrogation of gene lists from the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. AnGeLi searches for significant enrichments among multiple qualitative and quantitative information sources, including gene and phenotype ontologies, genetic and protein interactions, numerous features of genes, transcripts, translation, and proteins such as copy numbers, chromosomal positions, genetic diversity, RNA polymerase II and ribosome occupancy, localization, conservation, half-lives, domains and molecular weight among others, as well as diverse sets of genes that are co-regulated or lead to the same phenotypes when mutated. AnGeLi uses robust statistics which can be tailored to specific needs. It also provides the option to upload user-defined gene sets to compare against the query list. Through an integrated data submission form, AnGeLi encourages the community to contribute additional curated gene lists to further increase the usefulness of this resource and to get the most from the ever increasing large-scale experiments. AnGeLi offers a rigorous yet flexible statistical analysis platform for rich insights into functional enrichments and biological context for query gene lists, thus providing a powerful exploratory tool through which S. pombe researchers can uncover fresh perspectives and unexpected connections from genomic data. AnGeLi is freely available at: www.bahlerlab.info/AnGeLi

  19. From genes to milk: genomic organization and epigenetic regulation of the mammary transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemay, Danielle G; Pollard, Katherine S; Martin, William F; Freeman Zadrowski, Courtneay; Hernandez, Joseph; Korf, Ian; German, J Bruce; Rijnkels, Monique

    2013-01-01

    Even in genomes lacking operons, a gene's position in the genome influences its potential for expression. The mechanisms by which adjacent genes are co-expressed are still not completely understood. Using lactation and the mammary gland as a model system, we explore the hypothesis that chromatin state contributes to the co-regulation of gene neighborhoods. The mammary gland represents a unique evolutionary model, due to its recent appearance, in the context of vertebrate genomes. An understanding of how the mammary gland is regulated to produce milk is also of biomedical and agricultural importance for human lactation and dairying. Here, we integrate epigenomic and transcriptomic data to develop a comprehensive regulatory model. Neighborhoods of mammary-expressed genes were determined using expression data derived from pregnant and lactating mice and a neighborhood scoring tool, G-NEST. Regions of open and closed chromatin were identified by ChIP-Seq of histone modifications H3K36me3, H3K4me2, and H3K27me3 in the mouse mammary gland and liver tissue during lactation. We found that neighborhoods of genes in regions of uniquely active chromatin in the lactating mammary gland, compared with liver tissue, were extremely rare. Rather, genes in most neighborhoods were suppressed during lactation as reflected in their expression levels and their location in regions of silenced chromatin. Chromatin silencing was largely shared between the liver and mammary gland during lactation, and what distinguished the mammary gland was mainly a small tissue-specific repertoire of isolated, expressed genes. These findings suggest that an advantage of the neighborhood organization is in the collective repression of groups of genes via a shared mechanism of chromatin repression. Genes essential to the mammary gland's uniqueness are isolated from neighbors, and likely have less tolerance for variation in expression, properties they share with genes responsible for an organism's survival.

  20. Gene Editing: Powerful New Tools for Nephrology Research and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyagi, Ayano; Lu, Aiwu; Humphreys, Benjamin D

    2016-10-01

    Biologic research is experiencing a transformation brought about by the ability of programmable nucleases to manipulate the genome. In the recently developed CRISPR/Cas system, short RNA sequences guide the endonuclease Cas9 to any location in the genome, causing a DNA double-strand break (DSB). Repair of DSBs allows the introduction of targeted genetic manipulations with high precision. Cas9-mediated gene editing is simple, scalable, and rapid, and it can be applied to virtually any organism. Here, we summarize the development of modern gene editing techniques and the biology of DSB repair on which these techniques are based. We discuss technical points in applying this technology and review its use in model organisms. Finally, we describe prospects for the use of gene editing to treat human genetic diseases. This technology offers tremendous promise for equipping the nephrology research community to better model and ultimately, treat kidney diseases.

  1. Genome-editing tools for stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva, E A; Shuvalov, O U; Garabadgiu, A V; Melino, G; Barlev, N A

    2015-07-23

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide a versatile platform for regenerative studies, drug testing and disease modeling. That the expression of only four transcription factors, Oct4, Klf4, Sox2 and c-Myc (OKSM), is sufficient for generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from differentiated somatic cells has revolutionized the field and also highlighted the importance of OKSM as targets for genome editing. A number of novel genome-editing systems have been developed recently. In this review, we focus on successful applications of several such systems for generation of iPSCs. In particular, we discuss genome-editing systems based on zinc-finger fusion proteins (ZFs), transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and an RNA-guided DNA-specific nuclease, Cas9, derived from the bacterial defense system against viruses that utilizes clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR).

  2. The capsicum transcriptome DB: a “hot” tool for genomic research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Góngora-Castillo, Elsa; Fajardo-Jaime, Rubén; Fernández-Cortes, Araceli; Jofre-Garfias, Alba E; Lozoya-Gloria, Edmundo; Martínez, Octavio; Ochoa-Alejo, Neftalí; Rivera-Bustamante, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Chili pepper (Capsicum annuum) is an economically important crop with no available public genome sequence. We describe a genomic resource to facilitate Capsicum annuum research. A collection of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) derived from five C. annuum organs (root, stem, leaf, flower and fruit) were sequenced using the Sanger method and multiple leaf transcriptomes were deeply sampled using with GS-pyrosequencing. A hybrid assembly of 1,324,516 raw reads yielded 32,314 high quality contigs as validated by coverage and identity analysis with existing pepper sequences. Overall, 75.5% of the contigs had significant sequence similarity to entries in nucleic acid and protein databases; 23% of the sequences have not been previously reported for C. annuum and expand sequence resources for this species. A MySQL database and a user-friendly Web interface were constructed with search-tools that permit queries of the ESTs including sequence, functional annotation, Gene Ontology classification, metabolic pathways, and assembly information. The Capsicum Transcriptome DB is free available from http://www.bioingenios.ira.cinvestav.mx:81/Joomla/ PMID:22359434

  3. PANTHER version 11: expanded annotation data from Gene Ontology and Reactome pathways, and data analysis tool enhancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Huaiyu; Huang, Xiaosong; Muruganujan, Anushya; Tang, Haiming; Mills, Caitlin; Kang, Diane; Thomas, Paul D

    2017-01-04

    The PANTHER database (Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships, http://pantherdb.org) contains comprehensive information on the evolution and function of protein-coding genes from 104 completely sequenced genomes. PANTHER software tools allow users to classify new protein sequences, and to analyze gene lists obtained from large-scale genomics experiments. In the past year, major improvements include a large expansion of classification information available in PANTHER, as well as significant enhancements to the analysis tools. Protein subfamily functional classifications have more than doubled due to progress of the Gene Ontology Phylogenetic Annotation Project. For human genes (as well as a few other organisms), PANTHER now also supports enrichment analysis using pathway classifications from the Reactome resource. The gene list enrichment tools include a new 'hierarchical view' of results, enabling users to leverage the structure of the classifications/ontologies; the tools also allow users to upload genetic variant data directly, rather than requiring prior conversion to a gene list. The updated coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) scoring tool uses an improved algorithm. The hidden Markov model (HMM) search tools now use HMMER3, dramatically reducing search times and improving accuracy of E-value statistics. Finally, the PANTHER Tree-Attribute Viewer has been implemented in JavaScript, with new views for exploring protein sequence evolution.

  4. PANTHER version 11: expanded annotation data from Gene Ontology and Reactome pathways, and data analysis tool enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Huaiyu; Huang, Xiaosong; Muruganujan, Anushya; Tang, Haiming; Mills, Caitlin; Kang, Diane; Thomas, Paul D.

    2017-01-01

    The PANTHER database (Protein ANalysis THrough Evolutionary Relationships, http://pantherdb.org) contains comprehensive information on the evolution and function of protein-coding genes from 104 completely sequenced genomes. PANTHER software tools allow users to classify new protein sequences, and to analyze gene lists obtained from large-scale genomics experiments. In the past year, major improvements include a large expansion of classification information available in PANTHER, as well as significant enhancements to the analysis tools. Protein subfamily functional classifications have more than doubled due to progress of the Gene Ontology Phylogenetic Annotation Project. For human genes (as well as a few other organisms), PANTHER now also supports enrichment analysis using pathway classifications from the Reactome resource. The gene list enrichment tools include a new ‘hierarchical view’ of results, enabling users to leverage the structure of the classifications/ontologies; the tools also allow users to upload genetic variant data directly, rather than requiring prior conversion to a gene list. The updated coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) scoring tool uses an improved algorithm. The hidden Markov model (HMM) search tools now use HMMER3, dramatically reducing search times and improving accuracy of E-value statistics. Finally, the PANTHER Tree-Attribute Viewer has been implemented in JavaScript, with new views for exploring protein sequence evolution. PMID:27899595

  5. GtRNAdb 2.0: an expanded database of transfer RNA genes identified in complete and draft genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patricia P; Lowe, Todd M

    2016-01-01

    Transfer RNAs represent the largest, most ubiquitous class of non-protein coding RNA genes found in all living organisms. The tRNAscan-SE search tool has become the de facto standard for annotating tRNA genes in genomes, and the Genomic tRNA Database (GtRNAdb) was created as a portal for interactive exploration of these gene predictions. Since its published description in 2009, the GtRNAdb has steadily grown in content, and remains the most commonly cited web-based source of tRNA gene information. In this update, we describe not only a major increase in the number of tRNA predictions (>367000) and genomes analyzed (>4370), but more importantly, the integration of new analytic and functional data to improve the quality and biological context of tRNA gene predictions. New information drawn from other sources includes tRNA modification data, epigenetic data, single nucleotide polymorphisms, gene expression and evolutionary conservation. A richer set of analytic data is also presented, including better tRNA functional prediction, non-canonical features, predicted structural impacts from sequence variants and minimum free energy structural predictions. Views of tRNA genes in genomic context are provided via direct links to the UCSC genome browsers. The database can be searched by sequence or gene features, and is available at http://gtrnadb.ucsc.edu/.

  6. The plant ontology as a tool for comparative plant anatomy and genomic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant science is now a major player in the fields of genomics, gene expression analysis, phenomics and metabolomics. Recent advances in sequencing technologies have led to a windfall of data, with new species being added rapidly to the list of species whose genomes have been decoded. The Plant Ontol...

  7. Whole genome sequencing as a tool for phylogenetic analysis of clinical strains of Mitis group streptococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusen, L. H.; Dargis, R.; Iversen, Katrine Højholt

    2016-01-01

    with infective endocarditis were whole genome sequenced. We compared the phylogenetic analyses based on single genes (recA, sodA, gdh), multigene (MLSA), SNPs, and core-genome sequences. The six phylogenetic analyses generally showed a similar pattern of six monophyletic clusters, though a few differences were...

  8. The evolution of chloroplast genes and genomes in ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Paul G; Der, Joshua P; Duffy, Aaron M; Davidson, Jacob B; Grusz, Amanda L; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2011-07-01

    Most of the publicly available data on chloroplast (plastid) genes and genomes come from seed plants, with relatively little information from their sister group, the ferns. Here we describe several broad evolutionary patterns and processes in fern plastid genomes (plastomes), and we include some new plastome sequence data. We review what we know about the evolutionary history of plastome structure across the fern phylogeny and we compare plastome organization and patterns of evolution in ferns to those in seed plants. A large clade of ferns is characterized by a plastome that has been reorganized with respect to the ancestral gene order (a similar order that is ancestral in seed plants). We review the sequence of inversions that gave rise to this organization. We also explore global nucleotide substitution patterns in ferns versus those found in seed plants across plastid genes, and we review the high levels of RNA editing observed in fern plastomes.

  9. Genome-wide identification of new Wnt/β-catenin target genes in the human genome using CART method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inestrosa Nibaldo C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of in silico predictions for understanding cellular processes is now widely accepted, and a variety of algorithms useful for studying different biological features have been designed. In particular, the prediction of cis regulatory modules in non-coding human genome regions represents a major challenge for understanding gene regulation in several diseases. Recently, studies of the Wnt signaling pathway revealed a connection with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. In this article, we construct a classification tool that uses the transcription factor binding site motifs composition of some gene promoters to identify new Wnt/β-catenin pathway target genes potentially involved in brain diseases. Results In this study, we propose 89 new Wnt/β-catenin pathway target genes predicted in silico by using a method based on multiple Classification and Regression Tree (CART analysis. We used as decision variables the presence of transcription factor binding site motifs in the upstream region of each gene. This prediction was validated by RT-qPCR in a sample of 9 genes. As expected, LEF1, a member of the T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor family (TCF/LEF1, was relevant for the classification algorithm and, remarkably, other factors related directly or indirectly to the inflammatory response and amyloidogenic processes also appeared to be relevant for the classification. Among the 89 new Wnt/β-catenin pathway targets, we found a group expressed in brain tissue that could be involved in diverse responses to neurodegenerative diseases, like Alzheimer's disease (AD. These genes represent new candidates to protect cells against amyloid β toxicity, in agreement with the proposed neuroprotective role of the Wnt signaling pathway. Conclusions Our multiple CART strategy proved to be an effective tool to identify new Wnt/β-catenin pathway targets based on the study of their regulatory regions in the human

  10. The CanOE strategy: integrating genomic and metabolic contexts across multiple prokaryote genomes to find candidate genes for orphan enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Alexander Thil Smith

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Of all biochemically characterized metabolic reactions formalized by the IUBMB, over one out of four have yet to be associated with a nucleic or protein sequence, i.e. are sequence-orphan enzymatic activities. Few bioinformatics annotation tools are able to propose candidate genes for such activities by exploiting context-dependent rather than sequence-dependent data, and none are readily accessible and propose result integration across multiple genomes. Here, we present CanOE (Candidate genes for Orphan Enzymes, a four-step bioinformatics strategy that proposes ranked candidate genes for sequence-orphan enzymatic activities (or orphan enzymes for short. The first step locates "genomic metabolons", i.e. groups of co-localized genes coding proteins catalyzing reactions linked by shared metabolites, in one genome at a time. These metabolons can be particularly helpful for aiding bioanalysts to visualize relevant metabolic data. In the second step, they are used to generate candidate associations between un-annotated genes and gene-less reactions. The third step integrates these gene-reaction associations over several genomes using gene families, and summarizes the strength of family-reaction associations by several scores. In the final step, these scores are used to rank members of gene families which are proposed for metabolic reactions. These associations are of particular interest when the metabolic reaction is a sequence-orphan enzymatic activity. Our strategy found over 60,000 genomic metabolons in more than 1,000 prokaryote organisms from the MicroScope platform, generating candidate genes for many metabolic reactions, of which more than 70 distinct orphan reactions. A computational validation of the approach is discussed. Finally, we present a case study on the anaerobic allantoin degradation pathway in Escherichia coli K-12.

  11. Mojo Hand, a TALEN design tool for genome editing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neff Kevin L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies of transcription activator-like (TAL effector domains fused to nucleases (TALENs demonstrate enormous potential for genome editing. Effective design of TALENs requires a combination of selecting appropriate genetic features, finding pairs of binding sites based on a consensus sequence, and, in some cases, identifying endogenous restriction sites for downstream molecular genetic applications. Results We present the web-based program Mojo Hand for designing TAL and TALEN constructs for genome editing applications (http://www.talendesign.org. We describe the algorithm and its implementation. The features of Mojo Hand include (1 automatic download of genomic data from the National Center for Biotechnology Information, (2 analysis of any DNA sequence to reveal pairs of binding sites based on a user-defined template, (3 selection of restriction-enzyme recognition sites in the spacer between the TAL monomer binding sites including options for the selection of restriction enzyme suppliers, and (4 output files designed for subsequent TALEN construction using the Golden Gate assembly method. Conclusions Mojo Hand enables the rapid identification of TAL binding sites for use in TALEN design. The assembly of TALEN constructs, is also simplified by using the TAL-site prediction program in conjunction with a spreadsheet management aid of reagent concentrations and TALEN formulation. Mojo Hand enables scientists to more rapidly deploy TALENs for genome editing applications.

