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Sample records for genomic instability contributes

  1. Aberrant methylation and associated transcriptional mobilization of Alu elements contributes to genomic instability in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Arnab; Srivastava, Tapasya; Sharma, Manish K; Mehndiratta, Mohit; Das, Prerna; Sinha, Subrata; Chattopadhyay, Parthaprasad

    2010-11-01

    Hypoxia is an integral part of tumorigenesis and contributes extensively to the neoplastic phenotype including drug resistance and genomic instability. It has also been reported that hypoxia results in global demethylation. Because a majority of the cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) islands are found within the repeat elements of DNA, and are usually methylated under normoxic conditions, we suggested that retrotransposable Alu or short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs) which show altered methylation and associated changes of gene expression during hypoxia, could be associated with genomic instability. U87MG glioblastoma cells were cultured in 0.1% O₂ for 6 weeks and compared with cells cultured in 21% O₂ for the same duration. Real-time PCR analysis showed a significant increase in SINE and reverse transcriptase coding long interspersed nuclear element (LINE) transcripts during hypoxia. Sequencing of bisulphite treated DNA as well as the Combined Bisulfite Restriction Analysis (COBRA) assay showed that the SINE loci studied underwent significant hypomethylation though there was patchy hypermethylation at a few sites. The inter-alu PCR profile of DNA from cells cultured under 6-week hypoxia, its 4-week revert back to normoxia and 6-week normoxia showed several changes in the band pattern indicating increased alu mediated genomic alteration. Our results show that aberrant methylation leading to increased transcription of SINE and reverse transcriptase associated LINE elements could lead to increased genomic instability in hypoxia. This might be a cause of genetic heterogeneity in tumours especially in variegated hypoxic environment and lead to a development of foci of more aggressive tumour cells.

  2. Causes of genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    , genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other...... scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis.......Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus...

  3. Centrosome Dysfunction Contributes To Chromosome Instability, Chromoanagenesis And Genome Reprograming In Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German A Pihan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The unique ability of centrosomes to nucleate and organize microtubules makes them unrivaled conductors of important interphase processes, such as intracellular payload traffic, cell polarity, cell locomotion, and organization of the immunologic synapse. But it is in mitosis that centrosomes loom large, for they orchestrate, with clockmaker’s precision, the assembly and functioning of the mitotic spindle, ensuring the equal partitioning of the replicated genome into daughter cells. Centrosome dysfunction is inextricably linked to aneuploidy and chromosome instability, both hallmarks of cancer cells. Several aspects of centrosome function in normal and cancer cells have been molecularly characterized during the last two decades, greatly enhancing our mechanistic understanding of this tiny organelle. Whether centrosome defects alone can cause cancer, remains unanswered. Until recently, the aggregate of the evidence had suggested that centrosome dysfunction, by deregulating the fidelity of chromosome segregation, promotes and accelerates the characteristic Darwinian evolution of the cancer genome enabled by increased mutational load and/or decreased DNA repair. Very recent experimental work has shown that missegreated chromosomes resulting from centrosome dysfunction may experience extensive DNA damage, suggesting additional dimensions to the role of centrosomes in cancer. Centrosome dysfunction is particularly prevalent in tumors in which the genome has undergone extensive structural rearrangements and chromosome domain reshuffling. Ongoing gene reshuffling reprograms the genome for continuous growth, survival, and evasion of the immune system. Manipulation of molecular networks controlling centrosome function may soon become a viable target for specific therapeutic intervention in cancer, particularly since normal cells, which lack centrosome alterations, may be spared the toxicity of such therapies.

  4. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  5. Genomic instability and cancer: an introduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyuan Shen

    2011-01-01

    @@ Genomic instability as a major driving force of tumorigenesis.The ultimate goal of cell division for most non-cancerous somatic cells is to accurately duplicate the genome and then evenly divide the duplicated genome into the two daughter cells.This ensures that the daughter cells will have exactly the same genetic material as their parent cell.

  6. The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert L Ullrich; Susan Bailey

    2008-01-17

    The mechanistic role of radiation-induced genomic instability in radiation carcinogenesis is an attractive hypothesis that remains to be rigorously tested. There are few in vivo studies on which to base judgments, but work in our laboratory with mouse models of radiogenic mammary neoplasia provided the first indications that certain forms of genetically predisposed radiation-induced genomic instability may contribute to tumor development. The central goal of this research project is to more firmly establish the mechanistic basis of this radiation-associated genomic instability and, from this, to assess whether such induced instability might play a major role in tumorigenesis at low doses of low LET radiation. In the case of mouse mammary tumors, susceptibility to induced instability is expressed as an autosomal recessive trait in mammary epithelial cells and is manifest largely as excess chromatid damage. Recently published studies associate this form of instability with DNA repair deficiency, polymorphic variation in the gene encoding DNA-PKcs (Prkdc), and mammary associated susceptibility. The underlying hypothesis being tested in this project is that tumor-associated genomic instability is preferentially expressed in certain recombinogenic genomic domains and that these may be cell lineage/individual-specific.

  7. Genome organization, instabilities, stem cells, and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Kumar Pazhanisamy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now widely recognized that advances in exploring genome organization provide remarkable insights on the induction and progression of chromosome abnormalities. Much of what we know about how mutations evolve and consequently transform into genome instabilities has been characterized in the spatial organization context of chromatin. Nevertheless, many underlying concepts of impact of the chromatin organization on perpetuation of multiple mutations and on propagation of chromosomal aberrations remain to be investigated in detail. Genesis of genome instabilities from accumulation of multiple mutations that drive tumorigenesis is increasingly becoming a focal theme in cancer studies. This review focuses on structural alterations evolve to raise a variety of genome instabilities that are manifested at the nucleotide, gene or sub-chromosomal, and whole chromosome level of genome. Here we explore an underlying connection between genome instability and cancer in the light of genome architecture. This review is limited to studies directed towards spatial organizational aspects of origin and propagation of aberrations into genetically unstable tumors.

  8. Mechanisms of cadmium induced genomic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipic, Metka, E-mail: metka.filipic@nib.si [National Institute of Biology, Department for Genetic Toxicology and Cancer Biology, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2012-05-01

    Cadmium is an ubiquitous environmental contaminant that represents hazard to humans and wildlife. It is found in the air, soil and water and, due to its extremely long half-life, accumulates in plants and animals. The main source of cadmium exposure for non-smoking human population is food. Cadmium is primarily toxic to the kidney, but has been also classified as carcinogenic to humans by several regulatory agencies. Current evidence suggests that exposure to cadmium induces genomic instability through complex and multifactorial mechanisms. Cadmium dose not induce direct DNA damage, however it induces increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, which in turn induce DNA damage and can also interfere with cell signalling. More important seems to be cadmium interaction with DNA repair mechanisms, cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis as well as with epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression control. Cadmium mediated inhibition of DNA repair mechanisms and apoptosis leads to accumulation of cells with unrepaired DNA damage, which in turn increases the mutation rate and thus genomic instability. This increases the probability of developing not only cancer but also other diseases associated with genomic instability. In the in vitro experiments cadmium induced effects leading to genomic instability have been observed at low concentrations that were comparable to those observed in target organs and tissues of humans that were non-occupationally exposed to cadmium. Therefore, further studies aiming to clarify the relevance of these observations for human health risks due to cadmium exposure are needed.

  9. c-MYC-induced genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyk, Alexandra; Mai, Sabine

    2014-04-01

    MYC dysregulation initiates a dynamic process of genomic instability that is linked to tumor initiation. Early studies using MYC-carrying retroviruses showed that these viruses were potent transforming agents. Cell culture models followed that addressed the role of MYC in transformation. With the advent of MYC transgenic mice, it became obvious that MYC deregulation alone was sufficient to initiate B-cell neoplasia in mice. More than 70% of all tumors have some form of c-MYC gene dysregulation, which affects gene regulation, microRNA expression profiles, large genomic amplifications, and the overall organization of the nucleus. These changes set the stage for the dynamic genomic rearrangements that are associated with cellular transformation.

  10. Nitric Oxide: Genomic Instability And Synthetic Lethality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasily A. Yakovlev

    2015-08-01

    Loss or inhibition of Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1 activity results in accumulation of DNA single-strand breaks, which are subsequently converted to DSB by the transcription machinery. In BRCA-positive cells, DSB are repaired by HRR, but they cannot be properly repaired in BRCA1-deficient cells, leading to genomic instability, chromosomal rearrangements, and cell death. Our data demonstrated that combination of NO-donors with PARP inhibitors significantly sensitized the BRCA1-positive cancer cells to DNA-damaging agents.

  11. One-hit wonders of genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strunnikov Alexander V

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent data show that cells from many cancers exhibit massive chromosome instability. The traditional view is that the gradual accumulation of mutations in genes involved in transcriptional regulation and cell cycle controls results in tumor development. This, however, does not exclude the possibility that some mutations could be more potent than others in destabilizing the genome by targeting both chromosomal integrity and corresponding checkpoint mechanisms simultaneously. Three such examples of "single-hit" lesions potentially leading to heritable genome destabilization are discussed. They include: failure to release sister chromatid cohesion due to the incomplete proteolytic cleavage of cohesin; massive merotelic kinetochore misattachments upon condensin depletion; and chromosome under-replication. In all three cases, cells fail to detect potential chromosomal bridges before anaphase entry, indicating that there is a basic cell cycle requirement to maintain a degree of sister chromatid bridging that is not recognizable as chromosomal damage.

  12. Genomic instability in newborn with short telomeres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Moreno-Palomo

    Full Text Available Telomere length is considered to be a risk factor in adults due to its proved association with cancer incidence and mortality. Since newborn present a wide interindividual variation in mean telomere length, it is relevant to demonstrate if these differences in length can act also as an early risk indicator. To answer this question, we have measured the mean telomere length of 74 samples of cord blood from newborns and studied its association with the basal genetic damage, measured as the frequency of binucleated cells carrying micronuclei. In addition, we have challenged the cells of a subgroup of individuals (N = 35 against mitomycin-C (MMC to establish their sensitivity to induced genomic instability. Results indicate that newborn with shorter telomeres present significantly higher levels of genetic damage when compared to those with longer telomeres. In addition, the cellular response to MMC was also significantly higher among those samples from subjects with shorter telomeres. Independently of the causal mechanisms involved, our results show for the first time that telomere length at delivery influence both the basal and induced genetic damage of the individual.Individuals born with shorter telomeres may be at increased risk, especially for those biological processes triggered by genomic instability as is the case of cancer and other age-related diseases.

  13. Tolerance of Whole-Genome Doubling Propagates Chromosomal Instability and Accelerates Cancer Genome Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dewhurst, Sally M.; McGranahan, Nicholas; Burrell, Rebecca A.;

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of whole-genome doubling to chromosomal instability (CIN) and tumor evolution is unclear. We use long-term culture of isogenic tetraploid cells from a stable diploid colon cancer progenitor to investigate how a genome-doubling event affects genome stability over time. Rare cells...... that survive genome doubling demonstrate increased tolerance to chromosome aberrations. Tetraploid cells do not exhibit increased frequencies of structural or numerical CIN per chromosome. However, the tolerant phenotype in tetraploid cells, coupled with a doubling of chromosome aberrations per cell, allows...... chromosome abnormalities to evolve specifically in tetraploids, recapitulating chromosomal changes in genomically complex colorectal tumors. Finally, a genome-doubling event is independently predictive of poor relapse-free survival in early-stage disease in two independent cohorts in multivariate analyses...

  14. Ectopic Expression of Testis Germ Cell Proteins in Cancer and Its Potential Role in Genomic Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaraby Yoheswaran Nielsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer and an enabling factor for the genetic alterations that drive cancer development. The processes involved in genomic instability resemble those of meiosis, where genetic material is interchanged between homologous chromosomes. In most types of human cancer, epigenetic changes, including hypomethylation of gene promoters, lead to the ectopic expression of a large number of proteins normally restricted to the germ cells of the testis. Due to the similarities between meiosis and genomic instability, it has been proposed that activation of meiotic programs may drive genomic instability in cancer cells. Some germ cell proteins with ectopic expression in cancer cells indeed seem to promote genomic instability, while others reduce polyploidy and maintain mitotic fidelity. Furthermore, oncogenic germ cell proteins may indirectly contribute to genomic instability through induction of replication stress, similar to classic oncogenes. Thus, current evidence suggests that testis germ cell proteins are implicated in cancer development by regulating genomic instability during tumorigenesis, and these proteins therefore represent promising targets for novel therapeutic strategies.

  15. Causes of genome instability: the effect of low dose chemical exposures in modern society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langie, Sabine A.S.; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Azqueta, Amaya; Bisson, William H.; Brown, Dustin; Brunborg, Gunnar; Charles, Amelia K.; Chen, Tao; Colacci, Annamaria; Darroudi, Firouz; Forte, Stefano; Gonzalez, Laetitia; Hamid, Roslida A.; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.; Leyns, Luc; Lopez de Cerain Salsamendi, Adela; Memeo, Lorenzo; Mondello, Chiara; Mothersill, Carmel; Olsen, Ann-Karin; Pavanello, Sofia; Raju, Jayadev; Rojas, Emilio; Roy, Rabindra; Ryan, Elizabeth; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia; Salem, Hosni K.; Scovassi, Ivana; Singh, Neetu; Vaccari, Monica; Van Schooten, Frederik J.; Valverde, Mahara; Woodrick, Jordan; Zhang, Luoping; van Larebeke, Nik; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Collins, Andrew R.

    2015-01-01

    Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome’s integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus, genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other chemicals present in our modern society could contribute to carcinogenesis by indirectly affecting genome stability. The selected chemicals with their mechanisms of action proposed to indirectly contribute to genome instability are: heavy metals (DNA repair, epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, telomere length), acrylamide (DNA repair, chromosome segregation), bisphenol A (epigenetic modification, DNA damage signaling, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation), benomyl (chromosome segregation), quinones (epigenetic modification) and nano-sized particles (epigenetic pathways, mitochondrial function, chromosome segregation, telomere length). The purpose of this review is to describe the crucial aspects of genome instability, to outline the ways in which environmental chemicals can affect this cancer hallmark and to identify candidate chemicals for further study. The overall aim is to make scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis. PMID:26106144

  16. In situ quantification of genomic instability in breast cancer progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz de Solorzano, Carlos; Chin, Koei; Gray, Joe W.; Lockett, Stephen J.

    2003-05-15

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of breast and other solid cancers. Presumably caused by critical telomere reduction, GI is responsible for providing the genetic diversity required in the multi-step progression of the disease. We have used multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization and 3D image analysis to quantify genomic instability cell-by-cell in thick, intact tissue sections of normal breast epithelium, preneoplastic lesions (usual ductal hyperplasia), ductal carcinona is situ or invasive carcinoma of the breast. Our in situ-cell by cell-analysis of genomic instability shows an important increase of genomic instability in the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma, followed by a reduction of instability in invasive carcinoma. This pattern suggests that the transition from hyperplasia to in situ carcinoma corresponds to telomere crisis and invasive carcinoma is a consequence of telomerase reactivation afertelomere crisis.

  17. Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.; Hartmann, Andreas; Limoli, Charles L.; Nagar, Shruti; Ponnaiya, Brian

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of GM10115 hamster-human hybrid cells to X-rays can result in the induction of chromosomal instability in the progeny of surviving cells. This instability manifests as the dynamic production of novel sub-populations of cells with unique cytogenetic rearrangements involving the "marker" human chromosome. We have used the comet assay to investigate whether there was an elevated level of endogenous DNA breaks in chromosomally unstable clones that could provide a source for the chromosomal rearrangements and thus account for the persistent instability observed. Our results indicate no significant difference in comet tail measurement between non-irradiated and radiation-induced chromosomally unstable clones. Using two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization we also investigated whether recombinational events involving the interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences in GM10115 cells were involved at frequencies higher than random processes would otherwise predict. Nine of 11 clones demonstrated a significantly higher than expected involvement of these interstitial telomere repeat-like sequences at the recombination junction between the human and hamster chromosomes. Since elevated levels of endogenous breaks were not detected in unstable clones we propose that epigenetic or bystander effects (BSEs) lead to the activation of recombinational pathways that perpetuate the unstable phenotype. Specifically, we expand upon the hypothesis that radiation induces conditions and/or factors that stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These reactive intermediates then contribute to a chronic pro-oxidant environment that cycles over multiple generations, promoting chromosomal recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability.

  18. DNA repair defects and genome instability in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Susana; Kreienkamp, Ray

    2015-06-01

    The integrity of the nuclear lamina has emerged as an important factor in the maintenance of genome stability. In particular, mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins (lamin A/C), alter nuclear morphology and function, and cause genomic instability. LMNA gene mutations are associated with a variety of degenerative diseases and devastating premature aging syndromes such as Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS) and Restrictive Dermopathy (RD). HGPS is a severe laminopathy, with patients dying in their teens from myocardial infarction or stroke. HGPS patient-derived cells exhibit nuclear shape abnormalities, changes in epigenetic regulation and gene expression, telomere shortening, genome instability, and premature senescence. This review highlights recent advances in identifying molecular mechanisms that contribute to the pathophysiology of HGPS, with a special emphasis on DNA repair defects and genome instability.

  19. A Signature of Genomic Instability Resulting from Deficient Replication Licensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Maochun; Wang, Jianmin; Kunnev, Dimiter; Freeland, Amy

    2017-01-01

    Insufficient licensing of DNA replication origins has been shown to result in genome instability, stem cell deficiency, and cancers. However, it is unclear whether the DNA damage resulting from deficient replication licensing occurs generally or if specific sites are preferentially affected. To map locations of ongoing DNA damage in vivo, the DNAs present in red blood cell micronuclei were sequenced. Many micronuclei are the product of DNA breaks that leave acentromeric remnants that failed to segregate during mitosis and should reflect the locations of breaks. To validate the approach we show that micronuclear sequences identify known common fragile sites under conditions that induce breaks at these locations (hydroxyurea). In MCM2 deficient mice a different set of preferred breakage sites is identified that includes the tumor suppressor gene Tcf3, which is known to contribute to T-lymphocytic leukemias that arise in these mice, and the 45S rRNA gene repeats. PMID:28045896

  20. Genome instability in Novel Lolium multiflorum x L. arundinaceum hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have identified a method whereby Lolium multiflorum (Lm) or L. arundinaceum (Fa) genomes are preferentially eliminated through a mitotic loss behavior in interspecific Lm x Fa F1 hybrids,generating either dihaploid Lm lines or Fa lines. The genome instability has been visualized phenotypically an...

  1. Mechanisms of Low Dose Radio-Suppression of Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelward, Bevin P

    2009-09-16

    The major goal of this project is to contribute toward the elucidation of the impact of long term low dose radiation on genomic stability. We have created and characterized novel technologies for delivering long term low dose radiation to animals, and we have studied genomic stability by applying cutting edge molecular analysis technologies. Remarkably, we have found that a dose rate that is 300X higher than background radiation does not lead to any detectable genomic damage, nor is there any significant change in gene expression for genes pertinent to the DNA damage response. These results point to the critical importance of dose rate, rather than just total dose, when evaluating public health risks and when creating regulatory guidelines. In addition to these studies, we have also further developed a mouse model for quantifying cells that have undergone a large scale DNA sequence rearrangement via homologous recombination, and we have applied these mice in studies of both low dose radiation and space radiation. In addition to more traditional approaches for assessing genomic stability, we have also explored radiation and possible beneficial effects (adaptive response), long term effects (persistent effects) and effects on communication among cells (bystander effects), both in vitro and in vivo. In terms of the adaptive response, we have not observed any significant induction of an adaptive response following long term low dose radiation in vivo, delivered at 300X background. In terms of persistent and bystander effects, we have revealed evidence of a bystander effect in vivo and with researchers at and demonstrated for the first time the molecular mechanism by which cells “remember” radiation exposure. Understanding the underlying molecular mechanisms by which radiation can induce genomic instability is fundamental to our ability to assess the biological impact of low dose radiation. Finally, in a parallel set of studies we have explored the effects of heavy

  2. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybesma, W.; Molenaar, D.; IJcken, W. van; Venema, K.; Korta, R.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing from the

  3. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Sybesma (Wilbert); D. Molenaar (Douwe); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); K. Venema (Koen); R. Kort (Remco)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing

  4. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Sybesma (Wilbert); D. Molenaar (Douwe); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); K. Venema (Koen); R. Kort (Remco)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing f

  5. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sybesma, W.; Molenaar, D.; IJcken, W. van; Venema, K.; Korta, R.

    2013-01-01

    We describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing from the geno

  6. c-MYC-induced genomic instability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kuzyk, Alexandra; Mai, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    ...% of all tumors have some form of c-MYC gene dysregulation, which affects gene regulation, microRNA expression profiles, large genomic amplifications, and the overall organization of the nucleus...

  7. G-rich proto-oncogenes are targeted for genomic instability in B-cell lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Michelle L; Huber, Michael D; Maizels, Nancy

    2007-03-15

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common lymphoid malignancy in adults. It is a heterogeneous disease with variability in outcome. Genomic instability of a subset of proto-oncogenes, including c-MYC, BCL6, RhoH, PIM1, and PAX5, can contribute to initial tumor development and has been correlated with poor prognosis and aggressive tumor growth. Lymphomas in which these proto-oncogenes are unstable derive from germinal center B cells that express activation-induced deaminase (AID), the B-cell-specific factor that deaminates DNA to initiate immunoglobulin gene diversification. Proto-oncogene instability is evident as both aberrant hypermutation and translocation, paralleling programmed instability which diversifies the immunoglobulin loci. We have asked if genomic sequence correlates with instability in AID-positive B-cell lymphomas. We show that instability does not correlate with enrichment of the WRC sequence motif that is the consensus for deamination by AID. Instability does correlate with G-richness, evident as multiple runs of the base guanine on the nontemplate DNA strand. Extending previous analysis of c-MYC, we show experimentally that transcription of BCL6 and RhoH induces formation of structures, G-loops, which contain single-stranded regions targeted by AID. We further show that G-richness does not characterize translocation breakpoints in AID-negative B- and T-cell malignancies. These results identify G-richness as one feature of genomic structure that can contribute to genomic instability in AID-positive B-cell malignancies.

  8. Radiation induced genome instability: multiscale modelling and data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Sergey; Eidelman, Yuri

    2012-07-01

    Genome instability (GI) is thought to be an important step in cancer induction and progression. Radiation induced GI is usually defined as genome alterations in the progeny of irradiated cells. The aim of this report is to demonstrate an opportunity for integrative analysis of radiation induced GI on the basis of multiscale modelling. Integrative, systems level modelling is necessary to assess different pathways resulting in GI in which a variety of genetic and epigenetic processes are involved. The multilevel modelling includes the Monte Carlo based simulation of several key processes involved in GI: DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) generation in cells initially irradiated as well as in descendants of irradiated cells, damage transmission through mitosis. Taking the cell-cycle-dependent generation of DNA/chromosome breakage into account ensures an advantage in estimating the contribution of different DNA damage response pathways to GI, as to nonhomologous vs homologous recombination repair mechanisms, the role of DSBs at telomeres or interstitial chromosomal sites, etc. The preliminary estimates show that both telomeric and non-telomeric DSB interactions are involved in delayed effects of radiation although differentially for different cell types. The computational experiments provide the data on the wide spectrum of GI endpoints (dicentrics, micronuclei, nonclonal translocations, chromatid exchanges, chromosome fragments) similar to those obtained experimentally for various cell lines under various experimental conditions. The modelling based analysis of experimental data demonstrates that radiation induced GI may be viewed as processes of delayed DSB induction/interaction/transmission being a key for quantification of GI. On the other hand, this conclusion is not sufficient to understand GI as a whole because factors of DNA non-damaging origin can also induce GI. Additionally, new data on induced pluripotent stem cells reveal that GI is acquired in normal mature

  9. Genome instability in Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybesma, Wilbert; Molenaar, Douwe; van IJcken, Wilfred; Venema, Koen; Kort, Remco

    2013-04-01

    We describe here a comparative genome analysis of three dairy product isolates of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) and the ATCC 53103 reference strain to the published genome sequence of L. rhamnosus GG. The analysis showed that in two of three isolates, major DNA segments were missing from the genomic islands LGGISL1,2. The deleted DNA segments consist of 34 genes in one isolate and 84 genes in the other and are flanked by identical insertion elements. Among the missing genes are the spaCBA genes, which encode pilin subunits involved in adhesion to mucus and persistence of the strains in the human intestinal tract. Subsequent quantitative PCR analyses of six commercial probiotic products confirmed that two more products contain a heterogeneous population of L. rhamnosus GG variants, including genotypes with or without spaC. These results underline the relevance for quality assurance and control measures targeting genome stability in probiotic strains and justify research assessing the effect of genetic rearrangements in probiotics on the outcome of in vitro and in vivo efficacy studies.

  10. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otozai, Shinji [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oda, Shoji [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Kamei, Yasuhiro [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ryo, Haruko [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Sato, Ayuko [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Nomura, Taisei [Nomura Project, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Osaka 565-0085 (Japan); Mitani, Hiroshi [Department of Integrated Biosciences, Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8562 (Japan); Tsujimura, Tohru [Department of Pathology, Hyogo College of Medicine, Hyogo 663-8501 (Japan); Inohara, Hidenori [Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University School of Medicine, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Todo, Takeshi, E-mail: todo@radbio.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Biology and Medical Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, B4, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Radiation-induced microsatellite instability (MSI) was investigated in medaka fish. • msh2{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of spontaneous MSI. • p53{sup −/−} fish had a high frequency of radiation-induced MSI. • p53 and msh2 suppress MSI by different pathways: mismatch removal and apoptosis. - Abstract: Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2{sup −/−} males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2{sup −/−} and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53{sup −/−} fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2{sup −/−} fish, but negligible levels in p53{sup −/−} fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells.

  11. Development of cancer-initiating cells and immortalized cells with genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Ken-ichi; Atsumi, Yuko; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2015-01-01

    Cancers that develop after middle age usually exhibit genomic instability and multiple mutations. This is in direct contrast to pediatric tumors that usually develop as a result of specific chromosomal translocations and epigenetic aberrations. The development of genomic instability is associated with mutations that contribute to cellular immortalization and transformation. Cancer occurs when cancer-initiating cells (CICs), also called cancer stem cells, develop as a result of these mutations. In this paper, we explore how CICs develop as a result of genomic instability, including looking at which cancer suppression mechanisms are abrogated. A recent in vitro study revealed the existence of a CIC induction pathway in differentiating stem cells. Under aberrant differentiation conditions, cells become senescent and develop genomic instabilities that lead to the development of CICs. The resulting CICs contain a mutation in the alternative reading frame of CDKN2A (ARF)/p53 module, i.e., in either ARF or p53. We summarize recently established knowledge of CIC development and cellular immortality, explore the role of the ARF/p53 module in protecting cells from transformation, and describe a risk factor for genomic destabilization that increases during the process of normal cell growth and differentiation and is associated with the downregulation of histone H2AX to levels representative of growth arrest in normal cells. PMID:25815132

  12. Myc-dependent genome instability and lifespan in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Greer

    Full Text Available The Myc family of transcription factors are key regulators of cell growth and proliferation that are dysregulated in a large number of human cancers. When overexpressed, Myc family proteins also cause genomic instability, a hallmark of both transformed and aging cells. Using an in vivo lacZ mutation reporter, we show that overexpression of Myc in Drosophila increases the frequency of large genome rearrangements associated with erroneous repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. In addition, we find that overexpression of Myc shortens adult lifespan and, conversely, that Myc haploinsufficiency reduces mutation load and extends lifespan. Our data provide the first evidence that Myc may act as a pro-aging factor, possibly through its ability to greatly increase genome instability.

  13. A novel mechanism inducing genome instability in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus infected cells.

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    Brian R Jackson

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is an oncogenic herpesvirus associated with multiple AIDS-related malignancies. Like other herpesviruses, KSHV has a biphasic life cycle and both the lytic and latent phases are required for tumorigenesis. Evidence suggests that KSHV lytic replication can cause genome instability in KSHV-infected cells, although no mechanism has thus far been described. A surprising link has recently been suggested between mRNA export, genome instability and cancer development. Notably, aberrations in the cellular transcription and export complex (hTREX proteins have been identified in high-grade tumours and these defects contribute to genome instability. We have previously shown that the lytically expressed KSHV ORF57 protein interacts with the complete hTREX complex; therefore, we investigated the possible intriguing link between ORF57, hTREX and KSHV-induced genome instability. Herein, we show that lytically active KSHV infected cells induce a DNA damage response and, importantly, we demonstrate directly that this is due to DNA strand breaks. Furthermore, we show that sequestration of the hTREX complex by the KSHV ORF57 protein leads to this double strand break response and significant DNA damage. Moreover, we describe a novel mechanism showing that the genetic instability observed is a consequence of R-loop formation. Importantly, the link between hTREX sequestration and DNA damage may be a common feature in herpesvirus infection, as a similar phenotype was observed with the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 ICP27 protein. Our data provide a model of R-loop induced DNA damage in KSHV infected cells and describes a novel system for studying genome instability caused by aberrant hTREX.

  14. Canonical DNA Repair Pathways Influence R-Loop-Driven Genome Instability.

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    Stirling, Peter C; Hieter, Philip

    2016-07-22

    DNA repair defects create cancer predisposition in humans by fostering a higher rate of mutations. While DNA repair is quite well characterized, recent studies have identified previously unrecognized relationships between DNA repair and R-loop-mediated genome instability. R-loops are three-stranded nucleic acid structures in which RNA binds to genomic DNA to displace a loop of single-stranded DNA. Mutations in homologous recombination, nucleotide excision repair, crosslink repair, and DNA damage checkpoints have all now been linked to formation and function of transcription-coupled R-loops. This perspective will summarize recent literature linking DNA repair to R-loop-mediated genomic instability and discuss how R-loops may contribute to mutagenesis in DNA-repair-deficient cancers.

  15. Mitochondrial genome instability in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Luiza F; Fonseca, Aline S; Muys, Bruna R; Plaça, Jessica R; Bueno, Rafaela B L; Lorenzi, Julio C C; Santos, Anemari R D; Molfetta, Greice A; Zanette, Dalila L; Souza, Jorge E S; Valente, Valeria; Silva, Wilson A

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is regarded as a hallmark of cancer progression. In the current study, we evaluated mitochondrial genome instability and copy number in colorectal cancer using Next Generation Sequencing approach and qPCR, respectively. The results revealed higher levels of heteroplasmy and depletion of the relative mtDNA copy number in colorectal adenocarcinoma. Adenocarcinoma samples also presented an increased number of mutations in nuclear genes encoding proteins which functions are related with mitochondria fusion, fission and localization. Moreover, we found a set of mitochondrial and nuclear genes, which cooperate in the same mitochondrial function simultaneously mutated in adenocarcinoma. In summary, these results support an important role for mitochondrial function and genomic instability in colorectal tumorigenesis.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Genomic Instability in Brca-Deficient Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Instability during DNA Replication." 10: April 12, 2013-University of Zurich Cancer Mini-Symposium in Grindelwald, Switzerland - “Genome Stability during...53BP1DB, 53BP18A, o 45 min recovery) and immunoprecipitation was performed with anti- FLAG antib immunoprecipitated protein (right). (B) Isogenic...explore the mechanism of PTIP recruitment to DSBs, we expressed FLAG -tagged PTIP in WT, 53BP1/, and ATM/ MEFs and irradiated them with 10 Gy (Figure 6A

  17. Radiation-induced genomic instability in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huumonen, Katriina; Immonen, Hanna-Kaisa; Baverstock, Keith; Hiltunen, Mikko; Korkalainen, Merja; Lahtinen, Tapani; Parviainen, Juha; Viluksela, Matti; Wong, Garry; Naarala, Jonne; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2012-10-01

    Radiation-induced genomic instability has been well documented, particularly in vitro. However, the understanding of its mechanisms and their consequences in vivo is still limited. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans; strain CB665) nematodes were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.1, 1, 3 or 10Gy. The endpoints were measured several generations after exposure and included mutations in the movement-related gene unc-58, alterations in gene expression analysed with oligoarrays containing the entire C. elegans genome, and micro-satellite mutations measured by capillary electrophoresis. The progeny of the irradiated nematodes showed an increased mutation frequency in the unc-58 gene, with a maximum response observed at 1Gy. Significant differences were also found in gene expression between the irradiated (1Gy) and non-irradiated nematode lines. Differences in gene expression did not show clear clustering into certain gene categories, suggesting that the instability might be a chaotic process rather than a result of changes in the function of few specific genes such as, e.g., those responsible for DNA repair. Increased heterogeneity in gene expression, which has previously been described in irradiated cultured human lymphocytes, was also observed in the present study in C. elegans, the coefficient of variation of gene expression being higher in the progeny of irradiated nematodes than in control nematodes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first publication reporting radiation-induced genomic instability in C. elegans.

  18. Regional genomic instability predisposes to complex dystrophin gene rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Junko; Magner, Daniel B; Lee, Jennifer A; Breman, Amy M; Schmitt, Eric S; White, Lisa D; Crowe, Carol A; Merrill, Michelle; Jayakar, Parul; Rajadhyaksha, Aparna; Eng, Christine M; del Gaudio, Daniela

    2009-09-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD) cause Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies and the majority of cases are due to DMD gene rearrangements. Despite the high incidence of these aberrations, little is known about their causative molecular mechanism(s). We examined 792 DMD/BMD clinical samples by oligonucleotide array-CGH and report on the junction sequence analysis of 15 unique deletion cases and three complex intragenic rearrangements to elucidate potential underlying mechanism(s). Furthermore, we present three cases with intergenic rearrangements involving DMD and neighboring loci. The cases with intragenic rearrangements include an inversion with flanking deleted sequences; a duplicated segment inserted in direct orientation into a deleted region; and a splicing mutation adjacent to a deletion. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that 7 of 12 breakpoints combined among 3 complex cases aligned with repetitive sequences, as compared to 4 of 30 breakpoints for the 15 deletion cases. Moreover, the inversion/deletion case may involve a stem-loop structure that has contributed to the initiation of this rearrangement. For the duplication/deletion and splicing mutation/deletion cases, the presence of the first mutation, either a duplication or point mutation, may have elicited the deletion events in an attempt to correct preexisting mutations. While NHEJ is one potential mechanism for these complex rearrangements, the highly complex junction sequence of the inversion/deletion case suggests the involvement of a replication-based mechanism. Our results support the notion that regional genomic instability, aided by the presence of repetitive elements, a stem-loop structure, and possibly preexisting mutations, may elicit complex rearrangements of the DMD gene.

  19. Characterization of genomic instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and engaging teaching strategies described in two curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Alexandra P.

    Cancer arises through an accumulation of mutations in the genome. In cancer cells, mutations are frequently caused by DNA rearrangements, which include chromosomal breakages, deletions, insertions, and translocations. Such events contribute to genomic instability, a known hallmark of cancer. To study cycles of chromosomal instability, we are using baker's yeast as a model organism. In yeast, a ChrVII system was previously developed (Admire et al., 2006), in which a disomic yeast strain was used to identify regions of instability on ChrVII. Using this system, a fragile site on the left arm of ChrVII (Admire et al., 2006) was identified and characterized. This study led to insight into mechanisms involved in chromosomal rearrangements and mutations that arise from them as well as to an understanding of mechanisms involved in genomic instability. To further our understanding of genomic instability, I devised a strategy to study instability on a different chromosome (ChrV) (Figure 3), so that we could determine whether lessons learned from the ChrVII system are applicable to other chromosomes, and/or whether other mechanisms of instability could be identified. A suitable strain was generated and analyzed, and our findings suggest that frequencies of instability on the right arm of ChrV are similar to those found in ChrVII. The results from the work in ChrV described in this paper support the idea that the instability found on ChrVII is not an isolated occurrence. My research was supported by an NSF GK-12 grant. The aim of this grant is to improve science education in middle schools, and as part of my participation in this program, I studied and practiced effective science communication methodologies. In attempts to explain my research to middle school students, I collaborated with others to develop methods for explaining genetics and the most important techniques I used in my research. While developing these methods, I learned more about what motivates people to learn

  20. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mitochondrial Proteins Reveals Pro-Survival Mechanisms in the Perpetuation of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Stefani N.; Waters, Katrina M.; Morgan, William F.; Yang, Austin; Baulch, Janet E.

    2012-07-26

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon that is measured as mitotically heritable genetic alterations observed in the progeny of an irradiated cell. The mechanisms that perpetuate this instability are unclear, however, a role for chronic oxidative stress has consistently been demonstrated. In the chromosomally unstable LS12 cell line, oxidative stress and genomic instability were correlated with mitochondrial dysfunction. To clarify this mitochondrial dysfunction and gain insight into the mechanisms underlying radiation induced genomic instability we have evaluated the mitochondrial sub-proteome and performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of LS12 cells. Of 98 quantified mitochondrial proteins, 17 met criteria for fold changes and reproducibility; and 11 were statistically significant in comparison with the stable parental GM10115 cell line. Previous observations implicated defects in the electron transport chain (ETC) in the LS12 cell mitochondrial dysfunction. Proteomic analysis supports these observations, demonstrating significantly reduced levels of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the intermediary between complexes III and IV of the ETC. Results also suggest that LS12 cells compensate for ETC dysfunction and oxidative stress through increased levels of tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes and up-regulation of proteins that protect against oxidative stress and apoptosis. More than one cellular defect is likely to contribute to the genomic instability phenotype. These data suggest that LS12 cells have adapted mechanisms that allow survival under sub-optimal conditions of oxidative stress and compromised mitochondrial function to perpetuate genomic instability.

  1. Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2009-10-15

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the 'recombination mediators'. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as 'recombination co-mediators'. Defects in either recombination mediators or comediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic restabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51.

  2. Genomic instability and cellular stress in organ biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with colorectal cancer and predisposing pathologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Sara; Fuoco, Ilenia; di Fluri, Giorgia; Costa, Francesco; Ricchiuti, Angelo; Biondi, Graziano; Nardini, Vincenzo; Scarpato, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and polyps, are common colorectal pathologies in western society and are risk factors for development of colorectal cancer (CRC). Genomic instability is a cancer hallmark and is connected to changes in chromosomal structure, often caused by double strand break formation (DSB), and aneuploidy. Cellular stress, may contribute to genomic instability. In colorectal biopsies and peripheral blood lymphocytes of patients with IBD, polyps and CRC, we evaluated 1) genomic instability using the γH2AX assay as marker of DSB and micronuclei in mononuclear lymphocytes kept under cytodieresis inhibition, and 2) cellular stress through expression and cellular localization of glutathione-S-transferase omega 1 (GSTO1). Colon biopsies showed γH2AX increase starting from polyps, while lymphocytes already from IBD. Micronuclei frequency began to rise in lymphocytes of subjects with polyps, suggesting a systemic genomic instability condition. Colorectal tissues lost GSTO1 expression but increased nuclear localization with pathology progression. Lymphocytes did not change GSTO1 expression and localization until CRC formation, where enzyme expression was increased. We propose that the growing genomic instability found in our patients is connected with the alteration of cellular environment. Evaluation of genomic damage and cellular stress in colorectal pathologies may facilitate prevention and management of CRC. PMID:26046795

  3. Genomic instability is associated with natural life span variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    Full Text Available Increasing genomic instability is associated with aging in eukaryotes, but the connection between genomic instability and natural variation in life span is unknown. We have quantified chronological life span and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH in 11 natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that genomic instability increases and mitotic asymmetry breaks down during chronological aging. The age-dependent increase of genomic instability generally lags behind the drop of viability and this delay accounts for approximately 50% of the observed natural variation of replicative life span in these yeast isolates. We conclude that the abilities of yeast strains to tolerate genomic instability co-vary with their replicative life spans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative evidence that demonstrates a link between genomic instability and natural variation in life span.

  4. Affected chromosome homeostasis and genomic instability of clonal yeast cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Jagoda; Deregowska, Anna; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Lewinska, Anna; Wnuk, Maciej

    2016-05-01

    Yeast cells originating from one single colony are considered genotypically and phenotypically identical. However, taking into account the cellular heterogeneity, it seems also important to monitor cell-to-cell variations within a clone population. In the present study, a comprehensive yeast karyotype screening was conducted using single chromosome comet assay. Chromosome-dependent and mutation-dependent changes in DNA (DNA with breaks or with abnormal replication intermediates) were studied using both single-gene deletion haploid mutants (bub1, bub2, mad1, tel1, rad1 and tor1) and diploid cells lacking one active gene of interest, namely BUB1/bub1, BUB2/bub2, MAD1/mad1, TEL1/tel1, RAD1/rad1 and TOR1/tor1 involved in the control of cell cycle progression, DNA repair and the regulation of longevity. Increased chromosome fragility and replication stress-mediated chromosome abnormalities were correlated with elevated incidence of genomic instability, namely aneuploid events-disomies, monosomies and to a lesser extent trisomies as judged by in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The tor1 longevity mutant with relatively balanced chromosome homeostasis was found the most genomically stable among analyzed mutants. During clonal yeast culture, spontaneously formed abnormal chromosome structures may stimulate changes in the ploidy state and, in turn, promote genomic heterogeneity. These alterations may be more accented in selected mutated genetic backgrounds, namely in yeast cells deficient in proper cell cycle regulation and DNA repair.

  5. Cancer models, genomic instability and somatic cellular Darwinian evolution

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    Little Mark P

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The biology of cancer is critically reviewed and evidence adduced that its development can be modelled as a somatic cellular Darwinian evolutionary process. The evidence for involvement of genomic instability (GI is also reviewed. A variety of quasi-mechanistic models of carcinogenesis are reviewed, all based on this somatic Darwinian evolutionary hypothesis; in particular, the multi-stage model of Armitage and Doll (Br. J. Cancer 1954:8;1-12, the two-mutation model of Moolgavkar, Venzon, and Knudson (MVK (Math. Biosci. 1979:47;55-77, the generalized MVK model of Little (Biometrics 1995:51;1278-1291 and various generalizations of these incorporating effects of GI (Little and Wright Math. Biosci. 2003:183;111-134; Little et al. J. Theoret. Biol. 2008:254;229-238. Reviewers This article was reviewed by RA Gatenby and M Kimmel.

  6. Methods to Monitor DNA Repair Defects and Genomic Instability in the Context of a Disrupted Nuclear Lamina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo, Susana; Kreienkamp, Ray

    2016-01-01

    The organization of the genome within the nuclear space is viewed as an additional level of regulation of genome function, as well as a means to ensure genome integrity. Structural proteins associated with the nuclear envelope, in particular lamins (A- and B-type) and lamin-associated proteins, play an important role in genome organization. Interestingly, there is a whole body of evidence that links disruptions of the nuclear lamina with DNA repair defects and genomic instability. Here, we describe a few standard techniques that have been successfully utilized to identify mechanisms behind DNA repair defects and genomic instability in cells with an altered nuclear lamina. In particular, we describe protocols to monitor changes in the expression of DNA repair factors (Western blot) and their recruitment to sites of DNA damage (immunofluorescence); kinetics of DNA double-strand break repair after ionizing radiation (neutral comet assays); frequency of chromosomal aberrations (FISH, fluorescence in situ hybridization); and alterations in telomere homeostasis (Quantitative-FISH). These techniques have allowed us to shed some light onto molecular mechanisms by which alterations in A-type lamins induce genomic instability, which could contribute to the pathophysiology of aging and aging-related diseases. PMID:27147057

  7. Genomic instability in rat: Breakpoints induced by ionising radiation and interstitial telomeric-like sequences

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    Camats, Nuria [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora [Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Parrilla, Juan Jose [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Acien, Maribel [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Paya, Pilar [Servicio de Ginecologia y Obstetricia, Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, Ctra, Madrid-Cartagena, s/n, El Palmar, 30120 Murcia (Spain); Giulotto, Elena [Dipartimento di Genetica e Microbiologia Adriano Buzzati Traverso, Universita degli Studi di Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Egozcue, Josep [Departament de Biologia Cel.lular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Francisca [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Garcia, Montserrat [Institut de Biotecnologia i Biomedicina (IBB), Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain) and Departament de Biologia Cellular, Fisiologia i Immunologia Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: Montserrat.Garcia.Caldes@uab.es

    2006-03-20

    The Norwegian rat (Rattus norvegicus) is the most widely studied experimental species in biomedical research although little is known about its chromosomal structure. The characterisation of possible unstable regions of the karyotype of this species would contribute to the better understanding of its genomic architecture. The cytogenetic effects of ionising radiation have been widely used for the study of genomic instability, and the importance of interstitial telomeric-like sequences (ITSs) in instability of the genome has also been reported in previous studies in vertebrates. In order to describe the unstable chromosomal regions of R. norvegicus, the distribution of breakpoints induced by X-irradiation and ITSs in its karyotype were analysed in this work. For the X-irradiation analysis, 52 foetuses (from 14 irradiated rats) were studied, 4803 metaphases were analysed, and a total of 456 breakpoints induced by X-rays were detected, located in 114 chromosomal bands, with 25 of them significantly affected by X-irradiation (hot spots). For the analysis of ITSs, three foetuses (from three rats) were studied, 305 metaphases were analysed and 121 ITSs were detected, widely distributed in the karyotype of this species. Seventy-six percent of all hot spots analysed in this study were co-localised with ITSs.

  8. Potential contribution of genomics and biotechnology in animal production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The overall objective of the book chapter is to define the potential contribution of genomics in livestock production in Latin American countries. A brief description on what is genomics, genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and genomic selection (GS) is provided. Genomics has been rapidly adopte...

  9. A novel ATM-dependent checkpoint defect distinct from loss of function mutation promotes genomic instability in melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerri, Loredana; Brooks, Kelly; Chia, KeeMing; Grossman, Gavriel; Ellis, Jonathan J; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Škalamera, Dubravka; Pavey, Sandra; Burmeister, Bryan; Gabrielli, Brian

    2016-05-01

    Melanomas have high levels of genomic instability that can contribute to poor disease prognosis. Here, we report a novel defect of the ATM-dependent cell cycle checkpoint in melanoma cell lines that promotes genomic instability. In defective cells, ATM signalling to CHK2 is intact, but the cells are unable to maintain the cell cycle arrest due to elevated PLK1 driving recovery from the arrest. Reducing PLK1 activity recovered the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest, and over-expressing PLK1 was sufficient to overcome the checkpoint arrest and increase genomic instability. Loss of the ATM-dependent checkpoint did not affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation demonstrating that this defect is distinct from ATM loss of function mutations. The checkpoint defective melanoma cell lines over-express PLK1, and a significant proportion of melanomas have high levels of PLK1 over-expression suggesting this defect is a common feature of melanomas. The inability of ATM to impose a cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage increases genomic instability. This work also suggests that the ATM-dependent checkpoint arrest is likely to be defective in a higher proportion of cancers than previously expected.

  10. Dioxin induces genomic instability in mouse embryonic fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merja Korkalainen

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation and certain other exposures have been shown to induce genomic instability (GI, i.e., delayed genetic damage observed many cell generations later in the progeny of the exposed cells. The aim of this study was to investigate induction of GI by a nongenotoxic carcinogen, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (C3H10T1/2 were exposed to 1, 10 or 100 nM TCDD for 2 days. Micronuclei (MN and expression of selected cancer-related genes were assayed both immediately and at a delayed point in time (8 days. For comparison, similar experiments were done with cadmium, a known genotoxic agent. TCDD treatment induced an elevated frequency of MN at 8 days, but not directly after the exposure. TCDD-induced alterations in gene expression were also mostly delayed, with more changes observed at 8 days than at 2 days. Exposure to cadmium produced an opposite pattern of responses, with pronounced effects immediately after exposure but no increase in MN and few gene expression changes at 8 days. Although all responses to TCDD alone were delayed, menadione-induced DNA damage (measured by the Comet assay, was found to be increased directly after a 2-day TCDD exposure, indicating that the stability of the genome was compromised already at this time point. The results suggested a flat dose-response relationship consistent with dose-response data reported for radiation-induced GI. These findings indicate that TCDD, although not directly genotoxic, induces GI, which is associated with impaired DNA damage response.

  11. Role of microRNAs and DNA methyltransferases in transmitting induced genomic instability between cell generations

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    Katriina eHuumonen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available There is limited understanding of how radiation or chemicals induce genomic instability, and how the instability is epigenetically transmitted to the progeny of exposed cells or organisms. Here we measured the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs and DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs in murine embryonal fibroblasts exposed to ionizing radiation or 2,3,7,8 -tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, which were previously shown to induce genomic instability in this cell line. Cadmium was used as a reference agent that does not induce genomic instability in our experimental model. Measurements at 8 and 15 days after exposure did not identify any such persistent changes that could be considered as signals transmitting genomic instability to the progeny of exposed cells. However, measurements at 2 days after exposure revealed findings that may reflect initial stages of genomic instability. Changes that were common to TCDD and two doses of radiation (but not to cadmium included 5 candidate signature miRNAs and general up-regulation of miRNA expression. Expression of DNMT3a, DNMT3b and DNMT2 were suppressed by cadmium but not by TCDD or radiation, consistently with the hypothesis that sufficient expression of DNMTs is necessary in the initial phase of induced genomic instability.

  12. Genomic instability of gold nanoparticle treated human lung fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jasmine J; Lo, Soo-Ling; Ng, Cheng-Teng; Gurung, Resham Lal; Hartono, Deny; Hande, Manoor Prakash; Ong, Choon-Nam; Bay, Boon-Huat; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2011-08-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are one of the most versatile and widely researched materials for novel biomedical applications. However, the current knowledge in their toxicological profile is still incomplete and many on-going investigations aim to understand the potential adverse effects in human body. Here, we employed two dimensional gel electrophoresis to perform a comparative proteomic analysis of AuNP treated MRC-5 lung fibroblast cells. In our findings, we identified 16 proteins that were differentially expressed in MRC-5 lung fibroblasts following exposure to AuNPs. Their expression levels were also verified by western blotting and real time RT-PCR analysis. Of interest was the difference in the oxidative stress related proteins (NADH ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDUFS1), protein disulfide isomerase associate 3 (PDIA3), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleus protein C1/C2 (hnRNP C1/C2) and thioredoxin-like protein 1 (TXNL1)) as well as proteins associated with cell cycle regulation, cytoskeleton and DNA repair (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleus protein C1/C2 (hnRNP C1/C2) and Secernin-1 (SCN1)). This finding is consistent with the genotoxicity observed in the AuNP treated lung fibroblasts. These results suggest that AuNP treatment can induce oxidative stress-mediated genomic instability.

  13. Assessing Whether Oil Dependency in Venezuela Contributes to National Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Kott

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is on what role, if any, oil has on Venezuela's instability. When trying to explain why a resource-rich country experiences slow or negative growth, experts often point to the resource curse. The following pages explore the traditional theory behind the resource curse as well as alternative perspectives to this theory such as ownership structure and the correlation between oil prices and democracy. This article also explores the various forms of instability within Venezuela and their causes. Finally, the article looks at President Hugo Chavez's political and economic policies as well as the stagnation of the state oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA. This article dispels the myth that the resource curse is the source of destabilization in many resource dependent countries. Rather than a cause of instability, this phenomenon is a symptom of a much larger problem that is largely structural.

  14. Genomic instability caused by hepatitis B virus: into the hepatoma inferno.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Hsu, Jye-Lin; Su, Ih-Jen; Huang, Wenya

    2011-06-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is an important cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) worldwide, especially in Asia. HBV induces HCC through multiple oncogenic pathways. Hepatitis-induced hepatocyte inflammation and regeneration stimulates cell proliferation. The interplay between the viral and host factors activates oncogenic signaling pathways and triggers cell transformation. In this review, we summarize previous studies, which reported that HBV induces host genomic instability and that HBV-induced genomic instability is a significant factor that accelerates carcinogenesis. The various types of genomic changes in HBV-induced HCC--chromosomal instability, telomere attrition, and gene-level mutations--are reviewed. In addition, the two viral factors, HBx and the pre-S2 mutant large surface antigen, are discussed for their roles in promoting genomic instability as their main features as viral oncoproteins.

  15. BYSTANDER EFFECTS GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIAION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    Science.gov (United States)

    BYSTANDER EFFECTS, GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIATION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURESR. Julian PrestonEnvironmental Carcinogenesis Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N.C. 27711, USAThere ...

  16. Bloom syndrome, genomic instability and cancer: the SOS-like hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2006-05-08

    Bloom syndrome (BS) displays one of the strongest known correlations between chromosomal instability and an increased risk of malignancy at an early age. The prevention of genomic instability and cancer depends on a complex network of pathways induced in response to DNA damage and stalled replication forks, including cell-cycle checkpoints, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Several studies have demonstrated that BLM is involved in the cellular response to DNA damage and stalled replication forks. BLM interacts physically and functionally with several proteins involved in the maintenance of genome integrity and BLM is redistributed and/or phosphorylated in response to several genotoxic stresses. The data concerning the relationship between BLM and these cellular pathways are summarized and the role of BLM in the rescue of arrested replication forks is discussed. Moreover, I speculate that BLM deficiency is lethal, and that BLM-deficient cells escaping apoptotic death do so by constitutively inducing a bacterial SOS-like response including the induction of alternative replication pathway(s) dependent on recombination, contributing to the mutator and hyper-Rec phenotypes characteristic of BS cells. This mechanism may be dependent on the RAD51 gene family, and involved in carcinogenesis in the general population.

  17. Genomic instability and telomere fusion of canine osteosarcoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junko Maeda

    Full Text Available Canine osteosarcoma (OSA is known to present with highly variable and chaotic karyotypes, including hypodiploidy, hyperdiploidy, and increased numbers of metacentric chromosomes. The spectrum of genomic instabilities in canine OSA has significantly augmented the difficulty in clearly defining the biological and clinical significance of the observed cytogenetic abnormalities. In this study, eight canine OSA cell lines were used to investigate telomere fusions by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH using a peptide nucleotide acid probe. We characterized each cell line by classical cytogenetic studies and cellular phenotypes including telomere associated factors and then evaluated correlations from this data. All eight canine OSA cell lines displayed increased abnormal metacentric chromosomes and exhibited numerous telomere fusions and interstitial telomeric signals. Also, as evidence of unstable telomeres, colocalization of γ-H2AX and telomere signals in interphase cells was observed. Each cell line was characterized by a combination of data representing cellular doubling time, DNA content, chromosome number, metacentric chromosome frequency, telomere signal level, cellular radiosensitivity, and DNA-PKcs protein expression level. We have also studied primary cultures from 10 spontaneous canine OSAs. Based on the observation of telomere aberrations in those primary cell cultures, we are reasonably certain that our observations in cell lines are not an artifact of prolonged culture. A correlation between telomere fusions and the other characteristics analyzed in our study could not be identified. However, it is important to note that all of the canine OSA samples exhibiting telomere fusion utilized in our study were telomerase positive. Pending further research regarding telomerase negative canine OSA cell lines, our findings may suggest telomere fusions can potentially serve as a novel marker for canine OSA.

  18. The Impact of dUTPase on Ribonucleotide Reductase-Induced Genome Instability in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Wei Chen

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate supply of dNTPs is critical for cell growth and genome integrity. Here, we investigated the interrelationship between dUTP pyrophosphatase (dUTPase and ribonucleotide reductase (RNR in the regulation of genome stability. Our results demonstrate that reducing the expression of dUTPase increases genome stress in cancer. Analysis of clinical samples reveals a significant correlation between the combination of low dUTPase and high R2, a subunit of RNR, and a poor prognosis in colorectal and breast cancer patients. Furthermore, overexpression of R2 in non-tumorigenic cells progressively increases genome stress, promoting transformation. These cells display alterations in replication fork progression, elevated genomic uracil, and breaks at AT-rich common fragile sites. Consistently, overexpression of dUTPase abolishes R2-induced genome instability. Thus, the expression level of dUTPase determines the role of high R2 in driving genome instability in cancer cells.

  19. Is there a common mechanism underlying genomic instability, bystander effects and other nontargeted effects of exposure to ionizing radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A number of nontargeted and delayed effects associated with radiation exposure have now been described. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, death-inducing and bystander effects, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects. It is unlikely that these nontargeted effects are directly induced by cellular irradiation. Instead, it is proposed that some as yet to be identified secreted factor can be produced by irradiated cells that can stimulate effects in nonirradiated cells (death-inducing and bystander effects, clastogenic factors) and perpetuate genomic instability in the clonally expanded progeny of an irradiated cell. The proposed factor must be soluble and capable of being transported between cells by cell-to-cell gap junction communication channels. Furthermore, it must have the potential to stimulate cellular cytokines and/or reactive oxygen species. While it is difficult to imagine a role for such a secreted factor in contributing to transgenerational effects, the other nontargeted effects of radiation may all share a common mechanism.

  20. The X chromosome: does it have a role in Bloom syndrome, a genomic instability disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    The Bloom syndrome, caused by mutations in a single gene [BLM (15q26.1)], is a rare genomic instability syndrome. Despite its autosomal recessive transmission, it shows a male dominance, suggesting the possibility of a subgroup with X-linked recessive inheritance. In view of the latest molecular developments achieved in the other genomic instability syndromes, the potential functions of the X chromosome in maintaining genomic stability, and particularly, the first clues of Bloom syndrome development by mechanisms other than the BLM, we suggest herein that the X chromosome should be investigated in Bloom syndrome.

  1. Contributions of microtubule dynamic instability and rotational diffusion to kinetochore capture

    CERN Document Server

    Blackwell, Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Gergely, Zachary R; Flynn, Patrick J; Montes, Salvador; Crapo, Ammon; Doostan, Alireza; McIntosh, J Richard; Glaser, Matthew A; Betterton, Meredith D

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule dynamic instability allows search and capture of kinetochores during spindle formation, an important process for accurate chromosome segregation during cell division. Recent work has found that microtubule rotational diffusion about minus-end attachment points contributes to kinetochore capture in fission yeast, but the relative contributions of dynamic instability and rotational diffusion are not well understood. We have developed a biophysical model of kinetochore capture in small fission-yeast nuclei using hybrid Brownian dynamics/kinetic Monte Carlo simulation techniques. With this model, we have studied the importance of dynamic instability and microtubule rotational diffusion for kinetochore capture, both to the lateral surface of a microtubule and at or near its end. Over a range of biologically relevant parameters, microtubule rotational diffusion decreased capture time, but made a relatively small contribution compared to dynamic instability. At most, rotational diffusion reduced capture ...

  2. Genomic instability of human embryonic stem cell lines using different passaging culture methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosca, Lucie; Feraud, Olivier; Magniez, Aurélie; Bas, Cécile; Griscelli, Frank; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells exhibit genomic instability that can be related to culture duration or to the passaging methods used for cell dissociation. In order to study the impact of cell dissociation techniques on human embryonic stem cells genomic instability, we cultured H1 and H9 human embryonic stem cells lines using mechanical/manual or enzymatic/collagenase-IV dissociation methods. Genomic instability was evaluated at early (p60) passages by using oligonucleotide based array-comparative genomic hybridization 105 K with a mean resolution of 50 Kb. DNA variations were mainly located on subtelomeric and pericentromeric regions with sizes <100 Kb. In this study, 9 recurrent genomic variations were acquired during culture including the well known duplication 20q11.21. When comparing cell dissociation methods, we found no significant differences between DNA variations number and size, DNA gain or DNA loss frequencies, homozygous loss frequencies and no significant difference on the content of genes involved in development, cell cycle tumorigenesis and syndrome disease. In addition, we have never found any malignant tissue in 4 different teratoma representative of the two independent stem cell lines. These results show that the occurrence of genomic instability in human embryonic stem cells is similar using mechanical or collagenase IV-based enzymatic cell culture dissociation methods. All the observed genomic variations have no impact on the development of malignancy.

  3. Induction of genomic instability and activation of autophagy in artificial human aneuploid cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ariyoshi, Kentaro [Hirosaki University, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan); Miura, Tomisato; Kasai, Kosuke; Fujishima, Yohei [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Health Sciences, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan); Oshimura, Mitsuo [Chromosome Engineering Research Center (CERC), Tottori University, Nishicho 86, Yonago, Tottori 683-8503 (Japan); Yoshida, Mitsuaki A., E-mail: ariyoshi@hirosaki-u.ac.jp [Hirosaki University, Institute of Radiation Emergency Medicine, 66-1 Hon-cho, Hirosaki 036-8564 (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. • Increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploid clones. • Inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. • Intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones. - Abstract: Chromosome missegregation can lead to a change in chromosome number known as aneuploidy. Although aneuploidy is a known hallmark of cancer cells, the various mechanisms by which altered gene and/or DNA copy number facilitate tumorigenesis remain unclear. To understand the effect of aneuploidy occurring in non-tumorigenic human breast epithelial cells, we generated clones harboring artificial aneuploidy using microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. Our results demonstrate that clones with artificial aneuploidy of chromosome 8 or chromosome 22 both show inhibited proliferation and genomic instability. Also, the increased autophagy was observed in the artificially aneuploidy clones, and inhibition of autophagy resulted in increased genomic instability and DNA damage. In addition, the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species were up-regulated in the artificially aneuploid clones, and inhibition of autophagy further increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Together, these results suggest that even a single extraneous chromosome can induce genomic instability, and that autophagy triggered by aneuploidy-induced stress is a mechanism to protect cells bearing abnormal chromosome number.

  4. Hip instability: a review of hip dysplasia and other contributing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraeutler, Matthew J; Garabekyan, Tigran; Pascual-Garrido, Cecilia; Mei-Dan, Omer

    2016-01-01

    Hip instability has classically been associated with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) in newborns and children. However, numerous factors may contribute to hip instability in children, adolescents, and adults. This review aims to concisely present the literature on hip instability in patients of all ages in order to guide health care professionals in the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of the various disorders which may contribute to an unstable hip. We reviewed the literature on the diagnosis and surgical management of hip dysplasia and other causes of hip instability. Multiple intra- and extra-articular variables may contribute to hip instability, including acetabular bony coverage, femoral torsion, femoroacetabular impingement, and soft tissue laxity. Physical examination and advanced imaging studies are essential to accurately diagnose the pathology contributing to a patient's unstable hip. Conservative management, including activity modification and physical therapy, may be used as a first-line treatment in patients with intra-articular hip pathology. Patients who continue to experience symptoms of pain or instability should proceed with arthroscopic or open surgical treatment aimed at correcting the underlying pathology. V.

  5. Genomic instability in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a new step towards precision medicine and novel therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ibrahim H; Lowery, Maeve A; Stadler, Zsofia K; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Kelsen, David P; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most challenging cancers. Whole genome sequencing studies have been conducted to elucidate the underlying fundamentals underscoring disease behavior. Studies have identified a subgroup of pancreatic cancer patients with distinct molecular and clinical features. Genetic fingerprinting of these tumors is consistent with an unstable genome and defective DNA repair pathways, which creates unique susceptibility to agents inducing DNA damage. BRCA1/2 mutations, both germline and somatic, which lead to impaired DNA repair, are found to be important biomarkers of genomic instability as well as of response to DNA damaging agents. Recent studies have elucidated that PARP inhibitors and platinum agents may be effective to induce tumor regression in solid tumors bearing an unstable genome including pancreatic cancer. In this review we discuss the characteristics of genomic instability in pancreatic cancer along with its clinical implications and the utility of DNA targeting agents particularly PARP inhibitors as a novel treatment approach.

  6. Loss of RMI2 Increases Genome Instability and Causes a Bloom-Like Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Damien F; Amor, David J; Boys, Amber; Butler, Kathy; Williams, Lorna; Zhang, Tao; Kalitsis, Paul

    2016-12-01

    Bloom syndrome is a recessive human genetic disorder with features of genome instability, growth deficiency and predisposition to cancer. The only known causative gene is the BLM helicase that is a member of a protein complex along with topoisomerase III alpha, RMI1 and 2, which maintains replication fork stability and dissolves double Holliday junctions to prevent genome instability. Here we report the identification of a second gene, RMI2, that is deleted in affected siblings with Bloom-like features. Cells from homozygous individuals exhibit elevated rates of sister chromatid exchange, anaphase DNA bridges and micronuclei. Similar genome and chromosome instability phenotypes are observed in independently derived RMI2 knockout cells. In both patient and knockout cell lines reduced localisation of BLM to ultra fine DNA bridges and FANCD2 at foci linking bridges are observed. Overall, loss of RMI2 produces a partially active BLM complex with mild features of Bloom syndrome.

  7. Coping with antibiotic resistance: contributions from genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Rossolini, G.; Thaller, M.

    2010-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a public health issue of global dimensions with a significant impact on morbidity, mortality and healthcare-associated costs. The problem has recently been worsened by the steady increase in multiresistant strains and by the restriction of antibiotic discovery and development programs. Recent advances in the field of bacterial genomics will further current knowledge on antibiotic resistance and help to tackle the problem. Bacterial genomics and transcriptomics can inf...

