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Sample records for genome-wide scan identifies

  1. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); I.M. Heid (Iris); J.C. Randall (Joshua); C. Lamina (Claudia); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); L. Qi (Lu); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); C.J. Willer (Cristen); B.M. Herrera (Blanca); A.U. Jackson (Anne); N. Lim (Noha); P. Scheet (Paul); N. Soranzo (Nicole); N. Amin (Najaf); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); J.C. Chambers (John); A. Drong (Alexander); J. Luan; H.N. Lyon (Helen); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); S. Sanna (Serena); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); H.Z. Jing; P. Almgren (Peter); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); A.J. Bennett (Amanda); R.N. Bergman (Richard); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); S. Bumpstead (Suzannah); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L. Cherkas (Lynn); P.S. Chines (Peter); L. Coin (Lachlan); C. Cooper (Charles); G. Crawford (Gabe); A. Doering (Angela); A. Dominiczak (Anna); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); S. Ebrahim (Shanil); P. Elliott (Paul); M.R. Erdos (Michael); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); G. Fischer (Guido); N.G. Forouhi (Nita); C. Gieger (Christian); H. Grallert (Harald); C.J. Groves (Christopher); S.M. Grundy (Scott); C. Guiducci (Candace); D. Hadley (David); A. Hamsten (Anders); A.S. Havulinna (Aki); A. Hofman (Albert); R. Holle (Rolf); J.W. Holloway (John); T. Illig (Thomas); B. Isomaa (Bo); L.C. Jacobs (Leonie); K. Jameson (Karen); P. Jousilahti (Pekka); F. Karpe (Fredrik); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); G.M. Lathrop (Mark); D.A. Lawlor (Debbie); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); T. Meitinger (Thomas); M.A. Morken (Mario); A.P. Morris (Andrew); P. Munroe (Patricia); N. Narisu (Narisu); A. Nordström (Anna); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); F. Payne (Felicity); J. Peden (John); I. Prokopenko (Inga); F. Renström (Frida); A. Ruokonen (Aimo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); M.S. Sandhu (Manjinder); L.J. Scott (Laura); A. Scuteri (Angelo); K. Silander (Kaisa); K. Song (Kijoung); X. Yuan (Xin); H.M. Stringham (Heather); A.J. Swift (Amy); T. Tuomi (Tiinamaija); M. Uda (Manuela); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); C. Wallace (Chris); G.B. Walters (Bragi); M.N. Weedon (Michael); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C. Zhang (Cuilin); M. Caulfield (Mark); F.S. Collins (Francis); G.D. Smith; I.N.M. Day (Ian); P.W. Franks (Paul); A.T. Hattersley (Andrew); F.B. Hu (Frank); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); A. Kong (Augustine); J.S. Kooner (Jaspal); M. Laakso (Markku); E. Lakatta (Edward); V. Mooser (Vincent); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); T.D. Spector (Timothy); D.P. Strachan (David); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); D. Waterworth (Dawn); M. Boehnke (Michael); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); L. Groop (Leif); D.J. Hunter (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); D. Schlessinger (David); H.E. Wichmann (Erich); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); I. Barroso (Inês); M.I. McCarthy (Mark)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractTo identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist-hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the

  2. Genome-wide association scan meta-analysis identifies three Loci influencing adiposity and fat distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia M Lindgren

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580 informative for adult waist circumference (WC and waist-hip ratio (WHR. We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9x10(-11 and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9x10(-9. A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6x10(-8. The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Scan Meta-Analysis Identifies Three Loci Influencing Adiposity and Fat Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lu; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Willer, Cristen J.; Herrera, Blanca M.; Jackson, Anne U.; Lim, Noha; Scheet, Paul; Soranzo, Nicole; Amin, Najaf; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Chambers, John C.; Drong, Alexander; Luan, Jian'an; Lyon, Helen N.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sanna, Serena; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zhao, Jing Hua; Almgren, Peter; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bennett, Amanda J.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cherkas, Lynn; Chines, Peter; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Cyrus; Crawford, Gabriel; Doering, Angela; Dominiczak, Anna; Doney, Alex S. F.; Ebrahim, Shah; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R.; Estrada, Karol; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Guido; Forouhi, Nita G.; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Groves, Christopher J.; Grundy, Scott; Guiducci, Candace; Hadley, David; Hamsten, Anders; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hofman, Albert; Holle, Rolf; Holloway, John W.; Illig, Thomas; Isomaa, Bo; Jacobs, Leonie C.; Jameson, Karen; Jousilahti, Pekka; Karpe, Fredrik; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana; Lathrop, G. Mark; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Meitinger, Thomas; Morken, Mario A.; Morris, Andrew P.; Munroe, Patricia; Narisu, Narisu; Nordström, Anna; Nordström, Peter; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Payne, Felicity; Peden, John F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Renström, Frida; Ruokonen, Aimo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Scott, Laura J.; Scuteri, Angelo; Silander, Kaisa; Song, Kijoung; Yuan, Xin; Stringham, Heather M.; Swift, Amy J.; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Uda, Manuela; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Wallace, Chris; Walters, G. Bragi; Weedon, Michael N.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Zhang, Cuilin; Zhang, Weihua; Caulfield, Mark J.; Collins, Francis S.; Davey Smith, George; Day, Ian N. M.; Franks, Paul W.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hu, Frank B.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kong, Augustine; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Laakso, Markku; Lakatta, Edward; Mooser, Vincent; Morris, Andrew D.; Peltonen, Leena; Samani, Nilesh J.; Spector, Timothy D.; Strachan, David P.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins for the PROCARDIS consortia, Hugh; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Boehnke, Michael; Deloukas, Panos; Groop, Leif; Hunter, David J.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schlessinger, David; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Frayling, Timothy M.; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Stefansson, Kari; Mohlke, Karen L.; Barroso, Inês; McCarthy for the GIANT consortium, Mark I.

    2009-01-01

    To identify genetic loci influencing central obesity and fat distribution, we performed a meta-analysis of 16 genome-wide association studies (GWAS, N = 38,580) informative for adult waist circumference (WC) and waist–hip ratio (WHR). We selected 26 SNPs for follow-up, for which the evidence of association with measures of central adiposity (WC and/or WHR) was strong and disproportionate to that for overall adiposity or height. Follow-up studies in a maximum of 70,689 individuals identified two loci strongly associated with measures of central adiposity; these map near TFAP2B (WC, P = 1.9×10−11) and MSRA (WC, P = 8.9×10−9). A third locus, near LYPLAL1, was associated with WHR in women only (P = 2.6×10−8). The variants near TFAP2B appear to influence central adiposity through an effect on overall obesity/fat-mass, whereas LYPLAL1 displays a strong female-only association with fat distribution. By focusing on anthropometric measures of central obesity and fat distribution, we have identified three loci implicated in the regulation of human adiposity. PMID:19557161

  4. Genome-wide copy number scan identifies disruption of PCDH11X in developmental dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Saldanha, Marita; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2013-12-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a complex heritable disorder with unexpected difficulty in learning to read and spell despite adequate intelligence, education, environment, and normal senses. We performed a whole genome copy number variations (CNV) scan on 11 dyslexic families consisting of 14 dyslexic subjects and 24 non dyslexic members using 1.8 million combined SNP and CNV markers. We found CNVs affecting protocadherin genes in six dyslexics from three families, while none among the non-dyslexic control members showed any CNV in protocadherins. We identified duplications in five cases and a deletion in one case in Xq21.3 region bearing PCDH11X. Unequal recombination between the X-transposed region (XTR) of Yp11.2 and the X chromosome might be causing these structural changes. PCDH11X, expressed in brain is implicated in cell-cell communication, verbal ability, cerebral asymmetry, and dendritic synaptic plasticity, may be regarded as a new candidate gene for dyslexia. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A genome-wide association scan in pig identifies novel regions associated with feed efficiency trait

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahana, Goutam; Kadlecová, Veronika; Hornshøj, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    and to study the genetic architecture of the trait. After quality control, a total of 30,847 SNPs that could be mapped to the 18 porcine autosomes (SSC) following the pig genome assembly 10.2, were used in the analyses. Deregressed estimated breeding value was used as the response variable. A total of 3......Feed conversion ratio (FCR) is an economically important trait in pigs and feed accounts for a significant proportion of the costs involved in pig production. In this study we used a high density SNP chip panel, Porcine SNP60 BeadChip, to identify association between FCR and SNP markers...

  6. Genome-Wide Scan Informed by Age-Related Disease Identifies Loci for Exceptional Human Longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Fortney

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We developed a new statistical framework to find genetic variants associated with extreme longevity. The method, informed GWAS (iGWAS, takes advantage of knowledge from large studies of age-related disease in order to narrow the search for SNPs associated with longevity. To gain support for our approach, we first show there is an overlap between loci involved in disease and loci associated with extreme longevity. These results indicate that several disease variants may be depleted in centenarians versus the general population. Next, we used iGWAS to harness information from 14 meta-analyses of disease and trait GWAS to identify longevity loci in two studies of long-lived humans. In a standard GWAS analysis, only one locus in these studies is significant (APOE/TOMM40 when controlling the false discovery rate (FDR at 10%. With iGWAS, we identify eight genetic loci to associate significantly with exceptional human longevity at FDR < 10%. We followed up the eight lead SNPs in independent cohorts, and found replication evidence of four loci and suggestive evidence for one more with exceptional longevity. The loci that replicated (FDR < 5% included APOE/TOMM40 (associated with Alzheimer's disease, CDKN2B/ANRIL (implicated in the regulation of cellular senescence, ABO (tags the O blood group, and SH2B3/ATXN2 (a signaling gene that extends lifespan in Drosophila and a gene involved in neurological disease. Our results implicate new loci in longevity and reveal a genetic overlap between longevity and age-related diseases and traits, including coronary artery disease and Alzheimer's disease. iGWAS provides a new analytical strategy for uncovering SNPs that influence extreme longevity, and can be applied more broadly to boost power in other studies of complex phenotypes.

  7. Genome-Wide Scan Informed by Age-Related Disease Identifies Loci for Exceptional Human Longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Kristen; Dobriban, Edgar; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Monti, Daniela; Mari, Daniela; Atzmon, Gil; Barzilai, Nir; Franceschi, Claudio; Owen, Art B; Kim, Stuart K

    2015-12-01

    We developed a new statistical framework to find genetic variants associated with extreme longevity. The method, informed GWAS (iGWAS), takes advantage of knowledge from large studies of age-related disease in order to narrow the search for SNPs associated with longevity. To gain support for our approach, we first show there is an overlap between loci involved in disease and loci associated with extreme longevity. These results indicate that several disease variants may be depleted in centenarians versus the general population. Next, we used iGWAS to harness information from 14 meta-analyses of disease and trait GWAS to identify longevity loci in two studies of long-lived humans. In a standard GWAS analysis, only one locus in these studies is significant (APOE/TOMM40) when controlling the false discovery rate (FDR) at 10%. With iGWAS, we identify eight genetic loci to associate significantly with exceptional human longevity at FDR Alzheimer's disease), CDKN2B/ANRIL (implicated in the regulation of cellular senescence), ABO (tags the O blood group), and SH2B3/ATXN2 (a signaling gene that extends lifespan in Drosophila and a gene involved in neurological disease). Our results implicate new loci in longevity and reveal a genetic overlap between longevity and age-related diseases and traits, including coronary artery disease and Alzheimer's disease. iGWAS provides a new analytical strategy for uncovering SNPs that influence extreme longevity, and can be applied more broadly to boost power in other studies of complex phenotypes.

  8. Genome-Wide Scan Informed by Age-Related Disease Identifies Loci for Exceptional Human Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortney, Kristen; Dobriban, Edgar; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Monti, Daniela; Mari, Daniela; Atzmon, Gil; Barzilai, Nir; Franceschi, Claudio; Owen, Art B.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new statistical framework to find genetic variants associated with extreme longevity. The method, informed GWAS (iGWAS), takes advantage of knowledge from large studies of age-related disease in order to narrow the search for SNPs associated with longevity. To gain support for our approach, we first show there is an overlap between loci involved in disease and loci associated with extreme longevity. These results indicate that several disease variants may be depleted in centenarians versus the general population. Next, we used iGWAS to harness information from 14 meta-analyses of disease and trait GWAS to identify longevity loci in two studies of long-lived humans. In a standard GWAS analysis, only one locus in these studies is significant (APOE/TOMM40) when controlling the false discovery rate (FDR) at 10%. With iGWAS, we identify eight genetic loci to associate significantly with exceptional human longevity at FDR Alzheimer’s disease), CDKN2B/ANRIL (implicated in the regulation of cellular senescence), ABO (tags the O blood group), and SH2B3/ATXN2 (a signaling gene that extends lifespan in Drosophila and a gene involved in neurological disease). Our results implicate new loci in longevity and reveal a genetic overlap between longevity and age-related diseases and traits, including coronary artery disease and Alzheimer’s disease. iGWAS provides a new analytical strategy for uncovering SNPs that influence extreme longevity, and can be applied more broadly to boost power in other studies of complex phenotypes. PMID:26677855

  9. A genome-wide "pleiotropy scan" does not identify new susceptibility loci for estrogen receptor negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Campa

    Full Text Available Approximately 15-30% of all breast cancer tumors are estrogen receptor negative (ER-. Compared with ER-positive (ER+ disease they have an earlier age at onset and worse prognosis. Despite the vast number of risk variants identified for numerous cancer types, only seven loci have been unambiguously identified for ER-negative breast cancer. With the aim of identifying new susceptibility SNPs for this disease we performed a pleiotropic genome-wide association study (GWAS. We selected 3079 SNPs associated with a human complex trait or disease at genome-wide significance level (P<5 × 10(-8 to perform a secondary analysis of an ER-negative GWAS from the National Cancer Institute's Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3, including 1998 cases and 2305 controls from prospective studies. We then tested the top ten associations (i.e. with the lowest P-values using three additional populations with a total sample size of 3509 ER+ cases, 2543 ER- cases and 7031 healthy controls. None of the 3079 selected variants in the BPC3 ER-GWAS were significant at the adjusted threshold. 186 variants were associated with ER- breast cancer risk at a conventional threshold of P<0.05, with P-values ranging from 0.049 to 2.3 × 10(-4. None of the variants reached statistical significance in the replication phase. In conclusion, this study did not identify any novel susceptibility loci for ER-breast cancer using a "pleiotropic approach".

  10. Family based genome-wide copy number scan identifies complex rearrangements at 17q21.31 in dyslexics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Saldanha, Marita; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2014-10-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a complex heritable disorder with unexpected difficulty in learning to read and spell despite adequate intelligence, education, environment, and normal senses. We performed genome-wide screening for copy number variations (CNVs) in 10 large Indian dyslexic families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Results revealed the complex genomic rearrangements due to one non-contiguous deletion and five contiguous micro duplications and micro deletions at 17q21.31 region in three dyslexic families. CNVs in this region harbor the genes KIAA1267, LRRC37A, ARL17A/B, NSFP1, and NSF. The CNVs in case 1 and case 2 at this locus were found to be in homozygous state and case 3 was a de novo CNV. These CNVs were found with at least one CNV having a common break and end points in the parents. This cluster of genes containing NSF is implicated in learning, cognition, and memory, though not formally associated with dyslexia. Molecular network analysis of these and other dyslexia related module genes suggests NSF and other genes to be associated with cellular/vesicular membrane fusion and synaptic transmission. Thus, we suggest that NSF in this cluster would be the nearest gene responsible for the learning disability phenotype. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Family-based genome-wide copy number scan identifies five new genes of dyslexia involved in dendritic spinal plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Saldanha, Marita; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2013-08-01

    Genome-wide screening for copy number variations (CNVs) in ten Indian dyslexic families revealed the presence of five de novo CNVs in regions harboring GABARAP, NEGR1, ACCN1, DCDC5, and one in already known candidate gene CNTNAP2. These genes are located on regions of chromosomes 17p13.1, 1p31.1, 17q11.21, 11p14.1 and 7q35, respectively, and are implicated in learning, cognition and memory processes through dendritic spinal plasticity, though not formally associated with dyslexia. Molecular network analysis of these and other dyslexia-related module genes suggests them to be associated with synaptic transmission, axon guidance and cell adhesion. Thus, we suggest that dyslexia may also be caused by neuronal disconnection in addition to the earlier view that it is due to neuronal migrational disorder.

  12. Genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs identifies candidate genes involved in T helper cells and macrophage signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    We conducted a genome-wide scan for visceral leishmaniasis in mixed-breed dogs from a highly endemic area in Brazil using 149,648 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers genotyped in 20 cases and 28 controls. Using a mixed model approach, we found two candidate loci on canine autosomes 1 and 2....

  13. Meta-analysis of genome-wide scans for human adult stature identifies novel Loci and associations with measures of skeletal frame size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Soranzo

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide (GW scans have identified several independent loci affecting human stature, but their contribution through the different skeletal components of height is still poorly understood. We carried out a genome-wide scan in 12,611 participants, followed by replication in an additional 7,187 individuals, and identified 17 genomic regions with GW-significant association with height. Of these, two are entirely novel (rs11809207 in CATSPER4, combined P-value = 6.1x10(-8 and rs910316 in TMED10, P-value = 1.4x10(-7 and two had previously been described with weak statistical support (rs10472828 in NPR3, P-value = 3x10(-7 and rs849141 in JAZF1, P-value = 3.2x10(-11. One locus (rs1182188 at GNA12 identifies the first height eQTL. We also assessed the contribution of height loci to the upper- (trunk and lower-body (hip axis and femur skeletal components of height. We find evidence for several loci associated with trunk length (including rs6570507 in GPR126, P-value = 4x10(-5 and rs6817306 in LCORL, P-value = 4x10(-4, hip axis length (including rs6830062 at LCORL, P-value = 4.8x10(-4 and rs4911494 at UQCC, P-value = 1.9x10(-4, and femur length (including rs710841 at PRKG2, P-value = 2.4x10(-5 and rs10946808 at HIST1H1D, P-value = 6.4x10(-6. Finally, we used conditional analyses to explore a possible differential contribution of the height loci to these different skeletal size measurements. In addition to validating four novel loci controlling adult stature, our study represents the first effort to assess the contribution of genetic loci to three skeletal components of height. Further statistical tests in larger numbers of individuals will be required to verify if the height loci affect height preferentially through these subcomponents of height.

  14. A genome-wide scan for preeclampsia in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lachmeijer, AMA; Arngrimsson, R; Bastiaans, EJ; Frigge, ML; Pals, G; Sigurdardottir, S; Stefansson, H; Palsson, B; Nicolae, D; Kong, A; Aarnoudse, JG; Gulcher, [No Value; Dekker, GA; ten Kate, LP; Stefansson, K

    2001-01-01

    Preeclampsia, hallmarked by de novo hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy, has a familial tendency. Recently, a large Icelandic genome-wide scan provided evidence for a maternal susceptibility locus for preeclampsia on chromosome 2p13 which was confirmed by a genome scan from Australia and New

  15. Genome-wide DNA methylation scan in major depressive disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarven Sabunciyan

    Full Text Available While genome-wide association studies are ongoing to identify sequence variation influencing susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD, epigenetic marks, such as DNA methylation, which can be influenced by environment, might also play a role. Here we present the first genome-wide DNA methylation (DNAm scan in MDD. We compared 39 postmortem frontal cortex MDD samples to 26 controls. DNA was hybridized to our Comprehensive High-throughput Arrays for Relative Methylation (CHARM platform, covering 3.5 million CpGs. CHARM identified 224 candidate regions with DNAm differences >10%. These regions are highly enriched for neuronal growth and development genes. Ten of 17 regions for which validation was attempted showed true DNAm differences; the greatest were in PRIMA1, with 12-15% increased DNAm in MDD (p = 0.0002-0.0003, and a concomitant decrease in gene expression. These results must be considered pilot data, however, as we could only test replication in a small number of additional brain samples (n = 16, which showed no significant difference in PRIMA1. Because PRIMA1 anchors acetylcholinesterase in neuronal membranes, decreased expression could result in decreased enzyme function and increased cholinergic transmission, consistent with a role in MDD. We observed decreased immunoreactivity for acetylcholinesterase in MDD brain with increased PRIMA1 DNAm, non-significant at p = 0.08.While we cannot draw firm conclusions about PRIMA1 DNAm in MDD, the involvement of neuronal development genes across the set showing differential methylation suggests a role for epigenetics in the illness. Further studies using limbic system brain regions might shed additional light on this role.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Scan Identifies a Risk Locus for Preeclampsia on 2q14, Near the Inhibin, Beta B Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew P.; Brennecke, Shaun P.; East, Christine E.; Göring, Harald H. H.; Kent, Jack W.; Dyer, Thomas D.; Said, Joanne M.; Roten, Linda T.; Iversen, Ann-Charlotte; Abraham, Lawrence J.; Heinonen, Seppo; Kajantie, Eero; Kere, Juha; Kivinen, Katja; Pouta, Anneli; Laivuori, Hannele; Austgulen, Rigmor; Blangero, John; Moses, Eric K.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic architecture of preeclampsia is a major goal in obstetric medicine. We have performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for preeclampsia in unrelated Australian individuals of Caucasian ancestry using the Illumina OmniExpress-12 BeadChip to successfully genotype 648,175 SNPs in 538 preeclampsia cases and 540 normal pregnancy controls. Two SNP associations (rs7579169, p = 3.58×10−7, OR = 1.57; rs12711941, p = 4.26×10−7, OR = 1.56) satisfied our genome-wide significance threshold (modified Bonferroni p0.92). We attempted to provide evidence of a putative regulatory role for these SNPs using bioinformatic analyses and found that they all reside within regions of low sequence conservation and/or low complexity, suggesting functional importance is low. We also explored the mRNA expression in decidua of genes ±500 kb of INHBB and found a nominally significant correlation between a transcript encoded by the EPB41L5 gene, ∼250 kb centromeric to INHBB, and preeclampsia (p = 0.03). We were unable to replicate the associations shown by the significant GWAS SNPs in case-control cohorts from Norway and Finland, leading us to conclude that it is more likely that these SNPs are in LD with as yet unidentified causal variant(s). PMID:22432041

  17. Genome-wide linkage and association scans for pulse pressure in Chinese twins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Pang, Zengchang; Li, Shuxia

    2012-01-01

    report the results of our gene mapping studies conducted in the Chinese population in mainland China. The genome-wide linkage and association scans were carried out on 63 middle-aged dizygotic twin pairs using high-density markers. The linkage analysis identified three significant linkage peaks (all...

  18. Meta-analysis of genome-wide linkage scans of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Kaixin; Dempfle, Astrid; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Bakker, Steven C; Banaschewski, Tobias; Biederman, Joseph; Buitelaar, Jan; Castellanos, F Xavier; Doyle, Alysa; Ebstein, Richard P; Ekholm, Jenny; Forabosco, Paola; Franke, Barbara; Freitag, Christine; Friedel, Susann; Gill, Michael; Hebebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke; Jacob, Christian; Lesch, Klaus Peter; Loo, Sandra K; Lopera, Francisco; McCracken, James T; McGough, James J; Meyer, Jobst; Mick, Eric; Miranda, Ana; Muenke, Maximilian; Mulas, Fernando; Nelson, Stanley F; Nguyen, T Trang; Oades, Robert D; Ogdie, Matthew N; Palacio, Juan David; Pineda, David; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J; Roeyers, Herbert; Romanos, Marcel; Rothenberger, Aribert; Schäfer, Helmut; Sergeant, Joseph; Sinke, Richard J; Smalley, Susan L; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; van der Meulen, Emma; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Lewis, Cathryn M; Faraone, Stephen V; Asherson, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Genetic contribution to the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is well established. Seven independent genome-wide linkage scans have been performed to map loci that increase the risk for ADHD. Although significant linkage signals were identified in some of the studies,

  19. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Linkage Scans of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kaixin; Dempfle, Astrid; Arcos-Burgos, Mauricio; Bakker, Steven C.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Biederman, Joseph; Buitelaar, Jan; Castellanos, F.Xavier; Doyle, Alysa; Ebstein, Richard P.; Ekholm, Jenny; Forabosco, Paola; Franke, Barbara; Freitag, Christine; Friedel, Susann; Gill, Michael; Hebebrand, Johannes; Hinney, Anke; Jacob, Christian; Lesch, Klaus Peter; Loo, Sandra K.; Lopera, Francisco; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Meyer, Jobst; Mick, Eric; Miranda, Ana; Muenke, Maximilian; Mulas, Fernando; Nelson, Stanley F.; Nguyen, T.Trang; Oades, Robert D.; Ogdie, Matthew N.; Palacio, Juan David; Pineda, David; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Roeyers, Herbert; Romanos, Marcel; Rothenberger, Aribert; Schäfer, Helmut; Sergeant, Joseph; Sinke, Richard J.; Smalley, Susan L.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; van der Meulen, Emma; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Lewis, Cathryn M; Faraone, Stephen V.; Asherson, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Genetic contribution to the development of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is well established. Seven independent genome-wide linkage scans have been performed to map loci that increase the risk for ADHD. Although significant linkage signals were identified in some of the studies, there has been limited replications between the various independent datasets. The current study gathered the results from all seven of the ADHD linkage scans and performed a Genome Scan Meta Analysis (GSMA) to identify the genomic region with most consistent linkage evidence across the studies. Genome-wide significant linkage (PSR=0.00034, POR=0.04) was identified on chromosome 16 between 64 and 83 Mb. In addition there are nine other genomic regions from the GSMA showing nominal or suggestive evidence of linkage. All these linkage results may be informative and focus the search for novel ADHD susceptibility genes. PMID:18988193

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerhan, James R.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Vijai, Joseph; Ghesquières, Hervé; McKay, James; Wang, Sophia S.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Conde, Lucia; De Bakker, Paul I W; Nieters, Alexandra; Cox, David; Burdett, Laurie; Monnereau, Alain; Flowers, Christopher R.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Lan, Qing; Severi, Gianluca; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kane, Eleanor; Teras, Lauren R.; Purdue, Mark P.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Spinelli, John J.; Giles, Graham G.; Albanes, Demetrius; Kelly, Rachel S.; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Hutchinson, Amy; Zhi, Degui; Habermann, Thomas M.; Link, Brian K.; Novak, Anne J.; Dogan, Ahmet; Asmann, Yan W.; Liebow, Mark; Thompson, Carrie A.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Weiner, George J.; Veron, Amelie S.; Zelenika, Diana; Tilly, Hervé; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry Jo; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Glimelius, Bengt; Adami, Hans Olov; Bracci, Paige M.; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Tinker, Lesley F.; North, Kari E.; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Lightfoot, Tracy; Crouch, Simon; Smith, Alex; Roman, Eve; Diver, W. Ryan; Offit, Kenneth; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J.; Villano, Danylo J.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R.; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Southey, Melissa C.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Boeing, Heiner; Tjonneland, Anne; Angelucci, Emanuele; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Rais, Marco; Birmann, Brenda M.; Laden, Francine; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Ye, Yuanqing; Chiu, Brian C H; Sampson, Joshua; Liang, Liming; Park, Ju Hyun; Chung, Charles C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Slager, Susan L.; Wu, Xifeng; De Sanjose, Silvia; Smedby, Karin E.; Salles, Gilles; Skibola, Christine F.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma subtype and is clinically aggressive. To identify genetic susceptibility loci for DLBCL, we conducted a meta-analysis of 3 new genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and 1 previous scan, totaling 3,857 cases and 7,666 controls of

  1. Robustness of genome-wide scanning using archived dried blood spot samples as a DNA source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollegaard, Mads V; Grove, Jakob; Grauholm, Jonas; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Nørgaard, Mette; Benfield, Thomas L; Nørgaard-Pedersen, Bent; Mortensen, Preben B; Mors, Ole; Sørensen, Henrik T; Harboe, Zitta B; Børglum, Anders D; Demontis, Ditte; Ørntoft, Torben F; Bisgaard, Hans; Hougaard, David M

    2011-07-04

    The search to identify disease-susceptible genes requires access to biological material from numerous well-characterized subjects. Archived residual dried blood spot (DBS) samples, also known as Guthrie cards, from national newborn screening programs may provide a DNA source for entire populations. Combined with clinical information from medical registries, DBS samples could provide a rich source for productive research. However, the amounts of DNA which can be extracted from these precious samples are minute and may be prohibitive for numerous genotypings. Previously, we demonstrated that DBS DNA can be whole-genome amplified and used for reliable genetic analysis on different platforms, including genome-wide scanning arrays. However, it remains unclear whether this approach is workable on a large sample scale. We examined the robustness of using DBS samples for whole-genome amplification following genome-wide scanning, using arrays from Illumina and Affymetrix. This study is based on 4,641 DBS samples from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank, extracted for three separate genome-wide association studies. The amount of amplified DNA was significantly (P Biobank represent a reliable resource of DNA for whole-genome amplification and subsequent genome-wide association studies. With call-rates equivalent to high quality DNA samples, our results point to new opportunities for using the neonatal biobanks available worldwide in the hunt for genetic components of disease.

  2. Robustness of genome-wide scanning using archived dried blood spot samples as a DNA source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Børglum Anders D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search to identify disease-susceptible genes requires access to biological material from numerous well-characterized subjects. Archived residual dried blood spot (DBS samples, also known as Guthrie cards, from national newborn screening programs may provide a DNA source for entire populations. Combined with clinical information from medical registries, DBS samples could provide a rich source for productive research. However, the amounts of DNA which can be extracted from these precious samples are minute and may be prohibitive for numerous genotypings. Previously, we demonstrated that DBS DNA can be whole-genome amplified and used for reliable genetic analysis on different platforms, including genome-wide scanning arrays. However, it remains unclear whether this approach is workable on a large sample scale. We examined the robustness of using DBS samples for whole-genome amplification following genome-wide scanning, using arrays from Illumina and Affymetrix. Results This study is based on 4,641 DBS samples from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank, extracted for three separate genome-wide association studies. The amount of amplified DNA was significantly (P Conclusion Our study indicates that archived DBS samples from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank represent a reliable resource of DNA for whole-genome amplification and subsequent genome-wide association studies. With call-rates equivalent to high quality DNA samples, our results point to new opportunities for using the neonatal biobanks available worldwide in the hunt for genetic components of disease.

  3. Heritability and genome-wide linkage scan of subjective happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Meike; Saviouk, Viatcheslav; de Moor, Marleen H M; Willemsen, Gonneke; van Beijsterveldt, Toos C E M; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Geus, Eco J C; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2010-04-01

    Causes of individual differences in happiness, as assessed with the Subjective Happiness Scale, are investigated in a large of sample twins and siblings from the Netherlands Twin Register. Over 12,000 twins and siblings, average age 24.7 years (range 12 to 88), took part in the study. A genetic model with an age by sex design was fitted to the data with structural equation modeling in Mx. The heritability of happiness was estimated at 22% for males and 41% in females. No effect of age was observed. To identify the genomic regions contributing to this heritability, a genome-wide linkage study for happiness was conducted in sibling pairs. A subsample of 1157 offspring from 441 families was genotyped with an average of 371 micro-satellite markers per individual. Phenotype and genotype data were analyzed in MERLIN with multipoint variance component linkage analysis and age and sex as covariates. A linkage signal (logarithm of odds score 2.73, empirical p value 0.095) was obtained at the end of the long arm of chromosome 19 for marker D19S254 at 110 cM. A second suggestive linkage peak was found at the short arm of chromosome 1 (LOD of 2.37) at 153 cM, marker D1S534 (empirical p value of .209). These two regions of interest are not overlapping with the regions found for contrasting phenotypes (such as depression, which is negatively associated with happiness). Further linkage and future association studies are warranted.

  4. Genome wide association identifies novel loci involved in fungal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Guerrero, Javier; Hall, Charles R; Kowbel, David; Welch, Juliet; Taylor, John W; Brem, Rachel B; Glass, N Louise

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how genomes encode complex cellular and organismal behaviors has become the outstanding challenge of modern genetics. Unlike classical screening methods, analysis of genetic variation that occurs naturally in wild populations can enable rapid, genome-scale mapping of genotype to phenotype with a medium-throughput experimental design. Here we describe the results of the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) used to identify novel loci underlying trait variation in a microbial eukaryote, harnessing wild isolates of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. We genotyped each of a population of wild Louisiana strains at 1 million genetic loci genome-wide, and we used these genotypes to map genetic determinants of microbial communication. In N. crassa, germinated asexual spores (germlings) sense the presence of other germlings, grow toward them in a coordinated fashion, and fuse. We evaluated germlings of each strain for their ability to chemically sense, chemotropically seek, and undergo cell fusion, and we subjected these trait measurements to GWAS. This analysis identified one gene, NCU04379 (cse-1, encoding a homolog of a neuronal calcium sensor), at which inheritance was strongly associated with the efficiency of germling communication. Deletion of cse-1 significantly impaired germling communication and fusion, and two genes encoding predicted interaction partners of CSE1 were also required for the communication trait. Additionally, mining our association results for signaling and secretion genes with a potential role in germling communication, we validated six more previously unknown molecular players, including a secreted protease and two other genes whose deletion conferred a novel phenotype of increased communication and multi-germling fusion. Our results establish protein secretion as a linchpin of germling communication in N. crassa and shed light on the regulation of communication molecules in this fungus. Our study demonstrates the power

  5. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association scans identifies IL18RAP, PTPN2, TAGAP, and PUS10 as shared risk loci for Crohn's disease and celiac disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora A M Festen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Crohn's disease (CD and celiac disease (CelD are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases, involving genetic and environmental factors in their pathogenesis. The two diseases can co-occur within families, and studies suggest that CelD patients have a higher risk to develop CD than the general population. These observations suggest that CD and CelD may share common genetic risk loci. Two such shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, have already been identified independently in these two diseases. The aim of our study was to explicitly identify shared risk loci for these diseases by combining results from genome-wide association study (GWAS datasets of CD and CelD. Specifically, GWAS results from CelD (768 cases, 1,422 controls and CD (3,230 cases, 4,829 controls were combined in a meta-analysis. Nine independent regions had nominal association p-value <1.0 x 10⁻⁵ in this meta-analysis and showed evidence of association to the individual diseases in the original scans (p-value < 1 x 10⁻² in CelD and < 1 x 10⁻³ in CD. These include the two previously reported shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, with p-values of 3.37 x 10⁻⁸ and 6.39 x 10⁻⁹, respectively, in the meta-analysis. The other seven had not been reported as shared loci and thus were tested in additional CelD (3,149 cases and 4,714 controls and CD (1,835 cases and 1,669 controls cohorts. Two of these loci, TAGAP and PUS10, showed significant evidence of replication (Bonferroni corrected p-values <0.0071 in the combined CelD and CD replication cohorts and were firmly established as shared risk loci of genome-wide significance, with overall combined p-values of 1.55 x 10⁻¹⁰ and 1.38 x 10⁻¹¹ respectively. Through a meta-analysis of GWAS data from CD and CelD, we have identified four shared risk loci: PTPN2, IL18RAP, TAGAP, and PUS10. The combined analysis of the two datasets provided the power, lacking in the individual GWAS for single diseases, to detect shared loci with a

  6. A Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Scans Identifies IL18RAP, PTPN2, TAGAP, and PUS10 As Shared Risk Loci for Crohn's Disease and Celiac Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Gabrielle; Beauchamp, Claudine; Trynka, Gosia; Dubois, Patrick C.; Lagacé, Caroline; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Hommes, Daan W.; Barisani, Donatella; Palmieri, Orazio; Annese, Vito; van Heel, David A.; Weersma, Rinse K.; Daly, Mark J.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Rioux, John D.

    2011-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and celiac disease (CelD) are chronic intestinal inflammatory diseases, involving genetic and environmental factors in their pathogenesis. The two diseases can co-occur within families, and studies suggest that CelD patients have a higher risk to develop CD than the general population. These observations suggest that CD and CelD may share common genetic risk loci. Two such shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, have already been identified independently in these two diseases. The aim of our study was to explicitly identify shared risk loci for these diseases by combining results from genome-wide association study (GWAS) datasets of CD and CelD. Specifically, GWAS results from CelD (768 cases, 1,422 controls) and CD (3,230 cases, 4,829 controls) were combined in a meta-analysis. Nine independent regions had nominal association p-value <1.0×10−5 in this meta-analysis and showed evidence of association to the individual diseases in the original scans (p-value <1×10−2 in CelD and <1×10−3 in CD). These include the two previously reported shared loci, IL18RAP and PTPN2, with p-values of 3.37×10−8 and 6.39×10−9, respectively, in the meta-analysis. The other seven had not been reported as shared loci and thus were tested in additional CelD (3,149 cases and 4,714 controls) and CD (1,835 cases and 1,669 controls) cohorts. Two of these loci, TAGAP and PUS10, showed significant evidence of replication (Bonferroni corrected p-values <0.0071) in the combined CelD and CD replication cohorts and were firmly established as shared risk loci of genome-wide significance, with overall combined p-values of 1.55×10−10 and 1.38×10−11 respectively. Through a meta-analysis of GWAS data from CD and CelD, we have identified four shared risk loci: PTPN2, IL18RAP, TAGAP, and PUS10. The combined analysis of the two datasets provided the power, lacking in the individual GWAS for single diseases, to detect shared loci with a relatively small effect. PMID:21298027

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ripke, Stephan

    2011-10-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10(-11)) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10(-9)), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10(-8)) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10(-9)).

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripke, Stephan; Sanders, Alan R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Sklar, Pamela; Holmans, Peter A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Duan, Jubao; Ophoff, Roel A.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Scolnick, Edward; Cichon, Sven; Clair, David St.; Corvin, Aiden; Gurling, Hugh; Werge, Thomas; Rujescu, Dan; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Pato, Carlos N.; Malhotra, Anil K.; Purcell, Shaun; Dudbridge, Frank; Neale, Benjamin M.; Rossin, Lizzy; Visscher, Peter M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Fanous, Ayman; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Mowry, Bryan J.; Golimbet, Vera; De Hert, Marc; Jonsson, Erik G.; Bitter, Istvan; Pietilainen, Olli P. H.; Collier, David A.; Tosato, Sarah; Agartz, Ingrid; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amdur, Richard L.; Amin, Farooq; Bass, Nicholas; Bergen, Sarah E.; Black, Donald W.; Borglum, Anders D.; Brown, Matthew A.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Byerley, William F.; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Catts, Stanley V.; Choudhury, Khalid; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nicholas; Danoy, Patrick A.; Datta, Susmita; De Haan, Lieuwe; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donnelly, Peter; Donohoe, Gary; Duong, Linh; Dwyer, Sarah; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Glenthoj, Birte; Godard, Stephanie; Hamshere, Marian; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Hougaard, David M.; Hultman, Christina M.; Ingason, Andres; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jakobsen, Klaus D.; Jay, Maurice; Juergens, Gesche; Kahn, Renes; Keller, Matthew C.; Kenis, Gunter; Kenny, Elaine; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Konnerth, Heike; Konte, Bettina; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Lasseter, Virginia K.; Laurent, Claudine; Lawrence, Jacob; Lencz, Todd; Lerer, F. Bernard; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Linszen, Don H.; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Loughland, Carmel M.; Maclean, Alan W.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Malloy, Pat; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGrath, John J.; McIntosh, Andrew; McLean, Duncan E.; McQuillin, Andrew; Melle, Ingrid; Michie, Patricia T.; Milanova, Vihra; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Moskvina, Valentina; Muglia, Pierandrea; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nielsen, Jimmi; Nikolov, Ivan; Nordentoft, Merete; Norton, Nadine; Noethen, Markus M.; O'Dushlaine, Colm T.; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Orntoft, Torben F.; Owen, Michael J.; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George; Pato, Michele T.; Peltonen, Leena; Petursson, Hannes; Pickard, Ben; Pimm, Jonathan; Pulver, Ann E.; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby; Quinn, Emma M.; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Rethelyi, Janos M.; Ribble, Robert; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Ruggeri, Mirella; Schall, Ulrich; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scott, Rodney J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefansson, Kari; Strange, Amy; Strengman, Eric; Stroup, T. Scott; Suvisaari, Jaana; Terenius, Lars; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thygesen, Johan H.; Timm, Sally; Toncheva, Draga; van den Oord, Edwin; van Os, Jim; van Winkel, Ruud; Veldink, Jan; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, August G.; Wiersma, Durk; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Hywel J.; Williams, Nigel M.; Wormley, Brandon; Zammit, Stan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Daly, Mark J.; Gejman, Pablo V.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripke, Stephan; Sanders, Alan R; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2011-01-01

    in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10(-9)), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10(-8)) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10(-9)).......We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis...... an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism...

  10. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  11. Genome-wide linkage and association scans for pulse pressure in Chinese twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongfeng; Pang, Zengchang; Li, Shuxia; Jiang, Wenjie; Wang, Shaojie; Thomassen, Mads; Hjelmborg, Jacob V B; Kruse, Torben A; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten; Christensen, Kaare; Zhu, Gu; Tan, Qihua

    2012-11-01

    Elevated pulse pressure (PP) is associated with cardiovascular disorders and mortality in various populations. The genetic influence on PP has been confirmed by heritability estimates using related individuals. Recently, efforts have been made by mapping genes that are linked to the phenotype. We report the results of our gene mapping studies conducted in the Chinese population in mainland China. The genome-wide linkage and association scans were carried out on 63 middle-aged dizygotic twin pairs using high-density markers. The linkage analysis identified three significant linkage peaks (all with a single point Ppeaks closely overlapping with linkage peaks reported by two American studies. Multiple regions with suggestive linkages were identified, with many of the peaks overlapping with published linkage regions. The genome-wide association analysis detected a suggestive association on chromosome 4 (rs17031508, P<8.34e(-08)) located within a wide region of suggestive linkage. Our results provide some evidence for genetic linkages and associations with PP in the Chinese population. Further investigation is warranted to replicate the findings and to explore the susceptibility loci or genes for PP.

  12. Genome-wide linkage scan for athlete status in 700 British female DZ twin pairs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Moor, M.H.M.; Spector, T.D.; Cherkas, L.F.; Falchi, M.; Hottenga, J.J.; Boomsma, D.I.; de Geus, E.J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Association studies, comparing elite athletes with sedentary controls, have reported a number of genes that may be related to athlete status. The present study reports the first genome wide linkage scan for athlete status. Subjects were 4488 adult female twins from the TwinsUK Adult Twin Registry

  13. Genome-wide association analysis identifies new lung cancer susceptibility loci in never-smoking women in Asia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lan, Q.; Hsiung, C.A.; Matsuo, K.; Hong, Y.C.; Seow, A.; Wang, Z.; Hosgood, H.D.; Chen, K.; Wang, J.C.; Chatterjee, N.; Hu, W.; Wong, M.P.; Zheng, W.; Caporaso, N.; Park, J.Y.; Chen, C.J.; Kim, Y.H.; Kim, Y.T.; Landi, M.T.; Shen, H.; Lawrence, C.; Burdett, L.; Yeager, M.; Yuenger, J.; Jacobs, K.B.; Chang, I.S.; Mitsudomi, T.; Kim, H.N.; Chang, G.C.; Bassig, B.A.; Tucker, M.; Wei, F.; Yin, Y.; Wu, C.; An, S.J.; Qian, B.; Lee, V.H.; Lu, D.; Liu, J.; Jeon, H.S.; Hsiao, C.F.; Sung, J.S.; Kim, J.H.; Gao, Y.T.; Tsai, Y.H.; Jung, Y.J.; Guo, H.; Hu, Z.; Hutchinson, A.; Wang, W.C.; Klein, R.; Chung, C.C.; Oh, I.J.; Chen, K.Y.; Berndt, S.I.; He, X.; Wu, W.; Chang, J.; Zhang, X.C.; Huang, M.S.; Zheng, H.; Wang, J.; Zhao, X.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413577805; Li, Y.; Choi, J.E.; Su, W.C.; Park, K.H.; Sung, S.W.; Shu, X.O.; Chen, Y.M.; Liu, L.; Kang, C.H.; Hu, L.; Chen, C.H.; Pao, W.; Kim, Y.C.; Yang, T.Y.; Xu, J.; Guan, P.; Tan, W.; Su, J.; Wang, C.L.; Li, H.; Sihoe, A.D.; Zhao, Z.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304120995; Chen, Y.; Choi, Y.Y.; Hung, J.Y.; Kim, J.S.; Yoon, H.I.; Cai, Q.; Lin, C.C.; Park, I.K.; Xu, P.; Dong, J.; Kim, C.; He, Q; Perng, R.P.; Kohno, T.; Kweon, S.S.; Chen, C.Y.; Vermeulen, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Wu, J.; Lim, W.Y.; Chen, K.C.; Chow, W.H.; Ji, B.T.; Chan, J.K.; Chu, M.; Li, Y.J.; Yokota, J.; Li, J.; Chen, H.; Xiang, Y.B.; Yu, C.J.; Kunitoh, H.; Wu, G.; Jin, L.; Lo, Y.L.; Shiraishi, K.; Chen, Y.H.; Lin, H.C.; Wu, T.; WU, Y.; Yang, P.C.; Zhou, B.; Shin, M.H.; Fraumeni, J.F.; Lin, D.; Chanock, S.J.; Rothman, N.

