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Sample records for genomic approaches uncover

  1. An integrative genomic approach to uncover molecular mechanisms of prokaryotic traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available With mounting availability of genomic and phenotypic databases, data integration and mining become increasingly challenging. While efforts have been put forward to analyze prokaryotic phenotypes, current computational technologies either lack high throughput capacity for genomic scale analysis, or are limited in their capability to integrate and mine data across different scales of biology. Consequently, simultaneous analysis of associations among genomes, phenotypes, and gene functions is prohibited. Here, we developed a high throughput computational approach, and demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of integrating large quantities of prokaryotic phenotypes along with genomic datasets for mining across multiple scales of biology (protein domains, pathways, molecular functions, and cellular processes. Applying this method over 59 fully sequenced prokaryotic species, we identified genetic basis and molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotypes in bacteria. We identified 3,711 significant correlations between 1,499 distinct Pfam and 63 phenotypes, with 2,650 correlations and 1,061 anti-correlations. Manual evaluation of a random sample of these significant correlations showed a minimal precision of 30% (95% confidence interval: 20%-42%; n = 50. We stratified the most significant 478 predictions and subjected 100 to manual evaluation, of which 60 were corroborated in the literature. We furthermore unveiled 10 significant correlations between phenotypes and KEGG pathways, eight of which were corroborated in the evaluation, and 309 significant correlations between phenotypes and 166 GO concepts evaluated using a random sample (minimal precision = 72%; 95% confidence interval: 60%-80%; n = 50. Additionally, we conducted a novel large-scale phenomic visualization analysis to provide insight into the modular nature of common molecular mechanisms spanning multiple biological scales and reused by related phenotypes (metaphenotypes. We propose

  2. Genomic approaches uncover increasing complexities in the regulatory landscape at the human SCL (TAL1 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawandeep Dhami

    Full Text Available The SCL (TAL1 transcription factor is a critical regulator of haematopoiesis and its expression is tightly controlled by multiple cis-acting regulatory elements. To elaborate further the DNA elements which control its regulation, we used genomic tiling microarrays covering 256 kb of the human SCL locus to perform a concerted analysis of chromatin structure and binding of regulatory proteins in human haematopoietic cell lines. This approach allowed us to characterise further or redefine known human SCL regulatory elements and led to the identification of six novel elements with putative regulatory function both up and downstream of the SCL gene. They bind a number of haematopoietic transcription factors (GATA1, E2A LMO2, SCL, LDB1, CTCF or components of the transcriptional machinery and are associated with relevant histone modifications, accessible chromatin and low nucleosomal density. Functional characterisation shows that these novel elements are able to enhance or repress SCL promoter activity, have endogenous promoter function or enhancer-blocking insulator function. Our analysis opens up several areas for further investigation and adds new layers of complexity to our understanding of the regulation of SCL expression.

  3. Functional genomics of the brain: uncovering networks in the CNS using a systems approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopka, Genevieve

    2011-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is undoubtedly the most complex human organ system in terms of its diverse functions, cellular composition, and connections. Attempts to capture this diversity experimentally were the foundation on which the field of neurobiology was built. Until now though, techniques were either painstakingly slow or insufficient in capturing this heterogeneity. In addition, the combination of multiple layers of information needed for a complete picture of neuronal diversity from the epigenome to the proteome requires an even more complex compilation of data. In this era of high-throughput genomics though, the ability to isolate and profile neurons and brain tissue has increased tremendously and now requires less effort. Both microarrays and next-generation sequencing have identified neuronal transcriptomes and signaling networks involved in normal brain development, as well as in disease. However, the expertise needed to organize and prioritize the resultant data remains substantial. A combination of supervised organization and unsupervised analyses are needed to fully appreciate the underlying structure in these datasets. When utilized effectively, these analyses have yielded striking insights into a number of fundamental questions in neuroscience on topics ranging from the evolution of the human brain to neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Future studies will incorporate these analyses with behavioral and physiological data from patients to more efficiently move toward personalized therapeutics.

  4. Integration of genomic approaches to uncover sources of variation in age at puberty and reproductive longevity in sows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic variants associated with traits such as age at puberty and litter size could provide insight into the underlying genetic sources of variation impacting sow reproductive longevity and productivity. Genome wide characterization and gene expression profiling were employed using gilts from the U...

  5. Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance mechanisms among Lepidoptera: progress on genomic approaches to uncover causal mutations in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic plants that expressed Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystalline (Cry) protein toxins can suffer feeding damage from a small number of lepidopteran insect species under field conditions, which has heightened concerns about the durability of pest control tactics. Genomics research has provid...

  6. Uncovering transcriptional interactions via an adaptive fuzzy logic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chung-Ming

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, only a limited number of transcriptional regulatory interactions have been uncovered. In a pilot study integrating sequence data with microarray data, a position weight matrix (PWM performed poorly in inferring transcriptional interactions (TIs, which represent physical interactions between transcription factors (TF and upstream sequences of target genes. Inferring a TI means that the promoter sequence of a target is inferred to match the consensus sequence motifs of a potential TF, and their interaction type such as AT or RT is also predicted. Thus, a robust PWM (rPWM was developed to search for consensus sequence motifs. In addition to rPWM, one feature extracted from ChIP-chip data was incorporated to identify potential TIs under specific conditions. An interaction type classifier was assembled to predict activation/repression of potential TIs using microarray data. This approach, combining an adaptive (learning fuzzy inference system and an interaction type classifier to predict transcriptional regulatory networks, was named AdaFuzzy. Results AdaFuzzy was applied to predict TIs using real genomics data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Following one of the latest advances in predicting TIs, constrained probabilistic sparse matrix factorization (cPSMF, and using 19 transcription factors (TFs, we compared AdaFuzzy to four well-known approaches using over-representation analysis and gene set enrichment analysis. AdaFuzzy outperformed these four algorithms. Furthermore, AdaFuzzy was shown to perform comparably to 'ChIP-experimental method' in inferring TIs identified by two sets of large scale ChIP-chip data, respectively. AdaFuzzy was also able to classify all predicted TIs into one or more of the four promoter architectures. The results coincided with known promoter architectures in yeast and provided insights into transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. Conclusion AdaFuzzy successfully integrates multiple types of

  7. Unique small RNA signatures uncovered in the tammar wallaby genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay James

    2012-10-01

    discovered crasiRNAs. These small RNAs are derived largely from centromere-enriched retroelements, including a novel SINE. Conclusions This study encompasses the first analyses of the major classes of small RNAs for the newly completed tammar genome, validates preliminary annotations using deep sequencing and computational approaches, and provides a foundation for future work on tammar-specific as well as conserved, but previously unknown small RNA progenitors and targets identified herein. The characterization of new miRNA target genes and a unique profile for crasiRNAs has allowed for insight into multiple RNA mediated processes in the tammar, including gene regulation, species incompatibilities, centromere and chromosome function.

  8. Comparative genomics of Beauveria bassiana: uncovering signatures of virulence against mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero-Jiménez, Claudio A; Faino, Luigi; Spring In't Veld, Daphne; Smit, Sandra; Zwaan, Bas J; van Kan, Jan A L

    2016-12-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi such as Beauveria bassiana are promising biological agents for control of malaria mosquitoes. Indeed, infection with B. bassiana reduces the lifespan of mosquitoes in the laboratory and in the field. Natural isolates of B. bassiana show up to 10-fold differences in virulence between the most and the least virulent isolate. In this study, we sequenced the genomes of five isolates representing the extremes of low/high virulence and three RNA libraries, and applied a genome comparison approach to uncover genetic mechanisms underpinning virulence. A high-quality, near-complete genome assembly was achieved for the highly virulent isolate Bb8028, which was compared to the assemblies of the four other isolates. Whole genome analysis showed a high level of genetic diversity between the five isolates (2.85-16.8 SNPs/kb), which grouped into two distinct phylogenetic clusters. Mating type gene analysis revealed the presence of either the MAT1-1-1 or the MAT1-2-1 gene. Moreover, a putative new MAT gene (MAT1-2-8) was detected in the MAT1-2 locus. Comparative genome analysis revealed that Bb8028 contains 163 genes exclusive for this isolate. These unique genes have a tendency to cluster in the genome and to be often located near the telomeres. Among the genes unique to Bb8028 are a Non-Ribosomal Peptide Synthetase (NRPS) secondary metabolite gene cluster, a polyketide synthase (PKS) gene, and five genes with homology to bacterial toxins. A survey of candidate virulence genes for B. bassiana is presented. Our results indicate several genes and molecular processes that may underpin virulence towards mosquitoes. Thus, the genome sequences of five isolates of B. bassiana provide a better understanding of the natural variation in virulence and will offer a major resource for future research on this important biological control agent.

  9. Phytophthora Genome Sequences Uncover Evolutionary Origins and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamour, Kurt H [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL; Savidor, Alon [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Genome sequences of the soybean pathogen, Phytophthora sojae, and the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, suggest a photosynthetic past and reveal recent massive expansion and diversification of potential pathogenicity gene families. Abstract: Draft genome sequences of the soybean pathogen, Phytophthora sojae, and the sudden oak death pathogen, Phytophthora ramorum, have been determined. O mycetes such as these Phytophthora species share the kingdom Stramenopila with photosynthetic algae such as diatoms and the presence of many Phytophthora genes of probable phototroph origin support a photosynthetic ancestry for the stramenopiles. Comparison of the two species' genomes reveals a rapid expansion and diversification of many protein families associated with plant infection such as hydrolases, ABC transporters, protein toxins, proteinase inhibitors and, in particular, a superfamily of 700 proteins with similarity to known o mycete avirulence genes.

  10. Phytophthora Genome Sequences Uncover Evolutionary Origins and Mechanisms of Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyler, Brett M.; Tripathy, Sucheta; Zhang, Xuemin; Dehal, Paramvir; Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Aerts, Andrea; Arredondo, Felipe D.; Baxter, Laura; Bensasson, Douda; Beynon, JIm L.; Chapman, Jarrod; Damasceno, Cynthia M. B.; Dorrance, Anne E.; Dou, Daolong; Dickerman, Allan W.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Garbelotto, Matteo; Gijzen, Mark; Gordon, Stuart G.; Govers, Francine; Grunwald, NIklaus J.; Huang, Wayne; Ivors, Kelly L.; Jones, Richard W.; Kamoun, Sophien; Krampis, Konstantinos; Lamour, Kurt H.; Lee, Mi-Kyung; McDonald, W. Hayes; Medina, Monica; Meijer, Harold J. G.; Nordberg, Erik K.; Maclean, Donald J.; Ospina-Giraldo, Manuel D.; Morris, Paul F.; Phuntumart, Vipaporn; Putnam, Nicholas J.; Rash, Sam; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Sakihama, Yasuko; Salamov, Asaf A.; Savidor, Alon; Scheuring, Chantel F.; Smith, Brian M.; Sobral, Bruno W. S.; Terry, Astrid; Torto-Alalibo, Trudy A.; Win, Joe; Xu, Zhanyou; Zhang, Hongbin; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2006-04-17

    Draft genome sequences have been determined for the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae and the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. Oömycetes such as these Phytophthora species share the kingdom Stramenopila with photosynthetic algae such as diatoms, and the presence of many Phytophthora genes of probable phototroph origin supports a photosynthetic ancestry for the stramenopiles. Comparison of the two species' genomes reveals a rapid expansion and diversification of many protein families associated with plant infection such as hydrolases, ABC transporters, protein toxins, proteinase inhibitors, and, in particular, a superfamily of 700 proteins with similarity to known oömycete avirulence genes.

  11. Phytophthora genome sequences uncover evolutionary origins and mechanisms of pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyler, B.M.; Tripathy, S.; Zhang, X.; Dehal, P.; Jiang, R.H.Y.; Aerts, A.; Arredondo, F.D.; Baxter, L.; Bensasson, D.; Beynon, J.L.; Chapman, J.; Damasceno, C.M.B.; Dorrance, A.E.; Dou, D.; Dickerman, A.W.; Dubchak, I.L.; Garbelotto, M.; Gijzen, M.; Gordon, S.G.; Govers, F.; Grunwald, N.J.; Huang, W.; Ivors, K.L.; Jones, R.W.; Kamoun, S.; Krampis, K.; Lamour, K.H.; Lee, M.K.; McDonald, W.H.; Medina, M.; Meijer, H.J.G.; Nordberg, E.K.; Maclean, D.J.; Ospina-Giraldo, M.D.; Morris, P.F.; Phuntumart, V.; Putnam, N.H.; Rash, S.; Rose, J.K.C.; Sakihama, Y.; Salamov, A.A.; Savidor, A.; Scheuring, C.F.; Smith, B.M.; Sobral, B.W.S.; Terry, A.; Torto-Alalibo, T.A.; Win, J.; Xu, Z.; Zhang, H.; Grigoriev, I.V.; Rokhsar, D.S.; Boore, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Draft genome sequences have been determined for the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae and the sudden oak death pathogen Phytophthora ramorum. Oömycetes such as these Phytophthora species share the kingdom Stramenopila with photosynthetic algae such as diatoms, and the presence of many Phytophthora

  12. Strategies and approaches in plasmidome studies—uncovering plasmid diversity disregarding of linear elements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dib, Julián R.; Wagenknecht, Martin; Farías, María E.; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2015-01-01

    The term plasmid was originally coined for circular, extrachromosomal genetic elements. Today, plasmids are widely recognized not only as important factors facilitating genome restructuring but also as vehicles for the dissemination of beneficial characters within bacterial communities. Plasmid diversity has been uncovered by means of culture-dependent or -independent approaches, such as endogenous or exogenous plasmid isolation as well as PCR-based detection or transposon-aided capture, respectively. High-throughput-sequencing made possible to cover total plasmid populations in a given environment, i.e., the plasmidome, and allowed to address the quality and significance of self-replicating genetic elements. Since such efforts were and still are rather restricted to circular molecules, here we put equal emphasis on the linear plasmids which—despite their frequent occurrence in a large number of bacteria—are largely neglected in prevalent plasmidome conceptions. PMID:26074886

  13. Uncovering direct and indirect molecular determinants of chromatin loops using a computational integrative approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Mourad

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chromosomal organization in 3D plays a central role in regulating cell-type specific transcriptional and DNA replication timing programs. Yet it remains unclear to what extent the resulting long-range contacts depend on specific molecular drivers. Here we propose a model that comprehensively assesses the influence on contacts of DNA-binding proteins, cis-regulatory elements and DNA consensus motifs. Using real data, we validate a large number of predictions for long-range contacts involving known architectural proteins and DNA motifs. Our model outperforms existing approaches including enrichment test, random forests and correlation, and it uncovers numerous novel long-range contacts in Drosophila and human. The model uncovers the orientation-dependent specificity for long-range contacts between CTCF motifs in Drosophila, highlighting its conserved property in 3D organization of metazoan genomes. Our model further unravels long-range contacts depending on co-factors recruited to DNA indirectly, as illustrated by the influence of cohesin in stabilizing long-range contacts between CTCF sites. It also reveals asymmetric contacts such as enhancer-promoter contacts that highlight opposite influences of the transcription factors EBF1, EGR1 or MEF2C depending on RNA Polymerase II pausing.

  14. Uncovering genomic features and maternal origin of korean native chicken by whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Woori; Song, Ki-Duk; Oh, Jae-Don; Heo, Kang-Nyeong; Lee, Jun-Heon; Lee, Woon Kyu; Yoon, Sook Hee; Kim, Heebal; Cho, Seoae; Lee, Hak-Kyo

    2014-01-01

    The Korean Native Chicken (KNC) is an important endemic biological resource in Korea. While numerous studies have been conducted exploring this breed, none have used next-generation sequencing to identify its specific genomic features. We sequenced five strains of KNC and identified 10.9 million SNVs and 1.3 million InDels. Through the analysis, we found that the highly variable region common to all 5 strains had genes like PCHD15, CISD1, PIK3C2A, and NUCB2 that might be related to the phenotypic traits of the chicken such as auditory sense, growth rate and egg traits. In addition, we assembled unaligned reads that could not be mapped to the reference genome. By assembling the unaligned reads, we were able to present genomic sequences characteristic to the KNC. Based on this, we also identified genes related to the olfactory receptors and antigen that are common to all 5 strains. Finally, through the reconstructed mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenomic analysis and elucidated the maternal origin of the artificially restored KNC. Our results revealed that the KNC has multiple maternal origins which are in agreement with Korea's history of chicken breed imports. The results presented here provide a valuable basis for future research on genomic features of KNC and further understanding of KNC's origin.

  15. Uncovering genomic features and maternal origin of korean native chicken by whole genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woori Kwak

    Full Text Available The Korean Native Chicken (KNC is an important endemic biological resource in Korea. While numerous studies have been conducted exploring this breed, none have used next-generation sequencing to identify its specific genomic features. We sequenced five strains of KNC and identified 10.9 million SNVs and 1.3 million InDels. Through the analysis, we found that the highly variable region common to all 5 strains had genes like PCHD15, CISD1, PIK3C2A, and NUCB2 that might be related to the phenotypic traits of the chicken such as auditory sense, growth rate and egg traits. In addition, we assembled unaligned reads that could not be mapped to the reference genome. By assembling the unaligned reads, we were able to present genomic sequences characteristic to the KNC. Based on this, we also identified genes related to the olfactory receptors and antigen that are common to all 5 strains. Finally, through the reconstructed mitochondrial genome sequences, we performed phylogenomic analysis and elucidated the maternal origin of the artificially restored KNC. Our results revealed that the KNC has multiple maternal origins which are in agreement with Korea's history of chicken breed imports. The results presented here provide a valuable basis for future research on genomic features of KNC and further understanding of KNC's origin.

  16. Genome-wide meta-analysis uncovers novel loci influencing circulating leptin levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Carli, Jayne F Martin; Skowronski, Alicja A

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone, the circulating levels of which correlate closely with overall adiposity. Although rare mutations in the leptin (LEP) gene are well known to cause leptin deficiency and severe obesity, no common loci regulating circulating leptin levels have been uncovered....... Therefore, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of circulating leptin levels from 32,161 individuals and followed up loci reaching Pleptin levels in/near LEP, SLC32A1, GCKR, CCNL1 and FTO....... Although the association of the FTO obesity locus with leptin levels is abolished by adjustment for BMI, associations of the four other loci are independent of adiposity. The GCKR locus was found associated with multiple metabolic traits in previous GWAS and the CCNL1 locus with birth weight. Knockdown...

  17. Genome-wide approaches to understanding behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Megan; Goodwin, Stephen F

    2012-09-01

    Understanding how an organism exhibits specific behaviours remains a major and important biological question. Studying behaviour in a simple model organism like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has the advantages of advanced molecular genetics approaches along with well-defined anatomy and physiology. With advancements in functional genomic technologies, researchers are now attempting to uncover genes and pathways involved in complex behaviours on a genome-wide scale. A systems-level network approach, which will include genomic approaches, to study behaviour will be key to understanding the regulation and modulation of behaviours and the importance of context in regulating them.

  18. An orphan gyrB in the Mycobacterium smegmatis genome uncovered by comparative genomics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P. Jain; V. Nagaraja

    2002-11-01

    DNA gyrase is an essential topoisomerase found in all bacteria. It is encoded by gyrB and gyrA genes. These genes are organized differently in different bacteria. Direct comparison of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis genomes reveals presence of an additional gyrB in M. smegmatis flanked by novel genes. Analysis of the amino acid sequence of GyrB from different organisms suggests that the orphan GyrB in M. smegmatis may have an important cellular role.

  19. Feminist Approaches to Triangulation: Uncovering Subjugated Knowledge and Fostering Social Change in Mixed Methods Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the deployment of triangulation in the service of uncovering subjugated knowledge and promoting social change for women and other oppressed groups. Feminist approaches to mixed methods praxis create a tight link between the research problem and the research design. An analysis of selected case studies of feminist praxis…

  20. Feminist Approaches to Triangulation: Uncovering Subjugated Knowledge and Fostering Social Change in Mixed Methods Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse-Biber, Sharlene

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the deployment of triangulation in the service of uncovering subjugated knowledge and promoting social change for women and other oppressed groups. Feminist approaches to mixed methods praxis create a tight link between the research problem and the research design. An analysis of selected case studies of feminist praxis…

  1. Genome-wide meta-analysis uncovers novel loci influencing circulating leptin levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Carli, Jayne F Martin; Skowronski, Alicja A; Sun, Qi; Kriebel, Jennifer; Feitosa, Mary F; Hedman, Åsa K; Drong, Alexander W; Hayes, James E; Zhao, Jinghua; Pers, Tune H; Schick, Ursula; Grarup, Niels; Kutalik, Zoltán; Trompet, Stella; Mangino, Massimo; Kristiansson, Kati; Beekman, Marian; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Eriksson, Joel; Henneman, Peter; Lahti, Jari; Tanaka, Toshiko; Luan, Jian'an; Del Greco M, Fabiola; Pasko, Dorota; Renström, Frida; Willems, Sara M; Mahajan, Anubha; Rose, Lynda M; Guo, Xiuqing; Liu, Yongmei; Kleber, Marcus E; Pérusse, Louis; Gaunt, Tom; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Ju Sung, Yun; Ramos, Yolande F; Amin, Najaf; Amuzu, Antoinette; Barroso, Inês; Bellis, Claire; Blangero, John; Buckley, Brendan M; Böhringer, Stefan; I Chen, Yii-Der; de Craen, Anton J N; Crosslin, David R; Dale, Caroline E; Dastani, Zari; Day, Felix R; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela E; Demirkan, Ayse; Finucane, Francis M; Ford, Ian; Garcia, Melissa E; Gieger, Christian; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hallmans, Göran; Hankinson, Susan E; Havulinna, Aki S; Herder, Christian; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A; Hunter, David J; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea; Jansson, John-Olov; Jenny, Nancy S; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Karlsson, Magnus; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraft, Peter; Kwekkeboom, Joanneke; Laatikainen, Tiina; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; LeDuc, Charles A; Lowe, Gordon; Lu, Yingchang; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meisinger, Christa; Menni, Cristina; Morris, Andrew P; Myers, Richard H; Männistö, Satu; Nalls, Mike A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peters, Annette; Pradhan, Aruna D; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rice, Treva K; Brent Richards, J; Ridker, Paul M; Sattar, Naveed; Savage, David B; Söderberg, Stefan; Timpson, Nicholas J; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van Heemst, Diana; Uh, Hae-Won; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Walker, Mark; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Widén, Elisabeth; Wood, Andrew R; Yao, Jie; Zeller, Tanja; Zhang, Yiying; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Astrup, Arne; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Sarzynski, Mark A; Rao, D C; Jousilahti, Pekka; Vartiainen, Erkki; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Kajantie, Eero; Osmond, Clive; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G; Heliövaara, Markku; Knekt, Paul B; Koskinen, Seppo; Jula, Antti; Perola, Markus; Huupponen, Risto K; Viikari, Jorma S; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T; Mellström, Dan; Lorentzon, Mattias; Casas, Juan P; Bandinelli, Stefanie; März, Winfried; Isaacs, Aaron; van Dijk, Ko W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Harris, Tamara B; Bouchard, Claude; Allison, Matthew A; Chasman, Daniel I; Ohlsson, Claes; Lind, Lars; Scott, Robert A; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M; Pramstaller, Peter P; Borecki, Ingrid B; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergmann, Sven; Waeber, Gérard; Vollenweider, Peter; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Hu, Frank B; Eline Slagboom, P; Grallert, Harald; Spector, Tim D; Jukema, J W; Klein, Robert J; Schadt, Erik E; Franks, Paul W; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Leibel, Rudolph L; Loos, Ruth J F

    2016-02-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone, the circulating levels of which correlate closely with overall adiposity. Although rare mutations in the leptin (LEP) gene are well known to cause leptin deficiency and severe obesity, no common loci regulating circulating leptin levels have been uncovered. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of circulating leptin levels from 32,161 individuals and followed up loci reaching P<10(-6) in 19,979 additional individuals. We identify five loci robustly associated (P<5 × 10(-8)) with leptin levels in/near LEP, SLC32A1, GCKR, CCNL1 and FTO. Although the association of the FTO obesity locus with leptin levels is abolished by adjustment for BMI, associations of the four other loci are independent of adiposity. The GCKR locus was found associated with multiple metabolic traits in previous GWAS and the CCNL1 locus with birth weight. Knockdown experiments in mouse adipose tissue explants show convincing evidence for adipogenin, a regulator of adipocyte differentiation, as the novel causal gene in the SLC32A1 locus influencing leptin levels. Our findings provide novel insights into the regulation of leptin production by adipose tissue and open new avenues for examining the influence of variation in leptin levels on adiposity and metabolic health.

  2. Genome-wide meta-analysis uncovers novel loci influencing circulating leptin levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Carli, Jayne F. Martin; Skowronski, Alicja A.; Sun, Qi; Kriebel, Jennifer; Feitosa, Mary F; Hedman, Åsa K.; Drong, Alexander W.; Hayes, James E.; Zhao, Jinghua; Pers, Tune H.; Schick, Ursula; Grarup, Niels; Kutalik, Zoltán; Trompet, Stella; Mangino, Massimo; Kristiansson, Kati; Beekman, Marian; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Eriksson, Joel; Henneman, Peter; Lahti, Jari; Tanaka, Toshiko; Luan, Jian'an; Greco M, Fabiola Del; Pasko, Dorota; Renström, Frida; Willems, Sara M.; Mahajan, Anubha; Rose, Lynda M.; Guo, Xiuqing; Liu, Yongmei; Kleber, Marcus E.; Pérusse, Louis; Gaunt, Tom; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Ju Sung, Yun; Ramos, Yolande F.; Amin, Najaf; Amuzu, Antoinette; Barroso, Inês; Bellis, Claire; Blangero, John; Buckley, Brendan M.; Böhringer, Stefan; I Chen, Yii-Der; de Craen, Anton J. N.; Crosslin, David R.; Dale, Caroline E.; Dastani, Zari; Day, Felix R.; Deelen, Joris; Delgado, Graciela E.; Demirkan, Ayse; Finucane, Francis M.; Ford, Ian; Garcia, Melissa E.; Gieger, Christian; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hallmans, Göran; Hankinson, Susan E.; Havulinna, Aki S; Herder, Christian; Hernandez, Dena; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hunter, David J.; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Ioan-Facsinay, Andreea; Jansson, John-Olov; Jenny, Nancy S.; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Karlsson, Magnus; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraft, Peter; Kwekkeboom, Joanneke; Laatikainen, Tiina; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; LeDuc, Charles A.; Lowe, Gordon; Lu, Yingchang; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meisinger, Christa; Menni, Cristina; Morris, Andrew P.; Myers, Richard H.; Männistö, Satu; Nalls, Mike A.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peters, Annette; Pradhan, Aruna D.; Rankinen, Tuomo; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rice, Treva K.; Brent Richards, J; Ridker, Paul M.; Sattar, Naveed; Savage, David B.; Söderberg, Stefan; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; van Heemst, Diana; Uh, Hae-Won; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Walker, Mark; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Widén, Elisabeth; Wood, Andrew R.; Yao, Jie; Zeller, Tanja; Zhang, Yiying; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Kloppenburg, Margreet; Astrup, Arne; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Sarzynski, Mark A.; Rao, D. C.; Jousilahti, Pekka; Vartiainen, Erkki; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Kajantie, Eero; Osmond, Clive; Palotie, Aarno; Eriksson, Johan G.; Heliövaara, Markku; Knekt, Paul B.; Koskinen, Seppo; Jula, Antti; Perola, Markus; Huupponen, Risto K.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T.; Mellström, Dan; Lorentzon, Mattias; Casas, Juan P.; Bandinelli, Stefanie; März, Winfried; Isaacs, Aaron; van Dijk, Ko W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Harris, Tamara B.; Bouchard, Claude; Allison, Matthew A.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Ohlsson, Claes; Lind, Lars; Scott, Robert A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Bergmann, Sven; Waeber, Gérard; Vollenweider, Peter; Vestergaard, Henrik; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Hu, Frank B.; Eline Slagboom, P; Grallert, Harald; Spector, Tim D.; Jukema, J.W.; Klein, Robert J.; Schadt, Erik E; Franks, Paul W.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Leibel, Rudolph L.; Loos, Ruth J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone, the circulating levels of which correlate closely with overall adiposity. Although rare mutations in the leptin (LEP) gene are well known to cause leptin deficiency and severe obesity, no common loci regulating circulating leptin levels have been uncovered. Therefore, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of circulating leptin levels from 32,161 individuals and followed up loci reaching P<10−6 in 19,979 additional individuals. We identify five loci robustly associated (P<5 × 10−8) with leptin levels in/near LEP, SLC32A1, GCKR, CCNL1 and FTO. Although the association of the FTO obesity locus with leptin levels is abolished by adjustment for BMI, associations of the four other loci are independent of adiposity. The GCKR locus was found associated with multiple metabolic traits in previous GWAS and the CCNL1 locus with birth weight. Knockdown experiments in mouse adipose tissue explants show convincing evidence for adipogenin, a regulator of adipocyte differentiation, as the novel causal gene in the SLC32A1 locus influencing leptin levels. Our findings provide novel insights into the regulation of leptin production by adipose tissue and open new avenues for examining the influence of variation in leptin levels on adiposity and metabolic health. PMID:26833098

  3. Their loss is our gain: regressive evolution in vertebrates provides genomic models for uncovering human disease loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerling, Christopher A; Widjaja, Andrew D; Nguyen, Nancy N; Springer, Mark S

    2017-08-16

    Throughout Earth's history, evolution's numerous natural 'experiments' have resulted in a diverse range of phenotypes. Though de novo phenotypes receive widespread attention, degeneration of traits inherited from an ancestor is a very common, yet frequently neglected, evolutionary path. The latter phenomenon, known as regressive evolution, often results in vertebrates with phenotypes that mimic inherited disease states in humans. Regressive evolution of anatomical and/or physiological traits is typically accompanied by inactivating mutations underlying these traits, which frequently occur at loci identical to those implicated in human diseases. Here we discuss the potential utility of examining the genomes of vertebrates that have experienced regressive evolution to inform human medical genetics. This approach is low cost and high throughput, giving it the potential to rapidly improve knowledge of disease genetics. We discuss two well-described examples, rod monochromacy (congenital achromatopsia) and amelogenesis imperfecta, to demonstrate the utility of this approach, and then suggest methods to equip non-experts with the ability to corroborate candidate genes and uncover new disease loci. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Genome engineering uncovers 54 evolutionarily conserved and testis-enriched genes that are not required for male fertility in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Haruhiko; Castaneda, Julio M.; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Yu, Zhifeng; Archambeault, Denise R.; Isotani, Ayako; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Kriseman, Maya L.; Mashiko, Daisuke; Matsumura, Takafumi; Matzuk, Ryan M.; Mori, Masashi; Noda, Taichi; Oji, Asami; Okabe, Masaru; Prunskaite-Hyyrylainen, Renata; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Zhang, Qian; Ikawa, Masahito; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2016-01-01

    Gene-expression analysis studies from Schultz et al. estimate that more than 2,300 genes in the mouse genome are expressed predominantly in the male germ line. As of their 2003 publication [Schultz N, Hamra FK, Garbers DL (2003) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100(21):12201–12206], the functions of the majority of these testis-enriched genes during spermatogenesis and fertilization were largely unknown. Since the study by Schultz et al., functional analysis of hundreds of reproductive-tract–enriched genes have been performed, but there remain many testis-enriched genes for which their relevance to reproduction remain unexplored or unreported. Historically, a gene knockout is the “gold standard” to determine whether a gene’s function is essential in vivo. Although knockout mice without apparent phenotypes are rarely published, these knockout mouse lines and their phenotypic information need to be shared to prevent redundant experiments. Herein, we used bioinformatic and experimental approaches to uncover mouse testis-enriched genes that are evolutionarily conserved in humans. We then used gene-disruption approaches, including Knockout Mouse Project resources (targeting vectors and mice) and CRISPR/Cas9, to mutate and quickly analyze the fertility of these mutant mice. We discovered that 54 mutant mouse lines were fertile. Thus, despite evolutionary conservation of these genes in vertebrates and in some cases in all eukaryotes, our results indicate that these genes are not individually essential for male mouse fertility. Our phenotypic data are highly relevant in this fiscally tight funding period and postgenomic age when large numbers of genomes are being analyzed for disease association, and will prevent unnecessary expenditures and duplications of effort by others. PMID:27357688

  5. Genome engineering uncovers 54 evolutionarily conserved and testis-enriched genes that are not required for male fertility in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyata, Haruhiko; Castaneda, Julio M; Fujihara, Yoshitaka; Yu, Zhifeng; Archambeault, Denise R; Isotani, Ayako; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Kriseman, Maya L; Mashiko, Daisuke; Matsumura, Takafumi; Matzuk, Ryan M; Mori, Masashi; Noda, Taichi; Oji, Asami; Okabe, Masaru; Prunskaite-Hyyrylainen, Renata; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Satouh, Yuhkoh; Zhang, Qian; Ikawa, Masahito; Matzuk, Martin M

    2016-07-12

    Gene-expression analysis studies from Schultz et al. estimate that more than 2,300 genes in the mouse genome are expressed predominantly in the male germ line. As of their 2003 publication [Schultz N, Hamra FK, Garbers DL (2003) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 100(21):12201-12206], the functions of the majority of these testis-enriched genes during spermatogenesis and fertilization were largely unknown. Since the study by Schultz et al., functional analysis of hundreds of reproductive-tract-enriched genes have been performed, but there remain many testis-enriched genes for which their relevance to reproduction remain unexplored or unreported. Historically, a gene knockout is the "gold standard" to determine whether a gene's function is essential in vivo. Although knockout mice without apparent phenotypes are rarely published, these knockout mouse lines and their phenotypic information need to be shared to prevent redundant experiments. Herein, we used bioinformatic and experimental approaches to uncover mouse testis-enriched genes that are evolutionarily conserved in humans. We then used gene-disruption approaches, including Knockout Mouse Project resources (targeting vectors and mice) and CRISPR/Cas9, to mutate and quickly analyze the fertility of these mutant mice. We discovered that 54 mutant mouse lines were fertile. Thus, despite evolutionary conservation of these genes in vertebrates and in some cases in all eukaryotes, our results indicate that these genes are not individually essential for male mouse fertility. Our phenotypic data are highly relevant in this fiscally tight funding period and postgenomic age when large numbers of genomes are being analyzed for disease association, and will prevent unnecessary expenditures and duplications of effort by others.

  6. Comparative phylogenomics uncovers the impact of symbiotic associations on host genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Marc Delaux

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutualistic symbioses between eukaryotes and beneficial microorganisms of their microbiome play an essential role in nutrition, protection against disease, and development of the host. However, the impact of beneficial symbionts on the evolution of host genomes remains poorly characterized. Here we used the independent loss of the most widespread plant-microbe symbiosis, arbuscular mycorrhization (AM, as a model to address this question. Using a large phenotypic approach and phylogenetic analyses, we present evidence that loss of AM symbiosis correlates with the loss of many symbiotic genes in the Arabidopsis lineage (Brassicales. Then, by analyzing the genome and/or transcriptomes of nine other phylogenetically divergent non-host plants, we show that this correlation occurred in a convergent manner in four additional plant lineages, demonstrating the existence of an evolutionary pattern specific to symbiotic genes. Finally, we use a global comparative phylogenomic approach to track this evolutionary pattern among land plants. Based on this approach, we identify a set of 174 highly conserved genes and demonstrate enrichment in symbiosis-related genes. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that beneficial symbionts maintain purifying selection on host gene networks during the evolution of entire lineages.

  7. Comparative phylogenomics uncovers the impact of symbiotic associations on host genome evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre-Marc Delaux

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mutualistic symbioses between eukaryotes and beneficial microorganisms of their microbiome play an essential role in nutrition, protection against disease, and development of the host. However, the impact of beneficial symbionts on the evolution of host genomes remains poorly characterized. Here we used the independent loss of the most widespread plant-microbe symbiosis, arbuscular mycorrhization (AM, as a model to address this question. Using a large phenotypic approach and phylogenetic analyses, we present evidence that loss of AM symbiosis correlates with the loss of many symbiotic genes in the Arabidopsis lineage (Brassicales. Then, by analyzing the genome and/or transcriptomes of nine other phylogenetically divergent non-host plants, we show that this correlation occurred in a convergent manner in four additional plant lineages, demonstrating the existence of an evolutionary pattern specific to symbiotic genes. Finally, we use a global comparative phylogenomic approach to track this evolutionary pattern among land plants. Based on this approach, we identify a set of 174 highly conserved genes and demonstrate enrichment in symbiosis-related genes. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis that beneficial symbionts maintain purifying selection on host gene networks during the evolution of entire lineages.

  8. Genomic proifling oflower-grade gliomas uncovers cohesive disease groups:implications fordiagnosis andtreatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ChangMingZhang; DanielJBrat

    2016-01-01

    Lower‑grade gliomas (including low‑ and intermediate‑grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) are diffusely inifltrative neoplasms that arise most often in the cerebral hemispheres of adults and have traditionally been classiifed based on their presumed histogenesis as astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, or oligoastrocytomas. Although the histopathologic classiifcation of lower‑grade glioma has been the accepted standard for nearly a century, it suffers from high intra‑ and inter‑observer variability and does not adequately predict clinical outcomes. Based on integrated analysis of multiplatform genomic data from The Cancer Genome Atlas, lower‑grade gliomas have been found to segregate into three cohesive, clinically relevant molecular classes. Molecular classes were closely aligned with the status of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations, tumor protein 53 mutations and the co‑deletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q, but were not closely aligned with histologic classes. These ifndings emphasize the potential for improved deifnition of clinically relevant disease subsets using integrated molecular approaches and highlight the importance of biomarkers for brain tumor classiifcation.

  9. Genome-wide meta-analysis uncovers novel loci influencing circulating leptin levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Carli, Jayne F Martin; Skowronski, Alicja A

    2016-01-01

    Leptin is an adipocyte-secreted hormone, the circulating levels of which correlate closely with overall adiposity. Although rare mutations in the leptin (LEP) gene are well known to cause leptin deficiency and severe obesity, no common loci regulating circulating leptin levels have been uncovered...

  10. Fish genomes : a powerful tool to uncover new functional elements in vertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stupka, Elia

    2011-01-01

    This thesis spans several years of work dedicated to understanding fish genomes. In the first chapter it describes the genome of the first fish for which the entire genome was sequenced through a large-scale international project, Fugu rubripes. the pufferfish. In particular, it highlights how this

  11. Analysis of the Legionella longbeachae genome and transcriptome uncovers unique strategies to cause Legionnaires' disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christel Cazalet

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila and L. longbeachae are two species of a large genus of bacteria that are ubiquitous in nature. L. pneumophila is mainly found in natural and artificial water circuits while L. longbeachae is mainly present in soil. Under the appropriate conditions both species are human pathogens, capable of causing a severe form of pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Here we report the sequencing and analysis of four L. longbeachae genomes, one complete genome sequence of L. longbeachae strain NSW150 serogroup (Sg 1, and three draft genome sequences another belonging to Sg1 and two to Sg2. The genome organization and gene content of the four L. longbeachae genomes are highly conserved, indicating strong pressure for niche adaptation. Analysis and comparison of L. longbeachae strain NSW150 with L. pneumophila revealed common but also unexpected features specific to this pathogen. The interaction with host cells shows distinct features from L. pneumophila, as L. longbeachae possesses a unique repertoire of putative Dot/Icm type IV secretion system substrates, eukaryotic-like and eukaryotic domain proteins, and encodes additional secretion systems. However, analysis of the ability of a dotA mutant of L. longbeachae NSW150 to replicate in the Acanthamoeba castellanii and in a mouse lung infection model showed that the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system is also essential for the virulence of L. longbeachae. In contrast to L. pneumophila, L. longbeachae does not encode flagella, thereby providing a possible explanation for differences in mouse susceptibility to infection between the two pathogens. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis revealed that L. longbeachae has a less pronounced biphasic life cycle as compared to L. pneumophila, and genome analysis and electron microscopy suggested that L. longbeachae is encapsulated. These species-specific differences may account for the different environmental niches and disease epidemiology of these

  12. Read clouds uncover variation in complex regions of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Alex; Liu, Yuling; Weng, Ziming; Kashef-Haghighi, Dorna; Newburger, Daniel E; West, Robert; Sidow, Arend; Batzoglou, Serafim

    2015-10-01

    Although an increasing amount of human genetic variation is being identified and recorded, determining variants within repeated sequences of the human genome remains a challenge. Most population and genome-wide association studies have therefore been unable to consider variation in these regions. Core to the problem is the lack of a sequencing technology that produces reads with sufficient length and accuracy to enable unique mapping. Here, we present a novel methodology of using read clouds, obtained by accurate short-read sequencing of DNA derived from long fragment libraries, to confidently align short reads within repeat regions and enable accurate variant discovery. Our novel algorithm, Random Field Aligner (RFA), captures the relationships among the short reads governed by the long read process via a Markov Random Field. We utilized a modified version of the Illumina TruSeq synthetic long-read protocol, which yielded shallow-sequenced read clouds. We test RFA through extensive simulations and apply it to discover variants on the NA12878 human sample, for which shallow TruSeq read cloud sequencing data are available, and on an invasive breast carcinoma genome that we sequenced using the same method. We demonstrate that RFA facilitates accurate recovery of variation in 155 Mb of the human genome, including 94% of 67 Mb of segmental duplication sequence and 96% of 11 Mb of transcribed sequence, that are currently hidden from short-read technologies.

  13. Next-generation sequencing of human mitochondrial reference genomes uncovers high heteroplasmy frequency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ximena Sosa

    Full Text Available We describe methods for rapid sequencing of the entire human mitochondrial genome (mtgenome, which involve long-range PCR for specific amplification of the mtgenome, pyrosequencing, quantitative mapping of sequence reads to identify sequence variants and heteroplasmy, as well as de novo sequence assembly. These methods have been used to study 40 publicly available HapMap samples of European (CEU and African (YRI ancestry to demonstrate a sequencing error rate <5.63×10(-4, nucleotide diversity of 1.6×10(-3 for CEU and 3.7×10(-3 for YRI, patterns of sequence variation consistent with earlier studies, but a higher rate of heteroplasmy varying between 10% and 50%. These results demonstrate that next-generation sequencing technologies allow interrogation of the mitochondrial genome in greater depth than previously possible which may be of value in biology and medicine.

  14. Chromosome conformation capture uncovers potential genome-wide interactions between human conserved non-coding sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Robyr

    Full Text Available Comparative analyses of various mammalian genomes have identified numerous conserved non-coding (CNC DNA elements that display striking conservation among species, suggesting that they have maintained specific functions throughout evolution. CNC function remains poorly understood, although recent studies have identified a role in gene regulation. We hypothesized that the identification of genomic loci that interact physically with CNCs would provide information on their functions. We have used circular chromosome conformation capture (4C to characterize interactions of 10 CNCs from human chromosome 21 in K562 cells. The data provide evidence that CNCs are capable of interacting with loci that are enriched for CNCs. The number of trans interactions varies among CNCs; some show interactions with many loci, while others interact with few. Some of the tested CNCs are capable of driving the expression of a reporter gene in the mouse embryo, and associate with the oligodendrocyte genes OLIG1 and OLIG2. Our results underscore the power of chromosome conformation capture for the identification of targets of functional DNA elements and raise the possibility that CNCs exert their functions by physical association with defined genomic regions enriched in CNCs. These CNC-CNC interactions may in part explain their stringent conservation as a group of regulatory sequences.

  15. An Integrated Metabolomic and Genomic Mining Workflow to Uncover the Biosynthetic Potential of Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Maria; Vynne, Nikolaj Grønnegaard; Klitgaard, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    considerable diversity: only 2% of the chemical features and 7% of the biosynthetic genes were common to all strains, while 30% of all features and 24% of the genes were unique to single strains. The list of chemical features was reduced to 50 discriminating features using a genetic algorithm and support...... vector machines. Features were dereplicated by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) networking to identify molecular families of the same biosynthetic origin, and the associated pathways were probed using comparative genomics. Most of the discriminating features were related to antibacterial compounds...

  16. Whole-Genome Sequencing Uncovers the Genetic Basis of Chronic Mountain Sickness in Andean Highlanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dan; Udpa, Nitin; Ronen, Roy; Stobdan, Tsering; Liang, Junbin; Appenzeller, Otto; Zhao, Huiwen W.; Yin, Yi; Du, Yuanping; Guo, Lixia; Cao, Rui; Wang, Yu; Jin, Xin; Huang, Chen; Jia, Wenlong; Cao, Dandan; Guo, Guangwu; Gamboa, Jorge L.; Villafuerte, Francisco; Callacondo, David; Xue, Jin; Liu, Siqi; Frazer, Kelly A.; Li, Yingrui; Bafna, Vineet; Haddad, Gabriel G.

    2013-01-01

    The hypoxic conditions at high altitudes present a challenge for survival, causing pressure for adaptation. Interestingly, many high-altitude denizens (particularly in the Andes) are maladapted, with a condition known as chronic mountain sickness (CMS) or Monge disease. To decode the genetic basis of this disease, we sequenced and compared the whole genomes of 20 Andean subjects (10 with CMS and 10 without). We discovered 11 regions genome-wide with significant differences in haplotype frequencies consistent with selective sweeps. In these regions, two genes (an erythropoiesis regulator, SENP1, and an oncogene, ANP32D) had a higher transcriptional response to hypoxia in individuals with CMS relative to those without. We further found that downregulating the orthologs of these genes in flies dramatically enhanced survival rates under hypoxia, demonstrating that suppression of SENP1 and ANP32D plays an essential role in hypoxia tolerance. Our study provides an unbiased framework to identify and validate the genetic basis of adaptation to high altitudes and identifies potentially targetable mechanisms for CMS treatment. PMID:23954164

  17. Genome-wide copy number analysis uncovers a new HSCR gene: NRG3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Sze-Man Tang

    Full Text Available Hirschsprung disease (HSCR is a congenital disorder characterized by aganglionosis of the distal intestine. To assess the contribution of copy number variants (CNVs to HSCR, we analysed the data generated from our previous genome-wide association study on HSCR patients, whereby we identified NRG1 as a new HSCR susceptibility locus. Analysis of 129 Chinese patients and 331 ethnically matched controls showed that HSCR patients have a greater burden of rare CNVs (p = 1.50 × 10(-5, particularly for those encompassing genes (p = 5.00 × 10(-6. Our study identified 246 rare-genic CNVs exclusive to patients. Among those, we detected a NRG3 deletion (p = 1.64 × 10(-3. Subsequent follow-up (96 additional patients and 220 controls on NRG3 revealed 9 deletions (combined p = 3.36 × 10(-5 and 2 de novo duplications among patients and two deletions among controls. Importantly, NRG3 is a paralog of NRG1. Stratification of patients by presence/absence of HSCR-associated syndromes showed that while syndromic-HSCR patients carried significantly longer CNVs than the non-syndromic or controls (p = 1.50 × 10(-5, non-syndromic patients were enriched in CNV number when compared to controls (p = 4.00 × 10(-6 or the syndromic counterpart. Our results suggest a role for NRG3 in HSCR etiology and provide insights into the relative contribution of structural variants in both syndromic and non-syndromic HSCR. This would be the first genome-wide catalog of copy number variants identified in HSCR.

  18. Genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms uncovers population structure in Northern Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Salmela

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genome-wide data provide a powerful tool for inferring patterns of genetic variation and structure of human populations. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we analysed almost 250,000 SNPs from a total of 945 samples from Eastern and Western Finland, Sweden, Northern Germany and Great Britain complemented with HapMap data. Small but statistically significant differences were observed between the European populations (F(ST = 0.0040, p<10(-4, also between Eastern and Western Finland (F(ST = 0.0032, p<10(-3. The latter indicated the existence of a relatively strong autosomal substructure within the country, similar to that observed earlier with smaller numbers of markers. The Germans and British were less differentiated than the Swedes, Western Finns and especially the Eastern Finns who also showed other signs of genetic drift. This is likely caused by the later founding of the northern populations, together with subsequent founder and bottleneck effects, and a smaller population size. Furthermore, our data suggest a small eastern contribution among the Finns, consistent with the historical and linguistic background of the population. SIGNIFICANCE: Our results warn against a priori assumptions of homogeneity among Finns and other seemingly isolated populations. Thus, in association studies in such populations, additional caution for population structure may be necessary. Our results illustrate that population history is often important for patterns of genetic variation, and that the analysis of hundreds of thousands of SNPs provides high resolution also for population genetics.

  19. Canine tumor cross-species genomics uncovers targets linked to osteosarcoma progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triche Timothy

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary metastasis continues to be the most common cause of death in osteosarcoma. Indeed, the 5-year survival for newly diagnosed osteosarcoma patients has not significantly changed in over 20 years. Further understanding of the mechanisms of metastasis and resistance for this aggressive pediatric cancer is necessary. Pet dogs naturally develop osteosarcoma providing a novel opportunity to model metastasis development and progression. Given the accelerated biology of canine osteosarcoma, we hypothesized that a direct comparison of canine and pediatric osteosarcoma expression profiles may help identify novel metastasis-associated tumor targets that have been missed through the study of the human cancer alone. Results Using parallel oligonucleotide array platforms, shared orthologues between species were identified and normalized. The osteosarcoma expression signatures could not distinguish the canine and human diseases by hierarchical clustering. Cross-species target mining identified two genes, interleukin-8 (IL-8 and solute carrier family 1 (glial high affinity glutamate transporter, member 3 (SLC1A3, which were uniformly expressed in dog but not in all pediatric osteosarcoma patient samples. Expression of these genes in an independent population of pediatric osteosarcoma patients was associated with poor outcome (p = 0.020 and p = 0.026, respectively. Validation of IL-8 and SLC1A3 protein expression in pediatric osteosarcoma tissues further supported the potential value of these novel targets. Ongoing evaluation will validate the biological significance of these targets and their associated pathways. Conclusions Collectively, these data support the strong similarities between human and canine osteosarcoma and underline the opportunities provided by a comparative oncology approach as a means to improve our understanding of cancer biology and therapies.

  20. A genome-wide immunodetection screen in S. cerevisiae uncovers novel genes involved in lysosomal vacuole function and morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florante Ricarte

    Full Text Available Vacuoles of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are functionally analogous to mammalian lysosomes. Both are cellular organelles responsible for macromolecular degradation, ion/pH homeostasis, and stress survival. We hypothesized that undefined gene functions remain at post-endosomal stage of vacuolar events and performed a genome-wide screen directed at such functions at the late endosome and vacuole interface - ENV genes. The immunodetection screen was designed to identify mutants that internally accumulate precursor form of the vacuolar hydrolase carboxypeptidase Y (CPY. Here, we report the uncovering and initial characterizations of twelve ENV genes. The small size of the collection and the lack of genes previously identified with vacuolar events are suggestive of the intended exclusive functional interface of the screen. Most notably, the collection includes four novel genes ENV7, ENV9, ENV10, and ENV11, and three genes previously linked to mitochondrial processes - MAM3, PCP1, PPE1. In all env mutants, vesicular trafficking stages were undisturbed in live cells as assessed by invertase and active α-factor secretion, as well as by localization of the endocytic fluorescent marker FM4-64 to the vacuole. Several mutants exhibit defects in stress survival functions associated with vacuoles. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed the collection to be significantly enriched in vacuolar morphologies suggestive of fusion and fission defects. These include the unique phenotype of lumenal vesicles within vacuoles in the novel env9Δ mutant and severely fragmented vacuoles upon deletion of GET4, a gene recently implicated in tail anchored membrane protein insertion. Thus, our results establish new gene functions in vacuolar function and morphology, and suggest a link between vacuolar and mitochondrial events.

  1. Meeting review. Uncovering the genetic basis of adaptive change: on the intersection of landscape genomics and theoretical population genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joost, Stéphane; Vuilleumier, Séverine; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Schoville, Sean; Leempoel, Kevin; Stucki, Sylvie; Widmer, Ivo; Melodelima, Christelle; Rolland, Jonathan; Manel, Stéphanie

    2013-07-01

    A workshop recently held at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL, Switzerland) was dedicated to understanding the genetic basis of adaptive change, taking stock of the different approaches developed in theoretical population genetics and landscape genomics and bringing together knowledge accumulated in both research fields. Indeed, an important challenge in theoretical population genetics is to incorporate effects of demographic history and population structure. But important design problems (e.g. focus on populations as units, focus on hard selective sweeps, no hypothesis-based framework in the design of the statistical tests) reduce their capability of detecting adaptive genetic variation. In parallel, landscape genomics offers a solution to several of these problems and provides a number of advantages (e.g. fast computation, landscape heterogeneity integration). But the approach makes several implicit assumptions that should be carefully considered (e.g. selection has had enough time to create a functional relationship between the allele distribution and the environmental variable, or this functional relationship is assumed to be constant). To address the respective strengths and weaknesses mentioned above, the workshop brought together a panel of experts from both disciplines to present their work and discuss the relevance of combining these approaches, possibly resulting in a joint software solution in the future.

  2. [Genomic approach to pathophysiology of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Ryo

    2012-11-01

    Genetic studies identified multiple genes and polymorphisms that increase risk to develop rheumatoid arthritis. Genomic approach is characterized with its integrative style using mathematical and statistical models. Its main targets include (1)combinatorial effect of multiple genetic and environmental factors, (2)heterogeneity of pathological states and its individuality, and (3)their chronological heterogeneity. Genomic approach will clarify pathophysiology of various diseases along with the progresses in molecular biology and other researches on individual molecules.

  3. Comparative analysis of the Photorhabdus luminescens and the Yersinia enterocolitica genomes: uncovering candidate genes involved in insect pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchs Thilo M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Photorhabdus luminescens and Yersinia enterocolitica are both enteric bacteria which are associated with insects. P. luminescens lives in symbiosis with soil nematodes and is highly pathogenic towards insects but not to humans. In contrast, Y. enterocolitica is widely found in the environment and mainly known to cause gastroenteritis in men, but has only recently been shown to be also toxic for insects. It is expected that both pathogens share an overlap of genetic determinants that play a role within the insect host. Results A selective genome comparison was applied. Proteins belonging to the class of two-component regulatory systems, quorum sensing, universal stress proteins, and c-di-GMP signalling have been analysed. The interorganismic synopsis of selected regulatory systems uncovered common and distinct signalling mechanisms of both pathogens used for perception of signals within the insect host. Particularly, a new class of LuxR-like regulators was identified, which might be involved in detecting insect-specific molecules. In addition, the genetic overlap unravelled a two-component system that is unique for the genera Photorhabdus and Yersinia and is therefore suggested to play a major role in the pathogen-insect relationship. Our analysis also highlights factors of both pathogens that are expressed at low temperatures as encountered in insects in contrast to higher (body temperature, providing evidence that temperature is a yet under-investigated environmental signal for bacterial adaptation to various hosts. Common degradative metabolic pathways are described that might be used to explore nutrients within the insect gut or hemolymph, thus enabling the proliferation of P. luminescens and Y. enterocolitica in their invertebrate hosts. A strikingly higher number of genes encoding insecticidal toxins and other virulence factors in P. luminescens compared to Y. enterocolitica correlates with the higher virulence of P

  4. Systems-level approach to uncovering diffusive states and their transitions from single particle trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Koo, Peter K

    2016-01-01

    The stochastic motions of a diffusing particle contain information concerning the particle's interactions with binding partners and with its local environment. However, accurate determination of the underlying diffusive properties, beyond normal diffusion, has remained challenging when analyzing particle trajectories on an individual basis. Here, we introduce the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) for confined diffusion and fractional Brownian motion. We demonstrate that this MLE yields improved estimation over traditional mean square displacement analyses. We also introduce a model selection scheme (that we call mleBIC) that classifies individual trajectories to a given diffusion mode. We demonstrate the statistical limitations of classification via mleBIC using simulated data. To overcome these limitations, we introduce a new version of perturbation expectation-maximization (pEMv2), which simultaneously analyzes a collection of particle trajectories to uncover the system of interactions which give rise to u...

  5. Complete mitochondrial genome sequences of Korean native horse from Jeju Island: uncovering the spatio-temporal dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Sook Hee; Kim, Jaemin; Shin, Donghyun; Cho, Seoae; Kwak, Woori; Lee, Hak-Kyo; Park, Kyoung-Do; Kim, Heebal

    2017-04-01

    The Korean native horse (Jeju horse) is one of the most important animals in Korean historical, cultural, and economical viewpoints. In the early 1980s, the Jeju horse was close to extinction. The aim of this study is to explore the phylogenomics of Korean native horse focusing on spatio-temporal dynamics. We determined complete mitochondrial genome sequences for the first Korean native (n = 6) and additional Mongolian (n = 2) horses. Those sequences were analyzed together with 143 published ones using Bayesian coalescent approach as well as three different phylogenetic analysis methods, Bayesian inference, maximum likelihood, and neighbor-joining methods. The phylogenomic trees revealed that the Korean native horses had multiple origins and clustered together with some horses from four European and one Middle Eastern breeds. Our phylogenomic analyses also supported that there was no apparent association between breed or geographic location and the evolution of global horses. Time of the most recent common ancestor of the Korean native horse was approximately 13,200-63,200 years, which was much younger than 0.696 My of modern horses. Additionally, our results showed that all global horse lineages including Korean native horse existed prior to their domestication events occurred in about 6000-10,000 years ago. This is the first study on phylogenomics of the Korean native horse focusing on spatio-temporal dynamics. Our findings increase our understanding of the domestication history of the Korean native horses, and could provide useful information for horse conservation projects as well as for horse genomics, emergence, and the geographical distribution.

  6. Genomic approaches in aquaculture and fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancela, M. Leonor; Bargelloni, Luca; Boudry, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Despite the enormous input into the worldwide development of fish and shellfish farming in the recent decades, in part as an attempt to minimize the impact of fishing on already overexploited natural populations, the application of genomics to aquaculture and fisheries remains poorly developed....... Improving state-of-the-art genomics research in various aquaculture systems, as well as its industrial applications, remains one of the major challenges in this area and should be the focus of well developed strategies to be implemented in the next generation of projects. This chapter will first provide...... an overview of the genomic tools and resources available, then discuss the application of genomic approaches to the improvement of fish and shellfish farming (e.g. breeding, reproduction, growth, nutrition and product quality), including the evaluation of stock diversity and the use of selection procedures...

  7. (Post-)genomics approaches in fungal research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Pontes, María Victoria; de Vries, Ronald P; Zhou, Miaomiao

    2014-11-01

    To date, hundreds of fungal genomes have been sequenced and many more are in progress. This wealth of genomic information has provided new directions to study fungal biodiversity. However, to further dissect and understand the complicated biological mechanisms involved in fungal life styles, functional studies beyond genomes are required. Thanks to the developments of current -omics techniques, it is possible to produce large amounts of fungal functional data in a high-throughput fashion (e.g. transcriptome, proteome, etc.). The increasing ease of creating -omics data has also created a major challenge for downstream data handling and analysis. Numerous databases, tools and software have been created to meet this challenge. Facing such a richness of techniques and information, hereby we provide a brief roadmap on current wet-lab and bioinformatics approaches to study functional genomics in fungi.

  8. genomic and transcriptomic approaches towards the genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    to the complex nature of these stresses, and the genotype x environment interaction (GxE). .... collection (Azam-Ali et al., 2001); (vi) biological .... Integrative platform to study gene function and gene evolution in legumes ..... a powerful dissection of the genetic control of ... complemented by a new approach called genomic.

  9. Genomic approaches to research in pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuder Rubin M

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genomics, or the study of genes and their function, is a burgeoning field with many new technologies. In the present review, we explore the application of genomic approaches to the study of pulmonary hypertension (PH. Candidate genes, important to the pathobiology of the disease, have been investigated. Rodent models enable the manipulation of selected genes, either by transgenesis or targeted disruption. Mutational analysis of genes in the transforming growth factor-β family have proven pivotal in both familial and sporadic forms of primary PH. Finally, microarray gene expression analysis is a robust molecular tool to aid in delineating the pathobiology of this disease.

  10. Comparative and Transcriptome Analyses Uncover Key Aspects of Coding- and Long Noncoding RNAs in Flatworm Mitochondrial Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Ross

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Exploiting the conservation of various features of mitochondrial genomes has been instrumental in resolving phylogenetic relationships. Despite extensive sequence evidence, it has not previously been possible to conclusively resolve some key aspects of flatworm mitochondrial genomes, including generally conserved traits, such as start codons, noncoding regions, the full complement of tRNAs, and whether ATP8 is, or is not, encoded by this extranuclear genome. In an effort to address these difficulties, we sought to determine the mitochondrial transcriptomes and genomes of sexual and asexual taxa of freshwater triclads, a group previously poorly represented in flatworm mitogenomic studies. We have discovered evidence for an alternative start codon, an extended cox1 gene, a previously undescribed conserved open reading frame, long noncoding RNAs, and a highly conserved gene order across the large evolutionary distances represented within the triclads. Our findings contribute to the expansion and refinement of mitogenomics to address evolutionary issues in this diverse group of animals.

  11. Buffering mechanisms in aging: a systems approach toward uncovering the genetic component of aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviv Bergman

    2007-08-01

    . Finally, using literature-based interaction discovery methods, we use the set of longevity genes, buffering genes, and their age-related target disease genes to construct the underlying subnetwork of interacting genes that is expected to be responsible for longevity. Genome wide, high-throughput hypothesis-free analyses are currently being utilized to elucidate unknown genetic pathways in many model organisms, linking observed phenotypes to their underlying genetic mechanisms. The longevity phenotype and its genetic mechanisms, such as our buffering hypothesis, are similar; thus, the experimental corroboration of our hypothesis provides a proof of concept for the utility of high-throughput methods for elucidating such mechanisms. It also provides a framework for developing strategies to prevent some age-related diseases by intervention at the appropriate level.

  12. A reduced-dimensionality approach to uncovering dyadic modes of body motion in conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Lior; Liron, Yuvalal; Alon, Uri

    2017-01-01

    Face-to-face conversations are central to human communication and a fascinating example of joint action. Beyond verbal content, one of the primary ways in which information is conveyed in conversations is body language. Body motion in natural conversations has been difficult to study precisely due to the large number of coordinates at play. There is need for fresh approaches to analyze and understand the data, in order to ask whether dyads show basic building blocks of coupled motion. Here we present a method for analyzing body motion during joint action using depth-sensing cameras, and use it to analyze a sample of scientific conversations. Our method consists of three steps: defining modes of body motion of individual participants, defining dyadic modes made of combinations of these individual modes, and lastly defining motion motifs as dyadic modes that occur significantly more often than expected given the single-person motion statistics. As a proof-of-concept, we analyze the motion of 12 dyads of scientists measured using two Microsoft Kinect cameras. In our sample, we find that out of many possible modes, only two were motion motifs: synchronized parallel torso motion in which the participants swayed from side to side in sync, and still segments where neither person moved. We find evidence of dyad individuality in the use of motion modes. For a randomly selected subset of 5 dyads, this individuality was maintained for at least 6 months. The present approach to simplify complex motion data and to define motion motifs may be used to understand other joint tasks and interactions. The analysis tools developed here and the motion dataset are publicly available. PMID:28141861

  13. Uncovering the Layers of Design Processes of a Global Undergraduate Engineering Course: An Interactional Ethnographic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jenna (Ji Eun)

    This dissertation presents an ethnographic study of an instructor's design logic and thinking underlying a global, multi-country undergraduate engineering design course. The study analyzed how, in what ways, and for what purposes, he continually defined and reformulated what counted as (Heap, 1991) "new" learning opportunities and outcomes for engineering design thinking in the 21st century, through his interactions with globally distributed groups of students and teaching teams (i.e., US, India, Israel, China and South Korea). By examining what was discursively made present to students in moment-by-moment and over-time, I identified the processes and practices that members of the class needed to know, understand, produce and engage in (Heath & Street, 2008) to develop their capacities to work in intercultural contexts on local design problems. Discourse analysis guided by an Interactional Ethnographic logic-in-use (Birdwhistell, 1977), grounded in a social construction of knowledge perspective (i.e., Green, Skukauskaite, and Baker, 2012; Castanheira, Crawford, Dixon and Green, 2001), framed the ways in which I examined the work of participants, what they oriented to and were held accountable for, and how what counted as this "new" instructional approach was socially constructed (Heap, 1991; Bloome & Egan-Robertson, 1993, Castanheira et al, 2001). This inquiry process required consideration of multimodal texts available to students in different technology-enabled educational contexts, public (re)presentations of this developing program as well as the construction of transcripts. From this perspective, texts were spoken, written and/or published works (Bakhtin, 1986) constructed by key actors (the designer, the support team, a teaching assistant and students). The analyses made visible how the instructor's discourse focused students on taking a problem-oriented approach to resolving challenges in working interculturally on a common task (e.g., the design thinking

  14. Uncovering the genome-wide transcriptional responses of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger to lignocellulose using RNA sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Delmas

    Full Text Available A key challenge in the production of second generation biofuels is the conversion of lignocellulosic substrates into fermentable sugars. Enzymes, particularly those from fungi, are a central part of this process, and many have been isolated and characterised. However, relatively little is known of how fungi respond to lignocellulose and produce the enzymes necessary for dis-assembly of plant biomass. We studied the physiological response of the fungus Aspergillus niger when exposed to wheat straw as a model lignocellulosic substrate. Using RNA sequencing we showed that, 24 hours after exposure to straw, gene expression of known and presumptive plant cell wall-degrading enzymes represents a huge investment for the cells (about 20% of the total mRNA. Our results also uncovered new esterases and surface interacting proteins that might form part of the fungal arsenal of enzymes for the degradation of plant biomass. Using transcription factor deletion mutants (xlnR and creA to study the response to both lignocellulosic substrates and low carbon source concentrations, we showed that a subset of genes coding for degradative enzymes is induced by starvation. Our data support a model whereby this subset of enzymes plays a scouting role under starvation conditions, testing for available complex polysaccharides and liberating inducing sugars, that triggers the subsequent induction of the majority of hydrolases. We also showed that antisense transcripts are abundant and that their expression can be regulated by growth conditions.

