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Sample records for genomics education partnership

  1. The Genomics Education Partnership: Successful Integration of Research into Laboratory Classes at a Diverse Group of Undergraduate Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Christopher D.; Alvarez, Consuelo; Bailey, Cheryl; Barnard, Daron; Bhalla, Satish; Chandrasekaran, Chitra; Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Chung, Hui-Min; Dorer, Douglas R.; Du, Chunguang; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Poet, Jeff L.; Frohlich, Donald; Goodman, Anya L.; Gosser, Yuying; Hauser, Charles; Hoopes, Laura L. M.; Johnson, Diana; Jones, Christopher J.; Kaehler, Marian; Kokan, Nighat; Kopp, Olga R.; Kuleck, Gary A.; McNeil, Gerard; Moss, Robert; Myka, Jennifer L.; Nagengast, Alexis; Morris, Robert; Overvoorde, Paul J.; Shoop, Elizabeth; Parrish, Susan; Reed, Kelynne; Regisford, E. Gloria; Revie, Dennis; Rosenwald, Anne G.; Saville, Ken; Schroeder, Stephanie; Shaw, Mary; Skuse, Gary; Smith, Christopher; Smith, Mary; Spana, Eric P.; Spratt, Mary; Stamm, Joyce; Thompson, Jeff S.; Wawersik, Matthew; Wilson, Barbara A.; Youngblom, Jim; Leung, Wilson; Buhler, Jeremy; Mardis, Elaine R.; Lopatto, David; Elgin, Sarah C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Genomics is not only essential for students to understand biology but also provides unprecedented opportunities for undergraduate research. The goal of the Genomics Education Partnership (GEP), a collaboration between a growing number of colleges and universities around the country and the Department of Biology and Genome Center of Washington…

  2. Problematising Parent-Professional Partnerships in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Nick; Runswick-Cole, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    The value of, and need for, parent-professional partnerships is an unchallenged mantra within policy relating to "special educational needs". In spite of this, partnerships continue to be experienced as problematic by both parents and professionals. This paper brings together the different perspectives of two disability researchers: one a parent…

  3. Learning Partnerships: Interdependent Learning in Adult Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joan, Ed.; And Others

    This volume contains essays and studies dealing with learning partnerships in adult education. The introduction, written by Joan Robinson and Sharon Saberton, discusses the concept of the learning partnership, defined as a peer relationship between two people for whom the main objective is learning. The second section consists of comments of…

  4. Mentoring Partnerships in Science Education

    OpenAIRE

    Schwortz, Andria C.; Burrows, Andrea C.; Guffey, Sarah Katie

    2016-01-01

    The authors use an action research (AR) approach in a collegiate studio physics class to investigate the power of partnerships via conferences as they relate to issues of establishing a student/mentor rapport, empowering students to reduce inequity, and the successes and barriers to hearing students' voices. The graduate teaching assistant (TA, Author 1) conducted one-on-one conferences with 29 students, elicited student opinions about the progress of the course, and talked with faculty, TAs,...

  5. Reimagining and Re-Creating Educational Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Ronald David

    2010-01-01

    Teachers and teacher educators who are seeking to (1) enact the kinds of innovative and transformative partnerships needed to bring out the best in teachers and students and (2) enable the rich connections possible among parents, teachers, student teachers, faculty members, and community members have no choice but to interrupt the old forms of…

  6. Mentoring Partnerships in Science Education

    CERN Document Server

    Schwortz, Andria C; Guffey, Sarah Katie

    2016-01-01

    The authors use an action research (AR) approach in a collegiate studio physics class to investigate the power of partnerships via conferences as they relate to issues of establishing a student/mentor rapport, empowering students to reduce inequity, and the successes and barriers to hearing students' voices. The graduate teaching assistant (TA, Author 1) conducted one-on-one conferences with 29 students, elicited student opinions about the progress of the course, and talked with faculty, TAs, and an undergraduate supplemental instructor for other sections of the course. At the end of the semester, the students reported increased knowledge of the TA as a person and as an instructor, and vice versa. Sixty-five percent of students reported no interest in changing circumstances to make it easier to talk about personal concerns with the TA. College students reluctantly voiced their opinions about the course, possibly due to the power structure of the classroom. Other TAs in the department expressed mostly disinter...

  7. The system of social partnership in educational practice

    OpenAIRE

    Garanzha N.

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the system of social partnership in education. The author gives a detailed description of the system of social partnership in educational practice at different levels. Based on the analysis of the definition of “social partnership”, the author attempts an interpretation of the concept. As a result, the theoretical–methodological analysis of psychological and pedagogical literature the author comes to the conclusion that social partnership in educational practice is a com...

  8. Cluster model of social partnership in municipal education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanova Oksana

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the model of educational clusters that are based on social interaction between educational institutions and public-private partnerships. Particular attention is paid to methods of creating such educational network, which allows not only to educational organizations to obtain the missing for the implementation of educational activities and resources to achieve certain educational outcomes, but also to meet the needs of customers of educational services. Different approaches to the formation of a model educational cluster, based on partnerships.

  9. Teacher Education Partnerships: An Australian Research-Based Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, David; Smith, Richard

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews literature about partnerships between teacher education faculties and schools that indicates not just heightened interest in recent years, but also significant progress. Despite interest and progress, conceptual and practical difficulties remain in establishing, developing, nurturing and implementing successful partnerships so…

  10. Science Education in Partnership: The 2002 Australian American Fulbright Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, E.; Oliver, C.; Wilmoth, K.; Vozzo, L.

    2004-01-01

    The Australian American Fulbright 2002 Symposium: Science Education in Partnership was held in parallel-in partnership-with the scientific meeting of the IAU 213 Bioastronomy 2002 Symposium: Life Among the Stars. In practice, the two meetings modeled partnership between educators and scientists, both professional events interacting while maintaining individual goals. Leading scientists attending the IAU meeting participated in the Fulbright with presentations based upon their work and their experiences. Educators and scientists interacted on how their work impacts science education and strategies for building direct connections between scientists and classrooms. Educators attending the Fulbright Symposium attended a number of scientific presentations in IAU meeting as well. A major issue in science education is teaching science in a way that is relevant to the student. Partnerships between scientists and teachers can provide real-life scientific research experience in the laboratory and the field for teachers and students. These partnerships enhance the quality of both teaching and learning, and engage students directly in projects and curricula that lead to a better understanding of the nature and practice of science. Scientists are often engaged in the development of new curricula as a part of the education and public outreach programs affiliated with research programs. Participants explored the similarities and differences between the approach to this endeavor in Australia and the US. Partnerships between all the professionals involved-scientists, teachers, and writers-creates an opportunity for innovative, cutting-edge research to reach the classroom. The excitement of seeking new knowledge, exploring the unknown, can motivate students to pursue science studies in high school and beyond at the university. Oral papers, posters and workshops presented the results of partnerships between scientists and educators in Australian and the USA as well as opportunities

  11. Supporting Inclusive Education: Negotiating Home-School Partnership in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Meng Ee; Ng, Zi Jia; Poon, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    While there has been growing theoretical and policy interest in the areas of homeschool partnership and inclusive education, relatively little work has linked the two fields. Where there have been studies, these have focused primarily on parent or school perspective. With inclusive education in its nascent stage in Singapore, this study examines…

  12. Exploring Cooperative Education Partnerships: A Case Study in Sport Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jenny; Hickey, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative education can be expressed in terms of a partnership between students, university and industry. A stakeholder-integrated approach to cooperative education involves formalized sustainable relationships between stakeholders. This study investigated the motives and determinants for the formation of cooperative education partnerships.…

  13. Democratic Communities and Business/Education "Partnerships" in Secondary Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2000-01-01

    Examines qualitative case study data of a partnership between corporate Cincinnati and an urban public secondary school, evaluating the partnership based on democratic criteria established by Deweyan pragmatism. The 10-year relationship did not always merit the label partnership, as business interests were at times the central focus. However, over…

  14. Exploring educational partnerships: a case study of client provider technology education partnerships in New Zealand primary schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weal, Brenda; Coll, Richard

    2007-04-01

    This paper explores the notion of educational partnerships and reports on research on client provider partnerships between full primary schools and external technology education providers for Year 7 and 8 New Zealand students (age range approx. 12 to 13 years). Educational reforms in New Zealand and the introduction of a more holistic technology education curriculum in 1995 changed the nature of the relationship between the technology education partners. The research sought to identify, from the perspective of the primary schools (clients), factors that contribute to successful partnerships between them and their technology education provider. A mixed methods approach consisting of a survey of client schools, in-depth interviews and a series of four in-depth case studies (drawing on issues derived from the survey) was employed. Issues relating to teacher subculture, leadership roles and inflexibility of official processes all surfaced. The research points to an absence of commitment, shared understanding, shared power, leadership, communication and accountability in many educational partnerships that were the focus of this work.

  15. Global partnerships: Expanding the frontiers of space exploration education

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeish, Marlene Y.; Akinyede, Joseph O.; Goswami, Nandu; Thomson, William A.

    2012-11-01

    Globalization is creating an interdependent space-faring world and new opportunities for international partnerships that strengthen space knowledge development and transfer. These opportunities have been codified in the Global Exploration Strategy, which endorses the "inspirational and educational value of space exploration" [1]. Also, during the 2010 Heads of Space Agencies Summit celebrating the International Academy of Astronautics' (IAA) 50th Anniversary, space-faring nations from across the globe issued a collective call in support of robust international partnerships to expand the frontiers of space exploration and generate knowledge for improving life on Earth [2]. Educators play a unique role in this mission, developing strategic partnerships and sharing best educational practices to (1) further global understanding of the benefits of space exploration for life on Earth and (2) prepare the next generation of scientists required for the 21st Century space workforce. Educational Outreach (EO) programs use evidence-based, measurable outcomes strategies and cutting edge information technologies to transfer space-based science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) knowledge to new audiences; create indigenous materials with cultural resonance for emerging space societies; support teacher professional development; and contribute to workforce development initiatives that inspire and prepare new cohorts of students for space exploration careers. The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) have sustained a 13-year space science education partnership dedicated to these objectives. This paper briefly describes the design and achievements of NSBRI's educational programs, with special emphasis on those initiatives' involvement with IAA and the International Astronautical Congress (IAC). The IAA Commission 2 Draft Report, Space for Africa, is discussed

  16. Education in the Direction of Public-Private Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Suely Siqueira Eiras

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The process of the neoliberalism reveals, at its more intense moment, the submission of all the levels of the life human being the mercantile transactions, the capitalist inclination to the world-wide trading. In this manner, the neoliberal proposals objectify, over all, the creation of an only feeling to guarantee the success of its ideals of globalization, free-economy and State minimum, not inhibit the social politics, but partnership of the market. Amongst the artifices used for the neoliberal proposers, placed the Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs with which this article concerns. From the conceptualization and characterization of the instrument Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs, national and European projects, developed through the PPPs, had been analyzed. The subjects of these projects involve Technology of Computer science and Communication and eLearning (education + technology + in the distance. Reflections had evidenced that the partnerships between governments and multinationals companies can lead to a loss of control on the part of the State on the educational formation of the citizens and the loss of identity of its resumes. The explanation for this phenomenon happens of the trend to the globalization. On the other hand, these partnerships bring profits politicians to the governments and economic to the companies.

  17. Enriching English Learner Education through School and Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Ruth M.

    2015-01-01

    Community partnerships allow schools and districts to empower and engage a broad range of English learners and their families in culturally responsive ways to support student learning and socio-emotional development. This article serves as an introduction to this issue of "Voices in Urban Education." This issue focuses on out-of-school…

  18. Structural Issues and Knowledge Management in Transnational Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, John S.; Guarisco, Gisele

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to analyse knowledge flows within a transnational educational partnership and to use social network analysis to map out structural differences between the two partners and the evolution of these differences over time. Design/methodology/approach: A single longitudinal case study social network analysis is…

  19. A Cross-Disciplinary Partnership to Improve Manufacturing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Matthew P.; Kraebber, Henry W.

    1998-01-01

    An exemplary university/business partnership involved the development of a training program to enhance workplace productivity for a relatively small manufacturing facility. The objectives were to educate the work force in the principles of workplace organization and lean manufacturing practices. (Author/JOW)

  20. In Search of "The Vibe": Creating Effective International Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Troy; Poole, David

    2005-01-01

    In common with universities in the United Kingdom, Canada and New Zealand, increasing numbers of Australian universities have established offshore education partnerships, particularly in the Asia-Pacific region. More than one-third of international students currently enrolled in Australian university courses study at a campus in their home country…

  1. Theorising Participation in Urban Regeneration Partnerships: An Adult Education Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Martin; Mooney Simmie, Geraldine

    2017-01-01

    While the policy approach in Urban Regeneration Partnership tends to be viewed as participatory governance using an urban studies lens, this article posits an alternative theorisation that takes an adult education perspective. We draw from Lefebvre's notion of "space", Engeström's "Cultural Historical Activity Theory" and…

  2. Marketing Educational Improvements via International Partnerships under Brain Drain Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Weslynne; Wagman, Liad

    2015-01-01

    We study the dynamics in an educational partnership between a university and a developing region. We examine how the university achieves its goals to improve and advertise its offerings while recruiting a cohort of students from the developing region and maintaining a sustainable relationship with the region and its students. We show that mutually…

  3. International partnerships in telehealth: healthcare, industry and education

    OpenAIRE

    Frances Louise Finn; Conor O’Byrne

    2012-01-01

    Project background In 2010 an internationally renowned American healthcare organisation partnered with Irish industry and higher education in Waterford with the goal to expand their telehealth services. Combining the skills and expertise of Nurse Consultants, Nurse Educators, IT Specialists and Healthcare Executives, these collaborative partnerships led to the delivery of telehealth services to North America from an Irish base, and to the development of new European telehealth programmes and ...

  4. Enabling practice development and research through partnerships with higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Helen; Buchanan, Katie

    2011-09-01

    This paper reports on a study that aimed to review a Practice Development and Research Partnership (PDRP) that was formed between an NHS community trust and a higher education institute (HEI) in 2008. Specific objectives were to focus on exploring stakeholders' views and experiences of the PDRP and to identify opportunities, barriers or challenges that were encountered. The ultimate goal of the PDRP was to promote partnership working between practitioners and academics in creating a culture of research and innovation in improving patient care, experiences and services. A qualitative research design was employed. Five lead practitioners, six academics and five senior managers from the PDRP steering group participated in semi-structured interviews. All were recorded and transcribed verbatim and a thematic approach to data analysis adopted. The PDRP provided opportunities for professional development for practitioners and academics, enhanced partnership working and recognised the need for a dedicated partnership coordinator. The evaluation recognised ambiguity with regard to roles, responsibilities and expectations. PDRPs can provide a vehicle for local NHS services to work collaboratively with HEls in developing a productive research environment that addresses local gaps in service and education in improving the quality of the patient experience.

  5. Building Ocean Learning Communities: A COSEE Science and Education Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robigou, V.; Bullerdick, S.; Anderson, A.

    2007-12-01

    The core mission of the Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (COSEE) is to promote partnerships between research scientists and educators through a national network of regional and thematic centers. In addition, the COSEEs also disseminate best practices in ocean sciences education, and promote ocean sciences as a charismatic interdisciplinary vehicle for creating a more scientifically literate workforce and citizenry. Although each center is mainly funded through a peer-reviewed grant process by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the centers form a national network that fosters collaborative efforts among the centers to design and implement initiatives for the benefit of the entire network and beyond. Among these initiatives the COSEE network has contributed to the definition, promotion, and dissemination of Ocean Literacy in formal and informal learning settings. Relevant to all research scientists, an Education and Public Outreach guide for scientists is now available at www.tos.org. This guide highlights strategies for engaging scientists in Ocean Sciences Education that are often applicable in other sciences. To address the challenging issue of ocean sciences education informed by scientific research, the COSEE approach supports centers that are partnerships between research institutions, formal and informal education venues, advocacy groups, industry, and others. The COSEE Ocean Learning Communities, is a partnership between the University of Washington College of Ocean and Fishery Sciences and College of Education, the Seattle Aquarium, and a not-for-profit educational organization. The main focus of the center is to foster and create Learning Communities that cultivate contributing, and ocean sciences-literate citizens aware of the ocean's impact on daily life. The center is currently working with volunteer groups around the Northwest region that are actively involved in projects in the marine environment and to empower these diverse groups

  6. Cross-Border Partnerships in Higher Education: Strategies and Issues. International Studies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Robin, Ed.; Chapman, David, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Cross-border Partnerships in Higher Education" looks beyond student and faculty exchanges to examine the myriad ways international colleges and universities work together as institutions. These partnerships have involved the creation of branch campuses, joint research and technology initiatives, collaboration in strengthening…

  7. Business, Education Partnerships -- Bridging the Paradigm Divide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne L. Seifert; Louis S. Nadelson

    2013-01-01

    The authors discuss the integrated science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (i-STEM) curriculum in business and industry comparing it with the traditional STEM K-12 curriculum in the U.S. Topics discussed includes limitations associated with the traditional STEM education, advantages of i-STEM such as enhancing professional development of educators to enhance their capacity to make youth capable for i-STEM careers, and i-STEM tools such as a project-based learning.

  8. Crow Education Partnership: Science in a Cultural Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, S. B.; NASA Astrobiology Institute Icy Worlds Science Team; Whillans Ice Stream Subglacial Access Research Drilling (Wissard) Science Team

    2011-12-01

    Join us to learn more about a developing science education partnership on the Crow Indian Reservation, in South Central Montana. Through this partnership we are designing culturally-relevant STEM science enrichment activites that focus on extreme environments for the Upper Elementary grades in the Hardin School District. The district encompasses three intermediate schools in a rural setting, with a largely Native American student body. Intermediate School teachers from Hardin, scientists and graduate students at Montana State University, and Crow tribal members are working together to develop inquiry-based science activities for students and teachers. Through the use of hands-on interactions, online technologies and field experiences, we are providing monthly science interaction for the classroom, and modeling inquiry-based activities for the teachers and community members. In addition to developing activities, we are working with Crow tribal members and teachers to tie science activities to the national standards and school district curriculum, while at the same time connecting science activities to Crow history and culture. Our blended education model which utilizes face to face interactions and video-conferencing, engages MSU graduate students in the teaching process. Graduate students are developing science communication skills and learning the importance of cross-cultural communication, while the teachers and intermediate students are gaining science content knowledge and direct interactions with authentic science experiences. We are developing a true partnership and community of learning through our efforts.

  9. CloudSat Education Network: Partnerships for Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    TeBockhorst, D.

    2014-12-01

    CloudSat Education Network (CEN): Partnerships to improve the understanding of clouds in formal and informal settings. Since The CloudSat satellite launched in 2006 the Formal and Informal education programs for the mission have been focused on bringing an understanding about the mission science and the importance of clouds, climate & weather science. This has been done by creating and strengthening partnership and collaboration within scientific and educational communities around the country and the world. Because CloudSat was formally recognized as a Earth System Science Pathfinder campaign with the GLOBE program, the CEN developed a set of field protocols for student observations that augmented the GLOBE atmosphere protocols when there was a satellite overpass. This shared process between GLOBE & CloudSat resulted in the training & creation of CEN schools that are both GLOBE schools and CloudSat schools, and also produced three GLOBE partnerships that specialize in cloud science education and outreach. In addition, the CEN has developed productive relationships with other NASA missions and EPO teams. Specifically, in collaboration with the NASA CERES mission projects S'Cool and MyNASAData, we have co-presented at NSTA conferences and with schools participating in a NASA EPOESS-funded formal education project. This collaborative work has been a very real benefit to a wide variety of audiences needing to strengthen their understanding of clouds and their roles in the earth system, and we hope will serve as a model to future missions looking to involve the public in mission science.

  10. The Strategic Partnership between Russia and China in Educational Sphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyu Tseya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the scientific and educational cooperation of Russia and China. Over the last two decades it has developed dramatically due to the constant support of the countries’ leaders and resultedin a large number of agreements in scientific, technical, educational and cultural spheres. The partnership involves the joint research programs, training programs, scientific and educational activities, mutual support of academic mobility of teachers and students, international conferences, workshops, contests of innovative projects and students’ festivals. The research methodology combines general scientific methods of logicalcognition, analysis and synthesis, and statistic methods of selection, combination, comparison and generalization. The paper demonstrates the dynamics of Chinese students graduated in Russia from 1950 to 2013 and Russian students graduated in China in the last thirteen years, as well as therelated prognoses for 2020.The partnership between Russia and China in educational sphere has a strategic importance for economic stability and steady development of both countries in the nearest and distant future, given the globalization processes, complicated international situation, etc. However, there still remains a considerable potential for the reciprocal friendly cooperation in educational and cultural spheres. The author emphasizes a need for further exploration and development of the intellectual exchange mechanisms and effectiveness of the process.

  11. Student Perspectives on Intercultural Learning from an Online Teacher Education Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauro, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on intercultural learning during telecollaboration from the perspective of student participants in a five-country online teacher education partnership. The student perspectives reported here were drawn from one intact class in the partnership, five students who completed this partnership as part of a sociolinguistics course in a…

  12. Napa County Business/Education Partnership: A Regional Planning Model for Career-Vocational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Diana; And Others

    This descriptive and evaluative report on the Napa County Business/Education Partnership (NCBEP) project describes the efforts of Napa Valley College (NVC), the Napa Valley Unified School District, and the County Office of Education to involve educators and business representatives in the development of a regional planning process for…

  13. Public–Private Partnerships in Cloud-Computing Services in the Context of Genomic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados Moreno, Palmira; Joly, Yann; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2017-01-01

    Public–private partnerships (PPPs) have been increasingly used to spur and facilitate innovation in a number of fields. In healthcare, the purpose of using a PPP is commonly to develop and/or provide vaccines and drugs against communicable diseases, mainly in developing or underdeveloped countries. With the advancement of technology and of the area of genomics, these partnerships also focus on large-scale genomic research projects that aim to advance the understanding of diseases that have a genetic component and to develop personalized treatments. This new focus has created new forms of PPPs that involve information technology companies, which provide computing infrastructure and services to store, analyze, and share the massive amounts of data genomic-related projects produce. In this article, we explore models of PPPs proposed to handle, protect, and share the genomic data collected and to further develop genomic-based medical products. We also identify the reasons that make these models suitable and the challenges they have yet to overcome. To achieve this, we describe the details and complexities of MSSNG, International Cancer Genome Consortium, and 100,000 Genomes Project, the three PPPs that focus on large-scale genomic research to better understand the genetic components of autism, cancer, rare diseases, and infectious diseases with the intention to find appropriate treatments. Organized as PPP and employing cloud-computing services, the three projects have advanced quickly and are likely to be important sources of research and development for future personalized medicine. However, there still are unresolved matters relating to conflicts of interest, commercialization, and data control. Learning from the challenges encountered by past PPPs allowed us to establish that developing guidelines to adequately manage personal health information stored in clouds and ensuring the protection of data integrity and privacy would be critical steps in the development

  14. Public-Private Partnerships in Cloud-Computing Services in the Context of Genomic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados Moreno, Palmira; Joly, Yann; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2017-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) have been increasingly used to spur and facilitate innovation in a number of fields. In healthcare, the purpose of using a PPP is commonly to develop and/or provide vaccines and drugs against communicable diseases, mainly in developing or underdeveloped countries. With the advancement of technology and of the area of genomics, these partnerships also focus on large-scale genomic research projects that aim to advance the understanding of diseases that have a genetic component and to develop personalized treatments. This new focus has created new forms of PPPs that involve information technology companies, which provide computing infrastructure and services to store, analyze, and share the massive amounts of data genomic-related projects produce. In this article, we explore models of PPPs proposed to handle, protect, and share the genomic data collected and to further develop genomic-based medical products. We also identify the reasons that make these models suitable and the challenges they have yet to overcome. To achieve this, we describe the details and complexities of MSSNG, International Cancer Genome Consortium, and 100,000 Genomes Project, the three PPPs that focus on large-scale genomic research to better understand the genetic components of autism, cancer, rare diseases, and infectious diseases with the intention to find appropriate treatments. Organized as PPP and employing cloud-computing services, the three projects have advanced quickly and are likely to be important sources of research and development for future personalized medicine. However, there still are unresolved matters relating to conflicts of interest, commercialization, and data control. Learning from the challenges encountered by past PPPs allowed us to establish that developing guidelines to adequately manage personal health information stored in clouds and ensuring the protection of data integrity and privacy would be critical steps in the development of

  15. A Partnership to Align Digital Resources to Educators' Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotchmoor, J.; Geary, E.; Marlino, M. R.; Pandya, R. E.; Sumner, T. R.

    2003-12-01

    The Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) is a community-led, NSF-funded effort to promote access to high-quality digital resources for teaching and learning about the earth. It is an operational library, with over 20,000 web visits a month and nearly 5000 resources available to educators and learners. As the library enters a new operational phase that targets widespread use in K-12 and undergraduate settings, DLESE has partnered with the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) Museum of Paleontology, the California State Science Teachers Association (CSTA), and several California school districts. These partners are initiating a pilot program intended to ensure that resources in the library align with the needs and curricula of K-12 teachers. This partnership represents a major advance in DLESE's utility to the K-12 teaching community and affords a number of advantages to each partner. The school districts benefit from materials that meet their unique curricular needs. The USGS and UCB Museum of Paleontology are able to integrate teacher needs into the design of their materials and promote wider use of their resources. DLESE gains a focused user group to participate in the user-centered design of new services and to support onsite evaluation of the library's educational impact. Finally, the overall project provides a vehicle to evaluate the effectiveness of these partnerships and apply successful practices to more general efforts.

  16. Partnerships

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Go Sport Free prize draw    Win Go Sport vouchers by participating in a prize draw of the Staff Association! Thanks to our partnership, 30 vouchers of 50 euros each have been offered to us. To reward you for your loyalty, the Staff Association, organizes a free prize draw for its members. The 30 people who will specify a number that comes closest to the total number of participants to this draw will win a voucher. Deadline for participation: Monday 14th July 2014 – 2 p.m. To participate: https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/content/concours-de-lassociation-du-personnel-2014-competition-staff-association Upon presentation of the Staff Association membership card Go Sport Val Thoiry offers a 15 % discount on all purchases in the shop (excluding promotions, sale items and bargain corner, and excluding purchases using Go Sport and Kadéos gift cards. Only one discount can be applied to each purchase). The manager of Go Sport Val Thoiry hands the discount vouchers to the presid...

  17. Overview of Commercial Building Partnerships in Higher Education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, Glenn [Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Higher education uses less energy per square foot than most commercial building sectors. However, higher education campuses house energy-intensive laboratories and data centers that may spend more than this average; laboratories, in particular, are disproportionately represented in the higher education sector. The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP), a public/private, cost-shared program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, its national laboratories, and private-sector technical experts. These teams explored energy-saving measures across building systems–including some considered too costly or technologically challenging–and used advanced energy modeling to achieve peak whole-building performance. Modeling results were then included in new construction or retrofit designs to achieve significant energy reductions.

  18. HOME, SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY PARTNERSHIPS IN NUMERACY EDUCATION: AN AUSTRALIAN PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merrilyn Goos, Tom Lowrie, Lesley Jolly

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of building educational partnerships between families, schools and communities is increasingly acknowledged since family and community involvement in education is thought to be associated with children’s success at school. Yet there arediscrepancies between the rhetoric of policy documents and the practice of family and community involvement in education. This paper draws on a large Australian study to critically examine different perspectives on numeracy education partnerships, with particular emphasis on the extent to which the needs of educationally disadvantaged children were being met. We elaborate a framework for analysing key features of educational partnerships, and then use the framework to compare the features of effective numeracy education partnerships represented in two case studies from our study. The case studies highlight different ways of initiating partnerships, different perspectives of stakeholders,different numeracy practices, and different ways of responding to cultural diversity and geographical isolation

  19. Teacher Education Partnerships: Integration of Case Studies within an Initial Teacher Education Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Goldblatt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper outlines the partnership between the Faculty of Education at Brock University and the Ontario College of Teachers as the self-regulatory body for the teaching profession in Ontario. The paper explores how two institutions collaborated to use case study methodology with faculty members in an initial teacher education program. The paper explores the planning and delivery of a case study institute to faculty members of the Teacher Education Department at Brock University and how self-study was incorporated to reflect on the partnership. This paper details the partnership and the links between self-study of teacher education practices and the constructivist approach of case study methodology.

  20. 34 CFR 403.174 - What additional fiscal requirements apply to the Business-Labor-Education Partnership for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Business-Labor-Education Partnership for Training Program? 403.174 Section 403.174 Education Regulations of... Does the Secretary Assist Under the Special Programs? Business-Labor-Education Partnership for Training Program § 403.174 What additional fiscal requirements apply to the Business-Labor-Education Partnership...

  1. Challenging Assumptions about Values, Interests and Power in Further and Higher Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    This article raises questions that challenge assumptions about values, interests and power in further and higher education partnerships. These topics were explored in a series of semi-structured interviews with a sample of principals and senior higher education partnership managers of colleges spread across a single region in England. The data…

  2. Implementing English Further/Higher Education Partnerships: The Street Level Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on research into the operation of English further/higher education, with a focus on the role of partnerships in supporting the massification of higher education. The research draws on the bottom-up policy implementation tradition to provide analysis of the effects on partnerships of a quasi-marketised environment. The rationale…

  3. School-Community Partnerships, Friend or Foe? The Doublespeak of Community with Educational Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Tasha

    2015-01-01

    In recent reform efforts, school-community partnerships have been touted as a means for promoting student success (Decker, Decker, & Brown 2007; Epstein 2010) and meeting student needs (Hands 2010). Yet, despite any accolades, the motives and results of school-community partnerships are contested. Gary Anderson (1998) points out that…

  4. Preparing Special Educators for Culturally Responsive School-Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Bridgie A.

    2004-01-01

    Today's increasingly multicultural student population requires that school-community partnerships operate from culturally responsive frameworks. Incorporating significant resources from multicultural communities is an essential component within school-community partnership. Although such a partnership is an essential strategy, it has not been…

  5. Alcohol Pharmacology Education Partnership: Using Chemistry and Biology Concepts to Educate High School Students about Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Elizabeth A.; Kwiek, Nicole; Sikes, Suzanne S.; Halpin, Myra J.; Weinbaum, Carolyn A.; Burgette, Lane F.; Reiter, Jerome P.; Schwartz-Bloom, Rochelle D.

    2014-01-01

    We developed the Alcohol Pharmacology Education Partnership (APEP), a set of modules designed to integrate a topic of interest (alcohol) with concepts in chemistry and biology for high school students. Chemistry and biology teachers (n = 156) were recruited nationally to field-test APEP in a controlled study. Teachers obtained professional…

  6. Agencies, educators, communities and wildfire: partnerships to enhance environmental education for youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martha C. Monroe; Heidi L. Ballard; Annie Oxarart; Victoria E. Sturtevant; Pamela J. Jakes; Emily R. Evans

    2015-01-01

    We studied seven programs that engage youth from 10 to 18 years old in wildfire risk reduction in their communities in the United States through in-depth interviews to examine the nature and role of community-school partnerships in resource-focused environmental education. While the programs use a variety of strategies, from Scout badge to summer school, they exhibit...

  7. Alcohol Pharmacology Education Partnership: Using Chemistry and Biology Concepts to Educate High School Students about Alcohol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Elizabeth A.; Kwiek, Nicole; Sikes, Suzanne S.; Halpin, Myra J.; Weinbaum, Carolyn A.; Burgette, Lane F.; Reiter, Jerome P.; Schwartz-Bloom, Rochelle D.

    2014-01-01

    We developed the Alcohol Pharmacology Education Partnership (APEP), a set of modules designed to integrate a topic of interest (alcohol) with concepts in chemistry and biology for high school students. Chemistry and biology teachers (n = 156) were recruited nationally to field-test APEP in a controlled study. Teachers obtained professional…

  8. Enhancing nursing education via academic–clinical partnership: An integrative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thokozani Bvumbwe

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A competent nursing workforce is important for an effective healthcare system. However, concerns on the poor quality of nursing care and poor competencies among nursing students, nurses, and midwives are increasing in Malawi. Anecdotal notes from stakeholders show shortfalls in nursing education. Furthermore, a large gap between theory and practice exists. This study described the role of academic–clinical partnership in strengthening nursing education. A search of ScienceDirect, PubMed, Medline, and PsychINFO on EBCSOhost and Google Scholar was conducted using the following key words: academic–clinical collaboration, academic–clinical partnership, academic practitioner gap, and college hospital partnership or/and nursing. Furthermore, peer reviewed reports on academic–clinical partnership in nursing were included in the search. Thirty-three records from 2002 to 2016 were reviewed. Six themes emerged from the review: mutual and shared goals, evidence-based practice, resource sharing and collaboration, capacity building, partnership elements, and challenges of academic clinical partnership. The review highlighted that academic–practice partnerships promote shared goal development for the healthcare system. The gap between theory and practice is reduced by the sharing of expertise and by increasing evidence-based practice. Academic clinical partnership improves competencies among students and the safety and health outcomes of patients. The study concluded that the nursing education implemented within an academic clinical partnership becomes relevant to the needs and demands of the healthcare system.

  9. Partnerships in Teacher Education--Going beyond the Rhetoric, with Reference to the Norwegian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Teacher education plays a central role in education and relates to various stakeholders of education. Currently, teacher education is not perceived as the sole responsibility of higher education institutions, and they are expected to work closely together with other partners. In this paper, the concept of "partnership" is defined and…

  10. Final Scientifc Report - Hydrogen Education State Partnership Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Warren

    2012-02-03

    Under the leadership of the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells program, Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) educated and worked with state leaders to encourage wider deployment of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Through outreach to state policymakers, legislative leaders, clean energy funds, energy agencies, and public utility commissions, CESA worked to accomplish the following objectives of this project: 1. Provide information and technical assistance to state policy leaders and state renewable energy programs in the development of effective hydrogen fuel cell programs. 2. Identify and foster hydrogen program best practices. 3. Identify and promote strategic opportunities for states and the Department of Energy (DOE) to advance hydrogen technology deployment through partnerships, collaboration, and targeted activities. Over the three years of this project, CESA, with our partner National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), was able to provide credible information on fuel cell policies, finance, and technical assistance to hundreds of state officials and other stakeholders. CESA worked with its membership network to effectively educate state clean energy policymakers, program managers, and decision makers about fuel cell and hydrogen technologies and the efforts by states to advance those technologies. With the assistance of NCSL, CESA gained access to an effective forum for outreach and communication with state legislators from all 50 states on hydrogen issues and policies. This project worked to educate policymakers and stakeholders with the potential to develop and deploy stationary and portable fuel cell technologies.

  11. The PRIDE (Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kathleen; Chambers, Laura; Bumol, Stefan; White, Richard O.; Gregory, Becky Pratt; Davis, Dianne; Rothman, Russell L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with low literacy, low numeracy, and/or linguistic needs can experience challenges understanding diabetes information and applying concepts to their self-management. The authors designed a toolkit of education materials that are sensitive to patients' literacy and numeracy levels, language preferences, and cultural norms and that encourage shared goal setting to improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. The Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education (PRIDE) toolkit was developed to facilitate diabetes self-management education and support. Methods The PRIDE toolkit includes a comprehensive set of 30 interactive education modules in English and Spanish to support diabetes self-management activities. The toolkit builds upon the authors' previously validated Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET) by adding a focus on shared goal setting, addressing the needs of Spanish-speaking patients, and including a broader range of diabetes management topics. Each PRIDE module was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument to determine the material's cultural appropriateness and its sensitivity to the needs of patients with low literacy and low numeracy. Reading grade level was also assessed using the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Fry, and SMOG formulas. Conclusions The average reading grade level of the materials was 5.3 (SD 1.0), with a mean SAM of 91.2 (SD 5.4). All of the 30 modules received a “superior” score (SAM >70%) when evaluated by 2 independent raters. The PRIDE toolkit modules can be used by all members of a multidisciplinary team to assist patients with low literacy and low numeracy in managing their diabetes. PMID:26647414

  12. PDS Leadership Team as Community of Practice: Implications for Local School System and Higher Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Laura Corbin; Brown-Hobbs, Stacey; Civetti, Linda; Gordon, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Professional development school (PDS) partnerships have existed in one local school system (LSS) with three different institutions of higher education (IHE) for over a decade. Commonalities and distinctive features were noted between the partnerships. In an attempt to establish standardized and equitable policies from the LSS level,…

  13. Adult Education in a Workplace Context: Recognising Production Workers' Responses and Partnership Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wärvik, Gun-Britt

    2016-01-01

    This article is about a larger regional Swedish partnership programme that was established to develop site-based education for production workers. A partnership is seen as composed of different practice architectures. The actors involved represented larger transnational as well as smaller manufacturing companies, employers, the metal workers'…

  14. Corporate Universities and Corporation- University Partnerships in Thailand: Complimenting Education in Learning, Leadership and Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver S. Crocco

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available With an estimated workforce of 285 million and the establishment of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN Economic Community in 2015, ASEAN faces vast challenges in human resource development (HRD and higher education. These challenges in Thailand have resulted in the rise of corporate universities and corporation-university partnerships. Corporate partnerships in education adapt quickly to industry needs and are increasingly popular and complimentary to traditional higher education. This research looks at one corporate university and one corporation-university partnership to investigate how, if at all, corporate universities and partnerships address HRD issues such as adult learning, leadership development, organisational change, corporate social responsibility (CSR, as well as ethical and global issues. This research finds initial evidence that corporate educational strategies address a variety of HRD issues and have the potential to revolutionise and compliment higher education in Thailand in a way that drives the nation toward a more sustainable future.

  15. Public health partnerships in medical toxicology education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schier, Joshua G; Rubin, Carol; Schwartz, Michael D; Thomas, Jerry D; Geller, Robert J; Morgan, Brent W; McGeehin, Michael A; Frumkin, Howard

    2010-06-01

    In December 2002, the medical toxicology sub-board, which consists of representatives from emergency medicine, preventive medicine, and pediatrics, released revised core content for medical toxicology, aiming to better meet the academic challenges imposed by the continually expanding knowledge base of medical toxicology. These challenges included the addition of relatively new areas of interest in medical toxicology, including population health, while simultaneously ensuring that a structural framework existed to accommodate future areas of interest. There is no evidence readily available to assess how well the educational curricula of existing fellowship programs are meeting these needs. In an effort to address this, the authors describe a medical toxicology fellowship program that consists of a partnership among the Emory University School of Medicine, the Georgia Poison Control Center, and the CDC, as well as the results of a reorganization of its academic curriculum that occurred in 2006. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first published report describing such a curriculum redesign. Suggestions and potential resources proposed as enhancements for the public health-associated education of medical toxicology fellows are discussed. The authors also seek to initiate a discussion among programs about how to optimally meet the new challenges developed by the medical toxicology sub-board.

  16. Third Way, Third Sector and the partnership IAS/public education system in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Maria Vidal Peroni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to debate on the public-private partnerships in education and to bring elements from the third way and third sector as an important part of this topic. And to present some consequences of the partnerships for democratic management, that is, how the logic of market as a parameter of efficiency is incorporated by public administration, and the consequences of this fact on the educational policies.

  17. Transnational Capacity Building: An Australian-Danish Partnership Model for Higher Education and Research in Nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Bodil; Kolbæk, Raymond; Lorentzen, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The article describes how a three level nursing partnership program between Australia and Denmark evolved and how barriers can be diminished when built on guiding principles of: professional trust, mutual understanding and respect for each other’s social, educational and cultural conditions...... and expertise across international borders as an important vehicle for developing nursing practice and research. Conclusion: The Australian-Danish education and research partnership program demonstrates that exchanging experiences can create opportunities for nurses’ professional growth, to advance careers...

  18. Service learning education and practice partnerships in maternal-infant health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebeke, Roberta; McCullough, Julie; Cagle, Lesa; St Clair, Julie

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT This article examines the concept of service learning in nursing practice and education. The benefits of education and practice partnerships for the community partners and organizations, students, nursing staff, the health care system, and academic institutions are described. Examples of innovative service learning projects with undergraduate nursing students that impact maternal-infant health are presented. A successful interdisciplinary campus and community partnership service learning project with students in a community nutrition course is highlighted.

  19. Commercial Buildings Partnerships - Overview of Higher education projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrish, Kristen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Robinson, Alastair [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP), a public/private, cost-shared program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, its national laboratories, and private-sector technical experts. These teams explored energy-saving measures across building systems – including some considered too costly or technologically challenging – and used advanced energy modeling to achieve peak whole-building performance. Modeling results were then included in new construction or retrofit designs to achieve significant energy reductions. CBP design goals aimed to achieve 50 percent energy savings compared to ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2004 for new construction, while retrofits are designed to consume at least 30 percent less energy than either Standard 90.1-2004 or current consumption. After construction and commissioning of the project, laboratory staff continued to work with partners to collect and analyze data for verification of the actual energy reduction. CBP projects represent diverse building types in commercial real estate, including lodging, grocery, retail, higher education, office, and warehouse/storage facilities. Partners also commit to replicating low-energy technologies and strategies from their CBP projects throughout their building portfolios. As a result of CBP projects, five sector overviews (Lodging, Food Sales, General Merchandise, Higher Education, Offices) were created to capture successful strategies and recommended energy efficiency measures that could broadly be applied across these sectors. These overviews are supplemented with individual case studies providing specific details on the decision criteria, modeling results, and lessons learned on specific projects. Sector overviews and CBP case studies will also be updated to reflect verified data and replication strategies as they become available.

  20. Commercial Buildings Partnerships - Overview of Higher Education Projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parrish, Kristen; Robinson, Alastair; Regnier, Cindy

    2013-02-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP), a public/private, cost-shared program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, its national laboratories, and private-sector technical experts. These teams explored energy-saving measures across building systems – including some considered too costly or technologically challenging – and used advanced energy modeling to achieve peak whole-building performance. Modeling results were then included in new construction or retrofit designs to achieve significant energy reductions. CBP design goals aimed to achieve 50 percent energy savings compared to ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2004 for new construction, while retrofits are designed to consume at least 30 percent less energy than either Standard 90.1-2004 or current consumption. After construction and commissioning of the project, laboratory staff continued to work with partners to collect and analyze data for verification of the actual energy reduction. CBP projects represent diverse building types in commercial real estate, including lodging, grocery, retail, higher education, office, and warehouse/storage facilities. Partners also commit to replicating low-energy technologies and strategies from their CBP projects throughout their building portfolios. As a result of CBP projects, five sector overviews (Lodging, Food Sales, General Merchandise, Higher Education, Offices) were created to capture successful strategies and recommended energy efficiency measures that could broadly be applied across these sectors. These overviews are supplemented with individual case studies providing specific details on the decision criteria, modeling results, and lessons learned on specific projects. Sector overviews and CBP case studies will also be updated to reflect verified data and replication strategies as they become available.

  1. Partnerships in Teacher Education – Going Beyond the Rhetoric, with Reference to the Norwegian Context

    OpenAIRE

    Kari Smith

    2016-01-01

    Teacher education plays a central role in education and relates to various stakeholders of education. Currently, teacher education is not perceived as the sole responsibility of higher education institutions, and they are expected to work closely together with other partners. In this paper, the concept of ‘partnership’ is defined and mutual benefits and challenges in partnerships with disciplines and institutions beyond teacher education programs are briefly discussed. Issues related to partn...

  2. Engaging underserved audiences in informal science education through community-based partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzo, Suzanne

    This thesis explores the impact of the Science Education and Engagement of Denver (SEED) Partnership on three of its participant families. The partnership, consisting of large informal science organizations, as well as small community-based organizations, created its programming based on prior research identifying barriers to minority participation in informal science education programs. SEED aims to engage youth and families of emerging populations in science and nature. Three families were examined as a case study to have an in depth investigation about their involvement in the programs sponsored by the partnership. Findings suggest a positive impact on participant feelings and engagement in science and nature. Future recommendations are made for furthering programming as well as conducting a larger scale, more comprehensive program evaluation. This research addresses prior studies that have identified several barriers toward participation of underserved audiences in informal science education programs and how the SEED partnership has addressed specific identified barriers.

  3. 34 CFR 403.170 - What activities does the Secretary support under the Business-Labor-Education Partnership for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Business-Labor-Education Partnership for Training Program? 403.170 Section 403.170 Education Regulations of... Does the Secretary Assist Under the Special Programs? Business-Labor-Education Partnership for Training Program § 403.170 What activities does the Secretary support under the Business-Labor-Education...

  4. Bridging the Gap Between Ocean Science and Education: Creating Effective Partnerships With Informal Science Education Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, C.; Franks, S.; Helling, H.; Solomon, E.; Driscoll, N.; Babcock, J.

    2003-12-01

    Many scientists would describe an effective E&O partnership as one that did not take up too much of their time. The California Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (CA COSEE), educators at the Ocean Institute (OI), Dana Point, and researchers at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) have collaborated to develop a highly efficient, productive and rewarding approach to crafting scientist/educator partnerships. These efforts represent a new model for facilitated collaboration between informal science education and research partners. Each partner brings unique elements to this collaboration. The Ocean Institute's recently funded Sea Floor Science Exhibition represents an innovative approach to exhibits and programming for K-12 students and the public. The exhibits and programs are firmly grounded in the needs of the formal science education community (i.e. standards based), designed to be constructed/created on extremely short time frames (months), convertible for both public display and programming needs and easily updated. Scripps researchers, as well as those from other institutions, provide briefings on their ongoing research work, loan or donate equipment and instrumentation both for use and display, and in some cases provide research experiences for OI staff and students. CA-COSEE acts as the catalyst, identifying and engaging researchers from disciplines that are consistent with OI exhibit and program goals, serve as a liaison between newly introduced scientists and educators and facilitate the incorporation of E&O components in scientists research proposals, including funding for future exhibits. Using the example of the newest Sea Floor Science exhibit, "Slopes, Slides and Tsunamis!", we will describe the role each partner has played in creating this research based exhibit and program, the chronology of the process, and how this approach will provide the basis for a long-term, sustained partnership between the researchers and science

  5. Gerontology Education and Research in Kenya: Establishing a U.S.-African Partnership in Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sharon V.; Gachuhi, Mugo; Ice, Gillian; Cattell, Maria; Whittington, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article reprises four presentations on "Gerontology Education in Kenya," a seminar at the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Association of Gerontology in Higher Education. It describes the process by which the Gerontology Institute of Georgia State University established a 3-year gerontology education and research partnership with Kenyatta…

  6. Gerontology Education and Research in Kenya: Establishing a U.S.-African Partnership in Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Sharon V.; Gachuhi, Mugo; Ice, Gillian; Cattell, Maria; Whittington, Frank

    2005-01-01

    This article reprises four presentations on "Gerontology Education in Kenya," a seminar at the 2004 Annual Meeting of the Association of Gerontology in Higher Education. It describes the process by which the Gerontology Institute of Georgia State University established a 3-year gerontology education and research partnership with Kenyatta…

  7. The Impact of Public Private Partnerships on Education: A Case Study of Sewell Group Plc and Victoria Dock Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Helen; Davies, Brent

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the implications of Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) for education delivery, attainment, attitude, behaviour and attendance. Partnership success factors are identified, and transferable lessons extracted. Barriers to the success of the partnership are explored and suggestions for improvement are…

  8. Earth, Meet Pluto: The New Horizons Education and Communications Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, M.