  8. Ectopic expression of cancer/testis antigen SSX2 induces DNA damage and promotes genomic instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Lindgreen, Jonas; Terp, Mikkel Green

    2015-01-01

    replication stress translates into mitotic defects and genomic instability. Arrest of cell growth and induction of DNA double-strand breaks was also observed in MCF7 breast cancer cells in response to SSX2 expression. Additionally, MCF7 cells with ectopic SSX2 expression demonstrated typical signs...... of SSX2 expression in melanoma cell lines demonstrated that SSX2 supports the growth of melanoma cells. Our results reveal two important phenotypes of ectopic SSX2 expression that may drive/support tumorigenesis: First, immediate induction of genomic instability, and second, long-term support of tumor...

  9. Genomic instability and bystander effects: a paradigm shift in radiation biology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2002-01-01

    A basic paradigm in radiobiology is that, following exposure to ionizing radiation, the deposition of energy in the cell nucleus and the resulting damage to DNA, the principal target, are responsible for the radiation's deleterious biological effects. Findings in two rapidly expanding fields of research--radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects--have caused us to reevaluate these central tenets. In this article, the potential influence of induced genomic instability and bystander effects on cellular injury after exposure to low-level radiation will be reviewed.

  10. Role of DNA Polymerases in Repeat-Mediated Genome Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik A. Shah

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Expansions of simple DNA repeats cause numerous hereditary diseases in humans. We analyzed the role of DNA polymerases in the instability of Friedreich’s ataxia (GAAn repeats in a yeast experimental system. The elementary step of expansion corresponded to ∼160 bp in the wild-type strain, matching the size of Okazaki fragments in yeast. This step increased when DNA polymerase α was mutated, suggesting a link between the scale of expansions and Okazaki fragment size. Expandable repeats strongly elevated the rate of mutations at substantial distances around them, a phenomenon we call repeat-induced mutagenesis (RIM. Notably, defects in the replicative DNA polymerases δ and ∊ strongly increased rates for both repeat expansions and RIM. The increases in repeat-mediated instability observed in DNA polymerase δ mutants depended on translesion DNA polymerases. We conclude that repeat expansions and RIM are two sides of the same replicative mechanism.

  11. Detection of genomic instability in hypospadias patients by random ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DIRECTOR

    2011-05-16

    May 16, 2011 ... in situ hybridization, comparative genomic hybridization. (CGH) and ... Gene Genius Bio Imaging System (Syngene; Frederick, Maryland,. USA). .... molecular genetic case control studies with high and low hypospadias grade ...

  12. Human embryonic stem cells reveal recurrent genomic instability at 20q11.21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefort, Nathalie; Feyeux, Maxime; Bas, Cécile; Féraud, Olivier; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Tachdjian, Gerard; Peschanski, Marc; Perrier, Anselme L

    2008-12-01

    By analyzing five human embryonic stem (hES) cell lines over long-term culture, we identified a recurrent genomic instability in the human genome. An amplification of 2.5-4.6 Mb at 20q11.21, encompassing approximately 23 genes in common, was detected in four cell lines of different origins. This amplification, which has been associated with oncogenic transformation, may provide a selective advantage to hES cells in culture.

  13. LTR retrotransposons contribute to genomic gigantism in plethodontid salamanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Cheng; Shepard, Donald B; Chong, Rebecca A; López Arriaza, José; Hall, Kathryn; Castoe, Todd A; Feschotte, Cédric; Pollock, David D; Mueller, Rachel Lockridge

    2012-01-01

    Among vertebrates, most of the largest genomes are found within the salamanders, a clade of amphibians that includes 613 species. Salamander genome sizes range from ~14 to ~120 Gb. Because genome size is correlated with nucleus and cell sizes, as well as other traits, morphological evolution in salamanders has been profoundly affected by genomic gigantism. However, the molecular mechanisms driving genomic expansion in this clade remain largely unknown. Here, we present the first comparative analysis of transposable element (TE) content in salamanders. Using high-throughput sequencing, we generated genomic shotgun data for six species from the Plethodontidae, the largest family of salamanders. We then developed a pipeline to mine TE sequences from shotgun data in taxa with limited genomic resources, such as salamanders. Our summaries of overall TE abundance and diversity for each species demonstrate that TEs make up a substantial portion of salamander genomes, and that all of the major known types of TEs are represented in salamanders. The most abundant TE superfamilies found in the genomes of our six focal species are similar, despite substantial variation in genome size. However, our results demonstrate a major difference between salamanders and other vertebrates: salamander genomes contain much larger amounts of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons, primarily Ty3/gypsy elements. Thus, the extreme increase in genome size that occurred in salamanders was likely accompanied by a shift in TE landscape. These results suggest that increased proliferation of LTR retrotransposons was a major molecular mechanism contributing to genomic expansion in salamanders.

  14. Heavy ions, radioprotectors and genomic instability: implications for human space exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziegielewski, Jaroslaw; Goetz, Wilfried; Baulch, Janet E

    2010-08-01

    The risk associated with space radiation exposure is unique from terrestrial radiation exposures due to differences in radiation quality, including linear energy transfer (LET). Both high- and low-LET radiations are capable of inducing genomic instability in mammalian cells, and this instability is thought to be a driving force underlying radiation carcinogenesis. Unfortunately, during space exploration, flight crews cannot entirely avoid radiation exposure. As a result, chemical and biological countermeasures will be an important component of successful extended missions such as the exploration of Mars. There are currently several radioprotective agents (radioprotectors) in use; however, scientists continue to search for ideal radioprotective compounds-safe to use and effective in preventing and/or reducing acute and delayed effects of irradiation. This review discusses the agents that are currently available or being evaluated for their potential as radioprotectors. Further, this review discusses some implications of radioprotection for the induction and/or propagation of genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells.

  15. Genomic instability and tumorigenic induction in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells by heavy ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, T. K.; Piao, C. Q.; Wu, L. J.; Willey, J. C.; Hall, E. J.

    1998-11-01

    Carcinogenesis is postulated to be a progressive multistage process characterized by an increase in genomic instability and clonal selection with each mutational event endowing a selective growth advantage. Genomic instability as manifested by the amplification of specific gene fragments is common among tumor and transformed cells. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 1GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions or 150 keV/μm alpha particles. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Tumorigenic cells showed neither ras mutations nor deletion in the p16 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, they harbored mutations in the p53 gene and over-expressed cyclin D1. Genomic instability among transformed cells at various stage of the carcinogenic process was examined based on frequencies of PALA resistance. Incidence of genomic instability was highest among established tumor cell lines relative to transformed, non-tumorigenic and control cell lines. Treatment of BEP2D cells with a 4 mM dose of the aminothiol WR-1065 significantly reduced their neoplastic transforming response to 56Fe particles. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of human epithelial cells by heavy ions.

  16. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-DoseCancer Responses.There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellularresponses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  17. BYSTANDERS, ADAPTIVE RESPONSES AND GENOMIC INSTABILITY - POTENTIAL MODIFIERS OF LOW-DOSE CANCER RESPONSES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bystanders, Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability -Potential Modifiers ofLow-DoseCancer Responses.There has been a concerted effort in the field of radiation biology to better understand cellularresponses that could have an impact on the estin1ation of cancer...

  18. A weak balance: the contribution of muscle weakness to postural instability and falls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horlings, C.G.; Engelen, B.G.M. van; Allum, J.H.; Bloem, B.R.

    2008-01-01

    Muscle strength is a potentially important factor contributing to postural control. In this article, we consider the influence of muscle weakness on postural instability and falling. We searched the literature for research evaluating muscle weakness as a risk factor for falls in community-dwelling e

  19. Gastric cancers of Western European and African patients show different patterns of genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mulder Chris JJ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with H. pylori is important in the etiology of gastric cancer. Gastric cancer is infrequent in Africa, despite high frequencies of H. pylori infection, referred to as the African enigma. Variation in environmental and host factors influencing gastric cancer risk between different populations have been reported but little is known about the biological differences between gastric cancers from different geographic locations. We aim to study genomic instability patterns of gastric cancers obtained from patients from United Kingdom (UK and South Africa (SA, in an attempt to support the African enigma hypothesis at the biological level. Methods DNA was isolated from 67 gastric adenocarcinomas, 33 UK patients, 9 Caucasian SA patients and 25 native SA patients. Microsatellite instability and chromosomal instability were analyzed by PCR and microarray comparative genomic hybridization, respectively. Data was analyzed by supervised univariate and multivariate analyses as well as unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis. Results Tumors from Caucasian and native SA patients showed significantly more microsatellite instable tumors (p Conclusions Gastric cancers from SA and UK patients show differences in genetic instability patterns, indicating possible different biological mechanisms in patients from different geographical origin. This is of future clinical relevance for stratification of gastric cancer therapy.

  20. Hypomethylation and Genetic Instability in Monosomy Blastocysts May Contribute to Decreased Implantation Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blair R McCallie

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a key epigenetic mechanism responsible for gene regulation, chromatin remodeling, and genome stability, playing a fundamental role during embryonic development. The aim of this study was to determine if these epigenetic marks are associated with chromosomal aneuploidy in human blastocysts. Surplus, cryopreserved blastocysts that were donated to research with IRB consent were chosen with varying chromosomal aneuploidies and respective implantation potential: monosomies and trisomies 7, 11, 15, 21, and 22. DNA methylation analysis was performed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (~485,000 CpG sites. The methylation profiles of these human blastocysts were found to be similar across all samples, independent of chromosome constitution; however, more detailed examination identified significant hypomethylation in the chromosome involved in the monosomy. Real-time PCR was also performed to determine if downstream messenger RNA (mRNA was affected for genes on the monosomy chromosome. Gene dysregulation was observed for monosomy blastocysts within significant regions of hypo-methylation (AVEN, CYFIP1, FAM189A1, MYO9A, ADM2, PACSIN2, PARVB, and PIWIL3 (P < 0.05. Additional analysis was performed to examine the gene expression profiles of associated methylation regulators including: DNA methyltransferases (DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, DNMT3L, chromatin modifying regulators (CSNK1E, KDM1, PRKCA, and a post-translational modifier (PRMT5. Decreased RNA transcription was confirmed for each DNMT, and the regulators that impact DNMT activity, for only monosomy blastocysts (P < 0.05. In summary, monosomy blastocysts displayed hypomethylation for the chromosome involved in the error, as well as transcription alterations of associated developmental genes. Together, these modifications may be contributing to genetic instability and therefore be responsible for the limited implantation potential observed for full monosomy

  1. Frequently mutated genes/pathways and genomic instability as prevention targets in liver cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Chinthalapally V; Asch, Adam S; Yamada, Hiroshi Y

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of liver cancer has increased in recent years. Worldwide, liver cancer is common: more than 600000 related deaths are estimated each year. In the USA, about 27170 deaths due to liver cancer are estimated for 2016. Liver cancer is highly resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. For all stages combined, the 5-year survival rate is 15-17%, leaving much to be desired for liver cancer prevention and therapy. Heterogeneity, which can originate from genomic instability, is one reason for poor outcome. About 80-90% of liver cancers are hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), and recent cancer genome sequencing studies have revealed frequently mutated genes in HCC. In this review, we discuss the cause of the tumor heterogeneity based on the functions of genes that are frequently mutated in HCC. We overview the functions of the genes that are most frequently mutated (e.g. TP53, CTNNB1, AXIN1, ARID1A and WWP1) that portray major pathways leading to HCC and identify the roles of these genes in preventing genomic instability. Notably, the pathway analysis suggested that oxidative stress management may be critical to prevent accumulation of DNA damage and further mutations. We propose that both chromosome instability (CIN) and microsatellite instability (MIN) are integral to the hepatic carcinogenesis process leading to heterogeneity in HCC and that the pathways leading to heterogeneity may be targeted for prognosis, prevention and treatment.

  2. Initiation of genome instability and preneoplastic processes through loss of Fhit expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C Saldivar

    Full Text Available Genomic instability drives tumorigenesis, but how it is initiated in sporadic neoplasias is unknown. In early preneoplasias, alterations at chromosome fragile sites arise due to DNA replication stress. A frequent, perhaps earliest, genetic alteration in preneoplasias is deletion within the fragile FRA3B/FHIT locus, leading to loss of Fhit protein expression. Because common chromosome fragile sites are exquisitely sensitive to replication stress, it has been proposed that their clonal alterations in cancer cells are due to stress sensitivity rather than to a selective advantage imparted by loss of expression of fragile gene products. Here, we show in normal, transformed, and cancer-derived cell lines that Fhit-depletion causes replication stress-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Using DNA combing, we observed a defect in replication fork progression in Fhit-deficient cells that stemmed primarily from fork stalling and collapse. The likely mechanism for the role of Fhit in replication fork progression is through regulation of Thymidine kinase 1 expression and thymidine triphosphate pool levels; notably, restoration of nucleotide balance rescued DNA replication defects and suppressed DNA breakage in Fhit-deficient cells. Depletion of Fhit did not activate the DNA damage response nor cause cell cycle arrest, allowing continued cell proliferation and ongoing chromosomal instability. This finding was in accord with in vivo studies, as Fhit knockout mouse tissue showed no evidence of cell cycle arrest or senescence yet exhibited numerous somatic DNA copy number aberrations at replication stress-sensitive loci. Furthermore, cells established from Fhit knockout tissue showed rapid immortalization and selection of DNA deletions and amplifications, including amplification of the Mdm2 gene, suggesting that Fhit loss-induced genome instability facilitates transformation. We propose that loss of Fhit expression in precancerous lesions is the first step in the

  3. Initiation of genome instability and preneoplastic processes through loss of Fhit expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C Saldivar

    Full Text Available Genomic instability drives tumorigenesis, but how it is initiated in sporadic neoplasias is unknown. In early preneoplasias, alterations at chromosome fragile sites arise due to DNA replication stress. A frequent, perhaps earliest, genetic alteration in preneoplasias is deletion within the fragile FRA3B/FHIT locus, leading to loss of Fhit protein expression. Because common chromosome fragile sites are exquisitely sensitive to replication stress, it has been proposed that their clonal alterations in cancer cells are due to stress sensitivity rather than to a selective advantage imparted by loss of expression of fragile gene products. Here, we show in normal, transformed, and cancer-derived cell lines that Fhit-depletion causes replication stress-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Using DNA combing, we observed a defect in replication fork progression in Fhit-deficient cells that stemmed primarily from fork stalling and collapse. The likely mechanism for the role of Fhit in replication fork progression is through regulation of Thymidine kinase 1 expression and thymidine triphosphate pool levels; notably, restoration of nucleotide balance rescued DNA replication defects and suppressed DNA breakage in Fhit-deficient cells. Depletion of Fhit did not activate the DNA damage response nor cause cell cycle arrest, allowing continued cell proliferation and ongoing chromosomal instability. This finding was in accord with in vivo studies, as Fhit knockout mouse tissue showed no evidence of cell cycle arrest or senescence yet exhibited numerous somatic DNA copy number aberrations at replication stress-sensitive loci. Furthermore, cells established from Fhit knockout tissue showed rapid immortalization and selection of DNA deletions and amplifications, including amplification of the Mdm2 gene, suggesting that Fhit loss-induced genome instability facilitates transformation. We propose that loss of Fhit expression in precancerous lesions is the first step in the

  4. Kynurenine signaling increases DNA polymerase kappa expression and promotes genomic instability in glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostian, April C.L.; Maddukuri, Leena; Reed, Megan R.; Savenka, Tatsiana; Hartman, Jessica H.; Davis, Lauren; Pouncey, Dakota L.; Miller, Grover P.; Eoff, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of the translesion synthesis polymerase (TLS pol) hpol κ in glioblastomas has been linked to a poor patient prognosis; however, the mechanism promoting higher expression in these tumors remains unknown. We determined that activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway in glioblastoma cells leads to increased hpol κ mRNA and protein levels. We blocked nuclear translocation and DNA binding by the AhR in glioblastoma cells using a small-molecule and observed decreased hpol κ expression. Pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), the enzyme largely responsible for activating the AhR in glioblastomas, led to a decrease in the endogenous AhR agonist kynurenine (Kyn) and a corresponding decrease in hpol κ protein levels. Importantly, we discovered that inhibiting TDO activity, AhR signaling, or suppressing hpol κ expression with RNA interference led to decreased chromosomal damage in glioblastoma cells. Epistasis assays further supported the idea that TDO activity, activation of AhR signaling and the resulting over-expression of hpol κ function primarily in the same pathway to increase endogenous DNA damage. These findings indicate that up-regulation of hpol κ through glioblastoma-specific TDO activity and activation of AhR signaling likely contributes to the high levels of replication stress and genomic instability observed in these tumors. PMID:26651356

  5. An update on the mechanisms and pathophysiological consequences of genomic instability with a focus on ionizing radiation

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    Streffer C

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Christian Streffer Institute for Medical Radiobiology, University Clinics Essen, Essen, Germany Abstract: The genome of eukaryotic cells is generally instable. DNA damage occurs by endogenous processes and exogenous toxic agents. The efficient DNA repair pathways conserve the genetic information to a large extent throughout the life. However, exposure to genotoxic agents can increase the genomic instability. This phenomenon develops in a delayed manner after approximately 20 and more cell generations. It is comparatively thoroughly investigated after the exposure to ionizing radiation. The increase of genomic instability has been observed after exposures to ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo as well as with many different types of radiation. The effect is induced over a wide dose range, and it has been found with cell death, chromosomal damage, cell transformations, mutations, double-strand breaks, malformations, and cancers. No specific chromosomes or genomic sites have been observed for such events. The increased genomic instability can be transmitted to the next generation. Possible mechanisms such as oxidative stress (mitochondria may be involved, reduced DNA repair, changes in telomeres, epigenetic effects are discussed. A second wave of oxidative stress has been observed after radiation exposures with considerably high doses as well as with cytotoxic agents at time periods when an increased genomic instability was seen. However, the increase of genomic instability also happens to much lower radiation doses. Hypoxia induces an increase of genomic instability. This effect is apparently connected with a reduction of DNA repair. Changes of telomeres appear as the most probable mechanisms for the increase of genomic instability. Syndromes have been described with a genetic predisposition for high radiosensitivity. These individuals show an increase of cancer, a deficient DNA repair, a disturbed regulation of the cell cycle, and an

  6. Transgenerational genomic instability in children of irradiated parents as a result of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghajanyan, Anna, E-mail: ann-aghajanyan@yandex.ru [Cytogenetics Laboratory, FSI Russian Scientific Center of Roentgenology and Radiology, Profsoyuznaya 86, GSP-7, Moscow, 117997 (Russian Federation); Suskov, Igor [Laboratory of Ecological Genetics, N.I. Vavilov Institute of General Genetics Russian Academy of Sciences, Gybkin st. 3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2009-12-01

    The study of families irradiated as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant revealed significantly increased aberrant genomes frequencies (AGFs) not only in irradiated parents (n = 106, p < 0.01), but also in their children born after the accident (n = 159, p < 0.05). This is an indicative of the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability. To elucidate this phenomenon, experiments were undertaken to model genomic instability by using single and fractional in vitro {gamma}-irradiation ({sup 137}Cs) of peripheral blood samples from the children and their parents at doses of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 Gy. The spectrum and frequency of chromosome aberrations were studied in the 1st and 2nd cell generations. The average AGF was significantly increased at all doses (except 0.1 Gy) in children of irradiated parents, as compared to children born from non-irradiated parents. Amplification of cells with single-break chromosome aberrations in mitosis 2, as compared to mitosis 1, suggests the replication mechanism of realization of potential damage in DNA and the occurrence of genomic instability in succeeding cell generations.

  7. Lack of major genome instability in tumors of p53 null rats.

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    Roel Hermsen

    Full Text Available Tumorigenesis is often associated with loss of tumor suppressor genes (such as TP53, genomic instability and telomere lengthening. Previously, we generated and characterized a rat p53 knockout model in which the homozygous rats predominantly develop hemangiosarcomas whereas the heterozygous rats mainly develop osteosarcomas. Using genome-wide analyses, we find that the tumors that arise in the heterozygous and homozygous Tp53C273X mutant animals are also different in their genomic instability profiles. While p53 was fully inactivated in both heterozygous and homozygous knockout rats, tumors from homozygous animals show very limited aneuploidy and low degrees of somatic copy number variation as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. In addition, complex structural rearrangements such as chromothripsis and breakage-fusion-bridge cycles were never found in tumors from homozygous animals, while these were readily detectable in tumors from heterozygous animals. Finally, we measured telomere length and telomere lengthening pathway activity and found that tumors of homozygous animals have longer telomeres but do not show clear telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT activity differences as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. Taken together, our results demonstrate that host p53 status in this rat p53 knockout model has a large effect on both tumor type and genomic instability characteristics, where full loss of functional p53 is not the main driver of large-scale structural variations. Our results also suggest that chromothripsis primarily occurs under p53 heterozygous rather than p53 null conditions.

  8. Lack of major genome instability in tumors of p53 null rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, Roel; Toonen, Pim; Kuijk, Ewart; Youssef, Sameh A; Kuiper, Raoul; van Heesch, Sebastiaan; de Bruin, Alain; Cuppen, Edwin; Simonis, Marieke

    2015-01-01

    Tumorigenesis is often associated with loss of tumor suppressor genes (such as TP53), genomic instability and telomere lengthening. Previously, we generated and characterized a rat p53 knockout model in which the homozygous rats predominantly develop hemangiosarcomas whereas the heterozygous rats mainly develop osteosarcomas. Using genome-wide analyses, we find that the tumors that arise in the heterozygous and homozygous Tp53C273X mutant animals are also different in their genomic instability profiles. While p53 was fully inactivated in both heterozygous and homozygous knockout rats, tumors from homozygous animals show very limited aneuploidy and low degrees of somatic copy number variation as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. In addition, complex structural rearrangements such as chromothripsis and breakage-fusion-bridge cycles were never found in tumors from homozygous animals, while these were readily detectable in tumors from heterozygous animals. Finally, we measured telomere length and telomere lengthening pathway activity and found that tumors of homozygous animals have longer telomeres but do not show clear telomerase or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) activity differences as compared to the tumors from heterozygous animals. Taken together, our results demonstrate that host p53 status in this rat p53 knockout model has a large effect on both tumor type and genomic instability characteristics, where full loss of functional p53 is not the main driver of large-scale structural variations. Our results also suggest that chromothripsis primarily occurs under p53 heterozygous rather than p53 null conditions.

  9. Autophagy-independent senescence and genome instability driven by targeted telomere dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Florie A; Debnath, Jayanta; Stohr, Bradley A

    2015-01-01

    Telomere dysfunction plays a complex role in tumorigenesis. While dysfunctional telomeres can block the proliferation of incipient cancer clones by inducing replicative senescence, fusion of dysfunctional telomeres can drive genome instability and oncogenic genomic rearrangements. Therefore, it is important to define the regulatory pathways that guide these opposing effects. Recent work has shown that the autophagy pathway regulates both senescence and genome instability in various contexts. Here, we apply models of acute telomere dysfunction to determine whether autophagy modulates the resulting genome instability and senescence responses. While telomere dysfunction rapidly induces autophagic flux in human fibroblast cell lines, inhibition of the autophagy pathway does not have a significant impact upon the transition to senescence, in contrast to what has previously been reported for oncogene-induced senescence. Our results suggest that this difference may be explained by disparities in the development of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. We also show that chromosome fusions induced by telomere dysfunction are comparable in autophagy-proficient and autophagy-deficient cells. Altogether, our results highlight the complexity of the senescence-autophagy interface and indicate that autophagy induction is unlikely to play a significant role in telomere dysfunction-driven senescence and chromosome fusions.

  10. Opposite roles for p38MAPK-driven responses and reactive oxygen species in the persistence and resolution of radiation-induced genomic instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Werner

    Full Text Available We report the functional and temporal relationship between cellular phenotypes such as oxidative stress, p38MAPK-dependent responses and genomic instability persisting in the progeny of cells exposed to sparsely ionizing low-Linear Energy Transfer (LET radiation such as X-rays or high-charge and high-energy (HZE particle high-LET radiation such as (56Fe ions. We found that exposure to low and high-LET radiation increased reactive oxygen species (ROS levels as a threshold-like response induced independently of radiation quality and dose. This response was sustained for two weeks, which is the period of time when genomic instability is evidenced by increased micronucleus formation frequency and DNA damage associated foci. Indicators for another persisting response sharing phenotypes with stress-induced senescence, including beta galactosidase induction, increased nuclear size, p38MAPK activation and IL-8 production, were induced in the absence of cell proliferation arrest during the first, but not the second week following exposure to high-LET radiation. This response was driven by a p38MAPK-dependent mechanism and was affected by radiation quality and dose. This stress response and elevation of ROS affected genomic instability by distinct pathways. Through interference with p38MAPK activity, we show that radiation-induced stress phenotypes promote genomic instability. In contrast, exposure to physiologically relevant doses of hydrogen peroxide or increasing endogenous ROS levels with a catalase inhibitor reduced the level of genomic instability. Our results implicate persistently elevated ROS following exposure to radiation as a factor contributing to genome stabilization.

  11. Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dynan, William S. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2016-11-14

    The goal of this study was to examine long-term effects of low-dose radiation exposure. One of the hypotheses was that radiation exposure would accelerate the normal aging process. The study was jointly funded by NASA and examined both low-LET radiation (γ-rays) and high-LET radiation (1000 MeV/nucleon 56Fe ions) at doses of 0.1 Gy and up. The work used the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes), as a vertebrate model organism that can be maintained in large numbers at low cost for lifetime studies. Like other small laboratory fish, Japanese medaka share many anatomical and histological characteristics with other vertebrates, and a variety of genetic and genomic resources are available. Some work also used the zebrafish (Danio rerio), another widely used laboratory model organism.

  12. Ectopic expression of cancer/testis antigen SSX2 induces DNA damage and promotes genomic instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Lindgreen, Jonas; Terp, Mikkel Green

    2015-01-01

    replication stress translates into mitotic defects and genomic instability. Arrest of cell growth and induction of DNA double-strand breaks was also observed in MCF7 breast cancer cells in response to SSX2 expression. Additionally, MCF7 cells with ectopic SSX2 expression demonstrated typical signs......SSX cancer/testis antigens are frequently expressed in melanoma tumors and represent attractive targets for immunotherapy, but their role in melanoma tumorigenesis has remained elusive. Here, we investigated the cellular effects of SSX2 expression. In A375 melanoma cells, SSX2 expression resulted...... of SSX2 expression in melanoma cell lines demonstrated that SSX2 supports the growth of melanoma cells. Our results reveal two important phenotypes of ectopic SSX2 expression that may drive/support tumorigenesis: First, immediate induction of genomic instability, and second, long-term support of tumor...

  13. A mathematical model of radiation carcinogenesis with induction of genomic instability and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtaki, M; Niwa, O

    2001-11-01

    We developed a mathematical model of carcinogenesis that incorporates genomic instability, a feature characterized by long-term destabilization of the genome in irradiated cells that leads to an increase in cancer risk in the exposed individuals at the cancer-prone age. This model also considers the induction of cell death, another important effect of radiation on cells. It is assumed that cell killing by radiation may occur at all stages of the carcinogenic process. The resulting model can explain not only the paradoxical relationship between low mutation rates and high cancer incidence but also the low-order dose-response relationship of cancer risk.

  14. with Genomic Instability in Untreated Breast Cancer Patients and Healthy Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Alves dos Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated the relationship between polymorphisms in the estrogen-metabolizing genes CYP17, CYP1B1, CYP1A1, and COMT and genomic instability in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of 62 BC patients and 62 controls considering that increased or prolonged exposure to estrogen can damage the DNA molecule and increase the genomic instability process in breast tissue. Our data demonstrated increased genomic instability in BC patients and that individuals with higher frequencies of MN exhibited higher risk to BC when belonging Val/Met genotype of the COMT gene. We also observed that CYP17 and CYP1A1 polymorphisms can modify the risk to BC depending on the menopause status. We can conclude that the genetic background in estrogen metabolism pathway can modulate chromosome damage in healthy controls and patients and thereby influence the risk to BC. These findings suggest the importance to ally biomarkers of susceptibility and effects to estimate risk groups.

  15. Amplification of HER2 is a marker for global genomic instability

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    Love Brad

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic alterations of the proto-oncogene c-erbB-2 (HER-2/neu are associated with aggressive behavior and poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer. The variable clinical outcomes seen in patients with similar HER2 status, given similar treatments, suggests that the effects of amplification of HER2 can be influenced by other genetic changes. To assess the broader genomic implications of structural changes at the HER2 locus, we investigated relationships between genomic instability and HER2 status in patients with invasive breast cancer. Methods HER2 status was determined using the PathVysion® assay. DNA was extracted after laser microdissection from the 181 paraffin-embedded HER2 amplified (n = 39 or HER2 negative (n = 142 tumor specimens with sufficient tumor available to perform molecular analysis. Allelic imbalance (AI was assessed using a panel of microsatellite markers representing 26 chromosomal regions commonly altered in breast cancer. Student t-tests and partial correlations were used to investigate relationships between genomic instability and HER2 status. Results The frequency of AI was significantly higher (P P Conclusion The poor prognosis associated with HER2 amplification may be attributed to global genomic instability as cells with high frequencies of chromosomal alterations have been associated with increased cellular proliferation and aggressive behavior. In addition, high levels of DNA damage may render tumor cells refractory to treatment. In addition, specific alterations at chromosomes 11q13, 16q22-q24, and 18q21, all of which have been associated with aggressive tumor behavior, may serve as genetic modifiers to HER2 amplification. These data not only improve our understanding of HER in breast pathogenesis but may allow more accurate risk profiles and better treatment options to be developed.

  16. Radiation-induced Genomic Instability and Radiation Sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2013-01-19

    The obvious relationships between reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory type responses and reactive chemokines and cytokines suggests a general stress response induced by ionizing radiation most likely leads to the non-targeted effects described after radiation exposure. We argue that true bystander effects do not occur in the radiation therapy clinic. But there is no question that effects outside the target volume do occur. These “out of field effects” are considered very low dose effects in the context of therapy. So what are the implications of non-targeted effects on radiation sensitivity? The primary goal of therapy is to eradicate the tumor. Given the genetic diversity of the human population, lifestyle and environment factors it is likely some combination of these will influence patient outcome. Non-targeted effects may contribute to a greater or lesser extent. But consider the potential situation involving a partial body exposure due to a radiation accident or radiological terrorism. Non-targeted effects suggest that the tissue at risk for demonstrating possible detrimental effects of radiation exposure might be greater than the volume actually irradiated.

  17. Upregulation of FOXM1 induces genomic instability in human epidermal keratinocytes

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    Philpott Michael P

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human cell cycle transcription factor FOXM1 is known to play a key role in regulating timely mitotic progression and accurate chromosomal segregation during cell division. Deregulation of FOXM1 has been linked to a majority of human cancers. We previously showed that FOXM1 was upregulated in basal cell carcinoma and recently reported that upregulation of FOXM1 precedes malignancy in a number of solid human cancer types including oral, oesophagus, lung, breast, kidney, bladder and uterus. This indicates that upregulation of FOXM1 may be an early molecular signal required for aberrant cell cycle and cancer initiation. Results The present study investigated the putative early mechanism of UVB and FOXM1 in skin cancer initiation. We have demonstrated that UVB dose-dependently increased FOXM1 protein levels through protein stabilisation and accumulation rather than de novo mRNA expression in human epidermal keratinocytes. FOXM1 upregulation in primary human keratinocytes triggered pro-apoptotic/DNA-damage checkpoint response genes such as p21, p38 MAPK, p53 and PARP, however, without causing significant cell cycle arrest or cell death. Using a high-resolution Affymetrix genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP mapping technique, we provided the evidence that FOXM1 upregulation in epidermal keratinocytes is sufficient to induce genomic instability, in the form of loss of heterozygosity (LOH and copy number variations (CNV. FOXM1-induced genomic instability was significantly enhanced and accumulated with increasing cell passage and this instability was increased even further upon exposure to UVB resulting in whole chromosomal gain (7p21.3-7q36.3 and segmental LOH (6q25.1-6q25.3. Conclusion We hypothesise that prolonged and repeated UVB exposure selects for skin cells bearing stable FOXM1 protein causes aberrant cell cycle checkpoint thereby allowing ectopic cell cycle entry and subsequent genomic instability. The aberrant

  18. Deletion-bias in DNA double-strand break repair differentially contributes to plant genome shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Giang T H; Cao, Hieu X; Reiss, Bernd; Schubert, Ingo

    2017-02-28

    In order to prevent genome instability, cells need to be protected by a number of repair mechanisms, including DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. The extent to which DSB repair, biased towards deletions or insertions, contributes to evolutionary diversification of genome size is still under debate. We analyzed mutation spectra in Arabidopsis thaliana and in barley (Hordeum vulgare) by PacBio sequencing of three DSB-targeted loci each, uncovering repair via gene conversion, single strand annealing (SSA) or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Furthermore, phylogenomic comparisons between A. thaliana and two related species were used to detect naturally occurring deletions during Arabidopsis evolution. Arabidopsis thaliana revealed significantly more and larger deletions after DSB repair than barley, and barley displayed more and larger insertions. Arabidopsis displayed a clear net loss of DNA after DSB repair, mainly via SSA and NHEJ. Barley revealed a very weak net loss of DNA, apparently due to less active break-end resection and easier copying of template sequences into breaks. Comparative phylogenomics revealed several footprints of SSA in the A. thaliana genome. Quantitative assessment of DNA gain and loss through DSB repair processes suggests deletion-biased DSB repair causing ongoing genome shrinking in A. thaliana, whereas genome size in barley remains nearly constant.

  19. Effect of Cu supplementation on genomic instability in chemically-induced mammary carcinogenesis in the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobrowska Barbara

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of dietary supplementation (copper or copper and resveratrol on the intensity of carcinogenesis and the frequency of microsatellite instability in a widely used model of mammary carcinogenesis induced in the rat by treatment with 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA. Methods DNA was extracted from rat mammary cancers and normal tisues, amplified by PCR, using different polymorphic DNA markers and the reaction products were analyzed for microsatellite instability. Results It was found that irrespectively of the applied diet there was no inhibition of mammary carcinogenesis in the rats due to DMBA. Besides, in the groups supplemented with Cu (II or Cu (II and resveratrol the tumor formation was clearly accelerated. Unlike the animals that were fed with standard diet, the supplemented rats were characterized by the loss of heterozygosity of microsatellite D3Mgh9 in cancer tumors (by respectively 50 and 40%. When the animals received Cu (II and resveratrol supplemented diet the occurrence of genomic instability was additionally found in their livers in the case of microsatellite D1Mgh6 (which was stable in the animals without dietary supplementation. Conclusions Identification of the underlying mechanisms by which dietary factors affect genomic stability might prove useful in the treatment of mammary cancer as well as in the incorporation of dietary factors into mammary cancer prevention strategies.

  20. Urinary tract infection drives genome instability in uropathogenic Escherichia coli and necessitates translesion synthesis DNA polymerase IV for virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawel, Damian; Seed, Patrick C

    2011-01-01

    Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) produces ~80% of community-acquired UTI, the second most common infection in humans. During UTI, UPEC has a complex life cycle, replicating and persisting in intracellular and extracellular niches. Host and environmental stresses may affect the integrity of the UPEC genome and threaten its viability. We determined how the host inflammatory response during UTI drives UPEC genome instability and evaluated the role of multiple factors of genome replication and repair for their roles in the maintenance of genome integrity and thus virulence during UTI. The urinary tract environment enhanced the mutation frequency of UPEC ~100-fold relative to in vitro levels. Abrogation of inflammation through a host TLR4-signaling defect significantly reduced the mutation frequency, demonstrating in the importance of the host response as a driver of UPEC genome instability. Inflammation induces the bacterial SOS response, leading to the hypothesis that the UPEC SOS-inducible translesion synthesis (TLS) DNA polymerases would be key factors in UPEC genome instability during UTI. However, while the TLS DNA polymerases enhanced in vitro, they did not increase in vivo mutagenesis. Although it is not a source of enhanced mutagenesis in vivo, the TLS DNA polymerase IV was critical for the survival of UPEC during UTI during an active inflammatory assault. Overall, this study provides the first evidence of a TLS DNA polymerase being critical for UPEC survival during urinary tract infection and points to independent mechanisms for genome instability and the maintenance of genome replication of UPEC under host inflammatory stress.

  1. TopBP1/Dpb11 binds DNA anaphase bridges to prevent genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Germann, Susanne M; Schramke, Vera; Pedersen, Rune Troelsgaard

    2014-01-01

    DNA anaphase bridges are a potential source of genome instability that may lead to chromosome breakage or nondisjunction during mitosis. Two classes of anaphase bridges can be distinguished: DAPI-positive chromatin bridges and DAPI-negative ultrafine DNA bridges (UFBs). Here, we establish budding...... yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the avian DT40 cell line as model systems for studying DNA anaphase bridges and show that TopBP1/Dpb11 plays an evolutionarily conserved role in their metabolism. Together with the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, TopBP1/Dpb11 binds to UFBs, and depletion...... instability. In conclusion, we propose that TopBP1/Dpb11 prevents accumulation of anaphase bridges via stimulation of the Mec1/ATR kinase and suppression of homologous recombination....

  2. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair factors promote R-loop-induced genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollier, Julie; Stork, Caroline Townsend; García-Rubio, María L; Paulsen, Renee D; Aguilera, Andrés; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2014-12-18

    R-loops, consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA, are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. Intriguingly, changes in R-loop dynamics have also been associated with DNA damage accumulation and genome instability; however, the mechanisms underlying R-loop-induced DNA damage remain unknown. Here we demonstrate in human cells that R-loops induced by the absence of diverse RNA processing factors, including the RNA/DNA helicases Aquarius (AQR) and Senataxin (SETX), or by the inhibition of topoisomerase I, are actively processed into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG. Surprisingly, DSB formation requires the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) factor Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), but not the global genome repair protein XPC. These findings reveal an unexpected and potentially deleterious role for TC-NER factors in driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability.

  3. Transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair factors promote R-loop-induced genome instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollier, Julie; Stork, Caroline Townsend; García-Rubio, María L.; Paulsen, Renee D.; Aguilera, Andrés; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary R-loops, consisting of an RNA-DNA hybrid and displaced single-stranded DNA, are physiological structures that regulate various cellular processes occurring on chromatin. Intriguingly, changes in R-loop dynamics have also been associated with DNA damage accumulation and genome instability, however the mechanisms underlying R-loop induced DNA damage remain unknown. Here we demonstrate in human cells that R-loops induced by the absence of diverse RNA processing factors, including the RNA/DNA helicases Aquarius (AQR) and Senataxin (SETX), or by the inhibition of topoisomerase I, are actively processed into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the nucleotide excision repair endonucleases XPF and XPG. Surprisingly, DSB formation requires the transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) factor Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB), but not the global genome repair protein XPC. These findings reveal an unexpected and potentially deleterious role for TC-NER factors in driving R-loop-induced DNA damage and genome instability. PMID:25435140

  4. The Role of DNA Methylation Changes in Radiation-Induced Transgenerational Genomic Instability and Bystander Effects in cranial irradiated Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Sun, Yeqing; Gao, Yinglong; Zhang, Baodong

    Heavy-ion radiation could lead to genome instability in the germline, and therefore to transgenerational genome and epigenome instability in offspring of exposed males. The exact mechanisms of radiation-induced genome instability in directly exposed and in bystander organ remain obscure, yet accumulating evidence points to the role of DNA methylation changes in genome instability development. The potential of localized body-part exposures to affect the germline and thus induce genome and epigenome changes in the progeny has not been studied. To investigate whether or not the paternal cranial irradiation can exert deleterious changes in the protected germline and the offsprings, we studied the alteration of DNA methylation in the shielded testes tissue. Here we report that the localized paternal cranial irradiation results in a significant altered DNA methylation in sperm cells and leads to a profound epigenetic dysregulation in the unexposed progeny conceived 3 months after paternal exposure. The possible molecular mechanisms and biological consequences of the observed changes are discussed. Keywords: Heavy-ion radiation; Transgenerational effect; Genomic Instability Bystander Effects; DNA methylation.

  5. Bystander effects, adaptive response and genomic instability induced by prenatal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, Christian [Institute for Science and Ethics, University Duisburg-Essen, Auf dem Sutan 12, D-45239 Essen (Germany)]. E-mail: streffer.essen@t-online.de

    2004-12-02

    The developing human embryo and fetus undergo very radiosensitive stages during the prenatal development. It is likely that the induction of low dose related effects such as bystander effects, the adaptive response, and genomic instability would have profound effects on embryonic and fetal development. In this paper, I review what has been reported on the induction of these three phenomena in exposed embryos and fetuses. All three phenomena have been shown to occur in murine embryonic or fetal cells and structures, although the induction of an adaptive response (and also likely the induction of bystander effects) are limited in terms of when during development they can be induced and the dose or dose-rate used to treat animals in utero. In contrast, genomic instability can be induced throughout development, and the effects of radiation exposure on genome instability can be observed for long times after irradiation including through pre- and postnatal development and into the next generation of mice. There are clearly strain-specific differences in the induction of these phenomena and all three can lead to long-term detrimental effects. This is true for the adaptive response as well. While induction of an adaptive response can make fetuses more resistant to some gross developmental defects induced by a subsequent high dose challenge with ionizing radiation, the long-term effects of this low dose exposure are detrimental. The negative effects of all three phenomena reflect the complexity of fetal development, a process where even small changes in the timing of gene expression or suppression can have dramatic effects on the pattern of biological events and the subsequent development of the mammalian organism.

  6. The role of APC/C(Cdh1) in replication stress and origin of genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greil, C; Krohs, J; Schnerch, D; Follo, M; Felthaus, J; Engelhardt, M; Wäsch, R

    2016-06-01

    It has been proposed that the APC/C(Cdh1) functions as a tumor suppressor by maintaining genomic stability. However, the exact nature of genomic instability following loss of Cdh1 is unclear. Using biochemistry and live cell imaging of single cells we found that Cdh1 knockdown (kd) leads to strong nuclear stabilization of the substrates cyclin A and B and deregulated kinetics of DNA replication. Restoration of the Cdh1-dependent G2 DNA damage checkpoint did not result in G2 arrest but blocked cells in prometaphase, suggesting that these cells enter mitosis despite incomplete replication. This results in DNA double-strand breaks, anaphase bridges, cytokinesis defects and tetraploidization. Tetraploid cells are the source of supernumerary centrosomes following Cdh1-kd, leading to multipolar mitosis or centrosome clustering, in turn resulting in merotelic attachment and lagging chromosomes. Whereas some of these events cause apoptosis during mitosis, surviving cells may accumulate chromosomal aberrations.

  7. Amplification of HER2 is a marker for global genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, Rachel E; Ellsworth, Darrell L; Patney, Heather L; Deyarmin, Brenda; Love, Brad; Hooke, Jeffrey A; Shriver, Craig D

    2008-10-14

    Genomic alterations of the proto-oncogene c-erbB-2 (HER-2/neu) are associated with aggressive behavior and poor prognosis in patients with breast cancer. The variable clinical outcomes seen in patients with similar HER2 status, given similar treatments, suggests that the effects of amplification of HER2 can be influenced by other genetic changes. To assess the broader genomic implications of structural changes at the HER2 locus, we investigated relationships between genomic instability and HER2 status in patients with invasive breast cancer. HER2 status was determined using the PathVysion assay. DNA was extracted after laser microdissection from the 181 paraffin-embedded HER2 amplified (n=39) or HER2 negative (n=142) tumor specimens with sufficient tumor available to perform molecular analysis. Allelic imbalance (AI) was assessed using a panel of microsatellite markers representing 26 chromosomal regions commonly altered in breast cancer. Student t-tests and partial correlations were used to investigate relationships between genomic instability and HER2 status. The frequency of AI was significantly higher (P.005) in HER2 amplified (27%) compared to HER2 negative tumors (19%). Samples with HER2 amplification showed significantly higher levels of AI (P.05) at chromosomes 11q23, 16q22-q24 and 18q21. Partial correlations including ER status and tumor grade supported associations between HER2 status and alterations at 11q13.1, 16q22-q24 and 18q21. The poor prognosis associated with HER2 amplification may be attributed to global genomic instability as cells with high frequencies of chromosomal alterations have been associated with increased cellular proliferation and aggressive behavior. In addition, high levels of DNA damage may render tumor cells refractory to treatment. In addition, specific alterations at chromosomes 11q13, 16q22-q24, and 18q21, all of which have been associated with aggressive tumor behavior, may serve as genetic modifiers to HER2 amplification

  8. Replication independent DNA double-strand break retention may prevent genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pornthanakasem Wichai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global hypomethylation and genomic instability are cardinal features of cancers. Recently, we established a method for the detection of DNA methylation levels at sites close to endogenous DNA double strand breaks (EDSBs, and found that those sites have a higher level of methylation than the rest of the genome. Interestingly, the most significant differences between EDSBs and genomes were observed when cells were cultured in the absence of serum. DNA methylation levels on each genomic location are different. Therefore, there are more replication-independent EDSBs (RIND-EDSBs located in methylated genomic regions. Moreover, methylated and unmethylated RIND-EDSBs are differentially processed. Euchromatins respond rapidly to DSBs induced by irradiation with the phosphorylation of H2AX, γ-H2AX, and these initiate the DSB repair process. During G0, most DSBs are repaired by non-homologous end-joining repair (NHEJ, mediated by at least two distinct pathways; the Ku-mediated and the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM-mediated. The ATM-mediated pathway is more precise. Here we explored how cells process methylated RIND-EDSBs and if RIND-EDSBs play a role in global hypomethylation-induced genomic instability. Results We observed a significant number of methylated RIND-EDSBs that are retained within deacetylated chromatin and free from an immediate cellular response to DSBs, the γ-H2AX. When cells were treated with tricostatin A (TSA and the histones became hyperacetylated, the amount of γ-H2AX-bound DNA increased and the retained RIND-EDSBs were rapidly repaired. When NHEJ was simultaneously inhibited in TSA-treated cells, more EDSBs were detected. Without TSA, a sporadic increase in unmethylated RIND-EDSBs could be observed when Ku-mediated NHEJ was inhibited. Finally, a remarkable increase in RIND-EDSB methylation levels was observed when cells were depleted of ATM, but not of Ku86 and RAD51. Conclusions Methylated RIND-EDSBs are

  9. Genomic instability in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J K

    1996-01-01

    The role of genomic instability in the development of squamous cell carcinoma (SCCHN) has become apparent with the publication of three major allelotype analysis of this disease, as well as many publications which have concentrated on specific target regions. The measurement of accumulated genetic alterations or fractional allele loss, as determined by allelotype analysis, provides a useful molecular indicator of tumour behaviour. In one major study, a positive correlation was found between FAL > median value and lymph node metastasis and also with a poor clinical outcome. In addition the recognition of microsatellite instability as a marker of DNA repair defects has provided a further molecular marker of the disease process and that loss of heterozygosity analysis and microsatellite instability appear to be independent genetic events in the development of SCCHN. Furthermore, the recognition of a number of novel target regions in SCCHN on chromosome arms, 1 p, 3p, 8p, 9p, 13q, 17p and 18q and our understanding of the role of certain oncogenes and tumour suppressor genes and their interaction with human papillomavirus has provided further elucidation of the neoplastic process. Even though this review describes a number of molecular events in SCCHN, the sequence of events still eludes the scientific community at present.

  10. Extrinsic Contribution and Instability Properties in Lead-Based and Lead-Free Piezoceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Eduardo García

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Piezoceramic materials generally exhibit a notable instability of their functional properties when they work under real external conditions. This undesirable effect, known as nonlinear behavior, is mostly associated with the extrinsic contribution to material response. In this article, the role of the ferroelectric domain walls’ motion in the nonlinear response in the most workable lead-based and lead-free piezoceramics is reviewed. Initially, the extrinsic origin of the nonlinear response is discussed in terms of the temperature dependence of material response. The influence of the crystallographic phase and of the phase boundaries on the material response are then reviewed. Subsequently, the impact of the defects created by doping in order to control the extrinsic contribution is discussed as a way of tuning material properties. Finally, some aspects related to the grain-size effect on the nonlinear response of piezoceramics are surveyed.

  11. Comparison of mortality and incidence cancer risk and models of genomic instability: the Techa River cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidemueller, Markus; Jacob, Peter [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institut fuer Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg (Germany); Ostroumova, Zhenia; Krestinina, Ludmila; Akleyev, Alexander [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    Solid cancer mortality and incidence risk after radiation exposure in the Techa River Cohort in the Southern Urals region of Russia is analyzed. Residents along the Techa River received protracted exposure in the 1950s due to the releases of radioactive materials from the Mayak plutonium complex. The analysis is performed within the framework of the biologically based two-stage clonal expansion (TSCE) model and with excess relative risk models. TSCE models including effects of radiation-induced genomic instability are applied to the data and it is found that the best description of the radiation risk is achieved with the same model of genomic instability both for the mortality and incidence cohort. By a direct comparison of the cancer risk in both cohorts it is shown how the mortality and incidence rates and excess relative risk can be related. The TSCE parameters, that describe effective biological time scales in the process of cancer development, turn out to be similar for the mortality and incidence data sets.

  12. Breast cancer risk among Swedish hemangioma patients and possible consequences of radiation-induced genomic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidemueller, Markus, E-mail: markus.eidemueller@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Holmberg, Erik [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Goeteborg (Sweden); Jacob, Peter [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Lundell, Marie [Department of Medical Physics, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden); Karlsson, Per [Department of Oncology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, SE-413 45 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2009-10-02

    Breast cancer incidence among 17,158 female Swedish hemangioma patients was analyzed with empirical excess relative risk models and with a biologically-based model of carcinogenesis. The patients were treated in infancy mainly by external application of radium-226. The mean and median absorbed doses to the breast were 0.29 and 0.04 Gy, and a total of 678 breast cancer cases have been observed. Both models agree very well in the risk estimates with an excess relative risk and excess absolute risk at the age of 50 years, about the mean age of breast cancer incidence, of 0.25 Gy{sup -1}(95% CI 0.14; 0.37) and 30.7 (10{sup 5}BYRGy){sup -1} (95% CI 16.9; 42.8), respectively. Models incorporating effects of radiation-induced genomic instability were developed and applied to the hemangioma cohort. The biologically-based description of the radiation risk was significantly improved with a model of genomic instability at an early stage of carcinogenesis.

  13. Synergistic interaction of Rnf8 and p53 in the protection against genomic instability and tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Jo Halaby

    Full Text Available Rnf8 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays a key role in the DNA damage response as well as in the maintenance of telomeres and chromatin remodeling. Rnf8(-/- mice exhibit developmental defects and increased susceptibility to tumorigenesis. We observed that levels of p53, a central regulator of the cellular response to DNA damage, increased in Rnf8(-/- mice in a tissue- and cell type-specific manner. To investigate the role of the p53-pathway inactivation on the phenotype observed in Rnf8(-/- mice, we have generated Rnf8(-/-p53(-/- mice. Double-knockout mice showed similar growth retardation defects and impaired class switch recombination compared to Rnf8(-/- mice. In contrast, loss of p53 fully rescued the increased apoptosis and reduced number of thymocytes and splenocytes in Rnf8(-/- mice. Similarly, the senescence phenotype of Rnf8(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts was rescued in p53 null background. Rnf8(-/-p53(-/- cells displayed defective cell cycle checkpoints and DNA double-strand break repair. In addition, Rnf8(-/-p53(-/- mice had increased levels of genomic instability and a remarkably elevated tumor incidence compared to either Rnf8(-/- or p53(-/- mice. Altogether, the data in this study highlight the importance of p53-pathway activation upon loss of Rnf8, suggesting that Rnf8 and p53 functionally interact to protect against genomic instability and tumorigenesis.

  14. Genomic instability and radiation risk in molecular pathways to colon cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Christian Kaiser

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is caused by multiple genomic alterations which lead to genomic instability (GI. GI appears in molecular pathways of microsatellite instability (MSI and chromosomal instability (CIN with clinically observed case shares of about 15-20% and 80-85%. Radiation enhances the colon cancer risk by inducing GI, but little is known about different outcomes for MSI and CIN. Computer-based modelling can facilitate the understanding of the phenomena named above. Comprehensive biological models, which combine the two main molecular pathways to colon cancer, are fitted to incidence data of Japanese a-bomb survivors. The preferred model is selected according to statistical criteria and biological plausibility. Imprints of cell-based processes in the succession from adenoma to carcinoma are identified by the model from age dependences and secular trends of the incidence data. Model parameters show remarkable compliance with mutation rates and growth rates for adenoma, which has been reported over the last fifteen years. Model results suggest that CIN begins during fission of intestinal crypts. Chromosomal aberrations are generated at a markedly elevated rate which favors the accelerated growth of premalignant adenoma. Possibly driven by a trend of Westernization in the Japanese diet, incidence rates for the CIN pathway increased notably in subsequent birth cohorts, whereas rates pertaining to MSI remained constant. An imbalance between number of CIN and MSI cases began to emerge in the 1980s, whereas in previous decades the number of cases was almost equal. The CIN pathway exhibits a strong radio-sensitivity, probably more intensive in men. Among young birth cohorts of both sexes the excess absolute radiation risk related to CIN is larger by an order of magnitude compared to the MSI-related risk. Observance of pathway-specific risks improves the determination of the probability of causation for radiation-induced colon cancer in individual patients

  15. Genomic instability and DNA damage responses in progeria arising from defective maturation of prelamin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musich, Phillip R; Zou, Yue

    2009-01-01

    Progeria syndromes have in common a premature aging phenotype and increased genome instability. The susceptibility to DNA damage arises from a compromised repair system, either in the repair proteins themselves or in the DNA damage response pathways. The most severe progerias stem from mutations affecting lamin A production, a filamentous protein of the nuclear lamina. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) patients are heterozygous for aLMNA gene mutation while Restrictive Dermopathy (RD) individuals have a homozygous deficiency in the processing protease Zmpste24. These mutations generate the mutant lamin A proteins progerin and FC-lamina A, respectively, which cause nuclear deformations and chromatin perturbations. Genome instability is observed even though genome maintenance and repair genes appear normal. The unresolved question is what features of the DNA damage response pathways are deficient in HGPS and RD cells. Here we review and discuss recent findings which resolve some mechanistic details of how the accumulation of progerin/FC-lamin A proteins may disrupt DNA damage response pathways in HGPS and RD cells. As the mutant lamin proteins accumulate they sequester replication and repair factors, leading to stalled replication forks which collapse into DNA double-strand beaks (DSBs). In a reaction unique to HGPS and RD cells these accessible DSB termini bind Xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA) protein which excludes normal binding by DNA DSB repair proteins. The bound XPA also signals activation of ATM and ATR, arresting cell cycle progression, leading to arrested growth. In addition, the effective sequestration of XPA at these DSB damage sites makes HGPS and RD cells more sensitive to ultraviolet light and other mutagens normally repaired by the nucleotide excision repair pathway of which XPA is a necessary and specific component.

  16. The Transient Inactivation of the Master Cell Cycle Phosphatase Cdc14 Causes Genomic Instability in Diploid Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo, Oliver; Ramos-Pérez, Cristina; Petes, Thomas D.; Machín, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a common feature found in cancer cells . Accordingly, many tumor suppressor genes identified in familiar cancer syndromes are involved in the maintenance of the stability of the genome during every cell division and are commonly referred to as caretakers. Inactivating mutations and epigenetic silencing of caretakers are thought to be the most important mechanisms that explain cancer-related genome instability. However, little is known of whether transient inactivation of caretaker proteins could trigger genome instability and, if so, what types of instability would occur. In this work, we show that a brief and reversible inactivation, during just one cell cycle, of the key phosphatase Cdc14 in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae is enough to result in diploid cells with multiple gross chromosomal rearrangements and changes in ploidy. Interestingly, we observed that such transient loss yields a characteristic fingerprint whereby trisomies are often found in small-sized chromosomes, and gross chromosome rearrangements, often associated with concomitant loss of heterozygosity, are detected mainly on the ribosomal DNA-bearing chromosome XII. Taking into account the key role of Cdc14 in preventing anaphase bridges, resetting replication origins, and controlling spindle dynamics in a well-defined window within anaphase, we speculate that the transient loss of Cdc14 activity causes cells to go through a single mitotic catastrophe with irreversible consequences for the genome stability of the progeny. PMID:25971663

  17. The contribution of bacterial genome engineering to sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuß, Daniel R; Commichau, Fabian M; Stülke, Jörg

    2017-08-03

    The United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals define important challenges for the prosperous development of mankind. To reach several of these goals, among them the production of value-added compounds, improved economic and ecologic balance of production processes, prevention of climate change and protection of ecosystems, the use of engineered bacteria can make valuable contributions. We discuss the strategies for genome engineering and how they can be applied to meet the United Nations' goals for sustainable development. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  18. Radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events: Telomere shortening and bridge formation coupled with mitochondrial dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Sheeona; Tosetto, Miriam [Centre for Colorectal Disease, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Lyng, Fiona; Howe, Orla [Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology and St. Luke' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Sheahan, Kieran; O' Donoghue, Diarmuid; Hyland, John; Mulcahy, Hugh [Centre for Colorectal Disease, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland); O' Sullivan, Jacintha, E-mail: jacintha.osullivan@ucd.ie [Centre for Colorectal Disease, St. Vincent' s University Hospital, Elm Park, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2009-10-02

    The bridge breakage fusion cycle is a chromosomal instability mechanism responsible for genomic changes. Radiation bystander effects induce genomic instability; however, the mechanism driving this instability is unknown. We examined if radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events such as telomere shortening and bridge formation using a human colon cancer explant model. We assessed telomere lengths, bridge formations, mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of reactive oxygen species in bystander cells exposed to medium from irradiated and chemotherapy-treated explant tissues. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2 Gy, 5 Gy, FOLFOX treated tumor and matching normal tissue showed a significant reduction in telomere lengths (all p values <0.018) and an increase in bridge formations (all p values <0.017) compared to bystander cells treated with media from unirradiated tissue (0 Gy) at 24 h. There was no significant difference between 2 Gy and 5 Gy treatments, or between effects elicited by tumor versus matched normal tissue. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2 Gy irradiated tumor tissue showed significant depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (p = 0.012) and an increase in reactive oxygen species levels. We also used bystander cells overexpressing a mitochondrial antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) to examine if this antioxidant could rescue the mitochondrial changes and subsequently influence nuclear instability events. In MnSOD cells, ROS levels were reduced (p = 0.02) and mitochondrial membrane potential increased (p = 0.04). These events were coupled with a decrease in percentage of cells with anaphase bridges and a decrease in the number of cells undergoing telomere length shortening (p values 0.01 and 0.028 respectively). We demonstrate that radiation and chemotherapy bystander responses induce early genomic instability coupled with defects in mitochondrial function. Restoring

  19. Radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events: telomere shortening and bridge formation coupled with mitochondrial dysfunction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gorman, Sheeona

    2012-02-01

    The bridge breakage fusion cycle is a chromosomal instability mechanism responsible for genomic changes. Radiation bystander effects induce genomic instability; however, the mechanism driving this instability is unknown. We examined if radiation and chemotherapy bystander effects induce early genomic instability events such as telomere shortening and bridge formation using a human colon cancer explant model. We assessed telomere lengths, bridge formations, mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of reactive oxygen species in bystander cells exposed to medium from irradiated and chemotherapy-treated explant tissues. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy, 5Gy, FOLFOX treated tumor and matching normal tissue showed a significant reduction in telomere lengths (all p values <0.018) and an increase in bridge formations (all p values <0.017) compared to bystander cells treated with media from unirradiated tissue (0Gy) at 24h. There was no significant difference between 2Gy and 5Gy treatments, or between effects elicited by tumor versus matched normal tissue. Bystander cells exposed to media from 2Gy irradiated tumor tissue showed significant depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (p=0.012) and an increase in reactive oxygen species levels. We also used bystander cells overexpressing a mitochondrial antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) to examine if this antioxidant could rescue the mitochondrial changes and subsequently influence nuclear instability events. In MnSOD cells, ROS levels were reduced (p=0.02) and mitochondrial membrane potential increased (p=0.04). These events were coupled with a decrease in percentage of cells with anaphase bridges and a decrease in the number of cells undergoing telomere length shortening (p values 0.01 and 0.028 respectively). We demonstrate that radiation and chemotherapy bystander responses induce early genomic instability coupled with defects in mitochondrial function. Restoring mitochondrial

  20. Separase phosphosite mutation leads to genome instability and primordial germ cell depletion during oogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xu

    Full Text Available To ensure equal chromosome segregation and the stability of the genome during cell division, Separase is strictly regulated primarily by Securin binding and inhibitory phosphorylation. By generating a mouse model that contained a mutation to the inhibitory phosphosite of Separase, we demonstrated that mice of both sexes are infertile. We showed that Separase deregulation leads to chromosome mis-segregation, genome instability, and eventually apoptosis of primordial germ cells (PGCs during embryonic oogenesis. Although the PGCs of mutant male mice were completely depleted, a population of PGCs from mutant females survived Separase deregulation. The surviving PGCs completed oogenesis but produced deficient initial follicles. These results indicate a sexual dimorphism effect on PGCs from Separase deregulation, which may be correlated with a gender-specific discrepancy of Securin. Our results reveal that Separase phospho-regulation is critical for genome stability in oogenesis. Furthermore, we provided the first evidence of a pre-zygotic mitotic chromosome segregation error resulting from Separase deregulation, whose sex-specific differences may be a reason for the sexual dimorphism of aneuploidy in gametogenesis.

  1. Variability: The common factor linking low dose-induced genomic instability, adaptation and bystander effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Jeffrey L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington Medical Center, 1959 NE Pacific, Box 356069, Seattle, WA 98195-6069 (United States)]. E-mail: jschwart@u.washington.edu

    2007-03-01

    The characteristics of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability, adaptive responses, and bystander effects were compared in order to probe possible underlying mechanisms, and develop models for predicting response to in vivo low dose radiation exposures. While there are some features that are common to all three (e.g., absence of a true dose-response, the multiple endpoints affected by each), other characteristics appear to distinguish one from the other (e.g., TP53 involvement, LET response, influence of DNA repair). Each of the responses is also highly variable; not all cell and tissue models show the same response and there is much interindividual variation in response. Most of these studies have employed in vitro cell culture or tissue explant models, and understanding underlying mechanisms and the biological significance of these low dose-responses will require study of tissue-specific in vivo endpoints. The in vitro studies strongly suggest that modeling low dose radiation effects will be a complex process, and will likely require separate study of each of these low dose phenomena. Knowledge of instability responses, for example, may not aid in predicting other low dose effects in the same tissue.

  2. Genomic landscape of copy number variation and copy neutral loss of heterozygosity events in equine sarcoids reveals increased instability of the sarcoid genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlina-Tyszko, Klaudia; Gurgul, Artur; Szmatoła, Tomasz; Ropka-Molik, Katarzyna; Semik-Gurgul, Ewelina; Klukowska-Rötzler, Jolanta; Koch, Christoph; Mählmann, Kathrin; Bugno-Poniewierska, Monika

    2017-09-01

    Although they are the most common neoplasms in equids, sarcoids are not fully characterized at the molecular level. Therefore, the objective of this study was to characterize the landscape of structural rearrangements, such as copy number variation (CNV) and copy neutral loss of heterozygosity (cnLOH), in the genomes of sarcoid tumor cells. This information will not only broaden our understanding of the characteristics of this genome but will also improve the general knowledge of this tumor and the mechanisms involved in its generation. To this end, Equine SNP64K Illumina microarrays were applied along with bioinformatics tools dedicated for signal intensity analysis. The analysis revealed increased instability of the genome of sarcoid cells compared with unaltered skin tissue samples, which was manifested by the prevalence of CNV and cnLOH events. Many of the identified CNVs overlapped with the other research results, but the simultaneously observed variability in the number and sizes of detected aberrations indicated a need for further studies and the development of more reliable bioinformatics algorithms. The functional analysis of genes co-localized with the identified aberrations revealed that these genes are engaged in vital cellular processes. In addition, a number of these genes directly contribute to neoplastic transformation. Furthermore, large numbers of cnLOH events identified in the sarcoids suggested that they may play no less significant roles than CNVs in the carcinogenesis of this tumor. Thus, our results indicate the importance of cnLOH and CNV in equine sarcoid oncogenesis and present a direction of future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  3. Double-strand break repair-adox: Restoration of suppressed double-strand break repair during mitosis induces genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terasawa, Masahiro; Shinohara, Akira; Shinohara, Miki

    2014-12-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are one of the severest types of DNA damage. Unrepaired DSBs easily induce cell death and chromosome aberrations. To maintain genomic stability, cells have checkpoint and DSB repair systems to respond to DNA damage throughout most of the cell cycle. The failure of this process often results in apoptosis or genomic instability, such as aneuploidy, deletion, or translocation. Therefore, DSB repair is essential for maintenance of genomic stability. During mitosis, however, cells seem to suppress the DNA damage response and proceed to the next G1 phase, even if there are unrepaired DSBs. The biological significance of this suppression is not known. In this review, we summarize recent studies of mitotic DSB repair and discuss the mechanisms of suppression of DSB repair during mitosis. DSB repair, which maintains genomic integrity in other phases of the cell cycle, is rather toxic to cells during mitosis, often resulting in chromosome missegregation and aberration. Cells have multiple safeguards to prevent genomic instability during mitosis: inhibition of 53BP1 or BRCA1 localization to DSB sites, which is important to promote non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination, respectively, and also modulation of the non-homologous end joining core complex to inhibit DSB repair. We discuss how DSBs during mitosis are toxic and the multiple safeguard systems that suppress genomic instability.