  12. MUTAGEN: Multi-user tool for annotating GENomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brugger, K.; Redder, P.; Skovgaard, Marie

    2003-01-01

    MUTAGEN is a free prokaryotic annotation system. It offers the advantages of genome comparison, graphical sequence browsers, search facilities and open-source for user-specific adjustments. The web-interface allows several users to access the system from standard desktop computers. The Sulfolobus...

  13. Comparison of methods for genomic localization of gene trap sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrin Thomas E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene knockouts in a model organism such as mouse provide a valuable resource for the study of basic biology and human disease. Determining which gene has been inactivated by an untargeted gene trapping event poses a challenging annotation problem because gene trap sequence tags, which represent sequence near the vector insertion site of a trapped gene, are typically short and often contain unresolved residues. To understand better the localization of these sequences on the mouse genome, we compared stand-alone versions of the alignment programs BLAT, SSAHA, and MegaBLAST. A set of 3,369 sequence tags was aligned to build 34 of the mouse genome using default parameters for each algorithm. Known genome coordinates for the cognate set of full-length genes (1,659 sequences were used to evaluate localization results. Results In general, all three programs performed well in terms of localizing sequences to a general region of the genome, with only relatively subtle errors identified for a small proportion of the sequence tags. However, large differences in performance were noted with regard to correctly identifying exon boundaries. BLAT correctly identified the vast majority of exon boundaries, while SSAHA and MegaBLAST missed the majority of exon boundaries. SSAHA consistently reported the fewest false positives and is the fastest algorithm. MegaBLAST was comparable to BLAT in speed, but was the most susceptible to localizing sequence tags incorrectly to pseudogenes. Conclusion The differences in performance for sequence tags and full-length reference sequences were surprisingly small. Characteristic variations in localization results for each program were noted that affect the localization of sequence at exon boundaries, in particular.

  14. Mass spectrometric imaging as a high-spatial resolution tool for functional genomics: Tissue-specific gene expression of TT7 inferred from heterogeneous distribution of metabolites in Arabidopsis flowers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korte, Andrew R.; Song, Zhihong; Nikolau, Basil J.; Lee, Young Jin

    2011-12-23

    Laser desorption/ionization (LDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) was used to acquire chemical images of flavonoid metabolites on the surface of wild-type and mutant (tt7) Arabidopsis thaliana flowers. Flavonoids were localized to the petals and carpels of flowers, with tissue heterogeneity in the petals. Specifically, kaempferol and/or its glycosides were abundant in the distal region of petals and quercetin and its downstream flavonoids were highly enriched in the more proximal region of petals. As a result of a mutation in the TT7 gene which blocks the conversion of dihydrokaempferol to dihydroquercetin, the downstream metabolites, quercetin, isohamnetin, and their glycosides, were not observed in the mutant flowers. Instead, the metabolites in an alternative pathway, kaempferol and/or its glycosides, were as highly abundant on the proximal region of the petals as in the distal region. In addition, the combined flavonoid amounts on the proximal region of petals in the wild-type are almost equivalent to the amounts of kaempferol and/or its glycosides in the mutant. This strongly suggests that the expression of the TT7 gene is localized on the proximal part of the petal while the other genes in the upper stream pathway are evenly expressed throughout the petal. Most importantly, this work demonstrates MSI of metabolites can be utilized for the localization of gene expression.

  15. Tools to kill: genome of one of the most destructive plant pathogenic fungi Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Haque, Md Samiul; Islam, Mohammad Moinul; Emdad, Emdadul Mannan; Halim, Abdul; Hossen, Quazi Md Mosaddeque; Hossain, Md Zakir; Ahmed, Borhan; Rahim, Sifatur; Rahman, Md Sharifur; Alam, Md Monjurul; Hou, Shaobin; Wan, Xuehua; Saito, Jennifer A; Alam, Maqsudul

    2012-09-19

    Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the most destructive necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species throughout the world. It can grow rapidly in infected plants and subsequently produces a large amount of sclerotia that plugs the vessels, resulting in wilting of the plant. We sequenced and assembled ~49 Mb into 15 super-scaffolds covering 92.83% of the M. phaseolina genome. We predict 14,249 open reading frames (ORFs) of which 9,934 are validated by the transcriptome. This phytopathogen has an abundance of secreted oxidases, peroxidases, and hydrolytic enzymes for degrading cell wall polysaccharides and lignocelluloses to penetrate into the host tissue. To overcome the host plant defense response, M. phaseolina encodes a significant number of P450s, MFS type membrane transporters, glycosidases, transposases, and secondary metabolites in comparison to all sequenced ascomycete species. A strikingly distinct set of carbohydrate esterases (CE) are present in M. phaseolina, with the CE9 and CE10 families remarkably higher than any other fungi. The phenotypic microarray data indicates that M. phaseolina can adapt to a wide range of osmotic and pH environments. As a broad host range pathogen, M. phaseolina possesses a large number of pathogen-host interaction genes including those for adhesion, signal transduction, cell wall breakdown, purine biosynthesis, and potent mycotoxin patulin. The M. phaseolina genome provides a framework of the infection process at the cytological and molecular level which uses a diverse arsenal of enzymatic and toxin tools to destroy the host plants. Further understanding of the M. phaseolina genome-based plant-pathogen interactions will be instrumental in designing rational strategies for disease control, essential to ensuring global agricultural crop production and security.

  16. Tools to kill: Genome of one of the most destructive plant pathogenic fungi Macrophomina phaseolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Md

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the most destructive necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species throughout the world. It can grow rapidly in infected plants and subsequently produces a large amount of sclerotia that plugs the vessels, resulting in wilting of the plant. Results We sequenced and assembled ~49 Mb into 15 super-scaffolds covering 92.83% of the M. phaseolina genome. We predict 14,249 open reading frames (ORFs of which 9,934 are validated by the transcriptome. This phytopathogen has an abundance of secreted oxidases, peroxidases, and hydrolytic enzymes for degrading cell wall polysaccharides and lignocelluloses to penetrate into the host tissue. To overcome the host plant defense response, M. phaseolina encodes a significant number of P450s, MFS type membrane transporters, glycosidases, transposases, and secondary metabolites in comparison to all sequenced ascomycete species. A strikingly distinct set of carbohydrate esterases (CE are present in M. phaseolina, with the CE9 and CE10 families remarkably higher than any other fungi. The phenotypic microarray data indicates that M. phaseolina can adapt to a wide range of osmotic and pH environments. As a broad host range pathogen, M. phaseolina possesses a large number of pathogen-host interaction genes including those for adhesion, signal transduction, cell wall breakdown, purine biosynthesis, and potent mycotoxin patulin. Conclusions The M. phaseolina genome provides a framework of the infection process at the cytological and molecular level which uses a diverse arsenal of enzymatic and toxin tools to destroy the host plants. Further understanding of the M. phaseolina genome-based plant-pathogen interactions will be instrumental in designing rational strategies for disease control, essential to ensuring global agricultural crop production and security.

  17. An enigmatic fourth runt domain gene in the fugu genome: ancestral gene loss versus accelerated evolution

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    Hood Leroy

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The runt domain transcription factors are key regulators of developmental processes in bilaterians, involved both in cell proliferation and differentiation, and their disruption usually leads to disease. Three runt domain genes have been described in each vertebrate genome (the RUNX gene family, but only one in other chordates. Therefore, the common ancestor of vertebrates has been thought to have had a single runt domain gene. Results Analysis of the genome draft of the fugu pufferfish (Takifugu rubripes reveals the existence of a fourth runt domain gene, FrRUNT, in addition to the orthologs of human RUNX1, RUNX2 and RUNX3. The tiny FrRUNT packs six exons and two putative promoters in just 3 kb of genomic sequence. The first exon is located within an intron of FrSUPT3H, the ortholog of human SUPT3H, and the first exon of FrSUPT3H resides within the first intron of FrRUNT. The two gene structures are therefore "interlocked". In the human genome, SUPT3H is instead interlocked with RUNX2. FrRUNT has no detectable ortholog in the genomes of mammals, birds or amphibians. We consider alternative explanations for an apparent contradiction between the phylogenetic data and the comparison of the genomic neighborhoods of human and fugu runt domain genes. We hypothesize that an ancient RUNT locus was lost in the tetrapod lineage, together with FrFSTL6, a member of a novel family of follistatin-like genes. Conclusions Our results suggest that the runt domain family may have started expanding in chordates much earlier than previously thought, and exemplify the importance of detailed analysis of whole-genome draft sequence to provide new insights into gene evolution.

  18. Statistical Viewer: a tool to upload and integrate linkage and association data as plots displayed within the Ensembl genome browser

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    Hauser Elizabeth R

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To facilitate efficient selection and the prioritization of candidate complex disease susceptibility genes for association analysis, increasingly comprehensive annotation tools are essential to integrate, visualize and analyze vast quantities of disparate data generated by genomic screens, public human genome sequence annotation and ancillary biological databases. We have developed a plug-in package for Ensembl called "Statistical Viewer" that facilitates the analysis of genomic features and annotation in the regions of interest defined by linkage analysis. Results Statistical Viewer is an add-on package to the open-source Ensembl Genome Browser and Annotation System that displays disease study-specific linkage and/or association data as 2 dimensional plots in new panels in the context of Ensembl's Contig View and Cyto View pages. An enhanced upload server facilitates the upload of statistical data, as well as additional feature annotation to be displayed in DAS tracts, in the form of Excel Files. The Statistical View panel, drawn directly under the ideogram, illustrates lod score values for markers from a study of interest that are plotted against their position in base pairs. A module called "Get Map" easily converts the genetic locations of markers to genomic coordinates. The graph is placed under the corresponding ideogram features a synchronized vertical sliding selection box that is seamlessly integrated into Ensembl's Contig- and Cyto- View pages to choose the region to be displayed in Ensembl's "Overview" and "Detailed View" panels. To resolve Association and Fine mapping data plots, a "Detailed Statistic View" plot corresponding to the "Detailed View" may be displayed underneath. Conclusion Features mapping to regions of linkage are accentuated when Statistic View is used in conjunction with the Distributed Annotation System (DAS to display supplemental laboratory information such as differentially expressed disease

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation as a tool for functional genomics in fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielse, C.B.; Hooykaas, P.J.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Ram, A.F.J.

    2005-01-01

    In the era of functional genomics, the need for tools to perform large-scale targeted and random mutagenesis is increasing. A potential tool is Agrobacterium-mediated fungal transformation. A. tumefaciens is able to transfer a part of its DNA (transferred DNA; T-DNA) to a wide variety of fungi and t

  20. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation as a tool for functional genomics in fungi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielse, C.B.; Hooykaas, P.J.; Hondel, C.A. van den; Ram, A.F.

    2005-01-01

    In the era of functional genomics, the need for tools to perform large-scale targeted and random mutagenesis is increasing. A potential tool is Agrobacterium-mediated fungal transformation. A. tumefaciens is able to transfer a part of its DNA (transferred DNA; T-DNA) to a wide variety of fungi and t

  1. Whole genome amplification of DNA for genotyping pharmacogenetics candidate genes.

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    Santosh ePhilips

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome amplification (WGA technologies can be used to amplify genomic DNA when only small amounts of DNA are available. The Multiple Displacement Amplification Phi polymerase based amplification has been shown to accurately amplify DNA for a variety of genotyping assays; however, it has not been tested for genotyping many of the clinically relevant genes important for pharmacogenetic studies, such as the cytochrome P450 genes, that are typically difficult to genotype due to multiple pseudogenes, copy number variations, and high similarity to other related genes. We evaluated whole genome amplified samples for Taqman™ genotyping of SNPs in a variety of pharmacogenetic genes. In 24 DNA samples from the Coriell human diversity panel, the call rates and concordance between amplified (~200-fold amplification and unamplified samples was 100% for two SNPs in CYP2D6 and one in ESR1. In samples from a breast cancer clinical trial (Trial 1, we compared the genotyping results in samples before and after WGA for four SNPs in CYP2D6, one SNP in CYP2C19, one SNP in CYP19A1, two SNPs in ESR1, and two SNPs in ESR2. The concordance rates were all >97%. Finally, we compared the allele frequencies of 143 SNPs determined in Trial 1 (whole genome amplified DNA to the allele frequencies determined in unamplified DNA samples from a separate trial (Trial 2 that enrolled a similar population. The call rates and allele frequencies between the two trials were 98% and 99.7%, respectively. We conclude that the whole genome amplified DNA is suitable for Taqman™ genotyping for a wide variety of pharmacogenetically relevant SNPs.

  2. Genome-Wide Associations of Gene Expression Variation in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  3. Genome-wide associations of gene expression variation in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E Stranger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  4. GOrilla: a tool for discovery and visualization of enriched GO terms in ranked gene lists

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    Steinfeld Israel

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the inception of the GO annotation project, a variety of tools have been developed that support exploring and searching the GO database. In particular, a variety of tools that perform GO enrichment analysis are currently available. Most of these tools require as input a target set of genes and a background set and seek enrichment in the target set compared to the background set. A few tools also exist that support analyzing ranked lists. The latter typically rely on simulations or on union-bound correction for assigning statistical significance to the results. Results GOrilla is a web-based application that identifies enriched GO terms in ranked lists of genes, without requiring the user to provide explicit target and background sets. This is particularly useful in many typical cases where genomic data may be naturally represented as a ranked list of genes (e.g. by level of expression or of differential expression. GOrilla employs a flexible threshold statistical approach to discover GO terms that are significantly enriched at the top of a ranked gene list. Building on a complete theoretical characterization of the underlying distribution, called mHG, GOrilla computes an exact p-value for the observed enrichment, taking threshold multiple testing into account without the need for simulations. This enables rigorous statistical analysis of thousand of genes and thousands of GO terms in order of seconds. The output of the enrichment analysis is visualized as a hierarchical structure, providing a clear view of the relations between enriched GO terms. Conclusion GOrilla is an efficient GO analysis tool with unique features that make a useful addition to the existing repertoire of GO enrichment tools. GOrilla's unique features and advantages over other threshold free enrichment tools include rigorous statistics, fast running time and an effective graphical representation. GOrilla is publicly available at: http://cbl-gorilla.cs.technion.ac.il

  5. An Introduction to Genome Annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Michael S; Yandell, Mark

    2015-12-17

    Genome projects have evolved from large international undertakings to tractable endeavors for a single lab. Accurate genome annotation is critical for successful genomic, genetic, and molecular biology experiments. These annotations can be generated using a number of approaches and available software tools. This unit describes methods for genome annotation and a number of software tools commonly used in gene annotation.