    2015-12-01

    The unique partnership between the NASA New Horizons education/communications and public affairs programs tapped into the excitement of visiting an unexplored planet in a new region of the solar system - resulting in unprecedented public participation in and coverage of a planetary mission. With a range of hands-on learning experiences, Web materials and online , the program provided opportunities for students, educators, museums, science centers, the media, Web surfers and other members of the public to ride along on the first mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt. The programs leveraged resources, materials and expertise to address a wide range of traditional and nontraditional audiences while providing consistent messages and information on this historic NASA endeavor. The E/C program included a variety of formal lesson plans and learning materials — based on New Horizons science and engineering goals, and aligned with National Research Council's National Science Education Standards — that continue to help students in grades K-12 learn more about science, technology, engineering and mathematics. College students designed and built an actual flight instrument on New Horizons and held internships with the spacecraft integration and test team. New Horizons E/C programs went well beyond the classroom, from a chance for people to send their names to Pluto on board the New Horizons spacecraft before launch, to opportunities for the public to access milestone events and the first-ever close-up views of Pluto in places such as museums, science centers and libraries, TV and the Web — as well as thousands who attended interactive "Plutopalooza" road shows across the country. Teamed with E/C was the public affairs strategy to communicate New Horizons news and messages to media, mission stakeholders, the scientific community and the public. These messages include various aspects of New Horizons, including the progress of the mission and key milestones and achievements

  9. Arts Education Partnerships: Informing Policy through the Development of Culture and Creativity within a Collaborative Project Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Katie

    2011-01-01

    Arts education partnerships have become an important means for developing and sustaining school arts programs that engage students, teachers, and communities. Tapping into additional perspectives, resources, and support from arts agencies and postsecondary institutions, arts education partnerships strengthen arts education infrastructure within…

  10. Who Gets Left Behind? The Fate of the Unrepresented in the Wake of US-India Higher Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baily, Supriya

    2015-01-01

    The promotion of US-Indian higher education partnerships affects those students who are most marginalized. This article explores the development, implementation, and reception of such partnerships to meet the needs of students who remain on the borders of educational access in India. This article addresses the ways higher education policies…

  11. The Early Childhood Education and Care Partnership for Bilingualism in Minority Language Schooling: Collaboration between Bilingual Families and Pedagogical Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergroth, Mari; Palviainen, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    Educational partnerships occur at the intersection of early childhood education and care (ECEC), families, and the surrounding community, and have been shown to play a significant role in student success rates in education. There is, however, a gap in research on the role and potential of "partnership" in the case of bilingual families…

  12. Community Partnerships: Educational Linkages to Increase the Number of Primary Care Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Ronald W.; Henry, Rebecca C.

    1993-01-01

    The Kellogg Foundation's Community Partnerships in Health Professions Education, a program designed to increase multidisciplinary, comprehensive, cost-effective primary care teams in communities, uses an organizational structure linking academic medical education with communities. The new structures have resulted in new curricula and other…

  13. Innovative Public Engagement Practices and Partnerships: Lifting Stakeholder Voices in Education Accountability Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Monica; Brewer, Curtis; Knoeppel, Robert; Witte, James; Pargas, Roy; Lindle, Jane Clark

    2010-01-01

    In 2008, due to increasing stakeholder dissatisfaction with assessment results and school report cards, South Carolina revised its 1998 Educational Accountability Act and required public engagement with stakeholders including parents/guardians, educators, business and community leaders, and taxpayers. The legislation created partnerships between…

  14. Beyond the Numbers: Understanding California's High School Dropouts. Partnership for Urban Education Research (PUER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jeric

    2008-01-01

    Six of California's largest urban school districts have joined together in the Partnership for Urban Education Research (PUER), to address the most pressing issues in urban education. The six PUER districts have agreed to work together to increase data availability, enhance internal research capacity, and promote collaboration and information…

  15. Practical School Community Partnerships Leading to Successful Educational Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kladifko, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    School leaders must have knowledge and understanding of the various external and internal entities in their school community. Partnerships, with a focus on communication and interaction with diverse community leaders and professionals, are essential for school success. In this article, the author discusses successful practical experiences and…

  16. Educational Partnerships: Connecting Schools, Families, and the Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox-Petersen, Amy

    2010-01-01

    This comprehensive text helps prepare pre-service and in-service teachers to build and sustain family, school, and community partnerships that are vital to student success. Focusing on grades preK-8, and with a particular emphasis on diverse families and learners, this book helps teachers to overcome barriers, create action plans, and sustain…

  17. Proceedings of the precollege-university partnerships for science and mathematics education conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    In April of 1992 in Atlanta, Georgia, nearly 50 elementary and secondary educators and about 100 postsecondary educators convened to explore their common interests in the conference on precollege-university partnerships. This report summarizes the remarks and conclusions of speakers, panelists, and of attendees gathered in regional work groups. During the course of the conference, attendees heard from federal agencies and foundations which fund education-related projects and learned of their enthusiastic support of partnerships. In our national need to manage education and training resources wisely, these funding agents see partnership benefits such as renewed excitement for teaching at all levels, effective and technologically up-to-date in-service training, more and better-prepared high school graduates entering colleges, and a general enhancement of understanding among educators at all levels of teaching. As an added benefit, the partnership concept promotes discussion and understanding in an atmosphere of respect, appreciation, and self-esteem. Several hours of the conference were devoted to panels addressing five questions important to education coalitions. The panelists represented a wide variety of teaching levels, geographic locations, educational experiences, and ethnic groups.

  18. The Human Genome Project and Biology Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, Joseph D.

    1996-01-01

    Highlights the importance of the Human Genome Project in educating the public about genetics. Discusses four challenges that science educators must address: teaching for conceptual understanding, the nature of science, the personal and social impact of science and technology, and the principles of technology. Contains 45 references. (JRH)

  19. Development of university-industry partnerships in railroad engineering education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautala, Pasi T.

    , such as willingness of partners to understand each others needs and motivations for the relationship should be alleviated by developing performance goals and measures of success. While it is impossible to evaluate all aspects of university level railroad engineering education in one study, this research suggests that there are opportunities for a partnership between the rail industry and universities. The purpose of this research was to identify those opportunities and increase the understanding of the forces that shape the demand for railroad engineers and engineering education. The findings can be used both by the rail industry and the universities as they initiate change in the current processes and thrive to develop railroad engineers to meet the demands of the 21 st century.

  20. Dismantling the School Sport Partnership Infrastructure: Findings from a Survey of Physical Education and School Sport Practitioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackintosh, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This research examines the perceptions of education practitioners to the proposed changes to the school sport partnership (SSP) programme in England and in particular its implications for primary school physical education. It aims to explore insights into the dismantling of this partnership programme. The SSP system developed club links, increased…

  1. Innovative informatics education: aligning theory and practice through strategic partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, K; Protti, D; Wright, I; Guerriere, M

    1998-01-01

    The University of Victoria School of Health Information Science (HINF) and The Toronto Hospital (TTH) have formed a strategic partnership to align current information management theory with practical experience. The fourth year undergraduate course in Information Management and Technology was redesigned to include a joint research project with TTH. Staff from TTH were paired with groups of 2-3 students to explore current information management issues. Technology such as electronic mail and conference calls enabled timely communication. Final results were presented via video conference at the end of the term and jointly graded by the professor and hospital staff. Over the three years, a variety of projects have been undertaken and the approach has been refined. Each year offered new insight to both students and staff. Findings include several key success factors: senior level support, early planning, timely communication, access to technology, and opportunity for staff and student feedback. This partnership offers strategic advantages to both organizations in innovation, mutual learning, recruiting, and partnership. Next steps include expansion of the project to a regional model and seminars on current information management topics for TTH staff.

  2. Alcohol Pharmacology Education Partnership: Using Chemistry and Biology Concepts To Educate High School Students about Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Elizabeth A; Kwiek, Nicole; Sikes, Suzanne S; Halpin, Myra J; Weinbaum, Carolyn A; Burgette, Lane F; Reiter, Jerome P; Schwartz-Bloom, Rochelle D

    2014-02-11

    We developed the Alcohol Pharmacology Education Partnership (APEP), a set of modules designed to integrate a topic of interest (alcohol) with concepts in chemistry and biology for high school students. Chemistry and biology teachers (n = 156) were recruited nationally to field-test APEP in a controlled study. Teachers obtained professional development either at a conference-based workshop (NSTA or NCSTA) or via distance learning to learn how to incorporate the APEP modules into their teaching. They field-tested the modules in their classes during the following year. Teacher knowledge of chemistry and biology concepts increased significantly following professional development, and was maintained for at least a year. Their students (n = 14 014) demonstrated significantly higher scores when assessed for knowledge of both basic and advanced chemistry and biology concepts compared to students not using APEP modules in their classes the previous year. Higher scores were achieved as the number of modules used increased. These findings are consistent with our previous studies, demonstrating higher scores in chemistry and biology after students use modules that integrate topics interesting to them, such as drugs (the Pharmacology Education Partnership).

  3. Higher Education in Further Education Colleges: Indirectly Funded Partnerships: Codes of Practice for Franchise and Consortia Arrangements. Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Funding Council for England, Bristol.

    This report provides codes of practice for two types of indirectly funded partnerships entered into by higher education institutions and further education sector colleges: franchises and consortia. The codes of practice set out guidance on the principles that should be reflected in the franchise and consortia agreements that underpin indirectly…

  4. Lessons learned about coordinating academic partnerships from an international network for health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Airong; Omollo, Kathleen Ludewig

    2013-11-01

    There is a growing trend of academic partnerships between U.S., Canadian, and European health science institutions and academic health centers in low- and middle-income countries. These partnerships often encounter challenges such as resource disparities and power differentials, which affect the motivations, expectations, balance of benefits, and results of the joint projects. Little has been discussed in previous literature regarding the communication and project management processes that affect the success of such partnerships. To fill the gap in the literature, the authors present lessons learned from the African Health Open Educational Resources Network, a multicountry, multiorganizational partnership established in May 2008. The authors introduce the history of the network, then discuss actively engaging stakeholders throughout the project's life cycle (design, planning, execution, and closure) through professional development, relationship building, and assessment activities. They focus on communication and management practices used to identify mutually beneficial project goals, ensure timely completion of deliverables, and develop sustainable sociotechnical infrastructure for future collaborative projects. These activities yielded an interactive process of action, assessment, and reflection to ensure that project goals and values were aligned with implementation. The authors conclude with a discussion of lessons learned and how the partnership project may serve as a model for other universities and academic health centers in high-income countries and low- and middle-income countries that are interested in or currently pursuing international academic partnerships.

  5. Otolaryngology outreach to Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital: a medical and educational partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, B; Larsen-Reindorf, R; Duah, M; Opoku-Buabeng, J; Edwards, B M; Brown, D; Moyer, J; Prince, M; Basura, G J

    2017-07-01

    Medical and educational partnerships between high- and low-resourced countries provide opportunities to have a long-term meaningful impact on medical training and healthcare delivery. An otolaryngology partnership between Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital in Kumasi, Ghana, and the University of Michigan Department of Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery has been undertaken to enhance healthcare delivery at both institutions. A temporal bone dissection laboratory, with the equipment to perform dedicated otological surgery, and academic platforms for clinical and medical education and residency training have been established. This article describes the details of this partnership in otological surgery and hearing health, with an emphasis on creating in-country surgical simulation, training on newly acquired medical equipment and planning regarding the formulation of objectified metrics to gauge progress going forward.

  6. Partnership Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlin, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Portrays partnerships as strategic alliances and temporary relationships characterized by self-interest. References a series of national and organizational case studies throughout the world. Compares the organizational and sectoral domains of partnerships. Examines the asymmetries of power and their implications for educational policy and…

  7. original article partnership between teacher education institutes and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    principals, deans, and practicum coordinators) using questionnaires (open and close-ended), interview ... approach to Teacher Education that links initial education to .... English, Mathematics, Geography, ..... teaching methodology, classroom.

  8. Powerful Partnerships for School-to-Career Success through Business and Education Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykman, Ann, Ed.

    This book is a practical guide that explains how both businesses and schools have benefitted from partnerships. The guide also contains sample letters, charts, forms, and further resources. The following 16 chapters are included: "What's in It for Business?" (Carver C. Gayton); "What's in It for Education: The Secondary Perspective" (Clifford A.…

  9. League Bilong Laif: Rugby, Education and Sport-for-Development Partnerships in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Emma; Schulenkorf, Nico

    2016-01-01

    League Bilong Laif (LBL) is a sport-for-development (SFD) programme that was established in 2013 as a three-way partnership between the Australian Government, the Papua New Guinea (PNG) Government (Department of Education) and the Australian Rugby League Commission (National Rugby League). As a contribution to addressing low rates of school…

  10. The Role of an International Higher Education Partnership to Improve Gender Equality and Empower Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sandra Louise Clements

    2014-01-01

    This is a research case study of an International Higher Education Partnership (IHEP) between Vanguard University of Southern California (VUSC) and the University of Duhok (UoD) in the Kurdistan Region of northern Iraq funded by the British Council DelPHE-Iraq project targeting Millennial Development Goal (MDG) #3 to promote gender equality and…

  11. 77 FR 55436 - Special Local Regulation; Partnership in Education, Dragon Boat Race; Maumee River, Toledo, OH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ..., Dragon Boat Race; Maumee River, Toledo, OH AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... River during the annual Dragon Boat Races. This special local regulated area is necessary to protect... Regulation; Partnership in Education Dragon Boat Race, Maumee River Toledo, OH in the Federal...

  12. Challenges to the Concept "Partnership with Parents" in Special Needs Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abed, Mohaned

    2014-01-01

    It is observed that professionals would meet the needs of individual children if they work closely with the child's parents [58]. The growing of a child is a continuous process which requires a coherent, close partnership between home and school, since the house is the first educational environment, and the first community in which a child lives…

  13. Culturally Appropriate Environmental Education: An Example of a Partnership with the Hmong American Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengston, David N.; Schermann, Michele A.; Hawj, Foung; Moua, MaiKia

    2012-01-01

    A partnership with the Hmong American community produced "The Wildlife and Wilderness Exploration Show," a DVD that puts a modern twist on traditional Hmong storytelling. Key educational messages in the DVD were identified through interviews with Hmong natural resource professionals. The messages are delivered in entertaining segments in the DVD,…

  14. Enhancing Global Service-Learning with Partnerships as an Engagement Strategy for Christian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bish, Gregory T.; Lommel, John

    2016-01-01

    Global engagement programming across higher education continues to expand as institutional leaders and practitioners strive to meet global citizenship and civic engagement outcomes. This article presents case study research on a global service-learning partnership, the "Christian University" (CU) Wheelchair Project, which has involved…

  15. Powerful Partnerships for School-to-Career Success through Business and Education Cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykman, Ann, Ed.

    This book is a practical guide that explains how both businesses and schools have benefitted from partnerships. The guide also contains sample letters, charts, forms, and further resources. The following 16 chapters are included: "What's in It for Business?" (Carver C. Gayton); "What's in It for Education: The Secondary Perspective" (Clifford A.…

  16. It Takes Two (or More) to Tango: Partnerships within the Education Sector in Timor-Leste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Ritesh

    2011-01-01

    Recent international declarations stress the importance of partnerships between and amongst donors, the state and civil society, in order to improve service delivery and promote qualities of good governance, particularly in key sectors such as education. However, in conditions of state fragility--where high levels of distrust between and amongst…

  17. A Partnership Approach to Action Learning within a Masters Educational Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Patricia; Edwards, Carys

    2012-01-01

    This account of practice provides a practical example of the use of action learning within a masters educational programme, an MA in Change Management designed and delivered by a collaborative partnership between the Isle of Anglesey County Council (ACC) and Liverpool Business School (LBS), Liverpool John Moores University. The account has been…

  18. Strategic Marketing of Further and Higher Educational Institutions: Partnership Arrangements and Centres of Entrepreneurship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trim, Peter R. J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes centers of entrepreneurship, which higher education academics and administrators can establish to facilitate the development of partnership arrangements. The centers can be viewed as catalysts for developing new products and services which can be turned into marketable products and services, leading to increased opportunities…

  19. Partnerships and Emancipatory Educational Movements: Issues and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnove, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Neoliberal and structural adjustment policies in Latin America have produced educational budget cuts that set higher education against primary/secondary education. Confronting this environment, a proposed project involving cooperation between Latin American and North American universities, popular education, community action, and alternative…

  20. China’s Higher Education Engagement with Africa: A Different Partnership and Cooperation Model?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth King

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available What is the nature of China’s educational partnerships with Africa? This chapter examines China’s investment in human resource development in Africa, especially in higher education, through several programmes including long- and short-term training of Africans in China, Confucius Institutes, stand-alone projects, and the 20+20 scheme for higher education cooperation between China and Africa. It investigates several apparent differences between China’s aid discourse and practice and those of traditional Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD donors. It asks how the enduring continuity of China’s discourse on mutual benefit and common good in educational aid can be explained. Can what looks like a one-way partnership in terms of financing really, in fact, be symmetrical?

  1. Creating value-added linkages through creative programming: a partnership for nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Linda M; Luke, Gerri; Tenofsky, Linda M

    2007-01-01

    Academic and clinical institutions can effectively collaborate to deliver programs that enhance the educational level of the nursing staff. Creative programming, which offers flexibility and convenience, and a reasonable cost are key elements in the success of a program. Open communication and mutual recognition and respect of the talents, abilities, and values of all developers of the program are essential factors in effective collaborations leading to successful partnerships. Although clear expectations and clarity of functions are important once the partnership has developed, flexibility and a desire to "own" both the problems and the successes of a program are crucial to success.

  2. PRIME Partnerships in International Medical Education - Restoring a Christian ethos to medical education worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huw Morgan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern medicine has developed from an essentially Christian world-view and in Western countries has been greatly influenced by the Christian tradition of hospitality and caring for the sick. However, during the 20th century, medical education became increasingly secularised and focussed on the bio-physical model of disease, losing sight of a holistic view of the person that includes awareness of a spiritual dimension. Former Communist countries in particular have little recent tradition of caring, and medical education there tends to be characterised by poor role-models and out-dated didactic teaching. In the resource poor countries of the global South there are many Christian hospitals and clinics but often a lack of experienced medical teachers. Partnerships in International Medical Education (PRIME’s vision and mission is to support health-care education worldwide to restore a Christian-based holistic approach to patients, and act as a resource where needed, tailoring medical educational programmes to meet the needs of overseas partners (or colleagues in the NHS. Using interactive leaner-centred and problem-based educational methods, PRIME tutors (all experienced and qualified Christian medical educators seek to model patient-centred care by using learner-centred teaching, valuing each person as a bearer of the image of God. Most of PRIME’s teaching involves the doctor-patient relationship, communication skills, compassion, ethics and professionalism, often based around particular clinical scenarios to suit the learners. Small teams of voluntary tutors visiting partner institutions and colleagues for a few weeks a year can have a surprisingly large impact, as those grasping the vision become advocates for positive change in their own situations. Training of trainers and teachers in learner-centred, androgogic methodology to build capacity and sustainability is also a major part of the work.

  3. Geoscientist/Educator Partnerships at the University of Colorado: Strategies and Examples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhr, S. M.; Hare, J.; Healy, G.

    2005-05-01

    According to a study about the factors that engage and hinder scientists' involvement in education and outreach (Andrews et.al., 2005), the presence of a dedicated outreach coordinator who can provide a point of contact and lessen the burden on scientists is one of the keys to success. For the past nine years, research scientists at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) have worked in partnership with just such a coordinating team, the CIRES Education and Outreach group. As funding agency emphasis on education and social impacts has increased, so have the opportunities to develop educational projects intrinsically linked to current geoscience research. One such effort is Ocean Interactions, a project which began as a ship-shore student communication opportunity at the initiation of the researcher. The roles of each contributor to the partnership will be described, along with the framework through which CIRES supports scientist/educator partnerships of this sort. Andrews, Elisabeth, Alexandra Weaver, Daniel Hanley, Jeff Hovermill, Ginger Melton. 2005. "Scientists and Public Outreach: Participation, Motivations and Impediments." Journal of Geoscience Education in press May 2005.

  4. Supporting Geoscientists in Partnerships for K-12 Education at NSF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinen, M.

    2001-12-01

    NSF Directorate for Geosciences (GEO) education activities have evolved over the last decade based on advice from a broad segment of the geosciences community. These activities gained momentum when a Geosciences Education Working Group (GEWG, 1996) recognized the shift from traditional priorities that emphasized only research, to those that support education in geosciences as well. The GEWG report embraced this increased emphasis on education as a component of NSF's role in assuring the long-term health of the geosciences and endorsed the principle that research and education should be well integrated. While many geosciences education activities are funded by the Education and Human Resources Directorate (EHR) of NSF, the GEWG report highlighted the need to have more active participation by research geoscientists in K-12 education activities, and the need to train them to be able to do so. While some roles in education are clearly best left to educational professionals (e.g. large-scale systemic reform projects, pedagogical development at the K-12 level, and many teacher enhancement projects), activities such as undergraduate research, technology advancement, curriculum content development and informal science are ones in which GEO should actively seek to collaborate with programs in EHR. The GEO education program has expanded over the last decade. Our first education activity, Awards to Facilitate Geoscience Education (AFGE), was very successful in attracting some of the leading researchers in geosciences. This program evolved to become the Geoscience Education Program. An important program funded by GEO that developed from community activity is the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE). This program grew out of a joint EHR/GEO award and a series of community workshops. The program will establish an Internet portal for geoscience curricular materials and other teacher resources that will enable further collaboration between the research and education

  5. Public-Private Partnership and Indian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiji, O.

    2014-01-01

    Today the requirements in higher education are vast and majority of the population in the country cannot afford higher education as their per capita income is very low. Neither the government nor the private sector alone can cater to the requirements of higher education. It is in this context, one should look at the scope, feasibility,…

  6. Understanding the Roles of Non-State Actors in Global Governance: Evidence from the Global Partnership for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menashy, Francine

    2016-01-01

    The study detailed in this paper examines the growing role of non-state actors in the transnational policy-making landscape through a case study of the Global Partnership for Education (GPE)--a partnership of donor and developing country governments, multilateral organizations, civil society, private companies and foundations, dedicated to…

  7. Evaluation of the National Science Foundation's Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) Program, Volume 2: Supplementary Materials. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alina; Epstein, Carter; Parsad, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    The National Science Foundation contracted with Abt Associates to conduct an evaluation of its Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) program, which supports intellectually substantive collaborations between U.S. and foreign researchers in which the international partnership is essential to the research effort. The evaluation…

  8. Understanding the Roles of Non-State Actors in Global Governance: Evidence from the Global Partnership for Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menashy, Francine

    2016-01-01

    The study detailed in this paper examines the growing role of non-state actors in the transnational policy-making landscape through a case study of the Global Partnership for Education (GPE)--a partnership of donor and developing country governments, multilateral organizations, civil society, private companies and foundations, dedicated to…

  9. AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION COURSES FRAMED BY A COLLABORATE PARTNERSHIP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    The study presents an alternative didactical approach to teacher education linking practice and theory through a collaborative partnership setting. Using a “small scale” teaching design in which students alternate between schools and college it was possible to show some evidence that, by following...... teacher education on its head and begins with a focus on practice so students alternate between school–based and college–based teaching in a cyclical fashion, and are encouraged to link theory with practice. This kind of college teaching demands a new teacher educational paradigm for which collaboration...... between schools and colleges is paramount. This study indicates that a collaborative partnership setting involving college and S&T- profile schools can provide a “room for study”, and that this kind of teaching design enhances the opportunities for students’ to develop teacher knowledge (aspects...

  10. Sigma XI and U.S. Army scientists: An innovative partnership for science education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardello, A.V. [Army Natick Research, Development, and Engineering Center, Kansas, MA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The Natick Chapter of Sigma Xi, the U.S. Army Natick R,D&E Center and the U.S. Army Research Institute for Environmental Medicine have established a multifaceted program of science education and outreach to local schools. This program provides support to state, regional and local science fairs; mentoring of students; class lectures and demonstrations; science minicourses; teacher-for-a-day programs; technical tours and laboratory research opportunities. These activities are facilitated by partnership agreements with school systems and by several U.S. Army-sponsored programs to foster science, mathematics and engineering education. Processes have been developed to engender interests of scientists, to encourage school and student participation, to build partnerships, and to coordinate outreach activities. This program is one of several U.S. Department of Defense programs designed to augment national science, mathematics, and engineering education.

  11. Healthcare organization-education partnerships and career ladder programs for health care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, Janette S; Chuang, Emmeline; Morgan, Jennifer C

    2014-12-01

    Increasing concerns about quality of care and workforce shortages have motivated health care organizations and educational institutions to partner to create career ladders for frontline health care workers. Career ladders reward workers for gains in skills and knowledge and may reduce the costs associated with turnover, improve patient care, and/or address projected shortages of certain nursing and allied health professions. This study examines partnerships between health care and educational organizations in the United States during the design and implementation of career ladder training programs for low-skill workers in health care settings, referred to as frontline health care workers. Mixed methods data from 291 frontline health care workers and 347 key informants (e.g., administrators, instructors, managers) collected between 2007 and 2010 were analyzed using both regression and fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (QCA). Results suggest that different combinations of partner characteristics, including having an education leader, employer leader, frontline management support, partnership history, community need, and educational policies, were necessary for high worker career self-efficacy and program satisfaction. Whether a worker received a wage increase, however, was primarily dependent on leadership within the health care organization, including having an employer leader and employer implementation policies. Findings suggest that strong partnerships between health care and educational organizations can contribute to the successful implementation of career ladder programs, but workers' ability to earn monetary rewards for program participation depends on the strength of leadership support within the health care organization.

  12. Rudiments of recent fertility decline in Hungary: Postponement, educational differences, and outcomes of changing partnership forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Spéder

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Our study describes fundamental changes in childbearing behavior in Hungary. It documents current postponement of entry into motherhood (first birth and uncovers signs of delay in second birth. We place the behavioral modifications into historical time and reveal the basic role of the political, economic, and societal transformation of Hungary that started in 1989-1990 in these modifications. We document postponement as well as differentiation, and mothers' highest level of education will represent the structural position of individuals. We shed light on the different speed of postponement and support the assumption of behavioral differences according to the highest level of education. Particular attention will be paid to changing partnership relations: Fertility outcomes remain to be strongly associated with the type of partnership and its development; profound changes in partnership formation, namely the proliferation of cohabitation and the increasing separation rate of first partnerships, may therefore facilitate fertility decline in Hungary. The analysis is based on the first wave of the Hungarian panel survey "Turning points of the life course" carried out in 2001/2002.

  13. Collaborating for Climate Education - A Look at Strategic Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozuwa, J.; Lewis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Collaborating for Climate Education WeekEarth Day Network (EDN) developed Climate Education Week toolkit, a turnkey online resource for grades K-12 that provided teachers with everything they needed to deliver lessons, activities, contests, and service learning projects that related to climate science during Climate Education Week (April 18-25). EDN assembled an Advisory Group to develop the survey, lesson plans and activities, and resources. The Advisory Group consisted of experts and partners in environmental education, including representatives from other government and non-governmental organizations working with the White House on Climate Education, as well as educators in our Educator's Network. EDN's Climate Education Week Advisory Board brought together top academics and major stakeholders in climate education throughout the development and outreach processes. The Advisory Board included representatives from the Alliance for Climate Education (ACE), The CLEAN Network, NOAA, The Department of Energy, and NASA. The representatives from the board helped to identify and streamline the most effective and necessary lesson plans, strategic themes to maintain throughout the toolkit, and avenues for increased outreach. EDN also partnered with Connect4Climate, PBS's Plum Landing, Young Voices of Climate Change, FEMA, and The Wild Center to develop content and to broaden the reach of the toolkit. Each of the seven days had a different theme that addressed a specific climate education topic, with highlighted activities and resources for elementary, middle and high school levels. The toolkit provided educators with a comprehensive view of climate change—beginning with the science, the anthropogenic causes, and societal impacts and then providing solutions, ways to take action, and the green economy transition. This online resource connected educators to a network of effective resources from our partners, all of which saw a significant uptick in their online viewership

  14. The Ridge 2000 Program: Promoting Earth Systems Science Literacy Through Science Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simms, E.; Goehring, E.; Larsen, J.; Kusek, K.

    2007-12-01

    Sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Ridge 2000 (R2K) is a mid-ocean ridge and hydrothermal vent research program with a history of successful education and public outreach (EPO) programs and products. This presentation will share general science and education partnership strategies and best practices employed by the R2K program, with a particular emphasis on the innovative R2K project From Local to EXtreme Environments (FLEXE). As a new project of the international NSF and NASA sponsored GLOBE earth science education program, FLEXE involves middle and high school students in structured, guided analyses and comparisons of real environmental data. The science and education partnership model employed by FLEXE relies on experienced education coordinators within the R2K and international InterRidge and ChEss science research programs, who directly solicit and facilitate the involvement of an interdisciplinary community of scientists in the project based on their needs and interests. Concurrently, the model also relies on the GLOBE program to facilitate awareness and access to a large, established network of international educators who are interested in the process of science and interacting with the scientific community. The predominantly web-based interfaces that serve to effectively link together the FLEXE science and education communities have been developed by the Center for Science and the Schools at Penn State University, and are based on researched educational pedagogy, tools and techniques. The FLEXE partnership model will be discussed in the context of both broad and specific considerations of audience needs, scientist and educator recruitment, and the costs and benefits for those involved in the project.

  15. Re-play: Re-assessing the effectiveness of an arts partnership in teacher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Bernard W.

    2006-09-01

    RE-PLAY: RE-ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF AN ARTS PARTNERSHIP IN CANADIAN TEACHER EDUCATION - Elementary teachers in Canada are increasingly expected to deliver arts instruction in their classrooms, as financial exigencies have restricted the hiring of specialists. This study examines the effectiveness of an arts partnership between a Canadian university faculty of education and local-area school boards. In this partnership, university staff and specialist arts teachers together delivered the integrated arts component in teacher education. Findings indicate that specialist arts instruction, peer learning methods and theory/practice integration strengthen such training in the arts. Specialist arts teachers can enhance the instructional effectiveness of teacher-candidates by introducing current classroom teaching strategies, concrete activities, up-to-date resources and classroom management techniques. The confidence of beginning teachers to teach the arts can be promoted by observing colleagues, engaging in team learning activities, and obtaining peer feedback. The use of integrated arts theory and a focus on practical applications of concepts, coupled with reflective discussion, can also be seen to promote conceptual understanding. A further recommendation involves expanding the role of the arts in teacher education to foster cultural diversity.

  16. Citizen Science: Broadening Access and Engagement Through Community Partnerships, Aerospace Education and Water Quality Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    We applied a new approach to the design and development of citizen science learning opportunities to enhance outreach to diverse student populations, while advancing water quality research and aerospace education. This collaborative approach to informal science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) and aerospace education required innovative partnerships between private general aviation pilots, researchers, teachers, and students. This research explored the development of active partnerships required to facilitate community engaged science, with an emphasis on increased participation of women and girls and people of color, while creating new exploratory pathways for broadening access to and engagement in STEM learning experiences. We developed an outreach program through collaborative planning with local schools to create new STEM learning experiences based upon basic aerospace education concepts and an existing water quality research project designed to track harmful algal blooms (HAB) that can produce toxins called cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, which can impact drinking, fishing, and recreational waters. General aviation pilots functioning as citizen scientists obtained high-resolution aerial images while flying over potentially impacted waters. Aerial data was made available to teachers and students, as well as researchers participating in the existing water quality program lead by NASA Glenn Research Center. Teachers used the images and results to educate in climate change and the dangers of HAB. Students were able to compare aerial data with their own observations, and also gained experience in aeronautical science through field trips to local airports, hands-on experience with private research aircraft, specialized equipment used for data collection, and advanced ground instruction from research pilots. As a result of reaching out to local educators serving diverse student populations and facilitating collaborative planning, we

  17. The Gulf Coast Health Services Steering Committee: a business-education partnership to solve the registered nurse shortage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Karen; McPherson, Robert; Distefano, Susan; Rice, Tabitha

    2006-12-01

    The need to increase the registered nurse work-force has historically been the concern only of nursing school administrators and educators and, occasionally, the focus of hospital administrators during spikes in demand. How can nursing educators develop and sustain a productive partnership with local hospitals and the business community? The authors describe their experience in creating and developing a long-term, employer-led, and sustainable partnership for increasing their own registered nurse workforce.

  18. Integrating science education and marine conservation through collaborative partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jeannie Miller; Higgins, Katie; Lee, Kristin; Stearns, Kira; Hunt, Lori

    2015-06-15

    The Georgia Sea Turtle Center has a mission of conservation based rehabilitation, research, and education. Marine debris is a serious threat to marine species. In an effort to educate local students, the GSTC obtained a grant to provide educational opportunities to local third graders. Third and fourth grade classes in Glynn County, Georgia were offered a Garbage in the Water program and 964 students were reached. After programming, students showed a statistically significant (p<.0001) increase in test scores between the pre and posttests. This success led to repeat funding for additional programming for first grades as well as a formalized relationship with the Glynn County School District. As part of this relationship the Georgia Sea Turtle Center is now the official field trip location for all third grades in the district.

  19. A Necessary Partnership: Study Abroad and Sustainability in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, Andrea M. W.; Christiansen, Lars D.; Fischer, Nancy L.; Underhill, Joseph B.

    2011-01-01

    The last two decades have seen institutions of higher education put increasing emphasis on both internationalizing their institutions and making them more sustainable. While laudable in their own right, there are contradictions and tensions between these goals, in particular when the carbon emissions involved in international activities like study…

  20. Working Partnerships: A Joint Venture in Vocational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Clifton P.

    Joint Ventures in Vocational Education projects link participating businesses with secondary vocational programs in a cooperative relationship. These are voluntary arrangements between vocational programs and a public or private sector agency that combine the energies and resources of the partners to enrich various aspects of the vocational…

  1. Building Sustainable Health and Education Partnerships: Stories from Local Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Growing health disparities have a negative impact on young people's educational achievement. Community schools that involve deep relationships with partners across multiple domains address these disparities by providing opportunities and services that promote healthy development of young people, and enable them to graduate from high…

  2. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Exploring an Innovative Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This report describes collaborations between the disciplines of museum education and art therapy, which inspired the implementation of a pilot art therapy program at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee (USA). Because relatively limited research has been conducted on this trend, the author reviewed museum exhibits and programming, as well…

  3. Working Partnerships: A Joint Venture in Vocational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Clifton P.

    Joint Ventures in Vocational Education projects link participating businesses with secondary vocational programs in a cooperative relationship. These are voluntary arrangements between vocational programs and a public or private sector agency that combine the energies and resources of the partners to enrich various aspects of the vocational…

  4. Classroom Effects of an Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algozzine, Bob; Babb, Julie; Algozzine, Kate; Mraz, Maryann; Kissel, Brian; Spano, Sedra; Foxworth, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated an Early Childhood Educator Professional Development (ECEPD) project that provided high-quality, sustained, and intensive professional development designed to support developmentally appropriate instruction for preschool-age children based on the best available research on early childhood pedagogy, child development, and preschool…

  5. Museum Education and Art Therapy: Exploring an Innovative Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Karen

    2012-01-01

    This report describes collaborations between the disciplines of museum education and art therapy, which inspired the implementation of a pilot art therapy program at the Memphis Brooks Museum of Art in Tennessee (USA). Because relatively limited research has been conducted on this trend, the author reviewed museum exhibits and programming, as well…

  6. Brokering Knowledge Mobilization Networks: Policy Reforms, Partnerships, and Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng-A-Fook, Nicholas; Kane, Ruth G.; Butler, Jesse K.; Glithero, Lisa; Forte, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Educational researchers and policy-makers are now expected by funding agencies and their institutions to innovate the multi-directional ways in which our production of knowledge can impact the classrooms of teachers (practitioners), while also integrating their experiential knowledge into the landscape of our research. In this article, we draw on…

  7. An International Partnership in Health Care and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlton, Donna; Miller, Marie

    The faculty achievements and challenges in an international nursing education project between two colleges are presented. In the spring of 1985, the University of Northern Colorado (UNC) and the University Autonomous of Benito Juarez of Oaxaca (UABJO), Oaxaca, Mexico, entered into an international covenant to develop a baccalaureate nursing…

  8. The Art of Partnerships: Community Resources for Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Daniel H.; Kisida, Brian

    2017-01-01

    The shift from the No Child Left Behind Act to the recently authorized Every Student Succeeds Act could beckon a renaissance of K-12 arts education in the U.S. Over the past decade, NCLB's increased emphasis on accountability testing in core subjects has coincided with a notable decline in school-based arts exposure. Recognizing this trend and…

  9. An International Partnership in Health Care and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arlton, Donna; Miller, Marie

    The faculty achievements and challenges in an international nursing education project between two colleges are presented. In the spring of 1985, the University of Northern Colorado (UNC) and the University Autonomous of Benito Juarez of Oaxaca (UABJO), Oaxaca, Mexico, entered into an international covenant to develop a baccalaureate nursing…

  10. Classroom Effects of an Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algozzine, Bob; Babb, Julie; Algozzine, Kate; Mraz, Maryann; Kissel, Brian; Spano, Sedra; Foxworth, Kimberly

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated an Early Childhood Educator Professional Development (ECEPD) project that provided high-quality, sustained, and intensive professional development designed to support developmentally appropriate instruction for preschool-age children based on the best available research on early childhood pedagogy, child development, and preschool…

  11. Transportation Electrification Education Partnership for Green Jobs and Sustainable Mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Huei [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Mi, Chris [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gover, James [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-06-28

    This collaborative educational project between the University of Michigan—Ann Arbor, University of Michigan—Dearborn and the Kettering University successfully executed almost all the elements we proposed to do. In the original proposal, we proposed to develop four graduate courses, six undergraduate courses, four professional short courses, a K-12 electric vehicle education kit, a Saturday morning seminar series, and a set of consumer education material to support the advancement of transportation electrification. The first four deliverables were all successfully developed and offered. When we held the kick-off meeting in NETL in Morgantown back in early 2010 with all the ten ARRA education teams, however, it quickly became clear that among the ten ARRA education grantee teams, our proposed “consume education” activities are not better or with the potential to create bigger impact than some of activities proposed in other teams. For example, the Odyssey 2010 event held by the West Virginia University team had planned and successfully reached to more than 230,000 attendees, which is way more than what our proposed 100k event could ever reach. It was under the suggestion of Joseph Quaranta, the ARRA education Program Director at that time, that we should coordinate and eliminate redundancy. The resources should then be focused on activities that have less overlap. Therefore, the originally proposed activities: Saturday morning seminar series, and a set of consumer education material were dropped from our scope. We expanded the scope of our “education kit” activity to include some educational materials, mainly in the form of videos. The target audience also changed from general public to K-12 students. The majority of the project cost (~70%) goes toward the establishment of three undergraduate laboratories, which provides critically needed hands-on learning experience for next-generation green mobility engineers. We are very proud that the ARRA money

  12. The evolving role of health educators in advancing patient safety: forging partnerships and leading change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercurio, Annette

    2007-04-01

    At least 1.5 million preventable injuries because of adverse drug events occur in the United States each year, according to an Institute of Medicine report. IOM and other organizations at the forefront of health care improvement emphasize that stronger partnerships between patients, their families, and health care providers are necessary to make health care safer. Health educators possess a skill set and an ethical framework that effectively equip them to advance patient and family-centered care and contribute in other significant ways to a safer health care system. Health educators in clinical settings are playing varied and significant roles in advancing patient safety. They are removing barriers to clear communication and forging partnerships between patients, their families, and staff. Health educators are leading patient safety culture change within their institutions and contributing to the shift from provider-centric to patient-centric systems. To expand their impact in improving patient safety, health educators in clinical settings are participating in public awareness campaigns. In seeking to enhance patient safety, health educators face a number of challenges. To successfully manage those, health educators must expand their knowledge, broaden connections, and engage patients and families in meaningful ways.

  13. Development of an International Clinical Education Extracurricular Experience Through a Collaborative Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandich, MaryBeth; Erickson, Mia; Nardella, Beth

    2017-01-01

    Participating in global health care through international clinical education may enhance the development of cultural competence and professionalism. Many logistical issues need to be resolved in the development of international clinical education experiences that meet program requirements. The purpose of this case report is to describe how a university developed such an experience for students by partnering with Amizade Global Service-Learning (Amizade), an organization that facilitates global learning experiences. Medical, nursing, and pharmacy students were already participating in a 4-week international health-related service learning rotation through Amizade. The preexisting relationship and contractual agreement with the university provided the necessary legal framework. Amizade staff assisted in finding a physical therapist qualified and willing to host a student. The academic coordinator for clinical education at the university and Amizade liaisons determined living arrangements, schedule, clinical settings, and patient population. The selected student had expressed interest and had met all clinical education placement requirements. The academic coordinator for clinical education had ongoing electronic communications with all parties. The student demonstrated predicted attributes of cultural competence and professionalism; through the partnership with Amizade, the student was exposed to several unique interprofessional experiences. The steps used by the university faculty in developing this interprofessional, international clinical education experience through a collaborative partnership may provide guidance for other institutions.

  14. Dedicated Education Units: Partnerships for Building Leadership Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuska, Lee A

    2015-07-01

    To enable nurses to lead in health care transformation, nursing education must include opportunities for developing leadership, as well as clinical competencies. Dedicated education units (DEUs) provide supportive environments for competency development in undergraduate students. This study's aim was to explore the effects of a DEU experience on the leadership development of baccalaureate nursing students. A mixed-methods design included a quantitative strand, using a quasi-experimental, pretest-posttest, multisite design with control groups and a qualitative strand using focus groups. Students in the DEUs demonstrated significant increases (p leadership behaviors, as measured by the Student Leadership Practice Inventory. Focus group themes illuminate how the experiences of the students contributed to their leadership growth. Findings suggest that the DEU experience may promote enhanced undergraduate leadership competency development. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  15. Partnership in Innovative Preparation for Educators and Students (PIPES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    and construction. Health Sciences – Thinking about medical school? Join us in this workshop to discuss how doctors diagnose and treat diseases...science educators’ academy: Benefits of inquiry- based teaching for educators and their students. Manuscript in preparation. Kuehler, C. P., Marle, P. D...Henry, R. M. (2012). CSI- chocolate science investigation and the case of the recipe rip-off: Using forensic science to engage students. Manuscript

  16. High Return on Investments in Scientist-Educator Partnerships: Broader Impact Strategies That Endure and Propagate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, C. L.; Franks, S. E.

    2004-12-01

    Tackling the broader impact section of a research proposal need not be a dilemma that "rears its ugly head" with each proposal deadline. By investing in partnerships with informal science education (ISE) organizations, researchers can establish a foundation for efficient, high quality, research-based educational outreach (EO) that can help them fulfill their broader impact obligations for years to come. Just as an interdisciplinary research project requires collaboration among scientists from a variety of disciplines, a research project with exemplary EO requires partnerships with those who specialize in science education. By engaging in such partnerships scientists gain access to professionals who have expertise in translating research topics into concept-centered programs, exhibits and online resources, and to the diverse student, teacher and public audience reached through ISE. By leveraging the intellectual and material resources of researchers and educators, these potentially long-lived relationships provide an efficient and effective means for achieving broader impact. Ultimately, the efficacy of this investment strategy depends on relieving the researcher of the time consuming burden of seeking out appropriate partners, initiating partnerships and conferring with science educators on potential projects. Recognizing this barrier to scientists' participation, the California Center for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence (CACOSEE) has adopted a unique approach - one in which CACOSEE serves primarily as a catalyst and facilitator of researchers EO activities rather than as an EO provider. We have apprised ourselves of the programs, interests and needs of a carefully selected group of ISE organizations and used this information as the basis for creating a spectrum of EO opportunities for researchers. These options are flexible, scalable and easily customized to fit the research interests, time constraints and budgetary limitations of any researcher. Through e

  17. A Radio Astronomy Science Education Partnership - GAVRT and Radio JOVE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, C. A.; Thieman, J. R.; Bunnell, K.; Soholt, G.

    2009-12-01

    The planet Jupiter provides an excellent subject to educate, engage, and inspire students and teachers to learn science. The Goldstone Apple-Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) program (http://www.lewiscenter.org/gavrt) and The Radio JOVE project (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) each have a long history of allowing students and teachers to interact with scientists and real radio telescopes. The upcoming Juno mission to Jupiter (2011 launch) allows both GAVRT and Radio JOVE to combine efforts and engage with the NASA Juno mission, thus increasing the excitement and learning potential for teachers, students, and the general public. Teachers can attend workshops for training to operate a 34-meter radio telescope and/or build their own simple radio telescope, both of which can be used directly in the classroom. We will overview some classroom activities and highlight some teacher-student experiences. In addition, we will update our efforts on greater Web-based control of the radio telescopes, as well as highlight our upcoming workshops to allow better access for teachers in different parts of the Country.

  18. Building partnerships for healthy environments: research, leadership and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Susan; Kent, Jennifer; Lyons, Claudine

    2014-12-01

    As populations across the globe face an increasing health burden from rising rates of obesity, diabetes and other lifestyle-related diseases, health professionals are collaborating with urban planners to influence city design that supports healthy ways of living. This paper details the establishment and operation of an innovative, interdisciplinary collaboration that brings together urban planning and health. Situated in a built environment faculty at one of Australia's most prestigious universities, the Healthy Built Environments Program (HBEP) partners planning academics, a health non-government organisation, local councils and private planning consultants in a state government health department funded consortium. The HBEP focuses on three strategic areas: research, workforce development and education, and leadership and advocacy. Interdisciplinary research includes a comprehensive literature review that establishes Australian-based evidence to support the development, prioritisation and implementation of healthy built environment policies and practices. Another ongoing study examines the design features, social interventions and locational qualities that positively benefit human health. Formal courses, workshops, public lectures and e-learning develop professional capacity, as well as skills in interdisciplinary practice to support productive collaborations between health professionals and planners. The third area involves working with government and non-government agencies, and the private sector and the community, to advocate closer links between health and the built environment. Our paper presents an overview of the HBEP's major achievements. We conclude with a critical review of the challenges, revealing lessons in bringing health and planning closer together to create health-supportive cities for the 21st century.