    2012-01-01

    To identify common genetic variants that contribute to lung cancer susceptibility, we conducted a multistage genome-wide association study of lung cancer in Asian women who never smoked. We scanned 5,510 never-smoking female lung cancer cases and 4,544 controls drawn from 14 studies from mainland

  14. Genome-wide Linkage and Association Analyses to Identify Genes Influencing Adiponectin Levels: The GEMS Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hua; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Stirnadel, Heide A.; Pollin, Toni I.; Barter, Philip J.; Kesäniemi, Y. Antero; Mahley, Robert W.; McPherson, Ruth; Waeber, Gérard; Bersot, Thomas P.; Cohen, Jonathan C.; Grundy, Scott M.; Mooser, Vincent E.; Mitchell, Braxton D.

    2014-01-01

    Adiponectin has a variety of metabolic effects on obesity, insulin sensitivity, and atherosclerosis. To identify genes influencing variation in plasma adiponectin levels, we performed genome-wide linkage and association scans of adiponectin in two cohorts of subjects recruited in the Genetic Epidemiology of Metabolic Syndrome Study. The genome-wide linkage scan was conducted in families of Turkish and southern European (TSE, n = 789) and Northern and Western European (NWE, N = 2,280) origin. A whole genome association (WGA) analysis (500K Affymetrix platform) was carried out in a set of unrelated NWE subjects consisting of approximately 1,000 subjects with dyslipidemia and 1,000 overweight subjects with normal lipids. Peak evidence for linkage occurred at chromosome 8p23 in NWE subjects (lod = 3.10) and at chromosome 3q28 near ADIPOQ, the adiponectin structural gene, in TSE subjects (lod = 1.70). In the WGA analysis, the single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) most strongly associated with adiponectin were rs3774261 and rs6773957 (P < 10−7). These two SNPs were in high linkage disequilibrium (r2 = 0.98) and located within ADIPOQ. Interestingly, our fourth strongest region of association (P < 2 × 10−5) was to an SNP within CDH13, whose protein product is a newly identified receptor for high-molecular-weight species of adiponectin. Through WGA analysis, we confirmed previous studies showing SNPs within ADIPOQ to be strongly associated with variation in adiponectin levels and further observed these to have the strongest effects on adiponectin levels throughout the genome. We additionally identified a second gene (CDH13) possibly influencing variation in adiponectin levels. The impact of these SNPs on health and disease has yet to be determined. PMID:19165155

  15. A Genome-Wide Scan of DNA Methylation Markers for Distinguishing Monozygotic Twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qingqing; Zhu, Guijun; Fu, Guangping; Zhang, Xiaojing; Fu, Lihong; Li, Shujin; Cong, Bin

    2015-12-01

    Identification of individuals within pairs of monozygotic (MZ) twins remains unresolved using common forensic DNA typing technology. For some criminal cases involving MZ twins as suspects, the twins had to be released due to inability to identify which of the pair was the perpetrator. In this study, we performed a genome-wide scan on whole blood-derived DNA from four pairs of healthy phenotypically concordant MZ twins using the methylated DNA immunoprecipitation sequencing technology to identify candidate DNA methylation markers with capacity to distinguish MZ twins within a pair. We identified 38 differential methylation regions showing within-pair methylation differences in all four MZ pairs. These are all located in CpG islands, 17 of which are promoter-associated, 17 are intergenic islands, and four are intragenic islands. Genes associated with these markers are related with cell proliferation, differentiation, and growth and development, including zinc finger proteins, PRRX2, RBBP9, or are involved in G-protein signaling, such as the regulator of G-protein signaling 16. Further validation studies on additional MZ twins are now required to evaluate the broader utility of these 38 markers for forensic use.

  16. Genome-Wide Scan for Adaptive Divergence and Association with Population-Specific Covariates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautier, Mathieu

    2015-12-01

    In population genomics studies, accounting for the neutral covariance structure across population allele frequencies is critical to improve the robustness of genome-wide scan approaches. Elaborating on the BayEnv model, this study investigates several modeling extensions (i) to improve the estimation accuracy of the population covariance matrix and all the related measures, (ii) to identify significantly overly differentiated SNPs based on a calibration procedure of the XtX statistics, and (iii) to consider alternative covariate models for analyses of association with population-specific covariables. In particular, the auxiliary variable model allows one to deal with multiple testing issues and, providing the relative marker positions are available, to capture some linkage disequilibrium information. A comprehensive simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performances of these different models. Also, when compared in terms of power, robustness, and computational efficiency to five other state-of-the-art genome-scan methods (BayEnv2, BayScEnv, BayScan, flk, and lfmm), the proposed approaches proved highly effective. For illustration purposes, genotyping data on 18 French cattle breeds were analyzed, leading to the identification of 13 strong signatures of selection. Among these, four (surrounding the KITLG, KIT, EDN3, and ALB genes) contained SNPs strongly associated with the piebald coloration pattern while a fifth (surrounding PLAG1) could be associated to morphological differences across the populations. Finally, analysis of Pool-Seq data from 12 populations of Littorina saxatilis living in two different ecotypes illustrates how the proposed framework might help in addressing relevant ecological issues in nonmodel species. Overall, the proposed methods define a robust Bayesian framework to characterize adaptive genetic differentiation across populations. The BayPass program implementing the different models is available at http://www1.montpellier

  17. Genome-wide scans detect adaptation to aridity in a widespread forest tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steane, Dorothy A; Potts, Brad M; McLean, Elizabeth; Prober, Suzanne M; Stock, William D; Vaillancourt, René E; Byrne, Margaret

    2014-05-01

    Patterns of adaptive variation within plant species are best studied through common garden experiments, but these are costly and time-consuming, especially for trees that have long generation times. We explored whether genome-wide scanning technology combined with outlier marker detection could be used to detect adaptation to climate and provide an alternative to common garden experiments. As a case study, we sampled nine provenances of the widespread forest tree species, Eucalyptus tricarpa, across an aridity gradient in southeastern Australia. Using a Bayesian analysis, we identified a suite of 94 putatively adaptive (outlying) sequence-tagged markers across the genome. Population-level allele frequencies of these outlier markers were strongly correlated with temperature and moisture availability at the site of origin, and with population differences in functional traits measured in two common gardens. Using the output from a canonical analysis of principal coordinates, we devised a metric that provides a holistic measure of genomic adaptation to aridity that could be used to guide assisted migration or genetic augmentation. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies African-Specific Susceptibility Loci in African Americans with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Steven R.; Okou, David T.; Simpson, Claire L.; Cutler, David J.; Haritunians, Talin; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Chopra, Pankaj; Prince, Jarod; Begum, Ferdouse; Kumar, Archana; Huang, Chengrui; Venkateswaran, Suresh; Datta, Lisa W.; Wei, Zhi; Thomas, Kelly; Herrinton, Lisa J.; Klapproth, Jan-Micheal A.; Quiros, Antonio J.; Seminerio, Jenifer; Liu, Zhenqiu; Alexander, Jonathan S.; Baldassano, Robert N.; Dudley-Brown, Sharon; Cross, Raymond K.; Dassopoulos, Themistocles; Denson, Lee A.; Dhere, Tanvi A.; Dryden, Gerald W.; Hanson, John S.; Hou, Jason K.; Hussain, Sunny Z.; Hyams, Jeffrey S.; Isaacs, Kim L.; Kader, Howard; Kappelman, Michael D.; Katz, Jeffry; Kellermayer, Richard; Kirschner, Barbara S.; Kuemmerle, John F.; Kwon, John H.; Lazarev, Mark; Li, Ellen; Mack, David; Mannon, Peter; Moulton, Dedrick E.; Newberry, Rodney D.; Osuntokun, Bankole O.; Patel, Ashish S.; Saeed, Shehzad A.; Targan, Stephan R.; Valentine, John F.; Wang, Ming-Hsi; Zonca, Martin; Rioux, John D.; Duerr, Richard H.; Silverberg, Mark S.; Cho, Judy H.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Zwick, Michael E.; McGovern, Dermot P.B.; Kugathasan, Subra

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) cause significant morbidity and are increasing in prevalence among all populations, including African Americans. More than 200 susceptibility loci have been identified in populations of predominantly European ancestry, but few loci have been associated with IBD in other ethnicities. Methods We performed 2 high-density, genome-wide scans comprising 2345 cases of African Americans with IBD (1646 with CD, 583 with UC, and 116 inflammatory bowel disease unclassified [IBD-U]) and 5002 individuals without IBD (controls, identified from the Health Retirement Study and Kaiser Permanente database). Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated at P<5.0×10−8 in meta-analysis with a nominal evidence (P<.05) in each scan were considered to have genome-wide significance. Results We detected SNPs at HLA-DRB1, and African-specific SNPs at ZNF649 and LSAMP, with associations of genome-wide significance for UC. We detected SNPs at USP25 with associations of genome-wide significance associations for IBD. No associations of genome-wide significance were detected for CD. In addition, 9 genes previously associated with IBD contained SNPs with significant evidence for replication (P<1.6×10−6): ADCY3, CXCR6, HLA-DRB1 to HLA-DQA1 (genome-wide significance on conditioning), IL12B, PTGER4, and TNC for IBD; IL23R, PTGER4, and SNX20 (in strong linkage disequilibrium with NOD2) for CD; and KCNQ2 (near TNFRSF6B) for UC. Several of these genes, such as TNC (near TNFSF15), CXCR6, and genes associated with IBD at the HLA locus, contained SNPs with unique association patterns with African-specific alleles. Conclusions We performed a genome-wide association study of African Americans with IBD and identified loci associated with CD and UC in only this population; we also replicated loci identified in European populations. The detection of variants associated with IBD risk in only

  19. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Five Susceptibility Loci for Follicular Lymphoma outside the HLA Region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skibola, Christine F.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Vijai, Joseph; Conde, Lucia; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Foo, Jia-Nee; Bracci, Paige M.; Vermeulen, Roel C. H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Slager, Susan L.; de Sanjose, Silvia; Wang, Sophia S.; Linet, Martha S.; Salles, Gilles; Lan, Qing; Severi, Gianluca; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Lightfoot, Tracy; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Ghesquieres, Herve; Link, Brian K.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Alex; Tinker, Lesley F.; Teras, Lauren R.; Kricker, Anne; Becker, Nikolaus; Purdue, Mark P.; Spinelli, John J.; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G.; Vineis, Paolo; Monnereau, Alain; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Albanes, Demetrius; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Gabbas, Attilio; Chung, Charles C.; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Liang, Liming; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Liu, Jianjun; Adami, Hans-Olov; Glimelius, Bengt; Ye, Yuanqing; Nowakowski, Grzegorz S.; Dogan, Ahmet; Thompson, Carrie A.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Novak, Anne J.; Liebow, Mark; Witzig, Thomas E.; Weiner, George J.; Schenk, Maryjean; Hartge, Patricia; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Cozen, Wendy; Zhi, Degui; Akers, Nicholas K.; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T.; Lacher, Mortimer; Villano, Danylo J.; Maria, Ann; Roman, Eve; Kane, Eleanor; Jackson, Rebecca D.; North, Kari E.; Diver, W. Ryan; Turner, Jenny; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; McKay, James; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R.; Chamosa, Saioa; Kaaks, Rudolph; Kelly, Rachel S.; Ohlsson, Bodil; Travis, Ruth C.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Clave, Jacqueline; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Virtamo, Jarmo; Mazza, Patrizio; Cocco, Pierluigi; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Chiu, Brian C. H.; Fraumeni, Joseph R.; Nieters, Alexandra; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; Cerhan, James R.; Smedby, Karin E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of follicular lymphoma (FL) have previously identified human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene variants. To identify additional FL susceptibility loci, we conducted a large-scale two-stage GWAS in 4,523 case subjects and 13,344 control subjects of European

  20. Functional genome-wide siRNA screen identifies KIAA0586 as mutated in Joubert syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosing, S.; Hofree, M.; Kim, S.; Scott, E.; Copeland, B.; Romani, M.; Silhavy, J.L.; Rosti, R.O.; Schroth, J.; Mazza, T.; Miccinilli, E.; Zaki, M.S.; Swoboda, K.J.; Milisa-Drautz, J.; Dobyns, W.B.; Mikati, M.A.; Incecik, F.; Azam, M.; Borgatti, R.; Romaniello, R.; Boustany, R.M.; Clericuzio, C.L.; D'Arrigo, S.; Stromme, P.; Boltshauser, E.; Stanzial, F.; Mirabelli-Badenier, M.; Moroni, I.; Bertini, E.; Emma, F.; Steinlin, M.; Hildebrandt, F.; Johnson, C.A.; Freilinger, M.; Vaux, K.K.; Gabriel, S.B.; Aza-Blanc, P.; Heynen-Genel, S.; Ideker, T.; Dynlacht, B.D.; Lee, J.E.; Valente, E.M.; Kim, J.; Gleeson, J.G.

    2015-01-01

    Defective primary ciliogenesis or cilium stability forms the basis of human ciliopathies, including Joubert syndrome (JS), with defective cerebellar vermis development. We performed a high-content genome-wide small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to identify genes regulating ciliogenesis as

  1. Genome-wide association analyses identify 18 new loci associated with serum urate concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köttgen, Anna; Albrecht, Eva; Teumer, Alexander; Vitart, Veronique; Krumsiek, Jan; Hundertmark, Claudia; Pistis, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Daniela; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Haller, Toomas; Yang, Qiong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Johnson, Andrew D; Kutalik, Zoltán; Smith, Albert V; Shi, Julia; Struchalin, Maksim; Middelberg, Rita P S; Brown, Morris J; Gaffo, Angelo L; Pirastu, Nicola; Li, Guo; Hayward, Caroline; Zemunik, Tatijana; Huffman, Jennifer; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Jing Hua; Demirkan, Ayse; Feitosa, Mary F; Liu, Xuan; Malerba, Giovanni; Lopez, Lorna M; van der Harst, Pim; Li, Xinzhong; Kleber, Marcus E; Hicks, Andrew A; Nolte, Ilja M; Johansson, Asa; Murgia, Federico; Wild, Sarah H; Bakker, Stephan J L; Peden, John F; Dehghan, Abbas; Steri, Maristella; Tenesa, Albert; Lagou, Vasiliki; Salo, Perttu; Mangino, Massimo; Rose, Lynda M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Woodward, Owen M; Okada, Yukinori; Tin, Adrienne; Müller, Christian; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Putku, Margus; Czamara, Darina; Kraft, Peter; Frogheri, Laura; Thun, Gian Andri; Grotevendt, Anne; Gislason, Gauti Kjartan; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; McArdle, Patrick; Shuldiner, Alan R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Helena; Schallert, Michael; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Munroe, Patricia B; Samani, Nilesh J; Jacobs, David R; Liu, Kiang; D'Adamo, Pio; Ulivi, Sheila; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Campbell, Susan; Devuyst, Olivier; Navarro, Pau; Kolcic, Ivana; Hastie, Nicholas; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Esko, Tõnu; Salumets, Andres; Khaw, Kay Tee; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Isaacs, Aaron; Kraja, Aldi; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wild, Philipp S; Scott, Rodney J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Org, Elin; Viigimaa, Margus; Bandinelli, Stefania; Metter, Jeffrey E; Lupo, Antonio; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Sorice, Rossella; Döring, Angela; Lattka, Eva; Strauch, Konstantin; Theis, Fabian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wichmann, H-Erich; Davies, Gail; Gow, Alan J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Stolk, Ronald P; Kooner, Jaspal S; Zhang, Weihua; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Boehm, Bernhard O; Lucae, Susanne; Penninx, Brenda W; Smit, Johannes H; Curhan, Gary; Mudgal, Poorva; Plenge, Robert M; Portas, Laura; Persico, Ivana; Kirin, Mirna; Wilson, James F; Mateo Leach, Irene; van Gilst, Wiek H; Goel, Anuj; Ongen, Halit; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Imboden, Medea; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Cucca, Francesco; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Piras, Maria Grazia; Nauck, Matthias; Schurmann, Claudia; Budde, Kathrin; Ernst, Florian; Farrington, Susan M; Theodoratou, Evropi; Prokopenko, Inga; Stumvoll, Michael; Jula, Antti; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Shin, So-Youn; Spector, Tim D; Sala, Cinzia; Ridker, Paul M; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Hengstenberg, Christian; Nelson, Christopher P; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Singleton, Andrew B; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Zeller, Tanja; Burnier, Michel; Attia, John; Laan, Maris; Klopp, Norman; Hillege, Hans L; Kloiber, Stefan; Choi, Hyon; Pirastu, Mario; Tore, Silvia; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Völzke, Henry; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Parsa, Afshin; Schmidt, Reinhold; Whitfield, John B; Fornage, Myriam; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David S; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Metspalu, Andres; Loos, Ruth J F; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gambaro, Giovanni; Deary, Ian J; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Chambers, John C; März, Winfried; Pramstaller, Peter P; Snieder, Harold; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wright, Alan F; Navis, Gerjan; Watkins, Hugh; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Sanna, Serena; Schipf, Sabine; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Tönjes, Anke; Ripatti, Samuli; Soranzo, Nicole; Toniolo, Daniela; Chasman, Daniel I; Raitakari, Olli; Kao, W H Linda; Ciullo, Marina; Fox, Caroline S; Caulfield, Mark; Bochud, Murielle; Gieger, Christian

    Elevated serum urate concentrations can cause gout, a prevalent and painful inflammatory arthritis. By combining data from >140,000 individuals of European ancestry within the Global Urate Genetics Consortium (GUGC), we identified and replicated 28 genome-wide significant loci in association with

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies loci influencing concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, John C.; Zhang, Weihua; Sehmi, Joban; Li, Xinzhong; Wass, Mark N.; van der Harst, Pim; Holm, Hilma; Sanna, Serena; Kavousi, Maryam; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Coin, Lachlan J.; Deng, Guohong; Gieger, Christian; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kühnel, Brigitte; Kumar, Vinod; Lagou, Vasiliki; Liang, Liming; Luan, Jian'an; Vidal, Pedro Marques; Mateo Leach, Irene; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Peden, John F.; Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Soininen, Pasi; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Yuan, Xin; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Atwood, Larry D.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Brown, Morris J.; Charoen, Pimphen; Cucca, Francesco; Das, Debashish; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Dixon, Anna L.; Döring, Angela; Ehret, Georg; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I.; Farrall, Martin; Forouhi, Nita G.; Friedrich, Nele; Goessling, Wolfram; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heath, Simon; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hyppönen, Elina; Janssen, Harry L. A.; Johnson, Toby; Kangas, Antti J.; Kema, Ido P.; Kühn, Jens P.; Lai, Sandra; Lathrop, Mark; Lerch, Markus M.; Li, Yun; Liang, T. Jake; Lin, Jing-Ping; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Moffatt, Miriam F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Musunuru, Kiran; Nakamura, Yusuke; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Olafsson, Isleifur; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pouta, Anneli; Prins, Bram P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Puls, Ralf; Ruokonen, Aimo; Savolainen, Markku J.; Schlessinger, David; Schouten, Jeoffrey N. L.; Seedorf, Udo; Sen-Chowdhry, Srijita; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Smit, Johannes H.; Spector, Timothy D.; Tan, Wenting; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Tukiainen, Taru; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wallace, Chris; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Willemsen, Gonneke; Würtz, Peter; Xu, Chun; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Ahmadi, Kourosh R.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark; Cookson, William O.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Froguel, Philippe; Matsuda, Koichi; McCarthy, Mark I.; Meisinger, Christa; Mooser, Vincent; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Schumann, Gunter; Snieder, Harold; Sternberg, Michael J. E.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Thomas, Howard C.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uda, Manuela; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Watkins, Hugh; Whitfield, John B.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Fox, Caroline S.; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Stefansson, Kari; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Schadt, Eric E.; Scott, James; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Scott, Laura J.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Morris, Andrew P.; Dina, Christian; Welch, Ryan P.; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Huth, Cornelia; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Mcculloch, Laura J.; Ferreira, Teresa; Grallert, Harald; Amin, Najaf; Wu, Guanming; Willer, Cristen J.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Mccarroll, Steve A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Dupuis, Josée; Qi, Lu; Segrè, Ayellet V.; van Hoek, Mandy; Navarro, Pau; Ardlie, Kristin; Balkau, Beverley; Benediktsson, Rafn; Bennett, Amanda J.; Blagieva, Roza; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Bengtsson Boström, Kristina; Bravenboer, Bert; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Burtt, Noël P.; Charpentier, Guillaume; Chines, Peter S.; Cornelis, Marilyn; Couper, David J.; Crawford, Gabe; Doney, Alex S. F.; Elliott, Katherine S.; Elliott, Amanda L.; Erdos, Michael R.; Franklin, Christopher S.; Ganser, Martha; Grarup, Niels; Green, Todd; Griffin, Simon; Groves, Christopher J.; Guiducci, Candace; Hadjadj, Samy; Hassanali, Neelam; Herder, Christian; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U.; Johnson, Paul R. V.; Jørgensen, Torben; Kao, Wen H. L.; Klopp, Norman; Kong, Augustine; Kraft, Peter; Kuusisto, Johanna; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Man; Lieverse, Aloysius; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Midthjell, Kristian; Morken, Mario A.; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R.; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John R. B.; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Platou, Carl; Proença, Christine; Rathmann, Wolfgang; William Rayner, N.; Robertson, Neil R.; Rocheleau, Ghislain; Roden, Michael; Sampson, Michael J.; Saxena, Richa; Shields, Beverley M.; Shrader, Peter; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Sparsø, Thomas; Strassburger, Klaus; Stringham, Heather M.; Sun, Qi; Swift, Amy J.; Thorand, Barbara; Tichet, Jean; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; van Dam, Rob M.; van Haeften, Timon W.; van Herpt, Thijs; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Walters, G. Bragi; Weedon, Michael N.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witteman, Jacqueline; Bergman, Richard N.; Cauchi, Stephane; Collins, Francis S.; Gloyn, Anna L.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hansen, Torben; Hide, Winston A.; Hitman, Graham A.; Hunter, David J.; Hveem, Kristian; Laakso, Markku; Mohlke, Karen L.; Morris, Andrew D.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rudan, Igor; Sijbrands, Eric; Stein, Lincoln D.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, Andre; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M.; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Campbell, Harry; Daly, Mark J.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hu, Frank B.; Meigs, James B.; Pankow, James S.; Pedersen, Oluf; Barroso, Inês; Florez, Jose C.; Frayling, Timothy M.; Groop, Leif; Sladek, Rob; Wilson, James F.; Illig, Thomas; Altshuler, David; Boehnke, Michael; Lango Allen, H.; Estrada, K.; Lettre, G.; Berndt, S. I.; Weedon, M. N.; Rivadeneira, F.; Willer, C. J.; Jackson, A. U.; Vedantam, S.; Raychaudhuri, S.; Ferreira, T.; Wood, A. R.; Weyant, R. J.; Segrè, A. V.; Speliotes, E. K.; Wheeler, E.; Soranzo, N.; Park, J. H.; Yang, J.; Gudbjartsson, D.; Heard-Costa, N. L.; Randall, J. C.; Qi, L.; Smith, A. Vernon; Mägi, R.; Pastinen, T.; Liang, L.; Heid, I. M.; Luan, J.; Thorleifsson, G.; Winkler, T. W.; Goddard, M. E.; Sin Lo, K.; Palmer, C.; Workalemahu, T.; Aulchenko, Y. S.; Johansson, A.; Zillikens, M. C.; Feitosa, M. F.; Esko, T.; Johnson, T.; Ketkar, S.; Kraft, P.; Mangino, M.; Prokopenko, I.; Absher, D.; Albrecht, E.; Ernst, F.; Glazer, N. L.; Hayward, C.; Hottenga, J. J.; Jacobs, K. B.; Knowles, J. W.; Kutalik, Z.; Monda, K. L.; Polasek, O.; Preuss, M.; Rayner, N. W.; Robertson, N. R.; Steinthorsdottir, V.; Tyrer, J. P.; Voight, B. F.; Wiklund, F.; Xu, J.; Zhao, J. Hua; Nyholt, D. R.; Pellikka, N.; Perola, M.; Perry, J. R.; Surakka, I.; Tammesoo, M. L.; Altmaier, E. L.; Amin, N.; Aspelund, T.; Bhangale, T.; Boucher, G.; Chasman, D. I.; Chen, C.; Coin, L.; Cooper, M. N.; Dixon, A. L.; Gibson, Q.; Grundberg, E.; Hao, K.; Juhani Junttila, M.; Kaplan, L. M.; Kettunen, J.; König, I. R.; Kwan, T.; Lawrence, R. W.; Levinson, D. F.; Lorentzon, M.; McKnight, B.; Morris, A. P.; Müller, M.; Suh Ngwa, J.; Purcell, S.; Rafelt, S.; Salem, R. M.; Salvi, E.; Sanna, S.; Shi, J.; Sovio, U.; Thompson, J. R.; Turchin, M. C.; Vandenput, L.; Verlaan, D. J.; Vitart, V.; White, C. C.; Ziegler, A.; Almgren, P.; Balmforth, A. J.; Campbell, H.; Citterio, L.; de Grandi, A.; Dominiczak, A.; Duan, J.; Elliott, P.; Elosua, R.; Eriksson, J. G.; Freimer, N. B.; Geus, E. J.; Glorioso, N.; Haiqing, S.; Hartikainen, A. L.; Havulinna, A. S.; Hicks, A. A.; Hui, J.; Igl, W.; Illig, T.; Jula, A.; Kajantie, E.; Kilpeläinen, T. O.; Koiranen, M.; Kolcic, I.; Koskinen, S.; Kovacs, P.; Laitinen, J.; Liu, J.; Lokki, M. L.; Marusic, A.; Maschio, A.; Meitinger, T.; Mulas, A.; Paré, G.; Parker, A. N.; Peden, J. F.; Petersmann, A.; Pichler, I.; Pietiläinen, K. H.; Pouta, A.; Ridderstråle, M.; Rotter, J. I.; Sambrook, J. G.; Sanders, A. R.; Schmidt, C. Oliver; Sinisalo, J.; Smit, J. H.; Stringham, H. M.; Widen, E.; Wild, S. H.; Willemsen, G.; Zagato, L.; Zgaga, L.; Zitting, P.; Alavere, H.; Farrall, M.; McArdle, W. L.; Nelis, M.; Peters, M. J.; Ripatti, S.; van Meurs, J. B.; Aben, K. K.; Ardlie, K. G.; Beckmann, J. S.; Beilby, J. P.; Bergman, R. N.; Bergmann, S.; Collins, F. S.; Cusi, D.; den Heijer, M.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Gejman, P. V.; Hamsten, A.; Huikuri, H. V.; Iribarren, C.; Kähönen, M.; Kaprio, J.; Kathiresan, S.; Kiemeney, L.; Kocher, T.; Launer, L. J.; Lehtimäki, T.; Melander, O.; Mosley, T. H.; Musk, A. W.; Nieminen, M. S.; O'Donnell, C. J.; Ohlsson, C.; Oostra, B.; Palmer, L. J.; Raitakari, O.; Ridker, P. M.; Rioux, J. D.; Rissanen, A.; Rivolta, C.; Schunkert, H.; Shuldiner, A. R.; Siscovick, D. S.; Stumvoll, M.; Tönjes, A.; Tuomilehto, J.; van Ommen, G. J.; Viikari, J.; Heath, A. C.; Martin, N. G.; Montgomery, G. W.; Province, M. A.; Kayser, M.; Arnold, A. M.; Atwood, L. D.; Boerwinkle, E.; Chanock, S. J.; Deloukas, P.; Gieger, C.; Grönberg, H.; Hall, P.; Hattersley, A. T.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hoffman, W.; Lathrop, G. Mark; Salomaa, V.; Schreiber, S.; Uda, M.; Waterworth, D.; Wright, A. F.; Assimes, T. L.; Barroso, I.; Hofman, A.; Mohlke, K. L.; Boomsma, D. I.; Caulfield, M. J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Erdmann, J.; Fox, C. S.; Gudnason, V.; Gyllensten, U.; Harris, T. B.; Hayes, R. B.; Jarvelin, M. R.; Mooser, V.; Munroe, P. B.; Ouwehand, W. H.; Penninx, B. W.; Pramstaller, P. P.; Quertermous, T.; Rudan, I.; Samani, N. J.; Spector, T. D.; Völzke, H.; Watkins, H.; Wilson, J. F.; Groop, L. C.; Haritunians, T.; Hu, F. B.; Kaplan, R. C.; Metspalu, A.; North, K. E.; Schlessinger, D.; Wareham, N. J.; Hunter, D. J.; O'Connell, J. R.; Strachan, D. P.; Wichmann, H. E.; Borecki, I. B.; van Duijn, C. M.; Schadt, E. E.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Peltonen, L.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; Visscher, P. M.; Chatterjee, N.; Loos, R. J.; Boehnke, M.; McCarthy, M. I.; Ingelsson, E.; Lindgren, C. M.; Abecasis, G. R.; Stefansson, K.; Frayling, T. M.; Hirschhorn, J. N.; Teslovich, T. M.; Musunuru, K.; Smith, A. V.; Edmondson, A. C.; Stylianou, I. M.; Koseki, M.; Pirruccello, J. P.; Johansen, C. T.; Fouchier, S. W.; Isaacs, A.; Peloso, G. M.; Barbalic, M.; Ricketts, S. L.; Bis, J. C.; Chambers, J.; Orho-Melander, M.; Li, X.; Guo, X.; Li, M.; Cho, Y. Shin; Go, M. Jin; Kim, Y. Jin; Lee, J. Y.; Park, T.; Kim, K.; Sim, X.; Ong, R. Twee-Hee; Croteau-Chonka, D. C.; Lange, L. A.; Smith, J. D.; Song, K.; Yuan, X.; Lamina, C.; Zhang, W.; Zee, R. Y.; Witteman, J. C.; Whitfield, J. B.; Waterworth, D. M.; Waeber, G.; Vollenweider, P.; Tanaka, T.; Silander, K.; Sijbrands, E. J.; Scuteri, A.; Scott, J.; Salomaa, J.; Sabatti, C.; Ruokonen, A.; Rose, L. M.; Roberts, R.; Rieder, M.; Psaty, B. M.; Pedersen, N. L.; Pattaro, C.; Pare, G.; Oostra, B. A.; Nickerson, D. A.; McPherson, R.; McArdle, W.; Masson, D.; Marroni, F.; Magnusson, P. K.; Lucas, G.; Luben, R.; Langenberg, C.; Lakatta, E. G.; Laaksonen, R.; Kyvik, K. O.; Kronenberg, F.; Khaw, K. T.; Janssens, A. C.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Hastie, N. D.; Hall, A. S.; Guiducci, C.; Gonzalez, E.; Gieger, N. B.; Ferrucci, L.; Ejebe, K. G.; Döring, A.; Dominiczak, A. F.; Demissie, S.; de Geus, E. J.; de Faire, U.; Crawford, G.; Chen, Y. D.; Burtt, N. P.; Bonnycastle, L. L.; Boekholdt, S. M.; Bandinelli, S.; Ballantyne, C. M.; Ballantyne, T. L.; Altshuler, D.; Seielstad, M.; Wong, T. Y.; Tai, E. S.; Feranil, A. B.; Kuzawa, C. W.; Adair, L. S.; Taylor, H. A.; Gabriel, S. B.; Wilson, J. G.; Holm, H.; Krauss, R. M.; Ordovas, J. M.; Kooner, J. S.; Tall, A. R.; Hegele, R. A.; Kastelein, J. J.; Reilly, M. P.; Cupples, L. A.; Sandhu, M. S.; Rader, D. J.; Hernaez, Ruben; Kim, Lauren J.; Palmer, Cameron D.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Garcia, Melissa E.; Launer, Lenore J.; Nalls, Michael A.; Clark, Jeanne M.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Butler, Johannah L.; Tomas, Marta; Hoffmann, Udo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Massaro, Joseph M.; Sahani, Dushyant V.; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Carr, J. Jeffrey; Feitosa, Mary F.; Smith, Albert V.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Ehret, Georg B.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bochud, Murielle; Johnson, Andrew D.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Tobin, Martin D.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Pihur, Vasyl; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Teumer, Alexander; Glazer, Nicole L.; Launer, Lenore; Zhao, Jing Hua; Aulchenko, Yurii; Sober, Siim; Parsa, Afshin; Arora, Pankaj; Dehghan, Abbas; Zhang, Feng; Lucas, Gavin; Hicks, Andrew A.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Wild, Sarah H.; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Parker, Alex N.; Fava, Cristiano; Fox, Ervin R.; Kumari, Meena; Go, Min Jin; Kao, Wen Hong Linda; Sjogren, Marketa; Vinay, D. G.; Alexander, Myriam; Tabara, Yasuharu; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Whincup, Peter H.; Liu, Yongmei; Shi, Gang; Tayo, Bamidele; Seielstad, Mark; Sim, Xueling; Nguyen, Khanh-Dung Hoang; Lehtimaki, Terho; Matullo, Giuseppe; Wu, Ying; Gaunt, Tom R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Cooper, Matthew N.; Platou, Carl G. P.; Org, Elin; Hardy, Rebecca; Dahgam, Santosh; Palmen, Jutta; Vitart, Veronique; Braund, Peter S.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Uiterwaal, Cuno S. P. M.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Palmas, Walter; Ludwig, Barbara; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Palmer, Nicholette D.; Aspelund, Thor; Garcia, Melissa; Chang, Yen-Pei C.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Steinle, Nanette I.; Grobbee, Diederick E.; Arking, Dan E.; Kardia, Sharon L.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer; McArdle, Wendy L.; Hadley, David; Connell, John M.; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Day, Ian N. M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Beilby, John P.; Lawrence, Robert W.; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Rory; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ongen, Halit; Dreisbach, Albert W.; Li, Yali; Young, J. H.; Bis, Joshua C.; Kahonen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Adair, Linda S.; Lee, Nanette R.; Chen, Ming-Huei; Olden, Matthias; Pattaro, Cristian; Bolton, Judith A. Hoffman; Kottgen, Anna; Bergmann, Sven; Chaturvedi, Nish R.; Islam, Muhammad; Jafar, Tazeen H.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Kulkarni, Smita R.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Grassler, Jurgen; Kettunen, Johannes; Howard, Philip; Taylor, Andrew; Guarrera, Simonetta; Ricceri, Fulvio; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Barroso, Ines; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Weder, Alan B.; Hunt, Steven C.; Sun, Yan V.; Peltonen, Leena; Perola, Markus; Vartiainen, Erkki; Brand, Stefan-Martin; Staessen, Jan A.; Wang, Thomas J.; Burton, Paul R.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Dong, Yanbin; Wang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Haidong; Lohman, Kurt K.; Rudock, Megan E.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Wiggins, Kerri L.; Doumatey, Ayo; Shriner, Daniel; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Kinra, Sanjay; Prabhakaran, Dorairajan; Tripathy, Vikal; Langefeld, Carl D.; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; Forrester, Terrence; Hilton, Gina; McKenzie, Colin A.; Salako, Tunde; Iwai, Naoharu; Kita, Yoshikuni; Ogihara, Toshio; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Umemura, Satoshi; Eyheramendy, Susana; Cho, Yoon Shin; Kim, Hyung-Lae; Lee, Jong-Young; Sehmi, Joban S.; Hedblad, Bo; Smith, George Davey; Wong, Andrew; Stančakova, Alena; Raffel, Leslie J.; Yao, Jie; Kathiresan, Sekar; O'Donnell, Chris; Schwartz, Steven M.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Longstreth, Will T.; Mosley, Thomas H.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shrine, Nick R. G.; Wain, Louise V.; Laitinen, Jaana; Zitting, Paavo; Cooper, Jackie A.; Humphries, Steve E.; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Janipalli, Charles S.; Mani, K. Radha; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Oostra, Ben A.; Demirkan, Ayse; Isaacs, Aaron; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lakatta, Edward G.; Orru, Marco; Scuteri, Angelo; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Wurz, Peter; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Dorr, Marcus; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Volker, Uwe; Volzke, Henry; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Zelenika, Diana; Deloukas, Panos; Mangino, Massimo; Spector, Tim D.; Zhai, Guangju; Meschia, James F.; Sharma, Pankaj; Terzic, Janos; Kumar, M. J. Kranthi; Denniff, Matthew; Zukowska-Szczechowska, Ewa; Wagenknecht, Lynne E.; Fowkes, F. Gerald R.; Charchar, Fadi J.; Schwarz, Peter E. H.; Hayward, Caroline; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotimi, Charles; Bots, Michiel L.; Brand, Eva; Samani, Nilesh J.; Polasek, Ozren; Talmud, Philippa J.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Laan, Maris; Palmer, Lyle J.; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Casas, Juan P.; Vineis, Paolo; Raitakari, Olli; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Wong, Tien Y.; Tai, E. Shyong; Cooper, Richard S.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Morris, Richard W.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Kivimaki, Mika; Marmot, Michael G.; Miki, Tetsuro; Saleheen, Danish; Chandak, Giriraj R.; Coresh, Josef; Navis, Gerjan; Han, Bok-Ghee; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Melander, Olle; Ridker, Paul M.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wright, Alan F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Elosua, Roberto; Soranzo, Nicole; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Meneton, Pierre; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Larson, Martin G.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Psaty, Bruce M.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Caulfield, Mark J.; Dupuis, J.; Saxena, R.; Bouatia-Naji, N.; Gloyn, A. L.; Randall, J.; Rybin, D.; Henneman, P.; Grallert, H.; Dehghan, A.; Franklin, C. S.; Navarro, P.; Goel, A.; Egan, J. M.; Lajunen, T.; Grarup, N.; Sparsø, T.; Doney, A.; Kanoni, S.; Shrader, P.; Cavalcanti-Proença, C.; Kumari, M.; Timpson, N. J.; Zabena, C.; Rocheleau, G.; An, P.; O'Connell, J.; Elliott, A.; McCarroll, S. A.; Payne, F.; Roccasecca, R. M.; Pattou, F.; Sethupathy, P.; Ardlie, K.; Ariyurek, Y.; Balkau, B.; Barter, P.; Ben-Shlomo, Y.; Benediktsson, R.; Bennett, A. J.; Bochud, M.; Bonnefond, A.; Borch-Johnsen, K.; Böttcher, Y.; Brunner, E.; Bumpstead, S. J.; Charpentier, G.; Chines, P.; Clarke, R.; Coin, L. J.; Cornelis, M.; Crisponi, L.; Day, I. N.; Delplanque, J.; Dina, C.; Erdos, M. R.; Fedson, A. C.; Fischer-Rosinsky, A.; Forouhi, N. G.; Frants, R.; Franzosi, M. G.; Galan, P.; Goodarzi, M. O.; Graessler, J.; Groves, C. J.; Grundy, S.; Gwilliam, R.; Hadjadj, S.; Hallmans, G.; Hammond, N.; Han, X.; Hassanali, N.; Heath, S. C.; Hercberg, S.; Herder, C.; Hillman, D. R.; Hingorani, A. D.; Hung, J.; Isomaa, B.; Johnson, P. R.; Jørgensen, T.; Kaakinen, M.; Kesaniemi, Y. A.; Kivimaki, M.; Knight, B.; Lathrop, G. M.; Lawlor, D. A.; Le Bacquer, O.; Lecoeur, C.; Li, Y.; Lyssenko, V.; Mahley, R.; Manning, A. K.; Martínez-Larrad, M. T.; McAteer, J. B.; McCulloch, L. J.; Meisinger, C.; Melzer, D.; Meyre, D.; Mitchell, B. D.; Morken, M. A.; Mukherjee, S.; Naitza, S.; Narisu, N.; Neville, M. J.; Orrù, M.; Pakyz, R.; Palmer, C. N.; Paolisso, G.; Pearson, D.; Pfeiffer, A. F.; Posthuma, D.; Potter, S. C.; Rathmann, W.; Rice, K.; Roden, M.; Rolandsson, O.; Sandbaek, A.; Sandhu, M.; Sayer, A. A.; Scheet, P.; Scott, L. J.; Seedorf, U.; Sharp, S. J.; Shields, B.; Sigurethsson, G.; Silveira, A.; Simpson, L.; Singleton, A.; Smith, N. L.; Swift, A.; Syddall, H.; Syvänen, A. C.; Thorand, B.; Tichet, J.; Tuomi, T.; van Dijk, K. W.; van Hoek, M.; Varma, D.; Visvikis-Siest, S.; Vogelzangs, N.; Wagner, P. J.; Walley, A.; Walters, G. B.; Ward, K. L.; Yarnell, J. W.; Zeggini, E.; Zelenika, D.; Zethelius, B.; Zhai, G.; Zhao, J. H.; Meneton, P.; Nathan, D. M.; Williams, G. H.; Smith, G. D.; Bornstein, S. R.; Schwarz, P.; Spranger, J.; Karpe, F.; Cooper, C.; Dedoussis, G. V.; Serrano-Ríos, M.; Morris, A. D.; Lind, L.; Franks, P. W.; Ebrahim, S.; Marmot, M.; Kao, W. H.; Pankow, J. S.; Sampson, M. J.; Kuusisto, J.; Laakso, M.; Hansen, T.; Pedersen, O.; Buchanan, T. A.; Valle, T. T.; Kong, A.; Cao, A.; Sladek, R.; Froguel, P.; Watanabe, R. M.; Meigs, J. B.; Groop, L.; Florez, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma are widely used as indicators of liver disease. We carried out a genome-wide association study in 61,089 individuals, identifying 42 loci associated with concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma, of which 32 are new associations (P = 10(-8) to P =

  3. Seven prostate cancer susceptibility loci identified by a multi-stage genome-wide association study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Giles, Graham G

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed male cancer in developed countries. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study for PrCa and previously reported the results of the first two stages, which identified 16 PrCa susceptibility loci. We report here the results of st...

  4. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ∼8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in ...

  5. Genome wide association study identifies KCNMA1 contributing to human obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiao, Hong; Arner, Peter; Hoffstedt, Johan

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) analyses have identified common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with obesity. However, the reported genetic variation in obesity explains only a minor fraction of the total genetic variation expected to be present in the population...

  6. Extension of Type 2 Diabetes Genome-Wide Association Scan Results in the Diabetes Prevention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Allan F.; Jablonski, Kathleen A.; McAteer, Jarred B.; Saxena, Richa; Pollin, Toni I.; Franks, Paul W.; Hanson, Robert L.; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Knowler, William C.; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE— Genome-wide association scans (GWASs) have identified novel diabetes-associated genes. We evaluated how these variants impact diabetes incidence, quantitative glycemic traits, and response to preventive interventions in 3,548 subjects at high risk of type 2 diabetes enrolled in the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which examined the effects of lifestyle intervention, metformin, and troglitazone versus placebo. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS— We genotyped selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in or near diabetes-associated loci, including EXT2, CDKAL1, CDKN2A/B, IGF2BP2, HHEX, LOC387761, and SLC30A8 in DPP participants and performed Cox regression analyses using genotype, intervention, and their interactions as predictors of diabetes incidence. We evaluated their effect on insulin resistance and secretion at 1 year. RESULTS— None of the selected SNPs were associated with increased diabetes incidence in this population. After adjustments for ethnicity, baseline insulin secretion was lower in subjects with the risk genotype at HHEX rs1111875 (P = 0.01); there were no significant differences in baseline insulin sensitivity. Both at baseline and at 1 year, subjects with the risk genotype at LOC387761 had paradoxically increased insulin secretion; adjustment for self-reported ethnicity abolished these differences. In ethnicity-adjusted analyses, we noted a nominal differential improvement in β-cell function for carriers of the protective genotype at CDKN2A/B after 1 year of troglitazone treatment (P = 0.01) and possibly lifestyle modification (P = 0.05). CONCLUSIONS— We were unable to replicate the GWAS findings regarding diabetes risk in the DPP. We did observe genotype associations with differences in baseline insulin secretion at the HHEX locus and a possible pharmacogenetic interaction at CDKNA2/B. PMID:18544707

  7. Genome-wide scans using archived neonatal dried blood spot samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiuf Carsten

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of disease susceptible genes requires access to DNA from numerous well-characterised subjects. Archived residual dried blood spot samples from national newborn screening programs may provide DNA from entire populations and medical registries the corresponding clinical information. The amount of DNA available in these samples is however rarely sufficient for reliable genome-wide scans, and whole-genome amplification may thus be necessary. This study assess the quality of DNA obtained from different amplification protocols by evaluating fidelity and robustness of the genotyping of 610,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, using the Illumina Infinium HD Human610-Quad BeadChip. Whole-genome amplified DNA from 24 neonatal dried blood spot samples stored between 15 to 25 years was tested, and high-quality genomic DNA from 8 of the same individuals was used as reference. Results Using 3.2 mm disks from dried blood spot samples the optimal DNA-extraction and amplification protocol resulted in call-rates between 99.15% – 99.73% (mean 99.56%, N = 16, and conflicts with reference DNA in only three per 10,000 genotype calls. Conclusion Whole-genome amplified DNA from archived neonatal dried blood spot samples can be used for reliable genome-wide scans and is a cost-efficient alternative to collecting new samples.

