WorldWideScience

Sample records for genomics developing tools

  1. Coral Reef Genomics: Developing tools for functional genomics ofcoral symbiosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Jodi; Brokstein, Peter; Manohar, Chitra; Coffroth, MaryAlice; Szmant, Alina; Medina, Monica

    2005-03-01

    Symbioses between cnidarians and dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are widespread in the marine environment. The importance of this symbiosis to reef-building corals and reef nutrient and carbon cycles is well documented, but little is known about the mechanisms by which the partners establish and regulate the symbiosis. Because the dinoflagellate symbionts live inside the cells of their host coral, the interactions between the partners occur on cellular and molecular levels, as each partner alters the expression of genes and proteins to facilitate the partnership. These interactions can examined using high-throughput techniques that allow thousands of genes to be examined simultaneously. We are developing the groundwork so that we can use DNA microarray profiling to identify genes involved in the Montastraea faveolata and Acropora palmata symbioses. Here we report results from the initial steps in this microarray initiative, that is, the construction of cDNA libraries from 4 of 16 target stages, sequencing of 3450 cDNA clones to generate Expressed Sequenced Tags (ESTs), and annotation of the ESTs to identify candidate genes to include in the microarrays. An understanding of how the coral-dinoflagellate symbiosis is regulated will have implications for atmospheric and ocean sciences, conservation biology, the study and diagnosis of coral bleaching and disease, and comparative studies of animal-protest interactions.

  2. Development of genomic tools for verification of hybrids and selfed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The petiole color trait was also used to verify TMS 96/1089A X TME117 where the pink color of the male parent was dominant over the female's green color. The pace of genomic analysis of populations used in the study was enhanced using a modified , quicker DNA isolation protocol which slashed extraction time by 60%.

  3. Development of an Efficient Genome Editing Tool in Bacillus licheniformis Using CRISPR-Cas9 Nickase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kaifeng; Cai, Dongbo; Wang, Zhangqian; He, Zhili; Chen, Shouwen

    2018-03-15

    Bacillus strains are important industrial bacteria that can produce various biochemical products. However, low transformation efficiencies and a lack of effective genome editing tools have hindered its widespread application. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 techniques have been utilized in many organisms as genome editing tools because of their high efficiency and easy manipulation. In this study, an efficient genome editing method was developed for Bacillus licheniformis using a CRISPR-Cas9 nickase integrated into the genome of B. licheniformis DW2 with overexpression driven by the P43 promoter. The yvmC gene was deleted using the CRISPR-Cas9n technique with homology arms of 1.0 kb as a representative example, and an efficiency of 100% was achieved. In addition, two genes were simultaneously disrupted with an efficiency of 11.6%, and the large DNA fragment bacABC (42.7 kb) was deleted with an efficiency of 79.0%. Furthermore, the heterologous reporter gene aprN , which codes for nattokinase in Bacillus subtilis , was inserted into the chromosome of B. licheniformis with an efficiency of 76.5%. The activity of nattokinase in the DWc9nΔ7/pP43SNT-S sacC strain reached 59.7 fibrinolytic units (FU)/ml, which was 25.7% higher than that of DWc9n/pP43SNT-S sacC Finally, the engineered strain DWc9nΔ7 (Δ epr Δ wprA Δ mpr Δ aprE Δ vpr Δ bprA Δ bacABC ), with multiple disrupted genes, was constructed using the CRISPR-Cas9n technique. Taken together, we have developed an efficient genome editing tool based on CRISPR-Cas9n in B. licheniformis This tool could be applied to strain improvement for future research. IMPORTANCE As important industrial bacteria, Bacillus strains have attracted significant attention due to their production of biological products. However, genetic manipulation of these bacteria is difficult. The CRISPR-Cas9 system has been applied to genome editing in some bacteria, and CRISPR-Cas9n was proven to

  4. Developing Cancer Informatics Applications and Tools Using the NCI Genomic Data Commons API.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Shane; Fitzsimons, Michael; Ferguson, Martin; Heath, Allison; Jensen, Mark; Miller, Josh; Murphy, Mark W; Porter, James; Sahni, Himanso; Staudt, Louis; Tang, Yajing; Wang, Zhining; Yu, Christine; Zhang, Junjun; Ferretti, Vincent; Grossman, Robert L

    2017-11-01

    The NCI Genomic Data Commons (GDC) was launched in 2016 and makes available over 4 petabytes (PB) of cancer genomic and associated clinical data to the research community. This dataset continues to grow and currently includes over 14,500 patients. The GDC is an example of a biomedical data commons, which collocates biomedical data with storage and computing infrastructure and commonly used web services, software applications, and tools to create a secure, interoperable, and extensible resource for researchers. The GDC is (i) a data repository for downloading data that have been submitted to it, and also a system that (ii) applies a common set of bioinformatics pipelines to submitted data; (iii) reanalyzes existing data when new pipelines are developed; and (iv) allows users to build their own applications and systems that interoperate with the GDC using the GDC Application Programming Interface (API). We describe the GDC API and how it has been used both by the GDC itself and by third parties. Cancer Res; 77(21); e15-18. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Application of Genomic Tools in Plant Breeding

    OpenAIRE

    Pérez-de-Castro, A.M.; Vilanova, S.; Cañizares, J.; Pascual, L.; Blanca, J.M.; Díez, M.J.; Prohens, J.; Picó, B.

    2012-01-01

    Plant breeding has been very successful in developing improved varieties using conventional tools and methodologies. Nowadays, the availability of genomic tools and resources is leading to a new revolution of plant breeding, as they facilitate the study of the genotype and its relationship with the phenotype, in particular for complex traits. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are allowing the mass sequencing of genomes and transcriptomes, which is producing a vast array of genomic...

  6. Development of Genomic and Genetic Tools for Foxtail Millet, and Use of These Tools in the Improvement of Biomass Production for Bioenergy Crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doust, Andrew, N.

    2011-11-11

    The overall aim of this research was to develop genomic and genetic tools in foxtail millet that will be useful in improving biomass production in bioenergy crops such as switchgrass, napier grass, and pearl millet. A variety of approaches have been implemented, and our lab has been primarily involved in genome analysis and quantitative genetic analysis. Our progress in these activities has been substantially helped by the genomic sequence of foxtail millet produced by the Joint Genome Institute (Bennetzen et al., in prep). In particular, the annotation and analysis of candidate genes for architecture, biomass production and flowering has led to new insights into the control of branching and flowering time, and has shown how closely related flowering time is to vegetative architectural development and biomass accumulation. The differences in genetic control identified at high and low density plantings have direct relevance to the breeding of bioenergy grasses that are tolerant of high planting densities. The developmental analyses have shown how plant architecture changes over time and may indicate which genes may best be manipulated at various times during development to obtain required biomass characteristics. This data contributes to the overall aim of significantly improving genetic and genomic tools in foxtail millet that can be directed to improvement of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass, where it is important to maximize vegetative growth for greatest biomass production.

  7. Development of Genome Engineering Tools from Plant-Specific PPR Proteins Using Animal Cultured Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takehito; Yagi, Yusuke; Nakamura, Takahiro

    2016-01-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motif is a sequence-specific RNA/DNA-binding module. Elucidation of the RNA/DNA recognition mechanism has enabled engineering of PPR motifs as new RNA/DNA manipulation tools in living cells, including for genome editing. However, the biochemical characteristics of PPR proteins remain unknown, mostly due to the instability and/or unfolding propensities of PPR proteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria and yeast. To overcome this issue, we constructed reporter systems using animal cultured cells. The cell-based system has highly attractive features for PPR engineering: robust eukaryotic gene expression; availability of various vectors, reagents, and antibodies; highly efficient DNA delivery ratio (>80 %); and rapid, high-throughput data production. In this chapter, we introduce an example of such reporter systems: a PPR-based sequence-specific translational activation system. The cell-based reporter system can be applied to characterize plant genes of interested and to PPR engineering.

  8. Application of genomic tools in plant breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de-Castro, A M; Vilanova, S; Cañizares, J; Pascual, L; Blanca, J M; Díez, M J; Prohens, J; Picó, B

    2012-05-01

    Plant breeding has been very successful in developing improved varieties using conventional tools and methodologies. Nowadays, the availability of genomic tools and resources is leading to a new revolution of plant breeding, as they facilitate the study of the genotype and its relationship with the phenotype, in particular for complex traits. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are allowing the mass sequencing of genomes and transcriptomes, which is producing a vast array of genomic information. The analysis of NGS data by means of bioinformatics developments allows discovering new genes and regulatory sequences and their positions, and makes available large collections of molecular markers. Genome-wide expression studies provide breeders with an understanding of the molecular basis of complex traits. Genomic approaches include TILLING and EcoTILLING, which make possible to screen mutant and germplasm collections for allelic variants in target genes. Re-sequencing of genomes is very useful for the genome-wide discovery of markers amenable for high-throughput genotyping platforms, like SSRs and SNPs, or the construction of high density genetic maps. All these tools and resources facilitate studying the genetic diversity, which is important for germplasm management, enhancement and use. Also, they allow the identification of markers linked to genes and QTLs, using a diversity of techniques like bulked segregant analysis (BSA), fine genetic mapping, or association mapping. These new markers are used for marker assisted selection, including marker assisted backcross selection, 'breeding by design', or new strategies, like genomic selection. In conclusion, advances in genomics are providing breeders with new tools and methodologies that allow a great leap forward in plant breeding, including the 'superdomestication' of crops and the genetic dissection and breeding for complex traits.

  9. Developing tools for the study of molluscan immunity: The sequencing of the genome of the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Chiarri, Marta; Warren, Wesley C; Guo, Ximing; Proestou, Dina

    2015-09-01

    The eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, provides important ecological and economical services, making it the target of restoration projects and supporting a significant fishery/aquaculture industry with landings valued at more than $100 million in 2012 in the United States of America. Due to the impact of infectious diseases on wild, restored, and cultured populations, the eastern oyster has been the focus of studies on host-pathogen interactions and immunity, as well as the target of selective breeding efforts for disease resistant oyster lines. Despite these efforts, relatively little is known about the genetic basis of resistance to diseases or environmental stress, not only in eastern oyster, but also in other molluscan species of commercial interest worldwide. In order to develop tools and resources to assist in the elucidation of the genomic basis of traits of commercial, biological, and ecological interest in oysters, a team of genome and bioinformatics experts, in collaboration with the oyster research community, is sequencing, assembling, and annotating the first reference genome for the eastern oyster and producing an exhaustive transcriptome from a variety of oyster developmental stages and tissues in response to a diverse set of environmentally-relevant stimuli. These transcriptomes and reference genome for the eastern oyster, added to the already available genome and transcriptomes for the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) and other bivalve species, will be an essential resource for the discovery of candidate genes and markers associated with traits of commercial, biological, and ecologic importance in bivalve molluscs, including those related to host-pathogen interactions and immunity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. GAPIT: genome association and prediction integrated tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipka, Alexander E; Tian, Feng; Wang, Qishan; Peiffer, Jason; Li, Meng; Bradbury, Peter J; Gore, Michael A; Buckler, Edward S; Zhang, Zhiwu

    2012-09-15

    Software programs that conduct genome-wide association studies and genomic prediction and selection need to use methodologies that maximize statistical power, provide high prediction accuracy and run in a computationally efficient manner. We developed an R package called Genome Association and Prediction Integrated Tool (GAPIT) that implements advanced statistical methods including the compressed mixed linear model (CMLM) and CMLM-based genomic prediction and selection. The GAPIT package can handle large datasets in excess of 10 000 individuals and 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms with minimal computational time, while providing user-friendly access and concise tables and graphs to interpret results. http://www.maizegenetics.net/GAPIT. zhiwu.zhang@cornell.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. Development of functional genomic tools in trematodes: RNA interference and luciferase reporter gene activity in Fasciola hepatica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rinaldi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The growing availability of sequence information from diverse parasites through genomic and transcriptomic projects offer new opportunities for the identification of key mediators in the parasite-host interaction. Functional genomics approaches and methods for the manipulation of genes are essential tools for deciphering the roles of genes and to identify new intervention targets in parasites. Exciting advances in functional genomics for parasitic helminths are starting to occur, with transgene expression and RNA interference (RNAi reported in several species of nematodes, but the area is still in its infancy in flatworms, with reports in just three species. While advancing in model organisms, there is a need to rapidly extend these technologies to other parasites responsible for several chronic diseases of humans and cattle. In order to extend these approaches to less well studied parasitic worms, we developed a test method for the presence of a viable RNAi pathway by silencing the exogenous reporter gene, firefly luciferase (fLUC. We established the method in the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni and then confirmed its utility in the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica. We transformed newly excysted juveniles of F. hepatica by electroporation with mRNA of fLUC and three hours later were able to detect luciferase enzyme activity, concentrated mainly in the digestive ceca. Subsequently, we tested the presence of an active RNAi pathway in F. hepatica by knocking down the exogenous luciferase activity by introduction into the transformed parasites of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA specific for fLUC. In addition, we tested the RNAi pathway targeting an endogenous F. hepatica gene encoding leucine aminopeptidase (FhLAP, and observed a significant reduction in specific mRNA levels. In summary, these studies demonstrated the utility of RNAi targeting reporter fLUC as a reporter gene assay to establish the presence of an intact RNAi pathway in helminth

  12. QUAST: quality assessment tool for genome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alexey; Saveliev, Vladislav; Vyahhi, Nikolay; Tesler, Glenn

    2013-04-15

    Limitations of genome sequencing techniques have led to dozens of assembly algorithms, none of which is perfect. A number of methods for comparing assemblers have been developed, but none is yet a recognized benchmark. Further, most existing methods for comparing assemblies are only applicable to new assemblies of finished genomes; the problem of evaluating assemblies of previously unsequenced species has not been adequately considered. Here, we present QUAST-a quality assessment tool for evaluating and comparing genome assemblies. This tool improves on leading assembly comparison software with new ideas and quality metrics. QUAST can evaluate assemblies both with a reference genome, as well as without a reference. QUAST produces many reports, summary tables and plots to help scientists in their research and in their publications. In this study, we used QUAST to compare several genome assemblers on three datasets. QUAST tables and plots for all of them are available in the Supplementary Material, and interactive versions of these reports are on the QUAST website. http://bioinf.spbau.ru/quast . Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF GENOMIC AND GENETIC TOOLS FOR FOXTAIL MILLET, AND USE OF THESE TOOLS IN THE IMPROVEMENT OF BIOMASS PRODUCTION FOR BIOENERGY CROPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xinlu; Zale, Janice; Chen, Feng

    2013-01-22

    Foxtail millet (Setaria italica L.) is a warm-season, C4 annual crop commonly grown for grain and forage worldwide. It has a relatively short generation time, yet produces hundreds of seeds per inflorescence. The crop is inbred and it has a small-size genome (~500 Mb). These features make foxtail millet an attractive grass model, especially for bioenergy crops. While a number of genomic tools have been established for foxtail millet, including a fully sequenced genome and molecular markers, the objectives of this project were to develop a tissue culture system, determine the best explant(s) for tissue culture, optimize transient gene expression, and establish a stable transformation system for foxtail millet cultivar Yugu1. In optimizing a tissue culture medium for the induction of calli and somatic embryos from immature inflorescences and mature seed explants, Murashige and Skoog medium containing 2.5 mg l-1 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid and 0.6 mg l-1 6- benzylaminopurine was determined to be optimal for callus induction of foxtail millet. The efficiency of callus induction from explants of immature inflorescences was significantly higher at 76% compared to that of callus induction from mature seed explants at 68%. The calli induced from this medium were regenerated into plants at high frequency (~100%) using 0.2 mg l-1 kinetin in the regeneration media. For performing transient gene expression, immature embryos were first isolated from inflorescences. Transient expression of the GUS reporter gene in immature embryos was significantly increased after sonication, a vacuum treatment, centrifugation and the addition of L-cysteine and dithiothreitol, which led to the efficiency of transient expression at levels greater than 70% after Agrobacterium inoculation. Inoculation with Agrobacterium was also tested with germinated seeds. The radicals of germinated seeds were pierced with needles and dipped into Agrobacterium solution. This method achieved a 10% transient

  14. Dcode.org anthology of comparative genomic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loots, Gabriela G; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2005-07-01

    Comparative genomics provides the means to demarcate functional regions in anonymous DNA sequences. The successful application of this method to identifying novel genes is currently shifting to deciphering the non-coding encryption of gene regulation across genomes. To facilitate the practical application of comparative sequence analysis to genetics and genomics, we have developed several analytical and visualization tools for the analysis of arbitrary sequences and whole genomes. These tools include two alignment tools, zPicture and Mulan; a phylogenetic shadowing tool, eShadow for identifying lineage- and species-specific functional elements; two evolutionary conserved transcription factor analysis tools, rVista and multiTF; a tool for extracting cis-regulatory modules governing the expression of co-regulated genes, Creme 2.0; and a dynamic portal to multiple vertebrate and invertebrate genome alignments, the ECR Browser. Here, we briefly describe each one of these tools and provide specific examples on their practical applications. All the tools are publicly available at the http://www.dcode.org/ website.

  15. Genomic Tools and Animal Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Ricardo

    2016-09-07

    Animals have been selected to improve their productivity in order to increase the profitability to the producer. In this scenario, not much attention was given to health traits. As a consequence of that, selection was made for animals with higher production and a shortened productive life. In addition to that, the intense production system used in livestock has forced animals to be exposed to higher pathogen loads, therefore predisposing them to infections. Infectious diseases are known to be caused by micro-organisms that are able to infect and colonize the host, affecting their physiological functions and causing problems in their production and on animal welfare. Even with the best management practices, diseases are still the most important cause of economic losses in the animal industry. In this review article we have addressed the new tools that could be used to select animals to better cope with diseases and pathogens.

  16. Comparative genomics using data mining tools

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have analysed the genomes of representatives of three kingdoms of life, namely, archaea, eubacteria and eukaryota using data mining tools based on compositional analyses of the protein sequences. The representatives chosen in this analysis were Methanococcus jannaschii, Haemophilus influenzae and ...

  17. BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkatawi, Manal; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-08-18

    Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACON's utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27%, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/ .

  18. BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal M.

    2015-08-18

    Background Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). Results The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACON’s utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27 %, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. Conclusions We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/

  19. VISTA - computational tools for comparative genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Pachter, Lior; Poliakov, Alexander; Rubin,Edward M.; Dubchak, Inna

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of DNA sequences from different species is a fundamental method for identifying functional elements in genomes. Here we describe the VISTA family of tools created to assist biologists in carrying out this task. Our first VISTA server at http://www-gsd.lbl.gov/VISTA/ was launched in the summer of 2000 and was designed to align long genomic sequences and visualize these alignments with associated functional annotations. Currently the VISTA site includes multiple comparative genomics tools and provides users with rich capabilities to browse pre-computed whole-genome alignments of large vertebrate genomes and other groups of organisms with VISTA Browser, submit their own sequences of interest to several VISTA servers for various types of comparative analysis, and obtain detailed comparative analysis results for a set of cardiovascular genes. We illustrate capabilities of the VISTA site by the analysis of a 180 kilobase (kb) interval on human chromosome 5 that encodes for the kinesin family member3A (KIF3A) protein.

  20. GenomePeek—an online tool for prokaryotic genome and metagenome analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katelyn McNair

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As more and more prokaryotic sequencing takes place, a method to quickly and accurately analyze this data is needed. Previous tools are mainly designed for metagenomic analysis and have limitations; such as long runtimes and significant false positive error rates. The online tool GenomePeek (edwards.sdsu.edu/GenomePeek was developed to analyze both single genome and metagenome sequencing files, quickly and with low error rates. GenomePeek uses a sequence assembly approach where reads to a set of conserved genes are extracted, assembled and then aligned against the highly specific reference database. GenomePeek was found to be faster than traditional approaches while still keeping error rates low, as well as offering unique data visualization options.

  1. The Switchgrass Genome: Tools and Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Casler

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Switchgrass ( L. is a perennial grass species receiving significant focus as a potential bioenergy crop. In the last 5 yr the switchgrass research community has produced a genetic linkage map, an expressed sequence tag (EST database, a set of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers that are distributed across the 18 linkage groups, 4x sampling of the AP13 genome in 400-bp reads, and bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC libraries containing over 200,000 clones. These studies have revealed close collinearity of the switchgrass genome with those of sorghum [ (L. Moench], rice ( L., and (L. P. Beauv. Switchgrass researchers have also developed several microarray technologies for gene expression studies. Switchgrass genomic resources will accelerate the ability of plant breeders to enhance productivity, pest resistance, and nutritional quality. Because switchgrass is a relative newcomer to the genomics world, many secrets of the switchgrass genome have yet to be revealed. To continue to efficiently explore basic and applied topics in switchgrass, it will be critical to capture and exploit the knowledge of plant geneticists and breeders on the next logical steps in the development and utilization of genomic resources for this species. To this end, the community has established a switchgrass genomics executive committee and work group ( [verified 28 Oct. 2011].

  2. BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal M.; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/

  3. Game development tool essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Berinstein, Paula; Ardolino, Alessandro; Franco, Simon; Herubel, Adrien; McCutchan, John; Nedelcu, Nicusor; Nitschke, Benjamin; Olmstead, Don; Robinet, Fabrice; Ronchi, Christian; Turkowski, Rita; Walter, Robert; Samour, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Offers game developers new techniques for streamlining the critical game tools pipeline. Inspires game developers to share their secrets and improve the productivity of the entire industry. Helps game industry practitioners compete in a hyper-competitive environment.

  4. Current development and application of soybean genomics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingli HE; Jing ZHAO; Man ZHAO; Chaoying HE

    2011-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max),an important domesticated species originated in China,constitutes a major source of edible oils and high-quality plant proteins worldwide.In spite of its complex genome as a consequence of an ancient tetraploidilization,platforms for map-based genomics,sequence-based genomics,comparative genomics and functional genomics have been well developed in the last decade,thus rich repertoires of genomic tools and resources are available,which have been influencing the soybean genetic improvement.Here we mainly review the progresses of soybean (including its wild relative Glycine soja) genomics and its impetus for soybean breeding,and raise the major biological questions needing to be addressed.Genetic maps,physical maps,QTL and EST mapping have been so well achieved that the marker assisted selection and positional cloning in soybean is feasible and even routine.Whole genome sequencing and transcriptomic analyses provide a large collection of molecular markers and predicted genes,which are instrumental to comparative genomics and functional genomics.Comparative genomics has started to reveal the evolution of soybean genome and the molecular basis of soybean domestication process.Microarrays resources,mutagenesis and efficient transformation systems become essential components of soybean functional genomics.Furthermore,phenotypic functional genomics via both forward and reverse genetic approaches has inferred functions of many genes involved in plant and seed development,in response to abiotic stresses,functioning in plant-pathogenic microbe interactions,and controlling the oil and protein content of seed.These achievements have paved the way for generation of transgenic or genetically modified (GM) soybean crops.

  5. Genephony: a knowledge management tool for genome-wide research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riva Alberto

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the consequences of the rapid and widespread adoption of high-throughput experimental technologies is an exponential increase of the amount of data produced by genome-wide experiments. Researchers increasingly need to handle very large volumes of heterogeneous data, including both the data generated by their own experiments and the data retrieved from publicly available repositories of genomic knowledge. Integration, exploration, manipulation and interpretation of data and information therefore need to become as automated as possible, since their scale and breadth are, in general, beyond the limits of what individual researchers and the basic data management tools in normal use can handle. This paper describes Genephony, a tool we are developing to address these challenges. Results We describe how Genephony can be used to manage large datesets of genomic information, integrating them with existing knowledge repositories. We illustrate its functionalities with an example of a complex annotation task, in which a set of SNPs coming from a genotyping experiment is annotated with genes known to be associated to a phenotype of interest. We show how, thanks to the modular architecture of Genephony and its user-friendly interface, this task can be performed in a few simple steps. Conclusion Genephony is an online tool for the manipulation of large datasets of genomic information. It can be used as a browser for genomic data, as a high-throughput annotation tool, and as a knowledge discovery tool. It is designed to be easy to use, flexible and extensible. Its knowledge management engine provides fine-grained control over individual data elements, as well as efficient operations on large datasets.

  6. Recurrence time statistics: versatile tools for genomic DNA sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yinhe; Tung, Wen-Wen; Gao, J B

    2004-01-01

    With the completion of the human and a few model organisms' genomes, and the genomes of many other organisms waiting to be sequenced, it has become increasingly important to develop faster computational tools which are capable of easily identifying the structures and extracting features from DNA sequences. One of the more important structures in a DNA sequence is repeat-related. Often they have to be masked before protein coding regions along a DNA sequence are to be identified or redundant expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are to be sequenced. Here we report a novel recurrence time based method for sequence analysis. The method can conveniently study all kinds of periodicity and exhaustively find all repeat-related features from a genomic DNA sequence. An efficient codon index is also derived from the recurrence time statistics, which has the salient features of being largely species-independent and working well on very short sequences. Efficient codon indices are key elements of successful gene finding algorithms, and are particularly useful for determining whether a suspected EST belongs to a coding or non-coding region. We illustrate the power of the method by studying the genomes of E. coli, the yeast S. cervisivae, the nematode worm C. elegans, and the human, Homo sapiens. Computationally, our method is very efficient. It allows us to carry out analysis of genomes on the whole genomic scale by a PC.

  7. Genomic-based-breeding tools for tropical maize improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakradhar, Thammineni; Hindu, Vemuri; Reddy, Palakolanu Sudhakar

    2017-12-01

    Maize has traditionally been the main staple diet in the Southern Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa and widely grown by millions of resource poor small scale farmers. Approximately, 35.4 million hectares are sown to tropical maize, constituting around 59% of the developing worlds. Tropical maize encounters tremendous challenges besides poor agro-climatic situations with average yields recorded <3 tones/hectare that is far less than the average of developed countries. On the contrary to poor yields, the demand for maize as food, feed, and fuel is continuously increasing in these regions. Heterosis breeding introduced in early 90 s improved maize yields significantly, but genetic gains is still a mirage, particularly for crop growing under marginal environments. Application of molecular markers has accelerated the pace of maize breeding to some extent. The availability of array of sequencing and genotyping technologies offers unrivalled service to improve precision in maize-breeding programs through modern approaches such as genomic selection, genome-wide association studies, bulk segregant analysis-based sequencing approaches, etc. Superior alleles underlying complex traits can easily be identified and introgressed efficiently using these sequence-based approaches. Integration of genomic tools and techniques with advanced genetic resources such as nested association mapping and backcross nested association mapping could certainly address the genetic issues in maize improvement programs in developing countries. Huge diversity in tropical maize and its inherent capacity for doubled haploid technology offers advantage to apply the next generation genomic tools for accelerating production in marginal environments of tropical and subtropical world. Precision in phenotyping is the key for success of any molecular-breeding approach. This article reviews genomic technologies and their application to improve agronomic traits in tropical maize breeding has been reviewed in

  8. KAIKObase: An integrated silkworm genome database and data mining tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaraju Javaregowda

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The silkworm, Bombyx mori, is one of the most economically important insects in many developing countries owing to its large-scale cultivation for silk production. With the development of genomic and biotechnological tools, B. mori has also become an important bioreactor for production of various recombinant proteins of biomedical interest. In 2004, two genome sequencing projects for B. mori were reported independently by Chinese and Japanese teams; however, the datasets were insufficient for building long genomic scaffolds which are essential for unambiguous annotation of the genome. Now, both the datasets have been merged and assembled through a joint collaboration between the two groups. Description Integration of the two data sets of silkworm whole-genome-shotgun sequencing by the Japanese and Chinese groups together with newly obtained fosmid- and BAC-end sequences produced the best continuity (~3.7 Mb in N50 scaffold size among the sequenced insect genomes and provided a high degree of nucleotide coverage (88% of all 28 chromosomes. In addition, a physical map of BAC contigs constructed by fingerprinting BAC clones and a SNP linkage map constructed using BAC-end sequences were available. In parallel, proteomic data from two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in various tissues and developmental stages were compiled into a silkworm proteome database. Finally, a Bombyx trap database was constructed for documenting insertion positions and expression data of transposon insertion lines. Conclusion For efficient usage of genome information for functional studies, genomic sequences, physical and genetic map information and EST data were compiled into KAIKObase, an integrated silkworm genome database which consists of 4 map viewers, a gene viewer, and sequence, keyword and position search systems to display results and data at the level of nucleotide sequence, gene, scaffold and chromosome. Integration of the

  9. Genomic suppression subtractive hybridization as a tool to identify differences in mycorrhizal fungal genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murat, Claude; Zampieri, Elisa; Vallino, Marta; Daghino, Stefania; Perotto, Silvia; Bonfante, Paola

    2011-05-01

    Characterization of genomic variation among different microbial species, or different strains of the same species, is a field of significant interest with a wide range of potential applications. We have investigated the genomic variation in mycorrhizal fungal genomes through genomic suppressive subtractive hybridization. The comparison was between phylogenetically distant and close truffle species (Tuber spp.), and between isolates of the ericoid mycorrhizal fungus Oidiodendron maius featuring different degrees of metal tolerance. In the interspecies experiment, almost all the sequences that were identified in the Tuber melanosporum genome and absent in Tuber borchii and Tuber indicum corresponded to transposable elements. In the intraspecies comparison, some specific sequences corresponded to regions coding for enzymes, among them a glutathione synthetase known to be involved in metal tolerance. This approach is a quick and rather inexpensive tool to develop molecular markers for mycorrhizal fungi tracking and barcoding, to identify functional genes and to investigate the genome plasticity, adaptation and evolution. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. GAViT: Genome Assembly Visualization Tool for Short Read Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syed, Aijazuddin; Shapiro, Harris; Tu, Hank; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Trong, Stephan

    2008-03-14

    It is a challenging job for genome analysts to accurately debug, troubleshoot, and validate genome assembly results. Genome analysts rely on visualization tools to help validate and troubleshoot assembly results, including such problems as mis-assemblies, low-quality regions, and repeats. Short read data adds further complexity and makes it extremely challenging for the visualization tools to scale and to view all needed assembly information. As a result, there is a need for a visualization tool that can scale to display assembly data from the new sequencing technologies. We present Genome Assembly Visualization Tool (GAViT), a highly scalable and interactive assembly visualization tool developed at the DOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI).

  11. Genomic Tools in Pea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayeh, Nadim; Aubert, Grégoire; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle; Warkentin, Thomas D.; Burstin, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L.) is an annual cool-season legume and one of the oldest domesticated crops. Dry pea seeds contain 22–25% protein, complex starch and fiber constituents, and a rich array of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals which make them a valuable source for human consumption and livestock feed. Dry pea ranks third to common bean and chickpea as the most widely grown pulse in the world with more than 11 million tons produced in 2013. Pea breeding has achieved great success since the time of Mendel's experiments in the mid-1800s. However, several traits still require significant improvement for better yield stability in a larger growing area. Key breeding objectives in pea include improving biotic and abiotic stress resistance and enhancing yield components and seed quality. Taking advantage of the diversity present in the pea genepool, many mapping populations have been constructed in the last decades and efforts have been deployed to identify loci involved in the control of target traits and further introgress them into elite breeding materials. Pea now benefits from next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies that are paving the way for genome-wide association studies and genomic selection approaches. This review covers the significant development and deployment of genomic tools for pea breeding in recent years. Future prospects are discussed especially in light of current progress toward deciphering the pea genome. PMID:26640470

  12. Genomic tools in pea breeding programs: status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadim eTAYEH

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. is an annual cool-season legume and one of the oldest domesticated crops. Dry pea seeds contain 22-25 percent protein, complex starch and fibre constituents and a rich array of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals which make them a valuable source for human consumption and livestock feed. Dry pea ranks third to common bean and chickpea as the most widely grown pulse in the world with more than 11 million tonnes produced in 2013. Pea breeding has achieved great success since the time of Mendel’s experiments in the mid-1800s. However, several traits still require significant improvement for better yield stability in a larger growing area. Key breeding objectives in pea include improving biotic and abiotic stress resistance and enhancing yield components and seed quality. Taking advantage of the diversity present in the pea genepool, many mapping populations have been constructed in the last decades and efforts have been deployed to identify loci involved in the control of target traits and further introgress them into elite breeding materials. Pea now benefits from next-generation sequencing and high-throughput genotyping technologies that are paving the way for genome-wide association studies and genomic selection approaches. This review covers the significant development and deployment of genomic tools for pea breeding in recent years. Future prospects are discussed especially in light of current progress towards deciphering the pea genome.

  13. Genovar: a detection and visualization tool for genomic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwang Su; Moon, Sanghoon; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Bong-Jo; Park, Kiejung

    2012-05-08

    Along with single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), copy number variation (CNV) is considered an important source of genetic variation associated with disease susceptibility. Despite the importance of CNV, the tools currently available for its analysis often produce false positive results due to limitations such as low resolution of array platforms, platform specificity, and the type of CNV. To resolve this problem, spurious signals must be separated from true signals by visual inspection. None of the previously reported CNV analysis tools support this function and the simultaneous visualization of comparative genomic hybridization arrays (aCGH) and sequence alignment. The purpose of the present study was to develop a useful program for the efficient detection and visualization of CNV regions that enables the manual exclusion of erroneous signals. A JAVA-based stand-alone program called Genovar was developed. To ascertain whether a detected CNV region is a novel variant, Genovar compares the detected CNV regions with previously reported CNV regions using the Database of Genomic Variants (DGV, http://projects.tcag.ca/variation) and the Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Database (dbSNP). The current version of Genovar is capable of visualizing genomic data from sources such as the aCGH data file and sequence alignment format files. Genovar is freely accessible and provides a user-friendly graphic user interface (GUI) to facilitate the detection of CNV regions. The program also provides comprehensive information to help in the elimination of spurious signals by visual inspection, making Genovar a valuable tool for reducing false positive CNV results. http://genovar.sourceforge.net/.

  14. Tools for the Validation of Genomes and Transcriptomes with Proteomics data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Aya, Carlos; Tay, Aidan

    data generated from protein mass spectrometry. We are developing a set of tools which allow users to: •Co-visualise genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics data using the Integrated Genomics Viewer (IGV).1 •Validate the existence of genes and mRNAs using peptides identified from mass spectrometry...

  15. MODEST: a web-based design tool for oligonucleotide-mediated genome engineering and recombineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Mads; Klausen, Michael Schantz; Anderson, Mads Valdemar

    2014-01-01

    Recombineering and multiplex automated genome engineering (MAGE) offer the possibility to rapidly modify multiple genomic or plasmid sites at high efficiencies. This enables efficient creation of genetic variants including both single mutants with specifically targeted modifications as well......, which confers the corresponding genetic change, is performed manually. To address these challenges, we have developed the MAGE Oligo Design Tool (MODEST). This web-based tool allows designing of MAGE oligos for (i) tuning translation rates by modifying the ribosomal binding site, (ii) generating...

  16. HEP Computing Tools, Grid and Supercomputers for Genome Sequencing Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, K.; Klimentov, A.; Maeno, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Novikov, A.; Poyda, A.; Tertychnyy, I.; Wenaus, T.

    2017-10-01

    PanDA - Production and Distributed Analysis Workload Management System has been developed to address ATLAS experiment at LHC data processing and analysis challenges. Recently PanDA has been extended to run HEP scientific applications on Leadership Class Facilities and supercomputers. The success of the projects to use PanDA beyond HEP and Grid has drawn attention from other compute intensive sciences such as bioinformatics. Recent advances of Next Generation Genome Sequencing (NGS) technology led to increasing streams of sequencing data that need to be processed, analysed and made available for bioinformaticians worldwide. Analysis of genomes sequencing data using popular software pipeline PALEOMIX can take a month even running it on the powerful computer resource. In this paper we will describe the adaptation the PALEOMIX pipeline to run it on a distributed computing environment powered by PanDA. To run pipeline we split input files into chunks which are run separately on different nodes as separate inputs for PALEOMIX and finally merge output file, it is very similar to what it done by ATLAS to process and to simulate data. We dramatically decreased the total walltime because of jobs (re)submission automation and brokering within PanDA. Using software tools developed initially for HEP and Grid can reduce payload execution time for Mammoths DNA samples from weeks to days.

  17. Analysis tools for the interplay between genome layout and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyioukos, Costas; Elati, Mohamed; Képès, François

    2016-06-06

    Genome layout and gene regulation appear to be interdependent. Understanding this interdependence is key to exploring the dynamic nature of chromosome conformation and to engineering functional genomes. Evidence for non-random genome layout, defined as the relative positioning of either co-functional or co-regulated genes, stems from two main approaches. Firstly, the analysis of contiguous genome segments across species, has highlighted the conservation of gene arrangement (synteny) along chromosomal regions. Secondly, the study of long-range interactions along a chromosome has emphasised regularities in the positioning of microbial genes that are co-regulated, co-expressed or evolutionarily correlated. While one-dimensional pattern analysis is a mature field, it is often powerless on biological datasets which tend to be incomplete, and partly incorrect. Moreover, there is a lack of comprehensive, user-friendly tools to systematically analyse, visualise, integrate and exploit regularities along genomes. Here we present the Genome REgulatory and Architecture Tools SCAN (GREAT:SCAN) software for the systematic study of the interplay between genome layout and gene expression regulation. SCAN is a collection of related and interconnected applications currently able to perform systematic analyses of genome regularities as well as to improve transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and gene regulatory network predictions based on gene positional information. We demonstrate the capabilities of these tools by studying on one hand the regular patterns of genome layout in the major regulons of the bacterium Escherichia coli. On the other hand, we demonstrate the capabilities to improve TFBS prediction in microbes. Finally, we highlight, by visualisation of multivariate techniques, the interplay between position and sequence information for effective transcription regulation.

  18. Public data and open source tools for multi-assay genomic investigation of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Lavanya; Ramos, Marcel; Re, Angela; El-Hachem, Nehme; Safikhani, Zhaleh; Gendoo, Deena M A; Davis, Sean; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Castelo, Robert; Hansen, Kasper D; Carey, Vincent J; Morgan, Martin; Culhane, Aedín C; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Waldron, Levi

    2016-07-01

    Molecular interrogation of a biological sample through DNA sequencing, RNA and microRNA profiling, proteomics and other assays, has the potential to provide a systems level approach to predicting treatment response and disease progression, and to developing precision therapies. Large publicly funded projects have generated extensive and freely available multi-assay data resources; however, bioinformatic and statistical methods for the analysis of such experiments are still nascent. We review multi-assay genomic data resources in the areas of clinical oncology, pharmacogenomics and other perturbation experiments, population genomics and regulatory genomics and other areas, and tools for data acquisition. Finally, we review bioinformatic tools that are explicitly geared toward integrative genomic data visualization and analysis. This review provides starting points for accessing publicly available data and tools to support development of needed integrative methods. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. GREAT: a web portal for Genome Regulatory Architecture Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouyioukos, Costas; Bucchini, François; Elati, Mohamed; Képès, François

    2016-07-08

    GREAT (Genome REgulatory Architecture Tools) is a novel web portal for tools designed to generate user-friendly and biologically useful analysis of genome architecture and regulation. The online tools of GREAT are freely accessible and compatible with essentially any operating system which runs a modern browser. GREAT is based on the analysis of genome layout -defined as the respective positioning of co-functional genes- and its relation with chromosome architecture and gene expression. GREAT tools allow users to systematically detect regular patterns along co-functional genomic features in an automatic way consisting of three individual steps and respective interactive visualizations. In addition to the complete analysis of regularities, GREAT tools enable the use of periodicity and position information for improving the prediction of transcription factor binding sites using a multi-view machine learning approach. The outcome of this integrative approach features a multivariate analysis of the interplay between the location of a gene and its regulatory sequence. GREAT results are plotted in web interactive graphs and are available for download either as individual plots, self-contained interactive pages or as machine readable tables for downstream analysis. The GREAT portal can be reached at the following URL https://absynth.issb.genopole.fr/GREAT and each individual GREAT tool is available for downloading. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Next generation tools for genomic data generation, distribution, and visualization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nix David A

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapidly falling cost and availability of high throughput sequencing and microarray technologies, the bottleneck for effectively using genomic analysis in the laboratory and clinic is shifting to one of effectively managing, analyzing, and sharing genomic data. Results Here we present three open-source, platform independent, software tools for generating, analyzing, distributing, and visualizing genomic data. These include a next generation sequencing/microarray LIMS and analysis project center (GNomEx; an application for annotating and programmatically distributing genomic data using the community vetted DAS/2 data exchange protocol (GenoPub; and a standalone Java Swing application (GWrap that makes cutting edge command line analysis tools available to those who prefer graphical user interfaces. Both GNomEx and GenoPub use the rich client Flex/Flash web browser interface to interact with Java classes and a relational database on a remote server. Both employ a public-private user-group security model enabling controlled distribution of patient and unpublished data alongside public resources. As such, they function as genomic data repositories that can be accessed manually or programmatically through DAS/2-enabled client applications such as the Integrated Genome Browser. Conclusions These tools have gained wide use in our core facilities, research laboratories and clinics and are freely available for non-profit use. See http://sourceforge.net/projects/gnomex/, http://sourceforge.net/projects/genoviz/, and http://sourceforge.net/projects/useq.

  1. Next generation tools for genomic data generation, distribution, and visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nix, David A; Di Sera, Tonya L; Dalley, Brian K; Milash, Brett A; Cundick, Robert M; Quinn, Kevin S; Courdy, Samir J

    2010-09-09

    With the rapidly falling cost and availability of high throughput sequencing and microarray technologies, the bottleneck for effectively using genomic analysis in the laboratory and clinic is shifting to one of effectively managing, analyzing, and sharing genomic data. Here we present three open-source, platform independent, software tools for generating, analyzing, distributing, and visualizing genomic data. These include a next generation sequencing/microarray LIMS and analysis project center (GNomEx); an application for annotating and programmatically distributing genomic data using the community vetted DAS/2 data exchange protocol (GenoPub); and a standalone Java Swing application (GWrap) that makes cutting edge command line analysis tools available to those who prefer graphical user interfaces. Both GNomEx and GenoPub use the rich client Flex/Flash web browser interface to interact with Java classes and a relational database on a remote server. Both employ a public-private user-group security model enabling controlled distribution of patient and unpublished data alongside public resources. As such, they function as genomic data repositories that can be accessed manually or programmatically through DAS/2-enabled client applications such as the Integrated Genome Browser. These tools have gained wide use in our core facilities, research laboratories and clinics and are freely available for non-profit use. See http://sourceforge.net/projects/gnomex/, http://sourceforge.net/projects/genoviz/, and http://sourceforge.net/projects/useq.

  2. PSAT: A web tool to compare genomic neighborhoods of multiple prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasnick Michael

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The conservation of gene order among prokaryotic genomes can provide valuable insight into gene function, protein interactions, or events by which genomes have evolved. Although some tools are available for visualizing and comparing the order of genes between genomes of study, few support an efficient and organized analysis between large numbers of genomes. The Prokaryotic Sequence homology Analysis Tool (PSAT is a web tool for comparing gene neighborhoods among multiple prokaryotic genomes. Results PSAT utilizes a database that is preloaded with gene annotation, BLAST hit results, and gene-clustering scores designed to help identify regions of conserved gene order. Researchers use the PSAT web interface to find a gene of interest in a reference genome and efficiently retrieve the sequence homologs found in other bacterial genomes. The tool generates a graphic of the genomic neighborhood surrounding the selected gene and the corresponding regions for its homologs in each comparison genome. Homologs in each region are color coded to assist users with analyzing gene order among various genomes. In contrast to common comparative analysis methods that filter sequence homolog data based on alignment score cutoffs, PSAT leverages gene context information for homologs, including those with weak alignment scores, enabling a more sensitive analysis. Features for constraining or ordering results are designed to help researchers browse results from large numbers of comparison genomes in an organized manner. PSAT has been demonstrated to be useful for helping to identify gene orthologs and potential functional gene clusters, and detecting genome modifications that may result in loss of function. Conclusion PSAT allows researchers to investigate the order of genes within local genomic neighborhoods of multiple genomes. A PSAT web server for public use is available for performing analyses on a growing set of reference genomes through any

  3. Emerging Genomic Tools for Legume Breeding: Current Status and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manish K.; Roorkiwal, Manish; Singh, Vikas K.; Ramalingam, Abirami; Kudapa, Himabindu; Thudi, Mahendar; Chitikineni, Anu; Rathore, Abhishek; Varshney, Rajeev K.

    2016-01-01

    Legumes play a vital role in ensuring global nutritional food security and improving soil quality through nitrogen fixation. Accelerated higher genetic gains is required to meet the demand of ever increasing global population. In recent years, speedy developments have been witnessed in legume genomics due to advancements in next-generation sequencing (NGS) and high-throughput genotyping technologies. Reference genome sequences for many legume crops have been reported in the last 5 years. The availability of the draft genome sequences and re-sequencing of elite genotypes for several important legume crops have made it possible to identify structural variations at large scale. Availability of large-scale genomic resources and low-cost and high-throughput genotyping technologies are enhancing the efficiency and resolution of genetic mapping and marker-trait association studies. Most importantly, deployment of molecular breeding approaches has resulted in development of improved lines in some legume crops such as chickpea and groundnut. In order to support genomics-driven crop improvement at a fast pace, the deployment of breeder-friendly genomics and decision support tools seems appear to be critical in breeding programs in developing countries. This review provides an overview of emerging genomics and informatics tools/approaches that will be the key driving force for accelerating genomics-assisted breeding and ultimately ensuring nutritional and food security in developing countries. PMID:27199998

  4. A Simulation Tool for the Study of Symmetric Inversions in Bacterial Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ulisses; Dias, Zanoni; Setubal, João C.

    We present the tool SIB that simulates genomic inversions in bacterial chromosomes. The tool simulates symmetric inversions but allows the appearance of nonsymmetric inversions by simulating small syntenic blocks frequently observed on bacterial genome comparisons. We evaluate SIB by comparing its results to real genome alignments. We develop measures that allow quantitative comparisons between real pairwise alignments (in terms of dotplots) and simulated ones. These measures allow an evaluation of SIB in terms of dendrograms. We evaluate SIB by comparing its results to whole chromosome alignments and maximum likelihood trees for three bacterial groups (the Pseudomonadaceae family and the Xanthomonas and Shewanella genera). We demonstrate an application of SIB by using it to evaluate the ancestral genome reconstruction tool MGR.

  5. Development of Bioinformatics Infrastructure for Genomics Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Nicola J; Adebiyi, Ezekiel; Adebiyi, Marion; Adeyemi, Seun; Ahmed, Azza; Ahmed, Rehab; Akanle, Bola; Alibi, Mohamed; Armstrong, Don L; Aron, Shaun; Ashano, Efejiro; Baichoo, Shakuntala; Benkahla, Alia; Brown, David K; Chimusa, Emile R; Fadlelmola, Faisal M; Falola, Dare; Fatumo, Segun; Ghedira, Kais; Ghouila, Amel; Hazelhurst, Scott; Isewon, Itunuoluwa; Jung, Segun; Kassim, Samar Kamal; Kayondo, Jonathan K; Mbiyavanga, Mamana; Meintjes, Ayton; Mohammed, Somia; Mosaku, Abayomi; Moussa, Ahmed; Muhammd, Mustafa; Mungloo-Dilmohamud, Zahra; Nashiru, Oyekanmi; Odia, Trust; Okafor, Adaobi; Oladipo, Olaleye; Osamor, Victor; Oyelade, Jellili; Sadki, Khalid; Salifu, Samson Pandam; Soyemi, Jumoke; Panji, Sumir; Radouani, Fouzia; Souiai, Oussama; Tastan Bishop, Özlem

    2017-06-01

    Although pockets of bioinformatics excellence have developed in Africa, generally, large-scale genomic data analysis has been limited by the availability of expertise and infrastructure. H3ABioNet, a pan-African bioinformatics network, was established to build capacity specifically to enable H3Africa (Human Heredity and Health in Africa) researchers to analyze their data in Africa. Since the inception of the H3Africa initiative, H3ABioNet's role has evolved in response to changing needs from the consortium and the African bioinformatics community. H3ABioNet set out to develop core bioinformatics infrastructure and capacity for genomics research in various aspects of data collection, transfer, storage, and analysis. Various resources have been developed to address genomic data management and analysis needs of H3Africa researchers and other scientific communities on the continent. NetMap was developed and used to build an accurate picture of network performance within Africa and between Africa and the rest of the world, and Globus Online has been rolled out to facilitate data transfer. A participant recruitment database was developed to monitor participant enrollment, and data is being harmonized through the use of ontologies and controlled vocabularies. The standardized metadata will be integrated to provide a search facility for H3Africa data and biospecimens. Because H3Africa projects are generating large-scale genomic data, facilities for analysis and interpretation are critical. H3ABioNet is implementing several data analysis platforms that provide a large range of bioinformatics tools or workflows, such as Galaxy, the Job Management System, and eBiokits. A set of reproducible, portable, and cloud-scalable pipelines to support the multiple H3Africa data types are also being developed and dockerized to enable execution on multiple computing infrastructures. In addition, new tools have been developed for analysis of the uniquely divergent African data and for

  6. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genomic sequence data are often available well before the annotated sequence is published. We present a method for analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by BLAST. The routines are used to develop a system for automated ...

  7. Environmental tools in product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wenzel, Henrik; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Jørgensen, Jørgen

    1994-01-01

    A precondition for design of environmentally friendly products is that the design team has access to methods and tools supporting the introduction of environmental criteria in product development. A large Danish program, EDIP, is being carried out by the Institute for Product Development, Technical...... University of Denmark, in cooperation with 5 major Danish companies aiming at the development and testing of such tools. These tools are presented in this paper...

  8. MaGnET: Malaria Genome Exploration Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, Joanna L; Gerloff, Dietlind L

    2013-09-15

    The Malaria Genome Exploration Tool (MaGnET) is a software tool enabling intuitive 'exploration-style' visualization of functional genomics data relating to the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. MaGnET provides innovative integrated graphic displays for different datasets, including genomic location of genes, mRNA expression data, protein-protein interactions and more. Any selection of genes to explore made by the user is easily carried over between the different viewers for different datasets, and can be changed interactively at any point (without returning to a search). Free online use (Java Web Start) or download (Java application archive and MySQL database; requires local MySQL installation) at http://malariagenomeexplorer.org joanna.sharman@ed.ac.uk or dgerloff@ffame.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. Genome sequencing of bacteria: sequencing, de novo assembly and rapid analysis using open source tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisand, Veljo; Lettieri, Teresa

    2013-04-01

    De novo genome sequencing of previously uncharacterized microorganisms has the potential to open up new frontiers in microbial genomics by providing insight into both functional capabilities and biodiversity. Until recently, Roche 454 pyrosequencing was the NGS method of choice for de novo assembly because it generates hundreds of thousands of long reads (tools for processing NGS data are increasingly free and open source and are often adopted for both their high quality and role in promoting academic freedom. The error rate of pyrosequencing the Alcanivorax borkumensis genome was such that thousands of insertions and deletions were artificially introduced into the finished genome. Despite a high coverage (~30 fold), it did not allow the reference genome to be fully mapped. Reads from regions with errors had low quality, low coverage, or were missing. The main defect of the reference mapping was the introduction of artificial indels into contigs through lower than 100% consensus and distracting gene calling due to artificial stop codons. No assembler was able to perform de novo assembly comparable to reference mapping. Automated annotation tools performed similarly on reference mapped and de novo draft genomes, and annotated most CDSs in the de novo assembled draft genomes. Free and open source software (FOSS) tools for assembly and annotation of NGS data are being developed rapidly to provide accurate results with less computational effort. Usability is not high priority and these tools currently do not allow the data to be processed without manual intervention. Despite this, genome assemblers now readily assemble medium short reads into long contigs (>97-98% genome coverage). A notable gap in pyrosequencing technology is the quality of base pair calling and conflicting base pairs between single reads at the same nucleotide position. Regardless, using draft whole genomes that are not finished and remain fragmented into tens of contigs allows one to characterize

  10. CRISPR-Cas9: tool for qualitative and quantitative plant genome editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Noman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Genome editing advancements have made many unachievable ideas practical. Increased adoption of genome editing has been geared by swiftly developing CRISPR-Cas9 technology. This technique is appearing as driving force for innovative utilization in diverse branches of plant biology. CRISPR mediated genome editing is being used for rapid, easy and efficient alteration of indigenous genes among diverse plant species. With approximate completion of conceptual work about CRISPR/Cas9, plant scientists are applying this genome editing tool for crop attributes enhancement. The capability of CRISPR-Cas9 systems for performing targeted and efficient modifications in genome sequence as well as gene expression will certainly spur novel developments not only in model plants but also in crop plants. Additionally, due to non-involvement of foreign DNA, this technique may help alleviating regulatory issues associated with GM Plants. We expect that prevailing challenges in plant science like genomic region manipulation, crop specific vectors etc. will be addressed along with sustained growth of this genome editing tool. In this review, recent progress of CRISPR/Cas9 technology in plants has been summarized and discussed. We review potential of CRISPR/Cas9 for different aspects of plant life. It also covers strengths of this technique in comparison with other genome editing techniques e.g. ZFNs and TALENs and potential challenges in coming decades have been described.

  11. Genetic, genomic, and molecular tools for studying the protoploid yeast, L. waltii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Rienzi, Sara C; Lindstrom, Kimberly C; Lancaster, Ragina; Rolczynski, Lisa; Raghuraman, M K; Brewer, Bonita J

    2011-02-01

    Sequencing of the yeast Kluyveromyces waltii (recently renamed Lachancea waltii) provided evidence of a whole genome duplication event in the lineage leading to the well-studied Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While comparative genomic analyses of these yeasts have proven to be extremely instructive in modeling the loss or maintenance of gene duplicates, experimental tests of the ramifications following such genome alterations remain difficult. To transform L. waltii from an organism of the computational comparative genomic literature into an organism of the functional comparative genomic literature, we have developed genetic, molecular and genomic tools for working with L. waltii. In particular, we have characterized basic properties of L. waltii (growth, ploidy, molecular karyotype, mating type and the sexual cycle), developed transformation, cell cycle arrest and synchronization protocols, and have created centromeric and non-centromeric vectors as well as a genome browser for L. waltii. We hope that these tools will be used by the community to follow up on the ideas generated by sequence data and lead to a greater understanding of eukaryotic biology and genome evolution. 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Supplementary Material for: BEACON: automated tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON

    KAUST Repository

    Kalkatawi, Manal M.; Alam, Intikhab; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Genome annotation is one way of summarizing the existing knowledge about genomic characteristics of an organism. There has been an increased interest during the last several decades in computer-based structural and functional genome annotation. Many methods for this purpose have been developed for eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Our study focuses on comparison of functional annotations of prokaryotic genomes. To the best of our knowledge there is no fully automated system for detailed comparison of functional genome annotations generated by different annotation methods (AMs). Results The presence of many AMs and development of new ones introduce needs to: a/ compare different annotations for a single genome, and b/ generate annotation by combining individual ones. To address these issues we developed an Automated Tool for Bacterial GEnome Annotation ComparisON (BEACON) that benefits both AM developers and annotation analysers. BEACON provides detailed comparison of gene function annotations of prokaryotic genomes obtained by different AMs and generates extended annotations through combination of individual ones. For the illustration of BEACONâ s utility, we provide a comparison analysis of multiple different annotations generated for four genomes and show on these examples that the extended annotation can increase the number of genes annotated by putative functions up to 27 %, while the number of genes without any function assignment is reduced. Conclusions We developed BEACON, a fast tool for an automated and a systematic comparison of different annotations of single genomes. The extended annotation assigns putative functions to many genes with unknown functions. BEACON is available under GNU General Public License version 3.0 and is accessible at: http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/BEACON/ .

  13. Genomic Tools in Cowpea Breeding Programs: Status and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukar, Ousmane; Fatokun, Christian A.; Huynh, Bao-Lam; Roberts, Philip A.; Close, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Cowpea is one of the most important grain legumes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). It provides strong support to the livelihood of small-scale farmers through its contributions to their nutritional security, income generation and soil fertility enhancement. Worldwide about 6.5 million metric tons of cowpea are produced annually on about 14.5 million hectares. The low productivity of cowpea is attributable to numerous abiotic and biotic constraints. The abiotic stress factors comprise drought, low soil fertility, and heat while biotic constraints include insects, diseases, parasitic weeds, and nematodes. Cowpea farmers also have limited access to quality seeds of improved varieties for planting. Some progress has been made through conventional breeding at international and national research institutions in the last three decades. Cowpea improvement could also benefit from modern breeding methods based on molecular genetic tools. A number of advances in cowpea genetic linkage maps, and quantitative trait loci associated with some desirable traits such as resistance to Striga, Macrophomina, Fusarium wilt, bacterial blight, root-knot nematodes, aphids, and foliar thrips have been reported. An improved consensus genetic linkage map has been developed and used to identify QTLs of additional traits. In order to take advantage of these developments single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping is being streamlined to establish an efficient workflow supported by genotyping support service (GSS)-client interactions. About 1100 SNPs mapped on the cowpea genome were converted by LGC Genomics to KASP assays. Several cowpea breeding programs have been exploiting these resources to implement molecular breeding, especially for MARS and MABC, to accelerate cowpea variety improvement. The combination of conventional breeding and molecular breeding strategies, with workflow managed through the CGIAR breeding management system (BMS), promises an increase in the number of improved

  14. Genomic tools in cowpea breeding programs: status and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ousmane eBoukar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea is one of the most important grain legumes in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA. It provides strong support to the livelihood of small-scale farmers through its contributions to their nutritional security, income generation and soil fertility enhancement. Worldwide about 6.5 million metric tons of cowpea are produced annually on about 14.5 million hectares. The low productivity of cowpea is attributable to numerous abiotic and biotic constraints. The abiotic stress factors comprise drought, low soil fertility, and heat while biotic constraints include insects, diseases, parasitic weeds and nematodes. Cowpea farmers also have limited access to quality seeds of improved varieties for planting. Some progress has been made through conventional breeding at international and national research institutions in the last three decades. Cowpea improvement could also benefit from modern breeding methods based on molecular genetic tools. A number of advances in cowpea genetic linkage maps, and quantitative trait loci associated with some desirable traits such as resistance to Striga, Macrophomina, Fusarium wilt, bacterial blight, root-knot nematodes, aphids and foliar thrips have been reported. An improved consensus genetic linkage map has been developed and used to identify QTLs of additional traits. In order to take advantage of these developments single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping is being streamlined to establish an efficient workflow supported by genotyping support service (GSS-client interactions. About 1100 SNPs mapped on the cowpea genome were converted by LGC Genomics to KASP assays. Several cowpea breeding programs have been exploiting these resources to implement molecular breeding, especially for MARS and MABC, to accelerate cowpea variety improvement. The combination of conventional breeding and molecular breeding strategies, with workflow managed through the CGIAR breeding management system (BMS, promises an increase in the number of

  15. [CRISPR/CAS9, the King of Genome Editing Tools].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikov, A V; Lavrov, A V

    2017-01-01

    The discovery of CRISPR/Cas9 brought a hope for having an efficient, reliable, and readily available tool for genome editing. CRISPR/Cas9 is certainly easy to use, while its efficiency and reliability remain the focus of studies. The review describes the general principles of the organization and function of Cas nucleases and a number of important issues to be considered while planning genome editing experiments with CRISPR/Cas9. The issues include evaluation of the efficiency and specificity for Cas9, sgRNA selection, Cas9 variants designed artificially, and use of homologous recombination and nonhomologous end joining in DNA editing.