  6. Endonucleases : new tools to edit the mouse genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijshake, Tobias; Baker, Darren J.; van de Sluis, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Mouse transgenesis has been instrumental in determining the function of genes in the pathophysiology of human diseases and modification of genes by homologous recombination in mouse embryonic stem cells remains a widely used technology. However, this approach harbors a number of disadvantages, as it

  7. CRISPR/Cas9-based tools for targeted genome editing and replication control of HBV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng; Peng; Mengji; Lu; Dongliang; Yang

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus(HBV) infection remains a major global health problem because current therapies rarely eliminate HBV infections to achieve a complete cure. A different treatment paradigm to effectively clear HBV infection and eradicate latent viral reservoirs is urgently required. In recent years, the development of a new RNA-guided gene-editing tool, the CRISPR/Cas9(clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated nuclease 9) system, has greatly facilitated site-specific mutagenesis and represents a very promising potential therapeutic tool for diseases, including for eradication of invasive pathogens such as HBV. Here, we review recent advances in the use of CRISPR/Cas9, which is designed to target HBV specific DNA sequences to inhibit HBV replication and to induce viral genome mutation, in cell lines or animal models. Advantages, limitations and possible solutions, and proposed directions for future research are discussed to highlight the opportunities and challenges of CRISPR/Cas9 as a new, potentially curative therapy for chronic hepatitis B infection.

  8. The Complete Mitochondrial Genome of Aleurocanthus camelliae: Insights into Gene Arrangement and Genome Organization within the Family Aleyrodidae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shi-Chun; Wang, Xiao-Qing; Li, Pin-Wu; Hu, Xiang; Wang, Jin-Jun; Peng, Ping

    2016-11-07

    There are numerous gene rearrangements and transfer RNA gene absences existing in mitochondrial (mt) genomes of Aleyrodidae species. To understand how mt genomes evolved in the family Aleyrodidae, we have sequenced the complete mt genome of Aleurocanthus camelliae and comparatively analyzed all reported whitefly mt genomes. The mt genome of A. camelliae is 15,188 bp long, and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA genes, 21 tRNA genes and a putative control region (GenBank: KU761949). The tRNA gene, trnI, has not been observed in this genome. The mt genome has a unique gene order and shares most gene boundaries with Tetraleurodes acaciae. Nineteen of 21 tRNA genes have the conventional cloverleaf shaped secondary structure and two (trnS₁ and trnS₂) lack the dihydrouridine (DHU) arm. Using ARWEN and homologous sequence alignment, we have identified five tRNA genes and revised the annotation for three whitefly mt genomes. This result suggests that most absent genes exist in the genomes and have not been identified, due to be lack of technology and inference sequence. The phylogenetic relationships among 11 whiteflies and Drosophila melanogaster were inferred by maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods. Aleurocanthus camelliae and T. acaciae form a sister group, and all three Bemisia tabaci and two Bemisia afer strains gather together. These results are identical to the relationships inferred from gene order. We inferred that gene rearrangement plays an important role in the mt genome evolved from whiteflies.

  9. Estimating variation within the genes and inferring the phylogeny of 186 sequenced diverse Escherichia coli genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Rundsten, Carsten Friis; Ussery, David

    2012-01-01

    more biologically relevant, especially considering that many of these genome sequences are draft quality. The E. coli pan-genome for this set of isolates contains 16,373 gene clusters. A core-gene tree, based on alignment and a pan-genome tree based on gene presence/absence, maps the relatedness...

  10. Evolutionary maintenance of filovirus-like genes in bat genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Derek J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known of the biological significance and evolutionary maintenance of integrated non-retroviral RNA virus genes in eukaryotic host genomes. Here, we isolated novel filovirus-like genes from bat genomes and tested for evolutionary maintenance. We also estimated the age of filovirus VP35-like gene integrations and tested the phylogenetic hypotheses that there is a eutherian mammal clade and a marsupial/ebolavirus/Marburgvirus dichotomy for filoviruses. Results We detected homologous copies of VP35-like and NP-like gene integrations in both Old World and New World species of Myotis (bats. We also detected previously unknown VP35-like genes in rodents that are positionally homologous. Comprehensive phylogenetic estimates for filovirus NP-like and VP35-like loci support two main clades with a marsupial and a rodent grouping within the ebolavirus/Lloviu virus/Marburgvirus clade. The concordance of VP35-like, NP-like and mitochondrial gene trees with the expected species tree supports the notion that the copies we examined are orthologs that predate the global spread and radiation of the genus Myotis. Parametric simulations were consistent with selective maintenance for the open reading frame (ORF of VP35-like genes in Myotis. The ORF of the filovirus-like VP35 gene has been maintained in bat genomes for an estimated 13. 4 MY. ORFs were disrupted for the NP-like genes in Myotis. Likelihood ratio tests revealed that a model that accommodates positive selection is a significantly better fit to the data than a model that does not allow for positive selection for VP35-like sequences. Moreover, site-by-site analysis of selection using two methods indicated at least 25 sites in the VP35-like alignment are under positive selection in Myotis. Conclusions Our results indicate that filovirus-like elements have significance beyond genomic imprints of prior infection. That is, there appears to be, or have been, functionally maintained

  11. Genomes correction and assembling: present methods and tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszek, Michał; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Nowak, Robert; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2014-11-01

    Recent rapid development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies provided significant impact into genomics field of study enabling implementation of many de novo sequencing projects of new species which was previously confined by technological costs. Along with advancement of NGS there was need for adjustment in assembly programs. New algorithms must cope with massive amounts of data computation in reasonable time limits and processing power and hardware is also an important factor. In this paper, we address the issue of assembly pipeline for de novo genome assembly provided by programs presently available for scientist both as commercial and as open - source software. The implementation of four different approaches - Greedy, Overlap - Layout - Consensus (OLC), De Bruijn and Integrated resulting in variation of performance is the main focus of our discussion with additional insight into issue of short and long reads correction.

  12. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-10-08

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Christopoulou et al.

  13. Genomic Analyses of Bacterial Porin-Cytochrome Gene Clusters

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    Liang eShi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The porin-cytochrome (Pcc protein complex is responsible for trans-outer membrane electron transfer during extracellular reduction of Fe(III by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. The identified and characterized Pcc complex of G. sulfurreducens PCA consists of a porin-like outer-membrane protein, a periplasmic 8-heme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt and an outer-membrane 12-heme c-Cyt, and the genes encoding the Pcc proteins are clustered in the same regions of genome (i.e., the pcc gene clusters of G. sulfurreducens PCA. A survey of additionally microbial genomes has identified the pcc gene clusters in all sequenced Geobacter spp. and other bacteria from six different phyla, including Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans 2CP-1, A. dehalogenans 2CP-C, Anaeromyxobacter sp. K, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis, Denitrovibrio acetiphilus DSM 12809, Desulfurispirillum indicum S5, Desulfurivibrio alkaliphilus AHT2, Desulfurobacterium thermolithotrophum DSM 11699, Desulfuromonas acetoxidans DSM 684, Ignavibacterium album JCM 16511, and Thermovibrio ammonificans HB-1. The numbers of genes in the pcc gene clusters vary, ranging from two to nine. Similar to the metal-reducing (Mtr gene clusters of other Fe(III-reducing bacteria, such as Shewanella spp., additional genes that encode putative c-Cyts with predicted cellular localizations at the cytoplasmic membrane, periplasm and outer membrane often associate with the pcc gene clusters. This suggests that the Pcc-associated c-Cyts may be part of the pathways for extracellular electron transfer reactions. The presence of pcc gene clusters in the microorganisms that do not reduce solid-phase Fe(III and Mn(IV oxides, such as D. alkaliphilus AHT2 and I. album JCM 16511, also suggests that some of the pcc gene clusters may be involved in extracellular electron transfer reactions with the substrates other than Fe(III and Mn(IV oxides.

  14. Electric fish genomics: Progress, prospects, and new tools for neuroethology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchers, William R; Constantinou, Savvas J; Losilla, Mauricio; Gallant, Jason R

    2016-10-01

    Electric fish have served as a model system in biology since the 18th century, providing deep insight into the nature of bioelectrogenesis, the molecular structure of the synapse, and brain circuitry underlying complex behavior. Neuroethologists have collected extensive phenotypic data that span biological levels of analysis from molecules to ecosystems. This phenotypic data, together with genomic resources obtained over the past decades, have motivated new and exciting hypotheses that position the weakly electric fish model to address fundamental 21(st) century biological questions. This review article considers the molecular data collected for weakly electric fish over the past three decades, and the insights that data of this nature has motivated. For readers relatively new to molecular genetics techniques, we also provide a table of terminology aimed at clarifying the numerous acronyms and techniques that accompany this field. Next, we pose a research agenda for expanding genomic resources for electric fish research over the next 10years. We conclude by considering some of the exciting research prospects for neuroethology that electric fish genomics may offer over the coming decades, if the electric fish community is successful in these endeavors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Systematically fragmented genes in a multipartite mitochondrial genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlcek, Cestmir; Marande, William; Teijeiro, Shona; Lukeš, Julius; Burger, Gertraud

    2011-01-01

    Arguably, the most bizarre mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is that of the euglenozoan eukaryote Diplonema papillatum. The genome consists of numerous small circular chromosomes none of which appears to encode a complete gene. For instance, the cox1 coding sequence is spread out over nine different chromosomes in non-overlapping pieces (modules), which are transcribed separately and joined to a contiguous mRNA by trans-splicing. Here, we examine how many genes are encoded by Diplonema mtDNA and whether all are fragmented and their transcripts trans-spliced. Module identification is challenging due to the sequence divergence of Diplonema mitochondrial genes. By employing most sensitive protein profile search algorithms and comparing genomic with cDNA sequence, we recognize a total of 11 typical mitochondrial genes. The 10 protein-coding genes are systematically chopped up into three to 12 modules of 60–350 bp length. The corresponding mRNAs are all trans-spliced. Identification of ribosomal RNAs is most difficult. So far, we only detect the 3′-module of the large subunit ribosomal RNA (rRNA); it does not trans-splice with other pieces. The small subunit rRNA gene remains elusive. Our results open new intriguing questions about the biochemistry and evolution of mitochondrial trans-splicing in Diplonema. PMID:20935050

  16. Comparative genomics of Neisseria meningitidis: core genome, islands of horizontal transfer and pathogen-specific genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunning Hotopp, Julie C; Grifantini, Renata; Kumar, Nikhil; Tzeng, Yih Ling; Fouts, Derrick; Frigimelica, Elisabetta; Draghi, Monia; Giuliani, Marzia Monica; Rappuoli, Rino; Stephens, David S; Grandi, Guido; Tettelin, Hervé

    2006-12-01

    To better understand Neisseria meningitidis genomes and virulence, microarray comparative genome hybridization (mCGH) data were collected from one Neisseria cinerea, two Neisseria lactamica, two Neisseria gonorrhoeae and 48 Neisseria meningitidis isolates. For N. meningitidis, these isolates are from diverse clonal complexes, invasive and carriage strains, and all major serogroups. The microarray platform represented N. meningitidis strains MC58, Z2491 and FAM18, and N. gonorrhoeae FA1090. By comparing hybridization data to genome sequences, the core N. meningitidis genome and insertions/deletions (e.g. capsule locus, type I secretion system) related to pathogenicity were identified, including further characterization of the capsule locus, bioinformatics analysis of a type I secretion system, and identification of some metabolic pathways associated with intracellular survival in pathogens. Hybridization data clustered meningococcal isolates from similar clonal complexes that were distinguished by the differential presence of six distinct islands of horizontal transfer. Several of these islands contained prophage or other mobile elements, including a novel prophage and a transposon carrying portions of a type I secretion system. Acquisition of some genetic islands appears to have occurred in multiple lineages, including transfer between N. lactamica and N. meningitidis. However, island acquisition occurs infrequently, such that the genomic-level relationship is not obscured within clonal complexes. The N. meningitidis genome is characterized by the horizontal acquisition of multiple genetic islands; the study of these islands reveals important sets of genes varying between isolates and likely to be related to pathogenicity.

  17. Paralogous Genes as a Tool to Study the Regulation of Gene Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Robert D

    The genomes of plants are marked by reoccurring events of whole-genome duplication. These events are major contributors to speciation and provide the genetic material for organisms to evolve ever greater complexity. Duplicated genes, referred to as paralogs, may be retained because they acquired...... new functions, or their gene products are in a dosage balance. Regulatory DNA elements - some of which are conserved across species and hence called conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs) - that control expression of duplicated genes are thus under similar purifying selection. In the present study, I...... have performed in-depth analyses of paralogous genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, their expression profile, their sequence conservation, and their functions, in order to investigate the relationship between gene expression and retention of paralogous genes. Paralogs with lower expression than...

  18. Correlation of microsynteny conservation and disease gene distribution in mammalian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiting

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the whole genome sequence for many organisms, investigations into genomic structure have revealed that gene distribution is variable, and that genes with similar function or expression are located within clusters. This clustering suggests that there are evolutionary constraints that determine genome architecture. However, as most of the evidence for constraints on genome evolution comes from studies on yeast, it is unclear how much of this prior work can be extrapolated to mammalian genomes. Therefore, in this work we wished to examine the constraints on regions of the mammalian genome containing conserved gene clusters. Results We first identified regions of the mouse genome with microsynteny conservation by comparing gene arrangement in the mouse genome to the human, rat, and dog genomes. We then asked if any particular gene types were found preferentially in conserved regions. We found a significant correlation between conserved microsynteny and the density of mouse orthologs of human disease genes, suggesting that disease genes are clustered in genomic regions of increased microsynteny conservation. Conclusion The correlation between microsynteny conservation and disease gene locations indicates that regions of the mouse genome with microsynteny conservation may contain undiscovered human disease genes. This study not only demonstrates that gene function constrains mammalian genome organization, but also identifies regions of the mouse genome that can be experimentally examined to produce mouse models of human disease.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of homeobox gene family in legumes: identification, gene duplication and expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Annapurna; Ghangal, Rajesh; Garg, Rohini; Jain, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode transcription factors that are known to play a major role in different aspects of plant growth and development. In the present study, we identified homeobox genes belonging to 14 different classes in five legume species, including chickpea, soybean, Medicago, Lotus and pigeonpea. The characteristic differences within homeodomain sequences among various classes of homeobox gene family were quite evident. Genome-wide expression analysis using publicly available datasets (RNA-seq and microarray) indicated that homeobox genes are differentially expressed in various tissues/developmental stages and under stress conditions in different legumes. We validated the differential expression of selected chickpea homeobox genes via quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Genome duplication analysis in soybean indicated that segmental duplication has significantly contributed in the expansion of homeobox gene family. The Ka/Ks ratio of duplicated homeobox genes in soybean showed that several members of this family have undergone purifying selection. Moreover, expression profiling indicated that duplicated genes might have been retained due to sub-functionalization. The genome-wide identification and comprehensive gene expression profiling of homeobox gene family members in legumes will provide opportunities for functional analysis to unravel their exact role in plant growth and development.

  20. WebScipio: An online tool for the determination of gene structures using protein sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waack Stephan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obtaining the gene structure for a given protein encoding gene is an important step in many analyses. A software suited for this task should be readily accessible, accurate, easy to handle and should provide the user with a coherent representation of the most probable gene structure. It should be rigorous enough to optimise features on the level of single bases and at the same time flexible enough to allow for cross-species searches. Results WebScipio, a web interface to the Scipio software, allows a user to obtain the corresponding coding sequence structure of a here given a query protein sequence that belongs to an already assembled eukaryotic genome. The resulting gene structure is presented in various human readable formats like a schematic representation, and a detailed alignment of the query and the target sequence highlighting any discrepancies. WebScipio can also be used to identify and characterise the gene structures of homologs in related organisms. In addition, it offers a web service for integration with other programs. Conclusion WebScipio is a tool that allows users to get a high-quality gene structure prediction from a protein query. It offers more than 250 eukaryotic genomes that can be searched and produces predictions that are close to what can be achieved by manual annotation, for in-species and cross-species searches alike. WebScipio is freely accessible at http://www.webscipio.org.