  19. The SAFE project: community-driven partnerships in health, mental health, and education to prevent early school failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, D L

    1997-11-01

    This article presents a case study of an innovative school-based health and mental health project that prevents early school failure in one county in Oklahoma. Success is attributed to social work development of broad-based partnerships involving families, schools, communities, and public policy officials. Citizen-driven, these partnerships have meshed previously fixed institutional boundaries in health, mental health, and education to prevent early school failure. The article describes school-family partnerships that form the core of the project's service intervention model. Statistics on service activities and outcomes are presented, along with a discussion of lessons learned for implementation of the project.

  20. Public/Private partnerships within the municipal sphere: implications for educational management and offer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dilneia Espíndola Fernandes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the implications of the partnership between the City Hall of Campo Grande and the Ayrton Senna Institute for the management of the educational system and of schools between 2001 and 2004, within the implementation of the Champion School Program. The Municipal Secretariat of Education embraced such program as its main project for the management of the system and its school units. The study included documents and relevant literature. Although the Champion School Program aims to improve the performance of elementary school through incentives towards school autonomy, better application of resources, and social equity, the change in the management system observed in the school investigated was not enough to alter educational indicators. In general, the main purpose of such programs is to materialize the managerial management, which replaces the democratic management instituted by the current educational legislation.

  1. International educational partnerships for doctors in training: a collaborative framework with the RCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, George A; Foster, Matthew; Sheriff, Rezvi; Mendis, Lalitha; Fernando, Devaka J S; Blundell, Caroline; Worrall, Jeffrey; Black, Carol

    2005-01-01

    The UK offers excellent postgraduate medical education, and overseas doctors in training often covet a period of training in the UK. Some overseas training authorities make UK training mandatory prior to appointment as a consultant. Unfortunately, the organisation of such training often proves to be ad hoc, and may lack educational value. UK training faces challenges as a result of reduced hours of work, more structured and intensive educational needs, and pressures of increasing clinical demand. A plethora of new 'trust' posts have developed, often with limited educational value, creating a risk that training quality for overseas doctors is reduced. Against this background, such posts can be used to create international training partnerships such as that at Sherwood Forest Hospitals NHS Trust (SFHT), providing high-quality general and specialty training. Given the success of this strategy, it would be desirable for other UK trusts to provide similar schemes offering specialties not covered at SFHT.

  2. Using a private-public partnership to supplement healthcare information technology in nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholewka, Patricia A; Harkins, John; Hoelper, Stephen; Schrieber, John; Daniel, Ralph Eddy; Kaur, Jasdip

    2012-01-01

    Various reports by the World Bank and U.S. business technology executives, academics, economists, researchers, and government policymakers have recommended crafting a new educational model for educating America's future workforce including nurses in their professional research pursuits. According to the National League for Nursing, nursing research is an integral part of the scientific enterprise of improving the nation's health. A major aim of this new educational focus is the partnering of private business enterprises and public educational institutions to achieve this outcome, i.e., public-private partnerships. Merck & Co., Inc. will partner/collaborate on a student learning pilot project with New York City College of Technology of the City University of New York Department of Nursing Bachelor of Nursing Program students - all practicing New York State Registered Professional Nurses - who are taking either Nursing Informatics or Leadership in the Management of Client Care courses.

  3. Genomics education for medical professionals - the current UK landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Ingrid; Subramanian, Deepak N; Burton, Hilary

    2016-08-01

    Genomics education in the UK is at an early stage of development, and its pace of evolution has lagged behind that of the genomics research upon which it is based. As a result, knowledge of genomics and its applications remains limited among non-specialist clinicians. In this review article, we describe the complex landscape for genomics education within the UK, and highlight the large number and variety of organisations that can influence, direct and provide genomics training to medical professionals. Postgraduate genomics education is being shaped by the work of the Health Education England (HEE) Genomics Education Programme, working in conjunction with the Joint Committee on Genomics in Medicine. The success of their work will be greatly enhanced by the full cooperation and engagement of the many groups, societies and organisations involved with medical education and training (such as the royal colleges). Without this cooperation, there is a risk of poor coordination and unnecessary duplication of work. Leadership from an organisation such as the HEE Genomics Education Programme will have a key role in guiding the formulation and delivery of genomics education policy by various stakeholders among the different disciplines in medicine.

  4. Partnering with parents in interprofessional leadership graduate education to promote family-professional partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Lewis H; Fahje Steber, Kathryn; Rosenberg, Angela; Palmer, Ann; Rounds, Kathleen; Wells, Marlyn

    2017-07-01

    Evidence supports the benefits to families of relationships with professionals that build on the concept of partnership, but there are few studies in the literature of strategies involving joint education for parents and professionals to enhance the capacity of parents of children with special healthcare needs to be effective interprofessional partners. Since 2007, parents of children with special healthcare needs have participated alongside graduate students from five different profession-based training programmes in a structured interprofessional leadership programme. The aims of this summative evaluation study were to elicit the influences of this training model on parents' capacity to partner with both health professionals and other parents and explore features of the training that facilitated these partnership skills. Using qualitative analysis, a semi-structured interview, guided by sensitising concepts informing leadership development, was conducted with 17 of the 23 parents who participated in the training. Transcriptions of the interviews were used for creating codes and categories for analysis. Parents described how the programme enhanced abilities to see other points of view, skills in communicating across professions, skills in conflict management, and feelings of confidence and equality with providers that influenced their relationships with their own providers and their capacity to assist other parents in addressing challenges in the care of their children. Parents reported that building concrete skills, organised opportunities to hear other viewpoints, structured time for learning and self-reflection, and learning in the context of a trusting relationship facilitated the development of partnership skills. These findings suggest that the leaders of interprofessional training programmes should involve parents and graduate students as equal partners to enhance partnership skills.

  5. Graduate health professions education: an interdisciplinary university - community partnership model 1996 - 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Deborah; Behringer, Bruce; Smith, Patricia; Townsend, Tom; Wachs, Joy; Stanifer, Larry; Goodrow, Bruce

    2003-07-01

    In 1996, East Tennessee State University (ETSU) reinforced its historical commitment to multidisciplinary community engagement by developing a graduate level community partnerships program in the Division of Health Sciences. While the university's earlier health partnership efforts relied primarily on curricular innovation, the approach to graduate health professions education was to seed a series of curricular enhancements and interdisciplinary, community-based learning experiences and service into traditional curricula. This paper presents the experience of one school in crafting a regional network that became the basis of a division-wide graduate level teaching and learning initiative. Carefully selected planning and implementation techniques enabled multidisciplinary practitioners and community members from across a 20-county region to participate with university faculty in training ETSU learners in community-based medical care. By year four of the project, curricular "enhancements" were institutionalized in over five departments across the Division and engaged 1160 medical residents and graduate learners in a give - get model of health education. Programme evaluation methodology was collaboratively defined and documentation of programme effort and outcomes regularly reported and strategically reviewed. Programme evaluation demonstrates mutual benefit to community and university. Faculty involvement in programme activity increased fourfold and community involvement in training of health professions graduate learners increased threefold by year four. Educational innovations were adopted into traditional curricula, thousands of hours of clinical services were provided to underserved communities and the university-community team forged by network links continues to promote multidisciplinary interests through joint public policy endeavors.

  6. Public-Private Partnerships in Colombian Education: The Equity and Quality Implications of 'Colegios en concesión'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termes, A.; Bonal, X.; Verger, A.; Zancajo, A.

    2015-01-01

    'Charter schools are one of the most iconic public-private partnership (PPP) formulas in education. Nonetheless, despite charter school programs having been implemented in some countries for decades and their global diffusion, evidence on their impact in education systems is far from conclusive.

  7. Distance Education: A University's Pioneering Master of Social Work Program Partnership with the U.S. Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Terri Moore; Freeman, Dexter

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the relevance of an army-university partnership in view of the cultures of both public higher education and the military graduate education system. The article also outlines the planning model used to navigate through the various issues that should be considered when a university partners with a federal or military agency to…

  8. The Family Club Activities for Organizing a Social Partnership of the Pre-School Educational Institution and the Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latipov, Zagir A.; Bykova, Svetlana S.; Zhigalova, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the theme is caused by the need for interaction between the family and the preschool educational organization towards a fully and harmoniously developed personality. Of all the forms of cooperation of educational organizations and families, the most relevant is a social partnership, where the subjects have common interests, equal…

  9. Public-Private Partnerships in Colombian Education: The Equity and Quality Implications of 'Colegios en concesión'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Termes, A.; Bonal, X.; Verger, A.; Zancajo, A.

    2015-01-01

    'Charter schools are one of the most iconic public-private partnership (PPP) formulas in education. Nonetheless, despite charter school programs having been implemented in some countries for decades and their global diffusion, evidence on their impact in education systems is far from conclusive. Thi

  10. A Social Partnership Model to Promote Educators' Development in Mauritius through Formal and Informal Capacity-Building Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santally, Mohammad Issack; Cooshna-Naik, Dorothy; Conruyt, Noel; Wing, Caroline Koa

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a social partnership model based on the living lab concept to promote the professional development of educators through formal and informal capacity-building initiatives. The aim is to have a broader impact on society through community outreach educational initiatives. A Living Lab is an environment for user-centered…

  11. Learning Partnerships: Improving Learning in Schools with Arts Partners in the Community. A Guide to Arts and Education Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreeszen, Craig; Aprill, Arnold; Deasy, Richard

    The purpose of this guide is to offer guidance to community leaders from the arts, education, business, civic, and government sectors who seek to combine their talents and resources in partnerships to address the arts and arts education needs of the young people of their community. The guide draws on and summarizes the knowledge and experience of…

  12. An alternative approach for teacher education framed by a collaborative partnership setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Birgitte Schou

    2010-01-01

    The study presents an alternative didactical approach to teacher education linking practice and theory through a collaborative partnership setting. Using a ―small scale teaching design in which students alternate between schools and college it was possible to show someevidence that, by following...... this approach, first year student teachers in a science & technology class developed teacher knowledge (as aspects of PCK). The study identifies an example using Co-Re and PaPeR as a Resource Folio to show where evidence of developing teacher knowledge is seen. This didactical approach turns the traditional...... teacher education on its head and begins with a focus on practice so students alternate between school–based and college–based teaching in a cyclical fashion, and are encouraged to link theory with practice. This kind of college teaching demands a new teacher educational paradigm for which collaboration...

  13. AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH FOR TEACHER EDUCATION COURSES FRAMED BY A COLLABORATE PARTNERSHIP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    The study presents an alternative didactical approach to teacher education linking practice and theory through a collaborative partnership setting. Using a “small scale” teaching design in which students alternate between schools and college it was possible to show some evidence that, by following...... this approach, first year student teachers in a science & technology class developed teacher knowledge (as aspects of PCK). The study identifies an example using Co-Re and PaPeR as a Resource Folio to show where evidence of developing teacher knowledge is seen. This didactical approach turns the traditional...... teacher education on its head and begins with a focus on practice so students alternate between school–based and college–based teaching in a cyclical fashion, and are encouraged to link theory with practice. This kind of college teaching demands a new teacher educational paradigm for which collaboration...

  14. Service-learning: community-campus partnerships for health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifer, S D

    1998-03-01

    In 1995, the Health Professions Schools in Service to the Nation (HPSISN) program was launched under the auspices of the Pew Health Professions Commission as a national demonstration of an innovative form of community-based education called service-learning. The foundation of service-learning is a balanced partnership between communities and health professions schools and a balance between serving the community and meeting defined learning objectives. This article offers a definition of service-learning and an outline of its core concepts; it also describes how service-learning differs from traditional clinical education in the health professions. Further, the author discusses how service-learning programs may benefit students, faculty, communities, higher education institutions, and the relationships among all these stakeholders. The article concludes with brief descriptions of recommended resources for integrating service-learning into the medical school curriculum.

  15. Wisconsin Partnerships to Educate and Engage Public Audiences on Climate Change Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, M. E.; Ackerman, S.; Rowley, P.; Crowley Conn, K.

    2011-12-01

    The complexity and scale of climate change-related challenges requires more than one strategy to share meaningful information with public audiences. This presentation will discuss a few initiatives to engage the public originating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. First, a local partnership between the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) and the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC), an informal learning center with a new climate change "classroom" which recently acquired a Science on a Sphere (SOS) exhibit. Second, an informal education project funded by the NOAA Office of Education coordinated by CIMSS in partnership with the national SOS Network with the goal of helping museum docents share meaningful interpretation of real-time weather and climate data. CIMSS staff has been conducting weather and climate discussions on a Magic Planet display for several years. This "mini-SOS" is powered by a solar panel on the roof, modeling the essential Sun-Earth connection and the first principle of climate literacy. However, the convenient proximity of CIMSS and ALNC provides a perfect opportunity to test "SOS-scale" talking points posted on a weekly docent blog to the benefit of the entire SOS Network. Two other Wisconsin projects of note include the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts, a partnership between the University and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and a pilot project between CIMSS and NOAA's National Weather Service to engage storm spotters in climate mitigation and stewardship. Ideally, the synergistic benefits and lessons learned from these collaborations can inform similar efforts in order to galvanize meaningful responses to climate change.

  16. Understanding Leadership in Civic Education Reform: An Examination of Change in CIVITAS International Partnerships and the Impact of Leader Theorizing on Civic Education Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, Jeffrey W.; Dziuban, Charles D.; Pitts, Annette Boyd; Setenyi, Janos; Rus, Calin; Bush, Marcella

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine the history of an international partnership for civic education begun in 1994, and concluded in 2011 that links Center for Civic Education partners in the United States (Florida Law-Related Education Association), Hungary (Civitas Hungary), and Romania (Intercultural Institute of Romania). This study serves…

  17. North-South Partnership in Training and Education in Space Research and Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balogun, E.

    Partnership between developed and developing countries in matters of space research and application must perforce be lopsided at the outset for a variety of reasons. In such developing countries, universities are weak, there are few centers of applied sciences, communities of scientists are sub-critical and isolated, institutional framework is inadequate, and because of shifting political climate, societies are not as well-ordered as in developed countries. Initially therefore, flow of ideas and facilities, both tangible and intangible, will be unidirectional. For this initial stage to be as short as possible, new approaches to hasten the process have to be developed. Classical approaches to collaborative effort by developed countries to assist these developing countries to the level at which meaningful partnership can evolve has to be reassessed. A few decades ago, one could speak of developing countries as a coherent whole, but now, the situation has changed. The collaborative effort between such countries as India, Korea, etc. and the developed world, which enabled those countries to take off technologically, cannot be adequately applied to the developing countries in Africa. New approaches have to be devised. New recipes have to be concocted. Even with countries in Africa, different approaches have to be taken. Each country in Africa faces unique circumstances, situations, and problems. While a country like Nigeria has a large trainable labour force and an enormous human capital which gives the country a comparative advantage, many countries have less than 10% of the young people between the ages of 1 11 years; 12-19 years; 20-24 years in- educational institutions. In establishing partnership between African countries and the developed countries, specific approaches need to be taken. For example, problems such as cultivating the right attitude in young people to the learning of science are common to both developed and developing countries. The problem could be

  18. Astronomy in the early years of elementary education: a partnership between university and school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barai, A.; Carvalho Neto, J. T.; Garrido, D.; Ityanagui, G.; Navi, M.

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes the interaction and partnership experience between a school and one of the Federal University of São Carlos (UFSCar)campi, both located in Araras, SP, aiming to teach and promote astronomy and astronautics knowledge among students of the first five years of Elementary Education. This initiative made use of Brazilian Olympiad of Astronomy and Astronautics as a motivating event for the theme exploration. The actions were divided into two fronts: an improvement course for the school teachers conducted by university professors and lectures for students by UFSCar students under the guidance of university teachers and the school coordinators. By the observed results, we noticed the importance of narrowing the distance school-university, promoting learning for both institutions and helping to raise the level of education from elementary school to college.

  19. The Internationalization of Doctoral Social Work Education: Learning from a Partnership in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice K. Johnson Butterfield

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean to internationalize doctoral education by working abroad? What does it mean to internationalize doctoral education in one’s home country? This article offers a perspective based on the Social Work Education in Ethiopia Partnership, which established Ethiopia’s first-ever master’s degree in social work in 2004. To ensure sustainability of the MSW program, a doctoral program in Social Work and Social Development was launched in 2006. This article describes the development and research base of the doctoral program. Beginning in the first semester, teams of doctoral students join with poor communities in action research.Overall, these efforts lead to an emerging model of university-based development. Through engaged action research, faculty and students use human capital resources and the educational process to function as “development actors.” Some ideas for internationalizing doctoral education are offered. Deans and directors in the United States and Canada are challenged to expand doctoral education within a developing country and to prepare doctoral students to include international perspectives in their teaching and research.

  20. Crossing Borders: A Qualitative Study of How Occupational Therapy Educators and Scholars Develop and Sustain Global Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witchger Hansen, Anne Marie

    2015-09-01

    The World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) and the American Occupational Therapy Association promote a globally connected profession that responds to the needs of our diverse societies. Global partnerships are grounded on the principle that cross-cultural experiences are enriching and provide mutual benefits. The purpose of this study was to uncover how occupational therapy educators and scholars perceive and experience (1) developing and sustaining global partnerships and (2) lessons learned. In this qualitative study, 30 occupational therapy educators and researchers completed an online survey. Eight participated in an interview. Results found major themes that help develop and sustain partnerships: building relationship of trust and respect, communicating effectively, cultivating cultural competence, sharing power and resources with collaborators and creating a context for reciprocal learning. Lessons learned include a call to walking humbly, building relationships of trust and respect, establishing open and honest communication, supporting local solutions to local problems, ensuring equality of resources and learning from their global partners. The findings suggest that global partnerships have the potential to transform both partners if the partners engage with mutual understanding and respect. Limitations of this study include a small sample size and participant's pool limited to occupational therapists from United States. Recommendations for future research include qualitative studies to identify model occupational therapy programmes that sustain global partnerships using a diverse sample of international occupational therapy educators and researchers.

  1. Disconnects Between Audiences, Resources, and Initiatives: Key Findings of the Coastal Areas Climate Change Education Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller-Karger, F. E.; Ryan, J. G.; Feldman, A.; Gilbes, F.; Trotz, M.; McKayle, C.; Stone, D.; Plank, L.; Meisels, G.; Peterson, M.; Reynolds, C. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) Partnership focused on defining a plan for effective education on climate change and its salient issues in coastal communities Florida and the US Caribbean territories. The approach included assessing perceptions and needs of stakeholders, evaluating the nature of available educational and information resources, and establishing a partnership that includes the public and professional organizations most relevant in planning and in addressing the resiliency of coastal communities. Information gathering activities included surveys among K-12 educators and students on climate change perceptions and current classroom activities in both Florida and the Caribbean territories; surveys of professional urban and land-use planners across Florida regarding their understanding of related in their professional practice; and conducting an inventory of relevant educational materials and information resources. Survey results showed a range of misperceptions about climate change, its causes and its likely impacts. At present, students and teachers in high and middle schools show poor understanding of climate science, and minimal time is spent in instruction on climate change in science courses in Florida and Puerto Rico schools. Also, there has to be professional development efforts and access to rich instructional content in a continuum spanning schools and professional communities including planners (which we surveyed). Architects and engineers are communities that also need to be surveyed and included in future efforts. A major obstacle to efforts at providing continuing education for planners and municipal officials is the lack of consensus on and access to regionally-specific scientific data regarding climate impacts and the relevant instructional content. It is difficult for professionals to prepare for climate change if they cannot define impacts in the Florida-Caribbean region and its coastal urban areas. Across over 1000

  2. Sustaining a Collaborative Partnership Between an Historically Black and a Historically White University: Earth System Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Despite increases over the last few decades in the number of degrees awarded to students from underrepresented groups in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines advancing diversity and inclusion in these disciplines remains a challenge. This paper describes one strategic approach to this challenge-the initiation and long-term sustaining of a partnership between the historically black, Elizabeth City State University, and the historically white, University of New Hampshire. The partnerships which focuses on earth system science education and research, is a type of learning organization that enhances opportunities for underrepresented students to pursue careers in STEM, and advances faculty opportunities between and among all faculty. The paper describes the results of this 9-year partnership, the 7 grants that have been awarded over time that support the partnership, and the "6 principles of partnership" that ground how faculty work across institutional and disciplinary boundaries. Implications for how other universities can achieve such a long terma partnership are also discussed as are lessons learned from this collaborative.

  3. BUILDING STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP OF TRANSNATIONAL EDUCATION USING ONLINE PROGRAM TO INCREASE ACADEMIC QUALITY OF GRADUATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardus Polla

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available International employment standard requires higher quality of graduates, which can be achieved through high-quality academic standards. As we know there are still a large number of graduates of Indonesian higher education rejected to work in global industry. Besides having low GPA, lots of graduates are considered lacking technical skills, interpersonal skills, and international experience. Indeed, the main weakness factor is the low English proficiency of graduates. We need a breakthrough that develops our academic standards of higher education to obtain international quality. Yet, there are challenges to face by the government, such as rebuilding the national system (establishing elite institutions, internationalizing higher education (globalizing the institutions or cross-border trades of education services, as well as enhancing private participation by repositioning the private sector. To overcome these challenges we need to build a strategic partnership of transnational education using online programs, which can obtain mutual benefit for the collaborating institutions. This article discusses about how to increase academic quality of graduates in Indonesia or in other Asian countries.

  4. The Value of Partnerships in Science Education: A Win-Win Situation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lacalle, Sonsoles; Petruso, Angellah

    2012-01-01

    An editorial in Science (Alberts, 2012) has expressed the need to teach “real science,” firmly based on hands-on and inquiry methodology. Also in a recent article, Stevens (2011) highlighted the contrast between the emphasis that federal agencies and professional associations place on science outreach, and the scarcity of support for such activities at the classroom level. To bridge this gap, we have developed a way to redefine science education by involving college students and faculty in “real science” outreach. Incorporating outreach activities into a college science curriculum is an efficient means to affect not only future scientists but also the world at large with which scientists need to communicate. In this paper we describe a Science Education Partnership Award (SEPA) project. The project has been implemented in a minority setting, at a small college of allied health located in one of the most underserved areas of Los Angeles. Some of its outcomes were presented at two Society for Neuroscience meetings (Gizerian et al., 2009; Ayers and de Lacalle, 2010), before being also discussed as an example of outreach program during the FUN summer workshop in Pomona (California) in 2011. This project entails the development of a working partnership between K-12 institutions and college science students and faculty. Participation was voluntary (but college students could request community service credit) and most importantly built on student interests and connections with the community. The three components are described in terms of efficacy (i.e., impact on college students’ communication skills) and community value (i.e., impact on educational outcomes for the partner K-12 institution). PMID:23493678

  5. I-LLINI Partnerships to improve K-12 Earth Science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkin, J. H.; Wong, K.; Charlevoix, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    I-LLINI Partnerships is a three-year State of Illinois funded program to initiate enhanced communication between the faculty at University of Illinois and K-12 teachers in the surrounding communities. The program focuses on math and science with a particular emphasis on the use of technology to teaching math and science to middle-school aged children. The Partnership provides participating teachers with a suite of technology including a computer, digital camera, and software, as well as a small stipend. University partners include representatives from the Departments of Mathematics as well as the Department of Atmospheric Sciences and the Department of Geology. The Atmospheric Sciences and Geology faculty have partnered to provide content using an Earth Systems Science approach to improving Earth Science education for in- and pre-service teachers through new undergraduate and graduate classes that focus on fundamental earth science content, State K-12 standards, and transferable lesson plans and materials that enable course participants to easily transfer university practice to the classroom.

  6. Identifying Effective Strategies for Climate Change Education: The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) Partnership Audiences and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.; Feldman, A.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Gilbes, F.; Stone, D.; Plank, L.; Reynolds, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Many past educational initiatives focused on global climate change have foundered on public skepticism and disbelief. Some key reasons for these past failures can be drawn directly from recognized best practices in STEM education - specifically, the necessity to help learners connect new knowledge with their own experiences and perspectives, and the need to create linkages with issues or concerns that are both important for and relevant to the audiences to be educated. The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) partnership has sought to follow these tenets as guiding principles in identifying critical audiences and developing new strategies for educating the public living in the low-lying coastal areas of Florida and the Caribbean on the realities, risks, and adaptation and mitigation strategies for dealing with the regional impacts of global climate change. CACCE is currently focused on three key learner audiences: a) The formal education spectrum, targeting K-12 curricula through middle school marine science courses, and student and educator audiences through coursework and participatory research strategies engaging participants in a range of climate-related investigations. b) Informal science educators and outlets, in particular aquaria and nature centers, as an avenue toward K-12 teacher professional development as well as for public education. c) Regional planning, regulatory and business professionals focused on the built environment along the coasts, many of whom require continuing education to maintain licensing and/or other professional certifications. Our current activities are focused on bringing together an effective set of educational, public- and private-sector partners to target the varied needs of these audiences in Florida and the U.S. Caribbean, and tailoring an educational plan aimed at these stakeholder audiences that starts with the regionally and topically relevant impacts of climate change, and strategies for effective adaptation and

  7. Evaluating and Educating - 2000: Is Your Catholic School System Ready? Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic School and Family Partnerships Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Robert J.; Vadenais, Kim Rocha

    Parents attitudes towards traditional Catholic education at Our Lady of Lourdes School (Raleigh, North Carolina) were explored in this study. From 315 surveys sent home to parents, 193 were returned completed. The survey was designed to gather information to improve the partnerships among schools, families, and communities and to prepare Catholic…

  8. Always Feed the Clowns and Other Tips for Building Better Partnerships between School Librarians and Providers of Educational Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Jason Edwards travels to schools and libraries across the nation performing educational enrichment programs, such as his Monster Hunt Library Skills-Building Adventure Program, for librarians and students. In this article, he shares tips that he has gleaned that may help librarian/programmer partnerships function more smoothly. Three of the…

  9. In Search of Signature Pedagogy for PDS Teacher Education: A Review of Articles Published in "School-University Partnerships"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yendol-Hoppey, Diane; Franco, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    ''In Search of Signature Pedagogy for PDS Teacher Education'' is a review of articles published in "School-University Partnerships" which emerged in response to Shulman's critique that we do not possess powerful, consistent models of practice that we can define and have deeply studied. To these ends, we searched…

  10. iPads and Teacher Education: Exploring a 1:1 Initiative in a Professional Development School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourlam, Daniel J.; Montgomery, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the experiences of elementary education teacher candidates in a Professional Development School Partnership that included a 1:1 iPad initiative. The teacher candidates in the year-long cohort were each given their own iPad to use in their coursework and field experience. Observation, survey, and interview data were collected to…

  11. Strengthening the Strength of Public-Private Partnership Model in Education: A Case Study of Durbar High School in Nepal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh

    2011-01-01

    Public-Private Partnership (PPP) model in education is being importantly valuable in developing countries in enriching the strength pf public schools that government appears to be heavy and slow. PPP model however, initiate developmental program that encourage teachers motivation to teach. This further allows private and local community group…

  12. Using the Knowledge Transfer Partnership Approach in Undergraduate Education and Practice-Based Training to Encourage Employer Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret; Chisholm, Colin; Burns, George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual viewpoint which proposes the use of the post graduate Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) approach to learning in undergraduate education and practice-based training. Design/methodology/approach: This is an examination of the KTP approach and how this could be used effectively in…

  13. ASEM--The Modern Silk Road: Travelling Ideas for Education Reforms and Partnerships between Asia and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Que Anh

    2013-01-01

    Today the modern Silk Road between Asia and Europe is increasingly well-travelled in both directions by students, academics and policy makers. Over the last decade the European Union (EU) and the Association of South East Asian Nations (ASEAN) have been making more attempts to shape this route by creating an educational partnership through an…

  14. An educational international partnership responding to local needs: process evaluation of the Brazil FAIMER Regional Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, E; Campos, H H; Friedman, S; Morahan, P S; Araujo, M N T; Carvalho, P M; Bollela, V; Ribeiro, M G F; Mennin, S; Haddad, A E; Campos, F

    2012-11-01

    The Brazilian public health system requires competent professionals sensitive to the needs of the population. The Foundation for Advancement of International Medical Education and Research (FAIMER) provides a two-year faculty development programme for health professions educators, aiming to build leadership in education to improve health. A partnership with governmental initiatives and FAIMER was established for meeting these needs. This paper describes the initial process evaluation results of the Brazilian FAIMER Institute Fellowship (FAIMER BR). Data were analysed for the classes 2007-2010 regarding: application processes; innovation project themes; retrospective post-pre self-ratings of knowledge acquisition; and professional development portfolios. Seventeen of 26 Brazilian states were represented among 98 Fellows, predominantly from public medical schools (75.5%) and schools awarded Ministry of Health grants to align education with public health services (89.8%). One-third (n = 32) of Fellows' innovation projects were related to these grants. Significant increases occurred in all topic subscales on self-report of knowledge acquisition (effect sizes, 1.21-2.77). In the follow up questionnaire, 63% of Fellows reported that their projects were incorporated into the curriculum or institutional policies. The majority reported that the programme deepened their knowledge (98%), provided new ideas about medical education (90%) and provided skills for conflict management (63%). One-half of the Fellows reported sustained benefits from the programme listserv and other communications, including breadth of expertise, establishment of research collaboration and receiving emotional support. Contributors to initial programme success included alignment of curriculum with governmental initiatives, curriculum design merging educational technology, leadership and management skills and central role of an innovation educational project responding to local needs.

  15. A Partnership Approach to Genetic and Genomic Graduate Nursing Curriculum: Report of a New Course's Impact on Student Confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tamara; Dale, Rosemary

    2016-10-01

    Genetics and genomics have historically not been included in nursing curricula but are increasingly important in health care delivery. A course was developed through a collaboration between nursing and pathology faculty, combining nursing practice and genomics content expertise. Graduate nursing students enrolled in the course self-reported confidence in the 38 American Nurses Association essential genetic and genomic competencies prior to, immediately after, and 9 months after completing the course. Before the course, students reported low confidence across all competencies. Students indicated a significant improvement in confidence in all competencies with an average 2-point improvement on a 5-point Likert scale, both immediately and 9 months after course completion. A course rooted in basic science directly linked to nursing application can prepare nurses to develop a sustained confidence in core competencies. Cross-disciplinary collaborations with faculty who have expertise in genomics may be an effective strategy for nursing programs. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(10):574-578.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Evolution of an experiential learning partnership in emergency management higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Claire Connolly; Harris, Alan S

    2016-01-01

    Experiential learning allows students to step outside the classroom and into a community setting to integrate theory with practice, while allowing the community partner to reach goals or address needs within their organization. Emergency Management and Homeland Security scholars recognize the importance, and support the increased implementation, of this pedagogical method in the higher education curriculum. Yet challenges to successful implementation exist including limited resources and time. This longitudinal study extends the literature by detailing the evolution of a partnership between a university and office of emergency management in which a functional exercise is strategically integrated into an undergraduate course. The manuscript concludes with a discussion of lessons learned from throughout the multiyear process.

  17. Partners in research: building academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbman, Patricia; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Carter, Nancy; Covell, Christine L; Donald, Faith; Gibbins, Sharyn; Kilpatrick, Kelley; McKinlay, James; Rawson, Krista; Sherifali, Diana; Tranmer, Joan; Valaitis, Ruta

    2017-04-01

    Clinical practice is the primary focus of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles. However, with unprecedented needs for health care reform and quality improvement (QI), health care administrators are seeking new ways to utilize all dimensions of APN expertise, especially related to research and evidence-based practice. International studies reveal research as the most underdeveloped and underutilized aspect of these roles. To improve patient care by strengthening the capacity of advanced practice nurses to integrate research and evidence-based practice activities into their day-to-day practice. An academic-practice partnership was created among hospital-based advanced practice nurses, nurse administrators, and APN researchers to create an innovative approach to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses in conducting point-of-care research, QI, or evidence-based practice projects to improve patient, provider, and/or system outcomes. A practice-based research course was delivered to 2 cohorts of advanced practice nurses using a range of teaching strategies including 1-to-1 academic mentorship. All participants completed self-report surveys before and after course delivery. Through participation in this initiative, advanced practice nurses enhanced their knowledge, skills, and confidence in the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of research, QI, and evidence-based practice activities. Evaluation of this initiative provides evidence of the acceptability and feasibility of academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor point-of-care providers on how to lead, implement, and integrate research, QI and evidence-based activities into their practices. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Creating and Sustaining University-Community Partnerships in Science Education (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, N.

    2009-12-01

    Despite years of research and investment, we have yet to see the widespread implementation of a myriad research-proven instructional strategies in STEM education[1]. To address this challenge, we present and analyze one such strategy, a theoretically-grounded model of university-community partnership [2] that engages university students and children in a collective enterprise that has the potential to improve the participation and education of all. We document the impact of this effort on: university participants who learn about education, the community and science; children in the community who learn about science, the nature of science and develop their identities and attitudes towards science; and, shifts in institutional structures which may allow these programs to be part of standard practice. This project is designed to be sustained and scaled, and is analyzed through the application of a new framework [3] which brings together theories of STEM change that come from studies in higher education, faculty development and disciplinary-based education research in STEM. [1] National Research Council. (2003). Improving Undergraduate Instruction in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: Report of A Workshop. Washington, D.C.: The National Academies Press. [2] Finkelstein, N. and Mayhew, L. (2008). Acting in Our Own Self-Interest: Blending University and Community. Proceedings of the 2008 Physics Education Research Conf, AIP Press. Melville NY, 1064, 19-22. [3] Henderson, C., Finkelstein, N. & Beach A. (to appear). Beyond Dissemination in College science teaching: An Introduction to Four Core Change Strategies. Accepted May 2009 in Journal of College Science Teaching.

  19. A partnership-based model for embedding employability in urban planning education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neale Blair

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a partnership-based model for embedding employability in urban planning education. The model is based on the author’s experiences of implementing an international project which supported the development of employability skills in urban and regional planning education in Malawi. Since independence, urban planners have typically trained outside the country, attending university in the UK and other Commonwealth countries. More recently, the paradigm has shifted towards in-country education delivered by academic staff cognisant with the opportunities and challenges of development in Malawi. There remains, though, a gap between graduate knowledge of the subject and the skills necessary to pursue a professional career in the sector. Although there is no consensus yet on the meaning of employability in the literature, lessons from the project indicate that academic–public–private collaboration helps incorporate in curriculum skills that employers anticipate. Applicability of these principles is however context dependent, particularly in the emerging economy context where institutional capacity may be less developed compared to elsewhere.

  20. Sustaining Public Education Events through Partnerships: Joining Forces for a Common Goal

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, L. R.; Clift, S.; Moore, S. L.

    2015-12-01

    Well-designed public STEM events benefit both the subject matter experts and the broader community. But planning and conducting these events costs participants' time and energy. For 15 years, the Bureau of Economic Geology of The University of Texas at Austin has hosted an Austin Earth Science Week Career Day, in which STEM professionals showcase their knowledge, skills, and experiences for middle-school students. By establishing partnerships and assuming a leadership role, the Bureau has leveraged resources to host a sustainable series of educational events. Key to success was finding a common goal that all participants were interested in fulfilling. Engaging and educating students about careers in geoscience became that unifying goal. Governmental agency staffers, industry professionals, graduate students, and school administrators were all interested in this effort. The career theme also attracted a wide variety of professionals, many of whom have participated in the event every year. The biggest challenge is meeting the demand from schools for this type of educational experience. In early years, the event was hosted by a few Bureau scientists in their offices. As word spread about the event, new partners and a larger facility were required to accommodate the growing number of participants. Currently, new media and distance learning platforms are being explored for broadening the event to meet demand. After 15 years, the Austin Earth Science Week Career Day has now become a tradition. We hope it serves as a model to others interested in establishing a STEM event in their own community.

  1. The TRUST Project: A Formal-Informal Teacher Education Partnership for the Promotion of Earth Science Teacher Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, H.; Miele, E.; Powell, W.; MacDonald, M.

    2004-12-01

    The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) in partnership with Lehman and Brooklyn Colleges of the City University of New York (CUNY) has initiated The Teacher Renewal for Urban Science Teaching (TRUST) project. TRUST combines informal and formal teacher education in a four-year initiative to enhance professional development and masters of science education programs, grades K-8 at Brooklyn College and 7-12 at Lehman College. This NSF-funded partnership brings together the resources of AMNH, CUNY, New York City school districts, New York City Department of Education-Museum Partnerships, and the expertise of scientists and teachers with research experiences. Following an initial planning year, TRUST will recruit and sustain 90 teachers over a period of 3 years as well as engage 30 school administrators in support of Earth science instruction. Program components include two new formal Earth systems science courses, intensive informal summer institutes, and a lecture and workshop series during which participants gain new Earth science content knowledge, develop action plans, and present their work on the local and national level. In addition, participants have access to ongoing resource and material support to enhance their learning and instruction. Continuous documentation and data collection by project investigators are being used to address questions regarding the impact various aspects of the TRUST participant experience on classroom instruction and learning, the acquisition of scientific knowledge in the new courses and institutes, and to examine the nature of the Museum experience in meeting certification goals. External formative and summative evaluation of the project is addressing issues surrounding the value of the program as a model for formal-informal partnership in urban Earth science teacher education and certification, analysis of policies that facilitate partnership arrangements, and how socialization of novices with experts affects retention and

  2. The Climate Change Education Partnership Alliance: Building a Network for Effective Collaboration and Impact (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scowcroft, G.

    2013-12-01

    The mission of the Climate Change Education Partnership Alliance (The Alliance), funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), is to advance exemplary climate change education through research and innovative partnerships. Through six unique regional projects, The Alliance is reaching wide and diverse audiences across the U.S., while linking groups and institutions that might not otherwise be connected by a common focus on climate change education. The goals for The Alliance include building collaborations between projects and institutions, sharing effective practices, and leveraging resources to create a community in which the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. To foster these goals, NSF has funded a central hub, the Alliance Office. Currently, the Alliance Office is building the infrastructure necessary to support activities and communication between the projects. Successful networks need objectives for their interactions and a common vision held by the partners. In the first national meeting of The Alliance members, held in June 2013, the foundation was laid to begin this work. The Alliance now has a common mission and vision to guide the next four years of activities. An initial 'mapping' of the network has identified the scope and diversity of the network, how members are connected, current boundaries of the network, network strengths and weaknesses, and network needs. This information will serve as a baseline as the network develops. The Alliance has also identified the need for key 'working groups' which provide an opportunity for members to work across the projects on common goals. As The Alliance evolves, building blocks identified by the field of network science will be used to forge a strong and successful collaborative enterprise. Infrastructure is being established to support widespread engagement; social ties are being fostered through face-to-face meetings and monthly teleconferences; time is provided to build and share knowledge; the

  3. The Role of DLESE in Fostering Partnerships Between Research and Educational Interests in the Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, D. W.; Manduca, C. A.

    2001-05-01

    The Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE; www.dlese.org) supports excellence in Earth system education-for all learners in all instructional settings. Application of emerging information technologies provides new opportunities to form meaningful partnerships between the research community and education and public outreach efforts in the Earth sciences. Current activities at DLESE include:\\Working/Interest Groups: List-servers and websites are available to support self-defined working/interest groups. Groups currently active include K-12, Diversity, Water in the Earth System, Integrating Research and Education, and Science Policy. You are invited to join existing groups or start new topical discussions. The Integrating Research and Education list-server provides an excellent venue for sharing information on successful programs of this type. Dataset Working Group: This group is focused on the development of data access, tools and materials that will allow students to explore the Earth system using research data. A demonstration project showing integrated access to distributed datasets spanning the Earth system is underway. The Earth Exploration Toolbook project is collecting information and tips for using available data interfaces and tools. Researcher and educators are invited to join the dataset working group and contribute to the data access, interfaces, and educational resources needed to support learning through data exploration.\\Collections Development: Both individual learning resources and resource collections are being collected, organized and cataloged for broad dissemination using the search and browse functions of the DLESE discovery system. A Resource Cataloger has been developed to allow individuals to catalog resources that they have either developed themselves or that they routinely use in their instructional practice. Our experience shows that users or creators are most familiar with resources they use, and are therefore best

  4. Achieving Hand Hygiene Success With a Partnership Between Graduate Medical Education, Hospital Leadership, and Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbluth, Glenn; Garritson, Susan; Green, Adrienne L; Milev, Dimiter; Vidyarthi, Arpana R; Auerbach, Andrew D; Baron, Robert B

    2016-11-01

    Engaging physicians in hand hygiene programs is a challenge faced by many academic medical centers. Partnerships between education and academic leaders present opportunities for effective collaboration and improvement. The authors developed a robust hand hygiene quality improvement program, with attention to rapid-cycle improvements, including all levels of staff and health care providers. The program included a defined governance structure, clear data collection process, educational interventions, rapid-cycle improvements, and financial incentive for staff and physicians (including residents and fellows). Outcomes were measured on patients in all clinical areas. Run charts were used to document compliance in aggregate and by subgroups throughout the project duration. Institutional targets were achieved and then exceeded, with sustained hand hygiene compliance >90%. Physician compliance lagged behind aggregate compliance but ultimately was sustained at a level exceeding the target. Successfully achieving the institutional goal required collaboration among all stakeholders. Physician-specific data and physician champions were essential to drive improvement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. NASA IceBridge and PolarTREC - Education and Outreach Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholow, S.; Warburton, J.; Beck, J.; Woods, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    PolarTREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, a teacher professional development program, began with the International Polar Year in 2004 and continues today in the United States. PolarTREC has worked specifically with OIB for 3 years and looking forward to ongoing collaboration. PolarTREC brings U.S. K­12 educators and polar researchers together through an innovative teacher research experience model. Participating teachers spend 3-6 weeks in the field with research teams conducting surveys and collecting data on various aspects of polar science. During their experience, teachers become research team members filling a variety of roles on the team. They also fulfill a unique role of public outreach officer, conducting live presentations about their field site and research as well as journaling, answering questions, and posting photos. Working with OIB has opened up the nature of science for the participating teachers. In developing the long-term relationship with OIB teams, teachers can now share (1) the diversity of training, backgrounds, and interests of OIB scientists, (2) identify the linkages between Greenlandic culture and community and cryospheric science and evidence of climate change, (3) network with Danish and Greenlandic educators on the mission (4) gain access to the full spectrum of a science project - development, implementation, analysis, networking, and dissemination of information. All aspects help these teachers become champions of NASA science and educational leaders in their communities. Evaluation data shows that PolarTREC has clearly achieved it goals with the OIB partnership and suggests that linking teachers and researchers can have the potential to transform the nature of science education. By giving teachers the content knowledge, pedagogical tools, confidence, understanding of science in the broader society, and experiences with scientific inquiry, participating teachers are using authentic scientific research in their

  6. What Are the Role and Impact of Public-Private Partnerships in Education? A Realist Evaluation of the Chilean Education Quasi-Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, Antoni; Bonal, Xavier; Zancajo, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    The superiority of market mechanisms in educational provision is a premise that has received renewed emphasis under the regime of public-private partnerships (PPPs). The central idea of PPPs--enthusiastically embraced by a range of international organizations, development agencies and scholars--is grounded in the assumption that competition…

  7. The Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT) Science Education Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, D. C.; Klein, M. J.; Wolff, S. E.

    2004-12-01

    The Goldstone Apple Valley Radio Telescope Project (GAVRT) offers a unique opportunity for students in grades K through 12 to not only learn about science through radio astronomy, but to actually do it. GAVRT is a science education partnership involving NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and the Lewis Center for Educational Research (LCER). Following a preparation period using curriculum especially written for the Project, teachers connect to the Operations Control Center at LCER where trained operators assist the students to conduct remotely controlled radio astronomy observations using a 34-m diameter antenna located at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex. Students use computers to record extremely faint radio waves collected by the radio telescope and analyze real data. Scientists at JPL and other research institutions ultimately validate and incorporate the data into their research. Through this process students have the opportunity to become part of a science/education team, participating with scientists in ongoing missions and special observing campaigns. Their measurements are often included in papers appearing in major scientific journals. They learn that they can make valuable contributions to the world of science. This presentation will detail the types of data and the "campaigns" in which the students are conducting observations of the radiation belts of Jupiter, the deep atmosphere of Uranus and Saturn, and the time variations in the radio emission from distant Quasars. It will describe how the student-produced data are valued by the scientists and how the involvement of the scientists impacts the attitudes and abilities of students in the classroom. The JPL contribution to this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. Post-Secondary Vocational Education and Training: Pathways and Partnerships. Institutional Management in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    OECD Publishing (NJ3), 2012

    2012-01-01

    Rapid growth of tertiary education is partly due to the expansion of post-secondary vocational education and training (PSV). A well developed post-secondary PSV system and links between universities and VET institutions improve skills and employment opportunities. What is post-secondary PSV and how does it relate to other components of the…

  9. Bridging the GAPS from Space: A Research/Educational Partnership in the Upper Delaware River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown de Colstoun, E.; Robin, J.; Minelli, S.; Katsaros, M.; Peterec, I.; Sandt, K.