  16. Databases and web tools for cancer genomics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yadong; Dong, Xunong; Xie, Bingbing; Ding, Nan; Chen, Juan; Li, Yongjun; Zhang, Qian; Qu, Hongzhu; Fang, Xiangdong

    2015-02-01

    Publicly-accessible resources have promoted the advance of scientific discovery. The era of genomics and big data has brought the need for collaboration and data sharing in order to make effective use of this new knowledge. Here, we describe the web resources for cancer genomics research and rate them on the basis of the diversity of cancer types, sample size, omics data comprehensiveness, and user experience. The resources reviewed include data repository and analysis tools; and we hope such introduction will promote the awareness and facilitate the usage of these resources in the cancer research community. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Genomic tools in pearl millet breeding for drought tolerance: Status and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desalegn Debelo Serba

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pearl millet (Penisetum glaucum (L R. Br. is a hardy cereal crop grown in the arid and semiarid tropics where other cereals are likely to fail to produce economic yields due to drought and heat stresses. Adaptive evolution, a form of natural selection shaped the crop to grow and yield satisfactorily with limited moisture supply or under periodic water deficits in the soil. Drought tolerance is a complex polygenic trait that various morphological and physiological responses are controlled by hundreds of genes and significantly influenced by the environment. The development of genomic tools will have enormous potential to improve the efficiency and precision of conventional breeding. The apparent independent domestication events, highly outcrossing nature and traditional cultivation in stressful environments maintained tremendous amount of polymorphism in pearl millet. This high polymorphism of the crop has been revealed by genome mapping that in turn stimulated the mapping and tagging of genomic regions controlling important traits such as drought tolerance. Mapping of a major QTL for terminal drought tolerance in independent populations envisaged the prospect for the development of molecular breeding in pearl millet. To accelerate genetic gains for drought tolerance targeted novel approaches such as establishment of marker-trait associations, genomic selection tools, genome sequence and genotyping-by-sequencing are still limited. Development and application of high throughput genomic tools need to be intensified to improve the breeding efficiency of pearl millet to minimize the impact of climate change on its production.

  18. Android development tools for Eclipse

    CERN Document Server

    Shah, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    A standard tutorial aimed at developing Android applications in a practical manner.Android Development Tools for Eclipse is aimed at beginners and existing developers who want to learn more about Android development. It is assumed that you have experience in Java programming and that you have used IDE for development.

  19. DivStat: a user-friendly tool for single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of genomic diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês Soares

    Full Text Available Recent developments have led to an enormous increase of publicly available large genomic data, including complete genomes. The 1000 Genomes Project was a major contributor, releasing the results of sequencing a large number of individual genomes, and allowing for a myriad of large scale studies on human genetic variation. However, the tools currently available are insufficient when the goal concerns some analyses of data sets encompassing more than hundreds of base pairs and when considering haplotype sequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Here, we present a new and potent tool to deal with large data sets allowing the computation of a variety of summary statistics of population genetic data, increasing the speed of data analysis.

  20. A comparative evaluation of genome assembly reconciliation tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhakami, Hind; Mirebrahim, Hamid; Lonardi, Stefano

    2017-05-18

    The majority of eukaryotic genomes are unfinished due to the algorithmic challenges of assembling them. A variety of assembly and scaffolding tools are available, but it is not always obvious which tool or parameters to use for a specific genome size and complexity. It is, therefore, common practice to produce multiple assemblies using different assemblers and parameters, then select the best one for public release. A more compelling approach would allow one to merge multiple assemblies with the intent of producing a higher quality consensus assembly, which is the objective of assembly reconciliation. Several assembly reconciliation tools have been proposed in the literature, but their strengths and weaknesses have never been compared on a common dataset. We fill this need with this work, in which we report on an extensive comparative evaluation of several tools. Specifically, we evaluate contiguity, correctness, coverage, and the duplication ratio of the merged assembly compared to the individual assemblies provided as input. None of the tools we tested consistently improved the quality of the input GAGE and synthetic assemblies. Our experiments show an increase in contiguity in the consensus assembly when the original assemblies already have high quality. In terms of correctness, the quality of the results depends on the specific tool, as well as on the quality and the ranking of the input assemblies. In general, the number of misassemblies ranges from being comparable to the best of the input assembly to being comparable to the worst of the input assembly.

  1. Correcting Inconsistencies and Errors in Bacterial Genome Metadata Using an Automated Curation Tool in Excel (AutoCurE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmedes, Sarah E; King, Jonathan L; Budowle, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Whole-genome data are invaluable for large-scale comparative genomic studies. Current sequencing technologies have made it feasible to sequence entire bacterial genomes with relative ease and time with a substantially reduced cost per nucleotide, hence cost per genome. More than 3,000 bacterial genomes have been sequenced and are available at the finished status. Publically available genomes can be readily downloaded; however, there are challenges to verify the specific supporting data contained within the download and to identify errors and inconsistencies that may be present within the organizational data content and metadata. AutoCurE, an automated tool for bacterial genome database curation in Excel, was developed to facilitate local database curation of supporting data that accompany downloaded genomes from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. AutoCurE provides an automated approach to curate local genomic databases by flagging inconsistencies or errors by comparing the downloaded supporting data to the genome reports to verify genome name, RefSeq accession numbers, the presence of archaea, BioProject/UIDs, and sequence file descriptions. Flags are generated for nine metadata fields if there are inconsistencies between the downloaded genomes and genomes reports and if erroneous or missing data are evident. AutoCurE is an easy-to-use tool for local database curation for large-scale genome data prior to downstream analyses.

  2. RatMap--rat genome tools and data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Greta; Johnson, Per; Andersson, Lars; Klinga-Levan, Karin; Gómez-Fabre, Pedro M; Ståhl, Fredrik

    2005-01-01

    The rat genome database RatMap (http://ratmap.org or http://ratmap.gen.gu.se) has been one of the main resources for rat genome information since 1994. The database is maintained by CMB-Genetics at Goteborg University in Sweden and provides information on rat genes, polymorphic rat DNA-markers and rat quantitative trait loci (QTLs), all curated at RatMap. The database is under the supervision of the Rat Gene and Nomenclature Committee (RGNC); thus much attention is paid to rat gene nomenclature. RatMap presents information on rat idiograms, karyotypes and provides a unified presentation of the rat genome sequence and integrated rat linkage maps. A set of tools is also available to facilitate the identification and characterization of rat QTLs, as well as the estimation of exon/intron number and sizes in individual rat genes. Furthermore, comparative gene maps of rat in regard to mouse and human are provided.

  3. Use of Whole-Genus Genome Sequence Data To Develop a Multilocus Sequence Typing Tool That Accurately Identifies Yersinia Isolates to the Species and Subspecies Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Miquette; Chattaway, Marie A.; Reuter, Sandra; Savin, Cyril; Strauch, Eckhard; Carniel, Elisabeth; Connor, Thomas; Van Damme, Inge; Rajakaruna, Lakshani; Rajendram, Dunstan; Jenkins, Claire; Thomson, Nicholas R.

    2014-01-01

    The genus Yersinia is a large and diverse bacterial genus consisting of human-pathogenic species, a fish-pathogenic species, and a large number of environmental species. Recently, the phylogenetic and population structure of the entire genus was elucidated through the genome sequence data of 241 strains encompassing every known species in the genus. Here we report the mining of this enormous data set to create a multilocus sequence typing-based scheme that can identify Yersinia strains to the species level to a level of resolution equal to that for whole-genome sequencing. Our assay is designed to be able to accurately subtype the important human-pathogenic species Yersinia enterocolitica to whole-genome resolution levels. We also report the validation of the scheme on 386 strains from reference laboratory collections across Europe. We propose that the scheme is an important molecular typing system to allow accurate and reproducible identification of Yersinia isolates to the species level, a process often inconsistent in nonspecialist laboratories. Additionally, our assay is the most phylogenetically informative typing scheme available for Y. enterocolitica. PMID:25339391

  4. Developing a learning analytics tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Christian; Belle, Gianna; Clemmensen, Anita Lykke

    This poster describes how learning analytics and collective intelligence can be combined in order to develop a tool for providing support and feedback to learners and teachers regarding students self-initiated learning activities.......This poster describes how learning analytics and collective intelligence can be combined in order to develop a tool for providing support and feedback to learners and teachers regarding students self-initiated learning activities....

  5. VarB Plus: An Integrated Tool for Visualization of Genome Variation Datasets

    KAUST Repository

    Hidayah, Lailatul

    2012-07-01

    Research on genomic sequences has been improving significantly as more advanced technology for sequencing has been developed. This opens enormous opportunities for sequence analysis. Various analytical tools have been built for purposes such as sequence assembly, read alignments, genome browsing, comparative genomics, and visualization. From the visualization perspective, there is an increasing trend towards use of large-scale computation. However, more than power is required to produce an informative image. This is a challenge that we address by providing several ways of representing biological data in order to advance the inference endeavors of biologists. This thesis focuses on visualization of variations found in genomic sequences. We develop several visualization functions and embed them in an existing variation visualization tool as extensions. The tool we improved is named VarB, hence the nomenclature for our enhancement is VarB Plus. To the best of our knowledge, besides VarB, there is no tool that provides the capability of dynamic visualization of genome variation datasets as well as statistical analysis. Dynamic visualization allows users to toggle different parameters on and off and see the results on the fly. The statistical analysis includes Fixation Index, Relative Variant Density, and Tajima’s D. Hence we focused our efforts on this tool. The scope of our work includes plots of per-base genome coverage, Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCoA), integration with a read alignment viewer named LookSeq, and visualization of geo-biological data. In addition to description of embedded functionalities, significance, and limitations, future improvements are discussed. The result is four extensions embedded successfully in the original tool, which is built on the Qt framework in C++. Hence it is portable to numerous platforms. Our extensions have shown acceptable execution time in a beta testing with various high-volume published datasets, as well as positive

  6. Viral Cre-LoxP tools aid genome engineering in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Ranjita; Mendenhall, Amy; Sarkar, Nandita; Mukherjee, Chandreyee; Afshari, Amirali; Huang, Joseph; Lu, Biao

    2017-01-01

    Targeted nucleases have transformed genome editing technology, providing more efficient methods to make targeted changes in mammalian genome. In parallel, there is an increasing demand of Cre-LoxP technology for complex genome manipulation such as large deletion, addition, gene fusion and conditional removal of gene sequences at the target site. However, an efficient and easy-to-use Cre-recombinase delivery system remains lacking. We designed and constructed two sets of expression vectors for Cre-recombinase using two highly efficient viral systems, the integrative lentivirus and non-integrative adeno associated virus. We demonstrate the effectiveness of those methods in Cre-delivery into stably-engineered HEK293 cells harboring LoxP-floxed red fluorescent protein (RFP) and puromycin (Puro) resistant reporters. The delivered Cre recombinase effectively excised the floxed RFP-Puro either directly or conditionally, therefore validating the function of these molecular tools. Given the convenient options of two selections markers, these viral-based systems offer a robust and easy-to-use tool for advanced genome editing, expanding complicated genome engineering to a variety of cell types and conditions. We have developed and functionally validated two viral-based Cre-recombinase delivery systems for efficient genome manipulation in various mammalian cells. The ease of gene delivery with the built-in reporters and inducible element enables live cell monitoring, drug selection and temporal knockout, broadening applications of genome editing.

  7. DFAST and DAGA: web-based integrated genome annotation tools and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizawa, Yasuhiro; Fujisawa, Takatomo; Kaminuma, Eli; Nakamura, Yasukazu; Arita, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance and correct taxonomic affiliation of data submitted to public sequence databases have been an everlasting problem. The DDBJ Fast Annotation and Submission Tool (DFAST) is a newly developed genome annotation pipeline with quality and taxonomy assessment tools. To enable annotation of ready-to-submit quality, we also constructed curated reference protein databases tailored for lactic acid bacteria. DFAST was developed so that all the procedures required for DDBJ submission could be done seamlessly online. The online workspace would be especially useful for users not familiar with bioinformatics skills. In addition, we have developed a genome repository, DFAST Archive of Genome Annotation (DAGA), which currently includes 1,421 genomes covering 179 species and 18 subspecies of two genera, Lactobacillus and Pediococcus , obtained from both DDBJ/ENA/GenBank and Sequence Read Archive (SRA). All the genomes deposited in DAGA were annotated consistently and assessed using DFAST. To assess the taxonomic position based on genomic sequence information, we used the average nucleotide identity (ANI), which showed high discriminative power to determine whether two given genomes belong to the same species. We corrected mislabeled or misidentified genomes in the public database and deposited the curated information in DAGA. The repository will improve the accessibility and reusability of genome resources for lactic acid bacteria. By exploiting the data deposited in DAGA, we found intraspecific subgroups in Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus jensenii , whose variation between subgroups is larger than the well-accepted ANI threshold of 95% to differentiate species. DFAST and DAGA are freely accessible at https://dfast.nig.ac.jp.

  8. Accessing the SEED genome databases via Web services API: tools for programmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disz, Terry; Akhter, Sajia; Cuevas, Daniel; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Vonstein, Veronika; Stevens, Rick; Edwards, Robert A

    2010-06-14

    The SEED integrates many publicly available genome sequences into a single resource. The database contains accurate and up-to-date annotations based on the subsystems concept that leverages clustering between genomes and other clues to accurately and efficiently annotate microbial genomes. The backend is used as the foundation for many genome annotation tools, such as the Rapid Annotation using Subsystems Technology (RAST) server for whole genome annotation, the metagenomics RAST server for random community genome annotations, and the annotation clearinghouse for exchanging annotations from different resources. In addition to a web user interface, the SEED also provides Web services based API for programmatic access to the data in the SEED, allowing the development of third-party tools and mash-ups. The currently exposed Web services encompass over forty different methods for accessing data related to microbial genome annotations. The Web services provide comprehensive access to the database back end, allowing any programmer access to the most consistent and accurate genome annotations available. The Web services are deployed using a platform independent service-oriented approach that allows the user to choose the most suitable programming platform for their application. Example code demonstrate that Web services can be used to access the SEED using common bioinformatics programming languages such as Perl, Python, and Java. We present a novel approach to access the SEED database. Using Web services, a robust API for access to genomics data is provided, without requiring large volume downloads all at once. The API ensures timely access to the most current datasets available, including the new genomes as soon as they come online.

  9. Molecular Tools for Exploring Polyploid Genomes in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Carputo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Polyploidy is a very common phenomenon in the plant kingdom, where even diploid species are often described as paleopolyploids. The polyploid condition may bring about several advantages compared to the diploid state. Polyploids often show phenotypes that are not present in their diploid progenitors or exceed the range of the contributing species. Some of these traits may play a role in heterosis or could favor adaptation to new ecological niches. Advances in genomics and sequencing technology may create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring the molecular effects of polyploidization. Through this review, we provide an overview of technologies and strategies that may allow an in-depth analysis of polyploid genomes. After introducing some basic aspects on the origin and genetics of polyploids, we highlight the main tools available for genome and gene expression analysis and summarize major findings. In the last part of this review, the implications of next generation sequencing are briefly discussed. The accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists to understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

  10. Intervene: a tool for intersection and visualization of multiple gene or genomic region sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aziz; Mathelier, Anthony

    2017-05-31

    A common task for scientists relies on comparing lists of genes or genomic regions derived from high-throughput sequencing experiments. While several tools exist to intersect and visualize sets of genes, similar tools dedicated to the visualization of genomic region sets are currently limited. To address this gap, we have developed the Intervene tool, which provides an easy and automated interface for the effective intersection and visualization of genomic region or list sets, thus facilitating their analysis and interpretation. Intervene contains three modules: venn to generate Venn diagrams of up to six sets, upset to generate UpSet plots of multiple sets, and pairwise to compute and visualize intersections of multiple sets as clustered heat maps. Intervene, and its interactive web ShinyApp companion, generate publication-quality figures for the interpretation of genomic region and list sets. Intervene and its web application companion provide an easy command line and an interactive web interface to compute intersections of multiple genomic and list sets. They have the capacity to plot intersections using easy-to-interpret visual approaches. Intervene is developed and designed to meet the needs of both computer scientists and biologists. The source code is freely available at https://bitbucket.org/CBGR/intervene , with the web application available at https://asntech.shinyapps.io/intervene .

  11. Building a model: developing genomic resources for common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca with low coverage genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitemier Kevin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Milkweeds (Asclepias L. have been extensively investigated in diverse areas of evolutionary biology and ecology; however, there are few genetic resources available to facilitate and compliment these studies. This study explored how low coverage genome sequencing of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L. could be useful in characterizing the genome of a plant without prior genomic information and for development of genomic resources as a step toward further developing A. syriaca as a model in ecology and evolution. Results A 0.5× genome of A. syriaca was produced using Illumina sequencing. A virtually complete chloroplast genome of 158,598 bp was assembled, revealing few repeats and loss of three genes: accD, clpP, and ycf1. A nearly complete rDNA cistron (18S-5.8S-26S; 7,541 bp and 5S rDNA (120 bp sequence were obtained. Assessment of polymorphism revealed that the rDNA cistron and 5S rDNA had 0.3% and 26.7% polymorphic sites, respectively. A partial mitochondrial genome sequence (130,764 bp, with identical gene content to tobacco, was also assembled. An initial characterization of repeat content indicated that Ty1/copia-like retroelements are the most common repeat type in the milkweed genome. At least one A. syriaca microread hit 88% of Catharanthus roseus (Apocynaceae unigenes (median coverage of 0.29× and 66% of single copy orthologs (COSII in asterids (median coverage of 0.14×. From this partial characterization of the A. syriaca genome, markers for population genetics (microsatellites and phylogenetics (low-copy nuclear genes studies were developed. Conclusions The results highlight the promise of next generation sequencing for development of genomic resources for any organism. Low coverage genome sequencing allows characterization of the high copy fraction of the genome and exploration of the low copy fraction of the genome, which facilitate the development of molecular tools for further study of a target species

  12. Building a model: developing genomic resources for common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) with low coverage genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straub, Shannon C K; Fishbein, Mark; Livshultz, Tatyana; Foster, Zachary; Parks, Matthew; Weitemier, Kevin; Cronn, Richard C; Liston, Aaron

    2011-05-04

    Milkweeds (Asclepias L.) have been extensively investigated in diverse areas of evolutionary biology and ecology; however, there are few genetic resources available to facilitate and compliment these studies. This study explored how low coverage genome sequencing of the common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca L.) could be useful in characterizing the genome of a plant without prior genomic information and for development of genomic resources as a step toward further developing A. syriaca as a model in ecology and evolution. A 0.5× genome of A. syriaca was produced using Illumina sequencing. A virtually complete chloroplast genome of 158,598 bp was assembled, revealing few repeats and loss of three genes: accD, clpP, and ycf1. A nearly complete rDNA cistron (18S-5.8S-26S; 7,541 bp) and 5S rDNA (120 bp) sequence were obtained. Assessment of polymorphism revealed that the rDNA cistron and 5S rDNA had 0.3% and 26.7% polymorphic sites, respectively. A partial mitochondrial genome sequence (130,764 bp), with identical gene content to tobacco, was also assembled. An initial characterization of repeat content indicated that Ty1/copia-like retroelements are the most common repeat type in the milkweed genome. At least one A. syriaca microread hit 88% of Catharanthus roseus (Apocynaceae) unigenes (median coverage of 0.29×) and 66% of single copy orthologs (COSII) in asterids (median coverage of 0.14×). From this partial characterization of the A. syriaca genome, markers for population genetics (microsatellites) and phylogenetics (low-copy nuclear genes) studies were developed. The results highlight the promise of next generation sequencing for development of genomic resources for any organism. Low coverage genome sequencing allows characterization of the high copy fraction of the genome and exploration of the low copy fraction of the genome, which facilitate the development of molecular tools for further study of a target species and its relatives. This study represents a first

  13. Exploring repetitive DNA landscapes using REPCLASS, a tool that automates the classification of transposable elements in eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feschotte, Cédric; Keswani, Umeshkumar; Ranganathan, Nirmal; Guibotsy, Marcel L; Levine, David

    2009-07-23

    Eukaryotic genomes contain large amount of repetitive DNA, most of which is derived from transposable elements (TEs). Progress has been made to develop computational tools for ab initio identification of repeat families, but there is an urgent need to develop tools to automate the annotation of TEs in genome sequences. Here we introduce REPCLASS, a tool that automates the classification of TE sequences. Using control repeat libraries, we show that the program can classify accurately virtually any known TE types. Combining REPCLASS to ab initio repeat finding in the genomes of Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster allowed us to recover the contrasting TE landscape characteristic of these species. Unexpectedly, REPCLASS also uncovered several novel TE families in both genomes, augmenting the TE repertoire of these model species. When applied to the genomes of distant Caenorhabditis and Drosophila species, the approach revealed a remarkable conservation of TE composition profile within each genus, despite substantial interspecific covariations in genome size and in the number of TEs and TE families. Lastly, we applied REPCLASS to analyze 10 fungal genomes from a wide taxonomic range, most of which have not been analyzed for TE content previously. The results showed that TE diversity varies widely across the fungi "kingdom" and appears to positively correlate with genome size, in particular for DNA transposons. Together, these data validate REPCLASS as a powerful tool to explore the repetitive DNA landscapes of eukaryotes and to shed light onto the evolutionary forces shaping TE diversity and genome architecture.

  14. The Dockstore: enabling modular, community-focused sharing of Docker-based genomics tools and workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Brian D; Yuen, Denis; Chung, Vincent; Duncan, Andrew G; Liu, Xiang Kun; Patricia, Janice; Paten, Benedict; Stein, Lincoln; Ferretti, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    As genomic datasets continue to grow, the feasibility of downloading data to a local organization and running analysis on a traditional compute environment is becoming increasingly problematic. Current large-scale projects, such as the ICGC PanCancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG), the Data Platform for the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative, and the NIH Big Data to Knowledge Center for Translational Genomics, are using cloud-based infrastructure to both host and perform analysis across large data sets. In PCAWG, over 5,800 whole human genomes were aligned and variant called across 14 cloud and HPC environments; the processed data was then made available on the cloud for further analysis and sharing. If run locally, an operation at this scale would have monopolized a typical academic data centre for many months, and would have presented major challenges for data storage and distribution. However, this scale is increasingly typical for genomics projects and necessitates a rethink of how analytical tools are packaged and moved to the data. For PCAWG, we embraced the use of highly portable Docker images for encapsulating and sharing complex alignment and variant calling workflows across highly variable environments. While successful, this endeavor revealed a limitation in Docker containers, namely the lack of a standardized way to describe and execute the tools encapsulated inside the container. As a result, we created the Dockstore ( https://dockstore.org), a project that brings together Docker images with standardized, machine-readable ways of describing and running the tools contained within. This service greatly improves the sharing and reuse of genomics tools and promotes interoperability with similar projects through emerging web service standards developed by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH).

  15. GEnomes Management Application (GEM.app): a new software tool for large-scale collaborative genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Michael A; Lebrigio, Rafael F Acosta; Van Booven, Derek; Ulloa, Rick H; Powell, Eric; Speziani, Fiorella; Tekin, Mustafa; Schüle, Rebecca; Züchner, Stephan

    2013-06-01

    Novel genes are now identified at a rapid pace for many Mendelian disorders, and increasingly, for genetically complex phenotypes. However, new challenges have also become evident: (1) effectively managing larger exome and/or genome datasets, especially for smaller labs; (2) direct hands-on analysis and contextual interpretation of variant data in large genomic datasets; and (3) many small and medium-sized clinical and research-based investigative teams around the world are generating data that, if combined and shared, will significantly increase the opportunities for the entire community to identify new genes. To address these challenges, we have developed GEnomes Management Application (GEM.app), a software tool to annotate, manage, visualize, and analyze large genomic datasets (https://genomics.med.miami.edu/). GEM.app currently contains ∼1,600 whole exomes from 50 different phenotypes studied by 40 principal investigators from 15 different countries. The focus of GEM.app is on user-friendly analysis for nonbioinformaticians to make next-generation sequencing data directly accessible. Yet, GEM.app provides powerful and flexible filter options, including single family filtering, across family/phenotype queries, nested filtering, and evaluation of segregation in families. In addition, the system is fast, obtaining results within 4 sec across ∼1,200 exomes. We believe that this system will further enhance identification of genetic causes of human disease. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. The CRISPR/Cas genome-editing tool: application in improvement of crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SURENDER eKHATODIA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR associated Cas9/sgRNA system is a novel fledgling targeted genome-editing technique from bacterial immune system, which is a cheap, easy and most rapidly adopted genome editing tool transforming to revolutionary paradigm. Cas9 protein is an RNA guided endonuclease utilized for creating targeted double stranded breaks with only a short RNA sequence to confer recognition of the target in animals and plants. Development of genetically edited (GE crops similar to those developed by conventional or mutation breeding using this potential technique makes it a promising and extremely versatile tool for providing sustainable productive agriculture for better feeding of rapidly growing population in changing climate. The emerging areas of research for the genome editing in plants are like, interrogating gene function, rewiring the regulatory signaling networks, sgRNA library for high-throughput loss-of-function screening. In this review, we will discuss the broad applicability of the Cas9 nuclease mediated targeted plant genome editing for development of designer crops. The regulatory uncertainty and social acceptance of plant breeding by Cas9 genome editing have also been discussed. The non-GM designer genetically edited plants could prospect climate resilient and sustainable energy agriculture in coming future for maximizing the yield by combating abiotic and biotic stresses with this new innovative plant breeding technique.

  17. A Tool for Multiple Targeted Genome Deletions that Is Precise, Scar-Free, and Suitable for Automation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Aubrey

    Full Text Available Many advances in synthetic biology require the removal of a large number of genomic elements from a genome. Most existing deletion methods leave behind markers, and as there are a limited number of markers, such methods can only be applied a fixed number of times. Deletion methods that recycle markers generally are either imprecise (remove untargeted sequences, or leave scar sequences which can cause genome instability and rearrangements. No existing marker recycling method is automation-friendly. We have developed a novel openly available deletion tool that consists of: 1 a method for deleting genomic elements that can be repeatedly used without limit, is precise, scar-free, and suitable for automation; and 2 software to design the method's primers. Our tool is sequence agnostic and could be used to delete large numbers of coding sequences, promoter regions, transcription factor binding sites, terminators, etc in a single genome. We have validated our tool on the deletion of non-essential open reading frames (ORFs from S. cerevisiae. The tool is applicable to arbitrary genomes, and we provide primer sequences for the deletion of: 90% of the ORFs from the S. cerevisiae genome, 88% of the ORFs from S. pombe genome, and 85% of the ORFs from the L. lactis genome.

  18. Microbial ecology in the age of genomics and metagenomics: concepts, tools, and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping

    2006-06-01

    Microbial ecology examines the diversity and activity of micro-organisms in Earth's biosphere. In the last 20 years, the application of genomics tools have revolutionized microbial ecological studies and drastically expanded our view on the previously underappreciated microbial world. This review first introduces the basic concepts in microbial ecology and the main genomics methods that have been used to examine natural microbial populations and communities. In the ensuing three specific sections, the applications of the genomics in microbial ecological research are highlighted. The first describes the widespread application of multilocus sequence typing and representational difference analysis in studying genetic variation within microbial species. Such investigations have identified that migration, horizontal gene transfer and recombination are common in natural microbial populations and that microbial strains can be highly variable in genome size and gene content. The second section highlights and summarizes the use of four specific genomics methods (phylogenetic analysis of ribosomal RNA, DNA-DNA re-association kinetics, metagenomics, and micro-arrays) in analysing the diversity and potential activity of microbial populations and communities from a variety of terrestrial and aquatic environments. Such analyses have identified many unexpected phylogenetic lineages in viruses, bacteria, archaea, and microbial eukaryotes. Functional analyses of environmental DNA also revealed highly prevalent, but previously unknown, metabolic processes in natural microbial communities. In the third section, the ecological implications of sequenced microbial genomes are briefly discussed. Comparative analyses of prokaryotic genomic sequences suggest the importance of ecology in determining microbial genome size and gene content. The significant variability in genome size and gene content among strains and species of prokaryotes indicate the highly fluid nature of prokaryotic

  19. ICT tools for curriculum development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Nieveen, N.M.; van den Akker, J.J.H.; Kuiper, W.J.A.M.; Hameyer, U.

    2003-01-01

    Along with others in this book, this chapter examines a recent trend in curriculum development, namely, employing the computer to support this complex process. Not to be confused with the vast majority of ICT tools for education, which support the teachers and learners more directly, this discussion

  20. Employability Skills Assessment Tool Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Rauf, Rose Amnah Abd; Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Puvanasvaran, A. P.

    2012-01-01

    Research nationally and internationally found that technical graduates are lacking in employability skills. As employability skills are crucial in outcome-based education, the main goal of this research is to develop an Employability Skill Assessment Tool to help students and lecturers produce competent graduates in employability skills needed by…

  1. Nuclear imaging drug development tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, L.; Jurek, P.; Redshaw, R.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the development of nuclear imaging as an enabling technology in the pharmaceutical industry. Molecular imaging is maturing into an important tool with expanding applications from validating that a drug reaches the intended target through to market launch of a new drug. Molecular imaging includes anatomical imaging of organs or tissues, computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound.

  2. RatMap—rat genome tools and data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Greta; Johnson, Per; Andersson, Lars; Klinga-Levan, Karin; Gómez-Fabre, Pedro M.; Ståhl, Fredrik

    2005-01-01

    The rat genome database RatMap (http://ratmap.org or http://ratmap.gen.gu.se) has been one of the main resources for rat genome information since 1994. The database is maintained by CMB–Genetics at Göteborg University in Sweden and provides information on rat genes, polymorphic rat DNA-markers and rat quantitative trait loci (QTLs), all curated at RatMap. The database is under the supervision of the Rat Gene and Nomenclature Committee (RGNC); thus much attention is paid to rat gene nomenclature. RatMap presents information on rat idiograms, karyotypes and provides a unified presentation of the rat genome sequence and integrated rat linkage maps. A set of tools is also available to facilitate the identification and characterization of rat QTLs, as well as the estimation of exon/intron number and sizes in individual rat genes. Furthermore, comparative gene maps of rat in regard to mouse and human are provided. PMID:15608244

  3. Genomic Islands: an overview of current software tools and future improvements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soares Siomar de Castro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are highly diverse and widely distributed organisms. They account for ~60% of Earth’s biomass and new predictions point for the existence of 1011 to 1012 species, which are constantly sharing genes through several different mechanisms. Genomic Islands (GI are critical in this context, as they are large regions acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Also, they present common features like genomic signature deviation, transposase genes, flanking tRNAs and insertion sequences. GIs carry large numbers of genes related to specific lifestyle and are commonly classified in Pathogenicity, Resistance, Metabolic or Symbiotic Islands. With the advent of the next-generation sequencing technologies and the deluge of genomic data, many software tools have been developed that aim to tackle the problem of GI prediction and they are all based on the prediction of GI common features. However, there is still room for the development of new software tools that implements new approaches, such as, machine learning and pangenomics based analyses. Finally, GIs will always hold a potential application in every newly invented genomic approach as they are directly responsible for much of the genomic plasticity of bacteria.

  4. Genomic Islands: an overview of current software tools and future improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Siomar de Castro; Oliveira, Letícia de Castro; Jaiswal, Arun Kumar; Azevedo, Vasco

    2016-03-01

    Microbes are highly diverse and widely distributed organisms. They account for ~60% of Earth's biomass and new predictions point for the existence of 1011 to 1012 species, which are constantly sharing genes through several different mechanisms. Genomic Islands (GI) are critical in this context, as they are large regions acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Also, they present common features like genomic signature deviation, transposase genes, flanking tRNAs and insertion sequences. GIs carry large numbers of genes related to specific lifestyle and are commonly classified in Pathogenicity, Resistance, Metabolic or Symbiotic Islands. With the advent of the next-generation sequencing technologies and the deluge of genomic data, many software tools have been developed that aim to tackle the problem of GI prediction and they are all based on the prediction of GI common features. However, there is still room for the development of new software tools that implements new approaches, such as, machine learning and pangenomics based analyses. Finally, GIs will always hold a potential application in every newly invented genomic approach as they are directly responsible for much of the genomic plasticity of bacteria.

  5. BFAST: an alignment tool for large scale genome resequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Homer

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The new generation of massively parallel DNA sequencers, combined with the challenge of whole human genome resequencing, result in the need for rapid and accurate alignment of billions of short DNA sequence reads to a large reference genome. Speed is obviously of great importance, but equally important is maintaining alignment accuracy of short reads, in the 25-100 base range, in the presence of errors and true biological variation.We introduce a new algorithm specifically optimized for this task, as well as a freely available implementation, BFAST, which can align data produced by any of current sequencing platforms, allows for user-customizable levels of speed and accuracy, supports paired end data, and provides for efficient parallel and multi-threaded computation on a computer cluster. The new method is based on creating flexible, efficient whole genome indexes to rapidly map reads to candidate alignment locations, with arbitrary multiple independent indexes allowed to achieve robustness against read errors and sequence variants. The final local alignment uses a Smith-Waterman method, with gaps to support the detection of small indels.We compare BFAST to a selection of large-scale alignment tools -- BLAT, MAQ, SHRiMP, and SOAP -- in terms of both speed and accuracy, using simulated and real-world datasets. We show BFAST can achieve substantially greater sensitivity of alignment in the context of errors and true variants, especially insertions and deletions, and minimize false mappings, while maintaining adequate speed compared to other current methods. We show BFAST can align the amount of data needed to fully resequence a human genome, one billion reads, with high sensitivity and accuracy, on a modest computer cluster in less than 24 hours. BFAST is available at (http://bfast.sourceforge.net.

  6. Development of Simulator Configuration Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedrelid, Olav; Pettersen, Geir

    1996-01-01

    The main objective of the development of a Simulator Configuration Tool (SCT) is to achieve faster and more efficient production of dynamic simulators. Through application of versatile graphical interfaces, the simulator builder should be able to configure different types of simulators including full-scope process simulators. The SCT should be able to serve different simulator environments. The configuration tool communicates with simulator execution environments through a TCP/IP-based interface, Communication with a Model Server System developed at Institutt for energiteknikk has been established and used as test case. The system consists of OSF/Motif dialogues for operations requiring textual input, list selections etc., and uses the Picasso-3 User Interface Management System to handle presentation of static and dynamic graphical information. (author)

  7. Genomic Enzymology: Web Tools for Leveraging Protein Family Sequence-Function Space and Genome Context to Discover Novel Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlt, John A

    2017-08-22

    The exponentially increasing number of protein and nucleic acid sequences provides opportunities to discover novel enzymes, metabolic pathways, and metabolites/natural products, thereby adding to our knowledge of biochemistry and biology. The challenge has evolved from generating sequence information to mining the databases to integrating and leveraging the available information, i.e., the availability of "genomic enzymology" web tools. Web tools that allow identification of biosynthetic gene clusters are widely used by the natural products/synthetic biology community, thereby facilitating the discovery of novel natural products and the enzymes responsible for their biosynthesis. However, many novel enzymes with interesting mechanisms participate in uncharacterized small-molecule metabolic pathways; their discovery and functional characterization also can be accomplished by leveraging information in protein and nucleic acid databases. This Perspective focuses on two genomic enzymology web tools that assist the discovery novel metabolic pathways: (1) Enzyme Function Initiative-Enzyme Similarity Tool (EFI-EST) for generating sequence similarity networks to visualize and analyze sequence-function space in protein families and (2) Enzyme Function Initiative-Genome Neighborhood Tool (EFI-GNT) for generating genome neighborhood networks to visualize and analyze the genome context in microbial and fungal genomes. Both tools have been adapted to other applications to facilitate target selection for enzyme discovery and functional characterization. As the natural products community has demonstrated, the enzymology community needs to embrace the essential role of web tools that allow the protein and genome sequence databases to be leveraged for novel insights into enzymological problems.

  8. Genomes correction and assembling: present methods and tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcieszek, Michał; Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Nowak, Robert; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2014-11-01

    Recent rapid development of next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies provided significant impact into genomics field of study enabling implementation of many de novo sequencing projects of new species which was previously confined by technological costs. Along with advancement of NGS there was need for adjustment in assembly programs. New algorithms must cope with massive amounts of data computation in reasonable time limits and processing power and hardware is also an important factor. In this paper, we address the issue of assembly pipeline for de novo genome assembly provided by programs presently available for scientist both as commercial and as open - source software. The implementation of four different approaches - Greedy, Overlap - Layout - Consensus (OLC), De Bruijn and Integrated resulting in variation of performance is the main focus of our discussion with additional insight into issue of short and long reads correction.

  9. Single virus genomics: a new tool for virus discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Zeigler Allen

    Full Text Available Whole genome amplification and sequencing of single microbial cells has significantly influenced genomics and microbial ecology by facilitating direct recovery of reference genome data. However, viral genomics continues to suffer due to difficulties related to the isolation and characterization of uncultivated viruses. We report here on a new approach called 'Single Virus Genomics', which enabled the isolation and complete genome sequencing of the first single virus particle. A mixed assemblage comprised of two known viruses; E. coli bacteriophages lambda and T4, were sorted using flow cytometric methods and subsequently immobilized in an agarose matrix. Genome amplification was then achieved in situ via multiple displacement amplification (MDA. The complete lambda phage genome was recovered with an average depth of coverage of approximately 437X. The isolation and genome sequencing of uncultivated viruses using Single Virus Genomics approaches will enable researchers to address questions about viral diversity, evolution, adaptation and ecology that were previously unattainable.

  10. Tools for Accurate and Efficient Analysis of Complex Evolutionary Mechanisms in Microbial Genomes. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakhleh, Luay

    2014-03-12

    I proposed to develop computationally efficient tools for accurate detection and reconstruction of microbes' complex evolutionary mechanisms, thus enabling rapid and accurate annotation, analysis and understanding of their genomes. To achieve this goal, I proposed to address three aspects. (1) Mathematical modeling. A major challenge facing the accurate detection of HGT is that of distinguishing between these two events on the one hand and other events that have similar "effects." I proposed to develop a novel mathematical approach for distinguishing among these events. Further, I proposed to develop a set of novel optimization criteria for the evolutionary analysis of microbial genomes in the presence of these complex evolutionary events. (2) Algorithm design. In this aspect of the project, I proposed to develop an array of e cient and accurate algorithms for analyzing microbial genomes based on the formulated optimization criteria. Further, I proposed to test the viability of the criteria and the accuracy of the algorithms in an experimental setting using both synthetic as well as biological data. (3) Software development. I proposed the nal outcome to be a suite of software tools which implements the mathematical models as well as the algorithms developed.

  11. Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplifications Tools (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quake, Steve

    2011-10-12

    Stanford University's Steve Quake on "Sequencing Single Cell Microbial Genomes with Microfluidic Amplification Tools" at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  12. Sequencing quality assessment tools to enable data-driven informatics for high throughput genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mark Leggett

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The processes of quality assessment and control are an active area of research at The Genome Analysis Centre (TGAC. Unlike other sequencing centres that often concentrate on a certain species or technology, TGAC applies expertise in genomics and bioinformatics to a wide range of projects, often requiring bespoke wet lab and in silico workflows. TGAC is fortunate to have access to a diverse range of sequencing and analysis platforms, and we are at the forefront of investigations into library quality and sequence data assessment. We have developed and implemented a number of algorithms, tools, pipelines and packages to ascertain, store, and expose quality metrics across a number of next-generation sequencing platforms, allowing rapid and in-depth cross-platform QC bioinformatics. In this review, we describe these tools as a vehicle for data-driven informatics, offering the potential to provide richer context for downstream analysis and to inform experimental design.

  13. iPat: intelligent prediction and association tool for genomic research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunpeng James; Zhang, Zhiwu

    2018-06-01

    The ultimate goal of genomic research is to effectively predict phenotypes from genotypes so that medical management can improve human health and molecular breeding can increase agricultural production. Genomic prediction or selection (GS) plays a complementary role to genome-wide association studies (GWAS), which is the primary method to identify genes underlying phenotypes. Unfortunately, most computing tools cannot perform data analyses for both GWAS and GS. Furthermore, the majority of these tools are executed through a command-line interface (CLI), which requires programming skills. Non-programmers struggle to use them efficiently because of the steep learning curves and zero tolerance for data formats and mistakes when inputting keywords and parameters. To address these problems, this study developed a software package, named the Intelligent Prediction and Association Tool (iPat), with a user-friendly graphical user interface. With iPat, GWAS or GS can be performed using a pointing device to simply drag and/or click on graphical elements to specify input data files, choose input parameters and select analytical models. Models available to users include those implemented in third party CLI packages such as GAPIT, PLINK, FarmCPU, BLINK, rrBLUP and BGLR. Users can choose any data format and conduct analyses with any of these packages. File conversions are automatically conducted for specified input data and selected packages. A GWAS-assisted genomic prediction method was implemented to perform genomic prediction using any GWAS method such as FarmCPU. iPat was written in Java for adaptation to multiple operating systems including Windows, Mac and Linux. The iPat executable file, user manual, tutorials and example datasets are freely available at http://zzlab.net/iPat. zhiwu.zhang@wsu.edu.

  14. A Novel Tool for Microbial Genome Editing Using the Restriction-Modification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hua; Deng, Aihua; Liu, Shuwen; Cui, Di; Qiu, Qidi; Wang, Laiyou; Yang, Zhao; Wu, Jie; Shang, Xiuling; Zhang, Yun; Wen, Tingyi

    2018-01-19

    Scarless genetic manipulation of genomes is an essential tool for biological research. The restriction-modification (R-M) system is a defense system in bacteria that protects against invading genomes on the basis of its ability to distinguish foreign DNA from self DNA. Here, we designed an R-M system-mediated genome editing (RMGE) technique for scarless genetic manipulation in different microorganisms. For bacteria with Type IV REase, an RMGE technique using the inducible DNA methyltransferase gene, bceSIIM (RMGE-bceSIIM), as the counter-selection cassette was developed to edit the genome of Escherichia coli. For bacteria without Type IV REase, an RMGE technique based on a restriction endonuclease (RMGE-mcrA) was established in Bacillus subtilis. These techniques were successfully used for gene deletion and replacement with nearly 100% counter-selection efficiencies, which were higher and more stable compared to conventional methods. Furthermore, precise point mutation without limiting sites was achieved in E. coli using RMGE-bceSIIM to introduce a single base mutation of A128C into the rpsL gene. In addition, the RMGE-mcrA technique was applied to delete the CAN1 gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae DAY414 with 100% counter-selection efficiency. The effectiveness of the RMGE technique in E. coli, B. subtilis, and S. cerevisiae suggests the potential universal usefulness of this technique for microbial genome manipulation.

  15. Forest and fibre genomics: biotechnology tools for applied tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A milestone for eucalypt research, the project will facilitate the development of new biotechnology tools that will accelerate the domestication, improvement and ... The application of DNA fingerprinting in eucalypt breeding programmes represented an early technology delivery to industry with practical, short-term benefi ts, ...

  16. MAKER2: an annotation pipeline and genome-database management tool for second-generation genome projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Carson; Yandell, Mark

    2011-12-22

    Second-generation sequencing technologies are precipitating major shifts with regards to what kinds of genomes are being sequenced and how they are annotated. While the first generation of genome projects focused on well-studied model organisms, many of today's projects involve exotic organisms whose genomes are largely terra incognita. This complicates their annotation, because unlike first-generation projects, there are no pre-existing 'gold-standard' gene-models with which to train gene-finders. Improvements in genome assembly and the wide availability of mRNA-seq data are also creating opportunities to update and re-annotate previously published genome annotations. Today's genome projects are thus in need of new genome annotation tools that can meet the challenges and opportunities presented by second-generation sequencing technologies. We present MAKER2, a genome annotation and data management tool designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 is a multi-threaded, parallelized application that can process second-generation datasets of virtually any size. We show that MAKER2 can produce accurate annotations for novel genomes where training-data are limited, of low quality or even non-existent. MAKER2 also provides an easy means to use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality; and it can use these data to update legacy annotations, significantly improving their quality. We also show that MAKER2 can evaluate the quality of genome annotations, and identify and prioritize problematic annotations for manual review. MAKER2 is the first annotation engine specifically designed for second-generation genome projects. MAKER2 scales to datasets of any size, requires little in the way of training data, and can use mRNA-seq data to improve annotation quality. It can also update and manage legacy genome annotation datasets.

  17. Genome-Wide Approaches to Drosophila Heart Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Frasch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of the dorsal vessel in Drosophila is one of the first systems in which key mechanisms regulating cardiogenesis have been defined in great detail at the genetic and molecular level. Due to evolutionary conservation, these findings have also provided major inputs into studies of cardiogenesis in vertebrates. Many of the major components that control Drosophila cardiogenesis were discovered based on candidate gene approaches and their functions were defined by employing the outstanding genetic tools and molecular techniques available in this system. More recently, approaches have been taken that aim to interrogate the entire genome in order to identify novel components and describe genomic features that are pertinent to the regulation of heart development. Apart from classical forward genetic screens, the availability of the thoroughly annotated Drosophila genome sequence made new genome-wide approaches possible, which include the generation of massive numbers of RNA interference (RNAi reagents that were used in forward genetic screens, as well as studies of the transcriptomes and proteomes of the developing heart under normal and experimentally manipulated conditions. Moreover, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments have been performed with the aim to define the full set of genomic binding sites of the major cardiogenic transcription factors, their relevant target genes, and a more complete picture of the regulatory network that drives cardiogenesis. This review will give an overview on these genome-wide approaches to Drosophila heart development and on computational analyses of the obtained information that ultimately aim to provide a description of this process at the systems level.

  18. CHESS (CgHExpreSS): a comprehensive analysis tool for the analysis of genomic alterations and their effects on the expression profile of the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mikyung; Kim, Yangseok

    2009-12-16

    test. By successive operations of two modules, users can clarify how gene expression levels are affected by the phenotype specific genomic alterations. As CHESS was developed in both Java application and web environments, it can be run on a web browser or a local machine. It also supports all experimental platforms if a properly formatted text file is provided to include the chromosomal position of probes and their gene identifiers. CHESS is a user-friendly tool for investigating disease specific genomic alterations and quantitative relationships between those genomic alterations and genome-wide gene expression profiling.

  19. Development and application of Human Genome Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingwen

    2017-12-01

    Epidemiology is a science that studies distribution of diseases and health in population and its influencing factors, it also studies how to prevent and cure disease and promote health strategies and measures. Epidemiology has developed rapidly in recent years and it is an intercross subject with various other disciplines to form a series of branch disciplines such as Genetic epidemiology, molecular epidemiology, drug epidemiology and tumor epidemiology. With the implementation and completion of Human Genome Project (HGP), Human Genome Epidemiology (HuGE) has emerged at this historic moment. In this review, the development of Human Genome Epidemiology, research content, the construction and structure of relevant network, research standards, as well as the existing results and problems are briefly outlined.

  20. Genetic Simulation Tools for Post-Genome Wide Association Studies of Complex Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, Christopher I.; Bafna, Vineet; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Hernandez, Ryan D.; Li, Chun; Liberles, David A.; McAllister, Kimberly; Moore, Jason H.; Paltoo, Dina N.; Papanicolaou, George J.; Peng, Bo; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Rosenfeld, Gabriel; Witte, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Genetic simulation programs are used to model data under specified assumptions to facilitate the understanding and study of complex genetic systems. Standardized data sets generated using genetic simulation are essential for the development and application of novel analytical tools in genetic epidemiology studies. With continuing advances in high-throughput genomic technologies and generation and analysis of larger, more complex data sets, there is a need for updating current approaches in genetic simulation modeling. To provide a forum to address current and emerging challenges in this area, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) sponsored a workshop, entitled “Genetic Simulation Tools for Post-Genome Wide Association Studies of Complex Diseases” at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland on March 11-12, 2014. The goals of the workshop were to: (i) identify opportunities, challenges and resource needs for the development and application of genetic simulation models; (ii) improve the integration of tools for modeling and analysis of simulated data; and (iii) foster collaborations to facilitate development and applications of genetic simulation. During the course of the meeting the group identified challenges and opportunities for the science of simulation, software and methods development, and collaboration. This paper summarizes key discussions at the meeting, and highlights important challenges and opportunities to advance the field of genetic simulation. PMID:25371374

  1. GenPlay Multi-Genome, a tool to compare and analyze multiple human genomes in a graphical interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajugie, Julien; Fourel, Nicolas; Bouhassira, Eric E

    2015-01-01

    Parallel visualization of multiple individual human genomes is a complex endeavor that is rapidly gaining importance with the increasing number of personal, phased and cancer genomes that are being generated. It requires the display of variants such as SNPs, indels and structural variants that are unique to specific genomes and the introduction of multiple overlapping gaps in the reference sequence. Here, we describe GenPlay Multi-Genome, an application specifically written to visualize and analyze multiple human genomes in parallel. GenPlay Multi-Genome is ideally suited for the comparison of allele-specific expression and functional genomic data obtained from multiple phased genomes in a graphical interface with access to multiple-track operation. It also allows the analysis of data that have been aligned to custom genomes rather than to a standard reference and can be used as a variant calling format file browser and as a tool to compare different genome assembly, such as hg19 and hg38. GenPlay is available under the GNU public license (GPL-3) from http://genplay.einstein.yu.edu. The source code is available at https://github.com/JulienLajugie/GenPlay. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. BRED: a simple and powerful tool for constructing mutant and recombinant bacteriophage genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J Marinelli

    Full Text Available Advances in DNA sequencing technology have facilitated the determination of hundreds of complete genome sequences both for bacteria and their bacteriophages. Some of these bacteria have well-developed and facile genetic systems for constructing mutants to determine gene function, and recombineering is a particularly effective tool. However, generally applicable methods for constructing defined mutants of bacteriophages are poorly developed, in part because of the inability to use selectable markers such as drug resistance genes during viral lytic growth. Here we describe a method for simple and effective directed mutagenesis of bacteriophage genomes using Bacteriophage Recombineering of Electroporated DNA (BRED, in which a highly efficient recombineering system is utilized directly on electroporated phage DNA; no selection is required and mutants can be readily detected by PCR. We describe the use of BRED to construct unmarked gene deletions, in-frame internal deletions, base substitutions, precise gene replacements, and the addition of gene tags.

  3. Epigenetic Mechanisms Underlie Genome Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    Technological and methodological advances, in particular next-generation sequencing and chromatin profiling, has led to a deluge of data on epigenetic mechanisms and processes. Epigenetic regulation in the brain is no exception. In this commentary, Ehud Lamm writes that extending existing frameworks for thinking about psychological development to…

  4. Agricultural genomics and sustainable development: perspectives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    era is to establish how genes and proteins function to bring about changes in phenotype. Some of ... within the context of sustainable development of African economies. The greatest .... these strategies, the genomes of many organisms have now been ... gene structure and order, e.g. between rice, wheat, corn, millets and ...

  5. System analysis: Developing tools for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jong, K.; clever, J.; Draper, J.V.; Davies, B.; Lonks, A.

    1996-02-01

    This report introduces and evaluates system analysis tools that were developed, or are under development, for the Robotics Technology Development Program (RTDP). Additionally, it discusses system analysis work completed using these tools aimed at completing a system analysis of the retrieval of waste from underground storage tanks on the Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington. The tools developed and evaluated include a mixture of commercially available tools adapted to RTDP requirements, and some tools developed in house. The tools that are included in this report include: a Process Diagramming Tool, a Cost Modeling Tool, an Amortization Modeling Tool, a graphical simulation linked to the Cost Modeling Tool, a decision assistance tool, and a system thinking tool. Additionally, the importance of performance testing to the RTDP and the results of such testing executed is discussed. Further, the results of the Tank Waste Retrieval (TWR) System Diagram, the TWR Operations Cost Model, and the TWR Amortization Model are presented, and the implication of the results are discussed. Finally, the RTDP system analysis tools are assessed and some recommendations are made regarding continuing development of the tools and process.

  6. MP3: a software tool for the prediction of pathogenic proteins in genomic and metagenomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ankit; Kapil, Rohan; Dhakan, Darshan B; Sharma, Vineet K

    2014-01-01

    The identification of virulent proteins in any de-novo sequenced genome is useful in estimating its pathogenic ability and understanding the mechanism of pathogenesis. Similarly, the identification of such proteins could be valuable in comparing the metagenome of healthy and diseased individuals and estimating the proportion of pathogenic species. However, the common challenge in both the above tasks is the identification of virulent proteins since a significant proportion of genomic and metagenomic proteins are novel and yet unannotated. The currently available tools which carry out the identification of virulent proteins provide limited accuracy and cannot be used on large datasets. Therefore, we have developed an MP3 standalone tool and web server for the prediction of pathogenic proteins in both genomic and metagenomic datasets. MP3 is developed using an integrated Support Vector Machine (SVM) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approach to carry out highly fast, sensitive and accurate prediction of pathogenic proteins. It displayed Sensitivity, Specificity, MCC and accuracy values of 92%, 100%, 0.92 and 96%, respectively, on blind dataset constructed using complete proteins. On the two metagenomic blind datasets (Blind A: 51-100 amino acids and Blind B: 30-50 amino acids), it displayed Sensitivity, Specificity, MCC and accuracy values of 82.39%, 97.86%, 0.80 and 89.32% for Blind A and 71.60%, 94.48%, 0.67 and 81.86% for Blind B, respectively. In addition, the performance of MP3 was validated on selected bacterial genomic and real metagenomic datasets. To our knowledge, MP3 is the only program that specializes in fast and accurate identification of partial pathogenic proteins predicted from short (100-150 bp) metagenomic reads and also performs exceptionally well on complete protein sequences. MP3 is publicly available at http://metagenomics.iiserb.ac.in/mp3/index.php.

  7. GACT: a Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool for SNP imputation and meta-analysis in genetic association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulovari, Arvis; Li, Dawei

    2014-07-19

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified genes associated with complex human diseases. Although much of the heritability remains unexplained, combining single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes from multiple studies for meta-analysis will increase the statistical power to identify new disease-associated variants. Meta-analysis requires same allele definition (nomenclature) and genome build among individual studies. Similarly, imputation, commonly-used prior to meta-analysis, requires the same consistency. However, the genotypes from various GWAS are generated using different genotyping platforms, arrays or SNP-calling approaches, resulting in use of different genome builds and allele definitions. Incorrect assumptions of identical allele definition among combined GWAS lead to a large portion of discarded genotypes or incorrect association findings. There is no published tool that predicts and converts among all major allele definitions. In this study, we have developed a tool, GACT, which stands for Genome build and Allele definition Conversion Tool, that predicts and inter-converts between any of the common SNP allele definitions and between the major genome builds. In addition, we assessed several factors that may affect imputation quality, and our results indicated that inclusion of singletons in the reference had detrimental effects while ambiguous SNPs had no measurable effect. Unexpectedly, exclusion of genotypes with missing rate > 0.001 (40% of study SNPs) showed no significant decrease of imputation quality (even significantly higher when compared to the imputation with singletons in the reference), especially for rare SNPs. GACT is a new, powerful, and user-friendly tool with both command-line and interactive online versions that can accurately predict, and convert between any of the common allele definitions and between genome builds for genome-wide meta-analysis and imputation of genotypes from SNP-arrays or deep

  8. GENEPEASE Genomic tools for assessment of pesticide effects on the agricultural soil ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Carsten Suhr; Feld, Louise; Hjelmsø, Mathis Hjort

    The project focussed on validating RNA based methods as potential genomic tools in assessment of agricultural soil ecosystems. It was shown that the mRNA based technique was very sensitive and the effects was seen in the same situations as when the OECD nitrification assay showed an effect. 16S r......RNA based pyrosequencing of bacterial communities in soil was shown to report different than just DNA based analysis and indicated unlike the DNA measurement that the community was developing. Finally microarray analysis was compared to traditional test for toxicity testing of Folsomia candida and showed...

  9. PAPA: a flexible tool for identifying pleiotropic pathways using genome-wide association study summaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yan; Wang, Wenyu; Guo, Xiong; Zhang, Feng

    2016-03-15

    : Pleiotropy is common in the genetic architectures of complex diseases. To the best of our knowledge, no analysis tool has been developed for identifying pleiotropic pathways using multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS) summaries by now. Here, we present PAPA, a flexible tool for pleiotropic pathway analysis utilizing GWAS summary results. The performance of PAPA was validated using publicly available GWAS summaries of body mass index and waist-hip ratio of the GIANT datasets. PAPA identified a set of pleiotropic pathways, which have been demonstrated to be involved in the development of obesity. PAPA program, document and illustrative example are available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/papav1/files/ : fzhxjtu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Development of genome- and transcriptome-derived microsatellites in related species of snapping shrimps with highly duplicated genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaynor, Kaitlyn M; Solomon, Joseph W; Siller, Stefanie; Jessell, Linnet; Duffy, J Emmett; Rubenstein, Dustin R

    2017-11-01

    Molecular markers are powerful tools for studying patterns of relatedness and parentage within populations and for making inferences about social evolution. However, the development of molecular markers for simultaneous study of multiple species presents challenges, particularly when species exhibit genome duplication or polyploidy. We developed microsatellite markers for Synalpheus shrimp, a genus in which species exhibit not only great variation in social organization, but also interspecific variation in genome size and partial genome duplication. From the four primary clades within Synalpheus, we identified microsatellites in the genomes of four species and in the consensus transcriptome of two species. Ultimately, we designed and tested primers for 143 microsatellite markers across 25 species. Although the majority of markers were disomic, many markers were polysomic for certain species. Surprisingly, we found no relationship between genome size and the number of polysomic markers. As expected, markers developed for a given species amplified better for closely related species than for more distant relatives. Finally, the markers developed from the transcriptome were more likely to work successfully and to be disomic than those developed from the genome, suggesting that consensus transcriptomes are likely to be conserved across species. Our findings suggest that the transcriptome, particularly consensus sequences from multiple species, can be a valuable source of molecular markers for taxa with complex, duplicated genomes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Developing a Social Media Marketing tool

    OpenAIRE

    Valova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the thesis is to develop a better, easier to use social media marketing tool that could be utilised in any business. By understanding and analysing how business uses social media as well as currently available social media marketing tools, design a tool with the maximum amount of features, but with a simple and intuitive User Interface. An agile software development life cycle was used throughout the creation of the tool. Qualitative analysis was used to analyse existing ...

  12. Whole genome sequencing as the ultimate tool to diagnose tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dick van Soolingen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, DNA techniques have been increasingly used in the laboratory diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB. The (sub species of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex are usually identified using reverse line blot techniques. The resistance is predicted by the detection of mutations in genes associated with resistance. Nevertheless, all cases are still subjected to cumbersome phenotypic resistance testing. The production of a strain-characteristic DNA fingerprint, to investigate the epidemiology of TB, is done by the 24-locus variable number tandem repeat (VNTR typing. However, most of the molecular techniques in the diagnosis of TB can eventually be replaced by whole genome sequencing (WGS. Many international TB reference laboratories are currently working on the introduction of WGS; however, standardization in the international context is lacking. The European Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control in Stockholm, Sweden organizes a yearly round of quality control on VNTR typing and in 2015 for the first time also WGS. In this first proficiency study, only three out of eight international TB laboratories produced WGS results in line with those of the reference laboratory. The whole process of DNA isolation, purification, quantification, sequencing, and analysis/interpretation of data is still under development. In this presentation, many aspects will be covered that influence the quality and interpretation of WGS results. The turn-around-time, analysis, and utility of WGS will be discussed. Moreover, the experiences in the use of WGS in the molecular epidemiology of TB in The Netherlands are detailed. It can be concluded that many difficulties still have to be conquered. The state of the art is that bacteria still have to be cultured to have sufficient quality and quantity of DNA for succesful WGS. The quality of sequencing has improved significantly over the past 7 years, and the detection of mutations has, therefore

  13. Stochastic airspace simulation tool development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Modeling and simulation is often used to study : the physical world when observation may not be : practical. The overall goal of a recent and ongoing : simulation tool project has been to provide a : documented, lifecycle-managed, multi-processor : c...