  8. A genome-wide scan for Eysenckian personality dimensions in adolescent twin sibships: psychoticism, extraversion, neuroticism, and lie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Nathan A; Zhu, Gu; Evans, David M; Medland, Sarah E; Wright, Margie J; Martin, Nick G

    2008-12-01

    We report the first genome-wide scan of adolescent personality. We conducted a genome-wide scan to detect linkage for measures of adolescent Psychoticism, Extraversion, Neuroticism, and Lie from the Junior Eysenck Personality Questionnaire. Data are based on 1,280 genotyped Australian adolescent twins and their siblings. The highest linkage peaks were found on chromosomes 16 and 19 for Neuroticism, on chromosomes 1, 7, 10, 13 m, and 18 for Psychoticism, and on chromosomes 2 and 3 for Extraversion.

  9. A genome-wide association study identifies multiple loci associated with mathematics ability and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, S J; Davis, O S P; Kovas, Y; Meaburn, E L; Dale, P S; Petrill, S A; Schalkwyk, L C; Plomin, R

    2010-03-01

    Numeracy is as important as literacy and exhibits a similar frequency of disability. Although its etiology is relatively poorly understood, quantitative genetic research has demonstrated mathematical ability to be moderately heritable. In this first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of mathematical ability and disability, 10 out of 43 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations nominated from two high- vs. low-ability (n = 600 10-year-olds each) scans of pooled DNA were validated (P mathematical ability, as assessed by teacher reports and online tests. Although the effects are of the modest sizes now expected for complex traits and require further replication, interesting candidate genes are implicated such as NRCAM which encodes a neuronal cell adhesion molecule. When combined into a set, the 10 SNPs account for 2.9% (F = 56.85; df = 1 and 1881; P = 7.277e-14) of the phenotypic variance. The association is linear across the distribution consistent with a quantitative trait locus (QTL) hypothesis; the third of children in our sample who harbour 10 or more of the 20 risk alleles identified are nearly twice as likely (OR = 1.96; df = 1; P = 3.696e-07) to be in the lowest performing 15% of the distribution. Our results correspond with those of quantitative genetic research in indicating that mathematical ability and disability are influenced by many genes generating small effects across the entire spectrum of ability, implying that more highly powered studies will be needed to detect and replicate these QTL associations.

  10. A genome-wide association study identifies susceptibility variants for type 2 diabetes in Han Chinese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuu-Jen Tsai

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the underlying mechanisms of T2D pathogenesis, we looked for diabetes susceptibility genes that increase the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D in a Han Chinese population. A two-stage genome-wide association (GWA study was conducted, in which 995 patients and 894 controls were genotyped using the Illumina HumanHap550-Duo BeadChip for the first genome scan stage. This was further replicated in 1,803 patients and 1,473 controls in stage 2. We found two loci not previously associated with diabetes susceptibility in and around the genes protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D (PTPRD (P = 8.54x10(-10; odds ratio [OR] = 1.57; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.36-1.82, and serine racemase (SRR (P = 3.06x10(-9; OR = 1.28; 95% CI = 1.18-1.39. We also confirmed that variants in KCNQ1 were associated with T2D risk, with the strongest signal at rs2237895 (P = 9.65x10(-10; OR = 1.29, 95% CI = 1.19-1.40. By identifying two novel genetic susceptibility loci in a Han Chinese population and confirming the involvement of KCNQ1, which was previously reported to be associated with T2D in Japanese and European descent populations, our results may lead to a better understanding of differences in the molecular pathogenesis of T2D among various populations.

  11. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Alison P; Wolpin, Brian M; Risch, Harvey A; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Mocci, Evelina; Zhang, Mingfeng; Canzian, Federico; Childs, Erica J; Hoskins, Jason W; Jermusyk, Ashley; Zhong, Jun; Chen, Fei; Albanes, Demetrius; Andreotti, Gabriella; Arslan, Alan A; Babic, Ana; Bamlet, William R; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Berndt, Sonja I; Blackford, Amanda; Borges, Michael; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M; Brais, Lauren; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Buring, Julie; Campa, Daniele; Capurso, Gabriele; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Chaffee, Kari G; Chung, Charles C; Cleary, Sean; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dijk, Frederike; Duell, Eric J; Foretova, Lenka; Fuchs, Charles; Funel, Niccola; Gallinger, Steven; M Gaziano, J Michael; Gazouli, Maria; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Gary E; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hackert, Thilo; Haiman, Christopher; Hartge, Patricia; Hasan, Manal; Hegyi, Peter; Helzlsouer, Kathy J; Herman, Joseph; Holcatova, Ivana; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert; Hung, Rayjean J; Jacobs, Eric J; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Janout, Vladimir; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Klein, Eric A; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kooperberg, Charles; Kulke, Matthew H; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Kurtz, Robert J; Laheru, Daniel; Landi, Stefano; Lawlor, Rita T; Lee, I-Min; LeMarchand, Loic; Lu, Lingeng; Malats, Núria; Mambrini, Andrea; Mannisto, Satu; Milne, Roger L; Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice; Neale, Rachel E; Neoptolemos, John P; Oberg, Ann L; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Pasquali, Claudio; Patel, Alpa V; Peters, Ulrike; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Porta, Miquel; Real, Francisco X; Rothman, Nathaniel; Scelo, Ghislaine; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Silverman, Debra; Smith, Jill P; Soucek, Pavel; Sund, Malin; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Tavano, Francesca; Thornquist, Mark D; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vashist, Yogesh; Visvanathan, Kala; Vodicka, Pavel; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Kraft, Peter; Li, Donghui; Chanock, Stephen; Obazee, Ofure; Petersen, Gloria M; Amundadottir, Laufey T

    2018-02-08

    In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Here, we find significant evidence of a novel association at rs78417682 (7p12/TNS3, P = 4.35 × 10 -8 ). Replication of 10 promising signals in up to 2737 patients and 4752 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium yields new genome-wide significant loci: rs13303010 at 1p36.33 (NOC2L, P = 8.36 × 10 -14 ), rs2941471 at 8q21.11 (HNF4G, P = 6.60 × 10 -10 ), rs4795218 at 17q12 (HNF1B, P = 1.32 × 10 -8 ), and rs1517037 at 18q21.32 (GRP, P = 3.28 × 10 -8 ). rs78417682 is not statistically significantly associated with pancreatic cancer in PANDoRA. Expression quantitative trait locus analysis in three independent pancreatic data sets provides molecular support of NOC2L as a pancreatic cancer susceptibility gene.

  12. High-Resolution Genome-Wide Linkage Mapping Identifies Susceptibility Loci for BMI in the Chinese Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Dong Feng; Pang, Zengchang; Li, Shuxia

    2012-01-01

    The genetic loci affecting the commonly used BMI have been intensively investigated using linkage approaches in multiple populations. This study aims at performing the first genome-wide linkage scan on BMI in the Chinese population in mainland China with hypothesis that heterogeneity in genetic...... linkage could exist in different ethnic populations. BMI was measured from 126 dizygotic twins in Qingdao municipality who were genotyped using high-resolution Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP arrays containing about 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Nonparametric linkage analysis...... in western countries. Multiple loci showing suggestive linkage were found on chromosome 1 (lod score 2.38 at 242 cM), chromosome 8 (2.48 at 95 cM), and chromosome 14 (2.2 at 89.4 cM). The strong linkage identified in the Chinese subjects that is consistent with that found in populations of European origin...

  13. Parent-of-origin effects in autism identified through genome-wide linkage analysis of 16,000 SNPs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Fradin

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Autism is a common heritable neurodevelopmental disorder with complex etiology. Several genome-wide linkage and association scans have been carried out to identify regions harboring genes related to autism or autism spectrum disorders, with mixed results. Given the overlap in autism features with genetic abnormalities known to be associated with imprinting, one possible reason for lack of consistency would be the influence of parent-of-origin effects that may mask the ability to detect linkage and association.We have performed a genome-wide linkage scan that accounts for potential parent-of-origin effects using 16,311 SNPs among families from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH autism repository. We report parametric (GH, Genehunter and allele-sharing linkage (Aspex results using a broad spectrum disorder case definition. Paternal-origin genome-wide statistically significant linkage was observed on chromosomes 4 (LOD(GH = 3.79, empirical p<0.005 and LOD(Aspex = 2.96, p = 0.008, 15 (LOD(GH = 3.09, empirical p<0.005 and LOD(Aspex = 3.62, empirical p = 0.003 and 20 (LOD(GH = 3.36, empirical p<0.005 and LOD(Aspex = 3.38, empirical p = 0.006.These regions may harbor imprinted sites associated with the development of autism and offer fruitful domains for molecular investigation into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in autism.

  14. Parent-of-origin effects in autism identified through genome-wide linkage analysis of 16,000 SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradin, Delphine; Cheslack-Postava, Keely; Ladd-Acosta, Christine; Newschaffer, Craig; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Arking, Dan E; Feinberg, Andrew; Fallin, M Daniele

    2010-09-02

    Autism is a common heritable neurodevelopmental disorder with complex etiology. Several genome-wide linkage and association scans have been carried out to identify regions harboring genes related to autism or autism spectrum disorders, with mixed results. Given the overlap in autism features with genetic abnormalities known to be associated with imprinting, one possible reason for lack of consistency would be the influence of parent-of-origin effects that may mask the ability to detect linkage and association. We have performed a genome-wide linkage scan that accounts for potential parent-of-origin effects using 16,311 SNPs among families from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE) and the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) autism repository. We report parametric (GH, Genehunter) and allele-sharing linkage (Aspex) results using a broad spectrum disorder case definition. Paternal-origin genome-wide statistically significant linkage was observed on chromosomes 4 (LOD(GH) = 3.79, empirical p<0.005 and LOD(Aspex) = 2.96, p = 0.008), 15 (LOD(GH) = 3.09, empirical p<0.005 and LOD(Aspex) = 3.62, empirical p = 0.003) and 20 (LOD(GH) = 3.36, empirical p<0.005 and LOD(Aspex) = 3.38, empirical p = 0.006). These regions may harbor imprinted sites associated with the development of autism and offer fruitful domains for molecular investigation into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in autism.

  15. Genome-wide analysis identifies 12 loci influencing human reproductive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barban, Nicola; Jansen, Rick; de Vlaming, Ronald; Vaez, Ahmad; Mandemakers, Jornt J; Tropf, Felix C; Shen, Xia; Wilson, James F; Chasman, Daniel I; Nolte, Ilja M; Tragante, Vinicius; van der Laan, Sander W; Perry, John R B; Kong, Augustine; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Albrecht, Eva; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura; Atzmon, Gil; Auro, Kirsi; Ayers, Kristin; Bakshi, Andrew; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Berger, Klaus; Bergman, Aviv; Bertram, Lars; Bielak, Lawrence F; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Bonder, Marc Jan; Broer, Linda; Bui, Minh; Barbieri, Caterina; Cavadino, Alana; Chavarro, Jorge E; Turman, Constance; Concas, Maria Pina; Cordell, Heather J; Davies, Gail; Eibich, Peter; Eriksson, Nicholas; Esko, Tõnu; Eriksson, Joel; Falahi, Fahimeh; Felix, Janine F; Fontana, Mark Alan; Franke, Lude; Gandin, Ilaria; Gaskins, Audrey J; Gieger, Christian; Gunderson, Erica P; Guo, Xiuqing; Hayward, Caroline; He, Chunyan; Hofer, Edith; Huang, Hongyan; Joshi, Peter K; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karlsson, Robert; Kiechl, Stefan; Kifley, Annette; Kluttig, Alexander; Kraft, Peter; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lahti, Jari; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Tian; Makalic, Enes; Mamasoula, Crysovalanto; Matteson, Lindsay; Mbarek, Hamdi; McArdle, Patrick F; McMahon, George; Meddens, S Fleur W; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Mike; Missmer, Stacey A; Monnereau, Claire; van der Most, Peter J; Myhre, Ronny; Nalls, Mike A; Nutile, Teresa; Kalafati, Ioanna Panagiota; Porcu, Eleonora; Prokopenko, Inga; Rajan, Kumar B; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rueedi, Rico; Ryan, Kathleen A; Saba, Yasaman; Schmidt, Daniel; Smith, Jennifer A; Stolk, Lisette; Streeten, Elizabeth; Tönjes, Anke; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Ulivi, Sheila; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Willeit, Peter; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhernakova, Daria V; Amin, Najaf; Andrews, Howard; Balkau, Beverley; Barzilai, Nir; Bergmann, Sven; Biino, Ginevra; Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boomsma, Dorret I; Buring, Julie E; Campbell, Harry; Cappellani, Stefania; Ciullo, Marina; Cox, Simon R; Cucca, Francesco; Toniolo, Daniela; Davey-Smith, George; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; van Duijn, Cornelia M; de Geus, Eco J C; Eriksson, Johan G; Evans, Denis A; Faul, Jessica D; Sala, Cinzia Felicita; Froguel, Philippe; Gasparini, Paolo; Girotto, Giorgia; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Greiser, Karin Halina; Groenen, Patrick J F; de Haan, Hugoline G; Haerting, Johannes; Harris, Tamara B; Heath, Andrew C; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hopper, John; Hyppönen, Elina; Jacobsson, Bo; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Johannesson, Magnus; Jugessur, Astanand; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keavney, Bernard; Kolcic, Ivana; Koponen, Päivikki; Kovacs, Peter; Kronenberg, Florian; Kutalik, Zoltan; La Bianca, Martina; Lachance, Genevieve; Iacono, William G; Lai, Sandra; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert; Lucht, Michael; Luoto, Riitta; Magnus, Per; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; McQuillan, Ruth; Medland, Sarah E; Meisinger, Christa; Mellström, Dan; Metspalu, Andres; Traglia, Michela; Milani, Lili; Mitchell, Paul; Montgomery, Grant W; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis; de Mutsert, Renée; Nohr, Ellen A; Ohlsson, Claes; Olsen, Jørn; Ong, Ken K; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Perola, Markus; Peyser, Patricia A; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Chris; Kaprio, Jaakko; Raffel, Leslie J; Räikkönen, Katri; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M; Ring, Susan M; Roll, Kathryn; Rudan, Igor; Ruggiero, Daniela; Rujescu, Dan; Salomaa, Veikko; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schupf, Nicole; Smit, Johannes; Sorice, Rossella; Spector, Tim D; Starr, John M; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Swertz, Morris A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tung, Joyce Y; Uitterlinden, André G; Vaccargiu, Simona; Viikari, Jorma; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Vuckovic, Dragana; Waage, Johannes; Wagner, Gert G; Wang, Jie Jin; Wareham, Nicholas J; Weir, David R; Willemsen, Gonneke; Willeit, Johann; Wright, Alan F; Zondervan, Krina T; Stefansson, Kari; Krueger, Robert F; Lee, James J; Benjamin, Daniel J; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D; den Hoed, Marcel; Snieder, Harold; Mills, Melinda C

    2016-12-01

    The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior-age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB)-has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified, and the underlying mechanisms of AFB and NEB are poorly understood. We report a large genome-wide association study of both sexes including 251,151 individuals for AFB and 343,072 individuals for NEB. We identified 12 independent loci that are significantly associated with AFB and/or NEB in a SNP-based genome-wide association study and 4 additional loci associated in a gene-based effort. These loci harbor genes that are likely to have a role, either directly or by affecting non-local gene expression, in human reproduction and infertility, thereby increasing understanding of these complex traits.

  16. Genome-wide association analyses identify 13 new susceptibility loci for generalized vitiligo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Birlea, Stanca A; Fain, Pamela R; Ferrara, Tracey M; Ben, Songtao; Riccardi, Sheri L; Cole, Joanne B; Gowan, Katherine; Holland, Paulene J; Bennett, Dorothy C; Luiten, Rosalie M; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; van der Veen, JP Wietze; Hartmann, Anke; Eichner, Saskia; Schuler, Gerold; van Geel, Nanja; Lambert, Jo; Kemp, E Helen; Gawkrodger, David J; Weetman, Anthony P; Taïeb, Alain; Jouary, Thomas; Ezzedine, Khaled; Wallace, Margaret R; McCormack, Wayne T; Picardo, Mauro; Leone, Giovanni; Overbeck, Andreas; Silverberg, Nanette B; Spritz, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    In previous linkage and genome-wide association studies we identified 17 susceptibility loci for generalized vitiligo. By a second genome-wide association study, meta-analysis, and independent replication study, we have now identified 13 additional vitiligo-associated loci, including OCA2-HERC2, a region of 16q24.3 containing MC1R, a region of chromosome 11q21 near TYR, several immunoregulatory loci including IFIH1, CD80, CLNK, BACH2, SLA, CASP7, CD44, IKZF4, SH2B3, and a region of 22q13.2 where the causal gene remains uncertain. Functional pathway analysis shows that most vitiligo susceptibility loci encode immunoregulatory proteins or melanocyte components that likely mediate immune targeting and genetic relationships among vitiligo, malignant melanoma, and normal variation of eye, skin, and hair color. PMID:22561518

  17. Genome-wide analysis identifies 12 loci influencing human reproductive behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barban, Nicola; Jansen, Rick; de Vlaming, Ronald; Vaez, Ahmad; Mandemakers, Jornt J.; Tropf, Felix C.; Shen, Xia; Wilson, James F.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Tragante, Vinicius; van der Laan, Sander W.; Perry, John R. B.; Kong, Augustine; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer; Albrecht, Eva; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura; Atzmon, Gil; Auro, Kirsi; Ayers, Kristin; Bakshi, Andrew; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Berger, Klaus; Bergman, Aviv; Bertram, Lars; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Bonder, Marc Jan; Broer, Linda; Bui, Minh; Barbieri, Caterina; Cavadino, Alana; Chavarro, Jorge E; Turman, Constance; Concas, Maria Pina; Cordell, Heather J.; Davies, Gail; Eibich, Peter; Eriksson, Nicholas; Esko, Tõnu; Eriksson, Joel; Falahi, Fahimeh; Felix, Janine F.; Fontana, Mark Alan; Franke, Lude; Gandin, Ilaria; Gaskins, Audrey J.; Gieger, Christian; Gunderson, Erica P.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hayward, Caroline; He, Chunyan; Hofer, Edith; Huang, Hongyan; Joshi, Peter K.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karlsson, Robert; Kiechl, Stefan; Kifley, Annette; Kluttig, Alexander; Kraft, Peter; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lahti, Jari; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lind, Penelope A.; Liu, Tian; Makalic, Enes; Mamasoula, Crysovalanto; Matteson, Lindsay; Mbarek, Hamdi; McArdle, Patrick F.; McMahon, George; Meddens, S. Fleur W.; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Mike; Missmer, Stacey A.; Monnereau, Claire; van der Most, Peter J.; Myhre, Ronny; Nalls, Mike A.; Nutile, Teresa; Panagiota, Kalafati Ioanna; Porcu, Eleonora; Prokopenko, Inga; Rajan, Kumar B.; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Rueedi, Rico; Ryan, Kathy; Saba, Yasaman; Schmidt, Daniel; Smith, Jennifer A.; Stolk, Lisette; Streeten, Elizabeth; Tonjes, Anke; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Ulivi, Sheila; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Willeit, Peter; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Amin, Najaf; Andrews, Howard; Balkau, Beverley; Barzilai, Nir; Bergmann, Sven; Biino, Ginevra; Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Buring, Julie E.; Campbell, Harry; Cappellani, Stefania; Ciullo, Marina; Cox, Simon R.; Cucca, Francesco; Daniela, Toniolo; Davey-Smith, George; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; de Geus, Eco JC.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Felicita, Sala Cinzia; Froguel, Philippe; Gasparini, Paolo; Girotto, Giorgia; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Greiser, Karin Halina; Groenen, Patrick J.F.; de Haan, Hugoline G.; Haerting, Johannes; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hopper, John; Hypponen, Elina; Jacobsson, Bo; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Johannesson, Magnus; Jugessur, Astanand; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Keavney, Bernard; Kolcic, Ivana; Koponen, Päivikki; Kovacs, Peter; Kronenberg, Florian; Kutalik, Zoltan; La Bianca, Martina; Lachance, Genevieve; Iacono, William; Lai, Sandra; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C; Lindgren, Cecilia; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert; Lucht, Michael; Luoto, Riitta; Magnus, Per; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; McQuillan, Ruth; Medland, Sarah E.; Meisinger, Christa; Mellström, Dan; Metspalu, Andres; Michela, Traglia; Milani, Lili; Mitchell, Paul; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis; de Mutsert, Renée; Nohr, Ellen A; Ohlsson, Claes; Olsen, Jørn; Ong, Ken K.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Penninx, Brenda WJH; Perola, Markus; Peyser, Patricia A.; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Chris; Kaprio, Jaakko; Raffel, Leslie J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M.; Ring, Susan M.; Roll, Kathryn; Rudan, Igor; Ruggiero, Daniela; Rujescu, Dan; Salomaa, Veikko; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schupf, Nicole; Smit, Johannes; Sorice, Rossella; Spector, Tim D.; Starr, John M.; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Swertz, Morris A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A. Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tönjes, Anke; Tung, Joyce Y.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vaccargiu, Simona; Viikari, Jorma; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Vuckovic, Dragana; Waage, Johannes; Wagner, Gert G.; Wang, Jie Jin; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Willeit, Johann; Wright, Alan F.; Zondervan, Krina T.; Stefansson, Kari; Krueger, Robert F.; Lee, James J.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D.; den Hoed, Marcel; Snieder, Harold; Mills, Melinda C.

    2017-01-01

    The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior – age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB) – has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified and the underlying mechanisms of AFB and NEB are poorly understood. We report the largest genome-wide association study to date of both sexes including 251,151 individuals for AFB and 343,072 for NEB. We identified 12 independent loci that are significantly associated with AFB and/or NEB in a SNP-based genome-wide association study, and four additional loci in a gene-based effort. These loci harbor genes that are likely to play a role – either directly or by affecting non-local gene expression – in human reproduction and infertility, thereby increasing our understanding of these complex traits. PMID:27798627

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    OpenAIRE

    Okbay, Aysu; Beauchamp, Jonathan; Fontana, M.A. (Mark Alan); Lee, James J.; Pers, Tune; Rietveld, C.A. (Cornelius A.); Turley, Patrick; Chen, G.-B. (Guo-Bo); Emilsson, Valur; Meddens, S.F.W. (S. Fleur W.); Oskarsson, S. (Sven); Pickrell, J.K. (Joseph K.); Thom, K. (Kevin); Timshel, P. (Pascal); Vlaming, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    textabstractEducational attainment is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for educational attainment that extends our earlier discovery sample of 101,069 individuals to 293,723 individuals, and a replication study in an independent sample of 111,349 individuals from the UK Biobank. We identify 74 geno...

  19. Genome-wide association study of ankylosing spondylitis identifies non-MHC susceptibility loci

    OpenAIRE

    Reveille, John D; Sims, Anne-Marie; Danoy, Patrick; Evans, David M; Leo, Paul; Pointon, Jennifer J; Jin, Rui; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bradbury, Linda A; Appleton, Louise H; Davis, John C; Diekman, Laura; Doan, Tracey; Dowling, Alison; Duan, Ran

    2010-01-01

    To identify susceptibility loci for ankylosing spondylitis, we undertook a genome-wide association study in 2,053 unrelated ankylosing spondylitis cases among people of European descent and 5,140 ethnically matched controls, with replication in an independent cohort of 898 ankylosing spondylitis cases and 1,518 controls. Cases were genotyped with Illumina HumHap370 genotyping chips. In addition to strong association with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC; P < 10−800), we found associa...

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies novel breast cancer susceptibility loci

    OpenAIRE

    Easton, Douglas F.; Pooley, Karen A.; Dunning, Alison M.; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Thompson, Deborah; Ballinger, Dennis G.; Struewing, Jeffery P.; Morrison, Jonathan; Field, Helen; Luben, Robert; Wareham, Nicholas; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S.; Bowman, Richard; Meyer, Kerstin B.

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer exhibits familial aggregation, consistent with variation in genetic susceptibility to the disease. Known susceptibility genes account for less than 25% of the familial risk of breast cancer, and the residual genetic variance is likely to be due to variants conferring more moderate risks. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study in 4,398 breast cancer cases and 4,316 controls, followed by a third stage in which 30 single n...

  1. Genome-wide association study to identify common variants associated with brachial circumference: a meta-analysis of 14 cohorts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna Boraska

    Full Text Available Brachial circumference (BC, also known as upper arm or mid arm circumference, can be used as an indicator of muscle mass and fat tissue, which are distributed differently in men and women. Analysis of anthropometric measures of peripheral fat distribution such as BC could help in understanding the complex pathophysiology behind overweight and obesity. The purpose of this study is to identify genetic variants associated with BC through a large-scale genome-wide association scan (GWAS meta-analysis. We used fixed-effects meta-analysis to synthesise summary results across 14 GWAS discovery and 4 replication cohorts comprising overall 22,376 individuals (12,031 women and 10,345 men of European ancestry. Individual analyses were carried out for men, women, and combined across sexes using linear regression and an additive genetic model: adjusted for age and adjusted for age and BMI. We prioritised signals for follow-up in two-stages. We did not detect any signals reaching genome-wide significance. The FTO rs9939609 SNP showed nominal evidence for association (p<0.05 in the age-adjusted strata for men and across both sexes. In this first GWAS meta-analysis for BC to date, we have not identified any genome-wide significant signals and do not observe robust association of previously established obesity loci with BC. Large-scale collaborations will be necessary to achieve higher power to detect loci underlying BC.

  2. Identifying Human Genome-Wide CNV, LOH and UPD by Targeted Sequencing of Selected Regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Copy-number variations (CNV, loss of heterozygosity (LOH, and uniparental disomy (UPD are large genomic aberrations leading to many common inherited diseases, cancers, and other complex diseases. An integrated tool to identify these aberrations is essential in understanding diseases and in designing clinical interventions. Previous discovery methods based on whole-genome sequencing (WGS require very high depth of coverage on the whole genome scale, and are cost-wise inefficient. Another approach, whole exome genome sequencing (WEGS, is limited to discovering variations within exons. Thus, we are lacking efficient methods to detect genomic aberrations on the whole genome scale using next-generation sequencing technology. Here we present a method to identify genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD for the human genome via selectively sequencing a small portion of genome termed Selected Target Regions (SeTRs. In our experiments, the SeTRs are covered by 99.73%~99.95% with sufficient depth. Our developed bioinformatics pipeline calls genome-wide CNVs with high confidence, revealing 8 credible events of LOH and 3 UPD events larger than 5M from 15 individual samples. We demonstrate that genome-wide CNV, LOH and UPD can be detected using a cost-effective SeTRs sequencing approach, and that LOH and UPD can be identified using just a sample grouping technique, without using a matched sample or familial information.

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkaissi, Hammoudi; Ekstrand, Jimmy; Jawad, Aksa

    2016-01-01

    . METHODS: A.SW, B10.S and their F1 and F2 offspring were exposed for 6 weeks to 2.0 mg Hg/L drinking water. Genotyping with Microsatellites were conducted on 84 F2 mice for Genome-Wide Scan by using Ion Pair Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (IP RP HPLC). Quantitative trait loci (QTL......BACKGROUND: Following human mercury (Hg) exposure, the metal accumulates with considerable concentrations in kidney, liver, and brain. Although the toxicokinetics of Hg has been studied extensively, factors responsible for inter-individual variation in humans are largely unknown. Differences...

  4. Polygenic analysis of genome-wide SNP data identifies common variants on allergic rhinitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohammadnejad, Afsaneh; Brasch-Andersen, Charlotte; Haagerup, Annette

    Background: Allergic Rhinitis (AR) is a complex disorder that affects many people around the world. There is a high genetic contribution to the development of the AR, as twins and family studies have estimated heritability of more than 33%. Due to the complex nature of the disease, single SNP...... analysis has limited power in identifying the genetic variations for AR. We combined genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) with polygenic risk score (PRS) in exploring the genetic basis underlying the disease. Methods: We collected clinical data on 631 Danish subjects with AR cases consisting of 434...... sibling pairs and unrelated individuals and control subjects of 197 unrelated individuals. SNP genotyping was done by Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 5.0. SNP imputation was performed using "IMPUTE2". Using additive effect model, GWAS was conducted in discovery sample, the genotypes...

  5. A genome-wide approach identifies that the aspartate metabolism pathway contributes to asparaginase sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang; Yang, Wenjian; Fan, Yiping; Stocco, Gabriele; Crews, Kristine R.; Yang, Jun J.; Paugh, Steven W.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2011-01-01

    Asparaginase is an important component of treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The basis for interindividual differences in asparaginase sensitivity remains unclear. To comprehensively identify genetic variants important in the cytotoxicity of asparaginase, we employed a genome-wide association approach using the HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (87 CEU trio members) and 54 primary ALL leukemic blast samples at diagnosis. Asparaginase sensitivity was assessed as the drug concentration necessary to inhibit 50% of growth (IC50). In CEU lines, we tested 2,390,203 SNP genotypes at the individual SNP (p ADSL and DARS genes. We validated that SNPs in the aspartate metabolism pathway were also associated with asparaginase sensitivity in primary ALL leukemic blast samples (p = 5.5 × 10−5). Our genome-wide interrogation of CEU cell lines and primary ALL blasts revealed that inherited genomic interindividual variation in a plausible candidate pathway can contribute to asparaginase sensitivity. PMID:21072045

  6. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with Mathematics Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huan; Gu, Xiao-Hong; Zhou, Yuxi; Ge, Zeng; Wang, Bin; Siok, Wai Ting; Wang, Guoqing; Huen, Michael; Jiang, Yuyang; Tan, Li-Hai; Sun, Yimin

    2017-02-03

    Mathematics ability is a complex cognitive trait with polygenic heritability. Genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been an effective approach to investigate genetic components underlying mathematic ability. Although previous studies reported several candidate genetic variants, none of them exceeded genome-wide significant threshold in general populations. Herein, we performed GWAS in Chinese elementary school students to identify potential genetic variants associated with mathematics ability. The discovery stage included 494 and 504 individuals from two independent cohorts respectively. The replication stage included another cohort of 599 individuals. In total, 28 of 81 candidate SNPs that met validation criteria were further replicated. Combined meta-analysis of three cohorts identified four SNPs (rs1012694, rs11743006, rs17778739 and rs17777541) of SPOCK1 gene showing association with mathematics ability (minimum p value 5.67 × 10 -10 , maximum β -2.43). The SPOCK1 gene is located on chromosome 5q31.2 and encodes a highly conserved glycoprotein testican-1 which was associated with tumor progression and prognosis as well as neurogenesis. This is the first study to report genome-wide significant association of individual SNPs with mathematics ability in general populations. Our preliminary results further supported the role of SPOCK1 during neurodevelopment. The genetic complexities underlying mathematics ability might contribute to explain the basis of human cognition and intelligence at genetic level.

  7. A Drosophila Genome-Wide Screen Identifies Regulators of Steroid Hormone Production and Developmental Timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas Danielsen, E.; E. Møller, Morten; Yamanaka, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormones control important developmental processes and are linked to many diseases. To systematically identify genes and pathways required for steroid production, we performed a Drosophila genome-wide in vivo RNAi screen and identified 1,906 genes with potential roles in steroidogenesis...... and developmental timing. Here, we use our screen as a resource to identify mechanisms regulating intracellular levels of cholesterol, a substrate for steroidogenesis. We identify a conserved fatty acid elongase that underlies a mechanism that adjusts cholesterol trafficking and steroidogenesis with nutrition...

  8. Genome-wide association analysis of insomnia complaints identifies risk genes and genetic overlap with psychiatric and metabolic traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammerschlag, Anke R; Stringer, Sven; de Leeuw, Christiaan A; Sniekers, Suzanne; Taskesen, Erdogan; Watanabe, Kyoko; Blanken, Tessa F; Dekker, Kim; Te Lindert, Bart H W; Wassing, Rick; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Stefansson, Hreinn; Gislason, Thorarinn; Berger, Klaus; Schormair, Barbara; Wellmann, Juergen; Winkelmann, Juliane; Stefansson, Kari; Oexle, Konrad; Van Someren, Eus J W; Posthuma, Danielle

    2017-01-01

    Persistent insomnia is among the most frequent complaints in general practice. To identify genetic factors for insomnia complaints, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a genome-wide gene-based association study (GWGAS) in 113,006 individuals. We identify three loci and seven

  9. Short communication: Genome-wide scan for bovine milk-fat composition. II. Quantitative trait loci for long-chain fatty acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schennink, A.; Stoop, W.M.; Visker, M.H.P.W.; Poel, van der J.J.; Bovenhuis, H.; Arendonk, van J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a genome-wide scan to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contribute to genetic variation in long-chain milk fatty acids. Milk-fat composition phenotypes were available on 1,905 Dutch Holstein-Friesian cows. A total of 849 cows and their 7 sires were genotyped for

  10. Genome-wide association study of ankylosing spondylitis identifies non-MHC susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveille, John D; Sims, Anne-Marie; Danoy, Patrick; Evans, David M; Leo, Paul; Pointon, Jennifer J; Jin, Rui; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bradbury, Linda A; Appleton, Louise H; Davis, John C; Diekman, Laura; Doan, Tracey; Dowling, Alison; Duan, Ran; Duncan, Emma L; Farrar, Claire; Hadler, Johanna; Harvey, David; Karaderi, Tugce; Mogg, Rebecca; Pomeroy, Emma; Pryce, Karena; Taylor, Jacqueline; Savage, Laurie; Deloukas, Panos; Kumanduri, Vasudev; Peltonen, Leena; Ring, Sue M; Whittaker, Pamela; Glazov, Evgeny; Thomas, Gethin P; Maksymowych, Walter P; Inman, Robert D; Ward, Michael M; Stone, Millicent A; Weisman, Michael H; Wordsworth, B Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2011-01-01

    To identify susceptibility loci for ankylosing spondylitis, we undertook a genome-wide association study in 2,053 unrelated ankylosing spondylitis cases among people of European descent and 5,140 ethnically matched controls, with replication in an independent cohort of 898 ankylosing spondylitis cases and 1,518 controls. Cases were genotyped with Illumina HumHap370 genotyping chips. In addition to strong association with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC; P ankylosing spondylitis risk and identifies a major role for the interleukin (IL)-23 and IL-1 cytokine pathways in disease susceptibility. PMID:20062062

  11. Genome-wide association study of ankylosing spondylitis identifies non-MHC susceptibility loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reveille, John D; Sims, Anne-Marie; Danoy, Patrick; Evans, David M; Leo, Paul; Pointon, Jennifer J; Jin, Rui; Zhou, Xiaodong; Bradbury, Linda A; Appleton, Louise H; Davis, John C; Diekman, Laura; Doan, Tracey; Dowling, Alison; Duan, Ran; Duncan, Emma L; Farrar, Claire; Hadler, Johanna; Harvey, David; Karaderi, Tugce; Mogg, Rebecca; Pomeroy, Emma; Pryce, Karena; Taylor, Jacqueline; Savage, Laurie; Deloukas, Panos; Kumanduri, Vasudev; Peltonen, Leena; Ring, Sue M; Whittaker, Pamela; Glazov, Evgeny; Thomas, Gethin P; Maksymowych, Walter P; Inman, Robert D; Ward, Michael M; Stone, Millicent A; Weisman, Michael H; Wordsworth, B Paul; Brown, Matthew A

    2010-02-01

    To identify susceptibility loci for ankylosing spondylitis, we undertook a genome-wide association study in 2,053 unrelated ankylosing spondylitis cases among people of European descent and 5,140 ethnically matched controls, with replication in an independent cohort of 898 ankylosing spondylitis cases and 1,518 controls. Cases were genotyped with Illumina HumHap370 genotyping chips. In addition to strong association with the major histocompatibility complex (MHC; P ankylosing spondylitis risk and identifies a major role for the interleukin (IL)-23 and IL-1 cytokine pathways in disease susceptibility.

  12. Large-scale meta-analysis of genome-wide association data identifies six new risk loci for Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalls, Mike A.; Pankratz, Nathan; Lill, Christina M.; Do, Chuong B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Saad, Mohamad; DeStefano, Anita L.; Kara, Eleanna; Bras, Jose; Sharma, Manu; Schulte, Claudia; Keller, Margaux F.; Arepalli, Sampath; Letson, Christopher; Edsall, Connor; Stefansson, Hreinn; Liu, Xinmin; Pliner, Hannah; Lee, Joseph H.; Cheng, Rong; Ikram, M. Arfan; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Martinez, Maria; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Goate, Alison; Marder, Karen; Fiske, Brian; Sutherland, Margaret; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Myers, Richard H.; Clark, Lorraine N.; Stefansson, Kari; Hardy, John A.; Heutink, Peter; Chen, Honglei; Wood, Nicholas W.; Houlden, Henry; Payami, Haydeh; Brice, Alexis; Scott, William K.; Gasser, Thomas; Bertram, Lars; Eriksson, Nicholas; Foroud, Tatiana; Singleton, Andrew B.; Plagnol, Vincent; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Sigurlaug; Barker, Roger; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Bras, Jose M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, J. Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Dürr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Dong, Jing; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Wurster, Isabel; Mätzler, Walter; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; Jónsson, Pálmi V.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw R.; Morrison, Karen E.; Mudanohwo, Ese; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Pearson, Justin; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Pollak, Pierre; Post, Bart; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Shoulson, Ira; Sidransky, Ellen; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Bettella, Francesco; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, Carlie M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, François; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefánsson, Kári; Hardy, John; Factor, S.; Higgins, D.; Evans, S.; Shill, H.; Stacy, M.; Danielson, J.; Marlor, L.; Williamson, K.; Jankovic, J.; Hunter, C.; Simon, D.; Ryan, P.; Scollins, L.; Saunders-Pullman, R.; Boyar, K.; Costan-Toth, C.; Ohmann, E.; Sudarsky, L.; Joubert, C.; Friedman, J.; Chou, K.; Fernandez, H.; Lannon, M.; Galvez-Jimenez, N.; Podichetty, A.; Thompson, K.; Lewitt, P.; Deangelis, M.; O'Brien, C.; Seeberger, L.; Dingmann, C.; Judd, D.; Marder, K.; Fraser, J.; Harris, J.; Bertoni, J.; Peterson, C.; Rezak, M.; Medalle, G.; Chouinard, S.; Panisset, M.; Hall, J.; Poiffaut, H.; Calabrese, V.; Roberge, P.; Wojcieszek, J.; Belden, J.; Jennings, D.; Marek, K.; Mendick, S.; Reich, S.; Dunlop, B.; Jog, M.; Horn, C.; Uitti, R.; Turk, M.; Ajax, T.; Mannetter, J.; Sethi, K.; Carpenter, J.; Dill, B.; Hatch, L.; Ligon, K.; Narayan, S.; Blindauer, K.; Abou-Samra, K.; Petit, J.; Elmer, L.; Aiken, E.; Davis, K.; Schell, C.; Wilson, S.; Velickovic, M.; Koller, W.; Phipps, S.; Feigin, A.; Gordon, M.; Hamann, J.; Licari, E.; Marotta-Kollarus, M.; Shannon, B.; Winnick, R.; Simuni, T.; Videnovic, A.; Kaczmarek, A.; Williams, K.; Wolff, M.; Rao, J.; Cook, M.; Fernandez, M.; Kostyk, S.; Hubble, J.; Campbell, A.; Reider, C.; Seward, A.; Camicioli, R.; Carter, J.; Nutt, J.; Andrews, P.; Morehouse, S.; Stone, C.; Mendis, T.; Grimes, D.; Alcorn-Costa, C.; Gray, P.; Haas, K.; Vendette, J.; Sutton, J.; Hutchinson, B.; Young, J.; Rajput, A.; Klassen, L.; Shirley, T.; Manyam, B.; Simpson, P.; Whetteckey, J.; Wulbrecht, B.; Truong, D.; Pathak, M.; Frei, K.; Luong, N.; Tra, T.; Tran, A.; Vo, J.; Lang, A.; Kleiner- Fisman, G.; Nieves, A.; Johnston, L.; So, J.; Podskalny, G.; Giffin, L.; Atchison, P.; Allen, C.; Martin, W.; Wieler, M.; Suchowersky, O.; Furtado, S.; Klimek, M.; Hermanowicz, N.; Niswonger, S.; Shults, C.; Fontaine, D.; Aminoff, M.; Christine, C.; Diminno, M.; Hevezi, J.; Dalvi, A.; Kang, U.; Richman, J.; Uy, S.; Sahay, A.; Gartner, M.; Schwieterman, D.; Hall, D.; Leehey, M.; Culver, S.; Derian, T.; Demarcaida, T.; Thurlow, S.; Rodnitzky, R.; Dobson, J.; Lyons, K.; Pahwa, R.; Gales, T.; Thomas, S.; Shulman, L.; Weiner, W.; Dustin, K.; Singer, C.; Zelaya, L.; Tuite, P.; Hagen, V.; Rolandelli, S.; Schacherer, R.; Kosowicz, J.; Gordon, P.; Werner, J.; Serrano, C.; Roque, S.; Kurlan, R.; Berry, D.; Gardiner, I.; Hauser, R.; Sanchez-Ramos, J.; Zesiewicz, T.; Delgado, H.; Price, K.; Rodriguez, P.; Wolfrath, S.; Pfeiffer, R.; Davis, L.; Pfeiffer, B.; Dewey, R.; Hayward, B.; Johnson, A.; Meacham, M.; Estes, B.; Walker, F.; Hunt, V.; O'Neill, C.; Racette, B.; Swisher, L.; Dijamco, Cheri; Conley, Emily Drabant; Dorfman, Elizabeth; Tung, Joyce Y.; Hinds, David A.; Mountain, Joanna L.; Wojcicki, Anne; Lew, M.; Klein, C.; Golbe, L.; Growdon, J.; Wooten, G. F.; Watts, R.; Guttman, M.; Goldwurm, S.; Saint-Hilaire, M. H.; Baker, K.; Litvan, I.; Nicholson, G.; Nance, M.; Drasby, E.; Isaacson, S.; Burn, D.; Pramstaller, P.; Al-hinti, J.; Moller, A.; Sherman, S.; Roxburgh, R.; Slevin, J.; Perlmutter, J.; Mark, M. H.; Huggins, N.; Pezzoli, G.; Massood, T.; Itin, I.; Corbett, A.; Chinnery, P.; Ostergaard, K.; Snow, B.; Cambi, F.; Kay, D.; Samii, A.; Agarwal, P.; Roberts, J. W.; Higgins, D. S.; Molho, Eric; Rosen, Ami; Montimurro, J.; Martinez, E.; Griffith, A.; Kusel, V.; Yearout, D.; Zabetian, C.; Clark, L. N.; Liu, X.; Lee, J. H.; Taub, R. Cheng; Louis, E. D.; Cote, L. J.; Waters, C.; Ford, B.; Fahn, S.; Vance, Jeffery M.; Beecham, Gary W.; Martin, Eden R.; Nuytemans, Karen; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; DeStefano, Anita; Seshadri, Sudha; Choi, Seung Hoan; Frank, Samuel; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rice, Kenneth; Longstreth, W. T.; Ton, Thanh G. N.; Jain, Samay; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verlinden, Vincent J.; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Singleton, Andrew; Cookson, Mark; Hernandez, Dena; Nalls, Michael; Zonderman, Alan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Johnson, Robert; Longo, Dan; O'Brien, Richard; Traynor, Bryan; Troncoso, Juan; van der Brug, Marcel; Zielke, Ronald; Weale, Michael; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Tsimourtou, Vana; Spanaki, Cleanthe; Plaitakis, Andreas; Bozi, Maria; Stefanis, Leonidas; Vassilatis, Dimitris; Koutsis, Georgios; Panas, Marios; Lunnon, Katie; Lupton, Michelle; Powell, John; Parkkinen, Laura; Ansorge, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of Parkinson's disease genome-wide association studies using a common set of 7,893,274 variants across 13,708 cases and 95,282 controls. Twenty-six loci were identified as having genome-wide significant association; these and 6 additional previously reported loci were

  13. Modifiers of notch transcriptional activity identified by genome-wide RNAi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firnhaber Christopher B

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Notch signaling pathway regulates a diverse array of developmental processes, and aberrant Notch signaling can lead to diseases, including cancer. To obtain a more comprehensive understanding of the genetic network that integrates into Notch signaling, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila cell culture to identify genes that modify Notch-dependent transcription. Results Employing complementary data analyses, we found 399 putative modifiers: 189 promoting and 210 antagonizing Notch activated transcription. These modifiers included several known Notch interactors, validating the robustness of the assay. Many novel modifiers were also identified, covering a range of cellular localizations from the extracellular matrix to the nucleus, as well as a large number of proteins with unknown function. Chromatin-modifying proteins represent a major class of genes identified, including histone deacetylase and demethylase complex components and other chromatin modifying, remodeling and replacement factors. A protein-protein interaction map of the Notch-dependent transcription modifiers revealed that a large number of the identified proteins interact physically with these core chromatin components. Conclusions The genome-wide RNAi screen identified many genes that can modulate Notch transcriptional output. A protein interaction map of the identified genes highlighted a network of chromatin-modifying enzymes and remodelers that regulate Notch transcription. Our results open new avenues to explore the mechanisms of Notch signal regulation and the integration of this pathway into diverse cellular processes.