  1. Gene transfer and genome-wide insertional mutagenesis by retroviral transduction in fish stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qizhi Liu

    Full Text Available Retrovirus (RV is efficient for gene transfer and integration in dividing cells of diverse organisms. RV provides a powerful tool for insertional mutagenesis (IM to identify and functionally analyze genes essential for normal and pathological processes. Here we report RV-mediated gene transfer and genome-wide IM in fish stem cells from medaka and zebrafish. Three RVs were produced for fish cell transduction: rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce green fluorescent protein (GFP and mCherry fluorescent protein respectively under control of human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter upon any chromosomal integration, whereas rvGTgfp contains a splicing acceptor and expresses GFP only upon gene trapping (GT via intronic in-frame integration and spliced to endogenous active genes. We show that rvLegfp and rvLcherry produce a transduction efficiency of 11~23% in medaka and zebrafish stem cell lines, which is as 30~67% efficient as the positive control in NIH/3T3. Upon co-infection with rvGTgfp and rvLcherry, GFP-positive cells were much fewer than Cherry-positive cells, consistent with rareness of productive gene trapping events versus random integration. Importantly, rvGTgfp infection in the medaka haploid embryonic stem (ES cell line HX1 generated GTgfp insertion on all 24 chromosomes of the haploid genome. Similar to the mammalian haploid cells, these insertion events were presented predominantly in intergenic regions and introns but rarely in exons. RV-transduced HX1 retained the ES cell properties such as stable growth, embryoid body formation and pluripotency gene expression. Therefore, RV is proficient for gene transfer and IM in fish stem cells. Our results open new avenue for genome-wide IM in medaka haploid ES cells in culture.

  2. Whole genome sequencing as a tool for phylogenetic analysis of clinical strains of Mitis group streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, L H; Dargis, R; Højholt, K; Christensen, J J; Skovgaard, O; Justesen, U S; Rosenvinge, F S; Moser, C; Lukjancenko, O; Rasmussen, S; Nielsen, X C

    2016-10-01

    Identification of Mitis group streptococci (MGS) to the species level is challenging for routine microbiology laboratories. Correct identification is crucial for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis, identification of treatment failure, and/or infection relapse. Eighty MGS from Danish patients with infective endocarditis were whole genome sequenced. We compared the phylogenetic analyses based on single genes (recA, sodA, gdh), multigene (MLSA), SNPs, and core-genome sequences. The six phylogenetic analyses generally showed a similar pattern of six monophyletic clusters, though a few differences were observed in single gene analyses. Species identification based on single gene analysis showed their limitations when more strains were included. In contrast, analyses incorporating more sequence data, like MLSA, SNPs and core-genome analyses, provided more distinct clustering. The core-genome tree showed the most distinct clustering.

  3. Cost-effective cloud computing: a case study using the comparative genomics tool, roundup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudtarkar, Parul; Deluca, Todd F; Fusaro, Vincent A; Tonellato, Peter J; Wall, Dennis P

    2010-12-22

    Comparative genomics resources, such as ortholog detection tools and repositories are rapidly increasing in scale and complexity. Cloud computing is an emerging technological paradigm that enables researchers to dynamically build a dedicated virtual cluster and may represent a valuable alternative for large computational tools in bioinformatics. In the present manuscript, we optimize the computation of a large-scale comparative genomics resource-Roundup-using cloud computing, describe the proper operating principles required to achieve computational efficiency on the cloud, and detail important procedures for improving cost-effectiveness to ensure maximal computation at minimal costs. Utilizing the comparative genomics tool, Roundup, as a case study, we computed orthologs among 902 fully sequenced genomes on Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud. For managing the ortholog processes, we designed a strategy to deploy the web service, Elastic MapReduce, and maximize the use of the cloud while simultaneously minimizing costs. Specifically, we created a model to estimate cloud runtime based on the size and complexity of the genomes being compared that determines in advance the optimal order of the jobs to be submitted. We computed orthologous relationships for 245,323 genome-to-genome comparisons on Amazon's computing cloud, a computation that required just over 200 hours and cost $8,000 USD, at least 40% less than expected under a strategy in which genome comparisons were submitted to the cloud randomly with respect to runtime. Our cost savings projections were based on a model that not only demonstrates the optimal strategy for deploying RSD to the cloud, but also finds the optimal cluster size to minimize waste and maximize usage. Our cost-reduction model is readily adaptable for other comparative genomics tools and potentially of significant benefit to labs seeking to take advantage of the cloud as an alternative to local computing infrastructure.

  4. Alpha tubulin genes from Leishmania braziliensis: genomic organization, gene structure and insights on their expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, César A; Requena, José M; Puerta, Concepción J

    2013-07-06

    Alpha tubulin is a fundamental component of the cytoskeleton which is responsible for cell shape and is involved in cell division, ciliary and flagellar motility and intracellular transport. Alpha tubulin gene expression varies according to the morphological changes suffered by Leishmania in its life cycle. However, the objective of studying the mechanisms responsible for the differential expression has resulted to be a difficult task due to the complex genome organization of tubulin genes and to the non-conventional mechanisms of gene regulation operating in Leishmania. We started this work by analyzing the genomic organization of α-tubulin genes in the Leishmania braziliensis genome database. The genomic organization of L. braziliensis α-tubulin genes differs from that existing in the L. major and L. infantum genomes. Two loci containing α-tubulin genes were found in the chromosomes 13 and 29, even though the existence of sequence gaps does not allow knowing the exact number of genes at each locus. Southern blot assays showed that α-tubulin locus at chromosome 13 contains at least 8 gene copies, which are tandemly organized with a 2.08-kb repetition unit; the locus at chromosome 29 seems to contain a sole α-tubulin gene. In addition, it was found that L. braziliensis α-tubulin locus at chromosome 13 contains two types of α-tubulin genes differing in their 3' UTR, each one presumably containing different regulatory motifs. It was also determined that the mRNA expression levels of these genes are controlled by post-transcriptional mechanisms tightly linked to the growth temperature. Moreover, the decrease in the α-tubulin mRNA abundance observed when promastigotes were cultured at 35°C was accompanied by parasite morphology alterations, similar to that occurring during the promastigote to amastigote differentiation. Information found in the genome databases indicates that α-tubulin genes have been reorganized in a drastic manner along Leishmania

  5. Synonymous Virus Genome Recoding as a Tool to Impact Viral Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Miguel Angel; Jordan-Paiz, Ana; Franco, Sandra; Nevot, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Synthetic genome recoding is a novel method of generating viruses with altered phenotypes, whereby many synonymous mutations are introduced into the protein coding region of the virus genome without altering the encoded proteins. Virus genome recoding with large numbers of slightly deleterious mutations has produced attenuated forms of several RNA viruses. Virus genome recoding can also aid in investigating virus interactions with innate immune responses, identifying functional virus genome structures, strategically ameliorating cis-inhibitory signaling sequences related to complex viral functions, to unravel the relevance of codon usage for the temporal regulation of viral gene expression and improving our knowledge of virus mutational robustness and adaptability. The present review discusses the impacts of synonymous genome recoding with regard to expanding our comprehension of virus biology, and the development of new and better therapeutic strategies.

  6. Classical Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes: A Comparative Genomics Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oxana K. Pickeral

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available We have curated a reference set of cancer-related genes and reanalyzed their sequences in the light of molecular information and resources that have become available since they were first cloned. Homology studies were carried out for human oncogenes and tumor suppressors, compared with the complete proteome of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, and partial proteomes of mouse and rat and the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Our results demonstrate that simple, semi-automated bioinformatics approaches to identifying putative functionally equivalent gene products in different organisms may often be misleading. An electronic supplement to this article1 provides an integrated view of our comparative genomics analysis as well as mapping data, physical cDNA resources and links to published literature and reviews, thus creating a “window” into the genomes of humans and other organisms for cancer biology.

  7. Genomic discovery of potent chromatin insulators for human gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mingdong; Maurano, Matthew T; Wang, Hao; Qi, Heyuan; Song, Chao-Zhong; Navas, Patrick A; Emery, David W; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A; Stamatoyannopoulos, George

    2015-02-01

    Insertional mutagenesis and genotoxicity, which usually manifest as hematopoietic malignancy, represent major barriers to realizing the promise of gene therapy. Although insulator sequences that block transcriptional enhancers could mitigate or eliminate these risks, so far no human insulators with high functional potency have been identified. Here we describe a genomic approach for the identification of compact sequence elements that function as insulators. These elements are highly occupied by the insulator protein CTCF, are DNase I hypersensitive and represent only a small minority of the CTCF recognition sequences in the human genome. We show that the elements identified acted as potent enhancer blockers and substantially decreased the risk of tumor formation in a cancer-prone animal model. The elements are small, can be efficiently accommodated by viral vectors and have no detrimental effects on viral titers. The insulators we describe here are expected to increase the safety of gene therapy for genetic diseases.

  8. A whole genome RNAi screen identifies replication stress response genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Gina; Ye, Fei; Mohni, Kareem N; Luzwick, Jessica W; Glick, Gloria; Cortez, David

    2015-11-01

    Proper DNA replication is critical to maintain genome stability. When the DNA replication machinery encounters obstacles to replication, replication forks stall and the replication stress response is activated. This response includes activation of cell cycle checkpoints, stabilization of the replication fork, and DNA damage repair and tolerance mechanisms. Defects in the replication stress response can result in alterations to the DNA sequence causing changes in protein function and expression, ultimately leading to disease states such as cancer. To identify additional genes that control the replication stress response, we performed a three-parameter, high content, whole genome siRNA screen measuring DNA replication before and after a challenge with replication stress as well as a marker of checkpoint kinase signalling. We identified over 200 replication stress response genes and subsequently analyzed how they influence cellular viability in response to replication stress. These data will serve as a useful resource for understanding the replication stress response.

  9. Emerging Genomic Tools for Legume Breeding: Current Status and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manish K; Roorkiwal, Manish; Singh, Vikas K; Ramalingam, Abirami; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Chitikineni, Anu; Rathore, Abhishek; Varshney, Rajeev K

    2016-01-01

    Legumes play a vital role in ensuring global nutritional food security and improving soil quality through nitrogen fixation. Accelerated higher genetic gains is required to meet the demand of ever increasing global population. In recent years, speedy developments have been witnessed in legume genomics due to advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) and high-throughput genotyping technologies. Reference genome sequences for many legume crops have been reported in the last 5 years. The availability of the draft genome sequences and re-sequencing of elite genotypes for several important legume crops have made it possible to identify structural variations at large scale. Availability of large-scale genomic resources and low-cost and high-throughput genotyping technologies are enhancing the efficiency and resolution of genetic mapping and marker-trait association studies. Most importantly, deployment of molecular breeding approaches has resulted in development of improved lines in some legume crops such as chickpea and groundnut. In order to support genomics-driven crop improvement at a fast pace, the deployment of breeder-friendly genomics and decision support tools seems appear to be critical in breeding programs in developing countries. This review provides an overview of emerging genomics and informatics tools/approaches that will be the key driving force for accelerating genomics-assisted breeding and ultimately ensuring nutritional and food security in developing countries.

  10. EVA: Exome Variation Analyzer, an efficient and versatile tool for filtering strategies in medical genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutant Sophie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole exome sequencing (WES has become the strategy of choice to identify a coding allelic variant for a rare human monogenic disorder. This approach is a revolution in medical genetics history, impacting both fundamental research, and diagnostic methods leading to personalized medicine. A plethora of efficient algorithms has been developed to ensure the variant discovery. They generally lead to ~20,000 variations that have to be narrow down to find the potential pathogenic allelic variant(s and the affected gene(s. For this purpose, commonly adopted procedures which implicate various filtering strategies have emerged: exclusion of common variations, type of the allelics variants, pathogenicity effect prediction, modes of inheritance and multiple individuals for exome comparison. To deal with the expansion of WES in medical genomics individual laboratories, new convivial and versatile software tools have to implement these filtering steps. Non-programmer biologists have to be autonomous combining themselves different filtering criteria and conduct a personal strategy depending on their assumptions and study design. Results We describe EVA (Exome Variation Analyzer, a user-friendly web-interfaced software dedicated to the filtering strategies for medical WES. Thanks to different modules, EVA (i integrates and stores annotated exome variation data as strictly confidential to the project owner, (ii allows to combine the main filters dealing with common variations, molecular types, inheritance mode and multiple samples, (iii offers the browsing of annotated data and filtered results in various interactive tables, graphical visualizations and statistical charts, (iv and finally offers export files and cross-links to external useful databases and softwares for further prioritization of the small subset of sorted candidate variations and genes. We report a demonstrative case study that allowed to identify a new candidate gene

  11. Genomic organization and evolution of the ULBP genes in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Joshua H; Marron, Brandy M; Beever, Jonathan E; Roe, Bruce A; Lewin, Harris A

    2006-09-05

    The cattle UL16-binding protein 1 (ULBP1) and ULBP2 genes encode members of the MHC Class I superfamily that have homology to the human ULBP genes. Human ULBP1 and ULBP2 interact with the NKG2D receptor to activate effector cells in the immune system. The human cytomegalovirus UL16 protein is known to disrupt the ULBP-NKG2D interaction, thereby subverting natural killer cell-mediated responses. Previous Southern blotting experiments identified evidence of increased ULBP copy number within the genomes of ruminant artiodactyls. On the basis of these observations we hypothesized that the cattle ULBPs evolved by duplication and sequence divergence to produce a sufficient number and diversity of ULBP molecules to deliver an immune activation signal in the presence of immunogenic peptides. Given the importance of the ULBPs in antiviral immunity in other species, our goal was to determine the copy number and genomic organization of the ULBP genes in the cattle genome. Sequencing of cattle bacterial artificial chromosome genomic inserts resulted in the identification of 30 cattle ULBP loci existing in two gene clusters. Evidence of extensive segmental duplication and approximately 14 Kbp of novel repetitive sequences were identified within the major cluster. Ten ULBPs are predicted to be expressed at the cell surface. Substitution analysis revealed 11 outwardly directed residues in the predicted extracellular domains that show evidence of positive Darwinian selection. These positively selected residues have only one residue that overlaps with those proposed to interact with NKG2D, thus suggesting the interaction with molecules other than NKG2D. The ULBP loci in the cattle genome apparently arose by gene duplication and subsequent sequence divergence. Substitution analysis of the ULBP proteins provided convincing evidence for positive selection on extracellular residues that may interact with peptide ligands. These results support our hypothesis that the cattle ULBPs

  12. Genomic organization and evolution of the ULBP genes in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Harris A

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cattle UL16-binding protein 1 (ULBP1 and ULBP2 genes encode members of the MHC Class I superfamily that have homology to the human ULBP genes. Human ULBP1 and ULBP2 interact with the NKG2D receptor to activate effector cells in the immune system. The human cytomegalovirus UL16 protein is known to disrupt the ULBP-NKG2D interaction, thereby subverting natural killer cell-mediated responses. Previous Southern blotting experiments identified evidence of increased ULBP copy number within the genomes of ruminant artiodactyls. On the basis of these observations we hypothesized that the cattle ULBPs evolved by duplication and sequence divergence to produce a sufficient number and diversity of ULBP molecules to deliver an immune activation signal in the presence of immunogenic peptides. Given the importance of the ULBPs in antiviral immunity in other species, our goal was to determine the copy number and genomic organization of the ULBP genes in the cattle genome. Results Sequencing of cattle bacterial artificial chromosome genomic inserts resulted in the identification of 30 cattle ULBP loci existing in two gene clusters. Evidence of extensive segmental duplication and approximately 14 Kbp of novel repetitive sequences were identified within the major cluster. Ten ULBPs are predicted to be expressed at the cell surface. Substitution analysis revealed 11 outwardly directed residues in the predicted extracellular domains that show evidence of positive Darwinian selection. These positively selected residues have only one residue that overlaps with those proposed to interact with NKG2D, thus suggesting the interaction with molecules other than NKG2D. Conclusion The ULBP loci in the cattle genome apparently arose by gene duplication and subsequent sequence divergence. Substitution analysis of the ULBP proteins provided convincing evidence for positive selection on extracellular residues that may interact with peptide ligands. These

  13. Metabolic Genes within Cyanophage Genomes: Implications for Diversity and Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E-Bin Gao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyanophages, a group of viruses specifically infecting cyanobacteria, are genetically diverse and extensively abundant in water environments. As a result of selective pressure, cyanophages often acquire a range of metabolic genes from host genomes. The host-derived genes make a significant contribution to the ecological success of cyanophages. In this review, we summarize the host-derived metabolic genes, as well as their origin and roles in cyanophage evolution and important host metabolic pathways, such as the light-dependent reactions of photosynthesis, the pentose phosphate pathway, nutrient acquisition and nucleotide biosynthesis. We also discuss the suitability of the host-derived metabolic genes as potential diagnostic markers for the detection of genetic diversity of cyanophages in natural environments.