  14. Transposons As Tools for Functional Genomics in Vertebrate Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Koichi; Largaespada, David A; Ivics, Zoltán

    2017-11-01

    Genetic tools and mutagenesis strategies based on transposable elements are currently under development with a vision to link primary DNA sequence information to gene functions in vertebrate models. By virtue of their inherent capacity to insert into DNA, transposons can be developed into powerful tools for chromosomal manipulations. Transposon-based forward mutagenesis screens have numerous advantages including high throughput, easy identification of mutated alleles, and providing insight into genetic networks and pathways based on phenotypes. For example, the Sleeping Beauty transposon has become highly instrumental to induce tumors in experimental animals in a tissue-specific manner with the aim of uncovering the genetic basis of diverse cancers. Here, we describe a battery of mutagenic cassettes that can be applied in conjunction with transposon vectors to mutagenize genes, and highlight versatile experimental strategies for the generation of engineered chromosomes for loss-of-function as well as gain-of-function mutagenesis for functional gene annotation in vertebrate models, including zebrafish, mice, and rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mi-DISCOVERER: A bioinformatics tool for the detection of mi-RNA in human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Saadia; Mumtaz, Asia; Ahmad, Freed; Liaquat, Sadia; Nadeem, Shahid; Mehboob, Shahid; Afzal, Muhammad

    2010-11-27

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 22 nucleotides non-coding RNAs that play pivotal regulatory roles in diverse organisms including the humans and are difficult to be identified due to lack of either sequence features or robust algorithms to efficiently identify. Therefore, we made a tool that is Mi-Discoverer for the detection of miRNAs in human genome. The tools used for the development of software are Microsoft Office Access 2003, the JDK version 1.6.0, BioJava version 1.0, and the NetBeans IDE version 6.0. All already made miRNAs softwares were web based; so the advantage of our project was to make a desktop facility to the user for sequence alignment search with already identified miRNAs of human genome present in the database. The user can also insert and update the newly discovered human miRNA in the database. Mi-Discoverer, a bioinformatics tool successfully identifies human miRNAs based on multiple sequence alignment searches. It's a non redundant database containing a large collection of publicly available human miRNAs.

  16. DNA Microarrays: a Powerful Genomic Tool for Biomedical and Clinical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Trevino, Victor; Falciani, Francesco; Barrera-Saldaña, Hugo A

    2007-01-01

    Among the many benefits of the Human Genome Project are new and powerful tools such as the genome-wide hybridization devices referred to as microarrays. Initially designed to measure gene transcriptional levels, microarray technologies are now used for comparing other genome features among individuals and their tissues and cells. Results provide valuable information on disease subcategories, disease prognosis, and treatment outcome. Likewise, they reveal differences in genetic makeup, regulat...

  17. GMATA: An Integrated Software Package for Genome-Scale SSR Mining, Marker Development and Viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuewen; Wang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), also referred to as microsatellites, are highly variable tandem DNAs that are widely used as genetic markers. The increasing availability of whole-genome and transcript sequences provides information resources for SSR marker development. However, efficient software is required to efficiently identify and display SSR information along with other gene features at a genome scale. We developed novel software package Genome-wide Microsatellite Analyzing Tool Package (GMATA) integrating SSR mining, statistical analysis and plotting, marker design, polymorphism screening and marker transferability, and enabled simultaneously display SSR markers with other genome features. GMATA applies novel strategies for SSR analysis and primer design in large genomes, which allows GMATA to perform faster calculation and provides more accurate results than existing tools. Our package is also capable of processing DNA sequences of any size on a standard computer. GMATA is user friendly, only requires mouse clicks or types inputs on the command line, and is executable in multiple computing platforms. We demonstrated the application of GMATA in plants genomes and reveal a novel distribution pattern of SSRs in 15 grass genomes. The most abundant motifs are dimer GA/TC, the A/T monomer and the GCG/CGC trimer, rather than the rich G/C content in DNA sequence. We also revealed that SSR count is a linear to the chromosome length in fully assembled grass genomes. GMATA represents a powerful application tool that facilitates genomic sequence analyses. GAMTA is freely available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/gmata/?source=navbar.

  18. Program Development Tools and Infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, M.

    2012-01-01

    Exascale class machines will exhibit a new level of complexity: they will feature an unprecedented number of cores and threads, will most likely be heterogeneous and deeply hierarchical, and offer a range of new hardware techniques (such as speculative threading, transactional memory, programmable prefetching, and programmable accelerators), which all have to be utilized for an application to realize the full potential of the machine. Additionally, users will be faced with less memory per core, fixed total power budgets, and sharply reduced MTBFs. At the same time, it is expected that the complexity of applications will rise sharply for exascale systems, both to implement new science possible at exascale and to exploit the new hardware features necessary to achieve exascale performance. This is particularly true for many of the NNSA codes, which are large and often highly complex integrated simulation codes that push the limits of everything in the system including language features. To overcome these limitations and to enable users to reach exascale performance, users will expect a new generation of tools that address the bottlenecks of exascale machines, that work seamlessly with the (set of) programming models on the target machines, that scale with the machine, that provide automatic analysis capabilities, and that are flexible and modular enough to overcome the complexities and changing demands of the exascale architectures. Further, any tool must be robust enough to handle the complexity of large integrated codes while keeping the user's learning curve low. With the ASC program, in particular the CSSE (Computational Systems and Software Engineering) and CCE (Common Compute Environment) projects, we are working towards a new generation of tools that fulfill these requirements and that provide our users as well as the larger HPC community with the necessary tools, techniques, and methodologies required to make exascale performance a reality.

  19. Program Development Tools and Infrastructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, M

    2012-03-12

    Exascale class machines will exhibit a new level of complexity: they will feature an unprecedented number of cores and threads, will most likely be heterogeneous and deeply hierarchical, and offer a range of new hardware techniques (such as speculative threading, transactional memory, programmable prefetching, and programmable accelerators), which all have to be utilized for an application to realize the full potential of the machine. Additionally, users will be faced with less memory per core, fixed total power budgets, and sharply reduced MTBFs. At the same time, it is expected that the complexity of applications will rise sharply for exascale systems, both to implement new science possible at exascale and to exploit the new hardware features necessary to achieve exascale performance. This is particularly true for many of the NNSA codes, which are large and often highly complex integrated simulation codes that push the limits of everything in the system including language features. To overcome these limitations and to enable users to reach exascale performance, users will expect a new generation of tools that address the bottlenecks of exascale machines, that work seamlessly with the (set of) programming models on the target machines, that scale with the machine, that provide automatic analysis capabilities, and that are flexible and modular enough to overcome the complexities and changing demands of the exascale architectures. Further, any tool must be robust enough to handle the complexity of large integrated codes while keeping the user's learning curve low. With the ASC program, in particular the CSSE (Computational Systems and Software Engineering) and CCE (Common Compute Environment) projects, we are working towards a new generation of tools that fulfill these requirements and that provide our users as well as the larger HPC community with the necessary tools, techniques, and methodologies required to make exascale performance a reality.

  20. CRISPR-Cpf1: A New Tool for Plant Genome Editing

    KAUST Repository

    Zaidi, Syed Shan-e-Ali

    2017-05-19

    Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated proteins (CRISPR-Cas), a groundbreaking genome-engineering tool, has facilitated targeted trait improvement in plants. Recently, CRISPR-CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella 1 (Cpf1) has emerged as a new tool for efficient genome editing, including DNA-free editing in plants, with higher efficiency, specificity, and potentially wider applications than CRISPR-Cas9.

  1. CRISPR-Cpf1: A New Tool for Plant Genome Editing

    KAUST Repository

    Zaidi, Syed Shan-e-Ali; Mahfouz, Magdy M.; Mansoor, Shahid

    2017-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated proteins (CRISPR-Cas), a groundbreaking genome-engineering tool, has facilitated targeted trait improvement in plants. Recently, CRISPR-CRISPR from Prevotella and Francisella 1 (Cpf1) has emerged as a new tool for efficient genome editing, including DNA-free editing in plants, with higher efficiency, specificity, and potentially wider applications than CRISPR-Cas9.

  2. Rainbow: a tool for large-scale whole-genome sequencing data analysis using cloud computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shanrong; Prenger, Kurt; Smith, Lance; Messina, Thomas; Fan, Hongtao; Jaeger, Edward; Stephens, Susan

    2013-06-27

    Technical improvements have decreased sequencing costs and, as a result, the size and number of genomic datasets have increased rapidly. Because of the lower cost, large amounts of sequence data are now being produced by small to midsize research groups. Crossbow is a software tool that can detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data from a single subject; however, Crossbow has a number of limitations when applied to multiple subjects from large-scale WGS projects. The data storage and CPU resources that are required for large-scale whole genome sequencing data analyses are too large for many core facilities and individual laboratories to provide. To help meet these challenges, we have developed Rainbow, a cloud-based software package that can assist in the automation of large-scale WGS data analyses. Here, we evaluated the performance of Rainbow by analyzing 44 different whole-genome-sequenced subjects. Rainbow has the capacity to process genomic data from more than 500 subjects in two weeks using cloud computing provided by the Amazon Web Service. The time includes the import and export of the data using Amazon Import/Export service. The average cost of processing a single sample in the cloud was less than 120 US dollars. Compared with Crossbow, the main improvements incorporated into Rainbow include the ability: (1) to handle BAM as well as FASTQ input files; (2) to split large sequence files for better load balance downstream; (3) to log the running metrics in data processing and monitoring multiple Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances; and (4) to merge SOAPsnp outputs for multiple individuals into a single file to facilitate downstream genome-wide association studies. Rainbow is a scalable, cost-effective, and open-source tool for large-scale WGS data analysis. For human WGS data sequenced by either the Illumina HiSeq 2000 or HiSeq 2500 platforms, Rainbow can be used straight out of the box. Rainbow is available

  3. GenomeCAT: a versatile tool for the analysis and integrative visualization of DNA copy number variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebel, Katrin; Boldt, Vivien; Steininger, Anne; Port, Matthias; Ebert, Grit; Ullmann, Reinhard

    2017-01-06

    The analysis of DNA copy number variants (CNV) has increasing impact in the field of genetic diagnostics and research. However, the interpretation of CNV data derived from high resolution array CGH or NGS platforms is complicated by the considerable variability of the human genome. Therefore, tools for multidimensional data analysis and comparison of patient cohorts are needed to assist in the discrimination of clinically relevant CNVs from others. We developed GenomeCAT, a standalone Java application for the analysis and integrative visualization of CNVs. GenomeCAT is composed of three modules dedicated to the inspection of single cases, comparative analysis of multidimensional data and group comparisons aiming at the identification of recurrent aberrations in patients sharing the same phenotype, respectively. Its flexible import options ease the comparative analysis of own results derived from microarray or NGS platforms with data from literature or public depositories. Multidimensional data obtained from different experiment types can be merged into a common data matrix to enable common visualization and analysis. All results are stored in the integrated MySQL database, but can also be exported as tab delimited files for further statistical calculations in external programs. GenomeCAT offers a broad spectrum of visualization and analysis tools that assist in the evaluation of CNVs in the context of other experiment data and annotations. The use of GenomeCAT does not require any specialized computer skills. The various R packages implemented for data analysis are fully integrated into GenomeCATs graphical user interface and the installation process is supported by a wizard. The flexibility in terms of data import and export in combination with the ability to create a common data matrix makes the program also well suited as an interface between genomic data from heterogeneous sources and external software tools. Due to the modular architecture the functionality of

  4. Developing a Modeling Tool Using Eclipse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirtley, Nick; Waqas Kamal, Ahmad; Avgeriou, Paris

    2008-01-01

    Tool development using an open source platform provides autonomy to users to change, use, and develop cost-effective software with freedom from licensing requirements. However, open source tool development poses a number of challenges, such as poor documentation and continuous evolution. In this

  5. Capitalizing on App Development Tools and Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luterbach, Kenneth J.; Hubbell, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Instructional developers and others creating apps must choose from a wide variety of app development tools and technologies. Some app development tools have incorporated visual programming features, which enable some drag and drop coding and contextual programming. While those features help novices begin programming with greater ease, questions…

  6. A practical comparison of de novo genome assembly software tools for next-generation sequencing technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenyu Zhang

    Full Text Available The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies is accompanied with the development of many whole-genome sequence assembly methods and software, especially for de novo fragment assembly. Due to the poor knowledge about the applicability and performance of these software tools, choosing a befitting assembler becomes a tough task. Here, we provide the information of adaptivity for each program, then above all, compare the performance of eight distinct tools against eight groups of simulated datasets from Solexa sequencing platform. Considering the computational time, maximum random access memory (RAM occupancy, assembly accuracy and integrity, our study indicate that string-based assemblers, overlap-layout-consensus (OLC assemblers are well-suited for very short reads and longer reads of small genomes respectively. For large datasets of more than hundred millions of short reads, De Bruijn graph-based assemblers would be more appropriate. In terms of software implementation, string-based assemblers are superior to graph-based ones, of which SOAPdenovo is complex for the creation of configuration file. Our comparison study will assist researchers in selecting a well-suited assembler and offer essential information for the improvement of existing assemblers or the developing of novel assemblers.

  7. Observation Tools for Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malu, Kathleen F.

    2015-01-01

    Professional development of teachers, including English language teachers, empowers them to change in ways that improve teaching and learning (Gall and Acheson 2011; Murray 2010). In their seminal research on staff development--professional development in today's terms--Joyce and Showers (2002) identify key factors that promote teacher change.…

  8. Development and Application of Camelid Molecular Cytogenetic Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Felipe; Das, Pranab J.; Kutzler, Michelle; Owens, Elaine; Perelman, Polina; Rubes, Jiri; Hornak, Miroslav; Johnson, Warren E.

    2014-01-01

    Cytogenetic chromosome maps offer molecular tools for genome analysis and clinical cytogenetics and are of particular importance for species with difficult karyotypes, such as camelids (2n = 74). Building on the available human–camel zoo-fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) data, we developed the first cytogenetic map for the alpaca (Lama pacos, LPA) genome by isolating and identifying 151 alpaca bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones corresponding to 44 specific genes. The genes were mapped by FISH to 31 alpaca autosomes and the sex chromosomes; 11 chromosomes had 2 markers, which were ordered by dual-color FISH. The STS gene mapped to Xpter/Ypter, demarcating the pseudoautosomal region, whereas no markers were assigned to chromosomes 14, 21, 22, 28, and 36. The chromosome-specific markers were applied in clinical cytogenetics to identify LPA20, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-carrying chromosome, as a part of an autosomal translocation in a sterile male llama (Lama glama, LGL; 2n = 73,XY). FISH with LPAX BACs and LPA36 paints, as well as comparative genomic hybridization, were also used to investigate the origin of the minute chromosome, an abnormally small LPA36 in infertile female alpacas. This collection of cytogenetically mapped markers represents a new tool for camelid clinical cytogenetics and has applications for the improvement of the alpaca genome map and sequence assembly. PMID:23109720

  9. MutaNET: a tool for automated analysis of genomic mutations in gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Markus; Hamed, Mohamed; Helms, Volkhard; Neininger, Kerstin

    2018-03-01

    Mutations in genomic key elements can influence gene expression and function in various ways, and hence greatly contribute to the phenotype. We developed MutaNET to score the impact of individual mutations on gene regulation and function of a given genome. MutaNET performs statistical analyses of mutations in different genomic regions. The tool also incorporates the mutations in a provided gene regulatory network to estimate their global impact. The integration of a next-generation sequencing pipeline enables calling mutations prior to the analyses. As application example, we used MutaNET to analyze the impact of mutations in antibiotic resistance (AR) genes and their potential effect on AR of bacterial strains. MutaNET is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/mutanet/. It is implemented in Python and supported on Mac OS X, Linux and MS Windows. Step-by-step instructions are available at http://service.bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de/mutanet/. volkhard.helms@bioinformatik.uni-saarland.de. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  10. UniPrimer: A Web-Based Primer Design Tool for Comparative Analyses of Primate Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nomin Batnyam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Whole genome sequences of various primates have been released due to advanced DNA-sequencing technology. A combination of computational data mining and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay to validate the data is an excellent method for conducting comparative genomics. Thus, designing primers for PCR is an essential procedure for a comparative analysis of primate genomes. Here, we developed and introduced UniPrimer for use in those studies. UniPrimer is a web-based tool that designs PCR- and DNA-sequencing primers. It compares the sequences from six different primates (human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, and rhesus macaque and designs primers on the conserved region across species. UniPrimer is linked to RepeatMasker, Primer3Plus, and OligoCalc softwares to produce primers with high accuracy and UCSC In-Silico PCR to confirm whether the designed primers work. To test the performance of UniPrimer, we designed primers on sample sequences using UniPrimer and manually designed primers for the same sequences. The comparison of the two processes showed that UniPrimer was more effective than manual work in terms of saving time and reducing errors.

  11. Genome editing: The efficient tool CRISPR–Cpf1

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2017-01-01

    The novel features of the CRISPR–Cpf1 RNA-guided endonuclease system facilitate precise and efficient genome engineering. Application of CRISPR–Cpf1 in plants shows promise for robust gene editing and regulation, opening exciting possibilities for targeted trait improvement in crops.

  12. Mojo Hand, a TALEN design tool for genome editing applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neff Kevin L

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies of transcription activator-like (TAL effector domains fused to nucleases (TALENs demonstrate enormous potential for genome editing. Effective design of TALENs requires a combination of selecting appropriate genetic features, finding pairs of binding sites based on a consensus sequence, and, in some cases, identifying endogenous restriction sites for downstream molecular genetic applications. Results We present the web-based program Mojo Hand for designing TAL and TALEN constructs for genome editing applications (http://www.talendesign.org. We describe the algorithm and its implementation. The features of Mojo Hand include (1 automatic download of genomic data from the National Center for Biotechnology Information, (2 analysis of any DNA sequence to reveal pairs of binding sites based on a user-defined template, (3 selection of restriction-enzyme recognition sites in the spacer between the TAL monomer binding sites including options for the selection of restriction enzyme suppliers, and (4 output files designed for subsequent TALEN construction using the Golden Gate assembly method. Conclusions Mojo Hand enables the rapid identification of TAL binding sites for use in TALEN design. The assembly of TALEN constructs, is also simplified by using the TAL-site prediction program in conjunction with a spreadsheet management aid of reagent concentrations and TALEN formulation. Mojo Hand enables scientists to more rapidly deploy TALENs for genome editing applications.

  13. Mojo Hand, a TALEN design tool for genome editing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Kevin L; Argue, David P; Ma, Alvin C; Lee, Han B; Clark, Karl J; Ekker, Stephen C

    2013-01-16

    Recent studies of transcription activator-like (TAL) effector domains fused to nucleases (TALENs) demonstrate enormous potential for genome editing. Effective design of TALENs requires a combination of selecting appropriate genetic features, finding pairs of binding sites based on a consensus sequence, and, in some cases, identifying endogenous restriction sites for downstream molecular genetic applications. We present the web-based program Mojo Hand for designing TAL and TALEN constructs for genome editing applications (http://www.talendesign.org). We describe the algorithm and its implementation. The features of Mojo Hand include (1) automatic download of genomic data from the National Center for Biotechnology Information, (2) analysis of any DNA sequence to reveal pairs of binding sites based on a user-defined template, (3) selection of restriction-enzyme recognition sites in the spacer between the TAL monomer binding sites including options for the selection of restriction enzyme suppliers, and (4) output files designed for subsequent TALEN construction using the Golden Gate assembly method. Mojo Hand enables the rapid identification of TAL binding sites for use in TALEN design. The assembly of TALEN constructs, is also simplified by using the TAL-site prediction program in conjunction with a spreadsheet management aid of reagent concentrations and TALEN formulation. Mojo Hand enables scientists to more rapidly deploy TALENs for genome editing applications.

  14. Genome editing: The efficient tool CRISPR–Cpf1

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2017-03-01

    The novel features of the CRISPR–Cpf1 RNA-guided endonuclease system facilitate precise and efficient genome engineering. Application of CRISPR–Cpf1 in plants shows promise for robust gene editing and regulation, opening exciting possibilities for targeted trait improvement in crops.

  15. Adenoviral vectors as genome editing tools : repairing defective DMD alleles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggio, Ignazio

    2016-01-01

    Adenoviral vectors (AdVs) constitute powerful gene delivery vehicles. However, so far, their potential for genome editing has not been extensively investigated. By tailoring AdVs as carriers of designer nucleases and donor DNA sequences, the research presented in this thesis expands the utility of

  16. MUTAGEN: Multi-user tool for annotating GENomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brugger, K.; Redder, P.; Skovgaard, Marie

    2003-01-01

    MUTAGEN is a free prokaryotic annotation system. It offers the advantages of genome comparison, graphical sequence browsers, search facilities and open-source for user-specific adjustments. The web-interface allows several users to access the system from standard desktop computers. The Sulfolobus...

  17. CAGO: a software tool for dynamic visual comparison and correlation measurement of genome organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Feng Chang

    Full Text Available CAGO (Comparative Analysis of Genome Organization is developed to address two critical shortcomings of conventional genome atlas plotters: lack of dynamic exploratory functions and absence of signal analysis for genomic properties. With dynamic exploratory functions, users can directly manipulate chromosome tracks of a genome atlas and intuitively identify distinct genomic signals by visual comparison. Signal analysis of genomic properties can further detect inconspicuous patterns from noisy genomic properties and calculate correlations between genomic properties across various genomes. To implement dynamic exploratory functions, CAGO presents each genome atlas in Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG format and allows users to interact with it using a SVG viewer through JavaScript. Signal analysis functions are implemented using R statistical software and a discrete wavelet transformation package waveslim. CAGO is not only a plotter for generating complex genome atlases, but also a platform for exploring genome atlases with dynamic exploratory functions for visual comparison and with signal analysis for comparing genomic properties across multiple organisms. The web-based application of CAGO, its source code, user guides, video demos, and live examples are publicly available and can be accessed at http://cbs.ym.edu.tw/cago.

  18. DECIDE: a Decision Support Tool to Facilitate Parents' Choices Regarding Genome-Wide Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, Patricia; Adam, S; Bansback, N; Coe, R R; Hicklin, J; Lehman, A; Li, K C; Friedman, J M

    2016-12-01

    We describe the rationale, development, and usability testing for an integrated e-learning tool and decision aid for parents facing decisions about genome-wide sequencing (GWS) for their children with a suspected genetic condition. The online tool, DECIDE, is designed to provide decision-support and to promote high quality decisions about undergoing GWS with or without return of optional incidental finding results. DECIDE works by integrating educational material with decision aids. Users may tailor their learning by controlling both the amount of information and its format - text and diagrams and/or short videos. The decision aid guides users to weigh the importance of various relevant factors in their own lives and circumstances. After considering the pros and cons of GWS and return of incidental findings, DECIDE summarizes the user's responses and apparent preferred choices. In a usability study of 16 parents who had already chosen GWS after conventional genetic counselling, all participants found DECIDE to be helpful. Many would have been satisfied to use it alone to guide their GWS decisions, but most would prefer to have the option of consulting a health care professional as well to aid their decision. Further testing is necessary to establish the effectiveness of using DECIDE as an adjunct to or instead of conventional pre-test genetic counselling for clinical genome-wide sequencing.

  19. Development tool for PHP programs

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsen, Håkon Skaarud

    2005-01-01

    This paper discusses how a PHP development toolbox can be implemented. One toolbox has been implemented, and the implementation is described and documented in the text. The toolbox is primarily meant to help students who are taking a System Development course (INF1050) at the University of Oslo with the implementation phase of a software engineering project, but other PHP programmers may also benefit from using the toolbox. It has been emphasized that the programming interface should be i...

  20. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation as a tool for functional genomics in fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielse, C.B.; Hooykaas, P.J.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Ram, A.F.J.

    2005-01-01

    In the era of functional genomics, the need for tools to perform large-scale targeted and random mutagenesis is increasing. A potential tool is Agrobacterium-mediated fungal transformation. A. tumefaciens is able to transfer a part of its DNA (transferred DNA; T-DNA) to a wide variety of fungi and

  1. Cost-effective cloud computing: a case study using the comparative genomics tool, roundup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudtarkar, Parul; Deluca, Todd F; Fusaro, Vincent A; Tonellato, Peter J; Wall, Dennis P

    2010-12-22

    Comparative genomics resources, such as ortholog detection tools and repositories are rapidly increasing in scale and complexity. Cloud computing is an emerging technological paradigm that enables researchers to dynamically build a dedicated virtual cluster and may represent a valuable alternative for large computational tools in bioinformatics. In the present manuscript, we optimize the computation of a large-scale comparative genomics resource-Roundup-using cloud computing, describe the proper operating principles required to achieve computational efficiency on the cloud, and detail important procedures for improving cost-effectiveness to ensure maximal computation at minimal costs. Utilizing the comparative genomics tool, Roundup, as a case study, we computed orthologs among 902 fully sequenced genomes on Amazon's Elastic Compute Cloud. For managing the ortholog processes, we designed a strategy to deploy the web service, Elastic MapReduce, and maximize the use of the cloud while simultaneously minimizing costs. Specifically, we created a model to estimate cloud runtime based on the size and complexity of the genomes being compared that determines in advance the optimal order of the jobs to be submitted. We computed orthologous relationships for 245,323 genome-to-genome comparisons on Amazon's computing cloud, a computation that required just over 200 hours and cost $8,000 USD, at least 40% less than expected under a strategy in which genome comparisons were submitted to the cloud randomly with respect to runtime. Our cost savings projections were based on a model that not only demonstrates the optimal strategy for deploying RSD to the cloud, but also finds the optimal cluster size to minimize waste and maximize usage. Our cost-reduction model is readily adaptable for other comparative genomics tools and potentially of significant benefit to labs seeking to take advantage of the cloud as an alternative to local computing infrastructure.

  2. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of "domestication" of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, partial functional release, and further mutation-driven reshaping of TFBS in tight coevolution with the enclosing genomic loci.

  3. CGUG: in silico proteome and genome parsing tool for the determination of "core" and unique genes in the analysis of genomes up to ca. 1.9 Mb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan Padmanabhan

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses and small-genome bacteria (~2 megabases and smaller comprise a considerable population in the biosphere and are of interest to many researchers. These genomes are now sequenced at an unprecedented rate and require complementary computational tools to analyze. "CoreGenesUniqueGenes" (CGUG is an in silico genome data mining tool that determines a "core" set of genes from two to five organisms with genomes in this size range. Core and unique genes may reflect similar niches and needs, and may be used in classifying organisms. Findings CGUG is available at http://binf.gmu.edu/geneorder.html as a web-based on-the-fly tool that performs iterative BLASTP analyses using a reference genome and up to four query genomes to provide a table of genes common to these genomes. The result is an in silico display of genomes and their proteomes, allowing for further analysis. CGUG can be used for "genome annotation by homology", as demonstrated with Chlamydophila and Francisella genomes. Conclusion CGUG is used to reanalyze the ICTV-based classifications of bacteriophages, to reconfirm long-standing relationships and to explore new classifications. These genomes have been problematic in the past, due largely to horizontal gene transfers. CGUG is validated as a tool for reannotating small genome bacteria using more up-to-date annotations by similarity or homology. These serve as an entry point for wet-bench experiments to confirm the functions of these "hypothetical" and "unknown" proteins.

  4. The Princeton Protein Orthology Database (P-POD): a comparative genomics analysis tool for biologists.

    OpenAIRE

    Sven Heinicke; Michael S Livstone; Charles Lu; Rose Oughtred; Fan Kang; Samuel V Angiuoli; Owen White; David Botstein; Kara Dolinski

    2007-01-01

    Many biological databases that provide comparative genomics information and tools are now available on the internet. While certainly quite useful, to our knowledge none of the existing databases combine results from multiple comparative genomics methods with manually curated information from the literature. Here we describe the Princeton Protein Orthology Database (P-POD, http://ortholog.princeton.edu), a user-friendly database system that allows users to find and visualize the phylogenetic r...

  5. Quality Assurance Project Plan Development Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    This tool contains information designed to assist in developing a Quality Assurance (QA) Project Plan that meets EPA requirements for projects that involve surface or groundwater monitoring and/or the collection and analysis of water samples.

  6. Developing a Parametric Urban Design Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinø, Nicolai; Obeling, Esben

    2014-01-01

    Parametric urban design is a potentially powerful tool for collaborative urban design processes. Rather than making one- off designs which need to be redesigned from the ground up in case of changes, parametric design tools make it possible keep the design open while at the same time allowing...... for a level of detailing which is high enough to facilitate an understan- ding of the generic qualities of proposed designs. Starting from a brief overview of parametric design, this paper presents initial findings from the development of a parametric urban design tool with regard to developing a structural...... logic which is flexible and expandable. It then moves on to outline and discuss further development work. Finally, it offers a brief reflection on the potentials and shortcomings of the software – CityEngine – which is used for developing the parametric urban design tool....

  7. Data Mining and Optimization Tools for Developing Engine Parameters Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Atam P.

    1998-01-01

    This project was awarded for understanding the problem and developing a plan for Data Mining tools for use in designing and implementing an Engine Condition Monitoring System. Tricia Erhardt and I studied the problem domain for developing an Engine Condition Monitoring system using the sparse and non-standardized datasets to be available through a consortium at NASA Lewis Research Center. We visited NASA three times to discuss additional issues related to dataset which was not made available to us. We discussed and developed a general framework of data mining and optimization tools to extract useful information from sparse and non-standard datasets. These discussions lead to the training of Tricia Erhardt to develop Genetic Algorithm based search programs which were written in C++ and used to demonstrate the capability of GA algorithm in searching an optimal solution in noisy, datasets. From the study and discussion with NASA LeRC personnel, we then prepared a proposal, which is being submitted to NASA for future work for the development of data mining algorithms for engine conditional monitoring. The proposed set of algorithm uses wavelet processing for creating multi-resolution pyramid of tile data for GA based multi-resolution optimal search.

  8. webMGR: an online tool for the multiple genome rearrangement problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi Ho; Zhao, Hao; Lowcay, Sean Harry; Shahab, Atif; Bourque, Guillaume

    2010-02-01

    The algorithm MGR enables the reconstruction of rearrangement phylogenies based on gene or synteny block order in multiple genomes. Although MGR has been successfully applied to study the evolution of different sets of species, its utilization has been hampered by the prohibitive running time for some applications. In the current work, we have designed new heuristics that significantly speed up the tool without compromising its accuracy. Moreover, we have developed a web server (webMGR) that includes elaborate web output to facilitate navigation through the results. webMGR can be accessed via http://www.gis.a-star.edu.sg/~bourque. The source code of the improved standalone version of MGR is also freely available from the web site. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. Development of remote handling tools and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahira, Masataka; Oka, Kiyoshi; Taguchi, Kou; Ito, Akira; Fukatsu, Seiichi; Oda, Yasushi; Kajiura, Soji; Yamazaki, Seiichiro; Aoyama, Kazuo.

    1997-01-01

    The remote handling (RH) tools and equipment development in ITER focuses mainly on the welding and cutting technique, weld inspection and double-seal door which are essential factors in the replacement of in-vessel components such as divertor and blanket. The conceptual design of these RH tools and equipment has been defined through ITER engineering design activity (EDA). Similarly, elementary R and D of the RH tools and equipment have been extensively performed to accumulate a technological data base for process and performance qualification. Based on this data, fabrications of full-scale RH tools and equipment are under progress. A prototypical bore tool for pipe welding and cutting has already been fabricated and is currently undergoing integrated performance tests. This paper describes the design outline of the RH tools and equipment related to in-vessel components maintenance, and highlights the current status of RH tools and equipment development by the Japan Home Team as an ITER R and D program. This paper also includes an outline of insulation joint and quick-pipe connector development, which has also been conducted through the ITER R and D program in order to standardize RH operations and components. (author)

  10. Remote tool development for nuclear dismantling operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, G.; Ferlay, J.C.; Ieracitano, F.

    2003-01-01

    Remote tool systems to undertake nuclear dismantling operations require careful design and development not only to perform their given duty but to perform it safely within the constraints imposed by harsh environmental conditions. Framatome ANP NUCLEAR SERVICES has for a long time developed and qualified equipment to undertake specific maintenance operations of nuclear reactors. The tool development methodology from this activity has since been adapted to resolve some very challenging reactor dismantling operations which are demonstrated in this paper. Each nuclear decommissioning project is a unique case, technical characterisation data is generally incomplete. The development of the dismantling methodology and associated equipment is by and large an iterative process combining design and simulation with feasibility and validation testing. The first stage of the development process involves feasibility testing of industrial tools and examining adaptations necessary to control and deploy the tool remotely with respect to the chosen methodology and environmental constraints. This results in a prototype tool and deployment system to validate the basic process. The second stage involves detailed design which integrates any remaining technical and environmental constraints. At the end of this stage, tools and deployment systems, operators and operating procedures are qualified on full scale mock ups. (authors)

  11. Nanopore sequencing technology and tools for genome assembly: computational analysis of the current state, bottlenecks and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senol Cali, Damla; Kim, Jeremie S; Ghose, Saugata; Alkan, Can; Mutlu, Onur

    2018-04-02

    Nanopore sequencing technology has the potential to render other sequencing technologies obsolete with its ability to generate long reads and provide portability. However, high error rates of the technology pose a challenge while generating accurate genome assemblies. The tools used for nanopore sequence analysis are of critical importance, as they should overcome the high error rates of the technology. Our goal in this work is to comprehensively analyze current publicly available tools for nanopore sequence analysis to understand their advantages, disadvantages and performance bottlenecks. It is important to understand where the current tools do not perform well to develop better tools. To this end, we (1) analyze the multiple steps and the associated tools in the genome assembly pipeline using nanopore sequence data, and (2) provide guidelines for determining the appropriate tools for each step. Based on our analyses, we make four key observations: (1) the choice of the tool for basecalling plays a critical role in overcoming the high error rates of nanopore sequencing technology. (2) Read-to-read overlap finding tools, GraphMap and Minimap, perform similarly in terms of accuracy. However, Minimap has a lower memory usage, and it is faster than GraphMap. (3) There is a trade-off between accuracy and performance when deciding on the appropriate tool for the assembly step. The fast but less accurate assembler Miniasm can be used for quick initial assembly, and further polishing can be applied on top of it to increase the accuracy, which leads to faster overall assembly. (4) The state-of-the-art polishing tool, Racon, generates high-quality consensus sequences while providing a significant speedup over another polishing tool, Nanopolish. We analyze various combinations of different tools and expose the trade-offs between accuracy, performance, memory usage and scalability. We conclude that our observations can guide researchers and practitioners in making conscious

  12. Human Ageing Genomic Resources: Integrated databases and tools for the biology and genetics of ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacutu, Robi; Craig, Thomas; Budovsky, Arie; Wuttke, Daniel; Lehmann, Gilad; Taranukha, Dmitri; Costa, Joana; Fraifeld, Vadim E.; de Magalhães, João Pedro

    2013-01-01

    The Human Ageing Genomic Resources (HAGR, http://genomics.senescence.info) is a freely available online collection of research databases and tools for the biology and genetics of ageing. HAGR features now several databases with high-quality manually curated data: (i) GenAge, a database of genes associated with ageing in humans and model organisms; (ii) AnAge, an extensive collection of longevity records and complementary traits for >4000 vertebrate species; and (iii) GenDR, a newly incorporated database, containing both gene mutations that interfere with dietary restriction-mediated lifespan extension and consistent gene expression changes induced by dietary restriction. Since its creation about 10 years ago, major efforts have been undertaken to maintain the quality of data in HAGR, while further continuing to develop, improve and extend it. This article briefly describes the content of HAGR and details the major updates since its previous publications, in terms of both structure and content. The completely redesigned interface, more intuitive and more integrative of HAGR resources, is also presented. Altogether, we hope that through its improvements, the current version of HAGR will continue to provide users with the most comprehensive and accessible resources available today in the field of biogerontology. PMID:23193293

  13. Comparing genomes: databases and computational tools for comparative analysis of prokaryotic genomes - DOI: 10.3395/reciis.v1i2.Sup.105en

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Catanho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990's, the complete genetic code of more than 600 living organisms has been deciphered, such as bacteria, yeasts, protozoan parasites, invertebrates and vertebrates, including Homo sapiens, and plants. More than 2,000 other genome projects representing medical, commercial, environmental and industrial interests, or comprising model organisms, important for the development of the scientific research, are currently in progress. The achievement of complete genome sequences of numerous species combined with the tremendous progress in computation that occurred in the last few decades allowed the use of new holistic approaches in the study of genome structure, organization and evolution, as well as in the field of gene prediction and functional classification. Numerous public or proprietary databases and computational tools have been created attempting to optimize the access to this information through the web. In this review, we present the main resources available through the web for comparative analysis of prokaryotic genomes. We concentrated on the group of mycobacteria that contains important human and animal pathogens. The birth of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology and the contributions of these disciplines to the scientific development of this field are also discussed.

  14. Recent updates and developments to plant genome size databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Sònia; Leitch, Ilia J.; Anadon-Rosell, Alba; Canela, Miguel Á.; Gálvez, Francisco; Garnatje, Teresa; Gras, Airy; Hidalgo, Oriane; Johnston, Emmeline; Mas de Xaxars, Gemma; Pellicer, Jaume; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja; Vallès, Joan; Vitales, Daniel; Bennett, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Two plant genome size databases have been recently updated and/or extended: the Plant DNA C-values database (http://data.kew.org/cvalues), and GSAD, the Genome Size in Asteraceae database (http://www.asteraceaegenomesize.com). While the first provides information on nuclear DNA contents across land plants and some algal groups, the second is focused on one of the largest and most economically important angiosperm families, Asteraceae. Genome size data have numerous applications: they can be used in comparative studies on genome evolution, or as a tool to appraise the cost of whole-genome sequencing programs. The growing interest in genome size and increasing rate of data accumulation has necessitated the continued update of these databases. Currently, the Plant DNA C-values database (Release 6.0, Dec. 2012) contains data for 8510 species, while GSAD has 1219 species (Release 2.0, June 2013), representing increases of 17 and 51%, respectively, in the number of species with genome size data, compared with previous releases. Here we provide overviews of the most recent releases of each database, and outline new features of GSAD. The latter include (i) a tool to visually compare genome size data between species, (ii) the option to export data and (iii) a webpage containing information about flow cytometry protocols. PMID:24288377

  15. Development of a transportation planning tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funkhouser, B.R.; Moyer, J.W.; Ballweg, E.L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the application of simulation modeling and logistics techniques to the development of a planning tool for the Department of Energy (DOE). The focus of the Transportation Planning Model (TPM) tool is to aid DOE and Sandia analysts in the planning of future fleet sizes, driver and support personnel sizes, base site locations, and resource balancing among the base sites. The design approach is to develop a rapid modeling environment which will allow analysts to easily set up a shipment scenario and perform multiple ''what if'' evaluations. The TPM is being developed on personal computers using commercial off-the shelf (COTS) software tools under the WINDOWS reg-sign operating environment. Prototype development of the TPM has been completed

  16. PIPEMicroDB: microsatellite database and primer generation tool for pigeonpea genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarika; Arora, Vasu; Iquebal, M A; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Molecular markers play a significant role for crop improvement in desirable characteristics, such as high yield, resistance to disease and others that will benefit the crop in long term. Pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan L.) is the recently sequenced legume by global consortium led by ICRISAT (Hyderabad, India) and been analysed for gene prediction, synteny maps, markers, etc. We present PIgeonPEa Microsatellite DataBase (PIPEMicroDB) with an automated primer designing tool for pigeonpea genome, based on chromosome wise as well as location wise search of primers. Total of 123 387 Short Tandem Repeats (STRs) were extracted from pigeonpea genome, available in public domain using MIcroSAtellite tool (MISA). The database is an online relational database based on 'three-tier architecture' that catalogues information of microsatellites in MySQL and user-friendly interface is developed using PHP. Search for STRs may be customized by limiting their location on chromosome as well as number of markers in that range. This is a novel approach and is not been implemented in any of the existing marker database. This database has been further appended with Primer3 for primer designing of selected markers with left and right flankings of size up to 500 bp. This will enable researchers to select markers of choice at desired interval over the chromosome. Furthermore, one can use individual STRs of a targeted region over chromosome to narrow down location of gene of interest or linked Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs). Although it is an in silico approach, markers' search based on characteristics and location of STRs is expected to be beneficial for researchers. Database URL: http://cabindb.iasri.res.in/pigeonpea/

  17. Developing new chemical tools for solvent extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyer, B.A.; Baes, C.F.; Burns, J.H.; Case, G.N.; Sachleben, R.A.; Bryan, S.A.; Lumetta, G.J.; McDowell, W.J.; Sachleben, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Prospects for innovation and for greater technological impact in the field of solvent extraction (SX) seem as bright as ever, despite the maturation of SX as an economically significant separation method and as an important technique in the laboratory. New industrial, environmental, and analytical problems provide compelling motivation for diversifying the application of SX, developing new solvent systems, and seeking improved properties. Toward this end, basic research must be dedicated to enhancing the tools of SX: physical tools for probing the basis of extraction and molecular tools for developing new SX chemistries. In this paper, the authors describe their progress in developing and applying the general tools of equilibrium analysis and of ion recognition in SX. Nearly half a century after the field of SX began in earnest, coordination chemistry continues to provide the impetus for important advancements in understanding SX systems and in controlling SX chemistry. In particular, the physical tools of equilibrium analysis, X-ray crystallography, and spectroscopy are elucidating the molecular basis of SX in unprecedented detail. Moreover, the principles of ion recognition are providing the molecular tools with which to achieve new selectivities and new applications

  18. Information technology tools for curriculum development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Nieveen, N.M.; Strijker, A.; Voogt, Joke; Knezek, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    The widespread introduction and use of computers in the workplace began in the early 1990s. Since then, computer-based tools have been developed to support a myriad of task types, including the complex process of curriculum development. This chapter begins by briefly introducing two concepts that

  19. Database development tool DELPHI and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Mei

    2000-01-01

    The authors described the progress of the software development technologies and tools, the features and performances of Borland Delphi and a software development instance which is the Management Information System of Tank region storage and transportation control center for Zhenhai Refining and Chemical CO., Ltd. in the Zhejiang province

  20. LEMONS - A Tool for the Identification of Splice Junctions in Transcriptomes of Organisms Lacking Reference Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liron Levin

    Full Text Available RNA-seq is becoming a preferred tool for genomics studies of model and non-model organisms. However, DNA-based analysis of organisms lacking sequenced genomes cannot rely on RNA-seq data alone to isolate most genes of interest, as DNA codes both exons and introns. With this in mind, we designed a novel tool, LEMONS, that exploits the evolutionary conservation of both exon/intron boundary positions and splice junction recognition signals to produce high throughput splice-junction predictions in the absence of a reference genome. When tested on multiple annotated vertebrate mRNA data, LEMONS accurately identified 87% (average of the splice-junctions. LEMONS was then applied to our updated Mediterranean chameleon transcriptome, which lacks a reference genome, and predicted a total of 90,820 exon-exon junctions. We experimentally verified these splice-junction predictions by amplifying and sequencing twenty randomly selected genes from chameleon DNA templates. Exons and introns were detected in 19 of 20 of the positions predicted by LEMONS. To the best of our knowledge, LEMONS is currently the only experimentally verified tool that can accurately predict splice-junctions in organisms that lack a reference genome.

  1. VCFtoTree: a user-friendly tool to construct locus-specific alignments and phylogenies from thousands of anthropologically relevant genome sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Duo; Jaber, Yousef; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Gokcumen, Omer

    2017-09-26

    Constructing alignments and phylogenies for a given locus from large genome sequencing studies with relevant outgroups allow novel evolutionary and anthropological insights. However, no user-friendly tool has been developed to integrate thousands of recently available and anthropologically relevant genome sequences to construct complete sequence alignments and phylogenies. Here, we provide VCFtoTree, a user friendly tool with a graphical user interface that directly accesses online databases to download, parse and analyze genome variation data for regions of interest. Our pipeline combines popular sequence datasets and tree building algorithms with custom data parsing to generate accurate alignments and phylogenies using all the individuals from the 1000 Genomes Project, Neanderthal and Denisovan genomes, as well as reference genomes of Chimpanzee and Rhesus Macaque. It can also be applied to other phased human genomes, as well as genomes from other species. The output of our pipeline includes an alignment in FASTA format and a tree file in newick format. VCFtoTree fulfills the increasing demand for constructing alignments and phylogenies for a given loci from thousands of available genomes. Our software provides a user friendly interface for a wider audience without prerequisite knowledge in programming. VCFtoTree can be accessed from https://github.com/duoduoo/VCFtoTree_3.0.0 .

  2. CRISPR-Cas: From the Bacterial Adaptive Immune System to a Versatile Tool for Genome Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, Marion; Schneider, Sabine

    2015-11-09

    The field of biology has been revolutionized by the recent advancement of an adaptive bacterial immune system as a universal genome engineering tool. Bacteria and archaea use repetitive genomic elements termed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in combination with an RNA-guided nuclease (CRISPR-associated nuclease: Cas) to target and destroy invading DNA. By choosing the appropriate sequence of the guide RNA, this two-component system can be used to efficiently modify, target, and edit genomic loci of interest in plants, insects, fungi, mammalian cells, and whole organisms. This has opened up new frontiers in genome engineering, including the potential to treat or cure human genetic disorders. Now the potential risks as well as the ethical, social, and legal implications of this powerful new technique move into the limelight. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. CRISPR-Cas9; an efficient tool for precise plant genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Waqar

    2018-04-03

    Efficient plant genome editing is dependent upon induction of double stranded DNA breaks (DSBs) through site specified nucleases. These DSBs initiate the process of DNA repair which can either base upon homologous recombination (HR) or non-homologous end jointing (NHEJ). Recently, CRISPR-Cas9 mechanism got highlighted as revolutionizing genetic tool due to its simpler frame work along with the broad range of adaptability and applications. So, in this review, I have tried to sum up the application of this biotechnological tool in plant genome editing. Furthermore, I have tried to explain successful adaptation of CRISPR in various plant species where it is used for the successful generation of stable mutations in a steadily growing number of species through NHEJ. The review also sheds light upon other biotechnological approaches relying upon single DNA lesion induction such as genomic deletion or pair wise nickases for evasion of offsite effects. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Decoding the genome with an integrative analysis tool: combinatorial CRM Decoder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Keunsoo; Kim, Joomyeong; Chung, Jae Hoon; Lee, Daeyoup

    2011-09-01

    The identification of genome-wide cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) and characterization of their associated epigenetic features are fundamental steps toward the understanding of gene regulatory networks. Although integrative analysis of available genome-wide information can provide new biological insights, the lack of novel methodologies has become a major bottleneck. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis tool called combinatorial CRM decoder (CCD), which utilizes the publicly available information to identify and characterize genome-wide CRMs in a species of interest. CCD first defines a set of the epigenetic features which is significantly associated with a set of known CRMs as a code called 'trace code', and subsequently uses the trace code to pinpoint putative CRMs throughout the genome. Using 61 genome-wide data sets obtained from 17 independent mouse studies, CCD successfully catalogued ∼12 600 CRMs (five distinct classes) including polycomb repressive complex 2 target sites as well as imprinting control regions. Interestingly, we discovered that ∼4% of the identified CRMs belong to at least two different classes named 'multi-functional CRM', suggesting their functional importance for regulating spatiotemporal gene expression. From these examples, we show that CCD can be applied to any potential genome-wide datasets and therefore will shed light on unveiling genome-wide CRMs in various species.

  5. Tools to covisualize and coanalyze proteomic data with genomes and transcriptomes: validation of genes and alternative mRNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chi Nam Ignatius; Tay, Aidan P; Aya, Carlos; Twine, Natalie A; Harkness, Linda; Hart-Smith, Gene; Chia, Samantha Z; Chen, Zhiliang; Deshpande, Nandan P; Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Mitchell, Hazel M; Kassem, Moustapha; Wilkins, Marc R

    2014-01-03

    Direct links between proteomic and genomic/transcriptomic data are not frequently made, partly because of lack of appropriate bioinformatics tools. To help address this, we have developed the PG Nexus pipeline. The PG Nexus allows users to covisualize peptides in the context of genomes or genomic contigs, along with RNA-seq reads. This is done in the Integrated Genome Viewer (IGV). A Results Analyzer reports the precise base position where LC-MS/MS-derived peptides cover genes or gene isoforms, on the chromosomes or contigs where this occurs. In prokaryotes, the PG Nexus pipeline facilitates the validation of genes, where annotation or gene prediction is available, or the discovery of genes using a "virtual protein"-based unbiased approach. We illustrate this with a comprehensive proteogenomics analysis of two strains of Campylobacter concisus . For higher eukaryotes, the PG Nexus facilitates gene validation and supports the identification of mRNA splice junction boundaries and splice variants that are protein-coding. This is illustrated with an analysis of splice junctions covered by human phosphopeptides, and other examples of relevance to the Chromosome-Centric Human Proteome Project. The PG Nexus is open-source and available from https://github.com/IntersectAustralia/ap11_Samifier. It has been integrated into Galaxy and made available in the Galaxy tool shed.

  6. Windows Developer Power Tools Turbocharge Windows development with more than 170 free and open source tools

    CERN Document Server

    Avery, James

    2007-01-01

    Software developers need to work harder and harder to bring value to their development process in order to build high quality applications and remain competitive. Developers can accomplish this by improving their productivity, quickly solving problems, and writing better code. A wealth of open source and free software tools are available for developers who want to improve the way they create, build, deploy, and use software. Tools, components, and frameworks exist to help developers at every point in the development process. Windows Developer Power Tools offers an encyclopedic guide to m

  7. Tools for Genomic and Transcriptomic Analysis of Microbes at Single-Cell Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zixi Chen

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbiologists traditionally study population rather than individual cells, as it is generally assumed that the status of individual cells will be similar to that observed in the population. However, the recent studies have shown that the individual behavior of each single cell could be quite different from that of the whole population, suggesting the importance of extending traditional microbiology studies to single-cell level. With recent technological advances, such as flow cytometry, next-generation sequencing (NGS, and microspectroscopy, single-cell microbiology has greatly enhanced the understanding of individuality and heterogeneity of microbes in many biological systems. Notably, the application of multiple ‘omics’ in single-cell analysis has shed light on how individual cells perceive, respond, and adapt to the environment, how heterogeneity arises under external stress and finally determines the fate of the whole population, and how microbes survive under natural conditions. As single-cell analysis involves no axenic cultivation of target microorganism, it has also been demonstrated as a valuable tool for dissecting the microbial ‘dark matter.’ In this review, current state-of-the-art tools and methods for genomic and transcriptomic analysis of microbes at single-cell level were critically summarized, including single-cell isolation methods and experimental strategies of single-cell analysis with NGS. In addition, perspectives on the future trends of technology development in the field of single-cell analysis was also presented.

  8. History of a secondary side inspection tooling development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, W.

    2012-01-01

    This presentation provides a brief history (1980 to present day) of steam generator secondary side tooling requirements, tooling development, tooling available today and how and where this tooling has been implemented for steam generator secondary side inspections. History of Tooling Development discussion covers the relatively short time period from when the SGSS tooling was required and why as well the associated challenges with development through present day; Available Tooling discussion covers the actual tooling available today, locations in the steam generator where the tooling is used and how the tooling works; Implementation discussion covers where in the world this tooling has been deployed as well the benefits the tooling has provided. (author)

  9. Research tools | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Through training materials and guides, we aim to build skills and knowledge to enhance the quality of development research. We also offer free access to our database of funded research projects, known as IDRIS+, and our digital library. Our research tools include. Guide to research databases at IDRC: How to access and ...

  10. Latest Developments in PVD Coatings for Tooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Strnad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the recent developments in the field of PVD coating for manufacturing tools. A review of monoblock, multilayer, nanocomposite, DLC and oxinitride coatings is discussed, with the emphasis on coatings which enables the manufacturers to implement high productivity processes such as high speed cutting and dry speed machining.

  11. Bioinformatics Tools for Genome-Wide Epigenetic Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angarica, Vladimir Espinosa; Del Sol, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetics play a central role in the regulation of many important cellular processes, and dysregulations at the epigenetic level could be the source of serious pathologies, such as neurological disorders affecting brain development, neurodegeneration, and intellectual disability. Despite significant technological advances for epigenetic profiling, there is still a need for a systematic understanding of how epigenetics shapes cellular circuitry, and disease pathogenesis. The development of accurate computational approaches for analyzing complex epigenetic profiles is essential for disentangling the mechanisms underlying cellular development, and the intricate interaction networks determining and sensing chromatin modifications and DNA methylation to control gene expression. In this chapter, we review the recent advances in the field of "computational epigenetics," including computational methods for processing different types of epigenetic data, prediction of chromatin states, and study of protein dynamics. We also discuss how "computational epigenetics" has complemented the fast growth in the generation of epigenetic data for uncovering the main differences and similarities at the epigenetic level between individuals and the mechanisms underlying disease onset and progression.

  12. Genome-Wide SNP Detection, Validation, and Development of an 8K SNP Array for Apple

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chagné, D.; Crowhurst, R.N.; Troggio, M.; Davey, M.W.; Gilmore, B.; Lawley, C.; Vanderzande, S.; Hellens, R.P.; Kumar, S.; Cestaro, A.; Velasco, R.; Main, D.; Rees, J.D.; Iezzoni, A.F.; Mockler, T.; Wilhelm, L.; Weg, van de W.E.; Gardiner, S.E.; Bassil, N.; Peace, C.

    2012-01-01

    As high-throughput genetic marker screening systems are essential for a range of genetics studies and plant breeding applications, the International RosBREED SNP Consortium (IRSC) has utilized the Illumina Infinium® II system to develop a medium- to high-throughput SNP screening tool for genome-wide

  13. Do online prognostication tools represent a valid alternative to genomic profiling in the context of adjuvant treatment of early breast cancer? A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hage Chehade, Hiba; Wazir, Umar; Mokbel, Kinan; Kasem, Abdul; Mokbel, Kefah

    2018-01-01

    Decision-making regarding adjuvant chemotherapy has been based on clinical and pathological features. However, such decisions are seldom consistent. Web-based predictive models have been developed using data from cancer registries to help determine the need for adjuvant therapy. More recently, with the recognition of the heterogenous nature of breast cancer, genomic assays have been developed to aid in the therapeutic decision-making. We have carried out a comprehensive literature review regarding online prognostication tools and genomic assays to assess whether online tools could be used as valid alternatives to genomic profiling in decision-making regarding adjuvant therapy in early breast cancer. Breast cancer has been recently recognized as a heterogenous disease based on variations in molecular characteristics. Online tools are valuable in guiding adjuvant treatment, especially in resource constrained countries. However, in the era of personalized therapy, molecular profiling appears to be superior in predicting clinical outcome and guiding therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. SearchSmallRNA: a graphical interface tool for the assemblage of viral genomes using small RNA libraries data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade, Roberto R S; Vaslin, Maite F S

    2014-03-07

    Next-generation parallel sequencing (NGS) allows the identification of viral pathogens by sequencing the small RNAs of infected hosts. Thus, viral genomes may be assembled from host immune response products without prior virus enrichment, amplification or purification. However, mapping of the vast information obtained presents a bioinformatics challenge. In order to by pass the need of line command and basic bioinformatics knowledge, we develop a mapping software with a graphical interface to the assemblage of viral genomes from small RNA dataset obtained by NGS. SearchSmallRNA was developed in JAVA language version 7 using NetBeans IDE 7.1 software. The program also allows the analysis of the viral small interfering RNAs (vsRNAs) profile; providing an overview of the size distribution and other features of the vsRNAs produced in infected cells. The program performs comparisons between each read sequenced present in a library and a chosen reference genome. Reads showing Hamming distances smaller or equal to an allowed mismatched will be selected as positives and used to the assemblage of a long nucleotide genome sequence. In order to validate the software, distinct analysis using NGS dataset obtained from HIV and two plant viruses were used to reconstruct viral whole genomes. SearchSmallRNA program was able to reconstructed viral genomes using NGS of small RNA dataset with high degree of reliability so it will be a valuable tool for viruses sequencing and discovery. It is accessible and free to all research communities and has the advantage to have an easy-to-use graphical interface. SearchSmallRNA was written in Java and is freely available at http://www.microbiologia.ufrj.br/ssrna/.

  15. Whole Genome Sequence Analysis Using JSpecies Tool Establishes Clonal Relationships between Listeria monocytogenes Strains from Epidemiologically Unrelated Listeriosis Outbreaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel S Burall

    Full Text Available In an effort to build a comprehensive genomic approach to food safety challenges, the FDA has implemented a whole genome sequencing effort, GenomeTrakr, which involves the sequencing and analysis of genomes of foodborne pathogens. As a part of this effort, we routinely sequence whole genomes of Listeria monocytogenes (Lm isolates associated with human listeriosis outbreaks, as well as those isolated through other sources. To rapidly establish genetic relatedness of these genomes, we evaluated tetranucleotide frequency analysis via the JSpecies program to provide a cursory analysis of strain relatedness. The JSpecies tetranucleotide (tetra analysis plots standardized (z-score tetramer word frequencies of two strains against each other and uses linear regression analysis to determine similarity (r2. This tool was able to validate the close relationships between outbreak related strains from four different outbreaks. Included in this study was the analysis of Lm strains isolated during the recent caramel apple outbreak and stone fruit incident in 2014. We identified that many of the isolates from these two outbreaks shared a common 4b variant (4bV serotype, also designated as IVb-v1, using a qPCR protocol developed in our laboratory. The 4bV serotype is characterized by the presence of a 6.3 Kb DNA segment normally found in serotype 1/2a, 3a, 1/2c and 3c strains but not in serotype 4b or 1/2b strains. We decided to compare these strains at a genomic level using the JSpecies Tetra tool. Specifically, we compared several 4bV and 4b isolates and identified a high level of similarity between the stone fruit and apple 4bV strains, but not the 4b strains co-identified in the caramel apple outbreak or other 4b or 4bV strains in our collection. This finding was further substantiated by a SNP-based analysis. Additionally, we were able to identify close relatedness between isolates from clinical cases from 1993-1994 and a single case from 2011 as well as

  16. Development of computerized risk management tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kil Yoo Kim; Mee Jung Hwang; Seung Cheol Jang; Sang Hoon Han; Tae Woon Kim

    1997-01-01

    The author describes the kinds of efforts for the development of computerized risk management tool; (1) development of a risk monitor, Risk Monster, (2) improvement of McFarm (Missing Cutsets Finding Algorithm for Risk Monitor) and finally (3) development of reliability database management system, KwDBMan. Risk Monster supports for plant operators and maintenance schedulers to monitor plant risk and to avoid high peak risk by rearranging maintenance work schedule. Improved McFarm significantly improved calculation speed of Risk Monster for the cases of supporting system OOS (Out Of Service). KwDBMan manages event data, generic data and CCF (Common Cause Failure) data to support Risk Monster as well as PSA tool, KIRAP (KAERI Integrated Reliability Analysis Package)

  17. Software development tools using GPGPU potentialities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudnik, V.A.; Kudryavtsev, V.I.; Sereda, T.M.; Us, S.A.; Shestakov, M.V.

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with potentialities of various up-to-date software development tools for making use of graphic processor (GPU) parallel computing resources. Examples are given to illustrate the use of present-day software tools for the development of applications and realization of algorithms for scientific-technical calculations performed by GPGPU. The paper presents some classes of hard mathematical problems of scientific-technical calculations, for which the GPGPU can be efficiently used. is possible. To reduce the time of calculation program development with the use of GPGPU capabilities, various dedicated programming systems and problem-oriented subroutine libraries are recommended. Performance parameters when solving the problems with and without the use of GPGPU potentialities are compared.