  14. AluScan: a method for genome-wide scanning of sequence and structure variations in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Lingling

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To complement next-generation sequencing technologies, there is a pressing need for efficient pre-sequencing capture methods with reduced costs and DNA requirement. The Alu family of short interspersed nucleotide elements is the most abundant type of transposable elements in the human genome and a recognized source of genome instability. With over one million Alu elements distributed throughout the genome, they are well positioned to facilitate genome-wide sequence amplification and capture of regions likely to harbor genetic variation hotspots of biological relevance. Results Here we report on the use of inter-Alu PCR with an enhanced range of amplicons in conjunction with next-generation sequencing to generate an Alu-anchored scan, or 'AluScan', of DNA sequences between Alu transposons, where Alu consensus sequence-based 'H-type' PCR primers that elongate outward from the head of an Alu element are combined with 'T-type' primers elongating from the poly-A containing tail to achieve huge amplicon range. To illustrate the method, glioma DNA was compared with white blood cell control DNA of the same patient by means of AluScan. The over 10 Mb sequences obtained, derived from more than 8,000 genes spread over all the chromosomes, revealed a highly reproducible capture of genomic sequences enriched in genic sequences and cancer candidate gene regions. Requiring only sub-micrograms of sample DNA, the power of AluScan as a discovery tool for genetic variations was demonstrated by the identification of 357 instances of loss of heterozygosity, 341 somatic indels, 274 somatic SNVs, and seven potential somatic SNV hotspots between control and glioma DNA. Conclusions AluScan, implemented with just a small number of H-type and T-type inter-Alu PCR primers, provides an effective capture of a diversity of genome-wide sequences for analysis. The method, by enabling an examination of gene-enriched regions containing exons, introns, and

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies variants associated with autoimmune hepatitis type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Ynto S; van Gerven, Nicole M F; Zwiers, Antonie; Verwer, Bart J; van Hoek, Bart; van Erpecum, Karel J; Beuers, Ulrich; van Buuren, Henk R; Drenth, Joost P H; den Ouden, Jannie W; Verdonk, Robert C; Koek, Ger H; Brouwer, Johannes T; Guichelaar, Maureen M J; Vrolijk, Jan M; Kraal, Georg; Mulder, Chris J J; van Nieuwkerk, Carin M J; Fischer, Janett; Berg, Thomas; Stickel, Felix; Sarrazin, Christoph; Schramm, Christoph; Lohse, Ansgar W; Weiler-Normann, Christina; Lerch, Markus M; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Homuth, Georg; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Verspaget, Hein W; Kumar, Vinod; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Wijmenga, Cisca; Franke, Lude; Bouma, Gerd

    2014-08-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an uncommon autoimmune liver disease of unknown etiology. We used a genome-wide approach to identify genetic variants that predispose individuals to AIH. We performed a genome-wide association study of 649 adults in The Netherlands with AIH type 1 and 13,436 controls. Initial associations were further analyzed in an independent replication panel comprising 451 patients with AIH type 1 in Germany and 4103 controls. We also performed an association analysis in the discovery cohort using imputed genotypes of the major histocompatibility complex region. We associated AIH with a variant in the major histocompatibility complex region at rs2187668 (P = 1.5 × 10(-78)). Analysis of this variant in the discovery cohort identified HLA-DRB1*0301 (P = 5.3 × 10(-49)) as a primary susceptibility genotype and HLA-DRB1*0401 (P = 2.8 × 10(-18)) as a secondary susceptibility genotype. We also associated AIH with variants of SH2B3 (rs3184504, 12q24; P = 7.7 × 10(-8)) and CARD10 (rs6000782, 22q13.1; P = 3.0 × 10(-6)). In addition, strong inflation of association signal was found with single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with other immune-mediated diseases, including primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis, but not with single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with other genetic traits. In a genome-wide association study, we associated AIH type 1 with variants in the major histocompatibility complex region, and identified variants of SH2B3and CARD10 as likely risk factors. These findings support a complex genetic basis for AIH pathogenesis and indicate that part of the genetic susceptibility overlaps with that for other immune-mediated liver diseases. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okbay, Aysu; P. Beauchamp, Jonathan; Alan Fontana, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Educational attainment is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals1. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for educational attainment that extends...... development. Our findings demonstrate that, even for a behavioural phenotype that is mostly environmentally determined, a well-powered GWAS identifies replicable associated genetic variants that suggest biologically relevant pathways. Because educational attainment is measured in large numbers of individuals...

  17. Meta-analyses of genome-wide linkage scans of anxiety-related phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Webb, B.T.; Guo, A.Y.; Maher, B.S.; Zhao, Z.; van den Oord, E.J.; Kendler, K.S.; Riley, B.P.; Gillespie, N.A.; Prescott, C.A.; Middeldorp, C.M.; Willemsen, G.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Hottenga, J.J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Slagboom, P.E.; Wray, N.R.; Montgomery, G.W.; Martin, N.G.; Wright, M.J.; Heath, A.C.; Madden, P.A.F.; Gelernter, J.; Knowles, J.A.; Hamilton, S.P.; Weissman, M.M.; Fyer, A.J.; Huezo-Diaz, P.; McGuffin, P.; Farmer, A.; Craig, I.W.; Lewis, C.; Sham, P.; Crowe, R.R.; Flint, J.; Hettema, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic factors underlying trait neuroticism, reflecting a tendency towards negative affective states, may overlap genetic susceptibility for anxiety disorders and help explain the extensive comorbidity amongst internalizing disorders. Genome-wide linkage (GWL) data from several studies of

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okbay, Aysu; Beauchamp, Jonathan P; Fontana, Mark Alan; Lee, James J; Pers, Tune H; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Turley, Patrick; Chen, Guo-Bo; Emilsson, Valur; Meddens, S Fleur W; Oskarsson, Sven; Pickrell, Joseph K; Thom, Kevin; Timshel, Pascal; de Vlaming, Ronald; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bacelis, Jonas; Baumbach, Clemens; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Brandsma, Johannes H; Pina Concas, Maria; Derringer, Jaime; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Galesloot, Tessel E; Girotto, Giorgia; Gupta, Richa; Hall, Leanne M; Harris, Sarah E; Hofer, Edith; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huffman, Jennifer E; Kaasik, Kadri; Kalafati, Ioanna P; Karlsson, Robert; Kong, Augustine; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J; deLeeuw, Christiaan; Lind, Penelope A; Lindgren, Karl-Oskar; Liu, Tian; Mangino, Massimo; Marten, Jonathan; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B; van der Most, Peter J; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Payton, Antony; Pervjakova, Natalia; Peyrot, Wouter J; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rueedi, Rico; Salvi, Erika; Schmidt, Börge; Schraut, Katharina E; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert V; Poot, Raymond A; St Pourcain, Beate; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Verweij, Niek; Vuckovic, Dragana; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jingyun; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Zhihong; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Biino, Ginevra; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boyle, Patricia A; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P; Davies, Gail; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deloukas, Panos; Demuth, Ilja; Ding, Jun; Eibich, Peter; Eisele, Lewin; Eklund, Niina; Evans, David M; Faul, Jessica D; Feitosa, Mary F; Forstner, Andreas J; Gandin, Ilaria; Gunnarsson, Bjarni; Halldórsson, Bjarni V; Harris, Tamara B; Heath, Andrew C; Hocking, Lynne J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Homuth, Georg; Horan, Michael A; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Jager, Philip L; Joshi, Peter K; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika A; Kähönen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Keltigangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kraja, Aldi T; Kroh, Martin; Kutalik, Zoltan; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J; Lebreton, Maël P; Levinson, Douglas F; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C M; Loukola, Anu; Madden, Pamela A; Mägi, Reedik; Mäki-Opas, Tomi; Marioni, Riccardo E; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meddens, Gerardus A; McMahon, George; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Milaneschi, Yusplitri; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W; Myhre, Ronny; Nelson, Christopher P; Nyholt, Dale R; Ollier, William E R; Palotie, Aarno; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pedersen, Nancy L; Petrovic, Katja E; Porteous, David J; Räikkönen, Katri; Ring, Susan M; Robino, Antonietta; Rostapshova, Olga; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Rodney J; Smith, Blair H; Smith, Jennifer A; Staessen, Jan A; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Strauch, Konstantin; Terracciano, Antonio; Tobin, Martin D; Ulivi, Sheila; Vaccargiu, Simona; Quaye, Lydia; van Rooij, Frank J A; Venturini, Cristina; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M; Vozzi, Diego; Waage, Johannes; Ware, Erin B; Willemsen, Gonneke; Attia, John R; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Bisgaard, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Bültmann, Ute; Chabris, Christopher F; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George V; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Franke, Barbara; Franke, Lude; Gasparini, Paolo; Gejman, Pablo V; Gieger, Christian; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Gratten, Jacob; Groenen, Patrick J F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Hinds, David A; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G; Jacobsson, Bo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lehrer, Steven F; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Pendleton, Neil; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Perola, Markus; Pirastu, Nicola; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Power, Christine; Province, Michael A; Samani, Nilesh J; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tiemeier, Henning; Tung, Joyce Y; Uitterlinden, André G; Vitart, Veronique; Vollenweider, Peter; Weir, David R; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Conley, Dalton C; Krueger, Robert F; Davey Smith, George; Hofman, Albert; Laibson, David I; Medland, Sarah E; Meyer, Michelle N; Yang, Jian; Johannesson, Magnus; Visscher, Peter M; Esko, Tõnu; Koellinger, Philipp D; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J

    2016-05-26

    Educational attainment is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for educational attainment that extends our earlier discovery sample of 101,069 individuals to 293,723 individuals, and a replication study in an independent sample of 111,349 individuals from the UK Biobank. We identify 74 genome-wide significant loci associated with the number of years of schooling completed. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with educational attainment are disproportionately found in genomic regions regulating gene expression in the fetal brain. Candidate genes are preferentially expressed in neural tissue, especially during the prenatal period, and enriched for biological pathways involved in neural development. Our findings demonstrate that, even for a behavioural phenotype that is mostly environmentally determined, a well-powered GWAS identifies replicable associated genetic variants that suggest biologically relevant pathways. Because educational attainment is measured in large numbers of individuals, it will continue to be useful as a proxy phenotype in efforts to characterize the genetic influences of related phenotypes, including cognition and neuropsychiatric diseases.

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okbay, Aysu; Beauchamp, Jonathan P.; Fontana, Mark A.; Lee, James J.; Pers, Tune H.; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Turley, Patrick; Chen, Guo-Bo; Emilsson, Valur; Meddens, S. Fleur W.; Oskarsson, Sven; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Thom, Kevin; Timshel, Pascal; de Vlaming, Ronald; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Bacelis, Jonas; Baumbach, Clemens; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Brandsma, Johannes H.; Concas, Maria Pina; Derringer, Jaime; Furlotte, Nicholas A.; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Girotto, Giorgia; Gupta, Richa; Hall, Leanne M.; Harris, Sarah E.; Hofer, Edith; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Kaasik, Kadri; Kalafati, Ioanna P.; Karlsson, Robert; Kong, Augustine; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J.; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Lind, Penelope A.; Lindgren, Karl-Oskar; Liu, Tian; Mangino, Massimo; Marten, Jonathan; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B.; van der Most, Peter J.; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Payton, Antony; Pervjakova, Natalia; Peyrot, Wouter J.; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rueedi, Rico; Salvi, Erika; Schmidt, Börge; Schraut, Katharina E.; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert V.; Poot, Raymond A.; Pourcain, Beate; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Verweij, Niek; Vuckovic, Dragana; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jingyun; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Zhihong; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boyle, Patricia A.; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Davies, Gail; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deloukas, Panos; Demuth, Ilja; Ding, Jun; Eibich, Peter; Eisele, Lewin; Eklund, Niina; Evans68, David M.; Faul, Jessica D.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Forstner, Andreas J.; Gandin, Ilaria; Gunnarsson, Bjarni; Halldórsson, Bjarni V.; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Homuth, Georg; Horan, Michael A.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Jager, Philip L.; Joshi, Peter K.; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika A.; Kähönen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Keltigangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kroh, Martin; Kutalik, Zoltan; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J.; Lebreton, Maël P.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C.M.; Loukola, Anu; Madden, Pamela A.; Mägi, Reedik; Mäki-Opas, Tomi; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meddens, Gerardus A.; McMahon, George; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Milaneschi, Yusplitri; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Myhre, Ronny; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Ollier, William E.R.; Palotie, Aarno; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Petrovic, Katja E.; Porteous, David J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Ring, Susan M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rostapshova, Olga; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Rodney J.; Smith, Blair H.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Staessen, Jan A.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Strauch, Konstantin; Terracciano, Antonio; Tobin, Martin D.; Ulivi, Sheila; Vaccargiu, Simona; Quaye, Lydia; van Rooij, Frank J.A.; Venturini, Cristina; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A.E.; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M.; Vozzi, Diego; Waage, Johannes; Ware, Erin B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Attia, John R.; Bennett, David A.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Bisgaard, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bultmann, Ute; Chabris, Christopher F.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George V.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franke, Barbara; Franke, Lude; Gasparini, Paolo; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Gratten, Jacob; Groenen, Patrick J.F.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Hinds, David A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G.; Jacobsson, Bo; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lehrer, Steven F.; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Pendleton, Neil; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Perola, Markus; Pirastu, Nicola; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Power, Christine; Province, Michael A.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A. Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tiemeier, Henning; Tung, Joyce Y.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vitart, Veronique; Vollenweider, Peter; Weir, David R.; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Conley, Dalton C.; Krueger, Robert F.; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Laibson, David I.; Medland, Sarah E.; Meyer, Michelle N.; Yang, Jian; Johannesson, Magnus; Visscher, Peter M.; Esko, Tõnu; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Educational attainment (EA) is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are also estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals1. We report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for EA that extends our earlier discovery sample1,2 of 101,069 individuals to 293,723 individuals, and a replication in an independent sample of 111,349 individuals from the UK Biobank. We now identify 74 genome-wide significant loci associated with number of years of schooling completed. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with educational attainment are disproportionately found in genomic regions regulating gene expression in the fetal brain. Candidate genes are preferentially expressed in neural tissue, especially during the prenatal period, and enriched for biological pathways involved in neural development. Our findings demonstrate that, even for a behavioral phenotype that is mostly environmentally determined, a well-powered GWAS identifies replicable associated genetic variants that suggest biologically relevant pathways. Because EA is measured in large numbers of individuals, it will continue to be useful as a proxy phenotype in efforts to characterize the genetic influences of related phenotypes, including cognition and neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:27225129

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies a maternal copy-number deletion in PSG11 enriched among preeclampsia patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Linlu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific genetic contributions for preeclampsia (PE are currently unknown. This genome-wide association study (GWAS aims to identify maternal single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and copy-number variants (CNVs involved in the etiology of PE. Methods A genome-wide scan was performed on 177 PE cases (diagnosed according to National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute guidelines and 116 normotensive controls. White female study subjects from Iowa were genotyped on Affymetrix SNP 6.0 microarrays. CNV calls made using a combination of four detection algorithms (Birdseye, Canary, PennCNV, and QuantiSNP were merged using CNVision and screened with stringent prioritization criteria. Due to limited DNA quantities and the deleterious nature of copy-number deletions, it was decided a priori that only deletions would be selected for assay on the entire case-control dataset using quantitative real-time PCR. Results The top four SNP candidates had an allelic or genotypic p-value between 10-5 and 10-6, however, none surpassed the Bonferroni-corrected significance threshold. Three recurrent rare deletions meeting prioritization criteria detected in multiple cases were selected for targeted genotyping. A locus of particular interest was found showing an enrichment of case deletions in 19q13.31 (5/169 cases and 1/114 controls, which encompasses the PSG11 gene contiguous to a highly plastic genomic region. All algorithm calls for these regions were assay confirmed. Conclusions CNVs may confer risk for PE and represent interesting regions that warrant further investigation. Top SNP candidates identified from the GWAS, although not genome-wide significant, may be useful to inform future studies in PE genetics.

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, Louise V; Verwoert, Germaine C; O’Reilly, Paul F; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V; Ehret, Georg B; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Dörr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tõnu; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian’an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U; Webster, Rebecca J; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hotteng, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Chambers, John C; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kühnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M; Polašek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P; Morrison, Alanna C; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco US; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric JG; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wang, Thomas J; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gérard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L; Kroemer, Heyo K; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L; Taylor, Kent D; Harris, Tamara B; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Inês; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sõber, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M; Penninx, Brenda W; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F; Melander, Olle; O’Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; d’Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, M Fabiola; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S; Bergman, Richard N; Beilby, John P; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco JC; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N; Rose, Lynda M; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Döring, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H; ’t Hoen, Peter AC; König, Inke R; Felix, Janine F; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stéphanie; DeStefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F; Smith, Nicholas L; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S; Stolk, Ronald P; Jukema, J Wouter; Wright, Alan F; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B; Wilson, James F; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D; Palmer, Lyle J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth JF; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J; Oostra, Ben A; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P; Beckmann, Jacques S; Witteman, Jacqueline CM; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B; Psaty, Bruce M; Caulfield, Mark J; Rao, Dabeeru C

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci influence systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans 1-3. We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N=74,064) and follow-up studies (N=48,607), we identified at genome-wide significance (P= 2.7×10-8 to P=2.3×10-13) four novel PP loci (at 4q12 near CHIC2/PDGFRAI, 7q22.3 near PIK3CG, 8q24.12 in NOV, 11q24.3 near ADAMTS-8), two novel MAP loci (3p21.31 in MAP4, 10q25.3 near ADRB1) and one locus associated with both traits (2q24.3 near FIGN) which has recently been associated with SBP in east Asians. For three of the novel PP signals, the estimated effect for SBP was opposite to that for DBP, in contrast to the majority of common SBP- and DBP-associated variants which show concordant effects on both traits. These findings indicate novel genetic mechanisms underlying blood pressure variation, including pathways that may differentially influence SBP and DBP. PMID:21909110

  2. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Janine F.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Monnereau, Claire; van der Valk, Ralf J.P.; Stergiakouli, Evie; Chesi, Alessandra; Gaillard, Romy; Feenstra, Bjarke; Thiering, Elisabeth; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Mahajan, Anubha; Pitkänen, Niina; Joro, Raimo; Cavadino, Alana; Huikari, Ville; Franks, Steve; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Marsh, Julie A.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Curtin, John A.; Vioque, Jesus; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Myhre, Ronny; Price, Thomas S.; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Yengo, Loïc; Grarup, Niels; Ntalla, Ioanna; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; Bisgaard, Hans; Blakemore, Alexandra I.; Bonnefond, Amelie; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Eriksson, Johan; Flexeder, Claudia; Franke, Lude; Geller, Frank; Geserick, Mandy; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Haworth, Claire M.A.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Holm, Jens-Christian; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jinyan; Kadarmideen, Haja N.; Kähönen, Mika; Kiess, Wieland; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lakka, Timo A.; Lewin, Alexandra M.; Liang, Liming; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Ma, Baoshan; Magnus, Per; McCormack, Shana E.; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D.; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Murray, Clare S.; Pahkala, Katja; Pers, Tune H.; Pfäffle, Roland; Postma, Dirkje S.; Power, Christine; Simpson, Angela; Sengpiel, Verena; Tiesler, Carla M. T.; Torrent, Maties; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Meurs, Joyce B.; Vinding, Rebecca; Waage, Johannes; Wardle, Jane; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zemel, Babette S.; Dedoussis, George V.; Pedersen, Oluf; Froguel, Philippe; Sunyer, Jordi; Plomin, Robert; Jacobsson, Bo; Hansen, Torben; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Custovic, Adnan; Raitakari, Olli T.; Pennell, Craig E.; Widén, Elisabeth; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Sebert, Sylvain; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hyppönen, Elina; McCarthy, Mark I.; Lindi, Virpi; Harri, Niinikoski; Körner, Antje; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Heinrich, Joachim; Melbye, Mads; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ring, Susan M.; Smith, George Davey; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Grant, Struan F.A.; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.

    2016-01-01

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We included 35 668 children from 20 studies in the discovery phase and 11 873 children from 13 studies in the replication phase. In total, 15 loci reached genome-wide significance (P-value childhood obesity. We identified three novel loci: rs13253111 near ELP3, rs8092503 near RAB27B and rs13387838 near ADAM23. Per additional risk allele, body mass index increased 0.04 Standard Deviation Score (SDS) [Standard Error (SE) 0.007], 0.05 SDS (SE 0.008) and 0.14 SDS (SE 0.025), for rs13253111, rs8092503 and rs13387838, respectively. A genetic risk score combining all 15 SNPs showed that each additional average risk allele was associated with a 0.073 SDS (SE 0.011, P-value = 3.12 × 10−10) increase in childhood body mass index in a population of 1955 children. This risk score explained 2% of the variance in childhood body mass index. This study highlights the shared genetic background between childhood and adult body mass index and adds three novel loci. These loci likely represent age-related differences in strength of the associations with body mass index. PMID:26604143

  3. Genome-wide association analysis identifies potential regulatory genes for eumelanin pigmentation in chicken plumage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, L; Du, X; Wei, S; Gu, L; Li, N; Gong, Y; Li, S

    2017-10-01

    Plumage color in chicken is determined by the proportion of eumelanin and pheomelanin pigmentation. As the main ingredient in plumage melanin, eumelanin plays a key role in the dark black, brown and grey coloration. However, very few studies have been performed to identify the related genes and mutations on a genome-wide scale. Herein, a resource family consisting of one backcross population and two F2 cross populations between a black roster and Yukou Brown I parent stockbreed was constructed for identification of genes related to eumelanin pigmentation. Chickens with eumelanin in their plumage were classified as the case group, and the rest were considered the control group. A genome-wide association study of this phenotype and genotypes using Affymetrix 600K HD SNP arrays in this F2 family revealed 13 significantly associated SNPs and in 10 separate genes on chromosomes 1, 2, 3 and 5. Based on previous studies in model species, we inferred that genes, including NUAK family kinase 1 (NUAK1) and sonic hedgehog (SHH), may play roles in the development of neural crest cells or melanoblasts during the embryonic period, which may also affect the eumelanin pigmentation. Our results facilitate the understanding of the genetic basis of eumelanin pigmentation in chicken plumage. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  4. Univariate/multivariate genome-wide association scans using data from families and unrelated samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available As genome-wide association studies (GWAS are becoming more popular, two approaches, among others, could be considered in order to improve statistical power for identifying genes contributing subtle to moderate effects to human diseases. The first approach is to increase sample size, which could be achieved by combining both unrelated and familial subjects together. The second approach is to jointly analyze multiple correlated traits. In this study, by extending generalized estimating equations (GEEs, we propose a simple approach for performing univariate or multivariate association tests for the combined data of unrelated subjects and nuclear families. In particular, we correct for population stratification by integrating principal component analysis and transmission disequilibrium test strategies. The proposed method allows for multiple siblings as well as missing parental information. Simulation studies show that the proposed test has improved power compared to two popular methods, EIGENSTRAT and FBAT, by analyzing the combined data, while correcting for population stratification. In addition, joint analysis of bivariate traits has improved power over univariate analysis when pleiotropic effects are present. Application to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 (GAW16 data sets attests to the feasibility and applicability of the proposed method.

  5. Genome-wide scan in Hispanics highlights candidate loci for brain white matter hyperintensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecham, Ashley; Dong, Chuanhui; Wright, Clinton B; Dueker, Nicole; Brickman, Adam M; Wang, Liyong; DeCarli, Charles; Blanton, Susan H; Rundek, Tatjana; Mayeux, Richard; Sacco, Ralph L

    2017-10-01

    To investigate genetic variants influencing white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) in the understudied Hispanic population. Using 6.8 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify SNPs associated with WMH volume (WMHV) in 922 Hispanics who underwent brain MRI as a cross-section of 2 community-based cohorts in the Northern Manhattan Study and the Washington Heights-Inwood Columbia Aging Project. Multiple linear modeling with PLINK was performed to examine the additive genetic effects on ln(WMHV) after controlling for age, sex, total intracranial volume, and principal components of ancestry. Gene-based tests of association were performed using VEGAS. Replication was performed in independent samples of Europeans, African Americans, and Asians. From the SNP analysis, a total of 17 independent SNPs in 7 genes had suggestive evidence of association with WMHV in Hispanics ( p < 1 × 10 -5 ) and 5 genes from the gene-based analysis with p < 1 × 10 -3 . One SNP (rs9957475 in GATA6 ) and 1 gene ( UBE2C ) demonstrated evidence of association ( p < 0.05) in the African American sample. Four SNPs with p < 1 × 10 -5 were shown to affect binding of SPI1 using RegulomeDB. This GWAS of 2 community-based Hispanic cohorts revealed several novel WMH-associated genetic variants. Further replication is needed in independent Hispanic samples to validate these suggestive associations, and fine mapping is needed to pinpoint causal variants.

  6. A genome-wide scan for common alleles affecting risk for autism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Anney, Richard

    2010-10-15

    Although autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have a substantial genetic basis, most of the known genetic risk has been traced to rare variants, principally copy number variants (CNVs). To identify common risk variation, the Autism Genome Project (AGP) Consortium genotyped 1558 rigorously defined ASD families for 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and analyzed these SNP genotypes for association with ASD. In one of four primary association analyses, the association signal for marker rs4141463, located within MACROD2, crossed the genome-wide association significance threshold of P < 5 × 10(-8). When a smaller replication sample was analyzed, the risk allele at rs4141463 was again over-transmitted; yet, consistent with the winner\\'s curse, its effect size in the replication sample was much smaller; and, for the combined samples, the association signal barely fell below the P < 5 × 10(-8) threshold. Exploratory analyses of phenotypic subtypes yielded no significant associations after correction for multiple testing. They did, however, yield strong signals within several genes, KIAA0564, PLD5, POU6F2, ST8SIA2 and TAF1C.

  7. A genome wide linkage scan for dizygotic twinning in 525 families of mothers of dizygotic twins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Jodie N; Willemsen, Gonneke; Nyholt, Dale; Hoekstra, Chantal; Duffy, David L; Henders, Anjali K; Wallace, Leanne; Healey, Sue; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Skolnick, Mark; Martin, Nicholas G; Boomsma, Dorret I; Montgomery, Grant W

    2010-06-01

    The tendency to conceive dizygotic (DZ) twins is a complex trait influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To search for new candidate loci for twinning, we conducted a genome-wide linkage scan in 525 families using microsatellite and single nucleotide polymorphism marker panels. Non-parametric linkage analyses, including 523 families containing a total of 1115 mothers of DZ twins (MODZT) from Australia and New Zealand (ANZ) and The Netherlands (NL), produced four linkage peaks above the threshold for suggestive linkage, including a highly suggestive peak at the extreme telomeric end of chromosome 6 with an exponential logarithm of odds [(exp)LOD] score of 2.813 (P = 0.0002). Since the DZ twinning rate increases steeply with maternal age independent of genetic effects, we also investigated linkage including only families where at least one MODZT gave birth to her first set of twins before the age of 30. These analyses produced a maximum expLOD score of 2.718 (P = 0.0002), largely due to linkage signal from the ANZ cohort, however, ordered subset analyses indicated this result is most likely a chance finding in the combined dataset. Linkage analyses were also performed for two large DZ twinning families from the USA, one of which produced a peak on chromosome 2 in the region of two potential candidate genes. Sequencing of FSHR and FIGLA, along with INHBB in MODZTs from two large NL families with family specific linkage peaks directly over this gene, revealed a potentially functional variant in the 5' untranslated region of FSHR that segregated with the DZ twinning phenotype in the Utah family. Our data provide further evidence for complex inheritance of familial DZ twinning.

  8. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans in Canola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Harsh; Raman, Rosy; Coombes, Neil; Song, Jie; Diffey, Simon; Kilian, Andrzej; Lindbeck, Kurt; Barbulescu, Denise M.; Batley, Jacqueline; Edwards, David; Salisbury, Phil A.; Marcroft, Steve

    2016-01-01

    Key message “We identified both quantitative and quantitative resistance loci to Leptosphaeria maculans, a fungal pathogen, causing blackleg disease in canola. Several genome-wide significant associations were detected at known and new loci for blackleg resistance. We further validated statistically significant associations in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance in canola.” Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a significant disease which affects the sustainable production of canola (Brassica napus). This study reports a genome-wide association study based on 18,804 polymorphic SNPs to identify loci associated with qualitative and quantitative resistance to L. maculans. Genomic regions delimited with 694 significant SNP markers, that are associated with resistance evaluated using 12 single spore isolates and pathotypes from four canola stubble were identified. Several significant associations were detected at known disease resistance loci including in the vicinity of recently cloned Rlm2/LepR3 genes, and at new loci on chromosomes A01/C01, A02/C02, A03/C03, A05/C05, A06, A08, and A09. In addition, we validated statistically significant associations on A01, A07, and A10 in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance and mapped within 13.2 kb from Arabidopsis R gene of TIR-NBS class. We showed that resistance loci are located in the vicinity of R genes of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica napus on the sequenced genome of B. napus cv. Darmor-bzh. Significantly associated SNP markers provide a valuable tool to enrich germplasm for favorable alleles in order to improve the level of resistance to L. maculans in

  9. PAPA: a flexible tool for identifying pleiotropic pathways using genome-wide association study summaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yan; Wang, Wenyu; Guo, Xiong; Zhang, Feng

    2016-03-15

    : Pleiotropy is common in the genetic architectures of complex diseases. To the best of our knowledge, no analysis tool has been developed for identifying pleiotropic pathways using multiple genome-wide association study (GWAS) summaries by now. Here, we present PAPA, a flexible tool for pleiotropic pathway analysis utilizing GWAS summary results. The performance of PAPA was validated using publicly available GWAS summaries of body mass index and waist-hip ratio of the GIANT datasets. PAPA identified a set of pleiotropic pathways, which have been demonstrated to be involved in the development of obesity. PAPA program, document and illustrative example are available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/papav1/files/ : fzhxjtu@mail.xjtu.edu.cn Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies variants in HORMAD2 associated with tonsillectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feenstra, Bjarke; Bager, Peter; Liu, Xueping

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Inflammation of the tonsils is a normal response to infection, but some individuals experience recurrent, severe tonsillitis and massive hypertrophy of the tonsils in which case surgical removal of the tonsils may be considered. OBJECTIVE: To identify common genetic variants associate...... the molecular mechanisms underlying the genetic association involve general lymphoid hyper-reaction throughout the mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue system.......BACKGROUND: Inflammation of the tonsils is a normal response to infection, but some individuals experience recurrent, severe tonsillitis and massive hypertrophy of the tonsils in which case surgical removal of the tonsils may be considered. OBJECTIVE: To identify common genetic variants associated...... with tonsillectomy. METHODS: We used tonsillectomy information from Danish health registers and carried out a genome-wide association study comprising 1464 patients and 12 019 controls of Northwestern European ancestry, with replication in an independent sample set of 1575 patients and 1367 controls. RESULTS...

  11. Genome-wide association study of classical Hodgkin lymphoma identifies key regulators of disease susceptibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sud, A. (Amit); Thomsen, H. (Hauke); Law, P.J. (Philip J.); A. Försti (Asta); Filho, M.I.D.S. (Miguel Inacio Da Silva); Holroyd, A. (Amy); P. Broderick (Peter); Orlando, G. (Giulia); Lenive, O. (Oleg); Wright, L. (Lauren); R. Cooke (Rosie); D.F. Easton (Douglas); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); A.M. Dunning (Alison); J. Peto (Julian); F. Canzian (Federico); Eeles, R. (Rosalind); Z. Kote-Jarai; K.R. Muir (K.); Pashayan, N. (Nora); B.E. Henderson (Brian); C.A. Haiman (Christopher); S. Benlloch (Sara); F.R. Schumacher (Fredrick R); Olama, A.A.A. (Ali Amin Al); S.I. Berndt (Sonja); G. Conti (Giario); F. Wiklund (Fredrik); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); Stevens, V.L. (Victoria L.); C.M. Tangen (Catherine M.); Batra, J. (Jyotsna); Clements, J. (Judith); H. Grönberg (Henrik); Schleutker, J. (Johanna); D. Albanes (Demetrius); Weinstein, S. (Stephanie); K. Wolk (Kerstin); West, C. (Catharine); Mucci, L. (Lorelei); Cancel-Tassin, G. (Géraldine); Koutros, S. (Stella); Sorensen, K.D. (Karina Dalsgaard); L. Maehle; D. Neal (David); S.P.L. Travis (Simon); Hamilton, R.J. (Robert J.); S.A. Ingles (Sue); B.S. Rosenstein (Barry S.); Lu, Y.-J. (Yong-Jie); Giles, G.G. (Graham G.); A. Kibel (Adam); Vega, A. (Ana); M. Kogevinas (Manolis); Penney, K.L. (Kathryn L.); Park, J.Y. (Jong Y.); Stanford, J.L. (Janet L.); C. Cybulski (Cezary); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); Brenner, H. (Hermann); Maier, C. (Christiane); Kim, J. (Jeri); E.M. John (Esther); P.J. Teixeira; Neuhausen, S.L. (Susan L.); De Ruyck, K. (Kim); Razack, A. (Azad); Newcomb, L.F. (Lisa F.); Lessel, D. (Davor); Kaneva, R. (Radka); N. Usmani (Nawaid); F. Claessens; Townsend, P.A. (Paul A.); Dominguez, M.G. (Manuela Gago); Roobol, M.J. (Monique J.); F. Menegaux (Florence); P. Hoffmann (Per); M.M. Nöthen (Markus); K.-H. JöCkel (Karl-Heinz); Strandmann, E.P.V. (Elke Pogge Von); Lightfoot, T. (Tracy); Kane, E. (Eleanor); Roman, E. (Eve); Lake, A. (Annette); Montgomery, D. (Dorothy); Jarrett, R.F. (Ruth F.); A.J. Swerdlow (Anthony ); A. Engert (Andreas); N. Orr (Nick); K. Hemminki (Kari); Houlston, R.S. (Richard S.)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractSeveral susceptibility loci for classical Hodgkin lymphoma have been reported. However, much of the heritable risk is unknown. Here, we perform a meta-analysis of two existing genome-wide association studies, a new genome-wide association study, and replication totalling 5,314 cases and

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel loci for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hara, Kazuo; Fujita, Hayato; Johnson, Todd A

    2014-01-01

    genotyped or imputed using East Asian references from the 1000 Genomes Project (June 2011 release) in 5976 Japanese patients with T2D and 20 829 nondiabetic individuals. Nineteen unreported loci were selected and taken forward to follow-up analyses. Combined discovery and follow-up analyses (30 392 cases...... (rs312457; risk allele = G; RAF = 0.078; P = 7.69 × 10(-13); OR = 1.20). This study demonstrates that GWASs based on the imputation of genotypes using modern reference haplotypes such as that from the 1000 Genomes Project data can assist in identification of new loci for common diseases.......Although over 60 loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified, there still remains a large genetic component to be clarified. To explore unidentified loci for T2D, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 6 209 637 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which were directly...

  13. Genome-wide association analyses identify multiple loci associated with central corneal thickness and keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Vitart, Veronique; Burdon, Kathryn P; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Mirshahi, Alireza; Hewitt, Alex W; Koehn, Demelza; Hysi, Pirro G; Ramdas, Wishal D; Zeller, Tanja; Vithana, Eranga N; Cornes, Belinda K; Tay, Wan-Ting; Tai, E Shyong; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Liu, Jianjun; Foo, Jia-Nee; Saw, Seang Mei; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Stefansson, Kari; Dimasi, David P; Mills, Richard A; Mountain, Jenny; Ang, Wei; Hoehn, René; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Grus, Franz; Wolfs, Roger; Castagne, Raphaële; Lackner, Karl J; Springelkamp, Henriët; Yang, Jian; Jonasson, Fridbert; Leung, Dexter Y L; Chen, Li J; Tham, Clement C Y; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Hayward, Caroline; Gibson, Jane; Cree, Angela J; MacLeod, Alex; Ennis, Sarah; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Fleck, Brian; Li, Xiaohui; Siscovick, David; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Yazar, Seyhan; Ulmer, Megan; Li, Jun; Yaspan, Brian L; Ozel, Ayse B; Richards, Julia E; Moroi, Sayoko E; Haines, Jonathan L; Kang, Jae H; Pasquale, Louis R; Allingham, R Rand; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Wright, Alan F; Pennell, Craig; Spector, Timothy D; Young, Terri L; Klaver, Caroline C W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Anderson, Michael G; Aung, Tin; Willoughby, Colin E; Wiggs, Janey L; Pang, Chi P; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Lotery, Andrew J; Hammond, Christopher J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hauser, Michael A; Rabinowitz, Yaron S; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mackey, David A; Craig, Jamie E; Macgregor, Stuart; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-02-01

    Central corneal thickness (CCT) is associated with eye conditions including keratoconus and glaucoma. We performed a meta-analysis on >20,000 individuals in European and Asian populations that identified 16 new loci associated with CCT at genome-wide significance (P keratoconus in 2 cohorts with 874 cases and 6,085 controls (rs2721051 near FOXO1 had odds ratio (OR) = 1.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4-1.88, P = 2.7 × 10(-10), and rs4894535 in FNDC3B had OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.29-1.68, P = 4.9 × 10(-9)). FNDC3B was also associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (P = 5.6 × 10(-4); tested in 3 cohorts with 2,979 cases and 7,399 controls). Further analyses implicate the collagen and extracellular matrix pathways in the regulation of CCT.

  14. Genome-wide gene expression dataset used to identify potential therapeutic targets in androgenetic alopecia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Dey-Rao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The microarray dataset attached to this report is related to the research article with the title: “A genomic approach to susceptibility and pathogenesis leads to identifying potential novel therapeutic targets in androgenetic alopecia” (Dey-Rao and Sinha, 2017 [1]. Male-pattern hair loss that is induced by androgens (testosterone in genetically predisposed individuals is known as androgenetic alopecia (AGA. The raw dataset is being made publicly available to enable critical and/or extended analyses. Our related research paper utilizes the attached raw dataset, for genome-wide gene-expression associated investigations. Combined with several in silico bioinformatics-based analyses we were able to delineate five strategic molecular elements as potential novel targets towards future AGA-therapy.

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies shared risk loci common to two malignancies in golden retrievers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Tonomura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Dogs, with their breed-determined limited genetic background, are great models of human disease including cancer. Canine B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma are both malignancies of the hematologic system that are clinically and histologically similar to human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and angiosarcoma, respectively. Golden retrievers in the US show significantly elevated lifetime risk for both B-cell lymphoma (6% and hemangiosarcoma (20%. We conducted genome-wide association studies for hemangiosarcoma and B-cell lymphoma, identifying two shared predisposing loci. The two associated loci are located on chromosome 5, and together contribute ~20% of the risk of developing these cancers. Genome-wide p-values for the top SNP of each locus are 4.6×10-7 and 2.7×10-6, respectively. Whole genome resequencing of nine cases and controls followed by genotyping and detailed analysis identified three shared and one B-cell lymphoma specific risk haplotypes within the two loci, but no coding changes were associated with the risk haplotypes. Gene expression analysis of B-cell lymphoma tumors revealed that carrying the risk haplotypes at the first locus is associated with down-regulation of several nearby genes including the proximal gene TRPC6, a transient receptor Ca2+-channel involved in T-cell activation, among other functions. The shared risk haplotype in the second locus overlaps the vesicle transport and release gene STX8. Carrying the shared risk haplotype is associated with gene expression changes of 100 genes enriched for pathways involved in immune cell activation. Thus, the predisposing germ-line mutations in B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma appear to be regulatory, and affect pathways involved in T-cell mediated immune response in the tumor. This suggests that the interaction between the immune system and malignant cells plays a common role in the tumorigenesis of these relatively different cancers.

  16. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Shared Risk Loci Common to Two Malignancies in Golden Retrievers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonomura, Noriko; Elvers, Ingegerd; Thomas, Rachael; Megquier, Kate; Turner-Maier, Jason; Howald, Cedric; Sarver, Aaron L.; Swofford, Ross; Frantz, Aric M.; Ito, Daisuke; Mauceli, Evan; Arendt, Maja; Noh, Hyun Ji; Koltookian, Michele; Biagi, Tara; Fryc, Sarah; Williams, Christina; Avery, Anne C.; Kim, Jong-Hyuk; Barber, Lisa; Burgess, Kristine; Lander, Eric S.; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Azuma, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Dogs, with their breed-determined limited genetic background, are great models of human disease including cancer. Canine B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma are both malignancies of the hematologic system that are clinically and histologically similar to human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and angiosarcoma, respectively. Golden retrievers in the US show significantly elevated lifetime risk for both B-cell lymphoma (6%) and hemangiosarcoma (20%). We conducted genome-wide association studies for hemangiosarcoma and B-cell lymphoma, identifying two shared predisposing loci. The two associated loci are located on chromosome 5, and together contribute ~20% of the risk of developing these cancers. Genome-wide p-values for the top SNP of each locus are 4.6×10-7 and 2.7×10-6, respectively. Whole genome resequencing of nine cases and controls followed by genotyping and detailed analysis identified three shared and one B-cell lymphoma specific risk haplotypes within the two loci, but no coding changes were associated with the risk haplotypes. Gene expression analysis of B-cell lymphoma tumors revealed that carrying the risk haplotypes at the first locus is associated with down-regulation of several nearby genes including the proximal gene TRPC6, a transient receptor Ca2+-channel involved in T-cell activation, among other functions. The shared risk haplotype in the second locus overlaps the vesicle transport and release gene STX8. Carrying the shared risk haplotype is associated with gene expression changes of 100 genes enriched for pathways involved in immune cell activation. Thus, the predisposing germ-line mutations in B-cell lymphoma and hemangiosarcoma appear to be regulatory, and affect pathways involved in T-cell mediated immune response in the tumor. This suggests that the interaction between the immune system and malignant cells plays a common role in the tumorigenesis of these relatively different cancers. PMID:25642983

  17. Genetic loci linked to pituitary-thyroid axis set points: a genome-wide scan of a large twin cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicker, Vijay; Wilson, Scott G; Spector, Tim D; Brown, Suzanne J; Kato, Bernet S; Reed, Peter W; Falchi, Mario; Richards, J Brent; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Lim, Ee M; Fletcher, Steven J; Walsh, John P

    2008-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that circulating concentrations of TSH, free T4, and free T3 are genetically regulated, but the genes responsible remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to identify genetic loci associated with these parameters. We performed a multipoint, nonparametric genome-wide linkage scan of 613 female dizygotic twin pairs. All subjects were euthyroid (TSH 0.4-4.0 mU/liter) with negative thyroid peroxidase antibodies and no history of thyroid disease. The genome scan comprised 737 microsatellite markers supplemented with dinucleotide markers. Data were analyzed using residualized thyroid hormone data after adjustment for age, smoking, and body mass index. Multipoint linkage analysis gave linkage peaks for free T4 on chromosome 14q13 and 18q21 [logarithm of odds (LOD) 2.4-3.2]; TSH on chromosomes 2q36, 4q32, and 9q34 (LOD 2.1-3.2); and free T3 on chromosomes 7q36, 8q22, and 18q21 (LOD 2.0-2.3). This study has identified eight genomic locations with linkage of LOD of 2.0 or greater. These results should enable targeted positional candidate and positional cloning studies to advance our understanding of genetic control of the pituitary-thyroid axis.