  4. Preventing AID, a physiological mutator, from deleterious activation: regulation of the genomic instability that is associated with antibody diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Hitoshi; Tran, Thinh Huy; Kobayashi, Maki; Aida, Masatoshi; Honjo, Tasuku

    2010-04-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential and sufficient to accomplish class-switch recombination and somatic hypermutation, which are two genetic events required for the generation of antibody-mediated memory responses. However, AID can also introduce genomic instability, giving rise to chromosomal translocation and/or mutations in proto-oncogenes. It is therefore important for cells to suppress AID expression unless B lymphocytes are stimulated by pathogens. The mechanisms for avoiding the accidental activation of AID and thereby avoiding genomic instability can be classified into three types: (i) transcriptional regulation, (ii) post-transcriptional regulation and (iii) target specificity. This review summarizes the recently elucidated comprehensive transcriptional regulation mechanisms of the AID gene and the post-transcriptional regulation that may be critical for preventing excess AID activity. Finally, we discuss why AID targets not only Igs but also other proto-oncogenes. AID targets many genes but it is not totally promiscuous and the criteria that specify its targets are unclear. A recent finding that a non-B DNA structure forms upon a decrease in topoisomerase 1 expression may explain this paradoxical target specificity determination. Evolution has chosen AID as a mutator of Ig genes because of its efficient DNA cleavage activity, even though its presence increases the risk of genomic instability. This is probably because immediate protection against pathogens is more critical for species survival than complete protection from the slower acting consequences of genomic instability, such as tumor formation.

  5. Radiation-induced genomic instability: Are epigenetic mechanisms the missing link?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: This review examines the evidence for the hypothesis that epigenetics are involved in the initiation and perpetuation of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI). Conclusion: In addition to the extensively studied targeted effects of radiation, it is now apparent that non-targeted delayed effects such as RIGI are also important post-irradiation outcomes. In RIGI, unirradiated progeny cells display phenotypic changes at delayed times after radiation of the parental cell. RIGI is thought to be important in the process of carcinogenesis, however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains to be elucidated. In the genomically unstable clones developed by Morgan and colleagues, radiation-induced mutations, double-strand breaks, or changes in mRNA levels alone could not account for the initiation or perpetuation of RIGI. Since changes in the DNA sequence could not fully explain the mechanism of RIGI, inherited epigenetic changes may be involved. Epigenetics are known to play an important role in many cellular processes and epigenetic aberrations can lead to carcinogenesis. Recent studies in the field of radiation biology suggest that the changes in methylation patterns may be involved in RIGI. Together these clues have led us to hypothesize that epigenetics may be the missing link in understanding the mechanism behind RIGI.

  6. Extracellular signaling through the microenvironment: a hypothesis relating carcinogenesis, bystander effects, and genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Brooks, A. L.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Cell growth, differentiation and death are directed in large part by extracellular signaling through the interactions of cells with other cells and with the extracellular matrix; these interactions are in turn modulated by cytokines and growth factors, i.e. the microenvironment. Here we discuss the idea that extracellular signaling integrates multicellular damage responses that are important deterrents to the development of cancer through mechanisms that eliminate abnormal cells and inhibit neoplastic behavior. As an example, we discuss the action of transforming growth factor beta (TGFB1) as an extracellular sensor of damage. We propose that radiation-induced bystander effects and genomic instability are, respectively, positive and negative manifestations of this homeostatic process. Bystander effects exhibited predominantly after a low-dose or a nonhomogeneous radiation exposure are extracellular signaling pathways that modulate cellular repair and death programs. Persistent disruption of extracellular signaling after exposure to relatively high doses of ionizing radiation may lead to the accumulation of aberrant cells that are genomically unstable. Understanding radiation effects in terms of coordinated multicellular responses that affect decisions regarding the fate of a cell may necessitate re-evaluation of radiation dose and risk concepts and provide avenues for intervention.

  7. Genomic Instability: The Driving Force behind Refractory/Relapsing Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knecht, Hans, E-mail: hans.knecht@usherbrooke.ca [Division d‘Hématologie, Département de Médecine, CHUS, Université de Sherbrooke, Québec, J1H 5N4 (Canada); Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, The Genomic Centre for Cancer Research and Diagnosis, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3E 0V9 (Canada); Righolt, Christiaan [Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, The Genomic Centre for Cancer Research and Diagnosis, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Imaging Science and Technology, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Mai, Sabine [Manitoba Institute of Cell Biology, The Genomic Centre for Cancer Research and Diagnosis, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3E 0V9 (Canada)

    2013-06-05

    In classical Hodgkin’s lymphoma (HL) the malignant mononuclear Hodgkin (H) and multinuclear, diagnostic Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells are rare and generally make up <3% of the total cellular mass of the affected lymph nodes. During recent years, the introduction of laser micro-dissection techniques at the single cell level has substantially improved our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of HL. Gene expression profiling, comparative genomic hybridization analysis, micro-RNA expression profiling and viral oncogene sequencing have deepened our knowledge of numerous facets of H- and RS-cell gene expression deregulation. The question remains whether disturbed signaling pathways and deregulated transcription factors are at the origin of refractory/relapsing Hodgkin’s lymphoma or whether these hallmarks are at least partially related to another major factor. We recently showed that the 3D nuclear organization of telomeres and chromosomes marked the transition from H- to RS-cells in HL cell lines. This transition is associated with progression of telomere dysfunction, shelterin disruption and progression of complex chromosomal rearrangements. We reported analogous findings in refractory/relapsing HL and identified the shelterin proteins TRF1, TRF2 and POT1 as targets of the LMP1 oncogene in post-germinal center B-cells. Here we summarize our findings, including data not previously published, and propose a model in which progressive disruption of nuclear integrity, a form of genomic instability, is the key-player in refractory/relapsing HL. Therapeutic approaches should take these findings into account.

  8. Retrocopy contributions to the evolution of the human genome

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    Haussler David

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution via point mutations is a relatively slow process and is unlikely to completely explain the differences between primates and other mammals. By contrast, 45% of the human genome is composed of retroposed elements, many of which were inserted in the primate lineage. A subset of retroposed mRNAs (retrocopies shows strong evidence of expression in primates, often yielding functional retrogenes. Results To identify and analyze the relatively recently evolved retrogenes, we carried out BLASTZ alignments of all human mRNAs against the human genome and scored a set of features indicative of retroposition. Of over 12,000 putative retrocopy-derived genes that arose mainly in the primate lineage, 726 with strong evidence of transcript expression were examined in detail. These mRNA retroposition events fall into three categories: I 34 retrocopies and antisense retrocopies that added potential protein coding space and UTRs to existing genes; II 682 complete retrocopy duplications inserted into new loci; and III an unexpected set of 13 retrocopies that contributed out-of-frame, or antisense sequences in combination with other types of transposed elements (SINEs, LINEs, LTRs, even unannotated sequence to form potentially novel genes with no homologs outside primates. In addition to their presence in human, several of the gene candidates also had potentially viable ORFs in chimpanzee, orangutan, and rhesus macaque, underscoring their potential of function. Conclusion mRNA-derived retrocopies provide raw material for the evolution of genes in a wide variety of ways, duplicating and amending the protein coding region of existing genes as well as generating the potential for new protein coding space, or non-protein coding RNAs, by unexpected contributions out of frame, in reverse orientation, or from previously non-protein coding sequence.

  9. Significance of genomic instability in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: analysis of microarray-comparative genomic hybridization.

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    Oikawa, Masahiro; Yoshiura, Koh-ichiro; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Miura, Shiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Nakashima, Masahiro

    2011-12-07

    It has been postulated that ionizing radiation induces breast cancers among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. We have reported a higher incidence of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers from A-bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of A-bomb radiation exposure on genomic instability (GIN), which is an important hallmark of carcinogenesis, in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of breast cancer by using microarray-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). Tumor DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of invasive ductal cancers from 15 survivors who were exposed at 1.5 km or less from the hypocenter and 13 calendar year-matched non-exposed patients followed by aCGH analysis using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The total length of copy number aberrations (CNA) was used as an indicator of GIN, and correlation with clinicopathological factors were statistically tested. The mean of the derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread), which estimates the noise by calculating the spread of log ratio differences between consecutive probes for all chromosomes, was 0.54 (range, 0.26 to 1.05). The concordance of results between aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for HER2 gene amplification was 88%. The incidence of HER2 amplification and histological grade was significantly higher in the A-bomb survivors than control group (P = 0.04, respectively). The total length of CNA tended to be larger in the A-bomb survivors (P = 0.15). Correlation analysis of CNA and clinicopathological factors revealed that DLRSpread was negatively correlated with that significantly (P = 0.034, r = -0.40). Multivariate analysis with covariance revealed that the exposure to A-bomb was a significant (P = 0.005) independent factor which was associated with larger total length of CNA of breast cancers. Thus, archival FFPE tissues from A-bomb survivors are useful for genome-wide aCGH analysis. Our results suggested that A

  10. Significance of genomic instability in breast cancer in atomic bomb survivors: analysis of microarray-comparative genomic hybridization

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    Oikawa Masahiro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been postulated that ionizing radiation induces breast cancers among atomic bomb (A-bomb survivors. We have reported a higher incidence of HER2 and C-MYC oncogene amplification in breast cancers from A-bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of A-bomb radiation exposure on genomic instability (GIN, which is an important hallmark of carcinogenesis, in archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE tissues of breast cancer by using microarray-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. Methods Tumor DNA was extracted from FFPE tissues of invasive ductal cancers from 15 survivors who were exposed at 1.5 km or less from the hypocenter and 13 calendar year-matched non-exposed patients followed by aCGH analysis using a high-density oligonucleotide microarray. The total length of copy number aberrations (CNA was used as an indicator of GIN, and correlation with clinicopathological factors were statistically tested. Results The mean of the derivative log ratio spread (DLRSpread, which estimates the noise by calculating the spread of log ratio differences between consecutive probes for all chromosomes, was 0.54 (range, 0.26 to 1.05. The concordance of results between aCGH and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH for HER2 gene amplification was 88%. The incidence of HER2 amplification and histological grade was significantly higher in the A-bomb survivors than control group (P = 0.04, respectively. The total length of CNA tended to be larger in the A-bomb survivors (P = 0.15. Correlation analysis of CNA and clinicopathological factors revealed that DLRSpread was negatively correlated with that significantly (P = 0.034, r = -0.40. Multivariate analysis with covariance revealed that the exposure to A-bomb was a significant (P = 0.005 independent factor which was associated with larger total length of CNA of breast cancers. Conclusions Thus, archival FFPE tissues from A-bomb survivors are useful for

  11. Dysfunctional telomeres promote genomic instability and metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in oncogene induced mammary cancer.

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    Bojovic, Bojana; Crowe, David L

    2013-02-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that maintains the ends of chromosomes (telomeres). In normal cells lacking telomerase activity, telomeres shorten with each cell division because of the inability to completely synthesize the lagging strand. Critically shortened telomeres elicit DNA damage responses and limit cellular division and lifespan, providing an important tumor suppressor function. Most human cancer cells express telomerase which contributes significantly to the tumor phenotype. In human breast cancer, telomerase expression is predictive of clinical outcomes such as lymph node metastasis and survival. In mouse models of mammary cancer, telomerase expression is also upregulated. Telomerase overexpression resulted in spontaneous mammary tumor development in aged female mice. Increased mammary cancer also was observed when telomerase deficient mice were crossed with p53 null mutant animals. However, the effects of telomerase and telomere length on oncogene driven mammary cancer have not been completely characterized. To address these issues we characterized neu proto-oncogene driven mammary tumor formation in G1 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with long telomeres), G3 Terc-/- (telomerase deficient with short telomeres), and Terc+/+ mice. Telomerase deficiency reduced the number of mammary tumors and increased tumor latency regardless of telomere length. Decreased tumor formation correlated with increased apoptosis in Terc deficient tumors. Short telomeres dramatically increased lung metastasis which correlated with increased genomic instability, and specific alterations in DNA copy number and gene expression. We concluded that short telomeres promote metastasis in the absence of telomerase activity in neu oncogene driven mammary tumors.

  12. Mycobacterium tuberculosis EsxO (Rv2346c) promotes bacillary survival by inducing oxidative stress mediated genomic instability in macrophages.

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    Mohanty, Soumitra; Dal Molin, Michael; Ganguli, Geetanjali; Padhi, Avinash; Jena, Prajna; Selchow, Petra; Sengupta, Srabasti; Meuli, Michael; Sander, Peter; Sonawane, Avinash

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) survives inside the macrophages by modulating the host immune responses in its favor. The 6-kDa early secretory antigenic target (ESAT-6; esxA) of Mtb is known as a potent virulence and T-cell antigenic determinant. At least 23 such ESAT-6 family proteins are encoded in the genome of Mtb; however, the function of many of them is still unknown. We herein report that ectopic expression of Mtb Rv2346c (esxO), a member of ESAT-6 family proteins, in non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis strain (MsmRv2346c) aids host cell invasion and intracellular bacillary persistence. Further mechanistic studies revealed that MsmRv2346c infection abated macrophage immunity by inducing host cell death and genomic instability as evident from the appearance of several DNA damage markers. We further report that the induction of genomic instability in infected cells was due to increase in the hosts oxidative stress responses. MsmRv2346c infection was also found to induce autophagy and modulate the immune function of macrophages. In contrast, blockade of Rv2346c induced oxidative stress by treatment with ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine prevented the host cell death, autophagy induction and genomic instability in infected macrophages. Conversely, MtbΔRv2346c mutant did not show any difference in intracellular survival and oxidative stress responses. We envision that Mtb ESAT-6 family protein Rv2346c dampens antibacterial effector functions namely by inducing oxidative stress mediated genomic instability in infected macrophages, while loss of Rv2346c gene function may be compensated by other redundant ESAT-6 family proteins. Thus EsxO plays an important role in mycobacterial pathogenesis in the context of innate immunity.

  13. BCR/ABL stimulates WRN to promote survival and genomic instability

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    Slupianek, Artur; Poplawski, Tomasz; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K.; Cramer, Kimberly; Pytel, Dariusz; Stoczynska, Ewelina; Nowicki, Michal O.; Blasiak, Janusz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2010-01-01

    BCR/ABL-transformed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells accumulate numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and genotoxic agents. To repair these lesions BCR/ABL stimulate unfaithful DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination repair (HRR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) and single-strand annealing (SSA). Here we show that BCR/ABL enhances the expression and increase nuclear localization of WRN (mutated in Werner syndrome), which is required for processing DSB ends during the repair. Other fusion tyrosine kinases (FTKs) such as TEL/ABL, TEL/JAK2, TEL/PDGFβR, and NPM/ALK also elevate WRN. BCR/ABL induces WRN mRNA and protein expression in part by c-MYC -mediated activation of transcription and Bcl-xL –dependent inhibition of caspase-dependent cleavage, respectively. WRN is in complex with BCR/ABL resulting in WRN tyrosine phosphorylation and stimulation of its helicase and exonuclease activities. Activated WRN protects BCR/ABL-positive cells from the lethal effect of oxidative and genotoxic stresses, which causes DSBs. In addition, WRN promotes unfaithful recombination-dependent repair mechanisms HRR and SSA, and enhances the loss of DNA bases during NHEJ in leukemia cells. In summary, we postulate that BCR/ABL-mediated stimulation of WRN modulates the efficiency and fidelity of major DSB repair mechanisms to protect leukemia cells from apoptosis and to facilitate genomic instability. PMID:21123451

  14. BCR/ABL stimulates WRN to promote survival and genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slupianek, Artur; Poplawski, Tomasz; Jozwiakowski, Stanislaw K; Cramer, Kimberly; Pytel, Dariusz; Stoczynska, Ewelina; Nowicki, Michal O; Blasiak, Janusz; Skorski, Tomasz

    2011-02-01

    BCR/ABL-transformed chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells accumulate numerous DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and genotoxic agents. To repair these lesions BCR/ABL stimulate unfaithful DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination repair (HRR), nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), and single-strand annealing (SSA). Here, we show that BCR/ABL enhances the expression and increase nuclear localization of WRN (mutated in Werner syndrome), which is required for processing DSB ends during the repair. Other fusion tyrosine kinases (FTK), such as TEL/ABL, TEL/JAK2, TEL/PDGFβR, and NPM/ALK also elevate WRN. BCR/ABL induces WRN mRNA and protein expression in part by c-MYC-mediated activation of transcription and Bcl-xL-dependent inhibition of caspase-dependent cleavage, respectively. WRN is in complex with BCR/ABL resulting in WRN tyrosine phosphorylation and stimulation of its helicase and exonuclease activities. Activated WRN protects BCR/ABL-positive cells from the lethal effect of oxidative and genotoxic stresses, which causes DSBs. In addition, WRN promotes unfaithful recombination-dependent repair mechanisms HRR and SSA, and enhances the loss of DNA bases during NHEJ in leukemia cells. In summary, we postulate that BCR/ABL-mediated stimulation of WRN modulates the efficiency and fidelity of major DSB repair mechanisms to protect leukemia cells from apoptosis and to facilitate genomic instability.

  15. Suppression of genome instability in pRB-deficient cells by enhancement of chromosome cohesion.

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    Manning, Amity L; Yazinski, Stephanie A; Nicolay, Brandon; Bryll, Alysia; Zou, Lee; Dyson, Nicholas J

    2014-03-20

    Chromosome instability (CIN), a common feature of solid tumors, promotes tumor evolution and increases drug resistance during therapy. We previously demonstrated that loss of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) tumor suppressor causes changes in centromere structure and generates CIN. However, the mechanism and significance of this change was unclear. Here, we show that defects in cohesion are key to the pRB loss phenotype. pRB loss alters H4K20 methylation, a prerequisite for efficient establishment of cohesion at centromeres. Changes in cohesin regulation are evident during S phase, where they compromise replication and increase DNA damage. Ultimately, such changes compromise mitotic fidelity following pRB loss. Remarkably, increasing cohesion suppressed all of these phenotypes and dramatically reduced CIN in cancer cells lacking functional pRB. These data explain how loss of pRB undermines genomic integrity. Given the frequent functional inactivation of pRB in cancer, conditions that increase cohesion may provide a general strategy to suppress CIN.

  16. A race between tumor immunoescape and genome maintenance selects for optimum levels of (epigenetic instability.

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    Shingo Iwami

    Full Text Available The human immune system functions to provide continuous body-wide surveillance to detect and eliminate foreign agents such as bacteria and viruses as well as the body's own cells that undergo malignant transformation. To counteract this surveillance, tumor cells evolve mechanisms to evade elimination by the immune system; this tumor immunoescape leads to continuous tumor expansion, albeit potentially with a different composition of the tumor cell population ("immunoediting". Tumor immunoescape and immunoediting are products of an evolutionary process and are hence driven by mutation and selection. Higher mutation rates allow cells to more rapidly acquire new phenotypes that help evade the immune system, but also harbor the risk of an inability to maintain essential genome structure and functions, thereby leading to an error catastrophe. In this paper, we designed a novel mathematical framework, based upon the quasispecies model, to study the effects of tumor immunoediting and the evolution of (epigenetic instability on the abundance of tumor and immune system cells. We found that there exists an optimum number of tumor variants and an optimum magnitude of mutation rates that maximize tumor progression despite an active immune response. Our findings provide insights into the dynamics of tumorigenesis during immune system attacks and help guide the choice of treatment strategies that best inhibit diverse tumor cell populations.

  17. Geosmin induces genomic instability in the mammalian cell microplate-based comet assay.

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    Silva, Aline Flor; Lehmann, Mauricio; Dihl, Rafael Rodrigues

    2015-11-01

    Geosmin (GEO) (trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans-9-decalol) is a metabolite that renders earthy and musty taste and odor to water. Data of GEO genotoxicity on mammalian cells are scarce in the literature. Thus, the present study assessed the genotoxicity of GEO on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells in the microplate-based comet assay. The percent of tail DNA (tail intensity (TI)), tail moment (TM), and tail length (TL) were used as parameters for DNA damage assessment. The results demonstrated that concentrations of GEO of 30 and 60 μg/mL were genotoxic to CHO cells after 4- and 24-h exposure periods, in all parameters evaluated, such as TI, TM, and TL. Additionally, GEO 15 μg/mL was genotoxic in the three parameters only in the 24-h exposure time. The same was observed for GEO 7.5 μg/mL, which induced significant DNA damage observed as TI in the 24-h treatment. The results present evidence that exposure to GEO may be associated with genomic instability in mammalian cells.

  18. MTHFR Functional Polymorphism C677T and Genomic Instability in the Etiology of Idiopathic Autism in Simplex Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0298 TITLE: MTHFR Functional Polymorphism C677T and Genomic Instability in the Etiology of Idiopathic Autism in... Autism in Simplex Families 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0298 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Xudong Liu, PhD 5d...DISTRIBUTION / AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD

  19. Rac2-MRC-cIII–generated ROS cause genomic instability in chronic myeloid leukemia stem cells and primitive progenitors

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    Nieborowska-Skorska, Margaret; Kopinski, Piotr K.; Ray, Regina; Hoser, Grazyna; Ngaba, Danielle; Flis, Sylwia; Cramer, Kimberly; Reddy, Mamatha M.; Koptyra, Mateusz; Penserga, Tyrone; Glodkowska-Mrowka, Eliza; Bolton, Elisabeth; Holyoake, Tessa L.; Eaves, Connie J.; Cerny-Reiterer, Sabine; Valent, Peter; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hughes, Timothy P.; van der Kuip, Heiko; Sattler, Martin; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, Wieslaw; Richardson, Christine; Dorrance, Adrienne; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Williams, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP) is induced by BCR-ABL1 oncogenic tyrosine kinase. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors eliminate the bulk of CML-CP cells, but fail to eradicate leukemia stem cells (LSCs) and leukemia progenitor cells (LPCs) displaying innate and acquired resistance, respectively. These cells may accumulate genomic instability, leading to disease relapse and/or malignant progression to a fatal blast phase. In the present study, we show that Rac2 GTPase alters mitochondrial membrane potential and electron flow through the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex III (MRC-cIII), thereby generating high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in CML-CP LSCs and primitive LPCs. MRC-cIII–generated ROS promote oxidative DNA damage to trigger genomic instability, resulting in an accumulation of chromosomal aberrations and tyrosine kinase inhibitor–resistant BCR-ABL1 mutants. JAK2(V617F) and FLT3(ITD)–positive polycythemia vera cells and acute myeloid leukemia cells also produce ROS via MRC-cIII. In the present study, inhibition of Rac2 by genetic deletion or a small-molecule inhibitor and down-regulation of mitochondrial ROS by disruption of MRC-cIII, expression of mitochondria-targeted catalase, or addition of ROS-scavenging mitochondria-targeted peptide aptamer reduced genomic instability. We postulate that the Rac2-MRC-cIII pathway triggers ROS-mediated genomic instability in LSCs and primitive LPCs, which could be targeted to prevent the relapse and malignant progression of CML. PMID:22411871

  20. p16(INK4a prevents centrosome dysfunction and genomic instability in primary cells.

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    Kimberly M McDermott

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy, frequently observed in premalignant lesions, disrupts gene dosage and contributes to neoplastic progression. Theodor Boveri hypothesized nearly 100 years ago that aneuploidy was due to an increase in centrosome number (multipolar mitoses and the resultant abnormal segregation of chromosomes. We performed immunocytochemistry, quantitative immunofluorescence, karyotypic analysis, and time-lapse microscopy on primary human diploid epithelial cells and fibroblasts to better understand the mechanism involved in the production of supernumerary centrosomes (more than two microtubule nucleating bodies to directly demonstrate that the presence of supernumerary centrosomes in genomically intact cells generates aneuploid daughter cells. We show that loss of p16(INK4a generates supernumerary centrosomes through centriole pair splitting. Generation of supernumerary centrosomes in human diploid epithelial cells was shown to nucleate multipolar spindles and directly drive production of aneuploid daughter cells as a result of unequal segregation of the genomic material during mitosis. Finally, we demonstrate that p16(INK4a cooperates with p21 through regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase activity to prevent centriole pair splitting. Cells with loss of p16(INK4a activity have been found in vivo in histologically normal mammary tissue from a substantial fraction of healthy, disease-free women. Demonstration of centrosome dysfunction in cells due to loss of p16(INK4a suggests that, under the appropriate conditions, these cells can become aneuploid. Gain or loss of genomic material (aneuploidy may provide the necessary proproliferation and antiapoptotic mechanisms needed for the earliest stages of tumorigenesis.

  1. Genomic Instability Associated with p53 Knockdown in the Generation of Huntington's Disease Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

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    Tidball, Andrew M; Neely, M Diana; Chamberlin, Reed; Aboud, Asad A; Kumar, Kevin K; Han, Bingying; Bryan, Miles R; Aschner, Michael; Ess, Kevin C; Bowman, Aaron B

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in DNA damage response and repair have been observed in Huntington's disease (HD). We generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from primary dermal fibroblasts of 5 patients with HD and 5 control subjects. A significant fraction of the HD iPSC lines had genomic abnormalities as assessed by karyotype analysis, while none of our control lines had detectable genomic abnormalities. We demonstrate a statistically significant increase in genomic instability in HD cells during reprogramming. We also report a significant association with repeat length and severity of this instability. Our karyotypically normal HD iPSCs also have elevated ATM-p53 signaling as shown by elevated levels of phosphorylated p53 and H2AX, indicating either elevated DNA damage or hypersensitive DNA damage signaling in HD iPSCs. Thus, increased DNA damage responses in the HD genotype is coincidental with the observed chromosomal aberrations. We conclude that the disease causing mutation in HD increases the propensity of chromosomal instability relative to control fibroblasts specifically during reprogramming to a pluripotent state by a commonly used episomal-based method that includes p53 knockdown.

  2. Molecular mechanisms of low dose ionizing radiation-induced hormesis, adaptive responses, radioresistance, bystander effects, and genomic instability.

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    Tang, Feng Ru; Loke, Weng Keong

    2015-01-01

    To review research progress on the molecular mechanisms of low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR)-induced hormesis, adaptive responses, radioresistance, bystander effects, and genomic instability in order to provide clues for therapeutic approaches to enhance biopositive effects (defined as radiation-induced beneficial effects to the organism), and control bionegative effects (defined as radiation-induced harmful effects to the organism) and related human diseases. Experimental studies have indicated that Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), phospho-c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) and protein 53 (P53)-related signal transduction pathways may be involved in LDIR-induced hormesis; MAPK, P53 may be important for adaptive response; ATM, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), ERK, JNK, reactive oxygen species (ROS), P53 for radioresistance; COX-2, ERK, MAPK, ROS, tumor necrosis factor receptor alpha (TNFα) for LDIR-induced bystander effect; whereas ATM, ERK, MAPK, P53, ROS, TNFα-related signal transduction pathways are involved in LDIR-induced genomic instability. These results suggest that different manifestations of LDIR-induced cellular responses may have different signal transduction pathways. On the other hand, LDIR-induced different responses may also share the same signal transduction pathways. For instance, P53 has been involved in LDIR-induced hormesis, adaptive response, radioresistance and genomic instability. Current data therefore suggest that caution should be taken when designing therapeutic approaches using LDIR to induce beneficial effects in humans.

  3. Estimation of low-dose radiation-responsive proteins in the absence of genomic instability in normal human fibroblast cells.

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    Yim, Ji-Hye; Yun, Jung Mi; Kim, Ji Young; Nam, Seon Young; Kim, Cha Soon

    2017-07-25

    Low-dose radiation has various biological effects such as adaptive responses, low-dose hypersensitivity, as well as beneficial effects. However, little is known about the particular proteins involved in these effects. Here, we sought to identify low-dose radiation-responsive phosphoproteins in normal fibroblast cells. We assessed genomic instability and proliferation of fibroblast cells after γ-irradiation by γ-H2AX foci and micronucleus formation analyses and BrdU incorporation assay, respectively. We screened fibroblast cells 8 h after low-dose (0.05 Gy) γ-irradiation using Phospho Explorer Antibody Microarray and validated two differentially expressed phosphoproteins using Western blotting. Cell proliferation proceeded normally in the absence of genomic instability after low-dose γ-irradiation. Phospho antibody microarray analysis and Western blotting revealed increased expression of two phosphoproteins, phospho-NFκB (Ser536) and phospho-P70S6K (Ser418), 8 h after low-dose radiation. Our findings suggest that low-dose radiation of normal fibroblast cells activates the expression of phospho-NFκB (Ser536) and phospho-P70S6K (Ser418) in the absence of genomic instability. Therefore, these proteins may be involved in DNA damage repair processes.

  4. Preferential retrotransposition in aging yeast mother cells is correlated with increased genome instability.

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    Patterson, Melissa N; Scannapieco, Alison E; Au, Pak Ho; Dorsey, Savanna; Royer, Catherine A; Maxwell, Patrick H

    2015-10-01

    Retrotransposon expression or mobility is increased with age in multiple species and could promote genome instability or altered gene expression during aging. However, it is unclear whether activation of retrotransposons during aging is an indirect result of global changes in chromatin and gene regulation or a result of retrotransposon-specific mechanisms. Retromobility of a marked chromosomal Ty1 retrotransposon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was elevated in mother cells relative to their daughter cells, as determined by magnetic cell sorting of mothers and daughters. Retromobility frequencies in aging mother cells were significantly higher than those predicted by cell age and the rate of mobility in young populations, beginning when mother cells were only several generations old. New Ty1 insertions in aging mothers were more strongly correlated with gross chromosome rearrangements than in young cells and were more often at non-preferred target sites. Mother cells were more likely to have high concentrations and bright foci of Ty1 Gag-GFP than their daughter cells. Levels of extrachromosomal Ty1 cDNA were also significantly higher in aged mother cell populations than their daughter cell populations. These observations are consistent with a retrotransposon-specific mechanism that causes retrotransposition to occur preferentially in yeast mother cells as they begin to age, as opposed to activation by phenotypic changes associated with very old age. These findings will likely be relevant for understanding retrotransposons and aging in many organisms, based on similarities in regulation and consequences of retrotransposition in diverse species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genomic instability, bystander effect, cytoplasmic irradiation and other phenomena that may achieve fame without fortune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    The possible risk of induced malignancies in astronauts, as a consequence of the radiation environment in space, is a factor of concern for long term missions. Cancer risk estimates for high doses of low LET radiation are available from the epidemiological studies of the A-bomb survivors. Cancer risks at lower doses cannot be detected in epidemiological studies and must be inferred by extrapolation from the high dose risks. The standard setting bodies, such as the ICRP recommend a linear, no-threshold extrapolation of risks from high to low doses, but this is controversial. A study of mechanisms of carcinogenesis may shed some light on the validity of a linear extrapolation. The multi-step nature of carcinogenesis suggests that the role of radiation may be to induce a mutation leading to a mutator phenotype. High energy Fe ions, such as those encountered in space are highly effective in inducing genomic instability. Experiments involving the single particle microbeam have demonstrated a "bystander effect", ie a biological effect in cells not themselves hit, but in close proximity to those that are, as well as the induction of mutations in cells where only the cytoplasm, and not the nucleus, have been traversed by a charged particle. These recent experiments cast doubt on the validity of a simple linear extrapolation, but the data are so far fragmentary and conflicting. More studies are necessary. While mechanistic studies cannot replace epidemiology as a source of quantitative risk estimates, they may shed some light on the shape of the dose response relationship and therefore on the limitations of a linear extrapolation to low doses.

  6. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells.

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    Shuhei Ito

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose polymerases (PARPs are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR, a DNA double-strand break (DSB repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi. Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR, and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold. Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications.

  7. Pyrimidine pool imbalance induced by BLM helicase deficiency contributes to genetic instability in Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabosseau, Pauline; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Lambert, Sarah; Debatisse, Michelle; Brison, Olivier; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2011-06-28

    Defects in DNA replication are associated with genetic instability and cancer development, as illustrated in Bloom syndrome. Features of this syndrome include a slowdown in replication speed, defective fork reactivation and high rates of sister chromatid exchange, with a general predisposition to cancer. Bloom syndrome is caused by mutations in the BLM gene encoding a RecQ helicase. Here we report that BLM deficiency is associated with a strong cytidine deaminase defect, leading to pyrimidine pool disequilibrium. In BLM-deficient cells, pyrimidine pool normalization leads to reduction of sister chromatid exchange frequency and is sufficient for full restoration of replication fork velocity but not the fork restart defect, thus identifying the part of the Bloom syndrome phenotype because of pyrimidine pool imbalance. This study provides new insights into the molecular basis of control of replication speed and the genetic instability associated with Bloom syndrome. Nucleotide pool disequilibrium could be a general phenomenon in a large spectrum of precancerous and cancer cells.

  8. Genomic instability in quartz dust exposed rat lungs: Is inflammation responsible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, C.; Knaapen, A. M.; Cakmak Demircigil, G.; Coskun, Erdem; van Schooten, F. J.; Borm, P. J. A.; Schins, R. P. F.

    2009-02-01

    the aluminium coated quartz intermediate effects were found. These findings were in line with the kinetics of inflammation and epithelial proliferation in the rat lungs for the different treatments. Notably, a highly significant correlation was observed between neutrophil numbers and micronucleus frequencies, indicative for a role of inflammation in eliciting genomic instability in target cells of quartz-induced carcinogenesis. Our ongoing investigations focus on the evaluation of the causality between both in relation to quartz exposure.

  9. Genomic instability in quartz dust exposed rat lungs: Is inflammation responsible?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, C; Schins, R P F [Institut fuer Umweltmedizinische Forschung (IUF) at the Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf (Germany); Demircigil, G Cakmak; Coskun, Erdem [Gazi University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Toxicology, Ankara (Turkey); Schooten, F J van [Nutrition and Toxicology Research Institute Maastricht (NUTRIM), Department of Health Risk Analysis and Toxicology, University of Maastricht (Netherlands); Borm, P J A [Centre of Expertise in Life Sciences (Cel), Hogeschool Zuyd, Heerlen (Netherlands); Knaapen, A M, E-mail: catrin.albrecht@uni-duesseldorf.d

    2009-02-01

    the aluminium coated quartz intermediate effects were found. These findings were in line with the kinetics of inflammation and epithelial proliferation in the rat lungs for the different treatments. Notably, a highly significant correlation was observed between neutrophil numbers and micronucleus frequencies, indicative for a role of inflammation in eliciting genomic instability in target cells of quartz-induced carcinogenesis. Our ongoing investigations focus on the evaluation of the causality between both in relation to quartz exposure.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard L. Liber; Jeffrey L. Schwartz

    2005-10-31

    There are many different model systems that have been used to study chromosome instability. What is clear from all these studies is that conclusions concerning chromosome instability depend greatly on the model system and instability endpoint that is studied. The model system for our studies was the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. TK6 was isolated from a spontaneously immortalized lymphoblast culture. Thus there was no outside genetic manipulation used to immortalize them. TK6 is a relatively stable p53-normal immortal cell line (37). It shows low gene and chromosome mutation frequencies (19;28;31). Our general approach to studying instability in TK6 cells has been to isolate individual clones and analyze gene and chromosome mutation frequencies in each. This approach maximizes the possibility of detecting low frequency events that might be selected against in mass cultures.

  11. Contribution of genetics and genomics to seagrass biology and conservation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Procaccini, Gabriele; Olsen, Jeanine L.; Reusch, Thorsten B. H.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic diversity is one of three forms of biodiversity recognized by the IUCN as deserving conservation along with species and ecosystems. Seagrasses provide all three levels in one. This review addresses the latest advances in our understanding of seagrass population genetics and genomics within t

  12. Bystander effects in UV-induced genomic instability: Antioxidants inhibit delayed mutagenesis induced by ultraviolet A and B radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dahle Jostein

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic instability is characteristic of many types of human cancer. Recently, we reported that ultraviolet radiation induced elevated mutation rates and chromosomal instability for many cell generations after ultraviolet irradiation. The increased mutation rates of unstable cells may allow them to accumulate aberrations that subsequently lead to cancer. Ultraviolet A radiation, which primarily acts by oxidative stress, and ultraviolet B radiation, which initially acts by absorption in DNA and direct damage to DNA, both produced genomically unstable cell clones. In this study, we have determined the effect of antioxidants on induction of delayed mutations by ultraviolet radiation. Delayed mutations are indicative of genomic instability. Methods Delayed mutations in the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt gene were detected by incubating the cells in medium selectively killing hprt mutants for 8 days after irradiation, followed by a 5 day period in normal medium before determining mutation frequencies. Results The UVB-induced delayed hprt mutations were strongly inhibited by the antioxidants catalase, reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase, while only reduced glutathione had a significant effect on UVA-induced delayed mutations. Treatment with antioxidants had only minor effects on early mutation frequenies, except that reduced glutathione decreased the UVB-induced early mutation frequency by 24 %. Incubation with reduced glutathione was shown to significantly increase the intracellular amount of reduced glutathione. Conclusion The strong effects of these antioxidants indicate that genomic instability, which is induced by the fundamentally different ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B radiation, is mediated by reactive oxygen species, including hydrogen peroxide and downstream products. However, cells take up neither catalase nor SOD, while incubation with glutathione resulted in increased intracellular levels of

  13. Effects of As2O3 on DNA methylation, genomic instability, and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erturk, Filiz Aygun; Aydin, Murat; Sigmaz, Burcu; Taspinar, M Sinan; Arslan, Esra; Agar, Guleray; Yagci, Semra

    2015-12-01

    Arsenic is a well-known toxic substance on the living organisms. However, limited efforts have been made to study its DNA methylation, genomic instability, and long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposon polymorphism causing properties in different crops. In the present study, effects of As2O3 (arsenic trioxide) on LTR retrotransposon polymorphism and DNA methylation as well as DNA damage in Zea mays seedlings were investigated. The results showed that all of arsenic doses caused a decreasing genomic template stability (GTS) and an increasing Random Amplified Polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs) profile changes (DNA damage). In addition, increasing DNA methylation and LTR retrotransposon polymorphism characterized a model to explain the epigenetically changes in the gene expression were also found. The results of this experiment have clearly shown that arsenic has epigenetic effect as well as its genotoxic effect. Especially, the increasing of polymorphism of some LTR retrotransposon under arsenic stress may be a part of the defense system against the stress.

  14. Genome-Wide Demethylation Promotes Triplet Repeat Instability Independently of Homologous Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dion, Vincent; Lin, Yunfu; Price, Brandee A.; Fyffe, Sharyl L.; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Wilson, John H.

    2008-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat instability is intrinsic to a family of human neurodegenerative diseases. The mechanism leading to repeat length variation is unclear. We previously showed that treatment with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-CdR) dramatically increases triplet repeat instability in mammalian cells. Based on previous reports that demethylation increases homologous recombination (HR), and our own observations that HR destabilizes triplet repeats, we hypothesized that demethylation alters repeat stability by stimulating HR. Here, we test that hypothesis at the Aprt (adenosine phosphoribosyl transferase) locus in CHO cells, where CpG demethylation and HR have both been shown to increase CAG repeat instability. We find that the rate of HR at the Aprt locus is not altered by demethylation. The spectrum of recombinants, however, was shifted from the usual 6:1 ratio of conversions to crossovers to more equal proportions in 5-aza-CdR-treated cells. The subtle influences of demethylation on HR at the Aprt locus are not sufficient to account for its dramatic effects on repeat instability. We conclude that 5-aza-CdR promotes triplet repeat instability independently of HR. PMID:18083071

  15. Tolerance of Deregulated G1/S Transcription Depends on Critical G1/S Regulon Genes to Prevent Catastrophic Genome Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Caetano

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Expression of a G1/S regulon of genes that are required for DNA replication is a ubiquitous mechanism for controlling cell proliferation; moreover, the pathological deregulated expression of E2F-regulated G1/S genes is found in every type of cancer. Cellular tolerance of deregulated G1/S transcription is surprising because this regulon includes many dosage-sensitive proteins. Here, we used the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe to investigate this issue. We report that deregulating the MBF G1/S regulon by eliminating the Nrm1 corepressor increases replication errors. Homology-directed repair proteins, including MBF-regulated Ctp1CtIP, are essential to prevent catastrophic genome instability. Surprisingly, the normally inconsequential MBF-regulated S-phase cyclin Cig2 also becomes essential in the absence of Nrm1. This requirement was traced to cyclin-dependent kinase inhibition of the MBF-regulated Cdc18Cdc6 replication origin-licensing factor. Collectively, these results establish that, although deregulation of G1/S transcription is well tolerated by cells, nonessential G1/S target genes become crucial for preventing catastrophic genome instability.

  16. The yeast Pif1 helicase prevents genomic instability caused by G-quadruplex-forming CEB1 sequences in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Ribeyre

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In budding yeast, the Pif1 DNA helicase is involved in the maintenance of both nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, but its role in these processes is still poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence for a new Pif1 function by demonstrating that its absence promotes genetic instability of alleles of the G-rich human minisatellite CEB1 inserted in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, but not of other tandem repeats. Inactivation of other DNA helicases, including Sgs1, had no effect on CEB1 stability. In vitro, we show that CEB1 repeats formed stable G-quadruplex (G4 secondary structures and the Pif1 protein unwinds these structures more efficiently than regular B-DNA. Finally, synthetic CEB1 arrays in which we mutated the potential G4-forming sequences were no longer destabilized in pif1Delta cells. Hence, we conclude that CEB1 instability in pif1Delta cells depends on the potential to form G-quadruplex structures, suggesting that Pif1 could play a role in the metabolism of G4-forming sequences.

  17. Nuclear DNA-Content in Mesenchymal Lesions in Dogs: Its Value as Marker of Malignancy and Extent of Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerkamp, Kim M., E-mail: K.M.Boerkamp@uu.nl; Rutteman, Gerard R. [Department of Clinical Science of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kik, Marja J. L. [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 1, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kirpensteijn, Jolle [Department of Clinical Science of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 104, 3584 CM, Utrecht (Netherlands); Schulze, Christoph; Grinwis, Guy C. M. [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, UU, Yalelaan 1, 3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-12-03

    DNA-aneuploidy may reflect the malignant nature of mesenchymal proliferations and herald gross genomic instability as a mechanistic factor in tumor genesis. DNA-ploidy and -index were determined by flow cytometry in canine inflammatory or neoplastic mesenchymal tissues and related to clinico-pathological features, biological behavior and p53 gene mutational status. Half of all sarcomas were aneuploid. Benign mesenchymal neoplasms were rarely aneuploid and inflammatory lesions not at all. The aneuploidy rate was comparable to that reported for human sarcomas with significant variation amongst subtypes. DNA-ploidy status in canines lacked a relation with histological grade of malignancy, in contrast to human sarcomas. While aneuploidy was related to the development of metastases in soft tissue sarcomas it was not in osteosarcomas. No relation amongst sarcomas was found between ploidy status and presence of P53 gene mutations. Heterogeneity of the DNA index between primary and metastatic sarcoma sites was present in half of the cases examined. Hypoploidy is more common in canine sarcomas and hyperploid cases have less deviation of the DNA index than human sarcomas. The variation in the presence and extent of aneuploidy amongst sarcoma subtypes indicates variation in genomic instability. This study strengthens the concept of interspecies variation in the evolution of gross chromosomal aberrations during cancer development.

  18. Nuclear DNA-Content in Mesenchymal Lesions in Dogs: Its Value as Marker of Malignancy and Extent of Genomic Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Schulze

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available DNA-aneuploidy may reflect the malignant nature of mesenchymal proliferations and herald gross genomic instability as a mechanistic factor in tumor genesis. DNA-ploidy and -index were determined by flow cytometry in canine inflammatory or neoplastic mesenchymal tissues and related to clinico-pathological features, biological behavior and p53 gene mutational status. Half of all sarcomas were aneuploid. Benign mesenchymal neoplasms were rarely aneuploid and inflammatory lesions not at all. The aneuploidy rate was comparable to that reported for human sarcomas with significant variation amongst subtypes. DNA-ploidy status in canines lacked a relation with histological grade of malignancy, in contrast to human sarcomas. While aneuploidy was related to the development of metastases in soft tissue sarcomas it was not in osteosarcomas. No relation amongst sarcomas was found between ploidy status and presence of P53 gene mutations. Heterogeneity of the DNA index between primary and metastatic sarcoma sites was present in half of the cases examined. Hypoploidy is more common in canine sarcomas and hyperploid cases have less deviation of the DNA index than human sarcomas. The variation in the presence and extent of aneuploidy amongst sarcoma subtypes indicates variation in genomic instability. This study strengthens the concept of interspecies variation in the evolution of gross chromosomal aberrations during cancer development.

  19. Genome-wide association studies and contribution to cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Patricia B; Tinker, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    The study of family pedigrees with rare monogenic cardiovascular disorders has revealed new molecular players in physiological processes. Genome-wide association studies of complex traits with a heritable component may afford a similar and potentially intellectually richer opportunity. In this review we focus on the interpretation of genetic associations and the issue of causality in relation to known and potentially new physiology. We mainly discuss cardiometabolic traits as it reflects our personal interests, but the issues pertain broadly in many other disciplines. We also describe some of the resources that are now available that may expedite follow up of genetic association signals into observations on causal mechanisms and pathophysiology.

  20. Are we Genomic Mosaics? Variations of the Genome of Somatic Cells can Contribute to Diversify our Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astolfi, P A; Salamini, F; Sgaramella, V

    2010-09-01

    Theoretical and experimental evidences support the hypothesis that the genomes and the epigenomes may be different in the somatic cells of complex organisms. In the genome, the differences range from single base substitutions to chromosome number; in the epigenome, they entail multiple postsynthetic modifications of the chromatin. Somatic genome variations (SGV) may accumulate during development in response both to genetic programs, which may differ from tissue to tissue, and to environmental stimuli, which are often undetected and generally irreproducible. SGV may jeopardize physiological cellular functions, but also create novel coding and regulatory sequences, to be exposed to intraorganismal Darwinian selection. Genomes acknowledged as comparatively poor in genes, such as humans', could thus increase their pristine informational endowment. A better understanding of SGV will contribute to basic issues such as the "nature vs nurture" dualism and the inheritance of acquired characters. On the applied side, they may explain the low yield of cloning via somatic cell nuclear transfer, provide clues to some of the problems associated with transdifferentiation, and interfere with individual DNA analysis. SGV may be unique in the different cells types and in the different developmental stages, and thus explain the several hundred gaps persisting in the human genomes "completed" so far. They may compound the variations associated to our epigenomes and make of each of us an "(epi)genomic" mosaic. An ensuing paradigm is the possibility that a single genome (the ephemeral one assembled at fertilization) has the capacity to generate several different brains in response to different environments.

  1. Arsenic-induced Aurora-A activation contributes to chromosome instability and tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Han; Tseng, Ya-Shih; Yang, Chao-Chun; Kao, Yu-Ting; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic may cause serious environmental pollution and is a serious industrial problem. Depending on the dosage, arsenic may trigger the cells undergoing either proliferation or apoptosis-related cell death. Because of lack of the proper animal model to study arsenic induced tumorigenesis, the accurate risk level of arsenic exposure has not been determined. Arsenic shows genotoxic effect on human beings who uptake water contaminated by arsenic. Chromosome aberration is frequently detected in arsenic exposure-related diseases and is associated with increased oxidative stress and decreased DNA repairing activity, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Aurora-A is a mitotic kinase, over-expression of Aurora-A leads to centrosome amplification, chromosomal instability and cell transformation. We revealed that Aurora-A is over-expressed in the skin and bladder cancer patients from blackfoot-disease endemic areas. Our cell line studies reveal that arsenic exposure between 0.5 μM and 1 μM for 2-7 days are able to induce Aurora-A expression and activation based on promoter activity, RNA and protein analysis. Aurora-A overexpression further increases the frequency of unsymmetrical chromosome segregation through centrosome amplification followed by cell population accumulated at S phase in immortalized keratinocyte (HaCaT) and uroepithelial cells (E7). Furthermore, Aurora-A over-expression was sustained for 1-4 weeks by chronic treatment of immortalized bladder and skin cells with NaAsO2. Aurora-A promoter methylation and gene amplification was not detected in the long-term arsenic treated E7 cells. Furthermore, the expression level of E2F1 transcription factor (E2F1) is increased in the presence of arsenic, and arsenic-related Aurora-A over-expression is transcriptionally regulated by E2F1. We further demonstrated that overexpression of Aurora-A and mutant Ha-ras or Aurora-A and mutant p53 may act additively to trigger arsenic-related bladder and skin cancer

  2. Comprehensive characterization of genomic instability in pluripotent stem cells and their derived neuroprogenitor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor Luis Lopez Corrales

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The genomic integrity of two human pluripotent stem cells and their derived neuroprogenitor cell lines was studied, applying a combination of high-resolution genetic methodologies. The usefulness of combining array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH and multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH techniques should be delineated to exclude/detect a maximum of possible genomic structural aberrations. Interestingly, in parts different genomic imbalances at chromosomal and subchromosomal levels were detected in pluripotent stem cells and their derivatives. Some of the copy number variations were inherited from the original cell line, whereas other modifications were presumably acquired during the differentiation and manipulation procedures. These results underline the necessity to study both pluripotent stem cells and their differentiated progeny by as many approaches as possible in order to assess their genomic stability before using them in clinical therapies.

  3. Transgenerational developmental effects and genomic instability after X-irradiation of preimplantation embryos: Studies on two mouse strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquet, P., E-mail: pjacquet@sckcen.be [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Buset, J.; Neefs, M. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Vankerkom, J. [Division of Environmental Research, VITO, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Benotmane, M.A.; Derradji, H. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Hildebrandt, G. [Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Stephanstrasse 9a, D-04103 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Radiotherapy, University of Rostock, Suedring 75, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Baatout, S. [Molecular and Cellular Biology, Institute for Environment, Health and Safety, SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, B-2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2010-05-01

    Recent results have shown that irradiation of a single cell, the zygote or 1-cell embryo of various mouse strains, could lead to congenital anomalies in the fetuses. In the Heiligenberger strain, a link between the radiation-induced congenital anomalies and the development of a genomic instability was also suggested. Moreover, further studies showed that in that strain, both congenital anomalies and genomic instability could be transmitted to the next generation. The aim of the experiments described in this paper was to investigate whether such non-targeted transgenerational effects could also be observed in two other radiosensitive mouse strains (CF1 and ICR), using lower radiation doses. Irradiation of the CF1 and ICR female zygotes with 0.2 or 0.4 Gy did not result in a decrease of their fertility after birth, when they had reached sexual maturity. Moreover, females of both strains that had been X-irradiated with 0.2 Gy exhibited higher rates of pregnancy, less resorptions and more living fetuses. Additionally, the mean weight of living fetuses in these groups had significantly increased. Exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in CF1 fetuses issued from control and X-irradiated females. In the control group of that strain, polydactyly and limb deformity were also found. The yields of abnormal fetuses did not differ significantly between the control and X-irradiated groups. Polydactyly, exencephaly and dwarfism were observed in fetuses issued from ICR control females. In addition to these anomalies, gastroschisis, curly tail and open eye were observed at low frequencies in ICR fetuses issued from X-irradiated females. Again, the frequencies of abnormal fetuses found in the different groups did not differ significantly. In both CF1 and ICR mouse strains, irradiation of female zygotes did not result in the development of a genomic instability in the next generation embryos. Overall, our results suggest that, at the moderate doses used, developmental defects

  4. Evaluation of Genomic Instability as an Early Event in the Progression of Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    instability allows additional classifying of the known aneuploid, diploid, and tetraploid categories of primary breast adenocarcinomas into low and high...expression analysis using stromal and epithelial cell RNA from CHN tissues by microarray hybridization . Determine molecular signatures as a function of...microarray hybridization experiments where performed on “bulk” breast tissues 1cm from tumor margin (N=5), breast tissues 5cm from tumor margin (N=5), and

  5. Roles of SLX1-SLX4, MUS81-EME1, and GEN1 in avoiding genome instability and mitotic catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarbajna, Shriparna; Davies, Derek; West, Stephen C

    2014-05-15

    The resolution of recombination intermediates containing Holliday junctions (HJs) is critical for genome maintenance and proper chromosome segregation. Three pathways for HJ processing exist in human cells and involve the following enzymes/complexes: BLM-TopoIIIα-RMI1-RMI2 (BTR complex), SLX1-SLX4-MUS81-EME1 (SLX-MUS complex), and GEN1. Cycling cells preferentially use the BTR complex for the removal of double HJs in S phase, with SLX-MUS and GEN1 acting at temporally distinct phases of the cell cycle. Cells lacking SLX-MUS and GEN1 exhibit chromosome missegregation, micronucleus formation, and elevated levels of 53BP1-positive G1 nuclear bodies, suggesting that defects in chromosome segregation lead to the transmission of extensive DNA damage to daughter cells. In addition, however, we found that the effects of SLX4, MUS81, and GEN1 depletion extend beyond mitosis, since genome instability is observed throughout all phases of the cell cycle. This is exemplified in the form of impaired replication fork movement and S-phase progression, endogenous checkpoint activation, chromosome segmentation, and multinucleation. In contrast to SLX4, SLX1, the nuclease subunit of the SLX1-SLX4 structure-selective nuclease, plays no role in the replication-related phenotypes associated with SLX4/MUS81 and GEN1 depletion. These observations demonstrate that the SLX1-SLX4 nuclease and the SLX4 scaffold play divergent roles in the maintenance of genome integrity in human cells.

  6. Role of Ku80-dependent end-joining in delayed genomic instability in mammalian cells surviving ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keiji, E-mail: kzsuzuki@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Course of Life Sciences and Radiation Research, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523 (Japan); Kodama, Seiji [Research Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-2 Gakuen-machi, Sakai 599-8570 (Japan); Watanabe, Masami [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Kumatori-cho Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2010-01-05

    Ionizing radiation induces delayed destabilization of the genome in the progenies of surviving cells. This phenomenon, which is called radiation-induced genomic instability, is manifested by delayed induction of radiation effects, such as cell death, chromosome aberration, and mutation in the progeny of cells surviving radiation exposure. Previously, there was a report showing that delayed cell death was absent in Ku80-deficient Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, however, the mechanism of their defect has not been determined. We found that delayed induction of DNA double strand breaks and chromosomal breaks were intact in Ku80-deficient cells surviving X-irradiation, whereas there was no sign for the production of chromosome bridges between divided daughter cells. Moreover, delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes was significantly compromised in those cells compared to the wild-type CHO cells. Reintroduction of the human Ku86 gene complimented the defective DNA repair and recovered delayed induction of dicentric chromosomes and delayed cell death, indicating that defective Ku80-dependent dicentric induction was the cause of the absence of delayed cell death. Since DNA-PKcs-defective cells showed delayed phenotypes, Ku80-dependent illegitimate rejoining is involved in delayed impairment of the integrity of the genome in radiation-survived cells.

  7. Living with genome instability: the adaptation of phytoplasmas todiverse environments of their insect and plant hosts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xiaodong; Zhang, Jianhua; Ewing, Adam; Miller, Sally A.; Radek, Agnes; Shevchenko, Dimitriy; Tsukerman, Kiryl; Walunas, Theresa; Lapidus, Alla; Campbell, John W.; Hogenhout Saskia A.

    2006-02-17

    Phytoplasmas (Candidatus Phytoplasma, Class Mollicutes) cause disease in hundreds of economically important plants, and are obligately transmitted by sap-feeding insects of the order Hemiptera, mainly leafhoppers and psyllids. The 706,569-bp chromosome and four plasmids of aster yellows phytoplasma strain witches broom (AY-WB) were sequenced and compared to the onion yellows phytoplasma strain M (OY-M) genome. The phytoplasmas have small repeat-rich genomes. The repeated DNAs are organized into large clusters, potential mobile units (PMUs), which contain tra5 insertion sequences (ISs), and specialized sigma factors and membrane proteins. So far, PMUs are unique to phytoplasmas. Compared to mycoplasmas, phytoplasmas lack several recombination and DNA modification functions, and therefore phytoplasmas probably use different mechanisms of recombination, likely involving PMUs, for the creation of variability, allowing phytoplasmas to adjust to the diverse environments of plants and insects. The irregular GC skews and presence of ISs and large repeated sequences in the AY-WB and OY-M genomes are indicative of high genomic plasticity. Nevertheless, segments of {approx}250 kb, located between genes lplA and glnQ are syntenic between the two phytoplasmas, contain the majority of the metabolic genes and no ISs. AY-WB is further along in the reductive evolution process than OY-M. The AY-WB genome is {approx}154 kb smaller than the OY-M genome, primarily as a result of fewer multicopy sequences, including PMUs. Further, AY-WB lacks genes that are truncated and are part of incomplete pathways in OY-M. This is the first comparative phytoplasma genome analysis and report of the existence of PMUs in phytoplasma genomes.

  8. Crossing the LINE toward genomic instability: LINE-1 retrotransposition in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline R. Kemp

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons are repetitive DNA sequences that are positioned throughout the human genome. Retrotransposons are capable of copying themselves and mobilizing new copies to novel genomic locations in a process called retrotransposition. While most retrotransposon sequences in the human genome are incomplete and incapable of mobilization, the LINE-1 retrotransposon, which comprises approximately 17% of the human genome, remains active. The disruption of cellular mechanisms that suppress retrotransposon activity is linked to the generation of aneuploidy, a potential driver of tumor development. When retrotransposons insert into a novel genomic region, they have the potential to disrupt the coding sequence of endogenous genes and alter gene expression, which can lead to deleterious consequences for the organism. Additionally, increased LINE-1 copy numbers provide more chances for recombination events to occur between retrotransposons, which can lead to chromosomal breaks and rearrangements. LINE-1 activity is increased in various cancer cell lines and in patient tissues resected from primary tumors. LINE-1 activity also correlates with increased cancer metastasis. This review aims to give a brief overview of the connections between LINE-1 retrotransposition and the loss of genome stability. We will also discuss the mechanisms that repress retrotransposition in human cells and their links to cancer.

  9. Crossing the LINE toward genomic instability: LINE-1 retrotransposition in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Jacqueline; Longworth, Michelle

    2015-12-01

    Retrotransposons are repetitive DNA sequences that are positioned throughout the human genome. Retrotransposons are capable of copying themselves and mobilizing new copies to novel genomic locations in a process called retrotransposition. While most retrotransposon sequences in the human genome are incomplete and incapable of mobilization, the LINE-1 retrotransposon, which comprises approximately 17% of the human genome, remains active. The disruption of cellular mechanisms that suppress retrotransposon activity is linked to the generation of aneuploidy, a potential driver of tumor development. When retrotransposons insert into a novel genomic region, they have the potential to disrupt the coding sequence of endogenous genes and alter gene expression, which can lead to deleterious consequences for the organism. Additionally, increased LINE-1 copy numbers provide more chances for recombination events to occur between retrotransposons, which can lead to chromosomal breaks and rearrangements. LINE-1 activity is increased in various cancer cell lines and in patient tissues resected from primary tumors. LINE-1 activity also correlates with increased cancer metastasis. This review aims to give a brief overview of the connections between LINE-1 retrotransposition and the loss of genome stability. We will also discuss the mechanisms that repress retrotransposition in human cells and their links to cancer.

  10. Accumulation and Phosphorylation of RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein 1 (RMI1) at Serine 284 and Serine 292 during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chang; Wang, Yan; Wang, Lu; Wang, Qin; Du, Li-Qing; Fan, Saijun; Liu, Qiang; Li, Lei

    2015-11-04

    Chromosome instability usually leads to tumorigenesis. Bloom syndrome (BS) is a genetic disease associated with chromosome instability. The BS gene product, BLM, has been reported to function in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) to prevent chromosome instability. BTR complex, composed of BLM, topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα), RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1, BLAP75) and RMI2 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 2, BLAP18), is crucial for maintaining genome stability. Recent work has demonstrated that RMI2 also plays critical role in SAC. However, little is know about RMI1 regulation during the cell cycle. Here we present that RMI1 protein level does not change through G1, S and G2 phases, but significantly increases in M phase. Moreover, phosphorylation of RMI1 occurs in mitosis. Upon microtubule-disturbing agent, RMI1 is phosphorylated primarily at the sites of Serine 284 and Serine 292, which does not interfere with the formation of BTR complex. Additionally, this phosphorylation is partially reversed by roscovitine treatment, implying cycling-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) might be one of the upstream kinases.

  11. Accumulation and Phosphorylation of RecQ-Mediated Genome Instability Protein 1 (RMI1 at Serine 284 and Serine 292 during Mitosis

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    Chang Xu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome instability usually leads to tumorigenesis. Bloom syndrome (BS is a genetic disease associated with chromosome instability. The BS gene product, BLM, has been reported to function in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC to prevent chromosome instability. BTR complex, composed of BLM, topoisomerase IIIα (Topo IIIα, RMI1 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 1, BLAP75 and RMI2 (RecQ-mediated genome instability protein 2, BLAP18, is crucial for maintaining genome stability. Recent work has demonstrated that RMI2 also plays critical role in SAC. However, little is know about RMI1 regulation during the cell cycle. Here we present that RMI1 protein level does not change through G1, S and G2 phases, but significantly increases in M phase. Moreover, phosphorylation of RMI1 occurs in mitosis. Upon microtubule-disturbing agent, RMI1 is phosphorylated primarily at the sites of Serine 284 and Serine 292, which does not interfere with the formation of BTR complex. Additionally, this phosphorylation is partially reversed by roscovitine treatment, implying cycling-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 might be one of the upstream kinases.

  12. Genome instability in AZFc region on Y chromosome in leukocytes of fertile and infertile individuals following exposure to gamma radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghbeli-Nejad, Sahar; Mozdarani, Hossein; Behmanesh, Mehrdad; Rezaiean, Zahra; Fallahi, Parvin

    2012-01-01

    Men are exposed to various doses of ionizing radiation due to living in regions with high natural background radiation, accidentally, occupationally or for cancer treatment. To study genomic instability of AZFc region to gamma radiation, blood samples from normal, oligozoospermia, and azoospermia individuals were irradiated by a Co-60 source. Irradiated cells were kept for 48 h in order to repair initial DNA damages. Real time PCR was performed for three markers (SY 1206, SY 1197, SY 579) for testing copy number variation before and after irradiation. Copy number variations were compared by calculation of cycle threshold comparative method. Copy number variations of studied markers in AZFc region (microdeletion and duplication) in all samples after exposure to radiation increased with a dose dependent fashion. The frequency of instability was significantly higher in samples from infertile men in comparison with fertile ones (p  0.05). This observation might be a possible explanation for induction of azoospermia and oligozoospermia after radiotherapy. Increased frequency of induced microdeletion and duplication in infertile men compared with normal might be attributed to the deficiency in repair systems and the genetic factors involved in incomplete spermatogenesis of infertile men.