  15. Comparative Chloroplast Genome Analyses of Streptophyte Green Algae Uncover Major Structural Alterations in the Klebsormidiophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Claude; Otis, Christian; Turmel, Monique

    2016-01-01

    The Streptophyta comprises all land plants and six main lineages of freshwater green algae: Mesostigmatophyceae, Chlorokybophyceae, Klebsormidiophyceae, Charophyceae, Coleochaetophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. Previous comparisons of the chloroplast genome from nine streptophyte algae (including four zygnematophyceans) revealed that, although land plant chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs) inherited most of their highly conserved structural features from green algal ancestors, considerable cpDNA changes took place during the evolution of the Zygnematophyceae, the sister group of land plants. To gain deeper insights into the evolutionary dynamics of the chloroplast genome in streptophyte algae, we sequenced the cpDNAs of nine additional taxa: two klebsormidiophyceans (Entransia fimbriata and Klebsormidium sp. SAG 51.86), one coleocheatophycean (Coleochaete scutata) and six zygnematophyceans (Cylindrocystis brebissonii, Netrium digitus, Roya obtusa, Spirogyra maxima, Cosmarium botrytis and Closterium baillyanum). Our comparative analyses of these genomes with their streptophyte algal counterparts indicate that the large inverted repeat (IR) encoding the rDNA operon experienced loss or expansion/contraction in all three sampled classes and that genes were extensively shuffled in both the Klebsormidiophyceae and Zygnematophyceae. The klebsormidiophycean genomes boast greatly expanded IRs, with the Entransia 60,590-bp IR being the largest known among green algae. The 206,025-bp Entransia cpDNA, which is one of the largest genome among streptophytes, encodes 118 standard genes, i.e., four additional genes compared to its Klebsormidium flaccidum homolog. We inferred that seven of the 21 group II introns usually found in land plants were already present in the common ancestor of the Klebsormidiophyceae and its sister lineages. At 107,236 bp and with 117 standard genes, the Coleochaete IR-less genome is both the smallest and most compact among the streptophyte algal cpDNAs analyzed thus

  16. Meta-analysis of cancer transcriptomes: A new approach to uncover molecular pathological events in different cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundus Iqbal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available To explore secrets of metastatic cancers, individual expression of true sets of respective genes must spread across the tissue. In this study, meta-analysis for transcriptional profiles of oncogenes was carried out to hunt critical genes or networks helping in metastasizing cancers. For this, transcriptomic analysis of different cancerous tissues causing leukemia, lung, liver, spleen, colorectal, colon, breast, bladder, and kidney cancers was performed by extracting microarray expression data from online resource; Gene Expression Omnibus. A newly developed bioinformatics technique; Dynamic Impact Approach (DIA was applied for enrichment analysis of transcriptional profiles using Database for Annotation Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID. Furthermore, oPOSSUM (v. 2.0 and Cytoscape (v. 2.8.2 were used for in-depth analysis of transcription factors and regulatory gene networks respectively. DAVID analysis uncovered the most significantly enriched pathways in molecular functions that were 'Ubiquitin thiolesterase activity' up regulated in blood, breast, bladder, colorectal, lung, spleen, prostrate cancer. 'Transforming growth factor beta receptor activity' was inhibited in all cancers except leukemia, colon and liver cancer. oPOSSUM further revealed highly over-represented Transcription Factors (TFs; Broad-complex_3, Broad-complex_4, and Foxd3 except for leukemia and bladder cancer. From these findings, it is possible to target genes and networks, play a crucial role in the development of cancer. In the future, these transcription factors can serve as potential candidates for the therapeutic drug targets which can impede the deadly spread.

  17. Integrating landscape genomics and spatially explicit approaches to detect loci under selection in clinal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Matthew R; Forester, Brenna R; Teufel, Ashley I; Adams, Rachael V; Anstett, Daniel N; Goodrich, Betsy A; Landguth, Erin L; Joost, Stéphane; Manel, Stéphanie

    2013-12-01

    Uncovering the genetic basis of adaptation hinges on the ability to detect loci under selection. However, population genomics outlier approaches to detect selected loci may be inappropriate for clinal populations or those with unclear population structure because they require that individuals be clustered into populations. An alternate approach, landscape genomics, uses individual-based approaches to detect loci under selection and reveal potential environmental drivers of selection. We tested four landscape genomics methods on a simulated clinal population to determine their effectiveness at identifying a locus under varying selection strengths along an environmental gradient. We found all methods produced very low type I error rates across all selection strengths, but elevated type II error rates under "weak" selection. We then applied these methods to an AFLP genome scan of an alpine plant, Campanula barbata, and identified five highly supported candidate loci associated with precipitation variables. These loci also showed spatial autocorrelation and cline patterns indicative of selection along a precipitation gradient. Our results suggest that landscape genomics in combination with other spatial analyses provides a powerful approach for identifying loci potentially under selection and explaining spatially complex interactions between species and their environment.

  18. Low frequency variants, collapsed based on biological knowledge, uncover complexity of population stratification in 1000 genomes project data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie B Moore

    Full Text Available Analyses investigating low frequency variants have the potential for explaining additional genetic heritability of many complex human traits. However, the natural frequencies of rare variation between human populations strongly confound genetic analyses. We have applied a novel collapsing method to identify biological features with low frequency variant burden differences in thirteen populations sequenced by the 1000 Genomes Project. Our flexible collapsing tool utilizes expert biological knowledge from multiple publicly available database sources to direct feature selection. Variants were collapsed according to genetically driven features, such as evolutionary conserved regions, regulatory regions genes, and pathways. We have conducted an extensive comparison of low frequency variant burden differences (MAF<0.03 between populations from 1000 Genomes Project Phase I data. We found that on average 26.87% of gene bins, 35.47% of intergenic bins, 42.85% of pathway bins, 14.86% of ORegAnno regulatory bins, and 5.97% of evolutionary conserved regions show statistically significant differences in low frequency variant burden across populations from the 1000 Genomes Project. The proportion of bins with significant differences in low frequency burden depends on the ancestral similarity of the two populations compared and types of features tested. Even closely related populations had notable differences in low frequency burden, but fewer differences than populations from different continents. Furthermore, conserved or functionally relevant regions had fewer significant differences in low frequency burden than regions under less evolutionary constraint. This degree of low frequency variant differentiation across diverse populations and feature elements highlights the critical importance of considering population stratification in the new era of DNA sequencing and low frequency variant genomic analyses.

  19. Genome-wide approaches to understanding human ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaeberlein Matt

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of genomic technologies in biogerontology has the potential to greatly enhance our understanding of human ageing. High-throughput screens for alleles correlated with survival in long-lived people have uncovered novel genes involved in age-associated disease. Genome-wide longevity studies in simple eukaryotes are identifying evolutionarily conserved pathways that determine longevity. It is hoped that validation of these 'public' aspects of ageing in mice, along with analyses of variation in candidate human ageing genes, will provide targets for future interventions to slow the ageing process and retard the onset of age-associated pathologies.

  20. Whole genomic sequencing of RT98 mitochondria derived from Oryza rufipogon and northern blot analysis to uncover a cytoplasmic male sterility-associated gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Keisuke; Kazama, Tomohiko; Motomura, Keiji; Toriyama, Kinya

    2013-02-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a maternally inherited trait resulting in the failure to produce functional pollen and is often observed when an alien cytoplasm is transferred into a cultivated species. An RT98A CMS line and an RT98C fertility restorer line were obtained by successive backcrossing between Oryza rufipogon W1109 and Oryza sativa cultivar Taichung 65. To uncover the CMS-associated mitochondrial genes, we determined the complete sequence of the RT98-CMS mitochondrial genome using next-generation pyrosequencing, and searched new open reading frames (orfs) absent in a reported mitochondrial genome of O. sativa Nipponbare. Then, six candidates were selected for the CMS-associated genes based on the criteria in which they were chimeric in structure or encoded a peptide with transmembrane domains. One of the candidates, orf113, showed different transcript sizes between RT98A and RT98C on Northern blot analysis. The orf113 gene was shown to be co-transcribed with atp4 and cox3 encoding ATP synthase F0 subunit 4 and Cyt c oxidase subunit 3, respectively, and their transcripts were distinctly processed in the presence of a fertility restorer gene. Our results indicate that orf113 is a CMS-associated gene of RT98-CMS.

  1. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Manning, Alisa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A.; Grimsby, Jonna L; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Chen, Han; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Bielak, Lawrence F; Prokopenko, Inga; Amin, Najaf; Barnes, Daniel; Cadby, Gemma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ingelsson, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and beta-cell dysfunction but have contributed little to the understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathways might be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interactions between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a joint meta-analysis approach to test associat...

  2. Comparative genomic analysis uncovers 3 novel loci encoding type six secretion systems differentially distributed in Salmonella serotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiviago Carlos A

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recently described Type VI Secretion System (T6SS represents a new paradigm of protein secretion in bacteria. A number of bioinformatic studies have been conducted to identify T6SS gene clusters in the available bacterial genome sequences. According to these studies, Salmonella harbors a unique T6SS encoded in the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 6 (SPI-6. Since these studies only considered few Salmonella genomes, the present work aimed to identify novel T6SS loci by in silico analysis of every genome sequence of Salmonella available. Results The analysis of sequencing data from 44 completed or in progress Salmonella genome projects allowed the identification of 3 novel T6SS loci. These clusters are located in differentially-distributed genomic islands we designated SPI-19, SPI-20 and SPI-21, respectively. SPI-19 was identified in a subset of S. enterica serotypes including Dublin, Weltevreden, Agona, Gallinarum and Enteritidis. In the later, an internal deletion eliminated most of the island. On the other hand, SPI-20 and SPI-21 were restricted to S. enterica subspecies arizonae (IIIa serotype 62:z4,z23:-. Remarkably, SPI-21 encodes a VgrG protein containing a C-terminal extension similar to S-type pyocins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This is not only the first evolved VgrG described in Salmonella, but also the first evolved VgrG including a pyocin domain described so far in the literature. In addition, the data indicate that SPI-6 T6SS is widely distributed in S. enterica and absent in serotypes Enteritidis, Gallinarum, Agona, Javiana, Paratyphi B, Virchow, IIIa 62:z4,z23:- and IIIb 61:1,v:1,5,(7. Interestingly, while some serotypes harbor multiple T6SS (Dublin, Weltvreden and IIIa 62:z4,z23:- others do not encode for any (Enteritidis, Paratyphi B, Javiana, Virchow and IIIb 61:1,v:1,5,(7. Comparative and phylogenetic analyses indicate that the 4 T6SS loci in Salmonella have a distinct evolutionary history. Finally, we

  3. Genomic analysis of host - Peste des petits ruminants vaccine viral transcriptome uncovers transcription factors modulating immune regulatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Siddappa; Kumar, Gandham Ravi; Mishra, Bishnu Prasad; Mishra, Bina; Sahoo, Aditya Prasad; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Tiwari, Ashok K; Rajak, Kaushal Kishore; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2015-02-24

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), is an acute transboundary viral disease of economic importance, affecting goats and sheep. Mass vaccination programs around the world resulted in the decline of PPR outbreaks. Sungri 96 is a live attenuated vaccine, widely used in Northern India against PPR. This vaccine virus, isolated from goat works efficiently both in sheep and goat. Global gene expression changes under PPR vaccine virus infection are not yet well defined. Therefore, in this study we investigated the host-vaccine virus interactions by infecting the peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from goat with PPRV (Sungri 96 vaccine virus), to quantify the global changes in the transcriptomic signature by RNA-sequencing. Viral genome of Sungri 96 vaccine virus was assembled from the PPRV infected transcriptome confirming the infection and demonstrating the feasibility of building a complete non-host genome from the blood transcriptome. Comparison of infected transcriptome with control transcriptome revealed 985 differentially expressed genes. Functional analysis showed enrichment of immune regulatory pathways under PPRV infection. Key genes involved in immune system regulation, spliceosomal and apoptotic pathways were identified to be dysregulated. Network analysis revealed that the protein - protein interaction network among differentially expressed genes is significantly disrupted in infected state. Several genes encoding TFs that govern immune regulatory pathways were identified to co-regulate the differentially expressed genes. These data provide insights into the host - PPRV vaccine virus interactome for the first time. Our findings suggested dysregulation of immune regulatory pathways and genes encoding Transcription Factors (TFs) that govern these pathways in response to viral infection.

  4. Genetic diversity and breeding history of Winter Mushroom (Flammulina velutipes) in China uncovered by genomic SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao Bin; Feng, Bang; Li, Jing; Yan, Chen; Yang, Zhu L

    2016-10-10

    Flammulina velutipes is one of the most widely cultivated mushroom species in China. However, its genetic background remains poorly understood due to the limited sampling and poor molecular markers used. In this study, 124 F. velutipes strains were employed, including 110 cultivars and 14 wild strains, and 25 new SSR markers were developed based on the genome of F. velutipes. A total of 153 alleles were detected in 124 strains to investigate the improper cultivar naming, genetic diversity and breeding history of F. velutipes in China. Our fingerprinting analyses indicated that 65 strains can be differentiated from the total of 124 strains, and over 53% of the strains are labeled with improper commercial names. The genetic diversities of wild strains are higher than those of the cultivars, suggesting that wild strains may harbor a large "arsenal" gene pool in nature available for strain breeding. The white cultivars in China were originally introduced from Japan, while the yellow cultivars were directly domesticated from wild strains isolated from southeastern China or hybridized between the white cultivars and yellow strains. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel Genes Affecting the Interaction between the Cabbage Whitefly and Arabidopsis Uncovered by Genome-Wide Association Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekgaarden, Colette; Bucher, Johan; Bac-Molenaar, Johanna; Keurentjes, Joost J B; Kruijer, Willem; Voorrips, Roeland E; Vosman, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Plants have evolved a variety of ways to defend themselves against biotic attackers. This has resulted in the presence of substantial variation in defense mechanisms among plants, even within a species. Genome-wide association (GWA) mapping is a useful tool to study the genetic architecture of traits, but has so far only had limited exploitation in studies of plant defense. Here, we study the genetic architecture of defense against the phloem-feeding insect cabbage whitefly (Aleyrodes proletella) in Arabidopsis thaliana. We determined whitefly performance, i.e. the survival and reproduction of whitefly females, on 360 worldwide selected natural accessions and subsequently performed GWA mapping using 214,051 SNPs. Substantial variation for whitefly adult survival and oviposition rate (number of eggs laid per female per day) was observed between the accessions. We identified 39 candidate SNPs for either whitefly adult survival or oviposition rate, all with relatively small effects, underpinning the complex architecture of defense traits. Among the corresponding candidate genes, i.e. genes in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with candidate SNPs, none have previously been identified as a gene playing a role in the interaction between plants and phloem-feeding insects. Whitefly performance on knock-out mutants of a number of candidate genes was significantly affected, validating the potential of GWA mapping for novel gene discovery in plant-insect interactions. Our results show that GWA analysis is a very useful tool to gain insight into the genetic architecture of plant defense against herbivorous insects, i.e. we identified and validated several genes affecting whitefly performance that have not previously been related to plant defense against herbivorous insects.

  6. A genome-wide polyketide synthase deletion library uncovers novel genetic links to polyketides and meroterpenoids in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Lynge; Nielsen, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Rank, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Fungi possess an advanced secondary metabolism that is regulated and coordinated in a complex manner depending on environmental challenges. To understand this complexity, a holistic approach is necessary. We initiated such an analysis in the important model fungus Aspergillus nidulans by systemat...... the current understanding of the biosynthetic pathways leading to arugosins and violaceols. We expect that the library will be an important resource towards a systemic understanding of polyketide production in A. nidulans.......Fungi possess an advanced secondary metabolism that is regulated and coordinated in a complex manner depending on environmental challenges. To understand this complexity, a holistic approach is necessary. We initiated such an analysis in the important model fungus Aspergillus nidulans...... by systematically deleting all 32 individual genes encoding polyketide synthases. Wild-type and all mutant strains were challenged on different complex media to provoke induction of the secondary metabolism. Screening of the mutant library revealed direct genetic links to two austinol meroterpenoids and expanded...

  7. A Scalable Genome-Editing-Based Approach for Mapping Multiprotein Complexes in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Dalvai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Conventional affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP-MS analysis is a broadly applicable method used to decipher molecular interaction networks and infer protein function. However, it is sensitive to perturbations induced by ectopically overexpressed target proteins and does not reflect multilevel physiological regulation in response to diverse stimuli. Here, we developed an interface between genome editing and proteomics to isolate native protein complexes produced from their natural genomic contexts. We used CRISPR/Cas9 and TAL effector nucleases (TALENs to tag endogenous genes and purified several DNA repair and chromatin-modifying holoenzymes to near homogeneity. We uncovered subunits and interactions among well-characterized complexes and report the isolation of MCM8/9, highlighting the efficiency and robustness of the approach. These methods improve and simplify both small- and large-scale explorations of protein interactions as well as the study of biochemical activities and structure-function relationships.

  8. Layers of epistasis: genome-wide regulatory networks and network approaches to genome-wide association studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowper-Sal·lari, Richard; Cole, Michael D.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Lupien, Mathieu; Moore, Jason H.

    2010-01-01

    The conceptual foundation of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) has advanced unchecked since its conception. A revision might seem premature as the potential of GWAS has not been fully realized. Multiple technical and practical limitations need to be overcome before GWAS can be fairly criticized. But with the completion of hundreds of studies and a deeper understanding of the genetic architecture of disease, warnings are being raised. The results compiled to date indicate that risk-associated variants lie predominantly in non-coding regions of the genome. Additionally, alternative methodologies are uncovering large and heterogeneous sets of rare variants underlying disease. The fear is that, even in its fulfilment, the current GWAS paradigm might be incapable of dissecting all kinds of phenotypes. In the following text we review several initiatives that aim to overcome these limitations. The overarching theme of these studies is the inclusion of biological knowledge to both the analysis and interpretation of genotyping data. GWAS is uninformed of biology by design and although there is some virtue in its simplicity it is also its most conspicuous deficiency. We propose a framework in which to integrate these novel approaches, both empirical and theoretical, in the form of a genome-wide regulatory network (GWRN). By processing experimental data into networks, emerging data types based on chromatin-immunoprecipitation are made computationally tractable. This will give GWAS re-analysis efforts the most current and relevant substrates, and root them firmly on our knowledge of human disease. PMID:21197657

  9. The Use of Evolutionary Approaches to Understand Single Cell Genomes

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    Haiwei eLuo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The vast majority of environmental bacteria and archaea remain uncultivated, yet their genome sequences are rapidly becoming available through single cell sequencing technologies. Reconstructing metabolism is one common way to make use of genome sequences of ecologically important bacteria, but molecular evolutionary analysis is another approach that, while currently underused, can reveal important insights into the function of these uncultivated microbes in nature. Because genome sequences from single cells are often incomplete, metabolic reconstruction based on genome content can be compromised. However, this problem does not necessarily impede the use of phylogenomic and population genomic approaches that are based on patterns of polymorphisms and substitutions at nucleotide and amino acid sites. These approaches explore how various evolutionary forces act to assemble genetic diversity within and between lineages. In this mini-review, I present examples illustrating the benefits of analyzing single cell genomes using evolutionary approaches.

  10. (Post-)genomics approaches in fungal research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aguilar-Pontes, María Victoria; de Vries, Ronald P; Zhou, M.; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    To date, hundreds of fungal genomes have been sequenced and many more are in progress. This wealth of genomic information has provided new directions to study fungal biodiversity. However, to further dissect and understand the complicated biological mechanisms involved in fungal life styles, functio

  11. Whole genome approaches to quantitative genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Peter M

    2009-06-01

    Apart from parent-offspring pairs and clones, relative pairs vary in the proportion of the genome that they share identical by descent. In the past, quantitative geneticists have used the expected value of sharing genes by descent to estimate genetic parameters and predict breeding values. With the possibility to genotype individuals for many markers across the genome it is now possible to empirically estimate the actual relationship between relatives. We review some of the theory underlying the variation in genetic identity, show applications to estimating genetic variance for height in humans and discuss other applications.

  12. Genome and exome sequencing in the clinic: unbiased genomic approaches with a high diagnostic yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nelen, M.; Veltman, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    For the reasons discussed here, we think whole-genome- or exome-based approaches are currently most suited for diagnostic implementation in genetically heterogeneous diseases, initially to complement and later to replace Sanger sequencing, qPCR and genomic microarrays. Patients do need to be counsel

  13. ChromaSig: a probabilistic approach to finding common chromatin signatures in the human genome.

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    Gary Hon

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Computational methods to identify functional genomic elements using genetic information have been very successful in determining gene structure and in identifying a handful of cis-regulatory elements. But the vast majority of regulatory elements have yet to be discovered, and it has become increasingly apparent that their discovery will not come from using genetic information alone. Recently, high-throughput technologies have enabled the creation of information-rich epigenetic maps, most notably for histone modifications. However, tools that search for functional elements using this epigenetic information have been lacking. Here, we describe an unsupervised learning method called ChromaSig to find, in an unbiased fashion, commonly occurring chromatin signatures in both tiling microarray and sequencing data. Applying this algorithm to nine chromatin marks across a 1% sampling of the human genome in HeLa cells, we recover eight clusters of distinct chromatin signatures, five of which correspond to known patterns associated with transcriptional promoters and enhancers. Interestingly, we observe that the distinct chromatin signatures found at enhancers mark distinct functional classes of enhancers in terms of transcription factor and coactivator binding. In addition, we identify three clusters of novel chromatin signatures that contain evolutionarily conserved sequences and potential cis-regulatory elements. Applying ChromaSig to a panel of 21 chromatin marks mapped genomewide by ChIP-Seq reveals 16 classes of genomic elements marked by distinct chromatin signatures. Interestingly, four classes containing enrichment for repressive histone modifications appear to be locally heterochromatic sites and are enriched in quickly evolving regions of the genome. The utility of this approach in uncovering novel, functionally significant genomic elements will aid future efforts of genome annotation via chromatin modifications.

  14. Genome Editing: A New Approach to Human Therapeutics.

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    Porteus, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The ability to manipulate the genome with precise spatial and nucleotide resolution (genome editing) has been a powerful research tool. In the past decade, the tools and expertise for using genome editing in human somatic cells and pluripotent cells have increased to such an extent that the approach is now being developed widely as a strategy to treat human disease. The fundamental process depends on creating a site-specific DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the genome and then allowing the cell's endogenous DSB repair machinery to fix the break such that precise nucleotide changes are made to the DNA sequence. With the development and discovery of several different nuclease platforms and increasing knowledge of the parameters affecting different genome editing outcomes, genome editing frequencies now reach therapeutic relevance for a wide variety of diseases. Moreover, there is a series of complementary approaches to assessing the safety and toxicity of any genome editing process, irrespective of the underlying nuclease used. Finally, the development of genome editing has raised the issue of whether it should be used to engineer the human germline. Although such an approach could clearly prevent the birth of people with devastating and destructive genetic diseases, questions remain about whether human society is morally responsible enough to use this tool.

  15. Impact of genomics approaches on plant genetics and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabata, Satoshi

    2002-08-01

    Comprehensive analysis of genetic information in higher plants is under way for several plants of biological and agronomical importance. Among them, Arabidopsis thaliana, a member of Brassica family, and Oryza sativa(rice) have been chosen as model plants most suitable for genome analysis. Sequencing of the genome of A. thaliana was completed in December 2000, and rice genome sequencing is in progress. The accumulated genome sequences, together with the hundreds of thousands of ESTs from several tens of plant species, have drastically changed the strategy of plant genetics. By utilizing the information on the genome and gene structures, comprehensive approaches for genome-wide functional analysis of the genes, including transcriptome analysis using microarray systems and a comprehensive analysis of a large number of insertion mutant lines, have been widely adopted. As a consequence, a large quantity of information on both the structure and function of genes in these model plants has been accumulated. However, other plant species may have their own characteristics and advantages to study individual phenomena. Application of knowledge from the model plants to other plant species and vice versa through the common language, namely the genome information, should facilitate understanding of the genetic systems underlying a variety of biological phenomena. Introduction of this common language may not be very simple, especially in the case of complex pathways such as a process of cell-covering formation. Nevertheless, it should be emphasized that genomics approaches are the most promising way to understand these processes.

  16. Uncovering ultrastructural defences in Daphnia magna--an interdisciplinary approach to assess the predator-induced fortification of the carapace.

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    Max Rabus

    Full Text Available The development of structural defences, such as the fortification of shells or exoskeletons, is a widespread strategy to reduce predator attack efficiency. In unpredictable environments these defences may be more pronounced in the presence of a predator. The cladoceran Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Cladocera has been shown to develop a bulky morphotype as an effective inducible morphological defence against the predatory tadpole shrimp Triops cancriformis (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Notostraca. Mediated by kairomones, the daphnids express an increased body length, width and an elongated tail spine. Here we examined whether these large scale morphological defences are accompanied by additional ultrastructural defences, i.e. a fortification of the exoskeleton. We employed atomic force microscopy (AFM based nanoindentation experiments to assess the cuticle hardness along with tapping mode AFM imaging to visualise the surface morphology for predator exposed and non-predator exposed daphnids. We used semi-thin sections of the carapace to measure the cuticle thickness, and finally, we used fluorescence microscopy to analyse the diameter of the pillars connecting the two carapace layers. We found that D. magna indeed expresses ultrastructural defences against Triops predation. The cuticle in predator exposed individuals is approximately five times harder and two times thicker than in control daphnids. Moreover, the pillar diameter is significantly increased in predator exposed daphnids. These predator-cue induced changes in the carapace architecture should provide effective protection against being crushed by the predator's mouthparts and may add to the protective effect of bulkiness. This study highlights the potential of interdisciplinary studies to uncover new and relevant aspects even in extensively studied fields of research.

  17. Uncovering Ultrastructural Defences in Daphnia magna – An Interdisciplinary Approach to Assess the Predator-Induced Fortification of the Carapace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, Max; Söllradl, Thomas; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Laforsch, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The development of structural defences, such as the fortification of shells or exoskeletons, is a widespread strategy to reduce predator attack efficiency. In unpredictable environments these defences may be more pronounced in the presence of a predator. The cladoceran Daphniamagna (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Cladocera) has been shown to develop a bulky morphotype as an effective inducible morphological defence against the predatory tadpole shrimp Triopscancriformis (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Notostraca). Mediated by kairomones, the daphnids express an increased body length, width and an elongated tail spine. Here we examined whether these large scale morphological defences are accompanied by additional ultrastructural defences, i.e. a fortification of the exoskeleton. We employed atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoindentation experiments to assess the cuticle hardness along with tapping mode AFM imaging to visualise the surface morphology for predator exposed and non-predator exposed daphnids. We used semi-thin sections of the carapace to measure the cuticle thickness, and finally, we used fluorescence microscopy to analyse the diameter of the pillars connecting the two carapace layers. We found that D. magna indeed expresses ultrastructural defences against Triops predation. The cuticle in predator exposed individuals is approximately five times harder and two times thicker than in control daphnids. Moreover, the pillar diameter is significantly increased in predator exposed daphnids. These predator-cue induced changes in the carapace architecture should provide effective protection against being crushed by the predator’s mouthparts and may add to the protective effect of bulkiness. This study highlights the potential of interdisciplinary studies to uncover new and relevant aspects even in extensively studied fields of research. PMID:23776711

  18. Uncovering ultrastructural defences in Daphnia magna--an interdisciplinary approach to assess the predator-induced fortification of the carapace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabus, Max; Söllradl, Thomas; Clausen-Schaumann, Hauke; Laforsch, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The development of structural defences, such as the fortification of shells or exoskeletons, is a widespread strategy to reduce predator attack efficiency. In unpredictable environments these defences may be more pronounced in the presence of a predator. The cladoceran Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Cladocera) has been shown to develop a bulky morphotype as an effective inducible morphological defence against the predatory tadpole shrimp Triops cancriformis (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Notostraca). Mediated by kairomones, the daphnids express an increased body length, width and an elongated tail spine. Here we examined whether these large scale morphological defences are accompanied by additional ultrastructural defences, i.e. a fortification of the exoskeleton. We employed atomic force microscopy (AFM) based nanoindentation experiments to assess the cuticle hardness along with tapping mode AFM imaging to visualise the surface morphology for predator exposed and non-predator exposed daphnids. We used semi-thin sections of the carapace to measure the cuticle thickness, and finally, we used fluorescence microscopy to analyse the diameter of the pillars connecting the two carapace layers. We found that D. magna indeed expresses ultrastructural defences against Triops predation. The cuticle in predator exposed individuals is approximately five times harder and two times thicker than in control daphnids. Moreover, the pillar diameter is significantly increased in predator exposed daphnids. These predator-cue induced changes in the carapace architecture should provide effective protection against being crushed by the predator's mouthparts and may add to the protective effect of bulkiness. This study highlights the potential of interdisciplinary studies to uncover new and relevant aspects even in extensively studied fields of research.

  19. Contemporary approaches for modifying the mouse genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, David J.; van der Weyden, Louise

    2008-01-01

    The mouse is a premiere experimental organism that has contributed significantly to our understanding of vertebrate biology. Manipulation of the mouse genome via embryonic stem (ES) cell technology makes it possible to engineer an almost limitless repertoire of mutations to model human disease and assess gene function. In this review we outline recent advances in mouse experimental genetics and provide a “how-to” guide for those people wishing to access this technology. We also discuss new technologies, such as transposon-mediated mutagenesis, and resources of targeting vectors and ES cells, which are likely to dramatically accelerate the pace with which we can assess gene function in vivo, and the progress of forward and reverse genetic screens in mice. PMID:18559964

  20. Genome classification by gene distribution: An overlapping subspace clustering approach

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    Halgamuge Saman K

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes of lower organisms have been observed with a large amount of horizontal gene transfers, which cause difficulties in their evolutionary study. Bacteriophage genomes are a typical example. One recent approach that addresses this problem is the unsupervised clustering of genomes based on gene order and genome position, which helps to reveal species relationships that may not be apparent from traditional phylogenetic methods. Results We propose the use of an overlapping subspace clustering algorithm for such genome classification problems. The advantage of subspace clustering over traditional clustering is that it can associate clusters with gene arrangement patterns, preserving genomic information in the clusters produced. Additionally, overlapping capability is desirable for the discovery of multiple conserved patterns within a single genome, such as those acquired from different species via horizontal gene transfers. The proposed method involves a novel strategy to vectorize genomes based on their gene distribution. A number of existing subspace clustering and biclustering algorithms were evaluated to identify the best framework upon which to develop our algorithm; we extended a generic subspace clustering algorithm called HARP to incorporate overlapping capability. The proposed algorithm was assessed and applied on bacteriophage genomes. The phage grouping results are consistent overall with the Phage Proteomic Tree and showed common genomic characteristics among the TP901-like, Sfi21-like and sk1-like phage groups. Among 441 phage genomes, we identified four significantly conserved distribution patterns structured by the terminase, portal, integrase, holin and lysin genes. We also observed a subgroup of Sfi21-like phages comprising a distinctive divergent genome organization and identified nine new phage members to the Sfi21-like genus: Staphylococcus 71, phiPVL108, Listeria A118, 2389, Lactobacillus phi AT3, A2

  1. Genome-Wide Approaches to Drosophila Heart Development

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    Manfred Frasch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of the dorsal vessel in Drosophila is one of the first systems in which key mechanisms regulating cardiogenesis have been defined in great detail at the genetic and molecular level. Due to evolutionary conservation, these findings have also provided major inputs into studies of cardiogenesis in vertebrates. Many of the major components that control Drosophila cardiogenesis were discovered based on candidate gene approaches and their functions were defined by employing the outstanding genetic tools and molecular techniques available in this system. More recently, approaches have been taken that aim to interrogate the entire genome in order to identify novel components and describe genomic features that are pertinent to the regulation of heart development. Apart from classical forward genetic screens, the availability of the thoroughly annotated Drosophila genome sequence made new genome-wide approaches possible, which include the generation of massive numbers of RNA interference (RNAi reagents that were used in forward genetic screens, as well as studies of the transcriptomes and proteomes of the developing heart under normal and experimentally manipulated conditions. Moreover, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments have been performed with the aim to define the full set of genomic binding sites of the major cardiogenic transcription factors, their relevant target genes, and a more complete picture of the regulatory network that drives cardiogenesis. This review will give an overview on these genome-wide approaches to Drosophila heart development and on computational analyses of the obtained information that ultimately aim to provide a description of this process at the systems level.

  2. Rational and evolutionary engineering approaches uncover a small set of genetic changes efficient for rapid xylose fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Soo Rin Kim

    Full Text Available Economic bioconversion of plant cell wall hydrolysates into fuels and chemicals has been hampered mainly due to the inability of microorganisms to efficiently co-ferment pentose and hexose sugars, especially glucose and xylose, which are the most abundant sugars in cellulosic hydrolysates. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot metabolize xylose due to a lack of xylose-metabolizing enzymes. We developed a rapid and efficient xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae through rational and inverse metabolic engineering strategies, comprising the optimization of a heterologous xylose-assimilating pathway and evolutionary engineering. Strong and balanced expression levels of the XYL1, XYL2, and XYL3 genes constituting the xylose-assimilating pathway increased ethanol yields and the xylose consumption rates from a mixture of glucose and xylose with little xylitol accumulation. The engineered strain, however, still exhibited a long lag time when metabolizing xylose above 10 g/l as a sole carbon source, defined here as xylose toxicity. Through serial-subcultures on xylose, we isolated evolved strains which exhibited a shorter lag time and improved xylose-fermenting capabilities than the parental strain. Genome sequencing of the evolved strains revealed that mutations in PHO13 causing loss of the Pho13p function are associated with the improved phenotypes of the evolved strains. Crude extracts of a PHO13-overexpressing strain showed a higher phosphatase activity on xylulose-5-phosphate (X-5-P, suggesting that the dephosphorylation of X-5-P by Pho13p might generate a futile cycle with xylulokinase overexpression. While xylose consumption rates by the evolved strains improved substantially as compared to the parental strain, xylose metabolism was interrupted by accumulated acetate. Deletion of ALD6 coding for acetaldehyde dehydrogenase not only prevented acetate accumulation, but also enabled complete and efficient fermentation of xylose as well as a mixture of glucose and

  3. A Network Pharmacology Approach to Uncover the Pharmacological Mechanism of XuanHuSuo Powder on Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyue; Luo, Shilin; Zhang, Baixia; Duan, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhiqian; Wang, Wenqi; Wang, Yun; Sun, Yikun

    2016-01-01

    As the most familiar type of arthritis and a chronic illness of the joints, Osteoarthritis (OA) affects a great number of people on the global scale. XuanHuSuo powder (XHSP), a conventional herbal formula from China, has been extensively applied in OA treatment. Nonetheless, its pharmacological mechanism has not been completely expounded. In this research, a network pharmacology approach has been chosen to study the pharmacological mechanism of XHSP on OA, and the pharmacology networks were established based on the relationship between four herbs found in XHSP, compound targets, and OA targets. The pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the significant bioprocess networks of XHSP on OA were regulation of inflammation, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production and nitric oxide (NO) biosynthetic process, response to cytokine or estrogen stimuli, and antiapoptosis. These effects have not been reported previously. The comprehensive network pharmacology approach developed by our research has revealed, for the first time, a connection between four herbs found in XHSP, corresponding compound targets, and OA pathway systems that are conducive to expanding the clinical application of XHSP. The proposed network pharmacology approach could be a promising complementary method by which researchers might better evaluate multitarget or multicomponent drugs on a systematic level. PMID:27110264

  4. Genetic and genomic approaches to understanding macrophage identity and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Christopher K

    2015-04-01

    A major goal of our laboratory is to understand the molecular mechanisms that underlie the development and functions of diverse macrophage phenotypes in health and disease. Recent studies using genetic and genomic approaches suggest a relatively simple model of collaborative and hierarchical interactions between lineage-determining and signal-dependent transcription factors that enable selection and activation of transcriptional enhancers that specify macrophage identity and function. In addition, we have found that it is possible to use natural genetic variation as a powerful tool for advancing our understanding of how the macrophage deciphers the information encoded by the genome to attain specific phenotypes in a context-dependent manner. Here, I will describe our recent efforts to extend genetic and genomic approaches to investigate the roles of distinct tissue environments in determining the phenotypes of different resident populations of macrophages.

  5. Genome trees constructed using five different approaches suggest new major bacterial clades

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    Tatusov Roman L

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of multiple complete genome sequences from diverse taxa prompts the development of new phylogenetic approaches, which attempt to incorporate information derived from comparative analysis of complete gene sets or large subsets thereof. Such attempts are particularly relevant because of the major role of horizontal gene transfer and lineage-specific gene loss, at least in the evolution of prokaryotes. Results Five largely independent approaches were employed to construct trees for completely sequenced bacterial and archaeal genomes: i presence-absence of genomes in clusters of orthologous genes; ii conservation of local gene order (gene pairs among prokaryotic genomes; iii parameters of identity distribution for probable orthologs; iv analysis of concatenated alignments of ribosomal proteins; v comparison of trees constructed for multiple protein families. All constructed trees support the separation of the two primary prokaryotic domains, bacteria and archaea, as well as some terminal bifurcations within the bacterial and archaeal domains. Beyond these obvious groupings, the trees made with different methods appeared to differ substantially in terms of the relative contributions of phylogenetic relationships and similarities in gene repertoires caused by similar life styles and horizontal gene transfer to the tree topology. The trees based on presence-absence of genomes in orthologous clusters and the trees based on conserved gene pairs appear to be strongly affected by gene loss and horizontal gene transfer. The trees based on identity distributions for orthologs and particularly the tree made of concatenated ribosomal protein sequences seemed to carry a stronger phylogenetic signal. The latter tree supported three potential high-level bacterial clades,: i Chlamydia-Spirochetes, ii Thermotogales-Aquificales (bacterial hyperthermophiles, and ii Actinomycetes-Deinococcales-Cyanobacteria. The latter group also

  6. Patient-controlled encrypted genomic data: an approach to advance clinical genomics

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    Trakadis Yannis J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The revolution in DNA sequencing technologies over the past decade has made it feasible to sequence an individual’s whole genome at a relatively low cost. The potential value of the information generated by genomic technologies for medicine and society is enormous. However, in order for exome sequencing, and eventually whole genome sequencing, to be implemented clinically, a number of major challenges need to be overcome. For instance, obtaining meaningful informed-consent, managing incidental findings and the great volume of data generated (including multiple findings with uncertain clinical significance, re-interpreting the genomic data and providing additional counselling to patients as genetic knowledge evolves are issues that need to be addressed. It appears that medical genetics is shifting from the present “phenotype-first” medical model to a “data-first” model which leads to multiple complexities. Discussion This manuscript discusses the different challenges associated with integrating genomic technologies into clinical practice and describes a “phenotype-first” approach, namely, “Individualized Mutation-weighed Phenotype Search”, and its benefits. The proposed approach allows for a more efficient prioritization of the genes to be tested in a clinical lab based on both the patient’s phenotype and his/her entire genomic data. It simplifies “informed-consent” for clinical use of genomic technologies and helps to protect the patient’s autonomy and privacy. Overall, this approach could potentially render widespread use of genomic technologies, in the immediate future, practical, ethical and clinically useful. Summary The “Individualized Mutation-weighed Phenotype Search” approach allows for an incremental integration of genomic technologies into clinical practice. It ensures that we do not over-medicalize genomic data but, rather, continue our current medical model which is based on serving

  7. Development and clinical application of an integrative genomic approach to personalized cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzilov, Andrew V; Ding, Wei; Fink, Marc Y; Antipin, Yevgeniy; Brohl, Andrew S; Davis, Claire; Lau, Chun Yee; Pandya, Chetanya; Shah, Hardik; Kasai, Yumi; Powell, James; Micchelli, Mark; Castellanos, Rafael; Zhang, Zhongyang; Linderman, Michael; Kinoshita, Yayoi; Zweig, Micol; Raustad, Katie; Cheung, Kakit; Castillo, Diane; Wooten, Melissa; Bourzgui, Imane; Newman, Leah C; Deikus, Gintaras; Mathew, Bino; Zhu, Jun; Glicksberg, Benjamin S; Moe, Aye S; Liao, Jun; Edelmann, Lisa; Dudley, Joel T; Maki, Robert G; Kasarskis, Andrew; Holcombe, Randall F; Mahajan, Milind; Hao, Ke; Reva, Boris; Longtine, Janina; Starcevic, Daniela; Sebra, Robert; Donovan, Michael J; Li, Shuyu; Schadt, Eric E; Chen, Rong

    2016-06-01

    Personalized therapy provides the best outcome of cancer care and its implementation in the clinic has been greatly facilitated by recent convergence of enormous progress in basic cancer research, rapid advancement of new tumor profiling technologies, and an expanding compendium of targeted cancer therapeutics. We developed a personalized cancer therapy (PCT) program in a clinical setting, using an integrative genomics approach to fully characterize the complexity of each tumor. We carried out whole exome sequencing (WES) and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray genotyping on DNA from tumor and patient-matched normal specimens, as well as RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) on available frozen specimens, to identify somatic (tumor-specific) mutations, copy number alterations (CNAs), gene expression changes, gene fusions, and also germline variants. To provide high sensitivity in known cancer mutation hotspots, Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (CHPv2) was also employed. We integrated the resulting data with cancer knowledge bases and developed a specific workflow for each cancer type to improve interpretation of genomic data. We returned genomics findings to 46 patients and their physicians describing somatic alterations and predicting drug response, toxicity, and prognosis. Mean 17.3 cancer-relevant somatic mutations per patient were identified, 13.3-fold, 6.9-fold, and 4.7-fold more than could have been detected using CHPv2, Oncomine Cancer Panel (OCP), and FoundationOne, respectively. Our approach delineated the underlying genetic drivers at the pathway level and provided meaningful predictions of therapeutic efficacy and toxicity. Actionable alterations were found in 91 % of patients (mean 4.9 per patient, including somatic mutations, copy number alterations, gene expression alterations, and germline variants), a 7.5-fold, 2.0-fold, and 1.9-fold increase over what could have been uncovered by CHPv2, OCP, and FoundationOne, respectively. The findings altered

  8. High-throughput sequencing approach uncovers the miRNome of peritoneal endometriotic lesions and adjacent healthy tissues.

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    Merli Saare

    Full Text Available Accumulating data have shown the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs in endometriosis pathogenesis. In this study, we used a novel approach to determine the endometriotic lesion-specific miRNAs by high-throughput small RNA sequencing of paired samples of peritoneal endometriotic lesions and matched healthy surrounding tissues together with eutopic endometria of the same patients. We found five miRNAs specific to epithelial cells--miR-34c, miR-449a, miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-141 showing significantly higher expression in peritoneal endometriotic lesions compared to healthy peritoneal tissues. We also determined the expression levels of miR-200 family target genes E-cadherin, ZEB1 and ZEB2 and found that the expression level of E-cadherin was significantly higher in endometriotic lesions compared to healthy tissues. Further evaluation verified that studied miRNAs could be used as diagnostic markers for confirming the presence of endometrial cells in endometriotic lesion biopsy samples. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the miRNA profile of peritoneal endometriotic lesion biopsies is largely masked by the surrounding peritoneal tissue, challenging the discovery of an accurate lesion-specific miRNA profile. Taken together, our findings indicate that only particular miRNAs with a significantly higher expression in endometriotic cells can be detected from lesion biopsies, and can serve as diagnostic markers for endometriosis.

  9. High-Throughput Sequencing Approach Uncovers the miRNome of Peritoneal Endometriotic Lesions and Adjacent Healthy Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saare, Merli; Rekker, Kadri; Laisk-Podar, Triin; Sõritsa, Deniss; Roost, Anne Mari; Simm, Jaak; Velthut-Meikas, Agne; Samuel, Külli; Metsalu, Tauno; Karro, Helle; Sõritsa, Andrei; Salumets, Andres; Peters, Maire

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating data have shown the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in endometriosis pathogenesis. In this study, we used a novel approach to determine the endometriotic lesion-specific miRNAs by high-throughput small RNA sequencing of paired samples of peritoneal endometriotic lesions and matched healthy surrounding tissues together with eutopic endometria of the same patients. We found five miRNAs specific to epithelial cells – miR-34c, miR-449a, miR-200a, miR-200b and miR-141 showing significantly higher expression in peritoneal endometriotic lesions compared to healthy peritoneal tissues. We also determined the expression levels of miR-200 family target genes E-cadherin, ZEB1 and ZEB2 and found that the expression level of E-cadherin was significantly higher in endometriotic lesions compared to healthy tissues. Further evaluation verified that studied miRNAs could be used as diagnostic markers for confirming the presence of endometrial cells in endometriotic lesion biopsy samples. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the miRNA profile of peritoneal endometriotic lesion biopsies is largely masked by the surrounding peritoneal tissue, challenging the discovery of an accurate lesion-specific miRNA profile. Taken together, our findings indicate that only particular miRNAs with a significantly higher expression in endometriotic cells can be detected from lesion biopsies, and can serve as diagnostic markers for endometriosis. PMID:25386850

  10. Deciphering Squamous Cell Carcinoma Using Multidimensional Genomic Approaches

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    Ewan A. Gibb

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Squamous cell carcinomas (SqCCs arise in a wide range of tissues including skin, lung, and oral mucosa. Although all SqCCs are epithelial in origin and share common nomenclature, these cancers differ greatly with respect to incidence, prognosis, and treatment. Current knowledge of genetic similarities and differences between SqCCs is insufficient to describe the biology of these cancers, which arise from diverse tissue origins. In this paper we provide a general overview of whole genome approaches for gene and pathway discovery and highlight the advancement of integrative genomics as a state-of-the-art technology in the study of SqCC genetics.

  11. A new approach for using genome scans to detect recent positive selection in the human genome.

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    Kun Tang

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide scanning for signals of recent positive selection is essential for a comprehensive and systematic understanding of human adaptation. Here, we present a genomic survey of recent local selective sweeps, especially aimed at those nearly or recently completed. A novel approach was developed for such signals, based on contrasting the extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH profiles between populations. We applied this method to the genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data of both the International HapMap Project and Perlegen Sciences, and detected widespread signals of recent local selection across the genome, consisting of both complete and partial sweeps. A challenging problem of genomic scans of recent positive selection is to clearly distinguish selection from neutral effects, given the high sensitivity of the test statistics to departures from neutral demographic assumptions and the lack of a single, accurate neutral model of human history. We therefore developed a new procedure that is robust across a wide range of demographic and ascertainment models, one that indicates that certain portions of the genome clearly depart from neutrality. Simulations of positive selection showed that our tests have high power towards strong selection sweeps that have undergone fixation. Gene ontology analysis of the candidate regions revealed several new functional groups that might help explain some important interpopulation differences in phenotypic traits.

  12. Comparative mapping in intraspecific populations uncovers a high degree of macrosynteny between A- and B-genome diploid species of peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Yufang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cultivated peanut or groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L. is an important oilseed crop with an allotetraploid genome (AABB, 2n = 4x = 40. Both the low level of genetic variation within the cultivated gene pool and its polyploid nature limit the utilization of molecular markers to explore genome structure and facilitate genetic improvement. Nevertheless, a wealth of genetic diversity exists in diploid Arachis species (2n = 2x = 20, which represent a valuable gene pool for cultivated peanut improvement. Interspecific populations have been used widely for genetic mapping in diploid species of Arachis. However, an intraspecific mapping strategy was essential to detect chromosomal rearrangements among species that could be obscured by mapping in interspecific populations. To develop intraspecific reference linkage maps and gain insights into karyotypic evolution within the genus, we comparatively mapped the A- and B-genome diploid species using intraspecific F2 populations. Exploring genome organization among diploid peanut species by comparative mapping will enhance our understanding of the cultivated tetraploid peanut genome. Moreover, new sources of molecular markers that are highly transferable between species and developed from expressed genes will be required to construct saturated genetic maps for peanut. Results A total of 2,138 EST-SSR (expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers were developed by mining a tetraploid peanut EST assembly including 101,132 unigenes (37,916 contigs and 63,216 singletons derived from 70,771 long-read (Sanger and 270,957 short-read (454 sequences. A set of 97 SSR markers were also developed by mining 9,517 genomic survey sequences of Arachis. An SSR-based intraspecific linkage map was constructed using an F2 population derived from a cross between K 9484 (PI 298639 and GKBSPSc 30081 (PI 468327 in the B-genome species A. batizocoi. A high degree of macrosynteny was observed

  13. TMA Uncovers Medicare Mistakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-07-01

    The Texas Medical Association recently uncovered some major Medicare mistakes that show just why some physicians talk about leaving the federal program. Investigations and advocacy by TMA staff put Medicare on the path to a fix.

  14. Combining genomic and proteomic approaches for epigenetics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yumiao; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics is the study of changes in gene expression or cellular phenotype that do not change the DNA sequence. In this review, current methods, both genomic and proteomic, associated with epigenetics research are discussed. Among them, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by sequencing and other ChIP-based techniques are powerful techniques for genome-wide profiling of DNA-binding proteins, histone post-translational modifications or nucleosome positions. However, mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used in functional biological studies and has proved to be an indispensable tool to characterize histone modifications, as well as DNA–protein and protein–protein interactions. With the development of genomic and proteomic approaches, combination of ChIP and mass spectrometry has the potential to expand our knowledge of epigenetics research to a higher level. PMID:23895656

  15. Whole genome phylogeny of Prochlorococcus marinus group of cyanobacteria: genome alignment and overlapping gene approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabha, Ratna; Singh, Dhananjaya P; Gupta, Shailendra K; Rai, Anil

    2014-06-01

    Prochlorococcus is the smallest known oxygenic phototrophic marine cyanobacterium dominating the mid-latitude oceans. Physiologically and genetically distinct P. marinus isolates from many oceans in the world were assigned two different groups, a tightly clustered high-light (HL)-adapted and a divergent low-light (LL-) adapted clade. Phylogenetic analysis of this cyanobacterium on the basis of 16S rRNA and other conserved genes did not show consistency with its phenotypic behavior. We analyzed phylogeny of this genus on the basis of complete genome sequences through genome alignment, overlapping-gene content and gene-order approach. Phylogenetic tree of P. marinus obtained by comparing whole genome sequences in contrast to that based on 16S rRNA gene, corresponded well with the HL/LL ecotypic distinction of twelve strains and showed consistency with phenotypic classification of P. marinus. Evidence for the horizontal descent and acquisition of genes within and across the genus was observed. Many genes involved in metabolic functions were found to be conserved across these genomes and many were continuously gained by different strains as per their needs during the course of their evolution. Consistency in the physiological and genetic phylogeny based on whole genome sequence is established. These observations improve our understanding about the adaptation and diversification of these organisms under evolutionary pressure.

  16. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species. PMID:27729506

  17. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Enfert, Christophe; Legrand, Mélanie

    2016-10-11

    The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species.

  18. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeline Feri

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4, including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species.

  19. Methane-Fueled Syntrophy through Extracellular Electron Transfer: Uncovering the Genomic Traits Conserved within Diverse Bacterial Partners of Anaerobic Methanotrophic Archaea

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    Connor T. Skennerton

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The anaerobic oxidation of methane by anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME archaea in syntrophic partnership with deltaproteobacterial sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB is the primary mechanism for methane removal in ocean sediments. The mechanism of their syntrophy has been the subject of much research as traditional intermediate compounds, such as hydrogen and formate, failed to decouple the partners. Recent findings have indicated the potential for extracellular electron transfer from ANME archaea to SRB, though it is unclear how extracellular electrons are integrated into the metabolism of the SRB partner. We used metagenomics to reconstruct eight genomes from the globally distributed SEEP-SRB1 clade of ANME partner bacteria to determine what genomic features are required for syntrophy. The SEEP-SRB1 genomes contain large multiheme cytochromes that were not found in previously described free-living SRB and also lack periplasmic hydrogenases that may prevent an independent lifestyle without an extracellular source of electrons from ANME archaea. Metaproteomics revealed the expression of these cytochromes at in situ methane seep sediments from three sites along the Pacific coast of the United States. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these cytochromes appear to have been horizontally transferred from metal-respiring members of the Deltaproteobacteria such as Geobacter and may allow these syntrophic SRB to accept extracellular electrons in place of other chemical/organic electron donors.

  20. Whole mitochondrial genome sequencing and transcriptional analysis to uncover an RT102-type cytoplasmic male sterility-associated candidate Gene Derived from Oryza rufipogon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Masayuki; Kazama, Tomohiko; Murata, Hayato; Motomura, Keiji; Toriyama, Kinya

    2013-09-01

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is a maternally inherited trait in which plants fail to produce functional pollen and is associated with the expression of a novel open reading frame (orf) gene encoded by the mitochondrial genome. An RT102A CMS line and an RT102C fertility restorer line were obtained by successive backcrossing between Oryza rufipogon W1125 and O. sativa Taichung 65. Using next-generation pyrosequencing, we determined whole-genome sequences of the mitochondria in RT102-CMS cytoplasm. To identify candidates for the CMS-associated gene in RT102 mitochondria, we screened the mitochondrial genome for the presence of specific orf genes that were chimeric or whose products carried predicted transmembrane domains. One of these orf genes, orf352, which showed different transcript sizes depending on whether the restorer of fertility (Rf) gene was present or not, was identified. The orf352 gene was co-transcribed with the ribosomal protein gene rpl5, and the 2.8 kb rpl5-orf352 transcripts were processed into 2.6 kb transcripts with a cleavage at the inside of the orf352 coding region in the presence of the Rf gene. The orf352 gene is an excellent candidate for the CMS-associated gene for RT102-CMS.

  1. Methane-Fueled Syntrophy through Extracellular Electron Transfer: Uncovering the Genomic Traits Conserved within Diverse Bacterial Partners of Anaerobic Methanotrophic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skennerton, Connor T; Chourey, Karuna; Iyer, Ramsunder; Hettich, Robert L; Tyson, Gene W; Orphan, Victoria J

    2017-08-01

    The anaerobic oxidation of methane by anaerobic methanotrophic (ANME) archaea in syntrophic partnership with deltaproteobacterial sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is the primary mechanism for methane removal in ocean sediments. The mechanism of their syntrophy has been the subject of much research as traditional intermediate compounds, such as hydrogen and formate, failed to decouple the partners. Recent findings have indicated the potential for extracellular electron transfer from ANME archaea to SRB, though it is unclear how extracellular electrons are integrated into the metabolism of the SRB partner. We used metagenomics to reconstruct eight genomes from the globally distributed SEEP-SRB1 clade of ANME partner bacteria to determine what genomic features are required for syntrophy. The SEEP-SRB1 genomes contain large multiheme cytochromes that were not found in previously described free-living SRB and also lack periplasmic hydrogenases that may prevent an independent lifestyle without an extracellular source of electrons from ANME archaea. Metaproteomics revealed the expression of these cytochromes at in situ methane seep sediments from three sites along the Pacific coast of the United States. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these cytochromes appear to have been horizontally transferred from metal-respiring members of the Deltaproteobacteria such as Geobacter and may allow these syntrophic SRB to accept extracellular electrons in place of other chemical/organic electron donors.IMPORTANCE Some archaea, known as anaerobic methanotrophs, are capable of converting methane into carbon dioxide when they are growing syntopically with sulfate-reducing bacteria. This partnership is the primary mechanism for methane removal in ocean sediments; however, there is still much to learn about how this syntrophy works. Previous studies have failed to identify the metabolic intermediate, such as hydrogen or formate, that is passed between partners. However, recent analysis of

  2. An improved probability mapping approach to assess genome mosaicism

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    Gogarten J Peter

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maximum likelihood and posterior probability mapping are useful visualization techniques that are used to ascertain the mosaic nature of prokaryotic genomes. However, posterior probabilities, especially when calculated for four-taxon cases, tend to overestimate the support for tree topologies. Furthermore, because of poor taxon sampling four-taxon analyses suffer from sensitivity to the long branch attraction artifact. Here we extend the probability mapping approach by improving taxon sampling of the analyzed datasets, and by using bootstrap support values, a more conservative tool to assess reliability. Results Quartets of orthologous proteins were complemented with homologs from selected reference genomes. The mapping of bootstrap support values from these extended datasets gives results similar to the original maximum likelihood and posterior probability mapping. The more conservative nature of the plotted support values allows to focus further analyses on those protein families that strongly disagree with the majority or plurality of genes present in the analyzed genomes. Conclusion Posterior probability is a non-conservative measure for support, and posterior probability mapping only provides a quick estimation of phylogenetic information content of four genomes. This approach can be utilized as a pre-screen to select genes that might have been horizontally transferred. Better taxon sampling combined with subtree analyses prevents the inconsistencies associated with four-taxon analyses, but retains the power of visual representation. Nevertheless, a case-by-case inspection of individual multi-taxon phylogenies remains necessary to differentiate unrecognized paralogy and shared phylogenetic reconstruction artifacts from horizontal gene transfer events.

  3. Uncovering the Math Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Marilyn

    2014-01-01

    Teachers often express to Marulyn Burns their worry about the need to "cover the curriculum." In response, she draws on one of her favorite quotes: "You don't want to cover a subject; you want to uncover it." This quote is from "The Having of Wonderful Ideas and Other Essays on Teaching and Learning" by Eleanor…

  4. Uncovering Fractional Monodromy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efstathiou, K.; Broer, H. W.

    2013-01-01

    The uncovering of the role of monodromy in integrable Hamiltonian fibrations has been one of the major advances in the study of integrable Hamiltonian systems in the past few decades: on one hand monodromy turned out to be the most fundamental obstruction to the existence of global action-angle coor

  5. Genomic Copy Number Signatures Uncovered a Genetically Distinct Group from Adenocarcinoma and Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunjung; Moon, Ji Wook; Wang, Xianfu; Kim, Chungyeul; Li, Shibo; Shin, Bong Kyung; Jung, Wonkyung; Kim, Hyun Koo; Kim, Han Kyeom; Lee, Ji-Yun

    2015-08-01

    Adenocarcinoma (AC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) have different clinical presentations, morphologies, treatments, and prognoses. Recent studies suggested that fundamental genetic alterations related to carcinogenesis of each tumor type may be different. In this study, we investigated the genomic alterations of 47 primary NSCLC samples (22 ACs and 25 SCCs) as well as the corresponding normal tissue using array comparative genomic hybridization. Frequent copy number alterations (CNAs), which were identified in more than 68% of all of the cases, were evaluated in each subtype (SCC and AC), and a CNA signature was established. Among these CNAs, 37 genes from the SCCs and 15 genes from the ACs were located in a region of gain, and 4 genes from the SCCs and 13 genes from the ACs were located in a region of loss. The most frequent gain was located on 3q26-29 including the gene TP63 in SCCs and 7q11.23 and 7q36.3 in ACs. Moreover, we identified 3 genetically distinct groups (group I [16 SCC] with CNA signature of SCC; group II [7 SCC + 8 AC], which has a genetically distinctive CNA signature from SCC and AC; and group III [2 SCC + 14 AC] with CNA signature of AC) by gene clustering extracted from CNAs, which are associated with a prognosis. The present study contributed to the molecular characterization of AC and SCC of NSCLC and showed a subtype of tumor that has a unique genetic CNA signature. However, further study about the significance of these 3 distinct groups and their usefulness as a diagnostic marker of identified CNAs is necessary.

  6. Variation in the Slope Coefficient of the Fama Regression for Testing Uncovered Interest Rate Parity: Evidence from Fixed and Time-varying Coefficient Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Koning (Camiel); S. Straetmans

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate the potential presence of time variation in the coefficients of the ''Fama regression'' for Uncovered Interest Rate Parity. We implement coefficient constancy tests, rolling regression techniques, and stochastic coefficient models based on state space modelling. Among six

  7. Variation in the Slope Coefficient of the Fama Regression for Testing Uncovered Interest Rate Parity: Evidence from Fixed and Time-varying Coefficient Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. de Koning (Camiel); S. Straetmans

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate the potential presence of time variation in the coefficients of the ''Fama regression'' for Uncovered Interest Rate Parity. We implement coefficient constancy tests, rolling regression techniques, and stochastic coefficient models based on state space modelling. Among six

  8. Integrative genome-wide approaches in embryonic stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyue; Huang, Jing

    2010-10-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from blastocysts. They can differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers and essentially any type of somatic cells. They therefore hold great potential in tissue regeneration therapy. The ethical issues associated with the use of human embryonic stem cells are resolved by the technical break-through of generating induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from various types of somatic cells. However, how ES and iPS cells self-renew and maintain their pluripotency is still largely unknown in spite of the great progress that has been made in the last two decades. Integrative genome-wide approaches, such as the gene expression microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation based microarray (ChIP-chip) and chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) offer unprecedented opportunities to elucidate the mechanism of the pluripotency, reprogramming and DNA damage response of ES and iPS cells. This frontier article summarizes the fundamental biological questions about ES and iPS cells and reviews the recent advances in ES and iPS cell research using genome-wide technologies. To this end, we offer our perspectives on the future of genome-wide studies on stem cells.

  9. A reference pan-genome approach to comparative bacterial genomics: identification of novel epidemiological markers in pathogenic Campylobacter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Méric

    Full Text Available The increasing availability of hundreds of whole bacterial genomes provides opportunities for enhanced understanding of the genes and alleles responsible for clinically important phenotypes and how they evolved. However, it is a significant challenge to develop easy-to-use and scalable methods for characterizing these large and complex data and relating it to disease epidemiology. Existing approaches typically focus on either homologous sequence variation in genes that are shared by all isolates, or non-homologous sequence variation--focusing on genes that are differentially present in the population. Here we present a comparative genomics approach that simultaneously approximates core and accessory genome variation in pathogen populations and apply it to pathogenic species in the genus Campylobacter. A total of 7 published Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli genomes were selected to represent diversity across these species, and a list of all loci that were present at least once was compiled. After filtering duplicates a 7-isolate reference pan-genome, of 3,933 loci, was defined. A core genome of 1,035 genes was ubiquitous in the sample accounting for 59% of the genes in each isolate (average genome size of 1.68 Mb. The accessory genome contained 2,792 genes. A Campylobacter population sample of 192 genomes was screened for the presence of reference pan-genome loci with gene presence defined as a BLAST match of ≥ 70% identity over ≥ 50% of the locus length--aligned using MUSCLE on a gene-by-gene basis. A total of 21 genes were present only in C. coli and 27 only in C. jejuni, providing information about functional differences associated with species and novel epidemiological markers for population genomic analyses. Homologs of these genes were found in several of the genomes used to define the pan-genome and, therefore, would not have been identified using a single reference strain approach.

  10. A whole-genome RNAi screen uncovers a novel role for human potassium channels in cell killing by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Chelsea; Verkerke, Hans P; Theodorescu, Dan; Petri, William A

    2015-09-08

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills human cells resulting in ulceration, inflammation and invasion of the colonic epithelium. We used the cytotoxic properties of ameba to select a genome-wide RNAi library to reveal novel host factors that control susceptibility to amebic killing. We identified 281 candidate susceptibility genes and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ion transporters were significantly enriched among susceptibility genes. Potassium (K(+)) channels were the most common transporter identified. Their importance was further supported by colon biopsy of humans with amebiasis that demonstrated suppressed K(+) channel expression. Inhibition of human K(+) channels by genetic silencing, pharmacologic inhibitors and with excess K(+) protected diverse cell types from E. histolytica-induced death. Contact with E. histolytica parasites triggered K(+) channel activation and K(+) efflux by intestinal epithelial cells, which preceded cell killing. Specific inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels was highly effective in preventing amebic cytotoxicity in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Blockade of K(+) efflux also inhibited caspase-1 activation, IL-1β secretion and pyroptotic death in THP-1 macrophages. We concluded that K(+) channels are host mediators of amebic cytotoxicity in multiple cells types and of inflammasome activation in macrophages.

  11. Evolutionary dynamics of an expressed MHC class IIβ locus in the Ranidae (Anura) uncovered by genome walking and high-throughput amplicon sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Kevin P.; Cortazar-Chinarro, Maria; Harris, D. James; Crottini, Angelica; Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Fleischer, Robert C.; Savage, Anna E.

    2017-01-01

    The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) is a genomic region encoding immune loci that are important and frequently used markers in studies of adaptive genetic variation and disease resistance. Given the primary role of infectious diseases in contributing to global amphibian declines, we characterized the hypervariable exon 2 and flanking introns of the MHC Class IIβ chain for 17 species of frogs in the Ranidae, a speciose and cosmopolitan family facing widespread pathogen infections and declines. We find high levels of genetic variation concentrated in the Peptide Binding Region (PBR) of the exon. Ten codons are under positive selection, nine of which are located in the mammal-defined PBR. We hypothesize that the tenth codon (residue 21) is an amphibian-specific PBR site that may be important in disease resistance. Trans-species and trans-generic polymorphisms are evident from exon-based genealogies, and co-phylogenetic analyses between intron, exon and mitochondrial based reconstructions reveal incongruent topologies, likely due to different locus histories. We developed two sets of barcoded adapters that reliably amplify a single and likely functional locus in all screened species using both 454 and Illumina based sequencing methods. These primers provide a resource for multiplexing and directly sequencing hundreds of samples in a single sequencing run, avoiding the labour and chimeric sequences associated with cloning, and enabling MHC population genetic analyses. Although the primers are currently limited to the 17 species we tested, these sequences and protocols provide a useful genetic resource and can serve as a starting point for future disease, adaptation and conservation studies across a range of anuran taxa.

  12. A hybrid approach for de novo human genome sequence assembly and phasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostovoy, Yulia; Levy-Sakin, Michal; Lam, Jessica; Lam, Ernest T; Hastie, Alex R; Marks, Patrick; Lee, Joyce; Chu, Catherine; Lin, Chin; Džakula, Željko; Cao, Han; Schlebusch, Stephen A; Giorda, Kristina; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Wall, Jeffrey D; Kwok, Pui-Yan

    2016-07-01

    Despite tremendous progress in genome sequencing, the basic goal of producing a phased (haplotype-resolved) genome sequence with end-to-end contiguity for each chromosome at reasonable cost and effort is still unrealized. In this study, we describe an approach to performing de novo genome assembly and experimental phasing by integrating the data from Illumina short-read sequencing, 10X Genomics linked-read sequencing, and BioNano Genomics genome mapping to yield a high-quality, phased, de novo assembled human genome.

  13. Association of Protein Translation and Extracellular Matrix Gene Sets with Breast Cancer Metastasis: Findings Uncovered on Analysis of Multiple Publicly Available Datasets Using Individual Patient Data Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilotpal Chowdhury

    Full Text Available Microarray analysis has revolutionized the role of genomic prognostication in breast cancer. However, most studies are single series studies, and suffer from methodological problems. We sought to use a meta-analytic approach in combining multiple publicly available datasets, while correcting for batch effects, to reach a more robust oncogenomic analysis.The aim of the present study was to find gene sets associated with distant metastasis free survival (DMFS in systemically untreated, node-negative breast cancer patients, from publicly available genomic microarray datasets.Four microarray series (having 742 patients were selected after a systematic search and combined. Cox regression for each gene was done for the combined dataset (univariate, as well as multivariate - adjusted for expression of Cell cycle related genes and for the 4 major molecular subtypes. The centre and microarray batch effects were adjusted by including them as random effects variables. The Cox regression coefficients for each analysis were then ranked and subjected to a Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA.Gene sets representing protein translation were independently negatively associated with metastasis in the Luminal A and Luminal B subtypes, but positively associated with metastasis in Basal tumors. Proteinaceous extracellular matrix (ECM gene set expression was positively associated with metastasis, after adjustment for expression of cell cycle related genes on the combined dataset. Finally, the positive association of the proliferation-related genes with metastases was confirmed.To the best of our knowledge, the results depicting mixed prognostic significance of protein translation in breast cancer subtypes are being reported for the first time. We attribute this to our study combining multiple series and performing a more robust meta-analytic Cox regression modeling on the combined dataset, thus discovering 'hidden' associations. This methodology seems to yield new and

  14. Variation in the Slope Coefficient of the Fama Regression for Testing Uncovered Interest Rate Parity: Evidence from Fixed and Time-varying Coefficient Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Koning, Camiel de; Straetmans, S.