  18. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Okbay, Aysu; Baselmans, B.M.L. (Bart M.L.); Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Turley, Patrick; Nivard, Michel; Fontana, M.A. (Mark Alan); Meddens, S.F.W. (S. Fleur W.); Linnér, R.K. (Richard Karlsson); Rietveld, C.A. (Cornelius A); Derringer, J.; Gratten, Jacob; Lee, James J.; Liu, J.Z. (Jimmy Z); Vlaming, Ronald; SAhluwalia, T. (Tarunveer)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractVery few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (n = 298,420), depressive symptoms (n = 161,460), and neuroticism (n = 170,911). We identify 3 variants associ...

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies loci affecting blood copper, selenium and zinc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, David M; Zhu, Gu; Dy, Veronica; Heath, Andrew C; Madden, Pamela A F; Kemp, John P; McMahon, George; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J; Golding, Jean; Lawlor, Debbie A; Steer, Colin; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Smith, George Davey; Whitfield, John B

    2013-10-01

    Genetic variation affecting absorption, distribution or excretion of essential trace elements may lead to health effects related to sub-clinical deficiency. We have tested for allelic effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on blood copper, selenium and zinc in a genome-wide association study using two adult cohorts from Australia and the UK. Participants were recruited in Australia from twins and their families and in the UK from pregnant women. We measured erythrocyte Cu, Se and Zn (Australian samples) or whole blood Se (UK samples) using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Genotyping was performed with Illumina chips and > 2.5 m SNPs were imputed from HapMap data. Genome-wide significant associations were found for each element. For Cu, there were two loci on chromosome 1 (most significant SNPs rs1175550, P = 5.03 × 10(-10), and rs2769264, P = 2.63 × 10(-20)); for Se, a locus on chromosome 5 was significant in both cohorts (combined P = 9.40 × 10(-28) at rs921943); and for Zn three loci on chromosomes 8, 15 and X showed significant results (rs1532423, P = 6.40 × 10(-12); rs2120019, P = 1.55 × 10(-18); and rs4826508, P = 1.40 × 10(-12), respectively). The Se locus covers three genes involved in metabolism of sulphur-containing amino acids and potentially of the analogous Se compounds; the chromosome 8 locus for Zn contains multiple genes for the Zn-containing enzyme carbonic anhydrase. Where potentially relevant genes were identified, they relate to metabolism of the element (Se) or to the presence at high concentration of a metal-containing protein (Cu).

  20. Genome-wide meta-analyses identify multiple loci associated with smoking behavior.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2010-05-01

    Consistent but indirect evidence has implicated genetic factors in smoking behavior. We report meta-analyses of several smoking phenotypes within cohorts of the Tobacco and Genetics Consortium (n = 74,053). We also partnered with the European Network of Genetic and Genomic Epidemiology (ENGAGE) and Oxford-GlaxoSmithKline (Ox-GSK) consortia to follow up the 15 most significant regions (n > 140,000). We identified three loci associated with number of cigarettes smoked per day. The strongest association was a synonymous 15q25 SNP in the nicotinic receptor gene CHRNA3 (rs1051730[A], beta = 1.03, standard error (s.e.) = 0.053, P = 2.8 x 10(-73)). Two 10q25 SNPs (rs1329650[G], beta = 0.367, s.e. = 0.059, P = 5.7 x 10(-10); and rs1028936[A], beta = 0.446, s.e. = 0.074, P = 1.3 x 10(-9)) and one 9q13 SNP in EGLN2 (rs3733829[G], beta = 0.333, s.e. = 0.058, P = 1.0 x 10(-8)) also exceeded genome-wide significance for cigarettes per day. For smoking initiation, eight SNPs exceeded genome-wide significance, with the strongest association at a nonsynonymous SNP in BDNF on chromosome 11 (rs6265[C], odds ratio (OR) = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 1.04-1.08, P = 1.8 x 10(-8)). One SNP located near DBH on chromosome 9 (rs3025343[G], OR = 1.12, 95% Cl 1.08-1.18, P = 3.6 x 10(-8)) was significantly associated with smoking cessation.

  1. CMDR based differential evolution identifies the epistatic interaction in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Lin, Yu-Da

    2017-08-01

    Detecting epistatic interactions in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) is a computational challenge. Such huge numbers of single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) combinations limit the some of the powerful algorithms to be applied to detect the potential epistasis in large-scale SNP datasets. We propose a new algorithm which combines the differential evolution (DE) algorithm with a classification based multifactor-dimensionality reduction (CMDR), termed DECMDR. DECMDR uses the CMDR as a fitness measure to evaluate values of solutions in DE process for scanning the potential statistical epistasis in GWAS. The results indicated that DECMDR outperforms the existing algorithms in terms of detection success rate by the large simulation and real data obtained from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. For running time comparison, DECMDR can efficient to apply the CMDR to detect the significant association between cases and controls amongst all possible SNP combinations in GWAS. DECMDR is freely available at https://goo.gl/p9sLuJ . chuang@isu.edu.tw or e0955767257@yahoo.com.tw. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Genome-wide scans for delineation of candidate genes regulating seed-protein content in chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Deo eUpadhyaya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Identification of potential genes/alleles governing complex seed-protein content (SPC trait is essential in marker-assisted breeding for quality trait improvement of chickpea. Henceforth, the present study utilized an integrated genomics-assisted breeding strategy encompassing trait association analysis, selective genotyping in traditional bi-parental mapping population and differential expression profiling for the first-time to understand the complex genetic architecture of quantitative SPC trait in chickpea. For GWAS (genome-wide association study, high-throughput genotyping information of 16376 genome-based SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism discovered from a structured population of 336 sequenced desi and kabuli accessions [with 150-200 kb LD (linkage disequilibrium decay] was utilized. This led to identification of seven most effective genomic loci (genes associated [10 to 20% with 41% combined PVE (phenotypic variation explained] with SPC trait in chickpea. Regardless of the diverse desi and kabuli genetic backgrounds, a comparable level of association potential of the identified seven genomic loci with SPC trait was observed. Five SPC-associated genes were validated successfully in parental accessions and homozygous individuals of an intra-specific desi RIL (recombinant inbred line mapping population (ICC 12299 x ICC 4958 by selective genotyping. The seed-specific expression, including differential up-regulation (> 4-fold of six SPC-associated genes particularly in accessions, parents and homozygous individuals of the aforementioned mapping population with high level of contrasting seed-protein content (21-22% was evident. Collectively, the integrated genomic approach delineated diverse naturally occurring novel functional SNP allelic variants in six potential candidate genes regulating SPC trait in chickpea. Of these, a non-synonymous SNP allele-carrying zinc finger transcription factor gene exhibiting strong association with SPC trait

  3. A scan statistic to extract causal gene clusters from case-control genome-wide rare CNV data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scherer Stephen W

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several statistical tests have been developed for analyzing genome-wide association data by incorporating gene pathway information in terms of gene sets. Using these methods, hundreds of gene sets are typically tested, and the tested gene sets often overlap. This overlapping greatly increases the probability of generating false positives, and the results obtained are difficult to interpret, particularly when many gene sets show statistical significance. Results We propose a flexible statistical framework to circumvent these problems. Inspired by spatial scan statistics for detecting clustering of disease occurrence in the field of epidemiology, we developed a scan statistic to extract disease-associated gene clusters from a whole gene pathway. Extracting one or a few significant gene clusters from a global pathway limits the overall false positive probability, which results in increased statistical power, and facilitates the interpretation of test results. In the present study, we applied our method to genome-wide association data for rare copy-number variations, which have been strongly implicated in common diseases. Application of our method to a simulated dataset demonstrated the high accuracy of this method in detecting disease-associated gene clusters in a whole gene pathway. Conclusions The scan statistic approach proposed here shows a high level of accuracy in detecting gene clusters in a whole gene pathway. This study has provided a sound statistical framework for analyzing genome-wide rare CNV data by incorporating topological information on the gene pathway.

  4. From The Cover: Genome-wide RNA interference screen identifies previously undescribed regulators of polyglutamine aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollen, Ellen A. A.; Garcia, Susana M.; van Haaften, Gijs; Kim, Soojin; Chavez, Alejandro; Morimoto, Richard I.; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.

    2004-04-01

    Protein misfolding and the formation of aggregates are increasingly recognized components of the pathology of human genetic disease and hallmarks of many neurodegenerative disorders. As exemplified by polyglutamine diseases, the propensity for protein misfolding is associated with the length of polyglutamine expansions and age-dependent changes in protein-folding homeostasis, suggesting a critical role for a protein homeostatic buffer. To identify the complement of protein factors that protects cells against the formation of protein aggregates, we tested transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains expressing polyglutamine expansion yellow fluorescent protein fusion proteins at the threshold length associated with the age-dependent appearance of protein aggregation. We used genome-wide RNA interference to identify genes that, when suppressed, resulted in the premature appearance of protein aggregates. Our screen identified 186 genes corresponding to five principal classes of polyglutamine regulators: genes involved in RNA metabolism, protein synthesis, protein folding, and protein degradation; and those involved in protein trafficking. We propose that each of these classes represents a molecular machine collectively comprising the protein homeostatic buffer that responds to the expression of damaged proteins to prevent their misfolding and aggregation. protein misfolding | neurodegenerative diseases

  5. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies New Loci for Resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans in Canola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh Raman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Blackleg, caused by Leptosphaeria maculans, is a significant disease which affects the sustainable production of canola. This study reports a genome-wide association study based on 18,804 polymorphic SNPs to identify loci associated with qualitative and quantitative resistance to L. maculans. Genomic regions delimited with 503 significant SNP markers, that are associated with resistance evaluated using 12 single spore isolates and pathotypes from four canola stubble were identified. Several significant associations were detected at known disease resistance loci including in the vicinity of recently cloned Rlm2/LepR3 genes, and at new loci on chromosomes A01/C01, A02/C02, A03/C03, A05/C05, A06, A08, and A09. In addition, we validated statistically significant associations on A01, A07 and A10 in four genetic mapping populations, demonstrating that GWAS marker loci are indeed associated with resistance to L. maculans. One of the novel loci identified for the first time, Rlm12, conveys adult plant resistance and mapped within 13.2 kb from Arabidopsis R gene of TIR-NBS class. We showed that resistance loci are located in the vicinity of R genes of A. thaliana and B. napus on the sequenced genome of B. napus cv. Darmor-bzh. Significantly associated SNP markers provide a valuable tool to enrich germplasm for favorable alleles in order to improve the level of resistance to L. maculans in canola.

  6. A genome-wide association study identifies protein quantitative trait loci (pQTLs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Melzer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable evidence that human genetic variation influences gene expression. Genome-wide studies have revealed that mRNA levels are associated with genetic variation in or close to the gene coding for those mRNA transcripts - cis effects, and elsewhere in the genome - trans effects. The role of genetic variation in determining protein levels has not been systematically assessed. Using a genome-wide association approach we show that common genetic variation influences levels of clinically relevant proteins in human serum and plasma. We evaluated the role of 496,032 polymorphisms on levels of 42 proteins measured in 1200 fasting individuals from the population based InCHIANTI study. Proteins included insulin, several interleukins, adipokines, chemokines, and liver function markers that are implicated in many common diseases including metabolic, inflammatory, and infectious conditions. We identified eight Cis effects, including variants in or near the IL6R (p = 1.8x10(-57, CCL4L1 (p = 3.9x10(-21, IL18 (p = 6.8x10(-13, LPA (p = 4.4x10(-10, GGT1 (p = 1.5x10(-7, SHBG (p = 3.1x10(-7, CRP (p = 6.4x10(-6 and IL1RN (p = 7.3x10(-6 genes, all associated with their respective protein products with effect sizes ranging from 0.19 to 0.69 standard deviations per allele. Mechanisms implicated include altered rates of cleavage of bound to unbound soluble receptor (IL6R, altered secretion rates of different sized proteins (LPA, variation in gene copy number (CCL4L1 and altered transcription (GGT1. We identified one novel trans effect that was an association between ABO blood group and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha levels (p = 6.8x10(-40, but this finding was not present when TNF-alpha was measured using a different assay , or in a second study, suggesting an assay-specific association. Our results show that protein levels share some of the features of the genetics of gene expression. These include the presence of strong genetic effects in cis

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies genetic loci associated with iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine E McLaren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple inherited disorders of iron metabolism in man, rodents and other vertebrates suggests genetic contributions to iron deficiency. To identify new genomic locations associated with iron deficiency, a genome-wide association study (GWAS was performed using DNA collected from white men aged≥25 y and women≥50 y in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS Study with serum ferritin (SF≤12 µg/L (cases and iron replete controls (SF>100 µg/L in men, SF>50 µg/L in women. Regression analysis was used to examine the association between case-control status (336 cases, 343 controls and quantitative serum iron measures and 331,060 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotypes, with replication analyses performed in a sample of 71 cases and 161 controls from a population of white male and female veterans screened at a US Veterans Affairs (VA medical center. Five SNPs identified in the GWAS met genome-wide statistical significance for association with at least one iron measure, rs2698530 on chr. 2p14; rs3811647 on chr. 3q22, a known SNP in the transferrin (TF gene region; rs1800562 on chr. 6p22, the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene; rs7787204 on chr. 7p21; and rs987710 on chr. 22q11 (GWAS observed P<1.51×10(-7 for all. An association between total iron binding capacity and SNP rs3811647 in the TF gene (GWAS observed P=7.0×10(-9, corrected P=0.012 was replicated within the VA samples (observed P=0.012. Associations with the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene also were replicated. The joint analysis of the HEIRS and VA samples revealed strong associations between rs2698530 on chr. 2p14 and iron status outcomes. These results confirm a previously-described TF polymorphism and implicate one potential new locus as a target for gene identification.

  8. Genome-wide Analyses Identify KIF5A as a Novel ALS Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Aude; Kenna, Kevin P; Renton, Alan E; Ticozzi, Nicola; Faghri, Faraz; Chia, Ruth; Dominov, Janice A; Kenna, Brendan J; Nalls, Mike A; Keagle, Pamela; Rivera, Alberto M; van Rheenen, Wouter; Murphy, Natalie A; van Vugt, Joke J F A; Geiger, Joshua T; Van der Spek, Rick A; Pliner, Hannah A; Shankaracharya; Smith, Bradley N; Marangi, Giuseppe; Topp, Simon D; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Gkazi, Athina Soragia; Eicher, John D; Kenna, Aoife; Mora, Gabriele; Calvo, Andrea; Mazzini, Letizia; Riva, Nilo; Mandrioli, Jessica; Caponnetto, Claudia; Battistini, Stefania; Volanti, Paolo; La Bella, Vincenzo; Conforti, Francesca L; Borghero, Giuseppe; Messina, Sonia; Simone, Isabella L; Trojsi, Francesca; Salvi, Fabrizio; Logullo, Francesco O; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Corrado, Lucia; Capasso, Margherita; Ferrucci, Luigi; Moreno, Cristiane de Araujo Martins; Kamalakaran, Sitharthan; Goldstein, David B; Gitler, Aaron D; Harris, Tim; Myers, Richard M; Phatnani, Hemali; Musunuri, Rajeeva Lochan; Evani, Uday Shankar; Abhyankar, Avinash; Zody, Michael C; Kaye, Julia; Finkbeiner, Steven; Wyman, Stacia K; LeNail, Alex; Lima, Leandro; Fraenkel, Ernest; Svendsen, Clive N; Thompson, Leslie M; Van Eyk, Jennifer E; Berry, James D; Miller, Timothy M; Kolb, Stephen J; Cudkowicz, Merit; Baxi, Emily; Benatar, Michael; Taylor, J Paul; Rampersaud, Evadnie; Wu, Gang; Wuu, Joanne; Lauria, Giuseppe; Verde, Federico; Fogh, Isabella; Tiloca, Cinzia; Comi, Giacomo P; Sorarù, Gianni; Cereda, Cristina; Corcia, Philippe; Laaksovirta, Hannu; Myllykangas, Liisa; Jansson, Lilja; Valori, Miko; Ealing, John; Hamdalla, Hisham; Rollinson, Sara; Pickering-Brown, Stuart; Orrell, Richard W; Sidle, Katie C; Malaspina, Andrea; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew B; Johnson, Janel O; Arepalli, Sampath; Sapp, Peter C; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Polak, Meraida; Asress, Seneshaw; Al-Sarraj, Safa; King, Andrew; Troakes, Claire; Vance, Caroline; de Belleroche, Jacqueline; Baas, Frank; Ten Asbroek, Anneloor L M A; Muñoz-Blanco, José Luis; Hernandez, Dena G; Ding, Jinhui; Gibbs, J Raphael; Scholz, Sonja W; Floeter, Mary Kay; Campbell, Roy H; Landi, Francesco; Bowser, Robert; Pulst, Stefan M; Ravits, John M; MacGowan, Daniel J L; Kirby, Janine; Pioro, Erik P; Pamphlett, Roger; Broach, James; Gerhard, Glenn; Dunckley, Travis L; Brady, Christopher B; Kowall, Neil W; Troncoso, Juan C; Le Ber, Isabelle; Mouzat, Kevin; Lumbroso, Serge; Heiman-Patterson, Terry D; Kamel, Freya; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Baloh, Robert H; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Shatunov, Aleksey; Van Eijk, Kristel R; de Carvalho, Mamede; Kooyman, Maarten; Middelkoop, Bas; Moisse, Matthieu; McLaughlin, Russell L; Van Es, Michael A; Weber, Markus; Boylan, Kevin B; Van Blitterswijk, Marka; Rademakers, Rosa; Morrison, Karen E; Basak, A Nazli; Mora, Jesús S; Drory, Vivian E; Shaw, Pamela J; Turner, Martin R; Talbot, Kevin; Hardiman, Orla; Williams, Kelly L; Fifita, Jennifer A; Nicholson, Garth A; Blair, Ian P; Rouleau, Guy A; Esteban-Pérez, Jesús; García-Redondo, Alberto; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zinman, Lorne; Ostrow, Lyle W; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Rothstein, Jeffrey D; Simmons, Zachary; Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; Brice, Alexis; Goutman, Stephen A; Feldman, Eva L; Gibson, Summer B; Taroni, Franco; Ratti, Antonia; Gellera, Cinzia; Van Damme, Philip; Robberecht, Wim; Fratta, Pietro; Sabatelli, Mario; Lunetta, Christian; Ludolph, Albert C; Andersen, Peter M; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Camu, William; Trojanowski, John Q; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Brown, Robert H; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan H; Harms, Matthew B; Glass, Jonathan D; Stone, David J; Tienari, Pentti; Silani, Vincenzo; Chiò, Adriano; Shaw, Christopher E; Traynor, Bryan J; Landers, John E

    2018-03-21

    To identify novel genes associated with ALS, we undertook two lines of investigation. We carried out a genome-wide association study comparing 20,806 ALS cases and 59,804 controls. Independently, we performed a rare variant burden analysis comparing 1,138 index familial ALS cases and 19,494 controls. Through both approaches, we identified kinesin family member 5A (KIF5A) as a novel gene associated with ALS. Interestingly, mutations predominantly in the N-terminal motor domain of KIF5A are causative for two neurodegenerative diseases: hereditary spastic paraplegia (SPG10) and Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2 (CMT2). In contrast, ALS-associated mutations are primarily located at the C-terminal cargo-binding tail domain and patients harboring loss-of-function mutations displayed an extended survival relative to typical ALS cases. Taken together, these results broaden the phenotype spectrum resulting from mutations in KIF5A and strengthen the role of cytoskeletal defects in the pathogenesis of ALS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Hieab H H; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Rentería, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivières, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Bis, Joshua C; Blanken, Laura M E; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Braber, Anouk Den; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Filippi, Irina; Ge, Tian; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Greven, Corina U; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hilal, Saima; Hofer, Edith; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liao, Jiemin; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mazoyer, Bernard; McKay, David R; McWhirter, Rebekah; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin; Muetzel, Ryan L; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pappa, Irene; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pudas, Sara; Pütz, Benno; Rajan, Kumar B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Thomson, Russell; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo G M; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Xu, Bing; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chen, Christopher; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Geus, Eco J C; De Jager, Philip L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita L; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Evans, Denis A; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald H H; Grabe, Hans J; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Ikeda, Masashi; Ikram, M Kamran; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Longstreth, W T; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Katie L; McMahon, Francis J; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schofield, Peter R; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Srikanth, Velandai; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Tiemeier, Henning; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; Van der Lugt, Aad; Van der Wee, Nic J A; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Van T Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Veltman, Dick J; Vernooij, Meike W; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, H Ronald; Zonderman, Alan B; Deary, Ian J; DeCarli, Charles; Schmidt, Helena; Martin, Nicholas G; De Craen, Anton J M; Wright, Margaret J; Launer, Lenore J; Schumann, Gunter; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Barbara; Debette, Stéphanie; Medland, Sarah E; Ikram, M Arfan; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-12-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height. We found a high genetic correlation with child head circumference (ρ genetic = 0.748), which indicates a similar genetic background and allowed us to identify four additional loci through meta-analysis (N combined = 37,345). Variants for intracranial volume were also related to childhood and adult cognitive function, and Parkinson's disease, and were enriched near genes involved in growth pathways, including PI3K-AKT signaling. These findings identify the biological underpinnings of intracranial volume and their link to physiological and pathological traits.

  10. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies regulators of cholesterol-modified hedgehog secretion in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reid Aikin

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh proteins are secreted molecules that function as organizers in animal development. In addition to being palmitoylated, Hh is the only metazoan protein known to possess a covalently-linked cholesterol moiety. The absence of either modification severely disrupts the organization of numerous tissues during development. It is currently not known how lipid-modified Hh is secreted and released from producing cells. We have performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila melanogaster cells to identify regulators of Hh secretion. We found that cholesterol-modified Hh secretion is strongly dependent on coat protein complex I (COPI but not COPII vesicles, suggesting that cholesterol modification alters the movement of Hh through the early secretory pathway. We provide evidence that both proteolysis and cholesterol modification are necessary for the efficient trafficking of Hh through the ER and Golgi. Finally, we identified several putative regulators of protein secretion and demonstrate a role for some of these genes in Hh and Wingless (Wg morphogen secretion in vivo. These data open new perspectives for studying how morphogen secretion is regulated, as well as provide insight into regulation of lipid-modified protein secretion.

  11. Genome-wide functional screen identifies a compendium of genes affecting sensitivity to tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Pereira, Ana M; Sims, David; Dexter, Tim; Fenwick, Kerry; Assiotis, Ioannis; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Hakas, Jarle; Zvelebil, Marketa; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2012-02-21

    Therapies that target estrogen signaling have made a very considerable contribution to reducing mortality from breast cancer. However, resistance to tamoxifen remains a major clinical problem. Here we have used a genome-wide functional profiling approach to identify multiple genes that confer resistance or sensitivity to tamoxifen. Combining whole-genome shRNA screening with massively parallel sequencing, we have profiled the impact of more than 56,670 RNA interference reagents targeting 16,487 genes on the cellular response to tamoxifen. This screen, along with subsequent validation experiments, identifies a compendium of genes whose silencing causes tamoxifen resistance (including BAP1, CLPP, GPRC5D, NAE1, NF1, NIPBL, NSD1, RAD21, RARG, SMC3, and UBA3) and also a set of genes whose silencing causes sensitivity to this endocrine agent (C10orf72, C15orf55/NUT, EDF1, ING5, KRAS, NOC3L, PPP1R15B, RRAS2, TMPRSS2, and TPM4). Multiple individual genes, including NF1, a regulator of RAS signaling, also correlate with clinical outcome after tamoxifen treatment.

  12. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yee-Chin

    2016-08-22

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  13. A Multinational Arab Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies New Genetic Associations for Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Richa; Plenge, Robert M; Bjonnes, Andrew C; Dashti, Hassan S; Okada, Yukinori; Gad El Haq, Wessam; Hammoudeh, Mohammed; Al Emadi, Samar; Masri, Basel K; Halabi, Hussein; Badsha, Humeira; Uthman, Imad W; Margolin, Lauren; Gupta, Namrata; Mahfoud, Ziyad R; Kapiri, Marianthi; Dargham, Soha R; Aranki, Grace; Kazkaz, Layla A; Arayssi, Thurayya

    2017-05-01

    Genetic factors underlying susceptibility to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in Arab populations are largely unknown. This genome-wide association study (GWAS) was undertaken to explore the generalizability of previously reported RA loci to Arab subjects and to discover new Arab-specific genetic loci. The Genetics of Rheumatoid Arthritis in Some Arab States Study was designed to examine the genetics and clinical features of RA patients from Jordan, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Lebanon, Qatar, and the United Arab Emirates. In total, >7 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association with RA overall and with seropositive or seronegative RA in 511 RA cases and 352 healthy controls. In addition, replication of 15 signals was attempted in 283 RA cases and 221 healthy controls. A genetic risk score of 68 known RA SNPs was also examined in this study population. Three loci (HLA region, intergenic 5q13, and 17p13 at SMTNL2/GGT6) reached genome-wide significance in the analyses of association with RA and with seropositive RA, and for all 3 loci, evidence of independent replication was demonstrated. Consistent with the findings in European and East Asian populations, the association of RA with HLA-DRB1 amino acid position 11 conferred the strongest effect (P = 4.8 × 10 -16 ), and a weighted genetic risk score of previously associated RA loci was found to be associated with RA (P = 3.41 × 10 -5 ) and with seropositive RA (P = 1.48 × 10 -6 ) in this population. In addition, 2 novel associations specific to Arab populations were found at the 5q13 and 17p13 loci. This first RA GWAS in Arab populations confirms that established HLA-region and known RA risk alleles contribute strongly to the risk and severity of disease in some Arab groups, suggesting that the genetic architecture of RA is similar across ethnic groups. Moreover, this study identified 2 novel RA risk loci in Arabs, offering further population-specific insights into the

  14. Screen and clean: a tool for identifying interactions in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing; Devlin, Bernie; Ringquist, Steven; Trucco, Massimo; Roeder, Kathryn

    2010-04-01

    Epistasis could be an important source of risk for disease. How interacting loci might be discovered is an open question for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most researchers limit their statistical analyses to testing individual pairwise interactions (i.e., marginal tests for association). A more effective means of identifying important predictors is to fit models that include many predictors simultaneously (i.e., higher-dimensional models). We explore a procedure called screen and clean (SC) for identifying liability loci, including interactions, by using the lasso procedure, which is a model selection tool for high-dimensional regression. We approach the problem by using a varying dictionary consisting of terms to include in the model. In the first step the lasso dictionary includes only main effects. The most promising single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are identified using a screening procedure. Next the lasso dictionary is adjusted to include these main effects and the corresponding interaction terms. Again, promising terms are identified using lasso screening. Then significant terms are identified through the cleaning process. Implementation of SC for GWAS requires algorithms to explore the complex model space induced by the many SNPs genotyped and their interactions. We propose and explore a set of algorithms and find that SC successfully controls Type I error while yielding good power to identify risk loci and their interactions. When the method is applied to data obtained from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium study of Type 1 Diabetes it uncovers evidence supporting interaction within the HLA class II region as well as within Chromosome 12q24.

  15. A Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Diagnostic Markers for Human Pathogenic Campylobacter jejuni Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody J. Buchanan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a leading human enteric pathogen worldwide and despite an improved understanding of its biology, ecology, and epidemiology, limited tools exist for identifying strains that are likely to cause disease. In the current study, we used subtyping data in a database representing over 24,000 isolates collected through various surveillance projects in Canada to identify 166 representative genomes from prevalent C. jejuni subtypes for whole genome sequencing. The sequence data was used in a genome-wide association study (GWAS aimed at identifying accessory gene markers associated with clinically related C. jejuni subtypes. Prospective markers (n = 28 were then validated against a large number (n = 3,902 of clinically associated and non-clinically associated genomes from a variety of sources. A total of 25 genes, including six sets of genetically linked genes, were identified as robust putative diagnostic markers for clinically related C. jejuni subtypes. Although some of the genes identified in this study have been previously shown to play a role in important processes such as iron acquisition and vitamin B5 biosynthesis, others have unknown function or are unique to the current study and warrant further investigation. As few as four of these markers could be used in combination to detect up to 90% of clinically associated isolates in the validation dataset, and such markers could form the basis for a screening assay to rapidly identify strains that pose an increased risk to public health. The results of the current study are consistent with the notion that specific groups of C. jejuni strains of interest are defined by the presence of specific accessory genes.

  16. Genome-wide linkage, exome sequencing and functional analyses identify ABCB6 as the pathogenic gene of dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Liu

    Full Text Available As a genetic disorder of abnormal pigmentation, the molecular basis of dyschromatosis universalis hereditaria (DUH had remained unclear until recently when ABCB6 was reported as a causative gene of DUH.We performed genome-wide linkage scan using Illumina Human 660W-Quad BeadChip and exome sequencing analyses using Agilent SureSelect Human All Exon Kits in a multiplex Chinese DUH family to identify the pathogenic mutations and verified the candidate mutations using Sanger sequencing. Quantitative RT-PCR and Immunohistochemistry was performed to verify the expression of the pathogenic gene, Zebrafish was also used to confirm the functional role of ABCB6 in melanocytes and pigmentation.Genome-wide linkage (assuming autosomal dominant inheritance mode and exome sequencing analyses identified ABCB6 as the disease candidate gene by discovering a coding mutation (c.1358C>T; p.Ala453Val that co-segregates with the disease phenotype. Further mutation analysis of ABCB6 in four other DUH families and two sporadic cases by Sanger sequencing confirmed the mutation (c.1358C>T; p.Ala453Val and discovered a second, co-segregating coding mutation (c.964A>C; p.Ser322Lys in one of the four families. Both mutations were heterozygous in DUH patients and not present in the 1000 Genome Project and dbSNP database as well as 1,516 unrelated Chinese healthy controls. Expression analysis in human skin and mutagenesis interrogation in zebrafish confirmed the functional role of ABCB6 in melanocytes and pigmentation. Given the involvement of ABCB6 mutations in coloboma, we performed ophthalmological examination of the DUH carriers of ABCB6 mutations and found ocular abnormalities in them.Our study has advanced our understanding of DUH pathogenesis and revealed the shared pathological mechanism between pigmentary DUH and ocular coloboma.

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies new susceptibility loci for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis in Chinese girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zezhang; Tang, Nelson Leung-Sang; Xu, Leilei; Qin, Xiaodong; Mao, Saihu; Song, Yueming; Liu, Limin; Li, Fangcai; Liu, Peng; Yi, Long; Chang, Jiang; Jiang, Long; Ng, Bobby Kin-Wah; Shi, Benlong; Zhang, Wen; Qiao, Jun; Sun, Xu; Qiu, Xusheng; Wang, Zhou; Wang, Fei; Xie, Dingding; Chen, Ling; Chen, Zhonghui; Jin, Mengran; Han, Xiao; Hu, Zongshan; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Zhen; Zhu, Feng; Qian, Bang-ping; Yu, Yang; Wang, Bing; Lee, K. M.; Lee, Wayne Y.W.; Lam, T. P.; Qiu, Yong; Cheng, Jack Chun-Yiu

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a structural deformity of the spine affecting millions of children. As a complex disease, the genetic aetiology of AIS remains obscure. Here we report the results of a four-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) conducted in a sample of 4,317 AIS patients and 6,016 controls. Overall, we identify three new susceptibility loci at 1p36.32 near AJAP1 (rs241215, Pcombined=2.95 × 10−9), 2q36.1 between PAX3 and EPHA4 (rs13398147, Pcombined=7.59 × 10−13) and 18q21.33 near BCL-2 (rs4940576, Pcombined=2.22 × 10−12). In addition, we refine a previously reported region associated with AIS at 10q24.32 (rs678741, Pcombined=9.68 × 10−37), which suggests LBX1AS1, encoding an antisense transcript of LBX1, might be a functional variant of AIS. This is the first GWAS investigating genetic variants associated with AIS in Chinese population, and the findings provide new insight into the multiple aetiological mechanisms of AIS. PMID:26394188

  18. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative–specific breast cancer risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather s; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van’t; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Mclean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; Van den Ouweland, Ans M W; Van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chasman, Daniel I; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Willett, Walter C; Hunter, David J; Simard, Jacques; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Sherman, Mark E; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Vachon, Celine; Easton, Douglas F; Haiman, Christopher A; Kraft, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20–30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry1. The etiology2 and clinical behavior3 of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition4. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10−12 and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10−8), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10−8) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10−8), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers. PMID:23535733

  19. Genome-wide association studies identify four ER negative-specific breast cancer risk loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Couch, Fergus J; Lindstrom, Sara; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Brook, Mark N; Orr, Nick; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Riboli, Elio; Feigelson, Heather S; Le Marchand, Loic; Buring, Julie E; Eccles, Diana; Miron, Penelope; Fasching, Peter A; Brauch, Hiltrud; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Carpenter, Jane; Godwin, Andrew K; Nevanlinna, Heli; Giles, Graham G; Cox, Angela; Hopper, John L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Howat, Will J; Schoof, Nils; Bojesen, Stig E; Lambrechts, Diether; Broeks, Annegien; Andrulis, Irene L; Guénel, Pascal; Burwinkel, Barbara; Sawyer, Elinor J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Fletcher, Olivia; Winqvist, Robert; Brenner, Hermann; Mannermaa, Arto; Hamann, Ute; Meindl, Alfons; Lindblom, Annika; Zheng, Wei; Devillee, Peter; Goldberg, Mark S; Lubinski, Jan; Kristensen, Vessela; Swerdlow, Anthony; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Dörk, Thilo; Muir, Kenneth; Matsuo, Keitaro; Wu, Anna H; Radice, Paolo; Teo, Soo Hwang; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Blot, William; Kang, Daehee; Hartman, Mikael; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Shen, Chen-Yang; Southey, Melissa C; Park, Daniel J; Hammet, Fleur; Stone, Jennifer; Veer, Laura J Van't; Rutgers, Emiel J; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Peto, Julian; Schrauder, Michael G; Ekici, Arif B; Beckmann, Matthias W; Dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Johnson, Nichola; Warren, Helen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Truong, Therese; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Kerbrat, Pierre; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Nielsen, Sune F; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Menéndez, Primitiva; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Lichtner, Peter; Lochmann, Magdalena; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Greco, Dario; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Margolin, Sara; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Balleine, Rosemary; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Berg, David Van Den; Stram, Daniel O; Neven, Patrick; Dieudonné, Anne-Sophie; Leunen, Karin; Rudolph, Anja; Nickels, Stefan; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peissel, Bernard; Bernard, Loris; Olson, Janet E; Wang, Xianshu; Stevens, Kristen; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Feng, Ye; Henderson, Brian E; Schumacher, Fredrick; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Tollenaar, Robertus A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline M; Kriege, Mieke; Hooning, Maartje J; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Deurzen, Carolien H M; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Signorello, Lisa; Cai, Qiuyin; Shah, Mitul; Miao, Hui; Chan, Ching Wan; Chia, Kee Seng; Jakubowska, Anna; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Ashworth, Alan; Jones, Michael; Tessier, Daniel C; González-Neira, Anna; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Ambrosone, Christine B; Bandera, Elisa V; John, Esther M; Chen, Gary K; Hu, Jennifer J; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L; Bernstein, Leslie; Press, Michael F; Ziegler, Regina G; Millikan, Robert M; Deming-Halverson, Sandra L; Nyante, Sarah; Ingles, Sue A; Waisfisz, Quinten; Tsimiklis, Helen; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel; Bui, Minh; Gibson, Lorna; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schmutzler, Rita K; Hein, Rebecca; Dahmen, Norbert; Beckmann, Lars; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Czene, Kamila; Irwanto, Astrid; Liu, Jianjun; Turnbull, Clare; Rahman, Nazneen; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Olswold, Curtis; Slager, Susan; Pilarski, Robert; Ademuyiwa, Foluso; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Slamon, Dennis J; Rauh, Claudia; Lux, Michael P; Jud, Sebastian M; Bruning, Thomas; Weaver, Joellen; Sharma, Priyanka; Pathak, Harsh; Tapper, Will; Gerty, Sue; Durcan, Lorraine; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Tumino, Rosario; Peeters, Petra H; Kaaks, Rudolf; Campa, Daniele; Canzian, Federico; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Johansson, Mattias; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Travis, Ruth; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Kolonel, Laurence N; Chen, Constance; Beck, Andy; Hankinson, Susan E; Berg, Christine D; Hoover, Robert N; Lissowska, Jolanta; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chasman, Daniel I; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Willett, Walter C; Hunter, David J; Simard, Jacques; Benitez, Javier; Dunning, Alison M; Sherman, Mark E; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Chanock, Stephen J; Hall, Per; Pharoah, Paul D P; Vachon, Celine; Easton, Douglas F; Haiman, Christopher A; Kraft, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER)-negative tumors represent 20-30% of all breast cancers, with a higher proportion occurring in younger women and women of African ancestry. The etiology and clinical behavior of ER-negative tumors are different from those of tumors expressing ER (ER positive), including differences in genetic predisposition. To identify susceptibility loci specific to ER-negative disease, we combined in a meta-analysis 3 genome-wide association studies of 4,193 ER-negative breast cancer cases and 35,194 controls with a series of 40 follow-up studies (6,514 cases and 41,455 controls), genotyped using a custom Illumina array, iCOGS, developed by the Collaborative Oncological Gene-environment Study (COGS). SNPs at four loci, 1q32.1 (MDM4, P = 2.1 × 10(-12) and LGR6, P = 1.4 × 10(-8)), 2p24.1 (P = 4.6 × 10(-8)) and 16q12.2 (FTO, P = 4.0 × 10(-8)), were associated with ER-negative but not ER-positive breast cancer (P > 0.05). These findings provide further evidence for distinct etiological pathways associated with invasive ER-positive and ER-negative breast cancers.

  20. Genome-wide screen of Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies new virulence factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafat eZrieq

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human opportunistic pathogen that causes mortality in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. While many virulence factors of this pathogen have already been identified, several remain to be discovered. In this respect we set an unprecedented genome-wide screen of a P. aeruginosa expression library based on a yeast growth phenotype. 51 candidates were selected in a three-round screening process. The robustness of the screen was validated by the selection of three well known secreted proteins including one demonstrated virulence factor, the protease LepA. Further in silico sorting of the 51 candidates highlighted three potential new Pseudomonas effector candidates (Pec. By testing the cytotoxicity of wild type P. aeruginosa vs pec mutants towards macrophages and the virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrated that the three selected Pecs are novel virulence factors of P. aeruginosa. Additional cellular localization experiments in the host revealed specific localization for Pec1 and Pec2 that could inform about their respective functions.

  1. Genome-wide association analyses identify multiple loci associated with central corneal thickness and keratoconus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Vitart, Veronique; Burdon, Kathryn P; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Mirshahi, Alireza; Hewitt, Alex W; Koehn, Demelza; Hysi, Pirro G; Ramdas, Wishal D; Zeller, Tanja; Vithana, Eranga N; Cornes, Belinda K; Tay, Wan-Ting; Tai, E Shyong; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Liu, Jianjun; Foo, Jia-Nee; Saw, Seang Mei; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Stefansson, Kari; Dimasi, David P; Mills, Richard A; Mountain, Jenny; Ang, Wei; Hoehn, René; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Grus, Franz; Wolfs, Roger; Castagne, Raphaële; Lackner, Karl J; Springelkamp, Henriët; Yang, Jian; Jonasson, Fridbert; Leung, Dexter Y L; Chen, Li J; Tham, Clement C Y; Rudan, Igor; Vatavuk, Zoran; Hayward, Caroline; Gibson, Jane; Cree, Angela J; MacLeod, Alex; Ennis, Sarah; Polasek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Wilson, James F; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Fleck, Brian; Li, Xiaohui; Siscovick, David; Taylor, Kent D; Rotter, Jerome I; Yazar, Seyhan; Ulmer, Megan; Li, Jun; Yaspan, Brian L; Ozel, Ayse B; Richards, Julia E; Moroi, Sayoko E; Haines, Jonathan L; Kang, Jae H; Pasquale, Louis R; Allingham, R Rand; Ashley-Koch, Allison; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Wright, Alan F; Pennell, Craig; Spector, Timothy D; Young, Terri L; Klaver, Caroline C W; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Anderson, Michael G; Aung, Tin; Willoughby, Colin E; Wiggs, Janey L; Pang, Chi P; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Lotery, Andrew J; Hammond, Christopher J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hauser, Michael A; Rabinowitz, Yaron S; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Mackey, David A; Craig, Jamie E; Macgregor, Stuart; Wong, Tien Y

    2013-01-01

    Central corneal thickness (CCT) is associated with eye conditions including keratoconus and glaucoma. We performed a meta-analysis on >20,000 individuals in European and Asian populations that identified 16 new loci associated with CCT at genome-wide significance (P keratoconus in 2 cohorts with 874 cases and 6,085 controls (rs2721051 near FOXO1 had odds ratio (OR) = 1.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4–1.88, P = 2.7 × 10−10, and rs4894535 in FNDC3B had OR = 1.47, 95% CI = 1.29–1.68, P = 4.9 × 10−9). FNDC3B was also associated with primary open-angle glaucoma (P = 5.6 × 10−4; tested in 3 cohorts with 2,979 cases and 7,399 controls). Further analyses implicate the collagen and extracellular matrix pathways in the regulation of CCT. PMID:23291589

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis to Identify HLA Factors Potentially Associated With Severe Dengue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudheer Gupta

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF, following dengue virus (DENV infection, is a complex and poorly understood phenomenon. In view of the clinical need of identifying patients with higher likelihood of developing this severe outcome, we undertook a comparative genome-wide association analysis of epitope variants from sequences available in the ViPR database that have been reported to be differentially related to dengue fever and DHF. Having enumerated the incriminated epitope variants, we determined the corresponding HLA alleles in the context of which DENV infection could potentially precipitate DHF. Our analysis considered the development of DHF in three different perspectives: (a as a consequence of primary DENV infection, (b following secondary DENV infection with a heterologous serotype, (c as a result of DENV infection following infection with related flaviviruses like Zika virus, Japanese Encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, etc. Subject to experimental validation, these viral and host markers would be valuable in triaging DENV-infected patients for closer supervision owing to the relatively higher risk of poor prognostic outcome and also for the judicious allocation of scarce institutional resources during large outbreaks.

  3. Visual genome-wide RNAi screening to identify human host factors required for Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Auguste Genovesio

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical infection that affects millions of people in the Americas. Current chemotherapy relies on only two drugs that have limited efficacy and considerable side effects. Therefore, the development of new and more effective drugs is of paramount importance. Although some host cellular factors that play a role in T. cruzi infection have been uncovered, the molecular requirements for intracellular parasite growth and persistence are still not well understood. To further study these host-parasite interactions and identify human host factors required for T. cruzi infection, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using cellular microarrays of a printed siRNA library that spanned the whole human genome. The screening was reproduced 6 times and a customized algorithm was used to select as hits those genes whose silencing visually impaired parasite infection. The 162 strongest hits were subjected to a secondary screening and subsequently validated in two different cell lines. Among the fourteen hits confirmed, we recognized some cellular membrane proteins that might function as cell receptors for parasite entry and others that may be related to calcium release triggered by parasites during cell invasion. In addition, two of the hits are related to the TGF-beta signaling pathway, whose inhibition is already known to diminish levels of T. cruzi infection. This study represents a significant step toward unveiling the key molecular requirements for host cell invasion and revealing new potential targets for antiparasitic therapy.