  14. Bioinformatics tools and databases for whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faksri, Kiatichai; Tan, Jun Hao; Chaiprasert, Angkana; Teo, Yik-Ying; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee

    2016-11-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease of global public health importance caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) in which M. tuberculosis (Mtb) is the major causative agent. Recent advancements in genomic technologies such as next generation sequencing have enabled high throughput cost-effective generation of whole genome sequence information from Mtb clinical isolates, providing new insights into the evolution, genomic diversity and transmission of the Mtb bacteria, including molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance. The large volume of sequencing data generated however necessitated effective and efficient management, storage, analysis and visualization of the data and results through development of novel and customized bioinformatics software tools and databases. In this review, we aim to provide a comprehensive survey of the current freely available bioinformatics software tools and publicly accessible databases for genomic analysis of Mtb for identifying disease transmission in molecular epidemiology and in rapid determination of the antibiotic profiles of clinical isolates for prompt and optimal patient treatment.

  15. DivStat: a user-friendly tool for single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of genomic diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Soares

    Full Text Available Recent developments have led to an enormous increase of publicly available large genomic data, including complete genomes. The 1000 Genomes Project was a major contributor, releasing the results of sequencing a large number of individual genomes, and allowing for a myriad of large scale studies on human genetic variation. However, the tools currently available are insufficient when the goal concerns some analyses of data sets encompassing more than hundreds of base pairs and when considering haplotype sequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Here, we present a new and potent tool to deal with large data sets allowing the computation of a variety of summary statistics of population genetic data, increasing the speed of data analysis.

  16. High-throughput gene and SNP discovery in Eucalyptus grandis, an uncharacterized genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pappas Georgios J

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benefits from high-throughput sequencing using 454 pyrosequencing technology may be most apparent for species with high societal or economic value but few genomic resources. Rapid means of gene sequence and SNP discovery using this novel sequencing technology provide a set of baseline tools for genome-level research. However, it is questionable how effective the sequencing of large numbers of short reads for species with essentially no prior gene sequence information will support contig assemblies and sequence annotation. Results With the purpose of generating the first broad survey of gene sequences in Eucalyptus grandis, the most widely planted hardwood tree species, we used 454 technology to sequence and assemble 148 Mbp of expressed sequences (EST. EST sequences were generated from a normalized cDNA pool comprised of multiple tissues and genotypes, promoting discovery of homologues to almost half of Arabidopsis genes, and a comprehensive survey of allelic variation in the transcriptome. By aligning the sequencing reads from multiple genotypes we detected 23,742 SNPs, 83% of which were validated in a sample. Genome-wide nucleotide diversity was estimated for 2,392 contigs using a modified theta (θ parameter, adapted for measuring genetic diversity from polymorphisms detected by randomly sequencing a multi-genotype cDNA pool. Diversity estimates in non-synonymous nucleotides were on average 4x smaller than in synonymous, suggesting purifying selection. Non-synonymous to synonymous substitutions (Ka/Ks among 2,001 contigs averaged 0.30 and was skewed to the right, further supporting that most genes are under purifying selection. Comparison of these estimates among contigs identified major functional classes of genes under purifying and diversifying selection in agreement with previous researches. Conclusion In providing an abundance of foundational transcript sequences where limited prior genomic information existed, this

  17. Regulatory Features for Odorant Receptor Genes in the Mouse Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degl'Innocenti, Andrea; D'Errico, Anna

    2017-01-01

    The odorant receptor genes, seven transmembrane receptor genes constituting the vastest mammalian gene multifamily, are expressed monogenically and monoallelicaly in each sensory neuron in the olfactory epithelium. This characteristic, often referred to as the one neuron-one receptor rule, is driven by mostly uncharacterized molecular dynamics, generally named odorant receptor gene choice. Much attention has been paid by the scientific community to the identification of sequences regulating the expression of odorant receptor genes within their loci, where related genes are usually arranged in genomic clusters. A number of studies identified transcription factor binding sites on odorant receptor promoter sequences. Similar binding sites were also found on a number of enhancers that regulate in cis their transcription, but have been proposed to form interchromosomal networks. Odorant receptor gene choice seems to occur via the local removal of strongly repressive epigenetic markings, put in place during the maturation of the sensory neuron on each odorant receptor locus. Here we review the fast-changing state of art for the study of regulatory features for odorant receptor genes.

  18. Comparative genome-scale analysis of niche-based stress-responsive genes in Lactobacillus helveticus strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senan, Suja; Prajapati, Jashbhai B; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2014-04-01

    Next generation sequencing technologies with advanced bioinformatic tools present a unique opportunity to compare genomes from diverse niches. The identification of niche-specific stress-responsive genes can help in characterizing robust strains for multiple applications. In this study, we attempted to compare the stress-responsive genes of a potential probiotic strain, Lactobacillus helveticus MTCC 5463, and a cheese starter strain, Lactobacillus helveticus DPC 4571, from a gut and dairy niche, respectively. Sequencing of MTCC 5463 was done using 454 GS FLX, and contigs were assembled using GS Assembler software. Genome analysis was done using BLAST hits and the prokaryotic annotation server RAST. The MTCC 5463 genome carried multiple orthologs of genes governing stress responses, whereas the DPC 4571 genome lacked in the number of major stress-response proteins. The absence of the bile salt hydrolase gene in DPC 4571 and its presence in MTCC 5463 clearly indicated niche adaptation. Further, MTCC 5463 carried higher copy numbers of genes contributing towards heat, cold, osmotic, and oxidative stress resistance as compared with DPC 4571. Through comparative genomics, we could thus identify stress-responsive gene sets required to adapt to gut and dairy niches.

  19. New Markov Model Approaches to Deciphering Microbial Genome Function and Evolution: Comparative Genomics of Laterally Transferred Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodovsky, M.

    2013-04-11

    Algorithmic methods for gene prediction have been developed and successfully applied to many different prokaryotic genome sequences. As the set of genes in a particular genome is not homogeneous with respect to DNA sequence composition features, the GeneMark.hmm program utilizes two Markov models representing distinct classes of protein coding genes denoted "typical" and "atypical". Atypical genes are those whose DNA features deviate significantly from those classified as typical and they represent approximately 10% of any given genome. In addition to the inherent interest of more accurately predicting genes, the atypical status of these genes may also reflect their separate evolutionary ancestry from other genes in that genome. We hypothesize that atypical genes are largely comprised of those genes that have been relatively recently acquired through lateral gene transfer (LGT). If so, what fraction of atypical genes are such bona fide LGTs? We have made atypical gene predictions for all fully completed prokaryotic genomes; we have been able to compare these results to other "surrogate" methods of LGT prediction.

  20. A fungal phylogeny based on 42 complete genomes derived from supertree and combined gene analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stajich Jason E

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, most fungal phylogenies have been derived from single gene comparisons, or from concatenated alignments of a small number of genes. The increase in fungal genome sequencing presents an opportunity to reconstruct evolutionary events using entire genomes. As a tool for future comparative, phylogenomic and phylogenetic studies, we used both supertrees and concatenated alignments to infer relationships between 42 species of fungi for which complete genome sequences are available. Results A dataset of 345,829 genes was extracted from 42 publicly available fungal genomes. Supertree methods were employed to derive phylogenies from 4,805 single gene families. We found that the average consensus supertree method may suffer from long-branch attraction artifacts, while matrix representation with parsimony (MRP appears to be immune from these. A genome phylogeny was also reconstructed from a concatenated alignment of 153 universally distributed orthologs. Our MRP supertree and concatenated phylogeny are highly congruent. Within the Ascomycota, the sub-phyla Pezizomycotina and Saccharomycotina were resolved. Both phylogenies infer that the Leotiomycetes are the closest sister group to the Sordariomycetes. There is some ambiguity regarding the placement of Stagonospora nodurum, the sole member of the class Dothideomycetes present in the dataset. Within the Saccharomycotina, a monophyletic clade containing organisms that translate CTG as serine instead of leucine is evident. There is also strong support for two groups within the CTG clade, one containing the fully sexual species Candida lusitaniae, Candida guilliermondii and Debaryomyces hansenii, and the second group containing Candida albicans, Candida dubliniensis, Candida tropicalis, Candida parapsilosis and Lodderomyces elongisporus. The second major clade within the Saccharomycotina contains species whose genomes have undergone a whole genome duplication (WGD, and their close

  1. Genome-level identification, gene expression, and comparative analysis of porcine ß-defensin genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Min-Kyeung

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-defensins (β-defensins are innate immune peptides with evolutionary conservation across a wide range of species and has been suggested to play important roles in innate immune reactions against pathogens. However, the complete β-defensin repertoire in the pig has not been fully addressed. Result A BLAST analysis was performed against the available pig genomic sequence in the NCBI database to identify β-defensin-related sequences using previously reported β-defensin sequences of pigs, humans, and cattle. The porcine β-defensin gene clusters were mapped to chromosomes 7, 14, 15 and 17. The gene expression analysis of 17 newly annotated porcine β-defensin genes across 15 tissues using semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR showed differences in their tissue distribution, with the kidney and testis having the largest pBD expression repertoire. We also analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the mature peptide region of pBD genes from 35 pigs of 7 breeds. We found 8 cSNPs in 7 pBDs. Conclusion We identified 29 porcine β-defensin (pBD gene-like sequences, including 17 unreported pBDs in the porcine genome. Comparative analysis of β-defensin genes in the pig genome with those in human and cattle genomes showed structural conservation of β-defensin syntenic regions among these species.

  2. BAGEL : a web-based bacteriocin genome mining tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Anne; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Bijlsma, Jetta J. E.; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2006-01-01

    A common problem in the annotation of open reading frames (ORFs) is the identification of genes that are functionally similar but have limited or no sequence homology. This is particularly the case for bacteriocins, a very diverse group of antimicrobial peptides produced by bacteria and usually enco

  3. BAGEL: a web-based bacteriocin genome mining tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, A; van Hijum, S.A F T; Bijlsma, Jetta; Kok, J.; Kuipers, O.P.

    2006-01-01

    A common problem in the annotation of open reading frames (ORFs) is the identification of genes that are functionally similar but have limited or no sequence homology. This is particularly the case for bacteriocins, a very diverse group of antimicrobial peptides produced by bacteria and usually enco

  4. BAGEL : a web-based bacteriocin genome mining tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Anne; van Hijum, Sacha A. F. T.; Bijlsma, Jetta J. E.; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2006-01-01

    A common problem in the annotation of open reading frames (ORFs) is the identification of genes that are functionally similar but have limited or no sequence homology. This is particularly the case for bacteriocins, a very diverse group of antimicrobial peptides produced by bacteria and usually

  5. Gene targeting and transgene stacking using intra genomic homologous recombination in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Barone, Pierluigi; Smith, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Modern agriculture has created a demand for plant biotechnology products that provide durable resistance to insect pests, tolerance of herbicide applications for weed control, and agronomic traits tailored for specific geographies. These transgenic trait products require a modular and sequential multigene stacking platform that is supported by precise genome engineering technology. Designed nucleases have emerged as potent tools for creating targeted DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Exogenously supplied donor DNA can repair the targeted DSB by a process known as gene targeting (GT), resulting in a desired modification of the target genome. The potential of GT technology has not been fully realized for trait deployment in agriculture, mainly because of inefficient transformation and plant regeneration systems in a majority of crop plants and genotypes. This challenge of transgene stacking in plants could be overcome by Intra-Genomic Homologous Recombination (IGHR) that converts independently segregating unlinked donor and target transgenic loci into a genetically linked molecular stack. The method requires stable integration of the donor DNA into the plant genome followed by intra-genomic mobilization. IGHR complements conventional breeding with genetic transformation and designed nucleases to provide a flexible transgene stacking and trait deployment platform.

  6. Evolution of endogenous non-retroviral genes integrated into plant genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyosub Chu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Numerous comparative genome analyses have revealed the wide extent of horizontal gene transfer (HGT in living organisms, which contributes to their evolution and genetic diversity. Viruses play important roles in HGT. Endogenous viral elements (EVEs are defined as viral DNA sequences present within the genomes of non-viral organisms. In eukaryotic cells, the majority of EVEs are derived from RNA viruses using reverse transcription. In contrast, endogenous non-retroviral elements (ENREs are poorly studied. However, the increasing availability of genomic data and the rapid development of bioinformatics tools have enabled the identification of several ENREs in various eukaryotic organisms. To date, a small number of ENREs integrated into plant genomes have been identified. Of the known non-retroviruses, most identified ENREs are derived from double-strand (ds RNA viruses, followed by single-strand (ss DNA and ssRNA viruses. At least eight virus families have been identified. Of these, viruses in the family Partitiviridae are dominant, followed by viruses of the families Chrysoviridae and Geminiviridae. The identified ENREs have been primarily identified in eudicots, followed by monocots. In this review, we briefly discuss the current view on non-retroviral sequences integrated into plant genomes that are associated with plant-virus evolution and their possible roles in antiviral resistance.