    2006-05-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program is currently developing scientific protocols to inventory and monitor the natural resources of 270 park units at the national level. These are aimed at providing critical tools needed by park managers for effective decision-making regarding the management and stewardship of the resources they are charged with protecting. We are currently developing a satellite-based regional land cover and land use monitoring protocol that addresses the immediate needs of the NPS I&M. This is a pilot project that examines land cover/use changes in and around the Upper Delaware Scenic and Recreational River and Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area national parks from Landsat data for the period 1984 to 2005, in one the fastest growing regions in the country. The products resulting from the application of the protocols are then used to guide the simulation of land cover/use changes within a simple Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) model called GAPS in order to better understand the consequences of the measured land cover/use change on the water and energy cycles of the parks and surrounding areas. The data needed for product validation and model parameterization are being acquired with the assistance of students and educators from area schools using protocols established through the GLOBE program. Through focused workshops organized in collaboration with NPS educational specialists and PA regional educational service agencies called Intermediate Units, and participation in hands-on field measurement campaigns, students and educators are learning about satellite remote sensing interpretation, land cover classification, and how to measure/monitor changes in land cover/use in their communities. Students will also assist in the model simulations using the data they acquire in the field. This partnership between the Principal Investigator, the NPS, Intermediate Units and area students and educators is

  10. The PRIDE (Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education) Toolkit: Development and Evaluation of Novel Literacy and Culturally Sensitive Diabetes Education Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Kathleen; Chambers, Laura; Bumol, Stefan; White, Richard O; Gregory, Becky Pratt; Davis, Dianne; Rothman, Russell L

    2016-02-01

    Patients with low literacy, low numeracy, and/or linguistic needs can experience challenges understanding diabetes information and applying concepts to their self-management. The authors designed a toolkit of education materials that are sensitive to patients' literacy and numeracy levels, language preferences, and cultural norms and that encourage shared goal setting to improve diabetes self-management and health outcomes. The Partnership to Improve Diabetes Education (PRIDE) toolkit was developed to facilitate diabetes self-management education and support. The PRIDE toolkit includes a comprehensive set of 30 interactive education modules in English and Spanish to support diabetes self-management activities. The toolkit builds upon the authors' previously validated Diabetes Literacy and Numeracy Education Toolkit (DLNET) by adding a focus on shared goal setting, addressing the needs of Spanish-speaking patients, and including a broader range of diabetes management topics. Each PRIDE module was evaluated using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) instrument to determine the material's cultural appropriateness and its sensitivity to the needs of patients with low literacy and low numeracy. Reading grade level was also assessed using the Automated Readability Index (ARI), Coleman-Liau, Flesch-Kincaid, Fry, and SMOG formulas. The average reading grade level of the materials was 5.3 (SD 1.0), with a mean SAM of 91.2 (SD 5.4). All of the 30 modules received a "superior" score (SAM >70%) when evaluated by 2 independent raters. The PRIDE toolkit modules can be used by all members of a multidisciplinary team to assist patients with low literacy and low numeracy in managing their diabetes. © 2015 The Author(s).

  11. Human genome education model project. Ethical, legal, and social implications of the human genome project: Education of interdisciplinary professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, J.O. [Alliance of Genetic Support Groups, Chevy Chase, MD (United States); Lapham, E.V. [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States). Child Development Center

    1996-12-31

    This meeting was held June 10, 1996 at Georgetown University. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on the human genome education model. Topics of discussion include the following: psychosocial issues; ethical issues for professionals; legislative issues and update; and education issues.

  12. Parks, Place and Pedagogy - Education Partnerships with the National Park Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vye, E. C.; Rose, W. I.; Nash, B.; Klawiter, M.; Huntoon, J. E.; Engelmann, C. A.; Gochis, E. E.; MiTEP

    2011-12-01

    The Michigan Teaching Excellence Program (MITEP) is a multi-year program of teacher leadership development that empowers science teachers in Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo, and Jackson to lead their schools and districts through the process of improving science teaching and learning. A component of this program is facilitated through partnership between academia, K-12 educators, and the National Park Service (NPS) that aims to develop place-based education strategies that improve diversity and Earth Science literacy. This tangible education method draws upon both the sense of place that National Parks offer and the art of interpretation employed by the park service. Combined, these deepen cognitive process and provide a more diverse reflection of what place means and the processes behind shaping what we see. Our partnerships present participants the opportunity to intern in a Midwest national park for 3-8 weeks during their third year in the program. In summer 2011, eleven teachers from the Grand Rapids school district participated in this innovative way of learning and teaching Earth Science. One goal was to develop geological interpretive materials desired and needed for the parks. Secondly, and important to place-based educational methodologies, these deliverables will be used as a way of bringing the parks to urban classrooms. Participants lived in the parks and worked directly with both national park and Michigan Tech staff to create lesson plans, podcasts, media clips, video, and photographic documentation of their experiences. These lesson plans will be hosted in the Views of the National Park website in an effort to provide innovative teaching resources nationally for teachers or free-choice learners wishing to access information on Midwest national parks. To the benefit of park staff, working with teachers from urban areas offered an opportunity for park staff to access diverse learners in urban settings unable to visit the park. The foundation has been laid for

  13. Utilizing the Scientist as Teacher Through the Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, D.; McNeal, K. S.; Radencic, S.

    2011-12-01

    The presence of a scientist or other STEM expert in secondary school science classroom can provide fresh new ideas for student learning. Through the Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) program sponsored by NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK-12), scientists and engineers at Mississippi State University work together with graduate students and area teachers to provide hands-on inquiry-based learning to middle school and high school students. Competitively selected graduate fellows from geosciences, physics, chemistry, and engineering spend ten hours per week in participating classrooms for an entire school year, working as a team with their assigned teacher to provide outstanding instruction in science and mathematics and to serve as positive role models for the students. We are currently in the second year of our five-year program, and we have already made significant achievements in science and mathematics instruction. We successfully hosted GIS Day on the Mississippi State University campus, allowing participating students to design an emergency response to a simulated flooding of the Mississippi Delta. We have also developed new laboratory exercises for high school physics classrooms, including a 3-D electric field mapping exercise, and the complete development of a robotics design course. Many of the activities developed by the fellows and teachers are written into formal lesson plans that are made publicly available as free downloads through our project website. All participants in this program channel aspects of their research interests and methods into classroom learning, thus providing students with the real-world applications of STEM principles. In return, participants enhance their own communication and scientific inquiry skills by employing lesson design techniques that are similar to defining their own research questions.

  14. Partnership of Environmental Education and Research-A compilation of student research, 1999-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    : Bradley, Michael W.; Armstrong, Patrice; Byl, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Tennessee Water Science Center and the College of Engineering and Technology at Tennessee State University developed a Partnership in Environmental Education and Research (PEER) to support environmental research at TSU and to expand the environmental research capabilities of the USGS in Tennessee. The PEER program is driven by the research needs to better define the occurrence, fate, and transport of contaminants in groundwater and surface water. Research in the PEER program has primarily focused on the transport and remediation of organic contamination in karst settings. Research conducted through the program has also expanded to a variety of media and settings. Research areas include contaminant occurrence and transport, natural and enhanced bioremediation, geochemical conditions in karst aquifers, mathematical modeling for contaminant transport and degradation, new methods to evaluate groundwater contamination, the resuspension of bacteria from sediment in streams, the use of bioluminescence and chemiluminescence to identify the presence of contaminants, and contaminant remediation in wetlands. The PEER program has increased research and education opportunities for students in the College of Engineering, Technology, and Computer Science and has provided students with experience in presenting the results of their research. Students in the program have participated in state, regional, national and international conferences with more than 140 presentations since 1998 and more than 40 student awards. The PEER program also supports TSU outreach activities and efforts to increase minority participation in environmental and earth science programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels. TSU students and USGS staff participate in the TSU summer programs for elementary and high school students to promote earth sciences. The 2007 summer camps included more than 130 students from 20 different States and Washington DC.

  15. Developing Partnerships between Higher Education Faculty, K-12 Science Teachers, and School Administrators via MSP initiatives: The RITES Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulkins, J. L.; Kortz, K. M.; Murray, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhode Island Technology Enhanced Science Project (RITES) is a NSF-funded Math and Science Partnership (MSP) project that seeks to improve science education. RITES is, at its core, a unique partnership that fosters relationships between middle and high school science teachers, district and school administrators, higher education (HE) faculty members, and science education researchers. Their common goal is to enhance scientific inquiry, increase classroom technology usage, and improve state level science test scores. In one of the more visible examples of this partnership, middle and high school science teachers work closely with HE science faculty partners to design and teach professional development (PD) workshops. The PD sessions focus on technology-enhanced scientific investigations (e.g. use of probes, online simulations, etc.), exemplify inquiry-based instruction, and relate expert content knowledge. Teachers from these sessions express substantial satisfaction in the program, report increased comfort levels in teaching the presented materials (both via post-workshop surveys), and show significant gains in content knowledge (via pre-post assessments). Other benefits to this kind of partnership, in which K-12 and HE teachers are considered equals, include: 1) K-12 teachers are empowered through interactions with HE faculty and other science teachers in the state; 2) HE instructors become more informed not only about good pedagogical practices, but also practical aspects of teaching science such as engaging students; and 3) the PD sessions tend to be much stronger than ones designed and presented solely by HE scientists, for while HE instructors provide content expertise, K-12 teachers provide expertise in K-12 classroom practice and implementation. Lastly, the partnership is mutually beneficial for the partners involved because both sides learn practical ways to teach science and inquiry at different levels. In addition to HE faculty and K-12 science teacher

  16. Building Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Mary J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Defines school-business partnerships and reviews changes in such partnerships over the past 25 years. Provides steps to building effective partnerships for school-to-work activities: review the school's mission; select partners that will bring strength to the relationship; set clearly defined, realistic goals; maintain the partnership; and…

  17. Building Partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Mary J.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Defines school-business partnerships and reviews changes in such partnerships over the past 25 years. Provides steps to building effective partnerships for school-to-work activities: review the school's mission; select partners that will bring strength to the relationship; set clearly defined, realistic goals; maintain the partnership; and…

  18. The Woods Hole Partnership Education Program (PEP): Broadening Participation in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, O.; Jearld, A., Jr.; Liles, G.; Gutierrez, B.

    2015-12-01

    In March 2009, the Woods Hole Diversity Initiative launched the Partnership Education Program (PEP), a multi-institutional effort to increase diversity in the student population (and ultimately the work force) in the Woods Hole science community. PEP, a summer research internship program, is open to students of all backgrounds but is designed especially to provide opportunities for URM in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). PEP is a 10-week program which provides intensive mentored research, a credit-bearing course and supplemental career and professional development activities. Students have opportunities to work in various research areas of geosciences. PEP is emerging as an effective and sustainable approach to bringing students into the STEM research community. PEP is carefully structured to provide critical support for students as they complete their undergraduate experience and prepare for geosciences careers and/or graduate school. The PEP experience is intended to provide students with an entry into the Woods Hole science community, one of the most vibrant marine and environmental research communities in the world. The program aims to provide a first-hand introduction to emerging issues and real-world training in the research skills that students need to advance in science, either as graduate students or bachelors-level working scientists. This is a long-recognized need and efforts are being made to ensure that the students begin to acquire skills and aptitudes that position them to take advantage of a wide range of opportunities. Of note is that the PEP is transitioning into a two year program where students are participating in a second year as a research intern or employee. Since 2013, at least four partner institutions have invited PEP alumni to participate in their respective programs as research assistants and/or full-time technicians.

  19. "Systems Education Experiences: Transforming high school science education through unique partnerships, inquiry based modules, and ocean systems studies"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, C.; Orellana, M. V.; Baliga, N. S.

    2012-12-01

    Recent advances in experimental practice, accompanying computational techniques and systems thinking, have advanced biological inquiry. However, current scientific practices do not typically resemble the science taught in schools. As a result, students are missing out on significant opportunities to develop the critical thinking that is needed both in science and many professions. As a potential solution to this ongoing problem in science education, we are using current scientific practices to create classroom activities, packaged in easy-to-use curriculum modules, which promote conceptual development of standards based instructional outcomes. By bringing together students, teachers, researchers, engineers, and programmers we bring needed systems thinking and engaging inquiry experiences to schools throughout Washington State and the nation. Teachers are trained and continuously supported as they learn needed content and methods to bring this new science into their classrooms. Current research on ocean acidification, changing biogeochemical cycles, and the complexity and interdisciplinary nature of ocean systems studies have been translated through our newest curriculum module. Developing this module presented a significant challenge due to the urgency and importance of instilling understanding in high school students as they prepare to make decisions on the highly charged political, economic, and scientific issues of climate change and ocean acidification. Challenges have been overcome through partnerships and through infusing the habits of sustainability, high level thinking, systems modeling, scientific design, and communication. The Next Generation Standards have opened the door for nationwide dissemination of the module as we embark enabling students to think, understand, and contribute to scientific research.

  20. Public-Private Partnerships in Education and the Pursuit of Gender Equality: A View from South Asia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shailaja Fennell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of public-private partnerships (PPPs into the educational sphere has opened up the sector to a wide range of new private providers in India and Pakistan. The global literature has indicated that the growth in partnerships that provide targeted programmes for girls, in locations where parents prefer to enrol their daughters in these new private schools rather than state schools, will further reduce any existing gender gap. A specific focus on gender equality considerations within PPP programmes is necessary to analyse new evidence on gender equality. A review of national documents on education for India and Pakistan indicates that the concept of gender equality was not included in the original education policy documents, and gender concerns were introduced through a particular institutional history of engagement between international and national policy interventions.District and village data show that there was very little gendered difference in how parental generations studied viewed the educational pathways of their sons and daughters. The younger generation studied are not confident that they will be able to enter gainful employment, which raises policy concerns that the lack of employment for this younger generation could undo any reduction in the gender gap as increased poverty pushes girls out of school in the next two decades.

  1. Learning to listen: designing architectural education through university-community partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Barbara Brown

    2008-01-01

    Our world is shaped by a patchwork of perspectives, of stories told to construct or even recreate our realities. Practitioners engaging with the built environment have a responsibility to assist in the proper translation of these stories into something that physically enriches the user's sense of place. However, academia separates itself from the "real world" in order to teach theory, history, and so forth as purely as possible. Critics argue that this separation is problematic when preparing students for a practical field in which they will become heavily entrenched in this world from which they have been sheltered. In response, community-based design initiatives are forming that conjoin students, faculty, community members, and activists to address urgent needs in neighborhoods around the globe. While empowering the communities through the opportunity to change their own surroundings, the researchers benefit from a culturally significant palette with which to search for innovative ways to make the built environment truly relevant to positive transformation at the local level. Nonetheless, this pedagogical method is, in turn, criticized for blurring the line between education and activism. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate both the intentions of such projects and the criticism of it through the analysis of a case study at the University of Texas: The Sustainable Design and Development Workshop (SDDW). Through this inquiry, the importance of community engagement to a student's professional development became clear. However, the experience also highlighted the university's inherent responsibility to the citizens with which it is engaging--which requires consideration of issues of funding, timing, accountability, and compromise that is vital to any such project's success. University-community partnerships provide young designers and their educators with important life skills that are not often emphasized within the realms of academia. But how can

  2. Analysis of the Public-private Partnership in Higher Education in South Africa%南非公私立高校合作关系探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高飞

    2012-01-01

      South Africa has become one of the most developed countries in higher education in African continent .Private colleges play an important role in higher education expansion , especially the public-private partnership.After four stages of evolution, the public-private partnerships have formed three types of specialist partnership , service partnership and teaching partnership .The public-private partnerships are composed mainly by for-profit institutions guided by public universities and show relatively low ed-ucational level.%  南非已成为非洲大陆高等教育最发达的国家之一,其中,私立院校在扩大高等教育入学中功不可没,特别是公私合作办学方式,发挥着重中之重的作用。南非公私立高校合作伙伴关系经过四个阶段的演变,形成专业学院合作、服务合作与教学合作三种类型,表现出以营利性私立院校为主、公立高校掌握主导权以及合作计划总体水平偏低的特点。

  3. Integrating local environmental research into K-12 science classrooms and the value of graduate student-educator partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, N. D.; Petrik-Finley, R.

    2015-12-01

    Collaboration between researchers and K-12 educators enables an invaluable exchange of teaching philosophies and educational tools. Programs that partner graduate students with K-12 educators serve the dual purpose of training future educators and providing K-12 students with unique opportunities and perspectives. The benefits of this type of partnership include providing students with enhanced educational experiences and positive student-mentor relationships, training STEM graduate students in effective teaching strategies, and providing teachers with a firsthand resource for scientific information and novel educational materials. Many high school students have had little exposure to science beyond the classroom. Frequent interactions with "real-life" scientists can help make science more approachable and is an effective strategy for promoting science as a career. Here I describe my experiences and several lessons designed as a NSK GK-12 fellow. For example, a month-long unit on biogeochemical principles was framed as a crime scene investigation of a fish kill event in Hood Canal, Washington, in which students were given additional pieces of evidence to solve the mystery as they satisfied checkpoints in their understanding of key concepts. The evidence pieces included scientific plots, maps, datasets, and laboratory exercises. A clear benefit of this investigation-style unit is that students were able to learn the material at their individual pace. This structure allowed for a streamlined integration of differentiated materials such as simplified background readings or visual learning aids for struggling students or more detailed news articles and primary literature for more advanced students. Although the NSF GK-12 program has been archived, educators and researchers should pursue new partnerships, leveraging local and state-level STEM outreach programs with the goal of increasing national exposure of the societal benefits of such synergistic activities.

  4. A Canadian model for building university and community partnerships: centre for research & education on violence against women and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Peter G; Berman, Helene; MacQuarrie, Barb

    2011-09-01

    The importance of Canadian research on violence against women became a national focus after the 1989 murder of 14 women at École Polytechnique in Montreal. This tragedy led to several federal government studies that identified a need to develop centers for applied research and community-university alliances on violence against women. One such center is the Centre for Research & Education on Violence against Women and Children. The Centre was founded in London, Canada in 1992 out of a partnership of a university, a community college, and community services. The centre's history and current activities are summarized as a model for the development and sustainability of similar centers.

  5. Development of a photonics outreach and education program through partnerships at Universidad Metropolitana for Puerto Rico and the IYL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, A.; Friedman, J. S.; Saltares, R.; Gordillo, R.; Trujillo, E.

    2016-09-01

    As the only photonics center in Puerto Rico and the Caribbean we have developed since 2014 and for the International Year of Light 2015 a comprehensive education and outreach program. We show how we have successfully reached an audience of more than 9,500 including K-12 students and teachers, general public, and specialized audiences, by partnering with other institutions and private companies to maximize resources. We present our experience, challenges, rewards and results or our activities and the types of partnerships we developed with institutions and private companies that were fundamental to achieve our goals.

  6. Exploring the mycobacteriophage metaproteome: phage genomics as an educational platform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham F Hatfull

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages are the most abundant forms of life in the biosphere and carry genomes characterized by high genetic diversity and mosaic architectures. The complete sequences of 30 mycobacteriophage genomes show them collectively to encode 101 tRNAs, three tmRNAs, and 3,357 proteins belonging to 1,536 "phamilies" of related sequences, and a statistical analysis predicts that these represent approximately 50% of the total number of phamilies in the mycobacteriophage population. These phamilies contain 2.19 proteins on average; more than half (774 of them contain just a single protein sequence. Only six phamilies have representatives in more than half of the 30 genomes, and only three-encoding tape-measure proteins, lysins, and minor tail proteins-are present in all 30 phages, although these phamilies are themselves highly modular, such that no single amino acid sequence element is present in all 30 mycobacteriophage genomes. Of the 1,536 phamilies, only 230 (15% have amino acid sequence similarity to previously reported proteins, reflecting the enormous genetic diversity of the entire phage population. The abundance and diversity of phages, the simplicity of phage isolation, and the relatively small size of phage genomes support bacteriophage isolation and comparative genomic analysis as a highly suitable platform for discovery-based education.

  7. THE ROLE OF EDUCATIONAL COMPLEXES IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE PARTNERSHIP MODEL FORMATION OF THE NATIONAL QUALIFICATIONS FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina V. Gileva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to define potential of modern educational complexes in the field of formation of national system of qualifications on the basis of interpretation of procedures changes in regulation of social and labour relations. Methods. The methods involve analysis, generalisation, ordering and a technique of modelling of processes.Results. The authors describe key positions of the theory of the continuous education that provides rapprochement of requirements of employers with quality of vocational training and the content of educational process in the branch educational institutions. The possible contribution of educational complexes to creation of national system of qualifications and professional standards is considered. In this connection various forms of partnership of the given complexes with public authorities, public structures, and also employers are described.Scientific novelty. The concept of business competence characterising ability of system of vocational training is offered to satisfy the requirement of a labour market by means of active integration of educational, innovative and labour processes.Practical significance. The presented model of interaction of educational complexes and subjects of a labour market can be realised by working out of professional standards, creation of the expert centers and the innovative platforms intended to realisation of advisory activity on the basis of high schools; and also organizational-methodical support of processes of professional certification system formation. According to authors, this model will help to co-ordinate the content of professional and Federal State Educational Standards (FSES. 

  8. A Researcher-Practitioner Partnership on Remedial Math Contextualization in Career and Technical Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueli; Wang, Yan; Prevost, Amy

    2017-01-01

    This chapter documents a partnership between university-based researchers and community college instructors and practitioners in their collective pursuit to improve student success in manufacturing programs at a large urban 2-year technical college, presenting an example of a contextualized instructional approach to teaching developmental math,…

  9. Civic Education Partnerships: Civil Society Organisations, Donors and the State in Fiji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleinakorodawa, Paolo; Spence, Rebecca; O'Loughlin, Micheal

    2011-01-01

    This article reflects on some of the challenges and opportunities presented when working in partnership in the highly politicised and contested Fijian Civil Society environment over the past five years. The authors are practitioners who specialise in working with communities which experience conflict. The paper discusses and analyses the genesis…

  10. International School Partnerships as a Vehicle for Global Education: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, Karen; Khamsi, Khatera

    2012-01-01

    The UK government has recently demonstrated an unprecedented interest in global learning within primary and secondary schools. While the adoption and implementation of the global dimension varies, international school partnerships (ISPs) have been identified as a key vehicle for harnessing the potential of the global dimension in schools. Despite…

  11. Assessing Effective Partnerships in Intercultural Education: Transformative Learning as a Tool for Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyshyn, Roxanna; Chamberlin-Quinlisk, Carla

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of the Intercultural Partnership Project is to introduce students to issues surrounding language and cultural identity, with the ultimate goal of helping students see themselves as engaged participants, rather than observers, in a multicultural community. For students in the intercultural communication class, this goal echoes…

  12. Describing an Academic and Nonprofit Organization Partnership to Educate At-Risk Adolescents about Cardiovascular Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Steven J.; Skager, Cherie; Kraiger, Anneliese

    2014-01-01

    There is emerging evidence to suggest community-based interventions can change community-wide behaviors and attitudes toward cardiovascular health. This article describes a partnership between an academic institution and a community nonprofit organization to develop and implement a cardiovascular health promotion program targeting at risk high…

  13. The Development and Implementation of Successful School-Community Partnerships in Public Elementary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Record, Vincent N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to define common characteristics of successful school-community partnerships supporting the improvement of academic achievement in public elementary schools. Based on the perceptions of elementary school administrators, this study identified important factors of, barriers to, and benefits of successful school-community…

  14. Partnerships in Medical Education: An Exploration of Library Service Models for Postgraduate Medicine at Macquarie University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Macquarie University's new medical school, The Australian School of Advanced Medicine (ASAM), is developing a postgraduate program that incorporates a partnership with Macquarie University Library. The curriculum encompasses contemporary models of competency-based assessment, teamwork and lifelong learning that are integrated with research and…

  15. A Smart Partnership: Integrating Educational Technology for Underserved Children in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charania, Amina; Davis, Niki

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the evolution of a large multi-stakeholder partnership that has grown since 2011 to scale deep engagement with learning through technology and decrease the digital divide for thousands of underserved school children in India. Using as its basis a case study of an initiative called integrated approach to technology in education…

  16. The Wheel Keeps Turning: A Critical Reflection on PIC Partnerships in Educational Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Christine

    2011-01-01

    Current government discourses on partnerships tend to assume an uncritical belief in the existence of equal ownership and equal power relations between development partners and partner governments. The rhetoric of shared visions, common strategic directions or complementary approaches to development in the Pacific begs the question of how such…

  17. Assessing the educational and support needs of nursing staff serving older adults: a case study of a community coalition/university partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Tam E; Ziemba, Rosemary

    2014-09-01

    Given the expected changes in demography and dependent care ratios, communities are preparing for the needs of older populations. Sometimes, communities form coalitions to address health-care needs. This case study evaluates a coalition/university partnership formed to assess the educational and support needs of nursing staff who are taking care of older adults across all service settings in one geographically defined community. A 17-member community-based coalition contracted with researchers from an external university to determine the perceptions of three key stakeholder groups: older adults and their families, all levels of nursing staff, and agency administrators. By applying principles of Participatory Action Research (PAR), this case study presents the challenges faced in the community-based coalition/university research team partnership. This coalition/research partnership is unique, differing from most academic examples of PAR because nursing professionals initiated the partnership.

  18. Expanding Earth and Space Science through the Initiating New Science Partnerships In Rural Education (INSPIRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radencic, S.; McNeal, K. S.; Pierce, D.; Hare, D.

    2010-12-01

    The INSPIRE program at Mississippi State University (MSU), funded by the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK12) program, focuses on Earth and Space science education and has partnered ten graduate students from MSU with five teachers from local, rural school districts. For the next five years the project will serve to increase inquiry and technology experiences in science and math while enhancing graduate student’s communication skills. Graduate students, from the disciplines of Geosciences, Physics, and Engineering are partnered with Chemistry, Physical Science, Physics, Geometry and Middle school science classrooms and will create engaging inquiry activities that incorporate elements of their research, and integrate various forms of technology. The generated lesson plans that are implemented in the classroom are published on the INSPIRE home page (www.gk12.msstate.edu) so that other classroom instructors can utilize this free resource. Local 7th -12th grade students will attend GIS day later this fall at MSU to increase their understanding and interest in Earth and Space sciences. Selected graduate students and teachers will visit one of four international university partners located in Poland, Australia, England, or The Bahamas to engage research abroad. Upon return they will incorporate their global experiences into their local classrooms. Planning for the project included many factors important to the success of the partnerships. The need for the program was evident in Mississippi K-12 schools based on low performance on high stakes assessments and lack of curriculum in the Earth and Space sciences. Meeting with administrators to determine what needs they would like addressed by the project and recognizing the individual differences among the schools were integral components to tailoring project goals and to meet the unique needs of each school partner. Time for training and team building of INSPIRE teachers and graduate students before the

  19. Developing Effective Partnerships for Special Populations: The Challenge of Partnerships and Alliances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, L. Allen; Maddy-Bernstein, Carolyn

    1992-01-01

    Effective business-education partnerships can have the following benefits for special populations: additional resources in resource-poor areas, employment opportunities, increased personal attention, improved facilities, and better teacher morale. Partnerships should complement, not replace, existing educational programs. (SK)

  20. Climate Change Education in Protected Areas: Highlights from the Earth to Sky NASA-NPS-USFWS Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A.; Morris, J.; Paglierani, R.

    2009-12-01

    National Parks, Hatcheries, Refuges, and other protected lands provide ideal settings for communicating the immediate and obvious effects of climate change, from rapidly melting glaciers, increased intensity and length of fire seasons, to flooding of archeological and historical treasures. Our nation's protected areas demonstrate clearly that climate change is happening now, and the impacts are affecting us all. Highlights of interpretive, educational and informational products presented in these sites, and developed through the Earth to Sky (ETS) partnership are described. The visiting public in our nation's parks, refuges, cultural sites and other protected lands wants to learn more about climate change, and is asking questions—often, complex questions. A broad array of educational programs and media are delivered in these unique settings, to diverse audiences. To be good "honest brokers" of the best information, staff needs access to accurate, up-to-date data, descriptions, analysis, and imagery that make the issues understandable. Pairing real world experiences of climate effects such as glacial retreat or beetle infestations, with NASA’s unique planetary perspective provides opportunities to link local, regional, and global effects in the minds and hearts of the public and students. The perspective afforded by such linkages can create powerful and long lasting impressions, and will likely provoke further learning about this topic. About Earth to Sky Earth to Sky is a partnership between NASA's Space and Earth Science disciplines, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the National Park Service (NPS). The partnership actively fosters collaborative work between the science and interpretation/education communities of NPS, USFWS, and NASA, centering around a series of professional development workshops aimed at informal educators. The workshops weave NASA content with NPS and USFWS interpretation and environmental education methodology, and use best

  1. Meeting in the MIDDLE:BUILDING off Regional Policies to Promote Climate Education Partnerships on and off Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, M.; Stylinski, C.; Shea, N.; Veron, D. E.; Merrill, J.

    2013-12-01

    Both the impacts of climate change and the choices available to adapt and mitigate climate change largely function at the regional scale. Understanding and addressing climate change will require a concerted campaign involving a diverse array of educations from small to large organizations. By focusing on a specific region's climate impacts, adaptation and mitigation options, and existing policies, climate education networks will likely have a higher likelihood of sustainability. Building on this concept, we have developed a climate education partnership, Maryland Delaware Climate Change Education, Assessment and Research (MADE CLEAR), to better understand effective ways to support formal-, informal- and higher-education practitioners in climate change education in this Mid-Atlantic region. We do so largely through face-to-face and web based professional development for each education practitioner group to improve their capacity to incorporate rigorous regionally-based climate science and solutions into their education strategies. We are promoting communities-of-practice within and across these groups as they share their successes and challenges and consider common messages and approaches. Our training and resources focus on impacts and solutions most relevant to our region including sea level rise, extreme events, and urban heat impacts. Our professional development approach aligns directly with existing education and natural resource, including the region's environmental literacy initiatives, the Next Generation Science Standards, and state climate adaptation and mitigation plans. We anticipate that by building off of existing policy, we will build the success of the network into the future. Our project includes design-based research of all three education groups, and thus we will identify effective climate change education strategies, in and out of schools, that are applicable in other regions.

  2. Training the 21st-Century Health Care Team: Maximizing Interprofessional Education Through Medical-Legal Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin-Tyler, Elizabeth; Teitelbaum, Joel

    2016-06-01

    For too long, many stakeholders in the health care delivery system have ignored the extent to which social determinants of health (SDH) are inextricably woven into and affect individual and population health. The health care system is undergoing a relatively rapid transformation, which has included in part an increasing recognition of SDH's effects. This recognition, in turn, has led to renewed calls for changing the way that physicians are trained and has accelerated medical education curricular reforms. This Perspective focuses on one such innovative method of team-based care and the opportunities for its integration into medical education: medical-legal partnership, a health care delivery model that embeds civil legal services into the spectrum of health care services provided to low-income or otherwise vulnerable patients and communities.

  3. Unequal Partnerships in Higher Education: Pedagogic Innovations in an Electronics within Physics Degree Course

    OpenAIRE

    Maddalena Taras; Francisco M. Gómez; Juan B. Roldán

    2014-01-01

    This cross-European research partnership reports on supporting pro-active learning and teaching. The two-part project firstly explored student beliefs about electronics within a physics degree and secondly, the use of peer assessment of a Mathematica notebook to develop understandings of standards and quality. Student beliefs were explored because of the negative perceptions tutors thought students brought to the Engineering course within the Physics degree. The results showed that tutors’ fe...

  4. Learning about the Human Genome. Part 2: Resources for Science Educators. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haury, David L.

    This ERIC Digest identifies how the human genome project fits into the "National Science Education Standards" and lists Human Genome Project Web sites found on the World Wide Web. It is a resource companion to "Learning about the Human Genome. Part 1: Challenge to Science Educators" (Haury 2001). The Web resources and…

  5. The Global Universities Partnership on Environment and Sustainability (GUPES): Networking of Higher Educational Institutions in Facilitating Implementation of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development 2005-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Mahesh; Mariam, Ayombi

    2014-01-01

    This article will focus on involvement of Higher Education Institutions in promoting Education for Sustainable Development through UNEPs flagship programme Global Universities Partnership on Environment and Sustainability. To achieve this, the activities of the network are centered on three pillars: Education, Training and Networking.

  6. The Global Universities Partnership on Environment and Sustainability (GUPES): Networking of Higher Educational Institutions in Facilitating Implementation of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development 2005-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Mahesh; Mariam, Ayombi

    2014-01-01

    This article will focus on involvement of Higher Education Institutions in promoting Education for Sustainable Development through UNEPs flagship programme Global Universities Partnership on Environment and Sustainability. To achieve this, the activities of the network are centered on three pillars: Education, Training and Networking.

  7. Genomics education for decision making : proceedings of the second invitational workshop on genomics education, 2–3 December 2010, Utrecht, The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerwinkel, D.J.; Waarlo, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genomics research and technology generate new personal and societal choices. As science education has the task of preparing students for decision-making on socio-scientific issues, research is needed to develop genomics education aimed at empowering students in the decision-making proces

  8. Social Media in Adult Education: Insights Gained from Grundtvig Learning Partnership Project “Institutional Strategies Targeting the Uptake of Social Networking in Adult Education (ISTUS”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilhelmina Vaičiūnienė

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—the focus of this article is the role of social media in adult education and their impact on adult students in regards to their educational needs and specific personal situations within the frame of the learning partnership project. The Grundtvig learning partnership project “Institutional Strategies Targeting the Uptake of Social Networking in Adult Education (ISTUS is an international partnership that includes partners from 7 EU countries. The aim of the research presented in this paper is to define cases of the uptake of technologies and applications by MRU students; thus, the objectives of the research are 1 to review literature pertaining to the field of social media in adult education context and 2 to analyse the respondents’ insights as regards learning/teaching practices, resources, and facilities that affect their learning in relation to social networking and media use (taking into consideration both personal and educational perspectives. Design/methodology/approach—the research paper adopts qualitative research approach. Findings—students perceive SM mainly as online communication means (usually informal communication is implied. SM is firstly associated by learners with pastime venue, not educational resource. Thus, methods of teaching/learning in SM and with the help of SM have to be developed and improved. They have to be considered in line with the necessity to develop critical and reflexive thinking skills and media and information literacy skills. The respondents have pointed out both positive and negative aspects of social media use for learning/teaching. Creation of an inner institutional SM type involving qualified people with expertise in SM use for education has been suggested. Research limitations/implications—this article is focused only on the attitudes of MRU students though 105 interviews in total have been conducted within the framework of the project and not only students, but also teachers and

  9. Social Media in Adult Education: Insights Gained from Grundtvig Learning Partnership Project “Institutional Strategies Targeting the Uptake of Social Networking in Adult Education (ISTUS”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilhelmina Vaičiūnienė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—the focus of this article is the role of social media in adult education and their impact on adult students in regards to their educational needs and specific personal situations within the frame of the learning partnership project. The Grundtvig learning partnership project “Institutional Strategies Targeting the Uptake of Social Networking in Adult Education (ISTUS is an international partnership that includes partners from 7 EU countries. The aim of the research presented in this paper is to define cases of the uptake of technologies and applications by MRU students; thus, the objectives of the research are 1 to review literature pertaining to the field of social media in adult education context and 2 to analyse the respondents’ insights as regards learning/teaching practices, resources, and facilities that affect their learning in relation to social networking and media use (taking into consideration both personal and educational perspectives.Design/methodology/approach—the research paper adopts qualitative research approach.Findings—students perceive SM mainly as online communication means (usually informal communication is implied. SM is firstly associated by learners with pastime venue, not educational resource. Thus, methods of teaching/learning in SM and with the help of SM have to be developed and improved. They have to be considered in line with the necessity to develop critical and reflexive thinking skills and media and information literacy skills. The respondents have pointed out both positive and negative aspects of social media use for learning/teaching. Creation of an inner institutional SM type involving qualified people with expertise in SM use for education has been suggested.Research limitations/implications—this article is focused only on the attitudes of MRU students though 105 interviews in total have been conducted within the framework of the project and not only students, but also teachers and

  10. A collection of research reporting, theoretical analysis, and practical applications in science education: Examining qualitative research methods, action research, educator-researcher partnerships, and constructivist learning theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, R. Todd

    2007-12-01

    Educator-researcher partnerships are increasingly being used to improve the teaching of science. Chapter 1 provides a summary of the literature concerning partnerships, and examines the justification of qualitative methods in studying these relationships. It also justifies the use of Participatory Action Research (PAR). Empirically-based studies of educator-researcher partnership relationships are rare despite investments in their implementation by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and others. Chapter 2 describes a qualitative research project in which participants in an NSF GK-12 fellowship program were studied using informal observations, focus groups, personal interviews, and journals to identify and characterize the cultural factors that influenced the relationships between the educators and researchers. These factors were organized into ten critical axes encompassing a range of attitudes, behaviors, or values defined by two stereotypical extremes. These axes were: (1) Task Dictates Context vs. Context Dictates Task; (2) Introspection vs. Extroversion; (3) Internal vs. External Source of Success; (4) Prior Planning vs. Implementation Flexibility; (5) Flexible vs. Rigid Time Sense; (6) Focused Time vs. Multi-tasking; (7) Specific Details vs. General Ideas; (8) Critical Feedback vs. Encouragement; (9) Short Procedural vs. Long Content Repetition; and (10) Methods vs. Outcomes are Well Defined. Another ten important stereotypical characteristics, which did not fit the structure of an axis, were identified and characterized. The educator stereotypes were: (1) Rapport/Empathy; (2) Like Kids; (3) People Management; (4) Communication Skills; and (5) Entertaining. The researcher stereotypes were: (1) Community Collaboration; (2) Focus Intensity; (3) Persistent; (4) Pattern Seekers; and (5) Curiosity/Skeptical. Chapter 3 summarizes the research presented in chapter 2 into a practical guide for participants and administrators of educator-researcher partnerships

  11. New Partnerships for EFA: Building on Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draxler, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    In 2007, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization-International Institute for Educational Planning (UNESCO-IIEP) and the World Economic Forum's Global Education Initiative launched a new program, "Partnerships for Education" (PfE), to create a global coalition for multi-stakeholder partnerships for education, including…

  12. A New Frontier for LIS Programs: E-Government Education, Library/Government Partnerships, and the Preparation of Future Information Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Paul T.; Bertot, John Carlo; Shuler, John A.; McGilvray, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the implications of the continued growth of e-government information, communication, and services for Library and Information Science programs in the United States in light of the development of e-government educational programs and library/government partnerships. The implementation of e-government raises several important…

  13. The Impact of Condom Use Negotiation Self-Efficacy and Partnership Patterns on Consistent Condom Use among College-Educated Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesoff, Elizabeth D.; Dunkle, Kristin; Lang, Delia

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to explore the impact of condom negotiation self-efficacy, interpersonal factors, and sensational factors on condom use behavior among a population of college-educated women with different patterns and types of sexual partner. We administered an online questionnaire capturing sexual behavior, partnership patterns, perceived…

  14. School-Parent-Community Partnerships: The Experience of Teachers Who Received the Queen Rania Award for Excellence in Education in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obeidat, Osamha M.; Al-Hassan, Suha M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine and understand the school-parents-community partnerships created by teachers who received the Queen Rania Award for Excellence in Education. This study analyzes the applications of the 28 teachers who received the Award in 2007 and addresses three questions: How do teachers who received the Queen Rania Award…

  15. Persistence, Partnership and Public Will: The Annie E. Casey Foundation's Investments in Kentucky School Reform. Principles for Effective Education Grantmaking. Case in Brief Number 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grantmakers for Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Persistence, Partnership and Public Will" explores the sustained role the Annie E. Casey Foundation played in Kentucky for more than a decade to help create an environment in which the state's ambitious and comprehensive effort to improve education for all of its students would have the time, resources and attention needed to prove its…

  16. SLICEIT and TAHMO Partnerships: Students Local and International Collaboration for Climate and Environmental Monitoring, Technology Development, Education, Adaptation and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aishlin, P. S.; Selker, J. S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate change understanding and impacts vary by community, yet the global nature of climate change requires international collaboration to address education, monitoring, adaptation and mitigation needs. We propose that effective climate change monitoring and education can be accomplished via student-led local and international community partnerships. By empowering students as community leaders in climate-environmental monitoring and education, as well as exploration of adaptation/mitigation needs, well-informed communities and young leadership are developed to support climate change science moving forward. Piloted 2013-2015, the SLICEIT1 program partnered with TAHMO2 to connect student leaders in North America, Europe and Africa. At the international level, schools in the U.S.A and Netherlands were partnered with schools in Ghana, Kenya, and Uganda for science and cultural exchange. Each school was equipped with a climate or other environmental sensing system, real-time data publication and curricula for both formal and informal science, technology, engineering and math education and skill development. African counterparts in TAHMO's School-2-School program collect critically important data for enhanced on-the-ground monitoring of weather conditions in data-scarce regions of Africa. In Idaho, student designed, constructed and installed weather stations provide real time data for classroom and community use. Student-designed formal educational activities are disseminated to project partners, increasing hands-on technology education and peer-based learning. At the local level, schools are partnered with a local agency, research institute, nonprofit organization, industry and/or community partner that supplies a climate science expert mentor to SLICEIT program leaders and teachers. Mentor engagement is facilitated and secured by program components that directly benefit the mentor's organization and local community via climate/environment monitoring, student workforce

  17. An assessment of partnerships between technical vocational education and training and its stakeholders in the development of Ethiopian SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killian MUNZWA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the Ethiopian Technical, Vocational Education and Training (TVET in terms of policy, strategies, curriculum, implementation, practice and challenges faced on the ground by both the TVET program and the nation in meeting the skills needs of industry and human capital development in general as enunciated in the goals of ESDP III, (Ministry of Education, 2005. In doing this the paper reviews the skills needs of industry against the capacity of the institutions of higher education’s capacity to meet these needs. It is in this context that the appropriateness of the curriculum and its implementation in respect of the TVET goals is scrutinized (Ministry of Education, 2008. Furthermore, government policies and strategies in the identification and selection of appropriate candidates for the TVET program and the incorporation of stakeholders are examined. In this assessment issues of collaboration by stakeholders in the provision of training resources and facilities are assessed, especially financing and human resource requirements in respect of staffing levels and requisite technical skills and supportive equipment and other resources. Policies and organizational structures in the identification, mobilization and distribution of such resources are also examined. To this end any opportunities that may exist for the retention and further training of the TVET graduates already employed by the industry are also reviewed. An important aspect of this evaluation is to identify and understand the kind of relationships and partnerships that exist between the TVET colleges, and government. Similarly an assessment is done concerning curriculum implementation, practice and delivery.

  18. Unequal Partnerships in Higher Education: Pedagogic Innovations in an Electronics within Physics Degree Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena Taras

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This cross-European research partnership reports on supporting pro-active learning and teaching. The two-part project firstly explored student beliefs about electronics within a physics degree and secondly, the use of peer assessment of a Mathematica notebook to develop understandings of standards and quality. Student beliefs were explored because of the negative perceptions tutors thought students brought to the Engineering course within the Physics degree. The results showed that tutors’ fears were unfounded and that the students were highly motivated. Secondly, through peer assessment of a notebook, students developed critical understandings of standards and quality. Generally, students valued the content support and appreciated both the work of their peer and how this helped their own understanding.

  19. 34 CFR 692.1 - What is the Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... institutions of higher education and have substantial financial need. The work-study assistance is provided through campus-based community service work learning study programs, hereinafter referred to as community... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Leveraging Educational Assistance...

  20. Over-Education and Assortative Matching in Partnerships: A Theoretical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tampieri, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues that assortative matching may explain over-education. Education determines individuals' income and, due to the presence of assortative matching, the quality of partners in personal, social and working life. Thus, an individual acquires education to improve the expected partners' quality. However, since every individual of the…

  1. Third-Generation Partnerships for P-16 Pipelines and Cradle-through-Career Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Hal A.

    2013-01-01

    Amid unprecedented novelty, complexity, turbulence, and conflict, it is apparent that a new education system is needed. Focused on a new outcome--postsecondary education completion with advanced competence--heretofore separate systems for early childhood, K-12 schools, and postsecondary education are being joined in P-16 pipelines and…

  2. Collaboration, Partnerships and Alliances: Perspectives on Erasmus Mundus MA/Magistr in Special Education Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Ann Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    It has been argued that higher education has irreversibly changed over the past 15-20 years. University education has moved from an elite system to a mass system. The frontiers of higher education have expanded more rapidly than they have ever done before by extensively moving across geographical boundaries and accommodating different forms of…

  3. Building Partnerships Between Research Institutions, University Academic Departments, Local School Districts, and Private Enterprise to Advance K-12 Science Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Ganey-Curry, P.; Fennell, T.

    2003-12-01

    The University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) is engaged in six K-12 education and outreach programs, including two NSF-sponsored projects--GK-12: Linking Graduate Fellows with K-12 Students and Teachers and Cataclysms and Catastrophes--Texas Teachers in the Field, Adopt-a-School, Geoscience in the Classroom, and UT's Science and Engineering Apprenticeship Program. The GK-12 Program is central to UTIG's effort and links the six education projects together. While the specific objectives of each project differ, the broad goals of UTIG's education and outreach are to provide high-quality professional development for teachers, develop curriculum resources aligned with state and national education standards, and promote interaction between teachers, scientists, graduate students, and science educators. To achieve these goals, UTIG has forged funded partnerships with scientific colleagues at UT's Bureau of Economic Geology, Marine Science Institute and Department of Geological Sciences; science educators at UT's Charles A. Dana Center and in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction in the College of Education; teachers in six Texas independent school districts; and 4empowerment.com, a private education company that established the "Cyberways and Waterways" Web site to integrate technology and education through an environmentally-based curriculum. These partnerships have allowed UTIG to achieve far more than would have been possible through individual projects alone. Examples include the development of more than 30 inquiry-based activities, hosting workshops and a summer institute, and participation in local science fairs. UTIG has expanded the impact of its education and outreach and achieved broader dissemination of learning activities through 4empowerment's web-based programs, which reach ethnically diverse students in schools across Texas. These partnerships have also helped UTIG and 4empowerment to secure additional funding for other education

  4. Promoting synergistic research and education in genomics and bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jack Y; Yang, Mary Qu; Zhu, Mengxia Michelle; Arabnia, Hamid R; Deng, Youping

    2008-01-01

    Bioinformatics and Genomics are closely related disciplines that hold great promises for the advancement of research and development in complex biomedical systems, as well as public health, drug design, comparative genomics, personalized medicine and so on. Research and development in these two important areas are impacting the science and technology.High throughput sequencing and molecular imaging technologies marked the beginning of a new era for modern translational medicine and personalized healthcare. The impact of having the human sequence and personalized digital images in hand has also created tremendous demands of developing powerful supercomputing, statistical learning and artificial intelligence approaches to handle the massive bioinformatics and personalized healthcare data, which will obviously have a profound effect on how biomedical research will be conducted toward the improvement of human health and prolonging of human life in the future. The International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine (http://www.isibm.org) and its official journals, the International Journal of Functional Informatics and Personalized Medicine (http://www.inderscience.com/ijfipm) and the International Journal of Computational Biology and Drug Design (http://www.inderscience.com/ijcbdd) in collaboration with International Conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (Biocomp), touch tomorrow's bioinformatics and personalized medicine throughout today's efforts in promoting the research, education and awareness of the upcoming integrated inter/multidisciplinary field. The 2007 international conference on Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (BIOCOMP07) was held in Las Vegas, the United States of American on June 25-28, 2007. The conference attracted over 400 papers, covering broad research areas in the genomics, biomedicine and bioinformatics. The Biocomp 2007 provides a common platform for the cross fertilization of ideas, and to help shape knowledge and

  5. The Discourse of Partnership and the Reality of Reform: Interrogating the Recent Reform Agenda at Initial Teacher Education and Induction Levels in Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Harford

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, teacher education in Ireland has experienced radical reconceptualization and restructuring at both initial teacher education [ITE] and induction levels, with reform of continuous professional development now in the planning phase. The establishment of the Teaching Council (2006 as a statutory, regulatory body, with a role in the review and accreditation of teacher education, increased the visibility of and policy focus on teacher education. Significant reform of initial teacher education was announced in 2011 that included both an extension of the duration of programmes and, most notably, the period the student teachers were to be engaged in school-based professional development. This increased period has been accompanied by a shift in the understanding of what is involved in practicum and implies a redefinition of the respective roles of the university and the school, and the development of a new form of partnership between both agencies. The period of induction and probation has also become an area of reform with an emphasis on school-based coaching and the evaluation of newly qualified teachers, which devolves decisions on teachers’ full recognition and membership of the profession, to principals and colleagues. This shift, which changes the established approach to induction for primary level teachers, has resulted in the withdrawal of cooperation with this policy by the main teacher union and to the implementation process being stymied. Both policy developments bring the concept of partnership within Irish education into sharp focus: a partnership between schools and universities in ITE, but also partnership in policy development and implementation in the case of induction.