  4. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies novel host proteins required for alphavirus entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw Shin Ooi

    Full Text Available The enveloped alphaviruses include important and emerging human pathogens such as Chikungunya virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus. Alphaviruses enter cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. While there has been considerable progress in defining the structure and function of the viral proteins, relatively little is known about the host factors involved in alphavirus infection. We used a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host factors that promote or inhibit alphavirus infection in human cells. Fuzzy homologue (FUZ, a protein with reported roles in planar cell polarity and cilia biogenesis, was required for the clathrin-dependent internalization of both alphaviruses and the classical endocytic ligand transferrin. The tetraspanin membrane protein TSPAN9 was critical for the efficient fusion of low pH-triggered virus with the endosome membrane. FUZ and TSPAN9 were broadly required for infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, and Chikungunya virus, but were not required by the structurally-related flavivirus Dengue virus. Our results highlight the unanticipated functions of FUZ and TSPAN9 in distinct steps of alphavirus entry and suggest novel host proteins that may serve as targets for antiviral therapy.

  5. Computational Characterization of Osteoporosis Associated SNPs and Genes Identified by Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longjuan Qin

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have revealed many SNPs and genes associated with osteoporosis. However, influence of these SNPs and genes on the predisposition to osteoporosis is not fully understood. We aimed to identify osteoporosis GWASs-associated SNPs potentially influencing the binding affinity of transcription factors and miRNAs, and reveal enrichment signaling pathway and "hub" genes of osteoporosis GWAS-associated genes.We conducted multiple computational analyses to explore function and mechanisms of osteoporosis GWAS-associated SNPs and genes, including SNP conservation analysis and functional annotation (influence of SNPs on transcription factors and miRNA binding, gene ontology analysis, pathway analysis and protein-protein interaction analysis.Our results suggested that a number of SNPs potentially influence the binding affinity of transcription factors (NFATC2, MEF2C, SOX9, RUNX2, ESR2, FOXA1 and STAT3 and miRNAs. Osteoporosis GWASs-associated genes showed enrichment of Wnt signaling pathway, basal cell carcinoma and Hedgehog signaling pathway. Highly interconnected "hub" genes revealed by interaction network analysis are RUNX2, SP7, TNFRSF11B, LRP5, DKK1, ESR1 and SOST.Our results provided the targets for further experimental assessment and further insight on osteoporosis pathophysiology.

  6. Computational Characterization of Osteoporosis Associated SNPs and Genes Identified by Genome-Wide Association Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Longjuan; Liu, Yuyong; Wang, Ya; Wu, Guiju; Chen, Jie; Ye, Weiyuan; Yang, Jiancai; Huang, Qingyang

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revealed many SNPs and genes associated with osteoporosis. However, influence of these SNPs and genes on the predisposition to osteoporosis is not fully understood. We aimed to identify osteoporosis GWASs-associated SNPs potentially influencing the binding affinity of transcription factors and miRNAs, and reveal enrichment signaling pathway and "hub" genes of osteoporosis GWAS-associated genes. We conducted multiple computational analyses to explore function and mechanisms of osteoporosis GWAS-associated SNPs and genes, including SNP conservation analysis and functional annotation (influence of SNPs on transcription factors and miRNA binding), gene ontology analysis, pathway analysis and protein-protein interaction analysis. Our results suggested that a number of SNPs potentially influence the binding affinity of transcription factors (NFATC2, MEF2C, SOX9, RUNX2, ESR2, FOXA1 and STAT3) and miRNAs. Osteoporosis GWASs-associated genes showed enrichment of Wnt signaling pathway, basal cell carcinoma and Hedgehog signaling pathway. Highly interconnected "hub" genes revealed by interaction network analysis are RUNX2, SP7, TNFRSF11B, LRP5, DKK1, ESR1 and SOST. Our results provided the targets for further experimental assessment and further insight on osteoporosis pathophysiology.

  7. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Hieab HH; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Rentería, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivières, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Bis, Joshua C; Blanken, Laura ME; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher RK; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Den Braber, Anouk; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Filippi, Irina; Ge, Tian; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Greven, Corina U; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hilal, Saima; Hofer, Edith; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liao, Jiemin; Liewald, David CM; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mazoyer, Bernard; McKay, David R; McWhirter, Rebekah; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin; Muetzel, Ryan L; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pappa, Irene; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pudas, Sara; Pütz, Benno; Rajan, Kumar B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Thomson, Russell; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein MJ; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo GM; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Xu, Bing; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chen, Christopher; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Geus, Eco JC; De Jager, Philip L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita L; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Evans, Denis A; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald HH; Grabe, Hans J; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Ikeda, Masashi; Ikram, M Kamran; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Longstreth, WT; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Katie L; McMahon, Francis J; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five novel loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci are also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjusting for height. We found a high genetic correlation with child head circumference (ρgenetic=0.748), which indicated a similar genetic background and allowed for the identification of four additional loci through meta-analysis (Ncombined = 37,345). Variants for intracranial volume were also related to childhood and adult cognitive function, Parkinson’s disease, and enriched near genes involved in growth pathways including PI3K–AKT signaling. These findings identify biological underpinnings of intracranial volume and provide genetic support for theories on brain reserve and brain overgrowth. PMID:27694991

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies candidate genes for starch content regulation in maize kernels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Liu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kernel starch content is an important trait in maize (Zea mays L. as it accounts for 65% to 75% of the dry kernel weight and positively correlates with seed yield. A number of starch synthesis-related genes have been identified in maize in recent years. However, many loci underlying variation in starch content among maize inbred lines still remain to be identified. The current study is a genome-wide association study that used a set of 263 maize inbred lines. In this panel, the average kernel starch content was 66.99%, ranging from 60.60% to 71.58% over the three study years. These inbred lines were genotyped with the SNP50 BeadChip maize array, which is comprised of 56,110 evenly spaced, random SNPs. Population structure was controlled by a mixed linear model (MLM as implemented in the software package TASSEL. After the statistical analyses, four SNPs were identified as significantly associated with starch content (P ≤ 0.0001, among which one each are located on chromosomes 1 and 5 and two are on chromosome 2. Furthermore, 77 candidate genes associated with starch synthesis were found within the 100-kb intervals containing these four QTLs, and four highly associated genes were within 20-kb intervals of the associated SNPs. Among the four genes, Glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase (APS1; Gene ID GRMZM2G163437 is known as an important regulator of kernel starch content. The identified SNPs, QTLs, and candidate genes may not only be readily used for germplasm improvement by marker-assisted selection in breeding, but can also elucidate the genetic basis of starch content. Further studies on these identified candidate genes may help determine the molecular mechanisms regulating kernel starch content in maize and other important cereal crops.

  9. Genome-wide methylation profiling identifies hypermethylated biomarkers in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendvai, Ágnes; Johannes, Frank; Grimm, Christina; Eijsink, Jasper J H; Wardenaar, René; Volders, Haukeline H; Klip, Harry G; Hollema, Harry; Jansen, Ritsert C; Schuuring, Ed; Wisman, G Bea A; van der Zee, Ate G J

    2012-11-01

    Epigenetic modifications, such as aberrant DNA promoter methylation, are frequently observed in cervical cancer. Identification of hypermethylated regions allowing discrimination between normal cervical epithelium and high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3), or worse, may improve current cervical cancer population-based screening programs. In this study, the DNA methylome of high-grade CIN lesions was studied using genome-wide DNA methylation screening to identify potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of cervical neoplasia. Methylated DNA Immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) combined with DNA microarray was used to compare DNA methylation profiles of epithelial cells derived from high-grade CIN lesions with normal cervical epithelium. Hypermethylated differentially methylated regions (DMRs) were identified. Validation of nine selected DMRs using BSP and MSP in cervical tissue revealed methylation in 63.2-94.7% high-grade CIN and in 59.3-100% cervical carcinomas. QMSP for the two most significant high-grade CIN-specific methylation markers was conducted exploring test performance in a large series of cervical scrapings. Frequency and relative level of methylation were significantly different between normal and cancer samples. Clinical validation of both markers in cervical scrapings from patients with an abnormal cervical smear confirmed that frequency and relative level of methylation were related with increasing severity of the underlying CIN lesion and that ROC analysis was discriminative. These markers represent the COL25A1 and KATNAL2 and their observed increased methylation upon progression could intimate the regulatory role in carcinogenesis. In conclusion, our newly identified hypermethylated DMRs represent specific DNA methylation patterns in high-grade CIN lesions and are candidate biomarkers for early detection.

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies a novel canine glaucoma locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saija J Ahonen

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy and one of the leading causes of blindness. Its hereditary forms are classified into primary closed-angle (PCAG, primary open-angle (POAG and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG. Although many loci have been mapped in human, only a few genes have been identified that are associated with the development of glaucoma and the genetic basis of the disease remains poorly understood. Glaucoma has also been described in many dog breeds, including Dandie Dinmont Terriers (DDT in which it is a late-onset (>7 years disease. We designed clinical and genetic studies to better define the clinical features of glaucoma in the DDT and to identify the genetic cause. Clinical diagnosis was based on ophthalmic examinations of the affected dogs and 18 additionally investigated unaffected DDTs. We collected DNA from over 400 DTTs and a genome wide association study was performed in a cohort of 23 affected and 23 controls, followed by a fine mapping, a replication study and candidate gene sequencing. The clinical study suggested that ocular abnormalities including abnormal iridocorneal angles and pectinate ligament dysplasia are common (50% and 72%, respectively in the breed and the disease resembles human PCAG. The genetic study identified a novel 9.5 Mb locus on canine chromosome 8 including the 1.6 Mb best associated region (p = 1.63 × 10(-10, OR = 32 for homozygosity. Mutation screening in five candidate genes did not reveal any causative variants. This study indicates that although ocular abnormalities are common in DDTs, the genetic risk for glaucoma is conferred by a novel locus on CFA8. The canine locus shares synteny to a region in human chromosome 14q, which harbors several loci associated with POAG and PCG. Our study reveals a new locus for canine glaucoma and ongoing molecular studies will likely help to understand the genetic etiology of the disease.

  11. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    OpenAIRE

    Felix, Janine; Bradfield, Jonathan; Monnereau, C.; Valk, Ralf; Stergiakouli, Evie; Chesi, Alessandra; Gaillard, Romy; Feenstra, Bjarke; Thiering, Elisabeth; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Mahajan, Anubha; Niina Pitkänen; Joro, Raimo; Cavadino, Alana; Huikari, Ville

    2016-01-01

    textabstractA large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown.We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores.We included 35 668 children from 20 studies in the discovery phase and 11 873 children from 13 studies in the replication phase. In total, 15 loci reached genome-wide significance (P-value < 5...

  12. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Five Loci Influencing Facial Morphology in Europeans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fan; van der Lijn, Fedde; Schurmann, Claudia; Zhu, Gu; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Hysi, Pirro G.; Wollstein, Andreas; Lao, Oscar; de Bruijne, Marleen; Ikram, M. Arfan; van der Lugt, Aad; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Niessen, Wiro J.; Homuth, Georg; de Zubicaray, Greig; McMahon, Katie L.; Thompson, Paul M.; Daboul, Amro; Puls, Ralf; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Bevan, Liisa; Pausova, Zdenka; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Wright, Margaret J.; Wicking, Carol; Boehringer, Stefan; Spector, Timothy D.; Paus, Tomáš; Martin, Nicholas G.; Biffar, Reiner; Kayser, Manfred

    2012-01-01

    Inter-individual variation in facial shape is one of the most noticeable phenotypes in humans, and it is clearly under genetic regulation; however, almost nothing is known about the genetic basis of normal human facial morphology. We therefore conducted a genome-wide association study for facial shape phenotypes in multiple discovery and replication cohorts, considering almost ten thousand individuals of European descent from several countries. Phenotyping of facial shape features was based on landmark data obtained from three-dimensional head magnetic resonance images (MRIs) and two-dimensional portrait images. We identified five independent genetic loci associated with different facial phenotypes, suggesting the involvement of five candidate genes—PRDM16, PAX3, TP63, C5orf50, and COL17A1—in the determination of the human face. Three of them have been implicated previously in vertebrate craniofacial development and disease, and the remaining two genes potentially represent novel players in the molecular networks governing facial development. Our finding at PAX3 influencing the position of the nasion replicates a recent GWAS of facial features. In addition to the reported GWA findings, we established links between common DNA variants previously associated with NSCL/P at 2p21, 8q24, 13q31, and 17q22 and normal facial-shape variations based on a candidate gene approach. Overall our study implies that DNA variants in genes essential for craniofacial development contribute with relatively small effect size to the spectrum of normal variation in human facial morphology. This observation has important consequences for future studies aiming to identify more genes involved in the human facial morphology, as well as for potential applications of DNA prediction of facial shape such as in future forensic applications. PMID:23028347

  13. Genome-wide DNA methylation profile analysis identifies differentially methylated loci associated with ankylosis spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jiangcan; Liu, Yang; Xu, Jiawen; Wang, Wenyu; Wen, Yan; He, Awen; Fan, Qianrui; Guo, Xiong; Zhang, Feng

    2017-07-25

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic rheumatic and autoimmune disease. Little is known about the potential role of DNA methylation in the pathogenesis of AS. This study was undertaken to explore the potential role of DNA methylation in the genetic mechanism of AS. In this study, we compared the genome-wide DNA methylation profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) between five AS patients and five healthy subjects, using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was performed to validate the relevance of the identified differentially methylated genes for AS, using another independent sample of five AS patients and five healthy subjects. Compared with healthy controls, we detected 1915 differentially methylated CpG sites mapped to 1214 genes. The HLA-DQB1 gene achieved the most significant signal (cg14323910, adjusted P = 1.84 × 10 -6 , β difference = 0.5634) for AS. Additionally, the CpG site cg04777551 of HLA-DQB1 presented a suggestive association with AS (adjusted P = 1.46 × 10 -3 , β difference = 0.3594). qRT-PCR observed that the mRNA expression level of HLA-DQB1 in AS PBMCs was significantly lower than that in healthy control PBMCs (ratio = 0.48 ± 0.10, P pathway enrichment analysis of differentially methylated genes identified four GO terms and 10 pathways for AS, functionally related to antigen dynamics and function. Our results demonstrated the altered DNA methylation profile of AS and implicated HLA-DQB1 in the development of AS.

  14. INNOVATIVE STRATEGIES TO IDENTIFY M. TUBERCULOSIS ANTIGENS AND EPITOPES USING GENOME-WIDE ANALYSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemieke eGeluk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the fact that only a small part of the Mtb expressome has been explored for identification of antigens capable of activating human T-cell responses, which is critically required for the design of better TB vaccination strategies, more emphasis should be placed on innovative ways to discover new Mtb antigens and explore their function at the several stages of infection. Better protective antigens for TB vaccines are urgently needed, also in view of the disappointing results of the MVA85 vaccine which failed to induce additional protection in BCG vaccinated infants [54]. Moreover, immune responses to relevant antigens may be useful to identify TB-specific biomarker signatures. Here we describe the potency of novel tools and strategies to reveal such Mtb antigens. Using proteins specific for different Mtb infection phases, many new antigens of the latency-associated Mtb DosR regulon as well as Rpf proteins, associated with resuscitating TB, were discovered that were recognized by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Furthermore, by employing MHC binding algorithms and bioinformatics combined with high throughput human T-cell screens and tetramers, HLA-class Ia restricted poly-functional CD8+ T-cells were identified in TB patients. Comparable methods, led to the identification of HLA-E-restricted Mtb epitopes recognized by CD8+ T-cells. A genome-wide unbiased antigen discovery approach was applied to analyse the in vivo Mtb gene expression profiles in the lungs of mice, resulting in the identification of IVE-TB antigens, which are expressed during infection in the lung, the main target organ of Mtb. IVE-TB antigens induce strong T cell responses in long-term latently Mtb infected individuals, and represent an interesting new group of TB antigens for vaccination. In summary, new tools have helped expand our view on the Mtb antigenome involved in human cellular immunity and provided new candidates for TB vaccination.

  15. A genome-wide association study identifies five loci influencing facial morphology in Europeans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Liu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Inter-individual variation in facial shape is one of the most noticeable phenotypes in humans, and it is clearly under genetic regulation; however, almost nothing is known about the genetic basis of normal human facial morphology. We therefore conducted a genome-wide association study for facial shape phenotypes in multiple discovery and replication cohorts, considering almost ten thousand individuals of European descent from several countries. Phenotyping of facial shape features was based on landmark data obtained from three-dimensional head magnetic resonance images (MRIs and two-dimensional portrait images. We identified five independent genetic loci associated with different facial phenotypes, suggesting the involvement of five candidate genes--PRDM16, PAX3, TP63, C5orf50, and COL17A1--in the determination of the human face. Three of them have been implicated previously in vertebrate craniofacial development and disease, and the remaining two genes potentially represent novel players in the molecular networks governing facial development. Our finding at PAX3 influencing the position of the nasion replicates a recent GWAS of facial features. In addition to the reported GWA findings, we established links between common DNA variants previously associated with NSCL/P at 2p21, 8q24, 13q31, and 17q22 and normal facial-shape variations based on a candidate gene approach. Overall our study implies that DNA variants in genes essential for craniofacial development contribute with relatively small effect size to the spectrum of normal variation in human facial morphology. This observation has important consequences for future studies aiming to identify more genes involved in the human facial morphology, as well as for potential applications of DNA prediction of facial shape such as in future forensic applications.

  16. A genome-wide association study identifies CDHR3 as a susceptibility locus for early childhood asthma with severe exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Sleiman, Patrick; Nielsen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    years of age in a total of 1,173 cases and 2,522 controls. Cases were identified from national health registries of hospitalization, and DNA was obtained from the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank. We identified five loci with genome-wide significant association. Four of these, GSDMB, IL33, RAD50 and IL...

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies FCGR2A as a susceptibility locus for Kawasaki disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khor, Chiea Chuen; Davila, Sonia; Breunis, Willemijn B.; Lee, Yi-Ching; Shimizu, Chisato; Wright, Victoria J.; Yeung, Rae S. M.; Tan, Dennis E. K.; Sim, Kar Seng; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Yin; Pang, Junxiong; Mitchell, Paul; Cimaz, Rolando; Dahdah, Nagib; Cheung, Yiu-Fai; Huang, Guo-Ying; Yang, Wanling; Park, In-Sook; Lee, Jong-Keuk; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Levin, Michael; Burns, Jane C.; Burgner, David; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Hibberd, Martin L.; Lau, Yu-Lung; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Xiao-Jing; Liu, Fang; Wu, Lin; Yoo, Jeong-Jin; Hong, Soo-Jong; Kim, Kwi-Joo; Kim, Jae-Jung; Park, Young-Mi; Mi Hong, Young; Sohn, Sejung; Young Jang, Gi; Ha, Kee-Soo; Nam, Hyo-Kyoung; Byeon, Jung-Hye; Weon Yun, Sin; Ki Han, Myung; Lee, Kyung-Yil; Hwang, Ja-Young; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Seob Song, Min; Lee, Hyoung-Doo; Kim, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae-Moo; Chang, Jeng-Sheng; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Liang, Chi-Di; Chen, Ming-Ren; Chi, Hsin; Chiu, Nan-Chang; Huang, Fu-Yuan; Chang, Luan-Yin; Huang, Li-Min; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Huang, Kao-Pin; Lee, Meng-Luen; Hwang, Betau; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Lee, Pi-Chang; Odam, Miranda; Christiansen, Frank T.; Witt, Campbell; Goldwater, Paul; Curtis, Nigel; Palasanthiran, Pamela; Ziegler, John; Nissen, Michael; Nourse, Clare; Kuipers, Irene M.; Ottenkamp, Jaap J.; Geissler, Judy; Biezeveld, Maarten; Tacke, Carline; Filippini, Luc; Brogan, Paul; Klein, Nigel; Shah, Vanita; Dillon, Michael; Booy, Robert; Shingadia, Delane; Bose, Anu; Mukasa, Thomas; Tulloh, Robert; Michie, Colin; Newburger, Jane W.; Baker, Annette L.; Rowley, Anne H.; Shulman, Stanford T.; Mason, Wilbert; Takahashi, Masato; Melish, Marian E.; Tremoulet, Adriana H.; Viswanathan, Ananth; Rochtchina, Elena; Attia, John; Scott, Rodney; Holliday, Elizabeth; Harrap, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology, with clinical observations suggesting a substantial genetic contribution to disease susceptibility. We conducted a genome-wide association study and replication analysis in 2,173 individuals with Kawasaki disease and 9,383 controls from

  18. Genome-wide association study identifies new prostate cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Siddiq, Afshan

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most common non-skin cancer diagnosed among males in developed countries and the second leading cause of cancer mortality, yet little is known regarding its etiology and factors that influence clinical outcome. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of PrCa have iden...

  19. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Cornelis (Marilyn); E.M. Byrne; T. Esko (Tõnu); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A. Ganna (Andrea); N.P. Paynter (Nina); K.L. Monda (Keri); N. Amin (Najaf); K. Fischer (Krista); F. Renström (Frida); J.S. Ngwa; V. Huikari (Ville); A. Cavadino (Alana); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); A. Teumer (Alexander); K. Yu; P. Marques-Vidal; R. Rawal; A. Manichaikul (Ani); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); J.M. Vink; J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); G. Burlutsky (George); J. Lahti (Jari); V. Mikkilä (Vera); R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn ); J. Eriksson; S. Musani (Solomon); T. Tanaka; F. Geller (Frank); J. Luan; J. Hui; R. Mägi (Reedik); M. Dimitriou (Maria); M. Garcia (Melissa); W.-K. Ho; M.J. Wright (Margaret); L.M. Rose (Lynda M.); P.K.E. Magnusson (Patrik K. E.); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); D.J. Couper (David); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Hofman (Albert); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); I. Barroso; I. Johansson (Ingegerd); L. Xue (Luting); M. Kaakinen (Marika); L. Milani (Lili); C. Power (Christine); H. Snieder (Harold); R.P. Stolk; S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); R. Biffar; F. Gu; F. Bastardot (Francois); Z. Kutalik; D.R. Jacobs (David); N.G. Forouhi (Nita G.); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Lind (Lars); C. Lindgren; K. Michaëlsson; A.P. Morris (Andrew); M.K. Jensen (Majken K.); K.T. Khaw; R.N. Luben (Robert); J.J. Wang; S. Männistö (Satu); M.-M. Perälä; M. Kähönen (Mika); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); J. Viikari (Jorma); D. Mozaffarian; K. Mukamal (Kenneth); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); A. Döring; A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); G.W. Montgomery (Grant W.); N. Dahmen (N.); T. Carithers; K.L. Tucker; L. Ferrucci (Luigi); H.A. Boyd; M. Melbye (Mads); J.L. Treur; D. Mellström (Dan); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); I. Prokopenko (Inga); A. Tönjes (Anke); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); D.K. Houston; Y. Liu; J. Danesh (John); A. Rasheed; M.A. Mason; A.B. Zonderman; L. Franke (Lude); B.S. Kristal; J. Karjalainen (Juha); D.R. Reed; H.-J. Westra; M.K. Evans; D. Saleheen; T.B. Harris (Tamara); G.V. Dedoussis (George V.); G.C. Curhan (Gary); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J. Beilby (John); L.R. Pasquale; B. Feenstra; S. Bandinelli; J.M. Ordovas; A.T. Chan; U. Peters (Ulrike); C. Ohlsson (Claes); C. Gieger (Christian); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); D.S. Siscovick (David); O. Raitakari (Olli); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); P. Mitchell (Paul); D. Hunter (David); P. Kraft (Peter); E.B. Rimm (Eric B.); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); N.J. Wareham (Nick); P.K. Vollenweider (Peter K.); N. Caporaso; H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); M.L. Neuhouser (Marian L.); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce H. R.); F.B. Hu (Frank); E. Hypponen (Elina); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); P.W. Franks; P.M. Ridker (Paul); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); G. Heiss (Gerardo); A. Metspalu (Andres); K.E. North (Kari); E. Ingelsson (Erik); J.A. Nettleton; R.M. van Dam (Rob); D.I. Chasman (Daniel)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCoffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day)

  20. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelis, M. C.; Byrne, E. M.; Esko, T.; Nalls, M. A.; Ganna, A.; Paynter, N.; Monda, K. L.; Amin, N.; Fischer, K.; Renstrom, F.; Ngwa, J. S.; Huikari, V.; Cavadino, A.; Nolte, I. M.; Teumer, A.; Yu, K.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Rawal, R.; Manichaikul, A.; Wojczynski, M. K.; Vink, J. M.; Zhao, J. H.; Burlutsky, G.; Lahti, J.; Mikkila, V.; Lemaitre, R. N.; Eriksson, J.; Musani, S. K.; Tanaka, T.; Geller, F.; Luan, J.; Hui, J.; Maegi, R.; Dimitriou, M.; Garcia, M. E.; Ho, W-K; Wright, M. J.; Rose, L. M.; Magnusson, P. K. E.; Pedersen, N. L.; Couper, D.; Oostra, B. A.; Hofman, A.; Ikram, M. A.; Tiemeier, H. W.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; van Rooij, F. J. A.; Barroso, I.; Johansson, I.; Xue, L.; Kaakinen, M.; Milani, L.; Power, C.; Snieder, H.; Stolk, R. P.; Baumeister, S. E.; Biffar, R.; Gu, F.; Bastardot, F.; Kutalik, Z.; Jacobs, D. R.; Forouhi, N. G.; Mihailov, E.; Lind, L.; Lindgren, C.; Michaelsson, K.; Morris, A.; Jensen, M.; Khaw, K-T; Luben, R. N.; Wang, J. J.; Mannisto, S.; Perala, M-M; Kahonen, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Viikari, J.; Mozaffarian, D.; Mukamal, K.; Psaty, B. M.; Doering, A.; Heath, A. C.; Montgomery, G. W.; Dahmen, N.; Carithers, T.; Tucker, K. L.; Ferrucci, L.; Boyd, H. A.; Melbye, M.; Treur, J. L.; Mellstrom, D.; Hottenga, J. J.; Prokopenko, I.; Toenjes, A.; Deloukas, P.; Kanoni, S.; Lorentzon, M.; Houston, D. K.; Liu, Y.; Danesh, J.; Rasheed, A.; Mason, M. A.; Zonderman, A. B.; Franke, L.; Kristal, B. S.; Karjalainen, J.; Reed, D. R.; Westra, H-J; Evans, M. K.; Saleheen, D.; Harris, T. B.; Dedoussis, G.; Curhan, G.; Stumvoll, M.; Beilby, J.; Pasquale, L. R.; Feenstra, B.; Bandinelli, S.; Ordovas, J. M.; Chan, A. T.; Peters, U.; Ohlsson, C.; Gieger, C.; Martin, N. G.; Waldenberger, M.; Siscovick, D. S.; Raitakari, O.; Eriksson, J. G.; Mitchell, P.; Hunter, D. J.; Kraft, P.; Rimm, E. B.; Boomsma, D. I.; Borecki, I. B.; Loos, R. J. F.; Wareham, N. J.; Vollenweider, P.; Caporaso, N.; Grabe, H. J.; Neuhouser, M. L.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.; Hu, F. B.; Hyppoenen, E.; Jarvelin, M-R; Cupples, L. A.; Franks, P. W.; Ridker, P. M.; van Duijn, C. M.; Heiss, G.; Metspalu, A.; North, K. E.; Ingelsson, E.; Nettleton, J. A.; van Dam, R. M.; Chasman, D. I.

    Coffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day) among up to

  1. Genome-wide association analysis identifies 13 new risk loci for schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripke, Stephan; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Chambert, Kimberly; Moran, Jennifer L.; Kähler, Anna K.; Akterin, Susanne; Bergen, Sarah E.; Collins, Ann L.; Crowley, James J.; Fromer, Menachem; Kim, Yunjung; Lee, Sang Hong; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Sanchez, Nick; Stahl, Eli A.; Williams, Stephanie; Wray, Naomi R.; Xia, Kai; Bettella, Francesco; Borglum, Anders D.; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan K.; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Durmishi, Naser; Gill, Michael; Golimbet, Vera; Hamshere, Marian L.; Holmans, Peter; Hougaard, David M.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Lin, Kuang; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Neale, Benjamin M.; O'Neill, Francis A.; Owen, Michael J.; Milovancevic, Milica Pejovic; Posthuma, Danielle; Powell, John; Richards, Alexander L.; Riley, Brien P.; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Smit, August B.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tosato, Sarah; Verhage, Matthijs; Walters, James T.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Gejman, Pablo V.; Laurent, Claudine; Mowry, Bryan J.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Pulver, Ann E.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Dudbridge, Frank; Shi, Jianxin; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Campion, Dominique; Cohen, David; Dikeos, Dimitris; Duan, Jubao; Eichhammer, Peter; Godard, Stephanie; Hansen, Mark; Lerer, F. Bernard; Liang, Kung-Yee; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Norton, Nadine; Papadimitriou, George N.; Ribble, Robert; Sanders, Alan R.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Walsh, Dermot; Williams, Nigel M.; Wormley, Brandon; Arranz, Maria J.; Bakker, Steven; Bender, Stephan; Bramon, Elvira; Collier, David; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Hall, Jeremy; Iyegbe, Conrad; Jablensky, Assen; Kahn, Rene S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Lawrie, Stephen; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Linszen, Don H.; Mata, Ignacio; McIntosh, Andrew; Murray, Robin M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; van Os, Jim; Walshe, Muriel; Weisbrod, Matthias; Wiersma, Durk; Donnelly, Peter; Barroso, Ines; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden P.; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Pirinen, Matti; Pearson, Richard D.; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gwilliam, Rhian; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Hammond, Naomi; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Waller, Matthew J.; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; McCarthy, Mark I.; Stefansson, Kari; Scolnick, Edward; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steven A.; Sklar, Pamela; Hultman, Christina M.; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is an idiopathic mental disorder with a heritable component and a substantial public health impact. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) for schizophrenia beginning with a Swedish national sample (5,001 cases and 6,243 controls) followed by meta-analysis with

  2. Using rice genome-wide association studies to identify DNA markers for marker-assisted selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice association mapping panels are collections of rice (Oryza sativa L.) accessions developed for genome-wide association (GWA) studies. One of these panels, the Rice Diversity Panel 1 (RDP1) was phenotyped by various research groups for several traits of interest, and more recently, genotyped with...

  3. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hieab H H; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Rentería, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivières, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija; Alhusaini, Saud; Amin, Najaf; Andersson, Micael; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Axelsson, Tomas; Beiser, Alexa; Bernard, Manon; Bis, Joshua C; Blanken, Laura M E; Blanton, Susan H; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brickman, Adam M; Carmichael, Owen; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chauhan, Ganesh; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Braber, Anouk Den; Doan, Nhat Trung; Ehrlich, Stefan; Filippi, Irina; Ge, Tian; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Gottesman, Rebecca F; Greven, Corina U; Grimm, Oliver; Griswold, Michael E; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Haukvik, Unn K; Hilal, Saima; Hofer, Edith; Hoehn, David; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Liao, Jiemin; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Marquand, Andre; Matarin, Mar; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mazoyer, Bernard; McKay, David R; McWhirter, Rebekah; Milaneschi, Yuri; Mirza-Schreiber, Nazanin; Muetzel, Ryan L; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Oosterlaan, Jaap; Papmeyer, Martina; Pappa, Irene; Pirpamer, Lukas; Pudas, Sara; Pütz, Benno; Rajan, Kumar B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Richards, Jennifer S; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rommelse, Nanda; Rose, Emma J; Royle, Natalie A; Rundek, Tatjana; Sämann, Philipp G; Satizabal, Claudia L; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shen, Li; Shin, Jean; Shumskaya, Elena; Smith, Albert V; Sprooten, Emma; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; Thomson, Russell; Tordesillas-Gutierrez, Diana; Toro, Roberto; Trabzuni, Daniah; Vaidya, Dhananjay; Van der Grond, Jeroen; Van der Meer, Dennis; Van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Van Eijk, Kristel R; Van Erp, Theo G M; Van Rooij, Daan; Walton, Esther; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Windham, Beverly G; Winkler, Anderson M; Woldehawariat, Girma; Wolf, Christiane; Wolfers, Thomas; Xu, Bing; Yanek, Lisa R; Yang, Jingyun; Zijdenbos, Alex; Zwiers, Marcel P; Agartz, Ingrid; Aggarwal, Neelum T; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Amouyel, Philippe; Andreassen, Ole A; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Barral, Sandra; Bastin, Mark E; Becker, Diane M; Becker, James T; Bennett, David A; Blangero, John; van Bokhoven, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brodaty, Henry; Brouwer, Rachel M; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cannon, Dara M; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Chen, Christopher; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cichon, Sven; Cookson, Mark R; Corvin, Aiden; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; De Geus, Eco J C; De Jager, Philip L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; DeStefano, Anita L; Dillman, Allissa; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drevets, Wayne C; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Espeseth, Thomas; Evans, Denis A; Fedko, Iryna O; Fernández, Guillén; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fisher, Simon E; Fleischman, Debra A; Ford, Ian; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Francks, Clyde; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Glahn, David C; Gollub, Randy L; Göring, Harald H H; Grabe, Hans J; Green, Robert C; Gruber, Oliver; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hardy, John; Hartman, Catharina A; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hosten, Norbert; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Pol, Hilleke E Hulshoff; Ikeda, Masashi; Ikram, M Kamran; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Jönsson, Erik G; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahn, René S; Kanai, Ryota; Kloszewska, Iwona; Knopman, David S; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Lemaître, Hervé; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; Longstreth, W T; Lopez, Oscar L; Lovestone, Simon; Martinez, Oliver; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Mattay, Venkata S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Katie L; McMahon, Francis J; Mecocci, Patrizia; Melle, Ingrid; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Morris, Derek W; Mosley, Thomas H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nalls, Michael A; Nauck, Matthias; Nichols, Thomas E; Niessen, Wiro J; Nöthen, Markus M; Nyberg, Lars; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Ophoff, Roel A; Pandolfo, Massimo; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Psaty, Bruce M; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rotter, Jerome I; Ryten, Mina; Sacco, Ralph L; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schofield, Peter R; Sigurdsson, Sigurdur; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smith, Colin; Smoller, Jordan W; Soininen, Hilkka; Srikanth, Velandai; Steen, Vidar M; Stott, David J; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Tiemeier, Henning; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Tzourio, Christophe; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hernández, Maria C Valdés; Van der Brug, Marcel; Van der Lugt, Aad; Van der Wee, Nic J A; Van Duijn, Cornelia M; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Van T Ent, Dennis; Van Tol, Marie-Jose; Vardarajan, Badri N; Veltman, Dick J; Vernooij, Meike W; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Wassink, Thomas H; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; Westman, Eric; White, Tonya; Wong, Tien Y; Wright, Clinton B; Zielke, H Ronald; Zonderman, Alan B; Deary, Ian J; DeCarli, Charles; Schmidt, Helena; Martin, Nicholas G; De Craen, Anton J M; Wright, Margaret J; Launer, Lenore J; Schumann, Gunter; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Barbara; Debette, Stéphanie; Medland, Sarah E; Ikram, M Arfan; Thompson, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously

  4. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.W. Loth (Daan); M.S. Artigas; S.A. Gharib (Sina); L.V. Wain (Louise); N. Franceschini (Nora); B. Koch (Beate); T.D. Pottinger (Tess); G.D. Smith; Q. Duan (Qing); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); M.K. Lee (Mi Kyeong); D.P. Strachan (David); A.L. James (Alan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); V. Vitart (Veronique); A. Ramasamy (Adaikalavan); N.J. Wareham (Nick); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); X.-Q. Wang (Xin-Qun); H. Trochet (Holly); M. Kähönen (Mika); C. Flexeder (Claudia); E. Albrecht (Eva); L.M. Lopez (Lorna); B. Thyagarajan (Bharat); A.C. Alves (Alexessander Couto); S. Enroth (Stefan); E. Omenaas (Ernst); P.K. Joshi (Peter); M. Fall (Magnus); A. Viñuela (Ana); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L.R. Loehr (Laura); M. Fornage (Myriam); G. Li (Guo); J.B. Wilk (Jemma); W. Tang (Wenbo); A. Manichaikul (Ani); L. Lahousse (Lies); T.B. Harris (Tamara); K.E. North (Kari); A.R. Rudnicka (Alicja); J. Hui (Jennie); X. Gu (Xiangjun); T. Lumley (Thomas); A.F. Wright (Alan); N. Hastie (Nick); S. Campbell (Susan); R. Kumar (Rajesh); I. Pin (Isabelle); R.A. Scott (Robert); K.H. Pietilainen (Kirsi Hannele); I. Surakka (Ida); Y. Liu (YongMei); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); H. Schulz (Holger); J. Heinrich (Joachim); G. Davies (Gail); J.M. Vonk (Judith); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); A. Pouta (Anneli); A. Johansson (Åsa); S.H. Wild (Sarah); E. Ingelsson (Erik); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); H. Völzke (Henry); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); A.C. Morrison (Alanna); J.I. Rotter (Jerome); W. Gao (Wei); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); W.B. White (Wendy); S.S. Rich (Stephen); A. Hofman (Albert); T. Aspelund (Thor); D. Couper (David); L.J. Smith (Lewis); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); K. Lohman (Kurt); E.G. Burchard (Esteban); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Garcia (Melissa); B.R. Joubert (Bonnie); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); A.W. Musk (Arthur); C.R.W. Hansel (Christian); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); L. Zgaga (Lina); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); P. Navarro (Pau); I. Rudan (Igor); Y.-M. Oh (Yeon-Mok); S. Redline (Susan); D.L. Jarvis (Deborah); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); T. Rantanen (Taina); G.T. O'Connor (George); S. Ripatti (Samuli); R.J. Scott (Rodney); S. Karrasch (Stefan); H. Grallert (Harald); N.C. Gaddis (Nathan); J.M. Starr (John); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); R.L. Minster (Ryan); C.W. Lederer (Carsten); J. Pekkanen (Juha); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); H. Campbell (Harry); A.P. Morris (Andrew); S. Gläser (Sven); C.J. Hammond (Christopher); K.M. Burkart (Kristin); J.P. Beilby (John); S.B. Kritchevsky (Stephen); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); D.B. Hancock (Dana); O.D. Williams (Dale); O. Polasek (Ozren); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); I. Kolcic (Ivana); M.F. Petrini (Marcy); K.T. de Jong (Kim); M. Wjst (Matthias); W.H. Kim (Woo); D.J. Porteous (David J.); G. Scotland (Generation); B.H. Smith (Blair); A. Viljanen (Anne); M. Heliovaara (Markku); J. Attia (John); I. Sayers (Ian); R. Hampel (Regina); C. Gieger (Christian); I.J. Deary (Ian); H.M. Boezen (Marike); A.B. Newman (Anne); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); J.F. Wilson (James); L. Lind (Lars); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); A. Teumer (Alexander); T.D. Spector (Timothy); E. Melén (Erik); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); L.A. Lange (Leslie); R.G. Barr (Graham); K.R. Bracke (Ken); F.M. Verhamme (Fien); J. Sung (Joohon); P.S. Hiemstra (Pieter); P.A. Cassano (Patricia); A. Sood (Akshay); C. Hayward (Caroline); J. Dupuis (Josée); I.P. Hall (Ian); G.G. Brusselle (Guy); M.D. Tobin (Martin); S.J. London (Stephanie)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractForced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in

  5. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loth, Daan W.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Wain, Louise V.; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess D.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P.; James, Alan L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kaonen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K.; Fall, Tove; Vinuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J.; Loehr, Laura R.; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wik, Jemma B.; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B.; North, Kari E.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A.; Pietilainen, Kirsi H.; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M.; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Asa; Wild, Sarah H.; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Voezke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S.; White, Wendy B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Musk, A. Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R.; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah L.; Rantanen, Taina; O'Connor, George T.; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L.; Lederer, David J.; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbe, Harry; Morris, Andrew P.; Glaeser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J.; Burkart, Kristin M.; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gucinason, Vilrnundur; Hancock, Dana B.; Williams, Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F.; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J.; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H.; Villanen, Anne; Heliovaara, Markku; Attia, John R.; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Boezen, Hendrika; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F.; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H.; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D.; Melen, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J.; Lange, Leslie A.; Barr, R. Graham; Bracke, Ken R.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josee; Hall, Ian P.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917

  6. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S; Gormley, Padhraig

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases...

  7. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelis, M. C.; Byrne, E. M.; Esko, T.; Nalls, M. A.; Ganna, A.; Paynter, N.; Monda, K. L.; Amin, N.; Fischer, K.; Renstrom, F.; Ngwa, J. S.; Huikari, V.; Cavadino, A.; Nolte, I. M.; Teumer, A.; Yu, K.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Rawal, R.; Manichaikul, A.; Wojczynski, M. K.; Vink, J. M.; Zhao, J. H.; Burlutsky, G.; Lahti, J.; Mikkilä, V.; Lemaitre, R. N.; Eriksson, J.; Musani, S. K.; Tanaka, T.; Geller, F.; Luan, J.; Hui, J.; Mägi, R.; Dimitriou, M.; Garcia, M. E.; Ho, W.-K.; Wright, M. J.; Rose, L. M.; Magnusson, P. K. E.; Pedersen, N. L.; Couper, D.; Oostra, B. A.; Hofman, A.; Ikram, M. A.; Tiemeier, H. W.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; van Rooij, F. J. A.; Barroso, I.; Johansson, I.; Xue, L.; Kaakinen, M.; Milani, L.; Power, C.; Snieder, H.; Stolk, R. P.; Baumeister, S. E.; Biffar, R.; Gu, F.; Bastardot, F.; Kutalik, Z.; Jacobs, D. R.; Forouhi, N. G.; Mihailov, E.; Lind, L.; Lindgren, C.; Michaëlsson, K.; Morris, A.; Jensen, M.; Khaw, K.-T.; Luben, R. N.; Wang, J. J.; Männistö, S.; Perälä, M.-M.; Kähönen, M.; Lehtimäki, T.; Viikari, J.; Mozaffarian, D.; Mukamal, K.; Psaty, B. M.; Döring, A.; Heath, A. C.; Montgomery, G. W.; Dahmen, N.; Carithers, T.; Tucker, K. L.; Ferrucci, L.; Boyd, H. A.; Melbye, M.; Treur, J. L.; Mellström, D.; Hottenga, J. J.; Prokopenko, I.; Tönjes, A.; Deloukas, P.; Kanoni, S.; Lorentzon, M.; Houston, D. K.; Liu, Y.; Danesh, J.; Rasheed, A.; Mason, M. A.; Zonderman, A. B.; Franke, L.; Kristal, B. S.; Karjalainen, J.; Reed, D. R.; Westra, H.-J.; Evans, M. K.; Saleheen, D.; Harris, T. B.; Dedoussis, G.; Curhan, G.; Stumvoll, M.; Beilby, J.; Pasquale, L. R.; Feenstra, B.; Bandinelli, S.; Ordovas, J. M.; Chan, A. T.; Peters, U.; Ohlsson, C.; Gieger, C.; Martin, N. G.; Waldenberger, M.; Siscovick, D. S.; Raitakari, O.; Eriksson, J. G.; Mitchell, P.; Hunter, D. J.; Kraft, P.; Rimm, E. B.; Boomsma, D. I.; Borecki, I. B.; Loos, R. J. F.; Wareham, N. J.; Vollenweider, P.; Caporaso, N.; Grabe, H. J.; Neuhouser, M. L.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.; Hu, F. B.; Hyppönen, E.; Järvelin, M.-R.; Cupples, L. A.; Franks, P. W.; Ridker, P. M.; van Duijn, C. M.; Heiss, G.; Metspalu, A.; North, K. E.; Ingelsson, E.; Nettleton, J. A.; van Dam, R. M.; Chasman, D. I.; Nalls, Michael A.; Plagnol, Vincent; Hernandez, Dena G.; Sharma, Manu; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Saad, Mohamad; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Sveinbjörnsdóttir, Sigurlaug; Arepalli, Sampath; Barker, Roger; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Berendse, Henk W.; Berg, Daniela; Bhatia, Kailash; de Bie, Rob M. A.; Biffi, Alessandro; Bloem, Bas; Bochdanovits, Zoltan; Bonin, Michael; Bras, M.; Brockmann, Kathrin; Brooks, Janet; Burn, David J.; Charlesworth, Gavin; Chen, Honglei; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Chong, Sean; Clarke, Carl E.; Cookson, Mark R.; Cooper, J. Mark; Corvol, Jean Christophe; Counsell, Carl; Damier, Philippe; Dartigues, Jean-François; Deloukas, Panos; Deuschl, Günther; Dexter, David T.; van Dijk, Karin D.; Dillman, Allissa; Durif, Frank; Dürr, Alexandra; Edkins, Sarah; Evans, Jonathan R.; Foltynie, Thomas; Dong, Jing; Gardner, Michelle; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Goate, Alison; Gray, Emma; Guerreiro, Rita; Harris, Clare; van Hilten, Jacobus J.; Hofman, Albert; Hollenbeck, Albert; Holton, Janice; Hu, Michele; Huang, Xuemei; Hershey, Milton S.; Wurster, Isabel; Mätzler, Walter; Hudson, Gavin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Huttenlocher, Johanna; Illig, Thomas; München, Helmholtz Zentrum; Jónsson, Pálmi V.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Langford, Cordelia; Lees, Andrew; Lichtner, Peter; Limousin, Patricia; Lopez, Grisel; Lorenz, Delia; McNeill, Alisdair; Moorby, Catriona; Moore, Matthew; Morris, Huw R.; Morrison, Karen E.; O' Sullivan, Sean S.; Pearson, Justin; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Pétursson, Hjörvar; Pollak, Pierre; Potter, Simon; Ravina, Bernard; Revesz, Tamas; Riess, Olaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rizzu, Patrizia; Ryten, Mina; Sawcer, Stephen; Schapira, Anthony; Scheffer, Hans; Shaw, Karen; Sidransky, Ellen; Smith, Colin; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Bettella, Francesco; Stockton, Joanna D.; Strange, Amy; Talbot, Kevin; Tanner, M.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Tison, François; Trabzuni, Daniah; Traynor, Bryan J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Velseboer, Daan; Vidailhet, Marie; Walker, Robert; van de Warrenburg, Bart; Wickremaratchi, Mirdhu; Williams, Nigel; Williams-Gray, Caroline H.; Winder-Rhodes, Sophie; Stefánsson, Kári; Martinez, Maria; Sabatier, Paul; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hardy, John; Heutink, Peter; Brice, Alexis; Gasser, Thomas; Singleton, Andrew B.; Singleton, Andrew; Cookson, Mark; Hernandez, Dena; Nalls, Michael; Zonderman, Alan; Ferrucci, Luigi; Johnson, Robert; Longo, Dan; O'Brien, Richard; Traynor, Bryan; Troncoso, Juan; van der Brug, Marcel; Zielke, Ronald; Weale, Michael; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Box, P. O.