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe investigate the potential presence of time variation in the coefficients of the ''Fama regression'' for Uncovered Interest Rate Parity. We implement coefficient constancy tests, rolling regression techniques, and stochastic coefficient models based on state space modelling. Among six major US bilateral exchange rates we find significant evidence for stochastic time variation. Using the statistical equivalence between stochastically varying coefficients and conditional heterosce...

  15. Predicting disease trait with genomic data: a composite kernel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haitao; Li, Shaoyu; Cao, Hongyan; Zhang, Chichen; Cui, Yuehua

    2016-06-02

    With the advancement of biotechniques, a vast amount of genomic data is generated with no limit. Predicting a disease trait based on these data offers a cost-effective and time-efficient way for early disease screening. Here we proposed a composite kernel partial least squares (CKPLS) regression model for quantitative disease trait prediction focusing on genomic data. It can efficiently capture nonlinear relationships among features compared with linear learning algorithms such as Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator or ridge regression. We proposed to optimize the kernel parameters and kernel weights with the genetic algorithm (GA). In addition to improved performance for parameter optimization, the proposed GA-CKPLS approach also has better learning capacity and generalization ability compared with single kernel-based KPLS method as well as other nonlinear prediction models such as the support vector regression. Extensive simulation studies demonstrated that GA-CKPLS had better prediction performance than its counterparts under different scenarios. The utility of the method was further demonstrated through two case studies. Our method provides an efficient quantitative platform for disease trait prediction based on increasing volume of omics data.

  16. An integrative computational approach for prioritization of genomic variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Dubchak

    Full Text Available An essential step in the discovery of molecular mechanisms contributing to disease phenotypes and efficient experimental planning is the development of weighted hypotheses that estimate the functional effects of sequence variants discovered by high-throughput genomics. With the increasing specialization of the bioinformatics resources, creating analytical workflows that seamlessly integrate data and bioinformatics tools developed by multiple groups becomes inevitable. Here we present a case study of a use of the distributed analytical environment integrating four complementary specialized resources, namely the Lynx platform, VISTA RViewer, the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB, and the RaptorX server, for the identification of high-confidence candidate genes contributing to pathogenesis of spina bifida. The analysis resulted in prediction and validation of deleterious mutations in the SLC19A placental transporter in mothers of the affected children that causes narrowing of the outlet channel and therefore leads to the reduced folate permeation rate. The described approach also enabled correct identification of several genes, previously shown to contribute to pathogenesis of spina bifida, and suggestion of additional genes for experimental validations. The study demonstrates that the seamless integration of bioinformatics resources enables fast and efficient prioritization and characterization of genomic factors and molecular networks contributing to the phenotypes of interest.

  17. Experimental Approaches to Study Genome Packaging of Influenza A Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Isel

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The genome of influenza A viruses (IAV consists of eight single-stranded negative sense viral RNAs (vRNAs encapsidated into viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs. It is now well established that genome packaging (i.e., the incorporation of a set of eight distinct vRNPs into budding viral particles, follows a specific pathway guided by segment-specific cis-acting packaging signals on each vRNA. However, the precise nature and function of the packaging signals, and the mechanisms underlying the assembly of vRNPs into sub-bundles in the cytoplasm and their selective packaging at the viral budding site, remain largely unknown. Here, we review the diverse and complementary methods currently being used to elucidate these aspects of the viral cycle. They range from conventional and competitive reverse genetics, single molecule imaging of vRNPs by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH and high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography of budding viral particles, to solely in vitro approaches to investigate vRNA-vRNA interactions at the molecular level.

  18. An Integrative Computational Approach for Prioritization of Genomic Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Meyden, Cem; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Poliakov, Alexander; Börnigen, Daniela; Xie, Bingqing; Taylor, Andrew; Ma, Jianzhu; Paciorkowski, Alex R.; Mirzaa, Ghayda M.; Dave, Paul; Agam, Gady; Xu, Jinbo; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Mason, Christopher E.; Ross, M. Elizabeth; Maltsev, Natalia; Gilliam, T. Conrad

    2014-01-01

    An essential step in the discovery of molecular mechanisms contributing to disease phenotypes and efficient experimental planning is the development of weighted hypotheses that estimate the functional effects of sequence variants discovered by high-throughput genomics. With the increasing specialization of the bioinformatics resources, creating analytical workflows that seamlessly integrate data and bioinformatics tools developed by multiple groups becomes inevitable. Here we present a case study of a use of the distributed analytical environment integrating four complementary specialized resources, namely the Lynx platform, VISTA RViewer, the Developmental Brain Disorders Database (DBDB), and the RaptorX server, for the identification of high-confidence candidate genes contributing to pathogenesis of spina bifida. The analysis resulted in prediction and validation of deleterious mutations in the SLC19A placental transporter in mothers of the affected children that causes narrowing of the outlet channel and therefore leads to the reduced folate permeation rate. The described approach also enabled correct identification of several genes, previously shown to contribute to pathogenesis of spina bifida, and suggestion of additional genes for experimental validations. The study demonstrates that the seamless integration of bioinformatics resources enables fast and efficient prioritization and characterization of genomic factors and molecular networks contributing to the phenotypes of interest. PMID:25506935

  19. Approaches for Comparative Genomics in Aspergillus and Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo; Theobald, Sebastian; Brandl, Julian

    2016-01-01

    The number of available genomes in the closely related fungal genera Aspergillus and Penicillium is rapidly increasing. At the time of writing, the genomes of 62 species are available, and an even higher number is being prepared. Fungal comparative genomics is thus becoming steadily more powerful...... and applicable for many types of studies. In this chapter, we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of comparative genomics in these fungi, along with recommended methods. The chapter describes databases for fungal comparative genomics. Based on experience, we suggest strategies for multiple types...... of comparative genomics, ranging from analysis of single genes, over gene clusters and CaZymes to genome-scale comparative genomics. Furthermore, we have examined published comparative genomics papers to summarize the preferred bioinformatic methods and parameters for a given type of analysis, highly useful...

  20. Computational approaches to identify functional genetic variants in cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Mustonen, Ville; Reva, Boris

    2013-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor but only a minority of these drive tumor progression. We present the result of discu......The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) aims to catalog genomic abnormalities in tumors from 50 different cancer types. Genome sequencing reveals hundreds to thousands of somatic mutations in each tumor but only a minority of these drive tumor progression. We present the result...

  1. Approaches for Comparative Genomics in Aspergillus and Penicillium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jane Lind Nybo; Theobald, Sebastian; Brandl, Julian

    2016-01-01

    of comparative genomics, ranging from analysis of single genes, over gene clusters and CaZymes to genome-scale comparative genomics. Furthermore, we have examined published comparative genomics papers to summarize the preferred bioinformatic methods and parameters for a given type of analysis, highly useful...... for new fungal geneticists. Moreover, the chapter contains a detailed overview of comparative genomics studies of key fungal traits such as primary metabolism, secondary metabolism, and secretome analysis. Finally, we gaze into a possible future of the field by comparing the current state of fungal......The number of available genomes in the closely related fungal genera Aspergillus and Penicillium is rapidly increasing. At the time of writing, the genomes of 62 species are available, and an even higher number is being prepared. Fungal comparative genomics is thus becoming steadily more powerful...

  2. Joint Genome Institute's Automation Approach and History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Simon

    2006-07-05

    Department of Energy/Joint Genome Institute (DOE/JGI) collaborates with DOE national laboratories and community users, to advance genome science in support of the DOE missions of clean bio-energy, carbon cycling, and bioremediation.

  3. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Alisa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A; Grimsby, Jonna L; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Chen, Han; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Bielak, Lawrence F; Prokopenko, Inga; Amin, Najaf; Barnes, Daniel; Cadby, Gemma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ladenvall, Claes; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lahti, Jari; Lecoeur, Cecile; Liu, Yongmei; Martinez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Montasser, May E; Navarro, Pau; Perry, John R B; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Salo, Perttu; Sattar, Naveed; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Duijn, Cornelia M; An, Ping; de Andrade, Mariza; Andrews, Jeanette S; Aspelund, Thor; Atalay, Mustafa; Aulchenko, Yurii; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Jacques S; Beilby, John P; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N; Blangero, John; Boban, Mladen; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bouchard, Claude; Brunner, Eric; Budimir, Danijela; Campbell, Harry; Carlson, Olga; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S; Corbatón-Anchuelo, Arturo; Couper, David; de Faire, Ulf; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Egan, Josephine M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Eury, Elodie; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Fox, Caroline S; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Franks, Paul W; Frayling, Timothy M; Froguel, Philippe; Galan, Pilar; de Geus, Eco; Gigante, Bruna; Glazer, Nicole L; Goel, Anuj; Groop, Leif; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hallmans, Göran; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Ola; Harris, Tamara B; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon; Hercberg, Serge; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joseph; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jhun, Min A; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Jula, Antti; Kao, W H; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kolcic, Ivana; Kovacs, Peter; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo; Lannfelt, Lars; Lathrop, G Mark; Launer, Lenore J; Leander, Karin; Li, Guo; Lind, Lars; Lindstrom, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loos, Ruth J F; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Marmot, Michael; Meneton, Pierre; Mohlke, Karen L; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A; Miljkovic, Iva; Narisu, Narisu; O'Connell, Jeff; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Lyle J; Palotie, Aarno; Pankow, James S; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy L; Pehlic, Marina; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda; Pericic, Marijana; Perola, Markus; Perusse, Louis; Peyser, Patricia A; Polasek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Räikkönen, Katri; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rehnberg, Emil; Rice, Ken; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Saaristo, Timo; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Salomaa, Veikko; Savage, David B; Saxena, Richa; Schwarz, Peter; Seedorf, Udo; Sennblad, Bengt; Serrano-Rios, Manuel; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Siscovick, David S; Smit, Johannes H; Small, Kerrin S; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stumvoll, Michael; Sun, Yan V; Swift, Amy J; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Trompet, Stella; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Uusitupa, Matti; Vikström, Max; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Voight, Benjamin F; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Waterworth, Dawn M; Watkins, Hugh; Wheeler, Eleanor; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H; Willems, Sara M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wright, Alan F; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zelenika, Diana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Wareham, Nicholas J; McCarthy, Mark I; Barroso, Ines; Watanabe, Richard M; Florez, Jose C; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B; Langenberg, Claudia

    2012-05-13

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and β-cell dysfunction but have contributed little to the understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathways might be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interactions between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a joint meta-analysis approach to test associations with fasting insulin and glucose on a genome-wide scale. We present six previously unknown loci associated with fasting insulin at P < 5 × 10(-8) in combined discovery and follow-up analyses of 52 studies comprising up to 96,496 non-diabetic individuals. Risk variants were associated with higher triglyceride and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels, suggesting a role for these loci in insulin resistance pathways. The discovery of these loci will aid further characterization of the role of insulin resistance in T2D pathophysiology.

  4. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Alisa K.; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A.; Grimsby, Jonna L.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Chen, Han; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Amin, Najaf; Barnes, Daniel; Cadby, Gemma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Jackson, Anne U.; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ladenvall, Claes; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lahti, Jari; Lecoeur, Cecile; Liu, Yongmei; Martinez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Montasser, May E.; Navarro, Pau; Perry, John R. B.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Salo, Perttu; Sattar, Naveed; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; An, Ping; de Andrade, Mariza; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Aspelund, Thor; Atalay, Mustafa; Aulchenko, Yurii; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N.; Blangero, John; Boban, Mladen; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bouchard, Claude; Brunner, Eric; Budimir, Danijela; Campbell, Harry; Carlson, Olga; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Corbatón-Anchuelo, Arturo; Couper, David; de Faire, Ulf; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Egan, Josephine M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Eury, Elodie; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Fox, Caroline S; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Franks, Paul W; Frayling, Timothy M; Froguel, Philippe; Galan, Pilar; de Geus, Eco; Gigante, Bruna; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goel, Anuj; Groop, Leif; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hallmans, Göran; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Ola; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon; Hercberg, Serge; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joseph; Jarvelin, Marjo Riitta; Jhun, Min A.; Johnson, Paul C.D.; Jukema, J Wouter; Jula, Antti; Kao, W.H.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kolcic, Ivana; Kovacs, Peter; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo; Lannfelt, Lars; Lathrop, G Mark; Launer, Lenore J.; Leander, Karin; Li, Guo; Lind, Lars; Lindstrom, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian’an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Marmot, Michael; Meneton, Pierre; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A.; Miljkovic, Iva; Narisu, Narisu; O’Connell, Jeff; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pankow, James S.; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pehlic, Marina; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda; Pericic, Marijana; Perola, Markus; Perusse, Louis; Peyser, Patricia A; Polasek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Province, Michael A.; Räikkönen, Katri; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rehnberg, Emil; Rice, Ken; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Saaristo, Timo; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Salomaa, Veikko; Savage, David B.; Saxena, Richa; Schwarz, Peter; Seedorf, Udo; Sennblad, Bengt; Serrano-Rios, Manuel; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Johannes H.; Small, Kerrin S.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stančáková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stumvoll, Michael; Sun, Yan V.; Swift, Amy J.; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Trompet, Stella; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Vikström, Max; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Waterworth, Dawn M; Watkins, Hugh; Wheeler, Eleanor; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willems, Sara M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wright, Alan F.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zelenika, Diana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Wareham, Nicholas J.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Barroso, Ines; Watanabe, Richard M.; Florez, Jose C.; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B.; Langenberg, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and beta-cell dysfunction, but contributed little to our understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathways may be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interaction between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a novel joint meta-analytical approach to test associations with fasting insulin (FI) and glucose (FG) on a genome-wide scale. We present six previously unknown FI loci at Pdiscovery and follow-up analyses of 52 studies comprising up to 96,496non-diabetic individuals. Risk variants were associated with higher triglyceride and lower HDL cholesterol levels, suggestive of a role for these FI loci in insulin resistance pathways. The localization of these additional loci will aid further characterization of the role of insulin resistance in T2D pathophysiology. PMID:22581228

  5. Genomic insights into ayurvedic and western approaches to personalized medicine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhavana Prasher; Greg Gibson; Mitali Mukerji

    2016-03-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient Indian system of medicine documented and practised since 1500 B.C., follows a systems approach that has interesting parallels with contemporary personalized genomic medicine approaches to the understanding and management of health and disease. It is based on the trisutra, which are the three aspects of causes, features and therapeutics that are interconnected through a common organizing principle termed ‘tridosha’. Tridosha comprise three ascertainable physiological entities; vata (kinetic), pitta (metabolic) and kapha (potential) that are pervasive across systems, work in conjunction with each other, respond to the external environment and maintain homeostasis. Each individual is born with a specific proportion of tridosha that are not only genetically determined but also influenced by the environment during foetal development. Jointly they determine a person’s basic constitution, which is termed their ‘prakriti’. Development and progression of different diseases with their subtypes are thought to depend on the origin and mechanism of perturbation of the doshas, and the aim of therapeutic practice is to ensure that the doshas retain their homeostatic state. Similarly, western systems biology epitomized by translational P4 medicine envisages the integration of multiscalar genetic, cellular, physiological and environmental networks to predict phenotypic outcomes of perturbations. In this perspective article, we aim to outline the shape of a unifying scaffold that may allow the two intellectual traditions to enhance one another. Specifically, we illustrate how a unique integrative ‘Ayurgenomics’ approach can be used to integrate the trisutra concept of Ayurveda with genomics. We observe biochemical and molecular correlates of prakriti and show how these differ significantly in processes that are linked to intermediate patho-phenotypes, known to take different course in diseases. We also observe a significant enrichment of the highly

  6. Genomic insights into ayurvedic and western approaches to personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasher, Bhavana; Gibson, Greg; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-03-01

    Ayurveda, an ancient Indian system of medicine documented and practised since 1500 B.C., follows a systems approach that has interesting parallels with contemporary personalized genomic medicine approaches to the understanding and management of health and disease. It is based on the trisutra, which are the three aspects of causes, features and therapeutics that are interconnected through a common organizing principle termed 'tridosha'. Tridosha comprise three ascertainable physiological entities; vata (kinetic), pitta (metabolic) and kapha (potential) that are pervasive across systems, work in conjunction with each other, respond to the external environment and maintain homeostasis. Each individual is born with a specific proportion of tridosha that are not only genetically determined but also influenced by the environment during foetal development. Jointly they determine a person's basic constitution, which is termed their 'prakriti'. Development and progressi on of different diseases with their subtypes are thought to depend on the origin and mechanism of perturbation of the doshas, and the aim of therapeutic practice is to ensure that the doshas retain their homeostatic state. Similarly, western systems biology epitomized by translational P4 medicine envisages the integration of multiscalar genetic, cellular, physiological and environmental networks to predict phenotypic outcomes of perturbations. In this perspective article, we aim to outline the shape of a unifying scaffold that may allow the two intellectual traditions to enhance one another. Specifically, we illustrate how a unique integrative 'Ayurgenomics' approach can be used to integrate the trisutra concept of Ayurveda with genomics. We observe biochemical and molecular correlates of prakriti and show how these differ significantly in processes that are linked to intermediate patho-phenotypes, known to take different course in diseases. We also observe a significant enr ichment of the highly connected

  7. Genomics, Physiology, and Molecular Breeding Approaches for Improving Salt Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Abdelbagi M; Horie, Tomoaki

    2017-02-22

    Salt stress reduces land and water productivity and contributes to poverty and food insecurity. Increased salinization caused by human practices and climate change is progressively reducing agriculture productivity despite escalating calls for more food. Plant responses to salt stress are fairly well understood, involving numerous critical processes that are each controlled by multiple genes. Knowledge of the critical mechanisms controlling salt uptake and exclusion from functioning tissues, signaling of salt stress, and the arsenal of protective metabolites is advancing. However, little progress has been made in developing salt-tolerant varieties of crop species using standard (but slow) breeding approaches. The genetic diversity available within cultivated crops and their wild relatives provides rich sources for trait and gene discovery that has yet to be sufficiently utilized. Transforming this knowledge into modern approaches using genomics and molecular tools for precision breeding will accelerate the development of tolerant cultivars and help sustain food production. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Plant Biology Volume 68 is April 29, 2017. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  8. (Far) Outside the box: genomic approach to acute porphyria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunell, S

    2006-01-01

    If I were living in Caucasus I would be writing fairy tales there Chekov, 1888 The question of the reasons for the extreme variation in morbidity among the gene carriers of acute porphyria and the great diversity of the precipitating factors are approached by the aid of a model of interacting genomic circuits. It is based on the current paradigm of the acute porphyric attack as a result of a toxic proximal overload of the enzyme-deficient heme-biosynthetic patway. Porphyrogenic influx of precursors is seen as a consequence of uncontrolled induction of its gate-keeping enzyme, ubiquitous 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS1), due to attenuated post-translational control of the enzyme combined with activated gene transcription. Focus is directed on the genomic control of the master-regulator of ALAS1-transcription, the nuclear receptor pair constitutively active receptor (CAR) and pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR). On activation by their ligands, i.e. lipophilic drugs, solvents, alcohols, hormonal steroids and biocides, these DNA-binding proteins transform xenobiotic or steroid stimuli to coordinated activations of gene transcription-programs for ALAS1 and apo-cytochromes P450 (apo-CYPs), thus effecting the formation of xenobiotic-metabolizing cytochrome P450 enzymes. The potency of the CAR/PXR-transduction axis is enhanced by co-activators generated in at least four other genomic circuits, each triggered by different external and internal stimuli clinically experienced to be porphyrogenic, and each controlled by co-activating and co-repressing modulators. The expressions of the genes for CAR and PXR are thus augmented by binding glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activated by a steroid hormone, e.g, cortisol generated in fasting, infection or different forms of stress. The promotor regions of ALAS1 and apoCYPs contain binding sites for at least three co-activating transcription factors enhancing CAR/PXR transduction: i.e. the ligand-independent growth hormone (GH

  9. Critical social theory approach to disclosure of genomic incidental findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan, Jeffrey L; Senn-Reeves, Julia N; Inventor, Ben R; Greiner, Shawna M; Mayer, Karen M; Rivard, Mary T; Hamilton, Rebekah J

    2012-11-01

    Technology has expanded genomic research and the complexity of extracted gene-related information. Health-related genomic incidental findings pose new dilemmas for nurse researchers regarding the ethical application of disclosure to participants. Consequently, informed consent specific to incidental findings is recommended. Critical Social Theory is used as a guide in recognition of the changing meaning of informed consent and to serve as a framework to inform nursing of the ethical application of disclosure consent in genomic nursing research practices.

  10. Emerging trends in genomic approaches for microbial bioprospecting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akondi, K B; Lakshmi, V V

    2013-02-01

    Microorganisms constitute two out of the three domains of life on earth. They exhibit vast biodiversity and metabolic versatility. This enables the microorganisms to inhabit and thrive in even the most extreme environmental conditions, making them all pervading. The magnitude of biodiversity observed among microorganisms substantially supersedes that exhibited by the eukaryotes. These characteristics make the microbial world a very lucrative and inexhaustible resource for prospecting novel bioactive molecules. Despite their vast potential, over 99% of the microbial world still remains to be explored. The primary reason for this is that the culture-dependent methods used in the laboratories are grossly insufficient, as they support the growth of under 1% of the microorganisms found in nature. This limitation necessitated the development of techniques to circumvent culture dependency and gain access to the outstanding majority of the microorganisms. The development of culture-independent techniques has essentially reshaped the study of microbial diversity and community dynamics. Application of genomic and metagenomic approaches is contributing substantially towards characterization of the real microbial diversity. The amenability of these techniques to high throughput has opened the doors to explore the vast number of "uncultivable" microbial forms in substantially lesser time. The present article provides an update on the recent technological advances and emerging trends in exploring microbial community.

  11. Approaching the Sequential and Three-Dimensional Organization of Genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. To achieve a deeper unterstanding of the human genome the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic prope

  12. An integrative genomics approach for deciphering the complex interactions between ascorbate metabolism and fruit growth and composition in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Virginie; Stevens, Rebecca; Gil, Laurent; Gilbert, Louise; Gest, Noé; Petit, Johann; Faurobert, Mireille; Maucourt, Mickael; Deborde, Catherine; Moing, Annick; Poessel, Jean-Luc; Jacob, Daniel; Bouchet, Jean-Paul; Giraudel, Jean-Luc; Gouble, Barbara; Page, David; Alhagdow, Moftah; Massot, Capucine; Gautier, Hélène; Lemaire-Chamley, Martine; de Daruvar, Antoine; Rolin, Dominique; Usadel, Bjoern; Lahaye, Marc; Causse, Mathilde; Baldet, Pierre; Rothan, Christophe

    2009-11-01

    Very few reports have studied the interactions between ascorbate and fruit metabolism. In order to get insights into the complex relationships between ascorbate biosynthesis/recycling and other metabolic pathways in the fruit, we undertook a fruit systems biology approach. To this end, we have produced tomato transgenic lines altered in ascorbate content and redox ratio by RNAi-targeting several key enzymes involved in ascorbate biosynthesis (2 enzymes) and recycling (2 enzymes). In the VTC (ViTamin C) Fruit project, we then generated phenotypic and genomic (transcriptome, proteome, metabolome) data from wild type and mutant tomato fruit at two stages of fruit development, and developed or implemented statistical and bioinformatic tools as a web application (named VTC Tool box) necessary to store, analyse and integrate experimental data in tomato. By using Kohonen's self-organizing maps (SOMs) to cluster the biological data, pair-wise Pearson correlation analyses and simultaneous visualization of transcript/protein and metabolites (MapMan), this approach allowed us to uncover major relationships between ascorbate and other metabolic pathways.

  13. Genotyping-by-sequencing for Populus population genomics: an assessment of genome sampling patterns and filtering approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin P Schilling

    Full Text Available Continuing advances in nucleotide sequencing technology are inspiring a suite of genomic approaches in studies of natural populations. Researchers are faced with data management and analytical scales that are increasing by orders of magnitude. With such dramatic advances comes a need to understand biases and error rates, which can be propagated and magnified in large-scale data acquisition and processing. Here we assess genomic sampling biases and the effects of various population-level data filtering strategies in a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS protocol. We focus on data from two species of Populus, because this genus has a relatively small genome and is emerging as a target for population genomic studies. We estimate the proportions and patterns of genomic sampling by examining the Populus trichocarpa genome (Nisqually-1, and demonstrate a pronounced bias towards coding regions when using the methylation-sensitive ApeKI restriction enzyme in this species. Using population-level data from a closely related species (P. tremuloides, we also investigate various approaches for filtering GBS data to retain high-depth, informative SNPs that can be used for population genetic analyses. We find a data filter that includes the designation of ambiguous alleles resulted in metrics of population structure and Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium that were most consistent with previous studies of the same populations based on other genetic markers. Analyses of the filtered data (27,910 SNPs also resulted in patterns of heterozygosity and population structure similar to a previous study using microsatellites. Our application demonstrates that technically and analytically simple approaches can readily be developed for population genomics of natural populations.

  14. Random matrix approach to the distribution of genomic distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, Nikita; Zograf, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The cycle graph introduced by Bafna and Pevzner is an important tool for evaluating the distance between two genomes, that is, the minimal number of rearrangements needed to transform one genome into another. We interpret this distance in topological terms and relate it to the random matrix theory. Namely, the number of genomes at a given 2-break distance from a fixed one (the Hultman number) is represented by a coefficient in the genus expansion of a matrix integral over the space of complex matrices with the Gaussian measure. We study generating functions for the Hultman numbers and prove that the two-break distance distribution is asymptotically normal.

  15. A Cost-Effective Approach to Sequence Hundreds of Complete Mitochondrial Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Joaquin C B; Oleksiak, Marjorie F

    2016-01-01

    We present a cost-effective approach to sequence whole mitochondrial genomes for hundreds of individuals. Our approach uses small reaction volumes and unmodified (non-phosphorylated) barcoded adaptors to minimize reagent costs. We demonstrate our approach by sequencing 383 Fundulus sp. mitochondrial genomes (192 F. heteroclitus and 191 F. majalis). Prior to sequencing, we amplified the mitochondrial genomes using 4-5 custom-made, overlapping primer pairs, and sequencing was performed on an Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. After removing low quality and short sequences, 2.9 million and 2.8 million reads were generated for F. heteroclitus and F. majalis respectively. Individual genomes were assembled for each species by mapping barcoded reads to a reference genome. For F. majalis, the reference genome was built de novo. On average, individual consensus sequences had high coverage: 61-fold for F. heteroclitus and 57-fold for F. majalis. The approach discussed in this paper is optimized for sequencing mitochondrial genomes on an Illumina platform. However, with the proper modifications, this approach could be easily applied to other small genomes and sequencing platforms.

  16. Ethical considerations of research policy for personal genome analysis: the approach of the Genome Science Project in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minari, Jusaku; Shirai, Tetsuya; Kato, Kazuto

    2014-12-01

    As evidenced by high-throughput sequencers, genomic technologies have recently undergone radical advances. These technologies enable comprehensive sequencing of personal genomes considerably more efficiently and less expensively than heretofore. These developments present a challenge to the conventional framework of biomedical ethics; under these changing circumstances, each research project has to develop a pragmatic research policy. Based on the experience with a new large-scale project-the Genome Science Project-this article presents a novel approach to conducting a specific policy for personal genome research in the Japanese context. In creating an original informed-consent form template for the project, we present a two-tiered process: making the draft of the template following an analysis of national and international policies; refining the draft template in conjunction with genome project researchers for practical application. Through practical use of the template, we have gained valuable experience in addressing challenges in the ethical review process, such as the importance of sharing details of the latest developments in genomics with members of research ethics committees. We discuss certain limitations of the conventional concept of informed consent and its governance system and suggest the potential of an alternative process using information technology.

  17. Cryptic diversity in Ptyodactylus (Reptilia: Gekkonidae) from the northern Hajar Mountains of Oman and the United Arab Emirates uncovered by an integrative taxonomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó-Riudalbas, Marc; Metallinou, Margarita; de Pous, Philip; Els, Johannes; Jayasinghe, Sithum; Péntek-Zakar, Erika; Wilms, Thomas; Al-Saadi, Saleh; Carranza, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    The Hajar Mountains of south-eastern Arabia form an isolated massif surrounded by the sea to the east and by a large desert to the west. As a result of their old geological origin, geographical isolation, complex topography and local climate, these mountains provide an important refuge for endemic and relict species of plants and animals. With 19 species restricted to the Hajar Mountains, reptiles are the vertebrate group with the highest level of endemicity, becoming an excellent model for understanding the patterns and processes that generate and shape diversity in this arid mountain range. The geckos of the Ptyodactylus hasselquistii species complex are the largest geckos in Arabia and are found widely distributed across the Arabian Mountains, constituting a very important component of the reptile mountain fauna. Preliminary analyses suggested that their diversity in the Hajar Mountains may be higher than expected and that their systematics should be revised. In order to tackle these questions, we inferred a nearly complete calibrated phylogeny of the genus Ptyodactylus to identify the origin of the Hajar Mountains lineages using information from two mitochondrial and four nuclear genes. Genetic variability within the Hajar Mountains was further investigated using 68 specimens of Ptyodactylus from 46 localities distributed across the entire mountain range and sequenced for the same genes as above. The molecular phylogenies and morphological analyses as well as niche comparisons indicate the presence of two very old sister cryptic species living in allopatry: one restricted to the extreme northern Hajar Mountains and described as a new species herein; the other distributed across the rest of the Hajar Mountains that can be confidently assigned to the species P. orlovi. Similar to recent findings in the geckos of the genus Asaccus, the results of the present study uncover more hidden diversity in the northern Hajar Mountains and stress once again the importance of

  18. Uncovering Earth's virome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paez-Espino, David; Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A; Pavlopoulos, Georgios A; Thomas, Alex D; Huntemann, Marcel; Mikhailova, Natalia; Rubin, Edward; Ivanova, Natalia N; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2016-08-25

    Viruses are the most abundant biological entities on Earth, but challenges in detecting, isolating, and classifying unknown viruses have prevented exhaustive surveys of the global virome. Here we analysed over 5 Tb of metagenomic sequence data from 3,042 geographically diverse samples to assess the global distribution, phylogenetic diversity, and host specificity of viruses. We discovered over 125,000 partial DNA viral genomes, including the largest phage yet identified, and increased the number of known viral genes by 16-fold. Half of the predicted partial viral genomes were clustered into genetically distinct groups, most of which included genes unrelated to those in known viruses. Using CRISPR spacers and transfer RNA matches to link viral groups to microbial host(s), we doubled the number of microbial phyla known to be infected by viruses, and identified viruses that can infect organisms from different phyla. Analysis of viral distribution across diverse ecosystems revealed strong habitat-type specificity for the vast majority of viruses, but also identified some cosmopolitan groups. Our results highlight an extensive global viral diversity and provide detailed insight into viral habitat distribution and host–virus interactions.

  19. A Functional Genomic Approach to Chlorinated Ethenes Bioremediation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P. K.; Brodie, E. L.; MacBeth, T. W.; Deeb, R. A.; Sorenson, K. S.; Andersen, G. L.; Alvarez-Cohen, L.

    2007-12-01

    With the recent advances in genomic sciences, a knowledge-based approach can now be taken to optimize the bioremediation of trichloroethene (TCE). During the bioremediation of a heterogeneous subsurface, it is vital to identify and quantify the functionally important microorganisms present, characterize the microbial community and measure their physiological activity. In our field experiments, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was coupled with reverse-transcription (RT) to analyze both copy numbers and transcripts expressed by the 16S rRNA gene and three reductive dehalogenase (RDase) genes as biomarkers of Dehalococcoides spp. in the groundwater of a TCE-DNAPL site at Ft. Lewis (WA) that was serially subjected to biostimulation and bioaugmentation. Genes in the Dehalococcoides genus were targeted as they are the only known organisms that can completely dechlorinate TCE to the innocuous product ethene. Biomarker quantification revealed an overall increase of more than three orders of magnitude in the total Dehalococcoides population and quantification of the more liable and stringently regulated mRNAs confirmed that Dehalococcoides spp. were active. Parallel with our field experiments, laboratory studies were conducted to explore the physiology of Dehalococcoides isolates in order to develop relevant biomarkers that are indicative of the metabolic state of cells. Recently, we verified the function of the nitrogenase operon in Dehalococcoides sp. strain 195 and nitrogenase-encoding genes are ideal biomarker targets to assess cellular nitrogen requirement. To characterize the microbial community, we applied a high-density phylogenetic microarray (16S PhyloChip) that simultaneous monitors over 8,700 unique taxa to track the bacterial and archaeal populations through different phases of treatment. As a measure of species richness, 1,300 to 1,520 taxa were detected in groundwater samples extracted during different stages of treatment as well as in the bioaugmentation culture. We

  20. Combinatorial approach of LC-MS/MS and LC-TOF-MS for uncovering in vivo kinetics and biotransformation of ochratoxin A in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zheng; Zhao, Zhiyong; Shi, Jianxin; Liao, Yucai; Zhao, Zhihui; Zhang, Dabing; Wu, Yongning; De Saeger, Sarah; Wu, Aibo

    2013-04-15

    A combinatorial platform of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography coupled with time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS) has been developed to investigate the in vivo kinetics and biotransformation of ochratoxin A (OTA) in rats. The stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS method was first validated by determining the linearity (R(2)≥0.9990), sensitivity (lower limit of quantitation of 0.05 ng mL(-1)), accuracy (83.3-108.3), precision (RSD≤15.6%) and stability (≥75.0%), and was approved for the determination OTA in plasma, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney and brain with a run time of 7.0 min. Simultaneously, an LC-TOF-MS method could unambiguously identify the metabolites of OTA in a total run time of 14 min. The subsequent studies on kinetics and distribution after oral administration of 0.2 mg/kg b.w. OTA in rat indicated that OTA could reach a maximum value of 1932.4±124.9 ng mL(-1) within 5h due to its fast absorption, and then was slowly eliminated in plasma with a half-life time (t1/2) of 75.6±29.0 h. Results of tissue accumulation after a daily oral administration of 0.1 mg/kg b.w. OTA during 20 days showed that the highest concentration of OTA was observed in lung (95.9±13.7 ng g(-1)), followed by liver (76.0±9.7 ng g(-1)), heart (62.0±4.2 ng g(-1)) and kidney (55.7±4.7 ng g(-1)). Furthermore, three less toxic metabolites of OTA were clearly identified: Ochratoxin β (OTβ) and ochratoxin B (OTB) methyl ester were found in kidney and spleen, respectively, while phenylalanine was detected in heart and kidney. Thus, a possible metabolic pathway of OTA was proposed. The above achieved results justified that the application of combinatorial LC-MS/MS and LC-TOF-MS methods are valuable tools to uncover the kinetics and metabolism of OTA for the interpretation of toxicological findings in animals and extrapolation of the resulting data as reference to humans.

  1. Definitive Metabolite Identification Coupled with Automated Ligand Identification System (ALIS) Technology: A Novel Approach to Uncover Structure-Activity Relationships and Guide Drug Design in a Factor IXa Inhibitor Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Liu, Yong; Yang, Xianshu; Martin, Gary E; Yao, Huifang; Shang, Jackie; Bugianesi, Randal M; Ellsworth, Kenneth P; Sonatore, Lisa M; Nizner, Peter; Sherer, Edward C; Hill, Susan E; Knemeyer, Ian W; Geissler, Wayne M; Dandliker, Peter J; Helmy, Roy; Wood, Harold B

    2016-03-10

    A potent and selective Factor IXa (FIXa) inhibitor was subjected to a series of liver microsomal incubations, which generated a number of metabolites. Using automated ligand identification system-affinity selection (ALIS-AS) methodology, metabolites in the incubation mixture were prioritized by their binding affinities to the FIXa protein. Microgram quantities of the metabolites of interest were then isolated through microisolation analytical capabilities, and structurally characterized using MicroCryoProbe heteronuclear 2D NMR techniques. The isolated metabolites recovered from the NMR experiments were then submitted directly to an in vitro FIXa enzymatic assay. The order of the metabolites' binding affinity to the Factor IXa protein from the ALIS assay was completely consistent with the enzymatic assay results. This work showcases an innovative and efficient approach to uncover structure-activity relationships (SARs) and guide drug design via microisolation-structural characterization and ALIS capabilities.

  2. Uncovering Substantive Patterns in Student Responses in International Large-Scale Assessments--Comparing a Latent Class to a Manifest DIF Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, María Elena; Ercikan, Kadriye; Zumbo, Bruno D.; Lawless, René

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we contrast results from two differential item functioning (DIF) approaches (manifest and latent class) by the number of items and sources of items identified as DIF using data from an international reading assessment. The latter approach yielded three latent classes, presenting evidence of heterogeneity in examinee response…

  3. An Alternative Methodological Approach for Cost-Effectiveness Analysis and Decision Making in Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragoulakis, Vasilios; Mitropoulou, Christina; van Schaik, Ron H; Maniadakis, Nikolaos; Patrinos, George P

    2016-05-01

    Genomic Medicine aims to improve therapeutic interventions and diagnostics, the quality of life of patients, but also to rationalize healthcare costs. To reach this goal, careful assessment and identification of evidence gaps for public health genomics priorities are required so that a more efficient healthcare environment is created. Here, we propose a public health genomics-driven approach to adjust the classical healthcare decision making process with an alternative methodological approach of cost-effectiveness analysis, which is particularly helpful for genomic medicine interventions. By combining classical cost-effectiveness analysis with budget constraints, social preferences, and patient ethics, we demonstrate the application of this model, the Genome Economics Model (GEM), based on a previously reported genome-guided intervention from a developing country environment. The model and the attendant rationale provide a practical guide by which all major healthcare stakeholders could ensure the sustainability of funding for genome-guided interventions, their adoption and coverage by health insurance funds, and prioritization of Genomic Medicine research, development, and innovation, given the restriction of budgets, particularly in developing countries and low-income healthcare settings in developed countries. The implications of the GEM for the policy makers interested in Genomic Medicine and new health technology and innovation assessment are also discussed.

  4. A hybrid approach for the automated finishing of bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Ali; Klammer, Aaron A; Robins, William P; Chin, Chen-Shan; Webster, Dale; Paxinos, Ellen; Hsu, David; Ashby, Meredith; Wang, Susana; Peluso, Paul; Sebra, Robert; Sorenson, Jon; Bullard, James; Yen, Jackie; Valdovino, Marie; Mollova, Emilia; Luong, Khai; Lin, Steven; LaMay, Brianna; Joshi, Amruta; Rowe, Lori; Frace, Michael; Tarr, Cheryl L; Turnsek, Maryann; Davis, Brigid M; Kasarskis, Andrew; Mekalanos, John J; Waldor, Matthew K; Schadt, Eric E

    2012-07-01

    Advances in DNA sequencing technology have improved our ability to characterize most genomic diversity. However, accurate resolution of large structural events is challenging because of the short read lengths of second-generation technologies. Third-generation sequencing technologies, which can yield longer multikilobase reads, have the potential to address limitations associated with genome assembly. Here we combine sequencing data from second- and third-generation DNA sequencing technologies to assemble the two-chromosome genome of a recent Haitian cholera outbreak strain into two nearly finished contigs at >99.9% accuracy. Complex regions with clinically relevant structure were completely resolved. In separate control assemblies on experimental and simulated data for the canonical N16961 cholera reference strain, we obtained 14 scaffolds of greater than 1 kb for the experimental data and 8 scaffolds of greater than 1 kb for the simulated data, which allowed us to correct several errors in contigs assembled from the short-read data alone. This work provides a blueprint for the next generation of rapid microbial identification and full-genome assembly.

  5. Single Step, a general approach for genomic selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Legarra, Andres; Christensen, Ole Fredslund; Aguilar, Ignacio;

    2014-01-01

    Genomic evaluation methods assume that the reference population is genotyped and phenotyped. This is most often false and the generation of pseudo-phenotypes is uncertain and inaccurate. However, markers obey transmission rules and therefore the covariances of marker genotypes across individuals ...

  6. Ecology of marine Bacteroidetes: a comparative genomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Gómez, Beatriz; Richter, Michael; Schüler, Margarete; Pinhassi, Jarone; Acinas, Silvia G; González, José M; Pedrós-Alió, Carlos

    2013-05-01

    Bacteroidetes are commonly assumed to be specialized in degrading high molecular weight (HMW) compounds and to have a preference for growth attached to particles, surfaces or algal cells. The first sequenced genomes of marine Bacteroidetes seemed to confirm this assumption. Many more genomes have been sequenced recently. Here, a comparative analysis of marine Bacteroidetes genomes revealed a life strategy different from those of other important phyla of marine bacterioplankton such as Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria. Bacteroidetes have many adaptations to grow attached to particles, have the capacity to degrade polymers, including a large number of peptidases, glycoside hydrolases (GHs), glycosyl transferases, adhesion proteins, as well as the genes for gliding motility. Several of the polymer degradation genes are located in close association with genes for TonB-dependent receptors and transducers, suggesting an integrated regulation of adhesion and degradation of polymers. This confirmed the role of this abundant group of marine bacteria as degraders of particulate matter. Marine Bacteroidetes had a significantly larger number of proteases than GHs, while non-marine Bacteroidetes had equal numbers of both. Proteorhodopsin containing Bacteroidetes shared two characteristics: small genome size and a higher number of genes involved in CO2 fixation per Mb. The latter may be important in order to survive when floating freely in the illuminated, but nutrient-poor, ocean surface.

  7. Accounting for Linkage Disequilibrium in genome scans for selection without individual genotypes: the local score approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariello, María Inés; Boitard, Simon; Mercier, Sabine; Robelin, David; Faraut, Thomas; Arnould, Cécile; Recoquillay, Julien; Bouchez, Olivier; Salin, Gérald; Dehais, Patrice; Gourichon, David; Leroux, Sophie; Pitel, Frédérique; Leterrier, Christine; SanCristobal, Magali

    2017-04-10

    Detecting genomic footprints of selection is an important step in the understanding of evolution. Accounting for linkage disequilibrium in genome scans increases detection power, but haplotype-based methods require individual genotypes and are not applicable on pool-sequenced samples. We propose to take advantage of the local score approach to account for linkage disequilibrium in genome scans for selection, cumulating (possibly small) signals from single markers over a genomic segment, to clearly pinpoint a selection signal. Using computer simulations, we demonstrate that this approach detects selection with higher power than several state-of-the-art single marker, windowing or haplotype-based approaches. We illustrate this on two benchmark data sets including individual genotypes, for which we obtain similar results with the local score and one haplotype-based approach. Finally, we apply the local score approach to Pool-Seq data obtained from a divergent selection experiment on behavior in quail, and obtain precise and biologically coherent selection signals: while competing methods fail to highlight any clear selection signature, our method detects several regions involving genes known to act on social responsiveness or autistic traits. Although we focus here on the detection of positive selection from multiple population data, the local score approach is general and can be applied to other genome scans for selection or other genome-wide analyses such as GWAS. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. A genomic approach to elucidating grass flower development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dornelas Marcelo C.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In sugarcane (Saccharum sp as with other species of grass, at a certain moment of its life cycle the vegetative meristem is converted into an inflorescence meristem which has at least two distinct inflorescence branching steps before the spikelet meristem terminates in the production of a flower (floret. In model dicotyledonous species such successive conversions of meristem identities and the concentric arrangement of floral organs in specific whorls have both been shown to be genetically controlled. Using data from the Sugarcane Expressed Sequence Tag (EST Project (SUCEST database, we have identified all sugarcane proteins and genes putatively involved in reproductive meristem and flower development. Sequence comparisons of known flower-related genes have uncovered conserved evolutionary pathways of flower development and flower pattern formation between dicotyledons and monocotyledons, such as some grass species. We have paid special attention to the analysis of the MADS-box multigene family of transcription factors that together with the APETALA2 (AP2 family are the key elements of the transcriptional networks controlling plant reproductive development. Considerations on the evolutionary developmental genetics of grass flowers and their relation to the ABC homeotic gene activity model of flower development are also presented.

  9. Sequencing of the mitochondrial genome of the avocado lace bug Pseudacysta perseae (Heteroptera, Tingidae) using a genome skimming approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocher, Arthur; Guilbert, Éric; Lhuillier, Émeline; Murienne, Jerôme

    2015-03-01

    Lace bugs (Tingidae) are a family of phytophagous heteropterans, some of which are important agricultural and forestry pests. They currently comprise around 2500 species distributed worldwide, for which only one mitochondrial genome has been described so far. We sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome and the nuclear ribosomal gene segment of the avocado lace bug Pseudacysta perseae using a genome skimming approach on an Illumina Hiseq 2000 platform. Fifty-four additional heteropteran mitogenomes, including the one of the sycamore lace bug Corythucha ciliata, were retrieved to allow for comparisons and phylogenetic analyses. P. perseae mitochondrial genome was determined to be 15,850 bp long, and presented the typical organisation of insect mitogenomes. The phylogenetic analysis placed P. perseae as a sister to C. ciliata but did not confirm the monophyly of Miroidae including Tingidae. Our results contradicted widely accepted phylogenetic hypothesis, which highlights the limits of analyses based on mitochondrial data only. Shotgun sequencing approaches should provide substantial improvements in harmonizing mitochondrial and nuclear databases.

  10. Statistical Approaches in Genome-Wide Association Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdani, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies, GWAS, typically contain hundreds of thousands single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs, genotyped for few numbers of samples. The aim of these studies is to identify regions harboring SNPs or to predict the outcomes of interest. Since the number of predictors in the GWAS far exceeds the number of samples, it is impossible to analyze the data with classical statistical methods. In the current GWAS, the widely applied methods are based on single marker analysis th...

  11. Functional genomic approach to the study of biodiversitywithin Trichoderma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Monte E; Hermosa M R; González F J; Rey M; Cardoza R E; Gutiérrez S; Delgado Jarana J; Llobell A

    2004-01-01

    @@ Trichoderma is a fungal genus of great and demonstrable biotechnological value, but its genome is poorly surveyed compared with other model microorganisms. Due to their ubiquity and rapid substrate colonization, Trichoderma species have been widely used as biocontrol organisms for agriculture, and their enzyme systems are widely used in industry. Therefore, there is a clear interest to explore beyond the phenotype to exploit the underlying genetic systems using functional genomics tools. The great diversity of species within the Trichoderma genus, the absence of optimized systems for its exploration, and the great variety of genes expressed under a wide range of ambient conditions are the main challenges to consider when starting a comprehensive functional genomics study. An initial project started by three Spanish groups has been extended into the project TRICHOEST, funded by the EU (FP5, QLRT-2001-02032) to target the transcriptome analysis of selected Trichoderma strains with biocontrol potential, in conditions related to antagonism, nutrient stress and plant interactions. Once specific conditions were defined, cDNA libraries were produced and used for EST sequencing. Nine strains from seven Trichoderma species have been considered in this study and an important amount of gene sequence data has been generated, analyzed and used to compare the gene expression in different strains.In parallel to sequencing, genomic expression studies were carried out by means of macro-arrays to identify genes expressed in specific conditions. In silico analysis of DNA sequencing data together with macro-array expression results have lead to a selection based on the potential use of the gene sequences.The selected clone sequences were completed and cloned in appropriate vectors to initiate functional analysis by means of expression studies in homologous and heterologous systems.

  12. Genomic sister-disorders of neurodevelopment: an evolutionary approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Bernard; Summers, Kyle; Dorus, Steve

    2009-02-01

    Genomic sister-disorders are defined here as diseases mediated by duplications versus deletions of the same region. Such disorders can provide unique information concerning the genomic underpinnings of human neurodevelopment because effects of diametric variation in gene copy number on cognitive and behavioral phenotypes can be inferred. We describe evidence from the literature on deletions versus duplications for the regions underlying the best-known human neurogenetic sister-disorders, including Williams syndrome, Velocardiofacial syndrome, and Smith-Magenis syndrome, as well as the X-chromosomal conditions Klinefelter and Turner syndromes. These data suggest that diametric copy-number alterations can, like diametric alterations to imprinted genes, generate contrasting phenotypes associated with autistic-spectrum and psychotic-spectrum conditions. Genomically based perturbations to the development of the human social brain are thus apparently mediated to a notable degree by effects of variation in gene copy number. We also conducted the first analyses of positive selection for genes in the regions affected by these disorders. We found evidence consistent with adaptive evolution of protein-coding genes, or selective sweeps, for three of the four sets of sister-syndromes analyzed. These studies of selection facilitate identification of candidate genes for the phenotypes observed and lend a novel evolutionary dimension to the analysis of human cognitive architecture and neurogenetic disorders.

  13. Integrating Genomic Data Sets for Knowledge Discovery: An Informed Approach to Management of Captive Endangered Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irizarry, Kristopher J L; Bryant, Doug; Kalish, Jordan; Eng, Curtis; Schmidt, Peggy L; Barrett, Gini; Barr, Margaret C

    2016-01-01

    Many endangered captive populations exhibit reduced genetic diversity resulting in health issues that impact reproductive fitness and quality of life. Numerous cost effective genomic sequencing and genotyping technologies provide unparalleled opportunity for incorporating genomics knowledge in management of endangered species. Genomic data, such as sequence data, transcriptome data, and genotyping data, provide critical information about a captive population that, when leveraged correctly, can be utilized to maximize population genetic variation while simultaneously reducing unintended introduction or propagation of undesirable phenotypes. Current approaches aimed at managing endangered captive populations utilize species survival plans (SSPs) that rely upon mean kinship estimates to maximize genetic diversity while simultaneously avoiding artificial selection in the breeding program. However, as genomic resources increase for each endangered species, the potential knowledge available for management also increases. Unlike model organisms in which considerable scientific resources are used to experimentally validate genotype-phenotype relationships, endangered species typically lack the necessary sample sizes and economic resources required for such studies. Even so, in the absence of experimentally verified genetic discoveries, genomics data still provides value. In fact, bioinformatics and comparative genomics approaches offer mechanisms for translating these raw genomics data sets into integrated knowledge that enable an informed approach to endangered species management.

  14. Genome-wide analytical approaches for reverse metabolic engineering of industrially relevant phenotypes in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Bart; Maris, Antonius J A; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T

    2012-01-01

    Successful reverse engineering of mutants that have been obtained by nontargeted strain improvement has long presented a major challenge in yeast biotechnology. This paper reviews the use of genome-wide approaches for analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains originating from evolutionary engineering or random mutagenesis. On the basis of an evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of different methods, we conclude that for the initial identification of relevant genetic changes, whole genome sequencing is superior to other analytical techniques, such as transcriptome, metabolome, proteome, or array-based genome analysis. Key advantages of this technique over gene expression analysis include the independency of genome sequences on experimental context and the possibility to directly and precisely reproduce the identified changes in naive strains. The predictive value of genome-wide analysis of strains with industrially relevant characteristics can be further improved by classical genetics or simultaneous analysis of strains derived from parallel, independent strain improvement lineages. PMID:22152095

  15. Genomic instability in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: a new step towards precision medicine and novel therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ibrahim H; Lowery, Maeve A; Stadler, Zsofia K; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Kelsen, David P; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most challenging cancers. Whole genome sequencing studies have been conducted to elucidate the underlying fundamentals underscoring disease behavior. Studies have identified a subgroup of pancreatic cancer patients with distinct molecular and clinical features. Genetic fingerprinting of these tumors is consistent with an unstable genome and defective DNA repair pathways, which creates unique susceptibility to agents inducing DNA damage. BRCA1/2 mutations, both germline and somatic, which lead to impaired DNA repair, are found to be important biomarkers of genomic instability as well as of response to DNA damaging agents. Recent studies have elucidated that PARP inhibitors and platinum agents may be effective to induce tumor regression in solid tumors bearing an unstable genome including pancreatic cancer. In this review we discuss the characteristics of genomic instability in pancreatic cancer along with its clinical implications and the utility of DNA targeting agents particularly PARP inhibitors as a novel treatment approach.

  16. Genome-wide analytical approaches for reverse metabolic engineering of industrially relevant phenotypes in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Bart; van Maris, Antonius J A; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T

    2012-03-01

    Successful reverse engineering of mutants that have been obtained by nontargeted strain improvement has long presented a major challenge in yeast biotechnology. This paper reviews the use of genome-wide approaches for analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains originating from evolutionary engineering or random mutagenesis. On the basis of an evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of different methods, we conclude that for the initial identification of relevant genetic changes, whole genome sequencing is superior to other analytical techniques, such as transcriptome, metabolome, proteome, or array-based genome analysis. Key advantages of this technique over gene expression analysis include the independency of genome sequences on experimental context and the possibility to directly and precisely reproduce the identified changes in naive strains. The predictive value of genome-wide analysis of strains with industrially relevant characteristics can be further improved by classical genetics or simultaneous analysis of strains derived from parallel, independent strain improvement lineages.

  17. Crowdfunding the Azolla fern genome project: a grassroots approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fay-Wei; Pryer, Kathleen M

    2014-01-01

    Much of science progresses within the tight boundaries of what is often seen as a "black box". Though familiar to funding agencies, researchers and the academic journals they publish in, it is an entity that outsiders rarely get to peek into. Crowdfunding is a novel means that allows the public to participate in, as well as to support and witness advancements in science. Here we describe our recent crowdfunding efforts to sequence the Azolla genome, a little fern with massive green potential. Crowdfunding is a worthy platform not only for obtaining seed money for exploratory research, but also for engaging directly with the general public as a rewarding form of outreach.

  18. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-07-14

    The structural genomics project is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy which is medically and biologically relevant, of good value, and tractable. As an option to consider, we present the Pfam5000 strategy, which involves selecting the 5000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. We compare the Pfam5000 strategy to several other proposed strategies that would require similar numbers of targets. These include including complete solution of several small to moderately sized bacterial proteomes, partial coverage of the human proteome, and random selection of approximately 5000 targets from sequenced genomes. We measure the impact that successful implementation of these strategies would have upon structural interpretation of the proteins in Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and 131 complete proteomes (including 10 of eukaryotes) from the Proteome Analysis database at EBI. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 68 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 59 percent of residues) and 61 percent of eukaryotic proteins (40 percent of residues). More fine-grained coverage which would allow accurate modeling of these proteins would require an order of magnitude more targets. The Pfam5000 strategy may be modified in several ways, for example to focus on larger families, bacterial sequences, or eukaryotic sequences; as long as secondary consideration is given to large families within Pfam, coverage results vary only slightly. In contrast, focusing structural genomics on a single tractable genome would have only a limited impact in structural knowledge of other proteomes: a significant fraction (about 30-40 percent of the proteins, and 40-60 percent of the residues) of each proteome is classified in small

  19. Flexible approaches for teaching computational genomics in a health information management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Leming; Watzlaf, Valerie; Abdelhak, Mervat

    2013-01-01

    The astonishing improvement of high-throughput biotechnologies in recent years makes it possible to access a huge amount of genomic data. The association between genomic data and genetic disease has already been and will continue to be applied to personalized healthcare. Health information management (HIM) professionals are the ones who will handle personal genetic information and provide solid evidence to support physicians' diagnoses and personalized treatment strategies, and therefore they will need to have the knowledge and skills to process genomic data. In this paper, we describe flexible approaches for teaching a computational genomics course in the HIM program at the University of Pittsburgh. HIM programs at other universities may choose an appropriate approach to fit into their own curriculum.

  20. A New Comparative-Genomics Approach for Defining Phenotype-Specific Indicators Reveals Specific Genetic Markers in Predatory Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasternak, Zohar; Ben Sasson, Tom; Cohen, Yossi; Segev, Elad; Jurkevitch, Edouard

    2015-01-01

    Predatory bacteria seek and consume other live bacteria. Although belonging to taxonomically diverse groups, relatively few bacterial predator species are known. Consequently, it is difficult to assess the impact of predation within the bacterial realm. As no genetic signatures distinguishing them from non-predatory bacteria are known, genomic resources cannot be exploited to uncover novel predators. In order to identify genes specific to predatory bacteria, we developed a bioinformatic tool called DiffGene. This tool automatically identifies marker genes that are specific to phenotypic or taxonomic groups, by mapping the complete gene content of all available fully-sequenced genomes for the presence/absence of each gene in each genome. A putative 'predator region' of ~60 amino acids in the tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) protein was found to probably be a predator-specific marker. This region is found in all known obligate predator and a few facultative predator genomes, and is absent from most facultative predators and all non-predatory bacteria. We designed PCR primers that uniquely amplify a ~180bp-long sequence within the predators' TDO gene, and validated them in monocultures as well as in metagenetic analysis of environmental wastewater samples. This marker, in addition to its usage in predator identification and phylogenetics, may finally permit reliable enumeration and cataloguing of predatory bacteria from environmental samples, as well as uncovering novel predators.

  1. A New Approach to Dissect Nuclear Organization: TALE-Mediated Genome Visualization (TGV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyanari, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    Spatiotemporal organization of chromatin within the nucleus has so far remained elusive. Live visualization of nuclear remodeling could be a promising approach to understand its functional relevance in genome functions and mechanisms regulating genome architecture. Recent technological advances in live imaging of chromosomes begun to explore the biological roles of the movement of the chromatin within the nucleus. Here I describe a new technique, called TALE-mediated genome visualization (TGV), which allows us to visualize endogenous repetitive sequence including centromeric, pericentromeric, and telomeric repeats in living cells.

  2. #fitspo on Instagram: A mixed-methods approach using Netlytic and photo analysis, uncovering the online discussion and author/image characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santarossa, Sara; Coyne, Paige; Lisinski, Carly; Woodruff, Sarah J

    2016-11-15

    The #fitspo 'tag' is a recent trend on Instagram, which is used on posts to motivate others towards a healthy lifestyle through exercise/eating habits. This study used a mixed-methods approach consisting of text and network analysis via the Netlytic program (N = 10,000 #fitspo posts), and content analysis of #fitspo images (N = 122) was used to examine author and image characteristics. Results suggest that #fitspo posts may motivate through appearance-mediated themes, as the largest content categories (based on the associated text) were 'feeling good' and 'appearance'. Furthermore, #fitspo posts may create peer influence/support as personal (opposed to non-personal) accounts were associated with higher popularity of images (i.e. number of likes/followers). Finally, most images contained posed individuals with some degree of objectification.

  3. Statistical Approaches Accomodating Uncertainty in Modern Genomic Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skotte, Line

    Due to recent technological advances the research fields of human genetics are poised as never before to provide valuable insights on the molecular basis of disease. The technological advances has made it possible to genotype hundreds of thousands known genetic variants, re-sequence entire genomes...... the contributed method applicable to case-control studies as well as mapping of quantitative traits. The contributed method provides a needed association test for quantitative traits in the presence of uncertain genotypes and it further allows correction for population structure in association tests for disease...... imbalanced allelic transcription from RNA sequencing data. The method differs from previous methods in that is accounts for the well-known inherent over-dispersion in re-sequencing data and that it combines information across individuals to form a population-based measure of allelic imbalance. Our...

  4. Statistical Approaches Accomodating Uncertainty in Modern Genomic Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skotte, Line

    to discover new variants and perform detailed profiling of an individual's entire transcriptome. However, uncertainties pervades every level of modern genome-wide data analyses and timely development of statistical methods that accommodates these uncertainties are therefore necessary to fully exploit...... the potential of the technological advances. The first of the four papers included in this thesis describes a new method for association mapping that accommodates uncertain genotypes from low-coverage re-sequencing data. The method allows uncertain genotypes using a score statistic based on the joint likelihood...... states and quantitative traits in the presence of uncertain genotypes, neither were possible prior to the development of the method. Our simulations show that the contributed method have higher statistical power than methods based on genotypes inferred from the sequencing data. The second paper presents...

  5. Whole genome sequencing: an efficient approach to ensuring food safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakicevic, B.; Nastasijevic, I.; Dimitrijevic, M.

    2017-09-01

    Whole genome sequencing is an effective, powerful tool that can be applied to a wide range of public health and food safety applications. A major difference between WGS and the traditional typing techniques is that WGS allows all genes to be included in the analysis, instead of a well-defined subset of genes or variable intergenic regions. Also, the use of WGS can facilitate the understanding of contamination/colonization routes of foodborne pathogens within the food production environment, and can also afford efficient tracking of pathogens’ entry routes and distribution from farm-to-consumer. Tracking foodborne pathogens in the food processing-distribution-retail-consumer continuum is of the utmost importance for facilitation of outbreak investigations and rapid action in controlling/preventing foodborne outbreaks. Therefore, WGS likely will replace most of the numerous workflows used in public health laboratories to characterize foodborne pathogens into one consolidated, efficient workflow.

  6. CRISPR/Cas9: A Practical Approach in Date Palm Genome Editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad N. Sattar

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The genetic modifications through breeding of crop plants have long been used to improve the yield and quality. However, precise genome editing (GE could be a very useful supplementary tool for improvement of crop plants by targeted genome modifications. Various GE techniques including ZFNs (zinc finger nucleases, TALENs (transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and most recently clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9-based approaches have been successfully employed for various crop plants including fruit trees. CRISPR/Cas9-based approaches hold great potential in GE due to their simplicity, competency, and versatility over other GE techniques. However, to the best of our knowledge no such genetic improvement has ever been developed in date palm—an important fruit crop in Oasis agriculture. The applications of CRISPR/Cas9 can be a challenging task in date palm GE due to its large and complex genome, high rate of heterozygosity and outcrossing, in vitro regeneration and screening of mutants, high frequency of single-nucleotide polymorphism in the genome and ultimately genetic instability. In this review, we addressed the potential application of CRISPR/Cas9-based approaches in date palm GE to improve the sustainable date palm production. The availability of the date palm whole genome sequence has made it feasible to use CRISPR/Cas9 GE approach for genetic improvement in this species. Moreover, the future prospects of GE application in date palm are also addressed in this review.

  7. Bacillus thuringiensis toxin resistance mechanisms among Lepidoptera: progress on genomic approaches to uncover causal mutations in the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Brad S

    2016-06-01

    Transgenic plants that express Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystal (Cry) protein toxins (Bt crops) effectively control feeding by the European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, although documented resistance evolution among a number of species in both the laboratory and field has heightened concerns about the durability of this technology. Research has provided major insights into the mutations that alter Bt toxin binding receptor structure and function within the midgut of Lepidoptera that directly impacts the efficacy of Bt toxins, and potentially leads to the evolution of resistance to Bt crops in the field. In this manuscript we provide an overview of available data on the identification of genes involved in high levels of resistance to Cry toxins, with emphasis on resistance described for O. nubilalis as the main target of Bt corn.

  8. Big Data Analytics for Genomic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Y. He

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic medicine attempts to build individualized strategies for diagnostic or therapeutic decision-making by utilizing patients’ genomic information. Big Data analytics uncovers hidden patterns, unknown correlations, and other insights through examining large-scale various data sets. While integration and manipulation of diverse genomic data and comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs on a Big Data infrastructure exhibit challenges, they also provide a feasible opportunity to develop an efficient and effective approach to identify clinically actionable genetic variants for individualized diagnosis and therapy. In this paper, we review the challenges of manipulating large-scale next-generation sequencing (NGS data and diverse clinical data derived from the EHRs for genomic medicine. We introduce possible solutions for different challenges in manipulating, managing, and analyzing genomic and clinical data to implement genomic medicine. Additionally, we also present a practical Big Data toolset for identifying clinically actionable genetic variants using high-throughput NGS data and EHRs.

  9. Big Data Analytics for Genomic Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Karen Y.; Ge, Dongliang; He, Max M.

    2017-01-01

    Genomic medicine attempts to build individualized strategies for diagnostic or therapeutic decision-making by utilizing patients’ genomic information. Big Data analytics uncovers hidden patterns, unknown correlations, and other insights through examining large-scale various data sets. While integration and manipulation of diverse genomic data and comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs) on a Big Data infrastructure exhibit challenges, they also provide a feasible opportunity to develop an efficient and effective approach to identify clinically actionable genetic variants for individualized diagnosis and therapy. In this paper, we review the challenges of manipulating large-scale next-generation sequencing (NGS) data and diverse clinical data derived from the EHRs for genomic medicine. We introduce possible solutions for different challenges in manipulating, managing, and analyzing genomic and clinical data to implement genomic medicine. Additionally, we also present a practical Big Data toolset for identifying clinically actionable genetic variants using high-throughput NGS data and EHRs. PMID:28212287

  10. Big Data Analytics for Genomic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Karen Y; Ge, Dongliang; He, Max M

    2017-02-15

    Genomic medicine attempts to build individualized strategies for diagnostic or therapeutic decision-making by utilizing patients' genomic information. Big Data analytics uncovers hidden patterns, unknown correlations, and other insights through examining large-scale various data sets. While integration and manipulation of diverse genomic data and comprehensive electronic health records (EHRs) on a Big Data infrastructure exhibit challenges, they also provide a feasible opportunity to develop an efficient and effective approach to identify clinically actionable genetic variants for individualized diagnosis and therapy. In this paper, we review the challenges of manipulating large-scale next-generation sequencing (NGS) data and diverse clinical data derived from the EHRs for genomic medicine. We introduce possible solutions for different challenges in manipulating, managing, and analyzing genomic and clinical data to implement genomic medicine. Additionally, we also present a practical Big Data toolset for identifying clinically actionable genetic variants using high-throughput NGS data and EHRs.

  11. Two heuristic approaches to describe periodicities in genomic microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Aßmus

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the first part we discuss the filtering of panels of time series based on singular value decomposition. The discussion is based on an approach where this filtering is used to normalize microarray data. We point out effects on the periodicity and phases for time series panels. In the second part we investigate time dependent periodic panels with different phases. We align the time series in the panel and discuss the periodogram of the aligned time series with the purpose of describing the periodic structure of the panel. The method is quite powerful assuming known phases in the model, but it deteriorates rapidly for noisy data.  