  6. Articulaciones público-privada para la oferta educativa: encantamientos, sospechas, tensiones Public-private partnerships for provision of education: enchantments, suspicions, tensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Astorga

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available El tema de articulaciones público-privadas se ha extendido, especialmente en educación, con más discurso que prácticas. Entre los actores los desacuerdos superan todavía a las convergencias. La visión de lo público, como lo colectivo y no solo estatal, facilita las articulaciones al colocar a todos los actores como responsables, con roles particulares, insustituibles. En educación, bien público por excelencia, se abren caminos para una nueva cultura de diálogo entre actores del Estado, sector empresarial y sociedad civil. Es preciso disolver encantamientos y sospechas para afrontar las articulaciones, transparentando su dimensión política. La defensa de los derechos constituye el corazón de las articulaciones y la exigibilidad - que implica participación integral y permanente - su línea maestra. Este enfoque confiere a las articulaciones un carácter estratégico y posibilita encarnar los derechos en las grandes y cotidianas conquistas por la calidad-equidad en la educación.The theme of public-private partnerships, especially in education, has been disseminated much more through speeches than practice. Among players, disagreements far outnumber convergences. Seeing public as collective, not only state-owned, facilitates partnerships, since all players thus become responsible and are given particular, irreplaceable roles. In education, the common good par excellence, paths have been developed that allow for a new dialog culture among the State, entrepreneurs and the civil society. Enchantments and suspicions must be allayed to deal with these partnerships and reveal their political dimension. Defending rights is at the heart of such partnerships and enforceability - which implies total and permanent participation - is their master line. Such focus endows these partnerships with a strategic feature and allows to insert rights among the important, daily conquests towards quality-equity in education.

  7. Value-Added Clinical Systems Learning Roles for Medical Students That Transform Education and Health: A Guide for Building Partnerships Between Medical Schools and Health Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Jed D; Lucey, Catherine; Wolpaw, Terry; Chang, Anna

    2017-05-01

    To ensure physician readiness for practice and leadership in changing health systems, an emerging three-pillar framework for undergraduate medical education integrates the biomedical and clinical sciences with health systems science, which includes population health, health care policy, and interprofessional teamwork. However, the partnerships between medical schools and health systems that are commonplace today use health systems as a substrate for learning. Educators need to transform the relationship between medical schools and health systems. One opportunity is the design of authentic workplace roles for medical students to add relevance to medical education and patient care. Based on the experiences at two U.S. medical schools, the authors describe principles and strategies for meaningful medical school-health system partnerships to engage students in value-added clinical systems learning roles. In 2013, the schools began large-scale efforts to develop novel required longitudinal, authentic health systems science curricula in classrooms and workplaces for all first-year students. In designing the new medical school-health system partnerships, the authors combined two models in an intersecting manner-Kotter's change management and Kern's curriculum development steps. Mapped to this framework, they recommend strategies for building mutually beneficial medical school-health system partnerships, including developing a shared vision and strategy and identifying learning goals and objectives; empowering broad-based action and overcoming barriers in implementation; and generating short-term wins in implementation. Applying this framework can lead to value-added clinical systems learning roles for students, meaningful medical school-health system partnerships, and a generation of future physicians prepared to lead health systems change.

  8. A Science-Faith Partnership to Provide Education and Facilitate Action on Climate Change and Energy Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervenec, J. M.; Hitzhusen, G.; Ward, S.; Foster, C.

    2014-12-01

    In 2009, the Byrd Polar Research Center (BPRC) and Ohio Interfaith Power and Light (OhIPL) collaborated on a climate change education summit for scientists and clergy. Since that first program, a robust partnership has been nurtured where researchers at the center regularly contribute to events within the faith community. In 2014 alone, BPRC supported OhIPL in hosting a Teach-In event on climate change before a live audience that was simultaneously broadcast to three remote sites across Ohio; a State of the Climate event at the Ohio Statehouse that featured presentations by a scientist, a policymaker, and a member of the faith community; and an Earthkeeping Summit to bring together members of the faith community from across Ohio. OhIPL has helped BPRC fulfill one of our mission objectives of communicating science to a broad community. OhIPL engages houses of worship of all denominations through faith and education with a goal of moving them towards actions that reduce energy consumption. Houses of worship take actions for various reasons - including creation care, concerns of social justice related to climate change, or a desire to save money through building efficiency.

  9. The Woods Hole Partnership Education Program: Increasing Diversity in the Ocean and Environmental Sciences in One Influential Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jearld, A.

    2011-12-01

    To increase diversity in one influential science community, a consortium of public and private institutions created the Woods Hole Partnership Education Program, or PEP, in 2008. Participating institutions are the Marine Biological Laboratory, Northeast Fisheries Science Center of NOAA's Fisheries Service, Sea Education Association, U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, the Woods Hole Research Center, and University of Maryland Eastern Shore. Aimed at college juniors and seniors with some course work in marine and/or environmental sciences, PEP is a four-week course and a six-to-eight-week individual research project under the guidance of a research mentor. Forty-six students have participated to date. Investigators from the science institutions serve as course faculty and research mentors. We listened to experts regarding critical mass, mentoring, adequate support, network recruitment, and then built a program based on those features. Three years in we have a program that works and that has its own model for choosing applicants and for matching with mentors. We continue fine-tuning our match process, enhancing mentoring skills, preparing our students for a variety of lab cultures, and setting expectations high while remaining supportive. Our challenges now are to keep at it, using leverage instead of capacity to make a difference. Collaboration, not competition, is key since a rising tide floats all boats.

  10. Pathways into childlessness: the impact of education, work history and partnership history on remaining childless

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer, R.

    2008-01-01

    Childlessness has received a great deal of media attention in recent years.Most attention has been paid to the relationship between education,work and having children.Other dimensions have been largely neglected.This study focuses on relationship histories alongside issues such as education and empl

  11. Perfecting the Partnership: Revitalising the Maori Language in New Zealand Education and Society 1987-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benton, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper looks at aspects of Maori language revitalisation since the passage of the Maori Language Act, 1987 which gave official status to the language. It is a sequel to an article on Maori language in education published in this journal the following year [Benton, R. A. (1988). "The Maori language in New Zealand education."…

  12. Coaching to Quality: Increasing Quality in Early Care and Education Programmes through Community-University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Jaesook Lee; Harte, Helene Arbouet

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes efforts to increase the quality in early care and education through targeted coaching. A collaborative including several community agencies and a university developed a framework of support for early care and education providers, using coaching as its foundational basis, called Coaching to Quality (CTQ). This paper provides a…

  13. The U.S. Partnership for Education for Sustainable Development: Progress and Challenges Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Debra; Gentile, Susan Jane; Clevey, Lilah

    2015-01-01

    There has been substantial growth in Education for Sustainability (EfS) in the United States over the past 10 years. Efforts within higher education have created thousands of new programs, majors, minors, specializations, certificates, and across-the-curricula integrations of sustainability learning with an emphasis on real-world problem-solving…

  14. Teacher-Parent Partnership: An Authentic Teacher Education Model to Improve Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mary M.; Mereoiu, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript describes a statewide initiative to implement a training model for educators and parents of children with disabilities in more than 90 public school districts and 20 higher education institutions. The proposed model was designed to facilitate positive changes among families, teachers and administrators by increasing their…

  15. Evolving Partnerships: The Role of NGOs in Basic Education in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller-Grandvaux, Yolande; Welmond, Michel; Wolf, Joy

    During the last decade non-governmental organizations (NGOs) have been increasingly called upon to implement development programs. The question is no longer whether NGOs should play a role in the education sector, but how NGOs are most likely to fulfill their promise to improve the quality, equity, accountability, and pertinence of education in…

  16. The U.S. Partnership for Education for Sustainable Development: Progress and Challenges Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Debra; Gentile, Susan Jane; Clevey, Lilah

    2015-01-01

    There has been substantial growth in Education for Sustainability (EfS) in the United States over the past 10 years. Efforts within higher education have created thousands of new programs, majors, minors, specializations, certificates, and across-the-curricula integrations of sustainability learning with an emphasis on real-world problem-solving…

  17. Developing educational leaders: A partnership between two universities to bring about system-wide change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraiya R Naicker

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated a system-wide change strategy in a South African school district, which sought to build the leadership capacity of principals and district officials to improve instruction. The three-year venture was called the Leadership for Learning Programme (LLP. A distinctive feature of the LLP was that it was based on a partnership between two universities, a local one with understanding of the local context of schools, and an international institution, which brought international expertise, experience and repute/branding. Both universities had a shared vision to contribute to the ailing South African school landscape by using leadership development to leverage change. The LLP was implemented in a single school district, where the overall learner performance was unsatisfactory. A qualitative approach was used to research this change intervention. One of the main findings was that collaboration between principals collectively and district officials, as well as among principals, was lacking. It is recommended that collaborative structures such as professional learning communities, networks and teams are established to reduce isolation and fragmented work practices in the school district. This may speed up system-wide change towards improved learner performance.

  18. Academe-Industry Partnership: Basis for Enhanced Learning Guide in the New Science General Education Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alma D. Agero

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the academe-industry partnership of Cebu Technological University Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management and Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology major in Food Preparation and Services courses, SY 2014-2015 to improve the quality of course offering. It takes on the feedback received from supervisors of 50 different hotels and restaurants of Cebu province, as well as the self-rating of 185 OJTs of the two courses as regard to OJTs' level of functional and science-based core competencies. This descriptive research utilizes Likert-type research-made survey questionnaire which was previously tested for validity and reliability. The findings revealed that industry supervisors evaluated the trainees as Competent in core competencies (Bartending, Bread and pastry products, Cookery, Customer services, Front office services, food and beverages as well as functional skills (Problem solving, Leadership, Communication, Independent work, Creativity, Negotiation, Teamwork, Time management and Initiative. However, they found the students need of strengthening their problem solving and communication skills. The researchers therefore developed an enhanced learning guide for the New Science GE course to address the gaps based on the industry feedback.

  19. University-school partnerships for social justice in mathematics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University-school partnerships for social justice in mathematics and science education: the case ... My purpose in this paper is to situate a university-school mathematics and science education partnership within a social justice ... Article Metrics.

  20. The Four R's in the Educational Partnership: Roles, Relationships, Responsibilities, and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Lee

    1972-01-01

    Presents text of a speech presented at five of eight 2-day regional forums which identifies and clarifies the roles, responsibilities, resources, and relationships of a consortia of individuals from government, labor, education, and industry. (Editor/SB)

  1. Healthcare management-training and education in the genomic era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betta, Michela; Clulow, Val

    2005-01-01

    Increasingly the rapid developments by scientists working in the new business sector of biotechnology are being thrust into mainstream news reports. The incredible pace of the creation of neo-knowledge recently leads us to believe there has not been enough time between events for the healthcare sector, the general public, the legislators or the ethicists to reflect and conduct the checks and balances required for thoughtful progress. The decline of the hospital and the emergence of the laboratory as a consequence of the advent of the genomic era signal a profound shift, which will have unprecedented impacts on professionals in the healthcare system and its repercussions will force explicit changes in their education.

  2. (Congressional Add) Partnership in Innovative Preparation for Educators and Students (PIPES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    Kxajcik, J. S. (2005). Designing Educative Curriculum Materials to Promote Teacher Learning. Educational Researcher, 34(3), 3-14. Driver, R., Guesne, E...to tinker and experiment? Join this workshop and use common household materials to construct a race car powered by the kinetic energy stored in a...enjoyed the robotics." • "The most interesting was the field trip to the composting farm. He told us all about the "farming" and the mycelium . He was

  3. NAPLAN and the Role of Edu-Business: New Governance, New Privatisations and New Partnerships in Australian Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a critical analysis of the edu-businesses currently working in partnership with the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority to deliver the Commonwealth government policy initiative of the National Assessment Program--Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN). These emerging public--private partnerships (PPPs) exemplify…

  4. An alternative approach to teacher education courses framed by a collaborte partnership setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pontoppidan, Birgitte Schou

    2010-01-01

    The focus of the study is a teacher education course design which offers the opportunity for first year student teachers to move between schools and college in an iterative process in an attempt to enhance the students' development of teacherknowledge(PCK).The collaboration with the partnershipsc......The focus of the study is a teacher education course design which offers the opportunity for first year student teachers to move between schools and college in an iterative process in an attempt to enhance the students' development of teacherknowledge(PCK).The collaboration...

  5. Shared Skies Partnership: A Dual-Site All-Sky Live Remote Observing Initiative for Research and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielkopf, John F.; Hart, R.; Carter, B.; Collins, K. A.; Brown, C.; Hay, J.; Hons, A.; Marsden, S.

    2014-01-01

    The University of Southern Queensland's Mt. Kent Observatory in Queensland, Australia, and the University of Louisville's Moore Observatory in Kentucky, USA, are collaborating in the development of live remote observing for research, student training, and education. With a focus on flexible operation assisted by semi-autonomous controllers, rather than completely robotic data acquisition, the partnership provides interactive hands-on experience to students at all levels, optimized performance based on real-time observations, and flexible scheduling for transient events and targets of opportunity. Two sites on opposites sides of the globe cover the entire sky, and for equatorial regions allow nearly continuous coverage. The facilites include 0.5-m corrected Dall-Kirkham (CDK) telescopes at both sites, a 0.6 m Ritchie-Chretien telescope at Moore, and a new Nasmyth design 0.7-meter CDK at Mt. Kent instrumented for milli-magnitude precision photometry and wide field imaging, with spectrographs under development. We will describe the operational and data acquisition software, recent research results, and how remote access is being made available to students and observers.

  6. Poverty, Power, and Partnerships in Educational Development: A Post-Victimology Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppers, Catherine A. Odora

    2001-01-01

    Argues that five decades of international development assistance have prevented the people of Africa from achieving post-colonial self-reliance. Stresses that cuts in economic, social, and educational opportunity are reducing the quality of life. Concludes that aid inspired capacity building initiatives have undermined essential routines and…

  7. Culturally appropriate environmental education: an example of a partnership with the Hmong American community

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Bengston; Michele A. Schermann; Foung Hawj; MaiKia. Moua

    2012-01-01

    Society's increasing diversity poses many challenges to environmental educators. Numerous barriers and constraints to ethnic minority communities' environmental literacy and engagement in nature-based activities have been identified, including lack of outreach, discrimination or the perceived potential for discrimination, cultural differences, economic...

  8. Public-Private Partnership in Education: A Ray of Hope for Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Sehba

    2013-01-01

    Pakistani children and education face continuous challenges as a result of human callousness and natural forces. These ordeals are more extreme than in many other parts of the world; however, the disadvantages do not end there. An additional, less explored, issue is the effect of class distinction in the Pakistan school system. The majority of…

  9. 78 FR 34313 - Funding Opportunity Title: Risk Management Education Partnerships Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... agribusiness leaders in the RMA Region. This will include: (a) reviewing and approving in advance all producer and agribusiness leader educational activities; (b) advising the project leader on technical issues... producers and agribusiness leaders in the designated RMA Region of training and informational...

  10. Exceptional Educators: A Collaborative Training Partnership for the Inclusion of Students with Down's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Michelle; Henderson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the results of a teacher training initiative in the United States. "Exceptional Educators" is the result of an inter-organisational collaboration between a community-based organisation (Gold Coast Down Syndrome Organization), the local public school system and a university professor. The training focuses on three…

  11. Neuroscience and Education: At Best a Civil Partnership: A Response to Schrag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    In this response, I agree with much of what Schrag says about the principled limits of neuroscience to inform educators' decisions about approaches to learning. However, I also raise questions about the extent to which discoveries about "deficits" in brain function could possibly help teachers. I dispute Schrag's view that externalism/internalism…

  12. 77 FR 31592 - Applications for New Awards; State-Tribal Education Partnership (STEP) Pilot Grant Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-29

    ... college- and career-ready; and (2) address the unique educational and cultural needs of the students. (f... managing project activities and resources, including lines of authority and procedures for decision-making... maximizing the effectiveness of project services. Quality of the Management Plan and Personnel (20...

  13. Why Collaborate? The Differing Reasons for Secondary School Educators' Establishment of School-Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hands, Catherine M.

    2010-01-01

    This article clarifies the reasons underlying educators' cultivation of community involvement in their schools and highlights the role that social capital plays and the benefits of partnering. In this qualitative case study, documents, observations, and 25 interviews with head teachers, teachers, and community partners at 2 Ontario secondary…

  14. The Art Association/Higher Education Partnership: Implementing Residential Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charland, William

    2006-01-01

    In-service professional development in education began informally in the early nineteenth-century as a means of disseminating classroom management techniques, specifically addressing ways in which corporal punishment could be delivered to a child without inflicting serious injury. This initial effort paralleled a concern regarding children's…

  15. CIM (Computer Integrated Manufacturing) in Higher Education: A Partnership with IBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Hans A.; Allen, John

    1992-01-01

    Discusses Illinois Valley Community College's selection as 1 of 48 community colleges operating technology transfer and demonstration centers for computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) in the IBM-CIM in Higher Education Alliance. Reviews local industry involvement, curriculum development, faculty training, deliverables, and the prognosis for the…

  16. Mixed parents, mixed results : Testing the effects of cross-nativity partnership on children's educational attainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonds, Viktor; van Tubergen, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we have used panel data from the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Survey (N = 3,337) to test several mechanisms (English proficiency, friends with native parents, parental socioeconomic status [SES], educational attitudes, bilingualism, and family stability) by which mixed

  17. Creating Expansive Learning Opportunities in Schools: The Role of School Leaders in Initial Teacher Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Alaster Scott

    2012-01-01

    This article analyses the learning opportunities afforded pre-service teachers when participating in a primary school placement in London, England as part of their university teacher education course. Cultural historical activity theory is used as a theoretical framework to address how pre-service teacher learning opportunities are constructed.…

  18. Africa and China Higher Education Cooperation: Establishing Knowledge Sharing Partnership between Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonondo, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge sharing should not be confused neither with data sharing nor with information sharing; the knowledge sharing includes data and information sharing, skills and expertise communication, ideas exchange. Since the fourth FOCAC held in Egypt in 2009, many policies have been added to reinforce Africa and China educational cooperation,…

  19. Neuroscience and Education: At Best a Civil Partnership: A Response to Schrag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    In this response, I agree with much of what Schrag says about the principled limits of neuroscience to inform educators' decisions about approaches to learning. However, I also raise questions about the extent to which discoveries about "deficits" in brain function could possibly help teachers. I dispute Schrag's view that externalism/internalism…

  20. Business-School Cooperatives: Meeting Educational Needs. Bar/School Partnership Programs Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Elenor

    Business-school cooperatives are a potential solution to the need of students and educators to learn more about business, its functions in U.S. society, and the need of businesses to have a future workforce ready to face the challenges of an increasingly more complicated and highly technical work atmosphere. Such cooperatives, which are an…

  1. Learning through South-South Development: Cuban-African Partnerships in Sport and Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darnell, Simon C.; Huish, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Since the 1990s, Cuba has offered scholarships to students from low-resource countries to attend the Escuela Internacional de Educación Física y Deporte (EIEFD) for a six-year degree in sport, physical education, and coaching. Drawing on the experiences of EIEFD graduates from four Southern African countries (Zambia, South Africa, Mozambique, and…

  2. Lost in Translation: Partnerships for Authentic Education in Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Juliana Mohok

    2011-01-01

    Pacific Island countries are recipients of considerable education reform projects, many of which are sponsored by various global donor agencies. These agencies have become partners for development in the region. Research cautions that development projects may have detrimental influences as their designs and delivery often ignore the economic,…

  3. [The National Institute for Nano-Engineering : a public-private partnership for research, education, and innovation].

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinnett, Regan White

    2010-10-01

    The National Institute for Nano-Engineering (NINE) is a government/university/industry collaboration formed to help develop the next generation of nano-engineering innovation leaders for the United States. NINE involves students in large scale multi-disciplinary research projects focused on developing nano-enabled solutions to important national problems. The NINE program is based on the growing understanding that science and engineering education and innovation can be strengthened by involvement of university students and faculty with the world-class capabilities and facilities of government laboratories supplemented by guidance and support from industry collaborators. A number of recent reports have highlighted global competitiveness issues that the Unites States faces in the coming decades. Technology innovation, the ability to progress from emerging technologies to products that change the way people live, is a key to global leadership and economic prosperity for nations and their people. One of the top technology and economic drivers for the coming decades will the spectrum of emerging capabilities that fall into the category of nanotechnologies. NINE was established as a national innovation hub in the exciting and rapidly developing field of nano-engineering. It is intended to be a model of a novel partnership between universities and companies throughout the nation and the Department of Energy, with Sandia National Laboratories as the host lab for NINE. Successful technology innovation requires the integration of technical research and development with additional expertise from other areas including manufacturing, business, marketing, intellectual property, and the interface between technology and society. NINE was created to address this need for a new integrated approach to science and engineering research, education and innovation in a way that takes advantage of the nation's investment in facilities and capabilities at the national laboratories.

  4. Health and education: service providers in partnership to improve mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eapen Valsamma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children and adolescents from complex or disadvantaged backgrounds and multiple needs often are reluctant to seek help and this is particularly relevant in the context of mental health difficulties. Further, the complexity of the health system can be overwhelming to the family who are likely to be chaotic and less able to seek help. The current project piloted an integrated service delivery model involving a child psychiatry service and the department of education to promote access to mental health assessment and intervention to young people attending special education schools in Sydney, Australia. Findings and conclusion The project allowed improved access to mental health services for a group of young people who would otherwise not have sought help through traditional referral pathways. Our findings support strategies to promote the social milieu of schools as a way of achieving better mental health and learning outcomes.

  5. Empaty as a human value in modern education; Partnership in teaching - a base for student development

    OpenAIRE

    Mirascieva, Snezana; Petrova Gjorgjeva, Emilija

    2010-01-01

    Empathy is developed as a form of self-consciousness - the better we know our own emotions, the better we will read other people's feelings. The students who are more skilled in reading feelings in a non-verbal manner are better accepted in school and emotionally most stable. That is why we think that confidence is the foundation of every real, humane and interpersonal relationship. Confidence between teachers and students, their parents and other subjects in the educational process will ...

  6. Developing Elementary Science PCK for Teacher Education: Lessons Learned from a Second Grade Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Leslie U.; Wilson, Rachel E.; Brookshire, Laura E.

    2017-06-01

    In this self-study, two science educators partnered with two elementary teachers to plan, implement, and reflect on a unit taught in second grade classrooms that integrated science and language arts. The researchers hoped to increase their pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) for elementary science teaching so that they might use their experiences working in an elementary context to modify their practices in their elementary science method instruction. The research question guiding the study was: What aspects of our PCK for elementary science teaching do we as science educators develop by co-planning, co-teaching, and reflecting with second grade teachers? Data include transcripts of planning meetings, oral reflections about the experience, and videos of the unit being enacted. Findings indicate that managing resources for science teaching, organizing students for science learning, and reflecting on science teaching were themes prevalent in the data. These themes were linked to the model of PCK developed by Park and Oliver (Research in Science Education, 38, 261-284, 2008) and demonstrate that we developed PCK for elementary science teaching in several areas. In our discussion, we include several proposed changes for our elementary science methods course based on the outcomes of the study.

  7. Teaching strategies to incorporate genomics education into academic nursing curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo Garcia, Sylvia P; Greco, Karen E; Loescher, Lois J

    2011-11-01

    The translation of genomic science into health care has expanded our ability to understand the effects of genomics on human health and disease. As genomic advances continue, nurses are expected to have the knowledge and skills to translate genomic information into improved patient care. This integrative review describes strategies used to teach genomics in academic nursing programs and their facilitators and barriers to inclusion in nursing curricula. The Learning Engagement Model and the Diffusion of Innovations Theory guided the interpretation of findings. CINAHL, Medline, and Web of Science were resources for articles published during the past decade that included strategies for teaching genomics in academic nursing programs. Of 135 articles, 13 met criteria for review. Examples of effective genomics teaching strategies included clinical application through case studies, storytelling, online genomics resources, student self-assessment, guest lecturers, and a genetics focus group. Most strategies were not evaluated for effectiveness.

  8. Genomics Education in Practice: Evaluation of a Mobile Lab Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Mil, Marc H. W.; Boerwinkel, Dirk Jan; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Speksnijder, Annelies; Waarlo, Arend Jan

    2010-01-01

    Dutch genomics research centers have developed the "DNA labs on the road" to bridge the gap between modern genomics research practice and secondary-school curriculum in the Netherlands. These mobile DNA labs offer upper-secondary students the opportunity to experience genomics research through experiments with laboratory equipment that…

  9. Faith-based partnerships in graduate medical education: the experience of the Morehouse School of Medicine Public Health/Preventive Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Beverly D; Buckner, Ayanna V; Walker, Carla Durham; Blumenthal, Daniel S

    2011-10-01

    Faith-based organizations can be strategic partners in addressing the needs of low-income and underserved individuals and communities. The Morehouse School of Medicine (MSM) Public Health/Preventive Medicine Residency Program (PH/PMR) collaborates with faith-based organizations for the purpose of resident education, community engagement, and service. These partners provide guidance for the program's community initiatives and health promotion activities designed to address health inequities. Residents complete a longitudinal community practicum experience with a faith-based organization over the 2-year training period. Residents conduct a community health needs assessment at the organization and design a health intervention that addresses the identified needs. The faith-based community practicum also serves as a vehicle for achieving skills in all eight domains of the Public Health Competencies developed by the Council on Linkages and all six Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Core Competencies. The MSM PH/PMR Program has engaged in faith-based partnerships for 7 years. This article discusses the structure of these partnerships, how partners are identified, funding sources for supporting resident projects, and examples of resident health needs assessment and intervention activities. The MSM PH/PMR Program may serve as a model to other residency and fellowship programs that may have an interest in developing partnerships with faith-based organizations.

  10. Agricultural Technology--A Real Industry-Education Partnership [and] John Deere Ag Tech in New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, Paul J.; Ginsburg, Alan

    1995-01-01

    Bamford describes the partnership between John Deere and colleges in the United States and Canada to train technicians in the latest agricultural technology. Ginsburg discusses the John Deere Agricultural Technology program at State University of New York-Cobleskill. (JOW)

  11. Climate Change Community Outreach Initiative (CCCOI)--A Gulf of Mexico Education Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, S. H.; Stone, D.; Schultz, T.; LeBlanc, T.; Miller-Way, T.; Estrada, P.

    2012-12-01

    This five-year, Gulf of Mexico regional collaborative is funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-Office of Education and represents a successful grant submitted by the FL Aquarium as a member of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA). This climate change effort focuses on enhanced content knowledge and the manner in which personal actions and behaviors contribute to sustainability and stewardship. Diverse audiences—represented by visitors at the informal centers listed above—have been and are involved in the following activities: social networking via responses to climate change surveys; an "ocean and climate change defender" computer game, specifically designed for this project; an average of 10 annual outreach events implemented by these facilities at community festivals; climate change lectures provided to family audiences; and professional development workshops for informal and formal educators. This presentation will provide opportunities and challenges encountered during the first two years of implementation. This regional effort is also aligned with both the Ocean Literacy: Essential Principles and the Climate Literacy: Essential Principles. Additional partners include: Normandeau Associates, Conservation Enterprises, Unlimited, and Mindclay Creative.

  12. PolarTREC-Celebrating the Legacy of the IPY Through Researcher-Educator Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, K.; Warburton, J.; Larson, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    Polar TREC-Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating, a three-year (2007-2009) NSF-funded program, has matched over 40 teachers with polar researchers working in multiple scientific disciplines for 2-8 week Teacher Research Experiences (TRE) in the Arctic and Antarctica during the IPY. PolarTREC contributes to the legacy of the IPY through the creation and dissemination of polar education resources, prolonged teacher-researcher relationships, and contributions to scholarly knowledge on the impacts of TRE's. Products developed during PolarTREC are helping to sustain the widespread interest and enthusiasm in the polar regions generated during the IPY. During their expeditions, participating teachers brought science and information about profound changes at the poles to school, community, and professional audiences through web-based communications, journals, discussion forums, multimedia, and live events. PolarTREC teachers constructed nearly 100 classroom lesson plans and activities as products of their experiences. Live events from the field attracted over 11,000 participants, primarily K-12 students. Although the field experience is central to the PolarTREC TRE Model, many participants cite the relationship they built with their teacher/researcher as one of the best outcomes. Through personal communications, presentations at professional conferences, and continued support of each other’s work through classroom visits or joint proposal development, teachers and researchers have maintained the mutually beneficial relationships established during the IPY. Participating scientists gained access to professional educators with expertise in translating research approaches and results into programs. The need for researchers to explain their research and “boil it down to the raw essence” helped many see how their work fits into a bigger picture, often helping them communicate outside their scientific discipline and to diverse public audiences. Teachers, on

  13. A Partnership Approach to Promoting Information Literacy for Higher Education Researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Goldstein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The promotion of information literacy in the UK higher education research sector has traditionally been the preserve of academic libraries. However, other professional groups have obvious interests in this area, and there is a strong case for providing a framework which enables different parties with a stake in information literacy to work together in order to reach practical objectives. In the UK, a coalition of partners has been set up to provide this collective framework and to provide synergy. This paper sets out the rationale for this approach, sets out the sort of activities that the coalition has fostered since its inception in late 2009 and reflects on whether it might serve as an example for other parts of Europe or for transnational collaborations.

  14. The GLOBE/Madagascar Malaria Project: Creating Student/Educator/Scientist Partnerships With Regional Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, D.; Boger, R.; Rafalimanana, A.

    2006-05-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease spread by mosquitoes in the genus Anopheles. It causes more than 300,000,000 acute illnesses and more than one million deaths annually, including the death of one African child every 30 seconds. Recent epidemiological trends include increases in malaria mortality and the emergence of drug-resistant parasites. Some experts believe that predicted climate changes during the 21st century will bring malaria to areas where it is not now common. The GLOBE Program is currently collaborating with students, educators, scientists, health department officials, and government officials in Madagascar to develop a program that combines existing GLOBE protocols for measuring atmospheric and water quality parameters with a new protocol for collecting and identifying mosquito larvae at the genus (Anopheles and non-Anopheles) level. There are dozens of Anopheles species and sub-species that are adapted to a wide range of micro-environmental conditions encountered in Madagascar's variable climate. Local data collection is essential because mosquitoes typically spend their entire lives within a few kilometers of their breeding sites. The GLOBE Program provides an ideal framework for such a project because it offers a highly structured system for defining experiment protocols that ensure consistent procedures, a widely dispersed network of observing sites, and a centralized data collection and reporting system. Following a series of training activities in 2005, students in Madagascar are now beginning to collect data. Basic environmental parameters and first attempts at larvae collection and identification are presented. Results from this project can be used to increase public awareness of malaria, to provide new scientific data concerning environmental impacts on mosquito breeding, and to provide better information for guiding effective mitigation strategies. Problems encountered include difficulties in visiting and communicating with remote school sites

  15. 职业教育校企合作制度设计探析%Analysis of the Design of School-Enterprise Partnerships in Vocational Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓志虹

    2015-01-01

    以制度经济学的视角探究职业教育校企合作制度设计的内涵.针对"市场失效"问题,对于国民经济有重要意义的职业教育发展问题,作为提供"公共产品"、满足"公共利益"的政府,应在校企合作中起到主导作用.宏观层面上,校企合作制度设计应在政府主导下搭建框架与平台;中微观层面,在具体路径与实施上可借鉴世界银行项目管理的经验,政府采购校企合作项目;此外,还应发挥企业、职业院校的"双主体"作用.%This paper is intended to explore the implication of the design of school-enterprise partnerships in voca-tional education from the perspective of institutional economics. As the development of the vocational education is of significance to national economy, the government, part of whose functions is to provide pubic goods to meet pub-lic interests, shall play a leading role in the school-enterprise partnerships. At the macro level, the frameworks and platforms should be set up under government's guidance for the design of school-enterprise partnership;at the inter-mediate and micro levels, the government, by drawing the experience from the World Bank in project management in terms of specific paths and implementation, may procure for school-enterprise partnerships projects; moreover; it shall give play to the"double-player"role of enterprises and vocational schools.

  16. Inclusive Partnership: Enhancing Student Engagement in Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore-Cherry, Niamh; Healey, Ruth; Nicholson, Dawn T.; Andrews, Will

    2016-01-01

    Partnership is currently the focus of much work within higher education and advocated as an important process to address a range of higher education goals. In this paper, we propose the term "inclusive partnership" to conceptualise a non-selective staff-student relationship. While recognising the challenges of inclusive partnership…

  17. Education through Fiction: Acquiring Opinion-Forming Skills in the Context of Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knippels, Marie-Christine P. J.; Severiens, Sabine E.; Klop, Tanja

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the outcomes of a newly designed four-lesson science module on opinion-forming in the context of genomics in upper secondary education. The lesson plan aims to foster 16-year-old students' opinion-forming skills in the context of genomics and to test the effect of the use of fiction in the module. The basic hypothesis…

  18. Education through fiction: acquiring opinion-forming skills in the context of genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, M.C.P.J.; Severiens, S.E.; Klop, T.

    2009-01-01

    The present study examined the outcomes of a newly designed four-lesson science module on opinion-forming in the context of genomics in upper secondary education. The lesson plan aims to foster 16-year-old students’ opinion-forming skills in the context of genomics and to test the effect of the use

  19. Genomics Analogy Model for Educators (GAME): From Jumping Genes to Alternative Splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corn, Joanie; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Orvis, Kathryn S.

    2004-01-01

    Studies have shown that there is usually a lack of understanding concerning the fields of genetics and genomics among high school students (Lewis and Wood-Robinson, 2000). A recent article (Kirkpatrick et al, 2002) introduced the GAME (Genomics Analogy Model for Educators) model and two of its components: (1) explaining sequencing technology with…

  20. The Denali EarthScope Education Partnership: Creating Opportunities for Learning About Solid Earth Processes in Alaska and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, J. J.; Hansen, R. A.

    2003-12-01

    The Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, in partnership with Denali National Park and Preserve, has begun an education outreach program that will create learning opportunities in solid earth geophysics for a wide sector of the public. We will capitalize upon a unique coincidence of heightened public interest in earthquakes (due to the M 7.9 Denali Fault event of Nov. 3rd, 2002), the startup of the EarthScope experiment, and the construction of the Denali Science & Learning Center, a premiere facility for science education located just 43 miles from the epicenter of the Denali Fault earthquake. Real-time data and current research results from EarthScope installations and science projects in Alaska will be used to engage students and teachers, national park visitors, and the general public in a discovery process that will enhance public understanding of tectonics, seismicity and volcanism along the boundary between the Pacific and North American plates. Activities will take place in five program areas, which are: 1) museum displays and exhibits, 2) outreach via print publications and electronic media, 3) curriculum development to enhance K-12 earth science education, 4) teacher training to develop earth science expertise among K-12 educators, and 5) interaction between scientists and the public. In order to engage the over 1 million annual visitors to Denali, as well as people throughout Alaska, project activities will correspond with the opening of the Denali Science and Learning Center in 2004. An electronic interactive kiosk is being constructed to provide public access to real-time data from seismic and geodetic monitoring networks in Alaska, as well as cutting edge visualizations of solid earth processes. A series of print publications and a website providing access to real-time seismic and geodetic data will be developed for park visitors and the general public, highlighting EarthScope science in Alaska. A suite of curriculum modules

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okbay, Aysu; P. Beauchamp, Jonathan; Alan Fontana, Mark;

    2016-01-01

    -nucleotide polymorphisms associated with educational attainment are disproportionately found in genomic regions regulating gene expression in the fetal brain. Candidate genes are preferentially expressed in neural tissue, especially during the prenatal period, and enriched for biological pathways involved in neural...

  2. Partnerships - Nutrition / Health

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Judy Bland: School Nutrition Program Employees Impact the Lives of Children. Roxie Rodgers Dinstel: Extension/Food Bank Partnership Unites to Fill Funding Gap in Alaska. Karen Ensle: Should I Eat the Fish I Catch - An Outreach Project to Pregnant Women. Susan Hansen: Child Care Providers – An Untapped Audience. Vicki Hayman: State and County Based Educators Team Up to Participate in Adolescent Calcium Research Project. Susan Holladay: Healthy Eating, Healthy Living. Luanne J. Hughes: Designin...

  3. The Effect of Education with the partnership approach on the self-efficacy and self-esteem of family caregivers of patients undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (CABG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaie N

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Care of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG creates some concerns for family caregivers. Increasing the ability of caregivers as accompanies the patient is essential.The purpose of current study was to determine the effect of education with the partnership approach on the self-efficacy and self-esteem of family caregivers of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft. Materials and Method: In this clinical trial study 102 caregivers of the hospitalized patients in cardiac surgery ward in one Hospital in Tehran, 2011 were selected through convenience sampling and randomly allocated into two intervention and control groups of 51 people. For intervention group, 5 sessions educational program with partnership approach were conducted. Self-efficacy and self-esteem of caregivers were measured before and 8 weeks after intervention through using the researcher-made questionnaires. Data analysis was done through PASW 18 Statistics and using independent and paired t-test, chi-square and Fisher exact test. Results: In intervention group, the mean score of caregiver’s self-efficacy was significantly increased from (29.49 ± 3.89 to (47.43 ± 1.93 (P < 0/001. As well as the mean score of caregiver’s self-esteem was increased from (93.49 ± 6.03 to (126.13 ± 18.52 (P < 0/001. Also, the results of independent t-test showed the significant difference concerning the self-efficacy (p < 0.001 and self-esteem (p < 0.002 between two groups. Conclusion: Education of family caregivers of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft with a partnership approach can lead to improvement the caregivers’ self-efficacy and self-esteem and thus the increasing of their participation in efficient care. Therefore, application of this method is recommended in the educational process

  4. Cataclysms and Catastrophes: A Case Study of Improving K-12 Science Education Through a University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, T.; Ellins, K. K.; Morris, M.; Christeson, G.

    2003-12-01

    The K-12 science teacher is always seeking ways of improving and updating their curriculum by integrating the latest research into their most effective classroom activities. However, the daily demands of delivering instruction to large numbers of students coupled with the rapid advances in some fields of science can often overwhelm this effort. The NSF-sponsored Cataclysms and Catastrophes curriculum, developed by scientists from the The University of Texas at Austin Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) and Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), middle and high school teachers, and UT graduate students (NSF GK-12 fellows) working together through the GK-12 program, is a textbook example of how universities can facilitate this quest, benefiting education at both K-12 and university levels. In 1992, "The Great K-T Extinction Debate" was developed as an activity in the Planet Earth class at the Liberal Arts and Science Academy of Austin as an interdisciplinary approach to science. Taking advantage of the media attention generated by the impact scenario for the K-T extinction, the activity consists of students participating in a simulated senate hearing on the potential causes of the K-T extinction and their implications for society today. This activity not only exposes students to the wide range of science involved in understanding mass extinctions, but also to the social, political and economic implications when this science is brought into the public arena and the corresponding use of data in decision making and disaster preparedness. While "The Great K-T Extinction Debate" was always a popular and effective activity with students, it was in desperate need of updating to keep pace with the evolving scientific debate over the cause of the K-T extinction and the growing body of impact evidence discovered over the past decade. By adding two inquiry-based learning activities that use real geophysical data collected by scientists studying the buried Chicxulub feature as a

  5. Holy Grail or Poisoned Chalice? A Case Study of Partnership Collaboration between a University School of Education and a Private Sector Education Services Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Bill; Brown, Marie

    2000-01-01

    Reports on a case study of the set up and first year operations of the public-private partnership between the University of Manchester (UK) and Nord Anglia that delivered training for the National Professional Qualification for Headship. Reviews the partnership according to four factors and discusses the areas of conflict (time and language). (CMK)

  6. Multilevel Boundary Crossing in a Professional Development School Partnership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Sanne; Bruining, Ton

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to understand the recurrent challenges of professional development school (PDS) partnerships experienced by many countries. It does so by conceptualizing PDS partnerships as endeavors to cross institutionally and epistemologically developed boundaries between teacher education, schoo

  7. Genetic link between family socioeconomic status and children's educational achievement estimated from genome-wide SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapohl, E; Plomin, R

    2016-03-01

    One of the best predictors of children's educational achievement is their family's socioeconomic status (SES), but the degree to which this association is genetically mediated remains unclear. For 3000 UK-representative unrelated children we found that genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms could explain a third of the variance of scores on an age-16 UK national examination of educational achievement and half of the correlation between their scores and family SES. Moreover, genome-wide polygenic scores based on a previously published genome-wide association meta-analysis of total number of years in education accounted for ~3.0% variance in educational achievement and ~2.5% in family SES. This study provides the first molecular evidence for substantial genetic influence on differences in children's educational achievement and its association with family SES.

  8. Partnership Opportunities In Earth System Science Education Between Historically Black and Historically White Universities: Elizabeth City State University and the University of New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. E.; Hayden, L. B.; Wake, C. P.; Varner, R. K.; Graham, K.; Rock, B. N.; Hale, S.; Hurtt, G. C.; Porter, W.; Blackmon, R.; Bryce, J. G.; Branch, B. D.; Johnson, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Federal efforts to promote the participation of underrepresented students in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics disciplines (STEM) in higher education have been in effect over several decades. The Science and Engineering Equal Opportunities Act of 1980 aimed to create equal opportunity in the STEM disciplines by promoting and broadening the participation of underrepresented talent in science and engineering. Since that time, federal agencies such as the National Science Foundation, NOAA and NASA, scientific organizations such as the American Geophysical Union, and other organizations such as the Educational Testing Service have created programs, diversity plans and cutting edge reports designed to further explicate the need to broaden the participation of underrepresented student talent in these disciplines. Despite increases in the degrees awarded to underrepresented students in the STEM disciplines, enhancing diversity in these disciplines continues to remain a significant challenge. This paper describes a strategic approach to this challenge via the development of a collaborative partnership model between two universities: the historically black Elizabeth City State University (ESCU) and the historically white University of New Hampshire (UNH). The alliance, built on a mutually-agreed upon set of partnership principles, strives to enhance opportunities for underrepresented students to pursue careers in STEM disciplines, specifically those in Earth system science and remote sensing. In examining the partnership, six promising practices that help advance its success come to the forefront. These practices include institutional commitment and faculty engagement, mutual respect and shared time commitment, identifying engaged leadership, engaging critical change agents, initiating difficult dialogues, and preparing for growth and evolution. Outcomes of the partnership to date include the successful submission and funding of four collaborative

  9. Multicultural Learning Partnerships in The Cafe: Integrating ICT into Transnational Tertiary Education in Australia Using the Collaborative Application for Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josh Mccarthy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on using the Cafe: the Collaborative Application for Education as an online learning environment within the Facebook framework, for integrating international students into first year university in Australia. The Cafe, a new e-learning application, has been designed and developed not only to take advantage of Facebook's popularity and social qualities,but also to provide institutions with a dedicated e-learning environment that meets the needs of modern-day tertiary students and teaching staff. During two courses in 2013, 91 first year design students, including 24 international students participated within the e-learning environment in combination with traditional face-to-face classes. Students submitted work-in-progress imagery related to assignments, and provided critiques to their peers. The evaluation process of the e-learning application involved pre and post semester surveys providing participating students with the opportunity to critically reflect on the experience during the year. The findings of the study are discussed in light of the growing use of social media within learning and teaching in tertiary education, and the importance of providing first year students, particularly international students, with multiple means of communication with staff and peers.

  10. "Parents Don't Want Their Children to Speak Their Home Language": How Do Educators Negotiate Partnerships with Chinese Parents Regarding Their Children's Use of Home Language and English in Early Childhood Settings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangbo; Torr, Jane; Whiteman, Peter

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated five Australian early childhood educators' negotiation of the complex terrain of working in partnership with Chinese parents regarding their children's language usage in early childhood settings. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken to explore educators' views on children's language usage in early childhood settings,…

  11. Geosciences Student Recruitment Strategies at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB): Earth System Science/Community-Research Based Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambos, E. L.; Behl, R.; Whitney, D.; Rodrigue, C.; Wechsler, S.; Holk, G.; Lee, C.; Francis, R. D.; Larson, D.