  18. Development of bore tools for pipe inspection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Nakahira, Masataka; Taguchi, Kou; Ito, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    In the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER), replacement and maintenance on in-vessel components requires that all cooling pipes connected be cut and removed, that a new component be installed, and that all cooling pipes be rewelded. After welding is completed, welded area must be inspected for soundness. These tasks require a new work concept for securing shielded area and access from narrow ports. Tools had to be developed for nondestructive inspection and leak testing to evaluate pipe welding soundness by accessing areas from inside pipes using autonomous locomotion welding and cutting tools. A system was proposed for nondestructive inspection of branch pipes and the main pipe after passing through pipe curves, the same as for welding and cutting tool development. Nondestructive inspection and leak testing sensors were developed and the basic parameters were obtained. In addition, the inspection systems which can move inside pipes and conduct the nondestructive inspection and the leak testing were developed. In this paper, an introduction will be given to the current situation concerning the development of nondestructive inspection and leak testing machines for the branch pipes. (author)

  19. Statistical Viewer: a tool to upload and integrate linkage and association data as plots displayed within the Ensembl genome browser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauser Elizabeth R

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To facilitate efficient selection and the prioritization of candidate complex disease susceptibility genes for association analysis, increasingly comprehensive annotation tools are essential to integrate, visualize and analyze vast quantities of disparate data generated by genomic screens, public human genome sequence annotation and ancillary biological databases. We have developed a plug-in package for Ensembl called "Statistical Viewer" that facilitates the analysis of genomic features and annotation in the regions of interest defined by linkage analysis. Results Statistical Viewer is an add-on package to the open-source Ensembl Genome Browser and Annotation System that displays disease study-specific linkage and/or association data as 2 dimensional plots in new panels in the context of Ensembl's Contig View and Cyto View pages. An enhanced upload server facilitates the upload of statistical data, as well as additional feature annotation to be displayed in DAS tracts, in the form of Excel Files. The Statistical View panel, drawn directly under the ideogram, illustrates lod score values for markers from a study of interest that are plotted against their position in base pairs. A module called "Get Map" easily converts the genetic locations of markers to genomic coordinates. The graph is placed under the corresponding ideogram features a synchronized vertical sliding selection box that is seamlessly integrated into Ensembl's Contig- and Cyto- View pages to choose the region to be displayed in Ensembl's "Overview" and "Detailed View" panels. To resolve Association and Fine mapping data plots, a "Detailed Statistic View" plot corresponding to the "Detailed View" may be displayed underneath. Conclusion Features mapping to regions of linkage are accentuated when Statistic View is used in conjunction with the Distributed Annotation System (DAS to display supplemental laboratory information such as differentially expressed disease

  20. Comparison of the most used game development tools

    OpenAIRE

    Soukup, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with comparison of most used game development tools. Author places game development tools in context of today´s game industry, analyses state of the market and the latest trends in the field of game development tools. The largest part of this thesis is aimed at comparing game development tools, where five tools are selected, overviewed and compared by specified criteria. Author demonstrates several basic features of chosen game development tool on development of a simple And...

  1. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): Developing Community Resources to Study Diverse Invertebrate Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Bracken-Grissom, Heather

    2013-12-12

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the invertebrates, but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative network of diverse scientists to tackle major challenges (e.g., species selection, sample collection and storage, sequence assembly, annotation, analytical tools) associated with genome/transcriptome sequencing across a large taxonomic spectrum. We aim to promote standards that will facilitate comparative approaches to invertebrate genomics and collaborations across the international scientific community. Candidate study taxa include species from Porifera, Ctenophora, Cnidaria, Placozoa, Mollusca, Arthropoda, Echinodermata, Annelida, Bryozoa, and Platyhelminthes, among others. GIGA will target 7000 noninsect/nonnematode species, with an emphasis on marine taxa because of the unrivaled phyletic diversity in the oceans. Priorities for selecting invertebrates for sequencing will include, but are not restricted to, their phylogenetic placement; relevance to organismal, ecological, and conservation research; and their importance to fisheries and human health. We highlight benefits of sequencing both whole genomes (DNA) and transcriptomes and also suggest policies for genomic-level data access and sharing based on transparency and inclusiveness. The GIGA Web site () has been launched to facilitate this collaborative venture.

  2. Community annotation and bioinformatics workforce development in concert--Little Skate Genome Annotation Workshops and Jamborees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; Arighi, Cecilia N; King, Benjamin L; Polson, Shawn W; Vincent, James; Chen, Chuming; Huang, Hongzhan; Kingham, Brewster F; Page, Shallee T; Rendino, Marc Farnum; Thomas, William Kelley; Udwary, Daniel W; Wu, Cathy H

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have equipped biologists with a powerful new set of tools for advancing research goals. The resulting flood of sequence data has made it critically important to train the next generation of scientists to handle the inherent bioinformatic challenges. The North East Bioinformatics Collaborative (NEBC) is undertaking the genome sequencing and annotation of the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) to promote advancement of bioinformatics infrastructure in our region, with an emphasis on practical education to create a critical mass of informatically savvy life scientists. In support of the Little Skate Genome Project, the NEBC members have developed several annotation workshops and jamborees to provide training in genome sequencing, annotation and analysis. Acting as a nexus for both curation activities and dissemination of project data, a project web portal, SkateBase (http://skatebase.org) has been developed. As a case study to illustrate effective coupling of community annotation with workforce development, we report the results of the Mitochondrial Genome Annotation Jamborees organized to annotate the first completely assembled element of the Little Skate Genome Project, as a culminating experience for participants from our three prior annotation workshops. We are applying the physical/virtual infrastructure and lessons learned from these activities to enhance and streamline the genome annotation workflow, as we look toward our continuing efforts for larger-scale functional and structural community annotation of the L. erinacea genome.

  3. Community annotation and bioinformatics workforce development in concert—Little Skate Genome Annotation Workshops and Jamborees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qinghua; Arighi, Cecilia N.; King, Benjamin L.; Polson, Shawn W.; Vincent, James; Chen, Chuming; Huang, Hongzhan; Kingham, Brewster F.; Page, Shallee T.; Farnum Rendino, Marc; Thomas, William Kelley; Udwary, Daniel W.; Wu, Cathy H.

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have equipped biologists with a powerful new set of tools for advancing research goals. The resulting flood of sequence data has made it critically important to train the next generation of scientists to handle the inherent bioinformatic challenges. The North East Bioinformatics Collaborative (NEBC) is undertaking the genome sequencing and annotation of the little skate (Leucoraja erinacea) to promote advancement of bioinformatics infrastructure in our region, with an emphasis on practical education to create a critical mass of informatically savvy life scientists. In support of the Little Skate Genome Project, the NEBC members have developed several annotation workshops and jamborees to provide training in genome sequencing, annotation and analysis. Acting as a nexus for both curation activities and dissemination of project data, a project web portal, SkateBase (http://skatebase.org) has been developed. As a case study to illustrate effective coupling of community annotation with workforce development, we report the results of the Mitochondrial Genome Annotation Jamborees organized to annotate the first completely assembled element of the Little Skate Genome Project, as a culminating experience for participants from our three prior annotation workshops. We are applying the physical/virtual infrastructure and lessons learned from these activities to enhance and streamline the genome annotation workflow, as we look toward our continuing efforts for larger-scale functional and structural community annotation of the L. erinacea genome. PMID:22434832

  4. Genome shotgun sequencing and development of microsatellite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of the gerbera genome DNA ('Raon') general library showed that sequences of (AT), (AG), (AAG) and (AAT) repeats appeared most often, whereas (AC), (AAC) and (ACC) were the least frequent. Primer pairs were designed for 80 loci. Only eight primer pairs produced reproducible polymorphic bands in the 28 ...

  5. Development of genomic prediction in sorghum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hunt, Colleen H.; Eeuwijk, van Fred A.; Mace, Emma S.; Hayes, Ben J.; Jordan, David R.

    2018-01-01

    Genomic selection can increase the rate of genetic gain in plant breeding programs by shortening the breeding cycle. Gain can also be increased through higher selection intensities, as the size of the population available for selection can be increased by predicting performance of nonphenotyped, but

  6. Developing Expert Tools for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2160780; Timkó, Helga

    2017-10-12

    This Thesis describes software tools developed for automated, precision setting-up of low-power level radio frequency (LLRF) loops, which will help expert users to have better control and faster setting-up of the radio-frequency (RF) system in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiment. The aim was to completely redesign the software architecture, to add new features, to improve certain algorithms, and to increase the automation.

  7. Development of configuration risk management tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Takahiro; Doi, Eiji

    2003-01-01

    Tokyo Electric Power Company (referred to as TEPCO hereinafter), and other Japanese utilities as well, have been trying to improve the capacity factor of their Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) through modernization of Operation and Maintenance strategy. TEPCO intends to apply risk information to O and M field with maintaining or even improving both safety and production efficiency. Under these situations, TEPCO with some BWR utilities started to develop a Configuration Risk Management (CRM) tool that can estimate risk in various plant conditions due to configuration changes during outage. Moreover, we also intend to apply CRM to on-line maintenance (OLM) in the near future. This tool can calculate the Core Damage Frequency (CDF) according to given plant condition, such as SSCs availability, decay heat level and the inventory of coolant in both outage state and full-power operation. From deterministic viewpoint, whether certain configuration meet the related requirements of Technical Specifications. User-friendly interface is one of the important features of this tool because this enables the site engineers with little experience in PSA to quantify and utilize the risk information by this tool. (author)

  8. Genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in the sequenced Brassica crop species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiaqin; Huang, Shunmou; Zhan, Jiepeng; Yu, Jingyin; Wang, Xinfa; Hua, Wei; Liu, Shengyi; Liu, Guihua; Wang, Hanzhong

    2014-02-01

    Although much research has been conducted, the pattern of microsatellite distribution has remained ambiguous, and the development/utilization of microsatellite markers has still been limited/inefficient in Brassica, due to the lack of genome sequences. In view of this, we conducted genome-wide microsatellite characterization and marker development in three recently sequenced Brassica crops: Brassica rapa, Brassica oleracea and Brassica napus. The analysed microsatellite characteristics of these Brassica species were highly similar or almost identical, which suggests that the pattern of microsatellite distribution is likely conservative in Brassica. The genomic distribution of microsatellites was highly non-uniform and positively or negatively correlated with genes or transposable elements, respectively. Of the total of 115 869, 185 662 and 356 522 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed with high frequencies (408.2, 343.8 and 356.2 per Mb or one every 2.45, 2.91 and 2.81 kb, respectively), most represented new SSR markers, the majority had determined physical positions, and a large number were genic or putative single-locus SSR markers. We also constructed a comprehensive database for the newly developed SSR markers, which was integrated with public Brassica SSR markers and annotated genome components. The genome-wide SSR markers developed in this study provide a useful tool to extend the annotated genome resources of sequenced Brassica species to genetic study/breeding in different Brassica species.

  9. Dissecting diabetes/metabolic disease mechanisms using pluripotent stem cells and genome editing tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Kee Keong Teo

    2015-09-01

    Major conclusions: hPSCs and the advancing genome editing tools appear to be a timely and potent combination for probing molecular mechanism(s underlying diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndromes. The knowledge gained from these hiPSC-based disease modeling studies can potentially be translated into the clinics by guiding clinicians on the appropriate type of medication to use for each condition based on the mechanism of action of the disease.

  10. Surrogate Analysis and Index Developer (SAID) tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, Marian M.; Straub, Timothy D.; Landers, Mark N.

    2015-10-01

    The use of acoustic and other parameters as surrogates for suspended-sediment concentrations (SSC) in rivers has been successful in multiple applications across the Nation. Tools to process and evaluate the data are critical to advancing the operational use of surrogates along with the subsequent development of regression models from which real-time sediment concentrations can be made available to the public. Recent developments in both areas are having an immediate impact on surrogate research and on surrogate monitoring sites currently (2015) in operation.

  11. Fernald Silo Remote Retrieval Tool Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varma, V.K.

    2004-01-01

    A long-reach tool was developed to remove discrete objects from the silos at the Fernald Environmental Management Project in Ohio. If they are not removed, these objects can potentially cause problems during the retrieval and transfer of waste from the silos. Most of the objects are on top of the Bentogrout cap inside the silos at or near the primary opening into the tank and will therefore require only vertical lifting. The objects are located about 20 ft from the top of the silo. Although most of the objects can be retrieved from 20 ft, the long-reach tool was designed to for a reach up to 40 ft in case objects roll towards the walls of the tank or need to be removed during heel retrieval operations. This report provides a detailed description of the tool that was developed, tested, and demonstrated at the Tanks Technology Cold Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Scaffolding was erected over two experimental cells to simulate the 40-ft maximum working depth anticipated in the silos at Fernald. Plastic bottles and plastic sheeting simulated the debris that could be encountered during waste retrieval operations

  12. EggLib: processing, analysis and simulation tools for population genetics and genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Mita Stéphane

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the considerable growth of available nucleotide sequence data over the last decade, integrated and flexible analytical tools have become a necessity. In particular, in the field of population genetics, there is a strong need for automated and reliable procedures to conduct repeatable and rapid polymorphism analyses, coalescent simulations, data manipulation and estimation of demographic parameters under a variety of scenarios. Results In this context, we present EggLib (Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics Library, a flexible and powerful C++/Python software package providing efficient and easy to use computational tools for sequence data management and extensive population genetic analyses on nucleotide sequence data. EggLib is a multifaceted project involving several integrated modules: an underlying computationally efficient C++ library (which can be used independently in pure C++ applications; two C++ programs; a Python package providing, among other features, a high level Python interface to the C++ library; and the egglib script which provides direct access to pre-programmed Python applications. Conclusions EggLib has been designed aiming to be both efficient and easy to use. A wide array of methods are implemented, including file format conversion, sequence alignment edition, coalescent simulations, neutrality tests and estimation of demographic parameters by Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC. Classes implementing different demographic scenarios for ABC analyses can easily be developed by the user and included to the package. EggLib source code is distributed freely under the GNU General Public License (GPL from its website http://egglib.sourceforge.net/ where a full documentation and a manual can also be found and downloaded.

  13. EggLib: processing, analysis and simulation tools for population genetics and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mita, Stéphane; Siol, Mathieu

    2012-04-11

    With the considerable growth of available nucleotide sequence data over the last decade, integrated and flexible analytical tools have become a necessity. In particular, in the field of population genetics, there is a strong need for automated and reliable procedures to conduct repeatable and rapid polymorphism analyses, coalescent simulations, data manipulation and estimation of demographic parameters under a variety of scenarios. In this context, we present EggLib (Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics Library), a flexible and powerful C++/Python software package providing efficient and easy to use computational tools for sequence data management and extensive population genetic analyses on nucleotide sequence data. EggLib is a multifaceted project involving several integrated modules: an underlying computationally efficient C++ library (which can be used independently in pure C++ applications); two C++ programs; a Python package providing, among other features, a high level Python interface to the C++ library; and the egglib script which provides direct access to pre-programmed Python applications. EggLib has been designed aiming to be both efficient and easy to use. A wide array of methods are implemented, including file format conversion, sequence alignment edition, coalescent simulations, neutrality tests and estimation of demographic parameters by Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC). Classes implementing different demographic scenarios for ABC analyses can easily be developed by the user and included to the package. EggLib source code is distributed freely under the GNU General Public License (GPL) from its website http://egglib.sourceforge.net/ where a full documentation and a manual can also be found and downloaded.

  14. Process-Based Quality (PBQ) Tools Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, J.L.

    2001-12-03

    The objective of this effort is to benchmark the development of process-based quality tools for application in CAD (computer-aided design) model-based applications. The processes of interest are design, manufacturing, and quality process applications. A study was commissioned addressing the impact, current technologies, and known problem areas in application of 3D MCAD (3-dimensional mechanical computer-aided design) models and model integrity on downstream manufacturing and quality processes. The downstream manufacturing and product quality processes are profoundly influenced and dependent on model quality and modeling process integrity. The goal is to illustrate and expedite the modeling and downstream model-based technologies for available or conceptual methods and tools to achieve maximum economic advantage and advance process-based quality concepts.

  15. Stakeholder engagement in policy development: challenges and opportunities for human genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, Amy A; Harris-Wai, Julie N

    2015-12-01

    Along with rapid advances in human genomics, policies governing genomic data and clinical technologies have proliferated. Stakeholder engagement is widely lauded as an important methodology for improving clinical, scientific, and public health policy decision making. The purpose of this paper is to examine how stakeholder engagement is used to develop policies in genomics research and public health areas, as well as to identify future priorities for conducting evidence-based stakeholder engagements. We focus on exemplars in biobanking and newborn screening to illustrate a variety of current stakeholder engagement in policy-making efforts. Each setting provides an important context for examining the methods of obtaining and integrating informed stakeholder voices into the policy-making process. While many organizations have an interest in engaging stakeholders with regard to genomic policy issues, there is broad divergence with respect to the stakeholders involved, the purpose of engagements, when stakeholders are engaged during policy development, methods of engagement, and the outcomes reported. Stakeholder engagement in genomics policy development is still at a nascent stage. Several challenges of using stakeholder engagement as a tool for genomics policy development remain, and little evidence regarding how to best incorporate stakeholder feedback into policy-making processes is currently available.

  16. A Tool for Conceptualising in PSS development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, Detlef; McAloone, Timothy Charles

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces a tool for conceptualising in the development of product/servicesystems (PSS), based upon the modelling of service activities. Our argumentation is built on two previous articles by the same author, previously presented at the 16. Symposium “Design for X” [1] and the 9th Int...... the integrated consideration of the customers’ activities, possible PSS offerings and beneficial partnering options (i.e. between different supplier companies) within the delivery value chain.......This paper introduces a tool for conceptualising in the development of product/servicesystems (PSS), based upon the modelling of service activities. Our argumentation is built on two previous articles by the same author, previously presented at the 16. Symposium “Design for X” [1] and the 9th...... International Design Conference [2]. In this contribution, we take the step from a fundamental understanding of the phenomenon to creating a normative exploitation of this understanding for PSS concept development. The developed modelling technique is based on the Customer Activity Cycle (CAC) model...

  17. Developing a mapping tool for tablets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Alan; Collins, Nathan; Krus, Mike

    2014-05-01

    Digital field mapping offers significant benefits when compared with traditional paper mapping techniques in that it provides closer integration with downstream geological modelling and analysis. It also provides the mapper with the ability to rapidly integrate new data with existing databases without the potential degradation caused by repeated manual transcription of numeric, graphical and meta-data. In order to achieve these benefits, a number of PC-based digital mapping tools are available which have been developed for specific communities, eg the BGS•SIGMA project, Midland Valley's FieldMove®, and a range of solutions based on ArcGIS® software, which can be combined with either traditional or digital orientation and data collection tools. However, with the now widespread availability of inexpensive tablets and smart phones, a user led demand for a fully integrated tablet mapping tool has arisen. This poster describes the development of a tablet-based mapping environment specifically designed for geologists. The challenge was to deliver a system that would feel sufficiently close to the flexibility of paper-based geological mapping while being implemented on a consumer communication and entertainment device. The first release of a tablet-based geological mapping system from this project is illustrated and will be shown as implemented on an iPad during the poster session. Midland Valley is pioneering tablet-based mapping and, along with its industrial and academic partners, will be using the application in field based projects throughout this year and will be integrating feedback in further developments of this technology.

  18. EVA: Exome Variation Analyzer, an efficient and versatile tool for filtering strategies in medical genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutant Sophie

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whole exome sequencing (WES has become the strategy of choice to identify a coding allelic variant for a rare human monogenic disorder. This approach is a revolution in medical genetics history, impacting both fundamental research, and diagnostic methods leading to personalized medicine. A plethora of efficient algorithms has been developed to ensure the variant discovery. They generally lead to ~20,000 variations that have to be narrow down to find the potential pathogenic allelic variant(s and the affected gene(s. For this purpose, commonly adopted procedures which implicate various filtering strategies have emerged: exclusion of common variations, type of the allelics variants, pathogenicity effect prediction, modes of inheritance and multiple individuals for exome comparison. To deal with the expansion of WES in medical genomics individual laboratories, new convivial and versatile software tools have to implement these filtering steps. Non-programmer biologists have to be autonomous combining themselves different filtering criteria and conduct a personal strategy depending on their assumptions and study design. Results We describe EVA (Exome Variation Analyzer, a user-friendly web-interfaced software dedicated to the filtering strategies for medical WES. Thanks to different modules, EVA (i integrates and stores annotated exome variation data as strictly confidential to the project owner, (ii allows to combine the main filters dealing with common variations, molecular types, inheritance mode and multiple samples, (iii offers the browsing of annotated data and filtered results in various interactive tables, graphical visualizations and statistical charts, (iv and finally offers export files and cross-links to external useful databases and softwares for further prioritization of the small subset of sorted candidate variations and genes. We report a demonstrative case study that allowed to identify a new candidate gene

  19. Networks as Tools for Sustainable Urban Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Ole; Tollin, Nicola

    will be discussed through a case study of a Danish municipal network on Sustainable Development, Dogme 20001. This network has become quite successful in terms of learning and innovation, committing actors, and influencing local policies, to a larger extent than other SUD-networks the municipalities are involved in....... By applying the GREMI2-theories of “innovative milieux” (Aydalot, 1986; Camagni, 1991) to the case study, we will suggest some reasons for the benefits achieved by the Dogme-network, compared to other networks. This analysis will point to the existence of an “innovative milieu” on sustainability within......Due to the increasing number of networks related to sustainable development (SUD) the paper focuses on understanding in which way networks can be considered useful tools for sustainable urban development, taking particularly into consideration the networks potential of spreading innovative policies...

  20. Development of Chloroplast Genomic Resources in Chinese Yam (Dioscorea polystachya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junling Cao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chinese yam has been used both as a food and in traditional herbal medicine. Developing more effective genetic markers in this species is necessary to assess its genetic diversity and perform cultivar identification. In this study, new chloroplast genomic resources were developed using whole chloroplast genomes from six genotypes originating from different geographical locations. The Dioscorea polystachya chloroplast genome is a circular molecule consisting of two single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats. Comparative analyses of six D. polystachya chloroplast genomes revealed 141 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Seventy simple sequence repeats (SSRs were found in the six genotypes, including 24 polymorphic SSRs. Forty-three common indels and five small inversions were detected. Phylogenetic analysis based on the complete chloroplast genome provided the best resolution among the genotypes. Our evaluation of chloroplast genome resources among these genotypes led us to consider the complete chloroplast genome sequence of D. polystachya as a source of reliable and valuable molecular markers for revealing biogeographical structure and the extent of genetic variation in wild populations and for identifying different cultivars.

  1. Cryogenic Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusby, Brian S.; Miranda, Bruno M.; Collins, Jacob A.

    2011-01-01

    The Propulsion Systems Branch at NASA s Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) has developed a parametric analytical tool to address the need to rapidly predict heat leak into propellant distribution lines based on insulation type, installation technique, line supports, penetrations, and instrumentation. The Propellant Feed System Analytical Tool (PFSAT) will also determine the optimum orifice diameter for an optional thermodynamic vent system (TVS) to counteract heat leak into the feed line and ensure temperature constraints at the end of the feed line are met. PFSAT was developed primarily using Fortran 90 code because of its number crunching power and the capability to directly access real fluid property subroutines in the Reference Fluid Thermodynamic and Transport Properties (REFPROP) Database developed by NIST. A Microsoft Excel front end user interface was implemented to provide convenient portability of PFSAT among a wide variety of potential users and its ability to utilize a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) developed in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). The focus of PFSAT is on-orbit reaction control systems and orbital maneuvering systems, but it may be used to predict heat leak into ground-based transfer lines as well. PFSAT is expected to be used for rapid initial design of cryogenic propellant distribution lines and thermodynamic vent systems. Once validated, PFSAT will support concept trades for a variety of cryogenic fluid transfer systems on spacecraft, including planetary landers, transfer vehicles, and propellant depots, as well as surface-based transfer systems. The details of the development of PFSAT, its user interface, and the program structure will be presented.

  2. Genome editing in plants: Advancing crop transformation and overview of tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Tariq; Andleeb, Tayyaba; Lateef, Sadia; Noor, Mehmood Ali

    2018-05-07

    Genome manipulation technology is one of emerging field which brings real revolution in genetic engineering and biotechnology. Targeted editing of genomes pave path to address a wide range of goals not only to improve quality and productivity of crops but also permit to investigate the fundamental roots of biological systems. These goals includes creation of plants with valued compositional properties and with characters that confer resistance to numerous biotic and abiotic stresses. Numerous novel genome editing systems have been introduced during the past few years; these comprise zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/Cas9 (CRISPR/Cas9). Genome editing technique is consistent for improving average yield to achieve the growing demands of the world's existing food famine and to launch a feasible and environmentally safe agriculture scheme, to more specific, productive, cost-effective and eco-friendly. These exciting novel methods, concisely reviewed herein, have verified themselves as efficient and reliable tools for the genetic improvement of plants. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of genome editing tools in human stem cell-based disease modeling and precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-da; Li, Shuang; Liu, Gai-gai; Zhang, Yong-xian; Ding, Qiu-rong

    2015-10-01

    Precision medicine emerges as a new approach that takes into account individual variability. The successful conduct of precision medicine requires the use of precise disease models. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), as well as adult stem cells, can be differentiated into a variety of human somatic cell types that can be used for research and drug screening. The development of genome editing technology over the past few years, especially the CRISPR/Cas system, has made it feasible to precisely and efficiently edit the genetic background. Therefore, disease modeling by using a combination of human stem cells and genome editing technology has offered a new platform to generate " personalized " disease models, which allow the study of the contribution of individual genetic variabilities to disease progression and the development of precise treatments. In this review, recent advances in the use of genome editing in human stem cells and the generation of stem cell models for rare diseases and cancers are discussed.

  4. Development of a fluorescence-activated cell sorting method coupled with whole genome amplification to analyze minority and trace Dehalococcoides genomes in microbial communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Patrick K H; Men, Yujie; Wang, Shanquan; He, Jianzhong; Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    2015-02-03

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi are functionally important bacteria that catalyze the reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethenes. However, these anaerobic bacteria are fastidious to isolate, making downstream genomic characterization challenging. In order to facilitate genomic analysis, a fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) method was developed in this study to separate D. mccartyi cells from a microbial community, and the DNA of the isolated cells was processed by whole genome amplification (WGA) and hybridized onto a D. mccartyi microarray for comparative genomics against four sequenced strains. First, FACS was successfully applied to a D. mccartyi isolate as positive control, and then microarray results verified that WGA from 10(6) cells or ∼1 ng of genomic DNA yielded high-quality coverage detecting nearly all genes across the genome. As expected, some inter- and intrasample variability in WGA was observed, but these biases were minimized by performing multiple parallel amplifications. Subsequent application of the FACS and WGA protocols to two enrichment cultures containing ∼10% and ∼1% D. mccartyi cells successfully enabled genomic analysis. As proof of concept, this study demonstrates that coupling FACS with WGA and microarrays is a promising tool to expedite genomic characterization of target strains in environmental communities where the relative concentrations are low.

  5. Development and characterization of genomic microsatellite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-10-18

    Oct 18, 2016 ... Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Centre for Plant Sciences, Central ... containing SSRs were analyse using SSR Identification Tool ... The clusters of hidden population were distinguished on the basis of multi-locus. Bayesian analysis.For evaluation of optimum number of populations (K), a simulation was.

  6. Accelerating Genome Editing in CHO Cells Using CRISPR Cas9 and CRISPy, a Web-Based Target Finding Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronda, Carlotta; Pedersen, Lasse Ebdrup; Hansen, Henning Gram

    2014-01-01

    of the CRISPR Cas9 technology in CHO cells by generating site-specific gene disruptions in COSMC and FUT8, both of which encode proteins involved in glycosylation. The tested single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) created an indel frequency up to 47.3% in COSMC, while an indel frequency up to 99.7% in FUT8 was achieved...... mutations at the target sites, with a strong preference for single base indels. Finally, we have developed a user-friendly bioinformatics tool, named “CRISPy” for rapid identification of sgRNA target sequences in the CHO-K1 genome. The CRISPy tool identified 1,970,449 CRISPR targets divided into 27...

  7. The Dockstore: enabling modular, community-focused sharing of Docker-based genomics tools and workflows [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. O'Connor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As genomic datasets continue to grow, the feasibility of downloading data to a local organization and running analysis on a traditional compute environment is becoming increasingly problematic. Current large-scale projects, such as the ICGC PanCancer Analysis of Whole Genomes (PCAWG, the Data Platform for the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative, and the NIH Big Data to Knowledge Center for Translational Genomics, are using cloud-based infrastructure to both host and perform analysis across large data sets. In PCAWG, over 5,800 whole human genomes were aligned and variant called across 14 cloud and HPC environments; the processed data was then made available on the cloud for further analysis and sharing. If run locally, an operation at this scale would have monopolized a typical academic data centre for many months, and would have presented major challenges for data storage and distribution. However, this scale is increasingly typical for genomics projects and necessitates a rethink of how analytical tools are packaged and moved to the data. For PCAWG, we embraced the use of highly portable Docker images for encapsulating and sharing complex alignment and variant calling workflows across highly variable environments. While successful, this endeavor revealed a limitation in Docker containers, namely the lack of a standardized way to describe and execute the tools encapsulated inside the container. As a result, we created the Dockstore (https://dockstore.org, a project that brings together Docker images with standardized, machine-readable ways of describing and running the tools contained within. This service greatly improves the sharing and reuse of genomics tools and promotes interoperability with similar projects through emerging web service standards developed by the Global Alliance for Genomics and Health (GA4GH.

  8. Some key issues in the development of ergonomic intervention tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Kasper; Winkel, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Literature reviews suggest that tools facilitating the ergonomic intervention processes should be integrated into rationalization tools, particular if such tools are participative. Such a Tool has recently been developed as an add-in module to the Lean tool “Value Stream Mapping” (VSM). However...

  9. Developing neutronics calculation tools for MYRRHA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Eynde, G.

    2006-01-01

    The design of the Accelerator Driven System MYRRHA requires adequate and specialised tools in the field of neutronics calculations. In order to fill the gaps, several PhD programmes were launched. In 2005 three such PhD projects were running. Each of them focuses on different stages in the computation of a core of MYRRHA. The first project I mprovements of the spallation reaction model , a collaboration with the University of Liege, deals with the characterisation of the spallation neutron source using the INCL (Intra-Nuclear Cascade of Liege) model. Since at high energies, nuclear data are sparse, calculations rely on models. Especially for spallation reactions that occur at proton energies of several hundreds of MeV, models are the only means to evaluate the spallation source in MYRRHA. The second project 'Neutron transport with anisotropic scattering', a collaboration with the Universite Libre de Bruxelles, works on the development of a neutronics code, CASE-BSM, for systems with highly anisotropic scattering. The presence in large amounts of both lead and bismuth atoms in the MYRRHA core results in a highly anisotropic scattering of the neutrons in the bulk of the coolant. Neglecting this effect has large consequences on both global parameters, like keff, as well as on local parameters, like the neutron flux seen by the vessel. The third project, 'ALEPH: An integrated Monte Carlo bun-up tool', a collaboration with Ghent University, treats the last phase of a core calculation: the depletion of the fuel during irradiation. For an experimental machine like MYRRHA it is of utmost importance to have a fast calculational tool to evaluate the incineration of both isotopes present in the fuel as isotopes present in experimental devices. The main objective is to improve the current quality of the neutronics codes focused on ADS applications and to have this knowledge 'in-house'

  10. [Development of Plant Metabolomics and Medicinal Plant Genomics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Kazuki

    2018-01-01

     A variety of chemicals produced by plants, often referred to as 'phytochemicals', have been used as medicines, food, fuels and industrial raw materials. Recent advances in the study of genomics and metabolomics in plant science have accelerated our understanding of the mechanisms, regulation and evolution of the biosynthesis of specialized plant products. We can now address such questions as how the metabolomic diversity of plants is originated at the levels of genome, and how we should apply this knowledge to drug discovery, industry and agriculture. Our research group has focused on metabolomics-based functional genomics over the last 15 years and we have developed a new research area called 'Phytochemical Genomics'. In this review, the development of a research platform for plant metabolomics is discussed first, to provide a better understanding of the chemical diversity of plants. Then, representative applications of metabolomics to functional genomics in a model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana, are described. The extension of integrated multi-omics analyses to non-model specialized plants, e.g., medicinal plants, is presented, including the identification of novel genes, metabolites and networks for the biosynthesis of flavonoids, alkaloids, sulfur-containing metabolites and terpenoids. Further, functional genomics studies on a variety of medicinal plants is presented. I also discuss future trends in pharmacognosy and related sciences.

  11. CRISPR/Cas9 Genome Editing: A Promising Tool for Therapeutic Applications of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanli; Sastre, Danuta; Wang, Feng

    2018-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells hold tremendous potential for biological and therapeutic applications. The development of efficient technologies for targeted genome alteration of stem cells in disease models is a prerequisite for utilizing stem cells to their full potential. The revolutionary technology for genome editing known as the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system is recently recognized as a powerful tool for editing DNA at specific loci. The ease of use of the CRISPR-Cas9 technology will allow us to improve our understanding of genomic variation in disease processes via cellular and animal models. More recently, this system was modified to repress (CRISPR interference, CRISPRi) or activate (CRISPR activation, CRISPRa) gene expression without alterations in the DNA, which amplified the scope of applications of CRISPR systems for stem cell biology. Here, we highlight latest advances of CRISPR-associated applications in human pluripotent stem cells. The challenges and future prospects of CRISPR-based systems for human research are also discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. PWMScan: a fast tool for scanning entire genomes with a position-specific weight matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, Giovanna; Groux, Romain; Bucher, Philipp

    2018-03-05

    Transcription factors (TFs) regulate gene expression by binding to specific short DNA sequences of 5 to 20-bp to regulate the rate of transcription of genetic information from DNA to messenger RNA. We present PWMScan, a fast web-based tool to scan server-resident genomes for matches to a user-supplied PWM or TF binding site model from a public database. The web server and source code are available at http://ccg.vital-it.ch/pwmscan and https://sourceforge.net/projects/pwmscan, respectively. giovanna.ambrosini@epfl.ch. SUPPLEMENTARY DATA ARE AVAILABLE AT BIOINFORMATICS ONLINE.

  13. Genome Partitioner: A web tool for multi-level partitioning of large-scale DNA constructs for synthetic biology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Matthias; Del Medico, Luca; Christen, Heinz; Christen, Beat

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in lower-cost DNA synthesis techniques have enabled new innovations in the field of synthetic biology. Still, efficient design and higher-order assembly of genome-scale DNA constructs remains a labor-intensive process. Given the complexity, computer assisted design tools that fragment large DNA sequences into fabricable DNA blocks are needed to pave the way towards streamlined assembly of biological systems. Here, we present the Genome Partitioner software implemented as a web-based interface that permits multi-level partitioning of genome-scale DNA designs. Without the need for specialized computing skills, biologists can submit their DNA designs to a fully automated pipeline that generates the optimal retrosynthetic route for higher-order DNA assembly. To test the algorithm, we partitioned a 783 kb Caulobacter crescentus genome design. We validated the partitioning strategy by assembling a 20 kb test segment encompassing a difficult to synthesize DNA sequence. Successful assembly from 1 kb subblocks into the 20 kb segment highlights the effectiveness of the Genome Partitioner for reducing synthesis costs and timelines for higher-order DNA assembly. The Genome Partitioner is broadly applicable to translate DNA designs into ready to order sequences that can be assembled with standardized protocols, thus offering new opportunities to harness the diversity of microbial genomes for synthetic biology applications. The Genome Partitioner web tool can be accessed at https://christenlab.ethz.ch/GenomePartitioner.

  14. Genome Partitioner: A web tool for multi-level partitioning of large-scale DNA constructs for synthetic biology applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Christen

    Full Text Available Recent advances in lower-cost DNA synthesis techniques have enabled new innovations in the field of synthetic biology. Still, efficient design and higher-order assembly of genome-scale DNA constructs remains a labor-intensive process. Given the complexity, computer assisted design tools that fragment large DNA sequences into fabricable DNA blocks are needed to pave the way towards streamlined assembly of biological systems. Here, we present the Genome Partitioner software implemented as a web-based interface that permits multi-level partitioning of genome-scale DNA designs. Without the need for specialized computing skills, biologists can submit their DNA designs to a fully automated pipeline that generates the optimal retrosynthetic route for higher-order DNA assembly. To test the algorithm, we partitioned a 783 kb Caulobacter crescentus genome design. We validated the partitioning strategy by assembling a 20 kb test segment encompassing a difficult to synthesize DNA sequence. Successful assembly from 1 kb subblocks into the 20 kb segment highlights the effectiveness of the Genome Partitioner for reducing synthesis costs and timelines for higher-order DNA assembly. The Genome Partitioner is broadly applicable to translate DNA designs into ready to order sequences that can be assembled with standardized protocols, thus offering new opportunities to harness the diversity of microbial genomes for synthetic biology applications. The Genome Partitioner web tool can be accessed at https://christenlab.ethz.ch/GenomePartitioner.

  15. Technology development for high temperature logging tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneruso, A.F.; Coquat, J.A.

    1979-01-01

    A set of prototype, high temperature logging tools (temperature, pressure and flow) were tested successfully to temperatures up to 275/sup 0/C in a Union geothermal well during November 1978 as part of the Geothermal Logging Instrumentation Development Program. This program is being conducted by Sandia Laboratories for the Department of Energy's Division of Geothermal Energy. The progress and plans of this industry based program to develop and apply the high temperature instrumentation technology needed to make reliable geothermal borehole measurements are described. Specifically, this program is upgrading existing sondes for improved high temperature performance, as well as applying new materials (elastomers, polymers, metals and ceramics) and developing component technology such as high temperature cables, cableheads and electronics to make borehole measurements such as formation temperature, flow rate, high resolution pressure and fracture mapping. In order to satisfy critical existing needs, the near term goal is for operation up to 275/sup 0/C and 7000 psi by the end of FY80. The long term goal is for operation up to 350/sup 0/C and 20,000 psi by the end of FY84.

  16. Genome-Wide SNP Detection, Validation, and Development of an 8K SNP Array for Apple

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chagné, David; Crowhurst, Ross N.; Troggio, Michela; Davey, Mark W.; Gilmore, Barbara; Lawley, Cindy; Vanderzande, Stijn; Hellens, Roger P.; Kumar, Satish; Cestaro, Alessandro; Velasco, Riccardo; Main, Dorrie; Rees, Jasper D.; Iezzoni, Amy; Mockler, Todd; Wilhelm, Larry; Van de Weg, Eric; Gardiner, Susan E.; Bassil, Nahla; Peace, Cameron

    2012-01-01

    As high-throughput genetic marker screening systems are essential for a range of genetics studies and plant breeding applications, the International RosBREED SNP Consortium (IRSC) has utilized the Illumina Infinium® II system to develop a medium- to high-throughput SNP screening tool for genome-wide evaluation of allelic variation in apple (Malus×domestica) breeding germplasm. For genome-wide SNP discovery, 27 apple cultivars were chosen to represent worldwide breeding germplasm and re-sequenced at low coverage with the Illumina Genome Analyzer II. Following alignment of these sequences to the whole genome sequence of ‘Golden Delicious’, SNPs were identified using SoapSNP. A total of 2,113,120 SNPs were detected, corresponding to one SNP to every 288 bp of the genome. The Illumina GoldenGate® assay was then used to validate a subset of 144 SNPs with a range of characteristics, using a set of 160 apple accessions. This validation assay enabled fine-tuning of the final subset of SNPs for the Illumina Infinium® II system. The set of stringent filtering criteria developed allowed choice of a set of SNPs that not only exhibited an even distribution across the apple genome and a range of minor allele frequencies to ensure utility across germplasm, but also were located in putative exonic regions to maximize genotyping success rate. A total of 7867 apple SNPs was established for the IRSC apple 8K SNP array v1, of which 5554 were polymorphic after evaluation in segregating families and a germplasm collection. This publicly available genomics resource will provide an unprecedented resolution of SNP haplotypes, which will enable marker-locus-trait association discovery, description of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits, investigation of genetic variation (neutral and functional), and genomic selection in apple. PMID:22363718

  17. Genome-wide SNP detection, validation, and development of an 8K SNP array for apple.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Chagné

    Full Text Available As high-throughput genetic marker screening systems are essential for a range of genetics studies and plant breeding applications, the International RosBREED SNP Consortium (IRSC has utilized the Illumina Infinium® II system to develop a medium- to high-throughput SNP screening tool for genome-wide evaluation of allelic variation in apple (Malus×domestica breeding germplasm. For genome-wide SNP discovery, 27 apple cultivars were chosen to represent worldwide breeding germplasm and re-sequenced at low coverage with the Illumina Genome Analyzer II. Following alignment of these sequences to the whole genome sequence of 'Golden Delicious', SNPs were identified using SoapSNP. A total of 2,113,120 SNPs were detected, corresponding to one SNP to every 288 bp of the genome. The Illumina GoldenGate® assay was then used to validate a subset of 144 SNPs with a range of characteristics, using a set of 160 apple accessions. This validation assay enabled fine-tuning of the final subset of SNPs for the Illumina Infinium® II system. The set of stringent filtering criteria developed allowed choice of a set of SNPs that not only exhibited an even distribution across the apple genome and a range of minor allele frequencies to ensure utility across germplasm, but also were located in putative exonic regions to maximize genotyping success rate. A total of 7867 apple SNPs was established for the IRSC apple 8K SNP array v1, of which 5554 were polymorphic after evaluation in segregating families and a germplasm collection. This publicly available genomics resource will provide an unprecedented resolution of SNP haplotypes, which will enable marker-locus-trait association discovery, description of the genetic architecture of quantitative traits, investigation of genetic variation (neutral and functional, and genomic selection in apple.

  18. Development of genomic SSR markers for fingerprinting lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) cultivars and mapping genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauscher, Gilda; Simko, Ivan

    2013-01-22

    Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) is the major crop from the group of leafy vegetables. Several types of molecular markers were developed that are effectively used in lettuce breeding and genetic studies. However only a very limited number of microsattelite-based markers are publicly available. We have employed the method of enriched microsatellite libraries to develop 97 genomic SSR markers. Testing of newly developed markers on a set of 36 Lactuca accession (33 L. sativa, and one of each L. serriola L., L. saligna L., and L. virosa L.) revealed that both the genetic heterozygosity (UHe = 0.56) and the number of loci per SSR (Na = 5.50) are significantly higher for genomic SSR markers than for previously developed EST-based SSR markers (UHe = 0.32, Na = 3.56). Fifty-four genomic SSR markers were placed on the molecular linkage map of lettuce. Distribution of markers in the genome appeared to be random, with the exception of possible cluster on linkage group 6. Any combination of 32 genomic SSRs was able to distinguish genotypes of all 36 accessions. Fourteen of newly developed SSR markers originate from fragments with high sequence similarity to resistance gene candidates (RGCs) and RGC pseudogenes. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) of L. sativa accessions showed that approximately 3% of genetic diversity was within accessions, 79% among accessions, and 18% among horticultural types. The newly developed genomic SSR markers were added to the pool of previously developed EST-SSRs markers. These two types of SSR-based markers provide useful tools for lettuce cultivar fingerprinting, development of integrated molecular linkage maps, and mapping of genes.

  19. Genomic-based tools for the risk assessment, management, and prevention of type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansen Taber KA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Katherine A Johansen Taber, Barry D DickinsonDepartment of Science and Biotechnology, American Medical Association, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a common and serious disorder and is a significant risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease, neuropathy, nephropathy, retinopathy, periodontal disease, and foot ulcers and amputations. The burden of disease associated with T2D has led to an emphasis on early identification of the millions of individuals at high risk so that management and intervention strategies can be effectively implemented before disease progression begins. With increasing knowledge about the genetic basis of T2D, several genomic-based strategies have been tested for their ability to improve risk assessment, management and prevention. Genetic risk scores have been developed with the intent to more accurately identify those at risk for T2D and to potentially improve motivation and adherence to lifestyle modification programs. In addition, evidence is building that oral antihyperglycemic medications are subject to pharmacogenomic variation in a substantial number of patients, suggesting genomics may soon play a role in determining the most effective therapies. T2D is a complex disease that affects individuals differently, and risk prediction and treatment may be challenging for health care providers. Genomic approaches hold promise for their potential to improve risk prediction and tailor management for individual patients and to contribute to better health outcomes for those with T2D.Keywords: diabetes, genomic, risk prediction, management

  20. Genomic selection to improve livestock production in developing countries with a focus on India

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kadarmideen, Haja; Do, Duy Ngoc

    2015-01-01

    growth will increase the demand for food as well as animal products, particularly in emerging economic giants like India. Moreover, the urbanization has considerable impact on patterns of food consumption in general and on demand for livestock products, in particular and the increased income growth led......Global livestock production has increased substantially during the last decades, in both number of animals and productivity. Meanwhile, the human population is projected to reach 9.6 billions by 2050 and most of the increase in the projection takes place in developing countries. Rapid population...... production (OPU-IVP) of embryos will have a considerable impact in the future. This paper attempts to provide basic concepts of using genomic tools for livestock production with the focus on genomic prediction and selection methods and discuss about the potential application of genomic selection to increase...

  1. Recent advances in functional perturbation and genome editing techniques in studying sea urchin development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Miao; Lin, Che-Yi; Su, Yi-Hsien

    2017-09-01

    Studies on the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) of sea urchin embryos have provided a basic understanding of the molecular mechanisms controlling animal development. The causal links in GRNs have been verified experimentally through perturbation of gene functions. Microinjection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (MOs) into the egg is the most widely used approach for gene knockdown in sea urchin embryos. The modification of MOs into a membrane-permeable form (vivo-MOs) has allowed gene knockdown at later developmental stages. Recent advances in genome editing tools, such as zinc-finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector-based nucleases and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) system, have provided methods for gene knockout in sea urchins. Here, we review the use of vivo-MOs and genome editing tools in sea urchin studies since the publication of its genome in 2006. Various applications of the CRISPR/Cas9 system and their potential in studying sea urchin development are also discussed. These new tools will provide more sophisticated experimental methods for studying sea urchin development. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Empowered genome community: leveraging a bioinformatics platform as a citizen–scientist collaboration tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Wendelsdorf

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is on-going effort in the biomedical research community to leverage Next Generation Sequencing (NGS technology to identify genetic variants that affect our health. The main challenge facing researchers is getting enough samples from individuals either sick or healthy – to be able to reliably identify the few variants that are causal for a phenotype among all other variants typically seen among individuals. At the same time, more and more individuals are having their genome sequenced either out of curiosity or to identify the cause of an illness. These individuals may benefit from of a way to view and understand their data. QIAGEN's Ingenuity Variant Analysis is an online application that allows users with and without extensive bioinformatics training to incorporate information from published experiments, genetic databases, and a variety of statistical models to identify variants, from a long list of candidates, that are most likely causal for a phenotype as well as annotate variants with what is already known about them in the literature and databases. Ingenuity Variant Analysis is also an information sharing platform where users may exchange samples and analyses. The Empowered Genome Community (EGC is a new program in which QIAGEN is making this on-line tool freely available to any individual who wishes to analyze their own genetic sequence. EGC members are then able to make their data available to other Ingenuity Variant Analysis users to be used in research. Here we present and describe the Empowered Genome Community in detail. We also present a preliminary, proof-of-concept study that utilizes the 200 genomes currently available through the EGC. The goal of this program is to allow individuals to access and understand their own data as well as facilitate citizen–scientist collaborations that can drive research forward and spur quality scientific dialogue in the general public.

  3. Empowered genome community: leveraging a bioinformatics platform as a citizen-scientist collaboration tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendelsdorf, Katherine; Shah, Sohela

    2015-09-01

    There is on-going effort in the biomedical research community to leverage Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to identify genetic variants that affect our health. The main challenge facing researchers is getting enough samples from individuals either sick or healthy - to be able to reliably identify the few variants that are causal for a phenotype among all other variants typically seen among individuals. At the same time, more and more individuals are having their genome sequenced either out of curiosity or to identify the cause of an illness. These individuals may benefit from of a way to view and understand their data. QIAGEN's Ingenuity Variant Analysis is an online application that allows users with and without extensive bioinformatics training to incorporate information from published experiments, genetic databases, and a variety of statistical models to identify variants, from a long list of candidates, that are most likely causal for a phenotype as well as annotate variants with what is already known about them in the literature and databases. Ingenuity Variant Analysis is also an information sharing platform where users may exchange samples and analyses. The Empowered Genome Community (EGC) is a new program in which QIAGEN is making this on-line tool freely available to any individual who wishes to analyze their own genetic sequence. EGC members are then able to make their data available to other Ingenuity Variant Analysis users to be used in research. Here we present and describe the Empowered Genome Community in detail. We also present a preliminary, proof-of-concept study that utilizes the 200 genomes currently available through the EGC. The goal of this program is to allow individuals to access and understand their own data as well as facilitate citizen-scientist collaborations that can drive research forward and spur quality scientific dialogue in the general public.

  4. European Institutional and Organisational Tools for Maritime Human Resources Development

    OpenAIRE

    Dragomir Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Seafarers need to continuously develop their career, at all stages of their professional life. This paper presents some tools of institutional and organisational career development. At insitutional level there are presented vocational education and training tools provided by the European Union institutions while at organisational level are exemplified some tools used by private crewing companies for maritime human resources assessment and development.

  5. Developing a Support Tool for Global Product Development Decisions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Erik Stefan; Ahmed-Kristensen, Saeema

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how global product development decisions are made through a multiple-case study in three Danish engineering. The paper identifies which information and methods are applied for making decisions and how decision-making can be supported based on previous experience. The paper...... presents results from 51 decisions made in the three companies, and based on the results of the studies a framework for a decision-support tool is outlined and discussed. The paper rounds off with an identification of future research opportunities in the area of global product development and decision-making....

  6. Genome shotgun sequencing and development of microsatellite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADP

    2012-04-10

    Apr 10, 2012 ... useful for investigating genetic diversity and differentiation in gerbera. Key words: ... However, this method had a disadvantage: it could not .... PCR product. PCR was ..... advantages, SSR markers had not been developed or ...

  7. Genomic analysis of mouse retinal development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth Blackshaw

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The vertebrate retina is comprised of seven major cell types that are generated in overlapping but well-defined intervals. To identify genes that might regulate retinal development, gene expression in the developing retina was profiled at multiple time points using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE. The expression patterns of 1,051 genes that showed developmentally dynamic expression by SAGE were investigated using in situ hybridization. A molecular atlas of gene expression in the developing and mature retina was thereby constructed, along with a taxonomic classification of developmental gene expression patterns. Genes were identified that label both temporal and spatial subsets of mitotic progenitor cells. For each developing and mature major retinal cell type, genes selectively expressed in that cell type were identified. The gene expression profiles of retinal Müller glia and mitotic progenitor cells were found to be highly similar, suggesting that Müller glia might serve to produce multiple retinal cell types under the right conditions. In addition, multiple transcripts that were evolutionarily conserved that did not appear to encode open reading frames of more than 100 amino acids in length ("noncoding RNAs" were found to be dynamically and specifically expressed in developing and mature retinal cell types. Finally, many photoreceptor-enriched genes that mapped to chromosomal intervals containing retinal disease genes were identified. These data serve as a starting point for functional investigations of the roles of these genes in retinal development and physiology.

  8. DNAqua-Net: Developing new genetic tools for bioassessment and monitoring of aquatic ecosystems in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Leese

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The protection, preservation and restoration of aquatic ecosystems and their functions are of global importance. For European states it became legally binding mainly through the EU-Water Framework Directive (WFD. In order to assess the ecological status of a given water body, aquatic biodiversity data are obtained and compared to a reference water body. The quantified mismatch obtained determines the extent of potential management actions. The current approach to biodiversity assessment is based on morpho-taxonomy. This approach has many drawbacks such as being time consuming, limited in temporal and spatial resolution, and error-prone due to the varying individual taxonomic expertise of the analysts. Novel genomic tools can overcome many of the aforementioned problems and could complement or even replace traditional bioassessment. Yet, a plethora of approaches are independently developed in different institutions, thereby hampering any concerted routine application. The goal of this Action is to nucleate a group of researchers across disciplines with the task to identify gold-standard genomic tools and novel eco-genomic indices for routine application in biodiversity assessments of European fresh- and marine water bodies. Furthermore, DNAqua-Net will provide a platform for training of the next generation of European researchers preparing them for the new technologies. Jointly with water managers, politicians, and other stakeholders, the group will develop a conceptual framework for the standard application of eco-genomic tools as part of legally binding assessments.

  9. Genome resource utilization during prokaryotic development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vohradský, Jiří; Ramsden, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 15, - (2001), s. 2054-2056 ISSN 0892-6638 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/00/1253 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : prokaryotic development Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.817, year: 2001

  10. Cluster development in the SA tooling industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Von Leipzig, Konrad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the concept of clustering in general, analysing research and experiences in different countries and regions, and summarising factors leading to success or contributing to failure of specific cluster initiatives. Based on this, requirements for the establishment of clusters are summarised. Next, initiatives especially in the South African tool and die making (TDM industry are considered. Through a benchmarking approach, the strengths and weaknesses of individual local tool rooms are analysed, and conclusions are drawn particularly about South African characteristics of the industry. From these results, and from structured interviews with individual tool room owners, difficulties in the establishment of a South African tooling cluster are explored, and specific areas of concern are pointed out.

  11. MobilomeFINDER: web-based tools for in silico and experimental discovery of bacterial genomic islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Hong-Yu; He, Xinyi; Harrison, Ewan M.; Kulasekara, Bridget R.; Thani, Ali Bin; Kadioglu, Aras; Lory, Stephen; Hinton, Jay C. D.; Barer, Michael R.; Rajakumar, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    MobilomeFINDER (http://mml.sjtu.edu.cn/MobilomeFINDER) is an interactive online tool that facilitates bacterial genomic island or ‘mobile genome’ (mobilome) discovery; it integrates the ArrayOme and tRNAcc software packages. ArrayOme utilizes a microarray-derived comparative genomic hybridization input data set to generate ‘inferred contigs’ produced by merging adjacent genes classified as ‘present’. Collectively these ‘fragments’ represent a hypothetical ‘microarray-visualized genome (MVG)’. ArrayOme permits recognition of discordances between physical genome and MVG sizes, thereby enabling identification of strains rich in microarray-elusive novel genes. Individual tRNAcc tools facilitate automated identification of genomic islands by comparative analysis of the contents and contexts of tRNA sites and other integration hotspots in closely related sequenced genomes. Accessory tools facilitate design of hotspot-flanking primers for in silico and/or wet-science-based interrogation of cognate loci in unsequenced strains and analysis of islands for features suggestive of foreign origins; island-specific and genome-contextual features are tabulated and represented in schematic and graphical forms. To date we have used MobilomeFINDER to analyse several Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Streptococcus suis genomes. MobilomeFINDER enables high-throughput island identification and characterization through increased exploitation of emerging sequence data and PCR-based profiling of unsequenced test strains; subsequent targeted yeast recombination-based capture permits full-length sequencing and detailed functional studies of novel genomic islands. PMID:17537813

  12. Develop risk-based procurement management tools for SMEs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staal, Anne; Hagelaar, Geoffrey; Walhof, Gert; Holman, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides guidance for developing risk-based management tools to improve the procurement (purchasing) performance of SMEs. Extant academic literature only offers little support on developing such tools and does not consider the wide variety of SMEs. The paper defines a procurement tool for

  13. MobilomeFINDER: web-based tools for in silico and experimental discovery of bacterial genomic islands

    OpenAIRE

    Ou, Hong-Yu; He, Xinyi; Harrison, Ewan M.; Kulasekara, Bridget R.; Thani, Ali Bin; Kadioglu, Aras; Lory, Stephen; Hinton, Jay C. D.; Barer, Michael R.; Deng, Zixin; Rajakumar, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    MobilomeFINDER (http://mml.sjtu.edu.cn/MobilomeFINDER) is an interactive online tool that facilitates bacterial genomic island or ‘mobile genome’ (mobilome) discovery; it integrates the ArrayOme and tRNAcc software packages. ArrayOme utilizes a microarray-derived comparative genomic hybridization input data set to generate ‘inferred contigs’ produced by merging adjacent genes classified as ‘present’. Collectively these ‘fragments’ represent a hypothetical ‘microarray-visualized genome (MVG)’....

  14. Tools to kill: Genome of one of the most destructive plant pathogenic fungi Macrophomina phaseolina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam Md

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the most destructive necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species throughout the world. It can grow rapidly in infected plants and subsequently produces a large amount of sclerotia that plugs the vessels, resulting in wilting of the plant. Results We sequenced and assembled ~49 Mb into 15 super-scaffolds covering 92.83% of the M. phaseolina genome. We predict 14,249 open reading frames (ORFs of which 9,934 are validated by the transcriptome. This phytopathogen has an abundance of secreted oxidases, peroxidases, and hydrolytic enzymes for degrading cell wall polysaccharides and lignocelluloses to penetrate into the host tissue. To overcome the host plant defense response, M. phaseolina encodes a significant number of P450s, MFS type membrane transporters, glycosidases, transposases, and secondary metabolites in comparison to all sequenced ascomycete species. A strikingly distinct set of carbohydrate esterases (CE are present in M. phaseolina, with the CE9 and CE10 families remarkably higher than any other fungi. The phenotypic microarray data indicates that M. phaseolina can adapt to a wide range of osmotic and pH environments. As a broad host range pathogen, M. phaseolina possesses a large number of pathogen-host interaction genes including those for adhesion, signal transduction, cell wall breakdown, purine biosynthesis, and potent mycotoxin patulin. Conclusions The M. phaseolina genome provides a framework of the infection process at the cytological and molecular level which uses a diverse arsenal of enzymatic and toxin tools to destroy the host plants. Further understanding of the M. phaseolina genome-based plant-pathogen interactions will be instrumental in designing rational strategies for disease control, essential to ensuring global agricultural crop production and security.

  15. Tools to kill: genome of one of the most destructive plant pathogenic fungi Macrophomina phaseolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Shahidul; Haque, Md Samiul; Islam, Mohammad Moinul; Emdad, Emdadul Mannan; Halim, Abdul; Hossen, Quazi Md Mosaddeque; Hossain, Md Zakir; Ahmed, Borhan; Rahim, Sifatur; Rahman, Md Sharifur; Alam, Md Monjurul; Hou, Shaobin; Wan, Xuehua; Saito, Jennifer A; Alam, Maqsudul

    2012-09-19

    Macrophomina phaseolina is one of the most destructive necrotrophic fungal pathogens that infect more than 500 plant species throughout the world. It can grow rapidly in infected plants and subsequently produces a large amount of sclerotia that plugs the vessels, resulting in wilting of the plant. We sequenced and assembled ~49 Mb into 15 super-scaffolds covering 92.83% of the M. phaseolina genome. We predict 14,249 open reading frames (ORFs) of which 9,934 are validated by the transcriptome. This phytopathogen has an abundance of secreted oxidases, peroxidases, and hydrolytic enzymes for degrading cell wall polysaccharides and lignocelluloses to penetrate into the host tissue. To overcome the host plant defense response, M. phaseolina encodes a significant number of P450s, MFS type membrane transporters, glycosidases, transposases, and secondary metabolites in comparison to all sequenced ascomycete species. A strikingly distinct set of carbohydrate esterases (CE) are present in M. phaseolina, with the CE9 and CE10 families remarkably higher than any other fungi. The phenotypic microarray data indicates that M. phaseolina can adapt to a wide range of osmotic and pH environments. As a broad host range pathogen, M. phaseolina possesses a large number of pathogen-host interaction genes including those for adhesion, signal transduction, cell wall breakdown, purine biosynthesis, and potent mycotoxin patulin. The M. phaseolina genome provides a framework of the infection process at the cytological and molecular level which uses a diverse arsenal of enzymatic and toxin tools to destroy the host plants. Further understanding of the M. phaseolina genome-based plant-pathogen interactions will be instrumental in designing rational strategies for disease control, essential to ensuring global agricultural crop production and security.

  16. [COMETE: a tool to develop psychosocial competences in patient education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugeron, Benoit; Sonnier, Pierre; Marchais, Stéphanie

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a detailed description of the development and use of the COMETE tool. The COMETE tool is designed to help medical teams identify, develop or evaluate psychosocial skills in patient education and counselling. This tool, designed in the form of a briefcase, proposes methodological activities and cards that assess psychosocial skills during a shared educational assessment, group meetings or during an individual evaluation. This tool is part of a support approach for medical teams caring for patients with chronic diseases.