  12. A physical approach to segregation and folding of the Caulobacter crescentus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dame, Remus T; Tark-Dame, Mariliis; Schiessel, Helmut

    2011-12-01

    Bacterial genomes are functionally organized. This organization is dynamic and globally changing throughout the cell cycle. Upon initiation of replication of the chromosome, the two origins segregate and move towards their new location taking along the newly replicated genome. Caulobacter crescentus employs a dedicated active partitioning (Par) system to move one copy of the parS centromere to the distal pole, while the other stays at the stalked pole. In this issue of Molecular Microbiology, Hong and McAdams describe studies on the speed of segregation of parS and regions up to 150 kb away. They show clear differences in segregation rates between parS and 50 kb flanking regions versus regions further away. To assess segregation rates the authors track fluorescent markers during movement using time-lapse microscopy. The relation between genomic and physical distance of pairs of markers reflects how the genome is folded. This relation permits testing experimental data against models from polymer physics. Such models are helpful in understanding principles of genome folding. Although long used in studies on eukaryotes, this approach has rarely been applied to bacteria. Finally, the authors give the first direct evidence for a role of the bacterial chromatin protein HU in folding the genome in vivo.

  13. Identifying contamination with advanced visualization and analysis practices: metagenomic approaches for eukaryotic genome assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom O. Delmont

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing provides a fast and cost-effective mean to recover genomes of organisms from all domains of life. However, adequate curation of the assembly results against potential contamination of non-target organisms requires advanced bioinformatics approaches and practices. Here, we re-analyzed the sequencing data generated for the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini, and created a holistic display of the eukaryotic genome assembly using DNA data originating from two groups and eleven sequencing libraries. By using bacterial single-copy genes, k-mer frequencies, and coverage values of scaffolds we could identify and characterize multiple near-complete bacterial genomes from the raw assembly, and curate a 182 Mbp draft genome for H. dujardini supported by RNA-Seq data. Our results indicate that most contaminant scaffolds were assembled from Moleculo long-read libraries, and most of these contaminants have differed between library preparations. Our re-analysis shows that visualization and curation of eukaryotic genome assemblies can benefit from tools designed to address the needs of today’s microbiologists, who are constantly challenged by the difficulties associated with the identification of distinct microbial genomes in complex environmental metagenomes.

  14. Identifying contamination with advanced visualization and analysis practices: metagenomic approaches for eukaryotic genome assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmont, Tom O.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing provides a fast and cost-effective mean to recover genomes of organisms from all domains of life. However, adequate curation of the assembly results against potential contamination of non-target organisms requires advanced bioinformatics approaches and practices. Here, we re-analyzed the sequencing data generated for the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini, and created a holistic display of the eukaryotic genome assembly using DNA data originating from two groups and eleven sequencing libraries. By using bacterial single-copy genes, k-mer frequencies, and coverage values of scaffolds we could identify and characterize multiple near-complete bacterial genomes from the raw assembly, and curate a 182 Mbp draft genome for H. dujardini supported by RNA-Seq data. Our results indicate that most contaminant scaffolds were assembled from Moleculo long-read libraries, and most of these contaminants have differed between library preparations. Our re-analysis shows that visualization and curation of eukaryotic genome assemblies can benefit from tools designed to address the needs of today’s microbiologists, who are constantly challenged by the difficulties associated with the identification of distinct microbial genomes in complex environmental metagenomes. PMID:27069789

  15. Identifying contamination with advanced visualization and analysis practices: metagenomic approaches for eukaryotic genome assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmont, Tom O; Eren, A Murat

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing provides a fast and cost-effective mean to recover genomes of organisms from all domains of life. However, adequate curation of the assembly results against potential contamination of non-target organisms requires advanced bioinformatics approaches and practices. Here, we re-analyzed the sequencing data generated for the tardigrade Hypsibius dujardini, and created a holistic display of the eukaryotic genome assembly using DNA data originating from two groups and eleven sequencing libraries. By using bacterial single-copy genes, k-mer frequencies, and coverage values of scaffolds we could identify and characterize multiple near-complete bacterial genomes from the raw assembly, and curate a 182 Mbp draft genome for H. dujardini supported by RNA-Seq data. Our results indicate that most contaminant scaffolds were assembled from Moleculo long-read libraries, and most of these contaminants have differed between library preparations. Our re-analysis shows that visualization and curation of eukaryotic genome assemblies can benefit from tools designed to address the needs of today's microbiologists, who are constantly challenged by the difficulties associated with the identification of distinct microbial genomes in complex environmental metagenomes.

  16. Integrated genomics and molecular breeding approaches for dissecting the complex quantitative traits in crop plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujur, Alice; Saxena, Maneesha S; Bajaj, Deepak; Laxmi; Parida, Swarup K

    2013-12-01

    The enormous population growth, climate change and global warming are now considered major threats to agriculture and world's food security. To improve the productivity and sustainability of agriculture, the development of highyielding and durable abiotic and biotic stress-tolerant cultivars and/climate resilient crops is essential. Henceforth, understanding the molecular mechanism and dissection of complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits is the prime objective in current agricultural biotechnology research. In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in plant genomics and molecular breeding research pertaining to conventional and next-generation whole genome, transcriptome and epigenome sequencing efforts, generation of huge genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic resources and development of modern genomics-assisted breeding approaches in diverse crop genotypes with contrasting yield and abiotic stress tolerance traits. Unfortunately, the detailed molecular mechanism and gene regulatory networks controlling such complex quantitative traits is not yet well understood in crop plants. Therefore, we propose an integrated strategies involving available enormous and diverse traditional and modern -omics (structural, functional, comparative and epigenomics) approaches/resources and genomics-assisted breeding methods which agricultural biotechnologist can adopt/utilize to dissect and decode the molecular and gene regulatory networks involved in the complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits in crop plants. This would provide clues and much needed inputs for rapid selection of novel functionally relevant molecular tags regulating such complex traits to expedite traditional and modern marker-assisted genetic enhancement studies in target crop species for developing high-yielding stress-tolerant varieties.

  17. BG7: A New Approach for Bacterial Genome Annotation Designed for Next Generation Sequencing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja-Tobes, Pablo; Manrique, Marina; Pareja-Tobes, Eduardo; Pareja, Eduardo; Tobes, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    BG7 is a new system for de novo bacterial, archaeal and viral genome annotation based on a new approach specifically designed for annotating genomes sequenced with next generation sequencing technologies. The system is versatile and able to annotate genes even in the step of preliminary assembly of the genome. It is especially efficient detecting unexpected genes horizontally acquired from bacterial or archaeal distant genomes, phages, plasmids, and mobile elements. From the initial phases of the gene annotation process, BG7 exploits the massive availability of annotated protein sequences in databases. BG7 predicts ORFs and infers their function based on protein similarity with a wide set of reference proteins, integrating ORF prediction and functional annotation phases in just one step. BG7 is especially tolerant to sequencing errors in start and stop codons, to frameshifts, and to assembly or scaffolding errors. The system is also tolerant to the high level of gene fragmentation which is frequently found in not fully assembled genomes. BG7 current version – which is developed in Java, takes advantage of Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud computing features, but it can also be run locally in any operating system. BG7 is a fast, automated and scalable system that can cope with the challenge of analyzing the huge amount of genomes that are being sequenced with NGS technologies. Its capabilities and efficiency were demonstrated in the 2011 EHEC Germany outbreak in which BG7 was used to get the first annotations right the next day after the first entero-hemorrhagic E. coli genome sequences were made publicly available. The suitability of BG7 for genome annotation has been proved for Illumina, 454, Ion Torrent, and PacBio sequencing technologies. Besides, thanks to its plasticity, our system could be very easily adapted to work with new technologies in the future. PMID:23185310

  18. Resolving the question of trypanosome monophyly: a comparative genomics approach using whole genome data sets with low taxon sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Guy; Soanes, Darren M; Stevens, Jamie R

    2011-07-01

    Since the first attempts to classify the evolutionary history of trypanosomes, there have been conflicting reports regarding their true phylogenetic relationships and, in particular, their relationships with other vertebrate trypanosomatids, e.g. Leishmania sp., as well as with the many insect parasitising trypanosomatids. Perhaps the issue that has provided most debate is that concerning the monophyly (or otherwise) of genus Trypanosoma and, even with the advent of molecular methods, the findings of numerous studies have varied significantly depending on the gene sequences analysed, number of taxa included, choice of outgroup and phylogenetic methodology. While of arguably limited applied importance, resolution of the question as to whether or not trypanosomes are monophyletic is critical to accurate evaluation of competing, mutually exclusive evolutionary scenarios for these parasites, namely the 'vertebrate-first' or 'insect-first' hypotheses. Therefore, a new approach, which could overcome previous limitations was needed. At its most simple, the problem can be defined within the framework of a trifurcated tree with three hypothetical positions at which the root can be placed. Using BLASTp and whole-genome gene-by-gene phylogenetic analyses of Trypanosoma brucei, Trypanosoma cruzi, Leishmania major and Naegleria gruberi, we have identified 599 gene markers--putative homologues--that were shared between the genomes of these four taxa. Of these, 75 homologous gene families that demonstrate monophyly of the kinetoplastids were identified. We then used these data sets in combination with an additional outgroup, Euglena gracilis, coupled with large-scale gene concatenation and diverse phylogenetic techniques to investigate the relative branching order of T. brucei, T. cruzi and L. major. Our findings confirm the monophyly of genus Trypanosoma and demonstrate that <1% of the analysed gene markers shared between the genomes of T. brucei, T. cruzi and L. major reject

  19. Revelando sentidos na prática docente: a abordagem de corpus na análise do discurso Uncovering meanings in pedagogical practice: the corpus approach in discourse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vander Viana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo discute a viabilidade da utilização de ferramentas da Linguística de Corpus na análise do discurso pedagógico. Para tanto, são apresentados dois estudos de caso. O primeiro focaliza o discurso de professores de língua inglesa de um renomado curso de idiomas do Rio de Janeiro acerca da implementação de recursos tecnológicos na sala de aula. O segundo estudo, por sua vez, busca perceber qual é o posicionamento de professores universitários de literaturas em língua inglesa sobre literatura e seu ensino. Os resultados apontam para a riqueza dos dados contextuais que podem ser depreendidos a partir de uma análise linguística de base empírica. Em última análise, o artigo revela a importância e a flexibilidade da abordagem de corpus na análise do discurso, que pode ser aplicada a inúmeros contextos.This paper discusses the feasibility of using Corpus Linguistics tools in the analysis of pedagogic discourse. For doing this, two case studies are presented. The first one focuses on the discourse of English language teachers of a well-known languages course in Rio de Janeiro about the implementation of technological resources in the classroom. The second study, in its turn, seeks to realize the position held by university professors of literatures in English language with regard to literature and its teaching. The results point out to the richness of contextual data which can be inferred from a linguistic analysis with an empirical basis. All in all, the paper uncovers the importance and flexibility of the corpus approach in discourse analysis, which may be applied to several contexts.

  20. Germ line genome editing in clinics: the approaches, objectives and global society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing allows for the versatile genetic modification of somatic cells, germ cells and embryos. In particular, CRISPR/Cas9 is worldwide used in biomedical research. Although the first report on Cas9-mediated gene modification in human embryos focused on the prevention of a genetic disease in offspring, it raised profound ethical and social concerns over the safety of subsequent generations and the potential misuse of genome editing for human enhancement. The present article considers germ line genome editing approaches from various clinical and ethical viewpoints and explores its objectives. The risks and benefits of the following three likely objectives are assessed: the prevention of monogenic diseases, personalized assisted reproductive technology (ART) and genetic enhancement. Although genetic enhancement should be avoided, the international regulatory landscape suggests the inevitability of this misuse at ART centers. Under these circumstances, possible regulatory responses and the potential roles of public dialogue are discussed. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. A pipeline for automated annotation of yeast genome sequences by a conserved-synteny approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proux-Wéra Estelle

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Yeasts are a model system for exploring eukaryotic genome evolution. Next-generation sequencing technologies are poised to vastly increase the number of yeast genome sequences, both from resequencing projects (population studies and from de novo sequencing projects (new species. However, the annotation of genomes presents a major bottleneck for de novo projects, because it still relies on a process that is largely manual. Results Here we present the Yeast Genome Annotation Pipeline (YGAP, an automated system designed specifically for new yeast genome sequences lacking transcriptome data. YGAP does automatic de novo annotation, exploiting homology and synteny information from other yeast species stored in the Yeast Gene Order Browser (YGOB database. The basic premises underlying YGAP's approach are that data from other species already tells us what genes we should expect to find in any particular genomic region and that we should also expect that orthologous genes are likely to have similar intron/exon structures. Additionally, it is able to detect probable frameshift sequencing errors and can propose corrections for them. YGAP searches intelligently for introns, and detects tRNA genes and Ty-like elements. Conclusions In tests on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and on the genomes of Naumovozyma castellii and Tetrapisispora blattae newly sequenced with Roche-454 technology, YGAP outperformed another popular annotation program (AUGUSTUS. For S. cerevisiae and N. castellii, 91-93% of YGAP's predicted gene structures were identical to those in previous manually curated gene sets. YGAP has been implemented as a webserver with a user-friendly interface at http://wolfe.gen.tcd.ie/annotation.

  2. RegPredict: an integrated system for regulon inference in prokaryotes by comparative genomics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novichkov, Pavel S.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Stavrovskaya, Elena D.; Novichkova, Elena S.; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Arkin, Adam P.; Mironov, Andrey A.; Dubchak, Inna

    2010-05-26

    RegPredict web server is designed to provide comparative genomics tools for reconstruction and analysis of microbial regulons using comparative genomics approach. The server allows the user to rapidly generate reference sets of regulons and regulatory motif profiles in a group of prokaryotic genomes. The new concept of a cluster of co-regulated orthologous operons allows the user to distribute the analysis of large regulons and to perform the comparative analysis of multiple clusters independently. Two major workflows currently implemented in RegPredict are: (i) regulon reconstruction for a known regulatory motif and (ii) ab initio inference of a novel regulon using several scenarios for the generation of starting gene sets. RegPredict provides a comprehensive collection of manually curated positional weight matrices of regulatory motifs. It is based on genomic sequences, ortholog and operon predictions from the MicrobesOnline. An interactive web interface of RegPredict integrates and presents diverse genomic and functional information about the candidate regulon members from several web resources. RegPredict is freely accessible at http://regpredict.lbl.gov.

  3. Evaluation of somatic genomic imbalances in thyroid carcinomas of follicular origin by CGH-based approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldan, Federica; Mio, Catia; Allegri, Lorenzo; Passon, Nadia; Lepore, Saverio M; Russo, Diego; Damante, Giuseppe

    2017-09-07

    Application of distinct technologies of cancer genome analysis has provided important information for the molecular characterization of several human neoplasia, including follicular cell-derived thyroid carcinoma. Among them, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH)-based procedures have been extensively applied to evaluate genomic imbalances present in these tumours, obtaining data leading to an increase in the understanding of their complexity and diversity. In this review, after a brief overview of the most commonly used CGH-based technichs, we will describe the major results deriving from the most influential studies in the literature which used this approach to investigate the genomic aberrations of thyroid cancer cells. In most studies a small number of patients have been analyzed. Deletions and duplications at different chromosomal regions were detected in all investigated cohorts. A higher number of genomic imbalances has been detected in anaplastic or poorly differentiated thyroid carcinomas compared to well differentiated ones. Limitations in the interpretation of the results, as well the potential impact in the clinical practice are discussed. Though a quite heterogeneous picture arises from results so far available, CGH array, combined with other methodologies as well as an accurate clinical management, may offer novel opportunities for a better stratification of thyroid cancer patients.

  4. Genome Investigations of Vector Competence in Aedes aegypti to Inform Novel Arbovirus Disease Control Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W. Severson

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dengue (DENV, yellow fever, chikungunya, and Zika virus transmission to humans by a mosquito host is confounded by both intrinsic and extrinsic variables. Besides virulence factors of the individual arboviruses, likelihood of virus transmission is subject to variability in the genome of the primary mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. The “vectorial capacity” of A. aegypti varies depending upon its density, biting rate, and survival rate, as well as its intrinsic ability to acquire, host and transmit a given arbovirus. This intrinsic ability is known as “vector competence”. Based on whole transcriptome analysis, several genes and pathways have been predicated to have an association with a susceptible or refractory response in A. aegypti to DENV infection. However, the functional genomics of vector competence of A. aegypti is not well understood, primarily due to lack of integrative approaches in genomic or transcriptomic studies. In this review, we focus on the present status of genomics studies of DENV vector competence in A. aegypti as limited information is available relative to the other arboviruses. We propose future areas of research needed to facilitate the integration of vector and virus genomics and environmental factors to work towards better understanding of vector competence and vectorial capacity in natural conditions.

  5. Genome Investigations of Vector Competence in Aedes aegypti to Inform Novel Arbovirus Disease Control Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severson, David W; Behura, Susanta K

    2016-10-30

    Dengue (DENV), yellow fever, chikungunya, and Zika virus transmission to humans by a mosquito host is confounded by both intrinsic and extrinsic variables. Besides virulence factors of the individual arboviruses, likelihood of virus transmission is subject to variability in the genome of the primary mosquito vector, Aedes aegypti. The "vectorial capacity" of A. aegypti varies depending upon its density, biting rate, and survival rate, as well as its intrinsic ability to acquire, host and transmit a given arbovirus. This intrinsic ability is known as "vector competence". Based on whole transcriptome analysis, several genes and pathways have been predicated to have an association with a susceptible or refractory response in A. aegypti to DENV infection. However, the functional genomics of vector competence of A. aegypti is not well understood, primarily due to lack of integrative approaches in genomic or transcriptomic studies. In this review, we focus on the present status of genomics studies of DENV vector competence in A. aegypti as limited information is available relative to the other arboviruses. We propose future areas of research needed to facilitate the integration of vector and virus genomics and environmental factors to work towards better understanding of vector competence and vectorial capacity in natural conditions.

  6. Anaplasma marginale: Diversity, Virulence, and Vaccine Landscape through a Genomics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro-Estrada, Itzel; Rodríguez-Camarillo, Sergio Darío

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the genetic diversity of A. marginale, several efforts have been made around the world. This rickettsia affects a significant number of ruminants, causing bovine anaplasmosis, so the interest in its virulence and how it is transmitted have drawn interest not only from a molecular point of view but also, recently, some genomics research have been performed to elucidate genes and proteins with potential as antigens. Unfortunately, so far, we still do not have a recombinant anaplasmosis vaccine. In this review, we present a landscape of the multiple approaches carried out from the genomic perspective to generate valuable information that could be used in a holistic way to finally develop an anaplasmosis vaccine. These approaches include the analysis of the genetic diversity of A. marginale and how this affects control measures for the disease. Anaplasmosis vaccine development is also reviewed from the conventional vaccinomics to genome-base vaccinology approach based on proteomics, metabolomics, and transcriptomics analyses reported. The use of these new omics approaches will undoubtedly reveal new targets of interest in the near future, comprising information of potential antigens and the immunogenic effect of A. marginale proteins. PMID:27610385

  7. Anaplasma marginale: Diversity, Virulence, and Vaccine Landscape through a Genomics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Estela Quiroz-Castañeda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the genetic diversity of A. marginale, several efforts have been made around the world. This rickettsia affects a significant number of ruminants, causing bovine anaplasmosis, so the interest in its virulence and how it is transmitted have drawn interest not only from a molecular point of view but also, recently, some genomics research have been performed to elucidate genes and proteins with potential as antigens. Unfortunately, so far, we still do not have a recombinant anaplasmosis vaccine. In this review, we present a landscape of the multiple approaches carried out from the genomic perspective to generate valuable information that could be used in a holistic way to finally develop an anaplasmosis vaccine. These approaches include the analysis of the genetic diversity of A. marginale and how this affects control measures for the disease. Anaplasmosis vaccine development is also reviewed from the conventional vaccinomics to genome-base vaccinology approach based on proteomics, metabolomics, and transcriptomics analyses reported. The use of these new omics approaches will undoubtedly reveal new targets of interest in the near future, comprising information of potential antigens and the immunogenic effect of A. marginale proteins.

  8. Contrasting patterns of evolution of 45S and 5S rDNA families uncover new aspects in the genome constitution of the agronomically important grass Thinopyrum intermedium (Triticeae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahelka, Václav; Kopecky, David; Baum, Bernard R

    2013-09-01

    We employed sequencing of clones and in situ hybridization (genomic and fluorescent in situ hybridization [GISH and rDNA-FISH]) to characterize both the sequence variation and genomic organization of 45S (herein ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region) and 5S (5S gene + nontranscribed spacer) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) families in the allohexaploid grass Thinopyrum intermedium. Both rDNA families are organized within several rDNA loci within all three subgenomes of the allohexaploid species. Both families have undergone different patterns of evolution. The 45S rDNA family has evolved in a concerted manner: internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences residing within the arrays of two subgenomes out of three got homogenized toward one major ribotype, whereas the third subgenome contained a minor proportion of distinct unhomogenized copies. Homogenization mechanisms such as unequal crossover and/or gene conversion were coupled with the loss of certain 45S rDNA loci. Unlike in the 45S family, the data suggest that neither interlocus homogenization among homeologous chromosomes nor locus loss occurred in 5S rDNA. Consistently with other Triticeae, the 5S rDNA family in intermediate wheatgrass comprised two distinct array types-the long- and short-spacer unit classes. Within the long and short units, we distinguished five and three different types, respectively, likely representing homeologous unit classes donated by putative parental species. Although the major ITS ribotype corresponds in our phylogenetic analysis to the E-genome species, the minor ribotype corresponds to Dasypyrum. 5S sequences suggested the contributions from Pseudoroegneria, Dasypyrum, and Aegilops. The contribution from Aegilops to the intermediate wheatgrass' genome is a new finding with implications in wheat improvement. We discuss rDNA evolution and potential origin of intermediate wheatgrass.

  9. Phylogeny-guided (meta)genome mining approach for the targeted discovery of new microbial natural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hahk-Soo

    2017-02-01

    Genomics-based methods are now commonplace in natural products research. A phylogeny-guided mining approach provides a means to quickly screen a large number of microbial genomes or metagenomes in search of new biosynthetic gene clusters of interest. In this approach, biosynthetic genes serve as molecular markers, and phylogenetic trees built with known and unknown marker gene sequences are used to quickly prioritize biosynthetic gene clusters for their metabolites characterization. An increase in the use of this approach has been observed for the last couple of years along with the emergence of low cost sequencing technologies. The aim of this review is to discuss the basic concept of a phylogeny-guided mining approach, and also to provide examples in which this approach was successfully applied to discover new natural products from microbial genomes and metagenomes. I believe that the phylogeny-guided mining approach will continue to play an important role in genomics-based natural products research.

  10. Evaluating the Cassandra NoSQL Database Approach for Genomic Data Persistency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniceto, Rodrigo; Xavier, Rene; Guimarães, Valeria; Hondo, Fernanda; Holanda, Maristela; Walter, Maria Emilia; Lifschitz, Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing techniques have created interesting computational challenges in bioinformatics. One of them refers to management of massive amounts of data generated by automatic sequencers. We need to deal with the persistency of genomic data, particularly storing and analyzing these large-scale processed data. To find an alternative to the frequently considered relational database model becomes a compelling task. Other data models may be more effective when dealing with a very large amount of nonconventional data, especially for writing and retrieving operations. In this paper, we discuss the Cassandra NoSQL database approach for storing genomic data. We perform an analysis of persistency and I/O operations with real data, using the Cassandra database system. We also compare the results obtained with a classical relational database system and another NoSQL database approach, MongoDB.

  11. Evaluating the Cassandra NoSQL Database Approach for Genomic Data Persistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Aniceto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in high-throughput sequencing techniques have created interesting computational challenges in bioinformatics. One of them refers to management of massive amounts of data generated by automatic sequencers. We need to deal with the persistency of genomic data, particularly storing and analyzing these large-scale processed data. To find an alternative to the frequently considered relational database model becomes a compelling task. Other data models may be more effective when dealing with a very large amount of nonconventional data, especially for writing and retrieving operations. In this paper, we discuss the Cassandra NoSQL database approach for storing genomic data. We perform an analysis of persistency and I/O operations with real data, using the Cassandra database system. We also compare the results obtained with a classical relational database system and another NoSQL database approach, MongoDB.

  12. Genomic approaches for understanding dengue: insights from the virus, vector, and host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Shuzhen; Hibberd, Martin L

    2016-03-02

    The incidence and geographic range of dengue have increased dramatically in recent decades. Climate change, rapid urbanization and increased global travel have facilitated the spread of both efficient mosquito vectors and the four dengue virus serotypes between population centers. At the same time, significant advances in genomics approaches have provided insights into host-pathogen interactions, immunogenetics, and viral evolution in both humans and mosquitoes. Here, we review these advances and the innovative treatment and control strategies that they are inspiring.

  13. A computational approach for ordering signal transduction pathway components from genomics and proteomics Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Hongyu

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transduction is one of the most important biological processes by which cells convert an external signal into a response. Novel computational approaches to mapping proteins onto signaling pathways are needed to fully take advantage of the rapid accumulation of genomic and proteomics information. However, despite their importance, research on signaling pathways reconstruction utilizing large-scale genomics and proteomics information has been limited. Results We have developed an approach for predicting the order of signaling pathway components, assuming all the components on the pathways are known. Our method is built on a score function that integrates protein-protein interaction data and microarray gene expression data. Compared to the individual datasets, either protein interactions or gene transcript abundance measurements, the integrated approach leads to better identification of the order of the pathway components. Conclusions As demonstrated in our study on the yeast MAPK signaling pathways, the integration analysis of high-throughput genomics and proteomics data can be a powerful means to infer the order of pathway components, enabling the transformation from molecular data into knowledge of cellular mechanisms.

  14. Integrated genomics and molecular breeding approaches for dissecting the complex quantitative traits in crop plants

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alice Kujur; Maneesha S Saxena; Deepak Bajaj; Laxmi; Swarup K Parida

    2013-12-01

    The enormous population growth, climate change and global warming are now considered major threats to agriculture and world’s food security. To improve the productivity and sustainability of agriculture, the development of high-yielding and durable abiotic and biotic stress-tolerant cultivars and/climate resilient crops is essential. Henceforth, understanding the molecular mechanism and dissection of complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits is the prime objective in current agricultural biotechnology research. In recent years, tremendous progress has been made in plant genomics and molecular breeding research pertaining to conventional and next-generation whole genome, transcriptome and epigenome sequencing efforts, generation of huge genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic resources and development of modern genomics-assisted breeding approaches in diverse crop genotypes with contrasting yield and abiotic stress tolerance traits. Unfortunately, the detailed molecular mechanism and gene regulatory networks controlling such complex quantitative traits is not yet well understood in crop plants. Therefore, we propose an integrated strategies involving available enormous and diverse traditional and modern –omics (structural, functional, comparative and epigenomics) approaches/resources and genomics-assisted breeding methods which agricultural biotechnologist can adopt/utilize to dissect and decode the molecular and gene regulatory networks involved in the complex quantitative yield and stress tolerance traits in crop plants. This would provide clues and much needed inputs for rapid selection of novel functionally relevant molecular tags regulating such complex traits to expedite traditional and modern marker-assisted genetic enhancement studies in target crop species for developing high-yielding stress-tolerant varieties.

  15. Whole-genome sequencing approaches for conservation biology: advantages, limitations, and practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Pardo, Angela P; Ruzzante, Daniel E

    2017-07-26

    Whole-genome resequencing (WGR) is a powerful method for addressing fundamental evolutionary biology questions that have not been fully resolved using traditional methods. WGR includes four approaches: the sequencing of individuals to a high depth of coverage with either unresolved (huWGR) or resolved haplotypes (hrWGR), the sequencing of population genomes to a high depth by mixing equimolar amounts of unlabelled-individual DNA (Pool-seq), and the sequencing of multiple individuals from a population to a low depth (lcWGR). These techniques require the availability of a reference genome. This, along with the still high cost of shotgun sequencing and the large demand for computing resources and storage, has limited their implementation in non-model species with scarce genomic resources and in fields such as conservation biology. Our goal here is to describe the various WGR methods, their pros and cons, and potential applications in conservation biology. WGR offers an unprecedented marker density and surveys a wide diversity of genetic variations not limited to single nucleotide polymorphisms (e.g. structural variants and mutations in regulatory elements), increasing their power for the detection of signatures of selection and local adaptation as well as for the identification of the genetic basis of phenotypic traits and diseases. Currently though, no single WGR approach fulfills all requirements of conservation genetics, and each method has its own limitations and sources of potential bias. We discuss proposed ways to minimize such biases. We envision a not distant future where the analysis of whole genomes becomes a routine task in many non-model species and fields including conservation biology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Integrated proteo-genomic approach for early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Hem D; Mahmood, Javed; Vujaskovic, Zeljko

    2015-12-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of mortality among men and women worldwide. Despite the availability of numerous diagnostic techniques for various cancers, the overall survival rate remains low and the majority of patients die due to late diagnosis and advanced stage of the disease. Diagnosing and treating cancer at its early stages ideally during the precancerous phase could significantly increase survival rate with the possibility of cure and prolong survival. Cancer is a genetic disease and it is illicitly activated by the acquisition of somatic DNA lesions and aberrations in genome structure and defects in maintenance and repair. These somatic DNA mutations known as driver mutations seem to be the prime cause in initiating tumorigenesis. The advances in genomic technologies have immensely facilitated the understanding of cancer progression and metastasis, and the discovery of novel biomarkers. However, changes in somatic mutational landscape of the oncogenome are translated into aberrantly regulated oncoproteome which drives the cancer initiation. Thus, combination of proteomic and genomic technologies is urgently required to discover biomarkers for early diagnosis. The recent advances in human genome based detection of cancer using advanced genomic technologies like NextGen Sequencing, digital PCR, cfDNA technology have shown promise; for example oncogenic somatic mutation variants, transcriptomic analysis, copy number variant, and methylation data from the Cancer Genome Atlas. Similarly, oncoproteomics has the potential to revolutionize clinical management of the disease, including cancer diagnosis and screening based on new proteomic database which embodies somatic variants and post translational modifications, thus devising proteomic technologies as a complement to histopathology. Further, the use of multiple proteomic and genomic biomarkers rather than a single gene or protein could greatly improve diagnostic accuracy and enhance the predictive power for

  17. A novel approach for determining cancer genomic breakpoints in the presence of normal DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tsueng Liu

    Full Text Available CDKN2A (encodes p16(INK4A and p14(ARF deletion, which results in both Rb and p53 inactivation, is the most common chromosomal anomaly in human cancers. To precisely map the deletion breakpoints is important to understanding the molecular mechanism of genomic rearrangement and may also be useful for clinical applications. However, current methods for determining the breakpoint are either of low resolution or require the isolation of relatively pure cancer cells, which can be difficult for clinical samples that are typically contaminated with various amounts of normal host cells. To overcome this hurdle, we have developed a novel approach, designated Primer Approximation Multiplex PCR (PAMP, for enriching breakpoint sequences followed by genomic tiling array hybridization to locate the breakpoints. In a series of proof-of-concept experiments, we were able to identify cancer-derived CDKN2A genomic breakpoints when more than 99.9% of wild type genome was present in a model system. This design can be scaled up with bioinformatics support and can be applied to validate other candidate cancer-associated loci that are revealed by other more systemic but lower throughput assays.

  18. Single-molecule approach to bacterial genomic comparisons via optical mapping.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shiguo [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Kile, A. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Bechner, M. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Kvikstad, E. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Deng, W. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Wei, J. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Severin, J. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Runnheim, R. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Churas, C. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Forrest, D. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Dimalanta, E. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Lamers, C. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Burland, V. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Blattner, F. R. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison; Schwartz, David C. [Univ. Wisc.-Madison

    2004-01-01

    Modern comparative genomics has been established, in part, by the sequencing and annotation of a broad range of microbial species. To gain further insights, new sequencing efforts are now dealing with the variety of strains or isolates that gives a species definition and range; however, this number vastly outstrips our ability to sequence them. Given the availability of a large number of microbial species, new whole genome approaches must be developed to fully leverage this information at the level of strain diversity that maximize discovery. Here, we describe how optical mapping, a single-molecule system, was used to identify and annotate chromosomal alterations between bacterial strains represented by several species. Since whole-genome optical maps are ordered restriction maps, sequenced strains of Shigella flexneri serotype 2a (2457T and 301), Yersinia pestis (CO 92 and KIM), and Escherichia coli were aligned as maps to identify regions of homology and to further characterize them as possible insertions, deletions, inversions, or translocations. Importantly, an unsequenced Shigella flexneri strain (serotype Y strain AMC[328Y]) was optically mapped and aligned with two sequenced ones to reveal one novel locus implicated in serotype conversion and several other loci containing insertion sequence elements or phage-related gene insertions. Our results suggest that genomic rearrangements and chromosomal breakpoints are readily identified and annotated against a prototypic sequenced strain by using the tools of optical mapping.

  19. Precursor-centric genome-mining approach for lasso peptide discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, Mikhail O; Pelczer, István; Link, A James

    2012-09-18

    Lasso peptides are a class of ribosomally synthesized posttranslationally modified natural products found in bacteria. Currently known lasso peptides have a diverse set of pharmacologically relevant activities, including inhibition of bacterial growth, receptor antagonism, and enzyme inhibition. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides is specified by a cluster of three genes encoding a precursor protein and two enzymes. Here we develop a unique genome-mining algorithm to identify lasso peptide gene clusters in prokaryotes. Our approach involves pattern matching to a small number of conserved amino acids in precursor proteins, and thus allows for a more global survey of lasso peptide gene clusters than does homology-based genome mining. Of more than 3,000 currently sequenced prokaryotic genomes, we found 76 organisms that are putative lasso peptide producers. These organisms span nine bacterial phyla and an archaeal phylum. To provide validation of the genome-mining method, we focused on a single lasso peptide predicted to be produced by the freshwater bacterium Asticcacaulis excentricus. Heterologous expression of an engineered, minimal gene cluster in Escherichia coli led to the production of a unique lasso peptide, astexin-1. At 23 aa, astexin-1 is the largest lasso peptide isolated to date. It is also highly polar, in contrast to many lasso peptides that are primarily hydrophobic. Astexin-1 has modest antimicrobial activity against its phylogenetic relative Caulobacter crescentus. The solution structure of astexin-1 was determined revealing a unique topology that is stabilized by hydrogen bonding between segments of the peptide.

  20. A functional genomics approach to establish the complement of carbohydrate transporters in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Bidossi

    Full Text Available The aerotolerant anaerobe Streptococcus pneumoniae is part of the normal nasopharyngeal microbiota of humans and one of the most important invasive pathogens. A genomic survey allowed establishing the occurrence of twenty-one phosphotransferase systems, seven carbohydrate uptake ABC transporters, one sodium:solute symporter and a permease, underlining an exceptionally high capacity for uptake of carbohydrate substrates. Despite high genomic variability, combined phenotypic and genomic analysis of twenty sequenced strains did assign the substrate specificity only to two uptake systems. Systematic analysis of mutants for most carbohydrate transporters enabled us to assign a phenotype and substrate specificity to twenty-three transport systems. For five putative transporters for galactose, pentoses, ribonucleosides and sulphated glycans activity was inferred, but not experimentally confirmed and only one transport system remains with an unknown substrate and lack of any functional annotation. Using a metabolic approach, 80% of the thirty-two fermentable carbon substrates were assigned to the corresponding transporter. The complexity and robustness of sugar uptake is underlined by the finding that many transporters have multiple substrates, and many sugars are transported by more than one system. The present work permits to draw a functional map of the complete arsenal of carbohydrate utilisation proteins of pneumococci, allows re-annotation of genomic data and might serve as a reference for related species. These data provide tools for specific investigation of the roles of the different carbon substrates on pneumococcal physiology in the host during carriage and invasive infection.

  1. Characterization of the Genomic Diversity of Norovirus in Linked Patients Using a Metagenomic Deep Sequencing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasheri, Neda; Petronella, Nicholas; Ronholm, Jennifer; Bidawid, Sabah; Corneau, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is the leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. A robust cell culture system does not exist for NoV and therefore detailed characterization of outbreak and sporadic strains relies on molecular techniques. In this study, we employed a metagenomic approach that uses non-specific amplification followed by next-generation sequencing to whole genome sequence NoV genomes directly from clinical samples obtained from 8 linked patients. Enough sequencing depth was obtained for each sample to use a de novo assembly of near-complete genome sequences. The resultant consensus sequences were then used to identify inter-host nucleotide variations that occur after direct transmission, analyze amino acid variations in the major capsid protein, and provide evidence of recombination events. The analysis of intra-host quasispecies diversity was possible due to high coverage-depth. We also observed a linear relationship between NoV viral load in the clinical sample and the number of sequence reads that could be attributed to NoV. The method demonstrated here has the potential for future use in whole genome sequence analyses of other RNA viruses isolated from clinical, environmental, and food specimens. PMID:28197136

  2. Functional genomic screening approaches in mechanistic toxicology and potential future applications of CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hua; McHale, Cliona M; Smith, Martyn T; Zhang, Luoping

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing variability in the extent and nature of responses to environmental exposures is a critical aspect of human health risk assessment. Chemical toxicants act by many different mechanisms, however, and the genes involved in adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) and AOP networks are not yet characterized. Functional genomic approaches can reveal both toxicity pathways and susceptibility genes, through knockdown or knockout of all non-essential genes in a cell of interest, and identification of genes associated with a toxicity phenotype following toxicant exposure. Screening approaches in yeast and human near-haploid leukemic KBM7 cells have identified roles for genes and pathways involved in response to many toxicants but are limited by partial homology among yeast and human genes and limited relevance to normal diploid cells. RNA interference (RNAi) suppresses mRNA expression level but is limited by off-target effects (OTEs) and incomplete knockdown. The recently developed gene editing approach called clustered regularly interspaced short palindrome repeats-associated nuclease (CRISPR)-Cas9, can precisely knock-out most regions of the genome at the DNA level with fewer OTEs than RNAi, in multiple human cell types, thus overcoming the limitations of the other approaches. It has been used to identify genes involved in the response to chemical and microbial toxicants in several human cell types and could readily be extended to the systematic screening of large numbers of environmental chemicals. CRISPR-Cas9 can also repress and activate gene expression, including that of non-coding RNA, with near-saturation, thus offering the potential to more fully characterize AOPs and AOP networks. Finally, CRISPR-Cas9 can generate complex animal models in which to conduct preclinical toxicity testing at the level of individual genotypes or haplotypes. Therefore, CRISPR-Cas9 is a powerful and flexible functional genomic screening approach that can be harnessed to provide

  3. MIRAGE: a functional genomics-based approach for metabolic network model reconstruction and its application to cyanobacteria networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitkin, Edward; Shlomi, Tomer

    2012-11-29

    Genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions are considered a key step in quantifying the genotype-phenotype relationship. We present a novel gap-filling approach, MetabolIc Reconstruction via functionAl GEnomics (MIRAGE), which identifies missing network reactions by integrating metabolic flux analysis and functional genomics data. MIRAGE's performance is demonstrated on the reconstruction of metabolic network models of E. coli and Synechocystis sp. and validated via existing networks for these species. Then, it is applied to reconstruct genome-scale metabolic network models for 36 sequenced cyanobacteria amenable for constraint-based modeling analysis and specifically for metabolic engineering. The reconstructed network models are supplied via standard SBML files.

  4. Pan-Genome Analysis of Human Gastric Pathogen H. pylori: Comparative Genomics and Pathogenomics Approaches to Identify Regions Associated with Pathogenicity and Prediction of Potential Core Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a human gastric pathogen implicated as the major cause of peptic ulcer and second leading cause of gastric cancer (~70% around the world. Conversely, an increased resistance to antibiotics and hindrances in the development of vaccines against H. pylori are observed. Pan-genome analyses of the global representative H. pylori isolates consisting of 39 complete genomes are presented in this paper. Phylogenetic analyses have revealed close relationships among geographically diverse strains of H. pylori. The conservation among these genomes was further analyzed by pan-genome approach; the predicted conserved gene families (1,193 constitute ~77% of the average H. pylori genome and 45% of the global gene repertoire of the species. Reverse vaccinology strategies have been adopted to identify and narrow down the potential core-immunogenic candidates. Total of 28 nonhost homolog proteins were characterized as universal therapeutic targets against H. pylori based on their functional annotation and protein-protein interaction. Finally, pathogenomics and genome plasticity analysis revealed 3 highly conserved and 2 highly variable putative pathogenicity islands in all of the H. pylori genomes been analyzed.

  5. Systems biology approach reveals genome to phenome correlation in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Priyanka; Vig, Saurabh; Datta, Malabika; Jindel, Dinesh; Mathur, Ashok Kumar; Mathur, Sandeep Kumar; Sharma, Abhay

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have discovered association of several loci with Type 2 diabetes (T2D), a common complex disease characterized by impaired insulin secretion by pancreatic β cells and insulin signaling in target tissues. However, effect of genetic risk variants on continuous glycemic measures in nondiabetic subjects mainly elucidates perturbation of insulin secretion. Also, the disease associated genes do not clearly converge on functional categories consistent with the known aspects of T2D pathophysiology. We used a systems biology approach to unravel genome to phenome correlation in T2D. We first examined enrichment of pathways in genes identified in T2D GWASs at genome-wide or lower levels of significance. Genes at lower significance threshold showed enrichment of insulin secretion related pathway. Notably, physical and genetic interaction network of these genes showed robust enrichment of insulin signaling and other T2D pathophysiology related pathways including insulin secretion. The network also overrepresented genes reported to interact with insulin secretion and insulin action targeting antidiabetic drugs. The drug interacting genes themselves showed overrepresentation of insulin signaling and other T2D relevant pathways. Next, we generated genome-wide expression profiles of multiple insulin responsive tissues from nondiabetic and diabetic patients. Remarkably, the differentially expressed genes showed significant overlap with the network genes, with the intersection showing enrichment of insulin signaling and other pathways consistent with T2D pathophysiology. Literature search led our genomic, interactomic, transcriptomic and toxicogenomic evidence to converge on TGF-beta signaling, a pathway known to play a crucial role in pancreatic islets development and function, and insulin signaling. Cumulatively, we find that GWAS genes relate directly to insulin secretion and indirectly, through collaborating with other genes, to insulin

  6. Systems biology approach reveals genome to phenome correlation in type 2 diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Jain

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have discovered association of several loci with Type 2 diabetes (T2D, a common complex disease characterized by impaired insulin secretion by pancreatic β cells and insulin signaling in target tissues. However, effect of genetic risk variants on continuous glycemic measures in nondiabetic subjects mainly elucidates perturbation of insulin secretion. Also, the disease associated genes do not clearly converge on functional categories consistent with the known aspects of T2D pathophysiology. We used a systems biology approach to unravel genome to phenome correlation in T2D. We first examined enrichment of pathways in genes identified in T2D GWASs at genome-wide or lower levels of significance. Genes at lower significance threshold showed enrichment of insulin secretion related pathway. Notably, physical and genetic interaction network of these genes showed robust enrichment of insulin signaling and other T2D pathophysiology related pathways including insulin secretion. The network also overrepresented genes reported to interact with insulin secretion and insulin action targeting antidiabetic drugs. The drug interacting genes themselves showed overrepresentation of insulin signaling and other T2D relevant pathways. Next, we generated genome-wide expression profiles of multiple insulin responsive tissues from nondiabetic and diabetic patients. Remarkably, the differentially expressed genes showed significant overlap with the network genes, with the intersection showing enrichment of insulin signaling and other pathways consistent with T2D pathophysiology. Literature search led our genomic, interactomic, transcriptomic and toxicogenomic evidence to converge on TGF-beta signaling, a pathway known to play a crucial role in pancreatic islets development and function, and insulin signaling. Cumulatively, we find that GWAS genes relate directly to insulin secretion and indirectly, through collaborating with other

  7. Multi-omic data integration and analysis using systems genomics approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suravajhala, Prashanth; Kogelman, Lisette; Kadarmideen, Haja

    2016-01-01

    , health and welfare. We conclude that there are big challenges in multi-omic data integration, modelling and systems-level analyses, particularly with the fast emerging HTO technologies. We highlight existing and emerging systems genomics approaches and discuss how they contribute to our understanding...... on animal production and health traits. However, notwithstanding these new HTO technologies, there remains an emerging challenge in data analysis. On the one hand, different HTO technologies judged on their own merit are appropriate for the identification of disease-causing genes, biomarkers for prevention...... and drug targets for the treatment of diseases and for individualized genomic predictions of performance or disease risks. On the other hand, integration of multi-omic data and joint modelling and analyses are very powerful and accurate to understand the systems biology of healthy and sustainable...

  8. Gene discovery in the hamster: a comparative genomics approach for gene annotation by sequencing of hamster testis cDNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Shafiq A

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complete genome annotation will likely be achieved through a combination of computer-based analysis of available genome sequences combined with direct experimental characterization of expressed regions of individual genomes. We have utilized a comparative genomics approach involving the sequencing of randomly selected hamster testis cDNAs to begin to identify genes not previously annotated on the human, mouse, rat and Fugu (pufferfish genomes. Results 735 distinct sequences were analyzed for their relatedness to known sequences in public databases. Eight of these sequences were derived from previously unidentified genes and expression of these genes in testis was confirmed by Northern blotting. The genomic locations of each sequence were mapped in human, mouse, rat and pufferfish, where applicable, and the structure of their cognate genes was derived using computer-based predictions, genomic comparisons and analysis of uncharacterized cDNA sequences from human and macaque. Conclusion The use of a comparative genomics approach resulted in the identification of eight cDNAs that correspond to previously uncharacterized genes in the human genome. The proteins encoded by these genes included a new member of the kinesin superfamily, a SET/MYND-domain protein, and six proteins for which no specific function could be predicted. Each gene was expressed primarily in testis, suggesting that they may play roles in the development and/or function of testicular cells.

  9. Genomic approach to studying nutritional requirements of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and other Clostridia causing late blowing defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storari, Michelangelo; Kulli, Sandra; Wüthrich, Daniel; Bruggmann, Rémy; Berthoud, Hélène; Arias-Roth, Emmanuelle

    2016-10-01

    Clostridium tyrobutyricum is the main microorganism responsible for the late blowing defect in hard and semi-hard cheeses, causing considerable economic losses to the cheese industry. Deeper knowledge of the metabolic requirements of this microorganism can lead to the development of more effective control approaches. In this work, the amino acids and B vitamins essential for sustaining the growth of C. tyrobutyricum were investigated using a genomic approach. As the first step, the genomes of four C. tyrobutyricum strains were analyzed for the presence of genes putatively involved in the biosynthesis of amino acids and B vitamins. Metabolic pathways could be reconstructed for all amino acids and B vitamins with the exception of biotin (vitamin B7) and folate (vitamin B9). The biotin pathway was missing the enzyme amino-7-oxononanoate synthase that catalyzes the condensation of pimeloyl-ACP and l-alanine to 8-amino-7-oxononanoate. In the folate pathway, the missing genes were those coding for para-aminobenzoate synthase and aminodeoxychorismate lyase enzymes. These enzymes are responsible for the conversion of chorismate into para-aminobenzoate (PABA). Two C. tyrobutyircum strains whose genome was analyzed in silico as well as other 10 strains isolated from cheese were tested in liquid media to confirm these observations. 11 strains showed growth in a defined liquid medium containing biotin and PABA after 6-8 days of incubation. No strain showed growth when only one or none of these compounds were added, confirming the observations obtained in silico. Furthermore, the genome analysis was extended to genomes of single strains of other Clostridium species potentially causing late blowing, namely Clostridium beijerinckii, Clostridium sporogenes and Clostridium butyricum. Only the biotin biosynthesis pathway was incomplete for C. butyricum and C. beijerincki. In contrast, C. sporogenes showed missing enzymes in biosynthesis pathways of several amino acids as well

  10. From the double-helix to novel approaches to the sequencing of large genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szybalski, W

    1993-12-15

    Elucidation of the structure of DNA by Watson and Crick [Nature 171 (1953) 737-738] has led to many crucial molecular experiments, including studies on DNA replication, transcription, physical mapping, and most recently to serious attempts directed toward the sequencing of large genomes [Watson, Science 248 (1990) 44-49]. I am totally convinced of the great importance of the Human Genome Project, and toward achieving this goal I strongly favor 'top-down' approaches consisting of the physical mapping and preparation of contiguous 50-100-kb fragments directly from the genome, followed by their automated sequencing based on the rapid assembly of primers by hexamer ligation together with primer walking. Our 'top-down' procedures totally avoids conventional cloning, subcloning and random sequencing, which are the elements of the present 'bottom-up' procedures. Fragments of 50-100 kb are prepared in sufficient quantities either by in vitro excision with rare-cutting restriction systems (including Achilles' heel cleavage [AC] or the RecA-AC procedures of Koob et al. [Nucleic Acids Res. 20 (1992) 5831-5836]) or by in vivo excision and amplification using the yeast FRT/Flp system or the phage lambda att/Int system. Such fragments, when derived directly from the Escherichia coli genome, are arranged in consecutive order, so that 50 specially constructed strains of E. coli would supply 50 end-to-end arranged approx. 100-kb fragments, which will cover the entire approx. 5-Mb E. coli genome. For the 150-Mb Drosophila melanogaster genome, 1500 of such consecutive 100-kb fragments (supplied by 1500 strains) are required to cover the entire genome. The fragments will be sequenced by the SPEL-6 method involving hexamer ligation [Szybalski, Gene 90 (1990) 177-178; Fresenius J. Anal. Chem. 4 (1992) 343] and primer walking. The 18-mer primers are synthesized in only a few minutes from three contiguous hexamers annealed to the DNA strand to be sequenced when using an over 100-fold

  11. A mixed-integer linear programming approach to the reduction of genome-scale metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhl, Annika; Bockmayr, Alexander

    2017-01-03

    Constraint-based analysis has become a widely used method to study metabolic networks. While some of the associated algorithms can be applied to genome-scale network reconstructions with several thousands of reactions, others are limited to small or medium-sized models. In 2015, Erdrich et al. introduced a method called NetworkReducer, which reduces large metabolic networks to smaller subnetworks, while preserving a set of biological requirements that can be specified by the user. Already in 2001, Burgard et al. developed a mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) approach for computing minimal reaction sets under a given growth requirement. Here we present an MILP approach for computing minimum subnetworks with the given properties. The minimality (with respect to the number of active reactions) is not guaranteed by NetworkReducer, while the method by Burgard et al. does not allow specifying the different biological requirements. Our procedure is about 5-10 times faster than NetworkReducer and can enumerate all minimum subnetworks in case there exist several ones. This allows identifying common reactions that are present in all subnetworks, and reactions appearing in alternative pathways. Applying complex analysis methods to genome-scale metabolic networks is often not possible in practice. Thus it may become necessary to reduce the size of the network while keeping important functionalities. We propose a MILP solution to this problem. Compared to previous work, our approach is more efficient and allows computing not only one, but even all minimum subnetworks satisfying the required properties.

  12. A hidden Markov model approach for determining expression from genomic tiling micro arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Gardner, P. P.; Arctander, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    HMM, that adaptively models tiling data prior to predicting expression on genomic sequence. A hidden Markov model (HMM) is used to model the distributions of tiling array probe scores in expressed and non-expressed regions. The HMM is trained on sets of probes mapped to regions of annotated expression and non......]. Results can be downloaded and viewed from our web site [2]. Conclusion The value of adaptive modelling of fluorescence scores prior to categorisation into expressed and non-expressed probes is demonstrated. Our results indicate that our adaptive approach is superior to the previous analysis in terms...

  13. Genome-first approach diagnosed Cabezas syndrome via novel CUL4B mutation detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Watanabe, Miki; Naruto, Takuya; Matsuda, Keiko; Kohmoto, Tomohiro; Saito, Masako; Masuda, Kiyoshi; Imoto, Issei

    2017-01-01

    Cabezas syndrome is a syndromic form of X-linked intellectual disability primarily characterized by a short stature, hypogonadism and abnormal gait, with other variable features resulting from mutations in the CUL4B gene. Here, we report a clinically undiagnosed 5-year-old male with severe intellectual disability. A genome-first approach using targeted exome sequencing identified a novel nonsense mutation [NM_003588.3:c.2698G>T, p.(Glu900*)] in the last coding exon of CUL4B, thus diagnosing this patient with Cabezas syndrome.

  14. Integrating experimental and analytic approaches to improve data quality in genome-wide RNAi screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas; Espeseth, Amy S; Johnson, Eric N; Chin, Jayne; Gates, Adam; Mitnaul, Lyndon J; Marine, Shane D; Tian, Jenny; Stec, Eric M; Kunapuli, Priya; Holder, Dan J; Heyse, Joseph F; Strulovici, Berta; Ferrer, Marc

    2008-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) not only plays an important role in drug discovery but can also be developed directly into drugs. RNAi high-throughput screening (HTS) biotechnology allows us to conduct genome-wide RNAi research. A central challenge in genome-wide RNAi research is to integrate both experimental and computational approaches to obtain high quality RNAi HTS assays. Based on our daily practice in RNAi HTS experiments, we propose the implementation of 3 experimental and analytic processes to improve the quality of data from RNAi HTS biotechnology: (1) select effective biological controls; (2) adopt appropriate plate designs to display and/or adjust for systematic errors of measurement; and (3) use effective analytic metrics to assess data quality. The applications in 5 real RNAi HTS experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of integrating these processes to improve data quality. Due to the effectiveness in improving data quality in RNAi HTS experiments, the methods and guidelines contained in the 3 experimental and analytic processes are likely to have broad utility in genome-wide RNAi research.

  15. Genome-scale modeling of human metabolism - a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardinoglu, Adil; Gatto, Francesco; Nielsen, Jens

    2013-09-01

    Altered metabolism is linked to the appearance of various human diseases and a better understanding of disease-associated metabolic changes may lead to the identification of novel prognostic biomarkers and the development of new therapies. Genome-scale metabolic models (GEMs) have been employed for studying human metabolism in a systematic manner, as well as for understanding complex human diseases. In the past decade, such metabolic models - one of the fundamental aspects of systems biology - have started contributing to the understanding of the mechanistic relationship between genotype and phenotype. In this review, we focus on the construction of the Human Metabolic Reaction database, the generation of healthy cell type- and cancer-specific GEMs using different procedures, and the potential applications of these developments in the study of human metabolism and in the identification of metabolic changes associated with various disorders. We further examine how in silico genome-scale reconstructions can be employed to simulate metabolic flux distributions and how high-throughput omics data can be analyzed in a context-dependent fashion. Insights yielded from this mechanistic modeling approach can be used for identifying new therapeutic agents and drug targets as well as for the discovery of novel biomarkers. Finally, recent advancements in genome-scale modeling and the future challenge of developing a model of whole-body metabolism are presented. The emergent contribution of GEMs to personalized and translational medicine is also discussed. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Novel approach for deriving genome wide SNP analysis data from archived blood spots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowler Katie E

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to transport and store DNA at room temperature in low volumes has the advantage of optimising cost, time and storage space. Blood spots on adapted filter papers are popular for this, with FTA (Flinders Technology Associates Whatman™TM technology being one of the most recent. Plant material, plasmids, viral particles, bacteria and animal blood have been stored and transported successfully using this technology, however the method of porcine DNA extraction from FTA Whatman™TM cards is a relatively new approach, allowing nucleic acids to be ready for downstream applications such as PCR, whole genome amplification, sequencing and subsequent application to single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays has hitherto been under-explored. Findings DNA was extracted from FTA Whatman™TM cards (following adaptations of the manufacturer’s instructions, whole genome amplified and subsequently analysed to validate the integrity of the DNA for downstream SNP analysis. DNA was successfully extracted from 288/288 samples and amplified by WGA. Allele dropout post WGA, was observed in less than 2% of samples and there was no clear evidence of amplification bias nor contamination. Acceptable call rates on porcine SNP chips were also achieved using DNA extracted and amplified in this way. Conclusions DNA extracted from FTA Whatman cards is of a high enough quality and quantity following whole genomic amplification to perform meaningful SNP chip studies.

  17. A novel scan statistics approach for clustering identification and comparison in binary genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellin, Danilo; Di Serio, Clelia

    2016-09-22

    In biomedical research a relevant issue is to identify time intervals or portions of a n-dimensional support where a particular event of interest is more likely to occur than expected. Algorithms that require to specify a-priori number/dimension/length of clusters assumed for the data suffer from a high degree of arbitrariness whenever no precise information are available, and this may strongly affect final estimation on parameters. Within this framework, spatial scan-statistics have been proposed in the literature, representing a valid non-parametric alternative. We adapt the so called Bernoulli-model scan statistic to the genomic field and we propose a multivariate extension, named Relative Scan Statistics, for the comparison of two series of Bernoulli r.v. defined over a common support, with the final goal of highlighting unshared event rate variations. Using a probabilistic approach based on success probability estimates and comparison (likelihood based), we can exploit an hypothesis testing procedure to identify clusters and relative clusters. Both the univariate and the novel multivariate extension of the scan statistic confirm previously published findings. The method described in the paper represents a challenging application of scan statistics framework to problem related to genomic data. From a biological perspective, these tools offer the possibility to clinicians and researcher to improve their knowledge on viral vectors integrations process, allowing to focus their attention to restricted over-targeted portion of the genome.

  18. A hidden Markov model approach for determining expression from genomic tiling micro arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krogh Anders

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic tiling micro arrays have great potential for identifying previously undiscovered coding as well as non-coding transcription. To-date, however, analyses of these data have been performed in an ad hoc fashion. Results We present a probabilistic procedure, ExpressHMM, that adaptively models tiling data prior to predicting expression on genomic sequence. A hidden Markov model (HMM is used to model the distributions of tiling array probe scores in expressed and non-expressed regions. The HMM is trained on sets of probes mapped to regions of annotated expression and non-expression. Subsequently, prediction of transcribed fragments is made on tiled genomic sequence. The prediction is accompanied by an expression probability curve for visual inspection of the supporting evidence. We test ExpressHMM on data from the Cheng et al. (2005 tiling array experiments on ten Human chromosomes 1. Results can be downloaded and viewed from our web site 2. Conclusion The value of adaptive modelling of fluorescence scores prior to categorisation into expressed and non-expressed probes is demonstrated. Our results indicate that our adaptive approach is superior to the previous analysis in terms of nucleotide sensitivity and transfrag specificity.

  19. Cross-Cancer Genome-Wide Analysis of Lung, Ovary, Breast, Prostate, and Colorectal Cancer Reveals Novel Pleiotropic Associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Lindstrom, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeboller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Berndt, Sonja I.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Gronberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C.; Goode, Ellen L.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brett M.; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J.; Kocarnik, Jonathan K.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Schoen, Robert E.; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Jenkins, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M.; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Woods, Michael O.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N.; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y. Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bosse, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L.; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B.; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 c

  20. Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehringer, G. (Gordon); P. Kraft (Peter); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); R. Eeles (Rosalind); Chatterjee, N. (Nilanjan); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick R); J.M. Schildkraut (Joellen); S. Lindstrom (Stephen); P. Brennan (Paul); H. Bickeböller (Heike); R. Houlston (Richard); M.T. Landi (Maria Teresa); N.E. Caporaso (Neil); Risch, A. (Angela); A.A. Al Olama (Ali Amin); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); Giovannucci, E.L. (Edward L.); H. Grönberg (Henrik); Z. Kote-Jarai; Ma, J. (Jing); K.R. Muir (K.); M.J. Stampfer (Meir J.); Stevens, V.L. (Victoria L.); F. Wiklund (Fredrik); W.C. Willett (Walter C.); E.L. Goode (Ellen); Permuth, J.B. (Jennifer B.); H. Risch (Harvey); Reid, B.M. (Brett M.); Bezieau, S. (Stephane); H. Brenner (Hermann); Chan, A.T. (Andrew T.); J. Chang-Claude (Jenny); T.J. Hudson (Thomas); Kocarnik, J.K. (Jonathan K.); P. Newcomb (Polly); Schoen, R.E. (Robert E.); Slattery, M.L. (Martha L.); White, E. (Emily); M.A. Adank (Muriel); H. Ahsan (Habibul); K. Aittomäki (Kristiina); Baglietto, L. (Laura); Blomquist, C. (Carl); F. Canzian (Federico); K. Czene (Kamila); I. dos Santos Silva (Isabel); Eliassen, A.H. (A. Heather); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); D. Flesch-Janys (Dieter); O. Fletcher (Olivia); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); M.M. Gaudet (Mia); Johnson, N. (Nichola); P. Hall (Per); A. Hazra (Aditi); R. Hein (Rebecca); Hofman, A. (Albert); J.L. Hopper (John); A. Irwanto (Astrid); M. Johansson (Mattias); R. Kaaks (Rudolf); M.G. Kibriya (Muhammad); P. Lichtner (Peter); J. Liu (Jianjun); E. Lund (Eiliv); Makalic, E. (Enes); A. Meindl (Alfons); B. Müller-Myhsok (B.); Muranen, T.A. (Taru A.); H. Nevanlinna (Heli); P.H.M. Peeters; J. Peto (Julian); R. Prentice (Ross); N. Rahman (Nazneen); M.-J. Sanchez (Maria-Jose); D.F. Schmidt (Daniel); R.K. Schmutzler (Rita); M.C. Southey (Melissa); Tamimi, R. (Rulla); S.P.L. Travis (Simon); C. Turnbull (Clare); Uitterlinden, A.G. (Andre G.); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); A.S. Whittemore (Alice); X.R. Yang (Xiaohong); W. Zheng (Wei); D. Buchanan (Daniel); G. Casey (Graham); G. Conti (Giario); C.K. Edlund (Christopher); S. Gallinger (Steve); R. Haile (Robert); M. Jenkins (Mark); Marchand, L. (Loïcle); Li, L. (Li); N.M. Lindor (Noralane); Schmit, S.L. (Stephanie L.); S.N. Thibodeau (Stephen); M.O. Woods (Michael); T. Rafnar (Thorunn); J. Gudmundsson (Julius); S.N. Stacey (Simon); Stefansson, K. (Kari); P. Sulem (Patrick); Chen, Y.A. (Y. Ann); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); Christiani, D.C. (David C.); Wei, Y. (Yongyue); H. Shen (Hongbing); Z. Hu (Zhibin); X.-O. Shu (Xiao-Ou); Shiraishi, K. (Kouya); A. Takahashi (Atsushi); Y. Bossé (Yohan); M. Obeidat; D.C. Nickle (David C.); W. Timens (Wim); M. Freedman (Matthew); Li, Q. (Qiyuan); D. Seminara (Daniela); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); Gong, J. (Jian); U. Peters (Ulrike); S.B. Gruber (Stephen); Amos, C.I. (Christopher I.); T.A. Sellers (Thomas A.); D.F. Easton (Douglas F.); D. Hunter (David); C.A. Haiman (Christopher A.); B.E. Henderson (Brian); R.J. Hung (Rayjean)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIdentifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cas

  1. Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D.; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Lindström, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil; Risch, Angela; Al Olama, Ali Amin; Berndt, Sonja I.; Giovannucci, Edward L.; Grönberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C.; Goode, Ellen L.; Permuth, Jennifer B.; Risch, Harvey A.; Reid, Brett M.; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J.; Kocarnik, Jonathan K.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Schoen, Robert E.; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A.; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos-Santos-silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Zheng, Wei; Buchanan, Daniel D.; Casey, Graham; Conti, David V.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Jenkins, Mark; Marchand, Loïcle; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralene M.; Schmit, Stephanie L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Woods, Michael O.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N.; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y. Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L.; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B.; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-stage approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 c

  2. Cross-cancer genome-wide analysis of lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer reveals novel pleiotropic associations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fehringer, Gordon; Kraft, Peter; Pharoah, Paul D P; Eeles, Rosalind A; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Lindstrom, Sara; Brennan, Paul; Bickeböller, Heike; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil E; Risch, Angela; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Berndt, Sonja I; Giovannucci, Edward; Gronberg, Henrik; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Ma, Jing; Muir, Kenneth; Stampfer, Meir J; Stevens, Victoria L; Wiklund, Fredrik; Willett, Walter C; Goode, Ellen L; Permuth, Jennifer B; Risch, Harvey A; Reid, Brett M; Bezieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Chan, Andrew T; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hudson, Thomas J; Kocarnik, Jonathan; Newcomb, Polly A; Schoen, Robert E; Slattery, Martha L; White, Emily; Adank, Muriel A; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomaki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Czene, Kamila; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Eliassen, A Heather; Figueroa, Jonine D; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M; Johnson, Nichola; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jian Jun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L; Rahman, Nazneen; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Schmidt, Daniel F; Schmutzler, Rita K; Southey, Melissa C; Tamimi, Rulla M; Travis, Ruth C; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S; Yang, Xiaohong R; Zheng, Wei; Rafnar, Thorunn; Gudmundsson, Julius; Stacey, Simon N; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Chen, Y Ann; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shiraishi, Kouya; Takahashi, Atsushi; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, Ma'en; Nickle, David; Timens, Wim; Freedman, Matthew L; Li, Qiyuan; Seminara, Daniela; Chanock, Stephen J; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike; Gruber, Stephen B; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Easton, Douglas F; Hunter, David J; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Hung, Rayjean J

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants with pleiotropic associations can uncover common pathways influencing multiple cancers. We took a two-staged approach to conduct genome-wide association studies for lung, ovary, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer from the GAME-ON/GECCO Network (61,851 cases, 61,820 c

  3. Genome-wide identification of Schistosoma japonicum microRNAs using a deep-sequencing approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human schistosomiasis is one of the most prevalent and serious parasitic diseases worldwide. Schistosoma japonicum is one of important pathogens of this disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a large group of non-coding RNAs that play important roles in regulating gene expression and protein translation in animals. Genome-wide identification of miRNAs in a given organism is a critical step to facilitating our understanding of genome organization, genome biology, evolution, and posttranscriptional regulation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We sequenced two small RNA libraries prepared from different stages of the life cycle of S. japonicum, immature schistosomula and mature pairing adults, through a deep DNA sequencing approach, which yielded approximately 12 million high-quality short sequence reads containing a total of approximately 2 million non-redundant tags. Based on a bioinformatics pipeline, we identified 176 new S. japonicum miRNAs, of which some exhibited a differential pattern of expression between the two stages. Although 21 S. japonicum miRNAs are orthologs of known miRNAs within the metazoans, some nucleotides at many positions of Schistosoma miRNAs, such as miR-8, let-7, miR-10, miR-31, miR-92, miR-124, and miR-125, are indeed significantly distinct from other bilaterian orthologs. In addition, both miR-71 and some miR-2 family members in tandem are found to be clustered in a reversal direction model on two genomic loci, and two pairs of novel S. japonicum miRNAs were derived from sense and antisense DNA strands at the same genomic loci. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The collection of S. japonicum miRNAs could be used as a new platform to study the genomic structure, gene regulation and networks, evolutionary processes, development, and host-parasite interactions. Some S. japonicum miRNAs and their clusters could represent the ancestral forms of the conserved orthologues and a model for the genesis of novel miRNAs.