    2015-01-01

    Coffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day) among up to

  8. Genome-wide pathway analysis identifies oxidative stress related gene MSRA as rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Jose Ezequiel; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A.; Balsa, Alejandro; Pascual-Salcedo, Dora; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamín; Raya, Enrique

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) carried out in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have led to the discovery of several genetic associations with this disease. Still, the current associated genetic variations can explain only part of the genetic risk involved in RA, and it is well

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wain, Louise V.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D.; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M.; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V.; Ehret, Georg B.; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G.; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Doerr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C.; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tonu; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U.; Webster, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F.; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I.; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Chambers, John C.; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kuehnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M.; Polasek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Voelker, Uwe; Voelzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L.; Taylor, Kent D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Ines; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sober, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F.; Melander, Olle; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Salomaa, Veikko; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, Fabiola M.; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S.; Bergman, Richard N.; Beilby, John P.; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A. William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S.; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N.; Rose, Lynda M.; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L.; Kahonen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Doering, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H.; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; Koenig, Inke R.; Felix, Janine F.; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stephanie; DeStefano, Anita L.; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J.; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T.; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wright, Alan F.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Tobin, Martin D.; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans(1-3). We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we

  10. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Felix, Janine F.; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Monnereau, Claire; van der Valk, Ralf J. P.; Stergiakouli, Evie; Chesi, Alessandra; Gaillard, Romy; Feenstra, Bjarke; Thiering, Elisabeth; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Mahajan, Anubha; Pitkanen, Niina; Joro, Raimo; Cavadino, Alana; Huikari, Ville; Franks, Steve; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Marsh, Julie A.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Curtin, John A.; Vioque, Jesus; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Myhre, Ronny; Price, Thomas S.; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Yengo, Loic; Grarup, Niels; Ntalla, Ioanna; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; Bisgaard, Hans; Blakemore, Alexandra I.; Bonnefond, Amelie; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Eriksson, Johan; Flexeder, Claudia; Franke, Lude; Geller, Frank; Geserick, Mandy; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hofman, Albert; Holm, Jens-Christian; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jinyan; Kadarmideen, Haja N.; Kahonen, Mika; Kiess, Wieland; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lakka, Timo A.; Lewin, Alexandra M.; Liang, Liming; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Ma, Baoshan; Magnus, Per; McCormack, Shana E.; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D.; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Murray, Clare S.; Pahkala, Katja; Pers, Tune H.; Pfaefle, Roland; Postma, Dirkje S.; Power, Christine; Simpson, Angela; Sengpiel, Verena; Tiesler, Carla M. T.; Torrent, Maties; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Meurs, Joyce B.; Vinding, Rebecca; Waage, Johannes; Wardle, Jane; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zemel, Babette S.; Dedoussis, George V.; Pedersen, Oluf; Froguel, Philippe; Sunyer, Jordi; Plomin, Robert; Jacobsson, Bo; Hansen, Torben; Gonzalez, Juan R.; Custovic, Adnan; Raitakari, Olli T.; Pennell, Craig E.; Widen, Elisabeth; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Sebert, Sylvain; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hypponen, Elina; McCarthy, Mark I.; Lindi, Virpi; Harri, Niinikoski; Koerner, Antje; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Heinrich, Joachim; Melbye, Mads; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ring, Susan M.; Smith, George Davey; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Grant, Struan F. A.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.

    2016-01-01

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex-and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We

  11. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.F. Felix (Janine); J.P. Bradfield (Jonathan); C. Monnereau; R.J.P. van der Valk (Ralf); E. Stergiakouli (Evie); A. Chesi (Alessandra); R. Gaillard (Romy); B. Feenstra (Bjarke); E. Thiering (Elisabeth); E. Kreiner-Møller (Eskil); A. Mahajan (Anubha); Niina Pitkänen; R. Joro (Raimo); A. Cavadino (Alana); V. Huikari (Ville); S. Franks (Steve); M. Groen-Blokhuis (Maria); D.L. Cousminer (Diana); J.A. Marsh (Julie); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); J.A. Curtin (John); J. Vioque (Jesus); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); R. Myhre (Ronny); T.S. Price (Thomas); Natalia Vilor-Tejedor; L. Yengo (Loic); N. Grarup (Niels); I. Ntalla (Ioanna); W.Q. Ang (Wei); M. Atalay (Mustafa); H. Bisgaard (Hans); A.I.F. Blakemore (Alexandra); A. Bonnefond (Amélie); L. Carstensen (Lisbeth); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); C. Flexeder (Claudia); L. Franke (Lude); F. Geller (Frank); M. Geserick (Mandy); A.L. Hartikainen; C.M.A. Haworth (Claire M.); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel N.); A. Hofman (Albert); J.-C. Holm (Jens-Christian); M. Horikoshi (Momoko); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J. Huang (Jian); H.N. Kadarmideen (Haja N.); M. Kähönen (Mika); W. Kiess (Wieland); T.A. Lakka (Timo); T.A. Lakka (Timo); A. Lewin (Alex); L. Liang (Liming); L.-P. Lyytikäinen (Leo-Pekka); B. Ma (Baoshan); P. Magnus (Per); S.E. McCormack (Shana E.); G. Mcmahon (George); F.D. Mentch (Frank); C.M. Middeldorp (Christel); C.S. Murray (Clare S.); K. Pahkala (Katja); T.H. Pers (Tune); R. Pfäffle (Roland); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); C. Power (Christine); A. Simpson (Angela); V. Sengpiel (Verena); C. Tiesler (Carla); M. Torrent (Maties); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); R. Vinding (Rebecca); J. Waage (Johannes); J. Wardle (Jane); E. Zeggini (Eleftheria); B.S. Zemel (Babette S.); G.V. Dedoussis (George); O. Pedersen (Oluf); P. Froguel (Philippe); J. Sunyer (Jordi); R. Plomin (Robert); B. Jacobsson (Bo); T. Hansen (Torben); J.R. Gonzalez (Juan R.); A. Custovic; O.T. Raitakari (Olli T.); C.E. Pennell (Craig); Elisabeth Widén; D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); S. Sebert (Sylvain); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); E. Hypponen (Elina); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); V. Lindi (Virpi); N. Harri (Niinikoski); A. Körner (Antje); K. Bønnelykke (Klaus); J. Heinrich (Joachim); M. Melbye (Mads); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); H. Hakonarson (Hakon); S.M. Ring (Susan); G.D. Smith; T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild I.A.); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); S.F.A. Grant (Struan); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent); H.J. Kalkwarf (Heidi J.); J.M. Lappe (Joan M.); V. Gilsanz (Vicente); S.E. Oberfield (Sharon E.); J.A. Shepherd (John A.); A. Kelly (Andrea)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractA large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown.We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation

  12. Genome-wide association analyses identify variants in developmental genes associated with hypospadias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geller, Frank; Feenstra, Bjarke; Carstensen, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common congenital condition in boys in which the urethra opens on the underside of the penis. We performed a genome-wide association study on 1,006 surgery-confirmed hypospadias cases and 5,486 controls from Denmark. After replication genotyping of an additional 1,972 cases and 1...

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitchell, Jonathan S; Li, Ni; Weinhold, Niels

    2016-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy with a significant heritable basis. Genome-wide association studies have transformed our understanding of MM predisposition, but individual studies have had limited power to discover risk loci. Here we perform a meta-analysis of these GWAS, add a ...

  14. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies ten loci influencing allergic sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Matheson, Melanie C; Pers, Tune Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (present in allergic sensitization) has a central role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. We performed the first large-scale genome-wide association study (GWAS) of allergic sensitization in 5,789 affected individuals and 10,056 controls and followed up th...

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Okbay (Aysu); J.P. Beauchamp (Jonathan); Fontana, M.A. (Mark Alan); J.J. Lee (James J.); T.H. Pers (Tune); Rietveld, C.A. (Cornelius A.); P. Turley (Patrick); Chen, G.-B. (Guo-Bo); V. Emilsson (Valur); Meddens, S.F.W. (S. Fleur W.); Oskarsson, S. (Sven); Pickrell, J.K. (Joseph K.); Thom, K. (Kevin); Timshel, P. (Pascal); R. de Vlaming (Ronald); A. Abdellaoui (Abdel); T.S. Ahluwalia (Tarunveer Singh); J. Bacelis (Jonas); C. Baumbach (Clemens); Bjornsdottir, G. (Gyda); J.H. Brandsma (Johan); Pina Concas, M. (Maria); J. Derringer; Furlotte, N.A. (Nicholas A.); T.E. Galesloot (Tessel); S. Girotto; Gupta, R. (Richa); L.M. Hall (Leanne M.); S.E. Harris (Sarah); E. Hofer; Horikoshi, M. (Momoko); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer E.); Kaasik, K. (Kadri); I.-P. Kalafati (Ioanna-Panagiota); R. Karlsson (Robert); A. Kong (Augustine); J. Lahti (Jari); S.J. van der Lee (Sven); Deleeuw, C. (Christiaan); P.A. Lind (Penelope); Lindgren, K.-O. (Karl-Oskar); Liu, T. (Tian); M. Mangino (Massimo); J. Marten (Jonathan); E. Mihailov (Evelin); M. Miller (Mike); P.J. van der Most (Peter); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); A. Payton (Antony); N. Pervjakova (Natalia); W.J. Peyrot (Wouter ); Qian, Y. (Yong); O. Raitakari (Olli); Rueedi, R. (Rico); Salvi, E. (Erika); Schmidt, B. (Börge); Schraut, K.E. (Katharina E.); Shi, J. (Jianxin); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); R.A. Poot (Raymond); B. St Pourcain (Beate); A. Teumer (Alexander); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); N. Verweij (Niek); D. Vuckovic (Dragana); Wellmann, J. (Juergen); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); Yang, J. (Jingyun); Zhao, W. (Wei); Zhu, Z. (Zhihong); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); N. Amin (Najaf); Bakshi, A. (Andrew); S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); G. Biino (Ginevra); K. Bønnelykke (Klaus); P.A. Boyle (Patricia); H. Campbell (Harry); Cappuccio, F.P. (Francesco P.); G. Davies (Gail); J.E. de Neve (Jan-Emmanuel); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); I. Demuth (Ilja); Ding, J. (Jun); Eibich, P. (Peter); Eisele, L. (Lewin); N. Eklund (Niina); D.M. Evans (David); J.D. Faul (Jessica D.); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); A.J. Forstner (Andreas); I. Gandin (Ilaria); Gunnarsson, B. (Bjarni); B.V. Halldorsson (Bjarni); T.B. Harris (Tamara); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); L.J. Hocking; G. Homuth (Georg); M. Horan (Mike); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); P.L. de Jager (Philip); P.K. Joshi (Peter); A. Juqessur (Astanand); M. Kaakinen (Marika); M. Kähönen (Mika); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); Keltigangas-Järvinen, L. (Liisa); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); I. Kolcic (Ivana); Koskinen, S. (Seppo); A. Kraja (Aldi); Kroh, M. (Martin); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); A. Latvala (Antti); L.J. Launer (Lenore); Lebreton, M.P. (Maël P.); D.F. Levinson (Douglas F.); P. Lichtenstein (Paul); P. Lichtner (Peter); D.C. Liewald (David C.); A. Loukola (Anu); P.A. Madden (Pamela); R. Mägi (Reedik); Mäki-Opas, T. (Tomi); R.E. Marioni (Riccardo); P. Marques-Vidal; Meddens, G.A. (Gerardus A.); G. Mcmahon (George); C. Meisinger (Christa); T. Meitinger (Thomas); Milaneschi, Y. (Yusplitri); L. Milani (Lili); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); R. Myhre (Ronny); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); D.R. Nyholt (Dale); W.E.R. Ollier (William); A. Palotie (Aarno); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); K. Petrovic (Katja); D.J. Porteous (David J.); K. Räikkönen (Katri); Ring, S.M. (Susan M.); A. Robino (Antonietta); O. Rostapshova (Olga); I. Rudan (Igor); A. Rustichini (Aldo); V. Salomaa (Veikko); Sanders, A.R. (Alan R.); A.-P. Sarin; R. Schmidt (Reinhold); R.J. Scott (Rodney); B.H. Smith (Blair); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); J.A. Staessen (Jan); E. Steinhagen-Thiessen (Elisabeth); K. Strauch (Konstantin); A. Terracciano; M.D. Tobin (Martin); S. Ulivi (Shelia); S. Vaccargiu (Simona); L. Quaye (Lydia); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); C. Venturini (Cristina); A.A.E. Vinkhuyzen (Anna A.); U. Völker (Uwe); Völzke, H. (Henry); J.M. Vonk (Judith); D. Vozzi (Diego); J. Waage (Johannes); E.B. Ware (Erin B.); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); J. Attia (John); D.A. Bennett (David A.); Berger, K. (Klaus); L. Bertram (Lars); H. Bisgaard (Hans); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); U. Bültmann (Ute); C.F. Chabris (Christopher F.); F. Cucca (Francesco); D. Cusi (Daniele); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); G.V. Dedoussis (George); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); K. Hagen (Knut); B. Franke (Barbara); L. Franke (Lude); P. Gasparini (Paolo); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); C. Gieger (Christian); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); J. Gratten (Jacob); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); P. van der Harst (Pim); C. Hayward (Caroline); D.A. Hinds (David A.); W. Hoffmann (Wolfgang); E. Hypponen (Elina); W.G. Iacono (William); B. Jacobsson (Bo); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); K.-H. JöCkel (Karl-Heinz); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); Lehrer, S.F. (Steven F.); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. McGue (Matt); A. Metspalu (Andres); N. Pendleton (Neil); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); M. Perola (Markus); N. Pirastu (Nicola); M. Pirastu (Mario); O. Polasek (Ozren); D. Posthuma (Danielle); C. Power (Christopher); M.A. Province (Mike); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); Schlessinger, D. (David); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); A.R. Thurik (Roy); Timpson, N.J. (Nicholas J.); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); J.Y. Tung (Joyce Y.); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); Vitart, V. (Veronique); P. Vollenweider (Peter); D.R. Weir (David); J.F. Wilson (James F.); A.F. Wright (Alan); Conley, D.C. (Dalton C.); R.F. Krueger; G.D. Smith; Hofman, A. (Albert); D. Laibson (David); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); M.N. Meyer (Michelle N.); J. Yang (Joanna); M. Johannesson (Magnus); P.M. Visscher (Peter); T. Esko (Tõnu); Ph.D. Koellinger (Philipp); D. Cesarini (David); D.J. Benjamin (Daniel J.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractEducational attainment is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals. Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for educational attainment that

  16. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okbay, Aysu; Beauchamp, Jonathan P.; Fontana, Mark Alan; Lee, James J.; Pers, Tune H.; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Turley, Patrick; Chen, Guo-Bo; Emilsson, Valur; Meddens, S. Fleur W.; Oskarsson, Sven; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Thom, Kevin; Timshel, Pascal; de Vlaming, Ronald; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Bacelis, Jonas; Baumbach, Clemens; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Brandsma, Johannes H.; Concas, Maria Pina; Derringer, Jaime; Furlotte, Nicholas A.; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Girotto, Giorgia; Gupta, Richa; Hall, Leanne M.; Harris, Sarah E.; Hofer, Edith; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Kaasik, Kadri; Kalafati, Ioanna P.; Karlsson, Robert; Kong, Augustine; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J.; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Lind, Penelope A.; Lindgren, Karl-Oskar; Liu, Tian; Mangino, Massimo; Marten, Jonathan; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B.; van der Most, Peter J.; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Payton, Antony; Pervjakova, Natalia; Peyrot, Wouter J.; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rueedi, Rico; Salvi, Erika; Schmidt, Brge; Schraut, Katharina E.; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert V.; Poot, Raymond A.; St Pourcain, Beate; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Verweij, Niek; Vuckovic, Dragana; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jingyun; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Zhihong; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Boyle, Patricia A.; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Davies, Gail; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deloukas, Panos; Demuth, Ilja; Ding, Jun; Eibich, Peter; Eisele, Lewin; Eklund, Niina; Evans, David M.; Faul, Jessica D.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Forstner, Andreas J.; Gandin, Ilaria; Gunnarsson, Bjarni; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Homuth, Georg; Horan, Michael A.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Jager, Philip L.; Joshi, Peter K.; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika A.; Kahonen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Keltigangas-Jarvinen, Liisa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kroh, Martin; Kutalik, Zoltan; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J.; Lebreton, Mael P.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C. M.; Loukola, Anu; Madden, Pamela A.; Magi, Reedik; Maki-Opas, Tomi; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meddens, Gerardus A.; McMahon, George; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Milaneschi, Yusplitri; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Myhre, Ronny; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Ollier, William E. R.; Palotie, Aarno; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Petrovic, Katja E.; Porteous, David J.; Raikkonen, Katri; Ring, Susan M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rostapshova, Olga; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Rodney J.; Smith, Blair H.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Staessen, Jan A.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Strauch, Konstantin; Terracciano, Antonio; Tobin, Martin D.; Ulivi, Sheila; Vaccargiu, Simona; Quaye, Lydia; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Venturini, Cristina; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Volker, Uwe; Volzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M.; Waage, Johannes; Ware, Erin B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Attia, John R.; Bennett, David A.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Bisgaard, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bultmann, Ute; Chabris, Christopher F.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George V.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franke, Barbara; Franke, Lude; Gasparini, Paolo; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Grabe, Hans-Jorgen; Gratten, Jacob; Groenen, Patrick J. F.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Hinds, David A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hyppnen, Elina; Iacono, William G.; Jacobsson, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jockel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lehrer, Steven F.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Pendleton, Neil; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Perola, Markus; Pirastu, Nicola; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Power, Christine; Province, Michael A.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A. Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tiemeier, Henning; Tung, Joyce Y.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vitart, Veronique; Vollenweider, Peter; Weir, David R.; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Conley, Dalton C.; Krueger, Robert F.; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Laibson, David I.; Medland, Sarah E.; Meyer, Michelle N.; Yang, Jian; Johannesson, Magnus; Visscher, Peter M.; Esko, Tonu; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational attainment is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals(1). Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for educational attainment that extends

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies four loci associated with eruption of permanent teeth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geller, Frank; Feenstra, Bjarke; Zhang, Hao

    2011-01-01

    The sequence and timing of permanent tooth eruption is thought to be highly heritable and can have important implications for the risk of malocclusion, crowding, and periodontal disease. We conducted a genome-wide association study of number of permanent teeth erupted between age 6 and 14 years, ...

  18. Genome-Wide Chromatin Landscape Transitions Identify Novel Pathways in Early Commitment to Osteoblast Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bethtrice; Varticovski, Lyuba; Baek, Songjoon; Hager, Gordon L

    2016-01-01

    Bone continuously undergoes remodeling by a tightly regulated process that involves osteoblast differentiation from Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC). However, commitment of MSC to osteoblastic lineage is a poorly understood process. Chromatin organization functions as a molecular gatekeeper of DNA functions. Detection of sites that are hypersensitive to Dnase I has been used for detailed examination of changes in response to hormones and differentiation cues. To investigate the early steps in commitment of MSC to osteoblasts, we used a model human temperature-sensitive cell line, hFOB. When shifted to non-permissive temperature, these cells undergo "spontaneous" differentiation that takes several weeks, a process that is greatly accelerated by osteogenic induction media. We performed Dnase I hypersensitivity assays combined with deep sequencing to identify genome-wide potential regulatory events in cells undergoing early steps of commitment to osteoblasts. Massive reorganization of chromatin occurred within hours of differentiation. Whereas ~30% of unique DHS sites were located in the promoters, the majority was outside of the promoters, designated as enhancers. Many of them were at novel genomic sites and need to be confirmed experimentally. We developed a novel method for identification of cellular networks based solely on DHS enhancers signature correlated to gene expression. The analysis of enhancers that were unique to differentiating cells led to identification of bone developmental program encompassing 147 genes that directly or indirectly participate in osteogenesis. Identification of these pathways provided an unprecedented view of genomic regulation during early steps of differentiation and changes related to WNT, AP-1 and other pathways may have therapeutic implications.

  19. Genome-Wide Chromatin Landscape Transitions Identify Novel Pathways in Early Commitment to Osteoblast Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethtrice Thompson

    Full Text Available Bone continuously undergoes remodeling by a tightly regulated process that involves osteoblast differentiation from Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC. However, commitment of MSC to osteoblastic lineage is a poorly understood process. Chromatin organization functions as a molecular gatekeeper of DNA functions. Detection of sites that are hypersensitive to Dnase I has been used for detailed examination of changes in response to hormones and differentiation cues. To investigate the early steps in commitment of MSC to osteoblasts, we used a model human temperature-sensitive cell line, hFOB. When shifted to non-permissive temperature, these cells undergo "spontaneous" differentiation that takes several weeks, a process that is greatly accelerated by osteogenic induction media. We performed Dnase I hypersensitivity assays combined with deep sequencing to identify genome-wide potential regulatory events in cells undergoing early steps of commitment to osteoblasts. Massive reorganization of chromatin occurred within hours of differentiation. Whereas ~30% of unique DHS sites were located in the promoters, the majority was outside of the promoters, designated as enhancers. Many of them were at novel genomic sites and need to be confirmed experimentally. We developed a novel method for identification of cellular networks based solely on DHS enhancers signature correlated to gene expression. The analysis of enhancers that were unique to differentiating cells led to identification of bone developmental program encompassing 147 genes that directly or indirectly participate in osteogenesis. Identification of these pathways provided an unprecedented view of genomic regulation during early steps of differentiation and changes related to WNT, AP-1 and other pathways may have therapeutic implications.

  20. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okbay, Aysu; Baselmans, Bart M L; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted...... genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (n = 298,420), depressive symptoms (n = 161,460), and neuroticism (n = 170,911). We identify 3 variants associated with subjective well-being, 2 variants associated with depressive symptoms, and 11 variants associated...

  1. Four Susceptibility Loci for Gallstone Disease Identified in a Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Amit D; Andersson, Charlotte; Buch, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 280 cases identified the hepatic cholesterol transporter ABCG8 as a locus associated with risk for gallstone disease, but findings have not been reported from any other GWAS of this phenotype. We performed a large-scale, meta-analysis o...

  2. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik

    2013-01-01

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass ...

  3. A Genome-wide Association Analysis of a Broad Psychosis Phenotype Identifies Three Loci for Further Investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramon, Elvira; Pirinen, Matti; Strange, Amy; Lin, Kuang; Freeman, Colin; Bellenguez, Celine; Su, Zhan; Band, Gavin; Pearson, Richard; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Edkins, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Arranz, Maria J.; Bakker, Steven; Bender, Stephan; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; Chandler, David; Collier, David A.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dazzan, Paola; de Haan, Lieuwe; di Forti, Marta; Dragovic, Milan; Giegling, Ina; Hall, Jeremy; Iyegbe, Conrad; Jablensky, Assen; Kahn, Rene S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Kravariti, Eugenia; Lawrie, Stephen; Lins-Zen, Don H.; Mata, Ignacio; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pariante, Carmine M.; Paunio, Tiina; Picchioni, Marco; Ripke, Stephan; Rujescu, Dan; Sauer, Heinrich; Shaikh, Madiha; Sussmann, Jessika; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tosato, Sarah; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Van Os, Jim; Walshe, Muriel; Weisbrod, Matthias; Whalley, Heather; Wiersma, Durk; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz A. Z.; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Barroso, Ines; Peltonen, Leena; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Murray, Robin M.; Donnelly, Peter; Powell, John; Spencer, Chris C. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several loci associated with schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder. We performed a GWAS of psychosis as a broad syndrome rather than within specific diagnostic categories. Methods: 1239 cases with schizophrenia, schizoaffective

  4. A genome-wide association analysis of a broad psychosis phenotype identifies three loci for further investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bramon, Elvira; Pirinen, Matti; Strange, Amy; Lin, Kuang; Freeman, Colin; Bellenguez, Céline; Su, Zhan; Band, Gavin; Pearson, Richard; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C.; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Edkins, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Arranz, Maria J.; Bakker, Steven; Bender, Stephan; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; Chandler, David; Collier, David A.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dazzan, Paola; de Haan, Lieuwe; Di Forti, Marta; Dragović, Milan; Giegling, Ina; Hall, Jeremy; Iyegbe, Conrad; Jablensky, Assen; Kahn, René S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Kravariti, Eugenia; Lawrie, Stephen; Linszen, Don H.; Mata, Ignacio; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Ophoff, Roel A.; Pariante, Carmine M.; Paunio, Tiina; Picchioni, Marco; Ripke, Stephan; Rujescu, Dan; Sauer, Heinrich; Shaikh, Madiha; Sussmann, Jessika; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tosato, Sarah; Toulopoulou, Timothea; van Os, Jim; Walshe, Muriel; Weisbrod, Matthias; Whalley, Heather; Wiersma, Durk; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz A. Z.; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Barroso, Ines; Peltonen, Leena; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Murray, Robin M.; Donnelly, Peter; Powell, John; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Collier, David; van, Jim; Jankowski, Janusz; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Hunt, Sarah E.; Gwilliam, Rhian; Blackburn, Hannah; Gillman, Matthew; Hammond, Naomi; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several loci associated with schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder. We performed a GWAS of psychosis as a broad syndrome rather than within specific diagnostic categories. 1239 cases with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or psychotic

  5. A genome-wide association study identifies GLT6D1 as a susceptibility locus for periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, A.S.; Richter, G.M.; Nothnagel, M.; Manke, T.; Dommisch, H.; Jacobs, G.; Arlt, A.; Rosenstiel, P.; Noack, B.; Groessner-Schreiber, B.; Jepsen, S.; Loos, B.G.; Schreiber, S.

    2010-01-01

    Periodontitis is a widespread, complex inflammatory disease of the mouth, which results in a loss of gingival tissue and alveolar bone, with aggressive periodontitis (AgP) as its most severe form. To identify genetic risk factors for periodontitis, we conducted a genome-wide association study in

  6. Genome-wide association analysis identifies variants associated with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease that have distinct effects on metabolic traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Wu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) clusters in families, but the only known common genetic variants influencing risk are near PNPLA3. We sought to identify additional genetic variants influencing NAFLD using genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of computed tomography (CT) measured hepatic...

  7. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berndt, S.I.; Gustafsson, S.; Magi, R.; Ganna, A.; Wheeler, E.; Feitosa, M.F.; Justice, A.E.; Monda, K.L.; Croteau-Chonka, D.C.; Day, F.R.; Esko, T.; Fall, T.; Ferreira, T.; Gentilini, D.; Jackson, A.U.; Luan, J.; Randall, J.C.; Vedantam, S.; Willer, C.J.; Winkler, T.W.; Wood, A.R.; Workalemahu, T.; Hu, Y.J.; Lee, S.; Liang, L.; Lin, D.Y.; Min, J.L.; Neale, B.M.; Thorleifsson, G.; Yang, J.; Albrecht, E.; Amin, N.; Bragg-Gresham, J.L.; Cadby, G.; Heijer, M. den; Eklund, N.; Fischer, K.; Goel, A.; Hottenga, J.J.; Huffman, J.E.; Jarick, I.; Johansson, A; Johnson, T.; Kanoni, S.; Kleber, M.E.; Konig, I.R.; Kristiansson, K.; Kutalik, Z.; Lamina, C.; Lecoeur, C.; Li, G.; Mangino, M.; McArdle, W.L.; Medina-Gomez, C.; Muller-Nurasyid, M.; Ngwa, J.S.; Nolte, I.M.; Paternoster, L.; Pechlivanis, S.; Perola, M.; Peters, M.J.; Preuss, M.; Rose, L.M.; Shi, J.; Shungin, D.; Smith, A.V.; Strawbridge, R.J.; Surakka, I.; Teumer, A.; Trip, M.D.; Tyrer, J.; Vliet-Ostaptchouk, J.V. Van; Vandenput, L.; Waite, L.L.; Zhao, J.H.; Absher, D.; Asselbergs, F.W.; Atalay, M.; Attwood, A.P.; Balmforth, A.J.; Basart, H.; Beilby, J.; Bonnycastle, L.L.; Brambilla, P.; Bruinenberg, M.; Campbell, H.; Chasman, D.I.; Chines, P.S.; Collins, F.S.; Connell, J.M.; Cookson, W.O.; Faire, U. de; Vegt, F. de; Dei, M.; Dimitriou, M.; Edkins, S.; Estrada, K.; Evans, D.M.; Farrall, M.; Ferrario, M.M.; Vermeulen, S.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; et al.,

    2013-01-01

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass

  8. Four Susceptibility Loci for Gallstone Disease Identified in a Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joshi, A.D. (Amit D.); Andersson, C. (Charlotte); T. Buch (Thorsten); Stender, S. (Stefan); R. Noordam; L.-C. Weng; Weeke, P.E. (Peter E.); P. Auer (Paul); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); C. Chen (Constance); Choi, H. (Hyon); Curhan, G. (Gary); J.C. Denny (Joshua C.); I. de Vivo (Immaculata); Eicher, J.D. (John D.); D. Ellinghaus (David); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); Fuchs, C. (Charles); Gala, M. (Manish); J. Haessler (Jeff); A. Hofman (Albert); Hu, F. (Frank); D. Hunter (David); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry); J.H. Kang; C. Kooperberg (Charles); P. Kraft (Peter); W. Kratzer (Wolfgang); W. Lieb (Wolfgang); P.L. Lutsey (Pamela); S. Darwish Murad (Sarwa); B.G. Nordestgaard (Børge); L.R. Pasquale (Louis); A. Reiner (Alexander); P.M. Ridker (Paul); E.B. Rimm (Eric B.); L.M. Rose (Lynda); Shaffer, C.M. (Christian M.); C. Schafmayer (Clemens); Tamimi, R.M. (Rulla M.); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); U. Völker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); Wakabayashi, Y. (Yoshiyuki); J.L. Wiggs (Janey L.); Zhu, J. (Jun); Roden, D.M. (Dan M.); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); W. Tang (Weihong); A. Teumer (Alexander); J. Hampe (Jochen); A. Tybjaerg-Hansen; D.I. Chasman (Daniel); Chan, A.T. (Andrew T.); A.D. Johnson (Andrew)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground & Aims A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 280 cases identified the hepatic cholesterol transporter ABCG8 as a locus associated with risk for gallstone disease, but findings have not been reported from any other GWAS of this phenotype. We performed a large-scale,

  9. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.I. Berndt (Sonja); S. Gustafsson (Stefan); R. Mägi (Reedik); A. Ganna (Andrea); E. Wheeler (Eleanor); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); A.E. Justice (Anne); K.L. Monda (Keri); D.C. Croteau-Chonka (Damien); F.R. Day (Felix); T. Esko (Tõnu); M. Fall (Magnus); T. Ferreira (Teresa); D. Gentilini (Davide); A.U. Jackson (Anne); J. Luan; J.C. Randall (Joshua); S. Vedantam (Sailaja); C.J. Willer (Cristen); T.W. Winkler (Thomas); A.R. Wood (Andrew); T. Workalemahu (Tsegaselassie); Y.-J. Hu (Yi-Juan); S.H. Lee (Sang Hong); L. Liang (Liming); D.Y. Lin (Dan); J. Min (Josine); B.M. Neale (Benjamin); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); J. Yang (Jian); E. Albrecht (Eva); N. Amin (Najaf); J.L. Bragg-Gresham (Jennifer L.); G. Cadby (Gemma); M. den Heijer (Martin); N. Eklund (Niina); K. Fischer (Krista); A. Goel (Anuj); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); J.E. Huffman (Jennifer); I. Jarick (Ivonne); A. Johansson (Åsa); T. Johnson (Toby); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); I.R. König (Inke); K. Kristiansson (Kati); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); C. Lamina (Claudia); C. Lecoeur (Cécile); G. Li (Guo); M. Mangino (Massimo); W.L. McArdle (Wendy); M.C. Medina-Gomez (Carolina); M. Müller-Nurasyid (Martina); J.S. Ngwa; I.M. Nolte (Ilja); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); S. Pechlivanis (Sonali); M. Perola (Markus); M.J. Peters (Marjolein); M. Preuss (Michael); L.M. Rose (Lynda); J. Shi (Jianxin); D. Shungin (Dmitry); G.D. Smith; R.J. Strawbridge (Rona); I. Surakka (Ida); A. Teumer (Alexander); M.D. Trip (Mieke); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); J.V. van Vliet-Ostaptchouk (Jana); L. Vandenput (Liesbeth); L. Waite (Lindsay); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); D. Absher (Devin); F.W. Asselbergs (Folkert); M. Atalay (Mustafa); A.P. Attwood (Antony); A.J. Balmforth (Anthony); D.C.G. Basart (Dick); J.P. Beilby (John); L.L. Bonnycastle (Lori); P. Brambilla (Paolo); M. Bruinenberg (M.); H. Campbell (Harry); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); P.S. Chines (Peter); F.S. Collins (Francis); J. Connell (John); W. O Cookson (William); U. de Faire (Ulf); F. de Vegt (Femmie); M. Dei (Mariano); M. Dimitriou (Maria); T. Edkins (Ted); K. Estrada Gil (Karol); D.M. Evans (David); M. Farrall (Martin); F. Ferrario (Franco); J. Ferrières (Jean); L. Franke (Lude); F. Frau (Francesca); P.V. Gejman (Pablo); H. Grallert (Harald); H. Grönberg (Henrik); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Hall (Anne); A.S. Hall (Alistair); A.L. Hartikainen; C. Hayward (Caroline); N.L. Heard-Costa (Nancy); A.C. Heath (Andrew); J. Hebebrand (Johannes); G. Homuth (Georg); F.B. Hu (Frank); S.E. Hunt (Sarah); E. Hyppönen (Elina); C. Iribarren (Carlos); K.B. Jacobs (Kevin); J.-O. Jansson (John-Olov); A. Jula (Antti); M. Kähönen (Mika); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); F. Kee (F.); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); M. Kivimaki (Mika); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); A. Kraja (Aldi); M. Kumari (Meena); K. Kuulasmaa (Kari); J. Kuusisto (Johanna); J. Laitinen (Jaana); T.A. Lakka (Timo); C. Langenberg (Claudia); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L. Lind (Lars); J. Lindstrom (Jaana); J. Liu (Jianjun); A. Liuzzi (Antonio); M.L. Lokki; M. Lorentzon (Mattias); P.A. Madden (Pamela); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); P. Manunta (Paolo); D. Marek (Diana); W. März (Winfried); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); B. McKnight (Barbara); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Milani (Lili); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); V. Mooser (Vincent); T.W. Mühleisen (Thomas); P. Munroe (Patricia); A.W. Musk (Arthur); N. Narisu (Narisu); G. Navis (Gerjan); G. Nicholson (Ggeorge); C. Nohr (Christian); K. Ong (Ken); B.A. Oostra (Ben); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); A. Palotie (Aarno); J. Peden (John); N. Pedersen; A. Peters (Annette); O. Polasek (Ozren); A. Pouta (Anneli); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); I. Prokopenko (Inga); C. Pütter (Carolin); A. Radhakrishnan (Aparna); O. Raitakari (Olli); A. Rendon (Augusto); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); I. Rudan (Igor); T. Saaristo (Timo); J.G. Sambrook (Jennifer); A.R. Sanders (Alan); S. Sanna (Serena); J. Saramies (Jouko); S. Schipf (Sabine); S. Schreiber (Stefan); H. Schunkert (Heribert); S.-Y. Shin; S. Signorini (Stefano); J. Sinisalo (Juha); B. Skrobek (Boris); N. Soranzo (Nicole); A. Stancáková (Alena); K. Stark (Klaus); J. Stephens (Jonathan); K. Stirrups (Kathy); R.P. Stolk (Ronald); M. Stumvoll (Michael); A.J. Swift (Amy); E.V. Theodoraki (Eirini); B. Thorand (Barbara); D.-A. Tregouet (David-Alexandre); E. Tremoli (Elena); M.M. van der Klauw (Melanie); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); S.H.H.M. Vermeulen (Sita); J. Viikari (Jorma); J. Virtamo (Jarmo); V. Vitart (Veronique); G. Waeber (Gérard); Z. Wang (Zhaoming); E. Widen (Elisabeth); S.H. Wild (Sarah); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); B. Winkelmann; J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce); A. Wong (Andrew); A.F. Wright (Alan); M.C. Zillikens (Carola); P. Amouyel (Philippe); B.O. Boehm (Bernhard); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); M. Caulfield (Mark); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); D. Cusi (Daniele); G.V. Dedoussis (George); J. Erdmann (Jeanette); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); P.W. Franks (Paul); P. Froguel (Philippe); C. Gieger (Christian); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); A. Hamsten (Anders); T.B. Harris (Tamara); C. Hengstenberg (Christian); A.A. Hicks (Andrew); A. Hingorani (Aroon); A. Hinney (Anke); A. Hofman (Albert); G.K. Hovingh (Kees); K. Hveem (Kristian); T. Illig (Thomas); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); K.-H. Jöckel (Karl-Heinz); S. Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi (Sirkka); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); D. Kuh (Diana); M. Laakso (Markku); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); D.F. Levinson (Douglas); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A. Metspalu (Andres); A.D. Morris (Andrew); M.S. Nieminen (Markku); I. Njølstad (Inger); C. Ohlsson (Claes); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); W.H. Ouwehand (Willem); C. Palmer (Cameron); B.W.J.H. Penninx (Brenda); C. Power (Christopher); M.A. Province (Mike); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); L. Qi (Lu); R. Rauramaa (Rainer); P.M. Ridker (Paul); S. Ripatti (Samuli); V. Salomaa (Veikko); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); H. Snieder (Harold); H.G. Sorensen; T.D. Spector (Timothy); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A. Tönjes (Anke); J. Tuomilehto (Jaakko); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); M. Uusitupa (Matti); P. van der Harst (Pim); P. Vollenweider (Peter); H. Wallaschofski (Henri); N.J. Wareham (Nick); H. Watkins (Hugh); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); J.F. Wilson (James F); G.R. Abecasis (Gonçalo); T.L. Assimes (Themistocles); I. Barroso (Inês); M. Boehnke (Michael); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); C. Fox (Craig); T.M. Frayling (Timothy); L. Groop (Leif); T. Haritunian (Talin); I.M. Heid (Iris); D. Hunter (David); R.C. Kaplan (Robert); F. Karpe (Fredrik); M.F. Moffatt (Miriam); K.L. Mohlke (Karen); J.R. O´Connell; Y. Pawitan (Yudi); E.E. Schadt (Eric); D. Schlessinger (David); V. Steinthorsdottir (Valgerdur); D.P. Strachan (David); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); P.M. Visscher (Peter); A.M. Di Blasio (Anna Maria); J.N. Hirschhorn (Joel); C.M. Lindgren (Cecilia); A.D. Morris (Andrew); D. Meyre (David); A. Scherag (Andre); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); E.K. Speliotes (Elizabeth); K.E. North (Kari); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); E. Ingelsson (Erik)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractApproaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of

  10. Genome-wide association study of blood pressure extremes identifies variant near UMOD associated with hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandosh Padmanabhan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a heritable and major contributor to the global burden of disease. The sum of rare and common genetic variants robustly identified so far explain only 1%-2% of the population variation in BP and hypertension. This suggests the existence of more undiscovered common variants. We conducted a genome-wide association study in 1,621 hypertensive cases and 1,699 controls and follow-up validation analyses in 19,845 cases and 16,541 controls using an extreme case-control design. We identified a locus on chromosome 16 in the 5' region of Uromodulin (UMOD; rs13333226, combined P value of 3.6 × 10⁻¹¹. The minor G allele is associated with a lower risk of hypertension (OR [95%CI]: 0.87 [0.84-0.91], reduced urinary uromodulin excretion, better renal function; and each copy of the G allele is associated with a 7.7% reduction in risk of CVD events after adjusting for age, sex, BMI, and smoking status (H.R. = 0.923, 95% CI 0.860-0.991; p = 0.027. In a subset of 13,446 individuals with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR measurements, we show that rs13333226 is independently associated with hypertension (unadjusted for eGFR: 0.89 [0.83-0.96], p = 0.004; after eGFR adjustment: 0.89 [0.83-0.96], p = 0.003. In clinical functional studies, we also consistently show the minor G allele is associated with lower urinary uromodulin excretion. The exclusive expression of uromodulin in the thick portion of the ascending limb of Henle suggests a putative role of this variant in hypertension through an effect on sodium homeostasis. The newly discovered UMOD locus for hypertension has the potential to give new insights into the role of uromodulin in BP regulation and to identify novel drugable targets for reducing cardiovascular risk.

  11. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel and Functionally Related Susceptibility Loci for Kawasaki Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breunis, Willemijn B.; Ng, Sarah B.; Li, Yi; Bonnard, Carine; Ling, Ling; Wright, Victoria J.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Odam, Miranda; Shimizu, Chisato; Burns, Jane C.; Levin, Michael; Kuijpers, Taco W.; Hibberd, Martin L.