  17. Comparison of microbial DNA enrichment tools for metagenomic whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoendel, Matthew; Jeraldo, Patricio R; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Yao, Janet Z; Chia, Nicholas; Hanssen, Arlen D; Abdel, Matthew P; Patel, Robin

    2016-08-01

    Metagenomic whole genome sequencing for detection of pathogens in clinical samples is an exciting new area for discovery and clinical testing. A major barrier to this approach is the overwhelming ratio of human to pathogen DNA in samples with low pathogen abundance, which is typical of most clinical specimens. Microbial DNA enrichment methods offer the potential to relieve this limitation by improving this ratio. Two commercially available enrichment kits, the NEBNext Microbiome DNA Enrichment Kit and the Molzym MolYsis Basic kit, were tested for their ability to enrich for microbial DNA from resected arthroplasty component sonicate fluids from prosthetic joint infections or uninfected sonicate fluids spiked with Staphylococcus aureus. Using spiked uninfected sonicate fluid there was a 6-fold enrichment of bacterial DNA with the NEBNext kit and 76-fold enrichment with the MolYsis kit. Metagenomic whole genome sequencing of sonicate fluid revealed 13- to 85-fold enrichment of bacterial DNA using the NEBNext enrichment kit. The MolYsis approach achieved 481- to 9580-fold enrichment, resulting in 7 to 59% of sequencing reads being from the pathogens known to be present in the samples. These results demonstrate the usefulness of these tools when testing clinical samples with low microbial burden using next generation sequencing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Genomic tools for behavioural ecologists to understand repeatable individual differences in behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengston, Sarah E; Dahan, Romain A; Donaldson, Zoe; Phelps, Steven M; van Oers, Kees; Sih, Andrew; Bell, Alison M

    2018-06-01

    Behaviour is a key interface between an animal's genome and its environment. Repeatable individual differences in behaviour have been extensively documented in animals, but the molecular underpinnings of behavioural variation among individuals within natural populations remain largely unknown. Here, we offer a critical review of when molecular techniques may yield new insights, and we provide specific guidance on how and whether the latest tools available are appropriate given different resources, system and organismal constraints, and experimental designs. Integrating molecular genetic techniques with other strategies to study the proximal causes of behaviour provides opportunities to expand rapidly into new avenues of exploration. Such endeavours will enable us to better understand how repeatable individual differences in behaviour have evolved, how they are expressed and how they can be maintained within natural populations of animals.

  19. Limited resources of genome sequencing in developing countries: Challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Helmy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The differences between countries in national income, growth, human development and many other factors are used to classify countries into developed and developing countries. There are several classification systems that use different sets of measures and criteria. The most common classifications are the United Nations (UN and the World Bank (WB systems. The UN classification system uses the UN Human Development Index (HDI, an indicator that uses statistic of life expectancy, education, and income per capita for countries' classification. While the WB system uses gross national income (GNI per capita that is calculated using the World Bank Atlas method. According to the UN and WB classification systems, there are 151 and 134 developing countries, respectively, with 89% overlap between the two systems. Developing countries have limited human development, and limited expenditure in education and research, among several other limitations. The biggest challenge facing genomic researchers and clinicians is limited resources. As a result, genomic tools, specifically genome sequencing technologies, which are rapidly becoming indispensable, are not widely available. In this report, we explore the current status of sequencing technologies in developing countries, describe the associated challenges and emphasize potential solutions.

  20. Workshop on Software Development Tools for Petascale Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, Jeffrey [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Petascale computing systems will soon be available to the DOE science community. Recent studies in the productivity of HPC platforms point to better software environments as a key enabler to science on these systems. To prepare for the deployment and productive use of these petascale platforms, the DOE science and general HPC community must have the software development tools, such as performance analyzers and debuggers that meet application requirements for scalability, functionality, reliability, and ease of use. In this report, we identify and prioritize the research opportunities in the area of software development tools for high performance computing. To facilitate this effort, DOE hosted a group of 55 leading international experts in this area at the Software Development Tools for PetaScale Computing (SDTPC) Workshop, which was held in Washington, D.C. on August 1 and 2, 2007. Software development tools serve as an important interface between the application teams and the target HPC architectures. Broadly speaking, these roles can be decomposed into three categories: performance tools, correctness tools, and development environments. Accordingly, this SDTPC report has four technical thrusts: performance tools, correctness tools, development environment infrastructures, and scalable tool infrastructures. The last thrust primarily targets tool developers per se, rather than end users. Finally, this report identifies non-technical strategic challenges that impact most tool development. The organizing committee emphasizes that many critical areas are outside the scope of this charter; these important areas include system software, compilers, and I/O.

  1. Specialized case tools for the development of the accounting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The paper presents an approach to building specialized CASE tools for the development of accounting applications. These tools form an integrated development environment allowing the computer aided development of the different applications in this field. This development environment consists of a formula interpreter, ...

  2. Ion Torrent sequencing as a tool for mutation discovery in the flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-González, Leonardo; Pinzón-Latorre, David; Bergen, Erik A; Jensen, Dustin C; Deyholos, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Detection of induced mutations is valuable for inferring gene function and for developing novel germplasm for crop improvement. Many reverse genetics approaches have been developed to identify mutations in genes of interest within a mutagenized population, including some approaches that rely on next-generation sequencing (e.g. exome capture, whole genome resequencing). As an alternative to these genome or exome-scale methods, we sought to develop a scalable and efficient method for detection of induced mutations that could be applied to a small number of target genes, using Ion Torrent technology. We developed this method in flax (Linum usitatissimum), to demonstrate its utility in a crop species. We used an amplicon-based approach in which DNA samples from an ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-mutagenized population were pooled and used as template in PCR reactions to amplify a region of each gene of interest. Barcodes were incorporated during PCR, and the pooled amplicons were sequenced using an Ion Torrent PGM. A pilot experiment with known SNPs showed that they could be detected at a frequency > 0.3% within the pools. We then selected eight genes for which we wanted to discover novel mutations, and applied our approach to screen 768 individuals from the EMS population, using either the Ion 314 or Ion 316 chips. Out of 29 potential mutations identified after processing the NGS reads, 16 mutations were confirmed using Sanger sequencing. The methodology presented here demonstrates the utility of Ion Torrent technology in detecting mutation variants in specific genome regions for large populations of a species such as flax. The methodology could be scaled-up to test >100 genes using the higher capacity chips now available from Ion Torrent.

  3. A general pipeline for the development of anchor markers for comparative genomics in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stougaard Jens

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete or near-complete genomic sequence information is presently only available for a few plant species representing a large phylogenetic diversity among plants. In order to effectively transfer this information to species lacking sequence information, comparative genomic tools need to be developed. Molecular markers permitting cross-species mapping along co-linear genomic regions are central to comparative genomics. These "anchor" markers, defining unique loci in genetic linkage maps of multiple species, are gene-based and possess a number of features that make them relatively sparse. To identify potential anchor marker sequences more efficiently, we have established an automated bioinformatic pipeline that combines multi-species Expressed Sequence Tags (EST and genome sequence data. Results Taking advantage of sequence data from related species, the pipeline identifies evolutionarily conserved sequences that are likely to define unique orthologous loci in most species of the same phylogenetic clade. The key features are the identification of evolutionarily conserved sequences followed by automated design of intron-flanking Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR primer pairs. Polymorphisms can subsequently be identified by size- or sequence variation of PCR products, amplified from mapping parents or populations. We illustrate our procedure in legumes and grasses and exemplify its application in legumes, where model plant studies and the genome- and EST-sequence data available have a potential impact on the breeding of crop species and on our understanding of the evolution of this large and diverse family. Conclusion We provide a database of 459 candidate anchor loci which have the potential to serve as map anchors in more than 18,000 legume species, a number of which are of agricultural importance. For grasses, the database contains 1335 candidate anchor loci. Based on this database, we have evaluated 76 candidate anchor loci

  4. Ceramic cutting tools materials, development and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Whitney, E Dow

    1994-01-01

    Interest in ceramics as a high speed cutting tool material is based primarily on favorable material properties. As a class of materials, ceramics possess high melting points, excellent hardness and good wear resistance. Unlike most metals, hardness levels in ceramics generally remain high at elevated temperatures which means that cutting tip integrity is relatively unaffected at high cutting speeds. Ceramics are also chemically inert against most workmetals.

  5. PLACNETw: a web-based tool for plasmid reconstruction from bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielva, Luis; de Toro, María; Lanza, Val F; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2017-12-01

    PLACNET is a graph-based tool for reconstruction of plasmids from next generation sequence pair-end datasets. PLACNET graphs contain two types of nodes (assembled contigs and reference genomes) and two types of edges (scaffold links and homology to references). Manual pruning of the graphs is a necessary requirement in PLACNET, but this is difficult for users without solid bioinformatic background. PLACNETw, a webtool based on PLACNET, provides an interactive graphic interface, automates BLAST searches, and extracts the relevant information for decision making. It allows a user with domain expertise to visualize the scaffold graphs and related information of contigs as well as reference sequences, so that the pruning operations can be done interactively from a personal computer without the need for additional tools. After successful pruning, each plasmid becomes a separate connected component subgraph. The resulting data are automatically downloaded by the user. PLACNETw is freely available at https://castillo.dicom.unican.es/upload/. delacruz@unican.es. A tutorial video and several solved examples are available at https://castillo.dicom.unican.es/placnetw_video/ and https://castillo.dicom.unican.es/examples/. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. SCNS: a graphical tool for reconstructing executable regulatory networks from single-cell genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Steven; Piterman, Nir; Wintersteiger, Christoph M; Göttgens, Berthold; Fisher, Jasmin

    2018-05-25

    Reconstruction of executable mechanistic models from single-cell gene expression data represents a powerful approach to understanding developmental and disease processes. New ambitious efforts like the Human Cell Atlas will soon lead to an explosion of data with potential for uncovering and understanding the regulatory networks which underlie the behaviour of all human cells. In order to take advantage of this data, however, there is a need for general-purpose, user-friendly and efficient computational tools that can be readily used by biologists who do not have specialist computer science knowledge. The Single Cell Network Synthesis toolkit (SCNS) is a general-purpose computational tool for the reconstruction and analysis of executable models from single-cell gene expression data. Through a graphical user interface, SCNS takes single-cell qPCR or RNA-sequencing data taken across a time course, and searches for logical rules that drive transitions from early cell states towards late cell states. Because the resulting reconstructed models are executable, they can be used to make predictions about the effect of specific gene perturbations on the generation of specific lineages. SCNS should be of broad interest to the growing number of researchers working in single-cell genomics and will help further facilitate the generation of valuable mechanistic insights into developmental, homeostatic and disease processes.

  7. Long range manipulator development and experiments with dismantling tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, K.

    1993-01-01

    An existing handling system (EMIR) was used as a carrier system for various tools for concrete dismantling and radiation protection monitoring. It combined the advantages of long reach and high payload with highly dexterous kinematics. This system was enhanced mechanically to allow the use of different tools. Tool attachment devices for automatic tool exchange were investigated as well as interfaces (electric, hydraulic, compressed air, cooling water and signals). The control system was improved with regard to accuracy and sensor data processing. Programmable logic controller functions for tool control were incorporated. A free field mockup of the EMIR was build that allowed close simulation of dismantling scenarios without radioactive inventory. Aged concrete was provided for the integration tests. The development scheduled included the basic concept investigation; the development of tools and sensors; the EMIR hardware enhancement including a tool exchange; the adaption of tools and mockup and the final evaluation of the system during experiments

  8. Development of a CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing toolbox for Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiao; Wang, Yu; Lu, Yujiao; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Ma, Yanhe

    2017-11-16

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is an important industrial workhorse and advanced genetic engineering tools are urgently demanded. Recently, the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and their CRISPR-associated proteins (Cas) have revolutionized the field of genome engineering. The CRISPR/Cas9 system that utilizes NGG as protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and has good targeting specificity can be developed into a powerful tool for efficient and precise genome editing of C. glutamicum. Herein, we developed a versatile CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing toolbox for C. glutamicum. Cas9 and gRNA expression cassettes were reconstituted to combat Cas9 toxicity and facilitate effective termination of gRNA transcription. Co-transformation of Cas9 and gRNA expression plasmids was exploited to overcome high-frequency mutation of cas9, allowing not only highly efficient gene deletion and insertion with plasmid-borne editing templates (efficiencies up to 60.0 and 62.5%, respectively) but also simple and time-saving operation. Furthermore, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated ssDNA recombineering was developed to precisely introduce small modifications and single-nucleotide changes into the genome of C. glutamicum with efficiencies over 80.0%. Notably, double-locus editing was also achieved in C. glutamicum. This toolbox works well in several C. glutamicum strains including the widely-used strains ATCC 13032 and ATCC 13869. In this study, we developed a CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox that could facilitate markerless gene deletion, gene insertion, precise base editing, and double-locus editing in C. glutamicum. The CRISPR/Cas9 toolbox holds promise for accelerating the engineering of C. glutamicum and advancing its application in the production of biochemicals and biofuels.

  9. The development of a post occupancy evaluation tool for primary schools: learner comfort assessment tool (LCAT)

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motsatsi, L

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available in order to facilitate teaching and learning. The aim of this study was to develop a Post Occupational Evaluation (POE) tool to assess learner comfort in relation to indoor environmental quality in the classroom. The development of POE tool followed a...

  10. Holistic Framework For Establishing Interoperability of Heterogeneous Software Development Tools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Puett, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation presents a Holistic Framework for Software Engineering (HFSE) that establishes collaborative mechanisms by which existing heterogeneous software development tools and models will interoperate...

  11. Holistic Framework For Establishing Interoperability of Heterogeneous Software Development Tools

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Puett, Joseph

    2003-01-01

    ...; however, this research focuses on establishing a holistic approach over the entire development effort where unrealized synergies and dependencies between all of the tools' artifacts can be visualized...

  12. The contribution of bacterial genome engineering to sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuß, Daniel R; Commichau, Fabian M; Stülke, Jörg

    2017-09-01

    The United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals define important challenges for the prosperous development of mankind. To reach several of these goals, among them the production of value-added compounds, improved economic and ecologic balance of production processes, prevention of climate change and protection of ecosystems, the use of engineered bacteria can make valuable contributions. We discuss the strategies for genome engineering and how they can be applied to meet the United Nations' goals for sustainable development. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Development and validation of an rDNA operon based primer walking strategy applicable to de novo bacterial genome finishing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander William Eastman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in sequencing technology have drastically increased the depth and feasibility of bacterial genome sequencing. However, little information is available that details the specific techniques and procedures employed during genome sequencing despite the large numbers of published genomes. Shotgun approaches employed by second-generation sequencing platforms has necessitated the development of robust bioinformatics tools for in silico assembly, and complete assembly is limited by the presence of repetitive DNA sequences and multi-copy operons. Typically, re-sequencing with multiple platforms and laborious, targeted Sanger sequencing are employed to finish a draft bacterial genome. Here we describe a novel strategy based on the identification and targeted sequencing of repetitive rDNA operons to expedite bacterial genome assembly and finishing. Our strategy was validated by finishing the genome of Paenibacillus polymyxa strain CR1, a bacterium with potential in sustainable agriculture and bio-based processes. An analysis of the 38 contigs contained in the P. polymyxa strain CR1 draft genome revealed 12 repetitive rDNA operons with varied intragenic and flanking regions of variable length, unanimously located at contig boundaries and within contig gaps. These highly similar but not identical rDNA operons were experimentally verified and sequenced simultaneously with multiple, specially designed primer sets. This approach also identified and corrected significant sequence rearrangement generated during the initial in silico assembly of sequencing reads. Our approach reduces the required effort associated with blind primer walking for contig assembly, increasing both the speed and feasibility of genome finishing. Our study further reinforces the notion that repetitive DNA elements are major limiting factors for genome finishing. Moreover, we provided a step-by-step workflow for genome finishing, which may guide future bacterial genome finishing

  14. Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation of Superroot-derived Lotus corniculatus plants: a valuable tool for functional genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wei

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transgenic approaches provide a powerful tool for gene function investigations in plants. However, some legumes are still recalcitrant to current transformation technologies, limiting the extent to which functional genomic studies can be performed on. Superroot of Lotus corniculatus is a continuous root cloning system allowing direct somatic embryogenesis and mass regeneration of plants. Recently, a technique to obtain transgenic L. corniculatus plants from Superroot-derived leaves through A. tumefaciens-mediated transformation was described. However, transformation efficiency was low and it took about six months from gene transfer to PCR identification. Results In the present study, we developed an A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation of Superroot-derived L. corniculatus for gene function investigation, combining the efficient A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation and the rapid regeneration system of Superroot. The transformation system using A. rhizogenes K599 harbouring pGFPGUSPlus was improved by validating some parameters which may influence the transformation frequency. Using stem sections with one node as explants, a 2-day pre-culture of explants, infection with K599 at OD600 = 0.6, and co-cultivation on medium (pH 5.4 at 22°C for 2 days enhanced the transformation frequency significantly. As proof of concept, Superroot-derived L. corniculatus was transformed with a gene from wheat encoding an Na+/H+ antiporter (TaNHX2 using the described system. Transgenic Superroot plants were obtained and had increased salt tolerance, as expected from the expression of TaNHX2. Conclusion A rapid and efficient tool for gene function investigation in L. corniculatus was developed, combining the simplicity and high efficiency of the Superroot regeneration system and the availability of A. rhizogenes-mediated transformation. This system was improved by validating some parameters influencing the transformation frequency, which could

  15. Applying CASE Tools for On-Board Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, U.; Hönle, A.

    For many space projects the software development is facing great pressure with respect to quality, costs and schedule. One way to cope with these challenges is the application of CASE tools for automatic generation of code and documentation. This paper describes two CASE tools: Rhapsody (I-Logix) featuring UML and ISG (BSSE) that provides modeling of finite state machines. Both tools have been used at Kayser-Threde in different space projects for the development of on-board software. The tools are discussed with regard to the full software development cycle.

  16. Water Loss Management: Tools and Methods for Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Mutikanga, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    Water utilities in developing countries are struggling to provide customers with a reliable level of service due to their peculiar water distribution characteristics including poorly zoned networks with irregular supply operating under restricted budgets. These unique conditions demand unique tools and methods for water loss control. Water loss management: Tools and Methods for Developing Countries provide a decision support toolbox (appropriate tools and methodologies) for assessing, quantif...

  17. Host-Brucella interactions and the Brucella genome as tools for subunit antigen discovery and immunization against brucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Gabriel; Adams, Leslie G.; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Ficht, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is the most important approach to counteract infectious diseases. Thus, the development of new and improved vaccines for existing, emerging, and re-emerging diseases is an area of great interest to the scientific community and general public. Traditional approaches to subunit antigen discovery and vaccine development lack consideration for the critical aspects of public safety and activation of relevant protective host immunity. The availability of genomic sequences for pathogenic Brucella spp. and their hosts have led to development of systems-wide analytical tools that have provided a better understanding of host and pathogen physiology while also beginning to unravel the intricacies at the host-pathogen interface. Advances in pathogen biology, host immunology, and host-agent interactions have the potential to serve as a platform for the design and implementation of better-targeted antigen discovery approaches. With emphasis on Brucella spp., we probe the biological aspects of host and pathogen that merit consideration in the targeted design of subunit antigen discovery and vaccine development. PMID:23720712

  18. Artificial intelligence tool development and applications to nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Two parallel efforts are being performed at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to help the electric utility industry take advantage of the expert system technology. The first effort is the development of expert system building tools, which are tailored to electric utility industry applications. The second effort is the development of expert system applications. These two efforts complement each other. The application development tests the tools and identifies additional tool capabilities that are required. The tool development helps define the applications that can be successfully developed. Artificial intelligence, as demonstrated by the developments described is being established as a credible technological tool for the electric utility industry. The challenge to transferring artificial intelligence technology and an understanding of its potential to the electric utility industry is to gain an understanding of the problems that reduce power plant performance and identify which can be successfully addressed using artificial intelligence

  19. Fish genomes : a powerful tool to uncover new functional elements in vertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stupka, Elia

    2011-01-01

    This thesis spans several years of work dedicated to understanding fish genomes. In the first chapter it describes the genome of the first fish for which the entire genome was sequenced through a large-scale international project, Fugu rubripes. the pufferfish. In particular, it highlights how this

  20. Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) on Pachytene Chromosomes as a Tool for Genome Characterization. In: Legume Genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, R.; Jong, de J.H.S.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    A growing number of international genome consortia have initiated large-scale sequencing projects for most of the major crop species. This huge amount of information not only boosted genetic and physical mapping research, but it also enabled novel applications on the level of chromosome biology

  1. Advanced reach tool (ART) : Development of the mechanistic model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fransman, W.; Tongeren, M. van; Cherrie, J.W.; Tischer, M.; Schneider, T.; Schinkel, J.; Kromhout, H.; Warren, N.; Goede, H.; Tielemans, E.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of the mechanistic model within a collaborative project, referred to as the Advanced REACH Tool (ART) project, to develop a tool to model inhalation exposure for workers sharing similar operational conditions across different industries and locations in Europe.

  2. Development of a piano learning tool

    OpenAIRE

    Baloh, Matevž

    2012-01-01

    This thesis analyzes the appropriateness of the formula defined by the game 'Guitar Hero' in an application, which aims to help it's users learn how to play the piano. The appropriateness is determined through the development of an application. The thesis describes an attempt at the development of a game, the primary intention of which is to be fun, with the secondary purpose of teaching how to play the piano. After this, it describes an attempt at the development of an application, the p...

  3. Development of an attrition risk prediction tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, John; Norrie, Peter

    To review lecturers' and students' perceptions of the factors that may lead to attrition from pre-registration nursing and midwifery programmes and to identify ways to reduce the impact of such factors on the student's experience. Comparable attrition rates for nursing and midwifery students across various universities are difficult to monitor accurately; however, estimates that there is approximately a 25% national attrition rate are not uncommon. The financial and human implications of this are significant and worthy of investigation. A study was carried out in one medium-sized UK school of nursing and midwifery, aimed at identifying perceived factors associated with attrition and retention. Thirty-five lecturers were interviewed individually; 605 students completed a questionnaire, and of these, 10 were individually interviewed. Attrition data kept by the student service department were reviewed. Data were collected over an 18-month period in 2007-2008. Regression analysis of the student data identified eight significant predictors. Four of these were 'positive' factors in that they aided student retention and four were 'negative' in that they were associated with students' thoughts of resigning. Student attrition and retention is multifactorial, and, as such, needs to be managed holistically. One aspect of this management could be an attrition risk prediction tool.

  4. DEVELOPING A TOOL FOR ENVIRONMENTALLY PREFERABLE PURCHASING

    Science.gov (United States)

    LCA-based guidance was developed by EPA under the Framework for Responsible Environmental Decision Making (FRED) effort to demonstrate how to conduct a relative comparison between product types to determine environmental preferability. It identifies data collection needs and iss...

  5. The Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA): Developing Community Resources to Study Diverse Invertebrate Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Bracken-Grissom, Heather; Collins, Allen G.; Collins, Timothy; Crandall, Keith; Distel, Daniel; Dunn, Casey; Giribet, Gonzalo; Haddock, Steven; Knowlton, Nancy; Martindale, Mark; Medina, Monica; Messing, Charles; O'Brien, Stephen J.; Paulay, Gustav; Putnam, Nicolas; Ravasi, Timothy; Rouse, Greg W.; Ryan, Joseph F.; Schulze, Anja; Worheide, Gert; Adamska, Maja; Bailly, Xavier; Breinholt, Jesse; Browne, William E.; Diaz, M. Christina; Evans, Nathaniel; Flot, Jean-Francois; Fogarty, Nicole; Johnston, Matthew; Kamel, Bishoy; Kawahara, Akito Y.; Laberge, Tammy; Lavrov, Dennis; Michonneau, Francois; Moroz, Leonid L.; Oakley, Todd; Osborne, Karen; Pomponi, Shirley A.; Rhodes, Adelaide; Rodriguez-Lanetty, Mauricio; Santos, Scott R.; Satoh, Nori; Thacker, Robert W.; Van de Peer, Yves; Voolstra, Christian R.; Welch, David Mark; Winston, Judith; Zhou, Xin

    2013-01-01

    Over 95% of all metazoan (animal) species comprise the invertebrates, but very few genomes from these organisms have been sequenced. We have, therefore, formed a Global Invertebrate Genomics Alliance (GIGA). Our intent is to build a collaborative

  6. Design and development of progressive tool for manufacturing washer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annigeri, Ulhas K.; Raghavendra Ravi Kiran, K.; Deepthi, Y. P.

    2017-07-01

    In a progressive tool the raw material is worked at different station to finally fabricate the component. A progressive tool is a lucrative tool for mass production of components. A lot of automobile and other transport industries develop progressive tool for the production of components. The design of tool involves lot of planning and the same amount of skill of process planning is required in the fabrication of the tool. The design also involves use of thumb rules and standard elements as per experience gained in practice. Manufacturing the press tool is a laborious task as special jigs and fixtures have to be designed for the purpose. Assembly of all the press tool elements is another task where use of accurate measuring instruments for alignment of various tool elements is important. In the present study, design and fabrication of progressive press tool for production of washer has been developed and the press tool has been tried out on a mechanical type of press. The components produced are to dimensions.

  7. Development of a tool for evaluating multimedia for surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Jane; Morar, Sonali S

    2008-09-01

    Educational multimedia has been designed to provide surgical trainees with expert operative information outside of the operating theater. The effectiveness of multimedia (e.g., CD-ROMs) for learning has been a common research topic since the 1990s. To date, however, little discussion has taken place on the mechanisms to evaluate the quality of multimedia-driven teaching. This may be because of a lack of research into the development of appropriate tools for evaluating multimedia, especially for surgical education. This paper reports on a small-scale pilot and exploratory study (n = 12) that developed a tool for surgical multimedia evaluation. The validity of the developed tool was established through adaptation of an existing tool, which was reviewed using experts in surgery, usability, and education. The reliability of the developed tool was tested with surgical trainees who used it to assess a multimedia CD-ROM created for teaching basic surgical skills. The findings contribute to an understanding of surgical trainees' experience of using educational multimedia, in terms of characteristics of the learning material for interface design and content and the process of developing evaluation tools, in terms of inclusion of appropriate assessment criteria. The increasing use of multimedia in medical education necessitates the development of standardized tools for determining the quality of teaching and learning. Little research exists into the development of such tools and so the present work stimulates discussion on how to evaluate surgical training.

  8. JGI Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-03-14

    Genomes of energy and environment fungi are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 50 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such 'parts' suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here

  9. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  10. Current Developments in Prokaryotic Single Cell Whole Genome Amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goudeau, Danielle; Nath, Nandita; Ciobanu, Doina; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Malmstrom, Rex

    2014-03-14

    Our approach to prokaryotic single-cell Whole Genome Amplification at the JGI continues to evolve. To increase both the quality and number of single-cell genomes produced, we explore all aspects of the process from cell sorting to sequencing. For example, we now utilize specialized reagents, acoustic liquid handling, and reduced reaction volumes eliminate non-target DNA contamination in WGA reactions. More specifically, we use a cleaner commercial WGA kit from Qiagen that employs a UV decontamination procedure initially developed at the JGI, and we use the Labcyte Echo for tip-less liquid transfer to set up 2uL reactions. Acoustic liquid handling also dramatically reduces reagent costs. In addition, we are exploring new cell lysis methods including treatment with Proteinase K, lysozyme, and other detergents, in order to complement standard alkaline lysis and allow for more efficient disruption of a wider range of cells. Incomplete lysis represents a major hurdle for WGA on some environmental samples, especially rhizosphere, peatland, and other soils. Finding effective lysis strategies that are also compatible with WGA is challenging, and we are currently assessing the impact of various strategies on genome recovery.

  11. Developing a 300C Analog Tool for EGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy

    2015-03-23

    This paper covers the development of a 300°C geothermal well monitoring tool for supporting future EGS (enhanced geothermal systems) power production. This is the first of 3 tools planed. This is an analog tool designed for monitoring well pressure and temperature. There is discussion on 3 different circuit topologies and the development of the supporting surface electronics and software. There is information on testing electronic circuits and component. One of the major components is the cable used to connect the analog tool to the surface.

  12. Genomes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, T. A. (Terence A.)

    2002-01-01

    ... of genome expression and replication processes, and transcriptomics and proteomics. This text is richly illustrated with clear, easy-to-follow, full color diagrams, which are downloadable from the book's website...

  13. A PSYCHOSOCIAL TOOL FOR CHILD'S DEVELOPMENT Nicholas

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They are often burdened with exceedingly great parental expectations particularly ... the life span, Smarts sees human development as: The scientific .... existence which is balance, speed and coordination. Dance: A ... In every work of art especially dance, what makes it more effective is .... The Benefits of Dance. Owerri: Ata ...

  14. Tools for Nanotechnology Education Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorothy Moore

    2010-09-27

    The overall focus of this project was the development of reusable, cost-effective educational modules for use with the table top scanning electron microscope (TTSEM). The goal of this project's outreach component was to increase students' exposure to the science and technology of nanoscience.

  15. Developing tools to sustain biological diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randy. Molina

    2004-01-01

    The Biodiversity Initiative strives to provide innovative solutions to the complex problem of managing forests for biodiversity. Although this initiative is in its beginning stages, an initial scoping meeting has already taken place and planning for the next steps is underway. The initiative is developing plans to conduct extensive scoping efforts in the management,...

  16. Development and characterization of genomic SSR markers in Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chengcheng; Wu, Yanqi; Taliaferro, Charles M; Bell, Greg E; Martin, Dennis L; Smith, Mike W

    2014-08-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are a major molecular tool for genetic and genomic research that have been extensively developed and used in major crops. However, few are available in African bermudagrass (Cynodon transvaalensis Burtt-Davy), an economically important warm-season turfgrass species. African bermudagrass is mainly used for hybridizations with common bermudagrass [C. dactylon var. dactylon (L.) Pers.] in the development of superior interspecific hybrid turfgrass cultivars. Accordingly, the major objective of this study was to develop and characterize a large set of SSR markers. Genomic DNA of C. transvaalensis '4200TN 24-2' from an Oklahoma State University (OSU) turf nursery was extracted for construction of four SSR genomic libraries enriched with [CA](n), [GA](n), [AAG](n), and [AAT](n) as core repeat motifs. A total of 3,064 clones were sequenced at the OSU core facility. The sequences were categorized into singletons and contiguous sequences to exclude redundancy. From the two sequence categories, 1,795 SSR loci were identified. After excluding duplicate SSRs by comparison with previously developed SSR markers using a nucleotide basic local alignment tool, 1,426 unique primer pairs (PPs) were designed. Out of the 1,426 designed PPs, 981 (68.8 %) amplified alleles of the expected size in the donor DNA. Polymorphisms of the SSR PPs tested in eight C. transvaalensis plants were 93 % polymorphic with 544 markers effective in all genotypes. Inheritance of the SSRs was examined in six F(1) progeny of African parents 'T577' × 'Uganda', indicating 917 markers amplified heritable alleles. The SSR markers developed in the study are the first large set of co-dominant markers in African bermudagrass and should be highly valuable for molecular and traditional breeding research.

  17. 78 FR 68459 - Medical Device Development Tools; Draft Guidance for Industry, Tool Developers, and Food and Drug...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-D-1279] Medical Device Development Tools; Draft Guidance for Industry, Tool Developers, and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food...

  18. EXPERT SYSTEMS - DEVELOPMENT OF AGRICULTURAL INSURANCE TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NAN Anca-Petruţa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Because of the fact that specialty agricultural assistance is not always available when the farmers need it, we identified expert systems as a strong instrument with an extended potential in agriculture. This started to grow in scale recently, including all socially-economic activity fields, having the role of collecting data regarding different aspects from human experts with the purpose of assisting the user in the necessary steps for solving problems, at the performance level of the expert, making his acquired knowledge and experience available. We opted for a general presentation of the expert systems as well as their necessity, because, the solution to develop the agricultural system can come from artificial intelligence by implementing the expert systems in the field of agricultural insurance, promoting existing insurance products, farmers finding options in depending on their necessities and possibilities. The objective of this article consists of collecting data about different aspects about specific areas of interest of agricultural insurance, preparing the database, a conceptual presentation of a pilot version which will become constantly richer depending on the answers received from agricultural producers, with the clearest exposure of knowledgebase possible. We can justify picking this theme with the fact that even while agricultural insurance plays a very important role in agricultural development, the registered result got from them are modest, reason why solutions need to be found in the scope of developing the agricultural sector. The importance of this consists in the proposal of an immediate viable solution to correspond with the current necessities of agricultural producers and in the proposal of an innovative solution, namely the implementation of expert system in agricultural insurance as a way of promoting insurance products. Our research, even though it treats the subject at an conceptual level, it wants to undertake an

  19. Libraries Are Dynamic Tools for National Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaoge Dorathy Agbo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Building an ideal nation requires a holistic approach. All facets of human activity must be harnessed while all indices of nation building must be taken care of. In doing this, all academic and professional disciplines are involved. Libraries are not exception. This paper looks at various types of libraries and their basic functions, their roles in national development, and in particular, the challenges facing library services in Nigeria, such as inadequately trained staff to meet the increasing demands of users.

  20. Infinity: An In-Silico Tool for Genome-Wide Prediction of Specific DNA Matrices in miRNA Genomic Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Emmanuela; Grandoni, Luca; Garibaldi, Francesca; Manni, Isabella; Filligoi, Giancarlo; Piaggio, Giulia; Gurtner, Aymone

    2016-01-01

    miRNAs are potent regulators of gene expression and modulate multiple cellular processes in physiology and pathology. Deregulation of miRNAs expression has been found in various cancer types, thus, miRNAs may be potential targets for cancer therapy. However, the mechanisms through which miRNAs are regulated in cancer remain unclear. Therefore, the identification of transcriptional factor-miRNA crosstalk is one of the most update aspects of the study of miRNAs regulation. In the present study we describe the development of a fast and user-friendly software, named infinity, able to find the presence of DNA matrices, such as binding sequences for transcriptional factors, on ~65kb (kilobase) of 939 human miRNA genomic sequences, simultaneously. Of note, the power of this software has been validated in vivo by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on a subset of new in silico identified target sequences (CCAAT) for the transcription factor NF-Y on colon cancer deregulated miRNA loci. Moreover, for the first time, we have demonstrated that NF-Y, through its CCAAT binding activity, regulates the expression of miRNA-181a, -181b, -21, -17, -130b, -301b in colon cancer cells. The infinity software that we have developed is a powerful tool to underscore new TF/miRNA regulatory networks. Infinity was implemented in pure Java using Eclipse framework, and runs on Linux and MS Windows machine, with MySQL database. The software is freely available on the web at https://github.com/bio-devel/infinity. The website is implemented in JavaScript, PHP and HTML with all major browsers supported.

  1. Infinity: An In-Silico Tool for Genome-Wide Prediction of Specific DNA Matrices in miRNA Genomic Loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuela Falcone

    Full Text Available miRNAs are potent regulators of gene expression and modulate multiple cellular processes in physiology and pathology. Deregulation of miRNAs expression has been found in various cancer types, thus, miRNAs may be potential targets for cancer therapy. However, the mechanisms through which miRNAs are regulated in cancer remain unclear. Therefore, the identification of transcriptional factor-miRNA crosstalk is one of the most update aspects of the study of miRNAs regulation.In the present study we describe the development of a fast and user-friendly software, named infinity, able to find the presence of DNA matrices, such as binding sequences for transcriptional factors, on ~65kb (kilobase of 939 human miRNA genomic sequences, simultaneously. Of note, the power of this software has been validated in vivo by performing chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on a subset of new in silico identified target sequences (CCAAT for the transcription factor NF-Y on colon cancer deregulated miRNA loci. Moreover, for the first time, we have demonstrated that NF-Y, through its CCAAT binding activity, regulates the expression of miRNA-181a, -181b, -21, -17, -130b, -301b in colon cancer cells.The infinity software that we have developed is a powerful tool to underscore new TF/miRNA regulatory networks.Infinity was implemented in pure Java using Eclipse framework, and runs on Linux and MS Windows machine, with MySQL database. The software is freely available on the web at https://github.com/bio-devel/infinity. The website is implemented in JavaScript, PHP and HTML with all major browsers supported.

  2. Genomic tools for evolution and conservation in the chimpanzee: Pan troglodytes ellioti is a genetically distinct population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory Bowden

    Full Text Available In spite of its evolutionary significance and conservation importance, the population structure of the common chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes, is still poorly understood. An issue of particular controversy is whether the proposed fourth subspecies of chimpanzee, Pan troglodytes ellioti, from parts of Nigeria and Cameroon, is genetically distinct. Although modern high-throughput SNP genotyping has had a major impact on our understanding of human population structure and demographic history, its application to ecological, demographic, or conservation questions in non-human species has been extremely limited. Here we apply these tools to chimpanzee population structure, using ∼700 autosomal SNPs derived from chimpanzee genomic data and a further ∼100 SNPs from targeted re-sequencing. We demonstrate conclusively the existence of P. t. ellioti as a genetically distinct subgroup. We show that there is clear differentiation between the verus, troglodytes, and ellioti populations at the SNP and haplotype level, on a scale that is greater than that separating continental human populations. Further, we show that only a small set of SNPs (10-20 is needed to successfully assign individuals to these populations. Tellingly, use of only mitochondrial DNA variation to classify individuals is erroneous in 4 of 54 cases, reinforcing the dangers of basing demographic inference on a single locus and implying that the demographic history of the species is more complicated than that suggested analyses based solely on mtDNA. In this study we demonstrate the feasibility of developing economical and robust tests of individual chimpanzee origin as well as in-depth studies of population structure. These findings have important implications for conservation strategies and our understanding of the evolution of chimpanzees. They also act as a proof-of-principle for the use of cheap high-throughput genomic methods for ecological questions.

  3. Development of Genomic Resources in the Species of Trifolium L. and Its Application in Forage Legume Breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Skøt

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Clovers (genus Trifolium are a large and widespread genus of legumes. A number of clovers are of agricultural importance as forage crops in grassland agriculture, particularly temperate areas. White clover (Trifolium repens L. is used in grazed pasture and red clover (T. pratense L. is widely cut and conserved as a winter feed. For the diploid red clover, genetic and genomic tools and resources have developed rapidly over the last five years including genetic and physical maps, BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome end sequence and transcriptome sequence information. This has paved the way for the use of genome wide selection and high throughput phenotyping in germplasm development. For the allotetraploid white clover progress has been slower although marker assisted selection is in use and relatively robust genetic maps and QTL (quantitative trait locus information now exist. For both species the sequencing of the model legume Medicago truncatula gene space is an important development to aid genomic, biological and evolutionary studies. The first genetic maps of another species, subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum L. have also been published and its comparative genomics with red clover and M. truncatula conducted. Next generation sequencing brings the potential to revolutionize clover genomics, but international consortia and effective use of germplasm, novel population structures and phenomics will be required to carry out effective translation into breeding. Another avenue for clover genomic and genetic improvement is interspecific hybridization. This approach has considerable potential with regard to crop improvement but also opens windows of opportunity for studies of biological and evolutionary processes.

  4. VisTool: A user interface and visualization development system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shangjin

    system – to simplify user interface development. VisTool allows user interface development without real programming. With VisTool a designer assembles visual objects (e.g. textboxes, ellipse, etc.) to visualize database contents. In VisTool, visual properties (e.g. color, position, etc.) can be formulas...... programming. However, in Software Engineering, software engineers who develop user interfaces do not follow it. In many cases, it is desirable to use graphical presentations, because a graphical presentation gives a better overview than text forms, and can improve task efficiency and user satisfaction....... However, it is more difficult to follow the classical usability approach for graphical presentation development. These difficulties result from the fact that designers cannot implement user interface with interactions and real data. We developed VisTool – a user interface and visualization development...

  5. Seductive Atmospheres: Using tools to effectuate spaces for Leadership Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Kasper Trolle; Clausen, Rune Thorbjørn; Madsen, Mona T

    2018-01-01

    Hospital, this study investigates how a business game is used as a tool to effectuate episodic spaces for leadership development. The study reveals three tool affordances and discusses how they enable and constrain episodic spaces for development and further develops the notion of seductive atmospheres......This study applies an affordance lens to understand the use of management tools and how atmospheres for change and development are created and exploited. Drawing on an ethnographic case study of a consultant-facilitated change intervention among a group of research leaders at a Danish Public...... as an important mechanism. The article suggests that a broader understanding of the use of tools and the role of atmospheres is essential for understanding how episodic spaces for development come to work in relation to organizational change and development....

  6. Geochip: A high throughput genomic tool for linking community structure to functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Liang, Yuting; He, Zhili; Li, Guanghe; Zhou, Jizhong

    2009-01-30

    GeoChip is a comprehensive functional gene array that targets key functional genes involved in the geochemical cycling of N, C, and P, sulfate reduction, metal resistance and reduction, and contaminant degradation. Studies have shown the GeoChip to be a sensitive, specific, and high-throughput tool for microbial community analysis that has the power to link geochemical processes with microbial community structure. However, several challenges remain regarding the development and applications of microarrays for microbial community analysis.

  7. Cytoscape: the network visualization tool for GenomeSpace workflows [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/47f

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Demchak

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Modern genomic analysis often requires workflows incorporating multiple best-of-breed tools. GenomeSpace is a web-based visual workbench that combines a selection of these tools with mechanisms that create data flows between them. One such tool is Cytoscape 3, a popular application that enables analysis and visualization of graph-oriented genomic networks. As Cytoscape runs on the desktop, and not in a web browser, integrating it into GenomeSpace required special care in creating a seamless user experience and enabling appropriate data flows. In this paper, we present the design and operation of the Cytoscape GenomeSpace app, which accomplishes this integration, thereby providing critical analysis and visualization functionality for GenomeSpace users. It has been downloaded over 850 times since the release of its first version in September, 2013.

  8. Cytoscape: the network visualization tool for GenomeSpace workflows [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3ph

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Demchak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Modern genomic analysis often requires workflows incorporating multiple best-ofbreed tools. GenomeSpace is a web-based visual workbench that combines a selection of these tools with mechanisms that create data flows between them. One such tool is Cytoscape 3, a popular application that enables analysis and visualization of graph-oriented genomic networks. As Cytoscape runs on the desktop, and not in a web browser, integrating it into GenomeSpace required special care in creating a seamless user experience and enabling appropriate data flows. In this paper, we present the design and operation of the Cytoscape GenomeSpace app, which accomplishes this integration, thereby providing critical analysis and visualization functionality for GenomeSpace users. It has been downloaded it over 850 times since the release of its first version in September, 2013.

  9. Software Development Methods and Tools: a New Zealand study

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Phillips; Elizabeth Kemp; Duncan Hedderley

    2005-01-01

    This study is a more detailed follow-up to a preliminary investigation of the practices of software engineers in New Zealand. The focus of this study is on the methods and tools used by software developers in their current organisation. The project involved detailed questionnaires being piloted and sent out to several hundred software developers. A central part of the research involved the identification of factors affecting the use and take-up of existing software development tools in the wo...

  10. The development of tool manufacture in humans: what helps young children make innovative tools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Jackie; Cutting, Nicola; Apperly, Ian A; Beck, Sarah R

    2013-11-19

    We know that even young children are proficient tool users, but until recently, little was known about how they make tools. Here, we will explore the concepts underlying tool making, and the kinds of information and putative cognitive abilities required for children to manufacture novel tools. We will review the evidence for novel tool manufacture from the comparative literature and present a growing body of data from children suggesting that innovation of the solution to a problem by making a tool is a much more challenging task than previously thought. Children's difficulty with these kinds of tasks does not seem to be explained by perseveration with unmodified tools, difficulty with switching to alternative strategies, task pragmatics or issues with permission. Rather, making novel tools (without having seen an example of the required tool within the context of the task) appears to be hard, because it is an example of an 'ill-structured problem'. In this type of ill-structured problem, the starting conditions and end goal are known, but the transformations and/or actions required to get from one to the other are not specified. We will discuss the implications of these findings for understanding the development of problem-solving in humans and other animals.

  11. The development of tool manufacture in humans: what helps young children make innovative tools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Jackie; Cutting, Nicola; Apperly, Ian A.; Beck, Sarah R.

    2013-01-01

    We know that even young children are proficient tool users, but until recently, little was known about how they make tools. Here, we will explore the concepts underlying tool making, and the kinds of information and putative cognitive abilities required for children to manufacture novel tools. We will review the evidence for novel tool manufacture from the comparative literature and present a growing body of data from children suggesting that innovation of the solution to a problem by making a tool is a much more challenging task than previously thought. Children's difficulty with these kinds of tasks does not seem to be explained by perseveration with unmodified tools, difficulty with switching to alternative strategies, task pragmatics or issues with permission. Rather, making novel tools (without having seen an example of the required tool within the context of the task) appears to be hard, because it is an example of an ‘ill-structured problem’. In this type of ill-structured problem, the starting conditions and end goal are known, but the transformations and/or actions required to get from one to the other are not specified. We will discuss the implications of these findings for understanding the development of problem-solving in humans and other animals. PMID:24101620

  12. Metagenomics as a tool to obtain full genomes of process-critical bacteria in engineered systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albertsen, Mads; Hugenholtz, Philip; Tyson, Gene W.

    of the community. The assembled genomes include many of the process-critical bacteria involved in wastewater treatment, such as Competibacter, Tetrasphaera and TM7. The approach is not limited to different extraction methods, but can be applied to any treatment that results in different relative abundance......Bacteria play a pivotal role in engineered systems such as wastewater treatment plants. Obtaining genomes of the bacteria provides the genetic potential of the system and also allows studies of in situ functions through transcriptomics and proteomics. Hence, it enables correlations of operational......, the sequencing of bulk genomic DNA from environmental samples, has the potential to provide genomes of this uncultured majority. However, so far only few bacterial genomes have been obtained from metagenomic data. In this study we present a new approach to obtain individual genomes from metagenomes. We deeply...

  13. Development of a core management tool for MYRRHA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jalůvka, David; Van den Eynde, Gert; Vandewalle, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • An in-core fuel management tool is being developed for the flexible irradiation machine MYRRHA. • Specific issues of the MYRRHA in-core fuel management are briefly discussed. • The tool addresses the loading pattern optimization problem. • Illustrative in-core fuel management optimization problems are solved using the tool. - Abstract: MYRRHA is an advanced multi-purpose irradiation facility under development at SCK• CEN in Mol, Belgium. In order to ensure an economical and safe operation of the reactor, an in-core fuel management tool is being developed within the project to address the loading pattern optimization problem. In the paper, the current version of the tool – its architecture and design, unique features, and the field of its application, are presented. In the second part of the paper, the tool’s capabilities are demonstrated on simple MYRRHA in-core fuel management optimization problems

  14. Software Development Methods and Tools: a New Zealand study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Phillips

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is a more detailed follow-up to a preliminary investigation of the practices of software engineers in New Zealand. The focus of this study is on the methods and tools used by software developers in their current organisation. The project involved detailed questionnaires being piloted and sent out to several hundred software developers. A central part of the research involved the identification of factors affecting the use and take-up of existing software development tools in the workplace. The full spectrum of tools from fully integrated I-CASE tools to individual software applications, such as drawing tools was investigated. This paper describes the project and presents the findings.

  15. Evaluation and selection of CASE tool for SMART OTS development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, K. O; Seo, S. M.; Seo, Y. S.; Koo, I. S.; Jang, M. H.

    1999-01-01

    CASE(Computer-Aided Software Engineering) tool is a software that aids in software engineering activities such as requirement analysis, design, testing, configuration management, and project management. The evaluation and selection of commercial CASE tools for the specific software development project is not a easy work because the technical ability of an evaluator and the maturity of a software development organization are required. In this paper, we discuss selection strategies, characteristic survey, evaluation criteria, and the result of CASE tool selection for the development of SMART(System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor) OTS(Operator Training Simulator)

  16. Market research companies and new product development tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, E.J.; Frambach, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This research investigates (1) the share of new product development (NPD) research services in market research (MR) companies’ turnover, (2) MR companies’ awareness and use of NPD tools and the modifications made to these NPD tools, and (3) MR company managers’ perceptions of the influence of client

  17. Market research companies and new product development tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, Edwin J.; Frambach, Ruud T.

    1998-01-01

    This research investigates (1) the share of new product development (NPD) research services in market research (MR) companies' turnover, (2) MR companies' awareness and use of NPD tools and the modifications made to these NPD tools, and (3) MR company managers' perceptions of the influence of client

  18. Developing Tool Support for Problem Diagrams with CPN and VDM++

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tjell, Simon; Lassen, Kristian Bisgaard

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe ongoing work on the development of tool support for formal description of domains found in Problem Diagrams. The purpose of the tool is to handle the generation of a CPN model based on a collection of Problem Diagrams. The Problem Diagrams are used for representing the ...

  19. Developing a verification tool for calculations dissemination through COBAYA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabater Alcaraz, A.; Rucabado Rucabado, G.; Cuervo Gomez, D.; Garcia Herranz, N.

    2014-01-01

    The development of a software tool that automates the comparison of results with previous versions of the code and results using models of accuracy is crucial for implementing the code new functionalities. The work presented here has been the generation the mentioned tool and the set of reference cases that have set up the afore mentioned matrix. (Author)

  20. Pupils, Tools and the Zone of Proximal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtahi, Yasmine

    2018-01-01

    In this article, I use the Vygotskian concept of the Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) to examine the learning experience of two grade seven pupils as they attempted to solve an addition of fractions problem using fraction strips. The aim is to highlight how tools can facilitate the enactment of a ZPD, within which the tool provides the guidance.…

  1. Development of a data capture tool for researching tech entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jakob Axel Bejbro; Howard, Thomas J.; McAloone, Tim C.

    2014-01-01

    . This paper elucidates the requirements for such tools by drawing on knowledge of the entrepreneurial phenomenon and by building on the existing research tools used in design research. On this basis, the development of a capture method for tech startup processes is described and its potential discussed....

  2. User Studies: Developing Learning Strategy Tool Software for Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Gail E.; Koury, Kevin A.; Peng, Hsinyi

    This paper is a report of user studies for developing learning strategy tool software for children. The prototype software demonstrated is designed for children with learning and behavioral disabilities. The tools consist of easy-to-use templates for creating organizational, memory, and learning approach guides for use in classrooms and at home.…

  3. A genomic atlas of human adrenal and gonad development

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Valle, Ignacio; Buonocore, Federica; Duncan, Andrew J.; Lin, Lin; Barenco, Martino; Parnaik, Rahul; Shah, Sonia; Hubank, Mike; Gerrelli, Dianne; Achermann, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: In humans, the adrenal glands and gonads undergo distinct biological events between 6-10 weeks post conception (wpc), such as testis determination, the onset of steroidogenesis and primordial germ cell development. However, relatively little is currently known about the genetic mechanisms underlying these processes. We therefore aimed to generate a detailed genomic atlas of adrenal and gonad development across these critical stages of human embryonic and fetal development. Methods: RNA was extracted from 53 tissue samples between 6-10 wpc (adrenal, testis, ovary and control). Affymetrix array analysis was performed and differential gene expression was analysed using Bioconductor. A mathematical model was constructed to investigate time-series changes across the dataset. Pathway analysis was performed using ClueGo and cellular localisation of novel factors confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Results: Using this approach, we have identified novel components of adrenal development (e.g. ASB4, NPR3) and confirmed the role of SRY as the main human testis-determining gene. By mathematical modelling time-series data we have found new genes up-regulated with SOX9 in the testis (e.g. CITED1), which may represent components of the testis development pathway. We have shown that testicular steroidogenesis has a distinct onset at around 8 wpc and identified potential novel components in adrenal and testicular steroidogenesis (e.g. MGARP, FOXO4, MAP3K15, GRAMD1B, RMND2), as well as testis biomarkers (e.g. SCUBE1). We have also shown that the developing human ovary expresses distinct subsets of genes (e.g. OR10G9, OR4D5), but enrichment for established biological pathways is limited. Conclusion: This genomic atlas is revealing important novel aspects of human development and new candidate genes for adrenal and reproductive disorders. PMID:28459107

  4. GenHtr: a tool for comparative assessment of genetic heterogeneity in microbial genomes generated by massive short-read sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu GongXin

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microevolution is the study of short-term changes of alleles within a population and their effects on the phenotype of organisms. The result of the below-species-level evolution is heterogeneity, where populations consist of subpopulations with a large number of structural variations. Heterogeneity analysis is thus essential to our understanding of how selective and neutral forces shape bacterial populations over a short period of time. The Solexa Genome Analyzer, a next-generation sequencing platform, allows millions of short sequencing reads to be obtained with great accuracy, allowing for the ability to study the dynamics of the bacterial population at the whole genome level. The tool referred to as GenHtr was developed for genome-wide heterogeneity analysis. Results For particular bacterial strains, GenHtr relies on a set of Solexa short reads on given bacteria pathogens and their isogenic reference genome to identify heterogeneity sites, the chromosomal positions with multiple variants of genes in the bacterial population, and variations that occur in large gene families. GenHtr accomplishes this by building and comparatively analyzing genome-wide heterogeneity genotypes for both the newly sequenced genomes (using massive short-read sequencing and their isogenic reference (using simulated data. As proof of the concept, this approach was applied to SRX007711, the Solexa sequencing data for a newly sequenced Staphylococcus aureus subsp. USA300 cell line, and demonstrated that it could predict such multiple variants. They include multiple variants of genes critical in pathogenesis, e.g. genes encoding a LysR family transcriptional regulator, 23 S ribosomal RNA, and DNA mismatch repair protein MutS. The heterogeneity results in non-synonymous and nonsense mutations, leading to truncated proteins for both LysR and MutS. Conclusion GenHtr was developed for genome-wide heterogeneity analysis. Although it is much more time

  5. Designing a tool for curriculum leadership development in postgraduate programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Avizhgan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Leadership in the area of curriculum development is increasingly important as we look for ways to improve our programmes and practices. In curriculum studies, leadership has received little attention. Considering the lack of an evaluation tool with objective criteria in postgraduate curriculum leadership process, this study aimed to design a specific tool and determine the validity and reliability of the tool. Method: This study is a methodological research.  At first, domains and items of the tool were determined through expert interviews and literature review. Then, using Delphi technique, 54 important criteria were developed. A panel of experts was used to confirm content and face validity. Reliability was determined by a descriptive study in which 30 faculties from two of Isfahan universities and was estimated by internal consistency. The data were analyzed by SPSS software, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient and reliability analysis. Results: At first, considering the definition of curriculum leadership determined the domains and items of the tool and they were developed primary tool. Expert’s faculties’ views were used in deferent stages of development and psychometry. The tool internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha coefficient times was 96.5. This was determined for each domain separately. Conclution: Applying this instrument can improve the effectiveness of curriculum leadership. Identifying the characteristics of successful and effective leaders, and utilizing this knowledge in developing and implementing curriculum might help us to have better respond to the changing needs of our students, teachers and schools of tomorrow.

  6. Genome-wide characterization of microsatelittes and marker development in the carcinogenic liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao T.B.; Arimatsu, Yuji; Hong, Sung-Jong; Brindley, Paul J.; Blair, David; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-01-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is an important carcinogenic human liver fluke endemic in East and Southeast Asia. There are several conventional molecular markers have been used for identification and genetic diversity, however, no information about microsatellites of this liver fluke published so far. We here report microsatellite characterization and marker development for genetic diversity study in C. sinensis using genome-wide bioinformatics approach. Based on our search criteria, a total of 256,990 microsatellites (≥ 12 base pairs) were identified from genome database of C. sinensis with hexa-nucleotide motif being the most abundant (51%) followed by penta-nucleotide (18.3%) and tri-nucleotide (12.7%). The tetra-nucleotide, di-nucleotide and mononucleotide motifs accounted for 9.75 %, 7.63% and 0.14%, respectively. The total length of all microsatellites accounts for 0. 72 % of 547 Mb of the whole genome size and the frequency of microsatellites were found to be one microsatellite in every 2.13 kb of DNA. For the di-, tri, and tetra-nucleotide, the repeat numbers redundant are six (28%), four (45%) and three (76%), respectively. The ATC repeat is the most abundant microsatellites followed by AT, AAT and AC, respectively. Within 40 microsatellite loci developed, 24 microsatellite markers showed potential to differentiate between C. sinensis and O. viverrini. Seven out of 24 loci showed heterozygous with observed heterozygosity ranged from 0.467 to 1. Four-primer sets could amplify both C. sinensis and O. viverrini DNA with different sizes. This study provides basic information of C. sinensis microsatellites and the genome-wide markers developed may be a useful tool for genetic study of C. sinensis. PMID:25782682

  7. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites and marker development in the carcinogenic liver fluke Clonorchis sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao T B; Arimatsu, Yuji; Hong, Sung-Jong; Brindley, Paul J; Blair, David; Laha, Thewarach; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-06-01

    Clonorchis sinensis is an important carcinogenic human liver fluke endemic in East and Southeast Asia. There are several conventional molecular markers that have been used for identification and genetic diversity; however, no information about microsatellites of this liver fluke is published so far. We here report microsatellite characterization and marker development for a genetic diversity study in C. sinensis, using a genome-wide bioinformatics approach. Based on our search criteria, a total of 256,990 microsatellites (≥12 base pairs) were identified from a genome database of C. sinensis, with hexanucleotide motif being the most abundant (51%) followed by pentanucleotide (18.3%) and trinucleotide (12.7%). The tetranucleotide, dinucleotide, and mononucleotide motifs accounted for 9.75, 7.63, and 0.14%, respectively. The total length of all microsatellites accounts for 0. 72% of 547 Mb of the whole genome size, and the frequency of microsatellites was found to be one microsatellite in every 2.13 kb of DNA. For the di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide, the repeat numbers redundant are six (28%), four (45%), and three (76%), respectively. The ATC repeat is the most abundant microsatellites followed by AT, AAT, and AC, respectively. Within 40 microsatellite loci developed, 24 microsatellite markers showed potential to differentiate between C. sinensis and Opisthorchis viverrini. Seven out of 24 loci showed to be heterozygous with observed heterozygosity that ranged from 0.467 to 1. Four primer sets could amplify both C. sinensis and O. viverrini DNA with different sizes. This study provides basic information of C. sinensis microsatellites, and the genome-wide markers developed may be a useful tool for the genetic study of C. sinensis.

  8. Development of tools for optimization of HWC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikmark, Gunnar; Lundgren, Klas; Wijkstroem, Hjalmar; Pein, Katarina; Ullberg, Mats

    2004-06-01

    An ECP model for the Swedish Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) was developed in a previous project sponsored by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate. The present work is an extension of that effort. The model work has been extended in three ways. Some potential problem areas of the ECP sub-model have been treated in full detail. A comprehensive calibration data set has been assembled from plant data and from laboratory and in-plant experiments. The model has been fitted to the calibration data set and the model parameters adjusted. The work on the ECP sub-model has demonstrated that the generalised Butler Volmer equation, as previously used, adequately describes the electrochemistry. Thus, there is no need to treat the system surface oxides as semiconductors or to take double layer effects into account. The existence of a pseudo potential for the reaction of oxygen on stainless steel is confirmed. The concentration dependence and temperature dependence of the exchange current densities are still unclear. An experimental investigation of these is therefore desirable. An interesting alternative to a conventional experimental set-up is to combine modelling with simpler and more easily controlled experiments. In addition to a calibration data set, the survey of plant data has also led to an improved understanding of the necessary parameters of an ECP model. Thus, variations of the H 2 injection rate at constant reactor power level and constant recirculation flow rate were traced to variations of the relative power level of the fuel elements in the core periphery. The power level in the core periphery determines the dose rate in the down comer and controls the recombination reaction that is fundamental to Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC). To accurately model ECP as a function of hydrogen injection rate and other plant parameters, the relative power level of the core periphery is a necessary model parameter that has to be regularly updated from core management codes

  9. Modulated modularity clustering as an exploratory tool for functional genomic inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Stone

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the advent of high-throughput assays, coupled with their diminishing cost, has facilitated a systems approach to biology. As a consequence, massive amounts of data are currently being generated, requiring efficient methodology aimed at the reduction of scale. Whole-genome transcriptional profiling is a standard component of systems-level analyses, and to reduce scale and improve inference clustering genes is common. Since clustering is often the first step toward generating hypotheses, cluster quality is critical. Conversely, because the validation of cluster-driven hypotheses is indirect, it is critical that quality clusters not be obtained by subjective means. In this paper, we present a new objective-based clustering method and demonstrate that it yields high-quality results. Our method, modulated modularity clustering (MMC, seeks community structure in graphical data. MMC modulates the connection strengths of edges in a weighted graph to maximize an objective function (called modularity that quantifies community structure. The result of this maximization is a clustering through which tightly-connected groups of vertices emerge. Our application is to systems genetics, and we quantitatively compare MMC both to the hierarchical clustering method most commonly employed and to three popular spectral clustering approaches. We further validate MMC through analyses of human and Drosophila melanogaster expression data, demonstrating that the clusters we obtain are biologically meaningful. We show MMC to be effective and suitable to applications of large scale. In light of these features, we advocate MMC as a standard tool for exploration and hypothesis generation.