  4. Identification and validation of specific markers of Bacillus anthracis spores by proteomics and genomics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenau, Jérôme; Fenaille, François; Caro, Valérie; Haustant, Michel; Diancourt, Laure; Klee, Silke R; Junot, Christophe; Ezan, Eric; Goossens, Pierre L; Becher, François

    2014-03-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative bacteria of anthrax, an acute and often fatal disease in humans. The infectious agent, the spore, represents a real bioterrorism threat and its specific identification is crucial. However, because of the high genomic relatedness within the Bacillus cereus group, it is still a real challenge to identify B. anthracis spores confidently. Mass spectrometry-based tools represent a powerful approach to the efficient discovery and identification of such protein markers. Here we undertook comparative proteomics analyses of Bacillus anthracis, cereus and thuringiensis spores to identify proteoforms unique to B. anthracis. The marker discovery pipeline developed combined peptide- and protein-centric approaches using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry experiments using a high resolution/high mass accuracy LTQ-Orbitrap instrument. By combining these data with those from complementary bioinformatics approaches, we were able to highlight a dozen novel proteins consistently observed across all the investigated B. anthracis spores while being absent in B. cereus/thuringiensis spores. To further demonstrate the relevance of these markers and their strict specificity to B. anthracis, the number of strains studied was extended to 55, by including closely related strains such as B. thuringiensis 9727, and above all the B. cereus biovar anthracis CI, CA strains that possess pXO1- and pXO2-like plasmids. Under these conditions, the combination of proteomics and genomics approaches confirms the pertinence of 11 markers. Genes encoding these 11 markers are located on the chromosome, which provides additional targets complementary to the commonly used plasmid-encoded markers. Last but not least, we also report the development of a targeted liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry method involving the selection reaction monitoring mode for the monitoring of the 4 most suitable protein markers. Within a proof

  5. Genome-scale Metabolic Reaction Modeling: a New Approach to Geomicrobial Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKernan, S. E.; Shapiro, B.; Jin, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Geomicrobial rates, rates of microbial metabolism in natural environments, are a key parameter of theoretical and practical problems in geobiology and biogeochemistry. Both laboratory- and field-based approaches have been applied to study rates of geomicrobial processes. Laboratory-based approaches analyze geomicrobial kinetics by incubating environmental samples under controlled laboratory conditions. Field methods quantify geomicrobial rates by observing the progress of geomicrobial processes. To take advantage of recent development in biogeochemical modeling and genome-scale metabolic modeling, we suggest that geomicrobial rates can also be predicted by simulating metabolic reaction networks of microbes. To predict geomicrobial rates, we developed a genome-scale metabolic model that describes enzyme reaction networks of microbial metabolism, and simulated the network model by accounting for the kinetics and thermodynamics of enzyme reactions. The model is simulated numerically to solve cellular enzyme abundance and hence metabolic rates under the constraints of cellular physiology. The new modeling approach differs from flux balance analysis of system biology in that it accounts for the thermodynamics and kinetics of enzymatic reactions. It builds on subcellular metabolic reaction networks, and hence also differs from classical biogeochemical reaction modeling. We applied the new approach to Methanosarcina acetivorans, an anaerobic, marine methanogen capable of disproportionating acetate to carbon dioxide and methane. The input of the new model includes (1) enzyme reaction network of acetoclastic methanogenesis, and (2) representative geochemical conditions of freshwater sedimentary environments. The output of the simulation includes the proteomics, metabolomics, and energy and matter fluxes of M. acetivorans. Our simulation results demonstrate the predictive power of the new modeling approach. Specifically, the results illustrate how methanogenesis rates vary

  6. Estimating variable effective population sizes from multiple genomes: a sequentially markov conditional sampling distribution approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Sara; Harris, Kelley; Song, Yun S

    2013-07-01

    Throughout history, the population size of modern humans has varied considerably due to changes in environment, culture, and technology. More accurate estimates of population size changes, and when they occurred, should provide a clearer picture of human colonization history and help remove confounding effects from natural selection inference. Demography influences the pattern of genetic variation in a population, and thus genomic data of multiple individuals sampled from one or more present-day populations contain valuable information about the past demographic history. Recently, Li and Durbin developed a coalescent-based hidden Markov model, called the pairwise sequentially Markovian coalescent (PSMC), for a pair of chromosomes (or one diploid individual) to estimate past population sizes. This is an efficient, useful approach, but its accuracy in the very recent past is hampered by the fact that, because of the small sample size, only few coalescence events occur in that period. Multiple genomes from the same population contain more information about the recent past, but are also more computationally challenging to study jointly in a coalescent framework. Here, we present a new coalescent-based method that can efficiently infer population size changes from multiple genomes, providing access to a new store of information about the recent past. Our work generalizes the recently developed sequentially Markov conditional sampling distribution framework, which provides an accurate approximation of the probability of observing a newly sampled haplotype given a set of previously sampled haplotypes. Simulation results demonstrate that we can accurately reconstruct the true population histories, with a significant improvement over the PSMC in the recent past. We apply our method, called diCal, to the genomes of multiple human individuals of European and African ancestry to obtain a detailed population size change history during recent times.

  7. Genomic Insights into Geothermal Spring Community Members using a 16S Agnostic Single-Cell Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowers, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    INSTUTIONS (ALL): DOE Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, CA USA. Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences, East Boothbay, ME USA. Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. ABSTRACT BODY: With recent advances in DNA sequencing, rapid and affordable screening of single-cell genomes has become a reality. Single-cell sequencing is a multi-step process that takes advantage of any number of single-cell sorting techniques, whole genome amplification (WGA), and 16S rRNA gene based PCR screening to identify the microbes of interest prior to shotgun sequencing. However, the 16S PCR based screening step is costly and may lead to unanticipated losses of microbial diversity, as cells that do not produce a clean 16S amplicon are typically omitted from downstream shotgun sequencing. While many of the sorted cells that fail the 16S PCR step likely originate from poor quality amplified DNA, some of the cells with good WGA kinetics may instead represent bacteria or archaea with 16S genes that fail to amplify due to primer mis-matches or the presence of intervening sequences. Using cell material from Dewar Creek, a hot spring in British Columbia, we sequenced all sorted cells with good WGA kinetics irrespective of their 16S amplification success. We show that this high-throughput approach to single-cell sequencing (i) can reduce the overall cost of single-cell genome production, and (ii). may lead to the discovery of previously unknown branches on the microbial tree of life.

  8. A genomic pathway approach to a complex disease: axon guidance and Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnick, Timothy G; Papapetropoulos, Spiridon; Mash, Deborah C; Ffrench-Mullen, Jarlath; Shehadeh, Lina; de Andrade, Mariza; Henley, John R; Rocca, Walter A; Ahlskog, J Eric; Maraganore, Demetrius M

    2007-06-01

    While major inroads have been made in identifying the genetic causes of rare Mendelian disorders, little progress has been made in the discovery of common gene variations that predispose to complex diseases. The single gene variants that have been shown to associate reproducibly with complex diseases typically have small effect sizes or attributable risks. However, the joint actions of common gene variants within pathways may play a major role in predisposing to complex diseases (the paradigm of complex genetics). The goal of this study was to determine whether polymorphism in a candidate pathway (axon guidance) predisposed to a complex disease (Parkinson disease [PD]). We mined a whole-genome association dataset and identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were within axon-guidance pathway genes. We then constructed models of axon-guidance pathway SNPs that predicted three outcomes: PD susceptibility (odds ratio = 90.8, p = 4.64 x 10(-38)), survival free of PD (hazards ratio = 19.0, p = 5.43 x 10(-48)), and PD age at onset (R(2) = 0.68, p = 1.68 x 10(-51)). By contrast, models constructed from thousands of random selections of genomic SNPs predicted the three PD outcomes poorly. Mining of a second whole-genome association dataset and mining of an expression profiling dataset also supported a role for many axon-guidance pathway genes in PD. These findings could have important implications regarding the pathogenesis of PD. This genomic pathway approach may also offer insights into other complex diseases such as Alzheimer disease, diabetes mellitus, nicotine and alcohol dependence, and several cancers.

  9. A genomic pathway approach to a complex disease: axon guidance and Parkinson disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy G Lesnick

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available While major inroads have been made in identifying the genetic causes of rare Mendelian disorders, little progress has been made in the discovery of common gene variations that predispose to complex diseases. The single gene variants that have been shown to associate reproducibly with complex diseases typically have small effect sizes or attributable risks. However, the joint actions of common gene variants within pathways may play a major role in predisposing to complex diseases (the paradigm of complex genetics. The goal of this study was to determine whether polymorphism in a candidate pathway (axon guidance predisposed to a complex disease (Parkinson disease [PD]. We mined a whole-genome association dataset and identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs that were within axon-guidance pathway genes. We then constructed models of axon-guidance pathway SNPs that predicted three outcomes: PD susceptibility (odds ratio = 90.8, p = 4.64 x 10(-38, survival free of PD (hazards ratio = 19.0, p = 5.43 x 10(-48, and PD age at onset (R(2 = 0.68, p = 1.68 x 10(-51. By contrast, models constructed from thousands of random selections of genomic SNPs predicted the three PD outcomes poorly. Mining of a second whole-genome association dataset and mining of an expression profiling dataset also supported a role for many axon-guidance pathway genes in PD. These findings could have important implications regarding the pathogenesis of PD. This genomic pathway approach may also offer insights into other complex diseases such as Alzheimer disease, diabetes mellitus, nicotine and alcohol dependence, and several cancers.

  10. Discovery and annotation of small proteins using genomics, proteomics and computational approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaohan; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Jawdy, Sara; Abraham, Paul E.; Lankford, Patricia K.; Adams, Rachel M.; Shah, Manesh B.; Hettich, Robert L.; Lindquist, Erika; Kalluri, Udaya C.; Gunter, Lee E.; Pennacchio, Christa; Tuskan, Gerald A.

    2011-03-02

    Small proteins (10 200 amino acids aa in length) encoded by short open reading frames (sORF) play important regulatory roles in various biological processes, including tumor progression, stress response, flowering, and hormone signaling. However, ab initio discovery of small proteins has been relatively overlooked. Recent advances in deep transcriptome sequencing make it possible to efficiently identify sORFs at the genome level. In this study, we obtained 2.6 million expressed sequence tag (EST) reads from Populus deltoides leaf transcriptome and reconstructed full-length transcripts from the EST sequences. We identified an initial set of 12,852 sORFs encoding proteins of 10 200 aa in length. Three computational approaches were then used to enrich for bona fide protein-coding sORFs from the initial sORF set: (1) codingpotential prediction, (2) evolutionary conservation between P. deltoides and other plant species, and (3) gene family clustering within P. deltoides. As a result, a high-confidence sORF candidate set containing 1469 genes was obtained. Analysis of the protein domains, non-protein-coding RNA motifs, sequence length distribution, and protein mass spectrometry data supported this high-confidence sORF set. In the high-confidence sORF candidate set, known protein domains were identified in 1282 genes (higher-confidence sORF candidate set), out of which 611 genes, designated as highest-confidence candidate sORF set, were supported by proteomics data. Of the 611 highest-confidence candidate sORF genes, 56 were new to the current Populus genome annotation. This study not only demonstrates that there are potential sORF candidates to be annotated in sequenced genomes, but also presents an efficient strategy for discovery of sORFs in species with no genome annotation yet available.

  11. Analysis of the Complete Mitochondrial Genome Sequence of the Diploid Cotton Gossypium raimondii by Comparative Genomics Approaches

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    Changwei Bi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotton is one of the most important economic crops and the primary source of natural fiber and is an important protein source for animal feed. The complete nuclear and chloroplast (cp genome sequences of G. raimondii are already available but not mitochondria. Here, we assembled the complete mitochondrial (mt DNA sequence of G. raimondii into a circular genome of length of 676,078 bp and performed comparative analyses with other higher plants. The genome contains 39 protein-coding genes, 6 rRNA genes, and 25 tRNA genes. We also identified four larger repeats (63.9 kb, 10.6 kb, 9.1 kb, and 2.5 kb in this mt genome, which may be active in intramolecular recombination in the evolution of cotton. Strikingly, nearly all of the G. raimondii mt genome has been transferred to nucleus on Chr1, and the transfer event must be very recent. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that G. raimondii, as a member of Malvaceae, is much closer to another cotton (G. barbadense than other rosids, and the clade formed by two Gossypium species is sister to Brassicales. The G. raimondii mt genome may provide a crucial foundation for evolutionary analysis, molecular biology, and cytoplasmic male sterility in cotton and other higher plants.

  12. A surrogate approach to study the evolution of noncoding DNA elements that organize eukaryotic genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaak, Danielle; Bayes, Joshua J; Malik, Harmit S

    2009-01-01

    Comparative genomics provides a facile way to address issues of evolutionary constraint acting on different elements of the genome. However, several important DNA elements have not reaped the benefits of this new approach. Some have proved intractable to current day sequencing technology. These include centromeric and heterochromatic DNA, which are essential for chromosome segregation as well as gene regulation, but the highly repetitive nature of the DNA sequences in these regions make them difficult to assemble into longer contigs. Other sequences, like dosage compensation X chromosomal sites, origins of DNA replication, or heterochromatic sequences that encode piwi-associated RNAs, have proved difficult to study because they do not have recognizable DNA features that allow them to be described functionally or computationally. We have employed an alternate approach to the direct study of these DNA elements. By using proteins that specifically bind these noncoding DNAs as surrogates, we can indirectly assay the evolutionary constraints acting on these important DNA elements. We review the impact that such "surrogate strategies" have had on our understanding of the evolutionary constraints shaping centromeres, origins of DNA replication, and dosage compensation X chromosomal sites. These have begun to reveal that in contrast to the view that such structural DNA elements are either highly constrained (under purifying selection) or free to drift (under neutral evolution), some of them may instead be shaped by adaptive evolution and genetic conflicts (these are not mutually exclusive). These insights also help to explain why the same elements (e.g., centromeres and replication origins), which are so complex in some eukaryotic genomes, can be simple and well defined in other where similar conflicts do not exist.

  13. Synthetic biology approaches in cancer immunotherapy, genetic network engineering, and genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Cho, Jang Hwan; Weinberg, Benjamin H; Wong, Nicole M; Wong, Wilson W

    2016-04-18

    Investigations into cells and their contents have provided evolving insight into the emergence of complex biological behaviors. Capitalizing on this knowledge, synthetic biology seeks to manipulate the cellular machinery towards novel purposes, extending discoveries from basic science to new applications. While these developments have demonstrated the potential of building with biological parts, the complexity of cells can pose numerous challenges. In this review, we will highlight the broad and vital role that the synthetic biology approach has played in applying fundamental biological discoveries in receptors, genetic circuits, and genome-editing systems towards translation in the fields of immunotherapy, biosensors, disease models and gene therapy. These examples are evidence of the strength of synthetic approaches, while also illustrating considerations that must be addressed when developing systems around living cells.

  14. Integrating Environmental Genomics and Biogeochemical Models: a Gene-centric Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D. C.; Algar, C. K.; Huber, J. A.; Dick, G.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid advances in molecular microbial ecology have yielded an unprecedented amount of data about the evolutionary relationships and functional traits of microbial communities that regulate global geochemical cycles. Biogeochemical models, however, are trailing in the wake of the environmental genomics revolution and such models rarely incorporate explicit representations of bacteria and archaea, nor are they compatible with nucleic acid or protein sequence data. Here, we present a functional gene-based framework for describing microbial communities in biogeochemical models that uses genomics data and provides predictions that are readily testable using cutting-edge molecular tools. To demonstrate the approach in practice, nitrogen cycling in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) was modelled to examine key questions about cryptic sulphur cycling and dinitrogen production pathways in OMZs. By directly linking geochemical dynamics to the genetic composition of microbial communities, the method provides mechanistic insights into patterns and biogeochemical consequences of marine microbes. Such an approach is critical for informing our understanding of the key role microbes play in modulating Earth's biogeochemistry.

  15. In silico prediction and screening of modular crystal structures via a high-throughput genomic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Li, Xu; Liu, Jiancong; Duan, Fangzheng; Yu, Jihong

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput computational methods capable of predicting, evaluating and identifying promising synthetic candidates with desired properties are highly appealing to today's scientists. Despite some successes, in silico design of crystalline materials with complex three-dimensionally extended structures remains challenging. Here we demonstrate the application of a new genomic approach to ABC-6 zeolites, a family of industrially important catalysts whose structures are built from the stacking of modular six-ring layers. The sequences of layer stacking, which we deem the genes of this family, determine the structures and the properties of ABC-6 zeolites. By enumerating these gene-like stacking sequences, we have identified 1,127 most realizable new ABC-6 structures out of 78 groups of 84,292 theoretical ones, and experimentally realized 2 of them. Our genomic approach can extract crucial structural information directly from these gene-like stacking sequences, enabling high-throughput identification of synthetic targets with desired properties among a large number of candidate structures.

  16. Integrative computational approach for genome-based study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorapreeda, Tayvich; Thammarongtham, Chinae; Laoteng, Kobkul

    2016-07-01

    Lipid-degrading or lipolytic enzymes have gained enormous attention in academic and industrial sectors. Several efforts are underway to discover new lipase enzymes from a variety of microorganisms with particular catalytic properties to be used for extensive applications. In addition, various tools and strategies have been implemented to unravel the functional relevance of the versatile lipid-degrading enzymes for special purposes. This review highlights the study of microbial lipid-degrading enzymes through an integrative computational approach. The identification of putative lipase genes from microbial genomes and metagenomic libraries using homology-based mining is discussed, with an emphasis on sequence analysis of conserved motifs and enzyme topology. Molecular modelling of three-dimensional structure on the basis of sequence similarity is shown to be a potential approach for exploring the structural and functional relationships of candidate lipase enzymes. The perspectives on a discriminative framework of cutting-edge tools and technologies, including bioinformatics, computational biology, functional genomics and functional proteomics, intended to facilitate rapid progress in understanding lipolysis mechanism and to discover novel lipid-degrading enzymes of microorganisms are discussed.

  17. Elastic-net regularization approaches for genome-wide association studies of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seoae; Kim, Haseong; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Kyunga; Park, Taesung

    2009-12-15

    The current trend in genome-wide association studies is to identify regions where the true disease-causing genes may lie by evaluating thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the whole genome. However, many challenges exist in detecting disease-causing genes among the thousands of SNPs. Examples include multicollinearity and multiple testing issues, especially when a large number of correlated SNPs are simultaneously tested. Multicollinearity can often occur when predictor variables in a multiple regression model are highly correlated, and can cause imprecise estimation of association. In this study, we propose a simple stepwise procedure that identifies disease-causing SNPs simultaneously by employing elastic-net regularization, a variable selection method that allows one to address multicollinearity. At Step 1, the single-marker association analysis was conducted to screen SNPs. At Step 2, the multiple-marker association was scanned based on the elastic-net regularization. The proposed approach was applied to the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) case-control data set of Genetic Analysis Workshop 16. While the selected SNPs at the screening step are located mostly on chromosome 6, the elastic-net approach identified putative RA-related SNPs on other chromosomes in an increased proportion. For some of those putative RA-related SNPs, we identified the interactions with sex, a well known factor affecting RA susceptibility.

  18. New Markov Model Approaches to Deciphering Microbial Genome Function and Evolution: Comparative Genomics of Laterally Transferred Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodovsky, M.

    2013-04-11

    Algorithmic methods for gene prediction have been developed and successfully applied to many different prokaryotic genome sequences. As the set of genes in a particular genome is not homogeneous with respect to DNA sequence composition features, the GeneMark.hmm program utilizes two Markov models representing distinct classes of protein coding genes denoted "typical" and "atypical". Atypical genes are those whose DNA features deviate significantly from those classified as typical and they represent approximately 10% of any given genome. In addition to the inherent interest of more accurately predicting genes, the atypical status of these genes may also reflect their separate evolutionary ancestry from other genes in that genome. We hypothesize that atypical genes are largely comprised of those genes that have been relatively recently acquired through lateral gene transfer (LGT). If so, what fraction of atypical genes are such bona fide LGTs? We have made atypical gene predictions for all fully completed prokaryotic genomes; we have been able to compare these results to other "surrogate" methods of LGT prediction.

  19. Clusters versus affinity-based approaches in F. tularensis whole genome search of CTL epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Zvi

    Full Text Available Deciphering the cellular immunome of a bacterial pathogen is challenging due to the enormous number of putative peptidic determinants. State-of-the-art prediction methods developed in recent years enable to significantly reduce the number of peptides to be screened, yet the number of remaining candidates for experimental evaluation is still in the range of ten-thousands, even for a limited coverage of MHC alleles. We have recently established a resource-efficient approach for down selection of candidates and enrichment of true positives, based on selection of predicted MHC binders located in high density "hotspots" of putative epitopes. This cluster-based approach was applied to an unbiased, whole genome search of Francisella tularensis CTL epitopes and was shown to yield a 17-25 fold higher level of responders as compared to randomly selected predicted epitopes tested in Kb/Db C57BL/6 mice. In the present study, we further evaluate the cluster-based approach (down to a lower density range and compare this approach to the classical affinity-based approach by testing putative CTL epitopes with predicted IC(50 values of <10 nM. We demonstrate that while the percent of responders achieved by both approaches is similar, the profile of responders is different, and the predicted binding affinity of most responders in the cluster-based approach is relatively low (geometric mean of 170 nM, rendering the two approaches complimentary. The cluster-based approach is further validated in BALB/c F. tularensis immunized mice belonging to another allelic restriction (Kd/Dd group. To date, the cluster-based approach yielded over 200 novel F. tularensis peptides eliciting a cellular response, all were verified as MHC class I binders, thereby substantially increasing the F. tularensis dataset of known CTL epitopes. The generality and power of the high density cluster-based approach suggest that it can be a valuable tool for identification of novel CTLs in

  20. Dry and wet approaches for genome-wide functional annotation of conventional and unconventional transcriptional activators

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    Elisabetta Levati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs are master gene products that regulate gene expression in response to a variety of stimuli. They interact with DNA in a sequence-specific manner using a variety of DNA-binding domain (DBD modules. This allows to properly position their second domain, called “effector domain”, to directly or indirectly recruit positively or negatively acting co-regulators including chromatin modifiers, thus modulating preinitiation complex formation as well as transcription elongation. At variance with the DBDs, which are comprised of well-defined and easily recognizable DNA binding motifs, effector domains are usually much less conserved and thus considerably more difficult to predict. Also not so easy to identify are the DNA-binding sites of TFs, especially on a genome-wide basis and in the case of overlapping binding regions. Another emerging issue, with many potential regulatory implications, is that of so-called “moonlighting” transcription factors, i.e., proteins with an annotated function unrelated to transcription and lacking any recognizable DBD or effector domain, that play a role in gene regulation as their second job. Starting from bioinformatic and experimental high-throughput tools for an unbiased, genome-wide identification and functional characterization of TFs (especially transcriptional activators, we describe both established (and usually well affordable as well as newly developed platforms for DNA-binding site identification. Selected combinations of these search tools, some of which rely on next-generation sequencing approaches, allow delineating the entire repertoire of TFs and unconventional regulators encoded by the any sequenced genome.

  1. An algorithmic approach for breakage-fusion-bridge detection in tumor genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakov, Shay; Kinsella, Marcus; Bafna, Vineet

    2013-04-01

    Breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) is a mechanism of genomic instability characterized by the joining and subsequent tearing apart of sister chromatids. When this process is repeated during multiple rounds of cell division, it leads to patterns of copy number increases of chromosomal segments as well as fold-back inversions where duplicated segments are arranged head-to-head. These structural variations can then drive tumorigenesis. BFB can be observed in progress using cytogenetic techniques, but generally BFB must be inferred from data such as microarrays or sequencing collected after BFB has ceased. Making correct inferences from this data is not straightforward, particularly given the complexity of some cancer genomes and BFB's ability to generate a wide range of rearrangement patterns. Here we present algorithms to aid the interpretation of evidence for BFB. We first pose the BFB count-vector problem: given a chromosome segmentation and segment copy numbers, decide whether BFB can yield a chromosome with the given segment counts. We present a linear time algorithm for the problem, in contrast to a previous exponential time algorithm. We then combine this algorithm with fold-back inversions to develop tests for BFB. We show that, contingent on assumptions about cancer genome evolution, count vectors and fold-back inversions are sufficient evidence for detecting BFB. We apply the presented techniques to paired-end sequencing data from pancreatic tumors and confirm a previous finding of BFB as well as identify a chromosomal region likely rearranged by BFB cycles, demonstrating the practicality of our approach.

  2. Revealing the biotechnological potential of Delftia sp. JD2 by a genomic approach

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    María A. Morel

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Delftia sp. JD2 is a chromium-resistant bacterium that reduces Cr(VI to Cr(III, accumulates Pb(II, produces the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid and siderophores, and increases the plant growth performance of rhizobia in co-inoculation experiments. We aimed to analyze the biotechnological potential of JD2 using a genomic approach. JD2 has a genome of 6.76Mb, with 6,051 predicted protein coding sequences and 93 RNA genes (tRNA and rRNA. The indole-acetamide pathway was identified as responsible for the synthesis of indole-3-acetic acid. The genetic information involved in chromium resistance (the gene cluster, chrBACF, was found. At least 40 putative genes encoding for TonB-dependent receptors, probably involved in the utilization of siderophores and biopolymers, and genes for the synthesis, maturation, exportation and uptake of pyoverdine, and acquisition of Fe-pyochelin and Fe-enterobactin were also identified. The information also suggests that JD2 produce polyhydroxybutyrate, a carbon reserve polymer commonly used for manufacturing petrochemical free bioplastics. In addition, JD2 may degrade lignin-derived aromatic compounds to 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate, a molecule used in the bio-based polymer industry. Finally, a comparative genomic analysis of JD2, Delftia sp. Cs1-4 and Delftia acidovorans SPH-1 is also discussed. The present work provides insights into the physiology and genetics of a microorganism with many potential uses in biotechnology.

  3. Genome-scale identification of Legionella pneumophila effectors using a machine learning approach.

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    David Burstein

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available A large number of highly pathogenic bacteria utilize secretion systems to translocate effector proteins into host cells. Using these effectors, the bacteria subvert host cell processes during infection. Legionella pneumophila translocates effectors via the Icm/Dot type-IV secretion system and to date, approximately 100 effectors have been identified by various experimental and computational techniques. Effector identification is a critical first step towards the understanding of the pathogenesis system in L. pneumophila as well as in other bacterial pathogens. Here, we formulate the task of effector identification as a classification problem: each L. pneumophila open reading frame (ORF was classified as either effector or not. We computationally defined a set of features that best distinguish effectors from non-effectors. These features cover a wide range of characteristics including taxonomical dispersion, regulatory data, genomic organization, similarity to eukaryotic proteomes and more. Machine learning algorithms utilizing these features were then applied to classify all the ORFs within the L. pneumophila genome. Using this approach we were able to predict and experimentally validate 40 new effectors, reaching a success rate of above 90%. Increasing the number of validated effectors to around 140, we were able to gain novel insights into their characteristics. Effectors were found to have low G+C content, supporting the hypothesis that a large number of effectors originate via horizontal gene transfer, probably from their protozoan host. In addition, effectors were found to cluster in specific genomic regions. Finally, we were able to provide a novel description of the C-terminal translocation signal required for effector translocation by the Icm/Dot secretion system. To conclude, we have discovered 40 novel L. pneumophila effectors, predicted over a hundred additional highly probable effectors, and shown the applicability of machine

  4. BAL31-NGS approach for identification of telomeres de novo in large genomes.

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    Peška, Vratislav; Sitová, Zdeňka; Fajkus, Petr; Fajkus, Jiří

    2017-02-01

    This article describes a novel method to identify as yet undiscovered telomere sequences, which combines next generation sequencing (NGS) with BAL31 digestion of high molecular weight DNA. The method was applied to two groups of plants: i) dicots, genus Cestrum, and ii) monocots, Allium species (e.g. A. ursinum and A. cepa). Both groups consist of species with large genomes (tens of Gb) and a low number of chromosomes (2n=14-16), full of repeat elements. Both genera lack typical telomeric repeats and multiple studies have attempted to characterize alternative telomeric sequences. However, despite interesting hypotheses and suggestions of alternative candidate telomeres (retrotransposons, rDNA, satellite repeats) these studies have not resolved the question. In a novel approach based on the two most general features of eukaryotic telomeres, their repetitive character and sensitivity to BAL31 nuclease digestion, we have taken advantage of the capacity and current affordability of NGS in combination with the robustness of classical BAL31 nuclease digestion of chromosomal termini. While representative samples of most repeat elements were ensured by low-coverage (less than 5%) genomic shot-gun NGS, candidate telomeres were identified as under-represented sequences in BAL31-treated samples.

  5. Post-genomic approaches to understanding interactions between fungi and their environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Vries, Ronald P.; Benoit, Isabelle; Doehlemann, Gunther; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Magnuson, Jon K.; Panisko, Ellen A.; Baker, Scott E.; Lebrun, Marc-Henri

    2011-05-24

    Fungi inhabit every natural and anthropogenic environment on Earth. They have highly varied life-styles including saprobes (using only dead biomass as a nutrient source), pathogens (feeding on living biomass), and symbionts (co-existing with other organisms). These distinctions are not absolute as many species employ several life styles (e.g. saprobe and opportunistic pathogen, saprobe and mycorrhiza). To efficiently survive in these different and often changing environments, fungi need to be able to modify their physiology and in some cases will even modify their local environment. Understanding the interaction between fungi and their environments has been a topic of study for many decades. However, recently these studies have reached a new dimension. The availability of fungal genomes and development of postgenomic technologies for fungi, such as transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics, have enabled more detailed studies into this topic resulting in new insights. Based on a Special Interest Group session held during IMC9, this paper provides examples of the recent advances in using (post-)genomic approaches to better understand fungal interactions with their environments.

  6. Genomic and Global Approaches to Unravelling How Hypermutable Sequences Influence Bacterial Pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadil A. Bidmos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid adaptation to fluctuations in the host milieu contributes to the host persistence and virulence of bacterial pathogens. Adaptation is frequently mediated by hypermutable sequences in bacterial pathogens. Early bacterial genomic studies identified the multiplicity and virulence-associated functions of these hypermutable sequences. Thus, simple sequence repeat tracts (SSRs and site-specific recombination were found to control capsular type, lipopolysaccharide structure, pilin diversity and the expression of outer membrane proteins. We review how the population diversity inherent in the SSR-mediated mechanism of localised hypermutation is being unlocked by the investigation of whole genome sequences of disease isolates, analysis of clinical samples and use of model systems. A contrast is presented between the problematical nature of analysing simple sequence repeats in next generation sequencing data and in simpler, pragmatic PCR-based approaches. Specific examples are presented of the potential relevance of this localized hypermutation to meningococcal pathogenesis. This leads us to speculate on the future prospects for unravelling how hypermutable mechanisms may contribute to the transmission, spread and persistence of bacterial pathogens.

  7. Affinity Density: a novel genomic approach to the identification of transcription factor regulatory targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelett, Dennis J; Lakeland, Daniel L; Weiss, Joseph B

    2009-07-01

    A new method was developed for identifying novel transcription factor regulatory targets based on calculating Local Affinity Density. Techniques from the signal-processing field were used, in particular the Hann digital filter, to calculate the relative binding affinity of different regions based on previously published in vitro binding data. To illustrate this approach, the complete genomes of Drosophila melanogaster and D.pseudoobscura were analyzed for binding sites of the homeodomain proteinc Tinman, an essential heart development gene in both Drosophila and Mouse. The significant binding regions were identified relative to genomic background and assigned to putative target genes. Valid candidates common to both species of Drosophila were selected as a test of conservation. The new method was more sensitive than cluster searches for conserved binding motifs with respect to positive identification of known Tinman targets. Our Local Affinity Density method also identified a significantly greater proportion of Tinman-coexpressed genes than equivalent, optimized cluster searching. In addition, this new method predicted a significantly greater than expected number of genes with previously published RNAi phenotypes in the heart. Algorithms were implemented in Python, LISP, R and maxima, using MySQL to access locally mirrored sequence data from Ensembl (D.melanogaster release 4.3) and flybase (D.pseudoobscura). All code is licensed under GPL and freely available at http://www.ohsu.edu/cellbio/dev_biol_prog/affinitydensity/.

  8. The Uncovered Interest Parity in the Foreign Exchange (FX Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Ricardo Micheloto

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This work verifies the uncovered interest rates parity (UIP in the FX (foreign exchange emerging markets by using the panel cointegration technique. The data involves several developing countries that compose the EMBI+ Global Index. We compare the results of several panel estimators: OLS (ordinary list square, DOLS (dynamic OLS and FMOLS (fully modified OLS. This new panel technique can handle problems of either non-stationary series (spurious regression or small problem. This latter problem has being considered one of the main causes for distorting the UIP empirical results. By using this approach, we check the UIP in the FX (foreign exchange emerging markets. These markets are more critical because they have been subjected to changing FX regimes and speculative attacks. Our results do not corroborate the uncovered interest parity for the developing countries in the recent years. Thus, the forward premium puzzle may hold in the FX emergent markets.

  9. Comparative genomic analysis of single-molecule sequencing and hybrid approaches for finishing the Clostridium autoethanogenum JA1-1 strain DSM 10061 genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Nagaraju, Shilpa [LanzaTech; Utturkar, Sagar M [ORNL; De Tissera, Sashini [LanzaTech; Segovia, Simón [LanzaTech; Mitchell, Wayne [LanzaTech; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Dassanayake, Asela [LanzaTech; Köpke, Michael [LanzaTech

    2014-01-01

    Background Clostridium autoethanogenum strain JA1-1 (DSM 10061) is an acetogen capable of fermenting CO, CO2 and H2 (e.g. from syngas or waste gases) into biofuel ethanol and commodity chemicals such as 2,3-butanediol. A draft genome sequence consisting of 100 contigs has been published. Results A closed, high-quality genome sequence for C. autoethanogenum DSM10061 was generated using only the latest single-molecule DNA sequencing technology and without the need for manual finishing. It is assigned to the most complex genome classification based upon genome features such as repeats, prophage, nine copies of the rRNA gene operons. It has a low G + C content of 31.1%. Illumina, 454, Illumina/454 hybrid assemblies were generated and then compared to the draft and PacBio assemblies using summary statistics, CGAL, QUAST and REAPR bioinformatics tools and comparative genomic approaches. Assemblies based upon shorter read DNA technologies were confounded by the large number repeats and their size, which in the case of the rRNA gene operons were ~5 kb. CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Paloindromic Repeats) systems among biotechnologically relevant Clostridia were classified and related to plasmid content and prophages. Potential associations between plasmid content and CRISPR systems may have implications for historical industrial scale Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol (ABE) fermentation failures and future large scale bacterial fermentations. While C. autoethanogenum contains an active CRISPR system, no such system is present in the closely related Clostridium ljungdahlii DSM 13528. A common prophage inserted into the Arg-tRNA shared between the strains suggests a common ancestor. However, C. ljungdahlii contains several additional putative prophages and it has more than double the amount of prophage DNA compared to C. autoethanogenum. Other differences include important metabolic genes for central metabolism (as an additional hydrogenase and the absence of a

  10. Data Mining Approaches for Genome-Wide Association of Mood Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirooznia, Mehdi; Seifuddin, Fayaz; Judy, Jennifer; Mahon, Pamela B.; Potash, James B.; Zandi, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Mood disorders are highly heritable forms of major mental illness. A major breakthrough in elucidating the genetic architecture of mood disorders was anticipated with the advent of genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, to date few susceptibility loci have been conclusively identified. The genetic etiology of mood disorders appears to be quite complex, and as a result, alternative approaches for analyzing GWAS data are needed. Recently, a polygenic scoring approach that captures the effects of alleles across multiple loci was successfully applied to the analysis of GWAS data in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BP). However, this method may be overly simplistic in its approach to the complexity of genetic effects. Data mining methods are available that may be applied to analyze the high dimensional data generated by GWAS of complex psychiatric disorders. We sought to compare the performance of five data mining methods, namely, Bayesian Networks (BN), Support Vector Machine (SVM), Random Forest (RF), Radial Basis Function network (RBF), and Logistic Regression (LR), against the polygenic scoring approach in the analysis of GWAS data on BP. The different classification methods were trained on GWAS datasets from the Bipolar Genome Study (2,191 cases with BP and 1,434 controls) and their ability to accurately classify case/control status was tested on a GWAS dataset from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. The performance of the classifiers in the test dataset was evaluated by comparing area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). BN performed the best of all the data mining classifiers, but none of these did significantly better than the polygenic score approach. We further examined a subset of SNPs in genes that are expressed in the brain, under the hypothesis that these might be most relevant to BP susceptibility, but all the classifiers performed worse with this reduced set of SNPs. The discriminative accuracy of all of these

  11. Disordered Collarettes and Uncovered Tables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Nina

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the use of negative polarity as a stylistic device in James Joyce's short story, "Two Gallants" (1992 [1914]). The article begins with a brief account of various approaches to negative polarity, focusing in particular on theoretical paradigms that favour the pragmatic functi......, accordingly, at times intimately connected to focalisation and narrative perspective...

  12. Disordered Collarettes and Uncovered Tables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Nina

    2007-01-01

    This article examines the use of negative polarity as a stylistic device in James Joyce's short story, "Two Gallants" (1992 [1914]). The article begins with a brief account of various approaches to negative polarity, focusing in particular on theoretical paradigms that favour the pragmatic functi...

  13. Multi-criteria decision making approaches for quality control of genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malovini, Alberto; Rognoni, Carla; Puca, Annibale; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2009-03-01

    Experimental errors in the genotyping phases of a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) can lead to false positive findings and to spurious associations. An appropriate quality control phase could minimize the effects of this kind of errors. Several filtering criteria can be used to perform quality control. Currently, no formal methods have been proposed for taking into account at the same time these criteria and the experimenter's preferences. In this paper we propose two strategies for setting appropriate genotyping rate thresholds for GWAS quality control. These two approaches are based on the Multi-Criteria Decision Making theory. We have applied our method on a real dataset composed by 734 individuals affected by Arterial Hypertension (AH) and 486 nonagenarians without history of AH. The proposed strategies appear to deal with GWAS quality control in a sound way, as they lead to rationalize and make explicit the experimenter's choices thus providing more reproducible results.

  14. A functional genomics approach using metabolomics and in silico pathway analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Förster, Jochen; Gombert, Andreas Karoly; Nielsen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    In the field of functional genomics increasing effort is being undertaken to analyze the function of orphan genes using metabolome data. Improved analytical equipment allows screening simultaneously for a high number of metabolites. Such metabolite profiles are analyzed using multivariate data...... analysis techniques and changes in the genotype will in many cases lead to different metabolite profiles. Here, a theoretical framework that may be applied to identify the function of orphan genes is presented. The approach is based on a combination of metabolome analysis combined with in silico pathway...... analysis. Pathway analysis may be carried out using convex analysis and a change in the active pathway structure of deletion mutants expressed in a different metabolite profile may disclose the function or the functional class of an orphan gene. The concept is illustrated using a simplified model...

  15. Genome-wide functional divergence after the symbiosis of proteobacteria with insects unraveled through a novel computational approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Toft

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Symbiosis has been among the most important evolutionary steps to generate biological complexity. The establishment of symbiosis required an intimate metabolic link between biological systems with different complexity levels. The strict endo-cellular symbiotic bacteria of insects are beautiful examples of the metabolic coupling between organisms belonging to different kingdoms, a eukaryote and a prokaryote. The host (eukaryote provides the endosymbiont (prokaryote with a stable cellular environment while the endosymbiont supplements the host's diet with essential metabolites. For such communication to take place, endosymbionts' genomes have suffered dramatic modifications and reconfigurations of proteins' functions. Two of the main modifications, loss of genes redundant for endosymbiotic bacteria or the host and bacterial genome streamlining, have been extensively studied. However, no studies have accounted for possible functional shifts in the endosymbiotic proteomes. Here, we develop a simple method to screen genomes for evidence of functional divergence between two species clusters, and we apply it to identify functional shifts in the endosymbiotic proteomes. Despite the strong effects of genetic drift in the endosymbiotic systems, we unexpectedly identified genes to be under stronger selective constraints in endosymbionts of aphids and ants than in their free-living bacterial relatives. These genes are directly involved in supplementing the host's diet with essential metabolites. A test of functional divergence supports a strong relationship between the endosymbiosis and the functional shifts of proteins involved in the metabolic communication with the insect host. The correlation between functional divergence in the endosymbiotic bacterium and the ecological requirements of the host uncovers their intimate biochemical and metabolic communication and provides insights on the role of symbiosis in generating species diversity.

  16. Biosurveillance enterprise for operational awareness, a genomic-based approach for tracking pathogen virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia-Granda, Willy A

    2013-11-15

    To protect our civilians and warfighters against both known and unknown pathogens, biodefense stakeholders must be able to foresee possible technological trends that could affect their threat risk assessment. However, significant flaws in how we prioritize our countermeasure-needs continue to limit their development. As recombinant biotechnology becomes increasingly simplified and inexpensive, small groups, and even individuals, can now achieve the design, synthesis, and production of pathogenic organisms for offensive purposes. Under these daunting circumstances, a reliable biosurveillance approach that supports a diversity of users could better provide early warnings about the emergence of new pathogens (both natural and manmade), reverse engineer pathogens carrying traits to avoid available countermeasures, and suggest the most appropriate detection, prophylactic, and therapeutic solutions. While impressive in data mining capabilities, real-time content analysis of social media data misses much of the complexity in the factual reality. Quality issues within freeform user-provided hashtags and biased referencing can significantly undermine our confidence in the information obtained to make critical decisions about the natural vs. intentional emergence of a pathogen. At the same time, errors in pathogen genomic records, the narrow scope of most databases, and the lack of standards and interoperability across different detection and diagnostic devices, continue to restrict the multidimensional biothreat assessment. The fragmentation of our biosurveillance efforts into different approaches has stultified attempts to implement any new foundational enterprise that is more reliable, more realistic and that avoids the scenario of the warning that comes too late. This discussion focus on the development of genomic-based decentralized medical intelligence and laboratory system to track emerging and novel microbial health threats in both military and civilian settings and

  17. A hybrid clustering approach to recognition of protein families in 114 microbial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogarten J Peter

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grouping proteins into sequence-based clusters is a fundamental step in many bioinformatic analyses (e.g., homology-based prediction of structure or function. Standard clustering methods such as single-linkage clustering capture a history of cluster topologies as a function of threshold, but in practice their usefulness is limited because unrelated sequences join clusters before biologically meaningful families are fully constituted, e.g. as the result of matches to so-called promiscuous domains. Use of the Markov Cluster algorithm avoids this non-specificity, but does not preserve topological or threshold information about protein families. Results We describe a hybrid approach to sequence-based clustering of proteins that combines the advantages of standard and Markov clustering. We have implemented this hybrid approach over a relational database environment, and describe its application to clustering a large subset of PDB, and to 328577 proteins from 114 fully sequenced microbial genomes. To demonstrate utility with difficult problems, we show that hybrid clustering allows us to constitute the paralogous family of ATP synthase F1 rotary motor subunits into a single, biologically interpretable hierarchical grouping that was not accessible using either single-linkage or Markov clustering alone. We describe validation of this method by hybrid clustering of PDB and mapping SCOP families and domains onto the resulting clusters. Conclusion Hybrid (Markov followed by single-linkage clustering combines the advantages of the Markov Cluster algorithm (avoidance of non-specific clusters resulting from matches to promiscuous domains and single-linkage clustering (preservation of topological information as a function of threshold. Within the individual Markov clusters, single-linkage clustering is a more-precise instrument, discerning sub-clusters of biological relevance. Our hybrid approach thus provides a computationally efficient

  18. Approaching confidentiality at a familial level in genomic medicine: a focus group study with healthcare professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheensa, Sandi; Fenwick, Angela; Lucassen, Anneke

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Clinical genetics guidelines from 2011 conceptualise genetic information as confidential to families, not individuals. The normative consequence of this is that the family's interest is the primary consideration and genetic information is shared unless there are good reasons not to do so. We investigated healthcare professionals' (HCPs') views about, and reasoning around, individual and familial approaches to confidentiality and how such views influenced their practice. Method 16 focus groups with 80 HCPs working in/with clinical genetics services were analysed, drawing on grounded theory. Results Participants raised seven problems with, and arguments against, going beyond the individual approach to confidentiality. These problems fell into two overlapping categories: ‘relationships’ and ‘structures’. Most participants had never considered ways to—or thought it was impossible to—treat familial genetic information and personal information differently. They worried that putting the familial approach into practice could disrupt family dynamics and erode patient trust in the health service. They also thought they had insufficient resources to share information and feared that sharing might change the standard of care and make them more vulnerable to liability. Conclusions A familial approach to confidentiality has not been accepted or adopted as a standard, but wider research suggests that some of the problems HCPs perceived are surmountable and sharing in the interest of the family can be achieved. However, further research is needed to explore how personal and familial genetic information can be separated in practice. Our findings are relevant to HCPs across health services who are starting to use genome tests as part of their routine investigations. PMID:28159847

  19. Un/covering: Making Disability Identity Legible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Dawn Evans

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article examines one aspect of disability identity among people with non-apparent or "invisible" disabilities: the decision to emphasize, remind others about, or openly acknowledge impairment in social settings. I call this process "un/covering," and situate this concept in the sociological and Disability Studies literature on disability stigma, passing, and covering. Drawing on interviews with people who have acquired a non-apparent impairment through chronic illness or injury, I argue that decisions to un/cover (after a disability disclosure has already been made play a pivotal role for this group in developing a strong, positive disability identity and making that identity legible to others. Decisions to pass, cover, or un/cover are ongoing decisions that stitch together the fabric of each person's daily life experiences, thus serving as primary mechanisms for identity negotiation and management.

  20. A new experimental approach for studying bacterial genomic island evolution identifies island genes with bacterial host-specific expression patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickerson Cheryl A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic islands are regions of bacterial genomes that have been acquired by horizontal transfer and often contain blocks of genes that function together for specific processes. Recently, it has become clear that the impact of genomic islands on the evolution of different bacterial species is significant and represents a major force in establishing bacterial genomic variation. However, the study of genomic island evolution has been mostly performed at the sequence level using computer software or hybridization analysis to compare different bacterial genomic sequences. We describe here a novel experimental approach to study the evolution of species-specific bacterial genomic islands that identifies island genes that have evolved in such a way that they are differentially-expressed depending on the bacterial host background into which they are transferred. Results We demonstrate this approach by using a "test" genomic island that we have cloned from the Salmonella typhimurium genome (island 4305 and transferred to a range of Gram negative bacterial hosts of differing evolutionary relationships to S. typhimurium. Systematic analysis of the expression of the island genes in the different hosts compared to proper controls allowed identification of genes with genera-specific expression patterns. The data from the analysis can be arranged in a matrix to give an expression "array" of the island genes in the different bacterial backgrounds. A conserved 19-bp DNA site was found upstream of at least two of the differentially-expressed island genes. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of horizontally-transferred genomic island gene expression in a broad range of Gram negative hosts. We also present evidence in this study that the IS200 element found in island 4305 in S. typhimurium strain LT2 was inserted after the island had already been acquired by the S. typhimurium lineage and that this element is likely not

  1. Uncovering Topological Structures in Unstructured Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-20

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0091 Uncovering Topological Structures in Unstructured Data Keith Bowman ILLINOIS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Final Report 04/20/2015...COVERED (From - To)      01-05-2012 to 30-04-2015 4.  TITLE AND SUBTITLE Uncovering Topological Structures in Unstructured Data 5a.  CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...scanned point-cloud data . It has two stages. In the first stage, we analyzed scan data and extracted topologically critical points. We used these critical

  2. Toward a Taxonomy for Multi-Omics Science? Terminology Development for Whole Genome Study Approaches by Omics Technology and Hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirih, Nina; Kunej, Tanja

    2017-01-01

    Omics is a form of high-throughput systems science. However, taxonomies for omics studies are limited, inviting us to rethink new ways in which we classify, prioritize, and rank various omics systems science studies. In this overarching context, the genome-wide study approaches have proliferated in number and popularity over the past decade. However, their hierarchy is not well organized and the development of attendant terminology is not controlled. In the present study, we searched the literature in PubMed and the Web of Science databases published from March 1999 to September 2016 using the keywords, including genome-wide, association, whole genome, transcriptome-wide, metabolome, epigenome, and phenome. We identified the whole genome study approaches and sorted them according to the omics technology types (genomics, proteomics, and so on) and hierarchy. Thirty-four studies from over 90 publications were sorted into 10 omics groups: DNA level, transcriptomics, proteomics, interactomics, metabolomics, epigenomics, miRNomics/ncRNomics, phenomics, environmental omics, and pharmacogenomics. We suggest here modifications of terminology for study approaches, which share the same acronyms such as EWAS for epigenome-wide association and environment-wide association studies, and MWAS for methylome-wide association and metabolome-wide association studies. Taken together, our study presented here provides the first systematic review and analyses of whole genome approaches and presents a baseline for further controlled terminology development, with a view to a new taxonomy for omics and multi-omics studies in the future. Finally, we call for greater dialogue and collaboration across diverse omics knowledge domains and applications, for example, across plants, animals, clinical medicine, and ecology.

  3. Novel phenotypes and loci identified through clinical genomics approaches to pediatric cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nisha; Anand, Deepti; Monies, Dorota; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Khan, Arif O; Algoufi, Talal; Alowain, Mohammed; Faqeih, Eissa; Alshammari, Muneera; Qudair, Ahmed; Alsharif, Hadeel; Aljubran, Fatimah; Alsaif, Hessa S; Ibrahim, Niema; Abdulwahab, Firdous M; Hashem, Mais; Alsedairy, Haifa; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Lachke, Salil A; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric cataract is highly heterogeneous clinically and etiologically. While mostly isolated, cataract can be part of many multisystem disorders, further complicating the diagnostic process. In this study, we applied genomic tools in the form of a multi-gene panel as well as whole-exome sequencing on unselected cohort of pediatric cataract (166 patients from 74 families). Mutations in previously reported cataract genes were identified in 58% for a total of 43 mutations, including 15 that are novel. GEMIN4 was independently mutated in families with a syndrome of cataract, global developmental delay with or without renal involvement. We also highlight a recognizable syndrome that resembles galactosemia (a fulminant infantile liver disease with cataract) caused by biallelic mutations in CYP51A1. A founder mutation in RIC1 (KIAA1432) was identified in patients with cataract, brain atrophy, microcephaly with or without cleft lip and palate. For non-syndromic pediatric cataract, we map a novel locus in a multiplex consanguineous family on 4p15.32 where exome sequencing revealed a homozygous truncating mutation in TAPT1. We report two further candidates that are biallelically inactivated each in a single cataract family: TAF1A (cataract with global developmental delay) and WDR87 (non-syndromic cataract). In addition to positional mapping data, we use iSyTE developmental lens expression and gene-network analysis to corroborate the proposed link between the novel candidate genes and cataract. Our study expands the phenotypic, allelic and locus heterogeneity of pediatric cataract. The high diagnostic yield of clinical genomics supports the adoption of this approach in this patient group.

  4. Distinguishing bacterial pathogens of potato using a genome-wide microarray approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aittamaa, M; Somervuo, P; Pirhonen, M; Mattinen, L; Nissinen, R; Auvinen, P; Valkonen, J P T

    2008-09-01

    A set of 9676 probes was designed for the most harmful bacterial pathogens of potato and tested in a microarray format. Gene-specific probes could be designed for all genes of Pectobacterium atrosepticum, c. 50% of the genes of Streptomyces scabies and c. 30% of the genes of Clavibacter michiganensis ssp. sepedonicus utilizing the whole-genome sequence information available. For Streptomyces turgidiscabies, 226 probes were designed according to the sequences of a pathogenicity island containing important virulence genes. In addition, probes were designed for the virulence-associated nip (necrosis-inducing protein) genes of P. atrosepticum, P. carotovorum and Dickeya dadantii and for the intergenic spacer (IGS) sequences of the 16S-23S rRNA gene region. Ralstonia solanacearum was not included in the study, because it is a quarantine organism and is not presently found in Finland, but a few probes were also designed for this species. The probes contained on average 40 target-specific nucleotides and were synthesized on the array in situ, organized as eight sub-arrays with an identical set of probes which could be used for hybridization with different samples. All bacteria were readily distinguished using a single channel system for signal detection. Nearly all of the c. 1000 probes designed for C. michiganensis ssp. sepedonicus, c. 50% and 40% of the c. 4000 probes designed for the genes of S. scabies and P. atrosepticum, respectively, and over 100 probes for S. turgidiscabies showed significant signals only with the respective species. P. atrosepticum, P. carotovorum and Dickeya strains were all detected with 110 common probes. By contrast, the strains of these species were found to differ in their signal profiles. Probes targeting the IGS region and nip genes could be used to place strains of Dickeya to two groups, which correlated with differences in virulence. Taken together, the approach of using a custom-designed, genome-wide microarray provided a robust means

  5. Mechanisms of colorectal and lung cancer prevention by vegetables: a genomic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breda, Simone G J; de Kok, Theo M C M; van Delft, Joost H M

    2008-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) and lung cancer (LC) occur at high incidence, and both can be effectively prevented by dietary vegetable consumption. This makes these two types of cancer highly suitable for elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms of cancer chemoprevention. Numerous studies have shown that vegetables exert their beneficial effects through various different mechanisms, but effects on the genome level remain mostly unclear. This review evaluates current knowledge on the mechanisms of CRC and LC prevention by vegetables, thereby focusing on the modulation of gene and protein expressions. The majority of the effects found in the colon are changes in the expression of genes and proteins involved in apoptosis, cell cycle, cell proliferation and intracellular defense, in favor of reduced CRC risk. Furthermore, vegetables and vegetable components changed the expression of many more genes and proteins involved in other pathways for which biologic meaning is less clear. The number of studies investigating gene and protein expression changes in the lungs is limited to only a few in vitro and animal studies. Data from these studies show that mostly genes involved in biotransformation, apoptosis and cell cycle regulation are affected. In both colon and lungs, genomewide analyses of gene and protein expression changes by new genomics and proteomics technologies, as well as the investigation of whole vegetables, are few in number. Further studies applying these 'omics' approaches are needed to provide more insights on affected genetic/biologic pathways and, thus, in molecular mechanisms by which different chemopreventive compounds can protect against carcinogenesis. Particularly studies with combinations of phytochemicals and whole vegetables are needed to establish gene expression changes in the colon, but especially in the lungs.

  6. Candidate genes, pathways and mechanisms for alcoholism: an expanded convergent functional genomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodd, Z A; Bertsch, B A; Strother, W N; Le-Niculescu, H; Balaraman, Y; Hayden, E; Jerome, R E; Lumeng, L; Nurnberger, J I; Edenberg, H J; McBride, W J; Niculescu, A B

    2007-08-01

    We describe a comprehensive translational approach for identifying candidate genes for alcoholism. The approach relies on the cross-matching of animal model brain gene expression data with human genetic linkage data, as well as human tissue data and biological roles data, an approach termed convergent functional genomics. An analysis of three animal model paradigms, based on inbred alcohol-preferring (iP) and alcohol-non-preferring (iNP) rats, and their response to treatments with alcohol, was used. A comprehensive analysis of microarray gene expression data from five key brain regions (frontal cortex, amygdala, caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens and hippocampus) was carried out. The Bayesian-like integration of multiple independent lines of evidence, each by itself lacking sufficient discriminatory power, led to the identification of high probability candidate genes, pathways and mechanisms for alcoholism. These data reveal that alcohol has pleiotropic effects on multiple systems, which may explain the diverse neuropsychiatric and medical pathology in alcoholism. Some of the pathways identified suggest avenues for pharmacotherapy of alcoholism with existing agents, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. Experiments we carried out in alcohol-preferring rats with an ACE inhibitor show a marked modulation of alcohol intake. Other pathways are new potential targets for drug development. The emergent overall picture is that physical and physiological robustness may permit alcohol-preferring individuals to withstand the aversive effects of alcohol. In conjunction with a higher reactivity to its rewarding effects, they may able to ingest enough of this nonspecific drug for a strong hedonic and addictive effect to occur.

  7. PCR-based ordered genomic libraries: a new approach to drug target identification for Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Aimee E; Lai, Angel; Brackman, Marcia A; LeBlanc, Donald J

    2002-08-01

    Described here are the development and validation of a novel approach to identify genes encoding drug targets in Streptococcus pneumoniae. The method relies on the use of an ordered genomic library composed of PCR amplicons that were generated under error-prone conditions so as to introduce random mutations into the DNA. Since some of the mutations occur in drug target-encoding genes and subsequently affect the binding of the drug to its respective cellular target, amplicons containing drug targets can be identified as those producing drug-resistant colonies when transformed into S. pneumoniae. Examination of the genetic content of the amplicon giving resistance coupled with bioinformatics and additional genetic approaches could be used to rapidly identify candidate drug target genes. The utility of this approach was verified by using a number of known antibiotics. For drugs with single protein targets, amplicons were identified that rendered S. pneumoniae drug resistant. Assessment of amplicon composition revealed that each of the relevant amplicons contained the gene encoding the known target for the particular drug tested. Fusidic acid-resistant mutants that resulted from the transformation of S. pneumoniae with amplicons containing fusA were further characterized by sequence analysis. A single mutation was found to occur in a region of the S. pneumoniae elongation factor G protein that is analogous to that already implicated in other bacteria as being associated with fusidic acid resistance. Thus, in addition to facilitating the identification of genes encoding drug targets, this method could provide strains that aid future mechanistic studies.

  8. Identification of putative drug targets of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 by subtractive genomics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Musharaf Hossain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The prolonged and uncontrolled use of antibiotics in treatment against many pathogens causes the multiple drug resistance. The drug resistance of Listeria monocytogenes F2365 has been evolved, which cause a major disease listeriosis. The drug dose limit against that pathogen was also increased for currently prescribed antibiotics and more often combinational therapy was preferred. Therefore, identification of an extensive novel drug target, unique and essential to the microorganism and subjected to its validation and drug development is imperative. Availability of the total proteome of L. monocytogenes F2365 enabled in silico identification of putative common drug targets and their subcellular localization by subtractive genomics approach. In the present work subtractive genomics approach is used to identify vaccine and drug targets of L. monocytogenes F2365 to speed up the rational drug and vaccine design. It has revealed that out of 2821 reference sequences of the pathogen, 744 represent essential proteins and among them 274 are human non-homolog proteins. Besides, all predicted human non-homologs were then analyzed by subcellular localization servers, in which 46 proteins were identified as surface exposed proteins and can be considered as potential drug and vaccine targets for the pathogen. The 3D structure of two human non-homolog putative drug targets, pantothenate kinase (LmPK and holliday junction resolvase-like protein (LmHJR of L. monocytogenes F2365 were generated by homology modeling program Easymodeller 4.0; a GUI version of modeller. Generated structures were also validated by several online servers. The overall stereochemical quality of the model was assessed by Ramachandran plot analysis that was provided by PROCHECK. ProQ, ERRAT, Pro-SA web and VERIFY 3D of SAVES programs were also used to compute several validation parameters during the evaluation of the model. This protein structure information is important in structure

  9. Uncovering transcriptional regulation of metabolism by using metabolic network topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-01-01

    therefore developed an algorithm that is based on hypothesis-driven data analysis to uncover the transcriptional regulatory architecture of metabolic networks. By using information on the metabolic network topology from genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, we show that it is possible to reveal patterns...... in the metabolic network that follow a common transcriptional response. Thus, the algorithm enables identification of so-called reporter metabolites (metabolites around which the most significant transcriptional changes occur) and a set of connected genes with significant and coordinated response to genetic...... changes induced by complex regulatory mechanisms coordinating the activity of different metabolic pathways. It is difficult to map such global transcriptional responses by using traditional methods, because many genes in the metabolic network have relatively small changes at their transcription level. We...

  10. Population genomics in Sardinia: a novel approach to hunt for genomic combinations underlying complex traits and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siniscalco, M; Robledo, R; Bender, P K; Carcassi, C; Contu, L; Beck, J C

    1999-01-01

    The availability of highly polymorphic markers permits testing whether complex traits and diseases result from genomic interactions between nonallelic normal variants at separate loci. Such variants may be identified by deviations from the expected distributions of alleles at a high number of polymorphic loci, when individuals with the phenotype of interest are compared to normal controls of the same breeding unit, provided that both groups share the same remote ancestry and had no ancestors in common for the last three to four generations. The circumstances needed for such studies are ideally met on the island of Sardinia. The recurrent finding of the same type of association in separate breeding units between the phenotype of interest and a given genotype should allow a distinction between true genetic identity by descent and randomly occurring identities, as these will be obviously different in separate breeding units. The availability of several breeding units located in sharply different ecological environments will permit assessment of the role of nature/nurture factors in the degree of manifestation of each newly discovered genotype/phenotype association. A pilot study to evaluate the proposed strategy has been carried out in the Sardinian village of Carloforte, a community of about 8,000 individuals who have remained genetically homogeneous. Fifty-five control samples have been genotyped with six tetranucleotide microsatellites and with a subset of the 400 markers contained in the ABI PRISM linkage mapping panel, version 2. The allele frequencies for these microsatellite markers have been determined for these 55 individuals and compared to those from a random sampling of subsets of these 55 persons. For the six tetranucleotide microsatellites, a subset of as few as 20 people displayed the same allele frequency distributions as observed with the original 55 unrelated individuals. In conclusion, when samples are chosen from the same breeding unit, the number

  11. Whole genome semiconductor based sequencing of farmed European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) Mediterranean genetic stocks using a DNA pooling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolini, Francesca; Geraci, Claudia; Schiavo, Giuseppina; Sardina, Maria Teresa; Chiofalo, Vincenzo; Fontanesi, Luca

    2016-08-01

    European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) is an important marine species for commercial and sport fisheries and aquaculture production. Recently, the European sea bass genome has been sequenced and assembled. This resource can open new opportunities to evaluate and monitor variability and identify variants that could contribute to the adaptation to farming conditions. In this work, two DNA pools constructed from cultivated European sea bass were sequenced using a next generation semiconductor sequencing approach based on Ion Proton sequencer. Using the first draft version of the D. labrax genome as reference, sequenced reads obtained a total of about 1.6 million of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), spread all over the chromosomes. Transition/transversion (Ti/Tv) was equal to 1.28, comparable to what was already reported in Salmon species. A pilot homozygosity analysis across the D. labrax genome using DNA pool sequence datasets indicated that this approach can identify chromosome regions with putative signatures of selection, including genes involved in ion transport and chloride channel functions, amino acid metabolism and circadian clock and related neurological systems. This is the first study that reported genome wide polymorphisms in a fish species obtained with the Ion Proton sequencer. Moreover, this study provided a methodological approach for selective sweep analysis in this species.

  12. Biofilm formation in Candida glabrata: What have we learnt from functional genomics approaches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Enfert, Christophe; Janbon, Guilhem

    2016-02-01

    Biofilms are a source of therapeutic failures because of their intrinsic tolerance to antimicrobials. Candida glabrata is one of the pathogenic yeasts that is responsible for life-threatening disseminated infections and able to form biofilms on medical devices such as vascular and urinary catheters. Recent progresses in the functional genomics of C. glabrata have been applied to the study of biofilm formation, revealing the contribution of an array of genes to this process. In particular, the Yak1 kinase and the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex have been shown to relieve the repression exerted by subtelomeric silencing on the expression of the EPA6 and EPA7 genes, thus allowing the encoded adhesins to exert their key roles in biofilm formation. This provides a framework to evaluate the contribution of other genes that have been genetically linked to biofilm development and, based on the function of their orthologs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, appear to have roles in adaptation to nutrient deprivation, calcium signaling, cell wall remodeling and adherence. Future studies combining the use of in vitro and animal models of biofilm formation, omics approaches and forward or reverse genetics are needed to expand the current knowledge of C. glabrata biofilm formation and reveal the mechanisms underlying their antifungal tolerance.

  13. A Comparative Genomics Approach to Prediction of New Members of Regulons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kai; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Collado-Vides, Julio; Stormo, Gary D.

    2001-01-01

    Identifying the complete transcriptional regulatory network for an organism is a major challenge. For each regulatory protein, we want to know all the genes it regulates, that is, its regulon. Examples of known binding sites can be used to estimate the binding specificity of the protein and to predict other binding sites. However, binding site predictions can be unreliable because determining the true specificity of the protein is difficult because of the considerable variability of binding sites. Because regulatory systems tend to be conserved through evolution, we can use comparisons between species to increase the reliability of binding site predictions. In this article, an approach is presented to evaluate the computational predicitions of regulatory sites. We combine the prediction of transcription units having orthologous genes with the prediction of transcription factor binding sites based on probabilistic models. We augment the sets of genes in Escherichia coli that are expected to be regulated by two transcription factors, the cAMP receptor protein and the fumarate and nitrate reduction regulatory protein, through a comparison with the Haemophilus influenzae genome. At the same time, we learned more about the regulatory networks of H. influenzae, a species with much less experimental knowledge than E. coli. By studying orthologous genes subject to regulation by the same transcription factor, we also gained understanding of the evolution of the entire regulatory systems. PMID:11282972

  14. A systems biological approach to identify key transcription factors and their genomic neighborhoods in human sarcomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antti Ylip(a)(a); Olli Yli-Harja; Wei Zhang; Matti Nykter

    2011-01-01

    Identification of genetic signatures is the main objective for many computational oncology studies. The signature usually consists of numerous genes that are differentially expressed between two clinically distinct groups of samples, such as tumor subtypes. Prospectively, many signatures have been found to generalize poorly to other datasets and, thus, have rarely been accepted into clinical use. Recognizing the limited success of traditionally generated signatures, we developed a systems biology-based framework for robust identification of key transcription factors and their genomic regulatory neighborhoods. Application of the framework to study the differences between gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST) and leiomyosarcoma (LMS) resulted in the identification of nine transcription factors (SRF, NKX2-5, CCDC6, LEF1, VDR, ZNF250, TRIM63, MAF, and MYC). Functional annotations of the obtained neighborhoods identified the biological processes which the key transcription factors regulate differently between the tumor types. Analyzing the differences in the expression patterns using our approach resulted in a more robust genetic signature and more biological insight into the diseases compared to a traditional genetic signature.