  7. VarB Plus: An Integrated Tool for Visualization of Genome Variation Datasets

    KAUST Repository

    Hidayah, Lailatul

    2012-07-01

    Research on genomic sequences has been improving significantly as more advanced technology for sequencing has been developed. This opens enormous opportunities for sequence analysis. Various analytical tools have been built for purposes such as sequence assembly, read alignments, genome browsing, comparative genomics, and visualization. From the visualization perspective, there is an increasing trend towards use of large-scale computation. However, more than power is required to produce an informative image. This is a challenge that we address by providing several ways of representing biological data in order to advance the inference endeavors of biologists. This thesis focuses on visualization of variations found in genomic sequences. We develop several visualization functions and embed them in an existing variation visualization tool as extensions. The tool we improved is named VarB, hence the nomenclature for our enhancement is VarB Plus. To the best of our knowledge, besides VarB, there is no tool that provides the capability of dynamic visualization of genome variation datasets as well as statistical analysis. Dynamic visualization allows users to toggle different parameters on and off and see the results on the fly. The statistical analysis includes Fixation Index, Relative Variant Density, and Tajima’s D. Hence we focused our efforts on this tool. The scope of our work includes plots of per-base genome coverage, Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA), integration with a read alignment viewer named LookSeq, and visualization of geo-biological data. In addition to description of embedded functionalities, significance, and limitations, future improvements are discussed. The result is four extensions embedded successfully in the original tool, which is built on the Qt framework in C++. Hence it is portable to numerous platforms. Our extensions have shown acceptable execution time in a beta testing with various high-volume published datasets, as well as positive

  8. Whole Genome Sequencing and a New Bioinformatics Platform Allow for Rapid Gene Identification in D. melanogaster EMS Screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeannette Osterloh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Forward genetic screens in Drosophila melanogaster using ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS mutagenesis are a powerful approach for identifying genes that modulate specific biological processes in an in vivo setting. The mapping of genes that contain randomly-induced point mutations has become more efficient in Drosophila thanks to the maturation and availability of many types of genetic tools. However, classic approaches to gene mapping are relatively slow and ultimately require extensive Sanger sequencing of candidate chromosomal loci. With the advent of new high-throughput sequencing techniques, it is increasingly efficient to directly re-sequence the whole genome of model organisms. This approach, in combination with traditional chromosomal mapping, has the potential to greatly simplify and accelerate mutation identification in mutants generated in EMS screens. Here we show that next-generation sequencing (NGS is an accurate and efficient tool for high-throughput sequencing and mutation discovery in Drosophila melanogaster. As a test case, mutant strains of Drosophila that exhibited long-term survival of severed peripheral axons were identified in a forward EMS mutagenesis. All mutants were recessive and fell into a single lethal complementation group, which suggested that a single gene was responsible for the protective axon degenerative phenotype. Whole genome sequencing of these genomes identified the underlying gene ect4. To improve the process of genome wide mutation identification, we developed Genomes Management Application (GEM.app, https://genomics.med.miami.edu, a graphical online user interface to a custom query framework. Using a custom GEM.app query, we were able to identify that each mutant carried a unique non-sense mutation in the gene ect4 (dSarm, which was recently shown by Osterloh et al. to be essential for the activation of axonal degeneration. Our results demonstrate the current advantages and limitations of NGS in Drosophila

  9. Tools and Principles for Microbial Gene Circuit Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Robert W; Buck, Martin; Wang, Baojun

    2016-02-27

    Synthetic biologists aim to construct novel genetic circuits with useful applications through rational design and forward engineering. Given the complexity of signal processing that occurs in natural biological systems, engineered microbes have the potential to perform a wide range of desirable tasks that require sophisticated computation and control. Realising this goal will require accurate predictive design of complex synthetic gene circuits and accompanying large sets of quality modular and orthogonal genetic parts. Here we present a current overview of the versatile components and tools available for engineering gene circuits in microbes, including recently developed RNA-based tools that possess large dynamic ranges and can be easily programmed. We introduce design principles that enable robust and scalable circuit performance such as insulating a gene circuit against unwanted interactions with its context, and we describe efficient strategies for rapidly identifying and correcting causes of failure and fine-tuning circuit characteristics.

  10. BioViews: Java-based tools for genomic data visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helt, G A; Lewis, S; Loraine, A E; Rubin, G M

    1998-03-01

    Visualization tools for bioinformatics ideally should provide universal access to the most current data in an interactive and intuitive graphical user interface. Since the introduction of Java, a language designed for distributed programming over the Web, the technology now exists to build a genomic data visualization tool that meets these requirements. Using Java we have developed a prototype genome browser applet (BioViews) that incorporates a three-level graphical view of genomic data: a physical map, an annotated sequence map, and a DNA sequence display. Annotated biological features are displayed on the physical and sequence-based maps, and the different views are interconnected. The applet is linked to several databases and can retrieve features and display hyperlinked textual data on selected features. In addition to browsing genomic data, different types of analyses can be performed interactively and the results of these analyses visualized alongside prior annotations. Our genome browser is built on top of extensible, reusable graphic components specifically designed for bioinformatics. Other groups can (and do) reuse this work in various ways. Genome centers can reuse large parts of the genome browser with minor modifications, bioinformatics groups working on sequence analysis can reuse components to build front ends for analysis programs, and biology laboratories can reuse components to publish results as dynamic Web documents.

  11. Accessing the SEED Genome Databases via Web Services API: Tools for Programmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vonstein Veronika

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SEED integrates many publicly available genome sequences into a single resource. The database contains accurate and up-to-date annotations based on the subsystems concept that leverages clustering between genomes and other clues to accurately and efficiently annotate microbial genomes. The backend is used as the foundation for many genome annotation tools, such as the Rapid Annotation using Subsystems Technology (RAST server for whole genome annotation, the metagenomics RAST server for random community genome annotations, and the annotation clearinghouse for exchanging annotations from different resources. In addition to a web user interface, the SEED also provides Web services based API for programmatic access to the data in the SEED, allowing the development of third-party tools and mash-ups. Results The currently exposed Web services encompass over forty different methods for accessing data related to microbial genome annotations. The Web services provide comprehensive access to the database back end, allowing any programmer access to the most consistent and accurate genome annotations available. The Web services are deployed using a platform independent service-oriented approach that allows the user to choose the most suitable programming platform for their application. Example code demonstrate that Web services can be used to access the SEED using common bioinformatics programming languages such as Perl, Python, and Java. Conclusions We present a novel approach to access the SEED database. Using Web services, a robust API for access to genomics data is provided, without requiring large volume downloads all at once. The API ensures timely access to the most current datasets available, including the new genomes as soon as they come online.

  12. Gene set analyses of genome-wide association studies on 49 quantitative traits measured in a single genetic epidemiology dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Kwon, Ji-Sun; Kim, Sangsoo

    2013-09-01

    Gene set analysis is a powerful tool for interpreting a genome-wide association study result and is gaining popularity these days. Comparison of the gene sets obtained for a variety of traits measured from a single genetic epidemiology dataset may give insights into the biological mechanisms underlying these traits. Based on the previously published single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype data on 8,842 individuals enrolled in the Korea Association Resource project, we performed a series of systematic genome-wide association analyses for 49 quantitative traits of basic epidemiological, anthropometric, or blood chemistry parameters. Each analysis result was subjected to subsequent gene set analyses based on Gene Ontology (GO) terms using gene set analysis software, GSA-SNP, identifying a set of GO terms significantly associated to each trait (pcorr neuronal or nerve systems.

  13. Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biankin, Andrew V; Waddell, Nicola; Kassahn, Karin S; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B; Johns, Amber L; Miller, David K; Wilson, Peter J; Patch, Ann-Marie; Wu, Jianmin; Chang, David K; Cowley, Mark J; Gardiner, Brooke B; Song, Sarah; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Nourse, Craig; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Manning, Suzanne; Wani, Shivangi; Gongora, Milena; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Gill, Anthony J; Pinho, Andreia V; Rooman, Ilse; Anderson, Matthew; Holmes, Oliver; Leonard, Conrad; Taylor, Darrin; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Nones, Katia; Fink, J Lynn; Christ, Angelika; Bruxner, Tim; Cloonan, Nicole; Kolle, Gabriel; Newell, Felicity; Pinese, Mark; Mead, R Scott; Humphris, Jeremy L; Kaplan, Warren; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chou, Angela; Chin, Venessa T; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Daly, Roger J; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Kakkar, Nipun; Zhao, Fengmei; Wu, Yuan Qing; Wang, Min; Muzny, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Brunicardi, F Charles; Hodges, Sally E; Reid, Jeffrey G; Drummond, Jennifer; Chang, Kyle; Han, Yi; Lewis, Lora R; Dinh, Huyen; Buhay, Christian J; Beck, Timothy; Timms, Lee; Sam, Michelle; Begley, Kimberly; Brown, Andrew; Pai, Deepa; Panchal, Ami; Buchner, Nicholas; De Borja, Richard; Denroche, Robert E; Yung, Christina K; Serra, Stefano; Onetto, Nicole; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A; Petersen, Gloria M; Gallinger, Steven; Hruban, Ralph H; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Schulick, Richard D; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Capelli, Paola; Corbo, Vincenzo; Scardoni, Maria; Tortora, Giampaolo; Tempero, Margaret A; Mann, Karen M; Jenkins, Nancy A; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A; Adams, David J; Largaespada, David A; Wessels, Lodewyk F A; Rust, Alistair G; Stein, Lincoln D; Tuveson, David A; Copeland, Neal G; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Scarpa, Aldo; Eshleman, James R; Hudson, Thomas J; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Pearson, John V; McPherson, John D; Gibbs, Richard A; Grimmond, Sean M

    2012-11-15

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

  14. Genome-wide identification of KANADI1 target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paz Merelo

    Full Text Available Plant organ development and polarity establishment is mediated by the action of several transcription factors. Among these, the KANADI (KAN subclade of the GARP protein family plays important roles in polarity-associated processes during embryo, shoot and root patterning. In this study, we have identified a set of potential direct target genes of KAN1 through a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation/DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq and genome-wide transcriptional profiling using tiling arrays. Target genes are over-represented for genes involved in the regulation of organ development as well as in the response to auxin. KAN1 affects directly the expression of several genes previously shown to be important in the establishment of polarity during lateral organ and vascular tissue development. We also show that KAN1 controls through its target genes auxin effects on organ development at different levels: transport and its regulation, and signaling. In addition, KAN1 regulates genes involved in the response to abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, brassinosteroids, ethylene, cytokinins and gibberellins. The role of KAN1 in organ polarity is antagonized by HD-ZIPIII transcription factors, including REVOLUTA (REV. A comparison of their target genes reveals that the REV/KAN1 module acts in organ patterning through opposite regulation of shared targets. Evidence of mutual repression between closely related family members is also shown.

  15. Integrase-directed recovery of functional genes from genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe-Magnus, Dean A

    2009-09-01

    Large population sizes, rapid growth and 3.8 billion years of evolution firmly establish microorganisms as a major source of the planet's biological and genetic diversity. However, up to 99% of the microorganisms in a given environment cannot be cultured. Culture-independent methods that directly access the genetic potential of an environmental sample can unveil new proteins with diverse functions, but the sequencing of random DNA can generate enormous amounts of extraneous data. Integrons are recombination systems that accumulate open reading frames (gene cassettes), many of which code for functional proteins with enormous adaptive potential. Some integrons harbor hundreds of gene cassettes and evidence suggests that the gene cassette pool may be limitless in size. Accessing this genetic pool has been hampered since sequence-based techniques, such as hybridization or PCR, often recover only partial genes or a small subset of those present in the sample. Here, a three-plasmid genetic strategy for the sequence-independent recovery of gene cassettes from genomic libraries is described and its use by retrieving functional gene cassettes from the chromosomal integron of Vibrio vulnificus ATCC 27562 is demonstrated. By manipulating the natural activity of integrons, we can gain access to the caches of functional genes amassed by these structures.

  16. MODEST: a web-based design tool for oligonucleotide-mediated genome engineering and recombineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Klausen, Michael Schantz; Anderson, Mads Valdemar

    2014-01-01

    Recombineering and multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE) offer the possibility to rapidly modify multiple genomic or plasmid sites at high efficiencies. This enables efficient creation of genetic variants including both single mutants with specifically targeted modifications as well......, which confers the corresponding genetic change, is performed manually. To address these challenges, we have developed the MAGE Oligo Design Tool (MODEST). This web-based tool allows designing of MAGE oligos for (i) tuning translation rates by modifying the ribosomal binding site, (ii) generating...... efficiency recombineering and MAGE. MODEST is available for free and is open to all users at http://modest.biosustain.dtu.dk....

  17. Development of genomic SSR markers for fingerprinting lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cultivars and mapping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Gilda; Simko, Ivan

    2013-01-22

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is the major crop from the group of leafy vegetables. Several types of molecular markers were developed that are effectively used in lettuce breeding and genetic studies. However only a very limited number of microsattelite-based markers are publicly available. We have employed the method of enriched microsatellite libraries to develop 97 genomic SSR markers. Testing of newly developed markers on a set of 36 Lactuca accession (33 L. sativa, and one of each L. serriola L., L. saligna L., and L. virosa L.) revealed that both the genetic heterozygosity (UHe = 0.56) and the number of loci per SSR (Na = 5.50) are significantly higher for genomic SSR markers than for previously developed EST-based SSR markers (UHe = 0.32, Na = 3.56). Fifty-four genomic SSR markers were placed on the molecular linkage map of lettuce. Distribution of markers in the genome appeared to be random, with the exception of possible cluster on linkage group 6. Any combination of 32 genomic SSRs was able to distinguish genotypes of all 36 accessions. Fourteen of newly developed SSR markers originate from fragments with high sequence similarity to resistance gene candidates (RGCs) and RGC pseudogenes. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) of L. sativa accessions showed that approximately 3% of genetic diversity was within accessions, 79% among accessions, and 18% among horticultural types. The newly developed genomic SSR markers were added to the pool of previously developed EST-SSRs markers. These two types of SSR-based markers provide useful tools for lettuce cultivar fingerprinting, development of integrated molecular linkage maps, and mapping of genes.

  18. Comparative analysis of a cryptic thienamycin-like gene cluster identified in Streptomyces flavogriseus by genome mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Gloria

    2012-06-01

    In silico database searches allowed the identification in the S. flavogriseus ATCC 33331 genome of a carbapenem gene cluster highly related to the S. cattleya thienamycin one. This is the second cluster found for a complex highly substituted carbapenem. Comparative analysis revealed that both gene clusters display a high degree of synteny in gene organization and in protein conservation. Although the cluster appears to be silent under our laboratory conditions, the putative metabolic product was predicted from bioinformatics analyses using sequence comparison tools. These data, together with previous reports concerning epithienamycins production by S. flavogriseus strains, suggest that the cluster metabolic product might be a thienamycin-like carbapenem, possibly the epimeric epithienamycin. This finding might help in understanding the biosynthetic pathway to thienamycin and other highly substituted carbapenems. It also provides another example of genome mining in Streptomyces sequenced genomes as a powerful approach for novel antibiotic discovery.

  19. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases : Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments,

  20. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases : Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marian, Ali J.; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on “omics.” Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments,

  1. Microarray and comparative genomics-based identification of genes and gene regulatory regions of the mouse immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Jonathan D

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study we have built and mined a gene expression database composed of 65 diverse mouse tissues for genes preferentially expressed in immune tissues and cell types. Using expression pattern criteria, we identified 360 genes with preferential expression in thymus, spleen, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, lymph nodes (unstimulated or stimulated, or in vitro activated T-cells. Results Gene clusters, formed based on similarity of expression-pattern across either all tissues or the immune tissues only, had highly significant associations both with immunological processes such as chemokine-mediated response, antigen processing, receptor-related signal transduction, and transcriptional regulation, and also with more general processes such as replication and cell cycle control. Within-cluster gene correlations implicated known associations of known genes, as well as immune process-related roles for poorly described genes. To characterize regulatory mechanisms and cis-elements of genes with similar patterns of expression, we used a new version of a comparative genomics-based cis-element analysis tool to identify clusters of cis-elements with compositional similarity among multiple genes. Several clusters contained genes that shared 5–6 cis-elements that included ETS and zinc-finger binding sites. cis-Elements AP2 EGRF ETSF MAZF SP1F ZF5F and AREB ETSF MZF1 PAX5 STAT were shared in a thymus-expressed set; AP4R E2FF EBOX ETSF MAZF SP1F ZF5F and CREB E2FF MAZF PCAT SP1F STAT cis-clusters occurred in activated T-cells; CEBP CREB NFKB SORY and GATA NKXH OCT1 RBIT occurred in stimulated lymph nodes. Conclusion This study demonstrates a series of analytic approaches that have allowed the implication of genes and regulatory elements that participate in the differentiation, maintenance, and function of the immune system. Polymorphism or mutation of these could adversely impact immune system functions.