  10. Development of road infrastructure as a tool of transforming Ibiono ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal of Social Sciences ... Development of road infrastructure as a tool of transforming Ibiono Ibom local government area. V Umoren ... The improvement of transportation network in the rural area in this regard becomes imperative.

  11. Psychometric properties of a Mental Health Team Development Audit Tool.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roncalli, Silvia

    2013-02-01

    To assist in improving team working in Community Mental Health Teams (CMHTs), the Mental Health Commission formulated a user-friendly but yet-to-be validated 25-item Mental Health Team Development Audit Tool (MHDAT).

  12. Water Loss Management: Tools and Methods for Developing Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutikanga, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    Water utilities in developing countries are struggling to provide customers with a reliable level of service due to their peculiar water distribution characteristics including poorly zoned networks with irregular supply operating under restricted budgets. These unique conditions demand unique tools

  13. Water Loss Management : Tools and Methods for Developing Countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mutikanga, H.E.

    2012-01-01

    Water utilities in developing countries are struggling to provide customers with a reliable level of service due to their peculiar water distribution characteristics including poorly zoned networks with irregular supply operating under restricted budgets. These unique conditions demand unique tools

  14. Economy diversification: a potent tool for tourism development in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Economy diversification: a potent tool for tourism development in Nigeria. ... AFRREV STECH: An International Journal of Science and Technology ... The diversity of cultural attractions, the friendly disposition of the people, revamped National ...

  15. Bioinformatics tools for development of fast and cost effective simple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioinformatics tools for development of fast and cost effective simple sequence repeat ... comparative mapping and exploration of functional genetic diversity in the ... Already, a number of computer programs have been implemented that aim at ...

  16. Optical Whole-Genome Restriction Mapping as a Tool for Rapidly Distinguishing and Identifying Bacterial Contaminants in Clinical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Article 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) Oct 2011 – Aug 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Optical Whole-Genome Restriction Mapping as a Tool for Rapidly...multiple bacteria could be uniquely identified within mixtures. In the first set of experiments, three unique organisms ( Bacillus subtilis subsp. globigii...be useful in monitoring nosocomial outbreaks in neonatal and intensive care wards, or even as an initial screen for antibiotic resistant strains

  17. Genomics in development of radiation countermeasure from Hippophae rhamnoides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhu Bala

    2013-01-01

    Development of an effective and non-toxic radiation countermeasure has been a global challenge, till date. On one hand single molecules have failed due to unacceptable toxicity and on the other hand herbal drugs, though non-toxic, are generally neglected because of issues such as incomplete understanding on mechanisms of actions, efficacy and quality control. In the conventional drug discovery process, a single active constituent is isolated, purified, and standardized, but herbal drugs have complex composition and multiple targeted actions. The assessment of efficacy and toxicity of herbal drugs is, therefore, not as straight forward as in case of single active compound. The completion of genome projects of human, mouse and many other simpler experimental models has opened multiple newer avenues for evaluating the metabolism, safety and efficacy of herbal drugs. The radioprotective properties of leaves of Hippophae rhamnoides L. (common name Seabuckthorn, family Eleagnaceae) were reported (Bala et al., 2009, J Herbs and Med Plants). Administration of SBL-1 (a coded herbal preparation from Seabuckthorn leaves), before whole body exposure to lethal dose of 60 Co-gamma-rays (10 Gy), rendered >90% survivors in mice population, while 100% mortality was observed in non-SBL-1 treated, 60 Co-gamma- irradiated (10 Gy) controls. Though, plant H. rhamnoides is popular for its medicinal and neutraceutical values and finds place is in many traditional medicinal systems world over, its prophylactic use as a radiation countermeasure is novel and needed thorough evaluation. To gain in depth understanding on metabolism and safety of SBL-1, the experimental animals were treated with radioprotective concentration of SBL-1. The genome evaluation was performed at different time intervals after the treatment. This talk highlights some of the prominent molecular pathways and genes affected by SBL-1 treatment in experimental animals. Our study suggested that application of genomics

  18. The plant ontology as a tool for comparative plant anatomy and genomic analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant science is now a major player in the fields of genomics, gene expression analysis, phenomics and metabolomics. Recent advances in sequencing technologies have led to a windfall of data, with new species being added rapidly to the list of species whose genomes have been decoded. The Plant Ontol...

  19. FGF: A web tool for Fishing Gene Family in a whole genome database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Hongkun; Shi, Junjie; Fang, Xiaodong

    2007-01-01

    Gene duplication is an important process in evolution. The availability of genome sequences of a number of organisms has made it possible to conduct comprehensive searches for duplicated genes enabling informative studies of their evolution. We have established the FGF (Fishing Gene Family) progr...... is freely available on a web server at http://fgf.genomics.org.cn/...

  20. Development of the major trauma case review tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Kate; Mitchell, Rebecca; McCarthy, Amy; Wilson, Kellie; Van, Connie; Kennedy, Belinda; Tall, Gary; Holland, Andrew; Foster, Kim; Dickinson, Stuart; Stelfox, Henry T

    2017-02-28

    As many as half of all patients with major traumatic injuries do not receive the recommended care, with variance in preventable mortality reported across the globe. This variance highlights the need for a comprehensive process for monitoring and reviewing patient care, central to which is a consistent peer-review process that includes trauma system safety and human factors. There is no published, evidence-informed standardised tool that considers these factors for use in adult or paediatric trauma case peer-review. The aim of this research was to develop and validate a trauma case review tool to facilitate clinical review of paediatric trauma patient care in extracting information to facilitate monitoring, inform change and enable loop closure. Development of the trauma case review tool was multi-faceted, beginning with a review of the trauma audit tool literature. Data were extracted from the literature to inform iterative tool development using a consensus approach. Inter-rater agreement was assessed for both the pilot and finalised versions of the tool. The final trauma case review tool contained ten sections, including patient factors (such as pre-existing conditions), presenting problem, a timeline of events, factors contributing to the care delivery problem (including equipment, work environment, staff action, organizational factors), positive aspects of care and the outcome of panel discussion. After refinement, the inter-rater reliability of the human factors and outcome components of the tool improved with an average 86% agreement between raters. This research developed an evidence-informed tool for use in paediatric trauma case review that considers both system safety and human factors to facilitate clinical review of trauma patient care. This tool can be used to identify opportunities for improvement in trauma care and guide quality assurance activities. Validation is required in the adult population.

  1. Effectiveness of operation tools developed by KEKB operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, K.; Satoh, Y.; Kitabayashi, T.

    2004-01-01

    The main tasks of KEKB (High Energy Accelerator Research Organization B-physics) operators are beam tuning and injection, operation logging, monitoring of accelerator conditions and safety management. New beam tuning methods are frequently applied to KEKB in order to accomplish high luminosity. In such a situation, various operation tools have been developed by the operators to realize efficient operation. In this paper, we describe effectiveness of tools developed by the operators. (author)

  2. New developments of RNAi in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis: prospects for high-throughput, genome-wide, functional genomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tercio Goes

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Fungal Genome Initiative of the Broad Institute, in partnership with the Paracoccidioides research community, has recently sequenced the genome of representative isolates of this human-pathogen dimorphic fungus: Pb18 (S1, Pb03 (PS2 and Pb01. The accomplishment of future high-throughput, genome-wide, functional genomics will rely upon appropriate molecular tools and straightforward techniques to streamline the generation of stable loss-of-function phenotypes. In the past decades, RNAi has emerged as the most robust genetic technique to modulate or to suppress gene expression in diverse eukaryotes, including fungi. These molecular tools and techniques, adapted for RNAi, were up until now unavailable for P. brasiliensis.In this paper, we report Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation of yeast cells for high-throughput applications with which higher transformation frequencies of 150±24 yeast cell transformants per 1×106 viable yeast cells were obtained. Our approach is based on a bifunctional selective marker fusion protein consisted of the Streptoalloteichus hindustanus bleomycin-resistance gene (Shble and the intrinsically fluorescent monomeric protein mCherry which was codon-optimized for heterologous expression in P. brasiliensis. We also report successful GP43 gene knock-down through the expression of intron-containing hairpin RNA (ihpRNA from a Gateway-adapted cassette (cALf which was purpose-built for gene silencing in a high-throughput manner. Gp43 transcript levels were reduced by 73.1±22.9% with this approach.We have a firm conviction that the genetic transformation technique and the molecular tools herein described will have a relevant contribution in future Paracoccidioides spp. functional genomics research.

  3. An integrated environment for developing object-oriented CAE tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, P.; Ryba, M.; Baitinger, U.G. [Integrated System Engeneering, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents how object oriented techniques can applied to improve the development of CAE tools. For the design of modular and reusable software systems we use predefined and well tested building blocks. These building blocks are reusable software components based on object-oriented technology which allows the assembling of software systems. Today CAE tools are typically very complex and computation extensive. Therefore we need a concept, that join the advantages of the object-oriented paradigm with the advantages of parallel and distributed programming. So we present a design environment for the development of concurrent-object oriented CAE tools called CoDO.

  4. Genome-wide screening and identification of antigens for rickettsial vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The capacity to identify immunogens for vaccine development by genome-wide screening has been markedly enhanced by the availability of complete microbial genome sequences coupled to rapid proteomic and bioinformatic analysis. Critical to this genome-wide screening is in vivo testing in the context o...

  5. HANDS: a tool for genome-wide discovery of subgenome-specific base-identity in polyploids.

    KAUST Repository

    Mithani, Aziz

    2013-09-24

    The analysis of polyploid genomes is problematic because homeologous subgenome sequences are closely related. This relatedness makes it difficult to assign individual sequences to the specific subgenome from which they are derived, and hinders the development of polyploid whole genome assemblies.We here present a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based approach for assignment of subgenome-specific base-identity at sites containing homeolog-specific polymorphisms (HSPs): \\'HSP base Assignment using NGS data through Diploid Similarity\\' (HANDS). We show that HANDS correctly predicts subgenome-specific base-identity at >90% of assayed HSPs in the hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) transcriptome, thus providing a substantial increase in accuracy versus previous methods for homeolog-specific base assignment.We conclude that HANDS enables rapid and accurate genome-wide discovery of homeolog-specific base-identity, a capability having multiple applications in polyploid genomics.

  6. HANDS: a tool for genome-wide discovery of subgenome-specific base-identity in polyploids.

    KAUST Repository

    Mithani, Aziz; Belfield, Eric J; Brown, Carly; Jiang, Caifu; Leach, Lindsey J; Harberd, Nicholas P

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of polyploid genomes is problematic because homeologous subgenome sequences are closely related. This relatedness makes it difficult to assign individual sequences to the specific subgenome from which they are derived, and hinders the development of polyploid whole genome assemblies.We here present a next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based approach for assignment of subgenome-specific base-identity at sites containing homeolog-specific polymorphisms (HSPs): 'HSP base Assignment using NGS data through Diploid Similarity' (HANDS). We show that HANDS correctly predicts subgenome-specific base-identity at >90% of assayed HSPs in the hexaploid bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) transcriptome, thus providing a substantial increase in accuracy versus previous methods for homeolog-specific base assignment.We conclude that HANDS enables rapid and accurate genome-wide discovery of homeolog-specific base-identity, a capability having multiple applications in polyploid genomics.

  7. Confluence of genes, environment, development, and behavior in a post Genome-Wide Association Study world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrieze, Scott I; Iacono, William G; McGue, Matt

    2012-11-01

    This article serves to outline a research paradigm to investigate main effects and interactions of genes, environment, and development on behavior and psychiatric illness. We provide a historical context for candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies, including benefits, limitations, and expected payoffs. Using substance use and abuse as our driving example, we then turn to the importance of etiological psychological theory in guiding genetic, environmental, and developmental research, as well as the utility of refined phenotypic measures, such as endophenotypes, in the pursuit of etiological understanding and focused tests of genetic and environmental associations. Phenotypic measurement has received considerable attention in the history of psychology and is informed by psychometrics, whereas the environment remains relatively poorly measured and is often confounded with genetic effects (i.e., gene-environment correlation). Genetically informed designs, which are no longer limited to twin and adoption studies thanks to ever-cheaper genotyping, are required to understand environmental influences. Finally, we outline the vast amount of individual difference in structural genomic variation, most of which remains to be leveraged in genetic association tests. Although the genetic data can be massive and burdensome (tens of millions of variants per person), we argue that improved understanding of genomic structure and function will provide investigators with new tools to test specific a priori hypotheses derived from etiological psychological theory, much like current candidate gene research but with less confusion and more payoff than candidate gene research has to date.

  8. Genome-wide analysis of signatures of selection in populations of African honey bees (Apis mellifera) using new web-based tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Zachary L; Niño, Elina L; Patch, Harland M; Bedoya-Reina, Oscar C; Baumgarten, Tracey; Muli, Elliud; Mumoki, Fiona; Ratan, Aakrosh; McGraw, John; Frazier, Maryann; Masiga, Daniel; Schuster, Stephen; Grozinger, Christina M; Miller, Webb

    2015-07-10

    With the development of inexpensive, high-throughput sequencing technologies, it has become feasible to examine questions related to population genetics and molecular evolution of non-model species in their ecological contexts on a genome-wide scale. Here, we employed a newly developed suite of integrated, web-based programs to examine population dynamics and signatures of selection across the genome using several well-established tests, including F ST, pN/pS, and McDonald-Kreitman. We applied these techniques to study populations of honey bees (Apis mellifera) in East Africa. In Kenya, there are several described A. mellifera subspecies, which are thought to be localized to distinct ecological regions. We performed whole genome sequencing of 11 worker honey bees from apiaries distributed throughout Kenya and identified 3.6 million putative single-nucleotide polymorphisms. The dense coverage allowed us to apply several computational procedures to study population structure and the evolutionary relationships among the populations, and to detect signs of adaptive evolution across the genome. While there is considerable gene flow among the sampled populations, there are clear distinctions between populations from the northern desert region and those from the temperate, savannah region. We identified several genes showing population genetic patterns consistent with positive selection within African bee populations, and between these populations and European A. mellifera or Asian Apis florea. These results lay the groundwork for future studies of adaptive ecological evolution in honey bees, and demonstrate the use of new, freely available web-based tools and workflows ( http://usegalaxy.org/r/kenyanbee ) that can be applied to any model system with genomic information.

  9. Development Of Remote Hanford Connector Gasket Replacement Tooling For DWPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krementz, D.; Coughlin, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to develop tooling and equipment to remotely replace gaskets in mechanical Hanford connectors to reduce personnel radiation exposure as compared to the current hands-on method. It is also expected that radiation levels will continually increase with future waste streams. The equipment is operated in the Remote Equipment Decontamination Cell (REDC), which is equipped with compressed air, two master-slave manipulators (MSM's) and an electro-mechanical manipulator (EMM) arm for operation of the remote tools. The REDC does not provide access to electrical power, so the equipment must be manually or pneumatically operated. The MSM's have a load limit at full extension of ten pounds, which limited the weight of the installation tool. In order to remotely replace Hanford connector gaskets several operations must be performed remotely, these include: removal of the spent gasket and retaining ring (retaining ring is also called snap ring), loading the new snap ring and gasket into the installation tool and installation of the new gasket into the Hanford connector. SRNL developed and tested tools that successfully perform all of the necessary tasks. Removal of snap rings from horizontal and vertical connectors is performed by separate air actuated retaining ring removal tools and is manipulated in the cell by the MSM. In order install a new gasket, the snap ring loader is used to load a new snap ring into a groove in the gasket installation tool. A new gasket is placed on the installation tool and retained by custom springs. An MSM lifts the installation tool and presses the mounted gasket against the connector block. Once the installation tool is in position, the gasket and snap ring are installed onto the connector by pneumatic actuation. All of the tools are located on a custom work table with a pneumatic valve station that directs compressed air to the desired tool and

  10. Developing climate resilient rice through genomics assisted breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valarmathi Muthu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the major cereal food crops whose production has to be doubled to achieve the projected demand [1] and current yield trends are not sufficient to meet the projected growth in production. Increasing the rice production by 30% during 2030 needs overcoming challenges viz., yield plateau, declining land, water and labor resources and predicted effects of global climate change. Development of high performance rice genotypes with enhanced yield potential and resilience to climate change will help in sustained increase in rice production. Deployment of genomic technologies can accelerate development and delivery of improved germplasm with enhanced resilience and adaptability [2, 3]. In this context, the present study was undertaken with an aim of developing rice genotypes pyramided with QTLs/genes controlling tolerance against various biotic and abiotic stresses viz., bacterial leaf blight (xa13, Xa21, blast (Pi9, Gall midge (Gm4, drought (qDTY1.1 qDTY2.1, submergence (Sub1 and salinity (Saltol. CBMAS14065 an elite culture harboring QTLs controlling tolerance against drought, salinity and submergence was crossed with a donor harboring BLB, Blast and Gall midge resistant genes. True F1s were backcrossed with CBMAS14065 and BC1F1 progenies were subjected to foreground selection using markers linked to the target traits. Superior plants (18 of BC1F1 generation were subjected to background selection which revealed 71.42 - 86.90% recurrent parent (CBMAS14065 genome recovery. Selected BC1F1 plants were advanced to BC2F1 generation backcrossing with CBMAS14065. In BC2F1 generation, through foreground selection 6-8 QTL/gene positive plants have been selected and advanced for further evaluation. The superior lines with desired QTLs/genes will be subjected to rigorous phenotypic evaluation against target stresses and advanced further.

  11. Embedded Systems Development Tools: A MODUS-oriented Market Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loupis Michalis

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The embedded systems technology has perhaps been the most dominating technology in high-tech industries, in the past decade. The industry has correctly identified the potential of this technology and has put its efforts into exploring its full potential. Objectives: The goal of the paper is to explore the versatility of the application in the embedded system development based on one FP7-SME project. Methods/Approach: Embedded applications normally demand high resilience and quality, as well as conformity to quality standards and rigid performance. As a result embedded system developers have adopted software methods that yield high quality. The qualitative approach to examining embedded systems development tools has been applied in this work. Results: This paper presents a MODUS-oriented market analysis in the domains of Formal Verification tools, HW/SW co-simulation tools, Software Performance Optimization tools and Code Generation tools. Conclusions: The versatility of applications this technology serves is amazing. With all this performance potential, the technology has carried with itself a large number of issues which the industry essentially needs to resolve to be able to harness the full potential contained. The MODUS project toolset addressed four discrete domains of the ESD Software Market, in which corresponding open tools were developed

  12. Genetics and Genomics: Discovery, Validation, and Utility of Novel Tools for management of Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W. Shindel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomics is the science of how genes influence human health and disease states. It differs from traditional genetic screening in that the transcriptional activity (or other markers in full panels of related genes are studied. Compared to simple genetic testing, assessment of expression levels in a panel of genes provides a more nuanced and holistic understanding of genetic modulation of human disease. Genomic testing may be used to great effect in resolving controversial questions on detection and treatment of prostate cancer. Genomic tests are currently in use for numerous facets of prostate cancer care, including screening, biopsy, and treatment planning. The clinical validity (predictive capacity of these assays has been well established; studies on clinical utility (i.e. usefulness of these tests in guiding patient/provider decisions have shown promising results. Men’s health specialists should be familiar with the role genomic testing will play in contemporary management of prostate cancer.

  13. MSeqDR mvTool: A mitochondrial DNA Web and API resource for comprehensive variant annotation, universal nomenclature collation, and reference genome conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lishuang; Attimonelli, Marcella; Bai, Renkui; Lott, Marie T; Wallace, Douglas C; Falk, Marni J; Gai, Xiaowu

    2018-06-01

    Accurate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variant annotation is essential for the clinical diagnosis of diverse human diseases. Substantial challenges to this process include the inconsistency in mtDNA nomenclatures, the existence of multiple reference genomes, and a lack of reference population frequency data. Clinicians need a simple bioinformatics tool that is user-friendly, and bioinformaticians need a powerful informatics resource for programmatic usage. Here, we report the development and functionality of the MSeqDR mtDNA Variant Tool set (mvTool), a one-stop mtDNA variant annotation and analysis Web service. mvTool is built upon the MSeqDR infrastructure (https://mseqdr.org), with contributions of expert curated data from MITOMAP (https://www.mitomap.org) and HmtDB (https://www.hmtdb.uniba.it/hmdb). mvTool supports all mtDNA nomenclatures, converts variants to standard rCRS- and HGVS-based nomenclatures, and annotates novel mtDNA variants. Besides generic annotations from dbNSFP and Variant Effect Predictor (VEP), mvTool provides allele frequencies in more than 47,000 germline mitogenomes, and disease and pathogenicity classifications from MSeqDR, Mitomap, HmtDB and ClinVar (Landrum et al., 2013). mvTools also provides mtDNA somatic variants annotations. "mvTool API" is implemented for programmatic access using inputs in VCF, HGVS, or classical mtDNA variant nomenclatures. The results are reported as hyperlinked html tables, JSON, Excel, and VCF formats. MSeqDR mvTool is freely accessible at https://mseqdr.org/mvtool.php. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A Scaffold Analysis Tool Using Mate-Pair Information in Genome Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-Gyu Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a Windows-based program, ConPath, as a scaffold analyzer. ConPath constructs scaffolds by ordering and orienting separate sequence contigs by exploiting the mate-pair information between contig-pairs. Our algorithm builds directed graphs from link information and traverses them to find the longest acyclic graphs. Using end read pairs of fixed-sized mate-pair libraries, ConPath determines relative orientations of all contigs, estimates the gap size of each adjacent contig pair, and reports wrong assembly information by validating orientations and gap sizes. We have utilized ConPath in more than 10 microbial genome projects, including Mannheimia succiniciproducens and Vibro vulnificus, where we verified contig assembly and identified several erroneous contigs using the four types of error defined in ConPath. Also, ConPath supports some convenient features and viewers that permit investigation of each contig in detail; these include contig viewer, scaffold viewer, edge information list, mate-pair list, and the printing of complex scaffold structures.

  15. Analysis of Multiple Genomic Sequence Alignments: A Web Resource, Online Tools, and Lessons Learned From Analysis of Mammalian SCL Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Michael A.; Donaldson, Ian J.; Gilbert, James; Grafham, Darren; Rogers, Jane; Green, Anthony R.; Göttgens, Berthold

    2004-01-01

    Comparative analysis of genomic sequences is becoming a standard technique for studying gene regulation. However, only a limited number of tools are currently available for the analysis of multiple genomic sequences. An extensive data set for the testing and training of such tools is provided by the SCL gene locus. Here we have expanded the data set to eight vertebrate species by sequencing the dog SCL locus and by annotating the dog and rat SCL loci. To provide a resource for the bioinformatics community, all SCL sequences and functional annotations, comprising a collation of the extensive experimental evidence pertaining to SCL regulation, have been made available via a Web server. A Web interface to new tools specifically designed for the display and analysis of multiple sequence alignments was also implemented. The unique SCL data set and new sequence comparison tools allowed us to perform a rigorous examination of the true benefits of multiple sequence comparisons. We demonstrate that multiple sequence alignments are, overall, superior to pairwise alignments for identification of mammalian regulatory regions. In the search for individual transcription factor binding sites, multiple alignments markedly increase the signal-to-noise ratio compared to pairwise alignments. PMID:14718377

  16. Developing and Validating a New Classroom Climate Observation Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Stephen S; Thomas, Duane E; Shapiro, Edward S; Paskewich, Brooke; Wilson, Kim; Necowitz-Hoffman, Beth; Jawad, Abbas F

    2011-01-01

    The climate of school classrooms, shaped by a combination of teacher practices and peer processes, is an important determinant for children's psychosocial functioning and is a primary factor affecting bullying and victimization. Given that there are relatively few theoretically-grounded and validated assessment tools designed to measure the social climate of classrooms, our research team developed an observation tool through participatory action research (PAR). This article details how the assessment tool was designed and preliminarily validated in 18 third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade classrooms in a large urban public school district. The goals of this study are to illustrate the feasibility of a PAR paradigm in measurement development, ascertain the psychometric properties of the assessment tool, and determine associations with different indices of classroom levels of relational and physical aggression.

  17. Development of Visualization Tools for ZPPR-15 Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Min Jae; Kim, Sang Ji

    2014-01-01

    ZPPR-15 cores consist of various drawer masters that have great heterogeneity. In order to build a proper homogenization strategy, the geometry of the drawer masters should be carefully analyzed with a visualization. Additionally, a visualization of drawer masters and the core configuration is necessary for minimizing human error during the input processing. For this purpose, visualization tools for a ZPPR-15 analysis has been developed based on a Perl script. In the following section, the implementation of visualization tools will be described and various visualization samples for both drawer masters and ZPPR-15 cores will be demonstrated. Visualization tools for drawer masters and a core configuration were successfully developed for a ZPPR-15 analysis. The visualization tools are expected to be useful for understanding ZPPR-15 experiments, and finding deterministic models of ZPPR-15. It turned out that generating VTK files is handy but the application of VTK files is powerful with the aid of the VISIT program

  18. Development of an improved low profile hub seal refurbishment tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagg, L.

    1997-01-01

    The hub seal area of a fuel channel feeder coupling can be exposed to oxygen in the atmosphere if protective measures are not taken during maintenance outages. Exposure to oxygen can lead to pitting of the hub seal area. Although this is a rare occurrence, the resulting possibility of the feeder coupling leakage led to the development of a feeder hub refurbishment tool. To reduce time and man-rem exposure during feeder hub seal refurbishment, an improved low profile hub seat refurbishing tool has been developed. The improved tool design will allow for quick and controlled removal of material, and the restoration of a roll-burnished finish equivalent to the original requirements. The new tool can be used in maintenance operations, with the end fitting present, as well as under retube-type circumstances, with the end fitting removed. (author)

  19. Developing e-marketing tools : Case company: CASTA Ltd.

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Chi

    2014-01-01

    This Bachelor’s thesis topic is developing e-marketing tools for the B2C sector of CASTA Ltd. The final outcome is a set of online marketing tools guidelines that can improve business activities, especially marketing effectiveness. Based on the company’s status as a novice in online marketing field, the thesis will focus on the basic level of three specific online marketing tools, instead of covering the whole e-marketing subject. The theoretical framework first describes the concept of e...

  20. China adopts rural tourism as a development tool

    OpenAIRE

    Wo, Zhuo

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, rural tourism has become ever more prominent as a tool to increase visitors' awareness and as an attraction to a destination as well as a tool for economic development in the countryside of China. Rural tourism is a new type of tourism industry, which makes rural cmmunities as its sites, rural distinctive production, living styles and idyllic landscapes as its objects. The writer aims to analyze the theory of tourism life cycle proposed by Butler, current problems, types, mod...

  1. Method Engineering: Engineering of Information Systems Development Methods and Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkkemper, J.N.; Brinkkemper, Sjaak

    1996-01-01

    This paper proposes the term method engineering for the research field of the construction of information systems development methods and tools. Some research issues in method engineering are identified. One major research topic in method engineering is discussed in depth: situational methods, i.e. the configuration of a project approach that is tuned to the project at hand. A language and support tool for the engineering of situational methods are discussed.

  2. Development of tools for automatic generation of PLC code

    OpenAIRE

    Koutli, Maria; Chasapis, Georgios; Rochez, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    This Master thesis was performed at CERN and more specifically in the EN-ICE-PLC section. The Thesis describes the integration of two PLC platforms, that are based on CODESYS development tool, to the CERN defined industrial framework, UNICOS. CODESYS is a development tool for PLC programming, based on IEC 61131-3 standard, and is adopted by many PLC manufacturers. The two PLC development environments are, the SoMachine from Schneider and the TwinCAT from Beckhoff. The two CODESYS compatible P...

  3. Open source tools for ATR development and performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, James M.; Dilsavor, Ronald L.; Stubbles, James; Mossing, John C.

    2002-07-01

    Early in almost every engineering project, a decision must be made about tools; should I buy off-the-shelf tools or should I develop my own. Either choice can involve significant cost and risk. Off-the-shelf tools may be readily available, but they can be expensive to purchase and to maintain licenses, and may not be flexible enough to satisfy all project requirements. On the other hand, developing new tools permits great flexibility, but it can be time- (and budget-) consuming, and the end product still may not work as intended. Open source software has the advantages of both approaches without many of the pitfalls. This paper examines the concept of open source software, including its history, unique culture, and informal yet closely followed conventions. These characteristics influence the quality and quantity of software available, and ultimately its suitability for serious ATR development work. We give an example where Python, an open source scripting language, and OpenEV, a viewing and analysis tool for geospatial data, have been incorporated into ATR performance evaluation projects. While this case highlights the successful use of open source tools, we also offer important insight into risks associated with this approach.

  4. Development of parallel/serial program analyzing tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Nagao, Saichi; Takigawa, Yoshio; Kumakura, Toshimasa

    1999-03-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute has been developing 'KMtool', a parallel/serial program analyzing tool, in order to promote the parallelization of the science and engineering computation program. KMtool analyzes the performance of program written by FORTRAN77 and MPI, and it reduces the effort for parallelization. This paper describes development purpose, design, utilization and evaluation of KMtool. (author)

  5. Development of novel tools to measure food neophobia in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsbo-Svendsen, Marie; Frøst, Michael Bom; Olsen, Annemarie

    2017-01-01

    The main tool currently used to measure food neophobia (the Food Neophobia Scale, FNS, developed by Pliner & Hobden, 1992) may not remain optimal forever. It was developed around 25 years ago, and the perception and availability of “novel” and “ethnic” foods may have changed in the meantime. Cons...

  6. A tutorial of diverse genome analysis tools found in the CoGe web-platform using Plasmodium spp. as a model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Andreina I; Nelson, Andrew D L; Haug-Baltzell, Asher K; Lyons, Eric

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Integrated platforms for storage, management, analysis and sharing of large quantities of omics data have become fundamental to comparative genomics. CoGe (https://genomevolution.org/coge/) is an online platform designed to manage and study genomic data, enabling both data- and hypothesis-driven comparative genomics. CoGe’s tools and resources can be used to organize and analyse both publicly available and private genomic data from any species. Here, we demonstrate the capabilities of CoGe through three example workflows using 17 Plasmodium genomes as a model. Plasmodium genomes present unique challenges for comparative genomics due to their rapidly evolving and highly variable genomic AT/GC content. These example workflows are intended to serve as templates to help guide researchers who would like to use CoGe to examine diverse aspects of genome evolution. In the first workflow, trends in genome composition and amino acid usage are explored. In the second, changes in genome structure and the distribution of synonymous (Ks) and non-synonymous (Kn) substitution values are evaluated across species with different levels of evolutionary relatedness. In the third workflow, microsyntenic analyses of multigene families’ genomic organization are conducted using two Plasmodium-specific gene families—serine repeat antigen, and cytoadherence-linked asexual gene—as models. In general, these example workflows show how to achieve quick, reproducible and shareable results using the CoGe platform. We were able to replicate previously published results, as well as leverage CoGe’s tools and resources to gain additional insight into various aspects of Plasmodium genome evolution. Our results highlight the usefulness of the CoGe platform, particularly in understanding complex features of genome evolution. Database URL: https://genomevolution.org/coge/

  7. Developing Healthcare Data Analytics APPs with Open Data Science Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Bibo; Sun, Wen; Yu, Yiqin; Xie, Guotong

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in big data analytics provide more flexible, efficient, and open tools for researchers to gain insight from healthcare data. Whilst many tools require researchers to develop programs with programming languages like Python, R and so on, which is not a skill set grasped by many researchers in the healthcare data analytics area. To make data science more approachable, we explored existing tools and developed a practice that can help data scientists convert existing analytics pipelines to user-friendly analytics APPs with rich interactions and features of real-time analysis. With this practice, data scientists can develop customized analytics pipelines as APPs in Jupyter Notebook and disseminate them to other researchers easily, and researchers can benefit from the shared notebook to perform analysis tasks or reproduce research results much more easily.

  8. Development of bore tools for pipe welding and cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Ito, Akira; Takiguchi, Yuji

    1998-01-01

    In the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), in-vessel components replacement and maintenance requires that connected cooling pipes be cut and removed beforehand and that new components be installed to which cooling pipes must be rewelded. All welding must be inspected for soundness after completion. These tasks require a new task concept for ensuring shielded areas and access from narrow ports. Thus, it became necessary to develop autonomous locomotion welding and cutting tools for branch and main pipes to weld pipes by in-pipe access; a system was proposed that cut and welded branch and main pipes after passing inside pipe curves, and elemental technologies developed. This paper introduces current development in tools for welding and cutting branch pipes and other tools for welding and cutting the main pipe. (author)

  9. Development of bore tools for pipe welding and cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Kiyoshi; Ito, Akira; Takiguchi, Yuji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    In the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), in-vessel components replacement and maintenance requires that connected cooling pipes be cut and removed beforehand and that new components be installed to which cooling pipes must be rewelded. All welding must be inspected for soundness after completion. These tasks require a new task concept for ensuring shielded areas and access from narrow ports. Thus, it became necessary to develop autonomous locomotion welding and cutting tools for branch and main pipes to weld pipes by in-pipe access; a system was proposed that cut and welded branch and main pipes after passing inside pipe curves, and elemental technologies developed. This paper introduces current development in tools for welding and cutting branch pipes and other tools for welding and cutting the main pipe. (author)

  10. Development of a Safety Management Web Tool for Horse Stables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppälä, Jarkko; Kolstrup, Christina Lunner; Pinzke, Stefan; Rautiainen, Risto; Saastamoinen, Markku; Särkijärvi, Susanna

    2015-11-12

    Managing a horse stable involves risks, which can have serious consequences for the stable, employees, clients, visitors and horses. Existing industrial or farm production risk management tools are not directly applicable to horse stables and they need to be adapted for use by managers of different types of stables. As a part of the InnoEquine project, an innovative web tool, InnoHorse, was developed to support horse stable managers in business, safety, pasture and manure management. A literature review, empirical horse stable case studies, expert panel workshops and stakeholder interviews were carried out to support the design. The InnoHorse web tool includes a safety section containing a horse stable safety map, stable safety checklists, and examples of good practices in stable safety, horse handling and rescue planning. This new horse stable safety management tool can also help in organizing work processes in horse stables in general.

  11. Development of thick wall welding and cutting tools for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakahira, Masataka; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Akou, Kentaro; Koizumi, Koichi

    1998-01-01

    The Vacuum Vessel, which is a core component of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is required to be exchanged remotely in a case of accident such as superconducting coil failure. The in-vessel components such as blanket and divertor are planned to be exchanged or fixed. In these exchange or maintenance operations, the thick wall welding and cutting are inevitable and remote handling tools are necessary. The thick wall welding and cutting tools for blanket are under developing in the ITER R and D program. The design requirement is to weld or cut the stainless steel of 70 mm thickness in the narrow space. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding, plasma cutting and iodine laser welding/cutting are selected as primary option. Element welding and cutting tests, design of small tools to satisfy space requirement, test fabrication and performance tests were performed. This paper reports the tool design and overview of welding and cutting tests. (author)

  12. Development of thick wall welding and cutting tools for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahira, Masataka; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Akou, Kentaro; Koizumi, Koichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-04-01

    The Vacuum Vessel, which is a core component of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), is required to be exchanged remotely in a case of accident such as superconducting coil failure. The in-vessel components such as blanket and divertor are planned to be exchanged or fixed. In these exchange or maintenance operations, the thick wall welding and cutting are inevitable and remote handling tools are necessary. The thick wall welding and cutting tools for blanket are under developing in the ITER R and D program. The design requirement is to weld or cut the stainless steel of 70 mm thickness in the narrow space. Tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding, plasma cutting and iodine laser welding/cutting are selected as primary option. Element welding and cutting tests, design of small tools to satisfy space requirement, test fabrication and performance tests were performed. This paper reports the tool design and overview of welding and cutting tests. (author)

  13. Child Development and Structural Variation in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Haraksingh, Rajini; Grubert, Fabian; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation of the human genome sequence is the insertion, deletion, or rearrangement of stretches of DNA sequence sized from around 1,000 to millions of base pairs. Over the past few years, structural variation has been shown to be far more common in human genomes than previously thought. Very little is currently known about the effects…

  14. Omni-PolyA: a method and tool for accurate recognition of Poly(A) signals in human genomic DNA

    KAUST Repository

    Magana-Mora, Arturo

    2017-08-15

    BackgroundPolyadenylation is a critical stage of RNA processing during the formation of mature mRNA, and is present in most of the known eukaryote protein-coding transcripts and many long non-coding RNAs. The correct identification of poly(A) signals (PAS) not only helps to elucidate the 3′-end genomic boundaries of a transcribed DNA region and gene regulatory mechanisms but also gives insight into the multiple transcript isoforms resulting from alternative PAS. Although progress has been made in the in-silico prediction of genomic signals, the recognition of PAS in DNA genomic sequences remains a challenge.ResultsIn this study, we analyzed human genomic DNA sequences for the 12 most common PAS variants. Our analysis has identified a set of features that helps in the recognition of true PAS, which may be involved in the regulation of the polyadenylation process. The proposed features, in combination with a recognition model, resulted in a novel method and tool, Omni-PolyA. Omni-PolyA combines several machine learning techniques such as different classifiers in a tree-like decision structure and genetic algorithms for deriving a robust classification model. We performed a comparison between results obtained by state-of-the-art methods, deep neural networks, and Omni-PolyA. Results show that Omni-PolyA significantly reduced the average classification error rate by 35.37% in the prediction of the 12 considered PAS variants relative to the state-of-the-art results.ConclusionsThe results of our study demonstrate that Omni-PolyA is currently the most accurate model for the prediction of PAS in human and can serve as a useful complement to other PAS recognition methods. Omni-PolyA is publicly available as an online tool accessible at www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/omnipolya/.

  15. Development of remote handling tools for glove box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Yutaka; Nemoto, Takeshi; Denuma, Akio; Todokoro, Akio

    1996-01-01

    For a part of advanced nuclear fuel recycling technology development, we will separate and recover Americium from the MOX fuel scrap by solvent extraction. When we carry this examination, reduction of exposure from Americium-241 is one of important problems. To solve this problem fundamentally, we studied many joints type of the remote handling tools for glove box and produced a trial production machine. Also, we carried out basic function examinations of it. As a result, we got the prospect of development of the remote handling tools which could treat Americium in glove box. (author)

  16. CRISPR-Cas9 System as a Versatile Tool for Genome Engineering in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelian Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeted nucleases are influential instruments for intervening in genome revision with great accuracy. RNA-guided Cas9 nucleases produced from clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas systems have noticeably altered the means to modify the genomes of distinct organisms. They can be notably used to facilitate effective genome manipulation in eukaryotic cells by clearly detailing a 20-nt targeting sequence inside its directed RNA. We discuss the most recent advancements in the molecular basis of the type II CRISPR/Cas system and encapsulate applications and elements affecting its use in human cells. We also propose possible applications covering its uses ranging from basic science to implementation in the clinic.

  17. Developing a testing tool for a port terminal operating system

    OpenAIRE

    Perič, Miran

    2011-01-01

    This thesis describes the approach for development of a testing tool which simulates the terminal operating system. Main result of the thesis is presentation of the approach for the development and operation of the application, which was developed in C# programming language. The application communicates with the port information system by messages exchange. Data is stored on a database. With the support of the application we can test the port information system before of future implem...

  18. Microarray-based whole-genome hybridization as a tool for determining procaryotic species relatedness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, L.; Liu, X.; Fields, M.W.; Thompson, D.K.; Bagwell, C.E.; Tiedje, J. M.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2008-01-15

    The definition and delineation of microbial species are of great importance and challenge due to the extent of evolution and diversity. Whole-genome DNA-DNA hybridization is the cornerstone for defining procaryotic species relatedness, but obtaining pairwise DNA-DNA reassociation values for a comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of procaryotes is tedious and time consuming. A previously described microarray format containing whole-genomic DNA (the community genome array or CGA) was rigorously evaluated as a high-throughput alternative to the traditional DNA-DNA reassociation approach for delineating procaryotic species relationships. DNA similarities for multiple bacterial strains obtained with the CGA-based hybridization were comparable to those obtained with various traditional whole-genome hybridization methods (r=0.87, P<0.01). Significant linear relationships were also observed between the CGA-based genome similarities and those derived from small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene sequences (r=0.79, P<0.0001), gyrB sequences (r=0.95, P<0.0001) or REP- and BOX-PCR fingerprinting profiles (r=0.82, P<0.0001). The CGA hybridization-revealed species relationships in several representative genera, including Pseudomonas, Azoarcus and Shewanella, were largely congruent with previous classifications based on various conventional whole-genome DNA-DNA reassociation, SSU rRNA and/or gyrB analyses. These results suggest that CGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization could serve as a powerful, high-throughput format for determining species relatedness among microorganisms.

  19. Whole genome sequencing as a tool for phylogenetic analysis of clinical strains of Mitis group streptococci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmusen, L. H.; Dargis, R.; Iversen, Katrine Højholt

    2016-01-01

    observed in single gene analyses. Species identification based on single gene analysis showed their limitations when more strains were included. In contrast, analyses incorporating more sequence data, like MLSA, SNPs and core-genome analyses, provided more distinct clustering. The core-genome tree showed......Identification of Mitis group streptococci (MGS) to the species level is challenging for routine microbiology laboratories. Correct identification is crucial for the diagnosis of infective endocarditis, identification of treatment failure, and/or infection relapse. Eighty MGS from Danish patients...

  20. Process development and tooling design for intrinsic hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, M.; Müller, R.; Drossel, W. G.; Landgrebe, D.

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid parts, which combine the advantages of different material classes, are moving into the focus of lightweight applications. This development is amplified by their high potential for usage in the field of crash relevant structures. By the current state of the art, hybrid parts are mainly made in separate, subsequent forming and joining processes. By using the concept of an intrinsic hybrid, the shaping of the part and the joining of the different materials are performed in a single process step for shortening the overall processing time and thereby the manufacturing costs. The investigated hybrid part is made from continuous fibre reinforced plastic (FRP), in which a metallic reinforcement structure is integrated. The connection between these layered components is realized by a combination of adhesive bonding and a geometrical form fit. The form fit elements are intrinsically generated during the forming process. This contribution regards the development of the forming process and the design of the forming tool for the single step production of a hybrid part. To this end a forming tool, which combines the thermo-forming and the metal forming process, is developed. The main challenge by designing the tool is the temperature management of the tool elements for the variothermal forming process. The process parameters are determined in basic tests and finite element (FE) simulation studies. On the basis of these investigations a control concept for the steering of the motion axes and the tool temperature is developed. Forming tests are carried out with the developed tool and the manufactured parts are analysed by computer assisted tomography (CT) scans.

  1. Stepwise Distributed Open Innovation Contests for Software Development: Acceleration of Genome-Wide Association Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew; Loh, Po-Ru; Bharadwaj, Ragu B; Pons, Pascal; Shang, Jingbo; Guinan, Eva; Lakhani, Karim; Kilty, Iain; Jelinsky, Scott A

    2017-05-01

    The association of differing genotypes with disease-related phenotypic traits offers great potential to both help identify new therapeutic targets and support stratification of patients who would gain the greatest benefit from specific drug classes. Development of low-cost genotyping and sequencing has made collecting large-scale genotyping data routine in population and therapeutic intervention studies. In addition, a range of new technologies is being used to capture numerous new and complex phenotypic descriptors. As a result, genotype and phenotype datasets have grown exponentially. Genome-wide association studies associate genotypes and phenotypes using methods such as logistic regression. As existing tools for association analysis limit the efficiency by which value can be extracted from increasing volumes of data, there is a pressing need for new software tools that can accelerate association analyses on large genotype-phenotype datasets. Using open innovation (OI) and contest-based crowdsourcing, the logistic regression analysis in a leading, community-standard genetics software package (PLINK 1.07) was substantially accelerated. OI allowed us to do this in innovation, we achieved an end-to-end speedup of 591-fold for a data set size of 6678 subjects by 645 863 variants, compared to PLINK 1.07's logistic regression. This represents a reduction in run time from 4.8 hours to 29 seconds. Accelerated logistic regression code developed in this project has been incorporated into the PLINK2 project. Using iterative competition-based OI, we have developed a new, faster implementation of logistic regression for genome-wide association studies analysis. We present lessons learned and recommendations on running a successful OI process for bioinformatics. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. The Development of a Tool for Sustainable Building Design:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tine Ring Hansen, Hanne; Knudstrup, Mary-Ann

    2009-01-01

    for sustainable buildings, as well as, an analysis of the relationship between the different approaches (e.g. low-energy, environmental, green building, solar architecture, bio-climatic architecture etc.) to sustainable building design and these indicators. The paper furthermore discusses how sustainable......The understanding of sustainable building has changed over time along with the architectural interpretation of sustainability. The paper presents the results of a comparative analysis of the indicators found in different internationally acclaimed and Danish certification schemes and standards...... architecture will gain more focus in the coming years, thus, establishing the need for the development of a new tool and methodology, The paper furthermore describes the background and considerations involved in the development of a design support tool for sustainable building design. A tool which considers...

  3. Development of culturally sensitive dialog tools in diabetes education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana Folmann Hempler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Person-centeredness is a goal in diabetes education, and cultural influences are important to consider in this regard. This report describes the use of a design-based research approach to develop culturally sensitive dialog tools to support person-centered dietary education targeting Pakistani immigrants in Denmark with type 2 diabetes. The approach appears to be a promising method to develop dialog tools for patient education that are culturally sensitive, thereby increasing their acceptability among ethnic minority groups. The process also emphasizes the importance of adequate training and competencies in the application of dialog tools and of alignment between researchers and health care professionals with regards to the educational philosophy underlying their use.

  4. Agrobacterium rhizogenes-induced cotton hairy root culture as an alternative tool for cotton functional genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although well-accepted as the ultimate method for cotton functional genomics, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated cotton transformation is not widely used for functional analyses of cotton genes and their promoters since regeneration of cotton in tissue culture is lengthy and labor intensive. In cer...

  5. FnCpf1: a novel and efficient genome editing tool for Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swiat, Michal A.; Dashko, Sofia; Ridder, den Maxime; Wijsman, Melanie; Oost, van der John; Daran, Jean Marc; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    Cpf1 is a new class II family of CRISPR-Cas RNA-programmable endonucleases with unique features that make it a very attractive alternative or complement to Cas9 for genome engineering. Using constitutively expressed Cpf1 from Francisella novicida, the present study demonstrates that FnCpf1 can

  6. FnCpf1: a novel and efficient genome editing tool for Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swiat, M.A.; Dashko, S.; den Ridder, M.J.; Wijsman, M.; van der Oost, John; Daran, J.G.; Daran-Lapujade, P.A.S.

    2017-01-01

    Cpf1 is a new class II family of CRISPR-Cas RNA-programmable endonucleases with unique features that make it a very attractive alternative or complement to Cas9 for genome engineering. Using constitutively expressed Cpf1 from Francisella novicida, the present study demonstrates that FnCpf1 can

  7. The Qatar genome: a population-specific tool for precision medicine in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhro, Khalid A; Staudt, Michelle R; Ramstetter, Monica Denise; Robay, Amal; Malek, Joel A; Badii, Ramin; Al-Marri, Ajayeb Al-Nabet; Khalil, Charbel Abi; Al-Shakaki, Alya; Chidiac, Omar; Stadler, Dora; Zirie, Mahmoud; Jayyousi, Amin; Salit, Jacqueline; Mezey, Jason G; Crystal, Ronald G; Rodriguez-Flores, Juan L

    2016-01-01

    Reaching the full potential of precision medicine depends on the quality of personalized genome interpretation. In order to facilitate precision medicine in regions of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), a population-specific genome for the indigenous Arab population of Qatar (QTRG) was constructed by incorporating allele frequency data from sequencing of 1,161 Qataris, representing 0.4% of the population. A total of 20.9 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 3.1 million indels were observed in Qatar, including an average of 1.79% novel variants per individual genome. Replacement of the GRCh37 standard reference with QTRG in a best practices genome analysis workflow resulted in an average of 7* deeper coverage depth (an improvement of 23%) and 756,671 fewer variants on average, a reduction of 16% that is attributed to common Qatari alleles being present in QTRG. The benefit for using QTRG varies across ancestries, a factor that should be taken into consideration when selecting an appropriate reference for analysis. PMID:27408750

  8. Genomics tools available for unravelling mechanisms underlying agronomical traits in strawberry with more to come

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the last few years, high-throughput genomics promised to bridge the gap between plant physiology and plant sciences. In addition, high-throughput genotyping technologies facilitate marker-based selection for better performing genotypes. In strawberry, Fragaria vesca was the first reference sequen...

  9. Development and Testing of the Church Environment Audit Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczynski, Andrew T; Jake-Schoffman, Danielle E; Peters, Nathan A; Dunn, Caroline G; Wilcox, Sara; Forthofer, Melinda

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we describe development and reliability testing of a novel tool to evaluate the physical environment of faith-based settings pertaining to opportunities for physical activity (PA) and healthy eating (HE). Tool development was a multistage process including a review of similar tools, stakeholder review, expert feedback, and pilot testing. Final tool sections included indoor opportunities for PA, outdoor opportunities for PA, food preparation equipment, kitchen type, food for purchase, beverages for purchase, and media. Two independent audits were completed at 54 churches. Interrater reliability (IRR) was determined with Kappa and percent agreement. Of 218 items, 102 were assessed for IRR and 116 could not be assessed because they were not present at enough churches. Percent agreement for all 102 items was over 80%. For 42 items, the sample was too homogeneous to assess Kappa. Forty-six of the remaining items had Kappas greater than 0.60 (25 items 0.80-1.00; 21 items 0.60-0.79), indicating substantial to almost perfect agreement. The tool proved reliable and efficient for assessing church environments and identifying potential intervention points. Future work can focus on applications within faith-based partnerships to understand how church environments influence diverse health outcomes.

  10. Development of the Writing Readiness Inventory Tool in Context (WRITIC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hartingsveldt, Margo J.; de Vries, Liesbeth; Cup, Edith HC; de Groot, Imelda JM; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria WG

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development of the Writing Readiness Inventory Tool in Context (WRITIC), a measurement evaluating writing readiness in Dutch kindergarten children (5 and 6 years old). Content validity was established through 10 expert evaluations in three rounds. Construct validity was

  11. Sharpening a Tool for Teaching: The Zone of Proximal Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, Rob; Golding, Clinton

    2014-01-01

    Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD) provides an important understanding of learning, but its implications for teachers are often unclear or limited and could be further explored. We use conceptual analysis to sharpen the ZPD as a teaching tool, illustrated with examples from teaching critical thinking in zoology. Our conclusions are…

  12. Method and Tools for Development of Advanced Instructional Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arend, J. van der; Riemersma, J.B.J.

    1994-01-01

    The application of advanced instructional systems (AISs), like computer-based training systems, intelligent tutoring systems and training simulators, is widely spread within the Royal Netherlands Army. As a consequence there is a growing interest in methods and tools to develop effective and

  13. Method Engineering: Engineering of Information Systems Development Methods and Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkkemper, J.N.; Brinkkemper, Sjaak

    1996-01-01

    This paper proposes the term method engineering for the research field of the construction of information systems development methods and tools. Some research issues in method engineering are identified. One major research topic in method engineering is discussed in depth: situational methods, i.e.

  14. Development of a New Measurement Tool for Individualism and Collectivism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulruf, Boaz; Hattie, John; Dixon, Robyn

    2007-01-01

    A new measurement tool for individualism and collectivism has been developed to address critical methodological issues in this field of social psychology. This new measure, the Auckland Individualism and Collectivism Scale (AICS), defines three dimensions of individualism: (a) responsibility (acknowledging one's responsibility for one's actions),…

  15. Interactive test tool for interoperable C-ITS development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voronov, A.; Englund, C.; Bengtsson, H.H.; Chen, L.; Ploeg, J.; Jongh, J.F.C.M. de; Sluis, H.J.D. van de

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the architecture of an Interactive Test Tool (ITT) for interoperability testing of Cooperative Intelligent Transport Systems (C-ITS). Cooperative systems are developed by different manufacturers at different locations, which makes interoperability testing a tedious task. Up until

  16. Methodology for Developing a Diesel Exhaust After Treatment Simulation Tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Tine; Jensen, Johanne; Åberg, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    A methodology for the development of catalyst models is presented. Also, a methodology of the implementation of such models into a modular simulation tool, which simulates the units in succession, is presented. A case study is presented illustrating how suitable models can be found and used for s...

  17. Millennium Development Goals: Tool or token of global social governance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Raee, M.; Amoateng, Elvis; Avenyo, E.K.; Beshay, Youssef; Bierbaum, M.; Keijser, C.; Sinha, R.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we argue that the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) experience suggests that Global Social Governance (GSG) exists and that the MDGs have been an effective tool in creating a global accountability framework despite shortcomings mainly arising in the formulation process. The paper

  18. EAST: Developing an Electronic Assessment and Storage Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Katherine I.; Fernandez, Eugenia; Milionis, Tracey M.; Williamson, David M.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the purpose, development, analysis, prototyping, and features of the Electronic Assessment and Storage Tool (EAST). The Web-based system aids curriculum assessment at Purdue School of Engineering and Technology at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis through the ability to easily store artifacts in electronic form, support…

  19. Developing a Benchmark Tool for Sustainable Consumption: An Iterative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, E.; Timonen, P.; Nissinen, A.; Gronroos, J.; Honkanen, A.; Katajajuuri, J. -M.; Kettunen, J.; Kurppa, S.; Makinen, T.; Seppala, J.; Silvenius, F.; Virtanen, Y.; Voutilainen, P.

    2007-01-01

    This article presents the development process of a consumer-oriented, illustrative benchmarking tool enabling consumers to use the results of environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) to make informed decisions. LCA provides a wealth of information on the environmental impacts of products, but its results are very difficult to present concisely…

  20. Development of Desktop Computing Applications and Engineering Tools on GPUs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg; Glimberg, Stefan Lemvig; Hansen, Toke Jansen

    (GPUs) for high-performance computing applications and software tools in science and engineering, inverse problems, visualization, imaging, dynamic optimization. The goals are to contribute to the development of new state-of-the-art mathematical models and algorithms for maximum throughout performance...

  1. Reflective Journaling: A Tool for Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Lorna M.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the introduction of postgraduate education students to reflective journaling as a tool for professional development. Students were purposefully selected to keep a weekly journal in which they reflected in and on the activities (methodologies, techniques, strategies) they engaged in while executing a workplace…

  2. Genomic Characterization of Flavobacterium psychrophilum Serotypes and Development of a Multiplex PCR-Based Serotyping Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Rochat

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Flavobacterium psychrophilum is a devastating bacterial pathogen of salmonids reared in freshwater worldwide. So far, serological diversity between isolates has been described but the underlying molecular factors remain unknown. By combining complete genome sequence analysis and the serotyping method proposed by Lorenzen and Olesen (1997 for a set of 34 strains, we identified key molecular determinants of the serotypes. This knowledge allowed us to develop a robust multiplex PCR-based serotyping scheme, which was applied to 244 bacterial isolates. The results revealed a striking association between PCR-serotype and fish host species and illustrate the use of this approach as a simple and cost-effective method for the determination of F. psychrophilum serogroups. PCR-based serotyping could be a useful tool in a range of applications such as disease surveillance, selection of salmonids for bacterial coldwater disease resistance and future vaccine formulation.

  3. Development of the Operational Events Groups Ranking Tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, Zdenko; Banov, Reni

    2014-01-01

    Both because of complexity and ageing, facilities like nuclear power plants require feedback from the operating experience in order to further improve safety and operation performance. That is the reason why significant effort is dedicated to operating experience feedback. This paper contains description of the specification and development of the application for the operating events ranking software tool. Robust and consistent way of selecting most important events for detail investigation is important because it is not feasible or even useful to investigate all of them. Development of the tool is based on the comprehensive events characterisation and methodical prioritization. This includes rich set of events parameters which allow their top level preliminary analysis, different ways of groupings and even to evaluate uncertainty propagation to the ranking results. One distinct feature of the implemented method is that user (i.e., expert) could determine how important is particular ranking parameter based on their pairwise comparison. For tools demonstration and usability it is crucial that sample database is also created. For useful analysis the whole set of events for 5 years is selected and characterised. Based on the preliminary results this tool seems valuable for new preliminary prospective on data as whole, and especially for the identification of events groups which should have priority in the more detailed assessment. The results are consisting of different informative views on the events groups importance and related sensitivity and uncertainty results. This presents valuable tool for improving overall picture about specific operating experience and also for helping identify the most important events groups for further assessment. It is clear that completeness and consistency of the input data characterisation is very important to get full and valuable importance ranking. Method and tool development described in this paper is part of continuous effort of

  4. Developing a Conceptual Design Engineering Toolbox and its Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. W. Vroom

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop a successful product, a design engineer needs to pay attention to all relevant aspects of that product. Many tools are available, software, books, websites, and commercial services. To unlock these potentially useful sources of knowledge, we are developing C-DET, a toolbox for conceptual design engineering. The idea of C-DET is that designers are supported by a system that provides them with a knowledge portal on one hand, and a system to store their current work on the other. The knowledge portal is to help the designer to find the most appropriate sites, experts, tools etc. at a short notice. Such a toolbox offers opportunities to incorporate extra functionalities to support the design engineering work. One of these functionalities could be to help the designer to reach a balanced comprehension in his work. Furthermore C-DET enables researchers in the area of design engineering and design engineers themselves to find each other or their work earlier and more easily. Newly developed design tools that can be used by design engineers but have not yet been developed up to a commercial level could be linked to by C-DET. In this way these tools can be evaluated in an early stage by design engineers who would like to use them. This paper describes the first prototypes of C-DET, an example of the development of a design tool that enables designers to forecast the use process and an example of the future functionalities of C-DET such as balanced comprehension.

  5. Development of the Central Dogma Concept Inventory (CDCI) Assessment Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Dina L.; Snyder, Christopher W.; Fisk, J. Nick; Wright, L. Kate

    2016-01-01

    Scientific teaching requires scientifically constructed, field-tested instruments to accurately evaluate student thinking and gauge teacher effectiveness. We have developed a 23-question, multiple select?format assessment of student understanding of the essential concepts of the central dogma of molecular biology that is appropriate for all levels of undergraduate biology. Questions for the Central Dogma Concept Inventory (CDCI) tool were developed and iteratively revised based on student lan...

  6. Development of bilingual tools to assess functional health patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krozy, R E; McCarthy, N C

    1999-01-01

    The theory and process of developing bilingual assessment tools based on Gordon's 11 functional health patterns. To facilitate assessing the individual, family, and community in a student clinical practicum in a Spanish-speaking country. Multiple family and community health promotion theories; translation theories, Gordon's Manual of Nursing Diagnosis (1982); translation/back-translation involving Ecuadorian faculty and students; student community assessments; faculty and staff workshops in Ecuador. Bilingual, culturally sensitive health assessment tools facilitate history taking, establish nursing diagnoses and interventions, and promote mutual learning. These outcomes demonstrate potential application to other systems in the international nursing community.