    2005-12-01

    Collaborations among geoscience-oriented departments at California State University, Long Beach (Geological Sciences, as well as portions of the Geography and Anthropology departments and a new, fast-growing Environmental Sciences and Policy (ES&P) program) are characterized by attention to three important elements: (1) community-based partnerships and research, (2) outreach and continuity within educational pipeline transitions from high school, to community college, to university, and, (3) sharing of resources and expertise. Three specific collaborations, (1) creation of the ES&P, (2) the NSF-funded Geoscience Diversity Enhancement Program (GDEP), and, (3) the Institute for Interdisciplinary Research on Materials, Environment, and Societies (IIRMES), are powerful illustrations of how these collaborations can work to foster geoscience student recruitment and academic development, particularly at urban, highly diverse institutions with limited resources. Through a combination of student surveys, focus groups, and institutional research supported by the GDEP program, we know (e.g., Whitney et al., 2005) that non-Caucasian students often express less affinity for the geosciences as a focus of study than Caucasians. Early exposure to positive field and laboratory experiences, better understanding of geoscience career possibilities, and better advising at high school and college levels are all excellent strategies for heightening student interest and recruitment in the geosciences, yet appear to be lacking for many of the students in the greater Long Beach, California area. GDEP, ES&P, and IIRMES all challenge these lacunae by emphasizing hands-on learning, research on relevant community-based problems, and one-on-one or small group research, advising and mentoring. Our current challenge is to help our high-school and community-college colleagues adopt their own model of these active-learning strategies, thereby priming the pump and patching the pipe(line) for student

  12. Faculties of Education in Traditional Universities and Universities of the Third Age: A Partnership Model in Gerontagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Andre; Boutin, Gerald; Riendeau, Jean

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses "Universities of the Third Age", whose function is quite distinct from established universities' traditional role in teaching, research, and community services. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a model of partnership between traditional universities and Universities of the Third Age, ensuring better training…

  13. Perfect Partners or Uneasy Bedfellows? Competing Understandings of the Place of Business Management within Contemporary Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Charlotte; Armstrong, Paul; Bragg, Joanna; Pearson, Diana

    2013-01-01

    This article examines illustrative cases of partnerships from a government-funded programme of experimental projects in England designed to test out the potential of senior business managers to provide leadership across a group of schools. The article places the programme within the context of international public service reforms and, more…

  14. Online Teacher Education: A Formal-Informal Partnership between Brooklyn College and the American Museum of Natural History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miele, Eleanor; Shanley, Deborah; Steiner, Robert V.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of a partnership between Brooklyn College (BC) of the City University of New York (CUNY) and the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) that ultimately resulted in the formal incorporation of the museum's online Seminars on Science (SoS) courses into master's degree programs at Brooklyn College for teachers…

  15. Building Social Infrastructure through Public-Private Partnerships: The Case of Student Housing in Public Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Bruce Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Evaluations of Public-Private Partnership arrangements as alternatives to traditional government procurement methods for the delivery of public infrastructure projects have been anecdotal at best. This paper proposes a framework to evaluate a public university's infrastructure asset management performance and a specific measure based on a new…

  16. Perfect Partners or Uneasy Bedfellows? Competing Understandings of the Place of Business Management within Contemporary Education Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Charlotte; Armstrong, Paul; Bragg, Joanna; Pearson, Diana

    2013-01-01

    This article examines illustrative cases of partnerships from a government-funded programme of experimental projects in England designed to test out the potential of senior business managers to provide leadership across a group of schools. The article places the programme within the context of international public service reforms and, more…

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okbay, Aysu; Beauchamp, Jonathan P.; Fontana, Mark Alan; Lee, James J.; Pers, Tune H.; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Turley, Patrick; Chen, Guo-Bo; Emilsson, Valur; Meddens, S. Fleur W.; Oskarsson, Sven; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Thom, Kevin; Timshel, Pascal; de Vlaming, Ronald; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Bacelis, Jonas; Baumbach, Clemens; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Brandsma, Johannes H.; Concas, Maria Pina; Derringer, Jaime; Furlotte, Nicholas A.; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Girotto, Giorgia; Gupta, Richa; Hall, Leanne M.; Harris, Sarah E.; Hofer, Edith; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Kaasik, Kadri; Kalafati, Ioanna P.; Karlsson, Robert; Kong, Augustine; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J.; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Lind, Penelope A.; Lindgren, Karl-Oskar; Liu, Tian; Mangino, Massimo; Marten, Jonathan; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B.; van der Most, Peter J.; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Payton, Antony; Pervjakova, Natalia; Peyrot, Wouter J.; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rueedi, Rico; Salvi, Erika; Schmidt, Brge; Schraut, Katharina E.; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert V.; Poot, Raymond A.; St Pourcain, Beate; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Verweij, Niek; Vuckovic, Dragana; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jingyun; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Zhihong; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Boyle, Patricia A.; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Davies, Gail; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deloukas, Panos; Demuth, Ilja; Ding, Jun; Eibich, Peter; Eisele, Lewin; Eklund, Niina; Evans, David M.; Faul, Jessica D.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Forstner, Andreas J.; Gandin, Ilaria; Gunnarsson, Bjarni; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Homuth, Georg; Horan, Michael A.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Jager, Philip L.; Joshi, Peter K.; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika A.; Kahonen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Keltigangas-Jarvinen, Liisa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kroh, Martin; Kutalik, Zoltan; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J.; Lebreton, Mael P.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C. M.; Loukola, Anu; Madden, Pamela A.; Magi, Reedik; Maki-Opas, Tomi; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meddens, Gerardus A.; McMahon, George; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Milaneschi, Yusplitri; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Myhre, Ronny; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Ollier, William E. R.; Palotie, Aarno; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Petrovic, Katja E.; Porteous, David J.; Raikkonen, Katri; Ring, Susan M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rostapshova, Olga; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Rodney J.; Smith, Blair H.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Staessen, Jan A.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Strauch, Konstantin; Terracciano, Antonio; Tobin, Martin D.; Ulivi, Sheila; Vaccargiu, Simona; Quaye, Lydia; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Venturini, Cristina; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Volker, Uwe; Volzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M.; Waage, Johannes; Ware, Erin B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Attia, John R.; Bennett, David A.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Bisgaard, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bultmann, Ute; Chabris, Christopher F.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George V.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franke, Barbara; Franke, Lude; Gasparini, Paolo; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Grabe, Hans-Jorgen; Gratten, Jacob; Groenen, Patrick J. F.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Hinds, David A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hyppnen, Elina; Iacono, William G.; Jacobsson, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jockel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lehrer, Steven F.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Pendleton, Neil; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Perola, Markus; Pirastu, Nicola; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Power, Christine; Province, Michael A.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A. Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tiemeier, Henning; Tung, Joyce Y.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vitart, Veronique; Vollenweider, Peter; Weir, David R.; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Conley, Dalton C.; Krueger, Robert F.; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Laibson, David I.; Medland, Sarah E.; Meyer, Michelle N.; Yang, Jian; Johannesson, Magnus; Visscher, Peter M.; Esko, Tonu; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational attainment is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals(1). Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for educational attainment that extends

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okbay, Aysu; Beauchamp, Jonathan P.; Fontana, Mark Alan; Lee, James J.; Pers, Tune H.; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Turley, Patrick; Chen, Guo-Bo; Emilsson, Valur; Meddens, S. Fleur W.; Oskarsson, Sven; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Thom, Kevin; Timshel, Pascal; de Vlaming, Ronald; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Bacelis, Jonas; Baumbach, Clemens; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Brandsma, Johannes H.; Concas, Maria Pina; Derringer, Jaime; Furlotte, Nicholas A.; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Girotto, Giorgia; Gupta, Richa; Hall, Leanne M.; Harris, Sarah E.; Hofer, Edith; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Kaasik, Kadri; Kalafati, Ioanna P.; Karlsson, Robert; Kong, Augustine; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J.; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Lind, Penelope A.; Lindgren, Karl-Oskar; Liu, Tian; Mangino, Massimo; Marten, Jonathan; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B.; van der Most, Peter J.; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Payton, Antony; Pervjakova, Natalia; Peyrot, Wouter J.; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rueedi, Rico; Salvi, Erika; Schmidt, Brge; Schraut, Katharina E.; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert V.; Poot, Raymond A.; St Pourcain, Beate; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Verweij, Niek; Vuckovic, Dragana; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jingyun; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Zhihong; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Boyle, Patricia A.; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Davies, Gail; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deloukas, Panos; Demuth, Ilja; Ding, Jun; Eibich, Peter; Eisele, Lewin; Eklund, Niina; Evans, David M.; Faul, Jessica D.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Forstner, Andreas J.; Gandin, Ilaria; Gunnarsson, Bjarni; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Homuth, Georg; Horan, Michael A.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Jager, Philip L.; Joshi, Peter K.; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika A.; Kahonen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Keltigangas-Jarvinen, Liisa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kroh, Martin; Kutalik, Zoltan; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J.; Lebreton, Mael P.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C. M.; Loukola, Anu; Madden, Pamela A.; Magi, Reedik; Maki-Opas, Tomi; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meddens, Gerardus A.; McMahon, George; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Milaneschi, Yusplitri; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Myhre, Ronny; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Ollier, William E. R.; Palotie, Aarno; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Petrovic, Katja E.; Porteous, David J.; Raikkonen, Katri; Ring, Susan M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rostapshova, Olga; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Rodney J.; Smith, Blair H.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Staessen, Jan A.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Strauch, Konstantin; Terracciano, Antonio; Tobin, Martin D.; Ulivi, Sheila; Vaccargiu, Simona; Quaye, Lydia; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Venturini, Cristina; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Volker, Uwe; Volzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M.; Waage, Johannes; Ware, Erin B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Attia, John R.; Bennett, David A.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Bisgaard, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bultmann, Ute; Chabris, Christopher F.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George V.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franke, Barbara; Franke, Lude; Gasparini, Paolo; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Grabe, Hans-Jorgen; Gratten, Jacob; Groenen, Patrick J. F.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Hinds, David A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hyppnen, Elina; Iacono, William G.; Jacobsson, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jockel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lehrer, Steven F.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Pendleton, Neil; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Perola, Markus; Pirastu, Nicola; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Power, Christine; Province, Michael A.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A. Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tiemeier, Henning; Tung, Joyce Y.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vitart, Veronique; Vollenweider, Peter; Weir, David R.; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Conley, Dalton C.; Krueger, Robert F.; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Laibson, David I.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Educational attainment is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals(1). Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for educational attainment that extends

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Okbay (Aysu); J.P. Beauchamp (Jonathan); Fontana, M.A. (Mark Alan); J.J. Lee (James J.); T.H. Pers (Tune); Rietveld, C.A. (Cornelius A.); P. Turley (Patrick); Chen, G.-B. (Guo-Bo); V. Emilsson (Valur); Meddens, S.F.W. (S. Fleur W.); Oskarsson, S. (Sven); Pickrell, J.K. (Joseph K.); Thom, K. (Kevin); Timshel, P. (Pascal); R. de Vlaming (Ronald); M. Abdellaoui (Mohammed); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); J. Bacelis (Jonas); C. Baumbach (Clemens); Bjornsdottir, G. (Gyda); J.H. Brandsma (Johan); Pina Concas, M. (Maria); J. Derringer; Furlotte, N.A. (Nicholas A.); T.E. Galesloot (Tessel); S. Girotto; Gupta, R. (Richa); L.M. Hall (Leanne M.); S.E. Harris (Sarah); E. Hofer; Horikoshi, M. (Momoko); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer E.); Kaasik, K. (Kadri); I.-P. Kalafati (Ioanna-Panagiota); R. Karlsson (Robert); A. Kong (Augustine); J. Lahti (Jari); S. van der Lee (Sven); Deleeuw, C. (Christiaan); P.A. Lind (Penelope); Lindgren, K.-O. (Karl-Oskar); Liu, T. (Tian); M. Mangino (Massimo); J. Marten (Jonathan); E. Mihailov (Evelin); M. Miller (Mike); P.J. van der Most (Peter); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); A. Payton (Antony); N. Pervjakova (Natalia); W.J. Peyrot (Wouter ); Qian, Y. (Yong); O. Raitakari (Olli); Rueedi, R. (Rico); Salvi, E. (Erika); Schmidt, B. (Börge); Schraut, K.E. (Katharina E.); Shi, J. (Jianxin); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); R.A. Poot (Raymond); B. St Pourcain (Beate); A. Teumer (Alexander); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); N. Verweij (Niek); D. Vuckovic (Dragana); Wellmann, J. (Juergen); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); Yang, J. (Jingyun); Zhao, W. (Wei); Zhu, Z. (Zhihong); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); N. Amin (Najaf); Bakshi, A. (Andrew); S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); G. Biino; K. Bønnelykke (Klaus); P.A. Boyle (Patricia); H. Campbell (Harry); Cappuccio, F.P. (Francesco P.); G. Davies (Gail); J.E. de Neve (Jan-Emmanuel); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); I. Demuth (Ilja); Ding, J. (Jun); Eibich, P. (Peter); Eisele, L. (Lewin); N. Eklund (Niina); D.M. Evans (David); J.D. Faul (Jessica D.); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); A.J. Forstner; I. Gandin (Ilaria); Gunnarsson, B. (Bjarni); B.V. Halldorsson (Bjarni); T.B. Harris (Tamara); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); L.J. Hocking; G. Homuth (Georg); M. Horan (Mike); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); P.L. de Jager (Philip); P.K. Joshi (Peter); A. Juqessur (Astanand); M. Kaakinen (Marika); M. Kähönen (Mika); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); Keltigangas-Järvinen, L. (Liisa); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); I. Kolcic (Ivana); Koskinen, S. (Seppo); A. Kraja (Aldi); Kroh, M. (Martin); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); A. Latvala (Antti); L.J. Launer (Lenore); Lebreton, M.P. (Maël P.); D.F. Levinson (Douglas F.); P. Lichtenstein (Paul); P. Lichtner (Peter); D.C. Liewald (David C.); A. Loukola (Anu); P.A. Madden (Pamela); R. Mägi (Reedik); Mäki-Opas, T. (Tomi); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); P. Marques-Vidal; Meddens, G.A. (Gerardus A.); G. Mcmahon (George); C. Meisinger (Christa); T. Meitinger (Thomas); Milaneschi, Y. (Yusplitri); L. Milani (Lili); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); R. Myhre (Ronny); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); D.R. Nyholt (Dale); W.E.R. Ollier (William); A. Palotie (Aarno); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); K. Petrovic (Katja); D.J. Porteous (David J.); K. Räikkönen (Katri); Ring, S.M. (Susan M.); A. Robino (Antonietta); O. Rostapshova (Olga); I. Rudan (Igor); A. Rustichini (Aldo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); Sanders, A.R. (Alan R.); A.-P. Sarin; R. Schmidt (Reinhold); R.J. Scott (Rodney); B.H. Smith (Blair); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); J.A. Staessen (Jan); E. Steinhagen-Thiessen (Elisabeth); K. Strauch (Konstantin); A. Terracciano; M.D. Tobin (Martin); S. Ulivi (Shelia); S. Vaccargiu (Simona); L. Quaye (Lydia); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); C. Venturini (Cristina); A.A.E. Vinkhuyzen (Anna A.); U. Völker (Uwe); Völzke, H. (Henry); J.M. Vonk (Judith); D. Vozzi (Diego); J. Waage (Johannes); E.B. Ware (Erin B.); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); J. Attia (John); D.A. Bennett (David A.); Berger, K. (Klaus); L. Bertram (Lars); H. Bisgaard (Hans); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); U. Bültmann (Ute); C.F. Chabris (Christopher F.); F. Cucca (Francesco); D. Cusi (Daniele); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); G.V. Dedoussis (George); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); K. Hagen (Knut); B. Franke (Barbara); L. Franke (Lude); P. Gasparini (Paolo); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); C. Gieger (Christian); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); J. Gratten (Jacob); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); P. van der Harst (Pim); C. Hayward (Caroline)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractEducational attainment is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for educational attainment that

  20. Assessing global partnerships in graduate nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Amelia P; Tuck, Jodi; Malata, Address; Gagnon, Anita J

    2013-11-01

    North-South partnerships in graduate nursing education can prepare students to address global healthcare issues, increase cultural competence, and build research capacity. However, the current literature does not include a critical and systematic assessment of partnerships using established guidelines. This paper has two objectives: 1) Find and refine a suitable measure to assess a North-South inter-institutional research and clinical partnership in nursing; 2) Pilot test an assessment measure and describe the results of a systematic institutional self-evaluation of a developing North-South research and clinical partnership within a graduate nursing program. The first objective was addressed by searching for, examining and selecting an assessment measure. The second objective was obtained by applying the assessment measure to a developing graduate-level research and clinical partnership between a Canadian School of Nursing and a Malawian College of Nursing; qualitative data collected included information from a document review and subjective experiences of partners. Results showed that when appropriate revisions are made to an existing guideline, it is applicable to use as an assessment measure for North-South inter-institutional research and clinical partnerships. Recommendations for improvement were made, allowing the guideline to be more specific for research and clinical partnerships. Results demonstrated that the existing Canadian-Malawian partnership was strongest in the guideline category of "shaping the purpose and scope of the partnership," and weakest in "partnership implementation and context." This paper implies that: 1) evaluation can strengthen partnerships and enhance educational experience for nursing students; 2) research comparing and contrasting different genres of partnerships could help determine which type is the most appropriate for an institutions' particular outcome goals; and 3) effective establishment and maintenance of North

  1. Partnerships: panacea or pretence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Hugh

    2004-05-01

    This article seeks to explore the centrality and reality of partnerships or partnership working in current British social policy. The article will investigate the rhetoric and reality of partnerships using research based on the Early Years Development and Childcare Partnerships (EYDCPs) as an exemplar to critically question whether partnerships have become more pretence than panacea? In so doing the article will suggest that partnerships are deserving of greater critical analysis and research as their rhetorical force potentially represents another metaphor for social control.

  2. Building Partnerships with College Campuses: Community Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiderman, Sally; Furco, Andrew; Zapf, Jennifer; Goss, Megan

    The information that forms the basis of this brochure was drawn from a summit of community organization representatives who have worked in partnerships with institutions of higher education. The brochure highlights three issues community partners believe must be fully addressed if community/campus partnerships are to be successful and mutually…

  3. Some considerations on the legal regulation of the process for public licitation, contracts and agreements on the establishment of educational partnerships between the government and the private sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana A. Dragone Silveira

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Currently the joint between the public administration and the private sector assumes new contours in function of the of the Brazilian State reform, configuring itself as a trend that if it has accented in the educational area, in the São Paulo’s cities, from the municipalization (municipal ownership of elementary school education, with the consolidation of partnerships and agreements involving the purchase of educational private system’s for municipal education net’s, the vacant subvention in private entities and the hiring of private institutions, aiming at the elaboration of educational politics for the management municipal. (ADRIÃO, BORGHI, 2008. Thus being, this article to look for introduce and to analyze, from the national legislation, the procedures for the establishment of these different partnership’s modalities between the municipal government and private institutions, physical or corporation body, discussing the rules for the licitation process for the services and works hiring, property and consumer goods acquisition, for the contracts celebration and the accords establishment with social organizations to transfer it of public resources, to look for understand the legal possibilities for the introduction of the privatizations mechanisms in the education.

  4. Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE): Enhancing Scientific Communication by Bringing STEM Research into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, D.; Radencic, S.; Funderburk, W. K.; Walker, R. M.; Jackson, B. S.; Dawkins, K. S.; Schmitz, D.; Bruce, L. M.; McNeal, K.

    2014-12-01

    INSPIRE, a five-year partnership between Mississippi State University and three local school districts, is designed to strengthen the communication skills of graduate Fellows in geosciences, physics, astronomy, chemistry, and engineering as they incorporate their research into inquiry-based lessons in 7th - 12th grade science and math classrooms. All lesson plans designed and taught by the graduate Fellows must include one or more connections to their research, and these connections must be demonstrated to the students during the lessons. International research partnerships with Australia, the Bahamas, England, and Poland provide valuable opportunities for graduate Fellows to conduct field work abroad and allow our partner teachers to have authentic research experiences that they can bring back to their classrooms. Program effectiveness has been examined using pre- and post-year attitudinal surveys, formal lesson plan documents, Fellow and teacher journals, focus group meetings with a project evaluator, and direct observation of Fellow-led classroom activities. Analyses of data gathered during the past four years of the partnership will be presented that examine the diversity in approaches taken by Fellows to communicate big ideas, changes in the ability of Fellows to find connections between their research and classroom lessons while keeping them aligned with state and national standards, and the quality of the mentorship provided to the Fellows by our partner teachers. INSPIRE is funded by the Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellowship Program of the National Science Foundation (Award No. DGE-0947419).

  5. Registered partnerships

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, family patterns have changed significantly. National laws have taken these changes into account, recognizing new forms of unions, different to heterosexual marriage. Indeed, recently some countries have given the possibility to same-sex couples to enter into various forms of unions. Staff regulations of international organizations are not directly affected by national laws, but in the context of diversity policies, the lack of recognition of these new forms of unions, may appear to discriminate based on sexual orientation and to limit the freedom of choosing marital status. A study by the International Service for Remunerations and Pensions (iSRP) of the OECD in January 2015 (PROS Report (1015) 04) shows that in comparison with other international organizations, CERN offers the least favorable social conditions for its Staff with in a registered partnership. As part of the Five-year review in 2015, it is important that CERN aligns itself with the practice of these other organizations...

  6. The Public-Private Partnership in ECEC Provision in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Peder

    2014-01-01

    This article seeks to answer three central questions pertaining to public-private partnership in early childhood education and care (ECEC provision) in Norway: How has public-private partnership developed during the last four decades? How is public-private partnership understood in Norwegian ECEC policy? What seem to be the future challenges in…

  7. University/Science Center Collaborations (A Science Center Perspective): Developing an Infrastructure of Partnerships with Science Centers to Support the Engagement of Scientists and Engineers in Education and Outreach for Broad Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Eric

    2009-03-01

    Science centers, professional associations, corporations and university research centers share the same mission of education and outreach, yet come from ``different worlds.'' This gap may be bridged by working together to leverage unique strengths in partnership. Front-end evaluation results for the development of new resources to support these (mostly volunteer-based) partnerships elucidate the factors which lead to a successful relationship. Maintaining a science museum-scientific community partnership requires that all partners devote adequate resources (time, money, etc.). In general, scientists/engineers and science museum professionals often approach relationships with different assumptions and expectations. The culture of science centers is distinctly different from the culture of science. Scientists/engineers prefer to select how they will ultimately share their expertise from an array of choices. Successful partnerships stem from clearly defined roles and responsibilities. Scientists/engineers are somewhat resistant to the idea of traditional, formal training. Instead of developing new expertise, many prefer to offer their existing strengths and expertise. Maintaining a healthy relationship requires the routine recognition of the contributions of scientists/engineers. As professional societies, university research centers and corporations increasingly engage in education and outreach, a need for a supportive infrastructure becomes evident. Work of TryScience.org/VolTS (Volunteers TryScience), the MRS NISE Net (Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network) subcommittee, NRCEN (NSF Research Center Education Network), the IBM On Demand Community, and IEEE Educational Activities exemplify some of the pieces of this evolving infrastructure.

  8. Ingredients for successful partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Pfisterer (Stella)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractFor the development of new cross-sector partnerships it is required to know what the essence of successful partnership projects is. Which factors influence success or failure of partnerships is highly related to the specific context where partnerships operate. The literature on critical

  9. The Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), a collaborative paradigm for institutional and human resources capacity building between high- and low- and middle-income countries: the Mozambique experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgínia Noormahomed, Emília; Carrilho, Carla; Ismail, Mamudo; Noormahomed, Sérgio; Nguenha, Alcido; Benson, Constance A.; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Schooley, Robert T.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Collaborations among researchers based in lower and middle income countries (LMICs) and high income countries (HICs) have made major discoveries related to diseases disproportionately affecting LMICs and have been vital to the development of research communities in LMICs. Such collaborations have generally been scientifically and structurally driven by HICs. Objectives: In this report we outline a paradigm shift in collaboration, exemplified by the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI), in which the formulation of priorities and administrative infrastructure reside in the LMIC. Methods: This descriptive report outlines the critical features of the MEPI partnership. Results: In the MEPI, LMIC program partners translate broad program goals and define metrics into priorities that are tailored to local conditions. Program funds flow to a LMIC-based leadership group that contracts with peers from HICs to provide technical and scientific advice and consultation in a 'reverse funds flow' model. Emphasis is also placed on strengthening administrative capacity within LMIC institutions. A rigorous monitoring and evaluation process modifies program priorities on the basis of evolving opportunities to maximize program impact. Conclusions: Vesting LMIC partners with the responsibility for program leadership, and building administrative and fiscal capacity in LMIC institutions substantially enhances program relevance, impact and sustainability.

  10. The Impact of Condom Use Negotiation Self-Efficacy and Partnership Patterns on Consistent Condom Use Among College-Educated Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesoff, Elizabeth D; Dunkle, Kristin; Lang, Delia

    2016-02-01

    This study sought to explore the impact of condom negotiation self-efficacy, interpersonal factors, and sensational factors on condom use behavior among a population of college-educated women with different patterns and types of sexual partner. We administered an online questionnaire capturing sexual behavior, partnership patterns, perceived benefits of and barriers to condom use, and condom use negotiation self-efficacy. A total of 433 women completed the online survey. Perceived sensual, erotic, and interpersonal benefits and barriers to condom use, along with negotiation self-efficacy, were found to be significantly associated with consistent condom use. When compared to respondents reporting only main partners, respondents reporting only casual partners were more likely to use condoms while respondents reporting both main and casual partners were least likely to use condoms. Previous negative experiences with condoms were significantly associated with decreased condom use, while history of sexually transmitted infection diagnosis was not consistently associated with condom use. This study supports the importance of negotiation self-efficacy in promoting condom use; however, building women's self-efficacy is not enough for effective condom use promotion among women. The impact of interpersonal, sensual and erotic factors, as well as the context of different partnership patterns, must be considered in future interventions.

  11. The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP Federation): Facilitating Partnerships that Work to Bring Earth Science Data into Educational Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freuder, R.; Ledley, T. S.; Dahlman, L.

    2004-12-01

    The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP Federation, http://www.esipfed.org) formed seven years ago and now with 77 member organizations is working to "increase the quality and value of Earth science products and services .for the benefit of the ESIP Federation's stakeholder communities." Education (both formal and informal) is a huge audience that we serve. Partnerships formed by members within the ESIP Federation have created bridges that close the gap between Earth science data collection and research and the effective use of that Earth science data to explore concepts in Earth system science by the educational community. The Earth Exploration Toolbook is one of those successful collaborations. The Earth Exploration Toolbook (EET, http://serc.carleton.edu/eet) grew out of a need of the educational community (articulated by the Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE) community) to have better access to Earth science data and data analysis tools and help in effectively using them with students. It is a collection of web-accessible chapters, each featuring step-by-step instructions on how to use an Earth science dataset and data analysis tool to investigate an issue or concept in Earth system science. Each chapter also provides the teacher information on the outcome of the activity, grade level, standards addressed, learning goals, time required, and ideas for exploring further. The individual ESIP Federation partners alone could not create the EET. However, the ESIP Federation facilitated the partnering of members, drawing from data providers, researchers and education tool developers, to create the EET. Interest in the EET has grown since it went live with five chapters in July 2003. There are currently seven chapters with another six soon to be released. Monthly online seminars in which over a hundred educators have participated have given very positive feedback. Post workshop surveys from our telecon-online workshops indicate that

  12. Spread of endemic disease and global change in an educational project: proposition of relationships developed in a twin partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michela Viale

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The sudden event of the spread of dengue fever (or break-bone fever that appeared for the first time in Cape Verde in 2009 revealed that inappropriate management of waste can be considered a major cause of the spread of this disease. Dengue fever is a tropical infectious disease that is caused by the dengue virus. Its vector, the mosquito Aedes aegypti, found an optimal environment for its life cycle in the context of Cape Verde, with the persistence of water in abandoned waste objects. The connection between the topics of Earth sciences and the spread of this disease is not obvious, but it was explored and illustrated in a school partnership. Activities with pupils and students provided an opportunity to investigate how some global phenomena, like climate change (with an increase in local rainfall and higher temperatures, are related to local events, such as the spread of dengue fever. Preventive strategies are conditioned by the geomorphology of the territory and by the complex relationships that connect the geosphere and the biosphere. For this reason, it is important to be aware of the risk of breaking these delicate balances, and hence activating unexpected consequences. The roles played by both partners linked knowledge about the natural dynamics of our planet with the development of appropriate behavior, thus contributing to the formation of responsible citizenship, to preserve and protect the environment. The partnership encouraged students to develop sustainable management strategies against dengue fever, and consequently against waste, actively involving them at school, at home, and in their community. In this study, we present a case study of the role of a school partnership in a complex problem, such as the spread of dengue fever and environmental pollution.

  13. Role of the African Diaspora Scholars in strengthening higher education in Africa: Case of a Danish-Ugandan Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ransom Nambuanyi, Lekunze

    2016-01-01

    for them to make their contribution to an emerging Africa. Given the rich and diverse intellectual, scholarly, disciplinary and socio-cultural background of some African diaspora scholars, many feel a moral responsibility to lend a hand of “intellectual remittance” to the development of scholarship...... circulation, enhancing academic visibility and leadership, and enhanced partnerships, this report seeks to point out that there can also be certain key challenges and learning points obtained in this kind of scientific collaboration. These may include: the asymmetrical capacity and resource constraints...

  14. Testing the effects of educational strategies on comprehension of a genomic concept using virtual reality technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaphingst, Kimberly A; Persky, Susan; McCall, Cade; Lachance, Christina; Loewenstein, Johanna; Beall, Andrew C; Blascovich, Jim

    2009-11-01

    Applying genetic susceptibility information to improve health will likely require educating patients about abstract concepts, for which there is little existing research. This experimental study examined the effect of learning mode on comprehension of a genomic concept. 156 individuals aged 18-40 without specialized knowledge were randomly assigned to either a virtual reality active learning or didactic learning condition. The outcome was comprehension (recall, transfer, mental models). Change in recall was greater for didactic learning than for active learning (pconcepts. Didactic, interpersonal health education approaches may be more effective than interactive games in educating patients about abstract, unfamiliar concepts. These findings indicate the importance of traditional health education approaches in emerging areas like genomics.

  15. Framework for development of physician competencies in genomic medicine: report of the Competencies Working Group of the Inter-Society Coordinating Committee for Physician Education in Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, Bruce R; Berry, Anna B; Limson, Melvin; Marian, Ali J; Murray, Michael F; O'Rourke, P Pearl; Passamani, Eugene R; Relling, Mary V; Tooker, John; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Rodriguez, Laura L

    2014-11-01

    Completion of the Human Genome Project, in conjunction with dramatic reductions in the cost of DNA sequencing and advances in translational research, is gradually ushering genomic discoveries and technologies into the practice of medicine. The rapid pace of these advances is opening up a gap between the knowledge available about the clinical relevance of genomic information and the ability of clinicians to include such information in their medical practices. This educational gap threatens to be rate limiting to the clinical adoption of genomics in medicine. Solutions will require not only a better understanding of the clinical implications of genetic discoveries but also training in genomics at all levels of professional development, including for individuals in formal training and others who long ago completed such training. The National Human Genome Research Institute has convened the Inter-Society Coordinating Committee for Physician Education in Genomics (ISCC) to develop and share best practices in the use of genomics in medicine. The ISCC has developed a framework for development of genomics practice competencies that may serve as a starting point for formulation of competencies for physicians in various medical disciplines.

  16. Leveraging Community Resources: Creating Successful Partnerships to Improve Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidman, Barry; Baray, Sarah Nelson

    2016-01-01

    Educational leaders increasingly acknowledge the importance of developing partnerships to address pressing and persistent educational concerns. This article reports the results of a qualitative case study that examined an exurban district's efforts to improve educational outcomes through the development of multisector partnerships with community…

  17. Development and implementation of FRESH--a post-secondary nutrition education program incorporating population strategies, experiential learning and intersectoral partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, June I; Zok, Anne V; Quenneville, Emily P M; Dworatzek, Paula D N

    2014-07-11

    The FRESH (Food Resources and Education for Student Health) peer nutrition education program engages undergraduate and graduate students in experiential learning to improve the campus food and nutrition environment and promote healthy behaviours among university students. University students in general, and graduate and undergraduate food and nutrition students as program designers and peer educators, respectively. Large university campus in southwestern Ontario. A peer nutrition education program, utilizing multiple population strategies and intersectoral partnerships, was created by and for university students with faculty and food service personnel as mentors. The population health strategies employed were building awareness and program branding; developing personal skills through peer nutrition education and hands-on cooking demonstrations; and creating supportive environments through incentive programs for fruit and dairy as well as point-of-purchase menu labelling. The program has reached students, staff and faculty through over 60 interactive FRESH displays and education sessions. Website and social media have also had a significant reach with over 4,000 website visits and 277 Facebook "likes". FRESH has also improved the food environment for over 5,000 students in residence, e.g., 1,931 FRESH Fruit/Dairy Cards have been returned for free fruit/milk cartons. Graduate students in Foods and Nutrition continue to participate every year (cumulative n=60) in ongoing program development. Peer educators have developed enhanced leadership, public speaking and group facilitation skills, and the ability to creatively apply what they have learned in the classroom to new contexts. Increased nutrition knowledge and an improved food environment could, over the long term, support improved university student health.

  18. A computer-based education intervention to enhance surrogates' informed consent for genomics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Ann K; Freeman, Bradley D; Fish, Anne F; Bachman, Jean A; Richardson, Lloyd I

    2015-03-01

    Many research studies conducted today in critical care have a genomics component. Patients' surrogates asked to authorize participation in genomics research for a loved one in the intensive care unit may not be prepared to make informed decisions about a patient's participation in the research. To examine the effectiveness of a new, computer-based education module on surrogates' understanding of the process of informed consent for genomics research. A pilot study was conducted with visitors in the waiting rooms of 2 intensive care units in a Midwestern tertiary care medical center. Visitors were randomly assigned to the experimental (education module plus a sample genomics consent form; n = 65) or the control (sample genomics consent form only; n = 69) group. Participants later completed a test on informed genomics consent. Understanding the process of informed consent was greater (P = .001) in the experimental group than in the control group. Specifically, compared with the control group, the experimental group had a greater understanding of 8 of 13 elements of informed consent: intended benefits of research (P = .02), definition of surrogate consenter (P= .001), withdrawal from the study (P = .001), explanation of risk (P = .002), purpose of the institutional review board (P = .001), definition of substituted judgment (P = .03), compensation for harm (P = .001), and alternative treatments (P = .004). Computer-based education modules may be an important addition to conventional approaches for obtaining informed consent in the intensive care unit. Preparing patients' family members who may consider serving as surrogate consenters is critical to facilitating genomics research in critical care. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  19. Noise-induced hearing loss in agriculture: Creating partnerships to overcome barriers and educate the community on prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet J Ehlers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL is a common and preventable injury for farmers. Farmers are frequently exposed to excessive noise, ranking among the top three occupations and industries with the highest risk for hearing loss. Use of hearing protection among farmers is not common. Although the age when NIHL begins among farmers is unknown, its prevalence is higher among male adolescents who live and work on farms. The purpose of this paper is to describe how NIOSH created partnerships to promote hearing conservation for this hard-to-reach population. Partnerships included organizations and individuals who were trusted sources of information for the target population, young farmers 14-35 years of age and their families, and those who had linkages in rural communities. NIOSH engaged partners through exhibits and train-the-trainer workshops at state or national conventions. NIOSH workshops included basic information on NIHL as well as information on free or low-lost resources that participants could use in training others at schools and community events. People with hearing conservation expertise have an important role and many opportunities to improve the knowledge and implementation of hearing conservation among those in agriculture.

  20. The human genome, implications for oral health and diseases, and dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavkin, H C

    2001-05-01

    We are living in an extraordinary time in human history punctuated by the convergence of major scientific and technological progress in the physical, chemical, and biological ways of knowing. Equally extraordinary are the sparkling intellectual developments at the interface between fields of study. One major example of an emerging influence on the future of oral health education is at the interface between the human genome, information technology, and biotechnology with miniaturizations (nanotechnology), suggesting new oral health professional competencies for a new century. A great deal has recently been learned from human and non-human genomics. Genome databases are being "mined" to prompt hypothesis-driven "postgenomic" or functional genomic science in microbial models such as Candida albicans related to oral candidiasis and in human genomics related to biological processes found in craniofacial, oral, and dental diseases and disorders. This growing body of knowledge is already providing the gene content of many oral microbial and human genomes and the knowledge of genetic variants or polymorphisms related to disease, disease progression, and disease response to therapeutics (pharmacogenomics). The knowledge base from human and non-human genomics, functional genomics, biotechnology, and associated information technologies is serving to revolutionize oral health promotion, risk assessment using biomarkers and disease prevention, diagnostics, treatments, and the full range of therapeutics for craniofacial, oral, and dental diseases and disorders. Education, training, and research opportunities are already transforming the curriculum and pedagogy for undergraduate science majors, predoctoral health professional programs, residency and specialty programs, and graduate programs within the health professions. In the words of Bob Dylan, "the times they are a-changing."

  1. A Critical Analysis of Assessment Quality in Genomics and Bioinformatics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chad E.; Nehm, Ross H.

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of genomics and bioinformatics methods and paradigms in biology has been accompanied by an explosion of new curricula and pedagogies. An important question to ask about these educational innovations is whether they are having a meaningful impact on students' knowledge, attitudes, or skills. Although assessments are…

  2. Learning about the Human Genome. Part 1: Challenge to Science Educators. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haury, David L.

    This digest explains how to inform high school students and their parents about the human genome project (HGP) and how the information from this milestone finding will affect future biological and medical research and challenge science educators. The sections include: (1) "The Emerging Legacy of the HGP"; (2) "Transforming How…

  3. A Critical Analysis of Assessment Quality in Genomics and Bioinformatics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chad E.; Nehm, Ross H.

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of genomics and bioinformatics methods and paradigms in biology has been accompanied by an explosion of new curricula and pedagogies. An important question to ask about these educational innovations is whether they are having a meaningful impact on students' knowledge, attitudes, or skills. Although assessments are…

  4. Strategic Philanthropy, Organizational Legitimacy, and the Development of Higher Education in Africa: The Partnership for Higher Education in Africa (2000-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaumont, Fabrice

    2014-01-01

    This discussion encompasses the specifics of a partnership between leading U.S. foundations---the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the Ford Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Kresge Foundation. This analysis…

  5. 基于软件开发产品线的校企合作模式研究%Educator-producer partnership based on software development product line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐守祥; 陈建刚; 何涛; 黄国伟

    2012-01-01

    With the rapid development of software industry, new requirements are put forward to the raise of software development talents. The model of the educator-producer partnership, relying on the development of software product line and based on product development, establishes win-win cooperation in the educator-producer partnership, ensuring the consistency of teaching process and the software development process, forming a unity of practical projects and software products, making scientific research and industry application butt, and achieving deep integration between schools and businesses. Through the practice of cooperation with a number of software development companies, its effectiveness and sustainability are fully validated.%飞速发展的软件产业对软件开发人才的培养提出了新的要求。本文提出的以软件开发产品线为依托的校企合作模式,立足产品开发,建立校企合作的共赢点,保证了教学过程和软件开发过程的一致性、形成了实训项目和软件产品统一、使科研成果和产业应用对接,实现了校企的深度融合。经过与多家软件开发企业的合作实践检验,充分验证了该模式的有效性和可持续性。

  6. The Wicehtowak Partnership: Improving Student Learning by Formalizing the Family-Community-School Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunison, Scott

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the extent to which formalization of the family-community-school partnership through the Wicehtowak Partnership influenced educational outcomes for Aboriginal students in one urban school district. It finds that the community engagement process employed by the school district for creating the partnership…

  7. From Franchise Network to Consortium: The Evolution and Operation of a New Kind of Further and Higher Education Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Freda; Fisher, Roy; Webb, Keith

    2003-01-01

    The Consortium for Post-Compulsory Education and Training (CPCET) is a single subject consortium of further education and higher education providers of professional development relating to in-service teacher training for the whole of the post-compulsory sector. Involving more than 30 partners spread across the North of England, CPCET evolved from…

  8. Issues in Associate Degree Nursing. Bridge to Success. Education and Service: A Partnership for Associate Degree Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    This publication is a compilation of highlights from papers presented at the Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) project's regional conferences during 1983-84. Papers address pertinent issues in ADN education and practice. "AD Education: Are the Parameters Real?" (Julia Perkins) examines the parameters of associate degree nursing education from a…

  9. How Can Corporations Contribute to the Community through Environmental Education?: Focusing on Partnerships between Corporations and Universities in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Eunjeong; Jang, Shinho

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was twofold: first, to determine the effectiveness of providing environmental education in collaboration between a company and a university, and, second, to describe perspective that the environmental education community has developed through close communication with stakeholders in environmental education. For the study, we…

  10. Professional Practice Schools as a Form of School-University Partnership in Teacher Education: Towards a Social Justice Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Maureen

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years into democracy, South Africa is still struggling to improve the quality of its education system. The identification of schools that can work closely with universities to mentor student teachers has been suggested as one way in which teacher education can contribute to an improved education system. The article outlines research that…

  11. Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education: STEM Graduate Students Bring Current Research into 7th-12th Grade Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radencic, S.; Dawkins, K. S.; Jackson, B. S.; Walker, R. M.; Schmitz, D.; Pierce, D.; Funderburk, W. K.; McNeal, K.

    2014-12-01

    Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE), a NSF Graduate K-12 (GK-12) program at Mississippi State University, pairs STEM graduate students with local K-12 teachers to bring new inquiry and technology experiences to the classroom (www.gk12.msstate.edu). The graduate fellows prepare lessons for the students incorporating different facets of their research. The lessons vary in degree of difficulty according to the content covered in the classroom and the grade level of the students. The focus of each lesson is directed toward the individual research of the STEM graduate student using inquiry based designed activities. Scientific instruments that are used in STEM research (e.g. SkyMaster weather stations, GPS, portable SEM, Inclinometer, Soil Moisture Probe, Google Earth, ArcGIS Explorer) are also utilized by K-12 students in the activities developed by the graduate students. Creativity and problem solving skills are sparked by curiosity which leads to the discovery of new information. The graduate students work to enhance their ability to effectively communicate their research to members of society through the creation of research linked classroom activities, enabling the 7-12th grade students to connect basic processes used in STEM research with the required state and national science standards. The graduate students become respected role models for the high school students because of their STEM knowledge base and their passion for their research. Sharing enthusiasm for their chosen STEM field, as well as the application techniques to discover new ideas, the graduate students stimulate the interests of the classroom students and model authentic science process skills while highlighting the relevance of STEM research to K-12 student lives. The measurement of the student attitudes about science is gathered from pre and post interest surveys for the past four years. This partnership allows students, teachers, graduate students, and the public to

  12. Neuroscience and education: an ideal partnership for producing evidence-based solutions to Guide 21(st) Century Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carew, Thomas J; Magsamen, Susan H

    2010-09-09

    Neuro-Education is a nascent discipline that seeks to blend the collective fields of neuroscience, psychology, cognitive science, and education to create a better understanding of how we learn and how this information can be used to create more effective teaching methods, curricula, and educational policy. Though still in its infancy as a research discipline, this initiative is already opening critical new dialog between teachers, administrators, parents, and brain scientists.

  13. Evaluating the Impact of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences Using the Most Significant Change Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Susan C; Nyaude, Shemiah; Challender, Amelia; Aagaard, Eva; Velez, Christine; Hakim, James

    2017-09-01

    In medical education, evaluating outcomes from programs intended to transform attitudes or influence career trajectories using conventional methods of monitoring is often difficult. To address this problem, the authors adapted the most significant change (MSC) technique to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the impact of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) program at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences. In 2014-2015, the authors applied the MSC to systematically examine the personal significance and level of positive transformation that individuals attributed to their MEPI participation. Interviews were conducted with 28 participants nominated by program leaders. The authors coded results inductively for prevalent themes in participants' stories and prepared profiles with representative quotes to place the stories in context. Stakeholders selected 9 themes and 18 stories to illustrate the most significant changes. Six themes (or outcomes) were expected, as they aligned with MEPI goals-becoming a better teacher, becoming a better clinician, increased interest in teaching, increased interest in research, new career pathways (including commitment to practice in Zimbabwe), and improved research skills. Three themes were unexpected-increased confidence, expanded interprofessional networks, and improved interpersonal interactions. The authors found the MSC to be a useful and systematic evaluation approach for large, complex, and transformative initiatives like MEPI. The MSC seemed to encourage participant reflection, support values inquiry by program leaders, and provide insights into the personal and cultural impacts of MEPI. Additional trial applications of the MSC technique in academic medicine are warranted.

  14. Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey (SATREPS Project: Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development by JICA-JST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Yoshiyuki

    2015-04-01

    Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey (SATREPS Project: Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development by JICA-JST) Yoshiyuki KANEDA Disaster mitigation center Nagoya University/ Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) Mustafa ELDIK Boğaziçi University, Kandilli Observatory and       Earthquake Researches Institute (KOERI) and Members of SATREPS Japan-Turkey project The target of this project is the Marmara Sea earthquake after the Izmit (Kocaeli) Earthquake 1999 along to the North Anatolian fault. According to occurrences of historical Earthquakes, epicenters have moved from East to West along to the North Anatolian Fault. There is a seismic gap in the Marmara Sea. In Marmara region, there is Istanbul with high populations such as Tokyo. Therefore, Japan and Turkey can share our own experiences during past damaging earthquakes and we can prepare for future large Earthquakes and Tsunamis in cooperation with each other in SATREPS project. This project is composed of Multidisciplinary research project including observation researches, simulation researches, educational researches, and goals are as follows, ① To develop disaster mitigation policy and strategies based on Multidisciplinary research activities. ② To provide decision makers with newly found knowledge for its implementation to the current regulations. ③ To organize disaster education programs in order to increase disaster awareness in Turkey. ④ To contribute the evaluation of active fault studies in Japan. In this SATREPS project, we will integrate Multidisciplinary research results for disaster mitigation in Marmara region and .disaster education in Turkey.

  15. Toward Understanding the Nature of a Partnership between an Elementary Classroom Teacher and an Informal Science Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, Ingrid S.; Akerson, Valarie L.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the nature of the relationship between a fifth-grade teacher and an informal science educator as they planned and implemented a life science unit in the classroom, and sought to define this relationship in order to gain insight into the roles of each educator. In addition, student learning as a result of instruction was…

  16. Global Connections to Global Partnerships: Navigating the Changing Landscape of Internationalism and Cross-Border Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olcott, Don, Jr.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide continuing higher education leaders with a comprehensive overview of the major considerations for doing business in the global market. Included is an analysis of the driving forces in global higher education and current trends in cross-border programs and a brief review of activities that may be part of a…

  17. Partnerships Enhancing Practice: A Preliminary Model of Technology-Based Peer-to-Peer Evaluations of Teaching in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servilio, Kathryn L.; Hollingshead, Aleksandra; Hott, Brittany L.