  15. Genetic approaches for studying myiasis-causing flies: molecular markers and mitochondrial genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Azeredo-Espin, Ana Maria Lima; Lessinger, Ana Cláudia

    2006-01-01

    "Myiasis-causing flies" is a generic term that includes species from numerous dipteran families, mainly Calliphoridae and Oestridae, of which blowflies, screwworm flies and botflies are among the most important. This group of flies is characterized by the ability of their larvae to develop in animal flesh. When the host is a live vertebrate, such parasitism by dipterous larvae is known as primary myiasis. Myiasis-causing flies can be classified as saprophagous (free-living species), facultative or obligate parasites. Many of these flies are of great medical and veterinary importance in Brazil because of their role as key livestock insect-pests and vectors of pathogens, in addition to being considered important legal evidence in forensic entomology. The characterization of myiasis-causing flies using molecular markers to study mtDNA (by RFLP) and nuclear DNA (by RAPD and microsatellite) has been used to identify the evolutionary mechanisms responsible for specific patterns of genetic variability. These approaches have been successfully used to analyze the population structures of the New World screwworm fly Cochliomyia hominivorax and the botfly Dermatobia hominis. In this review, various aspects of the organization, evolution and potential applications of the mitochondrial genome of myiasis-causing flies in Brazil, and the analysis of nuclear markers in genetic studies of populations, are discussed.

  16. PRISM offers a comprehensive genomic approach to transcription factor function prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Wenger, A. M.

    2013-02-04

    The human genome encodes 1500-2000 different transcription factors (TFs). ChIP-seq is revealing the global binding profiles of a fraction of TFs in a fraction of their biological contexts. These data show that the majority of TFs bind directly next to a large number of context-relevant target genes, that most binding is distal, and that binding is context specific. Because of the effort and cost involved, ChIP-seq is seldom used in search of novel TF function. Such exploration is instead done using expression perturbation and genetic screens. Here we propose a comprehensive computational framework for transcription factor function prediction. We curate 332 high-quality nonredundant TF binding motifs that represent all major DNA binding domains, and improve cross-species conserved binding site prediction to obtain 3.3 million conserved, mostly distal, binding site predictions. We combine these with 2.4 million facts about all human and mouse gene functions, in a novel statistical framework, in search of enrichments of particular motifs next to groups of target genes of particular functions. Rigorous parameter tuning and a harsh null are used to minimize false positives. Our novel PRISM (predicting regulatory information from single motifs) approach obtains 2543 TF function predictions in a large variety of contexts, at a false discovery rate of 16%. The predictions are highly enriched for validated TF roles, and 45 of 67 (67%) tested binding site regions in five different contexts act as enhancers in functionally matched cells.

  17. A network-based approach to prioritize results from genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala Akula

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS are a valuable approach to understanding the genetic basis of complex traits. One of the challenges of GWAS is the translation of genetic association results into biological hypotheses suitable for further investigation in the laboratory. To address this challenge, we introduce Network Interface Miner for Multigenic Interactions (NIMMI, a network-based method that combines GWAS data with human protein-protein interaction data (PPI. NIMMI builds biological networks weighted by connectivity, which is estimated by use of a modification of the Google PageRank algorithm. These weights are then combined with genetic association p-values derived from GWAS, producing what we call 'trait prioritized sub-networks.' As a proof of principle, NIMMI was tested on three GWAS datasets previously analyzed for height, a classical polygenic trait. Despite differences in sample size and ancestry, NIMMI captured 95% of the known height associated genes within the top 20% of ranked sub-networks, far better than what could be achieved by a single-locus approach. The top 2% of NIMMI height-prioritized sub-networks were significantly enriched for genes involved in transcription, signal transduction, transport, and gene expression, as well as nucleic acid, phosphate, protein, and zinc metabolism. All of these sub-networks were ranked near the top across all three height GWAS datasets we tested. We also tested NIMMI on a categorical phenotype, Crohn's disease. NIMMI prioritized sub-networks involved in B- and T-cell receptor, chemokine, interleukin, and other pathways consistent with the known autoimmune nature of Crohn's disease. NIMMI is a simple, user-friendly, open-source software tool that efficiently combines genetic association data with biological networks, translating GWAS findings into biological hypotheses.

  18. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeepkiran JA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jangampalli Adi Pradeepkiran,1* Sri Bhashyam Sainath,2,3* Konidala Kranthi Kumar,1 Matcha Bhaskar1 1Division of Animal Biotechnology, Department of Zoology, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, India; 2CIMAR/CIIMAR, Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental, Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas, Porto, Portugal, 3Department of Biotechnology, Vikrama Simhapuri University, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50% to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3. A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the

  19. PARP1 genomics: chromatin immunoprecipitation approach using anti-PARP1 antibody (ChIP and ChIP-seq).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Niraj; Tulin, Alexei V

    2011-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase1 (PARP1) is a global regulator of different cellular mechanisms, ranging from DNA damage repair to control of gene expression. Since PARP1 protein and pADPr have been shown to persist in chromatin through cell cycle, they may both act as epigenetic markers. However, it is not known how many loci are occupied by PARP1 protein during mitosis genome-wide. To reveal the genome-wide PARP1 binding sites, we used the ChIP-seq approach, an emerging technique to study genome-wide PARP1 protein interaction with chromatin. Here, we describe how to perform ChIP-seq in the context of PARP1 binding sites identification in chromatin, using human embryonic kidney cell lines.

  20. Genome editing using artificial site-specific nucleases in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Yu; Ota, Satoshi; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish is a model vertebrate suitable for genetic analysis. Forward genetic analysis via chemical mutagenesis screening has established a variety of zebrafish mutants that are defective in various types of organogenesis, and the genes responsible for the individual mutants have been identified from genome mapping. On the other hand, reverse genetic analysis via targeted gene disruption using embryonic stem (ES) cells (e.g., knockout mouse) can uncover gene functions by investigating the phenotypic effects. However, this approach is mostly limited to mice among the vertebrate models because of the difficulty in establishing ES cells. Recently, new gene targeting technologies, such as the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 systems, have been developed: that can directly introduce genome modifications at the targeted genomic locus. Here, we summarize these new and powerful genome editing techniques for the study of zebrafish.

  1. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis.

  2. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  3. Genome-enabled Modeling of Microbial Biogeochemistry using a Trait-based Approach. Does Increasing Metabolic Complexity Increase Predictive Capabilities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E.; Karaoz, U.; Molins, S.; Bouskill, N.; Anantharaman, K.; Beller, H. R.; Banfield, J. F.; Steefel, C. I.; Brodie, E.

    2015-12-01

    The biogeochemical functioning of ecosystems is shaped in part by genomic information stored in the subsurface microbiome. Cultivation-independent approaches allow us to extract this information through reconstruction of thousands of genomes from a microbial community. Analysis of these genomes, in turn, gives an indication of the organisms present and their functional roles. However, metagenomic analyses can currently deliver thousands of different genomes that range in abundance/importance, requiring the identification and assimilation of key physiologies and metabolisms to be represented as traits for successful simulation of subsurface processes. Here we focus on incorporating -omics information into BioCrunch, a genome-informed trait-based model that represents the diversity of microbial functional processes within a reactive transport framework. This approach models the rate of nutrient uptake and the thermodynamics of coupled electron donors and acceptors for a range of microbial metabolisms including heterotrophs and chemolithotrophs. Metabolism of exogenous substrates fuels catabolic and anabolic processes, with the proportion of energy used for cellular maintenance, respiration, biomass development, and enzyme production based upon dynamic intracellular and environmental conditions. This internal resource partitioning represents a trade-off against biomass formation and results in microbial community emergence across a fitness landscape. Biocrunch was used here in simulations that included organisms and metabolic pathways derived from a dataset of ~1200 non-redundant genomes reflecting a microbial community in a floodplain aquifer. Metagenomic data was directly used to parameterize trait values related to growth and to identify trait linkages associated with respiration, fermentation, and key enzymatic functions such as plant polymer degradation. Simulations spanned a range of metabolic complexities and highlight benefits originating from simulations

  4. Genomic DNA enrichment using sequence capture microarrays: a novel approach to discover sequence nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP in Brassica napus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne E Clarke

    Full Text Available Targeted genomic selection methodologies, or sequence capture, allow for DNA enrichment and large-scale resequencing and characterization of natural genetic variation in species with complex genomes, such as rapeseed canola (Brassica napus L., AACC, 2n=38. The main goal of this project was to combine sequence capture with next generation sequencing (NGS to discover single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in specific areas of the B. napus genome historically associated (via quantitative trait loci -QTL- analysis to traits of agronomical and nutritional importance. A 2.1 million feature sequence capture platform was designed to interrogate DNA sequence variation across 47 specific genomic regions, representing 51.2 Mb of the Brassica A and C genomes, in ten diverse rapeseed genotypes. All ten genotypes were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences chemistry and to assess the effect of increased sequence depth, two genotypes were also sequenced using Illumina HiSeq chemistry. As a result, 589,367 potentially useful SNPs were identified. Analysis of sequence coverage indicated a four-fold increased representation of target regions, with 57% of the filtered SNPs falling within these regions. Sixty percent of discovered SNPs corresponded to transitions while 40% were transversions. Interestingly, fifty eight percent of the SNPs were found in genic regions while 42% were found in intergenic regions. Further, a high percentage of genic SNPs was found in exons (65% and 64% for the A and C genomes, respectively. Two different genotyping assays were used to validate the discovered SNPs. Validation rates ranged from 61.5% to 84% of tested SNPs, underpinning the effectiveness of this SNP discovery approach. Most importantly, the discovered SNPs were associated with agronomically important regions of the B. napus genome generating a novel data resource for research and breeding this crop species.

  5. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and organ

  6. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and organ

  7. Approaching the three-dimensional organization and dynamics of the human genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and organ

  8. Re-annotation of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome using a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellin, Esteban; Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Mercer, Tim R; Palfreyman, Robin W; Nielsen, Lars K

    2013-10-11

    Accurate bacterial genome annotations provide a framework to understanding cellular functions, behavior and pathogenicity and are essential for metabolic engineering. Annotations based only on in silico predictions are inaccurate, particularly for large, high G + C content genomes due to the lack of similarities in gene length and gene organization to model organisms. Here we describe a 2D systems biology driven re-annotation of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome using proteogenomics, a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction, RNA-sequencing and small-RNA-sequencing. We observed transcription of more than 300 intergenic regions, detected 59 peptides in intergenic regions, confirmed 164 open reading frames previously annotated as hypothetical proteins and reassigned function to open reading frames using the genome-scale metabolic reconstruction. Finally, we present a novel way of mapping ribosomal binding sites across the genome by sequencing small RNAs. The work presented here describes a novel framework for annotation of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome. Based on experimental observations, the 2D annotation framework greatly reduces errors that are commonly made when annotating large-high G + C content genomes using computational prediction algorithms.

  9. Optimization of genome engineering approaches with the CRISPR/Cas9 system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Kai; Wang, Gang; Andersen, Troels

    2014-01-01

    Designer nucleases such as TALENS and Cas9 have opened new opportunities to scarlessly edit the mammalian genome. Here we explored several parameters that influence Cas9-mediated scarless genome editing efficiency in murine embryonic stem cells. Optimization of transfection conditions and enrichi...

  10. Reference set of regulons in Desulfovibrionales inferred by comparative genomics approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazakov, A.E.; Rodionov, D.A.; Price, M.N.; Arkin, A.P.; Dubchak, I.; Novichkov, P.S.

    2010-11-15

    in this study, we carried out large-scale comparative genomics analysis of regulatory interactions in Desulfovibrio vulgaris and 12 related genomes from Desulfovibrionales order using our recently developed web server RegPredict (http://regpredict.lbl.gov). An overall reference collection of 26 Desulfovibrionales regulogs can be accessed through RegPrecise database (http://regpredict.lbl.gov).

  11. Novel genomic approaches unravel genetic architecture of complex traits in apple.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, S.; Garrick, D.J.; Bink, M.C.A.M.; Whitworth, C.; Chagné, D.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Understanding the genetic architecture of quantitative traits is important for developing genome-based crop improvement methods. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a powerful technique for mining novel functional variants. Using a family-based design involving 1,200 apple (Malus × d

  12. A physical approach to segregation and folding of the Caulobacter crescentus genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dame, R.T.; Tark-Dame, M.; Schiessel, H

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are functionally organized. This organization is dynamic and globally changing throughout the cell cycle. Upon initiation of replication of the chromosome, the two origins segregate and move towards their new location taking along the newly replicated genome. Caulobacter crescentus

  13. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as ist interplay with and embedding into the cell and o

  14. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and or

  15. Approaching the three-dimensional organization and dynamics of the human genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractGenomes are one of the major foundations of life due to their role in information storage, process regulation and evolution. However, the sequential and three-dimensional structure of the human genome in the cell nucleus as well as its interplay with and embedding into the cell and o

  16. Use of comparative genomics approaches to characterize interspecies differences in response to environmental chemicals: Challenges, opportunities, and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess-Herbert, Sarah L., E-mail: sarah.burgess@alum.mit.edu [American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 2009–10 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    A critical challenge for environmental chemical risk assessment is the characterization and reduction of uncertainties introduced when extrapolating inferences from one species to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges, opportunities, and research needs surrounding the issue of how genomics data and computational and systems level approaches can be applied to inform differences in response to environmental chemical exposure across species. We propose that the data, tools, and evolutionary framework of comparative genomics be adapted to inform interspecies differences in chemical mechanisms of action. We compare and contrast existing approaches, from disciplines as varied as evolutionary biology, systems biology, mathematics, and computer science, that can be used, modified, and combined in new ways to discover and characterize interspecies differences in chemical mechanism of action which, in turn, can be explored for application to risk assessment. We consider how genetic, protein, pathway, and network information can be interrogated from an evolutionary biology perspective to effectively characterize variations in biological processes of toxicological relevance among organisms. We conclude that comparative genomics approaches show promise for characterizing interspecies differences in mechanisms of action, and further, for improving our understanding of the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating inferences across species in both ecological and human health risk assessment. To achieve long-term relevance and consistent use in environmental chemical risk assessment, improved bioinformatics tools, computational methods robust to data gaps, and quantitative approaches for conducting extrapolations across species are critically needed. Specific areas ripe for research to address these needs are recommended.

  17. Genome wide association analysis of the 16th QTL- MAS Workshop dataset using the Random Forest machine learning approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome wide association studies are now widely used in the livestock sector to estimate the association among single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distributed across the whole genome and one or more trait. As computational power increases, the use of machine learning techniques to analyze large genome wide datasets becomes possible. Methods The objective of this study was to identify SNPs associated with the three traits simulated in the 16th MAS-QTL workshop dataset using the Random Forest (RF) approach. The approach was applied to single and multiple trait estimated breeding values, and on yield deviations and to compare them with the results of the GRAMMAR-CG method. Results The two QTL mapping methods used, GRAMMAR-CG and RF, were successful in identifying the main QTLs for trait 1 on chromosomes 1 and 4, for trait 2 on chromosomes 1, 4 and 5 and for trait 3 on chromosomes 1, 2 and 3. Conclusions The results of the RF approach were confirmed by the GRAMMAR-CG method and validated by the effective QTL position, even if their approach to unravel cryptic genetic structure is different. Furthermore, both methods showed complementary findings. However, when the variance explained by the QTL is low, they both failed to detect significant associations. PMID:25519518

  18. Social and behavioral research in genomic sequencing: approaches from the Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium Outcomes and Measures Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Stacy W; Martins, Yolanda; Feuerman, Lindsay Z; Bernhardt, Barbara A; Biesecker, Barbara B; Christensen, Kurt D; Joffe, Steven; Rini, Christine; Veenstra, David; McGuire, Amy L

    2014-10-01

    The routine use of genomic sequencing in clinical medicine has the potential to dramatically alter patient care and medical outcomes. To fully understand the psychosocial and behavioral impact of sequencing integration into clinical practice, it is imperative that we identify the factors that influence sequencing-related decision making and patient outcomes. In an effort to develop a collaborative and conceptually grounded approach to studying sequencing adoption, members of the National Human Genome Research Institute's Clinical Sequencing Exploratory Research Consortium formed the Outcomes and Measures Working Group. Here we highlight the priority areas of investigation and psychosocial and behavioral outcomes identified by the Working Group. We also review some of the anticipated challenges to measurement in social and behavioral research related to genomic sequencing; opportunities for instrument development; and the importance of qualitative, quantitative, and mixed-method approaches. This work represents the early, shared efforts of multiple research teams as we strive to understand individuals' experiences with genomic sequencing. The resulting body of knowledge will guide recommendations for the optimal use of sequencing in clinical practice.

  19. Phylogenetic approaches for the analysis of mitochondrial genome sequence data in the Hymenoptera--a lineage with both rapidly and slowly evolving mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowton, Mark; Cameron, Stephen L; Austin, Andy D; Whiting, Michael F

    2009-08-01

    We entirely sequenced two new hymenopteran mitochondrial genomes (Cephus cinctus and Orussus occidentalis), and a substantial portion of another three hymenopterans (Schlettererius cinctipes, Venturia canescens, and Enicospilus). We analyze them together with nine others reported in the literature. We establish that the rate of genetic divergence is two to three times higher among some Hymenoptera when compared with others, making this a group with both long and short phylogenetic branches. We then assessed the ability of a range of phylogenetic approaches to recover seven uncontroversial relationships, when lineages show markedly different rates of molecular evolution. This range encompassed maximum parsimony and Bayesian analysis of (i) amino acid data, (ii) nucleotide data, and (iii) nucleotide data excluding third codon positions. Unpartitioned analyses were compared with partitioned analyses, with the data partitioned by codon position (ribosomal genes were placed in a separate partition). These analyses indicated that partitioned, Bayesian analysis of nucleotide data, excluding 3rd codon positions, recovered more of the uncontroversial relationships than any other approach. These results suggest that the analysis of complete mitochondrial genome sequences holds promise for the resolution of hymenopteran superfamily relationships.

  20. Microsatellite analysis in the genome of Acanthaceae: An in silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadharsini Kaliswamy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acanthaceae is one of the advanced and specialized families with conventionally used medicinal plants. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs play a major role as molecular markers for genome analysis and plant breeding. The microsatellites existing in the complete genome sequences would help to attain a direct role in the genome organization, recombination, gene regulation, quantitative genetic variation, and evolution of genes. Objective: The current study reports the frequency of microsatellites and appropriate markers for the Acanthaceae family genome sequences. Materials and Methods: The whole nucleotide sequences of Acanthaceae species were obtained from National Center for Biotechnology Information database and screened for the presence of SSRs. SSR Locator tool was used to predict the microsatellites and inbuilt Primer3 module was used for primer designing. Results: Totally 110 repeats from 108 sequences of Acanthaceae family plant genomes were identified, and the occurrence of dinucleotide repeats was found to be abundant in the genome sequences. The essential amino acid isoleucine was found rich in all the sequences. We also designed the SSR-based primers/markers for 59 sequences of this family that contains microsatellite repeats in their genome. Conclusion: The identified microsatellites and primers might be useful for breeding and genetic studies of plants that belong to Acanthaceae family in the future.

  1. Uncovering student ideas in physical science

    CERN Document Server

    Keeley, Page

    2014-01-01

    If you and your students can't get enough of a good thing, Volume 2 of Uncovering Student Ideas in Physical Science is just what you need. The book offers 39 new formative assessment probes, this time with a focus on electric charge, electric current, and magnets and electromagnetism. It can help you do everything from demystify electromagnetic fields to explain the real reason balloons stick to the wall after you rub them on your hair.

  2. A Genome-Scale Modeling Approach to Quantify Biofilm Component Growth of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaudo, Nicholas; Li, Xianhua; Davis, Brett; Wood, Thomas K; Huang, Zuyi Jacky

    2017-01-01

    Salmonella typhimurium (S. typhimurium) is an extremely dangerous foodborne bacterium that infects both animal and human subjects, causing fatal diseases around the world. Salmonella's robust virulence, antibiotic-resistant nature, and capacity to survive under harsh conditions are largely due to its ability to form resilient biofilms. Multiple genome-scale metabolic models have been developed to study the complex and diverse nature of this organism's metabolism; however, none of these models fully integrated the reactions and mechanisms required to study the influence of biofilm formation. This work developed a systems-level approach to study the adjustment of intracellular metabolism of S. typhimurium during biofilm formation. The most advanced metabolic reconstruction currently available, STM_v1.0, was 1st extended to include the formation of the extracellular biofilm matrix. Flux balance analysis was then employed to study the influence of biofilm formation on cellular growth rate and the production rates of biofilm components. With biofilm formation present, biomass growth was examined under nutrient rich and nutrient deficient conditions, resulting in overall growth rates of 0.8675 and 0.6238 h(-1) respectively. Investigation of intracellular flux variation during biofilm formation resulted in the elucidation of 32 crucial reactions, and associated genes, whose fluxes most significantly adapt during the physiological response. Experimental data were found in the literature to validate the importance of these genes for the biofilm formation of S. typhimurium. This preliminary investigation on the adjustment of intracellular metabolism of S. typhimurium during biofilm formation will serve as a platform to generate hypotheses for further experimental study on the biofilm formation of this virulent bacterium.

  3. [DNA barcoding is a new approach in comparative genomics of plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shneer, V S

    2009-11-01

    DNA barcoding was proposed as a method for recognition and identification of eukaryotic species through comparison of sequences of a standard short DNA fragment--DNA barcode--from an unknown specimen to a library of reference sequences from known species. This allows identifying an organism at any stage of development from a very small tissue sample, fresh or conserved many years ago. Molecular identification of plant samples can be used in various scientific and applied fields. It would also help to find new species, which is particularly important for cryptogamic plants. An optimal DNA barcode region is a small fragment present in all species of a major taxonomic group, having invariable nucleotide sequence in all members of the same species, but with sufficient variation to discriminate among the species. This fragment should be flanked by low-variable regions for use of universal primers in PCR for amplification and sequencing. The DNA barcode that is well established in animals is a sequence of a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase gene CO1. However, searching for DNA barcode in plants proved to be a more challenging task. No DNA region universally suitable for all plants and meeting all of the necessary criteria has been found. Apparently, a multilocus or two-stage approach should be applied for this purpose. Several fragments of the chloroplast genome (trnH-psbA, matK, rpoC, rpoB, rbcL) in combinations of two or three regions were suggested as candidate regions with highest potential, but more representative samples should be examined to choose the best candidate. The possibility is discussed to use as DNA barcode internal transcribed spacers (ITS) of nuclear rRNA genes, which are highly variable, widely employed in molecular phylogenetic studies at the species level, but also have some limitations.

  4. A functional genomics approach identifies candidate effectors from the aphid species Myzus persicae (green peach aphid).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Jorunn I B; Prince, David; Pitino, Marco; Maffei, Massimo E; Win, Joe; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2010-11-18

    Aphids are amongst the most devastating sap-feeding insects of plants. Like most plant parasites, aphids require intimate associations with their host plants to gain access to nutrients. Aphid feeding induces responses such as clogging of phloem sieve elements and callose formation, which are suppressed by unknown molecules, probably proteins, in aphid saliva. Therefore, it is likely that aphids, like plant pathogens, deliver proteins (effectors) inside their hosts to modulate host cell processes, suppress plant defenses, and promote infestation. We exploited publicly available aphid salivary gland expressed sequence tags (ESTs) to apply a functional genomics approach for identification of candidate effectors from Myzus persicae (green peach aphid), based on common features of plant pathogen effectors. A total of 48 effector candidates were identified, cloned, and subjected to transient overexpression in Nicotiana benthamiana to assay for elicitation of a phenotype, suppression of the Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern (PAMP)-mediated oxidative burst, and effects on aphid reproductive performance. We identified one candidate effector, Mp10, which specifically induced chlorosis and local cell death in N. benthamiana and conferred avirulence to recombinant Potato virus X (PVX) expressing Mp10, PVX-Mp10, in N. tabacum, indicating that this protein may trigger plant defenses. The ubiquitin-ligase associated protein SGT1 was required for the Mp10-mediated chlorosis response in N. benthamiana. Mp10 also suppressed the oxidative burst induced by flg22, but not by chitin. Aphid fecundity assays revealed that in planta overexpression of Mp10 and Mp42 reduced aphid fecundity, whereas another effector candidate, MpC002, enhanced aphid fecundity. Thus, these results suggest that, although Mp10 suppresses flg22-triggered immunity, it triggers a defense response, resulting in an overall decrease in aphid performance in the fecundity assays. Overall, we identified aphid

  5. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated Genome Editing as a Therapeutic Approach for Leber Congenital Amaurosis 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Guo-Xiang; Barry, Elizabeth; Yu, Dan; Lukason, Michael; Cheng, Seng H; Scaria, Abraham

    2017-02-01

    As the most common subtype of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), LCA10 is a severe retinal dystrophy caused by mutations in the CEP290 gene. The most frequent mutation found in patients with LCA10 is a deep intronic mutation in CEP290 that generates a cryptic splice donor site. The large size of the CEP290 gene prevents its use in adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene augmentation therapy. Here, we show that targeted genomic deletion using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of patients with LCA10 bearing the CEP290 splice mutation. We generated a cellular model of LCA10 by introducing the CEP290 splice mutation into 293FT cells and we showed that guide RNA pairs coupled with SpCas9 were highly efficient at removing the intronic splice mutation and restoring the expression of wild-type CEP290. In addition, we demonstrated that a dual AAV system could effectively delete an intronic fragment of the Cep290 gene in the mouse retina. To minimize the immune response to prolonged expression of SpCas9, we developed a self-limiting CRISPR/Cas9 system that minimizes the duration of SpCas9 expression. These results support further studies to determine the therapeutic potential of CRISPR/Cas9-based strategies for the treatment of patients with LCA10. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Genomic landscape of liposarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanojia, Deepika; Nagata, Yasunobu; Garg, Manoj; Lee, Dhong Hyun; Sato, Aiko; Yoshida, Kenichi; Sato, Yusuke; Sanada, Masashi; Mayakonda, Anand; Bartenhagen, Christoph; Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Doan, Ngan B; Said, Jonathan W; Mohith, S; Gunasekar, Swetha; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Myklebost, Ola; Yang, Henry; Dugas, Martin; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A; Silberman, Allan W; Forscher, Charles; Tyner, Jeffrey W; Ogawa, Seishi; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2015-12-15

    Liposarcoma (LPS) is the most common type of soft tissue sarcoma accounting for 20% of all adult sarcomas. Due to absence of clinically effective treatment options in inoperable situations and resistance to chemotherapeutics, a critical need exists to identify novel therapeutic targets. We analyzed LPS genomic landscape using SNP arrays, whole exome sequencing and targeted exome sequencing to uncover the genomic information for development of specific anti-cancer targets. SNP array analysis indicated known amplified genes (MDM2, CDK4, HMGA2) and important novel genes (UAP1, MIR557, LAMA4, CPM, IGF2, ERBB3, IGF1R). Carboxypeptidase M (CPM), recurrently amplified gene in well-differentiated/de-differentiated LPS was noted as a putative oncogene involved in the EGFR pathway. Notable deletions were found at chromosome 1p (RUNX3, ARID1A), chromosome 11q (ATM, CHEK1) and chromosome 13q14.2 (MIR15A, MIR16-1). Significantly and recurrently mutated genes (false discovery rate < 0.05) included PLEC (27%), MXRA5 (21%), FAT3 (24%), NF1 (20%), MDC1 (10%), TP53 (7%) and CHEK2 (6%). Further, in vitro and in vivo functional studies provided evidence for the tumor suppressor role for Neurofibromin 1 (NF1) gene in different subtypes of LPS. Pathway analysis of recurrent mutations demonstrated signaling through MAPK, JAK-STAT, Wnt, ErbB, axon guidance, apoptosis, DNA damage repair and cell cycle pathways were involved in liposarcomagenesis. Interestingly, we also found mutational and copy number heterogeneity within a primary LPS tumor signifying the importance of multi-region sequencing for cancer-genome guided therapy. In summary, these findings provide insight into the genomic complexity of LPS and highlight potential druggable pathways for targeted therapeutic approach.

  7. A genome-wide SNP scan accelerates trait-regulatory genomic loci identification in chickpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujur, Alice; Bajaj, Deepak; Upadhyaya, Hari D.; Das, Shouvik; Ranjan, Rajeev; Shree, Tanima; Saxena, Maneesha S.; Badoni, Saurabh; Kumar, Vinod; Tripathi, Shailesh; Gowda, C.L.L.; Sharma, Shivali; Singh, Sube; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2015-01-01

    We identified 44844 high-quality SNPs by sequencing 92 diverse chickpea accessions belonging to a seed and pod trait-specific association panel using reference genome- and de novo-based GBS (genotyping-by-sequencing) assays. A GWAS (genome-wide association study) in an association panel of 211, including the 92 sequenced accessions, identified 22 major genomic loci showing significant association (explaining 23–47% phenotypic variation) with pod and seed number/plant and 100-seed weight. Eighteen trait-regulatory major genomic loci underlying 13 robust QTLs were validated and mapped on an intra-specific genetic linkage map by QTL mapping. A combinatorial approach of GWAS, QTL mapping and gene haplotype-specific LD mapping and transcript profiling uncovered one superior haplotype and favourable natural allelic variants in the upstream regulatory region of a CesA-type cellulose synthase (Ca_Kabuli_CesA3) gene regulating high pod and seed number/plant (explaining 47% phenotypic variation) in chickpea. The up-regulation of this superior gene haplotype correlated with increased transcript expression of Ca_Kabuli_CesA3 gene in the pollen and pod of high pod/seed number accession, resulting in higher cellulose accumulation for normal pollen and pollen tube growth. A rapid combinatorial genome-wide SNP genotyping-based approach has potential to dissect complex quantitative agronomic traits and delineate trait-regulatory genomic loci (candidate genes) for genetic enhancement in crop plants, including chickpea. PMID:26058368

  8. Pan-Genome Analysis of Human Gastric Pathogen H. pylori: Comparative Genomics and Pathogenomics Approaches to Identify Regions Associated with Pathogenicity and Prediction of Potential Core Therapeutic Targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ali, Amjad; Naz, Anam; Soares, Siomar C.

    2015-01-01

    . Pan-genome analyses of the global representative H. pylori isolates consisting of 39 complete genomes are presented in this paper. Phylogenetic analyses have revealed close relationships among geographically diverse strains of H. pylori. The conservation among these genomes was further analyzed by pan-genome...

  9. PEMapper and PECaller provide a simplified approach to whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, H Richard; Chopra, Pankaj; Wingo, Thomas S; Patel, Viren; Epstein, Michael P; Mulle, Jennifer G; Warren, Stephen T; Zwick, Michael E; Cutler, David J

    2017-03-07

    The analysis of human whole-genome sequencing data presents significant computational challenges. The sheer size of datasets places an enormous burden on computational, disk array, and network resources. Here, we present an integrated computational package, PEMapper/PECaller, that was designed specifically to minimize the burden on networks and disk arrays, create output files that are minimal in size, and run in a highly computationally efficient way, with the single goal of enabling whole-genome sequencing at scale. In addition to improved computational efficiency, we implement a statistical framework that allows for a base by base error model, allowing this package to perform as well or better than the widely used Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) in all key measures of performance on human whole-genome sequences.

  10. Tapping into Salmonella typhimurium LT2 genome in a quest to explore its therapeutic arsenal: A metabolic network modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehla, Kusum; Ramana, Jayashree

    2017-02-01

    S. typhimurium, the classical broad-host-range serovar is a widely distributed cause of food-borne illness. Escalating antibiotic resistance and potential of conjugal transmission to other pathogens attributable to its broad spectrum host specificities have aided S. typhimurium to emerge as a global health threat. To keep pace with ever evolving bacterial defenses, there is dire need to restock the antibiotic pipeline. Genome scale metabolic reconstructions present immense possibilities to decipher physiological properties of an organism using constraint-based methods The systems-level approaches of genome scale metabolic networks interrogation open up new avenues of drug target identification against deadly infectious diseases. We performed flux balance analysis and minimization of metabolic adjustment studies of genome scale reconstruction model of S. typhimurium targeted at identifying large number of metabolites with a potential to be utilized as therapeutic drug targets. These constraint based approaches initially predict a set of genes indispensable to bacterial survival by performing gene knockout studies which are then prioritized through a multistep process. Metabolites involved in l-rhamnose biosynthesis, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, fatty acid biosynthesis, and folate biosynthesis pathways were prioritized as candidate drug targets. This study provides a general therapeutic approach which can be effectively applied to other pathogens as well.

  11. Random Tagging Genotyping by Sequencing (rtGBS, an Unbiased Approach to Locate Restriction Enzyme Sites across the Target Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Hilario

    Full Text Available Genotyping by sequencing (GBS is a restriction enzyme based targeted approach developed to reduce the genome complexity and discover genetic markers when a priori sequence information is unavailable. Sufficient coverage at each locus is essential to distinguish heterozygous from homozygous sites accurately. The number of GBS samples able to be pooled in one sequencing lane is limited by the number of restriction sites present in the genome and the read depth required at each site per sample for accurate calling of single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Loci bias was observed using a slight modification of the Elshire et al.some restriction enzyme sites were represented in higher proportions while others were poorly represented or absent. This bias could be due to the quality of genomic DNA, the endonuclease and ligase reaction efficiency, the distance between restriction sites, the preferential amplification of small library restriction fragments, or bias towards cluster formation of small amplicons during the sequencing process. To overcome these issues, we have developed a GBS method based on randomly tagging genomic DNA (rtGBS. By randomly landing on the genome, we can, with less bias, find restriction sites that are far apart, and undetected by the standard GBS (stdGBS method. The study comprises two types of biological replicates: six different kiwifruit plants and two independent DNA extractions per plant; and three types of technical replicates: four samples of each DNA extraction, stdGBS vs. rtGBS methods, and two independent library amplifications, each sequenced in separate lanes. A statistically significant unbiased distribution of restriction fragment size by rtGBS showed that this method targeted 49% (39,145 of BamH I sites shared with the reference genome, compared to only 14% (11,513 by stdGBS.

  12. Unraveling CRISPR-Cas9 genome engineering parameters via a library-on-library approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Raj; Mali, Prashant; Moosburner, Mark; Church, George M.

    2017-01-01

    We develop an in vivo library-on-library methodology to simultaneously assess single guide RNA (sgRNA) activity across ~1,400 genomic loci. Assaying across multiple human cell types, end-processing enzymes, and two Cas9 orthologs, we unravel underlying nucleotide sequence and epigenetic parameters. Our results enable improved design of reagents, shed light on mechanisms of genome targeting, and provide a generalizable framework to study nucleic acid-nucleic acid interactions and biochemistry in high throughput. PMID:26167643

  13. Germ line genome editing in clinics: the approaches, objectives and global society

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Genome editing allows for the versatile genetic modification of somatic cells, germ cells and embryos. In particular, CRISPR/Cas9 is worldwide used in biomedical research. Although the first report on Cas9-mediated gene modification in human embryos focused on the prevention of a genetic disease in offspring, it raised profound ethical and social concerns over the safety of subsequent generations and the potential misuse of genome editing for human enhancement. The present article considers g...

  14. Regulatory hurdles for genome editing: process- vs. product-based approaches in different regulatory contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Sprink, Thorben; Eriksson, Dennis; Schiemann, Joachim; Hartung, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Novel plant genome editing techniques call for an updated legislation regulating the use of plants produced by genetic engineering or genome editing, especially in the European Union. Established more than 25?years ago and based on a clear distinction between transgenic and conventionally bred plants, the current EU Directives fail to accommodate the new continuum between genetic engineering and conventional breeding. Despite the fact that the Directive 2001/18/EC contains both process- and p...

  15. Nutritional genomics: a practical approach by early life conditioning with dietary phosphorus

    OpenAIRE

    Ashwell,Christopher M.; Angel, Roselina

    2010-01-01

    The recent technologies that have led to the new field of functional genomics (how the genome of an organism regulates homeostasis and responds to stimuli) are providing a clearer understanding of how organisms interact with their environment and in particular their diet. We are beginning to learn how the diet may have long-term influence on performance and health. A form of epigenetic regulation has been recently described called fetal "programming". Fueled by epidemiological data the "fetal...

  16. Germ line genome editing in clinics: the approaches, objectives and global society

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, Tetsuya

    2017-01-01

    Genome editing allows for the versatile genetic modification of somatic cells, germ cells and embryos. In particular, CRISPR/ Cas9 is worldwide used in biomedical research. Although the first report on Cas9-mediated gene modification in human embryos focused on the prevention of a genetic disease in offspring, it raised profound ethical and social concerns over the safety of subsequent generations and the potential misuse of genome editing for human enhancement. The present article considers ...

  17. Uncovering transportation networks from traffic flux by compressed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Si-Qi; Shen, Zhesi; Wang, Wen-Xu; Di, Zengru

    2015-08-01

    Transportation and communication networks are ubiquitous in nature and society. Uncovering the underlying topology as well as link weights, is fundamental to understanding traffic dynamics and designing effective control strategies to facilitate transmission efficiency. We develop a general method for reconstructing transportation networks from detectable traffic flux data using the aid of a compressed sensing algorithm. Our approach enables full reconstruction of network topology and link weights for both directed and undirected networks from relatively small amounts of data compared to the network size. The limited data requirement and certain resistance to noise allows our method to achieve real-time network reconstruction. We substantiate the effectiveness of our method through systematic numerical tests with respect to several different network structures and transmission strategies. We expect our approach to be widely applicable in a variety of transportation and communication systems.

  18. A Systems Biology-Based Approach to Uncovering the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Effects of Dragon's Blood Tablet in Colitis, Involving the Integration of Chemical Analysis, ADME Prediction, and Network Pharmacology

    OpenAIRE

    Haiyu Xu; Yanqiong Zhang; Yun Lei; Xiumei Gao; Huaqiang Zhai; Na Lin; Shihuan Tang; Rixin Liang; Yan Ma; Defeng Li; Yi Zhang; Guangrong Zhu; Hongjun Yang; Luqi Huang

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is one of the oldest East Asian medical systems. The present study adopted a systems biology-based approach to provide new insights relating to the active constituents and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of dragon's blood (DB) tablets for the treatment of colitis. This study integrated chemical analysis, prediction of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME), and network pharmacology. Firstly, a rapid, reliable, and accurate ult...

  19. Multi-omic data integration and analysis using systems genomics approaches: methods and applications in animal production, health and welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suravajhala, Prashanth; Kogelman, Lisette J A; Kadarmideen, Haja N

    2016-04-29

    In the past years, there has been a remarkable development of high-throughput omics (HTO) technologies such as genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics across all facets of biology. This has spearheaded the progress of the systems biology era, including applications on animal production and health traits. However, notwithstanding these new HTO technologies, there remains an emerging challenge in data analysis. On the one hand, different HTO technologies judged on their own merit are appropriate for the identification of disease-causing genes, biomarkers for prevention and drug targets for the treatment of diseases and for individualized genomic predictions of performance or disease risks. On the other hand, integration of multi-omic data and joint modelling and analyses are very powerful and accurate to understand the systems biology of healthy and sustainable production of animals. We present an overview of current and emerging HTO technologies each with a focus on their applications in animal and veterinary sciences before introducing an integrative systems genomics framework for analysing and integrating multi-omic data towards improved animal production, health and welfare. We conclude that there are big challenges in multi-omic data integration, modelling and systems-level analyses, particularly with the fast emerging HTO technologies. We highlight existing and emerging systems genomics approaches and discuss how they contribute to our understanding of the biology of complex traits or diseases and holistic improvement of production performance, disease resistance and welfare.

  20. Combining Mass Spectrometric Metabolic Profiling with Genomic Analysis: A Powerful Approach for Discovering Natural Products from Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleigrewe, Karin; Almaliti, Jehad; Tian, Isaac Yuheng; Kinnel, Robin B; Korobeynikov, Anton; Monroe, Emily A; Duggan, Brendan M; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Sherman, David H; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H

    2015-07-24

    An innovative approach was developed for the discovery of new natural products by combining mass spectrometric metabolic profiling with genomic analysis and resulted in the discovery of the columbamides, a new class of di- and trichlorinated acyl amides with cannabinomimetic activity. Three species of cultured marine cyanobacteria, Moorea producens 3L, Moorea producens JHB, and Moorea bouillonii PNG, were subjected to genome sequencing and analysis for their recognizable biosynthetic pathways, and this information was then compared with their respective metabolomes as detected by MS profiling. By genome analysis, a presumed regulatory domain was identified upstream of several previously described biosynthetic gene clusters in two of these cyanobacteria, M. producens 3L and M. producens JHB. A similar regulatory domain was identified in the M. bouillonii PNG genome, and a corresponding downstream biosynthetic gene cluster was located and carefully analyzed. Subsequently, MS-based molecular networking identified a series of candidate products, and these were isolated and their structures rigorously established. On the basis of their distinctive acyl amide structure, the most prevalent metabolite was evaluated for cannabinomimetic properties and found to be moderate affinity ligands for CB1.

  1. Inferring Population Size History from Large Samples of Genome-Wide Molecular Data - An Approximate Bayesian Computation Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Boitard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inferring the ancestral dynamics of effective population size is a long-standing question in population genetics, which can now be tackled much more accurately thanks to the massive genomic data available in many species. Several promising methods that take advantage of whole-genome sequences have been recently developed in this context. However, they can only be applied to rather small samples, which limits their ability to estimate recent population size history. Besides, they can be very sensitive to sequencing or phasing errors. Here we introduce a new approximate Bayesian computation approach named PopSizeABC that allows estimating the evolution of the effective population size through time, using a large sample of complete genomes. This sample is summarized using the folded allele frequency spectrum and the average zygotic linkage disequilibrium at different bins of physical distance, two classes of statistics that are widely used in population genetics and can be easily computed from unphased and unpolarized SNP data. Our approach provides accurate estimations of past population sizes, from the very first generations before present back to the expected time to the most recent common ancestor of the sample, as shown by simulations under a wide range of demographic scenarios. When applied to samples of 15 or 25 complete genomes in four cattle breeds (Angus, Fleckvieh, Holstein and Jersey, PopSizeABC revealed a series of population declines, related to historical events such as domestication or modern breed creation. We further highlight that our approach is robust to sequencing errors, provided summary statistics are computed from SNPs with common alleles.

  2. Uncovering the molecular networks in periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, Fábio; Oppenheim, Frank G.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Amado, Francisco; Gomes, Pedro S.; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a complex immune-inflammatory disease that results from a preestablished infection in gingiva, mainly due to Gram-negative bacteria that colonize deeper in gingival sulcus and latter periodontal pocket. Host inflammatory and immune responses have both protective and destructive roles. Although cytokines, prostaglandins, and proteases struggle against microbial burden, these molecules promote connective tissue loss and alveolar bone resorption, leading to several histopathological changes, namely destruction of periodontal ligament, deepening of periodontal pocket, and bone loss, which can converge to attain tooth loss. Despite the efforts of genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics/peptidomics, and metabolomics, there is no available biomarker for periodontitis diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment evaluation, which could assist on the established clinical evaluation. Nevertheless, some genes, transcripts, proteins and metabolites have already shown a different expression in healthy subjects and in patients. Though, so far, ‘omics approaches only disclosed the host inflammatory response as a consequence of microbial invasion in periodontitis and the diagnosis in periodontitis still relies on clinical parameters, thus a molecular tool for assessing periodontitis lacks in current dental medicine paradigm. Saliva and gingival crevicular fluid have been attracting researchers due to their diagnostic potential, ease, and noninvasive nature of collection. Each one of these fluids has some advantages and disadvantages that are discussed in this review. PMID:24828325

  3. Final Report: Transport and its regulation in Marine Microorganisms: A Genomic Based Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Palenik; Bianca Brahamsha; Ian Paulsen

    2009-09-03

    This grant funded the analysis and annotation of the genomes of Synechococcus and Ostreococcus, major marine primary producers. Particular attention was paid to the analysis of transporters using state of the art bioinformatics analyses. During the analysis of the Synechococcus genome, some of the components of the unique bacterial swimming apparatus of one species of Synechococcus (Clade III, strain WH8102) were determined and these included transporters, novel giant proteins and glycosyltransferases. This grant funded the analysis of gene expression in Synechococcus using whole genome microarrays. These analyses revealed the strategies by which marine cyanobacteria respond to environmental conditions such as the absence of phosphorus, a common limiting nutrient, and the interaction of Synechococcus with other microbes. These analyses will help develop models of gene regulation in cyanobacteria and thus help predict their responses to changes in environmental conditions.

  4. Genomics approaches to unlock the high yield potential of cassava, a tropical model plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengkui ZHANG,Ping'an MA,Haiyan WANG,Cheng LU,Xin CHEN,Zhiqiang XIA,Meiling ZOU,Xinchen ZHOU,Wenquan WANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cassava, a tropical food, feed and biofuel crop, has great capacity for biomass accumulation and an extraordinary efficiency in water use and mineral nutrition, which makes it highly suitable as a model plant for tropical crops. However, the understanding of the metabolism and genomics of this important crop is limited. The recent breakthroughs in the genomics of cassava, including whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis, as well as advances in the biology of photosynthesis, starch biosynthesis, adaptation to drought and high temperature, and resistance to virus and bacterial diseases, are reviewed here. Many of the new developments have come from comparative analyses between a wild ancestor and existing cultivars. Finally, the current challenges and future potential of cassava as a model plant are discussed.

  5. An approach to incorporate linkage disequilibrium structure into genomic association analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengyu Zhang; Diane Wagener

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we propose to use the principal component analysis (PCA) and regression model to incorporate linkage disequilibrium (LD) in genomic association data analysis. To accommodate LD in genomic data and reduce multiple testing, we suggest performing PCA and extracting the PCA score to capture the variation of genomic data, after which regression analysis is used to assess the association of the disease with the principal component score. An empirical analysis result shows that both genotype-basod correlation matrix and haplotype-based LD matrix can produce similar results for PCA. Principal component score seems to be more powerful in detecting genetic association because the principal component score is quantitatively measured and may be able to capture the effect of multiple loci.

  6. New approach for phylogenetic tree recovery based on genome-scale metabolic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamermann, Daniel; Montagud, Arnaud; Conejero, J Alberto; Urchueguía, Javier F; de Córdoba, Pedro Fernández

    2014-07-01

    A wide range of applications and research has been done with genome-scale metabolic models. In this work, we describe an innovative methodology for comparing metabolic networks constructed from genome-scale metabolic models and how to apply this comparison in order to infer evolutionary distances between different organisms. Our methodology allows a quantification of the metabolic differences between different species from a broad range of families and even kingdoms. This quantification is then applied in order to reconstruct phylogenetic trees for sets of various organisms.

  7. Landscape genomics of Sphaeralcea ambigua in the Mojave Desert: a multivariate, spatially-explicit approach to guide ecological restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shryock, Daniel F.; Havrilla, Caroline A.; DeFalco, Lesley; Esque, Todd C.; Custer, Nathan; Wood, Troy E.

    2015-01-01

    Local adaptation influences plant species’ responses to climate change and their performance in ecological restoration. Fine-scale physiological or phenological adaptations that direct demographic processes may drive intraspecific variability when baseline environmental conditions change. Landscape genomics characterize adaptive differentiation by identifying environmental drivers of adaptive genetic variability and mapping the associated landscape patterns. We applied such an approach to Sphaeralcea ambigua, an important restoration plant in the arid southwestern United States, by analyzing variation at 153 amplified fragment length polymorphism loci in the context of environmental gradients separating 47 Mojave Desert populations. We identified 37 potentially adaptive loci through a combination of genome scan approaches. We then used a generalized dissimilarity model (GDM) to relate variability in potentially adaptive loci with spatial gradients in temperature, precipitation, and topography. We identified non-linear thresholds in loci frequencies driven by summer maximum temperature and water stress, along with continuous variation corresponding to temperature seasonality. Two GDM-based approaches for mapping predicted patterns of local adaptation are compared. Additionally, we assess uncertainty in spatial interpolations through a novel spatial bootstrapping approach. Our study presents robust, accessible methods for deriving spatially-explicit models of adaptive genetic variability in non-model species that will inform climate change modelling and ecological restoration.

  8. Multi-omic data integration and analysis using systems genomics approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suravajhala, Prashanth; Kogelman, Lisette; Kadarmideen, Haja

    2016-01-01

    In the past years, there has been a remarkable development of high-throughput omics (HTO) technologies such as genomics, epigenomics, transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics across all facets of biology. This has spearheaded the progress of the systems biology era, including applications on ...

  9. Candidate fire blight resistance genes in Malus identified with the use of genomic tools and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this research is to utilize current advances in Rosaceae genomics to identify DNA markers for use in marker-assisted selection of durable resistance to fire blight. Candidate fire blight resistance genes were selected and ranked based upon differential expression after inoculation with ...

  10. DNA Slippage Occurs at Microsatellite Loci without Minimal Threshold Length in Humans: A Comparative Genomic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclercq, Sébastien; Rivals, Eric; Jarne, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of microsatellite, or short tandem repeats (STRs), is well documented for long, polymorphic loci, but much less is known for shorter ones. For example, the issue of a minimum threshold length for DNA slippage remains contentious. Model-fitting methods have generally concluded that slippage only occurs over a threshold length of about eight nucleotides, in contradiction with some direct observations of tandem duplications at shorter repeated sites. Using a comparative analysis of the human and chimpanzee genomes, we examined the mutation patterns at microsatellite loci with lengths as short as one period plus one nucleotide. We found that the rates of tandem insertions and deletions at microsatellite loci strongly deviated from background rates in other parts of the human genome and followed an exponential increase with STR size. More importantly, we detected no lower threshold length for slippage. The rate of tandem duplications at unrepeated sites was higher than expected from random insertions, providing evidence for genome-wide action of indel slippage (an alternative mechanism generating tandem repeats). The rate of point mutations adjacent to STRs did not differ from that estimated elsewhere in the genome, except around dinucleotide loci. Our results suggest that the emergence of STR depends on DNA slippage, indel slippage, and point mutations. We also found that the dynamics of tandem insertions and deletions differed in both rates and size at which these mutations take place. We discuss these results in both evolutionary and mechanistic terms. PMID:20624737

  11. A genomic approach to examine the complex evolution of laurasiatherian mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn M Hallström

    Full Text Available Recent phylogenomic studies have failed to conclusively resolve certain branches of the placental mammalian tree, despite the evolutionary analysis of genomic data from 32 species. Previous analyses of single genes and retroposon insertion data yielded support for different phylogenetic scenarios for the most basal divergences. The results indicated that some mammalian divergences were best interpreted not as a single bifurcating tree, but as an evolutionary network. In these studies the relationships among some orders of the super-clade Laurasiatheria were poorly supported, albeit not studied in detail. Therefore, 4775 protein-coding genes (6,196,263 nucleotides were collected and aligned in order to analyze the evolution of this clade. Additionally, over 200,000 introns were screened in silico, resulting in 32 phylogenetically informative long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE insertion events. The present study shows that the genome evolution of Laurasiatheria may best be understood as an evolutionary network. Thus, contrary to the common expectation to resolve major evolutionary events as a bifurcating tree, genome analyses unveil complex speciation processes even in deep mammalian divergences. We exemplify this on a subset of 1159 suitable genes that have individual histories, most likely due to incomplete lineage sorting or introgression, processes that can make the genealogy of mammalian genomes complex. These unexpected results have major implications for the understanding of evolution in general, because the evolution of even some higher level taxa such as mammalian orders may sometimes not be interpreted as a simple bifurcating pattern.

  12. A combined approach for genome wide protein function annotation/prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benso, Alfredo; Di Carlo, Stefano; Ur Rehman, Hafeez

    2013-01-01

    proteins in functional genomics and biology in general motivates the use of computational techniques well orchestrated to accurately predict their functions. METHODS: We propose a computational flow for the functional annotation of a protein able to assign the most probable functions to a protein...

  13. Identification of a strawberry flavor gene candidate using an integrated genetic-genomic-analytical chemistry approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is interest in improving the flavor of commercial strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) varieties. Fruit flavor is shaped by combinations of sugars, acids and volatile compounds. Many efforts seek to use genomics-based strategies to identify genes controlling flavor, and then designing ...

  14. GenoMetric Query Language: a novel approach to large-scale genomic data management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masseroli, Marco; Pinoli, Pietro; Venco, Francesco; Kaitoua, Abdulrahman; Jalili, Vahid; Palluzzi, Fernando; Muller, Heiko; Ceri, Stefano

    2015-06-15

    Improvement of sequencing technologies and data processing pipelines is rapidly providing sequencing data, with associated high-level features, of many individual genomes in multiple biological and clinical conditions. They allow for data-driven genomic, transcriptomic and epigenomic characterizations, but require state-of-the-art 'big data' computing strategies, with abstraction levels beyond available tool capabilities. We propose a high-level, declarative GenoMetric Query Language (GMQL) and a toolkit for its use. GMQL operates downstream of raw data preprocessing pipelines and supports queries over thousands of heterogeneous datasets and samples; as such it is key to genomic 'big data' analysis. GMQL leverages a simple data model that provides both abstractions of genomic region data and associated experimental, biological and clinical metadata and interoperability between many data formats. Based on Hadoop framework and Apache Pig platform, GMQL ensures high scalability, expressivity, flexibility and simplicity of use, as demonstrated by several biological query examples on ENCODE and TCGA datasets. The GMQL toolkit is freely available for non-commercial use at http://www.bioinformatics.deib.polimi.it/GMQL/. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. A genomic approach to examine the complex evolution of laurasiatherian mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallström, Björn M; Schneider, Adrian; Zoller, Stefan; Janke, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Recent phylogenomic studies have failed to conclusively resolve certain branches of the placental mammalian tree, despite the evolutionary analysis of genomic data from 32 species. Previous analyses of single genes and retroposon insertion data yielded support for different phylogenetic scenarios for the most basal divergences. The results indicated that some mammalian divergences were best interpreted not as a single bifurcating tree, but as an evolutionary network. In these studies the relationships among some orders of the super-clade Laurasiatheria were poorly supported, albeit not studied in detail. Therefore, 4775 protein-coding genes (6,196,263 nucleotides) were collected and aligned in order to analyze the evolution of this clade. Additionally, over 200,000 introns were screened in silico, resulting in 32 phylogenetically informative long interspersed nuclear elements (LINE) insertion events. The present study shows that the genome evolution of Laurasiatheria may best be understood as an evolutionary network. Thus, contrary to the common expectation to resolve major evolutionary events as a bifurcating tree, genome analyses unveil complex speciation processes even in deep mammalian divergences. We exemplify this on a subset of 1159 suitable genes that have individual histories, most likely due to incomplete lineage sorting or introgression, processes that can make the genealogy of mammalian genomes complex. These unexpected results have major implications for the understanding of evolution in general, because the evolution of even some higher level taxa such as mammalian orders may sometimes not be interpreted as a simple bifurcating pattern.

  16. Crop systems biology : an approach to connect functional genomics with crop modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yin, X.; Struik, P.C.

    2007-01-01

    The response of the whole crop to environmental conditions is a critical factor in agriculture. It can only be understood if the organization of the crop system is taken into account. A popular view in modern science is that genomics (and other `omics¿) will provide knowledge and tools to allow the

  17. A systems biology-based approach to uncovering the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of dragon's blood tablet in colitis, involving the integration of chemical analysis, ADME prediction, and network pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haiyu; Zhang, Yanqiong; Lei, Yun; Gao, Xiumei; Zhai, Huaqiang; Lin, Na; Tang, Shihuan; Liang, Rixin; Ma, Yan; Li, Defeng; Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Guangrong; Yang, Hongjun; Huang, Luqi

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is one of the oldest East Asian medical systems. The present study adopted a systems biology-based approach to provide new insights relating to the active constituents and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of dragon's blood (DB) tablets for the treatment of colitis. This study integrated chemical analysis, prediction of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME), and network pharmacology. Firstly, a rapid, reliable, and accurate ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method was employed to identify 48 components of DB tablets. In silico prediction of the passive absorption of these compounds, based on Caco-2 cell permeability, and their P450 metabolism enabled the identification of 22 potentially absorbed components and 8 metabolites. Finally, networks were constructed to analyze interactions between these DB components/metabolites absorbed and their putative targets, and between the putative DB targets and known therapeutic targets for colitis. This study provided a great opportunity to deepen the understanding of the complex pharmacological mechanisms underlying the effects of DB in colitis treatment.

  18. A systems biology-based approach to uncovering the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of dragon's blood tablet in colitis, involving the integration of chemical analysis, ADME prediction, and network pharmacology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyu Xu

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is one of the oldest East Asian medical systems. The present study adopted a systems biology-based approach to provide new insights relating to the active constituents and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of dragon's blood (DB tablets for the treatment of colitis. This study integrated chemical analysis, prediction of absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME, and network pharmacology. Firstly, a rapid, reliable, and accurate ultra-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method was employed to identify 48 components of DB tablets. In silico prediction of the passive absorption of these compounds, based on Caco-2 cell permeability, and their P450 metabolism enabled the identification of 22 potentially absorbed components and 8 metabolites. Finally, networks were constructed to analyze interactions between these DB components/metabolites absorbed and their putative targets, and between the putative DB targets and known therapeutic targets for colitis. This study provided a great opportunity to deepen the understanding of the complex pharmacological mechanisms underlying the effects of DB in colitis treatment.

  19. 77 FR 12227 - Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule: Uncovered Finished Water Reservoirs; Public...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ...The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is hosting a public meeting on April 24, 2012, concerning information that may inform the regulatory review of the uncovered finished water reservoir requirement in the Long Term 2 Enhanced Surface Water Treatment Rule (LT2 rule). At this meeting, EPA will provide background information on the LT2 rule's uncovered finished water reservoir requirement and the agency's Six Year Review process. EPA also plans to discuss and solicit public input on data and information related to microbial occurrence of Cryptosporidium, Giardia, viruses, and other pathogens/indicators in uncovered finished water reservoirs; public health risks; strategies to control or remove contaminants in uncovered finished water reservoirs; and potential assessment approaches to determine the effectiveness of these control and/or removal strategies. The primary focus of this meeting is to have a scientific and technical discussion related to uncovered finished water reservoirs. EPA will consider the data and/or information discussed at this meeting during the agency's review of the LT2 rule, which the agency announced as part of EPA's Retrospective Review Plan under Executive Order (E.O.) 13563 in August 2011.

  20. Computational discovery of pathway-level genetic vulnerabilities in non-small-cell lung cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel approaches are needed for discovery of targeted therapies for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that are specific to certain patients. Whole genome RNAi screening of lung cancer cell lines provides an ideal source for determining candidate drug targets. Unsupervised learning algorithms uncovered patterns of differential vulnerability across lung cancer cell lines to loss of functionally related genes. Such genetic vulnerabilities represent candidate targets for therapy and are found to be involved in splicing, translation and protein folding.

  1. Approaches to advancing quantitative human health risk assessment of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A., E-mail: chiu.weihsueh@epa.gov [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States); Euling, Susan Y.; Scott, Cheryl Siegel; Subramaniam, Ravi P. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington DC, 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    The contribution of genomics and associated technologies to human health risk assessment for environmental chemicals has focused largely on elucidating mechanisms of toxicity, as discussed in other articles in this issue. However, there is interest in moving beyond hazard characterization to making more direct impacts on quantitative risk assessment (QRA) — i.e., the determination of toxicity values for setting exposure standards and cleanup values. We propose that the evolution of QRA of environmental chemicals in the post-genomic era will involve three, somewhat overlapping phases in which different types of approaches begin to mature. The initial focus (in Phase I) has been and continues to be on “augmentation” of weight of evidence — using genomic and related technologies qualitatively to increase the confidence in and scientific basis of the results of QRA. Efforts aimed towards “integration” of these data with traditional animal-based approaches, in particular quantitative predictors, or surrogates, for the in vivo toxicity data to which they have been anchored are just beginning to be explored now (in Phase II). In parallel, there is a recognized need for “expansion” of the use of established biomarkers of susceptibility or risk of human diseases and disorders for QRA, particularly for addressing the issues of cumulative assessment and population risk. Ultimately (in Phase III), substantial further advances could be realized by the development of novel molecular and pathway-based biomarkers and statistical and in silico models that build on anticipated progress in understanding the pathways of human diseases and disorders. Such efforts would facilitate a gradual “reorientation” of QRA towards approaches that more directly link environmental exposures to human outcomes.

  2. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jia; Zhang, Jianqiu(Michelle); Qi, Yuan(Alan); Chen, Yidong; Huang, Yufei

    2010-12-01

    The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM) is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status and Estrogen Receptor negative ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]) status, respectively.

  3. Uncovering Transcriptional Regulatory Networks by Sparse Bayesian Factor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Yuan(Alan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The problem of uncovering transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs based on microarray data is considered. A novel Bayesian sparse correlated rectified factor model (BSCRFM is proposed that models the unknown TF protein level activity, the correlated regulations between TFs, and the sparse nature of TF-regulated genes. The model admits prior knowledge from existing database regarding TF-regulated target genes based on a sparse prior and through a developed Gibbs sampling algorithm, a context-specific transcriptional regulatory network specific to the experimental condition of the microarray data can be obtained. The proposed model and the Gibbs sampling algorithm were evaluated on the simulated systems, and results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach. The proposed model was then applied to the breast cancer microarray data of patients with Estrogen Receptor positive ( status and Estrogen Receptor negative ( status, respectively.

  4. The genomic architecture and association genetics of adaptive characters using a candidate SNP approach in boreal black spruce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prunier, Julien; Pelgas, Betty; Gagnon, France; Desponts, Mireille; Isabel, Nathalie; Beaulieu, Jean; Bousquet, Jean

    2013-06-01

    The genomic architecture of adaptive traits remains poorly understood in non-model plants. Various approaches can be used to bridge this gap, including the mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) in pedigrees, and genetic association studies in non-structured populations. Here we present results on the genomic architecture of adaptive traits in black spruce, which is a widely distributed conifer of the North American boreal forest. As an alternative to the usual candidate gene approach, a candidate SNP approach was developed for association testing. A genetic map containing 231 gene loci was used to identify QTL that were related to budset timing and to tree height assessed over multiple years and sites. Twenty-two unique genomic regions were identified, including 20 that were related to budset timing and 6 that were related to tree height. From results of outlier detection and bulk segregant analysis for adaptive traits using DNA pool sequencing of 434 genes, 52 candidate SNPs were identified and subsequently tested in genetic association studies for budset timing and tree height assessed over multiple years and sites. A total of 34 (65%) SNPs were significantly associated with budset timing, or tree height, or both. Although the percentages of explained variance (PVE) by individual SNPs were small, several significant SNPs were shared between sites and among years. The sharing of genomic regions and significant SNPs between budset timing and tree height indicates pleiotropic effects. Significant QTLs and SNPs differed quite greatly among years, suggesting that different sets of genes for the same characters are involved at different stages in the tree's life history. The functional diversity of genes carrying significant SNPs and low observed PVE further indicated that a large number of polymorphisms are involved in adaptive genetic variation. Accordingly, for undomesticated species such as black spruce with natural populations of large effective size and low

  5. A new approach to in silico SNP detection and some new SNPs in the Bacillus anthracis genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francoeur Joe

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus anthracis is one of the most monomorphic pathogens known. Identification of polymorphisms in its genome is essential for taxonomic classification, for determination of recent evolutionary changes, and for evaluation of pathogenic potency. Findings In this work three strains of the Bacillus anthracis genome are compared and previously unpublished single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are revealed. Moreover, it is shown that, despite the highly monomorphic nature of Bacillus anthracis, the SNPs are (1 abundant in the genome and (2 distributed relatively uniformly across the sequence. Conclusions The findings support the proposition that SNPs, together with indels and variable number tandem repeats (VNTRs, can be used effectively not only for the differentiation of perfect strain data, but also for the comparison of moderately incomplete, noisy and, in some cases, unknown Bacillus anthracis strains. In the case when the data is of still lower quality, a new DNA sequence fingerprinting approach based on recently introduced markers, based on combinatorial-analytic concepts and called cyclic difference sets, can be used.

  6. Evaluation of a Two-Stage Approach in Trans-Ethnic Meta-Analysis in Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jaeyoung; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Cupples, L Adrienne; Dupuis, Josée; Liu, Ching-Ti

    2016-05-01

    Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has achieved great success in detecting loci underlying human diseases. Incorporating GWAS results from diverse ethnic populations for meta-analysis, however, remains challenging because of the possible heterogeneity across studies. Conventional fixed-effects (FE) or random-effects (RE) methods may not be most suitable to aggregate multiethnic GWAS results because of violation of the homogeneous effect assumption across studies (FE) or low power to detect signals (RE). Three recently proposed methods, modified RE (RE-HE) model, binary-effects (BE) model and a Bayesian approach (Meta-analysis of Transethnic Association [MANTRA]), show increased power over FE and RE methods while incorporating heterogeneity of effects when meta-analyzing trans-ethnic GWAS results. We propose a two-stage approach to account for heterogeneity in trans-ethnic meta-analysis in which we clustered studies with cohort-specific ancestry information prior to meta-analysis. We compare this to a no-prior-clustering (crude) approach, evaluating type I error and power of these two strategies, in an extensive simulation study to investigate whether the two-stage approach offers any improvements over the crude approach. We find that the two-stage approach and the crude approach for all five methods (FE, RE, RE-HE, BE, MANTRA) provide well-controlled type I error. However, the two-stage approach shows increased power for BE and RE-HE, and similar power for MANTRA and FE compared to their corresponding crude approach, especially when there is heterogeneity across the multiethnic GWAS results. These results suggest that prior clustering in the two-stage approach can be an effective and efficient intermediate step in meta-analysis to account for the multiethnic heterogeneity.

  7. A systems approach to predict oncometabolites via context-specific genome-scale metabolic networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojung Nam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered metabolism in cancer cells has been viewed as a passive response required for a malignant transformation. However, this view has changed through the recently described metabolic oncogenic factors: mutated isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH, and fumarate hydratase (FH that produce oncometabolites that competitively inhibit epigenetic regulation. In this study, we demonstrate in silico predictions of oncometabolites that have the potential to dysregulate epigenetic controls in nine types of cancer by incorporating massive scale genetic mutation information (collected from more than 1,700 cancer genomes, expression profiling data, and deploying Recon 2 to reconstruct context-specific genome-scale metabolic models. Our analysis predicted 15 compounds and 24 substructures of potential oncometabolites that could result from the loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations of metabolic enzymes, respectively. These results suggest a substantial potential for discovering unidentified oncometabolites in various forms of cancers.

  8. Survey of Genomics Approaches to Improve Bioenergy Traits in Maize, Sorghum and Sugarcane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wilfred Vermerris

    2011-01-01

    Bioenergy crops currently provide the only source of alternative energy with the potential to reduce the use of fossil transportation fuels in a way that is compatible with existing engine technology, including in developing countries. Even though bioenergy research is currently receiving considerable attention, many of the concepts are not new,but rather build on intense research efforts from 30 years ago. A major difference with that era is the availability of genomics tools that have the potential to accelerate crop improvement significantly. This review is focused on maize, sorghum and sugarcane as representatives of bioenergy grasses that produce sugar and/or lignocellulosic biomass.Examples of how genetic mapping, forward and reverse genetics, high-throughput expression profiling and comparative genomics can be used to unravel and improve bioenergy traits will be presented.