  13. Combining magnetic sorting of mother cells and fluctuation tests to analyze genome instability during mitotic cell aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Melissa N; Maxwell, Patrick H

    2014-10-16

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an excellent model system for examining mechanisms and consequences of genome instability. Information gained from this yeast model is relevant to many organisms, including humans, since DNA repair and DNA damage response factors are well conserved across diverse species. However, S. cerevisiae has not yet been used to fully address whether the rate of accumulating mutations changes with increasing replicative (mitotic) age due to technical constraints. For instance, measurements of yeast replicative lifespan through micromanipulation involve very small populations of cells, which prohibit detection of rare mutations. Genetic methods to enrich for mother cells in populations by inducing death of daughter cells have been developed, but population sizes are still limited by the frequency with which random mutations that compromise the selection systems occur. The current protocol takes advantage of magnetic sorting of surface-labeled yeast mother cells to obtain large enough populations of aging mother cells to quantify rare mutations through phenotypic selections. Mutation rates, measured through fluctuation tests, and mutation frequencies are first established for young cells and used to predict the frequency of mutations in mother cells of various replicative ages. Mutation frequencies are then determined for sorted mother cells, and the age of the mother cells is determined using flow cytometry by staining with a fluorescent reagent that detects bud scars formed on their cell surfaces during cell division. Comparison of predicted mutation frequencies based on the number of cell divisions to the frequencies experimentally observed for mother cells of a given replicative age can then identify whether there are age-related changes in the rate of accumulating mutations. Variations of this basic protocol provide the means to investigate the influence of alterations in specific gene functions or specific environmental conditions on

  14. LAMMER kinase contributes to genome stability in Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sena-Tomás, Carmen; Sutherland, Jeanette H; Milisavljevic, Mira; Nikolic, Dragana B; Pérez-Martín, José; Kojic, Milorad; Holloman, William K

    2015-09-01

    Here we report identification of the lkh1 gene encoding a LAMMER kinase homolog (Lkh1) from a screen for DNA repair-deficient mutants in Ustilago maydis. The mutant allele isolated results from a mutation at glutamine codon 488 to a stop codon that would be predicted to lead to truncation of the carboxy-terminal kinase domain of the protein. This mutant (lkh1(Q488*)) is highly sensitive to ultraviolet light, methyl methanesulfonate, and hydroxyurea. In contrast, a null mutant (lkh1Δ) deleted of the entire lkh1 gene has a less severe phenotype. No epistasis was observed when an lkh1(Q488*)rad51Δ double mutant was tested for genotoxin sensitivity. However, overexpressing the gene for Rad51, its regulator Brh2, or the Brh2 regulator Dss1 partially restored genotoxin resistance of the lkh1Δ and lkh1(Q488*) mutants. Deletion of lkh1 in a chk1Δ mutant enabled these double mutant cells to continue to cycle when challenged with hydroxyurea. lkh1Δ and lkh1(Q488*) mutants were able to complete the meiotic process but exhibited reduced heteroallelic recombination and aberrant chromosome segregation. The observations suggest that Lkh1 serves in some aspect of cell cycle regulation after DNA damage or replication stress and that it also contributes to proper chromosome segregation in meiosis.

  15. Chromosomal instability in Afrotheria: fragile sites, evolutionary breakpoints and phylogenetic inference from genome sequence assemblies

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    Ruiz-Herrera Aurora

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extant placental mammals are divided into four major clades (Laurasiatheria, Supraprimates, Xenarthra and Afrotheria. Given that Afrotheria is generally thought to root the eutherian tree in phylogenetic analysis of large nuclear gene data sets, the study of the organization of the genomes of afrotherian species provides new insights into the dynamics of mammalian chromosomal evolution. Here we test if there are chromosomal bands with a high tendency to break and reorganize in Afrotheria, and by analyzing the expression of aphidicolin-induced common fragile sites in three afrotherian species, whether these are coincidental with recognized evolutionary breakpoints. Results We described 29 fragile sites in the aardvark (OAF genome, 27 in the golden mole (CAS, and 35 in the elephant-shrew (EED genome. We show that fragile sites are conserved among afrotherian species and these are correlated with evolutionary breakpoints when compared to the human (HSA genome. Inddition, by computationally scanning the newly released opossum (Monodelphis domestica and chicken sequence assemblies for use as outgroups to Placentalia, we validate the HSA 3/21/5 chromosomal synteny as a rare genomic change that defines the monophyly of this ancient African clade of mammals. On the other hand, support for HSA 1/19p, which is also thought to underpin Afrotheria, is currently ambiguous. Conclusion We provide evidence that (i the evolutionary breakpoints that characterise human syntenies detected in the basal Afrotheria correspond at the chromosomal band level with fragile sites, (ii that HSA 3p/21 was in the amniote ancestor (i.e., common to turtles, lepidosaurs, crocodilians, birds and mammals and was subsequently disrupted in the lineage leading to marsupials. Its expansion to include HSA 5 in Afrotheria is unique and (iii that its fragmentation to HSA 3p/21 + HSA 5/21 in elephant and manatee was due to a fission within HSA 21 that is probably shared

  16. Phosphate steering by Flap Endonuclease 1 promotes 5′-flap specificity and incision to prevent genome instability

    KAUST Repository

    Tsutakawa, Susan E.

    2017-06-27

    DNA replication and repair enzyme Flap Endonuclease 1 (FEN1) is vital for genome integrity, and FEN1 mutations arise in multiple cancers. FEN1 precisely cleaves single-stranded (ss) 5\\'-flaps one nucleotide into duplex (ds) DNA. Yet, how FEN1 selects for but does not incise the ss 5\\'-flap was enigmatic. Here we combine crystallographic, biochemical and genetic analyses to show that two dsDNA binding sites set the 5\\'polarity and to reveal unexpected control of the DNA phosphodiester backbone by electrostatic interactions. Via phosphate steering\\', basic residues energetically steer an inverted ss 5\\'-flap through a gateway over FEN1\\'s active site and shift dsDNA for catalysis. Mutations of these residues cause an 18,000-fold reduction in catalytic rate in vitro and large-scale trinucleotide (GAA) repeat expansions in vivo, implying failed phosphate-steering promotes an unanticipated lagging-strand template-switch mechanism during replication. Thus, phosphate steering is an unappreciated FEN1 function that enforces 5\\'-flap specificity and catalysis, preventing genomic instability.

  17. The Adaptive Response in p53 Cancer Prone Mice: Loss of heterozygosity and Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josee, Lavoie [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences; Dolling, Jo-Anna [Credit Valley Hospital, Missassauga, ON (Canada); Mitchel, Ron E.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL), Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Boreham, Douglas R. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences

    2004-09-28

    The Trp53 gene is clearly associated with increased cancer risk. This, coupled with the broad understanding of its mode of action at the molecular level, makes this gene a good candidate for investigating the relationship between genetic risk factors and spontaneous cancer occurring in a mouse model exposed to low dose radiation. We have shown that adaptive response to chronic low dose radiation could increase cancer latency, as well as overall lifespan. To better understand the molecular processes that influence cellular risk, modern tools in molecular biology were used to evaluate the loss of heterozigozity (LOH) at the Trp53 locus, and chromosomal instability in the cells from mice exposed to chronic low dose radiation. Female mice carrying a single defective copy of the Trp53 gene were irradiated with doses of gamma-radiation delivered at a low dose rate of about 0.7 mGy/hr. Groups of mice (5 irradiated and 5 unexposed) were exposed to 0.33 mGy per day for 15, 30, 45, 60, 67 and 75 weeks equaling total body doses of 2.4, 4.7, 7.2, 9.7, 10.9 and 12.1 cGy, respectively. The presence of a single defective copy of the Trp53 gene increases cancer risk in these mice. However, in vivo exposure to low dose radiation increased cancer latency. We hypothesized that: (1) These mice might have spontaneous chromosome instability, and (2) that this low dose adaptive exposure would reduce the chromosomal instability. This instability was investigated using spectral karyotyping (SKY). Bone marrow cells from 5 irradiated mice (doses of 10.9 and 12.1 cGy) and 5 control mice were collected for metaphase harvest. Briefly, the cells were incubated at 37 C for 4 hours in RPMI containing 25% heat-inactivated FBS and 0.1 mg/ml colcemid, and then given a hypotonic treatment of 0.075M KCl for 20 minutes at 37 C. An average of 100 metaphases per mouse were karyotyped. The Trp53 heterozygous mice do not show apparent structural chromosome instability. From both unexposed and irradiated

  18. Mutations in MAPT gene cause chromosome instability and introduce copy number variations widely in the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Giacomina; Conconi, Donatella; Panzeri, Elena; Redaelli, Serena; Piccoli, Elena; Paoletta, Laura; Dalprà, Leda; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the main function of promoting polymerization and stabilization of microtubules, other roles are being attributed to tau, now considered a multifunctional protein. In particular, previous studies suggest that tau is involved in chromosome stability and genome protection. We performed cytogenetic analysis, including molecular karyotyping, on lymphocytes and fibroblasts from patients affected by frontotemporal lobar degeneration carrying different mutations in the microtubule-associated protein tau gene, to investigate the effects of these mutations on genome stability. Furthermore, we analyzed the response of mutated lymphoblastoid cell lines to genotoxic agents to evaluate the participation of tau to DNA repair systems. We found a significantly higher level of chromosome aberrations in mutated than in control cells. Mutated lymphocytes showed higher percentages of stable lesions, clonal and total aneuploidy (medians: 2 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01; 1.5 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01; 16.5 versus 0, p $\\ll$ 0.01, respectively). Fibroblasts of patients showed higher percentages of stable lesions, structural aberrations and total aneuploidy (medians: 0 versus 0, p = 0.03; 5.8 versus 0, p = 0.02; 26.5 versus 12.6, p $\\ll$ 0.01, respectively). In addition, the in depth analysis of DNA copy number variations showed a higher tendency to non-allelic homologous recombination in mutated cells. Finally, while our analysis did not support an involvement of tau in DNA repair systems, it revealed its role in stabilization of chromatin. In summary, our findings indicate a role of tau in genome and chromosome stability that can be ascribed to its function as a microtubule-associated protein as well as a protein protecting chromatin integrity through interaction with DNA.

  19. INMAP overexpression inhibits cell proliferation, induces genomic instability and functions through p53/p21 pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhu

    Full Text Available INMAP is a spindle protein that plays essential role for mitosis, by ensuring spindle and centromere integrality. The aim of this study was to investigate the relevant functions of INMAP for genomic stability and its functional pathway. We overexpressed INMAP in HeLa cells, resulting in growth inhibition in monolayer cell cultures, anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and xenograft growth in nude mice. In this system caused micronuclei (MNi formation, chromosome distortion and γH2AX expression upregulation, suggesting DNA damage induction and genomic stability impairment. As a tumour biochemical marker, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH isoenzymes were detected to evaluate cell metabolic activity, the results confirming that total activity of LDH, as well as that of its LDH5 isoform, is significantly decreased in INMAP-overexpressing HeLa cells. The levels of p53 and p21 were upregulated, and however, that of PCNA and Bcl-2, downregulated. Indirect immunofluorescence (IIF and coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP analyses revealed the interaction between INMAP and p21. These results suggest that INMAP might function through p53/p21 pathways.

  20. T-cell-specific deletion of Mof blocks their differentiation and results in genomic instability in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Arun; Hunt, Clayton R; Pandita, Raj K; Pae, Juhee; Komal, K; Singh, Mayank; Shay, Jerry W; Kumar, Rakesh; Ariizumi, Kiyoshi; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Hittelman, Walter N; Guha, Chandan; Ludwig, Thomas; Pandita, Tej K

    2013-05-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia patients develop lymphoid malignancies of both B- and T-cell origin. Similarly, ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm)-deficient mice exhibit severe defects in T-cell maturation and eventually develop thymomas. The function of ATM is known to be influenced by the mammalian orthologue of the Drosophila MOF (males absent on the first) gene. Here, we report the effect of T-cell-specific ablation of the mouse Mof (Mof) gene on leucocyte trafficking and survival. Conditional Mof(Flox/Flox) (Mof (F/F)) mice expressing Cre recombinase under control of the T-cell-specific Lck proximal promoter (Mof(F/F)/Lck-Cre(+)) display a marked reduction in thymus size compared with Mof(F/F)/Lck-Cre(-) mice. In contrast, the spleen size of Mof(F/F)/Lck-Cre(+) mice was increased compared with control Mof(F/F)/Lck-Cre(-) mice. The thymus of Mof(F/F)/Lck-Cre(+) mice contained significantly reduced T cells, whereas thymic B cells were elevated. Within the T-cell population, CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive T-cell levels were reduced, whereas the immature CD4(-)CD8(-) double-negative (DN) population was elevated. Defective T-cell differentiation is also evident as an increased DN3 (CD44(-)CD25(+)) population, the cell stage during which T-cell receptor rearrangement takes place. The differentiation defect in T cells and reduced thymus size were not rescued in a p53-deficient background. Splenic B-cell distributions were similar between Mof(F/F)/Lck-Cre(+) and Mof(F/F)/Lck-Cre(-) mice except for an elevation of the κ light-chain population, suggestive of an abnormal clonal expansion. T cells from Mof(F/F)/Lck-Cre(+) mice did not respond to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation, whereas LPS-stimulated B cells from Mof(F/F)/Lck-Cre(+) mice demonstrated spontaneous genomic instability. Mice with T-cell-specific loss of MOF had shorter lifespans and decreased survival following irradiation than did Mof(F/F)/Lck-Cre(-) mice. These observations suggest that Mof plays a critical

  1. Polytene chromosomes of Chironomidae (Diptera as a bioassay of trace-metal-induced genome instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskeva Vladimirova Michailova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Chironomids are a ubiquitous group of aquatic insects that are very sensitive to environmental stress. Due to the presence of polytene (‘giant’ salivary gland chromosomes, it is possible to define the genome response of several Chironomid species to various stress agents. The aim of this study was to assess the genotoxic changes in populations of widely distributed chironomid species from aquatic basins in Bulgaria, Italy, Russia, U.K. and Poland, which were exposed to high concentrations of trace metals. We analyzed the structural and functional alterations of polytene chromosomes of the salivary glands of larvae belonging to three different cytocomplexes of the genus Chironomus (“thummi”, “lacunarius”, “pseudothummi”, and genera Glyptotendipes and Kiefferulus. Somatic structural chromosome rearrangements (para- and pericentric heterozygous inversions, deletions, deficiencies and amplifications were used to estimate a Somatic index (S for each population. The highest S indexes were detected in Chironomus riparius populations from locations with high concentrations of trace metals in the sediment. Each species showed specific genome responses to stress agents which we discussed in the light of the specific DNA structures and cytogenetic characteristics of the species. In larvae from polluted sediments two key structures of the salivary gland chromosomes (Balbiani Rings and Nucleolar Organizer sharply reduced their activity to levels below those observed under non-polluted conditions. It is concluded that polytene chromosomes can be used as tools for evaluating the genotoxicity of the aquatic environment. Structural and functional chromosome alterations provide cost-effective early-warning signals of genotoxic concentrations of environmental pollutants.doi: 10.5324/fn.v31i0.1355.Published online: 17 October 2012.

  2. The Quiescent Cellular State is Arf/p53-Dependent and Associated with H2AX Downregulation and Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuko Masutani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease associated with genomic instability and mutations. Excluding some tumors with specific chromosomal translocations, most cancers that develop at an advanced age are characterized by either chromosomal or microsatellite instability. However, it is still unclear how genomic instability and mutations are generated during the process of cellular transformation and how the development of genomic instability contributes to cellular transformation. Recent studies of cellular regulation and tetraploidy development have provided insights into the factors triggering cellular transformation and the regulatory mechanisms that protect chromosomes from genomic instability.

  3. The moyamoya disease susceptibility variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431) induces genomic instability by mitotic abnormality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitomi, Toshiaki; Habu, Toshiyuki; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H; Osafune, Kenji; Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu; Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko; Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi; Morito, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Susumu; Nakao, Kazuwa; Koizumi, Akio

    2013-10-04

    Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the Circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. In the present study, we characterized phenotypes caused by overexpression of RNF213 wild type and R4810K variant in the cell cycle to investigate the mechanism of proliferation inhibition. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K in HeLa cells inhibited cell proliferation and extended the time of mitosis 4-fold. Ablation of spindle checkpoint by depletion of mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (MAD2) did not shorten the time of mitosis. Mitotic morphology in HeLa cells revealed that MAD2 colocalized with RNF213 R4810K. Immunoprecipitation revealed an RNF213/MAD2 complex: R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than RNF213 wild-type. Desynchronized localization of MAD2 was observed more frequently during mitosis in fibroblasts from patients (n=3, 61.0 ± 8.2%) compared with wild-type subjects (n=6, 13.1 ± 7.7%; pcarrier had a longer time from prometaphase to metaphase than those from controls (pcarrier had significantly increased mitotic failure rates compared with controls (p<0.05). Thus, RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormalities and increased risk of genomic instability. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of two organomodified clays intended to food contact materials on the genomic instability and gene expression of hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Jordá-Beneyto, María; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Ángeles

    2016-02-01

    Globally, food industries have made significant progress in order to increase the shelf-life of food products and have fewer economic losses. In this sense, the use of organomodified clays destined to be incorporated in polymer matrices play a novel role, leading to improved materials named nanocomposites with enhanced technological profiles. Due to the presence of these clays into the package, the safety of the consumers is a main concern. Cloisite(®)30B and Clay1 are two organomodified clays containing quaternary ammonium salts as modifiers, that can be potentially used to reinforce packaging polymers. Available toxicity data about these clays, specifically genotoxicity, is still limited and inconclusive in some aspects. Thus, the purpose of this work was to evaluate both clays ability to induce genomic instability through the cytokinesis block micronucleus cytome assay (CBMN) and for the first time, their influence in the modulation of several genes involved in genotoxicity and cell death mechanisms. Overall, no genotoxicity response was obtained in any case at the conditions tested. On the other hand, significant expression changes were observed on the genes selected. Nevertheless, further studies are highly needed to elucidate and increase the knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of clays toxicity.

  5. Reactive oxygen species, DNA damage, and error-prone repair: a model for genomic instability with progression in myeloid leukemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassool, Feyruz V; Gaymes, Terry J; Omidvar, Nader; Brady, Nicola; Beurlet, Stephanie; Pla, Marika; Reboul, Murielle; Lea, Nicholas; Chomienne, Christine; Thomas, Nicholas S B; Mufti, Ghulam J; Padua, Rose Ann

    2007-09-15

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) comprise a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis, with an increased propensity to develop acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The molecular basis for MDS progression is unknown, but a key element in MDS disease progression is loss of chromosomal material (genomic instability). Using our two-step mouse model for myeloid leukemic disease progression involving overexpression of human mutant NRAS and BCL2 genes, we show that there is a stepwise increase in the frequency of DNA damage leading to an increased frequency of error-prone repair of double-strand breaks (DSB) by nonhomologous end-joining. There is a concomitant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these transgenic mice with disease progression. Importantly, RAC1, an essential component of the ROS-producing NADPH oxidase, is downstream of RAS, and we show that ROS production in NRAS/BCL2 mice is in part dependent on RAC1 activity. DNA damage and error-prone repair can be decreased or reversed in vivo by N-acetyl cysteine antioxidant treatment. Our data link gene abnormalities to constitutive DNA damage and increased DSB repair errors in vivo and provide a mechanism for an increase in the error rate of DNA repair with MDS disease progression. These data suggest treatment strategies that target RAS/RAC pathways and ROS production in human MDS/AML.

  6. Possible expressions of radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects or low-dose hypersensitivity in cancer epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Peter, E-mail: Jacob@helmholtz-muenchen.de [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Meckbach, Reinhard; Kaiser, Jan Christian [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Radiation Protection, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Sokolnikov, Mikhail [Southern Urals Biophysics Institute, Ozyorsk 456780 (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-01

    Recent publications on the integration of radiobiological effects in the two-step clonal expansion (TSCE) model of carcinogenesis and applications to radioepidemiological data are reviewed and updated. First, a model version with radiation-induced genomic instability was shown to be a possible explanation for the age dependence of the radiation-induced cancer mortality in the Techa River Cohort. Second, it is demonstrated that inclusion of a bystander effect with a dose threshold allows an improved description of the lung cancer mortality risk for the Mayak workers cohort due to incorporation of plutonium. The threshold for the annual lung dose is estimated to 12 (90%CI: 4; 14) mGy/year. This threshold applies to the initiation of preneoplastic cells and to hyperplastic growth. There is, however, no evidence for a threshold for the effects of gamma radiation. Third, models with radiation-induced cell inactivation tend to predict lower cancer risks among the atomic bomb survivors with exposure at young age than conventionally used empirical models. Also, risks after exposures with doses in the order of 100 mGy are predicted to be higher in models with low-dose hypersensitivity than in models with conventional cell survival curves. In the reviewed literature, models of carcinogenesis tend to describe radioepidemiological data better than conventionally used empirical models.

  7. [CHANGING OF PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PARAMETERS OF NON-CONTACT (ELECTROCHEMICAL) ACTIVATED DRINKING WATER IS ASSOCIATED WITH INDUCTION OF GENOMIC INSTABILITY OF CULTIVATED HUMAN BLOOD LYMPHOCYTES].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatsepina, O V; Ingel, F I

    2016-01-01

    In the article there are presented data which are the fragment of large multidisciplinary study of genetic safety of non-contact electrochemically activated water (NAW). The aim of this study was the analysis of the relation of impacts of genomic instability (micronucleus test with cytochalasin B) detected in human blood cells, cultured in medias prepared on the base of these NAWs, with physical and chemical properties of these NaWs. In experiments there were used catholytes and anolytes obtained by activation of osmotic, tap and dining bottled water As a result of such activation, all waters were shown to acquire the ability to induce genomic instability in cellular cultures. Notably in cell cultures on catholytes and anolytes these effects differed between themselves and have been associated with different physical and chemical properties of the NAWs.

  8. DNA end resection by CtIP and exonuclease 1 prevents genomic instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eid, Wassim; Steger, Martin; El-Shemerly, Mahmoud

    2010-01-01

    End resection of DNA-which is essential for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination-relies first on the partnership between MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) and CtIP, followed by a processive step involving helicases and exonucleases such as exonuclease 1 (EXO1). In this s......End resection of DNA-which is essential for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination-relies first on the partnership between MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) and CtIP, followed by a processive step involving helicases and exonucleases such as exonuclease 1 (EXO1......). In this study, we show that the localization of EXO1 to DSBs depends on both CtIP and MRN. We also establish that CtIP interacts with EXO1 and restrains its exonucleolytic activity in vitro. Finally, we show that on exposure to camptothecin, depletion of EXO1 in CtIP-deficient cells increases the frequency...... of DNA-PK-dependent radial chromosome formation. Thus, our study identifies new functions of CtIP and EXO1 in DNA end resection and provides new information on the regulation of DSB repair pathways, which is a key factor in the maintenance of genome integrity....

  9. A germline polymorphism of DNA polymerase beta induces genomic instability and cellular transformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yamtich

    Full Text Available Several germline single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs have been identified in the POLB gene, but little is known about their cellular and biochemical impact. DNA Polymerase β (Pol β, encoded by the POLB gene, is the main gap-filling polymerase involved in base excision repair (BER, a pathway that protects the genome from the consequences of oxidative DNA damage. In this study we tested the hypothesis that expression of the POLB germline coding SNP (rs3136797 in mammalian cells could induce a cancerous phenotype. Expression of this SNP in both human and mouse cells induced double-strand breaks, chromosomal aberrations, and cellular transformation. Following treatment with an alkylating agent, cells expressing this coding SNP accumulated BER intermediate substrates, including single-strand and double-strand breaks. The rs3136797 SNP encodes the P242R variant Pol β protein and biochemical analysis showed that P242R protein had a slower catalytic rate than WT, although P242R binds DNA similarly to WT. Our results suggest that people who carry the rs3136797 germline SNP may be at an increased risk for cancer susceptibility.

  10. Canonical non-homologous end joining in mitosis induces genome instability and is suppressed by M-phase-specific phosphorylation of XRCC4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Terasawa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs can be repaired by one of two major pathways-non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and homologous recombination (HR-depending on whether cells are in G1 or S/G2 phase, respectively. However, the mechanisms of DSB repair during M phase remain largely unclear. In this study, we demonstrate that transient treatment of M-phase cells with the chemotherapeutic topoisomerase inhibitor etoposide induced DSBs that were often associated with anaphase bridge formation and genome instability such as dicentric chromosomes. Although most of the DSBs were carried over into the next G1 phase, some were repaired during M phase. Both NHEJ and HR, in particular NHEJ, promoted anaphase-bridge formation, suggesting that these repair pathways can induce genome instability during M phase. On the other hand, C-terminal-binding protein interacting protein (CtIP suppressed anaphase bridge formation, implying that CtIP function prevents genome instability during mitosis. We also observed M-phase-specific phosphorylation of XRCC4, a regulatory subunit of the ligase IV complex specialized for NHEJ. This phosphorylation required cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK activity as well as polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1. A phosphorylation-defective XRCC4 mutant showed more efficient M-phase DSB repair accompanied with an increase in anaphase bridge formation. These results suggest that phosphorylation of XRCC4 suppresses DSB repair by modulating ligase IV function to prevent genome instability during M phase. Taken together, our results indicate that XRCC4 is required not only for the promotion of NHEJ during interphase but also for its M-phase-specific suppression of DSB repair.

  11. Genome Instability of Chironomus riparius Mg. (Diptera, Chironomidae from Polluted Water Basins in Bulgaria

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    Julia Ilkova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Larvae of Chironomus riparius Mg. (Chironomidae, Diptera collected from two polluted water basins in Bulgaria, the Maritsa and Chaya Rivers (adjacent to Plovdiv and Asenovgrad respectively, a small pool (near Plovdiv plus controls reared in the laboratory were studied. High concentrations of the heavy metals Pb, Cu and Cd were recorded in the sediments of the polluted stations. Marked somatic structural chromosome aberrations were found in C. riparius salivary polytene chromosomes from the field stations and their frequency was significantly higher (p<0.01 compared to the control. The observed somatic chromosome changes are discussed as a response of the chironomid genome to aquatic pollution. A new cytogenetic index based on the number of aberrations found in larvae from polluted regions in comparison with the control was applied to the data to more easily evaluate the degree of heavy metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems. Our study of a polluted site near the River Chaya showed that the somatic index was very high at 3.35 for 2010 and 11.66 for 2013 compared to 0.5 in the control. The cytogenetic index was effective in showing that all studied sites were highly polluted in comparison with the control. To determine the mechanism involved in the concentration of aberration breakpoints within specific regions of the chironomid polytene chromosome the FISH method was applied. The localization of a transposable element TFB1 along the polytene chromosomes of C. riparius was analyzed and the sites of localization were compared with breakpoints of chromosome aberrations. A significant correlation (p<0.05 was found which shows that most of the aberrations do not appear randomly but are concentrated in sites rich in transposable elements.

  12. Incompatibility between Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genomes Contributes to an Interspecies Reproductive Barrier.

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    Ma, Hong; Marti Gutierrez, Nuria; Morey, Robert; Van Dyken, Crystal; Kang, Eunju; Hayama, Tomonari; Lee, Yeonmi; Li, Ying; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Wolf, Don P; Laurent, Louise C; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2016-08-09

    Vertebrate cells carry two different genomes, nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial (mtDNA), both encoding proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation. Because of the extensive interactions, adaptive coevolution of the two genomes must occur to ensure normal mitochondrial function. To investigate whether incompatibilities between these two genomes could contribute to interspecies reproductive barriers, we performed reciprocal mtDNA replacement (MR) in zygotes between widely divergent Mus m. domesticus (B6) and conplastic Mus m. musculus (PWD) mice. Transfer of MR1 cybrid embryos (B6nDNA-PWDmtDNA) supported normal development of F1 offspring with reduced male fertility but unaffected reproductive fitness in females. Furthermore, donor PWD mtDNA was faithfully transmitted through the germline into F2 and F3 generations. In contrast, reciprocal MR2 (PWDnDNA-B6mtDNA) produced high embryonic loss and stillborn rates, suggesting an association between mitochondrial function and infertility. These results strongly suggest that functional incompatibility between nuclear and mitochondrial genomes contributes to interspecies reproductive isolation in mammals.

  13. Disproportionate Contributions of Select Genomic Compartments and Cell Types to Genetic Risk for Coronary Artery Disease.

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    Hong-Hee Won

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Large genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many genetic loci associated with risk for myocardial infarction (MI and coronary artery disease (CAD. Concurrently, efforts such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Project and the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE Consortium have provided unprecedented data on functional elements of the human genome. In the present study, we systematically investigate the biological link between genetic variants associated with this complex disease and their impacts on gene function. First, we examined the heritability of MI/CAD according to genomic compartments. We observed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs residing within nearby regulatory regions show significant polygenicity and contribute between 59-71% of the heritability for MI/CAD. Second, we showed that the polygenicity and heritability explained by these SNPs are enriched in histone modification marks in specific cell types. Third, we found that a statistically higher number of 45 MI/CAD-associated SNPs that have been identified from large-scale GWAS studies reside within certain functional elements of the genome, particularly in active enhancer and promoter regions. Finally, we observed significant heterogeneity of this signal across cell types, with strong signals observed within adipose nuclei, as well as brain and spleen cell types. These results suggest that the genetic etiology of MI/CAD is largely explained by tissue-specific regulatory perturbation within the human genome.

  14. Bacterial Responses and Genome Instability Induced by Subinhibitory Concentrations of Antibiotics

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    Arnaud Gutierrez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance have become an utmost medical and economical problem. It has also become evident that subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics, which pollute all kind of terrestrial and aquatic environments, have a non-negligible effect on the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacterial populations. Subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics have a strong effect on mutation rates, horizontal gene transfer and biofilm formation, which may all contribute to the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance. Therefore, the molecular mechanisms and the evolutionary pressures shaping the bacterial responses to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics merit to be extensively studied. Such knowledge is valuable for the development of strategies to increase the efficacy of antibiotic treatments and to extend the lifetime of antibiotics used in therapy by slowing down the emergence of antibiotic resistance.

  15. Toxicogenetic study of Persea americana fruit pulp oil and its effect on genomic instability.

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    Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; Neto, Francisco Rinaldi; Corrêa, Mariana Beltrame; Lopes, Danillo Henrique; Rondon, Edilaura Nunes; Dos Santos, Luiz Felipe Ribeiro; de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Damasceno, Jaqueline Lopes; Acésio, Nathália Oliveira; Turatti, Izabel Cristina Casanova; Tozatti, Marcos Gomide; Cunha, Wilson Roberto; Furtado, Ricardo Andrade; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2017-03-01

    Persea americana Mill., commonly known as avocado, is a tree native to Central America that is widely used as a food source and for the treatment of diseases. This plant has various biological properties such as analgesic, anti-inflammatory and total cholesterol-lowering activity. In view of its pharmacological potential, we conducted a toxicogenetic study of the fruit pulp oil of P. americana (PAO) and investigated its influence on genotoxicity induced by methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and doxorubicin. V79 cells and Swiss mice were used for the assays. The results showed no genotoxic effects of PAO in the in vitro or in vivo test systems. However, the highest PAO dose tested led to an increase in the levels of aspartate aminotransferase, indicating hepatic/tissue damage. This effect may be related to high concentrations of palmitic acid, the main component of PAO. Furthermore, PAO was effective in reducing the chromosome damage induced by MMS and doxorubicin. These results contribute to the safety assessment of PAO as a medicinal plant for human use.

  16. Final report- Links between persistent DNA damage, genome instability, and aging

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    Dynan, William S. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-11-30

    The goal of the project was to determine whether high linear energy transfer (LET) space radiation produces the same or different effects as low doses of terrestrial (low-LET) radiation. The work used the Japanese medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) as a vertebrate model organism that can be maintained in large numbers at low cost for lifetime studies. To determine whether simulated space radiation produced the same or different effects as low doses of low-LET radiation, medaka embryos were irradiated at doses ranging from 0.1 to 9 Gray (Gy) of high-LET charged particle radiation (1000 MeV/nucleon 56-Fe ions) or 0.1 Gy to 27 Gy of low-LET gamma-rays. To examine the effect of irradiation on potential biomarkers, the population was sampled at intervals from 8 to 28 months post-irradiation and liver tissue was subjected to histological and molecular analysis. Charged particle radiation and aging contributed synergistically to accumulation of lipid oxidation products, which are a marker of chronic oxidative stress. This was mirrored by a decline in mRNA encoding the transcriptional activator PPARGC1A, which is required for mitochondrial maintenance and for defense against oxidative stress. Additionally, mitochondria had an elongated and enlarged ultrastructure. Depending on the endpoint, effects of gamma-rays in the same dose range were either lesser or not detected. Together, results indicate that a single exposure to high-LET, but not low-LET radiation, early in life, leads to increased oxidative stress throughout the normal lifespan of the individual.

  17. Gene loss and horizontal gene transfer contributed to the genome evolution of the extreme acidophile Ferrovum

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    Sophie Roxana Ullrich

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD, associated with active and abandoned mining sites, is a habitat for acidophilic microorganisms that gain energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and ferrous iron and that thrive at pH below 4. Members of the recently proposed genus Ferrovum are the first acidophilic iron oxidizers to be described within the Betaproteobacteria. Although they have been detected as typical community members in AMD habitats worldwide, knowledge of their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is scarce. Genomics approaches appear to be most promising in addressing this lacuna since isolation and cultivation of Ferrovum has proven to be extremely difficult and has so far only been successful for the designated type strain Ferrovum myxofaciens P3G. In this study, the genomes of two novel strains of Ferrovum (PN-J185 and Z-31 derived from water samples of a mine water treatment plant were sequenced. These genomes were compared with those of Ferrovum sp. JA12 that also originated from the mine water treatment plant, and of the type strain (P3G. Phylogenomic scrutiny suggests that the four strains represent three Ferrovum species that cluster in two groups (1 and 2. Comprehensive analysis of their predicted metabolic pathways revealed that these groups harbor characteristic metabolic profiles, notably with respect to motility, chemotaxis, nitrogen metabolism, biofilm formation and their potential strategies to cope with the acidic environment. For example, while the F. myxofaciens strains (group 1 appear to be motile and diazotrophic, the non-motile group 2 strains have the predicted potential to use a greater variety of fixed nitrogen sources. Furthermore, analysis of their genome synteny provides first insights into their genome evolution, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer and genome reduction in the group 2 strains by loss of genes encoding complete metabolic pathways or physiological features contributed to the observed

  18. miR-155 Over-expression Promotes Genomic Instability by Reducing High-fidelity Polymerase Delta Expression and Activating Error-prone DSB Repair

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    Czochor, Jennifer R.; Sulkowski, Parker; Glazer, Peter M.

    2016-01-01

    miR-155 is an oncogenic microRNA (miR) that is often over-expressed in cancer and is associated with poor prognosis. miR-155 can target several DNA repair factors including RAD51, MLH1, and MSH6, and its over-expression results in an increased mutation frequency in vitro, although the mechanism has yet to be fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that over-expression of miR-155 drives an increased mutation frequency both in vitro and in vivo, promoting genomic instability by affecting multiple DNA repair pathways. miR-155 over-expression causes a decrease in homologous recombination, but yields a concurrent increase in the error-prone non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. Despite repressing established targets MLH1 and MSH6, the identified mutation pattern upon miR-155 over-expression does not resemble that of a mismatch repair-deficient background. Further investigation revealed that all four subunits of polymerase delta, a high-fidelity DNA replication and repair polymerase, are down-regulated at the mRNA level in the context of miR-155 over-expression. FOXO3a, a transcription factor and known target of miR-155, has one or more putative binding site(s) in the promoter of all four polymerase delta subunits. Finally, suppression of FOXO3a by miR-155 or by siRNA knockdown is sufficient to repress the expression of the catalytic subunit of polymerase delta, POLD1, at the protein level, indicating that FOXO3a contributes to the regulation of polymerase delta levels. PMID:26850462

  19. Cyanobacterial contribution to the genomes of the plastid-lacking protists

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    Matsuzaki Motomichi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic genes with cyanobacterial ancestry in plastid-lacking protists have been regarded as important evolutionary markers implicating the presence of plastids in the early evolution of eukaryotes. Although recent genomic surveys demonstrated the presence of cyanobacterial and algal ancestry genes in the genomes of plastid-lacking protists, comparative analyses on the origin and distribution of those genes are still limited. Results We identified 12 gene families with cyanobacterial ancestry in the genomes of a taxonomically wide range of plastid-lacking eukaryotes (Phytophthora [Chromalveolata], Naegleria [Excavata], Dictyostelium [Amoebozoa], Saccharomyces and Monosiga [Opisthokonta] using a novel phylogenetic pipeline. The eukaryotic gene clades with cyanobacterial ancestry were mostly composed of genes from bikonts (Archaeplastida, Chromalveolata, Rhizaria and Excavata. We failed to find genes with cyanobacterial ancestry in Saccharomyces and Dictyostelium, except for a photorespiratory enzyme conserved among fungi. Meanwhile, we found several Monosiga genes with cyanobacterial ancestry, which were unrelated to other Opisthokonta genes. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that a considerable number of genes with cyanobacterial ancestry have contributed to the genome composition of the plastid-lacking protists, especially bikonts. The origins of those genes might be due to lateral gene transfer events, or an ancient primary or secondary endosymbiosis before the diversification of bikonts. Our data also show that all genes identified in this study constitute multi-gene families with punctate distribution among eukaryotes, suggesting that the transferred genes could have survived through rounds of gene family expansion and differential reduction.

  20. Multilevel comparative analysis of the contributions of genome reduction and heat shock to the Escherichia coli transcriptome

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    Ying Bei-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Both large deletions in genome and heat shock stress would lead to alterations in the gene expression profile; however, whether there is any potential linkage between these disturbances to the transcriptome have not been discovered. Here, the relationship between the genomic and environmental contributions to the transcriptome was analyzed by comparing the transcriptomes of the bacterium Escherichia coli (strain MG1655 and its extensive genomic deletion derivative, MDS42 grown in regular and transient heat shock conditions. Results The transcriptome analysis showed the following: (i there was a reorganization of the transcriptome in accordance with preferred chromosomal periodicity upon genomic or heat shock perturbation; (ii there was a considerable overlap between the perturbed regulatory networks and the categories enriched for differentially expressed genes (DEGs following genome reduction and heat shock; (iii the genes sensitive to genome reduction tended to be located close to genomic scars, and some were also highly responsive to heat shock; and (iv the genomic and environmental contributions to the transcriptome displayed not only a positive correlation but also a negatively compensated relationship (i.e., antagonistic epistasis. Conclusion The contributions of genome reduction and heat shock to the Escherichia coli transcriptome were evaluated at multiple levels. The observations of overlapping perturbed networks, directional similarity in transcriptional changes, positive correlation and epistatic nature linked the two contributions and suggest somehow a crosstalk guiding transcriptional reorganization in response to both genetic and environmental disturbances in bacterium E. coli.

  1. BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibits uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 to enhance oxidative DNA damage and stimulate genomic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slupianek, Artur; Falinski, Rafal; Znojek, Pawel; Stoklosa, Tomasz; Flis, Sylwia; Doneddu, Valentina; Pytel, Dariusz; Synowiec, Ewelina; Blasiak, Janusz; Bellacosa, Alfonso; Skorski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized the treatment of CML-CP. Unfortunately, 25% of TKI-naive patients and 50–90% of TKI-responding patients carry CML clones expressing TKI resistant BCR-ABL1 kinase mutants. We reported that CML-CP leukemia stem and progenitor cell populations accumulate high amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may result in accumulation of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA. Unfaithful and/or inefficient repair of these lesions generates TKI resistant point mutations in BCR-ABL1 kinase. Using an array of specific substrates and inhibitors/blocking antibodies we found that uracil-DNA glycosylase UNG2 were inhibited in BCR-ABL1 –transformed cell lines and CD34+ CML cells. The inhibitory effect was not accompanied by downregulation of nuclear expression and/or chromatin association of UNG2. The effect was BCR-ABL1 kinase-specific because several other fusion tyrosine kinases did not reduce UNG2 activity. Using UNG2-specific inhibitor UGI we found that reduction of UNG2 activity increased the number of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA detected by modified comet assay and facilitated accumulation of ouabain-resistant point mutations in reporter gene Na+/K+ATPase. In conclusion, we postulate that BCR-ABL1 kinase-mediated inhibition of UNG2 contributes to accumulation of point mutations responsible for TKI-resistance causing the disease relapse, and perhaps also other point mutations facilitating malignant progression of CML. PMID:23047475

  2. Loss of ATRX, genome instability, and an altered DNA damage response are hallmarks of the alternative lengthening of telomeres pathway.

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    Courtney A Lovejoy

    Full Text Available The Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT pathway is a telomerase-independent pathway for telomere maintenance that is active in a significant subset of human cancers and in vitro immortalized cell lines. ALT is thought to involve templated extension of telomeres through homologous recombination, but the genetic or epigenetic changes that unleash ALT are not known. Recently, mutations in the ATRX/DAXX chromatin remodeling complex and histone H3.3 were found to correlate with features of ALT in pancreatic neuroendocrine cancers, pediatric glioblastomas, and other tumors of the central nervous system, suggesting that these mutations might contribute to the activation of the ALT pathway in these cancers. We have taken a comprehensive approach to deciphering ALT by applying genomic, molecular biological, and cell biological approaches to a panel of 22 ALT cell lines, including cell lines derived in vitro. Here we show that loss of ATRX protein and mutations in the ATRX gene are hallmarks of ALT-immortalized cell lines. In addition, ALT is associated with extensive genome rearrangements, marked micronucleation, defects in the G2/M checkpoint, and altered double-strand break (DSB repair. These attributes will facilitate the diagnosis and treatment of ALT positive human cancers.

  3. Loss of yeast peroxiredoxin Tsa1p induces genome instability through activation of the DNA damage checkpoint and elevation of dNTP levels.

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    Hei-Man Vincent Tang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Peroxiredoxins are a family of antioxidant enzymes critically involved in cellular defense and signaling. Particularly, yeast peroxiredoxin Tsa1p is thought to play a role in the maintenance of genome integrity, but the underlying mechanism is not understood. In this study, we took a genetic approach to investigate the cause of genome instability in tsa1Delta cells. Strong genetic interactions of TSA1 with DNA damage checkpoint components DUN1, SML1, and CRT1 were found when mutant cells were analyzed for either sensitivity to DNA damage or rate of spontaneous base substitutions. An elevation in intracellular dNTP production was observed in tsa1Delta cells. This was associated with constitutive activation of the DNA damage checkpoint as indicated by phosphorylation of Rad9/Rad53p, reduced steady-state amount of Sml1p, and induction of RNR and HUG1 genes. In addition, defects in the DNA damage checkpoint did not modulate intracellular level of reactive oxygen species, but suppressed the mutator phenotype of tsa1Delta cells. On the contrary, overexpression of RNR1 exacerbated this phenotype by increasing dNTP levels. Taken together, our findings uncover a new role of TSA1 in preventing the overproduction of dNTPs, which is a root cause of genome instability.

  4. Loss of the histone pre-mRNA processing factor stem-loop binding protein in Drosophila causes genomic instability and impaired cellular proliferation.

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    Harmony R Salzler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Metazoan replication-dependent histone mRNAs terminate in a conserved stem-loop structure rather than a polyA tail. Formation of this unique mRNA 3' end requires Stem-loop Binding Protein (SLBP, which directly binds histone pre-mRNA and stimulates 3' end processing. The 3' end stem-loop is necessary for all aspects of histone mRNA metabolism, including replication coupling, but its importance to organism fitness and genome maintenance in vivo have not been characterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Drosophila, disruption of the Slbp gene prevents normal histone pre-mRNA processing and causes histone pre-mRNAs to utilize the canonical 3' end processing pathway, resulting in polyadenylated histone mRNAs that are no longer properly regulated. Here we show that Slbp mutants display genomic instability, including loss of heterozygosity (LOH, increased presence of chromosome breaks, tetraploidy, and changes in position effect variegation (PEV. During imaginal disc growth, Slbp mutant cells show defects in S phase and proliferate more slowly than control cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data are consistent with a model in which changing the 3' end of histone mRNA disrupts normal replication-coupled histone mRNA biosynthesis and alters chromatin assembly, resulting in genomic instability, inhibition of cell proliferation, and impaired development.

  5. Dysregulation of mitotic machinery genes precedes genome instability during spontaneous pre-malignant transformation of mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells

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    Ulises Urzúa

    2016-10-01

    suggests altered control of nuclear RNA maturation, features recently linked to impaired DNA damage response leading to genome instability. These results, combined with cytogenetic analysis by other authors in this model, suggest that transcriptional profile at passage 14 might induce cytokinesis failure by which tetraploid cells approach a near-tetraploid stage containing primary chromosome aberrations that initiate the tumorigenic drive.

  6. Genomic instability induced in distant progeny of bystander cells depends on the connexins expressed in the irradiated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Toledo, Sonia M; Buonanno, Manuela; Harris, Andrew L; Azzam, Edouard I

    2017-06-15

    To examine the time window during which intercellular signaling though gap junctions mediates non-targeted (bystander) effects induced by moderate doses of ionizing radiation; and to investigate the impact of gap junction communication on genomic instability in distant progeny of bystander cells. A layered cell culture system was developed to investigate the propagation of harmful effects from irradiated normal or tumor cells that express specific connexins to contiguous bystander normal human fibroblasts. Irradiated cells were exposed to moderate mean absorbed doses from 3.7 MeV α particle, 1000 MeV/u iron ions, 600 MeV/u silicon ions, or (137)Cs γ rays. Following 5 h of co-culture, pure populations of bystander cells, unexposed to secondary radiation, were isolated and DNA damage and oxidative stress was assessed in them and in their distant progeny (20-25 population doublings). Increased frequency of micronucleus formation and enhanced oxidative changes were observed in bystander cells co-cultured with confluent cells exposed to either sparsely ionizing ((137)Cs γ rays) or densely ionizing (α particles, energetic iron or silicon ions) radiations. The irradiated cells propagated signals leading to biological changes in bystander cells within 1 h of irradiation, and the effect required cellular coupling by gap junctions. Notably, the distant progeny of isolated bystander cells also exhibited increased levels of spontaneous micronuclei. This effect was dependent on the type of junctional channels that coupled the irradiated donor cells with the bystander cells. Previous work showed that gap junctions composed of connexin26 (Cx26) or connexin43 (Cx43) mediate toxic bystander effects within 5 h of co-culture, whereas gap junctions composed of connexin32 (Cx32) mediate protective effects. In contrast, the long-term progeny of bystander cells expressing Cx26 or Cx43 did not display elevated DNA damage, whereas those coupled by Cx32 had enhanced DNA

  7. The moyamoya disease susceptibility variant RNF213 R4810K (rs112735431) induces genomic instability by mitotic abnormality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitomi, Toshiaki [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Habu, Toshiyuki [Radiation Biology Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Kobayashi, Hatasu; Okuda, Hiroko; Harada, Kouji H. [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Osafune, Kenji [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Taura, Daisuke; Sone, Masakatsu [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Asaka, Isao; Ameku, Tomonaga; Watanabe, Akira; Kasahara, Tomoko; Sudo, Tomomi; Shiota, Fumihiko [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Hashikata, Hirokuni; Takagi, Yasushi [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Morito, Daisuke [Faculty of Life Sciences, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto (Japan); Miyamoto, Susumu [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nakao, Kazuwa [Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Koizumi, Akio, E-mail: koizumi.akio.5v@kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Health and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K inhibited cell proliferation. •Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K had the time of mitosis 4-fold and mitotic failure. •R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than wild-type. •iPSECs from the MMD patients had elevated mitotic failure compared from the control. •RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormality and increased risk of aneuploidy. -- Abstract: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a cerebrovascular disease characterized by occlusive lesions in the Circle of Willis. The RNF213 R4810K polymorphism increases susceptibility to MMD. In the present study, we characterized phenotypes caused by overexpression of RNF213 wild type and R4810K variant in the cell cycle to investigate the mechanism of proliferation inhibition. Overexpression of RNF213 R4810K in HeLa cells inhibited cell proliferation and extended the time of mitosis 4-fold. Ablation of spindle checkpoint by depletion of mitotic arrest deficiency 2 (MAD2) did not shorten the time of mitosis. Mitotic morphology in HeLa cells revealed that MAD2 colocalized with RNF213 R4810K. Immunoprecipitation revealed an RNF213/MAD2 complex: R4810K formed a complex with MAD2 more readily than RNF213 wild-type. Desynchronized localization of MAD2 was observed more frequently during mitosis in fibroblasts from patients (n = 3, 61.0 ± 8.2%) compared with wild-type subjects (n = 6, 13.1 ± 7.7%; p < 0.01). Aneuploidy was observed more frequently in fibroblasts (p < 0.01) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) (p < 0.03) from patients than from wild-type subjects. Vascular endothelial cells differentiated from iPSCs (iPSECs) of patients and an unaffected carrier had a longer time from prometaphase to metaphase than those from controls (p < 0.05). iPSECs from the patients and unaffected carrier had significantly increased mitotic failure rates compared with controls (p < 0.05). Thus, RNF213 R4810K induced mitotic abnormalities and increased risk of genomic instability.

  8. Induction of genomic instability, oxidative processes, and mitochondrial activity by 50Hz magnetic fields in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells.

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    Luukkonen, Jukka; Liimatainen, Anu; Juutilainen, Jukka; Naarala, Jonne

    2014-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that exposure to 50Hz magnetic fields (MF) increases the risk of childhood leukemia, but there is no mechanistic explanation for carcinogenic effects. In two previous studies we have observed that a 24-h pre-exposure to MF alters cellular responses to menadione-induced DNA damage. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular changes that must occur already during the first 24h of exposure to MF, and to explore whether the MF-induced changes in DNA damage response can lead to genomic instability in the progeny of the exposed cells. In order to answer these questions, human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells were exposed to a 50-Hz, 100-μT MF for 24h, followed by 3-h exposure to menadione. The main finding was that MF exposure was associated with increased level of micronuclei, used as an indicator of induced genomic instability, at 8 and 15d after the exposures. Other delayed effects in MF-exposed cells included increased mitochondrial activity at 8d, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and lipid peroxidation at 15d after the exposures. Oxidative processes (ROS production, reduced glutathione level, and mitochondrial superoxide level) were affected by MF immediately after the exposure. In conclusion, the present results suggest that MF exposure disturbs oxidative balance immediately after the exposure, which might explain our previous findings on MF altered cellular responses to menadione-induced DNA damage. Persistently elevated levels of micronuclei were found in the progeny of MF-exposed cells, indicating induction of genomic instability.

  9. Basal-like Breast cancer DNA copy number losses identify genes involved in genomic instability, response to therapy, and patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigman, Victor J; Chao, Hann-Hsiang; Shabalin, Andrey A; He, Xiaping; Parker, Joel S; Nordgard, Silje H; Grushko, Tatyana; Huo, Dezheng; Nwachukwu, Chika; Nobel, Andrew; Kristensen, Vessela N; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Perou, Charles M

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with known expression-defined tumor subtypes. DNA copy number studies have suggested that tumors within gene expression subtypes share similar DNA Copy number aberrations (CNA) and that CNA can be used to further sub-divide expression classes. To gain further insights into the etiologies of the intrinsic subtypes, we classified tumors according to gene expression subtype and next identified subtype-associated CNA using a novel method called SWITCHdna, using a training set of 180 tumors and a validation set of 359 tumors. Fisher's exact tests, Chi-square approximations, and Wilcoxon rank-sum tests were performed to evaluate differences in CNA by subtype. To assess the functional significance of loss of a specific chromosomal region, individual genes were knocked down by shRNA and drug sensitivity, and DNA repair foci assays performed. Most tumor subtypes exhibited specific CNA. The Basal-like subtype was the most distinct with common losses of the regions containing RB1, BRCA1, INPP4B, and the greatest overall genomic instability. One Basal-like subtype-associated CNA was loss of 5q11-35, which contains at least three genes important for BRCA1-dependent DNA repair (RAD17, RAD50, and RAP80); these genes were predominantly lost as a pair, or all three simultaneously. Loss of two or three of these genes was associated with significantly increased genomic instability and poor patient survival. RNAi knockdown of RAD17, or RAD17/RAD50, in immortalized human mammary epithelial cell lines caused increased sensitivity to a PARP inhibitor and carboplatin, and inhibited BRCA1 foci formation in response to DNA damage. These data suggest a possible genetic cause for genomic instability in Basal-like breast cancers and a biological rationale for the use of DNA repair inhibitor related therapeutics in this breast cancer subtype.

  10. BCR-ABL1 kinase inhibits uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 to enhance oxidative DNA damage and stimulate genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slupianek, A; Falinski, R; Znojek, P; Stoklosa, T; Flis, S; Doneddu, V; Pytel, D; Synowiec, E; Blasiak, J; Bellacosa, A; Skorski, T

    2013-03-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) revolutionized the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia in chronic phase (CML-CP). Unfortunately, 25% of TKI-naive patients and 50-90% of patients developing TKI-resistance carry CML clones expressing TKI-resistant BCR-ABL1 kinase mutants. We reported that CML-CP leukemia stem and progenitor cell populations accumulate high amounts of reactive oxygen species, which may result in accumulation of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA. Unfaithful and/or inefficient repair of these lesions generates TKI-resistant point mutations in BCR-ABL1 kinase. Using an array of specific substrates and inhibitors/blocking antibodies we found that uracil DNA glycosylase UNG2 were inhibited in BCR-ABL1-transformed cell lines and CD34(+) CML cells. The inhibitory effect was not accompanied by downregulation of nuclear expression and/or chromatin association of UNG2. The effect was BCR-ABL1 kinase-specific because several other fusion tyrosine kinases did not reduce UNG2 activity. Using UNG2-specific inhibitor UGI, we found that reduction of UNG2 activity increased the number of uracil derivatives in genomic DNA detected by modified comet assay and facilitated accumulation of ouabain-resistant point mutations in reporter gene Na(+)/K(+)ATPase. In conclusion, we postulate that BCR-ABL1 kinase-mediated inhibition of UNG2 contributes to accumulation of point mutations responsible for TKI resistance causing the disease relapse, and perhaps also other point mutations facilitating malignant progression of CML.

  11. High-Level HOOK3 Expression Is an Independent Predictor of Poor Prognosis Associated with Genomic Instability in Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel Melling

    Full Text Available Hook microtubule-tethering protein 3 (HOOK3 is an adaptor protein for microtubule-dependent intracellular vesicle and protein trafficking. In order to assess the role of HOOK3 in prostate cancer we analyzed HOOK3 expression by immunohistochemistry on a TMA containing more than 12,400 prostate cancers. Results were compared to tumor phenotype and PSA recurrence as well as aberrations possibly defining relevant molecular subtypes such as ERG status and deletions of 3p13, 5q21, 6q15 and PTEN. HOOK3 immunostaining was negative in normal luminal cells of prostate epithelium, whereas 53.3% of 10,572 interpretable cancers showed HOOK3 expression, which was considered low in 36.4% and high in 16.9% of cases. High-level HOOK3 expression was linked to advanced tumor stage, high Gleason score, high proliferation index, positive lymph node stage, and PSA recurrence (p<0.0001 each. The prognostic role of HOOK3 expression was independent of established clinico-pathological parameters both in preoperative and postoperative settings. Comparisons with molecular features were performed to draw conclusions on the potential function of HOOK3 in the prostate. A strong association with all examined deletions is consistent with a role of HOOK3 for maintaining genomic integrity by contributing to proper centrosome assembly. Finding HOOK3 expression in 74% of ERG positive but in only 38% of ERG negative cancers (p<0.0001 further suggests functional interactions between these genes. In conclusion, the results of our study identify HOOK3 as a strong candidate prognostic marker with a possible role in maintaining genomic integrity in prostate cancer, which may have potential for inclusion into clinical routine assays.

  12. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: I. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing dogma in the radiation sciences is that energy from radiation must be deposited in the cell nucleus to elicit a biological effect. A number of non-targeted, delayed effects of ionizing radiation have been described that challenge this dogma and pose new challenges to evaluating potential hazards associated with radiation exposure. These effects include induced genomic instability and non-targeted bystander effects. The in vitro evidence for non-targeted effects in radiation biology will be reviewed, but the question as to how one extrapolates from these in vitro observations to the risk of radiation-induced adverse health effects such as cancer remains open.

  13. T-cell factor-4 frameshift mutations occur frequently in human microsatellite instability-high colorectal carcinomas but do not contribute to carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruckert, Stefan; Hiendlmeyer, Elke; Brueckl, Wolfgang M; Oswald, Ursula; Beyser, Kurt; Dietmaier, Wolfgang; Haynl, Angela; Koch, Claudia; Rüschoff, Josef; Brabletz, Thomas; Kirchner, Thomas; Jung, Andreas

    2002-06-01

    Colorectal carcinomas with microsatellite instability accumulate errors in short repetitive DNA repeats, especially mono and dinucleotide repeats. One such error-prone A(9) monorepeat is found in exon 17 of the TCF-4 gene. TCF-4 and beta-catenin form a transcription complex, which is important for both maintenance of normal epithelium and development of colorectal tumors. To elucidate the relevance of frameshift mutations in the TCF-4 in colorectal carcinogenesis, a variety of investigations in human tumors and cell lines was performed. It was found that mutations in the TCF-4 A(9) repeat do not contribute to tumorigenesis and seem to be passenger mutations.

  14. Exposure to estrogen and ionizing radiation causes epigenetic dysregulation, activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, and genome instability in the mammary gland of ACI rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutanzi, Kristy; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-07-01

    The impact of environmental mutagens and carcinogens on the mammary gland has recently received a lot of attention. Among the most generally accepted carcinogenic agents identified as factors that may increase breast cancer incidence are ionizing radiation and elevated estrogen levels. However, the molecular mechanisms of mammary gland aberrations associated with radiation and estrogen exposure still need to be further elucidated, especially the interplay between elevated hormone levels and radiation. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated molecular changes induced in rat mammary gland tissue by estrogen, ionizing radiation, and the combined action of these two carcinogens using a well-established ACI rat model. We found that continuous exposure of intact female ACI rats to elevated levels of estrogen or to both estrogen and radiation resulted in significant hyperproliferative changes in rat mammary glands. In contrast, radiation exposure alone did not induce hyperplasia. Interestingly, despite the obvious disparity in mammary gland morphology, we did not detect significant differences in the levels of genomic methylation among animals exposed to estrogen, radiation, or both agents together. Specifically, we observed a significant global genomic hypomethylation at 6 weeks of exposure. However, by 12 and 18 weeks, the levels of global DNA methylation returned to those of age-matched controls. We also found that combined exposure to radiation and estrogen significantly altered the levels of histone H3 and H4 methylation and acetylation. Most importantly, we for the first time demonstrated that estrogen and radiation exposure caused a significant induction of p42/44 MAPK and p38 pathways that was paralleled by elevated levels of H3S10 phosphorylation, a well-established biomarker of genome and chromosome instability. The precise role of MAPK pathways and their inter-relationship with H3S10 phosphorylation and genome instability in mammary gland tissues needs

  15. Oligodeoxynucleotide binding to (CTG) · (CAG) microsatellite repeats inhibits replication fork stalling, hairpin formation, and genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoqi; Chen, Xiaomi; Leffak, Michael

    2013-02-01

    (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion in the 3' untranslated region of the dystrophia myotonica protein kinase (DMPK) gene causes myotonic dystrophy type 1. However, a direct link between TNR instability, the formation of noncanonical (CTG)(n) · (CAG)(n) structures, and replication stress has not been demonstrated. In a human cell model, we found that (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) causes local replication fork stalling, DNA hairpin formation, and TNR instability. Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) complementary to the (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) lagging-strand template eliminated DNA hairpin formation on leading- and lagging-strand templates and relieved fork stalling. Prolonged cell culture, emetine inhibition of lagging-strand synthesis, or slowing of DNA synthesis by low-dose aphidicolin induced (CTG)(45) · (CAG)(45) expansions and contractions. ODNs targeting the lagging-strand template blocked the time-dependent or emetine-induced instability but did not eliminate aphidicolin-induced instability. These results show directly that TNR replication stalling, replication stress, hairpin formation, and instability are mechanistically linked in vivo.

  16. Phantastic objects and the financial market's sense of reality: a psychoanalytic contribution to the understanding of stock market instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckett, David; Taffler, Richard

    2008-04-01

    This paper sets out to explore if standard psychoanalytic thinking based on clinical experience can illuminate instability in financial markets and its widespread human consequences. Buying, holding or selling financial assets in conditions of inherent uncertainty and ambiguity, it is argued, necessarily implies an ambivalent emotional and phantasy relationship to them. Based on the evidence of historical accounts, supplemented by some interviewing, the authors suggest a psychoanalytic approach focusing on unconscious phantasy relationships, states of mind, and unconscious group functioning can explain some outstanding questions about financial bubbles which cannot be explained with mainstream economic theories. The authors also suggest some institutional features of financial markets which may ordinarily increase or decrease the likelihood that financial decisions result from splitting off those thoughts which give rise to painful emotions. Splitting would increase the future risk of financial instability and in this respect the theory with which economic agents in such markets approach their work is important. An interdisciplinary theory recognizing and making possible the integration of emotional experience may be more useful to economic agents than the present mainstream theories which contrast rational and irrational decision-making and model them as making consistent decisions on the basis of reasoning alone.

  17. Distinct Contributions of Replication and Transcription to Mutation Rate Variation of Human Genomes

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2012-03-23

    Here, we evaluate the contribution of two major biological processes—DNA replication and transcription—to mutation rate variation in human genomes. Based on analysis of the public human tissue transcriptomics data, high-resolution replicating map of Hela cells and dbSNP data, we present significant correlations between expression breadth, replication time in local regions and SNP density. SNP density of tissue-specific (TS) genes is significantly higher than that of housekeeping (HK) genes. TS genes tend to locate in late-replicating genomic regions and genes in such regions have a higher SNP density compared to those in early-replication regions. In addition, SNP density is found to be positively correlated with expression level among HK genes. We conclude that the process of DNA replication generates stronger mutational pressure than transcription-associated biological processes do, resulting in an increase of mutation rate in TS genes while having weaker effects on HK genes. In contrast, transcription-associated processes are mainly responsible for the accumulation of mutations in highly-expressed HK genes.

  18. Genome-wide approaches to identify pharmacogenetic contributions to adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M R; Bacanu, S-A; Mosteller, M; Li, L; Bowman, C E; Roses, A D; Lai, E H; Ehm, M G

    2009-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) have a major impact on patients, physicians, health care providers, regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical companies. Identifying the genetic contributions to ADR risk may lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms, identification of patients at risk and a decrease in the number of events. Technological advances have made the routine monitoring and investigation of the genetic basis of ADRs during clinical trials possible. We demonstrate through simulation that genome-wide genotyping, coupled with the use of clinically matched or population controls, can yield sufficient statistical power to permit the identification of strong genetic predictors of ADR risk in a prospective manner with modest numbers of ADR cases. The results of a 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of abacavir-associated hypersensitivity reaction suggest that the known HLA-B gene region could be identified with as few as 15 cases and 200 population controls in a sequential analysis.

  19. The contribution of microbunching instability to solar flare emission in the GHz to THz range of frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Klopf, J Michael; Raulin, Jean-Pierre; Szpigel, Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Recent solar flare observations in the sub-THz range have provided evidence of a new spectral component with fluxes increasing for larger frequencies, separated from the well-known microwave emission that maximizes in the GHz range. Suggested interpretations explain the THz spectral component, but do not account for the simultaneous microwave component. We present a mechanism for producing the observed double-spectra. Based on coherent enhancement of synchrotron emission at long wavelengths in laboratory accelerators, we consider how similar processes may occur within a solar flare. The instability known as microbunching arises from perturbations that produce electron beam density modulations, giving rise to broadband coherent synchrotron emission at wavelengths comparable to the characteristic size of the microbunch structure. The spectral intensity of this coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) can far exceed that of the incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), which peaks at higher frequency, thus producing a...