  2. TreeSeq, a Fast and Intuitive Tool for Analysis of Whole Genome and Metagenomic Sequence Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastiaan Wintermans

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing is not yet commonly used in clinical laboratories because of a lack of simple and intuitive tools. We developed a software tool (TreeSeq with a quaternary tree search structure for the analysis of sequence data. This permits rapid searches for sequences of interest in large datasets. We used TreeSeq to screen a gut microbiota metagenomic dataset and a whole genome sequencing (WGS dataset of a strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae for antibiotic resistance genes and compared the results with BLAST and phenotypic resistance determination. TreeSeq was more than thirty times faster than BLAST and accurately detected resistance gene sequences in complex metagenomic data and resistance genes corresponding with the phenotypic resistance pattern of the Klebsiella strain. Resistance genes found by TreeSeq were visualized as a gene coverage heat map, aiding in the interpretation of results. TreeSeq brings analysis of metagenomic and WGS data within reach of clinical diagnostics.

  3. Genome size diversity in angiosperms and its influence on gene space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodsworth, Steven; Leitch, Andrew R; Leitch, Ilia J

    2015-12-01

    Genome size varies c. 2400-fold in angiosperms (flowering plants), although the range of genome size is skewed towards small genomes, with a mean genome size of 1C=5.7Gb. One of the most crucial factors governing genome size in angiosperms is the relative amount and activity of repetitive elements. Recently, there have been new insights into how these repeats, previously discarded as 'junk' DNA, can have a significant impact on gene space (i.e. the part of the genome comprising all the genes and gene-related DNA). Here we review these new findings and explore in what ways genome size itself plays a role in influencing how repeats impact genome dynamics and gene space, including gene expression. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Powerful tools for genetic modification: Advances in gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch, Erica A; Drumm, Mitchell L

    2017-09-27

    Recent discoveries and technical advances in genetic engineering, methods called gene or genome editing, provide hope for repairing genes that cause diseases like cystic fibrosis (CF) or otherwise altering a gene for therapeutic benefit. There are both hopes and hurdles with these technologies, with new ideas emerging almost daily. Initial studies using intestinal organoid cultures carrying the common, F508del mutation have shown that gene editing by CRISPR/Cas9 can convert cells lacking CFTR function to cells with normal channel function, providing a precedent that this technology can be harnessed for CF. While this is an important precedent, the challenges that remain are not trivial. A logistical issue for this and many other genetic diseases is genetic heterogeneity. Approximately, 2000 mutations associated with CF have been found in CFTR, the gene responsible for CF, and thus a feasible strategy that would encompass all individuals affected by the disease is particularly difficult to envision. However, single strategies that would be applicable to all subjects affected by CF have been conceived and are being investigated. With all of these approaches, efficiency (the proportion of cells edited), accuracy (how often other sites in the genome are affected), and delivery of the gene editing components to the desired cells are perhaps the most significant, impending hurdles. Our understanding of each of these areas is increasing rapidly, and while it is impossible to predict when a successful strategy will reach the clinic, there is every reason to believe it is a question of "when" and not "if." © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Functional Associations by Response Overlap (FARO), a functional genomics approach matching gene expression phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Mundy, J.; Willenbrock, Hanni

    2007-01-01

    The systematic comparison of transcriptional responses of organisms is a powerful tool in functional genomics. For example, mutants may be characterized by comparing their transcript profiles to those obtained in other experiments querying the effects on gene expression of many experimental factors...... including treatments, mutations and pathogen infections. Similarly, drugs may be discovered by the relationship between the transcript profiles effectuated or impacted by a candidate drug and by the target disease. The integration of such data enables systems biology to predict the interplay between...

  6. BPhyOG: An interactive server for genome-wide inference of bacterial phylogenies based on overlapping genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Kui

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overlapping genes (OGs in bacterial genomes are pairs of adjacent genes of which the coding sequences overlap partly or entirely. With the rapid accumulation of sequence data, many OGs in bacterial genomes have now been identified. Indeed, these might prove a consistent feature across all microbial genomes. Our previous work suggests that OGs can be considered as robust markers at the whole genome level for the construction of phylogenies. An online, interactive web server for inferring phylogenies is needed for biologists to analyze phylogenetic relationships among a set of bacterial genomes of interest. Description BPhyOG is an online interactive server for reconstructing the phylogenies of completely sequenced bacterial genomes on the basis of their shared overlapping genes. It provides two tree-reconstruction methods: Neighbor Joining (NJ and Unweighted Pair-Group Method using Arithmetic averages (UPGMA. Users can apply the desired method to generate phylogenetic trees, which are based on an evolutionary distance matrix for the selected genomes. The distance between two genomes is defined by the normalized number of their shared OG pairs. BPhyOG also allows users to browse the OGs that were used to infer the phylogenetic relationships. It provides detailed annotation for each OG pair and the features of the component genes through hyperlinks. Users can also retrieve each of the homologous OG pairs that have been determined among 177 genomes. It is a useful tool for analyzing the tree of life and overlapping genes from a genomic standpoint. Conclusion BPhyOG is a useful interactive web server for genome-wide inference of any potential evolutionary relationship among the genomes selected by users. It currently includes 177 completely sequenced bacterial genomes containing 79,855 OG pairs, the annotation and homologous OG pairs of which are integrated comprehensively. The reliability of phylogenies complemented by

  7. The MI bundle: enabling network and structural biology in genome visualization tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céol, Arnaud; Müller, Heiko

    2015-11-15

    Prioritization of candidate genes emanating from large-scale screens requires integrated analyses at the genomics, molecular, network and structural biology levels. We have extended the Integrated Genome Browser (IGB) to facilitate these tasks. The graphical user interface greatly simplifies building disease networks and zooming in at atomic resolution to identify variations in molecular complexes that may affect molecular interactions in the context of genomic data. All results are summarized in genome tracks and can be visualized and analyzed at the transcript level. The MI Bundle is a plugin for the IGB. The plugin, help, video and tutorial are available at http://cru.genomics.iit.it/igbmibundle/ and https://github.com/CRUiit/igb-mi-bundle/wiki. The source code is released under the Apache License, Version 2. arnaud.ceol@iit.it Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  8. Mapping our genes: The genome projects: How big, how fast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1988-04-01

    For the past 2 years, scientific and technical journals in biology and medicine have extensively covered a debate about whether and how to determine the function and order of human genes on human chromosomes and when to determine the sequence of molecular building blocks that comprise DNA in those chromosomes. In 1987, these issues rose to become part of the public agenda. The debate involves science, technology, and politics. Congress is responsible for /open quotes/writing the rules/close quotes/ of what various federal agencies do and for funding their work. This report surveys the points made so far in the debate, focusing on those that most directly influence the policy options facing the US Congress. Congressional interest focused on how to assess the rationales for conducting human genome projects, how to fund human genome projects (at what level and through which mechanisms), how to coordinate the scientific and technical programs of the several federal agencies and private interests already supporting various genome projects, and how to strike a balance regarding the impact of genome projects on international scientific cooperation and international economic competition in biotechnology. OTA prepared this report with the assistance of several hundred experts throughout the world. 342 refs., 26 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. Mapping Our Genes: The Genome Projects: How Big, How Fast

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    For the past 2 years, scientific and technical journals in biology and medicine have extensively covered a debate about whether and how to determine the function and order of human genes on human chromosomes and when to determine the sequence of molecular building blocks that comprise DNA in those chromosomes. In 1987, these issues rose to become part of the public agenda. The debate involves science, technology, and politics. Congress is responsible for �writing the rules� of what various federal agencies do and for funding their work. This report surveys the points made so far in the debate, focusing on those that most directly influence the policy options facing the US Congress. Congressional interest focused on how to assess the rationales for conducting human genome projects, how to fund human genome projects (at what level and through which mechanisms), how to coordinate the scientific and technical programs of the several federal agencies and private interests already supporting various genome projects, and how to strike a balance regarding the impact of genome projects on international scientific cooperation and international economic competition in biotechnology. The Office of Technology Assessment (OTA) prepared this report with the assistance of several hundred experts throughout the world.

  10. Computational prediction of microRNA genes in silkworm genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG Chuan-zhou; JIN Yong-feng; ZHANG Yao-zhou

    2006-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a novel, extensive class of small RNAs (~21 nucleotides), and play important gene-regulation roles during growth and development in various organisms. Here we conducted a homology search to identify homologs of previously validated miRNAs from silkworm genome. We identified 24 potential miRNA genes, and gave each of them a name according to the common criteria. Interestingly, we found that a great number of newly identified miRNAs were conserved in silkworm and Drosophila, and family alignment revealed that miRNA families might possess single nucleotide polymorphisms. miRNA gene clusters and possible functions of complement miRNA pairs are discussed.

  11. Genomic and gene variation in Mycoplasma hominis strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Gunna; Andersen, H; Birkelund, Svend

    1987-01-01

    DNAs from 14 strains of Mycoplasma hominis isolated from various habitats, including strain PG21, were analyzed for genomic heterogeneity. DNA-DNA filter hybridization values were from 51 to 91%. Restriction endonuclease digestion patterns, analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis, revealed...... no identity or cluster formation between strains. Variation within M. hominis rRNA genes was analyzed by Southern hybridization of EcoRI-cleaved DNA hybridized with a cloned fragment of the rRNA gene from the mycoplasma strain PG50. Five of the M. hominis strains showed identical hybridization patterns....... These hybridization patterns were compared with those of 12 other mycoplasma species, which showed a much more complex band pattern. Cloned nonribosomal RNA gene fragments of M. hominis PG21 DNA were analyzed, and the fragments were used to demonstrate heterogeneity among the strains. A monoclonal antibody against...

  12. MAAP: a versatile and universal tool for genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano-Anollés, G

    1994-09-01

    Multiple arbitrary amplicon profiling (MAAP) uses one or more oligonucleotide primers (> or = 5 nt) of arbitrary sequence to initiate DNA amplification and generate characteristic fingerprints from anonymous genomes or DNA templates. MAAP markers can be used in general fingerprinting as well as in mapping applications, either directly or as sequence-characterized amplified regions (SCARs). MAAP profiles can be tailored in the number of monomorphic and/or polymorphic products. For example, multiple endonuclease digestion of template DNA or the use of mini-hairpin primers can enhance detection of polymorphic DNA. Comparison of the expected and actual number of amplification products produced with primers differing in length, sequence and GC content from templates of varying complexity reveal severe departures from theoretical formulations with interesting implications in primer-template interaction. Extensive primer-template mismatching can occur when using templates of low complexity or long primers. Primer annealing and extension appears directed by an 8 nt 3'-terminal primer domain, requires sites with perfect homology to the first 5-6 nt fom the 3' terminus, and involves direct physical interaction between amplicon annealing sites.

  13. Antisense transcription as a tool to tune gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Jennifer A N; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-01-14

    A surprise that has emerged from transcriptomics is the prevalence of genomic antisense transcription, which occurs counter to gene orientation. While frequent, the roles of antisense transcription in regulation are poorly understood. We built a synthetic system in Escherichia coli to study how antisense transcription can change the expression of a gene and tune the response characteristics of a regulatory circuit. We developed a new genetic part that consists of a unidirectional terminator followed by a constitutive antisense promoter and demonstrate that this part represses gene expression proportionally to the antisense promoter strength. Chip-based oligo synthesis was applied to build a large library of 5,668 terminator-promoter combinations that was used to control the expression of three repressors (PhlF, SrpR, and TarA) in a simple genetic circuit (NOT gate). Using the library, we demonstrate that antisense promoters can be used to tune the threshold of a regulatory circuit without impacting other properties of its response function. Finally, we determined the relative contributions of antisense RNA and transcriptional interference to repressing gene expression and introduce a biophysical model to capture the impact of RNA polymerase collisions on gene repression. This work quantifies the role of antisense transcription in regulatory networks and introduces a new mode to control gene expression that has been previously overlooked in genetic engineering.

  14. Genomic and gene expression signature of the pre-invasive testicular carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Ottesen, Anne Marie; Sonne, Si Brask

    2005-01-01

    on the pre-invasive CIS and its possible fetal origin by reviewing recent data originating from DNA microarrays and comparative genomic hybridisations. A comparison of gene expression and genomic aberrations reveal chromosomal "hot spots" with mutual clustering of gene expression and genomic amplification...

  15. Genome-Wide Comparative Analysis of Chemosensory Gene Families in Five Tsetse Fly Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosaline Macharia

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available For decades, odour-baited traps have been used for control of tsetse flies (Diptera; Glossinidae, vectors of African trypanosomes. However, differential responses to known attractants have been reported in different Glossina species, hindering establishment of a universal vector control tool. Availability of full genome sequences of five Glossina species offers an opportunity to compare their chemosensory repertoire and enhance our understanding of their biology in relation to chemosensation. Here, we identified and annotated the major chemosensory gene families in Glossina. We identified a total of 118, 115, 124, and 123 chemosensory genes in Glossina austeni, G. brevipalpis, G. f. fuscipes, G. pallidipes, respectively, relative to 127 reported in G. m. morsitans. Our results show that tsetse fly genomes have fewer chemosensory genes when compared to other dipterans such as Musca domestica (n>393, Drosophila melanogaster (n = 246 and Anopheles gambiae (n>247. We also found that Glossina chemosensory genes are dispersed across distantly located scaffolds in their respective genomes, in contrast to other insects like D. melanogaster whose genes occur in clusters. Further, Glossina appears to be devoid of sugar receptors and to have expanded CO2 associated receptors, potentially reflecting Glossina's obligate hematophagy and the need to detect hosts that may be out of sight. We also identified, in all species, homologs of Ir84a; a Drosophila-specific ionotropic receptor that promotes male courtship suggesting that this is a conserved trait in tsetse flies. Notably, our selection analysis revealed that a total of four gene loci (Gr21a, GluRIIA, Gr28b, and Obp83a were under positive selection, which confers fitness advantage to species. These findings provide a platform for studies to further define the language of communication of tsetse with their environment, and influence development of novel approaches for control.

  16. The Dockstore: enabling modular, community-focused sharing of Docker-based genomics tools and workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Brian D; Yuen, Denis; Chung, Vincent; Duncan, Andrew G; Liu, Xiang Kun; Patricia, Janice; Paten, Benedict; Stein, Lincoln; Ferretti, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    As genomic datasets continue to grow, the feasibility of downloading data to a local organization and running analysis on a traditional compute environment is becoming increasingly problematic. Current large-scale projects, such as the ICGC PanCancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG), the Data Platform for the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative, and the NIH Big Data to Knowledge Center for Translational Genomics, are using cloud-based infrastructure to both host and perform analysis across large data sets. In PCAWG, over 5,800 whole human genomes were aligned and variant called across 14 cloud and HPC environments; the processed data was then made available on the cloud for further analysis and sharing. If run locally, an operation at this scale would have monopolized a typical academic data centre for many months, and would have presented major challenges for data storage and distribution. However, this scale is increasingly typical for genomics projects and necessitates a rethink of how analytical tools are packaged and moved to the data. For PCAWG, we embraced the use of highly portable Docker images for encapsulating and sharing complex alignment and variant calling workflows across highly variable environments. While successful, this endeavor revealed a limitation in Docker containers, namely the lack of a standardized way to describe and execute the tools encapsulated inside the container. As a result, we created the Dockstore ( https://dockstore.org), a project that brings together Docker images with standardized, machine-readable ways of describing and running the tools contained within. This service greatly improves the sharing and reuse of genomics tools and promotes interoperability with similar projects through emerging web service standards developed by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH).