  7. XSC plasma control: Tool development for the session leader

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosino, G.; Albanese, R.; Ariola, M.; Cenedese, A.; Crisanti, F.; Tommasi, G. De; Mattei, M.; Piccolo, F.; Pironti, A.; Sartori, F.; Villone, F.

    2005-01-01

    A new model-based shape controller (XSC, i.e., eXtreme Shape Controller) able to operate with high elongation and triangularity plasmas has been designed and implemented at JET in 2003. The use of the XSC needs a number of steps, which at present are not automated and therefore imply the involvement of several experts. To help the session leader in preparing an experiment, a number of software tools are needed. The paper describes the SW tools that are currently in the developing phase, and describes the new framework for the preparation of a JET experiment

  8. Designing the user experience of game development tools

    CERN Document Server

    Lightbown, David

    2015-01-01

    The Big Green Button My Story Who Should Read this Book? Companion Website and Twitter Account Before we BeginWelcome to Designing the User Experience of Game Development ToolsWhat Will We Learn in This Chapter?What Is This Book About?Defining User ExperienceThe Value of Improving the User Experience of Our ToolsParallels Between User Experience and Game DesignHow Do People Benefit From an Improved User Experience?Finding the Right BalanceWrapping UpThe User-Centered Design ProcessWhat Will We

  9. Social Live Streaming tools for the development of Virtual Workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. García-García

    2017-04-01

    This paper proposes the use of Social Live Streaming Tools in mobile devices in order to facilitate the development of creative workshops, using the virtual territory as co-creation area with the aim of promoting one-to-many communications, so that a lecturer can perform a mass communication, in real time and delocalized, without losing the possibility of interact with the audience. These tools also allow the possibility for each member of a creative team to swap between different roles (viewer at some times or lecturer at others, thus stimulating the creative process through social participation.

  10. Development and characterization of genomic microsatellite markers in Prosopis cineraria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Shekhar Anand

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of genetic diversity is a must for exploring the genetic resources for plant development and improvement. Prosopis cineraria is ecologically imperative species known for its innumerable biological benefits. Since there is a lack of genetic resources for the species, so it is crucial to unravel the population dynamics which will be very effective in plant improvement and conservation strategies. Of the 41 genomic microsatellite markers designed from (AGn enriched library, 24 were subsequently employed for characterization on 30 genotypes of Indian arid region. A total of 93 alleles with an average 3.875 could be amplified by tested primer pairs. The average observed and expected heterozygosity was 0.5139 and 0.5786, respectively with 23 primer pairs showing significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. Polymorphic information content average to 0.5102 and the overall polymorphism level was found to be 93.27%. STRUCTURE analysis and DARwin exhibited the presence of 4 clusters among 30 genotypes.

  11. ADVANCED AND RAPID DEVELOPMENT OF DYNAMIC ANALYSIS TOOLS FOR JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Villazón

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-level bytecode instrumentation techniques are widely used in many software-engineering tools for the Java Virtual Machine (JVM, that perform some form of dynamic program analysis, such as profilers or debuggers. While program manipulation at the bytecode level is very flexible, because the possible bytecode transformations are not restricted, tool development based on this technique is tedious and error-prone. As a promising alternative, the specification of bytecode instrumentation at a higher level using aspect-oriented programming (AOP can reduce tool development time and cost. Unfortunately, prevailing AOP frameworks lack some features that are essential for certain dynamic analyses. In this article, we focus on three common shortcomings in AOP frameworks with respect to the development of aspect-based tools - (1 the lack of mechanisms for passing data between woven advices in local variables, (2 the support for user-defined static analyses at weaving time, and (3 the absence of pointcuts at the level of individual basic blocks of code. We propose @J, an annotation-based AOP language and weaver that integrates support for these three features. The benefits of the proposed features are illustrated with concrete examples.

  12. Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  13. Ongoing development of digital radiotherapy plan review tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, M.A.; Hatton, J.; Cornes, D.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: To describe ongoing development of software to support the review of radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS) data. The 'SWAN' software program was conceived in 2000 and initially developed for the RADAR (TROG 03.04) prostate radiotherapy trial. Validation of the SWAN program has been occurring via implementation by TROG in support of multiple clinical trials. Development has continued and the SWAN software program is now supported by modular components which comprise the 'SW AN system'. This provides a comprehensive set of tools for the review, analysis and archive of TPS exports. The SWAN system has now been used in support of over 20 radiotherapy trials and to review the plans of over 2,000 trial participants. The use of the system for the RADAR trial is now culminating in the derivation of dose-outcomes indices for prostate treatment toxicity. Newly developed SWAN tools include enhanced remote data archive/retrieval, display of dose in both relative and absolute modes, and interfacing to a Matlab-based add-on ('VAST') that allows quantitative analysis of delineated volumes including regional overlap statistics for multi-observer studies. Efforts are continuing to develop the SWAN system in the context of international collaboration aimed at harmonising the quality-assurance activities of collaborative trials groups. Tools such as the SWAN system are essential for ensuring the collection of accurate and reliable evidence to guide future radiotherapy treatments. One of the principal challenges of developing such a tool is establishing a development path that will ensure its validity and applicability well into the future.

  14. National Energy Audit Tool for Multifamily Buildings Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, Mini [ORNL; MacDonald, Michael [Sentech, Inc.; Accawi, Gina K [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL; Im, Piljae [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) enables low-income families to reduce their energy costs by providing funds to make their homes more energy efficient. In addition, the program funds Weatherization Training and Technical Assistance (T and TA) activities to support a range of program operations. These activities include measuring and documenting performance, monitoring programs, promoting advanced techniques and collaborations to further improve program effectiveness, and training, including developing tools and information resources. The T and TA plan outlines the tasks, activities, and milestones to support the weatherization network with the program implementation ramp up efforts. Weatherization of multifamily buildings has been recognized as an effective way to ramp up weatherization efforts. To support this effort, the 2009 National Weatherization T and TA plan includes the task of expanding the functionality of the Weatherization Assistant, a DOE-sponsored family of energy audit computer programs, to perform audits for large and small multifamily buildings This report describes the planning effort for a new multifamily energy audit tool for DOE's WAP. The functionality of the Weatherization Assistant is being expanded to also perform energy audits of small multifamily and large multifamily buildings. The process covers an assessment of needs that includes input from national experts during two national Web conferences. The assessment of needs is then translated into capability and performance descriptions for the proposed new multifamily energy audit, with some description of what might or should be provided in the new tool. The assessment of needs is combined with our best judgment to lay out a strategy for development of the multifamily tool that proceeds in stages, with features of an initial tool (version 1) and a more capable version 2 handled with currently available resources. Additional

  15. Stakeholder engagement in policy development: challenges and opportunities for human genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Lemke, Amy A.; Harris-Wai, Julie N.

    2015-01-01

    Along with rapid advances in human genomics, policies governing genomic data and clinical technologies have proliferated. Stakeholder engagement is widely lauded as an important methodology for improving clinical, scientific, and public health policy decision making. The purpose of this paper is to examine how stakeholder engagement is used to develop policies in genomics research and public health areas, as well as to identify future priorities for conducting evidence-based stakeholder engag...

  16. Development of a site analysis tool for distributed wind projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaw, Shawn [The Cadmus Group, Inc., Waltham MA (United States)

    2012-02-28

    The Cadmus Group, Inc., in collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Encraft, was awarded a grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop a site analysis tool for distributed wind technologies. As the principal investigator for this project, Mr. Shawn Shaw was responsible for overall project management, direction, and technical approach. The product resulting from this project is the Distributed Wind Site Analysis Tool (DSAT), a software tool for analyzing proposed sites for distributed wind technology (DWT) systems. This user-friendly tool supports the long-term growth and stability of the DWT market by providing reliable, realistic estimates of site and system energy output and feasibility. DSAT-which is accessible online and requires no purchase or download of software-is available in two account types; Standard: This free account allows the user to analyze a limited number of sites and to produce a system performance report for each; and Professional: For a small annual fee users can analyze an unlimited number of sites, produce system performance reports, and generate other customizable reports containing key information such as visual influence and wind resources. The tool’s interactive maps allow users to create site models that incorporate the obstructions and terrain types present. Users can generate site reports immediately after entering the requisite site information. Ideally, this tool also educates users regarding good site selection and effective evaluation practices.

  17. Empowered genome community: leveraging a bioinformatics platform as a citizen?scientist collaboration tool

    OpenAIRE

    Wendelsdorf, Katherine; Shah, Sohela

    2015-01-01

    There is on-going effort in the biomedical research community to leverage Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technology to identify genetic variants that affect our health. The main challenge facing researchers is getting enough samples from individuals either sick or healthy – to be able to reliably identify the few variants that are causal for a phenotype among all other variants typically seen among individuals. At the same time, more and more individuals are having their genome sequenced ei...

  18. Challenging a bioinformatic tool's ability to detect microbial contaminants using in silico whole genome sequencing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Nathan D; Zook, Justin M; Morrow, Jayne B; Lin, Nancy J

    2017-01-01

    High sensitivity methods such as next generation sequencing and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are adversely impacted by organismal and DNA contaminants. Current methods for detecting contaminants in microbial materials (genomic DNA and cultures) are not sensitive enough and require either a known or culturable contaminant. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is a promising approach for detecting contaminants due to its sensitivity and lack of need for a priori assumptions about the contaminant. Prior to applying WGS, we must first understand its limitations for detecting contaminants and potential for false positives. Herein we demonstrate and characterize a WGS-based approach to detect organismal contaminants using an existing metagenomic taxonomic classification algorithm. Simulated WGS datasets from ten genera as individuals and binary mixtures of eight organisms at varying ratios were analyzed to evaluate the role of contaminant concentration and taxonomy on detection. For the individual genomes the false positive contaminants reported depended on the genus, with Staphylococcus , Escherichia , and Shigella having the highest proportion of false positives. For nearly all binary mixtures the contaminant was detected in the in-silico datasets at the equivalent of 1 in 1,000 cells, though F. tularensis was not detected in any of the simulated contaminant mixtures and Y. pestis was only detected at the equivalent of one in 10 cells. Once a WGS method for detecting contaminants is characterized, it can be applied to evaluate microbial material purity, in efforts to ensure that contaminants are characterized in microbial materials used to validate pathogen detection assays, generate genome assemblies for database submission, and benchmark sequencing methods.

  19. Microsatellite marker development by partial sequencing of the sour passion fruit genome (Passiflora edulis Sims).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Susan; Martins, Alexandre M; Junqueira, Nilton T V; Costa, Ana Maria; Faleiro, Fábio G; Ferreira, Márcio E

    2017-07-21

    The Passiflora genus comprises hundreds of wild and cultivated species of passion fruit used for food, industrial, ornamental and medicinal purposes. Efforts to develop genomic tools for genetic analysis of P. edulis, the most important commercial Passiflora species, are still incipient. In spite of many recognized applications of microsatellite markers in genetics and breeding, their availability for passion fruit research remains restricted. Microsatellite markers in P. edulis are usually limited in number, show reduced polymorphism, and are mostly based on compound or imperfect repeats. Furthermore, they are confined to only a few Passiflora species. We describe the use of NGS technology to partially assemble the P. edulis genome in order to develop hundreds of new microsatellite markers. A total of 14.11 Gbp of Illumina paired-end sequence reads were analyzed to detect simple sequence repeat sites in the sour passion fruit genome. A sample of 1300 contigs containing perfect repeat microsatellite sequences was selected for PCR primer development. Panels of di- and tri-nucleotide repeat markers were then tested in P. edulis germplasm accessions for validation. DNA polymorphism was detected in 74% of the markers (PIC = 0.16 to 0.77; number of alleles/locus = 2 to 7). A core panel of highly polymorphic markers (PIC = 0.46 to 0.77) was used to cross-amplify PCR products in 79 species of Passiflora (including P. edulis), belonging to four subgenera (Astrophea, Decaloba, Distephana and Passiflora). Approximately 71% of the marker/species combinations resulted in positive amplicons in all species tested. DNA polymorphism was detected in germplasm accessions of six closely related Passiflora species (P. edulis, P. alata, P. maliformis, P. nitida, P. quadrangularis and P. setacea) and the data used for accession discrimination and species assignment. A database of P. edulis DNA sequences obtained by NGS technology was examined to identify microsatellite repeats in

  20. Infectious diseases of marine molluscs and host responses as revealed by genomic tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    More and more infectious diseases affect marine molluscs. Some diseases have impacted commercial species including MSX and Dermo of the eastern oyster, QPX of hard clams, withering syndrome of abalone and ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infections of many molluscs. Although the exact transmission mechanisms are not well understood, human activities and associated environmental changes often correlate with increased disease prevalence. For instance, hatcheries and large-scale aquaculture create high host densities, which, along with increasing ocean temperature, might have contributed to OsHV-1 epizootics in scallops and oysters. A key to understanding linkages between the environment and disease is to understand how the environment affects the host immune system. Although we might be tempted to downplay the role of immunity in invertebrates, recent advances in genomics have provided insights into host and parasite genomes and revealed surprisingly sophisticated innate immune systems in molluscs. All major innate immune pathways are found in molluscs with many immune receptors, regulators and effectors expanded. The expanded gene families provide great diversity and complexity in innate immune response, which may be key to mollusc's defence against diverse pathogens in the absence of adaptive immunity. Further advances in host and parasite genomics should improve our understanding of genetic variation in parasite virulence and host disease resistance. PMID:26880838

  1. CRISPR/Cas9:A powerful tool for crop genome editing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaoyuan Song; Meiling Jia; Kai Chen; Xingchen Kong; Bushra Khattak; Chuanxiao Xie; Aili Li; Long Mao

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 technology is evolved from a type II bacterial immune system and represents a new generation of targeted genome editing technology that can be applied to nearly all organisms. Site-specific modification is achieved by a single guide RNA (usually about 20 nucleotides) that is complementary to a target gene or locus and is anchored by a protospacer-adjacent motif. Cas9 nuclease then cleaves the targeted DNA to generate double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are subsequently repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology-directed repair (HDR) mechanisms. NHEJ may introduce indels that cause frame shift mutations and hence the disruption of gene functions. When combined with double or multiplex guide RNA design, NHEJ may also introduce targeted chromosome deletions, whereas HDR can be engineered for target gene correction, gene replacement, and gene knock-in. In this review, we briefly survey the history of the CRISPR/Cas9 system invention and its genome-editing mechanism. We also describe the most recent innovation of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, particularly the broad applications of modified Cas9 variants, and discuss the potential of this system for targeted genome editing and modification for crop improvement.

  2. CRISPR/Cas9:A powerful tool for crop genome editing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gaoyuan Song; Meiling Jia; Kai Chen; Xingchen Kong; Bushra Khattak; Chuanxiao Xie; Aili Li; Long Mao

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 technology is evolved from a type II bacterial immune system and represents a new generation of targeted genome editing technology that can be applied to nearly all organisms. Site-specific modification is achieved by a single guide RNA(usually about 20nucleotides) that is complementary to a target gene or locus and is anchored by a protospaceradjacent motif. Cas9 nuclease then cleaves the targeted DNA to generate double-strand breaks(DSBs), which are subsequently repaired by non-homologous end joining(NHEJ) or homology-directed repair(HDR) mechanisms. NHEJ may introduce indels that cause frame shift mutations and hence the disruption of gene functions. When combined with double or multiplex guide RNA design, NHEJ may also introduce targeted chromosome deletions,whereas HDR can be engineered for target gene correction, gene replacement, and gene knock-in. In this review, we briefly survey the history of the CRISPR/Cas9 system invention and its genome-editing mechanism. We also describe the most recent innovation of the CRISPR/Cas9 technology, particularly the broad applications of modified Cas9 variants, and discuss the potential of this system for targeted genome editing and modification for crop improvement.

  3. Use of the Operon Structure of the C. elegans Genome as a Tool to Identify Functionally Related Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Dossena

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most pressing challenges in the post genomic era is the identification and characterization of protein-protein interactions (PPIs, as these are essential in understanding the cellular physiology of health and disease. Experimental techniques suitable for characterizing PPIs (X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, among others are usually laborious, time-consuming and often difficult to apply to membrane proteins, and therefore require accurate prediction of the candidate interacting partners. High-throughput experimental methods (yeast two-hybrid and affinity purification succumb to the same shortcomings, and can also lead to high rates of false positive and negative results. Therefore, reliable tools for predicting PPIs are needed. The use of the operon structure in the eukaryote Caenorhabditis elegans genome is a valuable, though underserved, tool for identifying physically or functionally interacting proteins. Based on the concept that genes organized in the same operon may encode physically or functionally related proteins, this algorithm is easy to be applied and, importantly, gives a limited number of candidate partners of a given protein, allowing for focused experimental verification. Moreover, this approach can be successfully used to predict PPIs in the human system, including those of membrane proteins.

  4. DIDADTIC TOOLS FOR THE STUDENTS’ ALGORITHMIC THINKING DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pushkaryeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Modern engineers must possess high potential of cognitive abilities, in particular, the algorithmic thinking (AT. In this regard, the training of future experts (university graduates of technical specialities has to provide the knowledge of principles and ways of designing of various algorithms, abilities to analyze them, and to choose the most optimal variants for engineering activity implementation. For full formation of AT skills it is necessary to consider all channels of psychological perception and cogitative processing of educational information: visual, auditory, and kinesthetic.The aim of the present research is theoretical basis of design, development and use of resources for successful development of AT during the educational process of training in programming.Methodology and research methods. Methodology of the research involves the basic thesis of cognitive psychology and information approach while organizing the educational process. The research used methods: analysis; modeling of cognitive processes; designing training tools that take into account the mentality and peculiarities of information perception; diagnostic efficiency of the didactic tools. Results. The three-level model for future engineers training in programming aimed at development of AT skills was developed. The model includes three components: aesthetic, simulative, and conceptual. Stages to mastering a new discipline are allocated. It is proved that for development of AT skills when training in programming it is necessary to use kinesthetic tools at the stage of mental algorithmic maps formation; algorithmic animation and algorithmic mental maps at the stage of algorithmic model and conceptual images formation. Kinesthetic tools for development of students’ AT skills when training in algorithmization and programming are designed. Using of kinesthetic training simulators in educational process provide the effective development of algorithmic style of

  5. Advanced Vibration Analysis Tool Developed for Robust Engine Rotor Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James B.

    2005-01-01

    The primary objective of this research program is to develop vibration analysis tools, design tools, and design strategies to significantly improve the safety and robustness of turbine engine rotors. Bladed disks in turbine engines always feature small, random blade-to-blade differences, or mistuning. Mistuning can lead to a dramatic increase in blade forced-response amplitudes and stresses. Ultimately, this results in high-cycle fatigue, which is a major safety and cost concern. In this research program, the necessary steps will be taken to transform a state-of-the-art vibration analysis tool, the Turbo- Reduce forced-response prediction code, into an effective design tool by enhancing and extending the underlying modeling and analysis methods. Furthermore, novel techniques will be developed to assess the safety of a given design. In particular, a procedure will be established for using natural-frequency curve veerings to identify ranges of operating conditions (rotational speeds and engine orders) in which there is a great risk that the rotor blades will suffer high stresses. This work also will aid statistical studies of the forced response by reducing the necessary number of simulations. Finally, new strategies for improving the design of rotors will be pursued.

  6. Development of METAL-ACTIVE SITE and ZINCCLUSTER tool to predict active site pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajitha, M; Sundar, K; Arul Mugilan, S; Arumugam, S

    2018-03-01

    The advent of whole genome sequencing leads to increasing number of proteins with known amino acid sequences. Despite many efforts, the number of proteins with resolved three dimensional structures is still low. One of the challenging tasks the structural biologists face is the prediction of the interaction of metal ion with any protein for which the structure is unknown. Based on the information available in Protein Data Bank, a site (METALACTIVE INTERACTION) has been generated which displays information for significant high preferential and low-preferential combination of endogenous ligands for 49 metal ions. User can also gain information about the residues present in the first and second coordination sphere as it plays a major role in maintaining the structure and function of metalloproteins in biological system. In this paper, a novel computational tool (ZINCCLUSTER) is developed, which can predict the zinc metal binding sites of proteins even if only the primary sequence is known. The purpose of this tool is to predict the active site cluster of an uncharacterized protein based on its primary sequence or a 3D structure. The tool can predict amino acids interacting with a metal or vice versa. This tool is based on the occurrence of significant triplets and it is tested to have higher prediction accuracy when compared to that of other available techniques. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Pilot evaluation of a continuing professional development tool for developing leadership skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Brandon J; Chang, Elizabeth H; Witry, Matthew J; Garza, Oscar W; Trewet, CoraLynn B

    2013-01-01

    Strategies are needed to assure essential nonclinical competencies, such as leadership, can be gained using a continuing professional development (CPD) framework. The objective of this study was to explore student pharmacists' utilization and perceived effectiveness of a CPD tool for leadership development in an elective course. Students completed 2 CPD cycles during a semester-long leadership elective using a CPD tool. A questionnaire was used to measure students' perceptions of utility, self-efficacy, and satisfaction in completing CPD cycles when using a tool to aid in this process. The CPD tool was completed twice by 7 students. On average, students spent nearly 5 hours per CPD cycle. More than half (57.1%) scored themselves as successful or very successful in achieving their learning plans, and most (71.4%) found the tool somewhat useful in developing their leadership skills. Some perceived that the tool provided a systematic way to engage in leadership development, whereas others found it difficult to use. In this pilot study, most student pharmacists successfully achieved a leadership development plan and found the CPD tool useful. Providing students with more guidance may help facilitate use and effectiveness of CPD tools. There is a need to continue to develop and refine tools that assist in the CPD of pharmacy practitioners at all levels. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Development of tools for automatic generation of PLC code

    CERN Document Server

    Koutli, Maria; Rochez, Jacques

    This Master thesis was performed at CERN and more specifically in the EN-ICE-PLC section. The Thesis describes the integration of two PLC platforms, that are based on CODESYS development tool, to the CERN defined industrial framework, UNICOS. CODESYS is a development tool for PLC programming, based on IEC 61131-3 standard, and is adopted by many PLC manufacturers. The two PLC development environments are, the SoMachine from Schneider and the TwinCAT from Beckhoff. The two CODESYS compatible PLCs, should be controlled by the SCADA system of Siemens, WinCC OA. The framework includes a library of Function Blocks (objects) for the PLC programs and a software for automatic generation of the PLC code based on this library, called UAB. The integration aimed to give a solution that is shared by both PLC platforms and was based on the PLCOpen XML scheme. The developed tools were demonstrated by creating a control application for both PLC environments and testing of the behavior of the code of the library.

  9. Development of JOYO Plant Operation Management Expert Tool (JOYPET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michino, Masanobu; Terano, Toshihiro; Hanawa, Mikio; Aoki, Hiroshi; Okubo, Toshiyuki

    2000-03-01

    The Operation and Maintenance Support Systems for JOYO are being developed, with the aim of ensuring the stable and safe operation of JOYO and improving operational reliability of future FBR plants. Plant Operation Management Expert Tool named JOYPET had been developed as one of the Operation and Maintenance Support Systems, which helps plant operation management. The following functions were developed and applied. (1) Papers management (Plant status management) function for maintenance activities, (2) Isolation management support function for plant operation, (3) Automatically drawing function of plant operation schedule, (4) Isolation judgment function for plant operation. By use this system, the plant management of JOYO was able to improved reliability and reduced manpower. (author)

  10. Developing electronic cooperation tools: a case from norwegian health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Eli; Mydske, Per Kristen

    2013-06-19

    Many countries aim to create electronic cooperational tools in health care, but the progress is rather slow. The study aimed to uncover how the authoritys' financing policies influence the development of electronic cooperational tools within public health care. An interpretative approach was used in this study. We performed 30 semistructured interviews with vendors, policy makers, and public authorities. Additionally, we conducted an extensive documentation study and participated in 18 workshops concerning information and communication technology (ICT) in Norwegian health care. We found that the interorganizational communication in sectors like health care, that have undergone an independent development of their internal information infrastructure would find it difficult to create electronic services that interconnect the organizations because such connections would affect all interconnected organizations within the heterogenic structure. The organizations would, to a large extent, depend on new functionality in existing information systems. Electronic patient records play a central role in all parts of the health care sector and therefore dependence is established to the information systems and theirs vendors. The Norwegian government authorities, which run more than 80% of the Norwegian health care, have not taken extraordinary steps to compensate for this dependency-the government's political philosophy is that each health care institution should pay for further electronic patient record development. However, cooperational tools are complex due to the number of players involved and the way they are intertwined with the overall workflow. The customers are not able to buy new functionalities on the drawing table, while the electronic patient record vendors are not willing to take the economic risk in developing cooperational tools. Thus, the market mechanisms in the domain are challenged. We also found that public projects that were only financed for the first

  11. The teaching portfolio as a professional development tool for anaesthetists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, N S

    2015-05-01

    A teaching portfolio (TP) is a document containing a factual description of a teacher's teaching strengths and accomplishments, allowing clinicians to display them for examination by others. The primary aim of a TP is to improve quality of teaching by providing a structure for self-reflection, which in turn aids professional development in medical education. Contents typically include a personal statement on teaching, an overview of teaching accomplishments and activities, feedback from colleagues and learners, a reflective component and some examples of teaching material. Electronic portfolios are more portable and flexible compared to paper portfolios. Clinicians gain the most benefit from a TP when it is used as a tool for self-reflection of their teaching practice and not merely as a list of activities and achievements. This article explains why and how anaesthetists might use a TP as a tool for professional development in medical education.

  12. Oral Development for LSP via Open Source Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Curado Fuentes

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available For the development of oral abilities in LSP, few computer-based teaching and learning resources have actually focused intensively on web-based listening and speaking. Many more do on reading, writing, vocabulary and grammatical activities. Our aim in this paper is to approach oral communication in the online environment of Moodle by striving to make it suitable for a learning project which incorporates oral skills. The paper describes a blended process in which both individual and collaborative learning strategies can be combined and exploited through the implementation of specific tools and resources which may go hand in hand with traditional face-to-face conversational classes. The challenge with this new perspective is, ultimately, to provide effective tools for oral LSP development in an apparently writing skill-focused medium.

  13. Development of IFC based fire safety assesment tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taciuc, Anca; Karlshøj, Jan; Dederichs, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Due to the impact that the fire safety design has on the building's layout and on other complementary systems, as installations, it is important during the conceptual design stage to evaluate continuously the safety level in the building. In case that the task is carried out too late, additional...... changes need to be implemented, involving supplementary work and costs with negative impact on the client. The aim of this project is to create a set of automatic compliance checking rules for prescriptive design and to develop a web application tool for performance based design that retrieves data from...... Building Information Models (BIM) to evacuate the safety level in the building during the conceptual design stage. The findings show that the developed tools can be useful in AEC industry. Integrating BIM from conceptual design stage for analyzing the fire safety level can ensure precision in further...

  14. Development and Validation of a Family Meeting Assessment Tool (FMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Yuya; Healy, Jennifer; Lee, Shuko; Ross, Jeanette; Fischer, Dixie; Sanchez-Reilly, Sandra

    2018-01-01

    A cornerstone procedure in Palliative Medicine is to perform family meetings. Learning how to lead a family meeting is an important skill for physicians and others who care for patients with serious illnesses and their families. There is limited evidence on how to assess best practice behaviors during end-of-life family meetings. Our aim was to develop and validate an observational tool to assess trainees' ability to lead a simulated end-of-life family meeting. Building on evidence from published studies and accrediting agency guidelines, an expert panel at our institution developed the Family Meeting Assessment Tool. All fourth-year medical students (MS4) and eight geriatric and palliative medicine fellows (GPFs) were invited to participate in a Family Meeting Objective Structured Clinical Examination, where each trainee assumed the physician role leading a complex family meeting. Two evaluators observed and rated randomly chosen students' performances using the Family Meeting Assessment Tool during the examination. Inter-rater reliability was measured using percent agreement. Internal consistency was measured using Cronbach α. A total of 141 trainees (MS4 = 133 and GPF = 8) and 26 interdisciplinary evaluators participated in the study. Internal reliability (Cronbach α) of the tool was 0.85. Number of trainees rated by two evaluators was 210 (MS4 = 202 and GPF = 8). Rater agreement was 84%. Composite scores, on average, were significantly higher for fellows than for medical students (P < 0.001). Expert-based content, high inter-rater reliability, good internal consistency, and ability to predict educational level provided initial evidence for construct validity for this novel assessment tool. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. All rights reserved.

  15. MOOCs as a Professional Development Tool for Librarians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan Ecclestone

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores how reference and instructional librarians taking over new areas of subject responsibility can develop professional expertise using new eLearning tools called MOOCs. MOOCs – Massive Open Online Courses – are a new online learning model that offers free higher education courses to anyone with an Internet connection and a keen interest to learn. As MOOCs proliferate, librarians have the opportunity to leverage this technology to improve their professional skills.

  16. EUV source development for high-volume chip manufacturing tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Uwe; Yoshioka, Masaki; Kleinschmidt, Jürgen; Ziener, Christian; Schriever, Guido; Schürmann, Max C.; Hergenhan, Guido; Borisov, Vladimir M.

    2007-03-01

    Xenon-fueled gas discharge produced plasma (DPP) sources were integrated into Micro Exposure Tools already in 2004. Operation of these tools in a research environment gave early learning for the development of EUV sources for Alpha and Beta-Tools. Further experiments with these sources were performed for basic understanding on EUV source technology and limits, especially the achievable power and reliability. The intermediate focus power of Alpha-Tool sources under development is measured to values above 10 W. Debris mitigation schemes were successfully integrated into the sources leading to reasonable collector mirror lifetimes with target of 10 billion pulses due to the effective debris flux reduction. Source collector mirrors, which withstand the radiation and temperature load of Xenon-fueled sources, have been developed in cooperation with MediaLario Technologies to support intermediate focus power well above 10 W. To fulfill the requirements for High Volume chip Manufacturing (HVM) applications, a new concept for HVM EUV sources with higher efficiency has been developed at XTREME technologies. The discharge produced plasma (DPP) source concept combines the use of rotating disk electrodes (RDE) with laser exited droplet targets. The source concept is called laser assisted droplet RDE source. The fuel of these sources has been selected to be Tin. The conversion efficiency achieved with the laser assisted droplet RDE source is 2-3x higher compared to Xenon. Very high pulse energies well above 200 mJ / 2π sr have been measured with first prototypes of the laser assisted droplet RDE source. If it is possible to maintain these high pulse energies at higher repetition rates a 10 kHz EUV source could deliver 2000 W / 2π sr. According to the first experimental data the new concept is expected to be scalable to an intermediate focus power on the 300 W level.

  17. Developing security tools of WSN and WBAN networks applications

    CERN Document Server

    A M El-Bendary, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on two of the most rapidly developing areas in wireless technology (WT) applications, namely, wireless sensors networks (WSNs) and wireless body area networks (WBANs). These networks can be considered smart applications of the recent WT revolutions. The book presents various security tools and scenarios for the proposed enhanced-security of WSNs, which are supplemented with numerous computer simulations. In the computer simulation section, WSN modeling is addressed using MATLAB programming language.

  18. An automated graphics tool for comparative genomics: the Coulson plot generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Helen I; Coulson, Richard M R; Field, Mark C

    2013-04-27

    Comparative analysis is an essential component to biology. When applied to genomics for example, analysis may require comparisons between the predicted presence and absence of genes in a group of genomes under consideration. Frequently, genes can be grouped into small categories based on functional criteria, for example membership of a multimeric complex, participation in a metabolic or signaling pathway or shared sequence features and/or paralogy. These patterns of retention and loss are highly informative for the prediction of function, and hence possible biological context, and can provide great insights into the evolutionary history of cellular functions. However, representation of such information in a standard spreadsheet is a poor visual means from which to extract patterns within a dataset. We devised the Coulson Plot, a new graphical representation that exploits a matrix of pie charts to display comparative genomics data. Each pie is used to describe a complex or process from a separate taxon, and is divided into sectors corresponding to the number of proteins (subunits) in a complex/process. The predicted presence or absence of proteins in each complex are delineated by occupancy of a given sector; this format is visually highly accessible and makes pattern recognition rapid and reliable. A key to the identity of each subunit, plus hierarchical naming of taxa and coloring are included. A java-based application, the Coulson plot generator (CPG) automates graphic production, with a tab or comma-delineated text file as input and generating an editable portable document format or svg file. CPG software may be used to rapidly convert spreadsheet data to a graphical matrix pie chart format. The representation essentially retains all of the information from the spreadsheet but presents a graphically rich format making comparisons and identification of patterns significantly clearer. While the Coulson plot format is highly useful in comparative genomics, its

  19. On transform coding tools under development for VP10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Sarah; Chen, Yue; Han, Jingning; Liu, Zoe; Mukherjee, Debargha; Su, Hui; Wang, Yongzhe; Bankoski, Jim; Li, Shunyao

    2016-09-01

    Google started the WebM Project in 2010 to develop open source, royaltyfree video codecs designed specifically for media on the Web. The second generation codec released by the WebM project, VP9, is currently served by YouTube, and enjoys billions of views per day. Realizing the need for even greater compression efficiency to cope with the growing demand for video on the web, the WebM team embarked on an ambitious project to develop a next edition codec, VP10, that achieves at least a generational improvement in coding efficiency over VP9. Starting from VP9, a set of new experimental coding tools have already been added to VP10 to achieve decent coding gains. Subsequently, Google joined a consortium of major tech companies called the Alliance for Open Media to jointly develop a new codec AV1. As a result, the VP10 effort is largely expected to merge with AV1. In this paper, we focus primarily on new tools in VP10 that improve coding of the prediction residue using transform coding techniques. Specifically, we describe tools that increase the flexibility of available transforms, allowing the codec to handle a more diverse range or residue structures. Results are presented on a standard test set.

  20. Impact of genomics on microbial food safety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abee, T.; Schaik, van W.; Siezen, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    Genome sequences are now available for many of the microbes that cause food-borne diseases. The information contained in pathogen genome sequences, together with the development of themed and whole-genome DNA microarrays and improved proteomics techniques, might provide tools for the rapid detection

  1. Using an evaluative tool to develop effective mathscasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galligan, Linda; Hobohm, Carola; Peake, Katherine

    2017-09-01

    This study is situated in a course designed for both on-campus and online pre-service and in-service teachers, where student-created mathscasts provide a way for university lecturers to assess students' quality of teaching, and understanding of mathematics. Teachers and pre-service teachers, in a university course with 90% online enrolment, were asked to create mathscasts to explain mathematics concepts at middle school level. This paper describes the process of developing and refining a tool for the creation and evaluation of quality student-produced mathscasts. The study then investigates the usefulness of the tool within the context of pedagogy and mathematical understanding. Despite an abundance of mathscasts already available on the web, there is merit in creating mathscasts, not only as a tool for teaching, but also as a means of learning by doing. The premise for creating student-produced mathscasts was to capture the creators' mathematical understanding and pedagogical approach to teaching a mathematical concept, which were then peer-assessed and graded. The analysis included surveys, practice mathscasts with peer- and self-reviews, and students' final assessed mathscasts. The results indicate that the use of the evaluative tool resulted in an improvement in quality of student-created mathscasts and critiques thereof. The paper concludes with a discussion on future directions of student-produced mathscasts.

  2. Genome engineering in Vibrio cholerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Val, Marie-Eve; Skovgaard, Ole; Ducos-Galand, Magaly

    2012-01-01

    Although bacteria with multipartite genomes are prevalent, our knowledge of the mechanisms maintaining their genome is very limited, and much remains to be learned about the structural and functional interrelationships of multiple chromosomes. Owing to its bi-chromosomal genome architecture and its....... This difficulty was surmounted using a unique and powerful strategy based on massive rearrangement of prokaryotic genomes. We developed a site-specific recombination-based engineering tool, which allows targeted, oriented, and reciprocal DNA exchanges. Using this genetic tool, we obtained a panel of V. cholerae...

  3. Xenopus egg extract: A powerful tool to study genome maintenance mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, Wouter S; Klein Douwel, Daisy; Knipscheer, Puck

    2017-08-15

    DNA repair pathways are crucial to maintain the integrity of our genome and prevent genetic diseases such as cancer. There are many different types of DNA damage and specific DNA repair mechanisms have evolved to deal with these lesions. In addition to these repair pathways there is an extensive signaling network that regulates processes important for repair, such as cell cycle control and transcription. Despite extensive research, DNA damage repair and signaling are not fully understood. In vitro systems such as the Xenopus egg extract system, have played, and still play, an important role in deciphering the molecular details of these processes. Xenopus laevis egg extracts contain all factors required to efficiently perform DNA repair outside a cell, using mechanisms conserved in humans. These extracts have been used to study several genome maintenance pathways, including mismatch repair, non-homologous end joining, ICL repair, DNA damage checkpoint activation, and replication fork stability. Here we describe how the Xenopus egg extract system, in combination with specifically designed DNA templates, contributed to our detailed understanding of these pathways. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Development and content validation of the power mobility training tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Lisa K; Farris, John P; Cain, Brett; King, Emily; VandenBerg, Ashley

    2018-01-01

    This paper outlines the development and content validation of the power mobility training tool (PMTT), an observational tool designed to assist therapists in developing power mobility training programs for children who have multiple, severe impairments. Initial items on the PMTT were developed based on a literature review and in consultation with therapists experienced in the use of power mobility. Items were trialled in clinical settings, reviewed, and refined. Items were then operationalized and an administration manual detailing scoring for each item was created. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to establish content validity via a 15 member, international expert panel. The content validity ratio (CVR) was determined for each possible item. Of the 19 original items, 10 achieved minimum required CVR values and were included in the final version of the PMTT. Items related to manoeuvring a power mobility device were merged and an item related to the number of switches used concurrently to operate a power mobility device were added to the PMTT. The PMTT may assist therapists in developing training programs that facilitate the acquisition of beginning power mobility skills in children who have multiple, severe impairments. Implications for Rehabilitation The Power Mobility Training Tool (PMTT) was developed to help guide the development of power mobility intervention programs for children who have multiple, severe impairments. The PMTT can be used with children who access a power mobility device using either a joystick or a switch. Therapists who have limited experience with power mobility may find the PMTT to be helpful in setting up and conducting power mobility training interventions as a feasible aspect of a plan of care for children who have multiple, severe impairments.

  5. Development and validation of a premature ejaculation diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symonds, Tara; Perelman, Michael A; Althof, Stanley; Giuliano, François; Martin, Mona; May, Kathryn; Abraham, Lucy; Crossland, Anna; Morris, Mark

    2007-08-01

    Diagnosis of premature ejaculation (PE) for clinical trial purposes has typically relied on intravaginal ejaculation latency time (IELT) for entry, but this parameter does not capture the multidimensional nature of PE. Therefore, the aim was to develop a brief, multidimensional, psychometrically validated instrument for diagnosing PE status. The questionnaire development involved three stages: (1) Five focus groups and six individual interviews were conducted to develop the content; (2) psychometric validation using three different groups of men; and (3) generation of a scoring system. For psychometric validation/scoring system development, data was collected from (1) men with PE based on clinician diagnosis, using DSM-IV-TR, who also had IELTs or =11 PE. The development and validation of this new PE diagnostic tool has resulted in a new, user-friendly, and brief self-report questionnaire for use in clinical trials to diagnose PE.

  6. Developing a practical evaluation tool for preceptor use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catherine M; Seldomridge, Lisa A; Badros, Karen K

    2008-01-01

    After years of dissatisfaction with existing instruments, a tool for preceptors to evaluate an undergraduate student's clinical performance was developed, with preceptors' input in its construction. A 2-year pilot evaluation revealed notable problems including excessively high preceptor ratings and significant disparities between faculty and preceptor ratings. Further revisions were made, reducing indicators to those which the preceptors can actually evaluate on an everyday basis and developing a rubric. Additional recommendations to bolster the quality of ratings are improving orientation and guidance of preceptors and modifying procedures for giving feedback.

  7. Application of DETECTER, an evolutionary genomic tool to analyze genetic variation, to the cystic fibrosis gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Kee Danny W

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The medical community requires computational tools that distinguish missense genetic differences having phenotypic impact within the vast number of sense mutations that do not. Tools that do this will become increasingly important for those seeking to use human genome sequence data to predict disease, make prognoses, and customize therapy to individual patients. Results An approach, termed DETECTER, is proposed to identify sites in a protein sequence where amino acid replacements are likely to have a significant effect on phenotype, including causing genetic disease. This approach uses a model-dependent tool to estimate the normalized replacement rate at individual sites in a protein sequence, based on a history of those sites extracted from an evolutionary analysis of the corresponding protein family. This tool identifies sites that have higher-than-average, average, or lower-than-average rates of change in the lineage leading to the sequence in the population of interest. The rates are then combined with sequence data to determine the likelihoods that particular amino acids were present at individual sites in the evolutionary history of the gene family. These likelihoods are used to predict whether any specific amino acid replacements, if introduced at the site in a modern human population, would have a significant impact on fitness. The DETECTER tool is used to analyze the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene family. Conclusion In this system, DETECTER retrodicts amino acid replacements associated with the cystic fibrosis disease with greater accuracy than alternative approaches. While this result validates this approach for this particular family of proteins only, the approach may be applicable to the analysis of polymorphisms generally, including SNPs in a human population.

  8. The development of a practical tool for risk assessment of manual work – the HAT-tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraker, H. de; Douwes, M.

    2008-01-01

    For the Dutch Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment we developed a tool to assess the risks of developing complaints of the arm, neck or shoulders during manual work. The tool was developed for every type of organization and is easy to use, does not require measurements other than time and can

  9. Developments in the Tools and Methodologies of Synthetic Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelwick, Richard; MacDonald, James T.; Webb, Alexander J.; Freemont, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology is principally concerned with the rational design and engineering of biologically based parts, devices, or systems. However, biological systems are generally complex and unpredictable, and are therefore, intrinsically difficult to engineer. In order to address these fundamental challenges, synthetic biology is aiming to unify a “body of knowledge” from several foundational scientific fields, within the context of a set of engineering principles. This shift in perspective is enabling synthetic biologists to address complexity, such that robust biological systems can be designed, assembled, and tested as part of a biological design cycle. The design cycle takes a forward-design approach in which a biological system is specified, modeled, analyzed, assembled, and its functionality tested. At each stage of the design cycle, an expanding repertoire of tools is being developed. In this review, we highlight several of these tools in terms of their applications and benefits to the synthetic biology community. PMID:25505788

  10. Process-Based Quality (PBQ) Tools Development; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cummins, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to benchmark the development of process-based quality tools for application in CAD (computer-aided design) model-based applications. The processes of interest are design, manufacturing, and quality process applications. A study was commissioned addressing the impact, current technologies, and known problem areas in application of 3D MCAD (3-dimensional mechanical computer-aided design) models and model integrity on downstream manufacturing and quality processes. The downstream manufacturing and product quality processes are profoundly influenced and dependent on model quality and modeling process integrity. The goal is to illustrate and expedite the modeling and downstream model-based technologies for available or conceptual methods and tools to achieve maximum economic advantage and advance process-based quality concepts

  11. Developments in the tools and methodologies of synthetic biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard eKelwick

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic biology is principally concerned with the rational design and engineering of biologically based parts, devices or systems. However, biological systems are generally complex and unpredictable and are therefore intrinsically difficult to engineer. In order to address these fundamental challenges, synthetic biology is aiming to unify a ‘body of knowledge’ from several foundational scientific fields, within the context of a set of engineering principles. This shift in perspective is enabling synthetic biologists to address complexity, such that robust biological systems can be designed, assembled and tested as part of a biological design cycle. The design cycle takes a forward-design approach in which a biological system is specified, modeled, analyzed, assembled and its functionality tested. At each stage of the design cycle an expanding repertoire of tools is being developed. In this review we highlight several of these tools in terms of their applications and benefits to the synthetic biology community.

  12. Development Life Cycle and Tools for XML Content Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulvatunyou, Boonserm [ORNL; Morris, Katherine [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Buhwan, Jeong [POSTECH University, South Korea; Goyal, Puja [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    2004-11-01

    Many integration projects today rely on shared semantic models based on standards represented using Extensible Mark up Language (XML) technologies. Shared semantic models typically evolve and require maintenance. In addition, to promote interoperability and reduce integration costs, the shared semantics should be reused as much as possible. Semantic components must be consistent and valid in terms of agreed upon standards and guidelines. In this paper, we describe an activity model for creation, use, and maintenance of a shared semantic model that is coherent and supports efficient enterprise integration. We then use this activity model to frame our research and the development of tools to support those activities. We provide overviews of these tools primarily in the context of the W3C XML Schema. At the present, we focus our work on the W3C XML Schema as the representation of choice, due to its extensive adoption by industry.

  13. Development to requirements for a procedures software tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasutake, J.Y.; Hachiro Isoda

    1993-01-01

    In 1989, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) in Japan initiated a joint research program to investigate various interventions to reduce personnel errors and inefficiencies in the maintenance of nuclear power plants. This program, consisting of several interrelated projects, was initiated because of the mutual recognition of the importance of the human element in the efficient and safe operation of utilities and the continuing need to enhance personnel performance to sustain plant safety and availability. This paper summarizes one of the projects, jointly funded by EPRI and CRIEPI, to analyze the requirements for, and prepare a functional description of, a procedures software tool (PST). The primary objective of this project was to develop a description of the features and functions of a software tool that would help procedure writers to improve the quality of maintenance and testing procedures, thereby enhancing the performance of both procedure writers and maintenance personnel

  14. Requirements Document for Development of a Livermore Tomography Tools Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetho, I. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-02-09

    In this document, we outline an exercise performed at LLNL to evaluate the user interface deficits of a LLNL-developed CT reconstruction software package, Livermore Tomography Tools (LTT). We observe that a difficult-to-use command line interface and the lack of support functions compound to generate a bottleneck in the CT reconstruction process when input parameters to key functions are not well known. Through the exercise of systems engineering best practices, we generate key performance parameters for a LTT interface refresh, and specify a combination of back-end (“test-mode” functions) and front-end (graphical user interface visualization and command scripting tools) solutions to LTT’s poor user interface that aim to mitigate issues and lower costs associated with CT reconstruction using LTT. Key functional and non-functional requirements and risk mitigation strategies for the solution are outlined and discussed.

  15. Continued development of modeling tools and theory for RF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Mission Research Corporation (MRC) is pleased to present the Department of Energy (DOE) with its renewal proposal to the Continued Development of Modeling Tools and Theory for RF Heating program. The objective of the program is to continue and extend the earlier work done by the proposed principal investigator in the field of modeling (Radio Frequency) RF heating experiments in the large tokamak fusion experiments, particularly the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) device located at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). An integral part of this work is the investigation and, in some cases, resolution of theoretical issues which pertain to accurate modeling. MRC is nearing the successful completion of the specified tasks of the Continued Development of Modeling Tools and Theory for RF Heating project. The following tasks are either completed or nearing completion. (1) Anisotropic temperature and rotation upgrades; (2) Modeling for relativistic ECRH; (3) Further documentation of SHOOT and SPRUCE. As a result of the progress achieved under this project, MRC has been urged to continue this effort. Specifically, during the performance of this project two topics were identified by PPPL personnel as new applications of the existing RF modeling tools. These two topics concern (a) future fast-wave current drive experiments on the large tokamaks including TFTR and (c) the interpretation of existing and future RF probe data from TFTR. To address each of these topics requires some modification or enhancement of the existing modeling tools, and the first topic requires resolution of certain theoretical issues to produce self-consistent results. This work falls within the scope of the original project and is more suited to the project's renewal than to the initiation of a new project

  16. Genomic sequence around butterfly wing development genes: annotation and comparative analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inês C Conceição

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Analysis of genomic sequence allows characterization of genome content and organization, and access beyond gene-coding regions for identification of functional elements. BAC libraries, where relatively large genomic regions are made readily available, are especially useful for species without a fully sequenced genome and can increase genomic coverage of phylogenetic and biological diversity. For example, no butterfly genome is yet available despite the unique genetic and biological properties of this group, such as diversified wing color patterns. The evolution and development of these patterns is being studied in a few target species, including Bicyclus anynana, where a whole-genome BAC library allows targeted access to large genomic regions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We characterize ∼1.3 Mb of genomic sequence around 11 selected genes expressed in B. anynana developing wings. Extensive manual curation of in silico predictions, also making use of a large dataset of expressed genes for this species, identified repetitive elements and protein coding sequence, and highlighted an expansion of Alcohol dehydrogenase genes. Comparative analysis with orthologous regions of the lepidopteran reference genome allowed assessment of conservation of fine-scale synteny (with detection of new inversions and translocations and of DNA sequence (with detection of high levels of conservation of non-coding regions around some, but not all, developmental genes. CONCLUSIONS: The general properties and organization of the available B. anynana genomic sequence are similar to the lepidopteran reference, despite the more than 140 MY divergence. Our results lay the groundwork for further studies of new interesting findings in relation to both coding and non-coding sequence: 1 the Alcohol dehydrogenase expansion with higher similarity between the five tandemly-repeated B. anynana paralogs than with the corresponding B. mori orthologs, and 2 the high

  17. COSTMODL - AN AUTOMATED SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT COST ESTIMATION TOOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, G. B.

    1994-01-01

    The cost of developing computer software consumes an increasing portion of many organizations' budgets. As this trend continues, the capability to estimate the effort and schedule required to develop a candidate software product becomes increasingly important. COSTMODL is an automated software development estimation tool which fulfills this need. Assimilating COSTMODL to any organization's particular environment can yield significant reduction in the risk of cost overruns and failed projects. This user-customization capability is unmatched by any other available estimation tool. COSTMODL accepts a description of a software product to be developed and computes estimates of the effort required to produce it, the calendar schedule required, and the distribution of effort and staffing as a function of the defined set of development life-cycle phases. This is accomplished by the five cost estimation algorithms incorporated into COSTMODL: the NASA-developed KISS model; the Basic, Intermediate, and Ada COCOMO models; and the Incremental Development model. This choice affords the user the ability to handle project complexities ranging from small, relatively simple projects to very large projects. Unique to COSTMODL is the ability to redefine the life-cycle phases of development and the capability to display a graphic representation of the optimum organizational structure required to develop the subject project, along with required staffing levels and skills. The program is menu-driven and mouse sensitive with an extensive context-sensitive help system that makes it possible for a new user to easily install and operate the program and to learn the fundamentals of cost estimation without having prior training or separate documentation. The implementation of these functions, along with the customization feature, into one program makes COSTMODL unique within the industry. COSTMODL was written for IBM PC compatibles, and it requires Turbo Pascal 5.0 or later and Turbo

  18. Whole Genome Sequencing of Enterovirus species C Isolates by High-throughput Sequencing: Development of Generic Primers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maël Bessaud

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Enteroviruses are among the most common viruses infecting humans and can cause diverse clinical syndromes ranging from minor febrile illness to severe and potentially fatal diseases. Enterovirus species C (EV-C consists of more than 20 types, among which the 3 serotypes of polioviruses, the etiological agents of poliomyelitis, are included. Biodiversity and evolution of EV-C genomes are shaped by frequent recombination events. Therefore, identification and characterization of circulating EV-C strains require the sequencing of different genomic regions.A simple method was developed to sequence quickly the entire genome of EV-C isolates. Four overlapping fragments were produced separately by RT-PCR performed with generic primers. The four amplicons were then pooled and purified prior to be sequenced by high-throughput technique.The method was assessed on a panel of EV-Cs belonging to a wide-range of types. It can be used to determine full-length genome sequences through de novo assembly of thousands of reads. It was also able to discriminate reads from closely related viruses in mixtures.By decreasing the workload compared to classical Sanger-based techniques, this method will serve as a precious tool for sequencing large panels of EV-Cs isolated in cell cultures during environmental surveillance or from patients, including vaccine-derived polioviruses.

  19. In-house developed methodologies and tools for decommissioning projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detilleux, Michel; Centner, Baudouin

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes different methodologies and tools developed in-house by Tractebel Engineering to facilitate the engineering works to be carried out especially in the frame of decommissioning projects. Three examples of tools with their corresponding results are presented: - The LLWAA-DECOM code, a software developed for the radiological characterization of contaminated systems and equipment. The code constitutes a specific module of more general software that was originally developed to characterize radioactive waste streams in order to be able to declare the radiological inventory of critical nuclides, in particular difficult-to-measure radionuclides, to the Authorities. In the case of LLWAA-DECOM, deposited activities inside contaminated equipment (piping, tanks, heat exchangers...) and scaling factors between nuclides, at any given time of the decommissioning time schedule, are calculated on the basis of physical characteristics of the systems and of operational parameters of the nuclear power plant. This methodology was applied to assess decommissioning costs of Belgian NPPs, to characterize the primary system of Trino NPP in Italy, to characterize the equipment of miscellaneous circuits of Ignalina NPP and of Kozloduy unit 1 and, to calculate remaining dose rates around equipment in the frame of the preparation of decommissioning activities; - The VISIMODELLER tool, a user friendly CAD interface developed to ease the introduction of lay-out areas in a software named VISIPLAN. VISIPLAN is a 3D dose rate assessment tool for ALARA work planning, developed by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK.CEN. Both softwares were used for projects such as the steam generators replacements in Belgian NPPs or the preparation of the decommissioning of units 1 and 2 of Kozloduy NPP; - The DBS software, a software developed to manage the different kinds of activities that are part of the general time schedule of a decommissioning project. For each activity, when relevant

  20. Developing a common framework for evaluating the implementation of genomic medicine interventions in clinical care: the IGNITE Network's Common Measures Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Lori A; Sperber, Nina R; Voils, Corrine; Nichols, Marshall; Myers, Rachel A; Wu, R Ryanne; Rakhra-Burris, Tejinder; Levy, Kenneth D; Levy, Mia; Pollin, Toni I; Guan, Yue; Horowitz, Carol R; Ramos, Michelle; Kimmel, Stephen E; McDonough, Caitrin W; Madden, Ebony B; Damschroder, Laura J

    2018-06-01

    PurposeImplementation research provides a structure for evaluating the clinical integration of genomic medicine interventions. This paper describes the Implementing Genomics in Practice (IGNITE) Network's efforts to promote (i) a broader understanding of genomic medicine implementation research and (ii) the sharing of knowledge generated in the network.MethodsTo facilitate this goal, the IGNITE Network Common Measures Working Group (CMG) members adopted the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) to guide its approach to identifying constructs and measures relevant to evaluating genomic medicine as a whole, standardizing data collection across projects, and combining data in a centralized resource for cross-network analyses.ResultsCMG identified 10 high-priority CFIR constructs as important for genomic medicine. Of those, eight did not have standardized measurement instruments. Therefore, we developed four survey tools to address this gap. In addition, we identified seven high-priority constructs related to patients, families, and communities that did not map to CFIR constructs. Both sets of constructs were combined to create a draft genomic medicine implementation model.ConclusionWe developed processes to identify constructs deemed valuable for genomic medicine implementation and codified them in a model. These resources are freely available to facilitate knowledge generation and sharing across the field.

  1. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shropshire, David Earl; Jacobson, Jacob Jordan; Berrett, Sharon; Cobb, D. A.; Worhach, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  2. WebaCGH: an interactive online tool for the analysis and display of array comparative genomic hybridisation data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankenberger, Casey; Wu, Xiaolin; Harmon, Jerry; Church, Deanna; Gangi, Lisa M; Munroe, David J; Urzúa, Ulises

    2006-01-01

    Gene copy number variations occur both in normal cells and in numerous pathologies including cancer and developmental diseases. Array comparative genomic hybridisation (aCGH) is an emerging technology that allows detection of chromosomal gains and losses in a high-resolution format. When aCGH is performed on cDNA and oligonucleotide microarrays, the impact of DNA copy number on gene transcription profiles may be directly compared. We have created an online software tool, WebaCGH, that functions to (i) upload aCGH and gene transcription results from multiple experiments; (ii) identify significant aberrant regions using a local Z-score threshold in user-selected chromosomal segments subjected to smoothing with moving averages; and (iii) display results in a graphical format with full genome and individual chromosome views. In the individual chromosome display, data can be zoomed in/out in both dimensions (i.e. ratio and physical location) and plotted features can have 'mouse over' linking to outside databases to identify loci of interest. Uploaded data can be stored indefinitely for subsequent retrieval and analysis. WebaCGH was created as a Java-based web application using the open-source database MySQL. WebaCGH is freely accessible at http://129.43.22.27/WebaCGH/welcome.htm Xiaolin Wu (forestwu@mail.nih.gov) or Ulises Urzúa (uurzua@med.uchile.cl).

  3. Mitogenomes from type specimens, a genotyping tool for morphologically simple species: ten genomes of agar-producing red algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boo, Ga Hun; Hughey, Jeffery R; Miller, Kathy Ann; Boo, Sung Min

    2016-10-14

    DNA sequences from type specimens provide independent, objective characters that enhance the value of type specimens and permit the correct application of species names to phylogenetic clades and specimens. We provide mitochondrial genomes (mitogenomes) from archival type specimens of ten species in agar-producing red algal genera Gelidium and Pterocladiella. The genomes contain 43-44 genes, ranging in size from 24,910 to 24,970 bp with highly conserved gene synteny. Low Ka/Ks ratios of apocytochrome b and cytochrome oxidase genes support their utility as markers. Phylogenies of mitogenomes and cox1+rbcL sequences clarified classification at the genus and species levels. Three species formerly in Gelidium and Pterocladia are transferred to Pterocladiella: P. media comb. nov., P. musciformis comb. nov., and P. luxurians comb. and stat. nov. Gelidium sinicola is merged with G. coulteri because they share identical cox1 and rbcL sequences. We describe a new species, Gelidium millariana sp. nov., previously identified as G. isabelae from Australia. We demonstrate that mitogenomes from type specimens provide a new tool for typifying species in the Gelidiales and that there is an urgent need for analyzing mitogenomes from type specimens of red algae and other morphologically simple organisms for insight into their nomenclature, taxonomy and evolution.

  4. Development and evaluation of a genomics training program for community health workers in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei-Shih; Zhao, Shixi; Stelzig, Donaji; Dhar, Shweta U; Eble, Tanya; Yeh, Yu-Chen; Kwok, Oi-Man

    2018-01-04

    PurposeGenomics services have the potential to reduce incidence and mortality of diseases by providing individualized, family health history (FHH)-based prevention strategies to clients. These services may benefit from the involvement of community health workers (CHWs) in the provision of FHH-based genomics education and services, as CHWs are frontline public health workers and lay health educators, who share similar ethnicities, languages, socioeconomic statuses, and life experiences with the communities they serve. We developed, implemented, and evaluated the FHH-based genomics training program for CHWs.MethodsThis theory- and evidence-based FHH-focused genomics curriculum was developed by an interdisciplinary team. Full-day workshops in English and Spanish were delivered to 145 Texas CHWs (91.6% were Hispanic/black). Preworkshop, postworkshop, and 3-month follow-up data were collected.ResultsCHWs significantly improved their attitudes, intention, self-efficacy, and knowledge regarding adopting FHH-based genomics into their practice after the workshops. At 3-month follow-up, these scores remained higher, and there was a significant increase in CHWs' genomics practices.ConclusionThis FHH-based genomics training successfully educated Texas CHWs, and the outcomes were promising. Dissemination of training to CHWs in and outside of Texas is needed to promote better access to and delivery of personalized genomics services for the lay and underserved communities.GENETICS in MEDICINE advance online publication, 4 January 2018; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.236.