  9. A bioinformatic approach to understanding antibiotic resistance in intracellular bacteria through whole genome analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, S.(National Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhubaneswar, India); Raoult, Didier; Rolain, J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Intracellular bacteria survive within eukaryotic host cells and are difficult to kill with certain antibiotics. As a result, antibiotic resistance in intracellular bacteria is becoming commonplace in healthcare institutions. Owing to the lack of methods available for transforming these bacteria, we evaluated the mechanisms of resistance using molecular methods and in silico genome analysis. The objective of this review was to understand the molecular mechanisms of antibiotic resistance throug...

  10. Precursor-centric genome-mining approach for lasso peptide discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Maksimov, Mikhail O.; Pelczer, István; Link, A. James

    2012-01-01

    Lasso peptides are a class of ribosomally synthesized posttranslationally modified natural products found in bacteria. Currently known lasso peptides have a diverse set of pharmacologically relevant activities, including inhibition of bacterial growth, receptor antagonism, and enzyme inhibition. The biosynthesis of lasso peptides is specified by a cluster of three genes encoding a precursor protein and two enzymes. Here we develop a unique genome-mining algorithm to identify lasso peptide gen...

  11. Cancer driver gene discovery through an integrative genomics approach in a non-parametric Bayesian framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hai; Wei, Qiang; Zhong, Xue; Yang, Hushan; Li, Bingshan

    2017-02-15

    Comprehensive catalogue of genes that drive tumor initiation and progression in cancer is key to advancing diagnostics, therapeutics and treatment. Given the complexity of cancer, the catalogue is far from complete yet. Increasing evidence shows that driver genes exhibit consistent aberration patterns across multiple-omics in tumors. In this study, we aim to leverage complementary information encoded in each of the omics data to identify novel driver genes through an integrative framework. Specifically, we integrated mutations, gene expression, DNA copy numbers, DNA methylation and protein abundance, all available in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and developed iDriver, a non-parametric Bayesian framework based on multivariate statistical modeling to identify driver genes in an unsupervised fashion. iDriver captures the inherent clusters of gene aberrations and constructs the background distribution that is used to assess and calibrate the confidence of driver genes identified through multi-dimensional genomic data. We applied the method to 4 cancer types in TCGA and identified candidate driver genes that are highly enriched with known drivers. (e.g.: P < 3.40 × 10 -36 for breast cancer). We are particularly interested in novel genes and observed multiple lines of supporting evidence. Using systematic evaluation from multiple independent aspects, we identified 45 candidate driver genes that were not previously known across these 4 cancer types. The finding has important implications that integrating additional genomic data with multivariate statistics can help identify cancer drivers and guide the next stage of cancer genomics research. The C ++ source code is freely available at https://medschool.vanderbilt.edu/cgg/ . hai.yang@vanderbilt.edu or bingshan.li@Vanderbilt.Edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Molecular characterisation of the poorly differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid carcinomas using genome-wide approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Pita, Jaime Miguel Gomes, 1985-

    2013-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento, Bioquímica (Genética Molecular), Universidade de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciências, 2013 Poorly differentiated (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid carcinomas (ATC) are highly malignant tumours composed by dedifferentiated cells, for which current therapeutic options have been ineffective. In the present project, the molecular signatures and genetic alterations associated with these tumours were elucidated, by using genome-wide expression analysis as first assessment. The role ...

  13. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from pigmented Bacilli: a genomic approach to assess carbohydrate utilization and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrissat Bernard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spore-forming Bacilli are Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in a variety of natural habitats, including soil, water and the gastro-intestinal (GI-tract of animals. Isolates of various Bacillus species produce pigments, mostly carotenoids, with a putative protective role against UV irradiation and oxygen-reactive forms. Results We report the annotation of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes of two pigmented Bacilli isolated from the human GI-tract and belonging to the Bacillus indicus and B. firmus species. A high number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs and carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs were found in both isolates. A detailed analysis of CAZyme families, was performed and supported by growth data. Carbohydrates able to support growth as the sole carbon source negatively effected carotenoid formation in rich medium, suggesting that a catabolite repression-like mechanism controls carotenoid biosynthesis in both Bacilli. Experimental results on biofilm formation confirmed genomic data on the potentials of B. indicus HU36 to produce a levan-based biofilm, while mucin-binding and -degradation experiments supported genomic data suggesting the ability of both Bacilli to degrade mammalian glycans. Conclusions CAZy analyses of the genomes of the two pigmented Bacilli, compared to other Bacillus species and validated by experimental data on carbohydrate utilization, biofilm formation and mucin degradation, suggests that the two pigmented Bacilli are adapted to the intestinal environment and are suited to grow in and colonize the human gut.

  14. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from pigmented Bacilli: a genomic approach to assess carbohydrate utilization and degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Spore-forming Bacilli are Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in a variety of natural habitats, including soil, water and the gastro-intestinal (GI)-tract of animals. Isolates of various Bacillus species produce pigments, mostly carotenoids, with a putative protective role against UV irradiation and oxygen-reactive forms. Results We report the annotation of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) of two pigmented Bacilli isolated from the human GI-tract and belonging to the Bacillus indicus and B. firmus species. A high number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) were found in both isolates. A detailed analysis of CAZyme families, was performed and supported by growth data. Carbohydrates able to support growth as the sole carbon source negatively effected carotenoid formation in rich medium, suggesting that a catabolite repression-like mechanism controls carotenoid biosynthesis in both Bacilli. Experimental results on biofilm formation confirmed genomic data on the potentials of B. indicus HU36 to produce a levan-based biofilm, while mucin-binding and -degradation experiments supported genomic data suggesting the ability of both Bacilli to degrade mammalian glycans. Conclusions CAZy analyses of the genomes of the two pigmented Bacilli, compared to other Bacillus species and validated by experimental data on carbohydrate utilization, biofilm formation and mucin degradation, suggests that the two pigmented Bacilli are adapted to the intestinal environment and are suited to grow in and colonize the human gut. PMID:21892951

  15. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from pigmented Bacilli: a genomic approach to assess carbohydrate utilization and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Nicola; D'Apuzzo, Enrica; Coutinho, Pedro M; Cutting, Simon M; Henrissat, Bernard; Ricca, Ezio

    2011-09-05

    Spore-forming Bacilli are gram-positive bacteria commonly found in a variety of natural habitats, including soil, water and the gastro-intestinal (GI)-tract of animals. Isolates of various Bacillus species produce pigments, mostly carotenoids, with a putative protective role against UV irradiation and oxygen-reactive forms. We report the annotation of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes) of two pigmented Bacilli isolated from the human GI-tract and belonging to the Bacillus indicus and B. firmus species. A high number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) were found in both isolates. A detailed analysis of CAZyme families, was performed and supported by growth data. Carbohydrates able to support growth as the sole carbon source negatively effected carotenoid formation in rich medium, suggesting that a catabolite repression-like mechanism controls carotenoid biosynthesis in both Bacilli. Experimental results on biofilm formation confirmed genomic data on the potentials of B. indicus HU36 to produce a levan-based biofilm, while mucin-binding and -degradation experiments supported genomic data suggesting the ability of both Bacilli to degrade mammalian glycans. CAZy analyses of the genomes of the two pigmented Bacilli, compared to other Bacillus species and validated by experimental data on carbohydrate utilization, biofilm formation and mucin degradation, suggests that the two pigmented Bacilli are adapted to the intestinal environment and are suited to grow in and colonize the human gut.

  16. Genome privacy: challenges, technical approaches to mitigate risk, and ethical considerations in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Jiang, Xiaoqian; Singh, Siddharth; Marmor, Rebecca; Bonomi, Luca; Fox, Dov; Dow, Michelle; Ohno-Machado, Lucila

    2017-01-01

    Accessing and integrating human genomic data with phenotypes are important for biomedical research. Making genomic data accessible for research purposes, however, must be handled carefully to avoid leakage of sensitive individual information to unauthorized parties and improper use of data. In this article, we focus on data sharing within the scope of data accessibility for research. Current common practices to gain biomedical data access are strictly rule based, without a clear and quantitative measurement of the risk of privacy breaches. In addition, several types of studies require privacy-preserving linkage of genotype and phenotype information across different locations (e.g., genotypes stored in a sequencing facility and phenotypes stored in an electronic health record) to accelerate discoveries. The computer science community has developed a spectrum of techniques for data privacy and confidentiality protection, many of which have yet to be tested on real-world problems. In this article, we discuss clinical, technical, and ethical aspects of genome data privacy and confidentiality in the United States, as well as potential solutions for privacy-preserving genotype-phenotype linkage in biomedical research. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  17. A comparative genomics approach to the evolution of eukaryotes and their mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, B F; Seif, E; Gray, M W; O'Kelly, C J; Burger, G

    1999-01-01

    The Organelle Genome Megasequencing Program (OGMP) investigates mitochondrial genome diversity and evolution by systematically determining the complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences of a phylogenetically broad selection of protists. The mtDNAs of lower fungi and choanoflagellates are being analyzed by the Fungal Mitochondrial Genome Project (FMGP), a sister project to the OGMP. Some of the most interesting protists include the jakobid flagellates Reclinomonas americana, Malawimonas jakobiformis, and Jakoba libera, which share ultrastructural similarities with amitochondriate retortamonads, and harbor mitochondrial genes not seen before in mtDNAs of other organisms. In R. americana and J. libera, gene clusters are found that resemble, to an unprecedented degree, the contiguous ribosomal protein operons str, S10, spc, and alpha of eubacteria. In addition, their mtDNAs code for an RNase P RNA that displays all the elements of a bacterial minimum consensus structure. This structure has been instrumental in detecting the rnpB gene in additional protists. Gene repertoire and gene order comparisons as well as multiple-gene phylogenies support the view of a single endosymbiotic origin of mitochondria, whose closest extant relatives are Rickettsia-type alpha-Proteobacteria.

  18. Chemical Biology Approaches to Genome Editing: Understanding, Controlling, and Delivering Programmable Nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Johnny H; Davis, Kevin M; Liu, David R

    2016-01-21

    Programmable DNA nucleases have provided scientists with the unprecedented ability to probe, regulate, and manipulate the human genome. Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat-Cas9 system (CRISPR-Cas9) represent a powerful array of tools that can bind to and cleave a specified DNA sequence. In their canonical forms, these nucleases induce double-strand breaks at a DNA locus of interest that can trigger cellular DNA repair processes that disrupt or replace genes. The fusion of these programmable nucleases with a variety of other protein domains has led to a rapidly growing suite of tools for activating, repressing, visualizing, and modifying loci of interest. Maximizing the usefulness and therapeutic relevance of these tools, however, requires precisely controlling their activity and specificity to minimize potentially toxic side effects arising from off-target activities. This need has motivated the application of chemical biology principles and methods to genome-editing proteins, including the engineering of variants of these proteins with improved or altered specificities, and the development of genetic, chemical, optical, and protein delivery methods that control the activity of these agents in cells. Advancing the capabilities, safety, effectiveness, and therapeutic relevance of genome-engineering proteins will continue to rely on chemical biology strategies that manipulate their activity, specificity, and localization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulatory hurdles for genome editing: process- vs. product-based approaches in different regulatory contexts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprink, Thorben; Eriksson, Dennis; Schiemann, Joachim; Hartung, Frank

    2016-07-01

    Novel plant genome editing techniques call for an updated legislation regulating the use of plants produced by genetic engineering or genome editing, especially in the European Union. Established more than 25 years ago and based on a clear distinction between transgenic and conventionally bred plants, the current EU Directives fail to accommodate the new continuum between genetic engineering and conventional breeding. Despite the fact that the Directive 2001/18/EC contains both process- and product-related terms, it is commonly interpreted as a strictly process-based legislation. In view of several new emerging techniques which are closer to the conventional breeding than common genetic engineering, we argue that it should be actually interpreted more in relation to the resulting product. A legal guidance on how to define plants produced by exploring novel genome editing techniques in relation to the decade-old legislation is urgently needed, as private companies and public researchers are waiting impatiently with products and projects in the pipeline. We here outline the process in the EU to develop a legislation that properly matches the scientific progress. As the process is facing several hurdles, we also compare with existing frameworks in other countries and discuss ideas for an alternative regulatory system.

  20. Challenges of metagenomics and single-cell genomics approaches for exploring cyanobacterial diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Michelle; Hall, Eric; Zare, Richard; Bhaya, Devaki

    2015-10-01

    Cyanobacteria have played a crucial role in the history of early earth and continue to be instrumental in shaping our planet, yet applications of cutting edge technology have not yet been widely used to explore cyanobacterial diversity. To provide adequate background, we briefly review current sequencing technologies and their innovative uses in genomics and metagenomics. Next, we focus on current cell capture technologies and the challenges of using them with cyanobacteria. We illustrate the utility in coupling breakthroughs in DNA amplification with cell capture platforms, with an example of microfluidic isolation and subsequent targeted amplicon sequencing from individual terrestrial thermophilic cyanobacteria. Single cells of thermophilic, unicellular Synechococcus sp. JA-2-3-B'a(2-13) (Syn OS-B') were sorted in a microfluidic device, lysed, and subjected to whole genome amplification by multiple displacement amplification. We amplified regions from specific CRISPR spacer arrays, which are known to be highly diverse, contain semi-palindromic repeats which form secondary structure, and can be difficult to amplify. Cell capture, lysis, and genome amplification on a microfluidic device have been optimized, setting a stage for further investigations of individual cyanobacterial cells isolated directly from natural populations.

  1. Optimization of genome engineering approaches with the CRISPR/Cas9 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Wang, Gang; Andersen, Troels; Zhou, Pingzhu; Pu, William T

    2014-01-01

    Designer nucleases such as TALENS and Cas9 have opened new opportunities to scarlessly edit the mammalian genome. Here we explored several parameters that influence Cas9-mediated scarless genome editing efficiency in murine embryonic stem cells. Optimization of transfection conditions and enriching for transfected cells are critical for efficiently recovering modified clones. Paired gRNAs and wild-type Cas9 efficiently create programmed deletions, which facilitate identification of targeted clones, while paired gRNAs and the Cas9D10A nickase generated smaller targeted indels with lower chance of off-target mutagenesis. Genome editing is also useful for programmed introduction of exogenous DNA sequences at a target locus. Increasing the length of the homology arms of the homology-directed repair template strongly enhanced targeting efficiency, while increasing the length of the DNA insert reduced it. Together our data provide guidance on optimal design of scarless gene knockout, modification, or knock-in experiments using Cas9 nuclease.

  2. Hepatitis C virus host cell interactions uncovered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Bukh, Jens

    2007-01-01

      Insights into virus-host cell interactions as uncovered by Randall et al. (1) in a recent issue of PNAS further our understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, persistence, and pathogenesis and might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. HCV persistently infects 180...... million individuals worldwide, causing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The only approved treatment, combination therapy with IFN- and ribavirin, targets cellular pathways (2); however, a sustained virologic response is achieved only in approximately half of the patients...... treated. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the identification of novel drugs against hepatitis C. Although most research focuses on the development of HCV-specific antivirals, such as protease and polymerase inhibitors (3), cellular targets could be pursued and might allow the development of broad...

  3. Hepatitis C virus host cell interactions uncovered

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gottwein, Judith; Bukh, Jens

    2007-01-01

      Insights into virus-host cell interactions as uncovered by Randall et al. (1) in a recent issue of PNAS further our understanding of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) life cycle, persistence, and pathogenesis and might lead to the identification of new therapeutic targets. HCV persistently infects 180...... million individuals worldwide, causing chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The only approved treatment, combination therapy with IFN- and ribavirin, targets cellular pathways (2); however, a sustained virologic response is achieved only in approximately half of the patients...... treated. Therefore, there is a pressing need for the identification of novel drugs against hepatitis C. Although most research focuses on the development of HCV-specific antivirals, such as protease and polymerase inhibitors (3), cellular targets could be pursued and might allow the development of broad...

  4. Uncovering the Hidden Decisions that Shape Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Danielle Boyd

    2010-10-01

    Developing explanatory models is a central practice to scientific inquiry. When students create and test explanatory models for scientific phenomenon, they develop content knowledge, knowledge of the nature of science, and creative thinking skills. Unfortunately, such instruction rarely occurs in K-12 science. This is, in part, because teachers do not have the opportunity to develop sophisticated understandings of the process of modeling, but also because teaching in this way requires teachers to make real-time instructional decisions that are responsive to students' ideas. This is challenging for teachers, especially because this decision process is often invisible. In this talk, I will highlight the importance of providing opportunities for sophisticated science thinking for our youngest learners and consider how uncovering the decisions that shape physics courses for teachers may benefit their future students.

  5. In silico and microarray-based genomic approaches to identifying potential vaccine candidates against Leptospira interrogans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Xu-Cheng

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently available vaccines against leptospirosis are of low efficacy, have an unacceptable side-effect profile, do not induce long-term protection, and provide no cross-protection against the different serovars of pathogenic leptospira. The current major focus in leptospirosis research is to discover conserved protective antigens that may elicit longer-term protection against a broad range of Leptospira. There is a need to screen vaccine candidate genes in the genome of Leptospira interrogans. Results Bioinformatics, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis and transcriptional analysis were used to identify vaccine candidates in the genome of L. interrogans serovar Lai strain #56601. Of a total of 4727 open reading frames (ORFs, 616 genes were predicted to encode surface-exposed proteins by P-CLASSIFIER combined with signal peptide prediction, α-helix transmembrane topology prediction, integral β-barrel outer membrane protein and lipoprotein prediction, as well as by retaining the genes shared by the two sequenced L. interrogans genomes and by subtracting genes with human homologues. A DNA microarray of L. interrogans strain #56601 was constructed for CGH analysis and transcriptome analysis in vitro. Three hundred and seven differential genes were identified in ten pathogenic serovars by CGH; 1427 genes had high transcriptional levels (Cy3 signal ≥ 342 and Cy5 signal ≥ 363.5, respectively. There were 565 genes in the intersection between the set encoding surface-exposed proteins and the set of 307 differential genes. The number of genes in the intersection between this set of 565 and the set of 1427 highly transcriptionally active genes was 226. These 226 genes were thus identified as putative vaccine candidates. The proteins encoded by these genes are not only potentially surface-exposed in the bacterium, but also conserved in two sequenced L. interrogans. Moreover, these genes are conserved among ten epidemic

  6. Beyond barcoding: a mitochondrial genomics approach to molecular phylogenetics and diagnostics of blowflies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Leigh A; Lambkin, Christine L; Batterham, Philip; Wallman, James F; Dowton, Mark; Whiting, Michael F; Yeates, David K; Cameron, Stephen L

    2012-12-15

    Members of the Calliphoridae (blowflies) are significant for medical and veterinary management, due to the ability of some species to consume living flesh as larvae, and for forensic investigations due to the ability of others to develop in corpses. Due to the difficulty of accurately identifying larval blowflies to species there is a need for DNA-based diagnostics for this family, however the widely used DNA-barcoding marker, cox1, has been shown to fail for several groups within this family. Additionally, many phylogenetic relationships within the Calliphoridae are still unresolved, particularly deeper level relationships. Sequencing whole mt genomes has been demonstrated both as an effective method for identifying the most informative diagnostic markers and for resolving phylogenetic relationships. Twenty-seven complete, or nearly so, mt genomes were sequenced representing 13 species, seven genera and four calliphorid subfamilies and a member of the related family Tachinidae. PCR and sequencing primers developed for sequencing one calliphorid species could be reused to sequence related species within the same superfamily with success rates ranging from 61% to 100%, demonstrating the speed and efficiency with which an mt genome dataset can be assembled. Comparison of molecular divergences for each of the 13 protein-coding genes and 2 ribosomal RNA genes, at a range of taxonomic scales identified novel targets for developing as diagnostic markers which were 117-200% more variable than the markers which have been used previously in calliphorids. Phylogenetic analysis of whole mt genome sequences resulted in much stronger support for family and subfamily-level relationships. The Calliphoridae are polyphyletic, with the Polleninae more closely related to the Tachinidae, and the Sarcophagidae are the sister group of the remaining calliphorids. Within the Calliphoridae, there was strong support for the monophyly of the Chrysomyinae and Luciliinae and for the sister

  7. Identification of cancer predisposition variants in apparently healthy individuals using a next-generation sequencing-based family genomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karageorgos, Ioannis; Mizzi, Clint; Giannopoulou, Efstathia; Pavlidis, Cristiana; Peters, Brock A; Zagoriti, Zoi; Stenson, Peter D; Mitropoulos, Konstantinos; Borg, Joseph; Kalofonos, Haralabos P; Drmanac, Radoje; Stubbs, Andrew; van der Spek, Peter; Cooper, David N; Katsila, Theodora; Patrinos, George P

    2015-06-20

    Cancer, like many common disorders, has a complex etiology, often with a strong genetic component and with multiple environmental factors contributing to susceptibility. A considerable number of genomic variants have been previously reported to be causative of, or associated with, an increased risk for various types of cancer. Here, we adopted a next-generation sequencing approach in 11 members of two families of Greek descent to identify all genomic variants with the potential to predispose family members to cancer. Cross-comparison with data from the Human Gene Mutation Database identified a total of 571 variants, from which 47 % were disease-associated polymorphisms, 26 % disease-associated polymorphisms with additional supporting functional evidence, 19 % functional polymorphisms with in vitro/laboratory or in vivo supporting evidence but no known disease association, 4 % putative disease-causing mutations but with some residual doubt as to their pathological significance, and 3 % disease-causing mutations. Subsequent analysis, focused on the latter variant class most likely to be involved in cancer predisposition, revealed two variants of prime interest, namely MSH2 c.2732T>A (p.L911R) and BRCA1 c.2955delC, the first of which is novel. KMT2D c.13895delC and c.1940C>A variants are additionally reported as incidental findings. The next-generation sequencing-based family genomics approach described herein has the potential to be applied to other types of complex genetic disorder in order to identify variants of potential pathological significance.

  8. A Bac Library and Paired-PCR Approach to Mapping and Completing the Genome Sequence of Sulfolobus Solfataricus P2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    She, Qunxin; Confalonieri, F.; Zivanovic, Y.;

    2000-01-01

    -productive because there was a high sequence bias in the cosmid and lambda libraries. Therefore, a new approach was devised for linking the sequenced regions which may be generally applicable. BAC libraries were constructed and terminal sequences of the clones were determined and used for both end mapping and PCR...... screening. The PCR approaches included a novel chromosome walking method termed “paired-PCR”. 21 gaps were filled by BAC end sequence analyses and 6 gaps were filled by PCR including three large ones by paired-PCR. The complete map revealed that 0.9 Mb remained to be sequenced and 34 BAC clones were...... selected for walking over small gaps and preparing template libraries for larger ones. It is concluded that an optimal strategy for sequencing microorganism genomes involves construction of a high-resolution physical map by BAC end analyses, PCR screening and paired-PCR chromosome walking after about half...

  9. MegaSNPHunter: a learning approach to detect disease predisposition SNPs and high level interactions in genome wide association study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Hong

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interactions of multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are highly hypothesized to affect an individual's susceptibility to complex diseases. Although many works have been done to identify and quantify the importance of multi-SNP interactions, few of them could handle the genome wide data due to the combinatorial explosive search space and the difficulty to statistically evaluate the high-order interactions given limited samples. Results Three comparative experiments are designed to evaluate the performance of MegaSNPHunter. The first experiment uses synthetic data generated on the basis of epistasis models. The second one uses a genome wide study on Parkinson disease (data acquired by using Illumina HumanHap300 SNP chips. The third one chooses the rheumatoid arthritis study from Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC using Affymetrix GeneChip 500K Mapping Array Set. MegaSNPHunter outperforms the best solution in this area and reports many potential interactions for the two real studies. Conclusion The experimental results on both synthetic data and two real data sets demonstrate that our proposed approach outperforms the best solution that is currently available in handling large-scale SNP data both in terms of speed and in terms of detection of potential interactions that were not identified before. To our knowledge, MegaSNPHunter is the first approach that is capable of identifying the disease-associated SNP interactions from WTCCC studies and is promising for practical disease prognosis.

  10. Health Detectives: Uncovering the Mysteries of Disease (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, Mina; Canaria, Christie; Celnicker, Susan; Karpen, Gary

    2012-04-23

    In this April 23, 2012 Science at the Theater event, Berkeley Lab scientists discuss how they uncover the mysteries of disease in unlikely places. Speakers and topics include: World-renowned cancer researcher Mina Bissell's pioneering research on the role of the cellular microenvironment in breast cancer has changed the conversation about the disease. How does DNA instability cause disease? To find out, Christie Canaria images neural networks to study disorders such as Huntington's disease. Fruit flies can tell us a lot about ourselves. Susan Celniker explores the fruit fly genome to learn how our genome works. DNA is not destiny. Gary Karpen explores how environmental factors shape genome function and disease through epigenetics.

  11. Combined Genetic and Genealogic Studies Uncover a Large BAP1 Cancer Syndrome Kindred Tracing Back Nine Generations to a Common Ancestor from the 1700s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Michele; Flores, Erin G; Emi, Mitsuru; Johnson, Todd A; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Behner, Dusty; Hoffman, Harriet; Hesdorffer, Mary; Nasu, Masaki; Napolitano, Andrea; Powers, Amy; Minaai, Michael; Baumann, Francine; Bryant-Greenwood, Peter; Lauk, Olivia; Kirschner, Michaela B; Weder, Walter; Opitz, Isabelle; Pass, Harvey I; Gaudino, Giovanni; Pastorino, Sandra; Yang, Haining

    2015-12-01

    We recently discovered an inherited cancer syndrome caused by BRCA1-Associated Protein 1 (BAP1) germline mutations, with high incidence of mesothelioma, uveal melanoma and other cancers and very high penetrance by age 55. To identify families with the BAP1 cancer syndrome, we screened patients with family histories of multiple mesotheliomas and melanomas and/or multiple cancers. We identified four families that shared an identical BAP1 mutation: they lived across the US and did not appear to be related. By combining family histories, molecular genetics, and genealogical approaches, we uncovered a BAP1 cancer syndrome kindred of ~80,000 descendants with a core of 106 individuals, whose members descend from a couple born in Germany in the early 1700s who immigrated to North America. Their descendants spread throughout the country with mutation carriers affected by multiple malignancies. Our data show that, once a proband is identified, extended analyses of these kindreds, using genomic and genealogical studies to identify the most recent common ancestor, allow investigators to uncover additional branches of the family that may carry BAP1 mutations. Using this knowledge, we have identified new branches of this family carrying BAP1 mutations. We have also implemented early-detection strategies that help identify cancers at early-stage, when they can be cured (melanomas) or are more susceptible to therapy (MM and other malignancies).

  12. A Two-Stage Penalized Logistic Regression Approach to Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyuan Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a two-stage penalized logistic regression approach to case-control genome-wide association studies. This approach consists of a screening stage and a selection stage. In the screening stage, main-effect and interaction-effect features are screened by using L1-penalized logistic like-lihoods. In the selection stage, the retained features are ranked by the logistic likelihood with the smoothly clipped absolute deviation (SCAD penalty (Fan and Li, 2001 and Jeffrey’s Prior penalty (Firth, 1993, a sequence of nested candidate models are formed, and the models are assessed by a family of extended Bayesian information criteria (J. Chen and Z. Chen, 2008. The proposed approach is applied to the analysis of the prostate cancer data of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS project in the National Cancer Institute, USA. Simulation studies are carried out to compare the approach with the pair-wise multiple testing approach (Marchini et al. 2005 and the LASSO-patternsearch algorithm (Shi et al. 2007.

  13. Investigation of Yersinia pestis Laboratory Adaptation through a Combined Genomics and Proteomics Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen P Leiser

    Full Text Available The bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis, the cause of plague in humans and animals, normally has a sylvatic lifestyle, cycling between fleas and mammals. In contrast, laboratory-grown Y. pestis experiences a more constant environment and conditions that it would not normally encounter. The transition from the natural environment to the laboratory results in a vastly different set of selective pressures, and represents what could be considered domestication. Understanding the kinds of adaptations Y. pestis undergoes as it becomes domesticated will contribute to understanding the basic biology of this important pathogen. In this study, we performed a parallel serial passage experiment (PSPE to explore the mechanisms by which Y. pestis adapts to laboratory conditions, hypothesizing that cells would undergo significant changes in virulence and nutrient acquisition systems. Two wild strains were serially passaged in 12 independent populations each for ~750 generations, after which each population was analyzed using whole-genome sequencing, LC-MS/MS proteomic analysis, and GC/MS metabolomics. We observed considerable parallel evolution in the endpoint populations, detecting multiple independent mutations in ail, pepA, and zwf, suggesting that specific selective pressures are shaping evolutionary responses. Complementary LC-MS/MS proteomic data provide physiological context to the observed mutations, and reveal regulatory changes not necessarily associated with specific mutations, including changes in amino acid metabolism and cell envelope biogenesis. Proteomic data support hypotheses generated by genomic data in addition to suggesting future mechanistic studies, indicating that future whole-genome sequencing studies be designed to leverage proteomics as a critical complement.

  14. SBH and the integration of complementary approaches in the mapping, sequencing, and understanding of complex genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Vicentic, A.; Gemmell, A.; Stavropoulos, N.; Jarvis, J.

    1992-12-01

    A variant of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is being developed with a potential to inexpensively determine up to 100 million base pairs per year. The method comprises (1) arraying short clones in 864-well plates; (2) growth of the M13 clones or PCR of the inserts; (3) automated spotting of DNAs by corresponding pin-arrays; (4) hybridization of dotted samples with 200-3000 {sup 32}P- or {sup 33}P-labeled 6- to 8-mer probes; and (5) scoring hybridization signals using storage phosphor plates. Some 200 7- to 8-mers can provide an inventory of the genes if CDNA clones are hybridized, or can define the order of 2-kb genomic clones, creating physical and structural maps with 100-bp resolution; the distribution of G+C, LINEs, SINEs, and gene families would be revealed. cDNAs that represent new genes and genomic clones in regions of interest selected by SBH can be sequenced by a gel method. Uniformly distributed clones from the previous step will be hybridized with 2000--3000 6- to 8-mers. As a result, approximately 50--60% of the genomic regions containing members of large repetitive and gene families and those families represented in GenBank would be completely sequenced. In the less redundant regions, every base pair is expected to be read with 3-4 probes, but the complete sequence can not be reconstructed. Such partial sequences allow the inference of similarity and the recognition of coding, regulatory, and repetitive sequences, as well as study of the evolutionary processes all the way up to the species delineation.

  15. SBH and the integration of complementary approaches in the mapping, sequencing, and understanding of complex genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drmanac, R.; Drmanac, S.; Labat, I.; Vicentic, A.; Gemmell, A.; Stavropoulos, N.; Jarvis, J.

    1992-01-01

    A variant of sequencing by hybridization (SBH) is being developed with a potential to inexpensively determine up to 100 million base pairs per year. The method comprises (1) arraying short clones in 864-well plates; (2) growth of the M13 clones or PCR of the inserts; (3) automated spotting of DNAs by corresponding pin-arrays; (4) hybridization of dotted samples with 200-3000 [sup 32]P- or [sup 33]P-labeled 6- to 8-mer probes; and (5) scoring hybridization signals using storage phosphor plates. Some 200 7- to 8-mers can provide an inventory of the genes if CDNA clones are hybridized, or can define the order of 2-kb genomic clones, creating physical and structural maps with 100-bp resolution; the distribution of G+C, LINEs, SINEs, and gene families would be revealed. cDNAs that represent new genes and genomic clones in regions of interest selected by SBH can be sequenced by a gel method. Uniformly distributed clones from the previous step will be hybridized with 2000--3000 6- to 8-mers. As a result, approximately 50--60% of the genomic regions containing members of large repetitive and gene families and those families represented in GenBank would be completely sequenced. In the less redundant regions, every base pair is expected to be read with 3-4 probes, but the complete sequence can not be reconstructed. Such partial sequences allow the inference of similarity and the recognition of coding, regulatory, and repetitive sequences, as well as study of the evolutionary processes all the way up to the species delineation.

  16. Estimating quantitative genetic parameters in wild populations: a comparison of pedigree and genomic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérénos, Camillo; Ellis, Philip A; Pilkington, Jill G; Pemberton, Josephine M

    2014-07-01

    The estimation of quantitative genetic parameters in wild populations is generally limited by the accuracy and completeness of the available pedigree information. Using relatedness at genomewide markers can potentially remove this limitation and lead to less biased and more precise estimates. We estimated heritability, maternal genetic effects and genetic correlations for body size traits in an unmanaged long-term study population of Soay sheep on St Kilda using three increasingly complete and accurate estimates of relatedness: (i) Pedigree 1, using observation-derived maternal links and microsatellite-derived paternal links; (ii) Pedigree 2, using SNP-derived assignment of both maternity and paternity; and (iii) whole-genome relatedness at 37 037 autosomal SNPs. In initial analyses, heritability estimates were strikingly similar for all three methods, while standard errors were systematically lower in analyses based on Pedigree 2 and genomic relatedness. Genetic correlations were generally strong, differed little between the three estimates of relatedness and the standard errors declined only very slightly with improved relatedness information. When partitioning maternal effects into separate genetic and environmental components, maternal genetic effects found in juvenile traits increased substantially across the three relatedness estimates. Heritability declined compared to parallel models where only a maternal environment effect was fitted, suggesting that maternal genetic effects are confounded with direct genetic effects and that more accurate estimates of relatedness were better able to separate maternal genetic effects from direct genetic effects. We found that the heritability captured by SNP markers asymptoted at about half the SNPs available, suggesting that denser marker panels are not necessarily required for precise and unbiased heritability estimates. Finally, we present guidelines for the use of genomic relatedness in future quantitative genetics

  17. Uncovering the Genetic Architectures of Quantitative Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James J; Vattikuti, Shashaank; Chow, Carson C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) is to identify loci in the human genome affecting a phenotype of interest. This review summarizes some recent work on conceptual and methodological aspects of GWAS. The average effect of gene substitution at a given causal site in the genome is the key estimand in GWAS, and we argue for its fundamental importance. Implicit in the definition of average effect is a linear model relating genotype to phenotype. The fraction of the phenotypic variance ascribable to polymorphic sites with nonzero average effects in this linear model is called the heritability, and we describe methods for estimating this quantity from GWAS data. Finally, we show that the theory of compressed sensing can be used to provide a sharp estimate of the sample size required to identify essentially all sites contributing to the heritability of a given phenotype.

  18. Uncovering the Genetic Architectures of Quantitative Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of a genome-wide association study (GWAS is to identify loci in the human genome affecting a phenotype of interest. This review summarizes some recent work on conceptual and methodological aspects of GWAS. The average effect of gene substitution at a given causal site in the genome is the key estimand in GWAS, and we argue for its fundamental importance. Implicit in the definition of average effect is a linear model relating genotype to phenotype. The fraction of the phenotypic variance ascribable to polymorphic sites with nonzero average effects in this linear model is called the heritability, and we describe methods for estimating this quantity from GWAS data. Finally, we show that the theory of compressed sensing can be used to provide a sharp estimate of the sample size required to identify essentially all sites contributing to the heritability of a given phenotype.

  19. A two step Bayesian approach for genomic prediction of breeding values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahdi Shariati, Mohammad; Sørensen, Peter; Janss, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Background: In genomic models that assign an individual variance to each marker, the contribution of one marker to the posterior distribution of the marker variance is only one degree of freedom (df), which introduces many variance parameters with only little information per variance parameter...... of predicted breeding values. However, the accuracies of predicted breeding values were lower than Bayesian methods with marker specific variances. Conclusions: Grouping markers is less flexible than allowing each marker to have a specific marker variance but, by grouping, the power to estimate marker...

  20. A comparative genomics approach to understanding the biosynthesis of the sunscreen scytonemin in cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potrafka Ruth M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The extracellular sunscreen scytonemin is the most common and widespread indole-alkaloid among cyanobacteria. Previous research using the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 revealed a unique 18-gene cluster (NpR1276 to NpR1259 in the N. punctiforme genome involved in the biosynthesis of scytonemin. We provide further genomic characterization of these genes in N. punctiforme and extend it to homologous regions in other cyanobacteria. Results Six putative genes in the scytonemin gene cluster (NpR1276 to NpR1271 in the N. punctiforme genome, with no previously known protein function and annotated in this study as scyA to scyF, are likely involved in the assembly of scytonemin from central metabolites, based on genetic, biochemical, and sequence similarity evidence. Also in this cluster are redundant copies of genes encoding for aromatic amino acid biosynthetic enzymes. These can theoretically lead to tryptophan and the tyrosine precursor, p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate, (expected biosynthetic precursors of scytonemin from end products of the shikimic acid pathway. Redundant copies of the genes coding for the key regulatory and rate-limiting enzymes of the shikimic acid pathway are found there as well. We identified four other cyanobacterial strains containing orthologues of all of these genes, three of them by database searches (Lyngbya PCC 8106, Anabaena PCC 7120, and Nodularia CCY 9414 and one by targeted sequencing (Chlorogloeopsis sp. strain Cgs-089; CCMEE 5094. Genomic comparisons revealed that most scytonemin-related genes were highly conserved among strains and that two additional conserved clusters, NpF5232 to NpF5236 and a putative two-component regulatory system (NpF1278 and NpF1277, are likely involved in scytonemin biosynthesis and regulation, respectively, on the basis of conservation and location. Since many of the protein product sequences for the newly described genes, including ScyD, ScyE, and ScyF, have

  1. Functional Associations by Response Overlap (FARO), a functional genomics approach matching gene expression phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Mundy, J.; Willenbrock, Hanni

    2007-01-01

    The systematic comparison of transcriptional responses of organisms is a powerful tool in functional genomics. For example, mutants may be characterized by comparing their transcript profiles to those obtained in other experiments querying the effects on gene expression of many experimental factors...... including treatments, mutations and pathogen infections. Similarly, drugs may be discovered by the relationship between the transcript profiles effectuated or impacted by a candidate drug and by the target disease. The integration of such data enables systems biology to predict the interplay between...

  2. On the analysis of genome-wide association studies in family-based designs: a universal, robust analysis approach and an application to four genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungho Won

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available For genome-wide association studies in family-based designs, we propose a new, universally applicable approach. The new test statistic exploits all available information about the association, while, by virtue of its design, it maintains the same robustness against population admixture as traditional family-based approaches that are based exclusively on the within-family information. The approach is suitable for the analysis of almost any trait type, e.g. binary, continuous, time-to-onset, multivariate, etc., and combinations of those. We use simulation studies to verify all theoretically derived properties of the approach, estimate its power, and compare it with other standard approaches. We illustrate the practical implications of the new analysis method by an application to a lung-function phenotype, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 in 4 genome-wide association studies.

  3. Quantitative approaches to uncover physical mechanisms of tissue morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleghorn, Jason P.; Manivannan, Sriram; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2013-01-01

    Morphogenesis, the creation of tissue and organ architecture, is a series of complex and dynamic processes driven by genetic programs, microenvironmental cues, and intercellular interactions. Elucidating the physical mechanisms that generate tissue form is key to understanding development, disease, and the strategies needed for regenerative therapies. Advancements in imaging technologies, genetic recombination techniques, laser ablation, and microfabricated tissue models have enabled quantitative descriptions of the cellular motions and tissue deformations and stresses with unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution. Using these data synergistically with increasingly more sophisticated physical, mathematical, and computational models will unveil the physical mechanisms that drive morphogenesis. PMID:23647971

  4. Genome-Wide Locations of Potential Epimutations Associated with Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Disease Using a Sequential Machine Learning Prediction Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, M Muksitul; Holder, Lawrence B; Skinner, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and phenotypic variation involves germline transmitted epimutations. The primary epimutations identified involve altered differential DNA methylation regions (DMRs). Different environmental toxicants have been shown to promote exposure (i.e., toxicant) specific signatures of germline epimutations. Analysis of genomic features associated with these epimutations identified low-density CpG regions (learning computational approach to predict all potential epimutations in the genome. A number of previously identified sperm epimutations were used as training sets. A novel machine learning approach using a sequential combination of Active Learning and Imbalance Class Learner analysis was developed. The transgenerational sperm epimutation analysis identified approximately 50K individual sites with a 1 kb mean size and 3,233 regions that had a minimum of three adjacent sites with a mean size of 3.5 kb. A select number of the most relevant genomic features were identified with the low density CpG deserts being a critical genomic feature of the features selected. A similar independent analysis with transgenerational somatic cell epimutation training sets identified a smaller number of 1,503 regions of genome-wide predicted sites and differences in genomic feature contributions. The predicted genome-wide germline (sperm) epimutations were found to be distinct from the predicted somatic cell epimutations. Validation of the genome-wide germline predicted sites used two recently identified transgenerational sperm epimutation signature sets from the pesticides dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and methoxychlor (MXC) exposure lineage F3 generation. Analysis of this positive validation data set showed a 100% prediction accuracy for all the DDT-MXC sperm epimutations. Observations further elucidate the genomic features associated with transgenerational germline epimutations and identify a genome-wide set

  5. A new approach for sequencing virion genome of Chinese HIV-1 strains subtype B and BC from plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Zhe-feng; ZHANG Xiao-yan; XIN Ruo-lei; XING Hui; HE Xiang; XU Jian-qing; SHAO Yi-ming

    2011-01-01

    Background Although it was widely accepted that full-length HIV genome sequences is important in studying virus genetic evolution and variation as well as developing vaccine candidate,to directly sequencing HIV-1 genome of virion RNA remains as a challenge worldwide.Up to date,no published genomic sequences from virion RNA are available for Chinese prevalent HIV-1 strains due to the absence of specialized protocol and appropriate lab equipments.In this study we developed a straightforward approach for amplifying and sequencing HIV virion RNA from plasma by modifying published protocols and further confirmed it is suitable to process Chinese samples.Methods The methods for viral RNA extraction and gene amplification was modified and optimized as could be widely used in most Chinese labs.Gene alignment of Chinese HIV-1 strains was employed for designing specialized primer sets for Thai-B and BC recombinant strains.Based on comprehensively consideration of high variable gene region and recombinant breakpoints in BC recombinant strains,a three-amplicon strategy (including 4.3-kb gag-pol,2.9-kb pol-env and 2.7-kb env-ne) was developed.In addition,one amplicon (9 kb near full-length genome) was also used in 32 samples with varied viral loads.All amplicons were directly sequenced by DNA automated sequencer.Results Twenty-five percent(8/32) amplification efficiency was achieved by the one-amplicon strategy and 65.6%(21/32) by three-amplicon strategy.For one amplicon strategy,none of complete near full-length genome sequences was obtained by DNA sequencing.For three-amplicon strategy,75% sequences were achieved in DNA sequencing.Amplification efficiency but not sequencing efficiency was closely associated with viral loads.Conclusion Three-amplicon strategy covering all encoding regions of HIV-1 is suitable for Thai-B and BC recombinant strains and could be potentially employed in less-well equipped Chinese labs.

  6. De novo discovery of neuropeptides in the genomes of parasitic flatworms using a novel comparative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Uriel; Koziol, Miguel; Preza, Matías; Costábile, Alicia; Brehm, Klaus; Castillo, Estela

    2016-10-01

    Neuropeptide mediated signalling is an ancient mechanism found in almost all animals and has been proposed as a promising target for the development of novel drugs against helminths. However, identification of neuropeptides from genomic data is challenging, and knowledge of the neuropeptide complement of parasitic flatworms is still fragmentary. In this work, we have developed an evolution-based strategy for the de novo discovery of neuropeptide precursors, based on the detection of localised sequence conservation between possible prohormone convertase cleavage sites. The method detected known neuropeptide precursors with good precision and specificity in the models Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. Furthermore, it identified novel putative neuropeptide precursors in nematodes, including the first description of allatotropin homologues in this phylum. Our search for neuropeptide precursors in the genomes of parasitic flatworms resulted in the description of 34 conserved neuropeptide precursor families, including 13 new ones, and of hundreds of new homologues of known neuropeptide precursor families. Most neuropeptide precursor families show a wide phylogenetic distribution among parasitic flatworms and show little similarity to neuropeptide precursors of other bilaterian animals. However, we could also find orthologs of some conserved bilaterian neuropeptides including pyrokinin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, myomodulin, neuropeptide-Y, neuropeptide KY and SIF-amide. Finally, we determined the expression patterns of seven putative neuropeptide precursor genes in the protoscolex of Echinococcus multilocularis. All genes were expressed in the nervous system with different patterns, indicating a hidden complexity of peptidergic signalling in cestodes.

  7. Predicting Hybrid Performances for Quality Traits through Genomic-Assisted Approaches in Central European Wheat

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Guozheng

    2016-07-06

    Bread-making quality traits are central targets for wheat breeding. The objectives of our study were to (1) examine the presence of major effect QTLs for quality traits in a Central European elite wheat population, (2) explore the optimal strategy for predicting the hybrid performance for wheat quality traits, and (3) investigate the effects of marker density and the composition and size of the training population on the accuracy of prediction of hybrid performance. In total 135 inbred lines of Central European bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and 1,604 hybrids derived from them were evaluated for seven quality traits in up to six environments. The 135 parental lines were genotyped using a 90k single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Genome-wide association mapping initially suggested presence of several quantitative trait loci (QTLs), but cross-validation rather indicated the absence of major effect QTLs for all quality traits except of 1000-kernel weight. Genomic selection substantially outperformed marker-assisted selection in predicting hybrid performance. A resampling study revealed that increasing the effective population size in the estimation set of hybrids is relevant to boost the accuracy of prediction for an unrelated test population.

  8. Predicting Hybrid Performances for Quality Traits through Genomic-Assisted Approaches in Central European Wheat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guozheng Liu

    Full Text Available Bread-making quality traits are central targets for wheat breeding. The objectives of our study were to (1 examine the presence of major effect QTLs for quality traits in a Central European elite wheat population, (2 explore the optimal strategy for predicting the hybrid performance for wheat quality traits, and (3 investigate the effects of marker density and the composition and size of the training population on the accuracy of prediction of hybrid performance. In total 135 inbred lines of Central European bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. and 1,604 hybrids derived from them were evaluated for seven quality traits in up to six environments. The 135 parental lines were genotyped using a 90k single-nucleotide polymorphism array. Genome-wide association mapping initially suggested presence of several quantitative trait loci (QTLs, but cross-validation rather indicated the absence of major effect QTLs for all quality traits except of 1000-kernel weight. Genomic selection substantially outperformed marker-assisted selection in predicting hybrid performance. A resampling study revealed that increasing the effective population size in the estimation set of hybrids is relevant to boost the accuracy of prediction for an unrelated test population.

  9. VaProS: a database-integration approach for protein/genome information retrieval

    KAUST Repository

    Gojobori, Takashi

    2016-12-24

    Life science research now heavily relies on all sorts of databases for genome sequences, transcription, protein three-dimensional (3D) structures, protein–protein interactions, phenotypes and so forth. The knowledge accumulated by all the omics research is so vast that a computer-aided search of data is now a prerequisite for starting a new study. In addition, a combinatory search throughout these databases has a chance to extract new ideas and new hypotheses that can be examined by wet-lab experiments. By virtually integrating the related databases on the Internet, we have built a new web application that facilitates life science researchers for retrieving experts’ knowledge stored in the databases and for building a new hypothesis of the research target. This web application, named VaProS, puts stress on the interconnection between the functional information of genome sequences and protein 3D structures, such as structural effect of the gene mutation. In this manuscript, we present the notion of VaProS, the databases and tools that can be accessed without any knowledge of database locations and data formats, and the power of search exemplified in quest of the molecular mechanisms of lysosomal storage disease. VaProS can be freely accessed at http://p4d-info.nig.ac.jp/vapros/.

  10. A Genomic Approach to Resolving Relapse versus Reinfection among Four Cases of Buruli Ulcer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Eddyani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased availability of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS techniques allows, for the first time, to distinguish relapses from reinfections in patients with multiple Buruli ulcer (BU episodes.We compared the number and location of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs identified by genomic screening between four pairs of Mycobacterium ulcerans isolates collected at the time of first diagnosis and at recurrence, derived from a collection of almost 5000 well characterized clinical samples from one BU treatment center in Benin.The findings suggest that after surgical treatment-without antibiotics-the second episodes were due to relapse rather than reinfection. Since specific antibiotics were introduced for the treatment of BU, the one patient with a culture available from both disease episodes had M. ulcerans isolates with a genomic distance of 20 SNPs, suggesting the patient was most likely reinfected rather than having a relapse.To our knowledge, this study is the first to study recurrences in M. ulcerans using NGS, and to identify exogenous reinfection as causing a recurrence of BU. The occurrence of reinfection highlights the contribution of ongoing exposure to M. ulcerans to disease recurrence, and has implications for vaccine development.

  11. Acclimation of microorganisms to harsh soil crust conditions: Experimental and genomic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raanan, Hagai; Kaplan, Aaron

    2015-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) are formed by the adhesion of sand particles to cyanobacterial exo- polysaccharides and play an important role in stabilizing sandy desert. Its destruction promotes desertification. These organisms cope with extreme temperatures, excess light and frequent hydration/dehydration cycles; the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. With the genome of newly sequenced Leptolyngbya, isolated from Nizzana BSC, we conduct comparative genomics of three desiccation tolerant cyanobacteria. This yield 46 unique genes, some of them similar to genes involve in sporulation of the gram positive bacteria Bacillus. In order to understand the molecular mechanisms taking place during desiccation we built an environmental chamber capable of simulating dynamic changes of environmental conditions in the crust. This chamber allows us to perform repetitive and accurate desiccation/rehydration experiments and follow cyanobacterial physiological and molecular response to such environmental changes. When we compared fast desiccation (less than 5 min) of isolated cyanobacteria to simulation of natural desiccation, we observed a 60% lower fluorescence recovery rate. The extent of damage from desiccation depended on the stress conditions during the dry period. These results suggest that cyanobacteria activated protection mechanisms in response to desiccation stress but which were not activated in 5 min desiccation tests. Gene expression patterns during desiccation are being analyzed in order to provide a better understanding of desiccation stress protection mechanisms.

  12. A surrogate-based approach for post-genomic partner identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano Tony

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern drug discovery is concerned with identification and validation of novel protein targets from among the 30,000 genes or more postulated to be present in the human genome. While protein-protein interactions may be central to many disease indications, it has been difficult to identify new chemical entities capable of regulating these interactions as either agonists or antagonists. Results In this paper, we show that peptide complements (or surrogates derived from highly diverse random phage display libraries can be used for the identification of the expected natural biological partners for protein and non-protein targets. Our examples include surrogates isolated against both an extracellular secreted protein (TNFβ and intracellular disease related mRNAs. In each case, surrogates binding to these targets were obtained and found to contain partner information embedded in their amino acid sequences. Furthermore, this information was able to identify the correct biological partners from large human genome databases by rapid and integrated computer based searches. Conclusions Modified versions of these surrogates should provide agents capable of modifying the activity of these targets and enable one to study their involvement in specific biological processes as a means of target validation for downstream drug discovery.

  13. The complex genetics of gait speed: genome-wide meta-analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Eicher, John D.; Vered, Rotem; Deelen, Joris; Arnold, Alice M.; Buchman, Aron S.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Faul, Jessica D.; Nethander, Maria; Fornage, Myriam; Adams, Hieab H.; Matteini, Amy M.; Callisaya, Michele L.; Smith, Albert V.; Yu, Lei; De Jager, Philip L.; Evans, Denis A.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hofman, Albert; Pattie, Alison; Corley, Janie; Launer, Lenore J.; Knopman, Davis S.; Parimi, Neeta; Turner, Stephen T.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beekman, Marian; Gutman, Danielle; Sharvit, Lital; Mooijaart, Simon P.; Liewald, David C.; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J.; Ohlsson, Claes; Moed, Matthijs; Verlinden, Vincent J.; Mellström, Dan; van der Geest, Jos N.; Karlsson, Magnus; Hernandez, Dena; McWhirter, Rebekah; Liu, Yongmei; Thomson, Russell; Tranah, Gregory J.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Weir, David R.; Zhao, Wei; Starr, John M.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Bennett, David A.; Cummings, Steven R.; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Tamara B.; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Srikanth, Velandai K.; Windham, Beverly G.; Newman, Ann B.; Walston, Jeremy D.; Davies, Gail; Evans, Daniel S.; Slagboom, Eline P.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Kiel, Douglas P.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Atzmon, Gil

    2017-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that the basis for variation in late-life mobility is attributable, in part, to genetic factors, which may become increasingly important with age. Our objective was to systematically assess the contribution of genetic variation to gait speed in older individuals. We conducted a meta-analysis of gait speed GWASs in 31,478 older adults from 17 cohorts of the CHARGE consortium, and validated our results in 2,588 older adults from 4 independent studies. We followed our initial discoveries with network and eQTL analysis of candidate signals in tissues. The meta-analysis resulted in a list of 536 suggestive genome wide significant SNPs in or near 69 genes. Further interrogation with Pathway Analysis placed gait speed as a polygenic complex trait in five major networks. Subsequent eQTL analysis revealed several SNPs significantly associated with the expression of PRSS16, WDSUB1 and PTPRT, which in addition to the meta-analysis and pathway suggested that genetic effects on gait speed may occur through synaptic function and neuronal development pathways. No genome-wide significant signals for gait speed were identified from this moderately large sample of older adults, suggesting that more refined physical function phenotypes will be needed to identify the genetic basis of gait speed in aging. PMID:28077804

  14. Kinetic theory approach to modeling of cellular repair mechanisms under genome stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinpeng Qi

    Full Text Available Under acute perturbations from outer environment, a normal cell can trigger cellular self-defense mechanism in response to genome stress. To investigate the kinetics of cellular self-repair process at single cell level further, a model of DNA damage generating and repair is proposed under acute Ion Radiation (IR by using mathematical framework of kinetic theory of active particles (KTAP. Firstly, we focus on illustrating the profile of Cellular Repair System (CRS instituted by two sub-populations, each of which is made up of the active particles with different discrete states. Then, we implement the mathematical framework of cellular self-repair mechanism, and illustrate the dynamic processes of Double Strand Breaks (DSBs and Repair Protein (RP generating, DSB-protein complexes (DSBCs synthesizing, and toxins accumulating. Finally, we roughly analyze the capability of cellular self-repair mechanism, cellular activity of transferring DNA damage, and genome stability, especially the different fates of a certain cell before and after the time thresholds of IR perturbations that a cell can tolerate maximally under different IR perturbation circumstances.

  15. Single Cell Genomics and Transcriptomics for Unicellular Eukaryotes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciobanu, Doina; Clum, Alicia; Singh, Vasanth; Salamov, Asaf; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Grigoriev, Igor; James, Timothy; Singer, Steven; Woyke, Tanja; Malmstrom, Rex; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2014-03-14

    Despite their small size, unicellular eukaryotes have complex genomes with a high degree of plasticity that allow them to adapt quickly to environmental changes. Unicellular eukaryotes live with prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, frequently in symbiotic or parasitic niches. To this day their contribution to the dynamics of the environmental communities remains to be understood. Unfortunately, the vast majority of eukaryotic microorganisms are either uncultured or unculturable, making genome sequencing impossible using traditional approaches. We have developed an approach to isolate unicellular eukaryotes of interest from environmental samples, and to sequence and analyze their genomes and transcriptomes. We have tested our methods with six species: an uncharacterized protist from cellulose-enriched compost identified as Platyophrya, a close relative of P. vorax; the fungus Metschnikowia bicuspidate, a parasite of water flea Daphnia; the mycoparasitic fungi Piptocephalis cylindrospora, a parasite of Cokeromyces and Mucor; Caulochytrium protosteloides, a parasite of Sordaria; Rozella allomycis, a parasite of the water mold Allomyces; and the microalgae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here, we present the four components of our approach: pre-sequencing methods, sequence analysis for single cell genome assembly, sequence analysis of single cell transcriptomes, and genome annotation. This technology has the potential to uncover the complexity of single cell eukaryotes and their role in the environmental samples.

  16. Genome-wide association analysis of bacterial cold water disease resistance in rainbow trout reveals the potential of a hybrid approach between genomic selection and marker assisted selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genomic selection (GS) simultaneously incorporates dense SNP marker genotypes with phenotypic data from related animals to predict animal-specific genomic breeding value (GEBV), which circumvents the need to measure the disease phenotype in potential breeders. Marker assisted selection (MAS) involv...

  17. The 'morbid anatomy' of the human genome: tracing the observational and representational approaches of postwar genetics and biomedicine the William Bynum Prize Essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    This paper explores evolving conceptions and depictions of the human genome among human and medical geneticists during the postwar period. Historians of science and medicine have shown significant interest in the use of informational approaches in postwar genetics, which treat the genome as an expansive digital data set composed of three billion DNA nucleotides. Since the 1950s, however, geneticists have largely interacted with the human genome at the microscopically visible level of chromosomes. Mindful of this, I examine the observational and representational approaches of postwar human and medical genetics. During the 1970s and 1980s, the genome increasingly came to be understood as, at once, a discrete part of the human anatomy and a standardised scientific object. This paper explores the role of influential medical geneticists in recasting the human genome as being a visible, tangible, and legible entity, which was highly relevant to traditional medical thinking and practice. I demonstrate how the human genome was established as an object amenable to laboratory and clinical research, and argue that the observational and representational approaches of postwar medical genetics reflect, more broadly, the interdisciplinary efforts underlying the development of contemporary biomedicine.

  18. Integrated genomic approaches implicate osteoglycin (Ogn) in the regulation of left ventricular mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petretto, Enrico; Sarwar, Rizwan; Grieve, Ian; Lu, Han; Kumaran, Mande K; Muckett, Phillip J; Mangion, Jonathan; Schroen, Blanche; Benson, Matthew; Punjabi, Prakash P; Prasad, Sanjay K; Pennell, Dudley J; Kiesewetter, Chris; Tasheva, Elena S; Corpuz, Lolita M; Webb, Megan D; Conrad, Gary W; Kurtz, Theodore W; Kren, Vladimir; Fischer, Judith; Hubner, Norbert; Pinto, Yigal M; Pravenec, Michal; Aitman, Timothy J; Cook, Stuart A

    2009-01-01

    Left ventricular mass (LVM) and cardiac gene expression are complex traits regulated by factors both intrinsic and extrinsic to the heart. To dissect the major determinants of LVM, we combined expression quantitative trait locus1 and quantitative trait transcript2 (QTT) analyses of the cardiac transcriptome in the rat. Using these methods and in vitro functional assays, we identified osteoglycin (Ogn) as a major candidate regulator of rat LVM, with increased Ogn protein expression associated with elevated LVM. We also applied genome-wide QTT analysis to the human heart and observed that, out of ~22,000 transcripts, OGN transcript abundance had the highest correlation with LVM. We further confirmed a role for Ogn in the in vivo regulation of LVM in Ogn knockout mice. Taken together, these data implicate Ogn as a key regulator of LVM in rats, mice and humans, and suggest that Ogn modifies the hypertrophic response to extrinsic factors such as hypertension and aortic stenosis. PMID:18443592

  19. Perspective: NanoMine: A material genome approach for polymer nanocomposites analysis and design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, He; Li, Xiaolin; Zhang, Yichi; Schadler, Linda S.; Chen, Wei; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2016-05-01

    Polymer nanocomposites are a designer class of materials where nanoscale particles, functional chemistry, and polymer resin combine to provide materials with unprecedented combinations of physical properties. In this paper, we introduce NanoMine, a data-driven web-based platform for analysis and design of polymer nanocomposite systems under the material genome concept. This open data resource strives to curate experimental and computational data on nanocomposite processing, structure, and properties, as well as to provide analysis and modeling tools that leverage curated data for material property prediction and design. With a continuously expanding dataset and toolkit, NanoMine encourages community feedback and input to construct a sustainable infrastructure that benefits nanocomposite material research and development.

  20. A genome-based identification approach for members of the genus Bifidobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrario, Chiara; Milani, Christian; Mancabelli, Leonardo; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Turroni, Francesca; Duranti, Sabrina; Mangifesta, Marta; Viappiani, Alice; Sinderen, Douwe van; Ventura, Marco

    2015-03-01

    During recent years, the significant and increasing interest in novel bifidobacterial strains with health-promoting characteristics has catalyzed the development of methods for efficient and reliable identification of Bifidobacterium strains at (sub) species level. We developed an assay based on recently acquired bifidobacterial genomic data and involving 98 primer pairs, called the Bifidobacterium-ampliseq panel. This panel includes multiplex PCR primers that target both core and variable genes of the pangenome of this genus. Our results demonstrate that the employment of the Bifidobacterium-ampliseq panel allows rapid and specific identification of the so far recognized 48 (sub)species harboring the Bifidobacterium genus, and thus represents a cost- and time-effective bifidobacterial screening methodology.

  1. Genome-wide approaches to identify pharmacogenetic contributions to adverse drug reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M R; Bacanu, S-A; Mosteller, M; Li, L; Bowman, C E; Roses, A D; Lai, E H; Ehm, M G

    2009-02-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) have a major impact on patients, physicians, health care providers, regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical companies. Identifying the genetic contributions to ADR risk may lead to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms, identification of patients at risk and a decrease in the number of events. Technological advances have made the routine monitoring and investigation of the genetic basis of ADRs during clinical trials possible. We demonstrate through simulation that genome-wide genotyping, coupled with the use of clinically matched or population controls, can yield sufficient statistical power to permit the identification of strong genetic predictors of ADR risk in a prospective manner with modest numbers of ADR cases. The results of a 500,000 single nucleotide polymorphism analysis of abacavir-associated hypersensitivity reaction suggest that the known HLA-B gene region could be identified with as few as 15 cases and 200 population controls in a sequential analysis.

  2. Development of bioleaching: proteomics and genomics approach in metals extraction process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Azizur Rahman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Microbes are key components of the structure and function of bioleaching process. Increasing consciousness of the role of microbes has led to a quick growth of descriptive and investigational studies of their abundance and activities. However, the detail information of complex functional molecules contain in promising microbes which are very important for understanding microbial processes in bioleaching, are lacking. Therefore, molecular functions of microbes in the bioleaching process are very essential to understand about the microbial activities, especially in the process of the extraction of metals in mineral industries. In this review, the current state of proteomics and genomics of bioleaching in metals extraction processes and the major developments of these analytical methods at industrial scales are highlighted.

  3. A strategic stakeholder approach for addressing further analysis requests in whole genome sequencing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornock, Bradley Steven O

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing (WGS) can be a cost-effective and efficient means of diagnosis for some children, but it also raises a number of ethical concerns. One such concern is how researchers derive and communicate results from WGS, including future requests for further analysis of stored sequences. The purpose of this paper is to think about what is at stake, and for whom, in any solution that is developed to deal with such requests. To accomplish this task, this paper will utilize stakeholder theory, a common method used in business ethics. Several scenarios that connect stakeholder concerns and WGS will also posited and analyzed. This paper concludes by developing criteria composed of a series of questions that researchers can answer in order to more effectively address requests for further analysis of stored sequences.

  4. PPARalpha siRNA-treated expression profiles uncover the causal sufficiency network for compound-induced liver hypertrophy.

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    Xudong Dai

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Uncovering pathways underlying drug-induced toxicity is a fundamental objective in the field of toxicogenomics. Developing mechanism-based toxicity biomarkers requires the identification of such novel pathways and the order of their sufficiency in causing a phenotypic response. Genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi phenotypic screening has emerged as an effective tool in unveiling the genes essential for specific cellular functions and biological activities. However, eliciting the relative contribution of and sufficiency relationships among the genes identified remains challenging. In the rodent, the most widely used animal model in preclinical studies, it is unrealistic to exhaustively examine all potential interactions by RNAi screening. Application of existing computational approaches to infer regulatory networks with biological outcomes in the rodent is limited by the requirements for a large number of targeted permutations. Therefore, we developed a two-step relay method that requires only one targeted perturbation for genome-wide de novo pathway discovery. Using expression profiles in response to small interfering RNAs (siRNAs against the gene for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (Ppara, our method unveiled the potential causal sufficiency order network for liver hypertrophy in the rodent. The validity of the inferred 16 causal transcripts or 15 known genes for PPARalpha-induced liver hypertrophy is supported by their ability to predict non-PPARalpha-induced liver hypertrophy with 84% sensitivity and 76% specificity. Simulation shows that the probability of achieving such predictive accuracy without the inferred causal relationship is exceedingly small (p < 0.005. Five of the most sufficient causal genes have been previously disrupted in mouse models; the resulting phenotypic changes in the liver support the inferred causal roles in liver hypertrophy. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of defining pathways mediating drug

  5. Identification of a strawberry flavor gene candidate using an integrated genetic-genomic-analytical chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Alan H; Pillet, Jeremy; Plotto, Anne; Bai, Jinhe; Whitaker, Vance M; Folta, Kevin M

    2014-04-17

    There is interest in improving the flavor of commercial strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) varieties. Fruit flavor is shaped by combinations of sugars, acids and volatile compounds. Many efforts seek to use genomics-based strategies to identify genes controlling flavor, and then designing durable molecular markers to follow these genes in breeding populations. In this report, fruit from two cultivars, varying for presence-absence of volatile compounds, along with segregating progeny, were analyzed using GC/MS and RNAseq. Expression data were bulked in silico according to presence/absence of a given volatile compound, in this case γ-decalactone, a compound conferring a peach flavor note to fruits. Computationally sorting reads in segregating progeny based on γ-decalactone presence eliminated transcripts not directly relevant to the volatile, revealing transcripts possibly imparting quantitative contributions. One candidate encodes an omega-6 fatty acid desaturase, an enzyme known to participate in lactone production in fungi, noted here as FaFAD1. This candidate was induced by ripening, was detected in certain harvests, and correlated with γ-decalactone presence. The FaFAD1 gene is present in every genotype where γ-decalactone has been detected, and it was invariably missing in non-producers. A functional, PCR-based molecular marker was developed that cosegregates with the phenotype in F1 and BC1 populations, as well as in many other cultivars and wild Fragaria accessions. Genetic, genomic and analytical chemistry techniques were combined to identify FaFAD1, a gene likely controlling a key flavor volatile in strawberry. The same data may now be re-sorted based on presence/absence of any other volatile to identify other flavor-affecting candidates, leading to rapid generation of gene-specific markers.

  6. A New Approach to Predict Microbial Community Assembly and Function Using a Stochastic, Genome-Enabled Modeling Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, E.; Brodie, E.; Anantharaman, K.; Karaoz, U.; Bouskill, N.; Banfield, J. F.; Steefel, C. I.; Molins, S.