    2017-01-01

    In higher education, current teaching evaluation models typically involve senior faculty evaluating junior faculty. However, there is evidence that peer-to-peer junior faculty observations and feedback may be just as effective. This descriptive case study utilized an inductive analysis to examine experiences of six special education early career…

  18. The AMTEX Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemon, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    The American Textile Partnership, as its name implies, is a collaborative effort between the DOE national labs and industry-related R D/educational institutions. The purpose of AMTEX is to promote R D that enhance the competitiveness of the integrated textile industry (i.e., fibers, textiles, sewn/fabricated products). The industry-related organizations bring a vital perspective of industry needs in addition to their own R D capabilities. The DOE labs bring broad R D capabilities and perspectives from other areas of research application. The strong synergy between industry and DOE will enable this collaboration to significantly impact industry competitiveness while focusing and strengthening, the labs' capabilities consistent with DOE's mission. There are three main components in AMTEX: DOE/ER oversight; the Operating Committee, which is composed a Laboratory Board and an Industry Board; and five Technology Area Coordination Teams (TACTs).

  19. The AMTEX Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemon, D.K.

    1993-03-01

    The American Textile Partnership, as its name implies, is a collaborative effort between the DOE national labs and industry-related R&D/educational institutions. The purpose of AMTEX is to promote R&D that enhance the competitiveness of the integrated textile industry (i.e., fibers, textiles, sewn/fabricated products). The industry-related organizations bring a vital perspective of industry needs in addition to their own R&D capabilities. The DOE labs bring broad R&D capabilities and perspectives from other areas of research application. The strong synergy between industry and DOE will enable this collaboration to significantly impact industry competitiveness while focusing and strengthening, the labs` capabilities consistent with DOE`s mission. There are three main components in AMTEX: DOE/ER oversight; the Operating Committee, which is composed a Laboratory Board and an Industry Board; and five Technology Area Coordination Teams (TACTs).

  20. A Critical Analysis of Assessment Quality in Genomics and Bioinformatics Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Chad E.; Nehm, Ross H.

    2013-01-01

    The growing importance of genomics and bioinformatics methods and paradigms in biology has been accompanied by an explosion of new curricula and pedagogies. An important question to ask about these educational innovations is whether they are having a meaningful impact on students’ knowledge, attitudes, or skills. Although assessments are necessary tools for answering this question, their outputs are dependent on their quality. Our study 1) reviews the central importance of reliability and construct validity evidence in the development and evaluation of science assessments and 2) examines the extent to which published assessments in genomics and bioinformatics education (GBE) have been developed using such evidence. We identified 95 GBE articles (out of 226) that contained claims of knowledge increases, affective changes, or skill acquisition. We found that 1) the purpose of most of these studies was to assess summative learning gains associated with curricular change at the undergraduate level, and 2) a minority (assessment quality in GBE. PMID:24006400

  1. Building Sustainable Capacity with University Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. M.

    2013-05-01

    Universities can play an important role in building scientific and technical capacity by providing educational opportunities for local and regional populations in developing countries. These opportunities may be short term or long term through for example faculty exchanges, student exchanges, and collaborative teaching and research activities. As the demand for talented graduates expands in developing countries, local universities face competition for students, lecturers, and professors from the same industries and communities they serve. This competition is in many ways counterproductive to building the sustainable human resource that is needed to support local development, management, and governance. Such competition is particularly evident for top science and engineering students in energy rich countries. University partnerships, e.g., in particular those between universities in OECD countries and universities in developing countries, have an important role to play in bridging the gap between today's lack of capacity and a sustainable human resource for the future. Such university partnerships, however, face many challenges, some of which can be traced to organizational and cultural differences In this presentation, I will discuss how university partnerships are formed, some of the benefits to partners, and some pitfalls to avoid during implementation of university partnerships. The examples are taken from Stanford partnerships that involve geoscience and engineering, and will include representative goals and content of the example partnerships. These partnerships I'll describe are actually trilateral, with partners from two or more universities and a private company or government agency. I conclude the presentation with a brief discussion on multiculturalism, perhaps the most important consideration when planning a partnership between diverse organizations. Organizers of partnerships must recognize the fact that multiculturalism and diversity are assets that

  2. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O' Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

    2006-01-01

    During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

  3. K-12 science education reform will take a decade, and community partnerships hold best hope for success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keever, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    Fundamental change in K-12 science education in the United States, essential for full citizenship in an increasingly technological world, will take a decade or more to accomplish, and only the sustained, cooperative efforts of people in their own communities -- scientists, teachers, and concerned citizens -- will likely ensure success. These were among the themes at Sigma Xi`s national K-12 science education forum.

  4. Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Mitigation in The Marmara Region and Disaster Education in Turkey. (SATREPS Project: Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development by JICA-JST)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Y.; Erdik, M. O.; Takahashi, N.; Meral Ozel, N.; Hori, T.; Hori, M.; Kumamoto, K.; Kalafat, D.; Pinar, A.; Ozel, A. O.; Yalciner, A. C.; Nurlu, M.; Tanircan, G.; Citak, S.; Ariyoshi, K.; Necmioglu, O.

    2014-12-01

    Since 1900, around 90,000 people have lost their lives in 76 earthquakes occurred in Turkey, with a total affected population of ~7 million and direct estimated losses of ~25 billion USD. About half the lives lost were due to two earthquakes associated with the North Anatolian Fault in 1939 and 1999. During this time, seven large westward-migrating earthquakes created a 900-km-long continuous surface rupture along the fault zone from Erzincan to the Marmara Sea, stopping just short of Istanbul. Based on a time-dependent model that includes coseismic and postseismic effects of the 1999 Kocaeli earthquake with moment magnitude (Mw) = 7.4, Parsons concluded that the probability of an earthquake with Mw >7 in the Sea of Marmara near Istanbul is 35% to 70% in the next 30 years. This high probability is shared by Tokyo and San Francisco; however, the earthquake fragility of the pre-2000 building stock in Turkey is much higher than that of California or Japan. (Erdik, 2013). All of the arguments described above provide a sound basis for a Japanese-Turkish partnership enabling each partner to share experiences gained from past destructive earthquakes and prepare for expected large earthquakes. The SATREPS project aims to address this need, also focusing on the tsunami hazard. The project's main objectives are i) to develop disaster mitigation policies and strategies based on multidisciplinary research activities; ii) to provide decision makers with newly found knowledge for its implementation to the current regulations; iii) to organize disaster education programs in order to increase disaster awareness in Turkey; iv) to contribute the evaluation of active fault studies in Japan. To achieve successfully these objectives, 4 research groups have been set specializing on observations, simulations, civil engineering and disaster education and the results will be integrated for disaster mitigation in the Marmara region and disaster education in Turkey.

  5. Quality partnerships: The community stakeholders' view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhonani Netshandama

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 1997 universities in South Africa have been encouraged to be responsive to the needs of communities, to encourage broader participation and to address issues of access in higher education (Department of Education 1997. This transformative agenda was found to be especially compelling in the case of rural-based South African universities, which often serve historically disadvantaged black populations in areas that are both under-resourced and underdeveloped (Nkomo & Sehoole 2007, pp. 235–36. In 2006 the traditional leadership of a local community approached the University of Venda to propose a partnership. This prompted the researcher to conduct a qualitative study, which sought to explore and describe community members’ views of what they understood to be a quality partnership. Thirty-seven community representatives were engaged in individual as well as focus group interviews. These representatives were identified first through a stakeholder analysis procedure that sought to determine who in the community would have valuable input for the university-community partnership. As a point of departure, the following two questions were asked consecutively: What are your needs and expectations of a partnership with the university and what would you regard as a quality partnership between the HEI and the community? The sample selection was purposive, utilising the snowball technique. Data was transcribed and analysed using Tesch’s eight-step method (Tesch 1990, in Creswell 1994, p. 155. Interview data and field notes were co-coded, crosschecked and triangulated. Feedback workshops were conducted with the community to confirm the findings. A consensus was reached that four main requirements emerged from the data: —Balance the partnership objectives of both parties —Ensure an unexploitative partnership —Share power and control in the partnership —Maintain and monitor the partnership. This article provides a brief overview of the national

  6. Engaging Families in Partnership Programs to Promote Student Success: Q&A for Dr. Joyce L. Epstein. REL Mid-Atlantic Educator Effectiveness Webinar Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In this webinar, Dr. Joyce Epstein, Director of the Center on School, Family, and Community Partnerships and the National Network of Partnership Schools, discussed what the research says about effective family engagement. The webinar and PowerPoint presentation are also available. A brief list of resources is included.

  7. Western Hemisphere Knowledge Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, T. F.

    2001-05-01

    , and application of knowledge concerning the nature of -- and interaction among -- matter, living organisms, energy, information, and human behavior. This strategy calls for innovative partnerships among the physical, biological, health, and social sciences, engineering, and the humanities. New kinds of partnership must also be forged among academia, business and industry, governments, and nongovernmental organizations. Geophysicists can play an important role in these partnerships. A focus for these partnerships is to manage the individual economic productivity that drives both human development and global change. As world population approaches stability during the twenty-first century, individual economic productivity will be the critical link between the human and the natural systems on planet Earth. AGU is among a core group of individuals and institutions proposing Western Hemisphere Knowledge Partnerships (WHKP) to test the hypothesis that knowledge, broadly construed, is an important organizing principle in choosing a path into the future. The WHKP agenda includes: (1) life-long learning, (2) the health and resilience of natural ecosystems, (3) eco-efficiency in economic production and consumption, (4) extension of national income accounts, (5) environmentally benign sources of energy, (6) delivery of health care, (7) intellectual property rights, and (8) networks for action by local communities.Collaboratories and distance education technologies will be major tools. A panel of experts will explore this proposal.

  8. [Overview of patents on targeted genome editing technologies and their implications for innovation and entrepreneurship education in universities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiangyu, Fan; Yanping, Lin; Guojian, Liao; Jianping, Xie

    2015-12-01

    Zinc finger nuclease, transcription activator-like effector nuclease, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 nuclease are important targeted genome editing technologies. They have great significance in scientific research and applications on aspects of functional genomics research, species improvement, disease prevention and gene therapy. There are past or ongoing disputes over ownership of the intellectual property behind every technology. In this review, we summarize the patents on these three targeted genome editing technologies in order to provide some reference for developing genome editing technologies with self-owned intellectual property rights and some implications for current innovation and entrepreneurship education in universities.

  9. School-University Partnerships and Partner Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodlad, John I.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the preservice teacher education role of professional development schools in the context of school-university partnerships. The necessary joining of K-12 and university cultures raises numerous problems, including dealing with cultural clash and schools of education, sustaining leadership and commitment, providing adequate resources,…

  10. SED/Apple Computer, Inc., Partnership Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Peter F.

    1991-01-01

    In 1990, the New York State Education Department (SED), Apple Computer, Inc., Boards of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES), and school districts formed a partnership to explore the contribution technology can make to schools based on Apple Computer's Learning Society and SED's Long-Range Plan for Technology in Elementary and Secondary…

  11. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the

  12. 高校对口支援中教育资源优化配置的理念研究%Philosophy Study on Optimal Allocation of Educational Resources in the Partnership Support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王成端

    2012-01-01

    西部高校对口支援工作中最核心的工作是教育资源的支援与优化配置。如何对受援高等学校公平、透明、有效配置教育资源一直是我国教育行政管理部门在西部高校对口支援工作中希望研究解决的问题。教育资源配置理念决定了教育资源配置的效果。基于教育部陈希副部长对今后对口支援工作提出的“四个显著提升”战略,使政府、支援学校和受援学校3个主体有效互动,研究提出了“政府主导,资源共享,绩效优先,验收后补”的政府对高校对口支援教育资源优化配置的理念,以及“强化领导,培育特色,提高质量,形成机制”的受援高校内部对对口支援教育资源的优化配置理念。%The core of partnership support in west colleges and universities is to support the educational resources and optimize their distribution. How to give the recipient universities a fair, transparent, and effec- tive allocation of educational resources is always the problem in partnership support of west colleges and uni- versifies studied and solved by the higher education administration. sources decides the effect of optimal allocation of resources. Based The philosophy of optimal allocation of re- on the strategy of " the Four Distinct Up-port, and to make by the deputy minister in Ministry of Education CHEN Xi for the future partnership sup- the government, supporting universities, and recipient universities in three of the main ef- fective interaction, the paper proposes the philosophy of " Government - led, Resource Sharing, Performance Priority, Complement after Acceptance" for government optimizing the allocation of educational resources with partnership support in colleges and universities, and the philosophy of ing the Characteristics, allocation of educational Strengthen the Leadership, Nurtur- Improve the Quality, Form the Mechanism" for recipient universities optimizing the

  13. Creating Linkages between the Labour Market and Agricultural Higher Education in Iran: Strategies and Mechanisms for Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahedi, Reza; Saadi, Heshmatollah; Farani, Ahmad Yaghoubi

    2011-01-01

    Employment of agriculture graduates in Iran is a major problem that needs to be addressed. There are three main issues: lack of robust strategies for linking agricultural higher education and the labour market, the lack of relevance of agricultural curricula to the real needs of the labour market, and diminishing levels of government services for…

  14. Towards New Learning Partnerships in Bilingual Educational Contexts--Raising "Learner Awareness" and Creating Conditions for "Reciprocity" and "Pedagogic Attention"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz de Zarobe, Yolanda; Coyle, Do

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the need to develop new pedagogic approaches which promote learner independence in contexts where learning takes place through the medium of more than one language. The challenges of responding to a rapidly changing educational landscape to ensure that our learners become pluriliterate global citizens are presented through…

  15. Choreographing Partnerships within an Organizational Structure of Accountability: Maryland State Department of Education's Shift from Compliance Monitor to Breakthrough Partner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickling, Laura Rutter; Doneker, Karen Lee

    2014-01-01

    Drawing upon data from twenty-five interviews, this paper examines how the Maryland State Department of Education's Cross-functional Team navigates its changing role from compliance monitor to breakthrough partner in terms of discourse, time, and flexibility, as it carries out the work of the Breakthrough Center. It also examines how the role of…

  16. Joined up Thinking? A Review of the Impact of a Higher Education and Industry Partnership on Undergraduate Product Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurn, Karl M.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide educators and potential industrial partners with an insight into students' perceptions of working with industry during their undergraduate studies, and to highlight, through comments from academic staff, the effect on their design outcomes. The paper focuses on a collaborative design activity conducted with…

  17. Inclusive Financial Literacy Education for Inspiring a Critical Financial Consciousness: An Experiment in Partnership with Marginalised Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visano, Brenda Spotton; Ek-Udofia, Imo

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of critical inquiry, traditional financial literacy education risks socialising economically marginalised groups into an acceptance of the very power structures that created their marginalisation in the first place. The instructor-facilitator seeking to confront the challenge of promoting critical thinking about a subject widely…

  18. Teaming Up: Higher Education-Business Partnerships and Alliances in North America. Understanding the Differences Series. Working Paper No. 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Garza, Guillermo Fernandez; Landrum, Bertha A.; Samuels, Barbara

    This report presents the responses of three experts from Canada, Mexico, and the United States to 18 questions concerning issues in business-higher education alliances in the context of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). They address such issues as the need for alliances; the characteristics of successful (and unsuccessful)…

  19. Benefit Incidence Analysis of Government Spending on Public-Private Partnership Schooling under Universal Secondary Education Policy in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokadala, J.; Barungi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The study establishes whether government spending on private universal secondary education (USE) schools is equitable across quintiles disaggregated by gender and by region in Uganda. The study employs benefit incidence analysis tool on the Uganda National Panel Survey (UNPS 2009/10) data to establish the welfare impact of public subsidy on…

  20. Dance Partners for Creativity: Choreographing Space for Co-Participative Research into Creativity and Partnership in Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Kerry; Craft, Anna; Rolfe, Linda; Jobbins, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    This paper details the early stages of research which, through exploring new methodological and conceptual spaces, is being carried out with the aim of contributing to redressing the balance between creativity and performativity, in secondary level dance education in England. The Dance Partners for Creativity Research (DPC) Project is a…

  1. Twenty-first Century Space Science in The Urban High School Setting: The NASA/John Dewey High School Educational Outreach Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, B.; Levy, M.; Reyes, C.; Austin, S.

    2003-05-01

    A unique and innovative partnership has recently developed between NASA and John Dewey High School, infusing Space Science into the curriculum. This partnership builds on an existing relationship with MUSPIN/NASA and their regional center at the City University of New York based at Medgar Evers College. As an outgrowth of the success and popularity of our Remote Sensing Research Program, sponsored by the New York State Committee for the Advancement of Technology Education (NYSCATE), and the National Science Foundation and stimulated by MUSPIN-based faculty development workshops, our science department has branched out in a new direction - the establishment of a Space Science Academy. John Dewey High School, located in Brooklyn, New York, is an innovative inner city public school with students of a diverse multi-ethnic population and a variety of economic backgrounds. Students were recruited from this broad spectrum, which covers the range of learning styles and academic achievement. This collaboration includes students of high, average, and below average academic levels, emphasizing participation of students with learning disabilities. In this classroom without walls, students apply the strategies and methodologies of problem-based learning in solving complicated tasks. The cooperative learning approach simulates the NASA method of problem solving, as students work in teams, share research and results. Students learn to recognize the complexity of certain tasks as they apply Earth Science, Mathematics, Physics, Technology and Engineering to design solutions. Their path very much follows the NASA model as they design and build various devices. Our Space Science curriculum presently consists of a one-year sequence of elective classes taken in conjunction with Regents-level science classes. This sequence consists of Remote Sensing, Planetology, Mission to Mars (NASA sponsored research program), and Microbiology, where future projects will be astronomy related. This

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okbay, Aysu; Beauchamp, Jonathan P.; Fontana, Mark A.; Lee, James J.; Pers, Tune H.; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Turley, Patrick; Chen, Guo-Bo; Emilsson, Valur; Meddens, S. Fleur W.; Oskarsson, Sven; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Thom, Kevin; Timshel, Pascal; de Vlaming, Ronald; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Bacelis, Jonas; Baumbach, Clemens; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Brandsma, Johannes H.; Concas, Maria Pina; Derringer, Jaime; Furlotte, Nicholas A.; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Girotto, Giorgia; Gupta, Richa; Hall, Leanne M.; Harris, Sarah E.; Hofer, Edith; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Kaasik, Kadri; Kalafati, Ioanna P.; Karlsson, Robert; Kong, Augustine; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J.; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Lind, Penelope A.; Lindgren, Karl-Oskar; Liu, Tian; Mangino, Massimo; Marten, Jonathan; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B.; van der Most, Peter J.; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Payton, Antony; Pervjakova, Natalia; Peyrot, Wouter J.; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rueedi, Rico; Salvi, Erika; Schmidt, Börge; Schraut, Katharina E.; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert V.; Poot, Raymond A.; Pourcain, Beate; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Verweij, Niek; Vuckovic, Dragana; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jingyun; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Zhihong; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boyle, Patricia A.; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Davies, Gail; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deloukas, Panos; Demuth, Ilja; Ding, Jun; Eibich, Peter; Eisele, Lewin; Eklund, Niina; Evans68, David M.; Faul, Jessica D.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Forstner, Andreas J.; Gandin, Ilaria; Gunnarsson, Bjarni; Halldórsson, Bjarni V.; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Homuth, Georg; Horan, Michael A.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Jager, Philip L.; Joshi, Peter K.; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika A.; Kähönen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Keltigangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kroh, Martin; Kutalik, Zoltan; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J.; Lebreton, Maël P.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C.M.; Loukola, Anu; Madden, Pamela A.; Mägi, Reedik; Mäki-Opas, Tomi; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meddens, Gerardus A.; McMahon, George; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Milaneschi, Yusplitri; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Myhre, Ronny; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Ollier, William E.R.; Palotie, Aarno; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Petrovic, Katja E.; Porteous, David J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Ring, Susan M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rostapshova, Olga; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Rodney J.; Smith, Blair H.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Staessen, Jan A.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Strauch, Konstantin; Terracciano, Antonio; Tobin, Martin D.; Ulivi, Sheila; Vaccargiu, Simona; Quaye, Lydia; van Rooij, Frank J.A.; Venturini, Cristina; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A.E.; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M.; Vozzi, Diego; Waage, Johannes; Ware, Erin B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Attia, John R.; Bennett, David A.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Bisgaard, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bultmann, Ute; Chabris, Christopher F.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George V.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franke, Barbara; Franke, Lude; Gasparini, Paolo; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Gratten, Jacob; Groenen, Patrick J.F.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Hinds, David A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G.; Jacobsson, Bo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lehrer, Steven F.; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Pendleton, Neil; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Perola, Markus; Pirastu, Nicola; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Power, Christine; Province, Michael A.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A. Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tiemeier, Henning; Tung, Joyce Y.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vitart, Veronique; Vollenweider, Peter; Weir, David R.; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Conley, Dalton C.; Krueger, Robert F.; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Laibson, David I.; Medland, Sarah E.; Meyer, Michelle N.; Yang, Jian; Johannesson, Magnus; Visscher, Peter M.; Esko, Tõnu; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Educational attainment (EA) is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are also estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals1. We report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for EA that extends our earlier discovery sample1,2 of 101,069 individuals to 293,723 individuals, and a replication in an independent sample of 111,349 individuals from the UK Biobank. We now identify 74 genome-wide significant loci associated with number of years of schooling completed. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with educational attainment are disproportionately found in genomic regions regulating gene expression in the fetal brain. Candidate genes are preferentially expressed in neural tissue, especially during the prenatal period, and enriched for biological pathways involved in neural development. Our findings demonstrate that, even for a behavioral phenotype that is mostly environmentally determined, a well-powered GWAS identifies replicable associated genetic variants that suggest biologically relevant pathways. Because EA is measured in large numbers of individuals, it will continue to be useful as a proxy phenotype in efforts to characterize the genetic influences of related phenotypes, including cognition and neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:27225129

  3. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is

  4. Strategic Partnership: Potential for Ensuring the University Sustainable Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Salimova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to research the theoretical approaches to strategic partnerships of universities, analyse the current trends of partnership development of universities in the context of sustainable development, discuss the experience of the National Research Ogarev Mordovia State University in terms of strategic partnerships creation and define the new opportunities of developing the strategic partnerships. The methodology of the paper is based on comprehensive literature review in the sphere of university partnerships. The authors use a comparative method, analysis and summarizing aimed on defining the current trends and issues related to strategic partnership. There has been developed the partnership commitment chart of key stakeholders of universities to show current points and target points. The research findings are generalization of the strategic partnership theory with the focus on university activities in reference to sustainable development, clarification of current trends and issues of university strategic partnership, definition of further opportunities and methods in the area under consideration. Under modern conditions it is extremely important to develop a strategic partnership in the sphere of higher education. Universities are open institutions and they need to be involved into different processes of economy and society development. Article’s significance is in a new view on strategic partnership in the context of sustainable development of universities.

  5. NASA Partnership with JSU and MSU to Promote Remote Sensing Applications and Global Climate Change Education: 2013 Summer Course/Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    NASA Innovations in Climate Education (NICE) is a competitive project to promote climate and Earth system science literacy and seeks to increase the access of underrepresented minority groups to science careers and educational opportunities. A three year funding was received from NASA to partnership with JSU and MSU under cooperative agreement "Strengthening Global Climate Change education through Remote Sensing Application in Coastal Environment using NASA Satellite Data and Models". The goal is to increase the number of undergraduate students at Jackson State University, a Historically Black University, who are prepared to pursue higher academic degrees and careers in the fields relevant to earth system science global climate change, marine and environmental sciences. A two week summer course/workshop was held during May 20-31, 2013 at JSU, focusing on historical and technical concepts of remote sensing technology and applications to climate and global climate change. Nine students from meteorology, biology, industrial technology and computer science/engineering of JSU participated in the course/workshop. The lecture topics include: introduction to remote sensing and GIS, introduction to atmospheric science and climate, introduction to NASA innovations in climate education, introduction to remote sensing technology for bio-geosphere, introduction to earth system science, principles of paleoclimatology and global change, daily weather briefing, satellite image interpretation and so on. In addition to lectures, lab sessions were held for hand-on experiences for remote sensing applications to atmosphere, biosphere, earth system science and climate change using ERDAS/ENVI GIS software and satellite tools. Field trip to Barnett reservoir and National weather Service (NWS) was part of the workshop. Some of the activities of the sessions will be presented. Basics of Earth System Science is a non-mathematical introductory course designed for high school seniors, high

  6. Service-Learning in the Undergraduate Geoscience Classroom: Establishing Community Partnerships to Enhance Education in Climate Change Science in Local Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, L. H.; Faust, R.

    2009-12-01

    The complexity of the science surrounding global climate change makes effective communication about this issue to the public difficult, especially at a time when many would argue that public understanding of science in general has decreased. As a service-learning project, a partnership was created between an upper-level environmental studies climate change class at Ursinus College (UC) and the UC Science In Motion (SIM) program to construct an appropriate lab activity that would foster scientific knowledge and abilities in high school students particularly in relation to basic climate change science. The Pennsylvania SIM program is a state-funded initiative to make a selection of lab activities, equipment, and expertise available to teachers at secondary schools at no cost to the schools with the goal to “strengthen the quality of science education for all.” The twelve SIM sites are dispersed throughout PA and serve over 200 school districts overall. The UC SIM program has served over 30 local schools with labs and activities from which the teachers may select. Prior to the partnership discussed here, there were no labs in the UC SIM program that incorporated the concepts of climate change and though a “drop-off” climate change lab was desired, the staff would have no time to design one. The adaptation of a previously written lab set on climate change was assigned as a project for the 9 environmental studies majors at UC enrolled in a Fall 2008 course exploring the science of global climate change. While an advanced course within the environmental studies curriculum, the science backgrounds of the college students themselves were mixed, ranging from science majors to students for whom this was the first or second science course taken at college. In addition to the typical load of coursework, the students worked in small groups on this project throughout the semester, collecting the supplies, testing and adapting the labs, creating a video to guide users

  7. The St. Catherine`s sea turtle conservation program: Modeling effective science education through conservation and research partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    March, N.B.; Bishop, G. [Georgia Southern Univ., Statesboro, GA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Georgia school teachers served eight to ten day internships as research colleagues on St. Catherine`s island, Georgia. Interns monitored daily nesting activity, evaluated possible nests, validated egg chambers, screened the nests, and monitored each nest daily and assessed hatching success by excavation upon emergence of hatchlings. The real-world, hands-on holistic field experience immersed school teachers in the problems of executing a natural history conservation project integrating scientific content and methodology, mathematical analysis, and computer documentation. Outcomes included increased scientific inquiry, reduced science anxiety, heightened self-confidence, and enhanced credibility with students and colleagues. This educational model is applicable to many areas and problems.

  8. Sharing our successes II: Changing the face of science and mathematics education through teacher-focused partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    Industry Initiatives for Science and Math Education (IISME) in the San Francisco Bay Area planned and convened the second national conference for representatives of scientific work experience programs for K-12 teachers (SWEPs) at Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California at Berkeley October 13-14, 1994. The goal of this conference was to further strengthen the growing community of SWEP managers and teacher participants by providing an opportunity for sharing expertise and strategies about the following: (1) How SWEPs can complement and stimulate systemic education reform efforts; (2) Assessment strategies piloted by the ambitious multi-site evaluation project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as well as smaller evaluation projects piloted by other SWEPs; (3) Expanding and strengthening the base of teachers served by SWEPs; (4) Ensuring that SWEPs adequately support teachers in affecting classroom transfer and offer {open_quotes}more than just a summerjob{close_quotes}; (5) Sustaining and expanding new programs. A special teacher strand focused on leadership development supporting teachers to become effective change agents in their classrooms and schools, and developing strong teacher communities.

  9. The Human Genome Project and Mental Retardation: An Educational Program. Final Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Sharon

    1999-05-03

    The Arc, a national organization on mental retardation, conducted an educational program for members, many of whom have a family member with a genetic condition causing mental retardation. The project informed members about the Human Genome scientific efforts, conducted training regarding ethical, legal and social implications and involved members in issue discussions. Short reports and fact sheets on genetic and ELSI topics were disseminated to 2,200 of the Arc's leaders across the country and to other interested individuals. Materials produced by the project can e found on the Arc's web site, TheArc.org.

  10. Climate change communication through networks and partnerships: A successful model of engaging and educating non-specialist audience in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, S.; Nayak, R.; Gore, A.

    2013-12-01

    There is an overwhelming international scientific consensus on climate change; however, the global community still lacks the resolve to implement meaningful solutions. No meaningful solutions can be found without educating and engaging non-scientific community in addressing the climate change. With more than 41 percent of world's population falling under 10-34 years age group, the future citizens, inspiring them is a great challenge for the climate scientists. In order to educate the youth and students in India, a model program named 'Climeducate' was created with the help of scientists in Indian Polar Research Network (IPRN), trained climate leaders in ';The Climate Reality Project', and a local organization (Planature Consultancy Services). This model was developed keeping in mind the obstacles that may be faced in reaching out to non-specialist audiences in different parts of India. The identified obstacles were 1- making such a presentation that could reveal the truth about the climate crisis in a way that ignites the moral courage in non-specialist audience 2- lack of funding for travel and boarding expenses of a climate communicator, 3- language barrier in educating local audiences, 4- logistical arrangements at the venue. In this presentation we will share how all the four obstacles were overcome. Audiences were also given short questionnaires before and after the presentation. Remarkable changes in the pattern of answers, data would be shared in the presentation, were observed between the two questionnaires. More importantly, a significant difference in audience engagement was observed comparing a presentation that integrated scientific data with audiovisuals prepared by The Climate Reality Project Chairman, Al Gore (also Former US Vice President) and the other using simple PowerPoint slides. With the success of this program which was implemented among 500 audiences in the eastern India, we aim to replicate this program soon in other parts of India. This

  11. Fonoaudiologia e educação infantil: uma parceria necessária Speech therapy and infantile education: a necessary partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana Carla Santos Maranhão

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: investigar as informações que os professores de educação infantil possuem em relação a Fonoaudiologia na escola, bem como sobre temas ligados à área de linguagem. MÉTODOS: foi aplicado um questionário, contendo 17 questões objetivas em uma amostra com 73 professores de educação infantil da rede municipal de ensino da cidade de Maceió-AL. RESULTADOS: os participantes relacionaram a atuação fonoaudiológica na escola à presença de alterações no desenvolvimento da criança. O índice de professores da amostra que obtiveram contato com o fonoaudiólogo na escola é de 4,1%. Estes educadores relatam que apenas 57,5% receberam informações sobre a aquisição de linguagem e o desenvolvimento da escrita. CONCLUSãO: com a realização da presente pesquisa foi possível confirmar a necessidade de reforçar as ações fonoaudiológicas na escola, bem como a parceria entre fonoaudiólogos e professores.PURPOSE: to investigate the knowledge of infantile education teachers about the speech therapy at school, as well as on subjects regarding language area. METHODS: 73 infantile education teachers in public schools of Maceió-AL answered a questionnaire containing 17 objective questions. RESULTS: the participants related the performance of speech therapy staff at schools to the presence of alterations in children development. Only 4.1% of the teachers have had contact with some speech therapist at school. These educators report that only 57.5% received information about language acquisition and development of writing. CONCLUSION: upon accomplishing this research it was possible to confirm the necessity for reinforcing speech therapy related actions in school, as well as the partnership among speech therapists and teachers.

  12. Creating a culture of innovation in nursing education through shared vision, leadership, interdisciplinary partnerships, and positive deviance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnyk, Bernadette Mazurek; Davidson, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    Although innovation is typically viewed by healthcare and academic institutions, business leaders, entrepreneurs, and private corporations as necessary for continuous improvement, high-quality care, and scientific advancement, barriers in creating and sustaining innovative academic environments abound and require effective leadership to overcome them. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to describe the major barriers and facilitators to innovation in colleges of nursing and healthcare professions along with recommendations for creating a culture of innovation in these academic environments. In addition, key strategies for educational innovation are discussed. Innovations launched by the Arizona State University College of Nursing & Healthcare Innovation are highlighted to provide examples of how a college that established innovation as a top priority in 2005 in its strategic plan created an innovative culture that has led to several successful outcomes.

  13. The Santa Ana Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cournoyer, David, Ed.

    2004-01-01

    One of the priority interests of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation is to connect the knowledge and resources of institutions with communities in order to improve the quality of life in community. Partnerships achieve uncommon results. In Santa Ana, California, an unusual partnership of public schools, community college, universities, community…

  14. Expanding Public/Private Partnerships For Improving Basic Education through School Sponsorship in the Dominican Republic. Final Report. Basic Education and Policy Support Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Patricia; Kane, Michael

    The Basic Education and Policy Support Activity (BEPS), a new five-year initiative sponsored by United States Agency for International Development's (USAID) Center for Human Capacity Development, is designed to improve the quality, effectiveness, and access to formal and nonformal basic education. BEPS operates through both core funds and buy-ins…

  15. Building Customized University-to-Business (U2B) Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, George; Verma, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Continuing education (CE) units throughout the United States have successfully built University-to-Business (U2B) partnerships to provide greater value to their community partners and to increase revenue for the university. Our experience in building U2B partnerships and feedback from our partners--businesses, corporations, state agencies, and…

  16. Increasing Geriatric Social Work Content through University/Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaslin, Rosemary; Barnstable, Cherie Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Since their inception, social work education programs have operated in partnership with community agencies, as both field sites and foci for research. However, surprisingly little has been written on models of university/community partnerships in social work or the role of agencies in shaping curricula. This study analyzed the outcome reports of…

  17. Formulating Effective Inter-Institutional Partnerships: A Policy Analysis Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antelo, Absael; Henderson, Richard L.

    The need for educators to recognize school/business partnerships and interinstitutional collaboration in a perspective generally shared among corporations is the focus of this paper. An overview of school/business partnerships is followed by a brief description of cooperative efforts that illustrates a shift toward more collaborative approaches.…

  18. A Canadian Lens on Facilitating Factors for North American Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Christa Lee

    2013-01-01

    What does it take to develop and maintain effective international education partnerships between institutions in the Canada, Mexico, and United States? This was a driving question for the qualitative study funded by a Fulbright-Enders-Garcia grant examining the relationship between North American partnerships and campus internationalization.…

  19. Features partnership in auditing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Bondar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The notion of «institution partnerships in the audit» and its importance in Ukraine. Done overview of international experience in the Institute of partnerships in the audit business. Determined the nature of the audit, rights, duties and powers of the partnership during the audit. Done distribution of functions between the partner and the engagement partner in the synthesis of these blocks: taking on a new customer service or continued cooperation with existing customers (clients; familiarization with activities of customer audits, including an understanding of its internal control system; identification and assessment of risks of material misstatement of accounting; audit process and the audit and the formation of the final judgment. On the basis of the distribution of functions between the partner and the engagement partner, defined the overall structure of management system auditing firm. These conditions for implementation of partnerships in the audit business, and identified a number of advantages and disadvantages of partnerships for auditing.

  20. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification

  1. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for

  2. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the

  3. Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) Brining STEM Research to 7th-12th Grade Science and Math Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radencic, S.; McNeal, K. S.; Pierce, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Initiating New Science Partnerships in Rural Education (INSPIRE) program at Mississippi State University (MSU), funded by the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK12) program, focuses on the advancement of Earth and Space science education in K-12 classrooms. INSPIRE currently in its third year of partnering ten graduate students each year from the STEM fields of Geosciences, Engineering, Physics and Chemistry at MSU with five teachers from local, rural school districts. The five year project serves to enhance graduate student's communication skills as they create interactive lessons linking their STEM research focus to the state and national standards covered in science and math classrooms for grades 7-12 through inquiry experiences. Each graduate student is responsible for the development of two lessons each month of the school year that include an aspect of their STEM research, including the technologies that they may utilize to conduct their STEM research. The plans are then published on the INSPIRE project webpage, www.gk12.msstate.edu, where they are a free resource for any K-12 classroom teacher seeking innovative activities for their classrooms and total over 300 lesson activities to date. Many of the participating teachers and graduate students share activities developed with non-participating teachers, expanding INSPIRE's outreach of incorporating STEM research into activities for K-12 students throughout the local community. Examples of STEM research connections to classroom topics related to earth and ocean science include activities using GPS with GIS for triangulation and measurement of area in geometry; biogeochemical response to oil spills compared to organism digestive system; hydrogeology water quality monitoring and GIS images used as a determinant for habitat suitability in area water; interactions of acids and bases in the Earth's environments and surfaces; and the importance of electrical circuitry in an electrode used in

  4. Canadian Art Partnership Program in Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketovuori, Mikko

    2011-01-01

    This article is about a multidisciplinary R&D project in which a Canadian Learning Through The Arts (LTTA) program was imported to Finland in 2003-2004. Cultural differences in arts education in Finland and Canada are discussed. While Finland has a national school curriculum with all the arts included. Canada relies more on partnerships to…

  5. CHP Partnership Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partners of EPA's Combined Heat and Power Partnership include federal, state, and local government agencies and private organizations such as energy users, energy service companies, CHP project developers and consultants, and equipment manufacturers.

  6. A Progressing Partnership

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Russian President Dmitry Medvedev’s China visit helps promote bilateral strategic partnership How similar are China and Russia? They are neighbors,partners and co-founders of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization(SCO).

  7. University/NETL Student Partnership Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald Holder; Jonathan Mathews; Thomas Wilson; Steven Chuang; Cristina Amon; Turgay Ertekin; Karl Johnson; Goodarz Ahmadi; David Sholl

    2006-10-31

    The University/National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Student Partnership Program stimulated basic and applied research in Energy and Environmental Science areas through NETL's Office of Science and Technology (OST). This Partnership Program supported the education of graduate students in Energy and Environmental Sciences, while fostering increased scientific interaction between NETL and the participating universities, by providing graduate student support for research at a NETL facility under the joint supervision of NETL and university faculty. Projects were intended to enhance a previously established scientific or engineering relationship or to create a new relationship. Major areas of research under the Partnership Program included CO{sub 2} sequestration, granular solids flow, multi-phase flow in porous solids, gas hydrates, nanotubes, acid-mine flow identification and remediation, water-gas shift reaction, circulating fluidized beds, slurry bubble column, fuel desulphurization, carbon fibers, and fuel cells.

  8. The clinical partnership as strategic alliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Jeanne M; Donahue, Moreen; Bhalla, Bharat B

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a renewed partnership between a collegiate school of nursing and a community hospital. Universities and hospitals are searching for creative solutions to increase the number of registered nurses available to meet the demand for nursing care. An affiliation agreement had been in existence for many years, but health care system imperatives made it necessary to redesign the partnership between nursing education and nursing service. The model used to develop this new partnership is based on the work done in the field of management and is in the form of a strategic alliance. The success of a strategic alliance depends on two key factors: the relationship between partners and partnership performance. Identified outcomes show that this partnership is helping to meet the increasing demand for nursing care by building student capacity, satisfying mutual needs of faculty and clinical staff, and removing economic barriers. This article describes the development of the strategic alliance, its current status, and strategies for the future.

  9. News Conference: Take a hold of Hands-on Science Meeting: Prize-winning physics-education talks are a highlight of the DPG spring meeting in Jena Event: Abstracts flow in for ICPE-EPEC 2013 Schools: A new Schools Physics Partnership in Oxfordshire Conference: 18th MPTL is forum for multimedia in education Meeting: Pursuing playful science with Science on Stage Forthcoming events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Conference: Take a hold of Hands-on Science Meeting: Prize-winning physics-education talks are a highlight of the DPG spring meeting in Jena Event: Abstracts flow in for ICPE-EPEC 2013 Schools: A new Schools Physics Partnership in Oxfordshire Conference: 18th MPTL is forum for multimedia in education Meeting: Pursuing playful science with Science on Stage Forthcoming events

  10. 75 FR 29524 - Student Assistance General Provisions, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-26

    ..., Federal Pell Grant, Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership, William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan..., Federal Perkins Loan, Federal Pell Grant, Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership, William D....

  11. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification

  12. Principles of successful partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Kara; Denke, Nancy J; Gorombei, Deb; Ostroski, Tammy L; Root, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Health care providers must understand and value the unique contributions of all interdisciplinary professionals, with the goal of optimizing the wellness or illness needs of each patient. Work cannot be done in silos, and the ability to develop and sustain effective professional partnerships is essential. Health care teams must work within a complex environment that depends on the shared efforts of multiple professionals to successfully provide care in a fragmented, highly stressed system. Implementing partnerships that foster relationships through shared interests, vision, and values can aid in the coordination of resources to provide a more positive patient experience and outcome. The development of partnerships requires time and acceptance of shared risks and responsibilities. In return, involved parties will be able to build trust, share rewards, and expand the possibilities of what can be accomplished. The purpose of this review is to describe results-oriented partnerships, which include the attributes of collaboration, coordination, and communication. Essential concepts and practical tools for success are reviewed to offer new and existing partnerships a lens through which to view interdisciplinary interactions that can contribute to organizational success and longevity. Potential pitfalls that may impact patient services and organizational health are also discussed.

  13. Targeting Mr Average: Participation, Gender Equity and School Sport Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flintoff, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The School Sport Partnership Programme (SSPP) is one strand of the national strategy for physical education and school sport in England, the physical education and social sport Club Links Strategy (PESSCL). The SSPP aims to make links between school physical education (PE) and out of school sports participation, and has a particular remit to raise…

  14. An Investigation of the Dayton Regional STEM School Public-Private Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Kimberly S.

    This dissertation study documents in-depth the exploration of the Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) between the Dayton Regional STEM School (DRSS) and their industry partners as well as the establishment of a framework for evaluating and assessing PPPs. The public-private partnership agreements were studied in order to answer the over-arching research question: How is an effective public-private partnership established, assessed, and evaluated in education? A descriptive case study methodology was used to study DRSS' public-private partnership agreements to determine if goals and objectives were established and whether or not the partnerships met those goals and objectives. This case study also included the development and testing of a proposed evaluation framework that will allow for consistent, systematic inquiry that can produce defensible assertions regarding the assessment and evaluation of public-private partnerships in education. Results of the case study support the findings that utilization of an evaluation framework can serve to make public-private partnerships more successful. Results also indicated that establishment of goals and objectives enable effective evaluation for informal partnerships but could not be definitively stated for formal partnerships due to the lack of data points. The data from this case study revealed many emergent themes that should be considered in the development of future public-private partnerships. Overall this study contributes to the growing body of knowledge for public-private partnerships in education.

  15. Forming Social Partnership Policy in Vocational Training of Service Sector Specialists in Germany and Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Kredenets Nadiya

    2016-01-01

    The article deals with the problem of forming social partnership policy in vocational training of service sector specialists in Germany and Austria. The foreign and domestic pedagogical experience in establishing an effective system of social partnership in vocational education has been analyzed. The author has considered main factors of social partnership development in vocational education that influence the forming of normative and legal support; a multilevel structure of government manage...

  16. Crime and Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svarer, Michael

    This paper tests whether being convicted of a crime affects marriage market outcomes. While it is relatively well documented that crime hurts in terms of reduced future income, there has been little systematic analysis on the association between crime and marriage market outcomes. This paper...... exploits a detailed Danish register-based data set to fill this gap in the literature. The main findings are that male convicts do not face lower transition rates into partnerships as such, but they face a lower chance of forming partnerships with females from more well-o¤ families. In addition males who...

  17. Medical service and education partnership intervention for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder:presentation at health and education partnership meeting of American Pediatrics Annual Conference, 2014%注意缺陷多动障碍的医教结合干预--2014年美国儿科年会医教结合会场发言

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金星明

    2015-01-01

    注意缺陷多动障碍(attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, ADHD)在儿科临床上属于高发病率﹑低严重度的神经发育障碍,对儿童青少年的危害颇大。临床面临的挑战是家庭对儿童的药物治疗顾虑重重。我们采用医教结合的方式,将理念变行动,强调“4W”要素,开辟医教结合双通道,建立医教结合临床途径,通过医院对父母的培训及学校与医师的结对,加强学校转介﹑参与﹑研究和教学实践。在该模式下,医师走进学校进行ADHD的公众宣传,诊治中获取教师的信息反馈,并将行为治疗的基本方法融入对儿童的教育中;教师可协助医师提高诊断的客观性和准确性,参与父母培训,并开展对家庭的教育咨询;家长能密切配合治疗,提高家庭教育质量;而儿童青少年本人则在积极治疗中改善学习﹑情绪﹑交流和社会适应性,提高生活质量。%Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a chronic neurodevelopmental disorder pertaining to the diseases with high incidence but low severity in the pediatric clinics, that causes various functional impairment. One challenge in the pediatric practice is family’s concerns about the medication used to treat ADHD in children or adolescents. We adopt an approach that combines clinical practice with medical education to putting the idea into the action. While stressing the elements of “4W”, we open up the dual channels between medicine and education, establish a medical education system to strengthen school referrals, participation, research and teaching practice through parents training provided by hospitals and partnerships between schools and physicians. This model allows the physician to provide public medical education of ADHA in schools, receive feedback from teachers during the course of diagosis and treatment, while intergrate basic methods of therapy into chlid education. Teachers may help physicians improve the

  18. Forging partnerships between rural women with chronic conditions and their health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudney, Shirley; Weinert, Clarann; Kinion, Elizabeth

    2011-03-01

    Successful adaptation to chronic illness is enhanced by active client-health care provider partnerships. The purposes of this article are to (a) examine the health care partnership needs of western rural women with chronic illness who participated in a computer-based support and education project, (b) describe how the role of the women in the partnership can be maximized by the use of a personal health record and improving health literacy, and (c) discuss ways health care providers can enhance their role in the partnership by careful listening and creating environments conducive to forging productive client-provider partnerships.