  20. Contribution of genome-environment interaction to pre-eclampsia in a Havana Maternity Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardoeyt, Roberto; Vargas, Gerardo; Lumpuy, Jairo; García, Ramón; Torres, Yuselis

    2013-07-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality during pregnancy worldwide and is among the leading causes of maternal mortality in Cuba. It is a complex, multifactoral disease, in which interaction of genetic and environmental factors should not be overlooked if the goal is proper risk assessment to support personalized preventive genetic counseling and more effective prenatal care to prevent pregnancy complications. Determine the contribution to pre-eclampsia of interaction between a predisposing genome and adverse environmental factors in pregnant women in a Havana maternity hospital. This was the exploratory phase of a hospital-based case-control study, using January 2007-December 2009 patient records from the Eusebio Hernández University Hospital, a provincial maternity hospital in Havana. Eighty pregnant women diagnosed with pre-eclampsia and 160 controls were studied. The main variables were age, parity, nutritional status (measured by BMI), alcohol use, tobacco use, and history of pre-eclampsia in relatives of the pregnant woman (proband) or of her partner. Pearson chi square and Fisher exact test were used to assess statistical significance of associations between variables and odds ratio as a measure of association strength. Familial aggregation was studied and a case-control design used to assess gene-environment interaction, using multiplicative and additive models. Among the environmental risk factors studied, alcohol showed the strongest effect on pre-eclampsia risk (OR 3.87, 95% CI 1.64-9.13). Familial pre-eclampsia clustering was observed; risk was increased for both first-degree (OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.62-3.73) and second-degree (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.34-2.68) relatives as well as for husband's relatives (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.40-3.86). There was evidence of interaction between alcohol consumption and family history. Familial aggregation of the disorder was demonstrated, the first Cuban epidemiological evidence of genetic and enviromental

  1. TDP2-dependent non-homologous end-joining protects against topoisomerase II-induced DNA breaks and genome instability in cells and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Gómez-Herreros

    Full Text Available Anticancer topoisomerase "poisons" exploit the break-and-rejoining mechanism of topoisomerase II (TOP2 to generate TOP2-linked DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. This characteristic underlies the clinical efficacy of TOP2 poisons, but is also implicated in chromosomal translocations and genome instability associated with secondary, treatment-related, haematological malignancy. Despite this relevance for cancer therapy, the mechanistic aspects governing repair of TOP2-induced DSBs and the physiological consequences that absent or aberrant repair can have are still poorly understood. To address these deficits, we employed cells and mice lacking tyrosyl DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (TDP2, an enzyme that hydrolyses 5'-phosphotyrosyl bonds at TOP2-associated DSBs, and studied their response to TOP2 poisons. Our results demonstrate that TDP2 functions in non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and liberates DSB termini that are competent for ligation. Moreover, we show that the absence of TDP2 in cells impairs not only the capacity to repair TOP2-induced DSBs but also the accuracy of the process, thus compromising genome integrity. Most importantly, we find this TDP2-dependent NHEJ mechanism to be physiologically relevant, as Tdp2-deleted mice are sensitive to TOP2-induced damage, displaying marked lymphoid toxicity, severe intestinal damage, and increased genome instability in the bone marrow. Collectively, our data reveal TDP2-mediated error-free NHEJ as an efficient and accurate mechanism to repair TOP2-induced DSBs. Given the widespread use of TOP2 poisons in cancer chemotherapy, this raises the possibility of TDP2 being an important etiological factor in the response of tumours to this type of agent and in the development of treatment-related malignancy.

  2. Comparative genomics analysis of rice and pineapple contributes to understand the chromosome number reduction and genomic changes in grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Rice is one of the most researched model plant, and has a genome structure most resembling that of the grass common ancestor after a grass common tetraploidization ~100 million years ago. There has been a standing controversy whether there had been 5 or 7 basic chromosomes, before the tetraploidization, which were tackled but could not be well solved for the lacking of a sequenced and assembled outgroup plant to have a conservative genome structure. Recently, the availability of pineapple genome, which has not been subjected to the grass-common tetraploidization, provides a precious opportunity to solve the above controversy and to research into genome changes of rice and other grasses. Here, we performed a comparative genomics analysis of pineapple and rice, and found solid evidence that grass-common ancestor had 2n =2x =14 basic chromosomes before the tetraploidization and duplicated to 2n = 4x = 28 after the event. Moreover, we proposed that enormous gene missing from duplicated regions in rice should be explained by an allotetraploid produced by prominently divergent parental lines, rather than gene losses after their divergence. This means that genome fractionation might have occurred before the formation of the allotetraploid grass ancestor.

  3. The genome of Nectria haematococca: contribution of supernumerary chromosomes to gene expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J.J.; Rounsley, S.D.; Rodriguez-Carres, M.; Kuo, A.; Wasmann, C.c.; Grimwood, J.; Schmutz, J.; Taga, M.; White, G.J.; Zhuo, S.; Schwartz, D.C.; Freitag, M.; Ma, L.-J.; Danchin, E.G.J.; Henrissat, B.; Cutinho, P.M.; Nelson, D.R.; Straney, D.; Napoli, C.A.; Baker, B.M.; Gribskov, M.; Rep, M.; Kroken, S.; Molnar, I.; Rensing, C.; Kennell, J.C.; Zamora, J.; Farman, M.L.; Selker, E.U.; Salamov, A.; Shapiro, H.; Pangilinan, J.; Lindquist, E.; Lamers, C.; Grigoriev, I.V.; Geiser, D.M.; Covert, S.F.; Temporini, S.; VanEtten, H.D.

    2009-04-20

    The ascomycetous fungus Nectria haematococca, (asexual name Fusarium solani), is a member of a group of .50 species known as the"Fusarium solani species complex". Members of this complex have diverse biological properties including the ability to cause disease on .100 genera of plants and opportunistic infections in humans. The current research analyzed the most extensively studied member of this complex, N. haematococca mating population VI (MPVI). Several genes controlling the ability of individual isolates of this species to colonize specific habitats are located on supernumerary chromosomes. Optical mapping revealed that the sequenced isolate has 17 chromosomes ranging from 530 kb to 6.52 Mb and that the physical size of the genome, 54.43 Mb, and the number of predicted genes, 15,707, are among the largest reported for ascomycetes. Two classes of genes have contributed to gene expansion: specific genes that are not found in other fungi including its closest sequenced relative, Fusarium graminearum; and genes that commonly occur as single copies in other fungi but are present as multiple copies in N. haematococca MPVI. Some of these additional genes appear to have resulted from gene duplication events, while others may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. The supernumerary nature of three chromosomes, 14, 15, and 17, was confirmed by their absence in pulsed field gel electrophoresis experiments of some isolates and by demonstrating that these isolates lacked chromosome-specific sequences found on the ends of these chromosomes. These supernumerary chromosomes contain more repeat sequences, are enriched in unique and duplicated genes, and have a lower G+C content in comparison to the other chromosomes. Although the origin(s) of the extra genes and the supernumerary chromosomes is not known, the gene expansion and its large genome size are consistent with this species' diverse range of habitats. Furthermore, the presence of unique genes on

  4. The genome of Nectria haematococca: contribution of supernumerary chromosomes to gene expansion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J Coleman

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The ascomycetous fungus Nectria haematococca, (asexual name Fusarium solani, is a member of a group of >50 species known as the "Fusarium solani species complex". Members of this complex have diverse biological properties including the ability to cause disease on >100 genera of plants and opportunistic infections in humans. The current research analyzed the most extensively studied member of this complex, N. haematococca mating population VI (MPVI. Several genes controlling the ability of individual isolates of this species to colonize specific habitats are located on supernumerary chromosomes. Optical mapping revealed that the sequenced isolate has 17 chromosomes ranging from 530 kb to 6.52 Mb and that the physical size of the genome, 54.43 Mb, and the number of predicted genes, 15,707, are among the largest reported for ascomycetes. Two classes of genes have contributed to gene expansion: specific genes that are not found in other fungi including its closest sequenced relative, Fusarium graminearum; and genes that commonly occur as single copies in other fungi but are present as multiple copies in N. haematococca MPVI. Some of these additional genes appear to have resulted from gene duplication events, while others may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. The supernumerary nature of three chromosomes, 14, 15, and 17, was confirmed by their absence in pulsed field gel electrophoresis experiments of some isolates and by demonstrating that these isolates lacked chromosome-specific sequences found on the ends of these chromosomes. These supernumerary chromosomes contain more repeat sequences, are enriched in unique and duplicated genes, and have a lower G+C content in comparison to the other chromosomes. Although the origin(s of the extra genes and the supernumerary chromosomes is not known, the gene expansion and its large genome size are consistent with this species' diverse range of habitats. Furthermore, the presence of unique

  5. Large scale genomic testing within herd does not affect contribution margin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortø, Line; Ettema, Jehan; Sørensen, Anders Christian

    2013-01-01

    A Danish study from 2012 shows that genomic test of all or part of the females in a Holstein herd gives roughly the same economic result as not performing any genomic test at all......A Danish study from 2012 shows that genomic test of all or part of the females in a Holstein herd gives roughly the same economic result as not performing any genomic test at all...

  6. Lung adenocarcinoma of never smokers and smokers harbor differential regions of genetic alteration and exhibit different levels of genomic instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelsie L Thu

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that the observed clinical distinctions between lung tumors in smokers and never smokers (NS extend beyond specific gene mutations, such as EGFR, EML4-ALK, and KRAS, some of which have been translated into targeted therapies. However, the molecular alterations identified thus far cannot explain all of the clinical and biological disparities observed in lung tumors of NS and smokers. To this end, we performed an unbiased genome-wide, comparative study to identify novel genomic aberrations that differ between smokers and NS. High resolution whole genome DNA copy number profiling of 69 lung adenocarcinomas from smokers (n = 39 and NS (n = 30 revealed both global and regional disparities in the tumor genomes of these two groups. We found that NS lung tumors had a greater proportion of their genomes altered than those of smokers. Moreover, copy number gains on chromosomes 5q, 7p, and 16p occurred more frequently in NS. We validated our findings in two independently generated public datasets. Our findings provide a novel line of evidence distinguishing genetic differences between smoker and NS lung tumors, namely, that the extent of segmental genomic alterations is greater in NS tumors. Collectively, our findings provide evidence that these lung tumors are globally and genetically different, which implies they are likely driven by distinct molecular mechanisms.

  7. Contribution of osseous and muscular stabilizing effects with the Latarjet procedure for anterior instability without glenoid bone loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dines, Joshua S; Dodson, Christopher C; McGarry, Michelle H; Oh, Joo Han; Altchek, David W; Lee, Thay Q

    2013-12-01

    The Latarjet procedure is used to treat anterior shoulder instability. Authors contend that the main concept of the operation is using the conjoined tendon as a sling to lower the subscapularis, reinforcing the anteroinferior capsule. The effects of the "sling," as well as stability and range of motion (ROM), after the Latarjet procedure have not been documented. In this study, we test the Latarjet procedure, attempting to account for the effect of the conjoined tendon. We also use the model to characterize the kinematic effects and stabilizing mechanism of the Latarjet procedure. Six cadaveric shoulders were tested in the intact state, after anterior capsulotomy, and after the Latarjet procedure. An apparatus was designed that allowed for loading of the conjoined tendon. ROM and translation were quantified. After conclusion of testing in the Latarjet group, the conjoined tendon was released and specimens were retested to determine stability attributable to the sling effect versus the osseous effect alone. We found no statistically significant differences with regard to ROM after the Latarjet procedure. The Latarjet procedure did significantly decrease anteroinferior translation. However, when the conjoined tendon was unloaded, there was a significantly decreased resistance to anterior translation. After conjoined tendon release, there was no effect on inferior translation. This study confirmed that the Latarjet procedure successfully decreases anteroinferior translation while maintaining ROM. It did not support the belief that inferior stability is provided by the sling effect. The model developed can serve as the basis for future testing. basic science study, biomechanics. Copyright © 2013 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  9. Induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs gamma radiation: comparison to the induction by exposure to accelerated 56Fe particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Helen H.; Horng, Min-Fen; Ricanati, Marlene; Diaz-Insua, M.; Jordan, Robert; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The induction of genomic instability in TK6 human lymphoblasts by exposure to (137)Cs gamma radiation was investigated by measuring the frequency and characteristics of unstable clones isolated approximately 36 generations after exposure. Clones surviving irradiation and control clones were analyzed for 17 characteristics including chromosomal aberrations, growth defects, alterations in response to a second irradiation, and mutant frequencies at the thymidine kinase and Na(+)/K(+) ATPase loci. Putative unstable clones were defined as those that exhibited a significant alteration in one or more characteristics compared to the controls. The frequency and characteristics of the unstable clones were compared in clones exposed to (137)Cs gamma rays or (56)Fe particles. The majority of the unstable clones isolated after exposure to either gamma rays or (56)Fe particles exhibited chromosomal instability. Alterations in growth characteristics, radiation response and mutant frequencies occurred much less often than cytogenetic alterations in these unstable clones. The frequency and complexity of the unstable clones were greater after exposure to (56)Fe particles than to gamma rays. Unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to gamma rays exhibited increases in the incidence of dicentric chromosomes but not of chromatid breaks, whereas unstable clones that survived 36 generations after exposure to (56)Fe particles exhibited increases in both chromatid and chromosome aberrations.

  10. Dose- and time-dependent changes of micronucleus frequency and gene expression in the progeny of irradiated cells: Two components in radiation-induced genomic instability?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huumonen, Katriina [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Korkalainen, Merja [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, 70701 Kuopio (Finland); Boman, Eeva; Heikkilä, Janne [Kuopio University Hospital, Cancer Center, P.O. Box 1777, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Höytö, Anne [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Lahtinen, Tapani [Kuopio University Hospital, Cancer Center, P.O. Box 1777, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Luukkonen, Jukka [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Viluksela, Matti [National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Environmental Health, P.O. Box 95, 70701 Kuopio (Finland); Naarala, Jonne [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Juutilainen, Jukka, E-mail: jukka.juutilainen@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Environmental Science, P.O. Box 1627, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Development with time of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI) was studied. • Dose–response of micronuclei showed marked time-dependent changes. • A new model assuming two components in RIGI was found to fit with the data. • The persisting component of RIGI seems to be independent of dose above a threshold. • Increasing heterogeneity was characteristic to delayed gene expression changes. - Abstract: Murine embryonic C3H/10T½ fibroblasts were exposed to X-rays at doses of 0.2, 0.5, 1, 2 or 5 Gy. To follow the development of radiation-induced genomic instability (RIGI), the frequency of micronuclei was measured with flow cytometry at 2 days after exposure and in the progeny of the irradiated cells at 8 and 15 days after exposure. Gene expression was measured at the same points in time by PCR arrays profiling the expression of 84 cancer-relevant genes. The micronucleus results showed a gradual decrease in the slope of the dose–response curve between days 2 and 15. The data were consistent with a model assuming two components in RIGI. The first component is characterized by dose-dependent increase in micronuclei. It may persist more than ten cell generations depending on dose, but eventually disappears. The second component is more persistent and independent of dose above a threshold higher than 0.2 Gy. Gene expression analysis 2 days after irradiation at 5 Gy showed consistent changes in genes that typically respond to DNA damage. However, the consistency of changes decreased with time, suggesting that non-specificity and increased heterogeneity of gene expression are characteristic to the second, more persistent component of RIGI.

  11. Contribution of copy number variants to schizophrenia from a genome-wide study of 41,321 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Christian R.; Howrigan, Daniel P.; Merico, Daniele; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Wu, Wenting; Greer, Douglas S.; Antaki, Danny; Shetty, Aniket; Holmans, Peter A.; Pinto, Dalila; Gujral, Madhusudan; Brandler, William M.; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Wang, Zhouzhi; Fajarado, Karin V. Fuentes; Maile, Michelle S.; Ripke, Stephan; Agartz, Ingrid; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Atkins, Joshua; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bergen, Sarah E.; Ertalan, Marcelo; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Cairns, Murray J.; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberley D.; Cheng, Wei; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farh, Kai-How; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedman, Joseph I.; Forstner, Andreas J.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodriguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffinann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Huang, Hailiang; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Kahler, Anna K.; Kahn, Rene S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Kim, Yunjung; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Laurent, Claudine; Lee, Phil; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Levy, Deborah L.; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Loughland, Carmel M.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Perkins, Diana O.; Pers, Tune H.; Pietilainen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Savitz, Adam; Schall, Ulrich; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soderman, Erik; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Tooney, Paul A.; Veijola, Juha; Visscher, Peter M.; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wray, Naomi R.; Wu, Jing Qin; Zai, Clement C.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cichon, Sven; Collier, David A.; Corvin, Aiden; Daly, Mark J.; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Esko, Tonu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jonsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nothen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Walters, James T. R.; Werge, Thomas; Siillivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Sebat, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have been strongly implicated in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia (SCZ). However, genome-wide investigation of the contribution of CNV to risk has been hampered by limited sample sizes. We sought to address this obstacle by applying a centralized analysis pipeline to

  12. Contribution of copy number variants to schizophrenia from a genome-wide study of 41,321 subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marshall, Christian R.; Howrigan, Daniel P.; Merico, Daniele; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Wu, Wenting; Greer, Douglas S.; Antaki, Danny; Shetty, Aniket; Holmans, Peter A.; Pinto, Dalila; Gujral, Madhusudan; Brandler, William M.; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Wang, Zhouzhi; Fajarado, Karin V. Fuentes; Maile, Michelle S.; Ripke, Stephan; Agartz, Ingrid; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Atkins, Joshua; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bergen, Sarah E.; Ertalan, Marcelo; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Cairns, Murray J.; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberley D.; Cheng, Wei; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farh, Kai-How; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedman, Joseph I.; Forstner, Andreas J.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodriguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffinann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Huang, Hailiang; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Kahler, Anna K.; Kahn, Rene S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Kim, Yunjung; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Laurent, Claudine; Lee, Phil; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Levy, Deborah L.; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Loughland, Carmel M.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Perkins, Diana O.; Pers, Tune H.; Pietilainen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Savitz, Adam; Schall, Ulrich; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Soderman, Erik; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Tooney, Paul A.; Veijola, Juha; Visscher, Peter M.; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wray, Naomi R.; Wu, Jing Qin; Zai, Clement C.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Cichon, Sven; Collier, David A.; Corvin, Aiden; Daly, Mark J.; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Esko, Tonu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jonsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nothen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have been strongly implicated in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia (SCZ). However, genome-wide investigation of the contribution of CNV to risk has been hampered by limited sample sizes. We sought to address this obstacle by applying a centralized analysis pipeline to

  13. Contribution of copy number variants to schizophrenia from a genome-wide study of 41,321 subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, Christian R.; Howrigan, Daniel P.; Merico, Daniele

    2017-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have been strongly implicated in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia (SCZ). However, genome-wide investigation of the contribution of CNV to risk has been hampered by limited sample sizes. We sought to address this obstacle by applying a centralized analysis pipeline...

  14. First performance results of PTB's atomic caesium fountain and a study of contributions to its frequency instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyers, S; Bauch, A; Hubner, U; Schroder, R; Tamm, C

    2000-01-01

    At the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), an atomic caesium fountain was constructed. Ramsey fringes with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.86 Hz were obtained by launching the atoms to a height of 83 cm above the cooling region (40 cm above the microwave cavity center). A first measurement of the homogeneity of the magnetic flux density yields 0.33 nT (rms), only 0.16% of the mean value of 0.205 muT used in normal operation. The inherent elementary noise contributions of the fountain and of a thermal beam atomic clock are compared in some detail.

  15. Fusion of nearby inverted repeats by a replication-based mechanism leads to formation of dicentric and acentric chromosomes that cause genome instability in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paek, Andrew L; Kaochar, Salma; Jones, Hope; Elezaby, Aly; Shanks, Lisa; Weinert, Ted

    2009-12-15

    Large-scale changes (gross chromosomal rearrangements [GCRs]) are common in genomes, and are often associated with pathological disorders. We report here that a specific pair of nearby inverted repeats in budding yeast fuse to form a dicentric chromosome intermediate, which then rearranges to form a translocation and other GCRs. We next show that fusion of nearby inverted repeats is general; we found that many nearby inverted repeats that are present in the yeast genome also fuse, as does a pair of synthetically constructed inverted repeats. Fusion occurs between inverted repeats that are separated by several kilobases of DNA and share >20 base pairs of homology. Finally, we show that fusion of inverted repeats, surprisingly, does not require genes involved in double-strand break (DSB) repair or genes involved in other repeat recombination events. We therefore propose that fusion may occur by a DSB-independent, DNA replication-based mechanism (which we term "faulty template switching"). Fusion of nearby inverted repeats to form dicentrics may be a major cause of instability in yeast and in other organisms.

  16. Contribution of sponge genes to unravel the genome of the hypothetical ancestor of Metazoa (Urmetazoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W E; Schröder, H C; Skorokhod, A; Bünz, C; Müller, I M; Grebenjuk, V A

    2001-10-03

    Recently the term Urmetazoa, as the hypothetical metazoan ancestor, was introduced to highlight the finding that all metazoan phyla including the Porifera (sponges) are derived from one common ancestor. Sponges as the evolutionarily oldest, still extant phylum, are provided with a complex network of structural and functional molecules. Analyses of sponge genomes from Demospongiae (Suberites domuncula and Geodia cydonium), Calcarea (Sycon raphanus) and Hexactinellida (Aphrocallistes vastus) have contributed also to the reconstruction of the evolutionary position of Metazoa with respect to Fungi. Furthermore, these analyses have provided evidence that the characteristic evolutionary novelties of Metazoa, such as the extracellular matrix molecules, the cell surface receptors, the nervous signal transduction molecules as well as the immune molecule existing in Porifera, share high sequence and in some aspects also functional similarities to related polypeptides found in other metazoan phyla. During the transition to Metazoa new domains occurred; as one example, the formation of the death domain from the ankyrin is outlined. In parallel, domanial proteins have been formed, such as the receptor tyrosine kinases. The metazoan essentials have been defined by analyzing and comparing the sponge sequences with the related sequences from the metazoans Homo sapiens, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster, the fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The data revealed that those sponge molecules grouped to cell adhesion cell recognition proteins are predominantly found in Protostomia and Deuterostomia while they are missing in Fungi and Viridiplantae. Moreover, evidence is presented allowing the conclusion that the sponge molecules are more closely related to the corresponding molecules from H. sapiens than to those of C. elegans or D. melanogaster. Especially surprising was the finding that the Demospongiae are provided with elements of

  17. Peroxiredoxin Tsa1 Is the Key Peroxidase Suppressing Genome Instability and Protecting against Cell Death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) constitute a family of thiol-specific peroxidases that utilize cysteine (Cys) as the primary site of oxidation during the reduction of peroxides. To gain more insight into the physiological role of the five Prxs in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we performed a comparative study and found that Tsa1 was distinguished from the other Prxs in that by itself it played a key role in maintaining genome stability and in sustaining aerobic viability of rad51 mutants that ...

  18. An array CGH based genomic instability index (G2I is predictive of clinical outcome in breast cancer and reveals a subset of tumors without lymph node involvement but with poor prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnet Françoise

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite entering complete remission after primary treatment, a substantial proportion of patients with early stage breast cancer will develop metastases. Prediction of such an outcome remains challenging despite the clinical use of several prognostic parameters. Several reports indicate that genomic instability, as reflected in specific chromosomal aneuploidies and variations in DNA content, influences clinical outcome but no precise definition of this parameter has yet been clearly established. Methods To explore the prognostic value of genomic alterations present in primary tumors, we performed a comparative genomic hybridization study on BAC arrays with a panel of breast carcinomas from 45 patients with metastatic relapse and 95 others, matched for age and axillary node involvement, without any recurrence after at least 11 years of follow-up. Array-CGH data was used to establish a two-parameter index representative of the global level of aneusomy by chromosomal arm, and of the number of breakpoints throughout the genome. Results Application of appropriate thresholds allowed us to distinguish three classes of tumors highly associated with metastatic relapse. This index used with the same thresholds on a published set of tumors confirms its prognostic significance with a hazard ratio of 3.24 [95CI: 1.76-5.96] p = 6.7x10-5 for the bad prognostic group with respect to the intermediate group. The high prognostic value of this genomic index is related to its ability to individualize a specific group of breast cancers, mainly luminal type and axillary node negative, showing very high genetic instability and poor outcome. Indirect transcriptomic validation was obtained on independent data sets. Conclusion Accurate evaluation of genetic instability in breast cancers by a genomic instability index (G2I helps individualizing specific tumors with previously unexpected very poor prognosis.

  19. Quantitative analysis of polycomb response elements (PREs at identical genomic locations distinguishes contributions of PRE sequence and genomic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okulski Helena

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycomb/Trithorax response elements (PREs are cis-regulatory elements essential for the regulation of several hundred developmentally important genes. However, the precise sequence requirements for PRE function are not fully understood, and it is also unclear whether these elements all function in a similar manner. Drosophila PRE reporter assays typically rely on random integration by P-element insertion, but PREs are extremely sensitive to genomic position. Results We adapted the ΦC31 site-specific integration tool to enable systematic quantitative comparison of PREs and sequence variants at identical genomic locations. In this adaptation, a miniwhite (mw reporter in combination with eye-pigment analysis gives a quantitative readout of PRE function. We compared the Hox PRE Frontabdominal-7 (Fab-7 with a PRE from the vestigial (vg gene at four landing sites. The analysis revealed that the Fab-7 and vg PREs have fundamentally different properties, both in terms of their interaction with the genomic environment at each site and their inherent silencing abilities. Furthermore, we used the ΦC31 tool to examine the effect of deletions and mutations in the vg PRE, identifying a 106 bp region containing a previously predicted motif (GTGT that is essential for silencing. Conclusions This analysis showed that different PREs have quantifiably different properties, and that changes in as few as four base pairs have profound effects on PRE function, thus illustrating the power and sensitivity of ΦC31 site-specific integration as a tool for the rapid and quantitative dissection of elements of PRE design.

  20. ATRX contributes to epigenetic asymmetry and silencing of major satellite transcripts in the maternal genome of the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Fuente, Rabindranath; Baumann, Claudia; Viveiros, Maria M

    2015-05-15

    A striking proportion of human cleavage-stage embryos exhibit chromosome instability (CIN). Notably, until now, no experimental model has been described to determine the origin and mechanisms of complex chromosomal rearrangements. Here, we examined mouse embryos deficient for the chromatin remodeling protein ATRX to determine the cellular mechanisms activated in response to CIN. We demonstrate that ATRX is required for silencing of major satellite transcripts in the maternal genome, where it confers epigenetic asymmetry to pericentric heterochromatin during the transition to the first mitosis. This stage is also characterized by a striking kinetochore size asymmetry established by differences in CENP-C protein between the parental genomes. Loss of ATRX results in increased centromeric mitotic recombination, a high frequency of sister chromatid exchanges and double strand DNA breaks, indicating the formation of mitotic recombination break points. ATRX-deficient embryos exhibit a twofold increase in transcripts for aurora kinase B, the centromeric cohesin ESCO2, DNMT1, the ubiquitin-ligase (DZIP3) and the histone methyl transferase (EHMT1). Thus, loss of ATRX activates a pathway that integrates epigenetic modifications and DNA repair in response to chromosome breaks. These results reveal the cellular response of the cleavage-stage embryo to CIN and uncover a mechanism by which centromeric fission induces the formation of large-scale chromosomal rearrangements. Our results have important implications to determine the epigenetic origins of CIN that lead to congenital birth defects and early pregnancy loss, as well as the mechanisms involved in the oocyte to embryo transition.

  1. Regulation of gene expression in Mycoplasmas: contribution from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae genome sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Maciel França Madeira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the transcription apparatus of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (strains J and 7448 and Mycoplasma synoviae, using a comparative genomics approach to summarize the main features related to transcription and control of gene expression in mycoplasmas. Most of the transcription-related genes present in the three strains are well conserved among mycoplasmas. Some unique aspects of transcription in mycoplasmas and the scarcity of regulatory proteins in mycoplasma genomes are discussed.

  2. 56Fe particle exposure results in a long-lasting increase in a cellular index of genomic instability and transiently suppresses adult hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCarolis, Nathan A.; Rivera, Phillip D.; Ahn, Francisca; Amaral, Wellington Z.; LeBlanc, Junie A.; Malhotra, Shveta; Shih, Hung-Ying; Petrik, David; Melvin, Neal R.; Chen, Benjamin P. C.; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2014-07-01

    The high-LET HZE particles from galactic cosmic radiation pose tremendous health risks to astronauts, as they may incur sub-threshold brain injury or maladaptations that may lead to cognitive impairment. The health effects of HZE particles are difficult to predict and unfeasible to prevent. This underscores the importance of estimating radiation risks to the central nervous system as a whole as well as to specific brain regions like the hippocampus, which is central to learning and memory. Given that neurogenesis in the hippocampus has been linked to learning and memory, we investigated the response and recovery of neurogenesis and neural stem cells in the adult mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus after HZE particle exposure using two nestin transgenic reporter mouse lines to label and track radial glia stem cells (Nestin-GFP and Nestin-CreERT2/R26R:YFP mice, respectively). Mice were subjected to 56Fe particle exposure (0 or 1 Gy, at either 300 or 1000 MeV/n) and brains were harvested at early (24 h), intermediate (7 d), and/or long time points (2-3 mo) post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure resulted in a robust increase in 53BP1+ foci at both the intermediate and long time points post-irradiation, suggesting long-term genomic instability in the brain. However, 56Fe particle exposure only produced a transient decrease in immature neuron number at the intermediate time point, with no significant decrease at the long time point post-irradiation. 56Fe particle exposure similarly produced a transient decrease in dividing progenitors, with fewer progenitors labeled at the early time point but equal number labeled at the intermediate time point, suggesting a recovery of neurogenesis. Notably, 56Fe particle exposure did not change the total number of nestin-expressing neural stem cells. These results highlight that despite the persistence of an index of genomic instability, 56Fe particle-induced deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis may be transient. These data support

  3. Coping with genetic diversity: the contribution of pathogen and human genomics to modern vaccinology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemaire, D. [Universidade Federal da Bahia and Universidade Estadual da Bahia, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Barbosa, T. [Centro de Pesquisas Gonçalo Moniz, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Rihet, P. [TAGC-INSERM U928, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille (France)

    2011-10-28

    Vaccine development faces major difficulties partly because of genetic variation in both infectious organisms and humans. This causes antigenic variation in infectious agents and a high interindividual variability in the human response to the vaccine. The exponential growth of genome sequence information has induced a shift from conventional culture-based to genome-based vaccinology, and allows the tackling of challenges in vaccine development due to pathogen genetic variability. Additionally, recent advances in immunogenetics and genomics should help in the understanding of the influence of genetic factors on the interindividual and interpopulation variations in immune responses to vaccines, and could be useful for developing new vaccine strategies. Accumulating results provide evidence for the existence of a number of genes involved in protective immune responses that are induced either by natural infections or vaccines. Variation in immune responses could be viewed as the result of a perturbation of gene networks; this should help in understanding how a particular polymorphism or a combination thereof could affect protective immune responses. Here we will present: i) the first genome-based vaccines that served as proof of concept, and that provided new critical insights into vaccine development strategies; ii) an overview of genetic predisposition in infectious diseases and genetic control in responses to vaccines; iii) population genetic differences that are a rationale behind group-targeted vaccines; iv) an outlook for genetic control in infectious diseases, with special emphasis on the concept of molecular networks that will provide a structure to the huge amount of genomic data.

  4. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-10-21

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer produced an almost identical genome. The whole genome sequence data of donor and cloned dogs can provide a resource for further investigations on epigenetic contributions in phenotypic differences.

  5. Gene Loss and Horizontal Gene Transfer Contributed to the Genome Evolution of the Extreme Acidophile “Ferrovum”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sophie R.; González, Carolina; Poehlein, Anja; Tischler, Judith S.; Daniel, Rolf; Schlömann, Michael; Holmes, David S.; Mühling, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), associated with active and abandoned mining sites, is a habitat for acidophilic microorganisms that gain energy from the oxidation of reduced sulfur compounds and ferrous iron and that thrive at pH below 4. Members of the recently proposed genus “Ferrovum” are the first acidophilic iron oxidizers to be described within the Betaproteobacteria. Although they have been detected as typical community members in AMD habitats worldwide, knowledge of their phylogenetic and metabolic diversity is scarce. Genomics approaches appear to be most promising in addressing this lacuna since isolation and cultivation of “Ferrovum” has proven to be extremely difficult and has so far only been successful for the designated type strain “Ferrovum myxofaciens” P3G. In this study, the genomes of two novel strains of “Ferrovum” (PN-J185 and Z-31) derived from water samples of a mine water treatment plant were sequenced. These genomes were compared with those of “Ferrovum” sp. JA12 that also originated from the mine water treatment plant, and of the type strain (P3G). Phylogenomic scrutiny suggests that the four strains represent three “Ferrovum” species that cluster in two groups (1 and 2). Comprehensive analysis of their predicted metabolic pathways revealed that these groups harbor characteristic metabolic profiles, notably with respect to motility, chemotaxis, nitrogen metabolism, biofilm formation and their potential strategies to cope with the acidic environment. For example, while the “F. myxofaciens” strains (group 1) appear to be motile and diazotrophic, the non-motile group 2 strains have the predicted potential to use a greater variety of fixed nitrogen sources. Furthermore, analysis of their genome synteny provides first insights into their genome evolution, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer and genome reduction in the group 2 strains by loss of genes encoding complete metabolic pathways or physiological features

  6. Radio-protective effect of cinnamic acid, a phenolic phytochemical, on genomic instability induced by X-rays in human blood lymphocytes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinkilic, Nilufer; Tüzün, Ece; Çetintaş, Sibel Kahraman; Vatan, Özgür; Yılmaz, Dilek; Çavaş, Tolga; Tunç, Sema; Özkan, Lütfi; Bilaloğlu, Rahmi

    2014-08-01

    The present study was designed to determine the protective activity of cinnamic acid against induction by X-rays of genomic instability in normal human blood lymphocytes. This radio-protective activity was assessed by use of the cytokinesis-block micronucleus test and the alkaline comet assay, with human blood lymphocytes isolated from two healthy donors. A Siemens Mevatron MD2 (Siemens AG, USA, 1994) linear accelerator was used for the irradiation with 1 or 2 Gy. Treatment of the lymphocytes with cinnamic acid prior to irradiation reduced the number of micronuclei when compared with that in control samples. Treatment with cinnamic acid without irradiation did not increase the number of micronuclei and did not show a cytostatic effect in the lymphocytes. The results of the alkaline comet assay revealed that cinnamic acid reduces the DNA damage induced by X-rays, showing a significant radio-protective effect. Cinnamic acid decreased the frequency of irradiation-induced micronuclei by 16-55% and reduced DNA breakage by 17-50%, as determined by the alkaline comet assay. Cinnamic acid may thus act as a radio-protective compound, and future studies may focus on elucidating the mechanism by which cinnamic acid offers radioprotection.

  7. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) deficiency decreases reprogramming efficiency and leads to genomic instability in iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Taisuke; Nagamatsu, Go; Kosaka, Takeo; Takubo, Keiyo; Hotta, Akitsu; Ellis, James; Suda, Toshio

    2011-04-08

    During cell division, one of the major features of somatic cell reprogramming by defined factors, cells are potentially exposed to DNA damage. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 raised reprogramming efficiency but resulted in an increased number of abnormal chromosomes in established iPS cells. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), which is critical in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, may also play an important role during reprogramming. To clarify the function of ATM in somatic cell reprogramming, we investigated reprogramming in ATM-deficient (ATM-KO) tail-tip fibroblasts (TTFs). Although reprogramming efficiency was greatly reduced in ATM-KO TTFs, ATM-KO iPS cells were successfully generated and showed the same proliferation activity as WT iPS cells. ATM-KO iPS cells had a gene expression profile similar to ES cells and WT iPS cells, and had the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers. On the other hand, ATM-KO iPS cells accumulated abnormal genome structures upon continuous passages. Even with the abnormal karyotype, ATM-KO iPS cells retained pluripotent cell characteristics for at least 20 passages. These data indicate that ATM does participate in the reprogramming process, although its role is not essential.

  8. Transposon Insertions, Structural Variations, and SNPs Contribute to the Evolution of the Melon Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanseverino, Walter; Hénaff, Elizabeth; Vives, Cristina; Pinosio, Sara; Burgos-Paz, William; Morgante, Michele; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián E; Garcia-Mas, Jordi; Casacuberta, Josep Maria

    2015-10-01

    The availability of extensive databases of crop genome sequences should allow analysis of crop variability at an unprecedented scale, which should have an important impact in plant breeding. However, up to now the analysis of genetic variability at the whole-genome scale has been mainly restricted to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). This is a strong limitation as structural variation (SV) and transposon insertion polymorphisms are frequent in plant species and have had an important mutational role in crop domestication and breeding. Here, we present the first comprehensive analysis of melon genetic diversity, which includes a detailed analysis of SNPs, SV, and transposon insertion polymorphisms. The variability found among seven melon varieties representing the species diversity and including wild accessions and highly breed lines, is relatively high due in part to the marked divergence of some lineages. The diversity is distributed nonuniformly across the genome, being lower at the extremes of the chromosomes and higher in the pericentromeric regions, which is compatible with the effect of purifying selection and recombination forces over functional regions. Additionally, this variability is greatly reduced among elite varieties, probably due to selection during breeding. We have found some chromosomal regions showing a high differentiation of the elite varieties versus the rest, which could be considered as strongly selected candidate regions. Our data also suggest that transposons and SV may be at the origin of an important fraction of the variability in melon, which highlights the importance of analyzing all types of genetic variability to understand crop genome evolution.

  9. Genomics-Guided Discovery of Traits Contributing to Interactions of Pseudomonas fluorescens with Other Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a diverse bacterial species known for its ubiquity in natural habitats and the production of structurally diverse, bioactive secondary metabolites. The high degree of ecological and metabolic diversity represented in P. fluorescens is reflected in the genomic diversity di...

  10. Mapping FAD2 genes on peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genome and contribution to oil quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improvement of oil quality traits in peanut is the second most important research goal other than yield because of high impact on market and consumers due to profitability and several health benefits. Although FAD genes are known to control some of these traits but their position on the peanut genom...

  11. Mapping FAD2 genes on peanut (arachis hypogaea L.) genome contribution to oil quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Improvement of oil quality traits in peanut is the second most important research goal other than yield because of high impact on market and consumers due to profitability and several health benefits. Although FAD genes are known to control some of these traits but their position on the peanut genom...

  12. Genomic regulation of type 2 diabetes endophenotypes: Contribution from genetic studies in the Goto-Kakizaki rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Dumas, Marc-Emmanuel; Lathrop, Mark; Gauguier, Dominique

    2017-08-24

    The inbred Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat strain is a unique model of spontaneous type 2 diabetes mellitus caused by naturally occurring genetic variants that have been selectively isolated from an outbred colony of Wistar rats. Genetic and genomic studies in experimental crosses and congenic strains of the GK have shed light on the complex etiopathogenesis of diabetes phenotypes in this model. Diabetes-related phenotypes in the GK are under polygenic control and distinct genetic loci regulate glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, β-cell mass and plasma lipids. Metabolome and transcriptome profiling data in GK crosses and congenics, combined with GK genome resequencing, have resulted in a comprehensive landscape of genomic regulations of metabolism that can disentangle causal relationships between GK variants and diabetes phenotypes. Application of systems biology and systems genetics in the GK has contributed to improve our understanding of the fundamental mechanisms regulating metabolism. The wealth of physiological, genetic and genomic information in this strain makes it one of the most powerful model systems to improve our understanding of genetic regulations of metabolism and for testing therapeutic solutions for diabetes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Coping with genetic diversity: the contribution of pathogen and human genomics to modern vaccinology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lemaire

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine development faces major difficulties partly because of genetic variation in both infectious organisms and humans. This causes antigenic variation in infectious agents and a high interindividual variability in the human response to the vaccine. The exponential growth of genome sequence information has induced a shift from conventional culture-based to genome-based vaccinology, and allows the tackling of challenges in vaccine development due to pathogen genetic variability. Additionally, recent advances in immunogenetics and genomics should help in the understanding of the influence of genetic factors on the interindividual and interpopulation variations in immune responses to vaccines, and could be useful for developing new vaccine strategies. Accumulating results provide evidence for the existence of a number of genes involved in protective immune responses that are induced either by natural infections or vaccines. Variation in immune responses could be viewed as the result of a perturbation of gene networks; this should help in understanding how a particular polymorphism or a combination thereof could affect protective immune responses. Here we will present: i the first genome-based vaccines that served as proof of concept, and that provided new critical insights into vaccine development strategies; ii an overview of genetic predisposition in infectious diseases and genetic control in responses to vaccines; iii population genetic differences that are a rationale behind group-targeted vaccines; iv an outlook for genetic control in infectious diseases, with special emphasis on the concept of molecular networks that will provide a structure to the huge amount of genomic data.

  14. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) deficiency decreases reprogramming efficiency and leads to genomic instability in iPS cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Taisuke [Department of Cell Differentiation, The Sakaguchi Laboratory, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Nagamatsu, Go, E-mail: gonag@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp [Department of Cell Differentiation, The Sakaguchi Laboratory, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Kosaka, Takeo [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Takubo, Keiyo [Department of Cell Differentiation, The Sakaguchi Laboratory, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Hotta, Akitsu [Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Department of Reprogramming Science, Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ellis, James [Ontario Human iPS Cell Facility, Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Developmental and Stem Cell Biology, SickKids, Toronto, Canada MG1L7 (Canada); Suda, Toshio, E-mail: sudato@sc.itc.keio.ac.jp [Department of Cell Differentiation, The Sakaguchi Laboratory, School of Medicine, Keio University, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan)

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} iPS cells were induced with a fluorescence monitoring system. {yields} ATM-deficient tail-tip fibroblasts exhibited quite a low reprogramming efficiency. {yields} iPS cells obtained from ATM-deficient cells had pluripotent cell characteristics. {yields} ATM-deficient iPS cells had abnormal chromosomes, which were accumulated in culture. -- Abstract: During cell division, one of the major features of somatic cell reprogramming by defined factors, cells are potentially exposed to DNA damage. Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 raised reprogramming efficiency but resulted in an increased number of abnormal chromosomes in established iPS cells. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), which is critical in the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, may also play an important role during reprogramming. To clarify the function of ATM in somatic cell reprogramming, we investigated reprogramming in ATM-deficient (ATM-KO) tail-tip fibroblasts (TTFs). Although reprogramming efficiency was greatly reduced in ATM-KO TTFs, ATM-KO iPS cells were successfully generated and showed the same proliferation activity as WT iPS cells. ATM-KO iPS cells had a gene expression profile similar to ES cells and WT iPS cells, and had the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers. On the other hand, ATM-KO iPS cells accumulated abnormal genome structures upon continuous passages. Even with the abnormal karyotype, ATM-KO iPS cells retained pluripotent cell characteristics for at least 20 passages. These data indicate that ATM does participate in the reprogramming process, although its role is not essential.

  15. Influence of the antifolate drug Methotrexate on the development of murine neural tube defects and genomic instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie; Guan, Tao; Wang, Jianhua; Xiang, Qian; Wang, Mingsheng; Wang, Xiuwei; Guan, Zhen; Xie, Qiu; Niu, Bo; Zhang, Ting

    2013-09-01

    Impaired folate metabolism is considered a risk factor for neural tube defects (NTDs). However, the relationship between folate deficiency and the risk of NTDs remains unclear, because experimentally induced dietary folate deficiency is insufficient to cause NTDs in non-mutant mice. Methotrexate (MTX) is a specific folate antagonist that competitively inhibits dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) activity. The objective of this study was to develop a folate dysmetabolism murine model, and study the development of NTDs and its mechanism. Pregnant mice were injected with different doses of MTX [0, 0.5, 1.0, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0 mg kg(-1) body weight (b/w) intraperitoneally (i.p.)] on gestational day 7.5 and sacrificed on gestational day 11.5. DHFR activity in embryonic tissues was detected, and folate concentrations were analyzed using LC/MS/MS. Copy number variations (CNVs) in neural tube tissues were detected using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). A dose of MTX 4.5 mg kg(-1) b/w, resulted in the highest incidence of NTDs (31.4%) compared with the other groups, and DHFR activities, 5-MeTHF and 5-FoTHF concentrations in embryonic tissues decreased significantly after MTX injection. Furthermore, we found three high-confidence CNVs on chromosome X using aCGH, which was confirmed by RT-PCR and MassARRAY. These results indicate that MTX could cause a folate-associated dysmetabolism, which is similar to that of dietary folate deficiency in mice. The presence of CNVs in neural tube tissues was associated with the development of NTDs.

  16. The effect of growth architecture on the induction and decay of bleomycin and X-ray-induced bystander response and genomic instability in lung adenocarcinoma cells and blood lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnadurai, Mani; Paul, Solomon F D; Venkatachalam, Perumal

    2013-02-01

    Cancer patients treated with radiomimetic drug bleomycin (BLM) have shown incidence of 7% second malignancy. Studies regarding BLM-induced genomic instability in bystander cells are scarce, and experiments with cells grown on three-dimensional (3D) cultures to mimic the in-vivo condition have never been attempted. A549 and NCI-H23 (human lung adenocarcinoma) cells were grown as 3D cultures using Cytomatrix(™), exposed to BLM or X-radiation and co-cultured with their respective unexposed cells. The DNA damage in direct and bystander cells were assessed by the induction of micronuclei (MN) or phosphorylated serine-15 residue in protein 53 (p53(ser-15)), a reflection of DNA damage, and by up-regulation of protein 21 (p21Waf1). The persistence of DNA damage was measured using MN assay and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) in cancer cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) respectively. BLM or X-irradiation induced DNA damage in both A549 and NCI-H23 cells and their respective bystander cells grown in 2D or 3D cultures. Further persistence of these damages in bystander PBL at delayed times indicated genomic instability in these cells. BLM-induced genomic instability in the progeny of bystander cells and their significance in therapy-induced second malignancy may not be eliminated completely.

  17. The pursuit of the genome instability by comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis) in patients with cancer of the cavum in western Algerian; La recherche de l'instabilite genomique par le test des cometes (single cell gel electrophoresis) chez les malades atteints d'un cancer du cavum dans l'Ouest algerien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukerche, A.; Dali-Youcef, A.F. [Service de Radiotherapie, Oran (Algeria); Bouali-Youcef, Y. [Laboratoire d' Immunologie, Oran (Algeria); Mehadji, M. [Service d' ORL, Oran (Algeria); Chenal, C. [Rennes-1 Univ., UMR CNRS 6853, 35 (France)

    2007-11-15

    The analysis of results has shown a constitutional genome instability among the patients with a cavum cancer with a defect in DNA repair where some exogenous factors ( Epstein-Barr virus, EBV) seem play an important part. (N.C.)

  18. Architecture of Burkholderia cepacia complex σ70 gene family: evidence of alternative primary and clade-specific factors, and genomic instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menard Aymeric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc groups bacterial species with beneficial properties that can improve crop yields or remediate polluted sites but can also lead to dramatic human clinical outcomes among cystic fibrosis (CF or immuno-compromised individuals. Genome-wide regulatory processes of gene expression could explain parts of this bacterial duality. Transcriptional σ70 factors are components of these processes. They allow the reversible binding of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase to form the holoenzyme that will lead to mRNA synthesis from a DNA promoter region. Bcc genome-wide analyses were performed to investigate the major evolutionary trends taking place in the σ70 family of these bacteria. Results Twenty σ70 paralogous genes were detected in the Burkholderia cenocepacia strain J2315 (Bcen-J2315 genome, of which 14 were of the ECF (extracytoplasmic function group. Non-ECF paralogs were related to primary (rpoD, alternative primary, stationary phase (rpoS, flagellin biosynthesis (fliA, and heat shock (rpoH factors. The number of σ70 genetic determinants among this genome was of 2,86 per Mb. This number is lower than the one of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a species found in similar habitats including CF lungs. These two bacterial groups showed strikingly different σ70 family architectures, with only three ECF paralogs in common (fecI-like, pvdS and algU. Bcen-J2315 σ70 paralogs showed clade-specific distributions. Some paralogs appeared limited to the ET12 epidemic clone (ecfA2, particular Bcc species (sigI, the Burkholderia genus (ecfJ, ecfF, and sigJ, certain proteobacterial groups (ecfA1, ecfC, ecfD, ecfE, ecfG, ecfL, ecfM and rpoS, or were broadly distributed in the eubacteria (ecfI, ecfK, ecfH, ecfB, and rpoD-, rpoH-, fliA-like genes. Genomic instability of this gene family was driven by chromosomal inversion (ecfA2, recent duplication events (ecfA and RpoD, localized (ecfG and large scale deletions (sig

  19. Genomic Damage in Endstage Renal Disease—Contribution of Uremic Toxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helga Stopper

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD, whether on conservative, peritoneal or hemodialysis therapy, have elevated genomic damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes and an increased cancer incidence, especially of the kidney. The damage is possibly due to accumulation of uremic toxins like advanced glycation endproducts or homocysteine. However, other endogenous substances with genotoxic properties, which are increased in ESRD, could be involved, such as the blood pressure regulating hormones angiotensin II and aldosterone or the inflammatory cytokine TNF-a. This review provides an overview of genomic damage observed in ESRD patients, focuses on possible underlying causes and shows modulations of the damage by modern dialysis strategies and vitamin supplementation.

  20. Genome wide association study identifies KCNMA1 contributing to human obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiao, Hong; Arner, Peter; Hoffstedt, Johan;

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have identified common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with obesity. However, the reported genetic variation in obesity explains only a minor fraction of the total genetic variation expected to be present in the population....... Thus many genetic variants controlling obesity remain to be identified. The aim of this study was to use GWA followed by multiple stepwise validations to identify additional genes associated with obesity....

  1. The contribution of dormant origins to genome stability: from cell biology to human genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alver, Robert C; Chadha, Gaganmeet Singh; Blow, J Julian

    2014-07-01

    The ability of a eukaryotic cell to precisely and accurately replicate its DNA is crucial to maintain genome stability. Here we describe our current understanding of the process by which origins are licensed for DNA replication and review recent work suggesting that fork stalling has exerted a strong selective pressure on the positioning of licensed origins. In light of this, we discuss the complex and disparate phenotypes observed in mouse models and humans patients that arise due to defects in replication licensing proteins.

  2. The contribution of homology arms to nuclease-assisted genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Oliver; Tsurkan, Sarah; Fu, Jun; Klink, Barbara; Rump, Andreas; Obst, Mandy; Kranz, Andrea; Schröck, Evelin; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Stewart, A Francis

    2017-07-27

    Designer nucleases like CRISPR/Cas9 enable fluent site-directed damage or small mutations in many genomes. Strategies for their use to achieve more complex tasks like regional exchanges for gene humanization or the establishment of conditional alleles are still emerging. To optimize Cas9-assisted targeting, we measured the relationship between targeting frequency and homology length in targeting constructs using a hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase assay in mouse embryonic stem cells. Targeting frequency with supercoiled plasmids improved steeply up to 2 kb total homology and continued to increase with even longer homology arms, thereby implying that Cas9-assisted targeting efficiencies can be improved using homology arms of 1 kb or greater. To humanize the Kmt2d gene, we built a hybrid mouse/human targeting construct in a bacterial artificial chromosome by recombineering. To simplify the possible outcomes, we employed a single Cas9 cleavage strategy and best achieved the intended 42 kb regional exchange with a targeting construct including a very long homology arm to recombine ∼42 kb away from the cleavage site. We recommend the use of long homology arm targeting constructs for accurate and efficient complex genome engineering, particularly when combined with the simplifying advantages of using just one Cas9 cleavage at the genome target site. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Increased RPA1 gene dosage affects genomic stability potentially contributing to 17p13.3 duplication syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Outwin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel microduplication syndrome involving various-sized contiguous duplications in 17p13.3 has recently been described, suggesting that increased copy number of genes in 17p13.3, particularly PAFAH1B1, is associated with clinical features including facial dysmorphism, developmental delay, and autism spectrum disorder. We have previously shown that patient-derived cell lines from individuals with haploinsufficiency of RPA1, a gene within 17p13.3, exhibit an impaired ATR-dependent DNA damage response (DDR. Here, we show that cell lines from patients with duplications specifically incorporating RPA1 exhibit a different although characteristic spectrum of DDR defects including abnormal S phase distribution, attenuated DNA double strand break (DSB-induced RAD51 chromatin retention, elevated genomic instability, and increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Using controlled conditional over-expression of RPA1 in a human model cell system, we also see attenuated DSB-induced RAD51 chromatin retention. Furthermore, we find that transient over-expression of RPA1 can impact on homologous recombination (HR pathways following DSB formation, favouring engagement in aberrant forms of recombination and repair. Our data identifies unanticipated defects in the DDR associated with duplications in 17p13.3 in humans involving modest RPA1 over-expression.

  4. Disaggregating polyploidy, parental genome dosage and hybridity contributions to heterosis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fort, Antoine; Ryder, Peter; Mckeown, P.C.; Wijnen, Cris; Aarts, M.G.; Sulpice, Ronan; Spillane, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Heterosis is the phenomenon whereby hybrid offspring of genetically divergent parents display superior characteristics compared with their parents. Although hybridity and polyploidy can influence heterosis in hybrid plants, the differential contributions of hybridity vs polyploidy to heterosis ef

  5. Elliptic and magneto-elliptic instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyra Wladimir

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vortices are the fundamental units of turbulent flow. Understanding their stability properties therefore provides fundamental insights on the nature of turbulence itself. In this contribution I briely review the phenomenological aspects of the instability of elliptic streamlines, in the hydro (elliptic instability and hydromagnetic (magneto-elliptic instability regimes. Vortex survival in disks is a balance between vortex destruction by these mechanisms, and vortex production by others, namely, the Rossby wave instability and the baroclinic instability.

  6. Genomic instability in the epidermis induced by atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation: a long-lasting health effect in A-bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruke, Yuki; Nakashima, Masahiro; Suzuki, Keiji; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Soda, Midori; Sekine, Ichiro

    2009-08-15

    Radiation etiology is suggested in the occurrence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin among atomic bomb (A-bomb) survivors. Any genotoxicity, including ionizing radiation, can induce a DNA damage response (DDR), leading to genomic instability (GIN), which allows the accumulation of mutations during tumorigenesis. In this study, the authors evaluated the presence of GIN in the epidermis of survivors as a late effect of A-bomb radiation. In total, 146 BCCs, including 23 cases arising from nonexposed skin, were identified in survivors from 1968 to 1999. The incidence rate (IR) of BCC was calculated with stratification by distance in kilometers from the hypocenter ( or =3 km). Nineteen epidermal samples surrounding BCC at the nonexposed sites were collected and tested for p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) expression with immunofluorescence. 53BP1 rapidly forms nuclear foci at the sites of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Because 1 manifestation of GIN is the induction of endogenous DSBs, the level of 53BP1-focus formation (DDR type) can be considered as a marker for GIN. : The incidence rate of BCC increased significantly as exposure distance approached the hypocenter. Of the 7 epidermal samples from the proximal group ( or =3 km) and all samples from the control group predominantly expressed the stable type of 53BP1 expression in the epidermis. : The current results demonstrated the endogenous activation of DDR in the epidermis surrounding BCC in the proximal group, suggesting the presence of a GIN in the survivors as a late effect of A-bomb radiation, which may indicate a predisposition to cancer.

  7. The SWR1 histone replacement complex causes genetic instability and genome-wide transcription misregulation in the absence of H2A.Z.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo-Huesca, Macarena; Clemente-Ruiz, Marta; Andújar, Eloísa; Prado, Félix

    2010-08-12

    The SWR1 complex replaces the canonical histone H2A with the variant H2A.Z (Htz1 in yeast) at specific chromatin regions. This dynamic alteration in nucleosome structure provides a molecular mechanism to regulate transcription, gene silencing, chromosome segregation and DNA repair. Here we show that genetic instability, sensitivity to drugs impairing different cellular processes and genome-wide transcriptional misregulation in htz1Delta can be partially or totally suppressed if SWR1 is not formed (swr1Delta), if it forms but cannot bind to chromatin (swc2Delta) or if it binds to chromatin but lacks histone replacement activity (swc5Delta and the ATPase-dead swr1-K727G). These results suggest that in htz1Delta the nucleosome remodelling activity of SWR1 affects chromatin integrity because of an attempt to replace H2A with Htz1 in the absence of the latter. This would impair transcription and, either directly or indirectly, other cellular processes. Specifically, we show that in htz1Delta, the SWR1 complex causes an accumulation of recombinogenic DNA damage by a mechanism dependent on phosphorylation of H2A at Ser129, a modification that occurs in response to DNA damage, suggesting that the SWR1 complex impairs the repair of spontaneous DNA damage in htz1Delta. In addition, SWR1 causes DSBs sensitivity in htz1Delta; consistently, in the absence of Htz1 the SWR1 complex bound near an endonuclease HO-induced DSB at the mating-type (MAT) locus impairs DSB-induced checkpoint activation. Our results support a stepwise mechanism for the replacement of H2A with Htz1 and demonstrate that a tight control of this mechanism is essential to regulate chromatin dynamics but also to prevent the deleterious consequences of an incomplete nucleosome remodelling.

  8. The SWR1 histone replacement complex causes genetic instability and genome-wide transcription misregulation in the absence of H2A.Z.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Morillo-Huesca

    Full Text Available The SWR1 complex replaces the canonical histone H2A with the variant H2A.Z (Htz1 in yeast at specific chromatin regions. This dynamic alteration in nucleosome structure provides a molecular mechanism to regulate transcription, gene silencing, chromosome segregation and DNA repair. Here we show that genetic instability, sensitivity to drugs impairing different cellular processes and genome-wide transcriptional misregulation in htz1Delta can be partially or totally suppressed if SWR1 is not formed (swr1Delta, if it forms but cannot bind to chromatin (swc2Delta or if it binds to chromatin but lacks histone replacement activity (swc5Delta and the ATPase-dead swr1-K727G. These results suggest that in htz1Delta the nucleosome remodelling activity of SWR1 affects chromatin integrity because of an attempt to replace H2A with Htz1 in the absence of the latter. This would impair transcription and, either directly or indirectly, other cellular processes. Specifically, we show that in htz1Delta, the SWR1 complex causes an accumulation of recombinogenic DNA damage by a mechanism dependent on phosphorylation of H2A at Ser129, a modification that occurs in response to DNA damage, suggesting that the SWR1 complex impairs the repair of spontaneous DNA damage in htz1Delta. In addition, SWR1 causes DSBs sensitivity in htz1Delta; consistently, in the absence of Htz1 the SWR1 complex bound near an endonuclease HO-induced DSB at the mating-type (MAT locus impairs DSB-induced checkpoint activation. Our results support a stepwise mechanism for the replacement of H2A with Htz1 and demonstrate that a tight control of this mechanism is essential to regulate chromatin dynamics but also to prevent the deleterious consequences of an incomplete nucleosome remodelling.

  9. Genome-wide Bisulfite Sequencing in Zygotes Identifies Demethylation Targets and Maps the Contribution of TET3 Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R. Peat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization triggers global erasure of paternal 5-methylcytosine as part of epigenetic reprogramming during the transition from gametic specialization to totipotency. This involves oxidation by TET3, but our understanding of its targets and the wider context of demethylation is limited to a small fraction of the genome. We employed an optimized bisulfite strategy to generate genome-wide methylation profiles of control and TET3-deficient zygotes, using SNPs to access paternal alleles. This revealed that in addition to pervasive removal from intergenic sequences and most retrotransposons, gene bodies constitute a major target of zygotic demethylation. Methylation loss is associated with zygotic genome activation and at gene bodies is also linked to increased transcriptional noise in early development. Our data map the primary contribution of oxidative demethylation to a subset of gene bodies and intergenic sequences and implicate redundant pathways at many loci. Unexpectedly, we demonstrate that TET3 activity also protects certain CpG islands against methylation buildup.

  10. Genomic prediction contributing to a promising global strategy to turbocharge gene banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoqing; Li, Xianran; Guo, Tingting; Zhu, Chengsong; Wu, Yuye; Mitchell, Sharon E; Roozeboom, Kraig L; Wang, Donghai; Wang, Ming Li; Pederson, Gary A; Tesso, Tesfaye T; Schnable, Patrick S; Bernardo, Rex; Yu, Jianming

    2016-10-03

    The 7.4 million plant accessions in gene banks are largely underutilized due to various resource constraints, but current genomic and analytic technologies are enabling us to mine this natural heritage. Here we report a proof-of-concept study to integrate genomic prediction into a broad germplasm evaluation process. First, a set of 962 biomass sorghum accessions were chosen as a reference set by germplasm curators. With high throughput genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), we genetically characterized this reference set with 340,496 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). A set of 299 accessions was selected as the training set to represent the overall diversity of the reference set, and we phenotypically characterized the training set for biomass yield and other related traits. Cross-validation with multiple analytical methods using the data of this training set indicated high prediction accuracy for biomass yield. Empirical experiments with a 200-accession validation set chosen from the reference set confirmed high prediction accuracy. The potential to apply the prediction model to broader genetic contexts was also examined with an independent population. Detailed analyses on prediction reliability provided new insights into strategy optimization. The success of this project illustrates that a global, cost-effective strategy may be designed to assess the vast amount of valuable germplasm archived in 1,750 gene banks.

  11. Fundamentals and clinical perspective of urethral sphincter instability as a contributing factor in patients with lower urinary tract dysfunction--ICI-RS 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner-Hermanns, Ruth; Anding, Ralf; Rosier, Peter; Birder, Lori; Andersson, Karl Erik; Djurhuus, Jens Christian

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Urethral pathophysiology is often neglected in discussions of bladder dysfunction. It has been debated whether "urethral sphincter instability," referred to based on observed "urethral pressure variations," is an important aspect of overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). The purpose of this report

  12. Genomic Instability and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    3A A nt i- Ig G e f Input Anti-Myc (katanin) IgH IgH pSer pThr M yc -k at an in W T M yc -k at an in A AA IP A nt i- ka ta ni n DYRK2... pThr Input Anti-katanin IP: Anti-Myc WB: Anti-pSer IP: Anti-Myc WB: Anti- pThr Figure 5 DYRK2 phosphorylates katanin. (a) An in vitro kinase assay was

  13. Genomic Instability and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    homologous recombination (HR) repair. As presented in 2008 annual report, we believe that this function of BRCA1 is at least in part mediated by its...human homologs of yeast Mei5/Swi5 complexes. We showed that this evolutionally conserved protein complex acts downstream of RPA, but is specifically...RAD51 paralogs (Figure 1A). Moreover, using bacterially expressed and purified proteins, we showed that FIGNL1 binds directly to RAD51 (Figure 1C

  14. Genomic Instability and Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    medium containing 10% bovine serum and penicillin /streptomycin. Transient transfection was performed with the polyethyleni- mine (25 kDa) method. Stable...mutations in 13 Fanc genes and renders cells hypersensitive to DNA interstrand cross-linking (ICL) agents. A central event in the FA pathway is mono...interstrand cross-links. Fanconi anemia (FA) is characterized bycongenital malformations, bone marrowfailure, cancer, and hypersensitivity toDNA interstrand

  15. Genome instability in Alzheimer disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yujun; Song, Hyundong; Croteau, Deborah L

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and the most common form of dementia. Autosomal dominant, familial AD (fAD) is very rare and caused by mutations in amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin-1 (PSEN-1), and presenilin-2 (PSEN-2) genes. The pathogenesis...