  17. Paralogous Genes as a Tool to Study the Regulation of Gene Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Robert D

    their duplicate were found to be under less purifying selection. A gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analysis showed that paralogs with similar expression levels were enriched in GO terms related to macromolecular complexes, whereas paralogs with different expression levels were enriched in terms associated......The genomes of plants are marked by reoccurring events of whole-genome duplication. These events are major contributors to speciation and provide the genetic material for organisms to evolve ever greater complexity. Duplicated genes, referred to as paralogs, may be retained because they acquired...... new functions, or their gene products are in a dosage balance. Regulatory DNA elements - some of which are conserved across species and hence called conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs) - that control expression of duplicated genes are thus under similar purifying selection. In the present study, I...

  18. Ensembl Plants: Integrating Tools for Visualizing, Mining, and Analyzing Plant Genomics Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolser, Dan; Staines, Daniel M; Pritchard, Emily; Kersey, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Ensembl Plants ( http://plants.ensembl.org ) is an integrative resource presenting genome-scale information for a growing number of sequenced plant species (currently 33). Data provided includes genome sequence, gene models, functional annotation, and polymorphic loci. Various additional information are provided for variation data, including population structure, individual genotypes, linkage, and phenotype data. In each release, comparative analyses are performed on whole genome and protein sequences, and genome alignments and gene trees are made available that show the implied evolutionary history of each gene family. Access to the data is provided through a genome browser incorporating many specialist interfaces for different data types, and through a variety of additional methods for programmatic access and data mining. These access routes are consistent with those offered through the Ensembl interface for the genomes of non-plant species, including those of plant pathogens, pests, and pollinators.Ensembl Plants is updated 4-5 times a year and is developed in collaboration with our international partners in the Gramene ( http://www.gramene.org ) and transPLANT projects ( http://www.transplantdb.org ).

  19. A Guide to Computational Tools and Design Strategies for Genome Editing Experiments in Zebrafish Using CRISPR/Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prykhozhij, Sergey V; Rajan, Vinothkumar; Berman, Jason N

    2016-02-01

    The development of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 technology for mainstream biotechnological use based on its discovery as an adaptive immune mechanism in bacteria has dramatically improved the ability of molecular biologists to modify genomes of model organisms. The zebrafish is highly amenable to applications of CRISPR/Cas9 for mutation generation and a variety of DNA insertions. Cas9 protein in complex with a guide RNA molecule recognizes where to cut the homologous DNA based on a short stretch of DNA termed the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM). Rapid and efficient identification of target sites immediately preceding PAM sites, quantification of genomic occurrences of similar (off target) sites and predictions of cutting efficiency are some of the features where computational tools play critical roles in CRISPR/Cas9 applications. Given the rapid advent and development of this technology, it can be a challenge for researchers to remain up to date with all of the important technological developments in this field. We have contributed to the armamentarium of CRISPR/Cas9 bioinformatics tools and trained other researchers in the use of appropriate computational programs to develop suitable experimental strategies. Here we provide an in-depth guide on how to use CRISPR/Cas9 and other relevant computational tools at each step of a host of genome editing experimental strategies. We also provide detailed conceptual outlines of the steps involved in the design and execution of CRISPR/Cas9-based experimental strategies, such as generation of frameshift mutations, larger chromosomal deletions and inversions, homology-independent insertion of gene cassettes and homology-based knock-in of defined point mutations and larger gene constructs.

  20. Global nutrient profiling by Phenotype MicroArrays: a tool complementing genomic and proteomic studies in conidial fungi*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasova, Lea; Druzhinina, Irina S.

    2010-01-01

    Conidial fungi or molds and mildews are widely used in modern biotechnology as producers of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites, industrially important enzymes, chemicals and food. They are also important pathogens of animals including humans and agricultural crops. These various applications and extremely versatile natural phenotypes have led to the constantly growing list of complete genomes which are now available. Functional genomics and proteomics widely exploit the genomic information to study the cell-wide impact of altered genes on the phenotype of an organism and its function. This allows for global analysis of the information flow from DNA to RNA to protein, but it is usually not sufficient for the description of the global phenotype of an organism. More recently, Phenotype MicroArray (PM) technology has been introduced as a tool to characterize the metabolism of a (wild) fungal strain or a mutant. In this article, we review the background of PM applications for fungi and the methodic requirements to obtain reliable results. We also report examples of the versatility of this tool. PMID:20205302

  1. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics reveal a repertoire of putative pathogenicity genes in chilli anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum truncatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Soumya; Nandineni, Madhusudan R

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum truncatum, a major fungal phytopathogen, causes the anthracnose disease on an economically important spice crop chilli (Capsicum annuum), resulting in huge economic losses in tropical and sub-tropical countries. It follows a subcuticular intramural infection strategy on chilli with a short, asymptomatic, endophytic phase, which contrasts with the intracellular hemibiotrophic lifestyle adopted by most of the Colletotrichum species. However, little is known about the molecular determinants and the mechanism of pathogenicity in this fungus. A high quality whole genome sequence and gene annotation based on transcriptome data of an Indian isolate of C. truncatum from chilli has been obtained. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed a rich repertoire of pathogenicity genes in C. truncatum encoding secreted proteins, effectors, plant cell wall degrading enzymes, secondary metabolism associated proteins, with potential roles in the host-specific infection strategy, placing it next only to the Fusarium species. The size of genome assembly, number of predicted genes and some of the functional categories were similar to other sequenced Colletotrichum species. The comparative genomic analyses with other species and related fungi identified some unique genes and certain highly expanded gene families of CAZymes, proteases and secondary metabolism associated genes in the genome of C. truncatum. The draft genome assembly and functional annotation of potential pathogenicity genes of C. truncatum provide an important genomic resource for understanding the biology and lifestyle of this important phytopathogen and will pave the way for designing efficient disease control regimens.

  2. Rapid genome reshaping by multiple-gene loss after whole-genome duplication in teleost fish suggested by mathematical modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Jun; Sato, Yukuto; Sinclair, Robert; Tsukamoto, Katsumi; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2015-12-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD) is believed to be a significant source of major evolutionary innovation. Redundant genes resulting from WGD are thought to be lost or acquire new functions. However, the rates of gene loss and thus temporal process of genome reshaping after WGD remain unclear. The WGD shared by all teleost fish, one-half of all jawed vertebrates, was more recent than the two ancient WGDs that occurred before the origin of jawed vertebrates, and thus lends itself to analysis of gene loss and genome reshaping. Using a newly developed orthology identification pipeline, we inferred the post-teleost-specific WGD evolutionary histories of 6,892 protein-coding genes from nine phylogenetically representative teleost genomes on a time-calibrated tree. We found that rapid gene loss did occur in the first 60 My, with a loss of more than 70-80% of duplicated genes, and produced similar genomic gene arrangements within teleosts in that relatively short time. Mathematical modeling suggests that rapid gene loss occurred mainly by events involving simultaneous loss of multiple genes. We found that the subsequent 250 My were characterized by slow and steady loss of individual genes. Our pipeline also identified about 1,100 shared single-copy genes that are inferred to have become singletons before the divergence of clupeocephalan teleosts. Therefore, our comparative genome analysis suggests that rapid gene loss just after the WGD reshaped teleost genomes before the major divergence, and provides a useful set of marker genes for future phylogenetic analysis.

  3. Exploiting genomics resources to identify candidate genes underlying antioxidants content in tomato fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta eCalafiore

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The tomato is a model species for fleshy fruit development and ripening, as well as for genomics studies of others Solanaceae. Many genetic and genomics resources, including databases for sequencing, transcriptomics and metabolomics data, have been developed and are today available. The purpose of the present work was to uncover new genes and/or alleles that determine ascorbic acid and carotenoids accumulation, by exploiting one Solanum pennellii introgression lines (IL7-3 harboring quantitative trait loci (QTL that increase the content of these metabolite in the fruit. The higher ascorbic acid and carotenoids content in IL7-3 was confirmed at three fruit developmental stages. The tomato genome reference sequence and the recently released S. pennellii genome sequence were investigated to identify candidate genes that might control ascorbic acid and carotenoids accumulation. First of all, a refinement of the wild region borders in the IL7-3 was achieved by analyzing CAPS markers designed in our laboratory. Afterwards, six candidate genes associated to ascorbic acid and one with carotenoids metabolism were identified exploring the annotation and the Gene Ontology terms of genes included in the region. Variants between the sequence of the wild and the cultivated alleles of these genes were investigated for their functional relevance and their potential effects on the protein sequences were predicted. Transcriptional levels of candidate genes in the introgression region were extracted from RNA-Seq data available for the entire S. pennellii introgression lines collection and verified by Real-Time qPCR. Finally, seven IL7-3 sub-lines were genotyped using 28 species-specific markers and then were evaluated for metabolites content. These analyses evidenced a significant decrease in transcript abundance for one 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase and one L-ascorbate oxidase homolog, whose role in the accumulation of carotenoids and ascorbic acid is

  4. Genome-enabled Discovery of Carbon Sequestration Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Kalluri, Udaya C [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Zhang, Xinye [ORNL; Engle, Nancy L [ORNL; Ranjan, Priya [ORNL; Basu, Manojit M [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Campbell, Alina S [ORNL; DiFazio, Stephen P [ORNL; Davis, John M [University of Florida; Hinchee, Maud [ORNL; Pinnacchio, Christa [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Meilan, R [Purdue University; Busov, V. [Michigan Technological University; Strauss, S [Oregon State University

    2009-01-01

    The fate of carbon below ground is likely to be a major factor determining the success of carbon sequestration strategies involving plants. Despite their importance, molecular processes controlling belowground C allocation and partitioning are poorly understood. This project is leveraging the Populus trichocarpa genome sequence to discover genes important to C sequestration in plants and soils. The focus is on the identification of genes that provide key control points for the flow and chemical transformations of carbon in roots, concentrating on genes that control the synthesis of chemical forms of carbon that result in slower turnover rates of soil organic matter (i.e., increased recalcitrance). We propose to enhance carbon allocation and partitioning to roots by 1) modifying the auxin signaling pathway, and the invertase family, which controls sucrose metabolism, and by 2) increasing root proliferation through transgenesis with genes known to control fine root proliferation (e.g., ANT), 3) increasing the production of recalcitrant C metabolites by identifying genes controlling secondary C metabolism by a major mQTL-based gene discovery effort, and 4) increasing aboveground productivity by enhancing drought tolerance to achieve maximum C sequestration. This broad, integrated approach is aimed at ultimately enhancing root biomass as well as root detritus longevity, providing the best prospects for significant enhancement of belowground C sequestration.

  5. Genome Diversification Mechanism of Rodent and Lagomorpha Chemokine Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanako Shibata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a large family of small cytokines that are involved in host defence and body homeostasis through recruitment of cells expressing their receptors. Their genes are known to undergo rapid evolution. Therefore, the number and content of chemokine genes can be quite diverse among the different species, making the orthologous relationships often ambiguous even between closely related species. Given that rodents and rabbit are useful experimental models in medicine and drug development, we have deduced the chemokine genes from the genome sequences of several rodent species and rabbit and compared them with those of human and mouse to determine the orthologous relationships. The interspecies differences should be taken into consideration when experimental results from animal models are extrapolated into humans. The chemokine gene lists and their orthologous relationships presented here will be useful for studies using these animal models. Our analysis also enables us to reconstruct possible gene duplication processes that generated the different sets of chemokine genes in these species.

  6. Dicyema Pax6 and Zic: tool-kit genes in a highly simplified bilaterian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamiya Akiko

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dicyemid mesozoans (Phylum Dicyemida are simple (8–40-cell cephalopod endoparasites. They have neither body cavities nor differentiated organs, such as nervous and gastrointestinal systems. Whether dicyemids are intermediate between Protozoa and Metazoa (as represented by their "Mesozoa" classification or degenerate species of more complex metazoans is controversial. Recent molecular phylogenetic studies suggested that they are simplified bilaterians belonging to the Lophotrochozoa. We cloned two genes developmentally critical in bilaterian animals (Pax6 and Zic, together with housekeeping genes (actin, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, and ATP synthase beta subunit from a dicyemid to reveal whether their molecular phylogeny supported the "simplification" hypothesis, and to clarify evolutionary changes in dicyemid gene structure and expression profiles. Results Genomic/cDNA sequence analysis showed that 1 the Pax6 molecular phylogeny and Zic intron positions supported the idea of dicyemids as reduced bilaterians; 2 the aa sequences deduced from the five genes were highly divergent; and 3 Dicyema genes contained very short introns of uniform length. In situ hybridization analyses revealed that Zic genes were expressed in hermaphroditic gonads, and Pax6 was expressed weakly throughout the developmental stages of the 2 types of embryo and in the hermaphroditic gonads. Conclusion The accelerated evolutionary rates and very short and uniform intron may represent a part of Dicyema genomic features. The presence and expression of the two tool-kit genes (Pax6 and Zic in Dicyema suggests that they can be very versatile genes even required for the highly reduced bilaterian like Dicyema. Dicyemids may be useful models of evolutionary body plan simplification.

  7. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senanu M Spring-Pearson

    Full Text Available The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspots for recombination driven primarily by site-specific recombination associated with tRNAs. However, recombination rates in other portions of the genome are also high, a feature we expected to disrupt gene order. We analyzed the pangenome of 37 isolates of B. pseudomallei and demonstrate that the pangenome is 'open', with approximately 136 new genes identified with each new genome sequenced, and that the global core genome consists of 4568±16 homologs. Genes associated with metabolism were statistically overrepresented in the core genome, and genes associated with mobile elements, disease, and motility were primarily associated with accessory portions of the pangenome. The frequency distribution of genes present in between 1 and 37 of the genomes analyzed matches well with a model of genome evolution in which 96% of the genome has very low recombination rates but 4% of the genome recombines readily. Using homologous genes among pairs of genomes, we found that gene order was highly conserved among strains, despite the high recombination rates previously observed. High rates of gene transfer and recombination are incompatible with retaining gene order unless these processes are either highly localized to specific sites within the genome, or are characterized by symmetrical gene gain and loss. Our results demonstrate that both processes occur: localized recombination introduces many new genes at relatively few sites, and recombination throughout the genome generates the novel multi-locus sequence types previously observed while preserving gene order.

  8. Pangenome Analysis of Burkholderia pseudomallei: Genome Evolution Preserves Gene Order despite High Recombination Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spring-Pearson, Senanu M; Stone, Joshua K; Doyle, Adina; Allender, Christopher J; Okinaka, Richard T; Mayo, Mark; Broomall, Stacey M; Hill, Jessica M; Karavis, Mark A; Hubbard, Kyle S; Insalaco, Joseph M; McNew, Lauren A; Rosenzweig, C Nicole; Gibbons, Henry S; Currie, Bart J; Wagner, David M; Keim, Paul; Tuanyok, Apichai

    2015-01-01

    The pangenomic diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei is high, with approximately 5.8% of the genome consisting of genomic islands. Genomic islands are known hotspo