    2016-12-01

    Characterizing and predicting the microbial and chemical compositions of subsurface aquatic systems necessitates an understanding of the metabolism and physiology of organisms that are often uncultured or studied under conditions not relevant for one's environment of interest. Cultivation-independent approaches are therefore important and have greatly enhanced our ability to characterize functional microbial diversity. The capability to reconstruct genomes representing thousands of populations from microbial communities using metagenomic techniques provides a foundation for development of predictive models for community structure and function. Here, we discuss a genome-informed stochastic trait-based model incorporated into a reactive transport framework to represent the activities of coupled guilds of hypothetical microorganisms. Metabolic pathways for each microbe within a functional guild are parameterized from metagenomic data with a unique combination of traits governing organism fitness under dynamic environmental conditions. We simulate the thermodynamics of coupled electron donor and acceptor reactions to predict the energy available for cellular maintenance, respiration, biomass development, and enzyme production. While `omics analyses can now characterize the metabolic potential of microbial communities, it is functionally redundant as well as computationally prohibitive to explicitly include the thousands of recovered organisms into biogeochemical models. However, one can derive potential metabolic pathways from genomes along with trait-linkages to build probability distributions of traits. These distributions are used to assemble groups of microbes that couple one or more of these pathways. From the initial ensemble of microbes, only a subset will persist based on the interaction of their physiological and metabolic traits with environmental conditions, competing organisms, etc. Here, we analyze the predicted niches of these hypothetical microbes and

  7. Retroviral integration process in the human genome: is it really non-random? A new statistical approach.

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    Alessandro Ambrosi

    Full Text Available Retroviral vectors are widely used in gene therapy to introduce therapeutic genes into patients' cells, since, once delivered to the nucleus, the genes of interest are stably inserted (integrated into the target cell genome. There is now compelling evidence that integration of retroviral vectors follows non-random patterns in mammalian genome, with a preference for active genes and regulatory regions. In particular, Moloney Leukemia Virus (MLV-derived vectors show a tendency to integrate in the proximity of the transcription start site (TSS of genes, occasionally resulting in the deregulation of gene expression and, where proto-oncogenes are targeted, in tumor initiation. This has drawn the attention of the scientific community to the molecular determinants of the retroviral integration process as well as to statistical methods to evaluate the genome-wide distribution of integration sites. In recent approaches, the observed distribution of MLV integration distances (IDs from the TSS of the nearest gene is assumed to be non-random by empirical comparison with a random distribution generated by computational simulation procedures. To provide a statistical procedure to test the randomness of the retroviral insertion pattern, we propose a probability model (Beta distribution based on IDs between two consecutive genes. We apply the procedure to a set of 595 unique MLV insertion sites retrieved from human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. The statistical goodness of fit test shows the suitability of this distribution to the observed data. Our statistical analysis confirms the preference of MLV-based vectors to integrate in promoter-proximal regions.

  8. Uncovering the architecture of action semantics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Christine E; Buxbaum, Laurel J

    2014-10-01

    Despite research suggesting that stored sensorimotor information about tool use is a component of the semantic representations of tools, little is known about the action features or organizing principles that underlie this knowledge. We used methods similar to those applied in other semantic domains to examine the "architecture" of action semantic knowledge. In Experiment 1, participants sorted photographs of tools into groups according to the similarity of their associated "use" actions and rated tools on dimensions related to action. The results suggest that the magnitude of arm movement, configuration of the hand, and manner of motion during tool use play a role in determining how tools cluster in action "semantic space." In Experiment 2, we validated the architecture uncovered in Experiment 1 using an implicit semantic task for which tool use knowledge was not ostensibly relevant (blocked cyclic word-picture matching). Using stimuli from Experiment 1, we found that participants performed more poorly during blocks of trials containing tools used with similar versus unrelated actions, and the amount of semantic interference depended on the magnitude of action similarity among tools. Thus, the degree of featural overlap between tool use actions plays a role in determining the overall semantic similarity of tools.

  9. Improved genome-scale multi-target virtual screening via a novel collaborative filtering approach to cold-start problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hansaim; Gray, Paul; Xie, Lei; Poleksic, Aleksandar

    2016-12-01

    Conventional one-drug-one-gene approach has been of limited success in modern drug discovery. Polypharmacology, which focuses on searching for multi-targeted drugs to perturb disease-causing networks instead of designing selective ligands to target individual proteins, has emerged as a new drug discovery paradigm. Although many methods for single-target virtual screening have been developed to improve the efficiency of drug discovery, few of these algorithms are designed for polypharmacology. Here, we present a novel theoretical framework and a corresponding algorithm for genome-scale multi-target virtual screening based on the one-class collaborative filtering technique. Our method overcomes the sparseness of the protein-chemical interaction data by means of interaction matrix weighting and dual regularization from both chemicals and proteins. While the statistical foundation behind our method is general enough to encompass genome-wide drug off-target prediction, the program is specifically tailored to find protein targets for new chemicals with little to no available interaction data. We extensively evaluate our method using a number of the most widely accepted gene-specific and cross-gene family benchmarks and demonstrate that our method outperforms other state-of-the-art algorithms for predicting the interaction of new chemicals with multiple proteins. Thus, the proposed algorithm may provide a powerful tool for multi-target drug design.

  10. swDMR: A Sliding Window Approach to Identify Differentially Methylated Regions Based on Whole Genome Bisulfite Sequencing.

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    Zhen Wang

    Full Text Available DNA methylation is a widespread epigenetic modification that plays an essential role in gene expression through transcriptional regulation and chromatin remodeling. The emergence of whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS represents an important milestone in the detection of DNA methylation. Characterization of differential methylated regions (DMRs is fundamental as well for further functional analysis. In this study, we present swDMR (http://sourceforge.net/projects/swDMR/ for the comprehensive analysis of DMRs from whole genome methylation profiles by a sliding window approach. It is an integrated tool designed for WGBS data, which not only implements accessible statistical methods to perform hypothesis test adapted to two or more samples without replicates, but false discovery rate was also controlled by multiple test correction. Downstream analysis tools were also provided, including cluster, annotation and visualization modules. In summary, based on WGBS data, swDMR can produce abundant information of differential methylated regions. As a convenient and flexible tool, we believe swDMR will bring us closer to unveil the potential functional regions involved in epigenetic regulation.

  11. Whole-genome sequencing of a laboratory-evolved yeast strain

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    Dunham Maitreya J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experimental evolution of microbial populations provides a unique opportunity to study evolutionary adaptation in response to controlled selective pressures. However, until recently it has been difficult to identify the precise genetic changes underlying adaptation at a genome-wide scale. New DNA sequencing technologies now allow the genome of parental and evolved strains of microorganisms to be rapidly determined. Results We sequenced >93.5% of the genome of a laboratory-evolved strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its ancestor at >28× depth. Both single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number amplifications were found, with specific gains over array-based methodologies previously used to analyze these genomes. Applying a segmentation algorithm to quantify structural changes, we determined the approximate genomic boundaries of a 5× gene amplification. These boundaries guided the recovery of breakpoint sequences, which provide insights into the nature of a complex genomic rearrangement. Conclusions This study suggests that whole-genome sequencing can provide a rapid approach to uncover the genetic basis of evolutionary adaptations, with further applications in the study of laboratory selections and mutagenesis screens. In addition, we show how single-end, short read sequencing data can provide detailed information about structural rearrangements, and generate predictions about the genomic features and processes that underlie genome plasticity.

  12. A new approach for cloning hLIF cDNA from genomic DNA isolated from the oral mucous membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y H; Zhu, G Q; Chen, Q J; Wang, Y F; Yang, M M; Song, Y X; Wang, J G; Cao, B Y

    2011-11-25

    Complementary DNA (cDNA) is valuable for investigating protein structure and function in the study of life science, but it is difficult to obtain by traditional reverse transcription. We employed a novel strategy to clone human leukemia inhibitory factor (hLIF) gene cDNA from genomic DNA, which was directly isolated from the mucous membrane of mouth. The hLIF sequence, which is 609 bp long and is composed of three exons, can be acquired within a few hours by amplifying each exon and splicing all of them using overlap-PCR. This new approach developed is simple, time- and cost-effective, without RNA preparation or cDNA synthesis, and is not limited to the specific tissues for a particular gene and the expression level of the gene.

  13. Integrated pathway-based approach identifies association between genomic regions at CTCF and CACNB2 and schizophrenia.

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    Dilafruz Juraeva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, an integrated hierarchical approach was applied to: (1 identify pathways associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia; (2 detect genes that may be potentially affected in these pathways since they contain an associated polymorphism; and (3 annotate the functional consequences of such single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the affected genes or their regulatory regions. The Global Test was applied to detect schizophrenia-associated pathways using discovery and replication datasets comprising 5,040 and 5,082 individuals of European ancestry, respectively. Information concerning functional gene-sets was retrieved from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, Gene Ontology, and the Molecular Signatures Database. Fourteen of the gene-sets or pathways identified in the discovery dataset were confirmed in the replication dataset. These include functional processes involved in transcriptional regulation and gene expression, synapse organization, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. For two genes, i.e. CTCF and CACNB2, evidence for association with schizophrenia was available (at the gene-level in both the discovery study and published data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia study. Furthermore, these genes mapped to four of the 14 presently identified pathways. Several of the SNPs assigned to CTCF and CACNB2 have potential functional consequences, and a gene in close proximity to CACNB2, i.e. ARL5B, was identified as a potential gene of interest. Application of the present hierarchical approach thus allowed: (1 identification of novel biological gene-sets or pathways with potential involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as replication of these findings in an independent cohort; (2 detection of genes of interest for future follow-up studies; and (3 the highlighting of novel genes in previously reported candidate regions for schizophrenia.

  14. A Bayesian Approach for Analysis of Whole-Genome Bisulphite Sequencing Data Identifies Disease-Associated Changes in DNA Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackham, Owen J L; Langley, Sarah R; Oates, Thomas; Vradi, Eleni; Harmston, Nathan; Srivastava, Prashant K; Behmoaras, Jacques; Dellaportas, Petros; Bottolo, Leonardo; Petretto, Enrico

    2017-02-17

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic modification involved in gene regulation whose contribution to disease susceptibility remains to be fully understood. Here, we present a novel Bayesian smoothing approach (called ABBA) to detect differentially methylated regions (DMRs) from whole-genome bisulphite sequencing (WGBS). We also show how this approach can be leveraged to identify disease-associated changes in DNA methylation, suggesting mechanisms through which these alterations might affect disease. From a data modeling perspective, ABBA has the distinctive feature of automatically adapting to different correlation structures in CpG methylation levels across the genome whilst taking into account the distance between CpG sites as a covariate. Our simulation study shows that ABBA has greater power to detect DMRs than existing methods, providing an accurate identification of DMRs in the large majority of simulated cases. To empirically demonstrate the method's efficacy in generating biological hypotheses, we performed WGBS of primary macrophages derived from an experimental rat system of glomerulonephritis and used ABBA to identify >1,000 disease-associated DMRs. Investigation of these DMRs revealed differential DNA methylation localized to a 600bp region in the promoter of the Ifitm3 gene. This was confirmed by ChIP-seq and RNA-seq analyses, showing differential transcription factor binding at the Ifitm3 promoter by JunD (an established determinant of glomerulonephritis) and a consistent change in Ifitm3 expression. Our ABBA analysis allowed us to propose a new role for Ifitm3 in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis via a mechanism involving promoter hypermethylation that is associated with Ifitm3 repression in the rat strain susceptible to glomerulonephritis.

  15. Genomic research with human samples. Points of view from scientists and research subjects about disclosure of results and risks of genomic research. Ethical and empirical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle Mansilla, José Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Biomedical researchers often now ask subjects to donate samples to be deposited in biobanks. This is not only of interest to researchers, patients and society as a whole can benefit from the improvements in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention that the advent of genomic medicine portends. However, there is a growing debate regarding the social and ethical implications of creating biobanks and using stored human tissue samples for genomic research. Our aim was to identify factors related to both scientists and patients' preferences regarding the sort of information to convey to subjects about the results of the study and the risks related to genomic research. The method used was a survey addressed to 204 scientists and 279 donors from the U.S. and Spain. In this sample, researchers had already published genomic epidemiology studies; and research subjects had actually volunteered to donate a human sample for genomic research. Concerning the results, patients supported more frequently than scientists their right to know individual results from future genomic research. These differences were statistically significant after adjusting by the opportunity to receive genetic research results from the research they had previously participated and their perception of risks regarding genetic information compared to other clinical data. A slight majority of researchers supported informing participants about individual genomic results only if the reliability and clinical validity of the information had been established. Men were more likely than women to believe that patients should be informed of research results even if these conditions were not met. Also among patients, almost half of them would always prefer to be informed about individual results from future genomic research. The three main factors associated to a higher support of a non-limited access to individual results were: being from the US, having previously been offered individual information and considering

  16. Hepatitis B virus infection in Latin America: A genomic medicine approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Sonia; Jose-Abrego, Alexis; Fierro, Nora Alma; Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Ojeda-Granados, Claudia; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Panduro, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause of severe chronic liver disease. This article provides a critical view of the importance of genomic medicine for the study of HBV infection and its clinical outcomes in Latin America. Three levels of evolutionary adaptation may correlate with the clinical outcomes of HBV infection. Infections in Latin America are predominantly of genotype H in Mexico and genotype F in Central and South America; these strains have historically circulated among the indigenous population. Both genotypes appear to be linked to a benign course of disease among the native and mestizo Mexicans and native South Americans. In contrast, genotypes F, A and D are common in acute and chronic infections among mestizos with Caucasian ancestry. Hepatocellular carcinoma is rare in Mexicans, but it has been associated with genotype F1b among Argentineans. This observation illustrates the significance of ascertaining the genetic and environmental factors involved in the development of HBV-related liver disease in Latin America, which contrast with those reported in other regions of the world. PMID:24966588

  17. α-amanitin resistance in Drosophila melanogaster: A genome-wide association approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Chelsea L.; Latuszek, Catrina E.; Vogel, Kara R.; Greenlund, Ian M.; Hobmeier, Rebecca E.; Ingram, Olivia K.; Dufek, Shannon R.; Pecore, Jared L.; Nip, Felicia R.; Johnson, Zachary J.; Ji, Xiaohui; Wei, Hairong; Gailing, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of mushroom toxin resistance in the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) fly lines, using genome-wide association studies (GWAS). While Drosophila melanogaster avoids mushrooms in nature, some lines are surprisingly resistant to α-amanitin—a toxin found solely in mushrooms. This resistance may represent a pre-adaptation, which might enable this species to invade the mushroom niche in the future. Although our previous microarray study had strongly suggested that pesticide-metabolizing detoxification genes confer α-amanitin resistance in a Taiwanese D. melanogaster line Ama-KTT, none of the traditional detoxification genes were among the top candidate genes resulting from the GWAS in the current study. Instead, we identified Megalin, Tequila, and widerborst as candidate genes underlying the α-amanitin resistance phenotype in the North American DGRP lines, all three of which are connected to the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) pathway. Both widerborst and Tequila are upstream regulators of TOR, and TOR is a key regulator of autophagy and Megalin-mediated endocytosis. We suggest that endocytosis and autophagy of α-amanitin, followed by lysosomal degradation of the toxin, is one of the mechanisms that confer α-amanitin resistance in the DGRP lines. PMID:28241077

  18. Hepatitis B virus infection in Latin America: a genomic medicine approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Sonia; Jose-Abrego, Alexis; Fierro, Nora Alma; Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Ojeda-Granados, Claudia; Martinez-Lopez, Erika; Panduro, Arturo

    2014-06-21

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is the leading cause of severe chronic liver disease. This article provides a critical view of the importance of genomic medicine for the study of HBV infection and its clinical outcomes in Latin America. Three levels of evolutionary adaptation may correlate with the clinical outcomes of HBV infection. Infections in Latin America are predominantly of genotype H in Mexico and genotype F in Central and South America; these strains have historically circulated among the indigenous population. Both genotypes appear to be linked to a benign course of disease among the native and mestizo Mexicans and native South Americans. In contrast, genotypes F, A and D are common in acute and chronic infections among mestizos with Caucasian ancestry. Hepatocellular carcinoma is rare in Mexicans, but it has been associated with genotype F1b among Argentineans. This observation illustrates the significance of ascertaining the genetic and environmental factors involved in the development of HBV-related liver disease in Latin America, which contrast with those reported in other regions of the world.

  19. Phenotypic consequences of polyploidy and genome size at the microevolutionary scale: a multivariate morphological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balao, Francisco; Herrera, Javier; Talavera, Salvador

    2011-10-01

    • Chromosomal duplications and increases in DNA amount have the potential to alter quantitative plant traits like flower number, plant stature or stomata size. This has been documented often across species, but information on whether such effects also occur within species (i.e. at the microevolutionary or population scale) is scarce. • We studied trait covariation associated with polyploidy and genome size (both monoploid and total) in 22 populations of Dianthus broteri s.l., a perennial herb with several cytotypes (2x, 4x, 6x and 12x) that do not coexist spatially. Principal component scores of organ size/number variations were assessed as correlates of polyploidy, and phylogenetic relatedness among populations was controlled using phylogenetic generalized least squares. • Polyploidy covaried with organ dimensions, causing multivariate characters to increase, remain unchanged, or decrease with DNA amount. Variations in monoploid DNA amount had detectable consequences on some phenotypic traits. According to the analyses, some traits would experience phenotypic selection, while others would not. • We show that polyploidy contributes to decouple variation among traits in D. broteri, and hypothesize that polyploids may experience an evolutionary advantage in this plant lineage, for example, if it helps to overcome the constraints imposed by trait integration.

  20. Gametic phase estimation over large genomic regions using an adaptive window approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Excoffier Laurent

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The authors present ELB, an easy to programme and computationally fast algorithm for inferring gametic phase in population samples of multilocus genotypes. Phase updates are made on the basis of a window of neighbouring loci, and the window size varies according to the local level of linkage disequilibrium. Thus, ELB is particularly well suited to problems involving many loci and/or relatively large genomic regions, including those with variable recombination rate. The authors have simulated population samples of single nucleotide polymorphism genotypes with varying levels of recombination and marker density, and find that ELB provides better local estimation of gametic phase than the PHASE or HTYPER programs, while its global accuracy is broadly similar. The relative improvement in local accuracy increases both with increasing recombination and with increasing marker density. Short tandem repeat (STR, or microsatellite simulation studies demonstrate ELB's superiority over PHASE both globally and locally. Missing data are handled by ELB; simulations show that phase recovery is virtually unaffected by up to 2 per cent of missing data, but that phase estimation is noticeably impaired beyond this amount. The authors also applied ELB to datasets obtained from random pairings of 42 human X chromosomes typed at 97 diallelic markers in a 200 kb low-recombination region. Once again, they found ELB to have consistently better local accuracy than PHASE or HTYPER, while its global accuracy was close to the best.

  1. Host influence in the genomic composition of flaviviruses: A multivariate approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, Diego; Fajardo, Alvaro; Sóñora, Martín; Delfraro, Adriana; Musto, Héctor

    2017-10-28

    Flaviviruses present substantial differences in their host range and transmissibility. We studied the evolution of base composition, dinucleotide biases, codon usage and amino acid frequencies in the genus Flavivirus within a phylogenetic framework by principal components analysis. There is a mutual interplay between the evolutionary history of flaviviruses and their respective vectors and/or hosts. Hosts associated to distinct phylogenetic groups may be driving flaviviruses at different pace and through various sequence landscapes, as can be seen for viruses associated with Aedes or Culex spp., although phylogenetic inertia cannot be ruled out. In some cases, viruses face even opposite forces. For instance, in tick-borne flaviviruses, while vertebrate hosts exert pressure to deplete their CpG, tick vectors drive them to exhibit GC-rich codons. Within a vertebrate environment, natural selection appears to be acting on the viral genome to overcome the immune system. On the other side, within an arthropod environment, mutational biases seem to be the dominant forces. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A genomic approach to study Down syndrome and cancer inverse comorbidity: Untangling the Chromosome 21

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    Jaume eForés-Martos

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS, one of the most common birth defects and the most widespread genetic cause of intellectual disabilities, is caused by extra genetic material on chromosome 21 (HSA21. The increased genomic dosage of trisomy 21 is thought to be responsible for the distinct DS phenotypes, including an increased risk of developing some types of childhood leukemia and germ cell tumors. Patients with DS, however, have a strikingly lower incidence of many other solid tumors. We hypothesized that the third copy of genes located in HSA21 may have an important role on the protective effect that DS patients show against most types of solid tumors. Focusing on Copy Number Variation (CNV array data, we have generated frequencies of deleted regions in HSA21 in four different tumor types from which DS patients have been reported to be protected. We describe three different regions of deletion pointing to a set of candidate genes that could explain the inverse comorbidity phenomenon between DS and solid tumors. In particular we found RCAN1 gene in Wilms tumors and the miR-99A, miR-125B2 and miR-LET7C in lung, breast and melanoma tumors as the main candidates for explaining the inverse comorbidity observed between solid tumors and DS.

  3. α-amanitin resistance in Drosophila melanogaster: A genome-wide association approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Chelsea L; Latuszek, Catrina E; Vogel, Kara R; Greenlund, Ian M; Hobmeier, Rebecca E; Ingram, Olivia K; Dufek, Shannon R; Pecore, Jared L; Nip, Felicia R; Johnson, Zachary J; Ji, Xiaohui; Wei, Hairong; Gailing, Oliver; Werner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the mechanisms of mushroom toxin resistance in the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP) fly lines, using genome-wide association studies (GWAS). While Drosophila melanogaster avoids mushrooms in nature, some lines are surprisingly resistant to α-amanitin-a toxin found solely in mushrooms. This resistance may represent a pre-adaptation, which might enable this species to invade the mushroom niche in the future. Although our previous microarray study had strongly suggested that pesticide-metabolizing detoxification genes confer α-amanitin resistance in a Taiwanese D. melanogaster line Ama-KTT, none of the traditional detoxification genes were among the top candidate genes resulting from the GWAS in the current study. Instead, we identified Megalin, Tequila, and widerborst as candidate genes underlying the α-amanitin resistance phenotype in the North American DGRP lines, all three of which are connected to the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) pathway. Both widerborst and Tequila are upstream regulators of TOR, and TOR is a key regulator of autophagy and Megalin-mediated endocytosis. We suggest that endocytosis and autophagy of α-amanitin, followed by lysosomal degradation of the toxin, is one of the mechanisms that confer α-amanitin resistance in the DGRP lines.

  4. An evolutionary and genomic approach to challenges and opportunities for eliminating aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Michael R; Rutledge, Grant A; Phung, Kevin H; Phillips, Mark A; Greer, Lee F; Mueller, Laurence D

    2014-01-01

    While solutions to major scientific and medical problems are never perfect or complete, it is still reasonable to delineate cases where both have been essentially solved. For example, Darwin's theory of natural selection provides a successful solution to the problem of biological adaptation, while the germ theory of infection solved the scientific problem of contagious disease. Likewise in the context of medicine, we have effectively solved the problem of contagious disease, reducing it to a minor cause of death and disability for almost everyone in countries with advanced medicine and adequate resources. Evolutionary biologists claim to have solved the scientific problem of aging: we explain it theoretically using Hamilton's forces of natural selection; in experimental evolution we readily manipulate the onset, rate, and eventual cessation of aging by manipulating these forces. In this article, we turn to the technological challenge of solving the medical problem of aging. While we feel that the broad outlines of such a solution are clear enough starting from the evolutionary solution to the scientific problem of aging, we do not claim that we can give a complete or exhaustive plan for medically solving the problem of aging. But we are confident that biology and medicine will effectively solve the problem of aging within the next 50 years, providing Hamiltonian lifestyle changes, tissue repair, and genomic technological opportunities are fully exploited in public health practices, in medical practice, and in medical research, respectively.

  5. An integrative genomic and epigenomic approach for the study of transcriptional regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E Figueroa

    Full Text Available The molecular heterogeneity of acute leukemias and other tumors constitutes a major obstacle towards understanding disease pathogenesis and developing new targeted-therapies. Aberrant gene regulation is a hallmark of cancer and plays a central role in determining tumor phenotype. We predicted that integration of different genome-wide epigenetic regulatory marks along with gene expression levels would provide greater power in capturing biological differences between leukemia subtypes. Gene expression, cytosine methylation and histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9 acetylation were measured using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays in primary human acute myeloid leukemia (AML and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL specimens. We found that DNA methylation and H3K9 acetylation distinguished these leukemias of distinct cell lineage, as expected, but that an integrative analysis combining the information from each platform revealed hundreds of additional differentially expressed genes that were missed by gene expression arrays alone. This integrated analysis also enhanced the detection and statistical significance of biological pathways dysregulated in AML and ALL. Integrative epigenomic studies are thus feasible using clinical samples and provide superior detection of aberrant transcriptional programming than single-platform microarray studies.

  6. Breeding approaches and genomics technologies to increase crop yield under low-temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Uday Chand; Bohra, Abhishek; Jha, Rintu

    2017-01-01

    Improved knowledge about plant cold stress tolerance offered by modern omics technologies will greatly inform future crop improvement strategies that aim to breed cultivars yielding substantially high under low-temperature conditions. Alarmingly rising temperature extremities present a substantial impediment to the projected target of 70% more food production by 2050. Low-temperature (LT) stress severely constrains crop production worldwide, thereby demanding an urgent yet sustainable solution. Considerable research progress has been achieved on this front. Here, we review the crucial cellular and metabolic alterations in plants that follow LT stress along with the signal transduction and the regulatory network describing the plant cold tolerance. The significance of plant genetic resources to expand the genetic base of breeding programmes with regard to cold tolerance is highlighted. Also, the genetic architecture of cold tolerance trait as elucidated by conventional QTL mapping and genome-wide association mapping is described. Further, global expression profiling techniques including RNA-Seq along with diverse omics platforms are briefly discussed to better understand the underlying mechanism and prioritize the candidate gene (s) for downstream applications. These latest additions to breeders' toolbox hold immense potential to support plant breeding schemes that seek development of LT-tolerant cultivars. High-yielding cultivars endowed with greater cold tolerance are urgently required to sustain the crop yield under conditions severely challenged by low-temperature.

  7. Uncovering Wolbachia diversity upon artificial host transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela I Schneider

    Full Text Available The common endosymbiotic Wolbachia bacteria influence arthropod hosts in multiple ways. They are mostly recognized for their manipulations of host reproduction, yet, more recent studies demonstrate that Wolbachia also impact host behavior, metabolic pathways and immunity. Besides their biological and evolutionary roles, Wolbachia are new potential biological control agents for pest and vector management. Importantly, Wolbachia-based control strategies require controlled symbiont transfer between host species and predictable outcomes of novel Wolbachia-host associations. Theoretically, this artificial horizontal transfer could inflict genetic changes within transferred Wolbachia populations. This could be facilitated through de novo mutations in the novel recipient host or changes of haplotype frequencies of polymorphic Wolbachia populations when transferred from donor to recipient hosts. Here we show that Wolbachia resident in the European cherry fruit fly, Rhagoletis cerasi, exhibit ancestral and cryptic sequence polymorphism in three symbiont genes, which are exposed upon microinjection into the new hosts Drosophila simulans and Ceratitis capitata. Our analyses of Wolbachia in microinjected D. simulans over 150 generations after microinjection uncovered infections with multiple Wolbachia strains in trans-infected lines that had previously been typed as single infections. This confirms the persistence of low-titer Wolbachia strains in microinjection experiments that had previously escaped standard detection techniques. Our study demonstrates that infections by multiple Wolbachia strains can shift in prevalence after artificial host transfer driven by either stochastic or selective processes. Trans-infection of Wolbachia can claim fitness costs in new hosts and we speculate that these costs may have driven the shifts of Wolbachia strains that we saw in our model system.

  8. Bioinformatical approaches to RNA structure prediction & Sequencing of an ancient human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgreen, Stinus

    Stinus Lindgreen has been working in two different fields during his Ph.D. The first part has been focused on computational approaches to predict the structure of non-coding RNA molecules at the base pairing level. This has resulted in the analysis of various measures of the base pairing potentia...

  9. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the still largely unknown sequential and three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated on the 30nm chromatin fiber level with Monte Carlo,

  10. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the still largely unknown sequential and three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated on the 30nm chromatin fiber level with Monte Carlo, Brownian Dyna

  11. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTo approach the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fiber was folded according to the M

  12. Approaching the Three-Dimensional Organization and Dynamics of the Human Genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTo approach by virtual microscopy the three-dimensional organization of the human cell nucleus, the structural-, scaling- and dynamic properties of interphase chromosomes and cell nuclei were simulated with Monte Carlo and Brownian Dynamics methods. The 30 nm chromatin fiber was fold

  13. A semantic web approach applied to integrative bioinformatics experimentation: a biological use case with genomics data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, L.J.G.; Roos, M.; Marshall, M.S.; van Driel, R.; Breit, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    The numerous public data resources make integrative bioinformatics experimentation increasingly important in life sciences research. However, it is severely hampered by the way the data and information are made available. The semantic web approach enhances data exchange and integration by providing

  14. POTENTIAL OF INDUCED METABOLIC BIOLUMINESCENCE IMAGING TO UNCOVER METABOLIC EFFECTS OF ANTI-ANGIOGENIC THERAPY IN TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano eIndraccolo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity at the genetic level has been illustrated by a multitude of studies on the genomics of cancer, but whether tumors can be heterogeneous at the metabolic level is an issue which has been less systematically investigated so far. A burning related question is whether the metabolic features of tumors can change either following natural tumor progression (i.e. in primary tumors versus metastasis or therapeutic interventions. In this regard, recent findings by independent teams indicate that anti-angiogenic drugs cause metabolic perturbations in tumors as well as metabolic adaptations associated with increased malignancy. Induced metabolic bioluminescence imaging (imBI is an imaging technique which enables detection of key metabolites associated with glycolysis, including lactate, glucose, pyruvate and ATP in tumor sections. Signals captured by imBI can be used to visualize the topographic distribution of these metabolites and quantify their absolute amount. ImBI can be very useful for metabolic classification of tumors as well as to track metabolic changes in the glycolytic pathway associated with certain therapies. Imaging of the metabolic changes induced by anti-angiogenic drugs in tumors by imBI or other emerging technologies is a valuable tool to uncover molecular sensors engaged by metabolic stress and offers an opportunity to understand how metabolism-based approaches could improve cancer therapy.

  15. Probing the pan-genome of Listeria monocytogenes: new insights into intraspecific niche expansion and genomic diversification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salzberg Steven L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial pathogens often show significant intraspecific variations in ecological fitness, host preference and pathogenic potential to cause infectious disease. The species of Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of human listeriosis, consists of at least three distinct genetic lineages. Two of these lineages predominantly cause human sporadic and epidemic infections, whereas the third lineage has never been implicated in human disease outbreaks despite its overall conservation of many known virulence factors. Results Here we compare the genomes of 26 L. monocytogenes strains representing the three lineages based on both in silico comparative genomic analysis and high-density, pan-genomic DNA array hybridizations. We uncover 86 genes and 8 small regulatory RNAs that likely make L. monocytogenes lineages differ in carbohydrate utilization and stress resistance during their residence in natural habitats and passage through the host gastrointestinal tract. We also identify 2,330 to 2,456 core genes that define this species along with an open pan-genome pool that contains more than 4,052 genes. Phylogenomic reconstructions based on 3,560 homologous groups allowed robust estimation of phylogenetic relatedness among L. monocytogenes strains. Conclusions Our pan-genome approach enables accurate co-analysis of DNA sequence and hybridization array data for both core gene estimation and phylogenomics. Application of our method to the pan-genome of L. monocytogenes sheds new insights into the intraspecific niche expansion and evolution of this important foodborne pathogen.

  16. Probing the pan-genome of Listeria monocytogenes: new insights into intraspecific niche expansion and genomic diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiangyu; Phillippy, Adam M; Li, Zengxin; Salzberg, Steven L; Zhang, Wei

    2010-09-16

    Bacterial pathogens often show significant intraspecific variations in ecological fitness, host preference and pathogenic potential to cause infectious disease. The species of Listeria monocytogenes, a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of human listeriosis, consists of at least three distinct genetic lineages. Two of these lineages predominantly cause human sporadic and epidemic infections, whereas the third lineage has never been implicated in human disease outbreaks despite its overall conservation of many known virulence factors. Here we compare the genomes of 26 L. monocytogenes strains representing the three lineages based on both in silico comparative genomic analysis and high-density, pan-genomic DNA array hybridizations. We uncover 86 genes and 8 small regulatory RNAs that likely make L. monocytogenes lineages differ in carbohydrate utilization and stress resistance during their residence in natural habitats and passage through the host gastrointestinal tract. We also identify 2,330 to 2,456 core genes that define this species along with an open pan-genome pool that contains more than 4,052 genes. Phylogenomic reconstructions based on 3,560 homologous groups allowed robust estimation of phylogenetic relatedness among L. monocytogenes strains. Our pan-genome approach enables accurate co-analysis of DNA sequence and hybridization array data for both core gene estimation and phylogenomics. Application of our method to the pan-genome of L. monocytogenes sheds new insights into the intraspecific niche expansion and evolution of this important foodborne pathogen.

  17. A genomic and transcriptomic approach to investigate the blue pigment phenotype in Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, Nadia Andrea; Carraro, Lisa; Martino, Maria Elena; Fondi, Marco; Fasolato, Luca; Miotto, Giovanni; Magro, Massimiliano; Vianello, Fabio; Cardazzo, Barbara

    2015-11-20

    Pseudomonas fluorescens is a well-known food spoiler, able to cause serious economic losses in the food industry due to its ability to produce many extracellular, and often thermostable, compounds. The most outstanding spoilage events involving P. fluorescens were blue discoloration of several food stuffs, mainly dairy products. The bacteria involved in such high-profile cases have been identified as belonging to a clearly distinct phylogenetic cluster of the P. fluorescens group. Although the blue pigment has recently been investigated in several studies, the biosynthetic pathway leading to the pigment formation, as well as its chemical nature, remain challenging and unsolved points. In the present paper, genomic and transcriptomic data of 4 P. fluorescens strains (2 blue-pigmenting strains and 2 non-pigmenting strains) were analyzed to evaluate the presence and the expression of blue strain-specific genes. In particular, the pangenome analysis showed the presence in the blue-pigmenting strains of two copies of genes involved in the tryptophan biosynthesis pathway (including trpABCDF). The global expression profiling of blue-pigmenting strains versus non-pigmenting strains showed a general up-regulation of genes involved in iron uptake and a down-regulation of genes involved in primary metabolism. Chromogenic reaction of the blue-pigmenting bacterial cells with Kovac's reagent indicated an indole-derivative as the precursor of the blue pigment. Finally, solubility tests and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis of the isolated pigment suggested that its molecular structure is very probably a hydrophobic indigo analog.

  18. Transcriptional control in embryonic Drosophila midline guidance assessed through a whole genome approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomancak Pavel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the development of the Drosophila central nervous system the process of midline crossing is orchestrated by a number of guidance receptors and ligands. Many key axon guidance molecules have been identified in both invertebrates and vertebrates, but the transcriptional regulation of growth cone guidance remains largely unknown. It is established that translational regulation plays a role in midline crossing, and there are indications that transcriptional regulation is also involved. To investigate this issue, we conducted a genome-wide study of transcription in Drosophila embryos using wild type and a number of well-characterized Drosophila guidance mutants and transgenics. We also analyzed a previously published microarray time course of Drosophila embryonic development with an axon guidance focus. Results Using hopach, a novel clustering method which is well suited to microarray data analysis, we identified groups of genes with similar expression patterns across guidance mutants and transgenics. We then systematically characterized the resulting clusters with respect to their relevance to axon guidance using two complementary controlled vocabularies: the Gene Ontology (GO and anatomical annotations of the Atlas of Pattern of Gene Expression (APoGE in situ hybridization database. The analysis indicates that regulation of gene expression does play a role in the process of axon guidance in Drosophila. We also find a strong link between axon guidance and hemocyte migration, a result that agrees with mounting evidence that axon guidance molecules are co-opted in vertebrate vascularization. Cell cyclin activity in the context of axon guidance is also suggested from our array data. RNA and protein expression patterns of cell cyclins in axon guidance mutants and transgenics support this possible link. Conclusion This study provides important insights into the regulation of axon guidance in vivo.

  19. Is gene activity in plant cells affected by UMTS-irradiation? A whole genome approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia C Engelmann

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Julia C Engelmann3,* Rosalia Deeken1,* Tobias Müller3, Günter Nimtz2, M Rob G Roelfsema1, Rainer Hedrich11Molecular Plant Physiology and Biophysics, Julius-von-Sachs Institute for Biosciences; 2Institute of Physics II, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Bioinformatics, Biocenter, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany; *These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Mobile phone technology makes use of radio frequency (RF electromagnetic fields transmitted through a dense network of base stations in Europe. Possible harmful effects of RF fields on humans and animals are discussed, but their effect on plants has received little attention. In search for physiological processes of plant cells sensitive to RF fields, cell suspension cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana were exposed for 24 h to a RF field protocol representing typical microwave exposition in an urban environment. mRNA of exposed cultures and controls was used to hybridize Affymetrix-ATH1 whole genome microarrays. Differential expression analysis revealed significant changes in transcription of 10 genes, but they did not exceed a fold change of 2.5. Besides that 3 of them are dark-inducible, their functions do not point to any known responses of plants to environmental stimuli. The changes in transcription of these genes were compared with published microarray datasets and revealed a weak similarity of the microwave to light treatment experiments. Considering the large changes described in published experiments, it is questionable if the small alterations caused by a 24 h continuous microwave exposure would have any impact on the growth and reproduction of whole plants.Keywords: suspension cultured plant cells, radio frequency electromagnetic fields, microarrays, Arabidopsis thaliana

  20. DNA Microarray as Part of a Genomic-Assisted Breeding Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincze, Éva; Bowra, Steve

    2010-01-01

    . tissue/pathway specific approaches using an example of focused microarray and how it follows predicted changes during grain development. We describe of an extension of the study to field grown material and conclude that such an approach is able to interpret differences in the gene expression profiles......In the struggle to achieve global food security, crop breeding retains an important role in crop production. A current trend is the diversification of the aims of crop production, to include an increased awareness of aspects and consequences of food quality. The added emphasis on food and feed...... and practical significances, fold changes, validation and possible additional regulatory mechanisms in gene expression. The subject of the fourth section is the applications of DNA microarrays to study of global gene expression during grain filling in monocot crops, especially barley. We compare large arrays vs...

  1. A metadata approach for clinical data management in translational genomics studies in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Jim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In molecular profiling studies of cancer patients, experimental and clinical data are combined in order to understand the clinical heterogeneity of the disease: clinical information for each subject needs to be linked to tumour samples, macromolecules extracted, and experimental results. This may involve the integration of clinical data sets from several different sources: these data sets may employ different data definitions and some may be incomplete. Methods In this work we employ semantic web techniques developed within the CancerGrid project, in particular the use of metadata elements and logic-based inference to annotate heterogeneous clinical information, integrate and query it. Results We show how this integration can be achieved automatically, following the declaration of appropriate metadata elements for each clinical data set; we demonstrate the practicality of this approach through application to experimental results and clinical data from five hospitals in the UK and Canada, undertaken as part of the METABRIC project (Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium. Conclusion We describe a metadata approach for managing similarities and differences in clinical datasets in a standardized way that uses Common Data Elements (CDEs. We apply and evaluate the approach by integrating the five different clinical datasets of METABRIC.

  2. Uncovering Special Nuclear Materials by Low-energy Nuclear Reaction Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    P. B. Rose; Erickson, A. S.; Mayer, M; J. Nattress; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-01-01

    Weapons-grade uranium and plutonium could be used as nuclear explosives with extreme destructive potential. The problem of their detection, especially in standard cargo containers during transit, has been described as “searching for a needle in a haystack” because of the inherently low rate of spontaneous emission of characteristic penetrating radiation and the ease of its shielding. Currently, the only practical approach for uncovering well-shielded special nuclear materials is by use of act...

  3. Developing an integrated proteo-genomic approach for the characterisation of biomarkers for the identification of Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Raju V; Ahmod, Nadia Z; Parker, Robert; Fang, Min; Shah, Haroun; Gharbia, Saheer

    2012-02-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax, an acute and often fatal disease in humans. Due to the high genomic relatedness within the Bacillus cereus group of species it is a challenge to identify B. anthracis consistently. Alternative strategies such as proteomics coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) provide a powerful approach for biomarker discovery. However, validating and evaluating these markers, particularly for genetically homogeneous species such as B. anthracis are challenging. The objective of this study is to develop a robust biomarker discovery and validation pipeline, using proteomic methodology combined with in silico and molecular approaches, to determine a biomarker list, using B. anthracis as a model. In this exploratory study we profiled the proteome of B. anthracis and genetically related species using GeLC-Liquid Chromatography MS/MS (GeLC-LC MS/MS), identifying peptides that could be used to detect B. anthracis. Peptides were filtered to remove low quality identifications. Using comparative bioinformatic approaches, matching and searching against genomic sequence data a shortlist of peptide biomarkers was determined and validated using DNA sequencing, against a panel of closely related strains, to determine marker specificity. Further validation was performed using MS quantitation methods to assess sensitivity and specificity. A biomarker discovery pipeline was successfully developed in this study, comprising four distinct stages: proteome profiling, comparative bioinformatic validation, DNA sequencing and MS validation. Using the pipeline, 5379 peptides specific for Bacillus species and 36 peptides specific for B. anthracis were identified and validated. The 36 peptides, representing 30 proteins were derived from over 15 different clusters of orthologous group categories, including proteins involved in transcription, energy production/conservation as well as multifunctional proteins. We demonstrated that the peptide biomarkers

  4. Utility of the pooling approach as applied to whole genome association scans with high-density Affymetrix microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Joanna

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report an attempt to extend the previously successful approach of combining SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays and DNA pooling (SNP-MaP employing high-density microarrays. Whereas earlier studies employed a range of Affymetrix SNP microarrays comprising from 10 K to 500 K SNPs, this most recent investigation used the 6.0 chip which displays 906,600 SNP probes and 946,000 probes for the interrogation of CNVs (copy number variations. The genotyping assay using the Affymetrix SNP 6.0 array is highly demanding on sample quality due to the small feature size, low redundancy, and lack of mismatch probes. Findings In the first study published so far using this microarray on pooled DNA, we found that pooled cheek swab DNA could not accurately predict real allele frequencies of the samples that comprised the pools. In contrast, the allele frequency estimates using blood DNA pools were reasonable, although inferior compared to those obtained with previously employed Affymetrix microarrays. However, it might be possible to improve performance by developing improved analysis methods. Conclusions Despite the decreasing costs of genome-wide individual genotyping, the pooling approach may have applications in very large-scale case-control association studies. In such cases, our study suggests that high-quality DNA preparations and lower density platforms should be preferred.

  5. Genome-Wide Locations of Potential Epimutations Associated with Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Disease Using a Sequential Machine Learning Prediction Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Muksitul Haque

    Full Text Available Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease and phenotypic variation involves germline transmitted epimutations. The primary epimutations identified involve altered differential DNA methylation regions (DMRs. Different environmental toxicants have been shown to promote exposure (i.e., toxicant specific signatures of germline epimutations. Analysis of genomic features associated with these epimutations identified low-density CpG regions (<3 CpG / 100bp termed CpG deserts and a number of unique DNA sequence motifs. The rat genome was annotated for these and additional relevant features. The objective of the current study was to use a machine learning computational approach to predict all potential epimutations in the genome. A number of previously identified sperm epimutations were used as training sets. A novel machine learning approach using a sequential combination of Active Learning and Imbalance Class Learner analysis was developed. The transgenerational sperm epimutation analysis identified approximately 50K individual sites with a 1 kb mean size and 3,233 regions that had a minimum of three adjacent sites with a mean size of 3.5 kb. A select number of the most relevant genomic features were identified with the low density CpG deserts being a critical genomic feature of the features selected. A similar independent analysis with transgenerational somatic cell epimutation training sets identified a smaller number of 1,503 regions of genome-wide predicted sites and differences in genomic feature contributions. The predicted genome-wide germline (sperm epimutations were found to be distinct from the predicted somatic cell epimutations. Validation of the genome-wide germline predicted sites used two recently identified transgenerational sperm epimutation signature sets from the pesticides dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT and methoxychlor (MXC exposure lineage F3 generation. Analysis of this positive validation

  6. Approaches to informed consent for hypothesis-testing and hypothesis-generating clinical genomics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facio Flavia M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Massively-parallel sequencing (MPS technologies create challenges for informed consent of research participants given the enormous scale of the data and the wide range of potential results. Discussion We propose that the consent process in these studies be based on whether they use MPS to test a hypothesis or to generate hypotheses. To demonstrate the differences in these approaches to informed consent, we describe the consent processes for two MPS studies. The purpose of our hypothesis-testing study is to elucidate the etiology of rare phenotypes using MPS. The purpose of our hypothesis-generating study is to test the feasibility of using MPS to generate clinical hypotheses, and to approach the return of results as an experimental manipulation. Issues to consider in both designs include: volume and nature of the potential results, primary versus secondary results, return of individual results, duty to warn, length of interaction, target population, and privacy and confidentiality. Summary The categorization of MPS studies as hypothesis-testing versus hypothesis-generating can help to clarify the issue of so-called incidental or secondary results for the consent process, and aid the communication of the research goals to study participants.

  7. An Integrated Genomic Approach for Rapid Delineation of Candidate Genes Regulating Agro-Morphological Traits in Chickpea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Maneesha S.; Bajaj, Deepak; Das, Shouvik; Kujur, Alice; Kumar, Vinod; Singh, Mohar; Bansal, Kailash C.; Tyagi, Akhilesh K.; Parida, Swarup K.

    2014-01-01

    The identification and fine mapping of robust quantitative trait loci (QTLs)/genes governing important agro-morphological traits in chickpea still lacks systematic efforts at a genome-wide scale involving wild Cicer accessions. In this context, an 834 simple sequence repeat and single-nucleotide polymorphism marker-based high-density genetic linkage map between cultivated and wild parental accessions (Cicer arietinum desi cv. ICC 4958 and Cicer reticulatum wild cv. ICC 17160) was constructed. This inter-specific genetic map comprising eight linkage groups spanned a map length of 949.4 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 1.14 cM. Eleven novel major genomic regions harbouring 15 robust QTLs (15.6–39.8% R2 at 4.2–15.7 logarithm of odds) associated with four agro-morphological traits (100-seed weight, pod and branch number/plant and plant hairiness) were identified and mapped on chickpea chromosomes. Most of these QTLs showed positive additive gene effects with effective allelic contribution from ICC 4958, particularly for increasing seed weight (SW) and pod and branch number. One robust SW-influencing major QTL region (qSW4.2) has been narrowed down by combining QTL mapping with high-resolution QTL region-specific association analysis, differential expression profiling and gene haplotype-based association/LD mapping. This enabled to delineate a strong SW-regulating ABI3VP1 transcription factor (TF) gene at trait-specific QTL interval and consequently identified favourable natural allelic variants and superior high seed weight-specific haplotypes in the upstream regulatory region of this gene showing increased transcript expression during seed development. The genes (TFs) harbouring diverse trait-regulating QTLs, once validated and fine-mapped by our developed rapid integrated genomic approach and through gene/QTL map-based cloning, can be utilized as potential candidates for marker-assisted genetic enhancement of chickpea. PMID:25335477

  8. A genomic approach to identify regulatory nodes in the transcriptional network of systemic acquired resistance in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Many biological processes are controlled by intricate networks of transcriptional regulators. With the development of microarray technology, transcriptional changes can be examined at the whole-genome level. However, such analysis often lacks information on the hierarchical relationship between components of a given system. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR is an inducible plant defense response involving a cascade of transcriptional events induced by salicylic acid through the transcription cofactor NPR1. To identify additional regulatory nodes in the SAR network, we performed microarray analysis on Arabidopsis plants expressing the NPR1-GR (glucocorticoid receptor fusion protein. Since nuclear translocation of NPR1-GR requires dexamethasone, we were able to control NPR1-dependent transcription and identify direct transcriptional targets of NPR1. We show that NPR1 directly upregulates the expression of eight WRKY transcription factor genes. This large family of 74 transcription factors has been implicated in various defense responses, but no specific WRKY factor has been placed in the SAR network. Identification of NPR1-regulated WRKY factors allowed us to perform in-depth genetic analysis on a small number of WRKY factors and test well-defined phenotypes of single and double mutants associated with NPR1. Among these WRKY factors we found both positive and negative regulators of SAR. This genomics-directed approach unambiguously positioned five WRKY factors in the complex transcriptional regulatory network of SAR. Our work not only discovered new transcription regulatory components in the signaling network of SAR but also demonstrated that functional studies of large gene families have to take into consideration sequence similarity as well as the expression patterns of the candidates.

  9. Contribution of genome-wide association studies to scientific research: a pragmatic approach to evaluate their impact.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito A G Ricigliano

    Full Text Available The factual value of genome-wide association studies (GWAS for the understanding of multifactorial diseases is a matter of intense debate. Practical consequences for the development of more effective therapies do not seem to be around the corner. Here we propose a pragmatic and objective evaluation of how much new biology is arising from these studies, with particular attention to the information that can help prioritize therapeutic targets. We chose multiple sclerosis (MS as a paradigm disease and assumed that, in pre-GWAS candidate-gene studies, the knowledge behind the choice of each gene reflected the understanding of the disease prior to the advent of GWAS. Importantly, this knowledge was based mainly on non-genetic, phenotypic grounds. We performed single-gene and pathway-oriented comparisons of old and new knowledge in MS by confronting an unbiased list of candidate genes in pre-GWAS association studies with those genes exceeding the genome-wide significance threshold in GWAS published from 2007 on. At the single gene level, the majority (94 out of 125 of GWAS-discovered variants had never been contemplated as plausible candidates in pre-GWAS association studies. The 31 genes that were present in both pre- and post-GWAS lists may be of particular interest in that they represent disease-associated variants whose pathogenetic relevance is supported at the phenotypic level (i.e. the phenotypic information that steered their selection as candidate genes in pre-GWAS association studies. As such they represent attractive therapeutic targets. Interestingly, our analysis shows that some of these variants are targets of pharmacologically active compounds, including drugs that are already registered for human use. Compared with the above single-gene analysis, at the pathway level GWAS results appear more coherent with previous knowledge, reinforcing some of the current views on MS pathogenesis and related therapeutic research. This study presents a

  10. IGESS: a statistical approach to integrating individual-level genotype data and summary statistics in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mingwei; Ming, Jingsi; Cai, Mingxuan; Liu, Jin; Yang, Can; Wan, Xiang; Xu, Zongben

    2017-09-15

    Results from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) suggest that a complex phenotype is often affected by many variants with small effects, known as 'polygenicity'. Tens of thousands of samples are often required to ensure statistical power of identifying these variants with small effects. However, it is often the case that a research group can only get approval for the access to individual-level genotype data with a limited sample size (e.g. a few hundreds or thousands). Meanwhile, summary statistics generated using single-variant-based analysis are becoming publicly available. The sample sizes associated with the summary statistics datasets are usually quite large. How to make the most efficient use of existing abundant data resources largely remains an open question. In this study, we propose a statistical approach, IGESS, to increasing statistical power of identifying risk variants and improving accuracy of risk prediction by i ntegrating individual level ge notype data and s ummary s tatistics. An efficient algorithm based on variational inference is developed to handle the genome-wide analysis. Through comprehensive simulation studies, we demonstrated the advantages of IGESS over the methods which take either individual-level data or summary statistics data as input. We applied IGESS to perform integrative analysis of Crohns Disease from WTCCC and summary statistics from other studies. IGESS was able to significantly increase the statistical power of identifying risk variants and improve the risk prediction accuracy from 63.2% ( ±0.4% ) to 69.4% ( ±0.1% ) using about 240 000 variants. The IGESS software is available at https://github.com/daviddaigithub/IGESS . zbxu@xjtu.edu.cn or xwan@comp.hkbu.edu.hk or eeyang@hkbu.edu.hk. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  11. Genomics-based Approach and Prognostic Stratification Significance of Gene Mutations in Intermediate-risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bian-Hong Wang; Yong-Hui Li; Li Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia (IR-AML),which accounts for a substantial number of AML cases,is highly heterogeneous.We systematically summarize the latest research progress on the significance ofgene mutations for prognostic stratification of IR-AML.Data Sources:We conducted a systemic search from the PubMed database up to October,2014 using various search terms and their combinations including IR-AML,gene mutations,mutational analysis,prognosis,risk stratification,next generation sequencing (NGS).Study Selection:Clinical or basic research articles on NGS and the prognosis of gene mutations in IR-AML were included.Results:The advent of the era of whole-genome sequencing has led to the discovery of an increasing number of molecular genetics aberrations that involved in leukemogenesis,and some of them have been used for prognostic risk stratification.Several studies have consistently identified that some gene mutations have prognostic relevance,however,there are still many controversies for some genes because of lacking sufficient evidence.In addition,tumor cells harbor hundreds of mutated genes and multiple mutations often coexist,therefore,single mutational analysis is not sufficient to make accurate prognostic predictions.The comprehensive analysis of multiple mutations based on sophisticated genomic technologies has raised increasing interest in recent years.Conclusions:NGS represents a pioneering and helpful approach to prognostic risk stratification of IR-AML patients.Further large-scale studies for comprehensive molecular analysis are needed to provide guidance and a theoretical basis for IR-AML prognostic stratification and clinical management.

  12. Losartan ameliorates dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa and uncovers new disease mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Alexander; Thriene, Kerstin; Mittapalli, Venugopal; Kern, Johannes S; Kiritsi, Dimitra; Dengjel, Jörn; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena

    2015-07-20

    Genetic loss of collagen VII causes recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB)-a severe skin fragility disorder associated with lifelong blistering and disabling progressive soft tissue fibrosis. Causative therapies for this complex disorder face major hurdles, and clinical implementation remains elusive. Here, we report an alternative evidence-based approach to ameliorate fibrosis and relieve symptoms in RDEB. Based on the findings that TGF-β activity is elevated in injured RDEB skin, we targeted TGF-β activity with losartan in a preclinical setting. Long-term treatment of RDEB mice efficiently reduced TGF-β signaling in chronically injured forepaws and halted fibrosis and subsequent fusion of the digits. In addition, proteomics analysis of losartan- vs. vehicle-treated RDEB skin uncovered changes in multiple proteins related to tissue inflammation. In line with this, losartan reduced inflammation and diminished TNF-α and IL-6 expression in injured forepaws. Collectively, the data argue that RDEB fibrosis is a consequence of a cascade encompassing tissue damage, TGF-β-mediated inflammation, and matrix remodeling. Inhibition of TGF-β activity limits these unwanted outcomes and thereby substantially ameliorates long-term symptoms.

  13. Challenging muscle homeostasis uncovers novel chaperone interactions in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frumkin, Anna; Dror, Shiran; Pokrzywa, Wojciech; Bar-Lavan, Yael; Karady, Ido; Hoppe, Thorsten; Ben-Zvi, Anat

    2014-01-01

    Proteome stability is central to cellular function and the lifespan of an organism. This is apparent in muscle cells, where incorrect folding and assembly of the sarcomere contributes to disease and aging. Apart from the myosin-assembly factor UNC-45, the complete network of chaperones involved in assembly and maintenance of muscle tissue is currently unknown. To identify additional factors required for sarcomere quality control, we performed genetic screens based on suppressed or synthetic motility defects in Caenorhabditis elegans. In addition to ethyl methyl sulfonate-based mutagenesis, we employed RNAi-mediated knockdown of candidate chaperones in unc-45 temperature-sensitive mutants and screened for impaired movement at permissive conditions. This approach confirmed the cooperation between UNC-45 and Hsp90. Moreover, the screens identified three novel co-chaperones, CeHop (STI-1), CeAha1 (C01G10.8) and Cep23 (ZC395.10), required for muscle integrity. The specific identification of Hsp90 and Hsp90 co-chaperones highlights the physiological role of Hsp90 in myosin folding. Our work thus provides a clear example of how a combination of mild perturbations to the proteostasis network can uncover specific quality control modules. PMID:25988162

  14. Uncovering Aberrant Mutant PKA Function with Flow Cytometric FRET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Rong Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Biology has been revolutionized by tools that allow the detection and characterization of protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET-based methods have become particularly attractive as they allow quantitative studies of PPIs within the convenient and relevant context of living cells. We describe here an approach that allows the rapid construction of live-cell FRET-based binding curves using a commercially available flow cytometer. We illustrate a simple method for absolutely calibrating the cytometer, validating our binding assay against the gold standard isothermal calorimetry (ITC, and using flow cytometric FRET to uncover the structural and functional effects of the Cushing-syndrome-causing mutation (L206R on PKA’s catalytic subunit. We discover that this mutation not only differentially affects PKAcat’s binding to its multiple partners but also impacts its rate of catalysis. These findings improve our mechanistic understanding of this disease-causing mutation, while illustrating the simplicity, general applicability, and power of flow cytometric FRET.

  15. Urban association rules: uncovering linked trips for shopping behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, Yuji; Hobin, Juan N Bautista; Ratti, Carlo; Blat, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we introduce the method of urban association rules and its uses for extracting frequently appearing combinations of stores that are visited together to characterize shoppers' behaviors. The Apriori algorithm is used to extract the association rules (i.e., if -> result) from customer transaction datasets in a market-basket analysis. An application to our large-scale and anonymized bank card transaction dataset enables us to output linked trips for shopping all over the city: the method enables us to predict the other shops most likely to be visited by a customer given a particular shop that was already visited as an input. In addition, our methodology can consider all transaction activities conducted by customers for a whole city in addition to the location of stores dispersed in the city. This approach enables us to uncover not only simple linked trips such as transition movements between stores but also the edge weight for each linked trip in the specific district. Thus, the proposed methodo...

  16. Identifying Loci for the Overlap between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder Using a Genome-Wide QTL Linkage Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijmeijer, Judith S.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Rommelse, Nanda N. J.; Altink, Marieke E.; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Banaschewski, Tobias; Buschgens, Cathelijne J. M.; Fliers, Ellen A.; Gill, Michael; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Poustka, Luise; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Franke, Barbara; Ebstein, Richard P.; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The genetic basis for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was addressed using a genome-wide linkage approach. Method: Participants of the International Multi-Center ADHD Genetics study comprising 1,143 probands with ADHD and 1,453 siblings were analyzed. The total and…

  17. Identifying Loci for the Overlap Between Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder Using a Genome-wide QTL Linkage Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, Judith S.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Rommelse, Nanda N. J.; Altink, Marieke E.; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Banaschewski, Tobias; Buschgens, Cathelijne J. M.; Fliers, Ellen A.; Gill, Michael; Minderaa, Ruud B.; Poustka, Luise; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Franke, Barbara; Ebstein, Richard P.; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Stephen. V.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.

    Objective: The genetic basis for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) symptoms in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was addressed using a genome-wide linkage approach. Method: Participants of the International Multi-Center ADHD Genetics study comprising 1,143 probands with ADHD

  18. NLM Grantee's "HealthMap" Helps Uncover Measles Vaccination Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... courtesy of NLM NLM Grantee's "HealthMap" Helps Uncover Measles Vaccination Gap Inadequate vaccine coverage is likely a driving force behind the ongoing Disneyland measles outbreak, according to calculations by a research team ...

  19. Macroscopic model for biological fixation and its uncover-ing idea in Chinese Mongolian traditional osteopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Namula; LI Xue-en; WANG Mei; HU Da-lai

    2009-01-01

    Splintage external fixation in Chinese Mongolian oste-opathy is a biological macroscopic model. In this model, the ideas of self-life "unity of mind and body" and vital natural "correspondence of nature and human" combine the physi-ological and psychological self-fixation with supplementary external fixation of fracture using small splints. This model implies macroscopic ideas of uncovering fixation and healing: structural stability integrating geometrical "dy-namic" stability with mechanical "dynamic" equilibrium and the stability of state integrating statics with dynamics, and osteoblasts with osteoclasts, and psychological stability in-tegrating closed and open systems of human and nature. These ideas indicate a trend of development in modem osteopathy.

  20. Characterization of the prohormone complement in cattle using genomic libraries and cleavage prediction approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Zas Sandra L

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropeptides are cell to cell signalling molecules that regulate many critical biological processes including development, growth and reproduction. These peptides result from the complex processing of prohormone proteins, making their characterization both challenging and resource demanding. In fact, only 42 neuropeptide genes have been empirically confirmed in cattle. Neuropeptide research using high-throughput technologies such as microarray and mass spectrometry require accurate annotation of prohormone genes and products. However, the annotation and associated prediction efforts, when based solely on sequence homology to species with known neuropeptides, can be problematic. Results Complementary bioinformatic resources were integrated in the first survey of the cattle neuropeptide complement. Functional neuropeptide characterization was based on gene expression profiles from microarray experiments. Once a gene is identified, knowledge of the enzymatic processing allows determination of the final products. Prohormone cleavage sites were predicted using several complementary cleavage prediction models and validated against known cleavage sites in cattle and other species. Our bioinformatics approach identified 92 cattle prohormone genes, with 84 of these supported by expressed sequence tags. Notable findings included an absence of evidence for a cattle relaxin 1 gene and evidence for a cattle galanin-like peptide pseudogene. The prohormone processing predictions are likely accurate as the mammalian proprotein convertase enzymes, except for proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9, were also identified. Microarray analysis revealed the differential expression of 21 prohormone genes in the liver associated with nutritional status and 8 prohormone genes in the placentome of embryos generated using different reproductive techniques. The neuropeptide cleavage prediction models had an exceptional performance, correctly

  1. Phenol-stacked carbon nanotubes: A new approach to genomic DNA isolation from plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Nazarian-Firouzabadi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of intact quality DNA from plant tissues, especially those rich in secondary metabolites, is often challenging. Literally, hundreds of different DNA isolation protocols from various plant species have been published over the last decades. Although many commercial DNA isolation kits are convenient and designed to be safe, their cost and availability cause limitations in small molecular labs in many developing countries. In nearly all protocols and DNA isolation kits, phenol and chloroform are used to precipitate various classes of impurities. However, phenol is partially soluble in water, resulting in the co-existence of proteins in upper (aqueous phases. This phenomenon results in the contamination of the nucleic acids and low quality DNA. Nanotechnology advances have helped many areas of molecular biology such as the development of new diagnosis and purification kits. In this study, for the first time, we report a different approach to isolate DNA from plants based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The results show that the phenol reagent stack on CNTs can effectively remove proteins, polysaccharides and other polyphenol constituents. The A260/A280nm absorbance ratios of isolated DNA samples were 1.9 and 1.8 for chamomile and opium plants, respectively, indicating the high purity of the isolated DNA. DNA yield was more than two times the standard Doyle and Doyle method. Furthermore, the isolated DNA proved amenable to PCR amplification, using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis.

  2. Contig-Layout-Authenticator (CLA): A Combinatorial Approach to Ordering and Scaffolding of Bacterial Contigs for Comparative Genomics and Molecular Epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Sabiha; Kumar, Narender; Lankapalli, Aditya K; Tiwari, Sumeet K; Baddam, Ramani; Ahmed, Niyaz

    2016-01-01

    A wide variety of genome sequencing platforms have emerged in the recent past. High-throughput platforms like Illumina and 454 are essentially adaptations of the shotgun approach generating millions of fragmented single or paired sequencing reads. To reconstruct whole genomes, the reads have to be assembled into contigs, which often require further downstream processing. The contigs can be directly ordered according to a reference, scaffolded based on paired read information, or assembled using a combination of the two approaches. While the reference-based approach appears to mask strain-specific information, scaffolding based on paired-end information suffers when repetitive elements longer than the size of the sequencing reads are present in the genome. Sequencing technologies that produce long reads can solve the problems associated with repetitive elements but are not necessarily easily available to researchers. The most common high-throughput technology currently used is the Illumina short read platform. To improve upon the shortcomings associated with the construction of draft genomes with Illumina paired-end sequencing, we developed Contig-Layout-Authenticator (CLA). The CLA pipeline can scaffold reference-sorted contigs based on paired reads, resulting in better assembled genomes. Moreover, CLA also hints at probable misassemblies and contaminations, for the users to cross-check before constructing the consensus draft. The CLA pipeline was designed and trained extensively on various bacterial genome datasets for the ordering and scaffolding of large repetitive contigs. The tool has been validated and compared favorably with other widely-used scaffolding and ordering tools using both simulated and real sequence datasets. CLA is a user friendly tool that requires a single command line input to generate ordered scaffolds.

  3. A systematic identification of multiple toxin-target interactions based on chemical, genomic and toxicological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei; Huang, Chao; Li, Yan; Duan, Jinyou; Wang, Yonghua; Yang, Ling

    2013-02-01

    Although the assessment of toxicity of various agents, -omics (genomic, proteomic, metabolomic, etc.) data has been accumulated largely, the acquirement of toxicity information of variety of molecules through experimental methods still remains a difficult task. Presently, a systems toxicology approach that integrates massive diverse chemical, genomic and toxicological information was developed for prediction of the toxin targets and their related networks. The procedures are: (1) by use of two powerful statistical methods, i.e., support vector machine (SVM) and random forest (RF), a systemic model for prediction of multiple toxin-target interactions using the extracted chemical and genomic features has been developed with its reliability and robustness estimated. And the qualitative classification of targets according to the phenotypic diseases has been taken into account to further uncover the biological meaning of the targets, as well as to validate the robustness of the in silico models. (2) Based on the predicted toxin-target interactions, a genome-scale toxin-target-disease network exampled by cardiovascular disease is generated. (3) A topological analysis of the network is carried out to identify those targets that are most susceptible in human to topical agents including the most critical toxins, as well as to uncover both the toxin-specific mechanisms and pathways. The methodologies presented herein for systems toxicology will make drug development, toxin environmental risk assessment more efficient, acceptable and cost-effective.

  4. Herbarium genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakker, Freek T.; Lei, Di; Yu, Jiaying

    2016-01-01

    Herbarium genomics is proving promising as next-generation sequencing approaches are well suited to deal with the usually fragmented nature of archival DNA. We show that routine assembly of partial plastome sequences from herbarium specimens is feasible, from total DNA extracts and with specimens...... up to 146 years old. We use genome skimming and an automated assembly pipeline, Iterative Organelle Genome Assembly, that assembles paired-end reads into a series of candidate assemblies, the best one of which is selected based on likelihood estimation. We used 93 specimens from 12 different...... correlation between plastome coverage and nuclear genome size (C value) in our samples, but the range of C values included is limited. Finally, we conclude that routine plastome sequencing from herbarium specimens is feasible and cost-effective (compared with Sanger sequencing or plastome...