  16. Mechanical instability

    CERN Document Server

    Krysinski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a study of the stability of mechanical systems, i.e. their free response when they are removed from their position of equilibrium after a temporary disturbance. After reviewing the main analytical methods of the dynamical stability of systems, it highlights the fundamental difference in nature between the phenomena of forced resonance vibration of mechanical systems subjected to an imposed excitation and instabilities that characterize their free response. It specifically develops instabilities arising from the rotor-structure coupling, instability of control systems, the se

  17. Collective instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  18. Genome-wide analyses reveal lineage specific contributions of positive selection and recombination to the evolution of Listeria monocytogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Qi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Listeria includes two closely related pathogenic and non-pathogenic species, L. monocytogenes and L. innocua. L. monocytogenes is an opportunistic human foodborne and animal pathogen that includes two common lineages. While lineage I is more commonly found among human listeriosis cases, lineage II appears to be overrepresented among isolates from foods and environmental sources. This study used the genome sequences for one L. innocua strain and four L. monocytogenes strains representing lineages I and II, to characterize the contributions of positive selection and recombination to the evolution of the L. innocua/L. monocytogenes core genome. Results Among the 2267 genes in the L. monocytogenes/L. innocua core genome, 1097 genes showed evidence for recombination and 36 genes showed evidence for positive selection. Positive selection was strongly associated with recombination. Specifically, 29 of the 36 genes under positive selection also showed evidence for recombination. Recombination was more common among isolates in lineage II than lineage I; this trend was confirmed by sequencing five genes in a larger isolate set. Positive selection was more abundant in the ancestral branch of lineage II (20 genes as compared to the ancestral branch of lineage I (9 genes. Additional genes under positive selection were identified in the branch separating the two species; for this branch, genes in the role category "Cell wall and membrane biogenesis" were significantly more likely to have evidence for positive selection. Positive selection of three genes was confirmed in a larger isolate set, which also revealed occurrence of multiple premature stop codons in one positively selected gene involved in flagellar motility (flaR. Conclusion While recombination and positive selection both contribute to evolution of L. monocytogenes, the relative contributions of these evolutionary forces seem to differ by L. monocytogenes lineages and

  19. Contribution of copy number variants to schizophrenia from a genome-wide study of 41,321 subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Christian R; Howrigan, Daniel P; Merico, Daniele; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Wu, Wenting; Greer, Douglas S; Antaki, Danny; Shetty, Aniket; Holmans, Peter A; Pinto, Dalila; Gujral, Madhusudan; Brandler, William M; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Wang, Zhouzhi; Fajarado, Karin V Fuentes; Maile, Michelle S; Ripke, Stephan; Agartz, Ingrid; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Atkins, Joshua; Bacanu, Silviu A; Belliveau, Richard A; Bergen, Sarah E; Bertalan, Marcelo; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B; Black, Donald W; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G; Buckner, Randy L; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Cairns, Murray J; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M; Carr, Vaughan J; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V; Chambert, Kimberley D; Cheng, Wei; Cloninger, C Robert; Cohen, David; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Crowley, James J; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H; Farh, Kai-How; Farrell, Martilias S; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B; Friedman, Joseph I; Forstner, Andreas J; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodríguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I; Gratten, Jacob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hamshere, Marian L; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M; Henskens, Frans A; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Huang, Hailiang; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Kähler, Anna K; Kahn, René S; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C; Kelly, Brian J; Kennedy, James L; Kim, Yunjung; Knowles, James A; Konte, Bettina; Laurent, Claudine; Lee, Phil; Lee, S Hong; Legge, Sophie E; Lerer, Bernard; Levy, Deborah L; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Loughland, Carmel M; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Maher, Brion S; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murphy, Kieran C; Murray, Robin M; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O'Callaghan, Eadbhard; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; O'Neill, F Anthony; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T; Paunio, Tiina; Perkins, Diana O; Pers, Tune H; Pietiläinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E; Purcell, Shaun M; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A; Richards, Alexander L; Roffman, Joshua L; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Savitz, Adam; Schall, Ulrich; Schulze, Thomas G; Schwab, Sibylle G; Scolnick, Edward M; Scott, Rodney J; Seidman, Larry J; Shi, Jianxin; Silverman, Jeremy M; Smoller, Jordan W; Söderman, Erik; Spencer, Chris C A; Stahl, Eli A; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T Scott; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Tooney, Paul A; Veijola, Juha; Visscher, Peter M; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Webb, Bradley T; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B; Williams, Nigel M; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H; Wolen, Aaron R; Wormley, Brandon K; Wray, Naomi R; Wu, Jing Qin; Zai, Clement C; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A; Blackwood, Douglas H R; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Cichon, Sven; Collier, David A; Corvin, Aiden; Daly, Mark J; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Esko, Tõnu; Gejman, Pablo V; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V; Jönsson, Erik G; Kendler, Kenneth S; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Levinson, Douglas F; Li, Qingqin S; McCarroll, Steven A; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L; Mowry, Bryan J; Nöthen, Markus M; Ophoff, Roel A; Owen, Michael J; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N; Petryshen, Tracey L; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P; Rujescu, Dan; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Walters, James T R; Werge, Thomas; Sullivan, Patrick F; O'Donovan, Michael C; Scherer, Stephen W; Neale, Benjamin M; Sebat, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have been strongly implicated in the genetic etiology of schizophrenia (SCZ). However, genome-wide investigation of the contribution of CNV to risk has been hampered by limited sample sizes. We sought to address this obstacle by applying a centralized analysis pipeline to a SCZ cohort of 21,094 cases and 20,227 controls. A global enrichment of CNV burden was observed in cases (odds ratio (OR) = 1.11, P = 5.7 × 10(-15)), which persisted after excluding loci implicated in previous studies (OR = 1.07, P = 1.7 × 10(-6)). CNV burden was enriched for genes associated with synaptic function (OR = 1.68, P = 2.8 × 10(-11)) and neurobehavioral phenotypes in mouse (OR = 1.18, P = 7.3 × 10(-5)). Genome-wide significant evidence was obtained for eight loci, including 1q21.1, 2p16.3 (NRXN1), 3q29, 7q11.2, 15q13.3, distal 16p11.2, proximal 16p11.2 and 22q11.2. Suggestive support was found for eight additional candidate susceptibility and protective loci, which consisted predominantly of CNVs mediated by nonallelic homologous recombination.

  20. Genome-wide patterns of genetic distances reveal candidate Loci contributing to human population-specific traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Magalhães, João Pedro; Matsuda, Alex

    2012-03-01

    Modern humans originated in Africa before migrating across the world with founder effects and adaptations to new environments contributing to their present phenotypic diversity. Determining the genetic basis of differences between populations may provide clues about our evolutionary history and may have clinical implications. Herein, we develop a method to detect genes and biological processes in which populations most differ by calculating the genetic distance between modern populations and a hypothetical ancestral population. We apply our method to large-scale single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from human populations of African, European and Asian origin. As expected, ancestral alleles were more conserved in the African populations and we found evidence of high divergence in genes previously suggested as targets of selection related to skin pigmentation, immune response, senses and dietary adaptations. Our genome-wide scan also reveals novel candidates for contributing to population-specific traits. These include genes related to neuronal development and behavior that may have been influenced by cultural processes. Moreover, in the African populations, we found a high divergence in genes related to UV protection and to the male reproductive system. Taken together, these results confirm and expand previous findings, providing new clues about the evolution and genetics of human phenotypic diversity. © 2011 The Authors Annals of Human Genetics © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/University College London.

  1. Contribution of a genomic accessory region encoding a putative cellobiose phosphotransferase system to virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren J McAllister

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (the pneumococcus is a formidable human pathogen, responsible for massive global morbidity and mortality. The ability to utilize carbohydrates in a variety of host niches appears to be integral to pneumococcal pathogenesis. In this study we investigated a genomic island, which includes a ROK family protein, a putative cellobiose phosphotransferase system (PTS and a putative sulfatase. This accessory region is widespread in the pneumococcus in strains of various serotypes and levels of virulence. We have performed simple bioinformatic analysis of the region and investigated its role in vivo in 2 strains with markedly different virulence profiles (WCH206 of serotype 3, ST180; Menzies5 of serotype 11A, ST662. Deleting and replacing the entire island with an antibiotic resistance cassette caused the virulent serotype 3 strain to become attenuated in a murine pneumonia/sepsis model. Further mutants were constructed and used to show that various components of the island contribute significantly to the fitness of WCH206 in a variety of niches of this model, including the nasopharynx, ears and blood, but especially in the lungs. In addition, the island conferred a competitive advantage in nasopharyngeal colonization for the serotype 11A strain, which was essentially avirulent in the pneumonia/sepsis model. The contribution of this island to both pathogenesis and colonization may explain why this accessory region is widespread in the pneumococcus.

  2. Karyotypic instability and centrosome aberrations in the progeny of finite life-span human mammary epithelial cells exposed to sparsely or densely ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hiroko; Garbe, James; Stampfer, Martha R; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Kronenberg, Amy

    2008-07-01

    The human breast is sensitive to radiation carcinogenesis, and genomic instability occurs early in breast cancer development. This study tests the hypothesis that ionizing radiation elicits genomic instability in finite life-span human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) and asks whether densely ionizing radiation is a more potent inducer of instability. HMEC in a non-proliferative state were exposed to X rays or 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions followed by delayed plating. Karyotypic instability and centrosome aberrations were monitored in expanded clonal isolates. Severe karyotypic instability was common in the progeny of cells that survived X-ray or iron-ion exposure. There was a lower dose threshold for severe karyotypic instability after iron-ion exposure. More than 90% of X-irradiated colonies and >60% of iron-ion-irradiated colonies showed supernumerary centrosomes at levels above the 95% upper confidence limit of the mean for unirradiated clones. A dose response was observed for centrosome aberrations for each radiation type. There was a statistically significant association between the incidence of karyotypic instability and supernumerary centrosomes for iron-ion-exposed colonies and a weaker association for X-irradiated colonies. Thus genomic instability occurs frequently in finite life-span HMEC exposed to sparsely or densely ionizing radiation and may contribute to radiation-induced breast cancer.

  3. Zygotes segregate entire parental genomes in distinct blastomere lineages causing cleavage-stage chimerism and mixoploidy

    OpenAIRE

    Destouni, Aspasia; Zamani Esteki, Masoud; Catteeuw, Maaike; Dimitriadou, Eftychia; Smits, Katrien; Kurg, Ants; Salumets, Andres; Van Soom, Ann; Voet, Thierry; Vermeesch, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Dramatic genome dynamics, such as chromosome instability, contribute to the remarkable genomic heterogeneity among the blastomeres comprising a single embryo during human preimplantation development. This heterogeneity, when compatible with life, manifests as constitutional mosaicism, chimerism, and mixoploidy in live-born individuals. Chimerism and mixoploidy are defined by the presence of cell lineages with different parental genomes or different ploidy states in a single individual, respec...

  4. Genome stability in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaften, G.W. van

    2006-01-01

    Genome stability is closely linked to cancer. Most, if not all tumor cells show some form of genome instability, mutations can range from single point mutations to gross chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy. Genome instability is believed to be the driving force behind tumorigenesis. In order t

  5. Genome stability in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaften, G.W. van

    2006-01-01

    Genome stability is closely linked to cancer. Most, if not all tumor cells show some form of genome instability, mutations can range from single point mutations to gross chromosomal rearrangements and aneuploidy. Genome instability is believed to be the driving force behind tumorigenesis. In order t

  6. Recombination instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.

    1967-01-01

    A recombination instability is considered which may arise in a plasma if the temperature dependence of the volume recombination coefficient, alpha, is sufficiently strong. Two cases are analyzed: (a) a steady-state plasma produced in a neutral gas by X-rays or high energy electrons; and (b) an af...

  7. Genome constraint through sexual reproduction: application of 4D-Genomics in reproductive biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Steven D; Abdallah, Batoul Y; Stevens, Joshua B; Liu, Guo; Ye, Karen J; Bremer, Steven W; Heng, Henry H Q

    2013-06-01

    Assisted reproductive technologies have been used to achieve pregnancies since the first successful test tube baby was born in 1978. Infertile couples are at an increased risk for multiple miscarriages and the application of current protocols are associated with high first-trimester miscarriage rates. Among the contributing factors of these higher rates is a high incidence of fetal aneuploidy. Numerous studies support that protocols including ovulation-induction, sperm cryostorage, density-gradient centrifugation, and embryo culture can induce genome instability, but the general mechanism is less clear. Application of the genome theory and 4D-Genomics recently led to the establishment of a new paradigm for sexual reproduction; sex primarily constrains genome integrity that defines the biological system rather than just providing genetic diversity at the gene level. We therefore propose that application of assisted reproductive technologies can bypass this sexual reproduction filter as well as potentially induce additional system instability. We have previously demonstrated that a single-cell resolution genomic approach, such as spectral karyotyping to trace stochastic genome level alterations, is effective for pre- and post-natal analysis. We propose that monitoring overall genome alteration at the karyotype level alongside the application of assisted reproductive technologies will improve the efficacy of the techniques while limiting stress-induced genome instability. The development of more single-cell based cytogenomic technologies are needed in order to better understand the system dynamics associated with infertility and the potential impact that assisted reproductive technologies have on genome instability. Importantly, this approach will be useful in studying the potential for diseases to arise as a result of bypassing the filter of sexual reproduction.

  8. Contribution of Large Genomic Rearrangements in Italian Lynch Syndrome Patients: Characterization of a Novel Alu-Mediated Deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Duraturo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Lynch syndrome is associated with germ-line mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes, mainly MLH1 and MSH2. Most of the mutations reported in these genes to date are point mutations, small deletions, and insertions. Large genomic rearrangements in the MMR genes predisposing to Lynch syndrome also occur, but the frequency varies depending on the population studied on average from 5 to 20%. The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of large rearrangements in the MLH1 and MSH2 genes in a well-characterised series of 63 unrelated Southern Italian Lynch syndrome patients who were negative for pathogenic point mutations in the MLH1, MSH2, and MSH6 genes. We identified a large novel deletion in the MSH2 gene, including exon 6 in one of the patients analysed (1.6% frequency. This deletion was confirmed and localised by long-range PCR. The breakpoints of this rearrangement were characterised by sequencing. Further analysis of the breakpoints revealed that this rearrangement was a product of Alu-mediated recombination. Our findings identified a novel Alu-mediated rearrangement within MSH2 gene and showed that large deletions or duplications in MLH1 and MSH2 genes are low-frequency mutational events in Southern Italian patients with an inherited predisposition to colon cancer.

  9. F-box genes: Genome-wide expansion, evolution and their contribution to pollen growth in pear (Pyrus bretschneideri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Ming; Yin, Hao; Qiao, Xin; Tan, Xu; Gu, Chao; Wang, Bao-Hua; Cheng, Rui; Wang, Ying-Zhen; Zhang, Shao-Ling

    2016-12-01

    F-box gene family, as one of the largest gene families in plants, plays crucial roles in regulating plant development, reproduction, cellular protein degradation and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, comprehensive analysis of the F-box gene family in pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.) and other Rosaceae species has not been reported yet. Herein, we identified a total of 226 full-length F-box genes in pear for the first time. And these genes were further divided into various subgroups based on specific domains and phylogenetic analysis. Intriguingly, we observed that whole-genome duplication and dispersed duplication have a major contribution to F-box family expansion. Furthermore, the dynamic evolution for different modes of gene duplication was dissected. Interestingly, we found that dispersed and tandem duplicate have been evolving at a high rate. In addition, we found that F-box genes exhibited functional specificity based on GO analysis, and most of the F-box genes were significantly enriched in the protein binding (GO: 0005515) term, supporting that F-box genes might play a critical role for gene regulation in pear. Transcriptome and digital expression profiles revealed that F-box genes are involved in the development of multiple pear tissues. Overall, these results will set stage for elaborating the biological role of F-box genes in pear and other plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Geological and geotechnical characterization of the debris avalanche and pyroclastic deposits of Cotopaxi Volcano (Ecuador). A contribute to instability-related hazard studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzoli, L.; Apuani, T.; Corazzato, C.; Uttini, A.

    2017-02-01

    The huge volcanic debris avalanche occurred at 4.5 ka is a major event in the evolution of the Cotopaxi volcano, Ecuador. The present volcanic hazard in the Cotopaxi region is related to lahars generated by volcanic eruptions and concurrent ice melting. This paper presents the geological and geotechnical field and laboratory characterization of the 4.5 ka Cotopaxi debris avalanche deposit and of the younger unconsolidated pyroclastic deposits, representing the probable source of future shallow landslides. The debris avalanche formed a deposit with a well-developed hummocky topography, and climbed a difference in height of about 260 m along the slopes of the adjacent Sincholagua volcano. The debris avalanche deposit includes four lithofacies (megablock, block, mixed, and sheared facies) that represent different flow regimes and degrees of substratum involvement. The facies distribution suggests that, in the proximal area, the debris avalanche slid predominantly confined to the valleys along the N and NE flank of the volcanic cone, emplacing a stack of megablocks. When the flow reached the break in slope at the base of the edifice, it became unconfined and spread laterally over most of the area of the Rio Pita valley. A dynamic block fragmentation and dilation occurred during the debris avalanche transport, emplacing the block facies. The incorporation of the older Chalupas Ignimbrite is responsible for the mixed facies and the sheared facies. Geotechnical results include a full-range grain size characterization, which enabled to make broader considerations on possible variability among the sampled facies. Consolidated drained triaxial compression tests, carried out on the fine fraction Failure surfaces are always well developed, indicating that the poorly consolidated pyroclastic cover could undergo failure leading to the formation of a gravity driven instability phenomena, like granular or debris flows, which are mainly controlled by the fine fraction. This work

  11. Contribution to modelization and simulation of the ablative-like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities for ICF; Contribution a la modelisation et a la simulation des instabilites de type Rayleigh-Taylor ablatif pour la FCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egly, H

    2007-10-15

    This thesis deals with the dynamics of accelerated ablative front spreading in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments. ICF is designed for the implosion of a deuterium-tritium spherical target. The outer shell, the ablator, is irradiated providing a high level pressure inside the target. During this first stage, the ablation front propagating inwards is perturbed by hydrodynamics instabilities, which can prevent the fusion reaction in the decelerated stage. We propose here a study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during ablation process, in the two dimensional case. In order to obtain a numerical solution, we perform an asymptotic analysis in the limit of a high temperature ratio, between the remaining cold ablator and the hot ablated plasma. This study is divided in two steps. First, the thermo-diffusive part of the set of equations is approximated by a Hele-Shaw model, which is then perturbed by the hydrodynamics part. Using a vortex method, we have to solve the advection of a vortical sheet moving with the ablation front. We compute the numerical solution on an Eulerian mesh coupled with a marker method. The thermal part is computed by implementing the Fat Boundary Method, recently developed. The hydrodynamic part is obtained from a Finite Volume scheme. (author)

  12. [Carpal instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeker, J; Vogt, P M

    2011-01-01

    Carpal instability can be understood as a disturbed anatomical alignment between bones articulating in the carpus. This disturbed balance occurs either only dynamically (with movement) under the effect of physiological force or even statically at rest. The most common cause of carpal instability is wrist trauma with rupture of the stabilizing ligaments and adaptive misalignment following fractures of the radius or carpus. Carpal collapse plays a special role in this mechanism due to non-healed fracture of the scaphoid bone. In addition degenerative inflammatory alterations, such as chondrocalcinosis or gout, more rarely aseptic bone necrosis of the lunate or scaphoid bones or misalignment due to deposition (Madelung deformity) can lead to wrist instability. Under increased pressure the misaligned joint surfaces lead to bone arrosion with secondary arthritis of the wrist. In order to arrest or slow down this irreversible process, diagnosis must occur as early as possible. Many surgical methods have been thought out to regain stability ranging from direct reconstruction of the damaged ligaments, through ligament replacement to partial stiffening of the wrist joint.

  13. FINANCIAL INSTABILITY AND POLITICAL INSTABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu Cristian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an important link between the following two variables: financial instability and political instability. Often, the link is bidirectional, so both may influence each other. This is way the lately crisis are becoming larger and increasingly complex. Therefore, the academic environment is simultaneously talking about economic crises, financial crises, political crises, social crises, highlighting the correlation and causality between variables belonging to the economic, financial, political and social areas, with repercussions and spillover effects that extend from one area to another. Given the importance, relevance and the actuality of the ones described above, I consider that at least a theoretical analysis between economic, financial and political factors is needed in order to understand the reality. Thus, this paper aims to find links and connections to complete the picture of the economic reality.

  14. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects: implications for radiation protection; Instabilite genomique et effet ''bystander'' induit par les rayonnements ionisants: implications pour la radioprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, J.B. [Harvard School of Public Health, Lab. of Radiobiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Evidence has emerged over the past decade for the existence of two cellular phenomenons which challenge the standard paradigms for the induction of biological effects by ionizing radiation. In both cases, important genetic changes arise in cells that in themselves receive no radiation exposure. In the first, radiation induces a type of transmissible genomic instability in cells that leads to a persistent enhancement in the rate at which genetic alterations including mutations and chromosomal aberrations arise in the descendants of the original irradiated cell after many generations of replication. In the bystander effect, damage signals are transmitted from irradiated to non-irradiated cells in the population, leading to the occurrence of biologic effects in these 'bystander' cells. In this review, our current knowledge concerning these two phenomena is described and their potential impact on the estimation of risks of low level radiation exposure discussed. (author)

  15. Study of rock-drilling fluid interactions that contribute for the borehole instability; Estudo das interacoes rocha-fluido de perfuracao que contribuem para a instabilidade dos pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Cleysson C.; Nascimento, Regina S.V. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica; Sa, Carlos H. de [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2004-07-01

    In this work it was developed a new three points flexural mechanical test submersed for the simultaneous evaluation of the mechanical and chemical nature processes involved in the rock/drilling fluid interactions, which contribute for the borehole instability. The utilized fluids were air, mineral oil, distilled water and water solutions of non hydrolized polyacrylamide, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) with different molecular weights, and the copolymer with acrylamide. Cuttings rolling tests were utilized to help in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the shale's inhibition process. The results suggest that shale/polymer interactions are responsible for the shale's mechanical resistance, since the quantity of water and total carbon content of the shales were the same, after the test, independently of the inhibitor used. The results also suggest that the shale instability depends on the amount of adsorbed water, since independently of the inhibitor utilized, the quantity of adsorbed water was the same as that obtained with the shale/water system. (author)

  16. Genome Architecture and Its Roles in Human Copy Number Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Besides single-nucleotide variants in the human genome, large-scale genomic variants, such as copy number variations (CNVs, are being increasingly discovered as a genetic source of human diversity and the pathogenic factors of diseases. Recent experimental findings have shed light on the links between different genome architectures and CNV mutagenesis. In this review, we summarize various genomic features and discuss their contributions to CNV formation. Genomic repeats, including both low-copy and high-copy repeats, play important roles in CNV instability, which was initially known as DNA recombination events. Furthermore, it has been found that human genomic repeats can also induce DNA replication errors and consequently result in CNV mutations. Some recent studies showed that DNA replication timing, which reflects the high-order information of genomic organization, is involved in human CNV mutations. Our review highlights that genome architecture, from DNA sequence to high-order genomic organization, is an important molecular factor in CNV mutagenesis and human genomic instability.

  17. The linkage of chromatin remodeling to genome maintenance: contribution from a human disease gene BRIT1/MCPH1

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Guang; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2009-01-01

    Genomic DNA is packed into a highly condensed chromatin structure, which acts as natural barrier preventing accessibility of DNA. In various processes to maintain genomic integrity such as DNA replication, DNA repair, telomere regulation, proteins need to overcome the barrier of condensed chromatin to gain access to DNA. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling is one of the fundamental mechanisms used by cells to relax chromatin. However, the chromatin remodeling complex does not contain intrinsic...

  18. New insight into the history of domesticated apple: secondary contribution of the European wild apple to the genome of cultivated varieties

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The apple is the most common and culturally important fruit crop of temperate areas. The elucidation of its origin and domestication history is therefore of great interest. The wild Central Asian species Malus sieversii has previously been identified as the main contributor to the genome of the cultivated apple (Malus domestica), on the basis of morphological, molecular, and historical evidence. The possible contribution of other wild species present along the Silk Route running from Asia to ...

  19. The contribution of health technology assessment, health needs assessment, and health impact assessment to the assessment and translation of technologies in the field of public health genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkötter, N; Vondeling, H; Blancquaert, I; Mekel, O C L; Kristensen, F B; Brand, A

    2011-01-01

    The European Union has named genomics as one of the promising research fields for the development of new health technologies. Major concerns with regard to these fields are, on the one hand, the rather slow and limited translation of new knowledge and, on the other hand, missing insights into the impact on public health and health care practice of those technologies that are actually introduced. This paper aims to give an overview of the major assessment instruments in public health [health technology assessment (HTA), health needs assessment (HNA) and health impact assessment (HIA)] which could contribute to the systematic translation and assessment of genomic health applications by focussing at population level and on public health policy making. It is shown to what extent HTA, HNA and HIA contribute to translational research by using the continuum of translational research (T1-T4) in genomic medicine as an analytic framework. The selected assessment methodologies predominantly cover 2 to 4 phases within the T1-T4 system. HTA delivers the most complete set of methodologies when assessing health applications. HNA can be used to prioritize areas where genomic health applications are needed or to identify infrastructural needs. HIA delivers information on the impact of technologies in a wider scope and promotes informed decision making. HTA, HNA and HIA provide a partly overlapping and partly unique set of methodologies and infrastructure for the translation and assessment of genomic health applications. They are broad in scope and go beyond the continuum of T1-T4 translational research regarding policy translation.

  20. The linkage of chromatin remodeling to genome maintenance: contribution from a human disease gene BRIT1/MCPH1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guang; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2009-10-01

    Genomic DNA is packed into a highly condensed chromatin structure, which acts as natural barrier preventing accessibility of DNA. In various processes to maintain genomic integrity such as DNA replication, DNA repair, telomere regulation, proteins need to overcome the barrier of condensed chromatin to gain access to DNA. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling is one of the fundamental mechanisms used by cells to relax chromatin. However, the chromatin remodeling complex does not contain intrinsic specificity for particular nuclear process, and the mechanism mediating its recruitment to DNA lesions remains to be an outstanding question. To address this question, in this review, we will discuss our current findings and future perspectives about how BRIT1/MCPH1, a human disease gene, specifies the function of chromatin remodelers and links chromatin remodeling to genome maintenance.

  1. Expression of Cyclins A, E and Topoisomerase II α correlates with centrosome amplification and genomic instability and influences the reliability of cytometric S-phase determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laytragoon-Lewin Nongnit

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progression of normal cells through the cell cycle is meticulously regulated by checkpoints guaranteeing the exact replication of the genome during S-phase and its equal division at mitosis. A prerequisite for this achievement is synchronized DNA-replication and centrosome duplication. In this context the expression of cyclins A and E has been shown to play a principal role. Results Our results demonstrated a correlation between centrosome amplification, cell cycle fidelity and the level of mRNA and protein expression of cyclins A and E during the part of the cell cycle defined as G1-phase by means of DNA content based histogram analysis. It is shown that the normal diploid breast cell line HTB-125, the genomically relatively stable aneuploid breast cancer cell line MCF-7, and the genomically unstable aneuploid breast cancer cell line MDA-231 differ remarkably concerning both mRNA and protein expression of the two cyclins during G1-phase. In MDA-231 cells the expression of e.g. cyclin A mRNA was found to be ten times higher than in MCF-7 cells and about 500 times higher than in HTB-125 cells. Topoisomerase II α showed high mRNA expression in MDA compared to MCF-7 cells, but the difference in protein expression was small. Furthermore, we measured centrosome aberrations in 8.4% of the MDA-231 cells, and in only 1.3% of the more stable aneuploid cell line MCF-7. MDA cells showed 27% more incorporation of BrdU than reflected by S-phase determination with flow cytometric DNA content analysis, whereas these values were found to be of the same size in both HTB-125 and MCF-7 cells. Conclusions Our data indicate that the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-231, although both DNA-aneuploid, differ significantly regarding the degree of cell cycle disturbance and centrosome aberrations, which partly could explain the different genomic stability of the two cell lines. The results also question the reliability of cytometric DNA

  2. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mouro Pinto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Huntington's disease gene (HTT CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111 mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111 than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111 . Linkage mapping in (B6x129.Hdh(Q111 F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111 mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111 somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3 complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3. The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest

  3. Mismatch repair genes Mlh1 and Mlh3 modify CAG instability in Huntington's disease mice: genome-wide and candidate approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Ricardo Mouro; Dragileva, Ella; Kirby, Andrew; Lloret, Alejandro; Lopez, Edith; St Claire, Jason; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Hou, Caixia; Holloway, Kim; Gillis, Tammy; Guide, Jolene R; Cohen, Paula E; Li, Guo-Min; Pearson, Christopher E; Daly, Mark J; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-10-01

    The Huntington's disease gene (HTT) CAG repeat mutation undergoes somatic expansion that correlates with pathogenesis. Modifiers of somatic expansion may therefore provide routes for therapies targeting the underlying mutation, an approach that is likely applicable to other trinucleotide repeat diseases. Huntington's disease Hdh(Q111) mice exhibit higher levels of somatic HTT CAG expansion on a C57BL/6 genetic background (B6.Hdh(Q111) ) than on a 129 background (129.Hdh(Q111) ). Linkage mapping in (B6x129).Hdh(Q111) F2 intercross animals identified a single quantitative trait locus underlying the strain-specific difference in expansion in the striatum, implicating mismatch repair (MMR) gene Mlh1 as the most likely candidate modifier. Crossing B6.Hdh(Q111) mice onto an Mlh1 null background demonstrated that Mlh1 is essential for somatic CAG expansions and that it is an enhancer of nuclear huntingtin accumulation in striatal neurons. Hdh(Q111) somatic expansion was also abolished in mice deficient in the Mlh3 gene, implicating MutLγ (MLH1-MLH3) complex as a key driver of somatic expansion. Strikingly, Mlh1 and Mlh3 genes encoding MMR effector proteins were as critical to somatic expansion as Msh2 and Msh3 genes encoding DNA mismatch recognition complex MutSβ (MSH2-MSH3). The Mlh1 locus is highly polymorphic between B6 and 129 strains. While we were unable to detect any difference in base-base mismatch or short slipped-repeat repair activity between B6 and 129 MLH1 variants, repair efficiency was MLH1 dose-dependent. MLH1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly decreased in 129 mice compared to B6 mice, consistent with a dose-sensitive MLH1-dependent DNA repair mechanism underlying the somatic expansion difference between these strains. Together, these data identify Mlh1 and Mlh3 as novel critical genetic modifiers of HTT CAG instability, point to Mlh1 genetic variation as the likely source of the instability difference in B6 and 129 strains and suggest that MLH1

  4. Genome-wide association study for acute otitis media in children identifies FNDC1 as disease contributing gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ingen, Gijs; Li, Jin; Goedegebure, André; Pandey, Rahul; Li, Yun Rose; March, Michael E.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Bakay, Marina; Mentch, Frank D.; Thomas, Kelly; Wei, Zhi; Chang, Xiao; Hain, Heather S.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Moll, Henriette A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Raat, Hein; Baatenburg de Jong, Robert J.; Sleiman, Patrick M.; van der Schroeff, Marc P.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2016-01-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is among the most common pediatric diseases, and the most frequent reason for antibiotic treatment in children. Risk of AOM is dependent on environmental and host factors, as well as a significant genetic component. We identify genome-wide significance at a locus on 6q25.3 (rs2932989, Pmeta=2.15 × 10−09), and show that the associated variants are correlated with the methylation status of the FNDC1 gene (cg05678571, P=1.43 × 10−06), and further show it is an eQTL for FNDC1 (P=9.3 × 10−05). The mouse homologue, Fndc1, is expressed in middle ear tissue and its expression is upregulated upon lipopolysaccharide treatment. In this first GWAS of AOM and the largest OM genetic study to date, we identify the first genome-wide significant locus associated with AOM. PMID:27677580

  5. Assessment of the scientific-technological production in molecular biology in Brazil (1996-2007): the contribution of genomics programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Rogério; Gamba, Estêvão C

    2011-06-01

    Several genome sequencing programs were launched in Brazil by the end of the nineties and the early 2000s.The most important initiatives were supported by the ONSA program (http://watson.fapesp.br/onsa/Genoma3.htm) and aimed at gaining domain in genomic technology and bringing molecular biology to the state of art. Two main sets of data were collected in the 1996-2007 period to evaluate the results of these genome programs: the scientific production (Scopus and Web of Science databases) and the register of patents (US Patent and Trademark Office), both related to the progress of molecular biology along this period. In regard to the former, Brazil took a great leap in comparison to 17 other developed and developing countries, being only surpassed by China. As to the register of patents in the area of molecular biology, Brazil's performance lags far behind most of the countries focused in the present study, confirming the Brazilian long-standing tendency of poor achievements in technological innovations when compared with scientific production. Possible solutions to surpass this inequality are discussed.

  6. Modes of storage ring coherent instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    Longitudinal impedance in a beam and various modes of longitudinal coherent instabilities are discussed. The coasting beam coherent instability, microwave instability, and single-bunch longitudinal coherent instabilities are considered. The Vlasov equation is formulated, and a method of solving it is developed. The synchrotron modes are treated, which take the possible bunch shape distortion fully into consideration. A method of treating the synchrotron mode coupling in the case of a small bunch is discussed which takes advantage of the fact that only a few of the synchrotron modes can contribute in such a case. The effect of many bunches on the coherent motion of the beam and the longitudinal symmetric coupled bunch modes are discussed. The transverse impedance is then introduced, and the transverse coasting beam instability is discussed. Various bunched beam instabilities are discussed, including both single bunch instabilities and coupled bunch instabilities. The Vlasov equation for transverse as well as longitudinal motion of particles is introduced as well as a method of solving it within a linear approximation. Head-tail modes and short bunch instabilities and strong coupling instabilities in the long bunch case are covered. (LEW)

  7. Systems-based analysis of the Sarcocystis neurona genome identifies pathways that contribute to a heteroxenous life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazejewski, Tomasz; Nursimulu, Nirvana; Pszenny, Viviana; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Namasivayam, Sivaranjani; Chiasson, Melissa A; Chessman, Kyle; Tonkin, Michelle; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S; Hung, Stacy S; Bridgers, Joshua; Ricklefs, Stacy M; Boulanger, Martin J; Dubey, Jitender P; Porcella, Stephen F; Kissinger, Jessica C; Howe, Daniel K; Grigg, Michael E; Parkinson, John

    2015-02-10

    Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the coccidia, a clade of single-celled parasites of medical and veterinary importance including Eimeria, Sarcocystis, Neospora, and Toxoplasma. Unlike Eimeria, a single-host enteric pathogen, Sarcocystis, Neospora, and Toxoplasma are two-host parasites that infect and produce infectious tissue cysts in a wide range of intermediate hosts. As a genus, Sarcocystis is one of the most successful protozoan parasites; all vertebrates, including birds, reptiles, fish, and mammals are hosts to at least one Sarcocystis species. Here we sequenced Sarcocystis neurona, the causal agent of fatal equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. The S. neurona genome is 127 Mbp, more than twice the size of other sequenced coccidian genomes. Comparative analyses identified conservation of the invasion machinery among the coccidia. However, many dense-granule and rhoptry kinase genes, responsible for altering host effector pathways in Toxoplasma and Neospora, are absent from S. neurona. Further, S. neurona has a divergent repertoire of SRS proteins, previously implicated in tissue cyst formation in Toxoplasma. Systems-based analyses identified a series of metabolic innovations, including the ability to exploit alternative sources of energy. Finally, we present an S. neurona model detailing conserved molecular innovations that promote the transition from a purely enteric lifestyle (Eimeria) to a heteroxenous parasite capable of infecting a wide range of intermediate hosts. Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the coccidia, a clade of single-celled apicomplexan parasites responsible for major economic and health care burdens worldwide. A cousin of Plasmodium, Cryptosporidium, Theileria, and Eimeria, Sarcocystis is one of the most successful parasite genera; it is capable of infecting all vertebrates (fish, reptiles, birds, and mammals-including humans). The past decade has witnessed an increasing number of human outbreaks of clinical significance associated with

  8. PprA contributes to Deinococcus radiodurans resistance to nalidixic acid, genome maintenance after DNA damage and interacts with deinococcal topoisomerases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swathi Kota

    Full Text Available PprA is known to contribute to Deinococcus radiodurans' remarkable capacity to survive a variety of genotoxic assaults. The molecular bases for PprA's role(s in the maintenance of the damaged D. radiodurans genome are incompletely understood, but PprA is thought to promote D. radiodurans's capacity for DSB repair. PprA is found in a multiprotein DNA processing complex along with an ATP type DNA ligase, and the D. radiodurans toposiomerase IB (DraTopoIB as well as other proteins. Here, we show that PprA is a key contributor to D. radiodurans resistance to nalidixic acid (Nal, an inhibitor of topoisomerase II. Growth of wild type D. radiodurans and a pprA mutant were similar in the absence of exogenous genotoxic insults; however, the pprA mutant exhibited marked growth delay and a higher frequency of anucleate cells following treatment with DNA-damaging agents. We show that PprA interacts with both DraTopoIB and the Gyrase A subunit (DraGyrA in vivo and that purified PprA enhances DraTopoIB catalysed relaxation of supercoiled DNA. Thus, besides promoting DNA repair, our findings suggest that PprA also contributes to preserving the integrity of the D. radiodurans genome following DNA damage by interacting with DNA topoisomerases and by facilitating the actions of DraTopoIB.

  9. VHL loss causes spindle misorientation and chromosome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Claudio R; Toso, Alberto; Gutbrodt, Katrin L; Reggi, Sabina P; Frew, Ian J; Schraml, Peter; Hergovich, Alexander; Moch, Holger; Meraldi, Patrick; Krek, Wilhelm

    2009-08-01

    Error-free mitosis depends on fidelity-monitoring checkpoint systems that ensure correct temporal and spatial coordination of chromosome segregation by the microtubule spindle apparatus. Defects in these checkpoint systems can lead to genomic instability, an important aspect of tumorigenesis. Here we show that the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor protein, pVHL, which is inactivated in hereditary and sporadic forms of renal cell carcinoma, localizes to the mitotic spindle in mammalian cells and its functional inactivation provokes spindle misorientation, spindle checkpoint weakening and chromosomal instability. Spindle misorientation is linked to unstable astral microtubules and is supressed by the restoration of wild-type pVHL in pVHL-deficient cells, but not in naturally-occurring VHL disease mutants that are defective in microtubule stabilization. Impaired spindle checkpoint function and chromosomal instability are the result of reduced Mad2 (mitotic arrest deficient 2) levels actuated by pVHL-inactivation and are rescued by re-expression of either Mad2 or pVHL in VHL-defective cells. An association between VHL inactivation, reduced Mad2 levels and increased aneuploidy was also found in human renal cancer, implying that the newly identified functions of pVHL in promoting proper spindle orientation and chromosomal stability probably contribute to tumour suppression.

  10. Plant STAND P-loop NTPases: a current perspective of genome distribution, evolution, and function : Plant STAND P-loop NTPases: genomic organization, evolution, and molecular mechanism models contribute broadly to plant pathogen defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Preeti; Acharya, Vishal

    2017-09-12

    STAND P-loop NTPase is the common weapon used by plant and other organisms from all three kingdoms of life to defend themselves against pathogen invasion. The purpose of this study is to review comprehensively the latest finding of plant STAND P-loop NTPase related to their genomic distribution, evolution, and their mechanism of action. Earlier, the plant STAND P-loop NTPase known to be comprised of only NBS-LRRs/AP-ATPase/NB-ARC ATPase. However, recent finding suggests that genome of early green plants comprised of two types of STAND P-loop NTPases: (1) mammalian NACHT NTPases and (2) NBS-LRRs. Moreover, YchF (unconventional G protein and members of P-loop NTPase) subfamily has been reported to be exceptionally involved in biotic stress (in case of Oryza sativa), thereby a novel member of STAND P-loop NTPase in green plants. The lineage-specific expansion and genome duplication events are responsible for abundance of plant STAND P-loop NTPases; where "moderate tandem and low segmental duplication" trajectory followed in majority of plant species with few exception (equal contribution of tandem and segmental duplication). Since the past decades, systematic research is being investigated into NBS-LRR function supported the direct recognition of pathogen or pathogen effectors by the latest models proposed via 'integrated decoy' or 'sensor domains' model. Here, we integrate the recently published findings together with the previous literature on the genomic distribution, evolution, and distinct models proposed for functional molecular mechanism of plant STAND P-loop NTPases.

  11. The contribution of the genomes of a termite and a locust to our understanding of insect neuropeptides and neurohormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    The genomes of the migratory locust Locusta migratoria and the termite Zootermopsis nevadensis were mined for the presence of genes encoding neuropeptides, neurohormones, and their G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Both species have retained a larger number of neuropeptide and neuropeptide GPCRs than the better known holometabolous insect species, while other genes that in holometabolous species appear to have a single transcript produce two different precursors in the locust, the termite or both. Thus, the recently discovered CNMa neuropeptide gene has two transcripts predicted to produce two structurally different CNMa peptides in the termite, while the locust produces two different myosuppressin peptides in the same fashion. Both these species also have a calcitonin gene, which is different from the gene encoding the calcitonin-like insect diuretic hormone. This gene produces two types of calcitonins, calcitonins A and B. It is also present in Lepidoptera and Coleoptera and some Diptera, but absent from mosquitoes and Drosophila. However, in holometabolous insect species, only the B transcript is produced. Their putative receptors were also identified. In contrast, Locusta has a highly unusual gene that codes for a salivation stimulatory peptide. The Locusta genes for neuroparsin and vasopressin are particularly interesting. The neuroparsin gene produces five different transcripts, of which only one codes for the neurohormone identified from the corpora cardiaca. The other four transcripts code for neuroparsin-like proteins, which lack four amino acid residues, and that for that reason we called neoneuroparsins. The number of transcripts for the neoneuroparsins is about 200 times larger than the number of neuroparsin transcripts. The first exon and the putative promoter of the vasopressin genes, of which there are about seven copies in the genome, is very well-conserved, but the remainder of these genes is not. The relevance of these findings is discussed

  12. Contribution of genome-wide association studies to scientific research: a pragmatic approach to evaluate their impact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito A G Ricigliano

    Full Text Available The factual value of genome-wide association studies (GWAS for the understanding of multifactorial diseases is a matter of intense debate. Practical consequences for the development of more effective therapies do not seem to be around the corner. Here we propose a pragmatic and objective evaluation of how much new biology is arising from these studies, with particular attention to the information that can help prioritize therapeutic targets. We chose multiple sclerosis (MS as a paradigm disease and assumed that, in pre-GWAS candidate-gene studies, the knowledge behind the choice of each gene reflected the understanding of the disease prior to the advent of GWAS. Importantly, this knowledge was based mainly on non-genetic, phenotypic grounds. We performed single-gene and pathway-oriented comparisons of old and new knowledge in MS by confronting an unbiased list of candidate genes in pre-GWAS association studies with those genes exceeding the genome-wide significance threshold in GWAS published from 2007 on. At the single gene level, the majority (94 out of 125 of GWAS-discovered variants had never been contemplated as plausible candidates in pre-GWAS association studies. The 31 genes that were present in both pre- and post-GWAS lists may be of particular interest in that they represent disease-associated variants whose pathogenetic relevance is supported at the phenotypic level (i.e. the phenotypic information that steered their selection as candidate genes in pre-GWAS association studies. As such they represent attractive therapeutic targets. Interestingly, our analysis shows that some of these variants are targets of pharmacologically active compounds, including drugs that are already registered for human use. Compared with the above single-gene analysis, at the pathway level GWAS results appear more coherent with previous knowledge, reinforcing some of the current views on MS pathogenesis and related therapeutic research. This study presents a

  13. The contribution of the genomes of a termite and a locust to our understanding of insect neuropeptides and neurohormones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Adrianus Veenstra

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The genomes of the migratory locust Locusta migratoria and the termite Zootermopsis nevadensis were mined for genes encoding neuropeptides, neurohormones and their G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Both species have retained a larger number of neuropeptide and neuropeptide GPCRs than the better known holometabolous insect species, while other genes that in holometabolous species appear to have a single transcript produce two different precursors in the locust, the termite or both. Thus the recently discovered CNMa neuropeptide gene has two transcripts predicted to produce two structurally different CNMa peptides in the termite, while the locust produces two different myosuppressin peptides in the same fashion. Both these species also have a calcitonin gene, which is different from the gene encoding the calcitonin-like insect diuretic hormone. This gene produces two types of calcitonins, calcitonins A and B. It is also present in Lepidoptera and Coleoptera and some Diptera, but absent from mosquitoes and Drosophila. However, in holometabolous insect species, only the B transcript is produced. Their putative receptors were also identified. In contrast, Locusta has a highly unusual gene that codes for a salivation stimulatory peptide. The Locusta genes for neuroparsin and vasopressin are particularly interesting. The neuroparsin gene produces five different transcripts, of which only one codes for the neurohormone identified from the corpora cardiaca. The other four transcripts code for neuroparsin-like proteins, which lack four amino acid residues, and that for that reason we called neoneuroparsins. The number of transcripts for the neoneuroparsins is about two hundred times larger than the number of neuroparsin transcripts. The first exon and the putative promoter of the vasopressin genes, of which there are about seven copies in the genome, is very well conserved, but the remainder of these genes is not. The relevance of these findings is

  14. Chromosomal and Extrachromosomal Instability of the cyclin D2 Gene is Induced by Myc Overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Mai

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined the expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3, and E in mouse B-lymphocytic tumors. Cyclin D2 mRNA was consistently elevated in plasmacytomas, which characteristically contain Myc-activating chromosome translocations and constitutive c-Myc mRNA and protein expression. We examined the nature of cyclin D2 overexpression in plasmacytomas and other tumors. Human and mouse tumor cell lines that exhibited c-Myc dysregulation displayed instability of the cyclin D2 gene, detected by Southern blot, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, and in extrachromosomal preparations (Hirt extracts. Cyclin D2 instability was not seen in cells with low levels of c-Myc protein. To unequivocally demonstrate a role of c-Myc in the instability of the cyclin D2 gene, a Myc-estrogen receptor chimera was activated in two mouse cell lines. After 3 to 4 days of Myc-ERTm activation, instability at the cyclin D2 locus was seen in the form of extrachromosomal elements, determined by FISH of metaphase and interphase nuclei and of purified extrachromosomal elements. At the same time points, Northern and Western blot analyses detected increased cyclin D2 mRNA and protein levels. These data suggest that Myc-induced genomic instability may contribute to neoplasia by increasing the levels of a cell cycle—regulating protein, cyclin D2, via intrachromosomal amplification of its gene or generation of extrachromosomal copies.

  15. Global genomic profiling reveals an extensive p53-regulated autophagy program contributing to key p53 responses

    OpenAIRE

    Kenzelmann Broz, Daniela; Spano Mello, Stephano; Bieging, Kathryn T.; Jiang, Dadi; Dusek, Rachel L.; Brady, Colleen A.; Sidow, Arend; Attardi, Laura D

    2013-01-01

    To gain new insights into p53 biology, Kenzelmann Broz et al. used high-throughput sequencing to analyze global p53 transcriptional networks in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts in response to DNA damage. This approach identified autophagy genes as direct p53 target genes. p53-induced autophagy was important for both p53-dependent apoptosis and transformation suppression by p53. These data highlight an intimate connection between p53 and autophagy and suggest that autophagy contributes to p53-...

  16. Electron heat flux instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  17. Structural and Material Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cifuentes, Gustavo Cifuentes

    This work is a small contribution to the general problem of structural and material instability. In this work, the main subject is the analysis of cracking and failure of structural elements made from quasi-brittle materials like concrete. The analysis is made using the finite element method. Three...... use of interface elements) is used successfully to model cases where the path of the discontinuity is known in advance, as is the case of the analysis of pull-out of fibers embedded in a concrete matrix. This method is applied to the case of non-straight fibers and fibers with forces that have....... Numerical problems associated with the use of elements with embedded cracks based on the extended finite element method are presented in the next part of this work. And an alternative procedure is used in order to successfully remove these numerical problems. In the final part of this work, a computer...

  18. Contribuciones de la genética y la proteómica al estudio de la enfermedad de Chagas Genomic and proteomic contributions for Chagas disease control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa López-Ordóñez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available La enfermedad de Chagas representa uno de los problemas más importantes de salud pública en el continente americano. El conocimiento sobre el genoma y el proteoma de los agentes de esta infección es esencial para desarrollar herramientas precisas y eficaces a corto y largo plazo y prevenir la transmisión. En el presente documento se destacan los aportes que han permitido mejorar el diseño, la implementación y la eficacia de las actividades de vigilancia y control de la enfermedad. Se revisan la contribución de la información genómica o proteómica sobre la distribución geográfica de los vectores, y la diversidad y la dinámica poblacional, además de la identificación de poblaciones y especies blanco para control. Por otra parte, se analiza la forma en que el conocimiento del genoma del parásito ha contribuido al diagnóstico de la infección, el estudio de las poblaciones de Trypanosoma cruzi, el tratamiento farmacológico y la interacción del parásito con sus hospederos. Una revisión de estas contribuciones incluye los temas de investigación básica y aplicada más destacados para el futuro inmediato.Chagas disease represents one of the more significant public health problems in the Americas. Information regarding the genome and proteome of vectors and parasite, as well as their interactions, will be essential to develop specific and effective diagnostic and preventive tools. Advances that have contributed to the design, implementation, and efficacy of disease surveillance and control activities are reviewed. Genomic and proteomic information has contributed to a better understanding of vector distributions and dispersion, diversity, population dynamics, and control targets (populations and species. In addition, genomic and proteomic studies have impacted parasite diagnostics, Trypanosoma cruzi population dynamics, pharmacological treatment and knowledge of parasite-host interactions. Discussion of these contributions includes

  19. Evaluating shoulder instability treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linde, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder instability common occurs. When treated nonoperatively, the resulting societal costs based on health care utilization and productivity losses are significant. Shoulder function can be evaluated using patient reported outcome measurements (PROMs). For shoulder instability, these include the

  20. Jeans instability in superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hason, Itamar; Oz, Yaron [Tel-Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    We analyze the effect of a gravitational field on the sound modes of superfluids. We derive an instability condition that generalizes the well-known Jeans instability of the sound mode in normal fluids. We discuss potential experimental implications. (orig.)

  1. A Genome-Wide Association Study for Regulators of Micronucleus Formation in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E. McIntyre

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In mammals the regulation of genomic instability plays a key role in tumor suppression and also controls genome plasticity, which is important for recombination during the processes of immunity and meiosis. Most studies to identify regulators of genomic instability have been performed in cells in culture or in systems that report on gross rearrangements of the genome, yet subtle differences in the level of genomic instability can contribute to whole organism phenotypes such as tumor predisposition. Here we performed a genome-wide association study in a population of 1379 outbred Crl:CFW(SW-US_P08 mice to dissect the genetic landscape of micronucleus formation, a biomarker of chromosomal breaks, whole chromosome loss, and extranuclear DNA. Variation in micronucleus levels is a complex trait with a genome-wide heritability of 53.1%. We identify seven loci influencing micronucleus formation (false discovery rate <5%, and define candidate genes at each locus. Intriguingly at several loci we find evidence for sexual dimorphism in micronucleus formation, with a locus on chromosome 11 being specific to males.

  2. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blandine Patillon

    Full Text Available VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2 is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK. This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8, and PRSS8 with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  3. Positive selection in the chromosome 16 VKORC1 genomic region has contributed to the variability of anticoagulant response in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patillon, Blandine; Luisi, Pierre; Blanché, Hélène; Patin, Etienne; Cann, Howard M; Génin, Emmanuelle; Sabbagh, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    VKORC1 (vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1, 16p11.2) is the main genetic determinant of human response to oral anticoagulants of antivitamin K type (AVK). This gene was recently suggested to be a putative target of positive selection in East Asian populations. In this study, we genotyped the HGDP-CEPH Panel for six VKORC1 SNPs and downloaded chromosome 16 genotypes from the HGDP-CEPH database in order to characterize the geographic distribution of footprints of positive selection within and around this locus. A unique VKORC1 haplotype carrying the promoter mutation associated with AVK sensitivity showed especially high frequencies in all the 17 HGDP-CEPH East Asian population samples. VKORC1 and 24 neighboring genes were found to lie in a 505 kb region of strong linkage disequilibrium in these populations. Patterns of allele frequency differentiation and haplotype structure suggest that this genomic region has been submitted to a near complete selective sweep in all East Asian populations and only in this geographic area. The most extreme scores of the different selection tests are found within a smaller 45 kb region that contains VKORC1 and three other genes (BCKDK, MYST1 (KAT8), and PRSS8) with different functions. Because of the strong linkage disequilibrium, it is not possible to determine if VKORC1 or one of the three other genes is the target of this strong positive selection that could explain present-day differences among human populations in AVK dose requirement. Our results show that the extended region surrounding a presumable single target of positive selection should be analyzed for genetic variation in a wide range of genetically diverse populations in order to account for other neighboring and confounding selective events and the hitchhiking effect.

  4. United theory of biological evolution:Disaster-forced evolution through Supernova, radioactive ash fall-outs, genome instability, and mass extinctions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toshikazu Ebisuzaki; Shigenori Maruyama

    2015-01-01

    We present the disaster-forced biological evolution model as a general framework that includes Darwinian “phylogenic gradualism”, Eldredge-Gould’s “punctuated equilibrium”, mass extinctions, and allopatric, parapatric, and sympatric speciation. It describes how reproductive isolation of organisms is established through global disasters due to supernova encounters and local disasters due to radioactive volcanic ash fall-outs by continental alkaline volcanism. Our new evolution model uniquely highlights three major factors of disaster-forced speciation: enhanced mutation rate by higher natural radiation level, smaller population size, and shrunken habitat size (i.e., isolation among the individual pop-ulations). We developed a mathematical model describing speciation of a half-isolated group from a parental group, taking into account the population size (Ne), immigration rate (m), and mutation rate (m). The model gives a quantitative estimate of the speciation, which is consistent with the observations of speciation speed. For example, the speciation takes at least 105 generations, if mutation rate is less than 10?3 per generation per individual. This result is consistent with the previous studies, in which m is assumed to be 10?3e10?5. On the other hand, the speciation is much faster (less than 105 generations) for the case that m is as large as 0.1 in parapatric conditions (mcontribute to macro-evolution during mass extinction events, such as observed during the Cambrian explosion of biodiversity. A similar rapid speciation (though in a much smaller

  5. United theory of biological evolution: Disaster-forced evolution through Supernova, radioactive ash fall-outs, genome instability, and mass extinctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Ebisuzaki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the disaster-forced biological evolution model as a general framework that includes Darwinian “phylogenic gradualism”, Eldredge-Gould's “punctuated equilibrium”, mass extinctions, and allopatric, parapatric, and sympatric speciation. It describes how reproductive isolation of organisms is established through global disasters due to supernova encounters and local disasters due to radioactive volcanic ash fall-outs by continental alkaline volcanism. Our new evolution model uniquely highlights three major factors of disaster-forced speciation: enhanced mutation rate by higher natural radiation level, smaller population size, and shrunken habitat size (i.e., isolation among the individual populations. We developed a mathematical model describing speciation of a half-isolated group from a parental group, taking into account the population size (Ne, immigration rate (m, and mutation rate (μ. The model gives a quantitative estimate of the speciation, which is consistent with the observations of speciation speed. For example, the speciation takes at least 105 generations, if mutation rate is less than 10−3 per generation per individual. This result is consistent with the previous studies, in which μ is assumed to be 10−3–10−5. On the other hand, the speciation is much faster (less than 105 generations for the case that μ is as large as 0.1 in parapatric conditions (m < μ. Even a sympatric (m ~ 1 speciation can occur within 103 generations, if mutation rate is very high (μ ~ 1 mutation per individual per generation, and if Ne < 20–30. Such a high mutation rate is possible during global disasters due to supernova encounters and local disasters due to radioactive ash fall-outs. They raise natural radiation level by a factor of 100–1000. Such rapid speciation events can also contribute to macro-evolution during mass extinction events, such as observed during the Cambrian explosion of biodiversity. A

  6. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  7. MD 751: Train Instability Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Carver, Lee Robert; Metral, Elias; Salvant, Benoit; Levens, Tom; Nisbet, David; Zobov, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this MD is to measure the octupole current thresholds for stability for a single bunch, and then make an immediate comparison (with the same operational settings) for a train of 72 bunches separated by 25ns. From theory, the expected thresholds should be similar. Any discrepancy between the two cases will be of great interest as it could indicate the presence of additional mechanisms that contribute to the instability threshold, for example electron cloud.

  8. Relativistic Gravothermal Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Roupas, Zacharias

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic instabilities of the self-gravitating, classical ideal gas are studied in the case of static, spherically symmetric configurations in General Relativity taking into account the Tolman-Ehrenfest effect. One type of instabilities is found at low energies, where thermal energy becomes too weak to halt gravity and another at high energies, where gravitational attraction of thermal pressure overcomes its stabilizing effect. These turning points of stability are found to depend on the total rest mass $\\mathcal{M}$ over the radius $R$. The low energy instability is the relativistic generalization of Antonov instability, which is recovered in the limit $G\\mathcal{M} \\ll R c^2$ and low temperatures, while in the same limit and high temperatures, the high energy instability recovers the instability of the radiation equation of state. In the temperature versus energy diagram of series of equilibria, the two types of gravothermal instabilities make themselves evident as a double spiral! The two energy l...

  9. Resonant Triad Instability in Stratified Fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Joubaud, Sylvain; Odier, Philippe; Dauxois, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Internal gravity waves contribute to fluid mixing and energy transport, not only in oceans but also in the atmosphere and in astrophysical bodies. We provide here the first experimental measurement of the growth rate of a resonant triad instability (also called parametric subharmonic instability) transferring energy to smaller scales where it is dissipated. We make careful and quantitative comparisons with theoretical predictions for propagating vertical modes in laboratory experiments.

  10. The Genomic Contributions of Avian H1N1 Influenza A Viruses to the Evolution of Mammalian Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçer, Zeynep A; Carter, Robert; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Jinghui; Webster, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Among the influenza A viruses (IAVs) in wild aquatic birds, only H1, H2, and H3 subtypes have caused epidemics in humans. H1N1 viruses of avian origin have also caused 3 of 5 pandemics. To understand the reappearance of H1N1 in the context of pandemic emergence, we investigated whether avian H1N1 IAVs have contributed to the evolution of human, swine, and 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, we concluded that the polymerase gene segments (especially PB2 and PA) circulating in North American avian H1N1 IAVs have been reintroduced to swine multiple times, resulting in different lineages that led to the emergence of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 IAVs. Moreover, the similar topologies of hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein and neuraminidase and matrix gene segments suggest that each surface glycoprotein coevolved with an internal gene segment within the H1N1 subtype. The genotype of avian H1N1 IAVs of Charadriiformes origin isolated in 2009 differs from that of avian H1N1 IAVs of Anseriformes origin. When the antigenic sites in the hemagglutinin of all 31 North American avian H1N1 IAVs were considered, 60%-80% of the amino acids at the antigenic sites were identical to those in 1918 and/or 2009 pandemic H1N1 viruses. Thus, although the pathogenicity of avian H1N1 IAVs could not be inferred from the phylogeny due to the small dataset, the evolutionary process within the H1N1 IAV subtype suggests that the circulation of H1N1 IAVs in wild birds poses a continuous threat for future influenza pandemics in humans.

  11. 3. Chromosomal instability in B-lymphoblasotoid cell lines from Werner's and Bloom's syndrome patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Werner's syndrome (WS) and Bloom's syndrome (BS) are rare autosomal recessive diseases in which the feature of premature aging and the elevated risk of neoplasia may be associated with genomic instability. To cha-racterize the genomic instability of WS and BS, B-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from WS and BS patients were cytogenetically analyzed, comparing to those from healthy donors. Although all

  12. Characterizing the Prevalence of Chromosome Instability in Interval Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.L. Cisyk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A substantial proportion of colorectal cancers (CRCs are interval CRCs (I-CRCs; i.e., CRCs diagnosed soon after a colonoscopy. Chromosomal instability (CIN is defined as an increase in the rate of which whole chromosomes/large chromosomal fragments are gained or lost and is observed in 85% of non-hereditary CRCs. The contribution of CIN to the etiology of I-CRCs remains unknown. We established a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH approach to characterize CIN by enumerating specific chromosomes and determined the prevalence of numerical CIN in a population-based cohort of I-CRCs and control (sporadic CRCs. Using the population-based Manitoba Health administrative databases and Manitoba Cancer Registry, we identified an age, sex, and colonic site of CRC matched cohort of I-CRCs and controls and retrieved their archived paraffin-embedded tumor samples. FISH chromosome enumeration probes specifically recognizing the pericentric regions of chromosomes 8, 11, and 17 were first used on cell lines and then CRC tissue microarrays to detect aneusomy, which was then used to calculate a CIN score (CS. The 15th percentile CS for control CRC was used to define CIN phenotype. Mean CSs were similar in the control CRCs and I-CRCs; 82% of I-CRCs exhibited a CIN phenotype, which was similar to that in the control CRCs. This study suggests that CIN is the most prevalent contributor to genomic instability in I-CRCs. Further studies should evaluate CIN and microsatellite instability (MSI in the same cohort of I-CRCs to corroborate our findings and to further assess concomitant contribution of CIN and MSI to I-CRCs.

  13. Characterizing the prevalence of chromosome instability in interval colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisyk, A L; Penner-Goeke, S; Lichtensztejn, Z; Nugent, Z; Wightman, R H; Singh, H; McManus, K J

    2015-03-01

    A substantial proportion of colorectal cancers (CRCs) are interval CRCs (I-CRCs; i.e., CRCs diagnosed soon after a colonoscopy). Chromosomal instability (CIN) is defined as an increase in the rate of which whole chromosomes/large chromosomal fragments are gained or lost and is observed in 85% of non-hereditary CRCs. The contribution of CIN to the etiology of I-CRCs remains unknown. We established a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) approach to characterize CIN by enumerating specific chromosomes and determined the prevalence of numerical CIN in a population-based cohort of I-CRCs and control (sporadic) CRCs. Using the population-based Manitoba Health administrative databases and Manitoba Cancer Registry, we identified an age, sex, and colonic site of CRC matched cohort of I-CRCs and controls and retrieved their archived paraffin-embedded tumor samples. FISH chromosome enumeration probes specifically recognizing the pericentric regions of chromosomes 8, 11, and 17 were first used on cell lines and then CRC tissue microarrays to detect aneusomy, which was then used to calculate a CIN score (CS). The 15th percentile CS for control CRC was used to define CIN phenotype. Mean CSs were similar in the control CRCs and I-CRCs; 82% of I-CRCs exhibited a CIN phenotype, which was similar to that in the control CRCs. This study suggests that CIN is the most prevalent contributor to genomic instability in I-CRCs. Further studies should evaluate CIN and microsatellite instability (MSI) in the same cohort of I-CRCs to corroborate our findings and to further assess concomitant contribution of CIN and MSI to I-CRCs. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Shoulder instability; Schulterinstabilitaeten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Mainiz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2014-06-15

    In the shoulder, the advantages of range of motion are traded for the disadvantages of vulnerability to injury and the development of instability. Shoulder instability and the lesion it produces represent one of the main causes of shoulder discomfort and pain. Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to their causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options: instabilities are classified in traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome, and in microtraumatic instabilities. Plain radiographs ('trauma series') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful reposition. Direct MR arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation the different injury patterns on the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast CT-arthrography with use of multidetector CT scanners may be an alternative imaging modality, however, regarding the younger patient age, MR imaging should be preferred in the diagnostic work-up of shoulder instabilities. (orig.)

  15. Functions of spindle check-point and its relationship to chromosome instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    It is generally believed that the equal distribution of genetic materials to two daughter cells during mitosis is the key to cell health and development. During the dynamic process, spindle checkpoint plays a very important role in chromosome movements and final sister chromatid separation. The equal and precise segregation of chromosomes contributes to the genomic stability while aberrant separations result in chromosome instability that causes pathogenesis of certain diseases such as Down's syndrome and cancers. Kinetochore and its regulatory proteins consist of the spindle checkpoint and determine the spatial and temporal orders of chromosome segregation.

  16. New Insight into the History of Domesticated Apple: Secondary Contribution of the European Wild Apple to the Genome of Cultivated Varieties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornille, Amandine; Gladieux, Pierre; Smulders, Marinus J. M.; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Laurens, François; Le Cam, Bruno; Nersesyan, Anush; Clavel, Joanne; Olonova, Marina; Feugey, Laurence; Gabrielyan, Ivan; Zhang, Xiu-Guo; Tenaillon, Maud I.; Giraud, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    The apple is the most common and culturally important fruit crop of temperate areas. The elucidation of its origin and domestication history is therefore of great interest. The wild Central Asian species Malus sieversii has previously been identified as the main contributor to the genome of the cultivated apple (Malus domestica), on the basis of morphological, molecular, and historical evidence. The possible contribution of other wild species present along the Silk Route running from Asia to Western Europe remains a matter of debate, particularly with respect to the contribution of the European wild apple. We used microsatellite markers and an unprecedented large sampling of five Malus species throughout Eurasia (839 accessions from China to Spain) to show that multiple species have contributed to the genetic makeup of domesticated apples. The wild European crabapple M. sylvestris, in particular, was a major secondary contributor. Bidirectional gene flow between the domesticated apple and the European crabapple resulted in the current M. domestica being genetically more closely related to this species than to its Central Asian progenitor, M. sieversii. We found no evidence of a domestication bottleneck or clonal population structure in apples, despite the use of vegetative propagation by grafting. We show that the evolution of domesticated apples occurred over a long time period and involved more than one wild species. Our results support the view that self-incompatibility, a long lifespan, and cultural practices such as selection from open-pollinated seeds have facilitated introgression from wild relatives and the maintenance of genetic variation during domestication. This combination of processes may account for the diversification of several long-lived perennial crops, yielding domestication patterns different from those observed for annual species. PMID:22589740

  17. New insight into the history of domesticated apple: secondary contribution of the European wild apple to the genome of cultivated varieties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandine Cornille

    Full Text Available The apple is the most common and culturally important fruit crop of temperate areas. The elucidation of its origin and domestication history is therefore of great interest. The wild Central Asian species Malus sieversii has previously been identified as the main contributor to the genome of the cultivated apple (Malus domestica, on the basis of morphological, molecular, and historical evidence. The possible contribution of other wild species present along the Silk Route running from Asia to Western Europe remains a matter of debate, particularly with respect to the contribution of the European wild apple. We used microsatellite markers and an unprecedented large sampling of five Malus species throughout Eurasia (839 accessions from China to Spain to show that multiple species have contributed to the genetic makeup of domesticated apples. The wild European crabapple M. sylvestris, in particular, was a major secondary contributor. Bidirectional gene flow between the domesticated apple and the European crabapple resulted in the current M. domestica being genetically more closely related to this species than to its Central Asian progenitor, M. sieversii. We found no evidence of a domestication bottleneck or clonal population structure in apples, despite the use of vegetative propagation by grafting. We show that the evolution of domesticated apples occurred over a long time period and involved more than one wild species. Our results support the view that self-incompatibility, a long lifespan, and cultural practices such as selection from open-pollinated seeds have facilitated introgression from wild relatives and the maintenance of genetic variation during domestication. This combination of processes may account for the diversification of several long-lived perennial crops, yielding domestication patterns different from those observed for annual species.