  19. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for

  20. WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Myer; Terry Surles; Kelly Birkinshaw

    2004-01-01

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership is one of seven partnerships which have been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon dioxide capture, transport and sequestration (CT&S) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and the North Slope of Alaska. Led by the California Energy Commission, the West Coast Partnership is a consortium of over thirty five organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national labs and universities; private companies working on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. In an eighteen month Phase I project, the Partnership will evaluate both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options. Work will focus on five major objectives: (1) Collect data to characterize major CO{sub 2} point sources, the transportation options, and the terrestrial and geologic sinks in the region, and compile and organize this data via a geographic information system (GIS) database; (2) Address key issues affecting deployment of CT&S technologies, including storage site permitting and monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks (3) Conduct public outreach and maintain an open dialogue with stakeholders in CT&S technologies through public meetings, joint research, and education work (4) Integrate and analyze data and information from the above tasks in order to develop supply curves and cost effective, environmentally acceptable sequestration options, both near- and long-term (5) Identify appropriate terrestrial and geologic demonstration projects consistent with the options defined above, and create action plans for their safe and effective implementation A kickoff meeting for the West Coast Partnership was held on Sept 30-Oct

  1. Partnerships for optimizing organizational flexibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis Poliquin

    1999-01-01

    For the purpose of this conference, I was asked to discuss partnerships in general. We will first review the reasons that bring organizations to enter into a collaborative agreement, then provide examples of different types of partnerships, discuss some factors that seem to explain the success of partnerships, and review important points to consider before preparing...

  2. CarboSchools: partnerships between climate researchers and secondary school teachers. CarboOcean's and CarboEurope's combined initiative to educate pupils in latest marine and terrestrial carbon cycle research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volbers, A.; Freibauer, A.; Saugier, P.; CarboSchools Consortium

    2009-04-01

    CarboSchools links researchers from several leading carbon science laboratories in Europe with secondary schools. In these partnerships, young Europeans conduct experiments on the impact of greenhouse gases and learn about climate research and the reduction of emissions. Scientists and teachers co-operate to give young people practical experience of research through true investiagtions and direct interactions with scientists. The pupils also have the opportunity to inform the wider community about climate change by producing a final output of articles, exhibitions, conferences etc. Nine research institutes in seven countries are exploring how they can best motivate and support such partnerships at the regional level across a wide variety of contexts, topics, and age-groups. European co-operation makes it possible to compare results, learn from each other and develop replicable good practive. Pupils can gain European experience by getting involved in the Europe-wide "school CO2-web" project. In order to assess the educational impact of the CarboSchools project, an in-depth evaluation of attitudes, beliefs, and skills will be carried out. Started in 2004 by CarboEurope and CarboOcean, two major European Integrated Projects on the terrestrial and marine carbon cycle, CarboSchools is currently funded by the Science and society programme of the EU with a target of ca 100 schools directly involved. Furthermore, EPOCA, a new EU project on ocean acidification, joins forces with CarboSchools.

  3. Public private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasing in number worldwide and are used to build and manage large public infrastructure projects. In PPPs, the private sector plays a role in developing and maintaining public infrastructure and services, which is usually a public sector responsibility. Des

  4. Public private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasing in number worldwide and are used to build and manage large public infrastructure projects. In PPPs, the private sector plays a role in developing and maintaining public infrastructure and services, which is usually a public sector responsibility.

  5. Public-Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helby Petersen, Ole

    This PhD dissertation studies national similarities and differences in policy and regulation of public-private partnerships (PPPs), with an empirical focus on Denmark and Ireland. The starting point and motivation for the study is the observation that whereas PPPs are often depicted in the academic...

  6. Public-Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Gudrid

    There is a great deal of confusion about the meaning of the concept public-private partnership (PPP). Much is written on the subject but only rarely do authors give an adequate account of what they mean when they talk about PPP, nor do they acknowledge that there exist qualitatively different PPP...

  7. Public-Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann, Martin; Jeppesen, S.

    2006-01-01

    Public-private partnerships in the environmental field have emerged as one option in the pursuit of sustainable development. So-called ‘Green Networks’, ‘Cleaner Production Centres’, ‘Waste Minimisation Clubs’ are among others highlighted as alternatives to governmental regulation. While being...

  8. The Eastern Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian L.; Vilson, Maili

    2014-01-01

    When the EU launched the Eastern Partnership (EaP) in 2009, it did so with much rhetoric about projecting its soft power into Eastern Europe. Yet today, the EU's soft power project seems to have stalled, with developments in the region being less than favourable. This article argues that the EaP ...

  9. DEWI partnership in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durante, F.; Dutilleux, P.; Klug, H.; Winkler, W. [DEWI, Wilhelmshaven (Germany)

    2006-02-15

    DEWI already has offices in Germany, France, Spain and Brazil. In order to cooperate with a local partner on the fast growing market of Italy, DEWI has signed a partnership contract with Fichtner Italia. In DEWI's main office in Wilhelmshaven the Italian micro siting specialist Francesco Durante is the contact person for Italy. (orig.)

  10. Public private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasing in number worldwide and are used to build and manage large public infrastructure projects. In PPPs, the private sector plays a role in developing and maintaining public infrastructure and services, which is usually a public sector responsibility. Des

  11. The California Academic Partnership Program: A Case Study of Retrenchment from Two Different Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Michael

    This case study analyzed the management of the retrenchment for the California Academic Partnership Program (CAPP) from two perspectives: the functionalist perspective and the radical structuralist view. CAPP is a program supporting higher education faculty-secondary school teacher partnerships to improve secondary education. The California…

  12. Engineering Efforts and Opportunities in the National Science Foundation's Math and Science Partnerships (MSP) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Pamela; Borrego, Maura

    2013-01-01

    The National Science Foundation's Math and Science Partnership (MSP) program (NSF, 2012) supports partnerships between K-12 school districts and institutions of higher education (IHEs) and has been funding projects to improve STEM education in K-12 since 2002. As of 2011, a total of 178 MSP projects have received support as part of a STEM…

  13. A Narrative Inquiry into Corporate Unknowns: Faculty Experiences Concerning Privatized-Partnership Matriculation Pathway Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle, Carter Allen

    2011-01-01

    Host universities of Intensive English Programs (IEPs) commonly found on university campuses as a means to preparing English language learners (ELL) for tertiary education are being targeted by for-profit educational service providers for privatized partnerships. Partnership agreements generally include provisions for assumption of international…

  14. Systematic review of knowledge, confidence and education in nutritional genomics for students and professionals in nutrition and dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, O R L

    2014-06-01

    This review examines knowledge and confidence of nutrition and dietetics professionals in nutritional genomics and evaluates the teaching strategies in this field within nutrition and dietetics university programmes and professional development courses internationally. A systematic search of 10 literature databases was conducted from January 2000 to December 2012 to identify original research. Any studies of either nutrition and/or dietetics students or dietitians/nutritionists investigating current levels of knowledge or confidence in nutritional genomics, or strategies to improve learning and/or confidence in this area, were eligible. Eighteen articles (15 separate studies) met the inclusion criteria. Three articles were assessed as negative, eight as neutral and seven as positive according to the American Dietetics Association Quality Criteria Checklist. The overall ranking of evidence was low. Dietitians have low involvement, knowledge and confidence in nutritional genomics, and evidence for educational strategies is limited and methodologically weak. There is a need to develop training pathways and material to up-skill nutrition and/or dietetics students and nutrition and/or dietetics professionals in nutritional genomics through multidisciplinary collaboration with content area experts. There is a paucity of high quality evidence on optimum teaching strategies; however, methods promoting repetitive exposure to nutritional genomics material, problem-solving, collaborative and case-based learning are most promising for university and professional development programmes. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  15. Genome-wide association study of cognitive functions and educational attainment in UK Biobank (N=112 151)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, G; Marioni, R E; Liewald, D C; Hill, W D; Hagenaars, S P; Harris, S E; Ritchie, S J; Luciano, M; Fawns-Ritchie, C; Lyall, D; Cullen, B; Cox, S R; Hayward, C; Porteous, D J; Evans, J; McIntosh, A M; Gallacher, J; Craddock, N; Pell, J P; Smith, D J; Gale, C R; Deary, I J

    2016-01-01

    People's differences in cognitive functions are partly heritable and are associated with important life outcomes. Previous genome-wide association (GWA) studies of cognitive functions have found evidence for polygenic effects yet, to date, there are few replicated genetic associations. Here we use data from the UK Biobank sample to investigate the genetic contributions to variation in tests of three cognitive functions and in educational attainment. GWA analyses were performed for verbal–numerical reasoning (N=36 035), memory (N=112 067), reaction time (N=111 483) and for the attainment of a college or a university degree (N=111 114). We report genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based associations in 20 genomic regions, and significant gene-based findings in 46 regions. These include findings in the ATXN2, CYP2DG, APBA1 and CADM2 genes. We report replication of these hits in published GWA studies of cognitive function, educational attainment and childhood intelligence. There is also replication, in UK Biobank, of SNP hits reported previously in GWA studies of educational attainment and cognitive function. GCTA-GREML analyses, using common SNPs (minor allele frequency>0.01), indicated significant SNP-based heritabilities of 31% (s.e.m.=1.8%) for verbal–numerical reasoning, 5% (s.e.m.=0.6%) for memory, 11% (s.e.m.=0.6%) for reaction time and 21% (s.e.m.=0.6%) for educational attainment. Polygenic score analyses indicate that up to 5% of the variance in cognitive test scores can be predicted in an independent cohort. The genomic regions identified include several novel loci, some of which have been associated with intracranial volume, neurodegeneration, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. PMID:27046643

  16. Genetic education and the challenge of genomic medicine: development of core competences to support preparation of health professionals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skirton, Heather; Lewis, Celine; Kent, Alastair;

    2010-01-01

    in professional education and regulation between European countries, setting curricula may not be practical. Core competences are used as a basis for health professional education in many fields and settings. An Expert Group working under the auspices of the EuroGentest project and European Society of Human...... Genetics Education Committee agreed that a pragmatic solution to the need to establish common standards for education and practice in genetic health care was to agree to a set of core competences that could apply across Europe. These were agreed through an exhaustive process of consultation with relevant......The use of genetics and genomics within a wide range of health-care settings requires health professionals to develop expertise to practise appropriately. There is a need for a common minimum standard of competence in genetics for health professionals in Europe but because of differences...

  17. Industrial Partnership Prosperity Game{trademark}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyak, K.; Berman, M.; Beck, D.

    1998-02-01

    Prosperity Games TM are an outgrowth and adaptation move/countermove and seminar War Games. Prosperity Games TM are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education, and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from a global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions in specific industries. All Prosperity Games TM are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the Industry Partnership Prosperity Game sponsored by the Technology Partnerships and Commercialization Center at Sandia National Laboratories. Players came from the Sandia line organizations, the Sandia business development and technology partnerships organizations, the US Department of Energy, academia, and industry The primary objectives of this game were to: explore ways to increase industry partnerships to meet long-term Sandia goals; improve Sandia business development and marketing strategies and tactics; improve the process by which Sandia develops long-term strategic alliances. The game actions and recommendations of these players provided valuable insights as to what Sandia can do to meet these objectives.

  18. Balancing power: A grounded theory study on partnership of academic service institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmati Nabavi, Fatemeh; Vanaki, Zohreh; Mohammadi, Eesa; Yazdani, Shahram

    2017-07-01

    Governments and professional organizations have called for new partnerships between health care providers and academics to improve clinical education for the benefit of both students and patients. To develop a substantive grounded theory on the process of forming academic-service partnerships in implementing clinical education, from the perspective of academic and clinical nursing staff members and managers working in Iranian settings. The participants included 15 hospital nurses, nurse managers, nurse educators, and educational managers from two central universities and clinical settings from 2009 to 2012. Data were collected through 30 in-depth, semi-structure interviews with the individual participants and then analyzed using the methodology of Strauss and Corbin's grounded theory. Utilizing "balancing power" as the core variable enabled us to integrate the concepts concerning the partnership processes between clinical and educational institutes. Three distinct and significant categories emerged to explain the process of partnership: 1) divergence, 2) conflict between educational and caring functions, and 3) creation of balance between educational and caring functions. In implementing clinical education, partnerships have been formed within a challenging context in Iran. Conflict between clinical and educational functions was the main concern of both sides of the partnership in forming a collaborative relationship, with our findings emphasizing the importance of nursing educators' role in the establishment of partnership programs.

  19. Public-private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodge, Graeme A.; Greve, Carsten; Boardman, Anthony E.

    2017-01-01

    Infrastructure PPPs are now main-stream. Both partnership language and its contractual forms have evolved over the past few decades, though. Compared to early optimistic promises, we now have a more nuanced and balanced view of what PPPs are and what they can achieve. Indeed, modern PPPs are tied...... experience in this context, particularly through the global financial crisis. It concludes that PPP can become an integrated part of infrastructure development around the world, assuming learning occurs from past experience. It presents several lessons on deepening partnerships; on the multiplicity...... of the PPP ‘model’ and its ingredients; on policy learning and on governing infrastructure in the medium term. And it also concludes that not only does the PPP brand today still offer manifold possibilities, even more public policy experimentation is currently warranted....

  20. Euro-Mediterranean Partnership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brach, Juliane

    2007-01-01

    The EU and 12 countries of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) engaged in 1995 in the Euro-Mediterranean Partnership (EMP) in political, economic and cultural matters with the aim to foster cooperation, stability and prosperity around the Mediterranean Basin. The Economic and Financial...... Partnership (EFP) plays a central role in the EMP design and implementation, which is centered on economic and trade integration as a starting point for and an anchor of socio-economic development in the MENA region. Against this background, this paper reviews the situation in the MENA partner countries...... and the past performance of the EFP. It analyses the association agreements, economic cooperation and financial assistance, discusses the major obstacles, and outlines the potential of the EFP to shape the European Neighborhood Policy....

  1. Policy, Performativity and Partnership: An Ethical Leadership Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    This paper identifies the need to think differently about educational partnerships in a changing and turbulent post-compulsory policy environment in England. The policy and institutional contexts in which universities and colleges currently operate seem to be fuelling performativity at the expense of educational values. There appears to be a sharp…

  2. Pre-Employment Course: A Partnership for Success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper, Ian K.; McGrath, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the benefits of pre-employment education and training and its impact on the students' choice of career paths. It focuses on a programme delivered in partnership between Teesside University and a North East Police Force, and provides a model for future pre-employment education and training.…

  3. Activating New Partnerships in Support of School Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doiron, Ray

    1999-01-01

    Outlines some of the similarities in the roles of the teacher-librarian, curriculum consultant, teacher educator, and administrators in general, and then describes new partnerships that can be nurtured when teacher-librarians move into other educational roles. Discusses institutional leadership, curriculum development, advocacy, management,…

  4. Innovation Partnerships to Enhance Student Learning and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Dennis C.; Komives, Susan R.

    2016-01-01

    Following chapters that have offered examples and tools relevant to higher education institutions that wish to enhance student learning and development, this chapter summarizes and extends the conversation of how true partnerships in international higher education can be cultivated to achieve the deepest impact.

  5. Forging an Indian Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    partnership. 100. Stephen Cohen, remarks at the Brookings Institution Conference, “Does the Elephant Dance ? A Discussion on Contemporary Indian Foreign...part of its foreign policy since independence. Throughout the Cold War, India was an essential member of the nonaligned movement , a collection of...continue to solidify as China grows and flexes its muscles across the Asian continent. Consequently, this relationship will be driven as much by

  6. A Tourism Partnership

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In April, the Beijing Tourism Administration and Reed Exhibitions, part of the Anglo-Dutch Reed Elsevier Group, announced a strategic partnership in recognition of the huge growth potential of the conference and exhibition industry in China. Reed Exhibitions sponsored the Second China International Business and Incentive Travel Mart (CBITM) in Beijing from July 11-13, the only high-end exhibition dedicated to business and incentive travel in China.

  7. Partnership in Computational Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huray, Paul G.

    1999-02-24

    This is the final report for the "Partnership in Computational Science" (PICS) award in an amount of $500,000 for the period January 1, 1993 through December 31, 1993. A copy of the proposal with its budget is attached as Appendix A. This report first describes the consequent significance of the DOE award in building infrastructure of high performance computing in the Southeast and then describes the work accomplished under this grant and a list of publications resulting from it.

  8. Balancing power: A grounded theory study on partnership of academic service institutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FATEMEH HESHMATI NABAVI

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Governments and professional organizations have called for new partnerships between health care providers and academics to improve clinical education for the benefit of both students and patients. To develop a substantive grounded theory on the process of forming academic-service partnerships in implementing clinical education, from the perspective of academic and clinical nursing staff members and managers working in Iranian settings. Methods: The participants included 15 hospital nurses, nurse managers, nurse educators, and educational managers from two central universities and clinical settings from 2009 to 2012. Data were collected through 30 in-depth, semi-structure interviews with the individual participants and then analyzed using the methodology of Strauss and Corbin’s grounded theory. Results: Utilizing “balancing power” as the core variable enabled us to integrate the concepts concerning the partnership processes between clinical and educational institutes. Three distinct and significant categories emerged to explain the process of partnership: 1 divergence, 2 conflict between educational and caring functions, and 3 creation of balance between educational and caring functions. Conclusions: In implementing clinical education, partnerships have been formed within a challenging context in Iran. Conflict between clinical and educational functions was the main concern of both sides of the partnership in forming a collaborative relationship, with our findings emphasizing the importance of nursing educators’ role in the establishment of partnership programs.

  9. A Brief Analysis on the Model of Public-Private Partner-ship (PPP) in the Field of Compulsory Education%浅析义务教育领域的公私合作关系(PPP)模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐媛媛; 林东海

    2016-01-01

    The model of public-private partnership (PPP) has ex-perienced over 30 years of development. To encourage and guide social capital into the field of compulsory education by using PPP model can effectively improve the imbalanced situation of the current compulsory education development, make school-run-ning and investment subjects diversified, and make the education market prosperous. It is worth noting that the risks along with the introduction of PPP model should be learned clearly.%公私合作关系(PPP)模式在中国已有三十余年的发展,运用PPP模式,鼓励、引导社会资本投入到义务教育领域,可以有效改善当前义务教育提供不均衡的局面,办学和投资主体的多元化,也使得教育市场更繁荣。应当注意的是,在义务教育领域引入PPP模式的同时,要对其风险有清晰的认识。

  10. Questioning the Public-Private Partnerships in Fundamental Education%基础教育领域公私合作伙伴关系三问

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄忠敬

    2014-01-01

    基础教育领域公私合作伙伴关系(Public-private Partnerships,简称PPPs)是指公共部门与私营部门建立合作伙伴、共同提供教育产品或服务的政策措施与教育实践.从合作的内容来看,PPPs可分为契约型合作与非契约型合作;从合作的程度来看,PPPs可以分为PPPs缺乏、萌芽、初显、中等、成熟和完善等六种状态;从合作的效果来看,PPPs既有积极的作用,也存在潜在的风险.

  11. National Conference on Student & Scientist Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barstow, D.

    2001-05-01

    Science education is turning an exciting corner with the development of a new class of projects called Student and Scientist Partnerships for authentic research. Examples include GLOBE, Hands-On Universe and EarthKAM. These projects engage students as learners and as participants in authentic research.Through such projects scientists acquire new research partners. At the same time, students experience real science, learning up-to-date science content and developing essential investigation skills. To better understand the nature and potential of these partnerships, an invitational conference was held in Washington, D.C.,from October 23-25, 1996. The conference, funded by the National Science Foundation and coordinated by TERC and the Concord Consortium, brought together 60 leaders in science and education who have research backgrounds, practical experience, or a high interest in Student, Scientists & Partnerships. The participants confirmed that this shift from the "student as recipient" to the "student as partner" model can be of real and substantive benefit for both the scientists and the students. The primary and most obvious benefits for the students are the excitement of doing authentic science, a new context for hands-on experiential learning, and the linkage of school learning with the "real world." For the scientists, the primary benefits are the help of student partners who enable the scientists to do research that might not otherwise be possible and the personal rewards of supporting education. Beyond these primary benefits, however, is a secondary and perhaps deeper level of benefits, resulting from the cross-fertilization between these two rich cultures. In each partnership, it helps to recognize and articulate what I call "the three authentics". Authentic Science-The science must be real science. It must contribute new knowledge. The research must be central to the scientists' work, and the student participation must contribute in a meaningful way to

  12. Dancing in the Ditches: Reflecting on the Capacity of a University/School Partnership to Clarify the Role of a Teacher Educator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Ruth; Ferguson-Patrick, Kate; McCormack, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This paper used the data collected from reflective diaries, semi-structured interviews and surveys to identify and examine common themes identified in the roles required and/or perceived for teacher educators by both teachers and teacher educators. Collaboration, discussion and critique enabled personal reflection as teacher educators worked as…

  13. The Role of OER Localisation in Building a Knowledge Partnership for Development: Insights from the TESSA and TESS-India Teacher Education Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckler, Alison; Perryman, Leigh-Anne; Seal, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Open educational resources (OER) continue to support the needs of educators and learners globally. However, it is clear that to maximise their potential more focus is needed on reuse and repurposing. Accordingly, adapting OER for local contexts remains one of the greatest challenges of the open education movement, with little written about how to…

  14. Civil partnerships five years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Helen; Gask, Karen; Berrington, Ann

    2011-01-01

    The Civil Partnership Act 2004, which came into force in December 2005 allowing same-sex couples in the UK to register their relationship for the first time, celebrated its fifth anniversary in December 2010. This article examines civil partnership in England and Wales, five years on from its introduction. The characteristics of those forming civil partnerships between 2005 and 2010 including age, sex and previous marital/civil partnership status are examined. These are then compared with the characteristics of those marrying over the same period. Further comparisons are also made between civil partnership dissolutions and divorce. The article presents estimates of the number of people currently in civil partnerships and children of civil partners. Finally the article examines attitudes towards same-sex and civil partner couples both in the UK and in other countries across Europe.

  15. Educational Gaps in Molecular Diagnostics, Genomics, and Personalized Medicine in Dermatopathology Training: A Survey of US Dermatopathology Fellowship Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Kristin; Russomanno, Kristen; Ferringer, Tammie; Elston, Dirk; Murphy, Michael J

    2017-05-02

    Molecular technologies offer clinicians the tools to provide high-quality, cost-effective patient care. We evaluated education focused on molecular diagnostics, genomics, and personalized medicine in dermatopathology fellowship. A 20-question online survey was emailed to all (n = 53) Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited dermatopathology training programs in the United States. Thirty-one of 53 program directors responded (response rate = 58%). Molecular training is undertaken in 74% of responding dermatopathology fellowships, with levels of instruction varying among dermatology-based and pathology-based programs. Education differed for dermatology- and pathology-trained fellows in approximately one-fifth (19%) of programs. Almost half (48%) of responding program directors believe that fellows are not currently receiving adequate molecular education although the majority (97%) expect to incorporate additional instruction in the next 2-5 years. Factors influencing the incorporation of relevant education include perceived clinical utility and Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education/residency review committee (RRC) requirements. Potential benefits of molecular education include increased medical knowledge, improved patient care, and promotion of effective communication with other healthcare professionals. More than two-thirds (68%) of responding program directors believe that instruction in molecular technologies should be required in dermatopathology fellowship training. Although all responding dermatopathology fellowship program directors agreed that molecular education is important, only a little over half of survey participants believe that their fellows receive adequate instruction. This represents an important educational gap. Discussion among those who oversee fellow education is necessary to best integrate and evaluate teaching of molecular dermatopathology.

  16. University-State Child Welfare Training Partnerships: The Challenge of Matching Dollar Contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Wells

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Universities are uniquely positioned to provide the very best training opportunities to public child welfare workers. However, university–child welfare agency training partnerships require a significant commitment of time and resources by university personnel at a time of extensive state cuts to public higher education. This national survey of university partnership administrators found significant differences among university respondents involving length of the contractual relationship, matching dollar requirements, and overall satisfaction with the training partnership.

  17. 我国教育领域公私合作伙伴关系(PPP)的思考%Thoughts on Public-private Partnerships (PPP) in China's Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周玲

    2016-01-01

    In order to perform public duties or complete public tasks ,the public sector can adopt differ‐ent production modes to provide public products or services ,including public private partnerships (PPP) .In PPP the public sector and private sector become partners through contracts and establish long and flexible cooperation relationships .In the field of education provided by the public sector ,PPP is applicable .But in establishing public‐private partnerships , the effectiveness and risks should be cleared .In order to implement PPP projects smoothly ,it is necessary to create scientific and perfect regulations and suitable cooperation environment .%为了履行公共服务职责、完成公共服务任务,公共部门可采用公私合作的方式来提供公共产品和服务。公私合作伙伴关系(PPP)就是由公共部门和私人部门通过合同形式缔结合作关系,通过合作提供公共产品和服务。这种公私合作模式适用于教育领域。在公私合作关系确立前,相关部门应对采取公私合作方式的有效性和存在的风险予以明确,并为公私合作伙伴关系项目的顺利实施创建科学完善的规制和适宜的合作环境。

  18. 31 CFR 306.87 - Partnerships (including nominee partnerships).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Partnerships (including nominee partnerships). 306.87 Section 306.87 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) FISCAL SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BUREAU OF THE PUBLIC DEBT GENERAL...

  19. Growing scientists: A partnership between a university and a school district

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Teresa Marie

    Precollege science education in the United States has virtually always been influenced by university scientists to one degree or another. Partnership models for university scientist---school district collaborations are being advocated to replace outreach models. Although the challenges for such partnerships are well documented, the means of fostering successful and sustainable science education partnerships are not well studied. This study addresses this need by empirically researching a unique scientist-educator partnership between a university and a school district utilizing case study methods. The development of the partnership, emerging issues, and multiple perspectives of participants were examined in order to understand the culture of the partnership and identify means of fostering successful science education partnerships. The findings show the partnership was based on a strong network of face-to-face relationships that fostered understanding, mutual learning and synergy. Specific processes instituted ensured equity and respect, and created a climate of trust so that an evolving common vision was maintained. The partnership provided synergy and resilience during the recent economic crisis, indicating the value of partnerships when public education institutions must do more with less. High staff turnover, however, especially of a key leader, threatened the partnership, pointing to the importance of maintaining multiple-level integration between institutions. The instrumental roles of a scientist-educator coordinator in bridging cultures and nurturing the collaborative environment are elucidated. Intense and productive collaborations between teams of scientists and educators helped transform leading edge disciplinary science content into school science learning. The innovative programs that resulted not only suggest important roles science education partnerships can play in twenty-first century learning, but they also shed light on the processes of educational

  20. Evaluating Partnership, or how to Evaluate the Contribution of Cultural Institutions to an Integrated Curriculum for Culture Education in Primary Schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heusden, Barend; Konings, Fianne

    2014-01-01

    Each year, many thousands of children and youngsters take part, with their school, in educational projects that have been designed and developed by cultural institutions, such as museums and theatres. Although the importance of these cultural educational programs is being stressed by governments and

  1. The Business/Labor/Education Professional Development Partnership: A Workshop to Assure Implementation of the Cooperative Teacher Training Concept in Selected States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman Center, Woodland Hills, CA.

    The report describes the planning, development, and conduct of a workshop held for educator, business, industry, and labor representatives of seven States. The workshop was designed to accomplish needed statewide planning for improved cooperative approaches to professional development, including industry/education exchange programs and internship.…

  2. The Discourse of Partnership and the Reality of Reform: Interrogating the Recent Reform Agenda at Initial Teacher Education and Induction Levels in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford, Judith; O'Doherty, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, teacher education in Ireland has experienced radical reconceptualization and restructuring at both initial teacher education [ITE] and induction levels, with reform of continuous professional development now in the planning phase. The establishment of the Teaching Council (2006) as a statutory, regulatory body, with a role in…

  3. From Data Source to Co-Researchers? Tracing the Shift from "Student Voice" to Student--teacher Partnerships in "Educational Action Research"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groundwater-Smith, Susan; Mockler, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a review of the concept of student voice as it has been represented in "Educational Action Research" from the 1990s to the present day. Contextualised within an exploration of the challenges posed by educational action research that incorporates student voice in the current age of accountability as reflected and…

  4. A study of a museum-school partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojton, Mary Ann

    Partnerships between museums and schools never have been more important than they are today. Schools, especially urban schools, are facing challenges, including low student achievement and difficulty obtaining funding. Partners can help schools overcome these challenges by sharing educational and financial resources. Nearly 11,000 American museums spend more than $1 billion annually to provide over 18 million instructional hours for k-12 educational programs such as professional development for teachers, guided field trips, and staff visits to schools. Museums would seem like natural partners for challenged urban schools. Yet museums and schools struggle to establish and maintain effective partnerships. This study examined a partnership between a science center and an urban elementary school to provide additional knowledge and resources for those in the field to overcome these challenges in order to create relationships that help students. Using qualitative methods with interpretive descriptive purposes (Erickson, 1986; Glesne, 1999; Lincoln & Guba, 2000), the research design is based on several methods of data collection, including face-to-face, semi-structured interviews; observations; written text; and field notes. Participants in this study included students, parents, teachers, school administrators and museum educators. In addition, adult representatives of community organizations were interviewed to determine the impact of the partnership on the community. The study found that an effective partnership will have four basic elements: mutual goals, communication plan, key leader support, planning and research, and four interpersonal elements: personal responsibility, honesty, communication at the intimate level, and trust. Partners may have difficulty developing these to their fullest extent due to time limitations. No partnership is perfect. By creating strong interpersonal relationships, partners can mitigate challenges caused by limited basic elements and

  5. Partnership for practice change and knowledge development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Stina Meyer; Stokholm, Gitte; Madsen, Anette Judithe

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This article presents and evaluates the results of an educational initiative at the occupational therapy programme at University College Lillebaelt in Denmark. The objectives of the initiative were (A) to establish institutional partnerships between the educational institution...... with occupational therapists in the practice fi eld and with citizens, and later drafted written reports and communicated their results Concurrent with this, they received special education and counselling from teaching staff. Results. The initiative was evaluated by analysing focus group interviews, questionnaires....... Conclusions. On top of what students learned through the initiative, all of this was to the bene fi t of the university college, the occupational therapy program, and the practice fi elds and citizens. The results point toward a continuation of the educational initiative. Key words: theory – practice relation...

  6. A Partnership Raises Healthier Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Rick; Banks, Patti; Eyres, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    A school district in western Washington commits to developing physically fit and healthy students, not only as a means of enhancing learning but as a whole child goal in its own right. This is a report on how it does so in partnership with its community, believing that it is only through such a partnership that it can reach its goals. The central…

  7. Partnership for Wave Power - Roadmaps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim; Krogh, Jan; Brodersen, Hans Jørgen;

    This Wave Energy Technology Roadmap is developed by the Partnership for Wave Power including nine Danish wave energy developers. It builds on to the strategy [1] published by the Partnership in 2012, a document that describes the long term vision of the Danish Wave Energy sector: “By 2030...

  8. Institutions, Partnerships and Institutional Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.A.C. van Wijk (Jeroen); S. Vellema (Sietze); J. van Wijk (Jakomijn)

    2011-01-01

    markdownabstractOne of the goals of the Partnership Resource Centre (PRC) is to execute evidence-based research and further develop a theoretical framework on the linkages between partnerships and value chain development (ECSAD 2009). Within the PRC Trajectory on Global Value Chains, this goal was s

  9. Leading Partnerships: Competencies for Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amey, Marilyn J.

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges are constantly challenged to find new ways to meet the needs of multiple constituents. One strategy becoming more popular in addressing these pressing needs is partnerships and other forms of organizational collaboration, consortia, and networks. Partnerships can allow for resource sharing, creation of joint educational…

  10. Pharmaceutical Public-Private Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagley, Constance; Tvarnø, Christina D.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a game theory and law-and-management analysis of for- profit pharmaceutical public-private partnerships, a complex type of legal arrangement in the highly regulated pharmaceutical industry. A pharmaceutical public-private partnership (PPPP) agreement is a legally binding con...

  11. 在中国提出医教结合理念的背景与思考%Health and education partnership for a healthy young generation:China’s perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈晓明

    2013-01-01

    儿童的教育需要儿科医师的积极参与,尤其是特殊教育领域。特殊教育之所以特殊,是因为教育对象不是普通儿童,而是特殊儿童,是医学意义上的“患儿”。由于不同疾病对学习能力的影响不同、同一疾病不同部位病变对学习能力的影响也不同、各种疾病的预后存在客观规律、现行的医院康复模式并不适应特殊教育的需求,医教结合存在客观必要性。教学实践中的医学问题还包括儿童入学年龄问题、多动症的标签问题、生长发育规律与教学规律问题等。在分析这些问题的基础上,沈晓明教授提出改革特殊教育师资培养模式和课程体系、建立特殊教育的工作制度并制定相应的工作规范、建立若干基于学校的儿童康复治疗中心等建议。%Pediatricians are indispensable to education, special education in particular. The objects of special education are not ordinary children, but pediatric patients instead. Due to the facts that different diseases may have different impact on learning ability, different manifestations of one disease may also lead to different performance of learning ability, there are objective rules for outcomes of various diseases, and the current hospital-based rehabilitation mode can not meet the requirements of special education, health and education partnership is of vital importance. The medical problems in teaching practice may involve school admission age, identification of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and relationship between growth and developmental patterns and teaching regulations. In addressing these problems, Professor SHEN Xiaoming calls for the reform of cultivation program and curricula system for teachers of special education, employment of working rules and standard of special education, and establishment of school-based rehabilitation centers.

  12. Copy but Not Paste: A Literature Review of Crossborder Curriculum Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterval, Dominique G. J.; Frambach, Janneke M.; Driessen, Erik W.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Crossborder curriculum partnerships, entailing the transposition of an entire curriculum and the related degree(s) from "home" to "host" institution, are a rather new phenomenon in internationalization in education. The literature describes successful and unsuccessful partnerships, but critical factors for the success or…

  13. Exploring Intercollegiate Athletic Department-Community Partnerships through the Lens of Community Service Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Per G.; Huml, Matthew R.; Hancock, Meg G.

    2014-01-01

    Institutions of higher education are increasingly engaging in partnerships with local communities. Within a sport context, the creation of the NCAA CHAMPS/Life Skills Program has emphasized partnerships between athletic departments and local community service organizations (CSOs). Prior studies, however, have used student-athletes rather than the…

  14. Copy but Not Paste: A Literature Review of Crossborder Curriculum Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterval, Dominique G. J.; Frambach, Janneke M.; Driessen, Erik W.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Crossborder curriculum partnerships, entailing the transposition of an entire curriculum and the related degree(s) from "home" to "host" institution, are a rather new phenomenon in internationalization in education. The literature describes successful and unsuccessful partnerships, but critical factors for the success or…

  15. School Leadership for Authentic Family and Community Partnerships: Research Perspectives for Transforming Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Susan, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    School leaders are increasingly called upon to pursue meaningful partnerships with families and community groups, yet many leaders are unprepared to meet the challenges of partnerships, to cross cultural boundaries, or to be accountable to the community. Alliances are needed among educators, families, and community groups that value relationship…

  16. Beyond Involvement and Engagement: The Role of the Family in School-Community Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanski, Amanda; Valli, Linda; Jacobson, Reuben

    2016-01-01

    Research indicates that partnerships between schools and neighborhood communities support student learning, improve schools, and strengthen families and neighborhoods. These partnerships expand the traditional educational mission of the school to include health and social services for children and their families and to involve the broader…

  17. Ready, Set, Go ... Again: Renewing an Academy-Agency Child Welfare Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Barbara; McGuire, Lisa E.; Howes, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a case study of the renewed partnership between a midwestern public child welfare agency and a midwestern university school of social work. The partnership, which includes educating BSW and MSW students, preparing frontline child welfare case managers, and providing leadership training for supervisors and managers,…

  18. The Influences of Leaders and Organizational Cultures in Sustained Multi-Agency Community College Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidotto, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Multi-agency partnerships can be a key element in sustaining growth and outreach in higher education, and the literature clearly indicates the increasing number and diversity of collaborative structures occurring on today's college campuses. However, partnership construction is a complex endeavor and attempts often fail for many reasons, including…

  19. Partnership in Learning between University and School: Evidence from a Researcher-in-Residence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ann-Marie; O'Neill, Amy; Mooney Simmie, Geraldine

    2015-01-01

    The status of school placement in the Republic of Ireland has recently been elevated in importance within a reconceptualisation of initial teacher education (ITE). This paper shares the findings from one case study of a school--university partnership enacted in this regard. The partnership involved a researcher-in-residence at the school…

  20. Creating and Sustaining Professional Learning Partnerships: Activity Theory as an Analytic Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Dianne; Nguyen, Hoa Thi Mai

    2015-01-01

    Significant attention has been paid to the forms and practices of effective school-university partnerships in recent times as they are commonly seen as a key element to improve the quality of teacher education programs and thus graduate teachers. However, analysis of the effectiveness of such partnerships has not been so evident. This article…

  1. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated

  2. Surpluses and Deficits: How University Partners Perceive University-Community Partnerships at One Ivy League Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Klebanoff Cohen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available University-community partnerships are a critical method for how universities can serve the public interest.  Yet key questions remain: how do these partnerships work in practice, and how can university and fill reciprocal and mutual needs effectively?  A participatory evaluation of university-community partnerships in education at an Ivy League university found that university partners had a surplus perspective of the university and a deficit perspective of community partners; practitioners must shift our paradigm towards mutually beneficial, asset-driven university-community partnerships to ensure success.

  3. Positioning Genomics in Biology Education: Content Mapping of Undergraduate Biology Textbooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi L. B. Wernick

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Biological thought increasingly recognizes the centrality of the genome in constituting and regulating processes ranging from cellular systems to ecology and evolution. In this paper, we ask whether genomics is similarly positioned as a core concept in the instructional sequence for undergraduate biology. Using quantitative methods, we analyzed the order in which core biological concepts were introduced in textbooks for first-year general and human biology. Statistical analysis was performed using self-organizing map algorithms and conventional methods to identify clusters of terms and their relative position in the books. General biology textbooks for both majors and nonmajors introduced genome-related content after text related to cell biology and biological chemistry, but before content describing higher-order biological processes. However, human biology textbooks most often introduced genomic content near the end of the books. These results suggest that genomics is not yet positioned as a core concept in commonly used textbooks for first-year biology and raises questions about whether such textbooks, or courses based on the outline of these textbooks, provide an appropriate foundation for understanding contemporary biological science.

  4. Academic service partnerships: organizational efficiency and efficacy between organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetsch, Susan H; DeBasio, Nancy O

    2011-01-01

    Two leading nursing organizations, the Greater Kansas City Area Collegiate Nurse Educators and the Kansas City Area Nurse Executives, represent the Kansas City metropolitan area nursing programs and area employers. These two organizations have been engaged in collaborative workforce planning and strategy development around key nursing issues for over 25 years. This model of collaboration is unique in that the partnership is between organizations representing 17 nursing programs and 28 hospitals. The collaborative partnership has enhanced organizational efficiency and efficacy between the groups, which has directly benefited the organizational members. Most importantly, it has had a transformative impact on both nursing education and professional practice in the Kansas City metropolitan area. This article describes the evolution of the partnership and the collaborative work that has led to the accomplishment of mutual goals.

  5. Teaching About Better Family–Clinician Partnerships in High-Risk Pediatric Asthma Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Michalopoulou PhD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Family–clinician partnership including communication, trust, respect, and power leveling is essential in pediatrics. Our case study illustrates elements supporting/hindering partnership in a high-risk urban pediatric asthma clinic. Data from observation of a 100-minute visit were qualitatively analyzed by applying codes to themes, using family-centered principles. Three key categories emerged from examining interactions and their sequencing: (1 partnership supported, (2 partnership missed, and (3 partnership hindered. Practitioners must become more sensitive to families’ lives and skilled in family-centered care delivery. Clinician education about partnership can help with negotiating workable treatment strategies for complex conditions such as asthma and reduce health disparities.

  6. [Genomics innovative teaching pattern based upon amalgamation between modern educational technology and constructivism studying theory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xu-Fang; Peng, Jing; Zhou, Tian-Hong

    2007-04-01

    In order to overcome various malpractices in the traditional teaching methods, and also as part of the Guangdong province molecular biology perfect course project, some reforms were carried out to the teaching pattern of genomics. The reforms include using the foreign original teaching materials, bilingual teaching, as well as taking the constructivism-directed discussion teaching method and the multimedia computer-assisted instruction. To improve the scoring way and the laboratory course of the subject, we carried on a multiplex inspection systems and a self-designing experiments. Through the teaching reform on Genomics, we have gradually consummated the construction of molecular biology curriculum system.

  7. Restoring a Tarnished Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugrue, Michael F.

    1972-01-01

    Tight money, public disenchantment with higher education, and rapidly changing degree and general education requirements now force the publishing industry and the academic community to reexamine their priorities, commitments, and practices. (Author)

  8. An examination of university-school partnerships in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Mutemeri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine university-school partnerships in the process of teacher education. The research question that guided the study was how teacher educators partner with schools in teacher training. A qualitative study was preferred because the aim was to gather information and opinions on how teacher educators trained student teachers as well as to provide a forum for pre-service student teachers to air their views about how they were trained. Twenty- six lecturers and nine student focus groups, purposively sampled, participated in the study. An interview was used for data collection and Holliday's thematic approach was used to analyse the data. The research revealed that there was a weak partnership between teacher education and schools. The study recommends the creation of third spaces in teacher education which involve an "equal and more dialectical relationship between academic and practitioner knowledge" in support of student teachers' learning.

  9. University Community Partnerships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G. Cooper

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available University-Community Partnerships have been recognized as a valuable contribution to both the academic community and our cities and towns. In the words of Henry Cisneros, former U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Design secretary, “The long-term futures of both the city and the university in this country are so intertwined that one cannot—or perhaps will not—survive without the other.” Increasingly, colleges and university are bringing their time, energy and resources to bear on local problems. They are using their other physical, financial and intellectual capital to facilitate economic development, provide social services, technical assistance and create opportunities for applied research.

  10. Scandinavian hydrogen highway partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloth, M.; Hansen, J. [H2 Logic A/S, Herning (Denmark); Wennike, F. [Hydrogen Link Denmark Association, Ringkoebing (Denmark)

    2009-07-01

    The Scandinavian Hydrogen Highway Partnership (SHHP) was launched in an effort to build hydrogen filling stations in Scandinavian countries by 2012 in order to enable hydrogen powered vehicles to operate and refuel when needed. Three hydrogen refueling stations are currently in operation in Scandinavia to fuel a fleet of 15 hydrogen-fuelled cars. It is anticipated that by the end of 2009, there will be 14 hydrogen refueling stations and more than 70 vehicles in operation. Beyond 2012, the number of filling stations and vehicles is expected to increase significantly through large scale demonstration, where SHHP aims to attract funding from the European Union. The current activities of SHHP are co-funded by national and regional authorities. The SHHP network is funded by Nordic Energy Research.

  11. Democratizing Human Genome Project Information: A Model Program for Education, Information and Debate in Public Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack, Miriam

    The "Mapping the Human Genome" project demonstrated that librarians can help whomever they serve in accessing information resources in the areas of biological and health information, whether it is the scientists who are developing the information or a member of the public who is using the information. Public libraries can guide library…

  12. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2006-08-30

    The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

  13. Academic-Practice Partnerships for Unemployed New Graduates in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van, Paulina; Berman, Audrey; Karshmer, Judith; Prion, Susan; West, Nikki; Wallace, Jonalyn

    2015-01-01

    In California, academic-practice partnerships offer innovative transition programs to new registered nurse (RN) graduates who have not yet found positions in nursing. This report describes the formation of 4 partnerships between 1 or more schools of nursing and clinical practice sites that included hospitals and nonacute care settings, such as hospice, clinics, school districts, and skilled nursing facilities. Factors facilitating the partnerships included relationships established as nurse leaders from practice and academia came together to address previous workforce issues, positive interpersonal experiences, an independent convening and coordinating organization, a shared understanding of the employment challenge faced by new RN graduates, and a shared vision for its solution. Partnerships face continuing challenges that include sustaining engagement, resource constraints, and insufficient nursing leadership succession planning. Partnership benefits include improved relationships between academia and practice, a forum to address contemporary issues in nursing education and practice advances, and stimulation of a reassessment of how to integrate ambulatory, transitional, and community-based nursing into prelicensure education. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated

  15. Building an Effective Bishop and President Relationship for the Mission of Catholic Higher Education: A Case Study of Five Bishop and President Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creagh, Kevin G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the 1990 apostolic constitution on Catholic higher education entitled "Ex Corde Ecclesiae" (From the Heart of the Church) is to emphasize the dual relationship Catholic institutions have to the academic community as well as the Church. The concepts of Catholicism and university are not to be experienced as polarizing…

  16. The IASSID Academy on Education, Teaching and Research and the Links with Low- and Middle-Income Countries: An International Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassiotis, Angela; Brown, Ivan; Brown, Roy I.; Favila, Gare; McConkey, Roy; Jokinen, Nancy; Lucchino, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The Academy, an arm of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities, was formed in 2006 in order to promote clinical and academic skills in low- and middle-income countries (LAMICs) and to carry out educational activities within international events. This article describes the global context of knowledge…

  17. Die Bedeutung Subjektiver Elternschaftskonzepte fur Erziehungsverhalten und elterliche Partnerschaft. Ein Uberblick uber neuere Forschungsergebnisse (The Significance of Subjective Concepts of Parenthood for Educational Behavior and Parental Partnership).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicki, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Outlines the subjective concept of parenthood as the personal interpretation of parental responsibility, distinguishing it from related theoretical concepts. Discusses, against the background of theoretical models and empirical findings, the relationship of the parenthood concept with the parents' actual educational behavior. Suggests ways to…

  18. The IASSID Academy on Education, Teaching and Research and the Links with Low- and Middle-Income Countries: An International Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassiotis, Angela; Brown, Ivan; Brown, Roy I.; Favila, Gare; McConkey, Roy; Jokinen, Nancy; Lucchino, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    The Academy, an arm of the International Association for the Scientific Study of Intellectual Disabilities, was formed in 2006 in order to promote clinical and academic skills in low- and middle-income countries (LAMICs) and to carry out educational activities within international events. This article describes the global context of knowledge…

  19. Die Bedeutung Subjektiver Elternschaftskonzepte fur Erziehungsverhalten und elterliche Partnerschaft. Ein Uberblick uber neuere Forschungsergebnisse (The Significance of Subjective Concepts of Parenthood for Educational Behavior and Parental Partnership).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalicki, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Outlines the subjective concept of parenthood as the personal interpretation of parental responsibility, distinguishing it from related theoretical concepts. Discusses, against the background of theoretical models and empirical findings, the relationship of the parenthood concept with the parents' actual educational behavior. Suggests ways to…

  20. School Partnerships: Technology Rich Classrooms and the Student Teaching Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSlyke-Briggs, Kjersti; Hogan, Molly; Waffle, Julene; Samplaski, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Building upon an established relationship between a college and a local school district, this project formally designated a Partnership School, at which education students conduct field experience. In addition to providing these participating pre-service teachers (students) with a clinically rich experience through closer supervision by and…