  5. Assessment of COTS IR image simulation tools for ATR development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Heiko; Stahl, Christoph; Bjerkeli, Frode; Skaaren-Fystro, Paal

    2005-05-01

    Following the tendency of increased use of imaging sensors in military aircraft, future fighter pilots will need onboard artificial intelligence e.g. ATR for aiding them in image interpretation and target designation. The European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company (EADS) in Germany has developed an advanced method for automatic target recognition (ATR) which is based on adaptive neural networks. This ATR method can assist the crew of military aircraft like the Eurofighter in sensor image monitoring and thereby reduce the workload in the cockpit and increase the mission efficiency. The EADS ATR approach can be adapted for imagery of visual, infrared and SAR sensors because of the training-based classifiers of the ATR method. For the optimal adaptation of these classifiers they have to be trained with appropriate and sufficient image data. The training images must show the target objects from different aspect angles, ranges, environmental conditions, etc. Incomplete training sets lead to a degradation of classifier performance. Additionally, ground truth information i.e. scenario conditions like class type and position of targets is necessary for the optimal adaptation of the ATR method. In Summer 2003, EADS started a cooperation with Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace (KDA) from Norway. The EADS/KDA approach is to provide additional image data sets for training-based ATR through IR image simulation. The joint study aims to investigate the benefits of enhancing incomplete training sets for classifier adaptation by simulated synthetic imagery. EADS/KDA identified the requirements of a commercial-off-the-shelf IR simulation tool capable of delivering appropriate synthetic imagery for ATR development. A market study of available IR simulation tools and suppliers was performed. After that the most promising tool was benchmarked according to several criteria e.g. thermal emission model, sensor model, targets model, non-radiometric image features etc., resulting in a

  6. Visualization for genomics: the Microbial Genome Viewer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhoven, R.; Enckevort, F.H.J. van; Boekhorst, J.; Molenaar, D; Siezen, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    SUMMARY: A Web-based visualization tool, the Microbial Genome Viewer, is presented that allows the user to combine complex genomic data in a highly interactive way. This Web tool enables the interactive generation of chromosome wheels and linear genome maps from genome annotation data stored in a

  7. Development of electronic barcodes for use in plant pathology and functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Monto H; Miller, Philip

    2006-06-01

    We have developed a novel 'electronic barcode' system that uses radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, cell phones, and portable computers to link phenotypic, environmental, and genomic data. We describe a secure, inexpensive system to record and retrieve data from plant samples. It utilizes RFID tags, computers, PDAs, and cell phones to link, record, and retrieve positional, and functional genomic data. Our results suggest that RFID tags can be used in functional genomic screens to record information that is involved in plant development or disease.

  8. Complete in vitro life cycle of Trypanosoma congolense: development of genetic tools.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Coustou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animal African trypanosomosis, a disease mainly caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma congolense, is a major constraint to livestock productivity and has a significant impact in the developing countries of Africa. RNA interference (RNAi has been used to study gene function and identify drug and vaccine targets in a variety of organisms including trypanosomes. However, trypanosome RNAi studies have mainly been conducted in T. brucei, as a model for human infection, largely ignoring livestock parasites of economical importance such as T. congolense, which displays different pathogenesis profiles. The whole T. congolense life cycle can be completed in vitro, but this attractive model displayed important limitations: (i genetic tools were currently limited to insect forms and production of modified infectious BSF through differentiation was never achieved, (ii in vitro differentiation techniques lasted several months, (iii absence of long-term bloodstream forms (BSF in vitro culture prevented genomic analyses. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We optimized culture conditions for each developmental stage and secured the differentiation steps. Specifically, we devised a medium adapted for the strenuous development of stable long-term BSF culture. Using Amaxa nucleofection technology, we greatly improved the transfection rate of the insect form and designed an inducible transgene expression system using the IL3000 reference strain. We tested it by expression of reporter genes and through RNAi. Subsequently, we achieved the complete in vitro life cycle with dramatically shortened time requirements for various wild type and transgenic strains. Finally, we established the use of modified strains for experimental infections and underlined a host adaptation phase requirement. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We devised an improved T. congolense model, which offers the opportunity to perform functional genomics analyses throughout the whole life

  9. NEEMO 20: Science Training, Operations, and Tool Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, T.; Miller, M.; Rodriguez-Lanetty, M.; Chappell, S.; Naids, A.; Hood, A.; Coan, D.; Abell, P.; Reagan, M.; Janoiko, B.

    2016-01-01

    The 20th mission of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) was a highly integrated evaluation of operational protocols and tools designed to enable future exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. NEEMO 20 was conducted from the Aquarius habitat off the coast of Key Largo, FL in July 2015. The habitat and its surroundings provide a convincing analog for space exploration. A crew of six (comprised of astronauts, engineers, and habitat technicians) lived and worked in and around the unique underwater laboratory over a mission duration of 14-days. Incorporated into NEEMO 20 was a diverse Science Team (ST) comprised of geoscientists from the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES/XI) Division from the Johnson Space Center (JSC), as well as marine scientists from the Department of Biological Sciences at Florida International University (FIU). This team trained the crew on the science to be conducted, defined sampling techniques and operational procedures, and planned and coordinated the science focused Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs). The primary science objectives of NEEMO 20 was to study planetary sampling techniques and tools in partial gravity environments under realistic mission communication time delays and operational pressures. To facilitate these objectives two types of science sites were employed 1) geoscience sites with available rocks and regolith for testing sampling procedures and tools and, 2) marine science sites dedicated to specific research focused on assessing the photosynthetic capability of corals and their genetic connectivity between deep and shallow reefs. These marine sites and associated research objectives included deployment of handheld instrumentation, context descriptions, imaging, and sampling; thus acted as a suitable proxy for planetary surface exploration activities. This abstract briefly summarizes the scientific training, scientific operations, and tool

  10. WP3 Prototype development for operational planning tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristoffersen, T.; Meibom, P. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Risoe DTU (Denmark)); Apfelbeck, J.; Barth, R.; Brand, H. (IER, Univ. of Stuttgart (Germany))

    2008-04-15

    This report documents the model development carried out in work package 3 in the SUPWIND project. It was decided to focus on the estimation of the need for reserve power, and on the reservation of reserve power by TSOs. Reserve power is needed to cover deviations from the day-ahead forecasts of electricity load and wind power production, and to cover forced outages of power plants and transmission lines. Work has been carried out to include load uncertainty and forced outages in the two main components of the Wilmar Planning tool namely the Scenario Tree Tool and the Joint Market Model. This work is documented in chapter 1 and 2. The inclusion of load uncertainty and forced outages in the Scenario Tree Tool enables calculation of the demand for reserve power depending on the forecast horizon. The algorithm is given in Section 3.1. The design of a modified version of the Joint Market Model enabling estimation of the optimal amount of reserve power to reserve day-ahead before the actual operation hour is documented in Section 3.2. With regard to the evaluation of a power system, its ability to cope with extreme events is crucial to be investigated. Chapter 4 gives a definition of such extreme events. Further, the methodology to identify extreme events on the basis of the existing tools is described. Within the SUPWIND consortium there has been an interest in using the Joint Market Model to model smaller parts of a power system but with more detailed representation of the transmission and distribution grid. Chapter 5 documents this work. (author)

  11. Development of dosimetry tools for proton therapy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong-Won; Kim, Dogyun

    2010-01-01

    Dosimetry tools for proton therapy research have been developed to measure the properties of a therapeutic proton beam. A CCD camera-scintillation screen system, which can verify the 2D dose distribution of a scanning beam and can be used for proton radiography, was developed. Also developed were a large area parallel-plate ionization chamber and a multi-layer Faraday cup to monitor the beam current and to measure the beam energy, respectively. To investigate the feasibility of locating the distal dose falloff in real time during patient treatment, a prompt gamma measuring system composed of multi-layer shielding structures was then devised. The system worked well for a pristine proton beam. However, correlation between the distal dose falloff and the prompt gamma distribution was blurred by neutron background for a therapy beam formed by scattering method. We have also worked on the design of a Compton camera to image the 2D distribution of prompt gamma rays.

  12. Environmental epigenetics: A promising venue for developing next-generation pollution biomonitoring tools in marine invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez-Ulloa, Victoria; Gonzalez-Romero, Rodrigo; Eirin-Lopez, Jose M

    2015-09-15

    Environmental epigenetics investigates the cause-effect relationships between specific environmental factors and the subsequent epigenetic modifications triggering adaptive responses in the cell. Given the dynamic and potentially reversible nature of the different types of epigenetic marks, environmental epigenetics constitutes a promising venue for developing fast and sensible biomonitoring programs. Indeed, several epigenetic biomarkers have been successfully developed and applied in traditional model organisms (e.g., human and mouse). Nevertheless, the lack of epigenetic knowledge in other ecologically and environmentally relevant organisms has hampered the application of these tools in a broader range of ecosystems, most notably in the marine environment. Fortunately, that scenario is now changing thanks to the growing availability of complete reference genome sequences along with the development of high-throughput DNA sequencing and bioinformatic methods. Altogether, these resources make the epigenetic study of marine organisms (and more specifically marine invertebrates) a reality. By building on this knowledge, the present work provides a timely perspective highlighting the extraordinary potential of environmental epigenetic analyses as a promising source of rapid and sensible tools for pollution biomonitoring, using marine invertebrates as sentinel organisms. This strategy represents an innovative, groundbreaking approach, improving the conservation and management of natural resources in the oceans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Development and first application of an operating events ranking tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Šimić, Zdenko; Zerger, Benoit; Banov, Reni

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A method using analitycal hierarchy process for ranking operating events is developed and tested. • The method is applied for 5 years of U.S. NRC Licensee Event Reports (1453 events). • Uncertainty and sensitivity of the ranking results are evaluated. • Real events assessment shows potential of the method for operating experience feedback. - Abstract: The operating experience feedback is important for maintaining and improving safety and availability in nuclear power plants. Detailed investigation of all events is challenging since it requires excessive resources, especially in case of large event databases. This paper presents an event groups ranking method to complement the analysis of individual operating events. The basis for the method is the use of an internationally accepted events characterization scheme that allows different ways of events grouping and ranking. The ranking method itself consists of implementing the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) by means of a custom developed tool which allows events ranking based on ranking indexes pre-determined by expert judgment. Following the development phase, the tool was applied to analyze a complete set of 5 years of real nuclear power plants operating events (1453 events). The paper presents the potential of this ranking method to identify possible patterns throughout the event database and therefore to give additional insights into the events as well as to give quantitative input for the prioritization of further more detailed investigation of selected event groups

  14. Development of a biogas planning tool for project owners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredenslund, Anders Michael; Kjær, Tyge

    are considered: Combined heat and power and natural gas grid injection. The main input to the model is the amount and types of substrates available for anaerobic digestion. By substituting the models’ default values with more project specific information, the model can be used in a biogas projects later phases......A spreadsheet model was developed, which can be used as a tool in the initial phases of planning a centralized biogas plant in Denmark. The model assesses energy production, total plant costs, operational costs and revenues and effect on greenhouse gas emissions. Two energy utilization alternatives...

  15. Genome-wide prediction models that incorporate de novo GWAS are a powerful new tool for tropical rice improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindel, J E; Begum, H; Akdemir, D; Collard, B; Redoña, E; Jannink, J-L; McCouch, S

    2016-01-01

    To address the multiple challenges to food security posed by global climate change, population growth and rising incomes, plant breeders are developing new crop varieties that can enhance both agricultural productivity and environmental sustainability. Current breeding practices, however, are unable to keep pace with demand. Genomic selection (GS) is a new technique that helps accelerate the rate of genetic gain in breeding by using whole-genome data to predict the breeding value of offspring. Here, we describe a new GS model that combines RR-BLUP with markers fit as fixed effects selected from the results of a genome-wide-association study (GWAS) on the RR-BLUP training data. We term this model GS + de novo GWAS. In a breeding population of tropical rice, GS + de novo GWAS outperformed six other models for a variety of traits and in multiple environments. On the basis of these results, we propose an extended, two-part breeding design that can be used to efficiently integrate novel variation into elite breeding populations, thus expanding genetic diversity and enhancing the potential for sustainable productivity gains. PMID:26860200

  16. Genomics Strategies for Germplasm Characterization and the Development of Climate Resilient Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eHenry

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Food security requires the development and deployment of crop varieties resilient to climate variation and change. The study of variations in the genome of wild plant populations can be used to guide crop improvement. Genome variation found in wild crop relatives may be directly relevant to the breeding of environmentally adapted and climate resilient crops. Analysis of the genomes of populations growing in contrasting environments will reveal the genes subject to natural selection in adaptation to climate variations. Whole genome sequencing of these populations should define the numbers and types of genes associated with climate adaptation. This strategy is facilitated by recent advances in sequencing technologies. Wild relatives of rice and barley have been used to assess these approaches. This strategy is most easily applied to species for which a high quality reference genome sequence is available and where populations of wild relatives can be found growing in diverse environments or across environmental gradients.

  17. Framework for development of physician competencies in genomic medicine: report of the Competencies Working Group of the Inter-Society Coordinating Committee for Physician Education in Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korf, Bruce R; Berry, Anna B; Limson, Melvin; Marian, Ali J; Murray, Michael F; O'Rourke, P Pearl; Passamani, Eugene R; Relling, Mary V; Tooker, John; Tsongalis, Gregory J; Rodriguez, Laura L

    2014-11-01

    Completion of the Human Genome Project, in conjunction with dramatic reductions in the cost of DNA sequencing and advances in translational research, is gradually ushering genomic discoveries and technologies into the practice of medicine. The rapid pace of these advances is opening up a gap between the knowledge available about the clinical relevance of genomic information and the ability of clinicians to include such information in their medical practices. This educational gap threatens to be rate limiting to the clinical adoption of genomics in medicine. Solutions will require not only a better understanding of the clinical implications of genetic discoveries but also training in genomics at all levels of professional development, including for individuals in formal training and others who long ago completed such training. The National Human Genome Research Institute has convened the Inter-Society Coordinating Committee for Physician Education in Genomics (ISCC) to develop and share best practices in the use of genomics in medicine. The ISCC has developed a framework for development of genomics practice competencies that may serve as a starting point for formulation of competencies for physicians in various medical disciplines.

  18. SCCmecFinder, a Web-Based Tool for Typing of Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec in Staphylococcus aureus Using Whole-Genome Sequence Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Hülya; Hasman, Henrik; Larsen, Jesper; Stegger, Marc; Johannesen, Thor Bech; Allesøe, Rosa Lundbye; Lemvigh, Camilla Koldbæk; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Lund, Ole; Larsen, Anders Rhod

    2018-01-01

    Typing of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is important in infection control and surveillance. The current nomenclature of MRSA includes the genetic background of the S. aureus strain determined by multilocus sequence typing (MLST) or equivalent methods like spa typing and typing of the mobile genetic element staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCC mec ), which carries the mecA or mecC gene. Whereas MLST and spa typing are relatively simple, typing of SCC mec is less trivial because of its heterogeneity. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) provides the essential data for typing of the genetic background and SCC mec , but so far, no bioinformatic tools for SCC mec typing have been available. Here, we report the development and evaluation of SCC mec Finder for characterization of the SCC mec element from S. aureus WGS data. SCC mec Finder is able to identify all SCC mec element types, designated I to XIII, with subtyping of SCC mec types IV (2B) and V (5C2). SCC mec elements are characterized by two different gene prediction approaches to achieve correct annotation, a Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST)-based approach and a k -mer-based approach. Evaluation of SCC mec Finder by using a diverse collection of clinical isolates ( n = 93) showed a high typeability level of 96.7%, which increased to 98.9% upon modification of the default settings. In conclusion, SCC mec Finder can be an alternative to more laborious SCC mec typing methods and is freely available at https://cge.cbs.dtu.dk/services/SCCmecFinder. IMPORTANCE SCC mec in MRSA is acknowledged to be of importance not only because it contains the mecA or mecC gene but also for staphylococcal adaptation to different environments, e.g., in hospitals, the community, and livestock. Typing of SCC mec by PCR techniques has, because of its heterogeneity, been challenging, and whole-genome sequencing has only partially solved this since no good bioinformatic tools have been available. In this

  19. DOMINO: development of informative molecular markers for phylogenetic and genome-wide population genetic studies in non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías-López, Cristina; Sánchez-Herrero, José F; Guirao-Rico, Sara; Mora, Elisa; Arnedo, Miquel A; Sánchez-Gracia, Alejandro; Rozas, Julio

    2016-12-15

    The development of molecular markers is one of the most important challenges in phylogenetic and genome wide population genetics studies, especially in studies with non-model organisms. A highly promising approach for obtaining suitable markers is the utilization of genomic partitioning strategies for the simultaneous discovery and genotyping of a large number of markers. Unfortunately, not all markers obtained from these strategies provide enough information for solving multiple evolutionary questions at a reasonable taxonomic resolution. We have developed Development Of Molecular markers In Non-model Organisms (DOMINO), a bioinformatics tool for informative marker development from both next generation sequencing (NGS) data and pre-computed sequence alignments. The application implements popular NGS tools with new utilities in a highly versatile pipeline specifically designed to discover or select personalized markers at different levels of taxonomic resolution. These markers can be directly used to study the taxa surveyed for their design, utilized for further downstream PCR amplification in a broader set taxonomic scope, or exploited as suitable templates to bait design for target DNA enrichment techniques. We conducted an exhaustive evaluation of the performance of DOMINO via computer simulations and illustrate its utility to find informative markers in an empirical dataset. DOMINO is freely available from www.ub.edu/softevol/domino CONTACT: elsanchez@ub.edu or jrozas@ub.eduSupplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Advances in editing microalgae genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Daboussi, Fayza

    2017-01-01

    There have been significant advances in microalgal genomics over the last decade. Nevertheless, there are still insufficient tools for the manipulation of microalgae genomes and the development of microalgae as industrial biofactories. Several research groups have recently contributed to progress by demonstrating that particular nucleases can be used for targeted and stable modifications of the genomes of some microalgae species. The nucleases include Meganucleases, Zinc Finger nucleases, TAL...

  1. Genomic signal processing

    CERN Document Server

    Shmulevich, Ilya

    2007-01-01

    Genomic signal processing (GSP) can be defined as the analysis, processing, and use of genomic signals to gain biological knowledge, and the translation of that knowledge into systems-based applications that can be used to diagnose and treat genetic diseases. Situated at the crossroads of engineering, biology, mathematics, statistics, and computer science, GSP requires the development of both nonlinear dynamical models that adequately represent genomic regulation, and diagnostic and therapeutic tools based on these models. This book facilitates these developments by providing rigorous mathema

  2. New Tools for Embryo Selection: Comprehensive Chromosome Screening by Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of comprehensive chromosome screening (CCS using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. The study included 1420 CCS cycles for recurrent miscarriage (n=203; repetitive implantation failure (n=188; severe male factor (n=116; previous trisomic pregnancy (n=33; and advanced maternal age (n=880. CCS was performed in cycles with fresh oocytes and embryos (n=774; mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified oocytes (n=320; mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-2 embryos (n=235; and mixed cycles with fresh and vitrified day-3 embryos (n=91. Day-3 embryo biopsy was performed and analyzed by aCGH followed by day-5 embryo transfer. Consistent implantation (range: 40.5–54.2% and pregnancy rates per transfer (range: 46.0–62.9% were obtained for all the indications and independently of the origin of the oocytes or embryos. However, a lower delivery rate per cycle was achieved in women aged over 40 years (18.1% due to the higher percentage of aneuploid embryos (85.3% and lower number of cycles with at least one euploid embryo available per transfer (40.3%. We concluded that aneuploidy is one of the major factors which affect embryo implantation.

  3. Sequencing of Bacterial Genomes: Principles and Insights into Pathogenesis and Development of Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric S. Donkor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The impact of bacterial diseases on public health has become enormous, and is partly due to the increasing trend of antibiotic resistance displayed by bacterial pathogens. Sequencing of bacterial genomes has significantly improved our understanding about the biology of many bacterial pathogens as well as identification of novel antibiotic targets. Since the advent of genome sequencing two decades ago, about 1,800 bacterial genomes have been fully sequenced and these include important aetiological agents such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Vibrio cholerae, Clostridium difficile and Staphylococcus aureus. Very recently, there has been an explosion of bacterial genome data and is due to the development of next generation sequencing technologies, which are evolving so rapidly. Indeed, the field of microbial genomics is advancing at a very fast rate and it is difficult for researchers to be abreast with the new developments. This highlights the need for regular updates in microbial genomics through comprehensive reviews. This review paper seeks to provide an update on bacterial genome sequencing generally, and to analyze insights gained from sequencing in two areas, including bacterial pathogenesis and the development of antibiotics.

  4. Development of Next Generation Multiphase Pipe Flow Prediction Tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cem Sarica; Holden Zhang

    2006-05-31

    The developments of oil and gas fields in deep waters (5000 ft and more) will become more common in the future. It is inevitable that production systems will operate under multiphase flow conditions (simultaneous flow of gas, oil and water possibly along with sand, hydrates, and waxes). Multiphase flow prediction tools are essential for every phase of hydrocarbon recovery from design to operation. Recovery from deep-waters poses special challenges and requires accurate multiphase flow predictive tools for several applications, including the design and diagnostics of the production systems, separation of phases in horizontal wells, and multiphase separation (topside, seabed or bottom-hole). It is crucial for any multiphase separation technique, either at topside, seabed or bottom-hole, to know inlet conditions such as flow rates, flow patterns, and volume fractions of gas, oil and water coming into the separation devices. Therefore, the development of a new generation of multiphase flow predictive tools is needed. The overall objective of the proposed study is to develop a unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase flow in wells, flow lines, and pipelines to predict flow characteristics such as flow patterns, phase distributions, and pressure gradient encountered during petroleum production at different flow conditions (pipe diameter and inclination, fluid properties and flow rates). In the current multiphase modeling approach, flow pattern and flow behavior (pressure gradient and phase fractions) prediction modeling are separated. Thus, different models based on different physics are employed, causing inaccuracies and discontinuities. Moreover, oil and water are treated as a pseudo single phase, ignoring the distinct characteristics of both oil and water, and often resulting in inaccurate design that leads to operational problems. In this study, a new model is being developed through a theoretical and experimental study employing a revolutionary approach. The

  5. atBioNet– an integrated network analysis tool for genomics and biomarker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yijun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large amounts of mammalian protein-protein interaction (PPI data have been generated and are available for public use. From a systems biology perspective, Proteins/genes interactions encode the key mechanisms distinguishing disease and health, and such mechanisms can be uncovered through network analysis. An effective network analysis tool should integrate different content-specific PPI databases into a comprehensive network format with a user-friendly platform to identify key functional modules/pathways and the underlying mechanisms of disease and toxicity. Results atBioNet integrates seven publicly available PPI databases into a network-specific knowledge base. Knowledge expansion is achieved by expanding a user supplied proteins/genes list with interactions from its integrated PPI network. The statistically significant functional modules are determined by applying a fast network-clustering algorithm (SCAN: a Structural Clustering Algorithm for Networks. The functional modules can be visualized either separately or together in the context of the whole network. Integration of pathway information enables enrichment analysis and assessment of the biological function of modules. Three case studies are presented using publicly available disease gene signatures as a basis to discover new biomarkers for acute leukemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, and breast cancer. The results demonstrated that atBioNet can not only identify functional modules and pathways related to the studied diseases, but this information can also be used to hypothesize novel biomarkers for future analysis. Conclusion atBioNet is a free web-based network analysis tool that provides a systematic insight into proteins/genes interactions through examining significant functional modules. The identified functional modules are useful for determining underlying mechanisms of disease and biomarker discovery. It can be accessed at: http://www.fda.gov/ScienceResearch/BioinformaticsTools

  6. atBioNet--an integrated network analysis tool for genomics and biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yijun; Chen, Minjun; Liu, Zhichao; Ding, Don; Ye, Yanbin; Zhang, Min; Kelly, Reagan; Guo, Li; Su, Zhenqiang; Harris, Stephen C; Qian, Feng; Ge, Weigong; Fang, Hong; Xu, Xiaowei; Tong, Weida

    2012-07-20

    Large amounts of mammalian protein-protein interaction (PPI) data have been generated and are available for public use. From a systems biology perspective, Proteins/genes interactions encode the key mechanisms distinguishing disease and health, and such mechanisms can be uncovered through network analysis. An effective network analysis tool should integrate different content-specific PPI databases into a comprehensive network format with a user-friendly platform to identify key functional modules/pathways and the underlying mechanisms of disease and toxicity. atBioNet integrates seven publicly available PPI databases into a network-specific knowledge base. Knowledge expansion is achieved by expanding a user supplied proteins/genes list with interactions from its integrated PPI network. The statistically significant functional modules are determined by applying a fast network-clustering algorithm (SCAN: a Structural Clustering Algorithm for Networks). The functional modules can be visualized either separately or together in the context of the whole network. Integration of pathway information enables enrichment analysis and assessment of the biological function of modules. Three case studies are presented using publicly available disease gene signatures as a basis to discover new biomarkers for acute leukemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, and breast cancer. The results demonstrated that atBioNet can not only identify functional modules and pathways related to the studied diseases, but this information can also be used to hypothesize novel biomarkers for future analysis. atBioNet is a free web-based network analysis tool that provides a systematic insight into proteins/genes interactions through examining significant functional modules. The identified functional modules are useful for determining underlying mechanisms of disease and biomarker discovery. It can be accessed at: http://www.fda.gov/ScienceResearch/BioinformaticsTools/ucm285284.htm.

  7. Development of an information retrieval tool for biomedical patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Tiago; Rodrigues, Rúben; Costa, Hugo; Rocha, Miguel

    2018-06-01

    The volume of biomedical literature has been increasing in the last years. Patent documents have also followed this trend, being important sources of biomedical knowledge, technical details and curated data, which are put together along the granting process. The field of Biomedical text mining (BioTM) has been creating solutions for the problems posed by the unstructured nature of natural language, which makes the search of information a challenging task. Several BioTM techniques can be applied to patents. From those, Information Retrieval (IR) includes processes where relevant data are obtained from collections of documents. In this work, the main goal was to build a patent pipeline addressing IR tasks over patent repositories to make these documents amenable to BioTM tasks. The pipeline was developed within @Note2, an open-source computational framework for BioTM, adding a number of modules to the core libraries, including patent metadata and full text retrieval, PDF to text conversion and optical character recognition. Also, user interfaces were developed for the main operations materialized in a new @Note2 plug-in. The integration of these tools in @Note2 opens opportunities to run BioTM tools over patent texts, including tasks from Information Extraction, such as Named Entity Recognition or Relation Extraction. We demonstrated the pipeline's main functions with a case study, using an available benchmark dataset from BioCreative challenges. Also, we show the use of the plug-in with a user query related to the production of vanillin. This work makes available all the relevant content from patents to the scientific community, decreasing drastically the time required for this task, and provides graphical interfaces to ease the use of these tools. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Simulation of spin dynamics: a tool in MRI system development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoecker, Tony; Vahedipour, Kaveh; Shah, N Jon

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a routine diagnostic tool in the clinics and the method of choice in soft-tissue contrast medical imaging. It is an important tool in neuroscience to investigate structure and function of the living brain on a systemic level. The latter is one of the driving forces to further develop MRI technology, as neuroscience especially demands higher spatiotemporal resolution which is to be achieved through increasing the static main magnetic field, B 0 . Although standard MRI is a mature technology, ultra high field (UHF) systems, at B 0 ≥ 7 T, offer space for new technical inventions as the physical conditions dramatically change. This work shows that the development strongly benefits from computer simulations of the measurement process on the basis of a semi-classical, nuclear spin-1/2 treatment given by the Bloch equations. Possible applications of such simulations are outlined, suggesting new solutions to the UHF-specific inhomogeneity problems of the static main field as well as the high-frequency transmit field.

  9. Development of a Scale-up Tool for Pervaporation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holger Thiess

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an engineering tool for the design and optimization of pervaporation processes is developed based on physico-chemical modelling coupled with laboratory/mini-plant experiments. The model incorporates the solution-diffusion-mechanism, polarization effects (concentration and temperature, axial dispersion, pressure drop and the temperature drop in the feed channel due to vaporization of the permeating components. The permeance, being the key model parameter, was determined via dehydration experiments on a mini-plant scale for the binary mixtures ethanol/water and ethyl acetate/water. A second set of experimental data was utilized for the validation of the model for two chemical systems. The industrially relevant ternary mixture, ethanol/ethyl acetate/water, was investigated close to its azeotropic point and compared to a simulation conducted with the determined binary permeance data. Experimental and simulation data proved to agree very well for the investigated process conditions. In order to test the scalability of the developed engineering tool, large-scale data from an industrial pervaporation plant used for the dehydration of ethanol was compared to a process simulation conducted with the validated physico-chemical model. Since the membranes employed in both mini-plant and industrial scale were of the same type, the permeance data could be transferred. The comparison of the measured and simulated data proved the scalability of the derived model.

  10. Computational tools for genome-wide miRNA prediction and study

    KAUST Repository

    Malas, T.B.; Ravasi, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded non-coding RNA susually of 22 nucleotidesin length that play an important post-transcriptional regulation role in many organisms. MicroRNAs bind a seed sequence to the 3-untranslated region (UTR) region of the target messenger RNA (mRNA), inducing degradation or inhibition of translation and resulting in a reduction in the protein level. This regulatory mechanism is central to many biological processes and perturbation could lead to diseases such as cancer. Given the biological importance, of miRNAs, there is a great need to identify and study their targets and functions. However, miRNAs are very difficult to clone in the lab and this has hindered the identification of novel miRNAs. Next-generation sequencing coupled with new computational tools has recently evolved to help researchers efficiently identify large numbers of novel miRNAs. In this review, we describe recent miRNA prediction tools and discuss their priorities, advantages and disadvantages. Malas and Ravasi.

  11. Computational tools for genome-wide miRNA prediction and study

    KAUST Repository

    Malas, T.B.

    2012-11-02

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single-stranded non-coding RNA susually of 22 nucleotidesin length that play an important post-transcriptional regulation role in many organisms. MicroRNAs bind a seed sequence to the 3-untranslated region (UTR) region of the target messenger RNA (mRNA), inducing degradation or inhibition of translation and resulting in a reduction in the protein level. This regulatory mechanism is central to many biological processes and perturbation could lead to diseases such as cancer. Given the biological importance, of miRNAs, there is a great need to identify and study their targets and functions. However, miRNAs are very difficult to clone in the lab and this has hindered the identification of novel miRNAs. Next-generation sequencing coupled with new computational tools has recently evolved to help researchers efficiently identify large numbers of novel miRNAs. In this review, we describe recent miRNA prediction tools and discuss their priorities, advantages and disadvantages. Malas and Ravasi.

  12. FSPP: A Tool for Genome-Wide Prediction of smORF-Encoded Peptides and Their Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available smORFs are small open reading frames of less than 100 codons. Recent low throughput experiments showed a lot of smORF-encoded peptides (SEPs played crucial rule in processes such as regulation of transcription or translation, transportation through membranes and the antimicrobial activity. In order to gather more functional SEPs, it is necessary to have access to genome-wide prediction tools to give profound directions for low throughput experiments. In this study, we put forward a functional smORF-encoded peptides predictor (FSPP which tended to predict authentic SEPs and their functions in a high throughput method. FSPP used the overlap of detected SEPs from Ribo-seq and mass spectrometry as target objects. With the expression data on transcription and translation levels, FSPP built two co-expression networks. Combing co-location relations, FSPP constructed a compound network and then annotated SEPs with functions of adjacent nodes. Tested on 38 sequenced samples of 5 human cell lines, FSPP successfully predicted 856 out of 960 annotated proteins. Interestingly, FSPP also highlighted 568 functional SEPs from these samples. After comparison, the roles predicted by FSPP were consistent with known functions. These results suggest that FSPP is a reliable tool for the identification of functional small peptides. FSPP source code can be acquired at https://www.bioinfo.org/FSPP.

  13. GEMMER: GEnome-wide tool for Multi-scale Modeling data Extraction and Representation for Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondeel, Thierry D G A; Crémazy, Frédéric; Barberis, Matteo

    2018-02-01

    Multi-scale modeling of biological systems requires integration of various information about genes and proteins that are connected together in networks. Spatial, temporal and functional information is available; however, it is still a challenge to retrieve and explore this knowledge in an integrated, quick and user-friendly manner. We present GEMMER (GEnome-wide tool for Multi-scale Modelling data Extraction and Representation), a web-based data-integration tool that facilitates high quality visualization of physical, regulatory and genetic interactions between proteins/genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. GEMMER creates network visualizations that integrate information on function, temporal expression, localization and abundance from various existing databases. GEMMER supports modeling efforts by effortlessly gathering this information and providing convenient export options for images and their underlying data. GEMMER is freely available at http://gemmer.barberislab.com. Source code, written in Python, JavaScript library D3js, PHP and JSON, is freely available at https://github.com/barberislab/GEMMER. M.Barberis@uva.nl. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Development of tools and models for computational fracture assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talja, H.; Santaoja, K.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the work presented in this paper has been to develop and test new computational tools and theoretically more sound methods for fracture mechanical analysis. The applicability of the engineering integrity assessment system MASI for evaluation of piping components has been extended. The most important motivation for the theoretical development have been the well-known fundamental limitations in the validity of J-integral, which limits its applicability in many important practical safety assessment cases. Examples are extensive plastic deformation, multimaterial structures and ascending loading paths (especially warm prestress, WPS). Further, the micromechanical Gurson model has been applied to several reactor pressure vessel materials. Special attention is paid to the transferability of Gurson model parameters from tensile test results to prediction of ductile failure behaviour of cracked structures. (author)

  15. TENTube: A Video-based Connection Tool Supporting Competence Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert A Angehrn

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of knowledge management initiatives fail because they do not take sufficiently into account the emotional, psychological and social needs of individuals. Only if users see real value for themselves will they actively use and contribute their own knowledge to the system, and engage with other users. Connection dynamics can make this easier, and even enjoyable, by connecting people and bringing them closer through shared experiences such as playing a game together. A higher connectedness of people to other people, and to relevant knowledge assets, will motivate them to participate more actively and increase system usage. In this paper, we describe the design of TENTube, a video-based connection tool we are developing to support competence development. TENTube integrates rich profiling and network visualization and navigation with agent-enhanced game-like connection dynamics.

  16. Monitoring of bedridden patients: development of a fall detection tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas-Boas, M; Silva, P; Cunha, S R; Correia, M V

    2013-01-01

    Falls of patients are an important issue in hospitals nowadays; it causes severe injuries, increases hospitalization time and treatment costs. The detection of a fall, in time, provides faster rescue to the patient, preventing more serious injuries, as well as saving nursing time. The MovinSense® is an electronic device designed for monitoring patients to prevent pressure sores, and the main goal of this work was to develop a new tool for this device, with the purpose of detecting if the patient has fallen from the hospital bed, without changing any of the device's original features. Experiments for gathering data samples of inertial signals of falling from the bed were obtained using the device. For fall detection a sensitivity of 72% and specificity of 100% were reached. Another algorithm was developed to detect if the patient got out of his/her bed.

  17. Developing Tools and Techniques to Increase Communication Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Linda A.; Peterson, Doug

    1997-01-01

    The Public Affairs Office (PAO) of the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is responsible for communicating current JSC Space Program activities as well as goals and objectives to the American Public. As part of the 1996 Strategic Communications Plan, a review of PAO' s current communication procedures was conducted. The 1996 Summer Faculty Fellow performed research activities to support this effort by reviewing current research concerning NASA/JSC's customers' perceptions and interests, developing communications tools which enable PAO to more effectively inform JSC customers about the Space Program, and proposing a process for developing and using consistent messages throughout PAO. Note that this research does not attempt to change or influence customer perceptions or interests but, instead, incorporates current customer interests into PAO's communication process.

  18. Tools for tracking progress. Indicators for sustainable energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.; Rogner, H.H.; Aslanian, G.

    2000-01-01

    A project on 'Indicators for Sustainable Energy Development (ISED)' was introduced by the IAEA as a part of its work programme on Comparative Assessment of Energy Sources for the biennium 1999-2000. It is being pursued by the Planning and Economic Studies Section of the Department of Nuclear Energy. The envisaged tasks are to: (1) identify the main components of sustainable energy development and derive a consistent set of appropriate indicators, keeping in view the indicators for Agenda 21, (2) establish relationship of ISED with those of the Agenda 21, and (3) review the Agency's databases and tools to determine the modifications required to apply the ISED. The first two tasks are being pursued with the help of experts from various international organizations and Member States. In this connection two expert group meetings were held, one in May 1999 and the other in November 1999. The following nine topics were identified as the key issues: social development; economic development; environmental congeniality and waste management; resource depletion; adequate provision of energy and disparities; energy efficiency; energy security; energy supply options; and energy pricing. A new conceptual framework model specifically tuned to the energy sector was developed, drawing upon work by other organizations in the environmental area. Within the framework of this conceptual model, two provisional lists of ISED - a full list and a core list - have been prepared. They cover indicators for the following energy related themes and sub-themes under the economic, social and environmental dimensions of sustainable energy development: Economic dimension: Economic activity levels; End-use energy intensities of selected sectors and different manufacturing industries; energy supply efficiency; energy security; and energy pricing. Social dimension: Energy accessibility and disparities. Environmental dimension: Air pollution (urban air quality; global climate change concern); water

  19. Development of Nylon Based FDM Filament for Rapid Tooling Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Singh, S.

    2014-04-01

    There has been critical need for development of cost effective nylon based wire to be used as feed stock filament for fused deposition modelling (FDM) machine. But hitherto, very less work has been reported for development of alternate solution of acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) based wire which is presently used in most of FDM machines. The present research work is focused on development of nylon based wire as an alternative of ABS wire (which is to be used as feedstock filament on FDM) without changing any hardware or software of machine. For the present study aluminium oxide (Al2O3) as additive in different proportion has been used with nylon fibre. Single screw extruder was used for wire preparation and wire thus produced was tested on FDM. Mechanical properties i.e. tensile strength and percentage elongation of finally developed wire have been optimized by Taguchi L9 technique. The work represented major development in reducing cost and time in rapid tooling applications.

  20. On the development of the METAR family of inspection tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavoie, E. [Inst. de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)]. E-mail: lavoie.eric@ireq.ca; Rousseau, G. [Hydro-Quebec, Central Nucleaire Gentilly-2, Gentilly, Quebec (Canada); Reynaud, L. [Inst. de recherche d' Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Since 1998, Hydro Quebec Research Centre (IREQ), in collaboration with Gentilly-2, has been working on the development of inspection devices for the feeder tubes of CANDU power plants. The first tool to come out of this work was the Metar bracelet, now used throughout the CANDU utilities, consisting of 14 ultrasonic probes held in place in a rigid bracelet to measure the thickness of the pipes and moved around manually along the pipe. Following the success of the Metar, a motorized version, i.e. the Crawler, has been developed to inspect beyond the operator arm's reach to access hard to reach place or further down the pipes in the reactor. This new system has been tested at 3 different stations and will be commercially available soon. Finally, the same technology was used to develop a motorized 2-axis crack detection device to answer new concerns about the feeder. Other configurations, depending on the demands from the industry, could also be developed for specific inspection needs, for example; inspection of the graylock welds, 360{sup o} inspection of feeders, or multitasking inspection on a single frame, etc. Most of the designs shown in this article have been or will be patented and are, or will be, licensed to a partner company to make them commercially available to the industry. This paper gives a brief history of the project and a description of the technologies developed in the last 5 years concerning feeder inspection. (author)

  1. Statistical thinking: tool for development of nursing as a science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Patricia Carreño Moreno

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To integrate findings of scientific literature that report on the importance of statistical thinking for development of nursing as a science.  Content synthesis: Literature review of articles published in indexed scientific journals between 1998 and 2017 in databases lilacs, sage Journals, Wiley Online Library, Scopus, bireme, Scielo, ScienceDirect, PubMed, cuiden® y ProQuest. 22 publications were included and findings were extracted, classified, and simplified using descriptor codes, nominal codes, and emerging topics. The following six topics emerged from searches: Education for statistical thinking; Statistical thinking for decision-making in practice; Obstacles to the statistical thinking development; Skills necessary to statistical thinking; Statistics in creating scientific knowledge; and Challenges for statistical thinking development. Conclusion: In the current development of nursing as a science, statistical thinking has primarily been a useful tool for the research field and training of researchers. The existence of obstacles to the statistical thinking development in nurse practitioners has been reported, revealing the need to bound statistics with nursing practice. For this purpose, it is essential to prepare texts and subject of statistics applied to the context of discipline and practice. Descriptors: Biostatistics; Statistics as Topic; Statistics; Science; Nursing(source: decs, bireme.

  2. Biomarkers as drug development tools: discovery, validation, qualification and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Virginia B

    2018-06-01

    The 21st Century Cures Act, approved in the USA in December 2016, has encouraged the establishment of the national Precision Medicine Initiative and the augmentation of efforts to address disease prevention, diagnosis and treatment on the basis of a molecular understanding of disease. The Act adopts into law the formal process, developed by the FDA, of qualification of drug development tools, including biomarkers and clinical outcome assessments, to increase the efficiency of clinical trials and encourage an era of molecular medicine. The FDA and European Medicines Agency (EMA) have developed similar processes for the qualification of biomarkers intended for use as companion diagnostics or for development and regulatory approval of a drug or therapeutic. Biomarkers that are used exclusively for the diagnosis, monitoring or stratification of patients in clinical trials are not subject to regulatory approval, although their qualification can facilitate the conduct of a trial. In this Review, the salient features of biomarker discovery, analytical validation, clinical qualification and utilization are described in order to provide an understanding of the process of biomarker development and, through this understanding, convey an appreciation of their potential advantages and limitations.

  3. Development of Antimicrobial Peptide Prediction Tool for Aquaculture Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Aditi; Sharma, Asuda; Jaiswal, Sarika; Fatma, Samar; Arora, Vasu; Iquebal, M A; Nandi, S; Sundaray, J K; Jayasankar, P; Rai, Anil; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-09-01

    Microbial diseases in fish, plant, animal and human are rising constantly; thus, discovery of their antidote is imperative. The use of antibiotic in aquaculture further compounds the problem by development of resistance and consequent consumer health risk by bio-magnification. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been highly promising as natural alternative to chemical antibiotics. Though AMPs are molecules of innate immune defense of all advance eukaryotic organisms, fish being heavily dependent on their innate immune defense has been a good source of AMPs with much wider applicability. Machine learning-based prediction method using wet laboratory-validated fish AMP can accelerate the AMP discovery using available fish genomic and proteomic data. Earlier AMP prediction servers are based on multi-phyla/species data, and we report here the world's first AMP prediction server in fishes. It is freely accessible at http://webapp.cabgrid.res.in/fishamp/ . A total of 151 AMPs related to fish collected from various databases and published literature were taken for this study. For model development and prediction, N-terminus residues, C-terminus residues and full sequences were considered. Best models were with kernels polynomial-2, linear and radial basis function with accuracy of 97, 99 and 97 %, respectively. We found that performance of support vector machine-based models is superior to artificial neural network. This in silico approach can drastically reduce the time and cost of AMP discovery. This accelerated discovery of lead AMP molecules having potential wider applications in diverse area like fish and human health as substitute of antibiotics, immunomodulator, antitumor, vaccine adjuvant and inactivator, and also for packaged food can be of much importance for industries.

  4. Novel Tools for Conservation Genomics: Comparing Two High-Throughput Approaches for SNP Discovery in the Transcriptome of the European Hake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milano, Ilaria; Babbucci, Massimiliano; Panitz, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The growing accessibility to genomic resources using next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has revolutionized the application of molecular genetic tools to ecology and evolutionary studies in non-model organisms. Here we present the case study of the European hake (Merluccius merluccius),...

  5. Crosscutting Development- EVA Tools and Geology Sample Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Exploration to all destinations has at one time or another involved the acquisition and return of samples and context data. Gathered at the summit of the highest mountain, the floor of the deepest sea, or the ice of a polar surface, samples and their value (both scientific and symbolic) have been a mainstay of Earthly exploration. In manned spaceflight exploration, the gathering of samples and their contextual information has continued. With the extension of collecting activities to spaceflight destinations comes the need for geology tools and equipment uniquely designed for use by suited crew members in radically different environments from conventional field geology. Beginning with the first Apollo Lunar Surface Extravehicular Activity (EVA), EVA Geology Tools were successfully used to enable the exploration and scientific sample gathering objectives of the lunar crew members. These early designs were a step in the evolution of Field Geology equipment, and the evolution continues today. Contemporary efforts seek to build upon and extend the knowledge gained in not only the Apollo program but a wealth of terrestrial field geology methods and hardware that have continued to evolve since the last lunar surface EVA. This paper is presented with intentional focus on documenting the continuing evolution and growing body of knowledge for both engineering and science team members seeking to further the development of EVA Geology. Recent engineering development and field testing efforts of EVA Geology equipment for surface EVA applications are presented, including the 2010 Desert Research and Technology Studies (Desert RATs) field trial. An executive summary of findings will also be presented, detailing efforts recommended for exotic sample acquisition and pre-return curation development regardless of planetary or microgravity destination.

  6. Cleaner production - a tool for sustainable environmental development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, I.; Batool, S.

    2005-01-01

    Industrial Development and Production with no regard for environmental impacts creates water and air pollution, soil degradation, and large-scale global impacts such as acid rain, global warming and ozone depletion. To create more sustainable methods of industrial production, there needs to be a shift in attitudes away from control towards pollution prevention and management. Cleaner Production (CP) refers to a management process that seeks out and eliminates the causes of pollution, waste generation and resource consumption at their source through input reductions or substitutions, pollution prevention, internal recycling and more efficient production technology and processes for sustainable environmental development. The objective of cleaner production is to avoid generating pollution in the first place, which frequently cuts costs, reduces risks associated with liability, and identifies new market opportunities. Introducing cleaner production has become a goal to improve the competitiveness through increased eco-efficiency. CP is a business strategy for enhancing productivity and environmental performance for overall socio-economic development. The environmental and economic benefits can only be achieved by implementing cleaner production tools. The CP assessment methodology is used to systematically identify and evaluate the waste minimization opportunities and facilitate their implementation in industries. It refers to how goods and services are produced with the minimum environmental impact under present technological and economic limits. CP shares characteristics with many environmental management tools such as Environmental Assessment or Design for Environment by including them among the technological options for reducing material and energy intensiveness in production, as well as facilitating ruse trough remanufacturing and recycling. It is thus an extension of the total quality management process. The CP program has been successfully implemented in

  7. Graduate nurses' evaluation of mentorship: Development of a new tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiew, Lay Hwa; Koh, Catherine S L; Creedy, Debra K; Tam, W S W

    2017-07-01

    Develop and test an instrument to measure graduate-nurses' perceptions of a structured mentorship program. New graduate nurses may experience difficulties in the transition from student to practitioner. Mentoring is commonly used to support graduates. However, there is a lack of published tools measuring graduate nurses' perceptions of mentorship. As mentoring is resource intensive, development and testing of a validated tool are important to assist in determining program effectiveness. A pretest-posttest interventional design was used. Following a critical review of literature and content experts' input, the 10-item National University Hospital Mentorship Evaluation (NUH ME) instrument was tested with a convenience sample of 83 graduate nurses. Psychometric tests included internal reliability, stability, content validity, and factor analysis. Changed scores were evaluated using paired samples t-test. Seventy-three graduates (88%) out of a possible 83 completed the pre-and post-program survey. Internal reliability was excellent with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.92. Test-retest reliability was stable over time (ICC=0.81). Exploratory factor analysis supported a 1-factor solution explaining 58.2% of variance. Paired samples t-test showed statistical significance between the pre- and post-program scores (pprograms can be an effective recruitment and retention strategy, but are also resource intensive. Measuring new graduates' perceptions of mentoring contributes to program relevance in addressing their personal, professional and clinical skill development needs. As mentoring engages a diverse range of mentors, feedback through measurement may also positively alter organizational learning culture. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Development and characterization of genomic SSR markers for Anneslea fragrans (Pentaphylacaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijing; Meng, Kaikai; Liao, Boyong; Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Yue; Liao, Wenbo; Chen, Sufang

    2017-10-01

    The genus Anneslea (Pentaphylacaceae) contains four species and six varieties, most of which are locally endemic. Here, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed for the conservation of these species. The genome of A. fragrans was sequenced and de novo assembled into 445,162 contigs, of which 30,409 SSR loci were detected. Primers for 100 SSR loci were validated with PCR amplification in three populations of A. fragrans . Seventy-nine loci successfully amplified, and 30 were polymorphic. The mean number of alleles, observed heterozygosity, and expected heterozygosity were 7.01 ± 1.60, 0.817 ± 0.241, and 0.796 ± 0.145, respectively. Most primers could be amplified in Ternstroemia gymnanthera , T. kwangtungensis , and Cleyera pachyphylla . Our study demonstrated that shotgun genome sequencing is an efficient way to develop genomic SSR markers for nonmodel species. These genomic SSR loci will be valuable in population genetic studies in Anneslea and its relatives.

  9. Development of reactor design aid tool using virtual reality technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuguchi, N.; Tamura, Y.; Imagawa, S.; Sagara, A.; Hayashi, T.

    2006-01-01

    A new type of aid system for fusion reactor design, to which the virtual reality (VR) visualization and sonification techniques are applied, is developed. This system provides us with an intuitive interaction environment in the VR space between the observer and the designed objects constructed by the conventional 3D computer-aided design (CAD) system. We have applied the design aid tool to the heliotron-type fusion reactor design activity FFHR2m [A. Sagara, S. Imagawa, O. Mitarai, T. Dolan, T. Tanaka, Y. Kubota, et al., Improved structure and long -life blanket concepts for heliotron reactors, Nucl. Fusion 45 (2005) 258-263] on the virtual reality system CompleXcope [Y. Tamura, A. Kageyama, T. Sato, S. Fujiwara, H. Nakamura, Virtual reality system to visualize and auralize numerical imulation data, Comp. Phys. Comm. 142 (2001) 227-230] of the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan, and have evaluated its performance. The tool includes the functions of transfer of the observer, translation and scaling of the objects, recording of the operations and the check of interference

  10. Development of nutrition education tool: healthy eating index in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taechangam, Sunard; Pinitchun, Utumporn; Pachotikarn, Chanida

    2008-01-01

    A healthful diet can reduce major risk factors for chronic diseases. To assess the dietary status of Thais and monitor changes in food consumption patterns, the Healthy Eating Index for Thais (THEI) is developed, an important tool for meeting the nutrition goals and determining people's overall diet quality. This index measures how well the diets of Thai people conform to the recommendations of the Food Guide Thailand Nutrition Flag. The THEI consists of 11 components, each representing different aspects of a healthful diet: Components 1-5 measure the degree to which a person's diet conforms to serving recommendations for the five major food groups of Thailand Nutrition Flag; Components 6, 7 and 8 measure total fat, saturated fat and added sugar consumption, respectively; Components 9 and 10 measure total cholesterol and sodium intake; and Component 11 examines variety in a person's diet. Each of the 11 components has a score ranging from 0 to 10, for a total score of 110. The dietary intake data from selected working adults were collected to derive the THEI scores. The average THEI score indicated that the diets of most people needed improvement and some individuals were more likely than others to consume a poor diet. This suggests a continued role for nutrition education and promotion efforts should result in a significant improvement of people's overall diet quality. In conclusion, the THEI is an useful index for describing overall diet quality for Thais and serves as a basic tool for providing nutrition education and promotion.

  11. Development of risk assessment tool for foundry workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, G Madhan; Prasad, P S S; Mokkapati, Anil Kumar; Venkataraman, G

    2008-01-01

    Occupational ill-health and work-related disorders are predominant in manufacturing industries due to the inevitable presence of manual work even after several waves of industrial automation and technological advancements. Ergonomic risk factors and musculoskeletal disorders like low-back symptoms have been noted amongst foundry workers. The purpose of this study was to formulate and develop a Physical Effort Index to assess risk factor. The questionnaire tool applicable to foundry environment has been designed and validated. The data recorded through survey across the foundries has been subjected to regression analysis to correlate between proposed physical effort index and the standard Borg's Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) scale. The physical efforts of sixty seven workers in various foundry shop floors were assessed subjectively. The 'Job factors' and 'Work environment' were the two major parameters considered in assessing the worker discomfort level at workplace. A relation between Borg's RPE scale and the above two parameters were arrived at, through regression analysis. The study demonstrates the prevalence of risk factors amongst foundry workers and the effectiveness of the proposed index in estimating the risk factor levels. RELEVANCE TO THE INDUSTRY: The proposed tool will assist foundry supervisors and managers to assess the risk factors and helps in better understanding of the workplace to avoid work-related disorders, ensuring better output.

  12. Developing tools and strategies for communicating climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, D.; Yam, E. M.; Perkins, L.

    2011-12-01

    Research indicates that the public views zoos and aquariums as reliable and trusted sources for information on conservation. Additionally, visiting zoos and aquariums helps people reconsider their connections to conservation issues and solutions. The Aquarium of the Pacific, an AZA-accredited institution that serves the most ethnically diverse population of all aquariums in the nation, is using exhibit space, technology, public programming, and staff professional development to present a model for how aquariums can promote climate literacy. Our newest galleries and programs are designed to immerse our visitors in experiences that connect our live animal collection to larger themes on ocean change. The Aquarium is supporting our new programming with a multifaceted staff professional development that exposes our interpretive staff to current climate science and researchers as well as current social science on public perception of climate science. Our staff also leads workshops for scientists; these sessions allow us to examine learning theory and develop tools to communicate science and controversial subjects effectively. Through our partnerships in the science, social science, and informal science education communities, we are working to innovate and develop best practices in climate communication.

  13. Developing a Grid-based search and categorization tool

    CERN Document Server

    Haya, Glenn; Vigen, Jens

    2003-01-01

    Grid technology has the potential to improve the accessibility of digital libraries. The participants in Project GRACE (Grid Search And Categorization Engine) are in the process of developing a search engine that will allow users to search through heterogeneous resources stored in geographically distributed digital collections. What differentiates this project from current search tools is that GRACE will be run on the European Data Grid, a large distributed network, and will not have a single centralized index as current web search engines do. In some cases, the distributed approach offers advantages over the centralized approach since it is more scalable, can be used on otherwise inaccessible material, and can provide advanced search options customized for each data source.

  14. Development of a simple estimation tool for LMFBR construction cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kazuo; Kinoshita, Izumi

    1999-01-01

    A simple tool for estimating the construction costs of liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), 'Simple Cost' was developed in this study. Simple Cost is based on a new estimation formula that can reduce the amount of design data required to estimate construction costs. Consequently, Simple cost can be used to estimate the construction costs of innovative LMFBR concepts for which detailed design has not been carried out. The results of test calculation show that Simple Cost provides cost estimations equivalent to those obtained with conventional methods within the range of plant power from 325 to 1500 MWe. Sensitivity analyses for typical design parameters were conducted using Simple Cost. The effects of four major parameters - reactor vessel diameter, core outlet temperature, sodium handling area and number of secondary loops - on the construction costs of LMFBRs were evaluated quantitatively. The results show that the reduction of sodium handling area is particularly effective in reducing construction costs. (author)

  15. Development of in-situ visualization tool for PIC simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Nobuaki; Ohtani, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    As the capability of a supercomputer is improved, the sizes of simulation and its output data also become larger and larger. Visualization is usually carried out on a researcher's PC with interactive visualization software after performing the computer simulation. However, the data size is becoming too large to do it currently. A promising answer is in-situ visualization. For this case a simulation code is coupled with the visualization code and visualization is performed with the simulation on the same supercomputer. We developed an in-situ visualization tool for particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation and it is provided as a Fortran's module. We coupled it with a PIC simulation code and tested the coupled code on Plasma Simulator supercomputer, and ensured that it works. (author)

  16. Large scale experiments as a tool for numerical model development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Jens; Hansen, Erik Asp; Fuchs, Jesper

    2003-01-01

    Experimental modelling is an important tool for study of hydrodynamic phenomena. The applicability of experiments can be expanded by the use of numerical models and experiments are important for documentation of the validity of numerical tools. In other cases numerical tools can be applied...

  17. Developing an integration tool for soil contamination assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Romero, Maria; Zingg, Felix; Pérez-Álvarez, José Miguel; Madejón, Paula; Kotb Abd-Elmabod, Sameh

    2015-04-01

    In the last decades, huge soil areas have been negatively influenced or altered in multiples forms. Soils and, consequently, underground water, have been contaminated by accumulation of contaminants from agricultural activities (fertilizers and pesticides) industrial activities (harmful material dumping, sludge, flying ashes) and urban activities (hydrocarbon, metals from vehicle traffic, urban waste dumping). In the framework of the RECARE project, local partners across Europe are focusing on a wide range of soil threats, as soil contamination, and aiming to develop effective prevention, remediation and restoration measures by designing and applying targeted land management strategies (van Lynden et al., 2013). In this context, the Guadiamar Green Corridor (Southern Spain) was used as a case study, aiming to obtain soil data and new information in order to assess soil contamination. The main threat in the Guadiamar valley is soil contamination after a mine spill occurred on April 1998. About four hm3 of acid waters and two hm3 of mud, rich in heavy metals, were released into the Agrio and Guadiamar rivers affecting more than 4,600 ha of agricultural and pasture land. Main trace elements contaminating soil and water were As, Cd, Cu, Pb, Tl and Zn. The objective of the present research is to develop informatics tools that integrate soil database, models and interactive platforms for soil contamination assessment. Preliminary results were obtained related to the compilation of harmonized databases including geographical, hydro-meteorological, soil and socio-economic variables based on spatial analysis and stakeholder's consultation. Further research will be modellization and upscaling at the European level, in order to obtain a scientifically-technical predictive tool for the assessment of soil contamination.

  18. Tripolar mitosis and partitioning of the genome arrests human preimplantation development in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottolini, Christian S; Kitchen, John; Xanthopoulou, Leoni; Gordon, Tony; Summers, Michael C; Handyside, Alan H

    2017-08-29

    Following in vitro fertilisation (IVF), only about half of normally fertilised human embryos develop beyond cleavage and morula stages to form a blastocyst in vitro. Although many human embryos are aneuploid and genomically imbalanced, often as a result of meiotic errors inherited in the oocyte, these aneuploidies persist at the blastocyst stage and the reasons for the high incidence of developmental arrest remain unknown. Here we use genome-wide SNP genotyping and meiomapping of both polar bodies to identify maternal meiotic errors and karyomapping to fingerprint the parental chromosomes in single cells from disaggregated arrested embryos and excluded cells from blastocysts. Combined with time lapse imaging of development in culture, we demonstrate that tripolar mitoses in early cleavage cause chromosome dispersal to clones of cells with identical or closely related sub-diploid chromosome profiles resulting in intercellular partitioning of the genome. We hypothesise that following zygotic genome activation (ZGA), the combination of genomic imbalance and partial genome loss disrupts the normal pattern of embryonic gene expression blocking development at the morula-blastocyst transition. Failure to coordinate the cell cycle in early cleavage and regulate centrosome duplication is therefore a major cause of human preimplantation developmental arrest in vitro.

  19. A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2003-06-30

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are

  20. Facilities as teaching tools: A transformative participatory professional development experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Eric A.

    Resource consumption continues to increase as the population grows. In order to secure a sustainable future, society must educate the next generation to become "sustainability natives." Schools play a pivotal role in educating a sustainability-literate society. However, a disconnect exists between the hidden curriculum of the built environment and the enacted curriculum. This study employs a transformative participatory professional development model to instruct teachers on how to use their school grounds as teaching tools for the purpose of helping students make explicit choices in energy consumption, materials use, and sustainable living. Incorporating a phenomenological perspective, this study considers the lived experience of two sustainability coordinators. Grounded theory provides an interpretational context for the participants' interactions with each other and the professional development process. Through a year long professional development experience - commencing with an intense, participatory two-day workshop -the participants discussed challenges they faced with integrating facilities into school curriculum and institutionalizing a culture of sustainability. Two major needs were identified in this study. For successful sustainability initiatives, a hybrid model that melds top-down and bottom-up approaches offers the requisite mix of administrative support, ground level buy-in, and excitement vis-a-vis sustainability. Second, related to this hybrid approach, K-12 sustainability coordinators ideally need administrative capabilities with access to decision making, while remaining connected to students in a meaningful way, either directly in the classroom, as a mentor, or through work with student groups and projects.