  18. New insight into the history of domesticated apple: secondary contribution of the European wild apple to the genome of cultivated varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornille, Amandine; Gladieux, Pierre; Smulders, Marinus J M; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Laurens, François; Le Cam, Bruno; Nersesyan, Anush; Clavel, Joanne; Olonova, Marina; Feugey, Laurence; Gabrielyan, Ivan; Zhang, Xiu-Guo; Tenaillon, Maud I; Giraud, Tatiana

    2012-01-01

    The apple is the most common and culturally important fruit crop of temperate areas. The elucidation of its origin and domestication history is therefore of great interest. The wild Central Asian species Malus sieversii has previously been identified as the main contributor to the genome of the cultivated apple (Malus domestica), on the basis of morphological, molecular, and historical evidence. The possible contribution of other wild species present along the Silk Route running from Asia to Western Europe remains a matter of debate, particularly with respect to the contribution of the European wild apple. We used microsatellite markers and an unprecedented large sampling of five Malus species throughout Eurasia (839 accessions from China to Spain) to show that multiple species have contributed to the genetic makeup of domesticated apples. The wild European crabapple M. sylvestris, in particular, was a major secondary contributor. Bidirectional gene flow between the domesticated apple and the European crabapple resulted in the current M. domestica being genetically more closely related to this species than to its Central Asian progenitor, M. sieversii. We found no evidence of a domestication bottleneck or clonal population structure in apples, despite the use of vegetative propagation by grafting. We show that the evolution of domesticated apples occurred over a long time period and involved more than one wild species. Our results support the view that self-incompatibility, a long lifespan, and cultural practices such as selection from open-pollinated seeds have facilitated introgression from wild relatives and the maintenance of genetic variation during domestication. This combination of processes may account for the diversification of several long-lived perennial crops, yielding domestication patterns different from those observed for annual species.

  19. Break-Induced Replication and Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Malkova

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Genetic instabilities, including mutations and chromosomal rearrangements, lead to cancer and other diseases in humans and play an important role in evolution. A frequent cause of genetic instabilities is double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs, which may arise from a wide range of exogeneous and endogeneous cellular factors. Although the repair of DSBs is required, some repair pathways are dangerous because they may destabilize the genome. One such pathway, break-induced replication (BIR, is the mechanism for repairing DSBs that possesses only one repairable end. This situation commonly arises as a result of eroded telomeres or collapsed replication forks. Although BIR plays a positive role in repairing DSBs, it can alternatively be a dangerous source of several types of genetic instabilities, including loss of heterozygosity, telomere maintenance in the absence of telomerase, and non-reciprocal translocations. Also, mutation rates in BIR are about 1000 times higher as compared to normal DNA replication. In addition, micro-homology-mediated BIR (MMBIR, which is a mechanism related to BIR, can generate copy-number variations (CNVs as well as various complex chromosomal rearrangements. Overall, activation of BIR may contribute to genomic destabilization resulting in substantial biological consequences including those affecting human health.

  20. Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.W.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.R.; Smith, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless drift instabilities in a shear-free magnetic field has been studied by means of gyrokinetic particle simulation as well as numerical integration of model mode-coupling equations. The purpose of the investigation is to identify relevant nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the steady-state drift wave fluctuations. It is found that the saturation of the instability is mainly caused by the nonlinear E x B convection of the resonant electrons and their associated velocity space nonlinearity. The latter also induces energy exchange between the competing modes, which, in turn, gives rise to enhanced diffusion. The nonlinear E x B convection of the ions, which contributes to the nonlinear frequency shift, is also an important ingredient for the saturation.

  1. Cavitation Instabilities in Inducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    gas handling turbomachines . The fluctuation of the cavity length is plotted in Fig.8 under the surge mode oscillation vi . The major differences...Cavitation Instabilities of Turbomachines .” AIAA Journal of Propulsion and Power, Vol.17, No.3, 636-643. [5] Tsujimoto, Y., (2006), “Flow Instabilities in

  2. Instability in evolutionary games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimo Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phenomena of instability are widely observed in many dissimilar systems, with punctuated equilibrium in biological evolution and economic crises being noticeable examples. Recent studies suggested that such instabilities, quantified by the abrupt changes of the composition of individuals, could result within the framework of a collection of individuals interacting through the prisoner's dilemma and incorporating three mechanisms: (i imitation and mutation, (ii preferred selection on successful individuals, and (iii networking effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We study the importance of each mechanism using simplified models. The models are studied numerically and analytically via rate equations and mean-field approximation. It is shown that imitation and mutation alone can lead to the instability on the number of cooperators, and preferred selection modifies the instability in an asymmetric way. The co-evolution of network topology and game dynamics is not necessary to the occurrence of instability and the network topology is found to have almost no impact on instability if new links are added in a global manner. The results are valid in both the contexts of the snowdrift game and prisoner's dilemma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The imitation and mutation mechanism, which gives a heterogeneous rate of change in the system's composition, is the dominating reason of the instability on the number of cooperators. The effects of payoffs and network topology are relatively insignificant. Our work refines the understanding on the driving forces of system instability.

  3. Treatment of hip instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, G M; Masri, B A; Garbuz, D S; Greidanus, N; Duncan, C P

    2001-10-01

    Instability after total hip arthroplasty is a major source of patient morbidity, second only to aseptic loosening. Certain patient groups have been identified as having a greater risk of instability, including patients undergoing revision arthroplasty as early or late treatment for proximal femoral fractures.

  4. Direct and inverted repeats elicit genetic instability by both exploiting and eluding DNA double-strand break repair systems in mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina A Wojcik

    Full Text Available Repetitive DNA sequences with the potential to form alternative DNA conformations, such as slipped structures and cruciforms, can induce genetic instability by promoting replication errors and by serving as a substrate for DNA repair proteins, which may lead to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs. However, the contribution of each of the DSB repair pathways, homologous recombination (HR, non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ and single-strand annealing (SSA, to this sort of genetic instability is not fully understood. Herein, we assessed the genome-wide distribution of repetitive DNA sequences in the Mycobacterium smegmatis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli genomes, and determined the types and frequencies of genetic instability induced by direct and inverted repeats, both in the presence and in the absence of HR, NHEJ, and SSA. All three genomes are strongly enriched in direct repeats and modestly enriched in inverted repeats. When using chromosomally integrated constructs in M. smegmatis, direct repeats induced the perfect deletion of their intervening sequences ~1,000-fold above background. Absence of HR further enhanced these perfect deletions, whereas absence of NHEJ or SSA had no influence, suggesting compromised replication fidelity. In contrast, inverted repeats induced perfect deletions only in the absence of SSA. Both direct and inverted repeats stimulated excision of the constructs from the attB integration sites independently of HR, NHEJ, or SSA. With episomal constructs, direct and inverted repeats triggered DNA instability by activating nucleolytic activity, and absence of the DSB repair pathways (in the order NHEJ>HR>SSA exacerbated this instability. Thus, direct and inverted repeats may elicit genetic instability in mycobacteria by 1 directly interfering with replication fidelity, 2 stimulating the three main DSB repair pathways, and 3 enticing L5 site-specific recombination.

  5. Brewing yeast genomes and genome-wide expression and proteome profiling during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Katherine A

    2007-11-01

    The genome structure, ancestry and instability of the brewing yeast strains have received considerable attention. The hybrid nature of brewing lager yeast strains provides adaptive potential but yields genome instability which can adversely affect fermentation performance. The requirement to differentiate between production strains and assess master cultures for genomic instability has led to significant adoption of specialized molecular tool kits by the industry. Furthermore, the development of genome-wide transcriptional and protein expression technologies has generated significant interest from brewers. The opportunity presented to explore, and the concurrent requirement to understand both, the constraints and potential of their strains to generate existing and new products during fermentation is discussed.

  6. Nonlinear helical MHD instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zueva, N.M.; Solov' ev, L.S.

    1977-07-01

    An examination is made of the boundary problem on the development of MHD instability in a toroidal plasma. Two types of local helical instability are noted - Alfven and thermal, and the corresponding criteria of instability are cited. An evaluation is made of the maximum attainable kinetic energy, limited by the degree to which the law of conservation is fulfilled. An examination is made of a precise solution to a kinematic problem on the helical evolution of a cylindrical magnetic configuration at a given velocity distribution in a plasma. A numerical computation of the development of MHD instability in a plasma cylinder by a computerized solution of MHD equations is made where the process's helical symmetry is conserved. The development of instability is of a resonance nature. The instability involves the entire cross section of the plasma and leads to an inside-out reversal of the magnetic surfaces when there is a maximum unstable equilibrium configuration in the nonlinear stage. The examined instability in the tore is apparently stabilized by a magnetic hole when certain limitations are placed on the distribution of flows in the plasma. 29 references, 8 figures.

  7. The Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability in stellar radiative zones

    CERN Document Server

    Caleo, Andrea; Tognelli, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    The Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke (GSF) instability is a rotational instability that is thought to contribute to the transfer of angular momentum in differentially rotating stars. It has been included in recent codes of stellar evolution in a diffusion-like approximation, under the assumption that the kinematic viscosity $\

  8. Micro-Scale Genomic DNA Copy Number Aberrations as Another Means of Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Hann-Hsiang; He, Xiaping; Parker, Joel S.; Zhao, Wei; Perou, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In breast cancer, the basal-like subtype has high levels of genomic instability relative to other breast cancer subtypes with many basal-like-specific regions of aberration. There is evidence that this genomic instability extends to smaller scale genomic aberrations, as shown by a previously described micro-deletion event in the PTEN gene in the Basal-like SUM149 breast cancer cell line. Methods We sought to identify if small regions of genomic DNA copy number changes exist by using a high density, gene-centric Comparative Genomic Hybridizations (CGH) array on cell lines and primary tumors. A custom tiling array for CGH (244,000 probes, 200 bp tiling resolution) was created to identify small regions of genomic change, which was focused on previously identified basal-like-specific, and general cancer genes. Tumor genomic DNA from 94 patients and 2 breast cancer cell lines was labeled and hybridized to these arrays. Aberrations were called using SWITCHdna and the smallest 25% of SWITCHdna-defined genomic segments were called micro-aberrations (micro-aberrations, most of which are undetectable using typical-density genome-wide aCGH arrays. The basal-like subtype exhibited the highest incidence of these events. These micro-aberrations sometimes altered expression of the involved gene. We confirmed the presence of the PTEN micro-amplification in SUM149 and by mRNA-seq showed that this resulted in loss of expression of all exons downstream of this event. Micro-aberrations disproportionately affected the 5′ regions of the affected genes, including the promoter region, and high frequency of micro-aberrations was associated with poor survival. Conclusion Using a high-probe-density, gene-centric aCGH microarray, we present evidence of small-scale genomic aberrations that can contribute to gene inactivation. These events may contribute to tumor formation through mechanisms not detected using conventional DNA copy number analyses. PMID:23284754

  9. Muscle activation patterns in patients with recurrent shoulder instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, Anju; Noorani, Ali; Malone, Alex; Cowan, Joseph; Lambert, Simon; Bayley, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to present muscle patterns observed with the direction of instability in a series of patients presenting with recurrent shoulder instability. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review was carried out on shoulder instability cases referred for fine wire dynamic electromyography (DEMG) studies at a specialist upper limb centre between 1981 and 2003. An experienced consultant clinical neurophysiologist performed dual needle insertion into four muscles (pectoralis major (PM), latissimus dorsi (LD), anterior deltoid (AD) and infraspinatus (IS)) in shoulders that were suspected to have increased or suppressed activation of muscles that could be contributing to the instability. Raw EMG signals were obtained while subjects performed simple uniplanar movements of the shoulder. The presence or absence of muscle activation was noted and compared to clinical diagnosis and direction of instability. Results: A total of 140 (26.6%) shoulders were referred for fine wire EMG, and 131 studies were completed. Of the shoulders tested, 122 shoulders (93%) were identified as having abnormal patterns and nine had normal patterns. PM was found to be more active in 60% of shoulders presenting with anterior instability. LD was found to be more active in 81% of shoulders with anterior instability and 80% with posterior instability. AD was found to be more active in 22% of shoulders with anterior instability and 18% with posterior instability. IS was found to be inappropriately inactive in only 3% of shoulders with anterior instability but in 25% with posterior instability. Clinical assessment identified 93% of cases suspected to have muscle patterning, but the specificity of the clinical assessment was only correct in 11% of cases. Conclusion: The DEMG results suggest that increased activation of LD may play a role in both anterior and posterior shoulder instability; increased activation of PM may play a role in anterior instability. PMID:23493512

  10. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D. (Privatpraxis fuer Upright MRT, Koeln (Germany)); Simons, P.; Kuchta, J. (Media Park Klinik, Koeln (Germany))

    2009-04-15

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI.

  11. Instabilities in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Csernai, László P; Papp, G

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of dynamical perturbations is examined in nuclear multifragmentation in the frame of Vlasov equation. Both plane wave and bubble type of perturbations are investigated in the presence of surface (Yukawa) forces. An energy condition is given for the allowed type of instabilities and the time scale of the exponential growth of the instabilities is calculated. The results are compared to the mechanical spinodal region predictions. PACS: 25.70 Mn

  12. Prediction of Algebraic Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretzky, Paula; King, Kristina; Hill, Nicole; Keithley, Kimberlee; Barlow, Nathaniel; Weinstein, Steven; Cromer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A widely unexplored type of hydrodynamic instability is examined - large-time algebraic growth. Such growth occurs on the threshold of (exponentially) neutral stability. A new methodology is provided for predicting the algebraic growth rate of an initial disturbance, when applied to the governing differential equation (or dispersion relation) describing wave propagation in dispersive media. Several types of algebraic instabilities are explored in the context of both linear and nonlinear waves.

  13. Propagating Instabilities in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakides, Stelios

    1998-03-01

    Instability is one of the factors which limit the extent to which solids can be loaded or deformed and plays a pivotal role in the design of many structures. Such instabilities often result in localized deformation which precipitates catastrophic failure. Some materials have the capacity to recover their stiffness following a certain amount of localized deformation. This local recovery in stiffness arrests further local deformation and spreading of the instability to neighboring material becomes preferred. Under displacement controlled loading the propagation of the transition fronts can be achieved in a steady-state manner at a constant stress level known as the propagation stress. The stresses in the transition fronts joining the highly deformed zone to the intact material overcome the instability nucleation stresses and, as a result, the propagation stress is usually much lower than the stress required to nucleate the instability. The classical example of this class of material instabilities is L/"uders bands which tend to affect mild steels and other metals. Recent work has demonstrated that propagating instabilities occur in several other materials. Experimental and analytical results from four examples will be used to illustrate this point: First the evolution of L=FCders bands in mild steel strips will be revisited. The second example involves the evolution of stress induced phase transformations (austenite to martensite phases and the reverse) in a shape memory alloy under displacement controlled stretching. The third example is the crushing behavior of cellular materials such as honeycombs and foams made from metals and polymers. The fourth example involves the axial broadening/propagation of kink bands in aligned fiber/matrix composites under compression. The microstructure and, as a result, the micromechanisms governing the onset, localization, local arrest and propagation of instabilities in each of the four materials are vastly different. Despite this

  14. Combustion instability mitigation by magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jocher, Agnes; Pitsch, Heinz; Gomez, Thomas; Bonnety, Jérôme; Legros, Guillaume

    2017-06-01

    The present interdisciplinary study combines electromagnetics and combustion to unveil an original and basic experiment displaying a spontaneous flame instability that is mitigated as the non-premixed sooting flame experiences a magnetic perturbation. This magnetic instability mitigation is reproduced by direct numerical simulations to be further elucidated by a flow stability analysis. A key role in the stabilization process is attributed to the momentum and thermochemistry coupling that the magnetic force, acting mainly on paramagnetic oxygen, contributes to sustain. The spatial local stability analysis based on the numerical simulations shows that the magnetic field tends to reduce the growth rates of small flame perturbations.

  15. A genomics-informed, SNP association study reveals FBLN1 and FABP4 as contributing to resistance to fleece rot in Australian Merino sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris Belinda J

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fleece rot (FR and body-strike of Merino sheep by the sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina are major problems for the Australian wool industry, causing significant losses as a result of increased management costs coupled with reduced wool productivity and quality. In addition to direct effects on fleece quality, fleece rot is a major predisposing factor to blowfly strike on the body of sheep. In order to investigate the genetic drivers of resistance to fleece rot, we constructed a combined ovine-bovine cDNA microarray of almost 12,000 probes including 6,125 skin expressed sequence tags and 5,760 anonymous clones obtained from skin subtracted libraries derived from fleece rot resistant and susceptible animals. This microarray platform was used to profile the gene expression changes between skin samples of six resistant and six susceptible animals taken immediately before, during and after FR induction. Mixed-model equations were employed to normalize the data and 155 genes were found to be differentially expressed (DE. Ten DE genes were selected for validation using real-time PCR on independent skin samples. The genomic regions of a further 5 DE genes were surveyed to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP that were genotyped across three populations for their associations with fleece rot resistance. Results The majority of the DE genes originated from the fleece rot subtracted libraries and over-representing gene ontology terms included defense response to bacterium and epidermis development, indicating a role of these processes in modulating the sheep's response to fleece rot. We focused on genes that contribute to the physical barrier function of skin, including keratins, collagens, fibulin and lipid proteins, to identify SNPs that were associated to fleece rot scores. Conclusions We identified FBLN1 (fibulin and FABP4 (fatty acid binding protein 4 as key factors in sheep's resistance to fleece rot. Validation of these

  16. Maintenance of Genome Integrity: How Mammalian Cells Orchestrate Genome Duplication by Coordinating Replicative and Specialized DNA Polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Barnes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Precise duplication of the human genome is challenging due to both its size and sequence complexity. DNA polymerase errors made during replication, repair or recombination are central to creating mutations that drive cancer and aging. Here, we address the regulation of human DNA polymerases, specifically how human cells orchestrate DNA polymerases in the face of stress to complete replication and maintain genome stability. DNA polymerases of the B-family are uniquely adept at accurate genome replication, but there are numerous situations in which one or more additional DNA polymerases are required to complete genome replication. Polymerases of the Y-family have been extensively studied in the bypass of DNA lesions; however, recent research has revealed that these polymerases play important roles in normal human physiology. Replication stress is widely cited as contributing to genome instability, and is caused by conditions leading to slowed or stalled DNA replication. Common Fragile Sites epitomize “difficult to replicate” genome regions that are particularly vulnerable to replication stress, and are associated with DNA breakage and structural variation. In this review, we summarize the roles of both the replicative and Y-family polymerases in human cells, and focus on how these activities are regulated during normal and perturbed genome replication.

  17. Maintenance of Genome Integrity: How Mammalian Cells Orchestrate Genome Duplication by Coordinating Replicative and Specialized DNA Polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Ryan; Eckert, Kristin

    2017-01-06

    Precise duplication of the human genome is challenging due to both its size and sequence complexity. DNA polymerase errors made during replication, repair or recombination are central to creating mutations that drive cancer and aging. Here, we address the regulation of human DNA polymerases, specifically how human cells orchestrate DNA polymerases in the face of stress to complete replication and maintain genome stability. DNA polymerases of the B-family are uniquely adept at accurate genome replication, but there are numerous situations in which one or more additional DNA polymerases are required to complete genome replication. Polymerases of the Y-family have been extensively studied in the bypass of DNA lesions; however, recent research has revealed that these polymerases play important roles in normal human physiology. Replication stress is widely cited as contributing to genome instability, and is caused by conditions leading to slowed or stalled DNA replication. Common Fragile Sites epitomize "difficult to replicate" genome regions that are particularly vulnerable to replication stress, and are associated with DNA breakage and structural variation. In this review, we summarize the roles of both the replicative and Y-family polymerases in human cells, and focus on how these activities are regulated during normal and perturbed genome replication.

  18. Genomic Prediction in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edriss, Vahid; Cericola, Fabio; Jensen, Jens D;

    Genomic prediction uses markers (SNPs) across the whole genome to predict individual breeding values at an early growth stage potentially before large scale phenotyping. One of the applications of genomic prediction in plant breeding is to identify the best individual candidate lines to contribut...

  19. Genomic Prediction in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edriss, Vahid; Cericola, Fabio; Jensen, Jens D;

    2015-01-01

    Genomic prediction uses markers (SNPs) across the whole genome to predict individual breeding values at an early growth stage potentially before large scale phenotyping. One of the applications of genomic prediction in plant breeding is to identify the best individual candidate lines to contribut...

  20. Induced dicentric chromosome formation promotes genomic rearrangements and tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascoigne, Karen E; Cheeseman, Iain M

    2013-07-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements can radically alter gene products and their function, driving tumor formation or progression. However, the molecular origins and evolution of such rearrangements are varied and poorly understood, with cancer cells often containing multiple, complex rearrangements. One mechanism that can lead to genomic rearrangements is the formation of a "dicentric" chromosome containing two functional centromeres. Indeed, such dicentric chromosomes have been observed in cancer cells. Here, we tested the ability of a single dicentric chromosome to contribute to genomic instability and neoplastic conversion in vertebrate cells. We developed a system to transiently and reversibly induce dicentric chromosome formation on a single chromosome with high temporal control. We find that induced dicentric chromosomes are frequently damaged and mis-segregated during mitosis, and that this leads to extensive chromosomal rearrangements including translocations with other chromosomes. Populations of pre-neoplastic cells in which a single dicentric chromosome is induced acquire extensive genomic instability and display hallmarks of cellular transformation including anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Our results suggest that a single dicentric chromosome could contribute to tumor initiation.

  1. Analysis of segmental duplications, mouse genome synteny and recurrent cancer-associated amplicons in human chromosome 6p21-p12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J W; Yoshimoto, M; Ludkovski, O; Thorner, P S; Zielenska, M; Squire, J A; Nuin, P A S

    2010-06-01

    It has been proposed that regions of microhomology in the human genome could facilitate genomic rearrangements, copy number transitions, and rapid genomic change during tumor progression. To investigate this idea, this study examines the role of repetitive sequence elements, and corresponding syntenic mouse genomic features, in targeting cancer-associated genomic instability of specific regions of the human genome. Automated database-mining algorithms designed to search for frequent copy number transitions and genomic breakpoints were applied to 2 publicly-available online databases and revealed that 6p21-p12 is one of the regions of the human genome most frequently involved in tumor-specific alterations. In these analyses, 6p21-p12 exhibited the highest frequency of genomic amplification in osteosarcomas. Analysis of repetitive elements in regions of homology between human chromosome 6p and the syntenic regions of the mouse genome revealed a strong association between the location of segmental duplications greater than 5 kilobase-pairs and the position of discontinuities at the end of the syntenic region. The presence of clusters of segmental duplications flanking these syntenic regions also correlated with a high frequency of amplification and genomic alteration. Collectively, the experimental findings, in silico analyses, and comparative genomic studies presented here suggest that segmental duplications may facilitate cancer-associated copy number transitions and rearrangements at chromosome 6p21-p12. This process may involve homology-dependent DNA recombination and/or repair, which may also contribute towards the overall plasticity of the human genome.

  2. Pathways towards instability in financial networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardoscia, Marco; Battiston, Stefano; Caccioli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Guido

    2017-02-01

    Following the financial crisis of 2007-2008, a deep analogy between the origins of instability in financial systems and complex ecosystems has been pointed out: in both cases, topological features of network structures influence how easily distress can spread within the system. However, in financial network models, the details of how financial institutions interact typically play a decisive role, and a general understanding of precisely how network topology creates instability remains lacking. Here we show how processes that are widely believed to stabilize the financial system, that is, market integration and diversification, can actually drive it towards instability, as they contribute to create cyclical structures which tend to amplify financial distress, thereby undermining systemic stability and making large crises more likely. This result holds irrespective of the details of how institutions interact, showing that policy-relevant analysis of the factors affecting financial stability can be carried out while abstracting away from such details.

  3. Alternative Splicing of CHEK2 and Codeletion with NF2 Promote Chromosomal Instability in Meningioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wei Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations of the NF2 gene on chromosome 22q are thought to initiate tumorigenesis in nearly 50% of meningiomas, and 22q deletion is the earliest and most frequent large-scale chromosomal abnormality observed in these tumors. In aggressive meningiomas, 22q deletions are generally accompanied by the presence of large-scale segmental abnormalities involving other chromosomes, but the reasons for this association are unknown. We find that large-scale chromosomal alterations accumulate during meningioma progression primarily in tumors harboring 22q deletions, suggesting 22q-associated chromosomal instability. Here we show frequent codeletion of the DNA repair and tumor suppressor gene, CHEK2, in combination with NF2 on chromosome 22q in a majority of aggressive meningiomas. In addition, tumor-specific splicing of CHEK2 in meningioma leads to decreased functional Chk2 protein expression. We show that enforced Chk2 knockdown in meningioma cells decreases DNA repair. Furthermore, Chk2 depletion increases centrosome amplification, thereby promoting chromosomal instability. Taken together, these data indicate that alternative splicing and frequent codeletion of CHEK2 and NF2 contribute to the genomic instability and associated development of aggressive biologic behavior in meningiomas.

  4. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vishnu M Bannur

    2001-10-01

    We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dispersion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming instability. It contains new, nonelectromagnetic, neutrino-plasma (or electroweak) stable and unstable modes also. The growth of the instability is weak for the highly relativistic neutrino flux, but becomes stronger for weakly relativistic neutrino flux in the case of parameters appropriate to the early universe and supernova explosions. However, this mode is dominant only for the beam velocity greater than 0.25 and in the other limit electroweak unstable mode takes over.

  5. Annotation of a hybrid partial genome of the coffee rust (Hemileia vastatrix) contributes to the gene repertoire catalog of the Pucciniales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristancho, Marco A; Botero-Rozo, David Octavio; Giraldo, William; Tabima, Javier; Riaño-Pachón, Diego Mauricio; Escobar, Carolina; Rozo, Yomara; Rivera, Luis F; Durán, Andrés; Restrepo, Silvia; Eilam, Tamar; Anikster, Yehoshua; Gaitán, Alvaro L

    2014-01-01

    Coffee leaf rust caused by the fungus Hemileia vastatrix is the most damaging disease to coffee worldwide. The pathogen has recently appeared in multiple outbreaks in coffee producing countries resulting in significant yield losses and increases in costs related to its control. New races/isolates are constantly emerging as evidenced by the presence of the fungus in plants that were previously resistant. Genomic studies are opening new avenues for the study of the evolution of pathogens, the detailed description of plant-pathogen interactions and the development of molecular techniques for the identification of individual isolates. For this purpose we sequenced 8 different H. vastatrix isolates using NGS technologies and gathered partial genome assemblies due to the large repetitive content in the coffee rust hybrid genome; 74.4% of the assembled contigs harbor repetitive sequences. A hybrid assembly of 333 Mb was built based on the 8 isolates; this assembly was used for subsequent analyses. Analysis of the conserved gene space showed that the hybrid H. vastatrix genome, though highly fragmented, had a satisfactory level of completion with 91.94% of core protein-coding orthologous genes present. RNA-Seq from urediniospores was used to guide the de novo annotation of the H. vastatrix gene complement. In total, 14,445 genes organized in 3921 families were uncovered; a considerable proportion of the predicted proteins (73.8%) were homologous to other Pucciniales species genomes. Several gene families related to the fungal lifestyle were identified, particularly 483 predicted secreted proteins that represent candidate effector genes and will provide interesting hints to decipher virulence in the coffee rust fungus. The genome sequence of Hva will serve as a template to understand the molecular mechanisms used by this fungus to attack the coffee plant, to study the diversity of this species and for the development of molecular markers to distinguish races/isolates.

  6. Annotation of a hybrid partial genome of the Coffee Rust (Hemileia vastatrix contributes to the gene repertoire catalogue of the Pucciniales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurelio Cristancho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Coffee leaf rust caused by the fungus Hemileia vastatrix is the most damaging disease to coffee worldwide. The pathogen has recently appeared in multiple outbreaks in coffee producing countries resulting in significant yield losses and increases in costs related to its control. New races/isolates are constantly emerging as evidenced by the presence of the fungus in plants that were previously resistant. Genomic studies are opening new avenues for the study of the evolution of pathogens, the detailed description of plant-pathogen interactions and the development of molecular techniques for the identification of individual isolates. For this purpose we sequenced 8 different H. vastatrix isolates using NGS technologies and gathered partial genome assemblies due to the large repetitive content in the coffee rust hybrid genome; 74.4% of the assembled contigs harbor repetitive sequences. A hybrid assembly of 333Mb was built based on the 8 isolates; this assembly was used for subsequent analyses.Analysis of the conserved gene space showed that the hybrid H. vastatrix genome, though highly fragmented, had a satisfactory level of completion with 91.94% of core protein-coding orthologous genes present. RNA-Seq from urediniospores was used to guide the de novo annotation of the H. vastatrix gene complement. In total, 14,445 genes organized in 3,921 families were uncovered; a considerable proportion of the predicted proteins (73.8% were homologous to other Pucciniales species genomes. Several gene families related to the fungal lifestyle were identified, particularly 483 predicted secreted proteins that represent candidate effector genes and will provide interesting hints to decipher virulence in the coffee rust fungus. The genome sequence of Hva will serve as a template to understand the molecular mechanisms used by this fungus to attack the coffee plant, to study the diversity of this species and for the development of molecular markers to distinguish

  7. Detection of cis- and trans-acting factors in DNA structure-induced genetic instability using in silico and cellular approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guliang Wang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Sequences that can adopt alternative DNA structures (i.e. non-B DNA are very abundant in mammalian genomes, and recent studies have revealed many important biological functions of non-B DNA structures in chromatin remodeling, DNA replication, transcription, and genetic instability. Here, we provide results from an in-silico web-based search engine coupled with cell-based experiments to characterize the roles of non-B DNA conformations in genetic instability in eukaryotes. The purpose of this article is to illustrate strategies that can be used to identify and interrogate the biological roles of non-B DNA structures, particularly on genetic instability. We have included unpublished data using a short H-DNA-forming sequence from the human c-MYC promoter region as an example, and identified two different mechanisms of H-DNA-induced genetic instability in yeast and mammalian cells: a DNA replication-related model of mutagenesis; and a replication-independent cleavage model. Further, we identified candidate proteins involved in H-DNA-induced genetic instability by using a yeast genetic screen. A combination of in silico and cellular methods, as described here, should provide further insight into the contributions of non-B DNA structures in biological functions, genetic evolution, and disease development.

  8. Mixing through shear instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Brüggen, M

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of numerical simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a stratified shear layer. This shear instability is believed to be responsible for extra mixing in differentially rotating stellar interiors and is the prime candidate to explain the abundance anomalies observed in many rotating stars. All mixing prescriptions currently in use are based on phenomenological and heuristic estimates whose validity is often unclear. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations, we study the mixing efficiency as a function of the Richardson number and compare our results with some semi-analytical formalisms of mixing.

  9. Mutagenic roles of DNA "repair" proteins in antibody diversity and disease-associated trinucleotide repeat instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slean, Meghan M; Panigrahi, Gagan B; Ranum, Laura P; Pearson, Christopher E

    2008-07-01

    While DNA repair proteins are generally thought to maintain the integrity of the whole genome by correctly repairing mutagenic DNA intermediates, there are cases where DNA "repair" proteins are involved in causing mutations instead. For instance, somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class switch recombination (CSR) require the contribution of various DNA repair proteins, including UNG, MSH2 and MSH6 to mutate certain regions of immunoglobulin genes in order to generate antibodies of increased antigen affinity and altered effector functions. Another instance where "repair" proteins drive mutations is the instability of gene-specific trinucleotide repeats (TNR), the causative mutations of numerous diseases including Fragile X mental retardation syndrome (FRAXA), Huntington's disease (HD), myotonic dystrophy (DM1) and several spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) all of which arise via various modes of pathogenesis. These healthy and deleterious mutations that are induced by repair proteins are distinct from the genome-wide mutations that arise in the absence of repair proteins: they occur at specific loci, are sensitive to cis-elements (sequence context and/or epigenetic marks) and transcription, occur in specific tissues during distinct developmental windows, and are age-dependent. Here we review and compare the mutagenic role of DNA "repair" proteins in the processes of SHM, CSR and TNR instability.

  10. Widespread telomere instability in prostatic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, LiRen; Huda, Nazmul; Grimes, Brenda R; Slee, Roger B; Bates, Alison M; Cheng, Liang; Gilley, David

    2016-05-01

    A critical function of the telomere is to disguise chromosome ends from cellular recognition as double strand breaks, thereby preventing aberrant chromosome fusion events. Such chromosome end-to-end fusions are known to initiate genomic instability via breakage-fusion-bridge cycles. Telomere dysfunction and other forms of genomic assault likely result in misregulation of genes involved in growth control, cell death, and senescence pathways, lowering the threshold to malignancy and likely drive disease progression. Shortened telomeres and anaphase bridges have been reported in a wide variety of early precursor and malignant cancer lesions including those of the prostate. These findings are being extended using methods for the analysis of telomere fusions (decisive genetic markers for telomere dysfunction) specifically within human tissue DNA. Here we report that benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and prostate cancer (PCa) prostate lesions all contain similarly high frequencies of telomere fusions and anaphase bridges. Tumor-adjacent, histologically normal prostate tissue generally did not contain telomere fusions or anaphase bridges as compared to matched PCa tissues. However, we found relatively high levels of telomerase activity in this histologically normal tumor-adjacent tissue that was reduced but closely correlated with telomerase levels in corresponding PCa samples. Thus, we present evidence of high levels of telomere dysfunction in BPH, an established early precursor (PIN) and prostate cancer lesions but not generally in tumor adjacent normal tissue. Our results suggest that telomere dysfunction may be a common gateway event leading to genomic instability in prostate tumorigenesis. .

  11. Evolutionary origin of Rosaceae-specific active non-autonomous hAT elements and their contribution to gene regulation and genomic structural variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Peng, Qian; Zhao, Jianbo; Ren, Fei; Zhou, Hui; Wang, Wei; Liao, Liao; Owiti, Albert; Jiang, Quan; Han, Yuepeng

    2016-05-01

    Transposable elements account for approximately 30 % of the Prunus genome; however, their evolutionary origin and functionality remain largely unclear. In this study, we identified a hAT transposon family, termed Moshan, in Prunus. The Moshan elements consist of three types, aMoshan, tMoshan, and mMoshan. The aMoshan and tMoshan types contain intact or truncated transposase genes, respectively, while the mMoshan type is miniature inverted-repeat transposable element (MITE). The Moshan transposons are unique to Rosaceae, and the copy numbers of different Moshan types are significantly correlated. Sequence homology analysis reveals that the mMoshan MITEs are direct deletion derivatives of the tMoshan progenitors, and one kind of mMoshan containing a MuDR-derived fragment were amplified predominately in the peach genome. The mMoshan sequences contain cis-regulatory elements that can enhance gene expression up to 100-fold. The mMoshan MITEs can serve as potential sources of micro and long noncoding RNAs. Whole-genome re-sequencing analysis indicates that mMoshan elements are highly active, and an insertion into S-haplotype-specific F-box gene was reported to cause the breakdown of self-incompatibility in sour cherry. Taken together, all these results suggest that the mMoshan elements play important roles in regulating gene expression and driving genomic structural variation in Prunus.

  12. New Insight into the History of Domesticated Apple: Secondary Contribution of the European Wild Apple to the Genome of Cultivated Varieties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornille, A.; Gladieux, P.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Roldán-Ruiz, I.; Laurens, F.; Cam, le B.; Nersesyan, A.; Clavel, J.; Olonova, M.; Feugey, L.; Gabrielyan, I.; Zhang, Xiu-Guo; Tenaillon, M.I.; Giraud, T.

    2012-01-01

    The apple is the most common and culturally important fruit crop of temperate areas. The elucidation of its origin and domestication history is therefore of great interest. The wild Central Asian species Malus sieversii has previously been identified as the main contributor to the genome of the cult

  13. The Contribution of Health Technology Assessment, Health Needs Assessment, and Health Impact Assessment to the Assessment and Translation of Technologies in the Field of Public Health Genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenköttera, N.; Vondeling, H.; Blancquaert, I.; Mekel, O.C.L.; Kristensen, F.B.; Brand, A.

    2011-01-01

    The European Union has named genomics as one of the promising research fields for the development of new health technologies. Major concerns with regard to these fields are, on the one hand, the rather slow and limited translation of new knowledge and, on the other hand, missing insights into the im

  14. HA novel approach to investigate tissue-specific trinucleotide repeat instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boily Marie-Josee

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Huntington's disease (HD, an expanded CAG repeat produces characteristic striatal neurodegeneration. Interestingly, the HD CAG repeat, whose length determines age at onset, undergoes tissue-specific somatic instability, predominant in the striatum, suggesting that tissue-specific CAG length changes could modify the disease process. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying the tissue specificity of somatic instability may provide novel routes to therapies. However progress in this area has been hampered by the lack of sensitive high-throughput instability quantification methods and global approaches to identify the underlying factors. Results Here we describe a novel approach to gain insight into the factors responsible for the tissue specificity of somatic instability. Using accurate genetic knock-in mouse models of HD, we developed a reliable, high-throughput method to quantify tissue HD CAG repeat instability and integrated this with genome-wide bioinformatic approaches. Using tissue instability quantified in 16 tissues as a phenotype and tissue microarray gene expression as a predictor, we built a mathematical model and identified a gene expression signature that accurately predicted tissue instability. Using the predictive ability of this signature we found that somatic instability was not a consequence of pathogenesis. In support of this, genetic crosses with models of accelerated neuropathology failed to induce somatic instability. In addition, we searched for genes and pathways that correlated with tissue instability. We found that expression levels of DNA repair genes did not explain the tissue specificity of somatic instability. Instead, our data implicate other pathways, particularly cell cycle, metabolism and neurotransmitter pathways, acting in combination to generate tissue-specific patterns of instability. Conclusion Our study clearly demonstrates that multiple tissue factors reflect the level of

  15. Shock instability in dissipative gases

    OpenAIRE

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Sirmas, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves in thermally relaxing gases, such as ionizing, dissociating and vibrationally excited gases, can become unstable. To date, the mechanism controlling this instability has not been resolved. Previous accounts of the D'yakov-Kontorovich instability, and Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson behaviour could not predict the experimentally observed instability. To address the mechanism controlling the instability, we study the propagation of shock waves in a ...

  16. Cooling Effect of the Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Mohseni, F; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2015-01-01

    We provide numerical evidence that the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability contributes to the cooling of a relativistic fluid. Due to the presence of jet particles traveling throughout the medium, shock waves are generated in the form of Mach cones. The interaction of multiple shock waves can trigger the RM instability, and we have found that this process leads to a down-cooling of the relativistic fluid. To confirm the cooling effect of the instability, shock tube Richtmyer-Meshkov instability simulations are performed. Additionally, in order to provide an experimental observable of the RM instability resulting from the Mach cone interaction, we measure the two particle correlation function and highlight the effects of the interaction. The simulations have been performed with an improved version of the relativistic lattice Boltzmann model, including general equations of state and external forces.

  17. Oblique Alfvén instabilities driven by compensated currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malovichko, P. [Main Astronomical Observatory, NASU, Kyiv (Ukraine); Voitenko, Y.; De Keyser, J., E-mail: voitenko@oma.be [Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence, Space Physics Division, Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Ringlaan-3-Avenue Circulaire, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-01-10

    Compensated-current systems created by energetic ion beams are widespread in space and astrophysical plasmas. The well-known examples are foreshock regions in the solar wind and around supernova remnants. We found a new oblique Alfvénic instability driven by compensated currents flowing along the background magnetic field. Because of the vastly different electron and ion gyroradii, oblique Alfvénic perturbations react differently on the currents carried by the hot ion beams and the return electron currents. Ultimately, this difference leads to a non-resonant aperiodic instability at perpendicular wavelengths close to the beam ion gyroradius. The instability growth rate increases with increasing beam current and temperature. In the solar wind upstream of Earth's bow shock, the instability growth time can drop below 10 proton cyclotron periods. Our results suggest that this instability can contribute to the turbulence and ion acceleration in space and astrophysical foreshocks.

  18. The Contribution of Health Technology Assessment, Health Needs Assessment, and Health Impact Assessment to the Assessment and Translation of Technologies in the Field of Public Health Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkotter, N.; Vondeling, H.; Blancquaert, I.

    2011-01-01

    or to identify infrastructural needs. HIA delivers information on the impact of technologies in a wider scope and promotes informed decision making. HTA, HNA and HIA provide a partly overlapping and partly unique set of methodologies and infrastructure for the translation and assessment of genomic health...... into the impact on public health and health care practice of those technologies that are actually introduced. This paper aims to give an overview of the major assessment instruments in public health [ health technology assessment (HTA), health needs assessment (HNA) and health impact assessment (HIA)] which could......The European Union has named genomics as one of the promising research fields for the development of new health technologies. Major concerns with regard to these fields are, on the one hand, the rather slow and limited translation of new knowledge and, on the other hand, missing insights...

  19. Arthroscopic Findings in Anterior Shoulder Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantes, Michael; Raoulis, Vasilios

    2017-01-01

    Background: In the last years, basic research and arthroscopic surgery, have improved our understanding of shoulder anatomy and pathology. It is a fact that arthroscopic treatment of shoulder instability has evolved considerably over the past decades. The aim of this paper is to present the variety of pathologies that should be identified and treated during shoulder arthroscopy when dealing with anterior shoulder instability cases. Methods: A review of the current literature regarding arthroscopic shoulder anatomy, anatomic variants, and arthroscopic findings in anterior shoulder instability, is presented. In addition, correlation of arthroscopic findings with physical examination and advanced imaging (CT and MRI) in order to improve our understanding in anterior shoulder instability pathology is discussed. Results: Shoulder instability represents a broad spectrum of disease and a thorough understanding of the pathoanatomy is the key for a successful treatment of the unstable shoulder. Patients can have a variety of pathologies concomitant with a traditional Bankart lesion, such as injuries of the glenoid (bony Bankart), injuries of the glenoid labrum, superiorly (SLAP) or anteroinferiorly (e.g. anterior labroligamentous periosteal sleeve avulsion, and Perthes), capsular lesions (humeral avulsion of the glenohumeral ligament), and accompanying osseous-cartilage lesions (Hill-Sachs, glenolabral articular disruption). Shoulder arthroscopy allows for a detailed visualization and a dynamic examination of all anatomic structures, identification of pathologic findings, and treatment of all concomitant lesions. Conclusion: Surgeons must be well prepared and understanding the normal anatomy of the glenohumeral joint, including its anatomic variants to seek for the possible pathologic lesions in anterior shoulder instability during shoulder arthroscopy. Patient selection criteria, improved surgical techniques, and implants available have contributed to the enhancement of

  20. Transcription elongation and tissue-specific somatic CAG instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agathi-Vasiliki Goula

    Full Text Available The expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is responsible for many diseases, including Huntington's disease (HD and myotonic dystrophy 1. CAG/CTG expansions are unstable in selective somatic tissues, which accelerates disease progression. The mechanisms underlying repeat instability are complex, and it remains unclear whether chromatin structure and/or transcription contribute to somatic CAG/CTG instability in vivo. To address these issues, we investigated the relationship between CAG instability, chromatin structure, and transcription at the HD locus using the R6/1 and R6/2 HD transgenic mouse lines. These mice express a similar transgene, albeit integrated at a different site, and recapitulate HD tissue-specific instability. We show that instability rates are increased in R6/2 tissues as compared to R6/1 matched-samples. High transgene expression levels and chromatin accessibility correlated with the increased CAG instability of R6/2 mice. Transgene mRNA and H3K4 trimethylation at the HD locus were increased, whereas H3K9 dimethylation was reduced in R6/2 tissues relative to R6/1 matched-tissues. However, the levels of transgene expression and these specific histone marks were similar in the striatum and cerebellum, two tissues showing very different CAG instability levels, irrespective of mouse line. Interestingly, the levels of elongating RNA Pol II at the HD locus, but not the initiating form of RNA Pol II, were tissue-specific and correlated with CAG instability levels. Similarly, H3K36 trimethylation, a mark associated with transcription elongation, was specifically increased at the HD locus in the striatum and not in the cerebellum. Together, our data support the view that transcription modulates somatic CAG instability in vivo. More specifically, our results suggest for the first time that transcription elongation is regulated in a tissue-dependent manner, contributing to tissue-selective CAG instability.

  1. Mechanistically Distinct Pathways of Divergent Regulatory DNA Creation Contribute to Evolution of Human-Specific Genomic Regulatory Networks Driving Phenotypic Divergence of Homo sapiens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-09-19

    Thousands of candidate human-specific regulatory sequences (HSRS) have been identified, supporting the hypothesis that unique to human phenotypes result from human-specific alterations of genomic regulatory networks. Collectively, a compendium of multiple diverse families of HSRS that are functionally and structurally divergent from Great Apes could be defined as the backbone of human-specific genomic regulatory networks. Here, the conservation patterns analysis of 18,364 candidate HSRS was carried out requiring that 100% of bases must remap during the alignments of human, chimpanzee, and bonobo sequences. A total of 5,535 candidate HSRS were identified that are: (i) highly conserved in Great Apes; (ii) evolved by the exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA; (iii) defined by either the acceleration of mutation rates on the human lineage or the functional divergence from non-human primates. The exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA pathway seems mechanistically distinct from the evolution of regulatory DNA segments driven by the species-specific expansion of transposable elements. Genome-wide proximity placement analysis of HSRS revealed that a small fraction of topologically associating domains (TADs) contain more than half of HSRS from four distinct families. TADs that are enriched for HSRS and termed rapidly evolving in humans TADs (revTADs) comprise 0.8-10.3% of 3,127 TADs in the hESC genome. RevTADs manifest distinct correlation patterns between placements of human accelerated regions, human-specific transcription factor-binding sites, and recombination rates. There is a significant enrichment within revTAD boundaries of hESC-enhancers, primate-specific CTCF-binding sites, human-specific RNAPII-binding sites, hCONDELs, and H3K4me3 peaks with human-specific enrichment at TSS in prefrontal cortex neurons (P Homo sapiens is driven by the evolution of human-specific genomic regulatory networks via at least two mechanistically distinct pathways of

  2. Genetic instability in Gynecological Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-hua; ZHOU Hong-lin

    2003-01-01

    Defects of mismatch repair (MMR) genes also have beenidentified in many kinds of tumors. Loss of MMR functionhas been linked to genetic instability especially microsatelliteinstability that results in high mutation rate. In this review, wediscussed the microsatellite instability observed in thegynecological tumors. We also discussed defects in the DNAmismatch repair in these tumors and their correlation to themicrosatellite instability, as well as the gene mutations due tothe microsatellite instability in these tumors. From thesediscussion, we tried to understand the mechanism ofcarcinogenesis in gynecological tumors from the aspect ofgenetic instability due to mismatch repair defects.

  3. Instabilities in sensory processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, J.

    2014-07-01

    In any organism there are different kinds of sensory receptors for detecting the various, distinct stimuli through which its external environment may impinge upon it. These receptors convey these stimuli in different ways to an organism's information processing region enabling it to distinctly perceive the varied sensations and to respond to them. The behavior of cells and their response to stimuli may be captured through simple mathematical models employing regulatory feedback mechanisms. We argue that the sensory processes such as olfaction function optimally by operating in the close proximity of dynamical instabilities. In the case of coupled neurons, we point out that random disturbances and fluctuations can move their operating point close to certain dynamical instabilities triggering synchronous activity.

  4. Modulation instability: The beginning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, Roman; Belov, Pavel; Kivshar, Yuri

    2012-11-01

    The study of metal nanoparticles plays a central role in the emerging novel technologies employing optics beyond the diffraction limit. Combining strong surface plasmon resonances, high intrinsic nonlinearities and deeply subwavelength scales, arrays of metal nanoparticles offer a unique playground to develop novel concepts for light manipulation at the nanoscale. Here we suggest a novel principle to control localized optical energy in chains of nonlinear subwavelength metal nanoparticles based on the fundamental nonlinear phenomenon of modulation instability. In particular, we demonstrate that modulation instability can lead to the formation of long-lived standing and moving nonlinear localized modes of several distinct types such as bright and dark solitons, oscillons, and domain walls. We analyze the properties of these nonlinear localized modes and reveal different scenarios of their dynamics including transformation of one type of mode to another. We believe this work paves a way towards the development of nonlinear nanophotonics circuitry.

  5. Instability and internet design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Braman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Instability - unpredictable but constant change in one’s environment and the means with which one deals with it - has replaced convergence as the focal problem for telecommunications policy in general and internet policy in particular. Those who designed what we now call the internet during the first decade of the effort (1969-1979, who in essence served simultaneously as its policy-makers, developed techniques for coping with instability of value for network designers today and for those involved with any kind of large-scale sociotechnical infrastructure. Analysis of the technical document series that was medium for and record of that design process reveals coping techniques that began with defining the problem and went on to include conceptual labour, social practices, and technical approaches.

  6. Gravitational instabilities of superspinars

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, Paolo; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor

    2010-01-01

    Superspinars are ultracompact objects whose mass M and angular momentum J violate the Kerr bound (cJ/GM^2>1). Recent studies analyzed the observable consequences of gravitational lensing and accretion around superspinars in astrophysical scenarios. In this paper we investigate the dynamical stability of superspinars to gravitational perturbations, considering either purely reflecting or perfectly absorbing boundary conditions at the "surface" of the superspinar. We find that these objects are unstable independently of the boundary conditions, and that the instability is strongest for relatively small values of the spin. Also, we give a physical interpretation of the various instabilities that we find. Our results (together with the well-known fact that accretion tends to spin superspinars down) imply that superspinars are very unlikely astrophysical alternatives to black holes.

  7. The instability of markets

    CERN Document Server

    Huberman, B A; Huberman, Bernardo A; Youssefmir, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Recent developments in the global liberalization of equity and currency markets, coupled to advances in trading technologies, are making markets increasingly interdependent. This increased fluidity raises questions about the stability of the international financial system. In this paper, we show that as couplings between stable markets grow, the likelihood of instabilities is increased, leading to a loss of general equilibrium as the system becomes increasingly large and diverse.

  8. Modulation instability: The beginning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Ostrovsky, L. A.

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the early history of an important field of “sturm and drang” in modern theory of nonlinear waves. It is demonstrated how scientific demand resulted in independent and almost simultaneous publications by many different authors on modulation instability, a phenomenon resulting in a variety of nonlinear processes such as envelope solitons, envelope shocks, freak waves, etc. Examples from water wave hydrodynamics, electrodynamics, nonlinear optics, and convection theory are given.

  9. Carpal instability nondissociative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Garcia-Elias, Marc; Kitay, Alison

    2012-09-01

    Carpal instability nondissociative (CIND) represents a spectrum of conditions characterized by kinematic dysfunction of the proximal carpal row, often associated with a clinical "clunk." CIND is manifested at the midcarpal and/or radiocarpal joints, and it is distinguished from carpal instability dissociative (CID) by the lack of disruption between bones within the same carpal row. There are four major subcategories of CIND: palmar, dorsal, combined, and adaptive. In palmar CIND, instability occurs across the entire proximal carpal row. When nonsurgical management fails, surgical options include arthroscopic thermal capsulorrhaphy, soft-tissue reconstruction, or limited radiocarpal or intercarpal fusions. In dorsal CIND, the capitate subluxates dorsally from its reduced resting position. Dorsal CIND usually responds to nonsurgical management; refractory cases respond to palmar ligament reefing and/or dorsal intercarpal capsulodesis. Combined CIND demonstrates signs of both palmar and dorsal CIND and can be treated with soft-tissue or bony procedures. In adaptive CIND, the volar carpal ligaments are slackened and are less capable of inducing the physiologic shift of the proximal carpal row from flexion into extension as the wrist ulnarly deviates. Treatment of choice is a corrective osteotomy to restore the normal volar tilt of the distal radius.

  10. Chromosomal instability in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Al Allak, Bushra; Velthuizen, Sandra C J M; de Vries, Annie; Kros, Johan M; Avezaat, Cees J J; de Klein, Annelies; Beverloo, H Berna; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 60% of sporadic meningiomas are caused by inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22. No causative gene is known for the remaining 40%. Cytogenetic analysis shows that meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene can be divided into tumors that show monosomy 22 as the sole abnormality and tumors with a more complex karyotype. Meningiomas not caused by the NF2 gene usually have a diploid karyotype. Here we report that, besides the clonal chromosomal aberrations, the chromosome numbers in many meningiomas varied from one metaphase spread to the other, a feature that is indicative of chromosomal instability. Unexpectedly and regardless of genotype, a subgroup of tumors was observed with an average number of 44.9 chromosomes and little variation in the number of chromosomes per metaphase spread. In addition, a second subgroup was recognized with a hyperdiploid number of chromosomes (average 48.5) and considerable variation in numbers per metaphase. However, this numerical instability resulted in a clonal karyotype with chromosomal gains and losses in addition to loss of chromosome 22 only in meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene. In cultured cells of all tumor groups, bi- and multinucleated cells were seen, as well as anaphase bridges, residual chromatid strings, multiple spindle poles, and unseparated chromatids, suggesting defects in the mitotic apparatus or kinetochore. Thus, we conclude that even a benign and slow-growing tumor like a meningioma displays chromosomal instability.

  11. Genome-wide analysis of ivermectin response by Onchocerca volvulus reveals that genetic drift and soft selective sweeps contribute to loss of drug sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R Doyle

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of onchocerciasis using mass ivermectin administration has reduced morbidity and transmission throughout Africa and Central/South America. Mass drug administration is likely to exert selection pressure on parasites, and phenotypic and genetic changes in several Onchocerca volvulus populations from Cameroon and Ghana-exposed to more than a decade of regular ivermectin treatment-have raised concern that sub-optimal responses to ivermectin's anti-fecundity effect are becoming more frequent and may spread.Pooled next generation sequencing (Pool-seq was used to characterise genetic diversity within and between 108 adult female worms differing in ivermectin treatment history and response. Genome-wide analyses revealed genetic variation that significantly differentiated good responder (GR and sub-optimal responder (SOR parasites. These variants were not randomly distributed but clustered in ~31 quantitative trait loci (QTLs, with little overlap in putative QTL position and gene content between the two countries. Published candidate ivermectin SOR genes were largely absent in these regions; QTLs differentiating GR and SOR worms were enriched for genes in molecular pathways associated with neurotransmission, development, and stress responses. Finally, single worm genotyping demonstrated that geographic isolation and genetic change over time (in the presence of drug exposure had a significantly greater role in shaping genetic diversity than the evolution of SOR.This study is one of the first genome-wide association analyses in a parasitic nematode, and provides insight into the genomics of ivermectin response and population structure of O. volvulus. We argue that ivermectin response is a polygenically-determined quantitative trait (QT whereby identical or related molecular pathways but not necessarily individual genes are likely to determine the extent of ivermectin response in different parasite populations. Furthermore, we propose that genetic

  12. Microsatellite instability and cytogenetic survey in myeloid leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M.S.F. Ribeiro

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites are short tandem repeat sequences dispersed throughout the genome. Their instability at multiple genetic loci may result from mismatch repair errors and it occurs in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. This instability is also found in many sporadic cancers. In order to evaluate the importance of this process in myeloid leukemias, we studied five loci in different chromosomes of 43 patients, 22 with chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML in the chronic phase, 7 with CML in blast crisis, and 14 with acute myeloid leukemia (AML, by comparing leukemic DNA extracted from bone marrow and constitutional DNA obtained from buccal epithelial cells. Only one of the 43 patients (2.1%, with relapsed AML, showed an alteration in the allele length at a single locus. Cytogenetic analysis was performed in order to improve the characterization of leukemic subtypes and to determine if specific chromosome aberrations were associated with the presence of microsatellite instability. Several chromosome aberrations were observed, most of them detected at diagnosis and during follow-up of the patients, according to current literature. These findings suggest that microsatellite instability is an infrequent genetic event in myeloid leukemias, adding support to the current view that the mechanisms of genomic instability in solid tumors differ from those observed in leukemias, where specific chromosome aberrations seem to play a major role.

  13. Influence of flavor oscillations on neutrino beam instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendonça, J. T., E-mail: titomend@ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05508-090 São Paulo SP (Brazil); Haas, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre RS (Brazil); Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-09-15

    We consider the collective neutrino plasma interactions and study the electron plasma instabilities produced by a nearly mono-energetic neutrino beam in a plasma. We describe the mutual interaction between neutrino flavor oscillations and electron plasma waves. We show that the neutrino flavor oscillations are not only perturbed by electron plasmas waves but also contribute to the dispersion relation and the growth rates of neutrino beam instabilities.

  14. Shoulder instability; Schultergelenkinstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, J.; Imhof, H. [Abteilung Osteoradiologie, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik Wien (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    Shoulder instability is a common clinical feature leading to recurrent pain and limitated range of motion within the glenohumeral joint. Instability can be due a single traumatic event, general joint laxity or repeated episodes of microtrauma. Differentiation between traumatic and atraumatic forms of shoulder instability requires careful history and a systemic clinical examination. Shoulder laxity has to be differentiated from true instability followed by the clinical assessment of direction and degree of glenohumeral translation. Conventional radiography and CT are used for the diagnosis of bony lesions. MR imaging and MR arthrography help in the detection of soft tissue affection, especially of the glenoid labrum and the capsuloligamentous complex. The most common lesion involving the labrum is the anterior labral tear, associated with capsuloperiostal stripping (Bankart lesion). A number of variants of the Bankart lesion have been described, such as ALPSA, SLAP or HAGL lesions. The purpose of this review is to highlight different forms of shoulder instability and its associated radiological findings with a focus on MR imaging. (orig.) [German] Die Schultergelenkinstabilitaet ist haeufig fuer wiederholt auftretende Schmerzen sowie eine eingeschraenkte Beweglichkeit im Glenohumeralgelenk verantwortlich. Sie kann als Folge eines vorangegangenen Traumas, einer generellen Hyperlaxitaet oder infolge wiederholter Mikrotraumen entstehen. Die Differenzierung zwischen traumatischer und atraumatischer Form der Gelenkinstabilitaet erfordert eine sorgfaeltige Anamnese und eine genaue klinische Untersuchung. Die Gelelenklaxitaet als Differenzialdiagnose muss von der echten Instabilitaet unterschieden werden, die Instabilitaet wird dann im Rahmen des klinischen Status nach Grad und Richtung der glenohumeralen Translation unterteilt. Zur Diagnose knoecherner Laesionen werden das konventionelle Roentgen sowie die CT herangezogen. MRT sowie MR-Arthrographie dienen zur Detektion

  15. Interfacial instabilities in vibrated fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Jeff; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Tinao Perez-Miravete, Ignacio; Fernandez Fraile, Jose Javier

    2016-07-01

    Vibrations induce a range of different interfacial phenomena in fluid systems depending on the frequency and orientation of the forcing. With gravity, (large) interfaces are approximately flat and there is a qualitative difference between vertical and horizontal forcing. Sufficient vertical forcing produces subharmonic standing waves (Faraday waves) that extend over the whole interface. Horizontal forcing can excite both localized and extended interfacial phenomena. The vibrating solid boundaries act as wavemakers to excite traveling waves (or sloshing modes at low frequencies) but they also drive evanescent bulk modes whose oscillatory pressure gradient can parametrically excite subharmonic surface waves like cross-waves. Depending on the magnitude of the damping and the aspect ratio of the container, these locally generated surfaces waves may interact in the interior resulting in temporal modulation and other complex dynamics. In the case where the interface separates two fluids of different density in, for example, a rectangular container, the mass transfer due to vertical motion near the endwalls requires a counterflow in the interior region that can lead to a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability and a ``frozen wave" pattern. In microgravity, the dominance of surface forces favors non-flat equilibrium configurations and the distinction between vertical and horizontal applied forcing can be lost. Hysteresis and multiplicity of solutions are more common, especially in non-wetting systems where disconnected (partial) volumes of fluid can be established. Furthermore, the vibrational field contributes a dynamic pressure term that competes with surface tension to select the (time averaged) shape of the surface. These new (quasi-static) surface configurations, known as vibroequilibria, can differ substantially from the hydrostatic state. There is a tendency for the interface to orient perpendicular to the vibrational axis and, in some cases, a bulge or cavity is induced

  16. The Fanconi Anemia Pathway Protects Genome Integrity from R-loops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María L García-Rubio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Co-transcriptional RNA-DNA hybrids (R loops cause genome instability. To prevent harmful R loop accumulation, cells have evolved specific eukaryotic factors, one being the BRCA2 double-strand break repair protein. As BRCA2 also protects stalled replication forks and is the FANCD1 member of the Fanconi Anemia (FA pathway, we investigated the FA role in R loop-dependent genome instability. Using human and murine cells defective in FANCD2 or FANCA and primary bone marrow cells from FANCD2 deficient mice, we show that the FA pathway removes R loops, and that many DNA breaks accumulated in FA cells are R loop-dependent. Importantly, FANCD2 foci in untreated and MMC-treated cells are largely R loop dependent, suggesting that the FA functions at R loop-containing sites. We conclude that co-transcriptional R loops and R loop-mediated DNA damage greatly contribute to genome instability and that one major function of the FA pathway is to protect cells from R loops.

  17. Genetic contributions to variation in general cognitive function: A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in the CHARGE consortium (N=53 949)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Davies (Gail); N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); J.C. Bis (Joshua); J. Bressler (Jan); V. Chouraki (Vincent); S. Giddaluru (Sudheer); E. Hofer; C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); M. Kirin (Mirna); J. Lahti; S. van der Lee (Sven); S. Le Hellard (Stephanie); T. Liu; R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); D. Postmus (Douwe); G.D. Smith; J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); A. Thalamuthu (Anbupalam); R. Thomson (Russell); V. Vitart (Veronique); J. Wang; L. Yu; L. Zgaga (Lina); W. Zhao (Wei); R. Boxall (Ruth); S.E. Harris (Sarah); W.D. Hill (W. David); D.C. Liewald (David C.); M. Luciano (Michelle); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); D. Ames; N. Amin (Najaf); P. Amouyel (Philippe); A.A. Assareh; R. Au; J.T. Becker; A. Beiser; C. Berr (Claudine); L. Bertram (Lars); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); H. Campbell (Harry); J. Corley; P.L. De Jager; C. Dufouil (Carole); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); T. Espeseth (Thomas); J.D. Faul; I. Ford; G. Scotland (Generation); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); M.D. Griswold (Michael); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); T.B. Harris; G. Heiss (Gerardo); A. Hofman (Albert); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); N.A. Kochan (Nicole A.); D.S. Knopman (David); J.B. Kwok; J.-C. Lambert; T. Lee; G. Li; S.-C. Li; M. Loitfelder (Marisa); O.L. Lopez (Oscar); A.J. Lundervold; A. Lundqvist; R. Mather; S.S. Mirza (Saira S.aeed); L. Nyberg; B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Palotie (Aarno); G. Papenberg; A. Pattie (Alison); K. Petrovic (Katja); O. Polasek (Ozren); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); P. Redmond (Paul); S. Reppermund; J.I. Rotter; R. Schmidt (Reinhold); M. Schuur (Maaike); P.W. Schofield; R.J. Scott; V.M. Steen (Vidar); D.J. Stott (David J.); J.C. van Swieten (John); K.D. Taylor (Kent); J. Trollor; S. Trompet (Stella); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); G. Weinstein; E. Widen (Elisabeth); B.G. Windham (B Gwen); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); A. Wright (Alan); M.J. Wright (Margaret); Q. Yang (Qiong Fang); H. Amieva (Hélène); J. Attia (John); D.A. Bennett (David); H. Brodaty (Henry); A.J. de Craen (Anton); C. Hayward; M.A. Ikram (Arfan); U. Lindenberger; L.-G. Nilsson; D.J. Porteous (David J.); K. Räikkönen (Katri); I. Reinvang (Ivar); I. Rudan (Igor); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); R. Schmidt; P. Schofield (Peter); V. Srikanth; J.M. Starr (John); S.T. Turner (Stephen); D.R. Weir (David R.); J.F. Wilson (James F); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia M.); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A.L. Fitzpatrick (Annette); S. Seshadri (Sudha); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.); I.J. Deary (Ian J.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGeneral cognitive function is substantially heritable across the human life course from adolescence to old age. We investigated the genetic contribution to variation in this important, health- and well-being-related trait in middle-aged and older adults. We conducted a meta-analysis of g

  18. Spatiotemporal instability in nonlinear dispersive media in the presence of space-time focusing effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文双春; 范滇元

    2002-01-01

    Spatiotemporal instability in nonlinear dispersive media is investigated on the basis of the nonlinear envelope equation. A general expression for instability gain which includes the effects of space-time focusing, arbitrarily higher-order dispersions and self-steepening is obtained. It is found that, for both normal and anomalous group-velocity dispersions, space-time focusing may lead to the appearance of new instability regions and influence the original instability gain spectra mainly by shrinking their regions. The region of the original instability gain spectrum shrinks much more in normal dispersion case than in anomalous one. In the former case, space-time focusing completely suppresses the growing of higher frequency components. In addition, we find that all the oddth-order dispersions contribute none to instability, while all the eventh-order dispersions influence instability region and do not influence the maximum instability gain, therein the fourth-order dispersion plays the same role as space-time focusing in spatiotemporal instability. The main role played by self-steepening in spatiotemporal instability is that it reduces the instability gain and exerts much more significant influence on the new instability regions resulting from space-time focusing.

  19. Modulational instability of nematic phase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Mithun; K Porsezian

    2014-02-01

    We numerically observe the effect of homogeneous magnetic field on the modulationally stable case of polar phase in = 2 spinor Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs). Also we investigate the modulational instability of uniaxial and biaxial (BN) states of polar phase. Our observations show that the magnetic field triggers the modulational instability and demonstrate that irrespective of the magnetic field effect the uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases show modulational instability.

  20. Political Instability and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Swagel, Phillip; Roubini, Nouriel; Ozler, Sule; Alesina, Alberto

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between political instability and per capita GDP growth in a sample of 113 countries for the period 1950-1982. We define ?political instability? as the propensity of a government collapse, and we estimate a model in which political instability and economic growth are jointly determined. The main result of this paper is that in countries and time periods with a high propensity of government collapse, growth is significantly lower than otherwise. This ef...

  1. Weibel instability with nonextensive distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Hui-Bin; Liu, Shi-Bing [Strong-field and Ultrafast Photonics Lab, Institute of Laser Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Weibel instability in plasma, where the ion distribution is isotropic and the electron component of the plasma possesses the anisotropic temperature distribution, is investigated based on the kinetic theory in context of nonextensive statistics mechanics. The instability growth rate is shown to be dependent on the nonextensive parameters of both electron and ion, and in the extensive limit, the result in Maxwellian distribution plasma is recovered. The instability growth rate is found to be enhanced as the nonextensive parameter of electron increases.

  2. Instabilities in mimetic matter perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2017-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic matter scenario with a general higher derivative function. We calculate the quadratic action and show that both the kinetic term and the gradient term have the wrong sings. We perform the analysis in both comoving and Newtonian gauges and confirm that the Hamiltonians and the associated instabilities are consistent with each other in both gauges. The existence of instabilities is independent of the specific form of higher derivative function which generates gradients for mimetic field perturbations. It is verified that the ghost instability in mimetic perturbations is not associated with the higher derivative instabilities such as the Ostrogradsky ghost.

  3. [Aspirin suppresses microsatellite instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallinger, S; Dietmaier, W; Beyser, K; Bocker, T; Hofstädter, F; Fishel, R; Rüschoff, J

    1999-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exhibit cancer preventive effects and have been shown to induce regression of adenomas in FAP patients. In order to elucidate the probable underlying mechanism, the effect of NSAIDs on mismatch repair related microsatellite instability was investigated. Six colorectal cancer cell lines all but one deficient for human mismatch repair (MMR) genes were examined for microsatellite instability (MSI) prior and after treatment with Aspirin or Sulindac. For rapid in vitro analysis of MSI a microcloning assay was developed by combining Laser microdissection and random (PEP-) PCR prior to specific MSI-PCR. Effects of NSAIDs on cell cycle and apoptosis were systematically investigated by using flow cytometry and cell-sorting. MSI frequency in cells deficient of MMR genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6) was markedly reduced after long-term (> 10 weeks) NSAID treatment. This effect was reversible, time- and concentration dependent. However, in the hPMS2 deficient endometrial cancer cell line (HEC-1-A) the MSI phenotype kept unchanged. According to cell sorting, non-apoptotic cells were stable and apoptotic cells were unstable. These results suggest that aspirin/sulindac induces a genetic selection for microsatellite stability in a subset of MMR-deficient cells and may thus provide an effective prophylactic therapy for HNPCC related colorectal carcinomas.

  4. Instability of enclosed horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Kay, Bernard S

    2013-01-01

    We study the classical massless scalar wave equation on the region of 1+1-dimensional Minkowski space between the two branches of the hyperbola $x^2-t^2=1$ with vanishing boundary conditions on it. We point out that there are initially finite-energy initially, say, right-going waves for which the stress-energy tensor becomes singular on the null-line $t+x=0$. We also construct the quantum theory of this system and show that, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state, there are coherent states built on this for which there is a similar singularity in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in 1+3-dimensional situations with 'enclosed horizons' such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a stationary box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be a similar singularity at the horizon and that would signal an instability when matter perturbations and/or gravity are switched on. Such an instability ...

  5. Libration driven multipolar instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Cébron, David; Herreman, Wietze

    2014-01-01

    We consider rotating flows in non-axisymmetric enclosures that are driven by libration, i.e. by a small periodic modulation of the rotation rate. Thanks to its simplicity, this model is relevant to various contexts, from industrial containers (with small oscillations of the rotation rate) to fluid layers of terrestial planets (with length-of-day variations). Assuming a multipolar $n$-fold boundary deformation, we first obtain the two-dimensional basic flow. We then perform a short-wavelength local stability analysis of the basic flow, showing that an instability may occur in three dimensions. We christen it the Libration Driven Multipolar Instability (LDMI). The growth rates of the LDMI are computed by a Floquet analysis in a systematic way, and compared to analytical expressions obtained by perturbation methods. We then focus on the simplest geometry allowing the LDMI, a librating deformed cylinder. To take into account viscous and confinement effects, we perform a global stability analysis, which shows that...

  6. Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functional Annotation of Cancer Genomes Principal Investigator: William C. Hahn, M.D., Ph.D. The comprehensive characterization of cancer genomes has and will continue to provide an increasingly complete catalog of genetic alterations in specific cancers. However, most epithelial cancers harbor hundreds of genetic alterations as a consequence of genomic instability. Therefore, the functional consequences of the majority of mutations remain unclear.

  7. Brassica napus genome possesses extraordinary high number of CAMTA genes and CAMTA3 contributes to PAMP triggered immunity and resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafizur eRahman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Calmodulin-binding transcription activators (CAMTAs play important roles in various plant biological processes including disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. Oilseed rape (Brassica napus L. is one of the most important oil-producing crops worldwide. To date, compositon of CAMTAs in genomes of Brassica species and role of CAMTAs in resistance to the devastating necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum are still unknown. In this study, 18 CAMTA genes were identified in oilseed rape genome through bioinformatics analyses, which were inherited from the nine copies each in its progenitors B. rapa and B. oleracea and represented the highest number of CAMTAs in a given plant species identified so far. Gene structure, protein domain organization and phylogentic analyses showed that the oilseed rape CAMTAs were structurally similar and clustered into three major groups as other plant CAMTAs, but had expanded subgroups CAMTA3 and CAMTA4 genes uniquely in rosids species occurring before formation of oilseed rape. A large number of stress response-related cis-elements existed in the 1.5 kb promoter regions of the BnCAMTA genes. BnCAMTA genes were expressed differentially in various organs and in response to treatments with plant hormones and the toxin oxalic acid (OA secreted by S. sclerotiorum as well as the pathogen inoculation. Remarkably, the expression of BnCAMTA3A1 and BnCAMTA3C1 was drastically induced in early phase of S. sclerotiorum infection, indicating their potential role in the interactions between oilseed rape and S. sclerotiorum. Furthermore, inoculation analyses using Arabidopsis camta mutants demonstrated that Atcamta3 mutant plants exhibited significantly smaller disease lesions than wild-type and other Atcamta mutant plants. In addition, compared with wild-type plants, Atcamta3 plants accumulated obviously more hydrogen peroxide in response to the PAMP chitin and exhibited much higher expression of the CGCG

  8. Electrostatic plasma instabilities driven by neutral gas flows in the solar chromosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Gogoberidze, G; Poedts, S; De Keyser, J

    2013-01-01

    We investigate electrostatic plasma instabilities of Farley-Buneman (FB) type driven by quasi-stationary neutral gas flows in the solar chromosphere. The role of these instabilities in the chromosphere is clarified. We find that the destabilizing ion thermal effect is highly reduced by the Coulomb collisions and can be ignored for the chromospheric FB-type instabilities. On the contrary, the destabilizing electron thermal effect is important and causes a significant reduction of the neutral drag velocity triggering the instability. The resulting threshold velocity is found as function of chromospheric height. Our results indicate that the FB type instabilities are still less efficient in the global chromospheric heating than the Joule dissipation of the currents driving these instabilities. This conclusion does not exclude the possibility that the FB type instabilities develop in the places where the cross-field currents overcome the threshold value and contribute to the heating locally. Typical length-scales...

  9. CTCF cis-regulates trinucleotide repeat instability in an epigenetic manner: a novel basis for mutational hot spot determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randell T Libby

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available At least 25 inherited disorders in humans result from microsatellite repeat expansion. Dramatic variation in repeat instability occurs at different disease loci and between different tissues; however, cis-elements and trans-factors regulating the instability process remain undefined. Genomic fragments from the human spinocerebellar ataxia type 7 (SCA7 locus, containing a highly unstable CAG tract, were previously introduced into mice to localize cis-acting "instability elements," and revealed that genomic context is required for repeat instability. The critical instability-inducing region contained binding sites for CTCF -- a regulatory factor implicated in genomic imprinting, chromatin remodeling, and DNA conformation change. To evaluate the role of CTCF in repeat instability, we derived transgenic mice carrying SCA7 genomic fragments with CTCF binding-site mutations. We found that CTCF binding-site mutation promotes triplet repeat instability both in the germ line and in somatic tissues, and that CpG methylation of CTCF binding sites can further destabilize triplet repeat expansions. As CTCF binding sites are associated with a number of highly unstable repeat loci, our findings suggest a novel basis for demarcation and regulation of mutational hot spots and implicate CTCF in the modulation of genetic repeat instability.

  10. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres-An Enhanced Chromosomal Instability in Aggressive Non-MYCN Amplified and Telomere Elongated Neuroblastomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Lundberg; D. Sehic; J.K. Lansberg; I. Ora; A. Frigyesi; V. Castel; S. Navarro; M. Piqueras; T. Martinsson; R. Noguera; D. Gisselsson

    2011-01-01

    Telomere length alterations are known to cause genomic instability and influence clinical course in several tumor types, but have been little investigated in neuroblastoma (NB), one of the most common childhood tumors. In the present study, telomere-dependent chromosomal instability and telomere len

  11. Genome-wide screen for metabolic syndrome susceptibility Loci reveals strong lipid gene contribution but no evidence for common genetic basis for clustering of metabolic syndrome traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansson, Kati; Perola, Markus; Tikkanen, Emmi; Kettunen, Johannes; Surakka, Ida; Havulinna, Aki S; Stancáková, Alena; Barnes, Chris; Widen, Elisabeth; Kajantie, Eero; Eriksson, Johan G; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Ruokonen, Aimo; Pouta, Anneli; Jula, Antti; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Männistö, Satu; Jousilahti, Pekka; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kuusisto, Johanna; Collins, Francis S; Laakso, Markku; Hurles, Matthew E; Palotie, Aarno; Peltonen, Leena; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified several susceptibility loci for metabolic syndrome (MetS) component traits, but have had variable success in identifying susceptibility loci to the syndrome as an entity. We conducted a GWA study on MetS and its component traits in 4 Finnish cohorts consisting of 2637 MetS cases and 7927 controls, both free of diabetes, and followed the top loci in an independent sample with transcriptome and nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics data. Furthermore, we tested for loci associated with multiple MetS component traits using factor analysis, and built a genetic risk score for MetS. A previously known lipid locus, APOA1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster region (SNP rs964184), was associated with MetS in all 4 study samples (P=7.23×10(-9) in meta-analysis). The association was further supported by serum metabolite analysis, where rs964184 was associated with various very low density lipoprotein, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein metabolites (P=0.024-1.88×10(-5)). Twenty-two previously identified susceptibility loci for individual MetS component traits were replicated in our GWA and factor analysis. Most of these were associated with lipid phenotypes, and none with 2 or more uncorrelated MetS components. A genetic risk score, calculated as the number of risk alleles in loci associated with individual MetS traits, was strongly associated with MetS status. Our findings suggest that genes from lipid metabolism pathways have the key role in the genetic background of MetS. We found little evidence for pleiotropy linking dyslipidemia and obesity to the other MetS component traits, such as hypertension and glucose intolerance.

  12. Bony instability of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Brandon D; Creighton, R Alexander; Herring, Marion M

    2008-09-01

    Instability of the shoulder is a common problem treated by many orthopaedists. Instability can result from baseline intrinsic ligamentous laxity or a traumatic event-often a dislocation that injures the stabilizing structures of the glenohumeral joint. Many cases involve soft-tissue injury only and can be treated successfully with repair of the labrum and ligamentous tissues. Both open and arthroscopic approaches have been well described, with recent studies of arthroscopic soft-tissue techniques reporting results equal to those of the more traditional open techniques. Over the last decade, attention has focused on the concept of instability of the shoulder mediated by bony pathology such as a large bony Bankart lesion or an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Recent literature has identified unrecognized large bony lesions as a primary cause of failure of arthroscopic reconstruction for instability, a major cause of recurrent instability, and a difficult diagnosis to make. Thus, although such bony lesions may be relatively rare compared with soft-tissue pathology, they constitute a critically important entity in the management of shoulder instability. Smaller bony lesions may be amenable to arthroscopic treatment, but larger lesions often require open surgery to prevent recurrent instability. This article reviews recent developments in the diagnosis and treatment of bony instability.

  13. Cinerama sickness and postural instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Ledegang, W.D.; Lubeck, A.J.A.; Stins, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min af

  14. Marital instability after midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z; Penning, M J

    1997-09-01

    "Divorce in later life has been shown to produce dramatic declines in the economic, psychological, and physical well-being of marital partners. This study examines the prevalence and determinants of marital disruption after midlife using Becker's theory of marital instability. Using recent Canadian national data, the marital outcomes of women and men who were married as of age 40 are tracked across the remaining years of the marriage. Cox proportional hazard regression models indicate stabilizing effects of the duration of the marriage, the age at first marriage, the presence of young children, as well as of remarriage for middle-aged and older persons. Other significant risk factors include education, heterogamous marital status, premarital cohabitation, number of siblings, and region."

  15. Instability and Information

    CERN Document Server

    Patzelt, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Many complex systems exhibit extreme events far more often than expected for a normal distribution. This work examines how self-similar bursts of activity across several orders of magnitude can emerge from first principles in systems that adapt to information. Surprising connections are found between two apparently unrelated research topics: hand-eye coordination in balancing tasks and speculative trading in financial markets. Seemingly paradoxically, locally minimising fluctuations can increase a dynamical system's sensitivity to unpredictable perturbations and thereby facilitate global catastrophes. This general principle is studied in several domain-specific models and in behavioural experiments. It explains many findings in both fields and resolves an apparent antinomy: the coexistence of stabilising control or market efficiency and perpetual instabilities resembling critical phenomena in physical systems.

  16. The bar instability revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodi, Filippo; Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The river bar instability is revisited, using a hydrodynamical model based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results are contrasted with the standard analysis based on shallow water Saint-Venant equations. We first show that the stability of both transverse modes (ripples) and of small wavelength inclined modes (bars) predicted by the Saint-Venant approach are artefacts of this hydrodynamical approximation. When using a more reliable hydrodynamical model, the dispersion relation does not present any maximum of the growth rate when the sediment transport is assumed to be locally saturated. The analysis therefore reveals the fundamental importance of the relaxation of sediment transport towards equilibrium as it it is responsible for the stabilisation of small wavelength modes. This dynamical mechanism is characterised by the saturation number, defined as the ratio of the saturation length to the water depth Lsat/H. This dimensionless number controls the transition from ripples (transverse patte...

  17. Chromosomal Instability as a Driver of Tumor Heterogeneity and Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoum, Samuel F; Landau, Dan Avi

    2017-02-17

    Large-scale, massively parallel sequencing of human cancer samples has revealed tremendous genetic heterogeneity within individual tumors. Indeed, tumors are composed of an admixture of diverse subpopulations-subclones-that vary in space and time. Here, we discuss a principal driver of clonal diversification in cancer known as chromosomal instability (CIN), which complements other modes of genetic diversification creating the multilayered genomic instability often seen in human cancer. Cancer cells have evolved to fine-tune chromosome missegregation rates to balance the acquisition of heterogeneity while preserving favorable genotypes, a dependence that can be exploited for a therapeutic benefit. We discuss how whole-genome doubling events accelerate clonal evolution in a subset of tumors by providing a viable path toward favorable near-triploid karyotypes and present evidence for CIN-induced clonal speciation that can overcome the dependence on truncal initiating events.

  18. Beam instability Workshop - plenary sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a review of the mechanisms of limiting beam instabilities, their cures, including feedback, and beam measurement for synchrotron radiation light sources. 12 plenary sessions took place whose titles are: 1) challenging brilliance and lifetime issues with increasing currents; 2) limiting instabilities in multibunch; 3) experience from high currents in B factories; 4) longitudinal dynamics in high intensity/bunch; 5) Transverse instabilities for high intensity/bunch; 6) working group introduction from ESRF experience; 7) impedance modelling: simulations, minimization; 8) report on the broadband impedance measurements and modelling workshop; 9) feedback systems for synchrotron light sources; 10) beam instabilities diagnostics; 11) harmonic cavities: the pros and cons; and 12) experimental study of fast beam-ion instabilities at PLS. This document gathers the 12 articles that were presented during these sessions.

  19. Equilibrium Electro-osmotic Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Isaak

    2014-01-01

    Since its prediction fifteen years ago, electro-osmotic instability has been attributed to non-equilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current in the course of concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface. This attribution had a double basis. Firstly, it has been recognized that equilibrium electro-osmosis cannot yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. Secondly, it has been shown that non-equilibrium electro-osmosis can. First theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge-selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent numerical studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge-selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential in the solid) allows for equilibrium electro-osmotic instability. Moreover, we s...

  20. Instability in Shocked Granular Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei

    2013-01-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. In the present study we have extended this work to investigate this instability at the continuum level. We modeled the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results showed a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Discrepancies, such as higher frequency instabilities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of higher order effects.

  1. Instability in shocked granular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmas, Nick; Falle, Sam; Radulescu, Matei

    2014-05-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. In the present study we have extended this work to investigate this instability at the continuum level. We modeled the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results showed a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Discrepancies, such as higher frequency instabilities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of higher order effects.

  2. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kratter, Kaitlin M

    2016-01-01

    [Abridged] Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability, and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability, supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the non-linear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analyt...

  3. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  4. Genomic Prediction in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edriss, Vahid; Cericola, Fabio; Jensen, Jens D

    2015-01-01

    Genomic prediction uses markers (SNPs) across the whole genome to predict individual breeding values at an early growth stage potentially before large scale phenotyping. One of the applications of genomic prediction in plant breeding is to identify the best individual candidate lines to contribute...... to next generation. The main goal of this study was to see the potential of using genomic prediction in a commercial Barley breeding program. The data used in this study was from Nordic Seed company which is located in Denmark. Around 350 advanced lines were genotyped with 9K Barely chip from Illumina...

  5. Repair-mediated duplication by capture of proximal chromosomal DNA has shaped vertebrate genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Pace

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs are a common form of cellular damage that can lead to cell death if not repaired promptly. Experimental systems have shown that DSB repair in eukaryotic cells is often imperfect and may result in the insertion of extra chromosomal DNA or the duplication of existing DNA at the breakpoint. These events are thought to be a source of genomic instability and human diseases, but it is unclear whether they have contributed significantly to genome evolution. Here we developed an innovative computational pipeline that takes advantage of the repetitive structure of genomes to detect repair-mediated duplication events (RDs that occurred in the germline and created insertions of at least 50 bp of genomic DNA. Using this pipeline we identified over 1,000 probable RDs in the human genome. Of these, 824 were intra-chromosomal, closely linked duplications of up to 619 bp bearing the hallmarks of the synthesis-dependent strand-annealing repair pathway. This mechanism has duplicated hundreds of sequences predicted to be functional in the human genome, including exons, UTRs, intron splice sites and transcription factor binding sites. Dating of the duplication events using comparative genomics and experimental validation revealed that the mechanism has operated continuously but with decreasing intensity throughout primate evolution. The mechanism has produced species-specific duplications in all primate species surveyed and is contributing to genomic variation among humans. Finally, we show that RDs have also occurred, albeit at a lower frequency, in non-primate mammals and other vertebrates, indicating that this mechanism has been an important force shaping vertebrate genome evolution.

  6. DNA instability in replicating Huntington's disease lymphoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frati Luigi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expanded CAG repeat in the Huntington's disease (HD gene may display tissue-specific variability (e.g. triplet mosaicism in repeat length, the longest mutations involving mitotic (germ and glial cells and postmitotic (neurons cells. What contributes to the triplet mutability underlying the development of HD nevertheless remains unknown. We investigated whether, besides the increased DNA instability documented in postmitotic neurons, possible environmental and genetic mechanisms, related to cell replication, may concur to determine CAG repeat mutability. To test this hypothesis we used, as a model, cultured HD patients' lymphoblasts with various CAG repeat lengths. Results Although most lymphoblastoid cell lines (88% showed little or no repeat instability even after six or more months culture, in lymphoblasts with large expansion repeats beyond 60 CAG repeats the mutation size and triplet mosaicism always increased during replication, implying that the repeat mutability for highly expanded mutations may quantitatively depend on the triplet expansion size. None of the investigated genetic factors, potentially acting in cis to the mutation, significantly influence the repeat changes. Finally, in our experiments certain drugs controlled triplet expansion in two prone-to-expand HD cell lines carrying large CAG mutations. Conclusion Our data support quantitative evidence that the inherited CAG length of expanded alleles has a major influence on somatic repeat variation. The longest triplet expansions show wide somatic variations and may offer a mechanistic model to study triplet drug-controlled instability and genetic factors influencing it.

  7. Hydrodynamics of pedestrians' instability in floodwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Chiara; Oumeraci, Hocine; Castelli, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    People's safety is the first objective to be fulfilled by flood risk mitigation measures, and according to existing reports on the causes of casualties, most of the fatalities are due to inappropriate behaviour such as walking or driving in floodwaters. Currently available experimental data on people instability in floodwaters suffer from a large dispersion primarily depending on the large variability of the physical characteristics of the subjects. This paper introduces a dimensionless mobility parameter θP for people partly immersed in flood flows, which accounts for both flood and subject characteristics. The parameter θP is capable of identifying a unique threshold of instability depending on a Froude number, thus reducing the scatter of existing experimental data. Moreover, a three-dimensional (3-D) numerical model describing the detailed geometry of a human body and reproducing a selection of critical pairs of water depth and velocity is presented. The numerical results in terms of hydrodynamic forces and force coefficients are analysed and discussed. Both the mobility parameter θP and the numerical results hint at the crucial role of the Froude number and relative submergence as the most relevant dimensionless numbers to interpret the loss of stability. Finally, the mobility parameter θP is compared with an analogous dimensionless parameter for vehicles' instability in floodwaters, providing a new contribution to support flood risk management and educating people.

  8. Coping with instabilities - lessons from Japanese architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Anni

    twentieth century, a born-again modernism that, while being modern in the Western sense of the term, attempted to combine modernism with tradition. It offers particular attention to the architect Arata Isozaki (born 1931) who contributed with insight into the puzzle of Tokyo’s robustness and its unique......This paper offers insight into the role of architecture in coping with instabilities. At its centre is a second generation of Japanese architects who came to maturity after World War II. They questioned the International Style, and asked for a return to architecture in the image of the early...

  9. Abelianization of QCD plasma instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Peter; Lenaghan, Jonathan

    2004-12-01

    QCD plasma instabilities appear to play an important role in the equilibration of quark-gluon plasmas in heavy-ion collisions in the theoretical limit of weak coupling (i.e. asymptotically high energy). It is important to understand what nonlinear physics eventually stops the exponential growth of unstable modes. It is already known that the initial growth of plasma instabilities in QCD closely parallels that in QED. However, once the unstable modes of the gauge fields grow large enough for non-Abelian interactions between them to become important, one might guess that the dynamics of QCD plasma instabilities and QED plasma instabilities become very different. In this paper, we give suggestive arguments that non-Abelian self-interactions between the unstable modes are ineffective at stopping instability growth, and that the growing non-Abelian gauge fields become approximately Abelian after a certain stage in their growth. This in turn suggests that understanding the development of QCD plasma instabilities in the nonlinear regime may have close parallels to similar processes in traditional plasma physics. We conjecture that the physics of collisionless plasma instabilities in SU(2) and SU(3) gauge theory becomes equivalent, respectively, to (i) traditional plasma physics, which is U(1) gauge theory, and (ii) plasma physics of U(1)×U(1) gauge theory.

  10. State of cat genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren; Driscoll, Carlos; Pontius, Joan; Pecon-Slattery, Jill; Menotti-Raymond, Marilyn

    2008-06-01

    Our knowledge of cat family biology was recently expanded to include a genomics perspective with the completion of a draft whole genome sequence of an Abyssinian cat. The utility of the new genome information has been demonstrated by applications ranging from disease gene discovery and comparative genomics to species conservation. Patterns of genomic organization among cats and inbred domestic cat breeds have illuminated our view of domestication, revealing linkage disequilibrium tracks consequent of breed formation, defining chromosome exchanges that punctuated major lineages of mammals and suggesting ancestral continental migration events that led to 37 modern species of Felidae. We review these recent advances here. As the genome resources develop, the cat is poised to make a major contribution to many areas in genetics and biology.

  11. Current View on Phytoplasma Genomes and Encoded Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kube

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplasmas are specialised bacteria that are obligate parasites of plant phloem tissue and insects. These bacteria have resisted all attempts of cell-free cultivation. Genome research is of particular importance to analyse the genetic endowment of such bacteria. Here we review the gene content of the four completely sequenced ‘Candidatus Phytoplasma’ genomes that include those of ‘Ca. P. asteris’ strains OY-M and AY-WB, ‘Ca. P. australiense,’ and ‘Ca. P. mali’. These genomes are characterized by chromosome condensation resulting in sizes below 900 kb and a G + C content of less than 28%. Evolutionary adaption of the phytoplasmas to nutrient-rich environments resulted in losses of genetic modules and increased host dependency highlighted by the transport systems and limited metabolic repertoire. On the other hand, duplication and integration events enlarged the chromosomes and contribute to genome instability. Present differences in the content of membrane and secreted proteins reflect the host adaptation in the phytoplasma strains. General differences are obvious between different phylogenetic subgroups. ‘Ca. P. mali’ is separated from the other strains by its deviating chromosome organization, the genetic repertoire for recombination and excision repair of nucleotides or the loss of the complete energy-yielding part of the glycolysis. Apart from these differences, comparative analysis exemplified that all four phytoplasmas are likely to encode an alternative pathway to generate pyruvate and ATP.

  12. Instability of ties in compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Masonry cavity walls are loaded by wind pressure and vertical load from upper floors. These loads results in bending moments and compression forces in the ties connecting the outer and the inner wall in a cavity wall. Large cavity walls are furthermore loaded by differential movements from...... exact instability solutions are complex to derive, not to mention the extra complexity introducing dimensional instability from the temperature gradients. Using an inverse variable substitution and comparing an exact theory with an analytical instability solution a method to design tie...

  13. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K;

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... chromosome for three tumors. Single locus alterations were detected in three tumors, while three other tumors revealed changes in two or more loci. In one tumor we found microsatellite instability in all five loci analyzed on chromosome 9. The alterations detected were either minor 2-base pair changes...

  14. On Modeling the Kelvin–Helmholtz Instability in Solar Atmosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I. Zhelyazkov

    2015-03-01

    In the present review article, we discuss the recent developments in studying the Kelvin–Helmholtz (KH) instability of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating in various solar magnetic structures. The main description is on the modeling of KH instability developing in the coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and contributes to the triggering of wave turbulence subsequently, leading to the coronal heating. KH instability of MHD waves in coronal active regions recently observed and imaged in unprecedented detail in EUV high cadence, high-resolution observations by SDO/AIA, and spectroscopic observations by Hinode/EIS instrument, is posing new challenge for its realistic modeling. It is shown that, considering the solar mass flows of CMEs as moving cylindrical twisted magnetic flux tubes, the observed instability can be explained in terms of unstable = −3 MHD mode. We also describe the occurrence of the KH instability in solar jets. The obtained critical jet speeds for the instability onset, as well as the linear wave growth rates, are in good agreement with the observational data of solar jets.

  15. Particle Acceleration in Relativistic Jets Due to Weibel Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Hardee, P.; Richardson, G.; Preece, R.; Sol, H.; Fishman, G. J.

    2004-01-01

    Shock acceleration is a ubiquitous phenomenon in astrophysical plasmas. Plasma waves and their associated instabilities (e.g., the Buneman instability, two-streaming instability, and the Weibel instability) created in the shocks are responsible for particle (electron, positron, and ion) acceleration. Using a three-dimensional relativistic electromagnetic particle code, we have investigated particle acceleration associated with a relativistic jet front propagating through an ambient plasma with and without initial magnetic fields. We find only small differences in the results between no ambient and weak ambient magnetic fields. Simulations show that the Weibel instability created in the collisionless shock front accelerates particles perpendicular and parallel to the jet propagation direction. While some Fermi acceleration may occur at the jet front, the majority of electron acceleration takes place behind the jet front and cannot be characterized as Fermi acceleration. The simulation results show that this instability is responsible for generating and amplifying highly nonuniform, small-scale magnetic fields, which contribute to the electron s transverse deflection behind the jet head. The "jitter" radiation from deflected electrons has different properties than synchrotron radiation which is calculated in a uniform magnetic field. This jitter radiation may be important to understanding the complex time evolution and/or spectral structure in gamma-ray bursts, relativistic jets, and supernova remnants.

  16. Subject to Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bouwer

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available For Plantier, language constitutes reality and is male dominated. Readers of texts, she says, are at a disadvantage because the author imposes a logic that we must accept in order to understand the text. The discourses shaping our social reality have the same effect. Plantier has struggled against individual voices, discourses, and the very fabric of language informed by these discourses. "Subject to Instability" examines the impact on her generic evolution of a changing sense of self, of who her interlocutors are, and of those for whom she is speaking. I argue that her increasing attempt to juggle many different voices destabilizes her "monologic," poetical voice, resulting in a blurring of generic boundaries and eventually the abandonment of poetry. Recognizing that our entry into language is a form of alienation also unsettles Plantier because it undermines the very identity that allows her to speak for others. She concludes that each woman needs to become a Subject in her own right, but she continues to struggle against dominant discourses, modeling "resisting reader" strategies. If she can no longer practice "monologic steadfastness," this does not deter her from attempting to dismantle patriarchal language and striving to make her voice prevail over others.

  17. Genome evolution of Oryza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tieyan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Oryza is composed of approximately 24 species. Wild species of Oryza contain a largely untapped resource of agronomically important genes. As an increasing number of genomes of wild rice species have been or will be sequenced, Oryza is becoming a model system for plant comparative, functional and evolutionary genomics studies. Comparative analyses of large genomic regions and whole-genome sequences have revealed molecular mechanisms involved in genome size variation, gene movement, genome evolution of polyploids, transition of euchromatin to heterochromatin and centromere evolution in the genus Oryza. Transposon activity and removal of transposable elements by unequal recombination or illegitimate recombination are two important factors contributing to expansion or contraction of Oryza genomes. Double-strand break repair mediated gene movement, especially non-homologous end joining, is an important source of non-colinear genes. Transition of euchromatin to heterochromatin is accompanied by transposable element amplification, segmental and tandem duplication of genic segments, and acquisition of heterochromatic genes from other genomic locations. Comparative analyses of multiple genomes dramatically improve the precision and sensitivity of evolutionary inference than single-genome analyses can provide. Further investigations on the impact of structural variation, lineage-specific genes and evolution of agriculturally important genes on phenotype diversity and adaptation in the genus Oryza should facilitate molecular breeding and genetic improvement of rice.

  18. Whole genome comparison of donor and cloned dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hak-Min; Cho, Yun Sung; Kim, Hyunmin; Jho, Sungwoong; Son, Bongjun; Choi, Joung Yoon; Kim, Sangsoo; Lee, Byeong Chun; Bhak, Jong; Jang, Goo

    2013-01-01

    Cloning is a process that produces genetically identical organisms. However, the genomic degree of genetic resemblance in clones needs to be determined. In this report, the genomes of a cloned dog and its donor were compared. Compared with a human monozygotic twin, the genome of the cloned dog showed little difference from the genome of the nuclear donor dog in terms of single nucleotide variations, chromosomal instability, and telomere lengths. These findings suggest that cloning by somatic ...

  19. Atlantoaxial instability in Down's syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1987-01-01

    The radiographs and clinical evaluations of 90 children with Down’s syndrome were reassessed after an interval of 5 years in a study of atlantoaxial instability (AAI) at the Derbyshire Children’s Hospital and Infirmary, Derby, UK.

  20. Evaporative instabilities in climbing films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, A. E.; Bush, John W. M.

    2001-09-01

    We consider flow in a thin film generated by partially submerging an inclined rigid plate in a reservoir of ethanol or methanol water solution and wetting its surface. Evaporation leads to concentration and surface tension gradients that drive flow up the plate. An experimental study indicates that the climbing film is subject to two distinct instabilities. The first is a convective instability characterized by flattened convection rolls aligned in the direction of flow and accompanied by free-surface deformations; in the meniscus region, this instability gives rise to pronounced ridge structures aligned with the mean flow. The second instability, evident when the plate is nearly vertical, takes the form of transverse surface waves propagating up the plate.

  1. Intrinsic Instability of Coronal Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y; Song, H Q; Shi, Q Q; Feng, S W; Xia, L D; 10.1088/0004-637X/691/2/1936

    2009-01-01

    Plasma blobs are observed to be weak density enhancements as radially stretched structures emerging from the cusps of quiescent coronal streamers. In this paper, it is suggested that the formation of blobs is a consequence of an intrinsic instability of coronal streamers occurring at a very localized region around the cusp. The evolutionary process of the instability, as revealed in our calculations, can be described as follows: (1) through the localized cusp region where the field is too weak to sustain the confinement, plasmas expand and stretch the closed field lines radially outward as a result of the freezing-in effect of plasma-magnetic field coupling; the expansion brings a strong velocity gradient into the slow wind regime providing the free energy necessary for the onset of a subsequent magnetohydrodynamic instability; (2) the instability manifests itself mainly as mixed streaming sausage-kink modes, the former results in pinches of elongated magnetic loops to provoke reconnections at one or many loc...

  2. Material Instabilities in Particulate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Following is a brief summary of a theoretical investigation of material (or constitutive) instability associated with shear induced particle migration in dense particulate suspensions or granular media. It is shown that one can obtain a fairly general linear-stability analysis, including the effects of shear-induced anisotropy in the base flow as well as Reynolds dilatancy. A criterion is presented here for simple shearing instability in the absence of inertia and dilatancy.

  3. Instability following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Background Knee prosthesis instability (KPI) is a frequent cause of failure of total knee arthroplasty. Moreover, the degree of constraint required to achieve immediate and long-term stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is frequently debated. Questions This review aims to define the problem, analyze risk factors, and review strategies for prevention and treatment of KPI. Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) search of the years 2000 to 2010 was performed using two key words: TKA and instability. One hundred and sixty-five initial articles were identified. The most important (17) articles as judged by the author were selected for this review. The main criteria for selection were that the articles addressed and provided solutions to the diagnosis and treatment of KPI. Results Patient-related risk factors predisposing to post-operative instability include deformity requiring a large surgical correction and aggressive ligament release, general or regional neuromuscular pathology, and hip or foot deformities. KPI can be prevented in most cases with appropriate selection of implants and good surgical technique. When ligament instability is anticipated post-operatively, the need for implants with a greater degree of constraint should be anticipated. In patients without significant varus or valgus malalignment and without significant flexion contracture, the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be retained. However, the PCL should be sacrificed when deformity exists particularly in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy, previous high tibial osteotomy or distal femoral osteotomy, and posttraumatic osteoarthritis with disruption of the PCL. In most cases, KPI requires revision surgery. Successful outcomes can only be obtained if the cause of KPI is identified and addressed. Conclusions Instability following TKA is a common cause of the need for revision. Typically, knees with deformity, rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy or high tibial osteotomy, and

  4. Midcarpal instability: a radiological perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toms, Andoni Paul [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom); Radiology Academy, Cotman Centre, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom); Chojnowski, Adrian [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom); Cahir, John G. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Midcarpal instability (MCI) is the result of complex abnormal carpal motion at the midcarpal joint of the wrist. It is a form of non-dissociative carpal instability (CIND) and can be caused by various combinations of extrinsic ligament injuries that then result in one of several subtypes of MCI. The complex patterns of injury and the kinematics are further complicated by competing theories, terminology and classifications of MCI. Palmar, dorsal, ulna midcarpal instability, and capitolunate or chronic capitolunate instability are all descriptions of types of MCI with often overlapping features. Palmar midcarpal instability (PMCI) is the most commonly reported type of MCI. It has been described as resulting from deficiencies in the ulna limb of the palmar arcuate ligament (triquetrohamate-capitate) or the dorsal radiotriquetral ligaments, or both. Unstable carpal articulations can be treated with limited carpal arthrodesis or the ligamentous defects can be treated with capsulorrhaphy or ligament reconstruction. Conventional radiographic abnormalities are usually limited to volar intercalated segment instability (VISI) patterns of carpal alignment and are not specific. For many years stress view radiographs and videofluoroscopy have been the methods of choice for demonstrating carpal instability and abnormal carpal kinematics respectively. Dynamic US can be also used to demonstrate midcarpal dyskinesia including the characteristic triquetral ''catch-up'' clunk. Tears of the extrinsic ligaments can be demonstrated with MR arthrography, and probably with CT arthrography, but intact yet redundant ligaments are more difficult to identify. The exact role of these investigations in the diagnosis, categorisation and management of midcarpal instability has yet to be determined. (orig.)

  5. Instability of enclosed horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Bernard S.

    2015-03-01

    We point out that there are solutions to the scalar wave equation on dimensional Minkowski space with finite energy tails which, if they reflect off a uniformly accelerated mirror due to (say) Dirichlet boundary conditions on it, develop an infinite stress-energy tensor on the mirror's Rindler horizon. We also show that, in the presence of an image mirror in the opposite Rindler wedge, suitable compactly supported arbitrarily small initial data on a suitable initial surface will develop an arbitrarily large stress-energy scalar near where the two horizons cross. Also, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state for the quantum theory between these two mirrors, there are coherent states built on it for which there are similar singularities in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in other situations with analogous enclosed horizons such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a (stationary spherical) box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be similar stress-energy singularities and almost-singularities—leading to instability of the horizons when gravity is switched on and matter and gravity perturbations are allowed for. All this suggests it is incorrect to picture a black hole in equilibrium in a box or a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as extending beyond the past and future horizons of a single Schwarzschild (/Schwarzschild-AdS) wedge. It would thus provide new evidence for 't Hooft's brick wall model while seeming to invalidate the picture in Maldacena's ` Eternal black holes in AdS'. It would thereby also support the validity of the author's matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis and of the paper ` Brick walls and AdS/CFT' by the author and Ortíz.

  6. Vector-Resonance-Multimode Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyev, S. V.; Kbashi, H.; Tarasov, N.; Loiko, Yu.; Kolpakov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The modulation and multimode instabilities are the main mechanisms which drive spontaneous spatial and temporal pattern formation in a vast number of nonlinear systems ranging from biology to laser physics. Using an Er-doped fiber laser as a test bed, here for the first time we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically a new type of a low-threshold vector-resonance-multimode instability which inherits features of multimode and modulation instabilities. The same as for the multimode instability, a large number of longitudinal modes can be excited without mode synchronization. To enable modulation instability, we modulate the state of polarization of the lasing signal with the period of the beat length by an adjustment of the in-cavity birefringence and the state of polarization of the pump wave. As a result, we show the regime's tunability from complex oscillatory to periodic with longitudinal mode synchronization in the case of resonance matching between the beat and cavity lengths. Apart from the interest in laser physics for unlocking the tunability and stability of dynamic regimes, the proposed mechanism of the vector-resonance-multimode instability can be of fundamental interest for the nonlinear dynamics of various distributed systems.

  7. Microsatellite instability in gastric cancer and pre-cancerous lesions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Liu; Xiao-Yong Zhang; Yun Shao; Dao-Fu Zhang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the microsatellite instability (MSI) in cancer and pre-cancerous lesions of the stomach and its mechanisms underlying the development of gastric cancer.METHODS: Thirty-six gastric cancer samples were obtained from patients undergoing surgery. Forty-one gastric mucosa samples with dysplasia and 51 with intestinal metaplasia (IM) were obtained from patients with chronic gastritis undergoing gastro-endoscopy. Genomic DNA was extracted from the samples. Silver staining single strand conformation polymorphis-polymerize chain reaction (SSCP-PCR) was used to screen MSI markers at 5 loci (Bat-25, Bat-26, D5S346, D17S250, and D2S123)in fresh tissues and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples and their corresponding normal gastric mucosa.RESULTS: The abnormal shifting of the single-strand DNA (MSI) was identified in 21 out of 36 (58.3%) gastric cancers.Seven cases showed high-level MSI (two or more loci altered) and 14 showed low-level MSI (one locus altered).Gastric cancer with MSI had a tendency to be located in the distal stomach. MSI was also detected in 11 out of 41(26.8%) dysplasia samples and in 9 of 51 (17.6%) IM samples respectively. Three cases of dysplasia and one case of IM showed high-level MSI. Eight cases of dysplasia and 8 cases of IM displayed low-level MSI. MIS in IM was found only in moderate or severe-grade IM. No association was detected between MSI and dysplasia grade.CONCLUSION: Accumulation of MSI in dysplasia and intestinal metaplasia of gastric mucosa may be an early molecular event during gastric carcinogenesis and may contribute to the acquisition of transformed cell phenotype and the development of gastric cancer.

  8. APOBEC3A damages the cellular genome during DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Abby M; Landry, Sébastien; Budagyan, Konstantin; Avgousti, Daphne C; Shalhout, Sophia; Bhagwat, Ashok S; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 family of DNA-cytosine deaminases comprises 7 members (A3A-A3H) that act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The APOBEC3 proteins function within the innate immune system by mutating DNA of viral genomes and retroelements to restrict infection and retrotransposition. Recent evidence suggests that APOBEC3 enzymes can also cause damage to the cellular genome. Mutational patterns consistent with APOBEC3 activity have been identified by bioinformatic analysis of tumor genome sequences. These mutational signatures include clusters of base substitutions that are proposed to occur due to APOBEC3 deamination. It has been suggested that transiently exposed ssDNA segments provide substrate for APOBEC3 deamination leading to mutation signatures within the genome. However, the mechanisms that produce single-stranded substrates for APOBEC3 deamination in mammalian cells have not been demonstrated. We investigated ssDNA at replication forks as a substrate for APOBEC3 deamination. We found that APOBEC3A (A3A) expression leads to DNA damage in replicating cells but this is reduced in quiescent cells. Upon A3A expression, cycling cells activate the DNA replication checkpoint and undergo cell cycle arrest. Additionally, we find that replication stress leaves cells vulnerable to A3A-induced DNA damage. We propose a model to explain A3A-induced damage to the cellular genome in which cytosine deamination at replication forks and other ssDNA substrates results in mutations and DNA breaks. This model highlights the risk of mutagenesis by A3A expression in replicating progenitor cells, and supports the emerging hypothesis that APOBEC3 enzymes contribute to genome instability in human tumors.

  9. Fungal Genomics Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-03-12

    The JGI Fungal Genomics Program aims to scale up sequencing and analysis of fungal genomes to explore the diversity of fungi important for energy and the environment, and to promote functional studies on a system level. Combining new sequencing technologies and comparative genomics tools, JGI is now leading the world in fungal genome sequencing and analysis. Over 120 sequenced fungal genomes with analytical tools are available via MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a web-portal for fungal biologists. Our model of interacting with user communities, unique among other sequencing centers, helps organize these communities, improves genome annotation and analysis work, and facilitates new larger-scale genomic projects. This resulted in 20 high-profile papers published in 2011 alone and contributing to the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, which targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts). Our next grand challenges include larger scale exploration of fungal diversity (1000 fungal genomes), developing molecular tools for DOE-relevant model organisms, and analysis of complex systems and metagenomes.

  10. Chromosomal instability in the lymphocytes of breast cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsimran Kaur

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Genomic instability in the tumor tissue has been correlated with tumor progression. In the present study, chromosomal aberrations (CAs in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs of breast tumor patients were studied to assess whether chromosomal instability (CIN in PBLs correlates with aggressiveness of breast tumor (i.e., disease stage and has any prognostic utility. Cultured blood lymphocyte metaphases were scored for aberrations in 31 breast cancer patients and 20 healthy age and sex-matched controls. A variety of CAs, including aneuploidy, polyploidy, terminal deletions, acentric fragments, double minutes, chromatid separations, ring chromosome, marker chromosome, chromatid gaps, and breaks were seen in PBLs of the patients. The CAs in patients were higher than in controls. A comparison of the frequency of metaphases with aberrations by grouping the patients according to the stage of advancement of disease did not reveal any consistent pattern of variation in lymphocytic CIN. Neither was any specific chromosomal abnormality found to be associated with the stage of cancer. This might be indicative of the fact that cancer patients have constitutional CIN, which predisposes them to the disease, and this inherent difference in the level of genomic instability might play a role in disease progression and response to treatment.

  11. Progesterone impairs cell respiration and suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport in isolated rat skeletal muscle: a non-genomic mechanism contributing to metabolic adaptation to late pregnancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, F; Brunmair, B; Quarré, L; Szöcs, Z; Waldhäusl, W; Fürnsinn, C

    2007-12-01

    The aim of the study was to gain better insight into the mechanisms responsible for impaired glucose metabolism during late pregnancy. We explored the direct effects of progesterone on glucose metabolism of skeletal muscle. Specimens of skeletal muscle from untreated rats were incubated with progesterone and rates of substrate fluxes through the various pathways of glucose metabolism were analysed. Progesterone dose-dependently reduced the rates of glucose and pyruvate oxidation (insulin-stimulated rates after 5 h of exposure to 1 and 10 mumol/l progesterone: glucose oxidation, -6 +/- 4%, NS, and -39 +/- 4%, p respiration, e.g. by the specific inhibitor rotenone, is known to trigger a compensatory increase in glucose transport, but this response was blunted in the case of progesterone (change of glucose transport in response to 10 mumol/l progesterone vs 60 nmol/l rotenone, both causing a reduction in glucose oxidation by -39%: progesterone, +14 +/- 8% vs rotenone, +84 +/- 23%, p respiration and at the same time suppresses a compensatory increase in glucose transport, causing cellular carbohydrate deficiency in isolated rat skeletal muscle. This effect is mediated by a direct, rapid and non-genomic mechanism and could contribute to pregnancy-associated changes in glucose homeostasis.

  12. DNA repair efficiency in germ cells and early mouse embryos and consequences for radiation-induced transgenerational genomic damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2009-01-18

    Exposure to ionizing radiation and other environmental agents can affect the genomic integrity of germ cells and induce adverse health effects in the progeny. Efficient DNA repair during gametogenesis and the early embryonic cycles after fertilization is critical for preventing transmission of DNA damage to the progeny and relies on maternal factors stored in the egg before fertilization. The ability of the maternal repair machinery to repair DNA damage in both parental genomes in the fertilizing egg is especially crucial for the fertilizing male genome that has not experienced a DNA repair-competent cellular environment for several weeks prior to fertilization. During the DNA repair-deficient period of spermatogenesis, DNA lesions may accumulate in sperm and be carried into the egg where, if not properly repaired, could result in the formation of heritable chromosomal aberrations or mutations and associated birth defects. Studies with female mice deficient in specific DNA repair genes have shown that: (i) cell cycle checkpoints are activated in the fertilized egg by DNA damage carried by the sperm; and (ii) the maternal genotype plays a major role in determining the efficiency of repairing genomic lesions in the fertilizing sperm and directly affect the risk for abnormal reproductive outcomes. There is also growing evidence that implicates DNA damage carried by the fertilizing gamete as a mediator of postfertilization processes that contribute to genomic instability in subsequent generations. Transgenerational genomic instability most likely involves epigenetic mechanisms or error-prone DNA repair processes in the early embryo. Maternal and embryonic DNA repair processes during the early phases of mammalian embryonic development can have far reaching consequences for the genomic integrity and health of subsequent generations.

  13. Active control of magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities in hot plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igochine, Valentin (ed.) [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Written and edited by leading plasma physics researchers. Provides a toolkit for scientists and engineers aiming to optimize plasma performance. Comprehensive treatment of different plasma instabilities. During the past century, world-wide energy consumption has risen dramatically, which leads to a quest for new energy sources. Fusion of hydrogen atoms in hot plasmas is an attractive approach to solve the energy problem, with abundant fuel, inherent safety and no long-lived radioactivity. However, one of the limits on plasma performance is due to the various classes of magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities that may occur. The physics and control of these instabilities in modern magnetic confinement fusion devices is the subject of this book. Written by foremost experts, the contributions will provide valuable reference and up-to-date research reviews for ''old hands'' and newcomers alike.

  14. Two-phase flow instability in a parallel multichannel system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Suxia

    2009-01-01

    The two-phase flow instabilities observed in through parallel multichannel can be classified into three types, of which only one is intrinsic to parallel multichannel systems. The intrinsic instabilities observed in parallel multichannel system have been studied experimentally. The stable boundary of the flow in such a parallel-channel system are sought, and the nature of inlet flow oscillation in the unstable region has been examined experimentally under various conditions of inlet velocity, heat flux, liquid temperature, cross section of channel and entrance throttling. The results show that parallel multichannel system possess a characteristic oscillation that is quite independent of the magnitude and duration of the initial disturbance, and the stable boundary is influenced by the characteristic frequency of the system as well as by the exit quality when this is low, and upon raising the exit quality and reducing the characteristic frequency, the system increases its instability, and entrance throttling effectively contributes to stabilization of the system.

  15. The chromo-Weibel instability in an expanding background

    CERN Document Server

    Attems, Maximilian; Strickland, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In this proceedings contribution we review recent calculations of the dynamics of the chromo-Weibel instability in the quark gluon plasma. This instability is present in gauge theories with a one-particle distribution function which is momentum-space anisotropic in the local rest frame. The conditions necessary for triggering this instability can be present already in the color-glass-condensate initial state or dynamically generated by the rapid longitudinal expansion of the matter created in a heavy-ion collision. Using the hard-loop framework we study the case that the one-particle distribution function possesses an arbitrary initial momentum anisotropy that increases in time due to longitudinal free streaming. The resulting three-dimensional dynamical equations for the chromofield evolution are solved numerically. We find that there is regeneration of the longitudinal pressure due to unstable plasma modes; nevertheless, the system seems to maintain a high-degree of momentum-space anisotropy. Despite this a...

  16. Microsatellite instability and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaron Niv

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is caused by a series of genetic or epigenetic changes, and in the last decade there has been an increased awareness that there are multiple forms of colorectal cancer that develop through different pathways. Microsatellite instability is involved in the genesis of about 15% of sporadic colorectal cancers and most of hereditary nonpolyposis cancers. Tumors with a high frequency of microsatellite instability tend to be diploid, to possess a mucinous histology, and to have a surrounding lymphoid reaction. They are more prevalent in the proximal colon and have a fast pass from polyp to cancer. Nevertheless, they are associated with longer survival than stage-matched tumors with microsatellite stability. Resistance of colorectal cancers with a high frequency of microsatellite instability to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is well established. Silencing the MLH1 gene expression by its promoter methylation stops the formation of MLH1 protein, and prevents the normal activation of the DMA repair gene. This is an important cause for genomic instability and cell proliferation to the point of colorectal cancer formation. Better knowledge of this process will have a huge impact on colorectal cancer management, prevention, treatment and prognosis.

  17. Niacin requirements for genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, James B

    2012-05-01

    Through its involvement in over 400 NAD(P)-dependent reactions, niacin status has the potential to influence every area of metabolism. Niacin deficiency has been linked to genomic instability largely through impaired function of the poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) family of enzymes. In various models, niacin deficiency has been found to cause impaired cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, delayed DNA excision repair, accumulation of single and double strand breaks, chromosomal breakage, telomere erosion and cancer development. Rat models suggest that most aspects of genomic instability are minimized by the recommended levels of niacin found in AIN-93 formulations; however, some beneficial responses do occur in the range from adequate up to pharmacological niacin intakes. Mouse models show a wide range of protection against UV-induced skin cancer well into pharmacological levels of niacin intake. It is currently a challenge to compare animal and human data to estimate the role of niacin status in the risk of genomic instability in human populations. It seems fairly certain that some portion of even affluent populations will benefit from niacin supplementation, and some subpopulations are likely well below an optimal intake of this vitamin. With exposure to stressors, like chemotherapy or excess sunlight, suraphysiological doses of niacin may be beneficial.

  18. Interfacial instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Madison

    2015-11-01

    Determining the critera for onset and amplitude growth of instabilities is one of the central problems of fluid mechanics. We develop a parallel between the Kapitsa effect, in which a pendulum subject to high-frequency low-amplitude vibrations becomes stable in the inverted position, and interfaces separating fluids of different density. It has long been known that such interfaces can be stabilized by vibrations, even when the denser fluid is on top. We demonstrate that the stability diagram for these fluid interfaces is identical to the stability diagram for an appopriate Kapitsa pendulum. We expand the robust, ``dictionary''-type relationship between Kapitsa pendula and interfacial instabilities by considering the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Plateau instabilities, as well as less-canonical examples ranging in scale from the micron to the width of a galaxy.

  19. Interfacial Instability during Granular Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Merceron, Aymeric; Jop, Pierre

    2016-02-12

    The complex interplay between the topography and the erosion and deposition phenomena is a key feature to model granular flows such as landslides. Here, we investigated the instability that develops during the erosion of a wet granular pile by a dry dense granular flow. The morphology and the propagation of the generated steps are analyzed in relation to the specific erosion mechanism. The selected flowing angle of the confined flow on a dry heap appears to play an important role both in the final state of the experiment, and for the shape of the structures. We show that the development of the instability is governed by the inertia of the flow through the Froude number. We model this instability and predict growth rates that are in agreement with the experiment results.

  20. Evaporative Instability in Binary Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ranga; Uguz, Erdem

    2012-11-01

    In this talk we depict the physics of evaporative convection for binary systems in the presence of surface tension gradient effects. Two results are of importance. The first is that a binary system, in the absence of gravity, can generate an instability only when heated from the vapor side. This is to be contrasted with the case of a single component where instability can occur only when heated from the liquid side. The second result is that a binary system, in the presence of gravity, will generate an instability when heated from either the vapor or the liquid side provided the heating is strong enough. In addition to these results we show the conditions at which interfacial patterns can occur. Support from NSF OISE 0968313, Partner Univ. Fund and a Chateaubriand Fellowship is acknowledged.

  1. Rotational effects on the negative magnetic pressure instability

    CERN Document Server

    Losada, Illa R; Kleeorin, N; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, I

    2012-01-01

    The surface layers of the Sun are strongly stratified. In the presence of turbulence with a weak mean magnetic field, a large-scale instability resulting in the formation of non-uniform magnetic structures, can be excited over the scale of many turbulent eddies or convection cells. This instability is caused by a negative contribution of turbulence to the effective (mean-field) magnetic pressure and has previously been discussed in connection with the formation of active regions and perhaps sunspots. We want to understand the effects of rotation on this instability in both two and three dimensions. We use mean-field magnetohydrodynamics in a parameter regime in which the properties of the negative effective magnetic pressure instability have previously been found to be in agreement with those of direct numerical simulations. We find that the instability is suppressed already for relatively slow rotation with Coriolis numbers (i.e. inverse Rossby numbers) around 0.2. The suppression is strongest at the equator...

  2. The Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke instability in stellar radiative zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caleo, Andrea; Balbus, Steven A.; Tognelli, Emanuele

    2016-07-01

    The Goldreich-Schubert-Fricke (GSF) instability is a rotational instability that is thought to contribute to the transfer of angular momentum in differentially rotating stars. It has been included in recent codes of stellar evolution in a diffusion-like approximation, under the assumption that the kinematic viscosity ν is unimportant for the development of the instability. As noted previously by other authors, for most stellar applications, this may not be a valid approximation. We discuss this issue in detail, solving the dispersion relation of the perturbed modes for realistic values of ν in the bulk of the radiative zone of the Sun and of three red giant stars at various evolutionary stages. We find that the GSF instability is triggered only in layers of an extremely strong shear. In a simple case study, we also investigate the effect of a small deviation from axisymmetry or a small background magnetic field. We find that, like the viscosity, these have a stabilizing effect. We conclude that this instability is probably far less efficient in transporting angular momentum than is often assumed, and may not even be present.

  3. Laboratory blast wave driven instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn

    2008-11-01

    This presentation discusses experiments involving the evolution of hydrodynamic instabilities in the laboratory under high-energy-density (HED) conditions. These instabilities are driven by blast waves, which occur following a sudden, finite release of energy, and consist of a shock front followed by a rarefaction wave. When a blast wave crosses an interface with a decrease in density, hydrodynamic instabilities will develop. Instabilities evolving under HED conditions are relevant to astrophysics. These experiments include target materials scaled in density to the He/H layer in SN1987A. About 5 kJ of laser energy from the Omega Laser facility irradiates a 150 μm plastic layer that is followed by a low-density foam layer. A blast wave structure similar to those in supernovae is created in the plastic layer. The blast wave crosses an interface having a 2D or 3D sinusoidal structure that serves as a seed perturbation for hydrodynamic instabilities. This produces unstable growth dominated by the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the nonlinear regime. We have detected the interface structure under these conditions using x-ray backlighting. Recent advances in our diagnostic techniques have greatly improved the resolution of our x-ray radiographic images. Under certain conditions, the improved images show some mass extending beyond the RT spike and penetrating further than previously observed or predicted by current simulations. The observed effect is potentially of great importance as a source of mass transport to places not anticipated by current theory and simulation. I will discuss the amount of mass in these spike extensions, the associated uncertainties, and hypotheses regarding their origin We also plan to show comparisons of experiments using single mode and multimode as well as 2D and 3D initial conditions. This work is sponsored by DOE/NNSA Research Grants DE-FG52-07NA28058 (Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliances) and DE-FG52-04NA00064 (National Laser User

  4. YAP controls retinal stem cell DNA replication timing and genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabochette, Pauline; Vega-Lopez, Guillermo; Bitard, Juliette; Parain, Karine; Chemouny, Romain; Masson, Christel; Borday, Caroline; Hedderich, Marie; Henningfeld, Kristine A; Locker, Morgane; Bronchain, Odile; Perron, Muriel

    2015-09-22

    The adult frog retina retains a reservoir of active neural stem cells that contribute to continuous eye growth throughout life. We found that Yap, a downstream effector of the Hippo pathway, is specifically expressed in these stem cells. Yap knock-down leads to an accelerated S-phase and an abnormal progression of DNA replication, a phenotype likely mediated by upregulation of c-Myc. This is associated with an increased occurrence of DNA damage and eventually p53-p21 pathway-mediated cell death. Finally, we identified PKNOX1, a transcription factor involved in the maintenance of genomic stability, as a functional and physical interactant of YAP. Altogether, we propose that YAP is required in adult retinal stem cells to regulate the temporal firing of replication origins and quality control of replicated DNA. Our data reinforce the view that specific mechanisms dedicated to S-phase control are at work in stem cells to protect them from genomic instability.

  5. Stringy bounces and gradient instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Bouncing solutions are obtained from a generally covariant action characterized by a potential which is a nonlocal functional of the dilaton field at two separated space-time points. Gradient instabilities are shown to arise in this context but they are argued to be nongeneric. After performing a gauge-invariant and frame-invariant derivation of the evolution equations of the fluctuations, a heuristic criterium for the avoidance of pathological instabilities is proposed and corroborated by a number of explicit examples that turn out to be compatible with a quasi-flat spectrum of curvature inhomogeneities for typical wavelengths larger than the Hubble radius.

  6. Research on aviation fuel instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C. E.; Bittker, D. A.; Cohen, S. M.; Seng, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    The problems associated with aircraft fuel instability are discussed. What is currently known about the problem is reviewed and a research program to identify those areas where more research is needed is discussed. The term fuel instability generally refers to the gums, sediments, or deposits which can form as a result of a set of complex chemical reactions when a fuel is stored for a long period at ambient conditions or when the fuel is thermally stressed inside the fuel system of an aircraft.

  7. Mechanical Instabilities of Biological Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannezo, Edouard; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François

    2012-07-01

    We study theoretically the morphologies of biological tubes affected by various pathologies. When epithelial cells grow, the negative tension produced by their division provokes a buckling instability. Several shapes are investigated: varicose, dilated, sinuous, or sausagelike. They are all found in pathologies of tracheal, renal tubes, or arteries. The final shape depends crucially on the mechanical parameters of the tissues: Young’s modulus, wall-to-lumen ratio, homeostatic pressure. We argue that since tissues must be in quasistatic mechanical equilibrium, abnormal shapes convey information as to what causes the pathology. We calculate a phase diagram of tubular instabilities which could be a helpful guide for investigating the underlying genetic regulation.

  8. Hydromagnetic Instabilities in Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lasky, Paul D; Kokkotas, Kostas D; Glampedakis, Kostas

    2011-01-01

    We model the non-linear ideal magnetohydrodynamics of poloidal magnetic fields in neutron stars in general relativity assuming a polytropic equation of state. We identify familiar hydromagnetic modes, in particular the 'sausage/varicose' mode and 'kink' instability inherent to poloidal magnetic fields. The evolution is dominated by the kink instability, which causes a cataclysmic reconfiguration of the magnetic field. The system subsequently evolves to new, non-axisymmetric, quasi-equilibrium end-states. The existence of this branch of stable quasi-equilibria may have consequences for magnetar physics, including flare generation mechanisms and interpretations of quasi-periodic oscillations.

  9. Political instability and illegal immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, J E; Lien, D

    1995-01-01

    "Economic theory suggests that transnational migration results from the push-pull effect of wage differentials between host and source countries. In this paper, we argue that political instability exacerbates the migration flow, with greater instability leading to relatively larger flows. We conclude then that an optimal solution to the illegal immigration problem requires proper coordination of immigration and foreign policies by the host country. A narrow preoccupation with tougher immigration laws is wasteful and may be marginally effective." Emphasis is on the United States as a host country.

  10. Undulation Instability of Epithelial Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Basan, Markus; Prost, Jacques; Risler, Thomas; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.158101

    2011-01-01

    Treating the epithelium as an incompressible fluid adjacent to a viscoelastic stroma, we find a novel hydrodynamic instability that leads to the formation of protrusions of the epithelium into the stroma. This instability is a candidate for epithelial fingering observed in vivo. It occurs for sufficiently large viscosity, cell-division rate and thickness of the dividing region in the epithelium. Our work provides physical insight into a potential mechanism by which interfaces between epithelia and stromas undulate, and potentially by which tissue dysplasia leads to cancerous invasion.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Genomic Instability in Brca-Deficient Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Neuberger , 2007; Liu and Schatz, 2009). To initiate the CSR reaction, AID gets targeted to the Igh locus downstream of the V(D)J gene segment and...is required for SHM, suggesting that specific interactions may modulate the targeting and/or func- tion of AID (Di Noia and Neuberger , 2007; Xu et al...with no activ- ity for 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) (Di Noia and Neuberger , 2007; Franchini et al., 2012; Nabel et al., 2012). As an epigenetic mark

  12. Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Genomic Instability in Brca-Deficient Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    rejoining is then completed by activi- ties of the XRCC4/ DNA ligase IV (Lig4) complex (Critchlow and Jackson, 1998). The importance of double-strand break...Recombination in DNA Interstrand Crosslink Repair, Molecular Cell (2012), doi:10.1016/j.molcel.2012.02.015 found that loss of DNA ligase IV (Lig