    2009-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a pediatric vasculitis that damages the coronary arteries in 25% of untreated and approximately 5% of treated children. Epidemiologic data suggest that KD is triggered by unidentified infection(s) in genetically susceptible children. To investigate genetic determinants of KD susceptibility, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 119 Caucasian KD cases and 135 matched controls with stringent correction for possible admixture, followed by replication in an independent cohort and subsequent fine-mapping, for a total of 893 KD cases plus population and family controls. Significant associations of 40 SNPs and six haplotypes, identifying 31 genes, were replicated in an independent cohort of 583 predominantly Caucasian KD families, with NAALADL2 (rs17531088, p combined = 1.13×10−6) and ZFHX3 (rs7199343, p combined = 2.37×10−6) most significantly associated. Sixteen associated variants with a minor allele frequency of >0.05 that lay within or close to known genes were fine-mapped with HapMap tagging SNPs in 781 KD cases, including 590 from the discovery and replication stages. Original or tagging SNPs in eight of these genes replicated the original findings, with seven genes having further significant markers in adjacent regions. In four genes (ZFHX3, NAALADL2, PPP1R14C, and TCP1), the neighboring markers were more significantly associated than the originally associated variants. Investigation of functional relationships between the eight fine-mapped genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified a single functional network (p = 10−13) containing five fine-mapped genes—LNX1, CAMK2D, ZFHX3, CSMD1, and TCP1—with functional relationships potentially related to inflammation, apoptosis, and cardiovascular pathology. Pair-wise blood transcript levels were measured during acute and convalescent KD for all fine-mapped genes, revealing a consistent trend of significantly reduced transcript levels prior to treatment

  12. A genome-wide association study identifies novel and functionally related susceptibility Loci for Kawasaki disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Burgner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD is a pediatric vasculitis that damages the coronary arteries in 25% of untreated and approximately 5% of treated children. Epidemiologic data suggest that KD is triggered by unidentified infection(s in genetically susceptible children. To investigate genetic determinants of KD susceptibility, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS in 119 Caucasian KD cases and 135 matched controls with stringent correction for possible admixture, followed by replication in an independent cohort and subsequent fine-mapping, for a total of 893 KD cases plus population and family controls. Significant associations of 40 SNPs and six haplotypes, identifying 31 genes, were replicated in an independent cohort of 583 predominantly Caucasian KD families, with NAALADL2 (rs17531088, p(combined = 1.13 x 10(-6 and ZFHX3 (rs7199343, p(combined = 2.37 x 10(-6 most significantly associated. Sixteen associated variants with a minor allele frequency of >0.05 that lay within or close to known genes were fine-mapped with HapMap tagging SNPs in 781 KD cases, including 590 from the discovery and replication stages. Original or tagging SNPs in eight of these genes replicated the original findings, with seven genes having further significant markers in adjacent regions. In four genes (ZFHX3, NAALADL2, PPP1R14C, and TCP1, the neighboring markers were more significantly associated than the originally associated variants. Investigation of functional relationships between the eight fine-mapped genes using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified a single functional network (p = 10(-13 containing five fine-mapped genes-LNX1, CAMK2D, ZFHX3, CSMD1, and TCP1-with functional relationships potentially related to inflammation, apoptosis, and cardiovascular pathology. Pair-wise blood transcript levels were measured during acute and convalescent KD for all fine-mapped genes, revealing a consistent trend of significantly reduced transcript levels prior to treatment

  13. Genome-wide association analysis identifies six new loci associated with forced vital capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loth, Daan W.; Artigas, María Soler; Gharib, Sina A.; Wain, Louise V.; Franceschini, Nora; Koch, Beate; Pottinger, Tess; Smith, Albert Vernon; Duan, Qing; Oldmeadow, Chris; Lee, Mi Kyeong; Strachan, David P.; James, Alan L.; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Vitart, Veronique; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wang, Xin-Qun; Trochet, Holly; Kähönen, Mika; Flexeder, Claudia; Albrecht, Eva; Lopez, Lorna M.; de Jong, Kim; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Enroth, Stefan; Omenaas, Ernst; Joshi, Peter K.; Fall, Tove; Viňuela, Ana; Launer, Lenore J.; Loehr, Laura R.; Fornage, Myriam; Li, Guo; Wilk, Jemma B.; Tang, Wenbo; Manichaikul, Ani; Lahousse, Lies; Harris, Tamara B.; North, Kari E.; Rudnicka, Alicja R.; Hui, Jennie; Gu, Xiangjun; Lumley, Thomas; Wright, Alan F.; Hastie, Nicholas D.; Campbell, Susan; Kumar, Rajesh; Pin, Isabelle; Scott, Robert A.; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Surakka, Ida; Liu, Yongmei; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Schulz, Holger; Heinrich, Joachim; Davies, Gail; Vonk, Judith M.; Wojczynski, Mary; Pouta, Anneli; Johansson, Åsa; Wild, Sarah H.; Ingelsson, Erik; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Völzke, Henry; Hysi, Pirro G.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Morrison, Alanna C.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Gao, Wei; Postma, Dirkje S.; White, Wendy B.; Rich, Stephen S.; Hofman, Albert; Aspelund, Thor; Couper, David; Smith, Lewis J.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Lohman, Kurt; Burchard, Esteban G.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Garcia, Melissa; Joubert, Bonnie R.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Musk, A. Bill; Hansel, Nadia; Heckbert, Susan R.; Zgaga, Lina; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Navarro, Pau; Rudan, Igor; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Redline, Susan; Jarvis, Deborah; Zhao, Jing Hua; Rantanen, Taina; O’Connor, George T.; Ripatti, Samuli; Scott, Rodney J.; Karrasch, Stefan; Grallert, Harald; Gaddis, Nathan C.; Starr, John M.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Minster, Ryan L.; Lederer, David J.; Pekkanen, Juha; Gyllensten, Ulf; Campbell, Harry; Morris, Andrew P.; Gläser, Sven; Hammond, Christopher J.; Burkart, Kristin M.; Beilby, John; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hancock, Dana B.; Williams, O. Dale; Polasek, Ozren; Zemunik, Tatijana; Kolcic, Ivana; Petrini, Marcy F.; Wjst, Matthias; Kim, Woo Jin; Porteous, David J.; Scotland, Generation; Smith, Blair H.; Viljanen, Anne; Heliövaara, Markku; Attia, John R.; Sayers, Ian; Hampel, Regina; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Boezen, H. Marike; Newman, Anne; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wilson, James F.; Lind, Lars; Stricker, Bruno H.; Teumer, Alexander; Spector, Timothy D.; Melén, Erik; Peters, Marjolein J.; Lange, Leslie A.; Barr, R. Graham; Bracke, Ken R.; Verhamme, Fien M.; Sung, Joohon; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Cassano, Patricia A.; Sood, Akshay; Hayward, Caroline; Dupuis, Josée; Hall, Ian P.; Brusselle, Guy G.; Tobin, Martin D.; London, Stephanie J.

    2014-01-01

    Forced vital capacity (FVC), a spirometric measure of pulmonary function, reflects lung volume and is used to diagnose and monitor lung diseases. We performed genome-wide association study meta-analysis of FVC in 52,253 individuals from 26 studies and followed up the top associations in 32,917 additional individuals of European ancestry. We found six new regions associated at genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10−8) with FVC in or near EFEMP1, BMP6, MIR-129-2/HSD17B12, PRDM11, WWOX, and KCNJ2. Two (GSTCD and PTCH1) loci previously associated with spirometric measures were related to FVC. Newly implicated regions were followed-up in samples of African American, Korean, Chinese, and Hispanic individuals. We detected transcripts for all six newly implicated genes in human lung tissue. The new loci may inform mechanisms involved in lung development and pathogenesis of restrictive lung disease. PMID:24929828

  14. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felix, Janine F; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Monnereau, Claire

    2016-01-01

    .011, P-value=3.12 x 10(-10)) increase in childhood body mass index in a population of 1,955 children. This risk score explained 2% of the variance in childhood body mass index. This study highlights the shared genetic background between childhood and adult body mass index and adds three novel loci......A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We...... included 35,668 children from 20 studies in the discovery phase and 11,873 children from 13 studies in the replication phase. In total, 15 loci reached genome-wide-significance (P-value

  15. Novel genetic loci underlying human intracranial volume identified through genome-wide association

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Hieab HH; Hibar, Derrek P; Chouraki, Vincent; Stein, Jason L; Nyquist, Paul A; Renter��a, Miguel E; Trompet, Stella; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Seshadri, Sudha; Desrivi��res, Sylvane; Beecham, Ashley H; Jahanshad, Neda; Wittfeld, Katharina; Van der Lee, Sven J; Abramovic, Lucija

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial volume reflects the maximally attained brain size during development, and remains stable with loss of tissue in late life. It is highly heritable, but the underlying genes remain largely undetermined. In a genome-wide association study of 32,438 adults, we discovered five previously unknown loci for intracranial volume and confirmed two known signals. Four of the loci were also associated with adult human stature, but these remained associated with intracranial volume after adjus...

  16. Genome-wide association analysis in primary sclerosing cholangitis identifies two non-HLA susceptibility loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melum, Espen; Franke, Andre; Schramm, Christoph; Weismüller, Tobias J; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Offner, Felix A; Juran, Brian D; Laerdahl, Jon K; Labi, Verena; Björnsson, Einar; Weersma, Rinse K; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Teufel, Andreas; Rust, Christian; Ellinghaus, Eva; Balschun, Tobias; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Ellinghaus, David; Bergquist, Annika; Sauer, Peter; Ryu, Euijung; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Wedemeyer, Jochen; Lindkvist, Björn; Wittig, Michael; Porte, Robert J; Holm, Kristian; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H-Erich; Stokkers, Pieter; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; Runz, Heiko; Stiehl, Adolf; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sterneck, Martina; Vermeire, Severine; Beuers, Ulrich; Villunger, Andreas; Schrumpf, Erik; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Manns, Michael P; Schreiber, Stefan; Karlsen, Tom H

    2015-01-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic bile duct disease affecting 2.4–7.5% of individuals with inflammatory bowel disease. We performed a genome-wide association analysis of 2,466,182 SNPs in 715 individuals with PSC and 2,962 controls, followed by replication in 1,025 PSC cases and 2,174 controls. We detected non-HLA associations at rs3197999 in MST1 and rs6720394 near BCL2L11 (combined P = 1.1 × 10−16 and P = 4.1 × 10−8, respectively). PMID:21151127

  17. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. Elks (Cathy); J.R.B. Perry (John); P. Sulem (Patrick); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); N. Franceschini (Nora); C. He (Chunyan); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); J.A. Visser (Jenny); E.M. Byrne (Enda); D.L. Cousminer (Diana); D.F. Gudbjartsson (Daniel); T. Esko (Tõnu); B. Feenstra (Bjarke); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); D.L. Koller (Daniel); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); P. Lin (Peng); M. Mangino (Massimo); M. Marongiu (Mara); P.F. McArdle (Patrick); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); L. Stolk (Lisette); S. van Wingerden (Sophie); J.H. Zhao (Jing Hua); E. Albrecht (Eva); T. Corre (Tanguy); E. Ingelsson (Erik); C. Hayward (Caroline); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); S. Ulivi (Shelia); N.M. Warrington (Nicole); L. Zgaga (Lina); H. Alavere (Helene); N. Amin (Najaf); T. Aspelund (Thor); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); I.E. Barroso (Inês); G. Berenson (Gerald); S.M. Bergmann (Sven); H. Blackburn (Hannah); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); J.E. Buring (Julie); F. Busonero; H. Campbell (Harry); S.J. Chanock (Stephen); W. Chen (Wei); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); D.J. Couper (David); A.D. Coviello (Andrea); P. d' Adamo (Pio); U. de Faire (Ulf); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); A. Döring (Angela); D.F. Easton (Douglas); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); V. Emilsson (Valur); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); A.R. Folsom (Aaron); T. Foroud (Tatiana); M. Garcia (Melissa); P. Gasparini (Paolo); F. Geller (Frank); C. Gieger (Christian); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A.S. Hall (Alistair); S.E. Hankinson (Susan); L. Ferreli (Liana); A.C. Heath (Andrew); D.G. Hernandez (Dena); A. Hofman (Albert); F.B. Hu (Frank); T. Illig (Thomas); M.R. Järvelin; A.D. Johnson (Andrew); D. Karasik (David); K-T. Khaw (Kay-Tee); D.P. Kiel (Douglas); T.O. Kilpelänen (Tuomas); I. Kolcic (Ivana); P. Kraft (Peter); L.J. Launer (Lenore); J.S.E. Laven (Joop); S. Li (Shengxu); J. Liu (Jianjun); D. Levy (Daniel); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. Melbye (Mads); V. Mooser (Vincent); J.C. Murray (Jeffrey); M.A. Nalls (Michael); P. Navarro (Pau); M. Nelis (Mari); A.R. Ness (Andrew); K. Northstone (Kate); B.A. Oostra (Ben); M. Peacock (Munro); C. Palmer (Cameron); A. Palotie (Aarno); G. Paré (Guillaume); A.N. Parker (Alex); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); C.E. Pennell (Craig); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul); O. Polasek (Ozren); A.S. Plump (Andrew); A. Pouta (Anneli); E. Porcu (Eleonora); T. Rafnar (Thorunn); J.P. Rice (John); S.M. Ring (Susan); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); I. Rudan (Igor); C. Sala (Cinzia); V. Salomaa (Veikko); S. Sanna (Serena); D. Schlessinger; N.J. Schork (Nicholas); A. Scuteri (Angelo); A.V. Segrè (Ayellet); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); N. Soranzo (Nicole); U. Sovio (Ulla); S.R. Srinivasan (Sathanur); D.P. Strachan (David); M.L. Tammesoo; E. Tikkanen (Emmi); D. Toniolo (Daniela); K. Tsui (Kim); L. Tryggvadottir (Laufey); J.P. Tyrer (Jonathan); M. Uda (Manuela); R.M. van Dam (Rob); J.B.J. van Meurs (Joyce); P. Vollenweider (Peter); G. Waeber (Gérard); N.J. Wareham (Nick); D. Waterworth (Dawn); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); J.F. Wilson (James); A.F. Wright (Alan); L. Young (Lauren); G. Zhai (Guangju); W.V. Zhuang; L.J. Bierut (Laura); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); H.A. Boyd (Heather); L. Crisponi (Laura); E.W. Demerath (Ellen); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); M.J. Econs (Michael); T.B. Harris (Tamara); D. Hunter (David); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); A. Metspalu (Andres); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); P.M. Ridker (Paul); T.D. Spector (Tim); E.A. Streeten (Elizabeth); K. Stefansson (Kari); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); E. Widen (Elisabeth); J. Murabito (Joanne); K. Ong (Ken); M.N. Weedon (Michael)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTo identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10 -60) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10 -33), we identified 30

  18. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elks, Cathy E; Perry, John R B; Sulem, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 × 10⁻⁶⁰) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 × 10⁻³³), we identified 30 new menarc...

  19. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new susceptibility loci for childhood body mass index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Janine F; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Monnereau, Claire; van der Valk, Ralf J P; Stergiakouli, Evie; Chesi, Alessandra; Gaillard, Romy; Feenstra, Bjarke; Thiering, Elisabeth; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Mahajan, Anubha; Pitkänen, Niina; Joro, Raimo; Cavadino, Alana; Huikari, Ville; Franks, Steve; Groen-Blokhuis, Maria M; Cousminer, Diana L; Marsh, Julie A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Curtin, John A; Vioque, Jesus; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Myhre, Ronny; Price, Thomas S; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Yengo, Loïc; Grarup, Niels; Ntalla, Ioanna; Ang, Wei; Atalay, Mustafa; Bisgaard, Hans; Blakemore, Alexandra I; Bonnefond, Amelie; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Eriksson, Johan; Flexeder, Claudia; Franke, Lude; Geller, Frank; Geserick, Mandy; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Haworth, Claire M A; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Holm, Jens-Christian; Horikoshi, Momoko; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Huang, Jinyan; Kadarmideen, Haja N; Kähönen, Mika; Kiess, Wieland; Lakka, Hanna-Maaria; Lakka, Timo A; Lewin, Alexandra M; Liang, Liming; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Ma, Baoshan; Magnus, Per; McCormack, Shana E; McMahon, George; Mentch, Frank D; Middeldorp, Christel M; Murray, Clare S; Pahkala, Katja; Pers, Tune H; Pfäffle, Roland; Postma, Dirkje S; Power, Christine; Simpson, Angela; Sengpiel, Verena; Tiesler, Carla M T; Torrent, Maties; Uitterlinden, André G; van Meurs, Joyce B; Vinding, Rebecca; Waage, Johannes; Wardle, Jane; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zemel, Babette S; Dedoussis, George V; Pedersen, Oluf; Froguel, Philippe; Sunyer, Jordi; Plomin, Robert; Jacobsson, Bo; Hansen, Torben; Gonzalez, Juan R; Custovic, Adnan; Raitakari, Olli T; Pennell, Craig E; Widén, Elisabeth; Boomsma, Dorret I; Koppelman, Gerard H; Sebert, Sylvain; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Hyppönen, Elina; McCarthy, Mark I; Lindi, Virpi; Harri, Niinikoski; Körner, Antje; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Heinrich, Joachim; Melbye, Mads; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hakonarson, Hakon; Ring, Susan M; Smith, George Davey; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Grant, Struan F A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V

    2016-01-15

    A large number of genetic loci are associated with adult body mass index. However, the genetics of childhood body mass index are largely unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of childhood body mass index, using sex- and age-adjusted standard deviation scores. We included 35 668 children from 20 studies in the discovery phase and 11 873 children from 13 studies in the replication phase. In total, 15 loci reached genome-wide significance (P-value genetic risk score combining all 15 SNPs showed that each additional average risk allele was associated with a 0.073 SDS (SE 0.011, P-value = 3.12 × 10(-10)) increase in childhood body mass index in a population of 1955 children. This risk score explained 2% of the variance in childhood body mass index. This study highlights the shared genetic background between childhood and adult body mass index and adds three novel loci. These loci likely represent age-related differences in strength of the associations with body mass index. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Four Loci Associated with Eruption of Permanent Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Shaffer, John R.; Hansen, Thomas; Esserlind, Ann-Louise; Boyd, Heather A.; Nohr, Ellen A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Paternoster, Lavinia; Evans, David M.; Weyant, Robert J.; Levy, Steven M.; Lathrop, Mark; Smith, George Davey; Murray, Jeffrey C.; Olesen, Jes; Werge, Thomas; Marazita, Mary L.; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.; Melbye, Mads

    2011-01-01

    The sequence and timing of permanent tooth eruption is thought to be highly heritable and can have important implications for the risk of malocclusion, crowding, and periodontal disease. We conducted a genome-wide association study of number of permanent teeth erupted between age 6 and 14 years, analyzed as age-adjusted standard deviation score averaged over multiple time points, based on childhood records for 5,104 women from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Four loci showed association at Peruption and were also known to influence height and breast cancer, respectively. The two other loci pointed to genomic regions without any previous significant genome-wide association study results. The intronic SNP rs7924176 in ADK could be linked to gene expression in monocytes. The combined effect of the four genetic variants was most pronounced between age 10 and 12 years, where children with 6 to 8 delayed tooth eruption alleles had on average 3.5 (95% confidence interval: 2.9–4.1) fewer permanent teeth than children with 0 or 1 of these alleles. PMID:21931568

  1. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies eight new loci for type 2 diabetes in east Asians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Yoon Shin; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Hu, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a three-stage genetic study to identify susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D) in east Asian populations. We followed our stage 1 meta-analysis of eight T2D genome-wide association studies (6,952 cases with T2D and 11,865 controls) with a stage 2 in silico replication analysis...... (5,843 cases and 4,574 controls) and a stage 3 de novo replication analysis (12,284 cases and 13,172 controls). The combined analysis identified eight new T2D loci reaching genome-wide significance, which mapped in or near GLIS3, PEPD, FITM2-R3HDML-HNF4A, KCNK16, MAEA, GCC1-PAX4, PSMD6 and ZFAND3...

  2. Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Hoggart, Clive J; Paternoster, Lavinia

    2013-01-01

    Twin and family studies indicate that the timing of primary tooth eruption is highly heritable, with estimates typically exceeding 80%. To identify variants involved in primary tooth eruption, we performed a population-based genome-wide association study of 'age at first tooth' and 'number of teeth......' using 5998 and 6609 individuals, respectively, from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and 5403 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966). We tested 2 446 724 SNPs imputed in both studies. Analyses were controlled for the effect of gestational age, sex...... and age of measurement. Results from the two studies were combined using fixed effects inverse variance meta-analysis. We identified a total of 15 independent loci, with 10 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P

  3. Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Hoggart, Clive J.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Horikoshi, Momoko; Wright, Victoria J.; Tobias, Jon H.; Richmond, Stephen; Zhurov, Alexei I.; Toma, Arshed M.; Pouta, Anneli; Taanila, Anja; Sipila, Kirsi; Lähdesmäki, Raija; Pillas, Demetris; Geller, Frank; Feenstra, Bjarke; Melbye, Mads; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ring, Susan M.; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Davey Smith, George; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Evans, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Twin and family studies indicate that the timing of primary tooth eruption is highly heritable, with estimates typically exceeding 80%. To identify variants involved in primary tooth eruption, we performed a population-based genome-wide association study of ‘age at first tooth’ and ‘number of teeth’ using 5998 and 6609 individuals, respectively, from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and 5403 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966). We tested 2 446 724 SNPs imputed in both studies. Analyses were controlled for the effect of gestational age, sex and age of measurement. Results from the two studies were combined using fixed effects inverse variance meta-analysis. We identified a total of 15 independent loci, with 10 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P eruption, and potentially craniofacial growth and more generally organ development. PMID:23704328

  4. Genome-wide association study identifies vitamin B5 biosynthesis as a host specificity factor in Campylobacter

    OpenAIRE

    Sheppard, Samuel K.; Didelot, Xavier; Meric, Guillaume; Torralbo, Alicia; Jolley, Keith A.; Kelly, David J.; Bentley, Stephen D.; Maiden, Martin C. J.; Parkhill, Julian; Falush, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have the potential to identify causal genetic factors underlying important phenotypes but have rarely been performed in bacteria. We present an association mapping method that takes into account the clonal population structure of bacteria and is applicable to both core and accessory genome variation. Campylobacter is a common cause of human gastroenteritis as a consequence of its proliferation in multiple farm animal species and its transmission via contaminate...

  5. Genome-Wide Association Identifies SLC2A9 and NLN Gene Regions as Associated with Entropion in Domestic Sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousel, Michelle R; Reynolds, James O; White, Stephen N

    2015-01-01

    Entropion is an inward rolling of the eyelid allowing contact between the eyelashes and cornea that may lead to blindness if not corrected. Although many mammalian species, including humans and dogs, are afflicted by congenital entropion, no specific genes or gene regions related to development of entropion have been reported in any mammalian species to date. Entropion in domestic sheep is known to have a genetic component therefore, we used domestic sheep as a model system to identify genomic regions containing genes associated with entropion. A genome-wide association was conducted with congenital entropion in 998 Columbia, Polypay, and Rambouillet sheep genotyped with 50,000 SNP markers. Prevalence of entropion was 6.01%, with all breeds represented. Logistic regression was performed in PLINK with additive allelic, recessive, dominant, and genotypic inheritance models. Two genome-wide significant (empirical Psheep genetic markers for marker-assisted selection.

  6. Genome-wide search for Zelda-like chromatin signatures identifies GAF as a pioneer factor in early fly development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshe, Arbel; Kaplan, Tommy

    2017-07-04

    The protein Zelda was shown to play a key role in early Drosophila development, binding thousands of promoters and enhancers prior to maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT), and marking them for transcriptional activation. Recently, we showed that Zelda acts through specific chromatin patterns of histone modifications to mark developmental enhancers and active promoters. Intriguingly, some Zelda sites still maintain these chromatin patterns in Drosophila embryos lacking maternal Zelda protein. This suggests that additional Zelda-like pioneer factors may act in early fly embryos. We developed a computational method to analyze and refine the chromatin landscape surrounding early Zelda peaks, using a multichannel spectral clustering. This allowed us to characterize their chromatin patterns through MZT (mitotic cycles 8-14). Specifically, we focused on H3K4me1, H3K4me3, H3K18ac, H3K27ac, and H3K27me3 and identified three different classes of chromatin signatures, matching "promoters," "enhancers" and "transiently bound" Zelda peaks. We then further scanned the genome using these chromatin patterns and identified additional loci-with no Zelda binding-that show similar chromatin patterns, resulting with hundreds of Zelda-independent putative enhancers. These regions were found to be enriched with GAGA factor (GAF, Trl) and are typically located near early developmental zygotic genes. Overall our analysis suggests that GAF, together with Zelda, plays an important role in activating the zygotic genome. As we show, our computational approach offers an efficient algorithm for characterizing chromatin signatures around some loci of interest and allows a genome-wide identification of additional loci with similar chromatin patterns.

  7. A genome-wide meta-analysis identifies novel loci associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Sheng; Liu, Xue-Feng; Aragam, Nagesh

    2010-12-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder both have strong inherited components. Recent studies have indicated that schizophrenia and bipolar disorder may share more than half of their genetic determinants. In this study, we performed a meta-analysis (combined analysis) for genome-wide association data of the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP array 6.0 to detect genetic variants influencing both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder using European-American samples (653 bipolar cases and 1034 controls, 1172 schizophrenia cases and 1379 controls). The best associated SNP rs11789399 was located at 9q33.1 (p=2.38 × 10(-6), 5.74 × 10(-4), and 5.56 × 10(-9), for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, respectively), where one flanking gene, ASTN2 (220kb away) has been associated with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. The next best SNP was rs12201676 located at 6q15 (p=2.67 × 10(-4), 2.12 × 10(-5), 3.88 × 10(-8) for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis, respectively), near two flanking genes, GABRR1 and GABRR2 (15 and 17kb away, respectively). The third interesting SNP rs802568 was at 7q35 within CNTNAP2 (p=8.92 × 10(-4), 1.38 × 10(-5), and 1.62 × 10(-7) for schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and meta-analysis, respectively). Through meta-analysis, we found two additional associated genes NALCN (the top SNP is rs2044117, p=4.57 × 10(-7)) and NAP5 (the top SNP is rs10496702, p=7.15 × 10(-7)). Haplotype analyses of above five loci further supported the associations with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These results provide evidence of common genetic variants influencing schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. These findings will serve as a resource for replication in other populations to elucidate the potential role of these genetic variants in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A genome-wide association study identifies risk loci for spirometric measures among smokers of European and African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Sharon M; Cho, Michael H; Young, Kendra; Hersh, Craig P; Castaldi, Peter J; McDonald, Merry-Lynn; Regan, Elizabeth; Mattheisen, Manuel; DeMeo, Dawn L; Parker, Margaret; Foreman, Marilyn; Make, Barry J; Jensen, Robert L; Casaburi, Richard; Lomas, David A; Bhatt, Surya P; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Laird, Nan M; Lange, Christoph; Hokanson, John E; Silverman, Edwin K

    2015-12-03

    Pulmonary function decline is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among smokers. Post bronchodilator FEV1 and FEV1/FVC ratio are considered the standard assessment of airflow obstruction. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 9919 current and former smokers in the COPDGene study (6659 non-Hispanic Whites [NHW] and 3260 African Americans [AA]) to identify associations with spirometric measures (post-bronchodilator FEV1 and FEV1/FVC). We also conducted meta-analysis of FEV1 and FEV1/FVC GWAS in the COPDGene, ECLIPSE, and GenKOLS cohorts (total n = 13,532). Among NHW in the COPDGene cohort, both measures of pulmonary function were significantly associated with SNPs at the 15q25 locus [containing CHRNA3/5, AGPHD1, IREB2, CHRNB4] (lowest p-value = 2.17 × 10(-11)), and FEV1/FVC was associated with a genomic region on chromosome 4 [upstream of HHIP] (lowest p-value = 5.94 × 10(-10)); both regions have been previously associated with COPD. For the meta-analysis, in addition to confirming associations to the regions near CHRNA3/5 and HHIP, genome-wide significant associations were identified for FEV1 on chromosome 1 [TGFB2] (p-value = 8.99 × 10(-9)), 9 [DBH] (p-value = 9.69 × 10(-9)) and 19 [CYP2A6/7] (p-value = 3.49 × 10(-8)) and for FEV1/FVC on chromosome 1 [TGFB2] (p-value = 8.99 × 10(-9)), 4 [FAM13A] (p-value = 3.88 × 10(-12)), 11 [MMP3/12] (p-value = 3.29 × 10(-10)) and 14 [RIN3] (p-value = 5.64 × 10(-9)). In a large genome-wide association study of lung function in smokers, we found genome-wide significant associations at several previously described loci with lung function or COPD. We additionally identified a novel genome-wide significant locus with FEV1 on chromosome 9 [DBH] in a meta-analysis of three study populations.

  9. A Genome-wide CRISPR Death Screen Identifies Genes Essential for Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Jason D; Jourdain, Alexis A; Calvo, Sarah E; Ballarano, Carmine A; Doench, John G; Root, David E; Mootha, Vamsi K

    2016-12-13

    Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is the major pathway for ATP production in humans. Deficiencies in OXPHOS can arise from mutations in either mitochondrial or nuclear genomes and comprise the largest collection of inborn errors of metabolism. At present we lack a complete catalog of human genes and pathways essential for OXPHOS. Here we introduce a genome-wide CRISPR "death screen" that actively selects dying cells to reveal human genes required for OXPHOS, inspired by the classic observation that human cells deficient in OXPHOS survive in glucose but die in galactose. We report 191 high-confidence hits essential for OXPHOS, including 72 underlying known OXPHOS diseases. Our screen reveals a functional module consisting of NGRN, WBSCR16, RPUSD3, RPUSD4, TRUB2, and FASTKD2 that regulates the mitochondrial 16S rRNA and intra-mitochondrial translation. Our work yields a rich catalog of genes required for OXPHOS and, more generally, demonstrates the power of death screening for functional genomic analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Genome-wide methylation analysis identified sexually dimorphic methylated regions in hybrid tilapia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zi Yi; Xia, Jun Hong; Lin, Grace; Wang, Le; Lin, Valerie C. L.; Yue, Gen Hua

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism is an interesting biological phenomenon. Previous studies showed that DNA methylation might play a role in sexual dimorphism. However, the overall picture of the genome-wide methylation landscape in sexually dimorphic species remains unclear. We analyzed the DNA methylation landscape and transcriptome in hybrid tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) using whole genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) and RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We found 4,757 sexually dimorphic differentially methylated regions (DMRs), with significant clusters of DMRs located on chromosomal regions associated with sex determination. CpG methylation in promoter regions was negatively correlated with the gene expression level. MAPK/ERK pathway was upregulated in male tilapia. We also inferred active cis-regulatory regions (ACRs) in skeletal muscle tissues from WGBS datasets, revealing sexually dimorphic cis-regulatory regions. These results suggest that DNA methylation contribute to sex-specific phenotypes and serve as resources for further investigation to analyze the functions of these regions and their contributions towards sexual dimorphisms. PMID:27782217

  11. Meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies identifies multiple new loci associated with testicular germ cell tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Zhaoming; McGlynn, Katherine A.; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The international Testicular Cancer Consortium (TECAC) combined five published genome-wide association studies of testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT; 3,558 cases and 13,970 controls) to identify new susceptibility loci. We conducted a fixed-effects meta-analysis, including, to our knowledge...... by identifying one and three additional independent SNPs, respectively. In aggregate, the 39 independent markers identified to date explain 37% of father-to-son familial risk, 8% of which can be attributed to the 12 new signals reported here. Our findings substantially increase the number of known TGCT...

  12. SARS CTL vaccine candidates; HLA supertype-, genome-wide scanning and biochemical validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sylvester-Hvid, C.; Nielsen, Morten; Lamberth, K.

    2004-01-01

    An effective Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) vaccine is likely to include components that can induce specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses. The specificities of such responses are governed by human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-restricted presentation of SARS-derived peptide epitopes...... of the HLA supertypes and identified almost 100 potential vaccine candidates. These should be further validated in SARS survivors and used for vaccine formulation. We suggest that immunobioinformatics may become a fast and valuable tool in rational vaccine design....

  13. A genome-wide scan for selection signatures in Nellore cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somavilla, A L; Sonstegard, T S; Higa, R H; Rosa, A N; Siqueira, F; Silva, L O C; Torres Júnior, R A A; Coutinho, L L; Mudadu, M A; Alencar, M M; Regitano, L C A

    2014-12-01

    Brazilian Nellore cattle (Bos indicus) have been selected for growth traits for over more than four decades. In recent years, reproductive and meat quality traits have become more important because of increasing consumption, exports and consumer demand. The identification of genome regions altered by artificial selection can potentially permit a better understanding of the biology of specific phenotypes that are useful for the development of tools designed to increase selection efficiency. Therefore, the aims of this study were to detect evidence of recent selection signatures in Nellore cattle using extended haplotype homozygosity methodology and BovineHD marker genotypes (>777,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms) as well as to identify corresponding genes underlying these signals. Thirty-one significant regions (P meat quality, fatty acid profiles and immunity. In addition, 545 genes were identified in regions harboring selection signatures. Within this group, 58 genes were associated with growth, muscle and adipose tissue metabolism, reproductive traits or the immune system. Using relative extended haplotype homozygosity to analyze high-density single nucleotide polymorphism marker data allowed for the identification of regions potentially under artificial selection pressure in the Nellore genome, which might be used to better understand autozygosity and the effects of selection on the Nellore genome. © 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  14. Genome-wide scans for candidate genes involved in the aquatic adaptation of dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-Bo; Zhou, Wei-Ping; Liu, He-Qun; Irwin, David M; Shen, Yong-Yi; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Since their divergence from the terrestrial artiodactyls, cetaceans have fully adapted to an aquatic lifestyle, which represents one of the most dramatic transformations in mammalian evolutionary history. Numerous morphological and physiological characters of cetaceans have been acquired in response to this drastic habitat transition, such as thickened blubber, echolocation, and ability to hold their breath for a long period of time. However, knowledge about the molecular basis underlying these adaptations is still limited. The sequence of the genome of Tursiops truncates provides an opportunity for a comparative genomic analyses to examine the molecular adaptation of this species. Here, we constructed 11,838 high-quality orthologous gene alignments culled from the dolphin and four other terrestrial mammalian genomes and screened for positive selection occurring in the dolphin lineage. In total, 368 (3.1%) of the genes were identified as having undergone positive selection by the branch-site model. Functional characterization of these genes showed that they are significantly enriched in the categories of lipid transport and localization, ATPase activity, sense perception of sound, and muscle contraction, areas that are potentially related to cetacean adaptations. In contrast, we did not find a similar pattern in the cow, a closely related species. We resequenced some of the positively selected sites (PSSs), within the positively selected genes, and showed that most of our identified PSSs (50/52) could be replicated. The results from this study should have important implications for our understanding of cetacean evolution and their adaptations to the aquatic environment.

  15. A genome-wide association study of COPD identifies a susceptibility locus on chromosome 19q13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cho, Michael H; Castaldi, Peter J; Wan, Emily S

    2012-01-01

    larger studies. We performed a GWAS using a total of 3499 cases and 1922 control subjects from four cohorts: the Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate Endpoints (ECLIPSE); the Normative Aging Study (NAS) and National Emphysema Treatment Trial (NETT); Bergen, Norway (Gen......KOLS); and the COPDGene study. Genotyping was performed on Illumina platforms with additional markers imputed using 1000 Genomes data; results were summarized using fixed-effect meta-analysis. We identified a new genome-wide significant locus on chromosome 19q13 (rs7937, OR = 0.74, P = 2.9 × 10(-9)). Genotyping...

  16. Genome-wide scans between two honeybee populations reveal putative signatures of human-mediated selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parejo, M; Wragg, D; Henriques, D; Vignal, A; Neuditschko, M

    2017-12-01

    Human-mediated selection has left signatures in the genomes of many domesticated animals, including the European dark honeybee, Apis mellifera mellifera, which has been selected by apiculturists for centuries. Using whole-genome sequence information, we investigated selection signatures in spatially separated honeybee subpopulations (Switzerland, n = 39 and France, n = 17). Three different test statistics were calculated in windows of 2 kb (fixation index, cross-population extended haplotype homozygosity and cross-population composite likelihood ratio) and combined into a recently developed composite selection score. Applying a stringent false discovery rate of 0.01, we identified six significant selective sweeps distributed across five chromosomes covering eight genes. These genes are associated with multiple molecular and biological functions, including regulation of transcription, receptor binding and signal transduction. Of particular interest is a selection signature on chromosome 1, which corresponds to the WNT4 gene, the family of which is conserved across the animal kingdom with a variety of functions. In Drosophila melanogaster, WNT4 alleles have been associated with differential wing, cross vein and abdominal phenotypes. Defining phenotypic characteristics of different Apis mellifera ssp., which are typically used as selection criteria, include colour and wing venation pattern. This signal is therefore likely to be a good candidate for human mediated-selection arising from different applied breeding practices in the two managed populations. © 2017 The Authors. Animal Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  17. Genome-wide association study of PR interval in Hispanics/Latinos identifies novel locus at ID2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyerle, Amanda A; Lin, Henry J; Gogarten, Stephanie M; Stilp, Adrienne; Méndez Giráldez, Raul; Soliman, Elsayed; Baldassari, Antoine; Graff, Mariaelisa; Heckbert, Susan; Kerr, Kathleen F; Kooperberg, Charles; Rodriguez, Carlos; Guo, Xiuqing; Yao, Jie; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Taylor, Kent D; Whitsel, Eric A; Rotter, Jerome I; Laurie, Cathy C; Avery, Christy L

    2017-11-10

    PR interval (PR) is a heritable electrocardiographic measure of atrial and atrioventricular nodal conduction. Changes in PR duration may be associated with atrial fibrillation, heart failure and all-cause mortality. Hispanic/Latino populations have high burdens of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, are highly admixed and represent exceptional opportunities for novel locus identification. However, they remain chronically understudied. We present the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of PR in 14 756 participants of Hispanic/Latino ancestry from three studies. Study-specific summary results of the association between 1000 Genomes Phase 1 imputed single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and PR assumed an additive genetic model and were adjusted for global ancestry, study centre/region and clinical covariates. Results were combined using fixed-effects, inverse variance weighted meta-analysis. Sequential conditional analyses were used to identify independent signals. Replication of novel loci was performed in populations of Asian, African and European descent. ENCODE and RoadMap data were used to annotate results. We identified a novel genome-wide association (PPR at ID2 (rs6730558), which replicated in Asian and European populations (PPR loci to Hispanics/Latinos. Bioinformatics annotation provided evidence for regulatory function in cardiac tissue. Further, for six loci that generalised, the Hispanic/Latino index SNP was genome-wide significant and identical to (or in high linkage disequilibrium with) the previously identified GWAS lead SNP. Our results suggest that genetic determinants of PR are consistent across race/ethnicity, but extending studies to admixed populations can identify novel associations, underscoring the importance of conducting genetic studies in diverse populations. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise

  18. Genome-wide association study of primary tooth eruption identifies pleiotropic loci associated with height and craniofacial distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Hoggart, Clive J; Paternoster, Lavinia; Kemp, John P; Prokopenko, Inga; Horikoshi, Momoko; Wright, Victoria J; Tobias, Jon H; Richmond, Stephen; Zhurov, Alexei I; Toma, Arshed M; Pouta, Anneli; Taanila, Anja; Sipila, Kirsi; Lähdesmäki, Raija; Pillas, Demetris; Geller, Frank; Feenstra, Bjarke; Melbye, Mads; Nohr, Ellen A; Ring, Susan M; St Pourcain, Beate; Timpson, Nicholas J; Davey Smith, George; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Evans, David M

    2013-09-15

    Twin and family studies indicate that the timing of primary tooth eruption is highly heritable, with estimates typically exceeding 80%. To identify variants involved in primary tooth eruption, we performed a population-based genome-wide association study of 'age at first tooth' and 'number of teeth' using 5998 and 6609 individuals, respectively, from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) and 5403 individuals from the 1966 Northern Finland Birth Cohort (NFBC1966). We tested 2 446 724 SNPs imputed in both studies. Analyses were controlled for the effect of gestational age, sex and age of measurement. Results from the two studies were combined using fixed effects inverse variance meta-analysis. We identified a total of 15 independent loci, with 10 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P tooth' and 11 loci for 'number of teeth'. Together, these associations explain 6.06% of the variation in 'age of first tooth' and 4.76% of the variation in 'number of teeth'. The identified loci included eight previously unidentified loci, some containing genes known to play a role in tooth and other developmental pathways, including an SNP in the protein-coding region of BMP4 (rs17563, P = 9.080 × 10(-17)). Three of these loci, containing the genes HMGA2, AJUBA and ADK, also showed evidence of association with craniofacial distances, particularly those indexing facial width. Our results suggest that the genome-wide association approach is a powerful strategy for detecting variants involved in tooth eruption, and potentially craniofacial growth and more generally organ development.

  19. Genome-wide association studies in the Japanese population identify seven novel loci for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imamura, Minako; Takahashi, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Toshimasa

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 80 susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes (T2D), but most of its heritability still remains to be elucidated. In this study, we conducted a meta-analysis of GWAS for T2D in the Japanese population. Combined data from discovery....... Of these, the association of 4 loci with T2D is replicated in multi-ethnic populations other than Japanese (up to 65,936 T2Ds and 158,030 controls, P

  20. Integrated genome-wide association, coexpression network, and expression single nucleotide polymorphism analysis identifies novel pathway in allergic rhinitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Allergic rhinitis is a common disease whose genetic basis is incompletely explained. We report an integrated genomic analysis of allergic rhinitis. Methods We performed genome wide association studies (GWAS) of allergic rhinitis in 5633 ethnically diverse North American subjects. Next, we profiled gene expression in disease-relevant tissue (peripheral blood CD4+ lymphocytes) collected from subjects who had been genotyped. We then integrated the GWAS and gene expression data using expression single nucleotide (eSNP), coexpression network, and pathway approaches to identify the biologic relevance of our GWAS. Results GWAS revealed ethnicity-specific findings, with 4 genome-wide significant loci among Latinos and 1 genome-wide significant locus in the GWAS meta-analysis across ethnic groups. To identify biologic context for these results, we constructed a coexpression network to define modules of genes with similar patterns of CD4+ gene expression (coexpression modules) that could serve as constructs of broader gene expression. 6 of the 22 GWAS loci with P-value ≤ 1x10−6 tagged one particular coexpression module (4.0-fold enrichment, P-value 0.0029), and this module also had the greatest enrichment (3.4-fold enrichment, P-value 2.6 × 10−24) for allergic rhinitis-associated eSNPs (genetic variants associated with both gene expression and allergic rhinitis). The integrated GWAS, coexpression network, and eSNP results therefore supported this coexpression module as an allergic rhinitis module. Pathway analysis revealed that the module was enriched for mitochondrial pathways (8.6-fold enrichment, P-value 4.5 × 10−72). Conclusions Our results highlight mitochondrial pathways as a target for further investigation of allergic rhinitis mechanism and treatment. Our integrated approach can be applied to provide biologic context for GWAS of other diseases. PMID:25085501

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies three common variants associated with serologic response to vitamin E supplementation in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Jacqueline M; Yu, Kai; Chung, Charles C; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Yeager, Meredith; Wheeler, William; Snyder, Kirk; Wright, Margaret E; Virtamo, Jarmo; Chanock, Stephen; Albanes, Demetrius

    2012-05-01

    Vitamin E inhibits lipid peroxidation in cell membranes, prevents oxidative damage to DNA by scavenging free radicals, and reduces carcinogen production. No study to our knowledge, however, has examined the association between genetic variants and response to long-term vitamin E supplementation. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of common variants associated with circulating α-tocopherol concentrations following 3 y of controlled supplementation. The study population included 2112 middle-aged, male smokers in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study cohort who received a trial supplementation of α-tocopherol (50 mg/d) and had fasting serum α-tocopherol concentrations measured after 3 y. Serum concentrations were log-transformed for statistical analysis and general linear models adjusted for age, BMI, serum total cholesterol, and cancer case status. Associations with serum response to α-tocopherol supplementation achieved genome-wide significance for 2 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP): rs964184 on 11q23.3 (P = 2.6 × 10(-12)) and rs2108622 on 19pter-p13.11 (P = 2.2 × 10(-7)), and approached genome-wide significance for one SNP, rs7834588 on 8q12.3 (P = 6.2 × 10(-7)). Combined, these SNP explain 3.4% of the residual variance in serum α-tocopherol concentrations during controlled vitamin E supplementation. A GWAS has identified 3 genetic variants at different loci that appear associated with serum concentrations after vitamin E supplementation in men. Identifying genetic variants that influence serum nutrient biochemical status (e.g., α-tocopherol) under supplementation conditions improves our understanding of the biological determinants of these nutritional exposures and their associations with cancer etiology.

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies novel locus for neuroticism and shows polygenic association with Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, Marleen H.M.; van den Berg, Stéphanie M.; Verweij, Karin J.H.; Krueger, Robert F.; Luciano, Michelle; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Matteson, Lindsay K.; Derringer, Jaime; Esko, Tõnu; Amin, Najaf; Gordon, Scott D.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hart, Amy B.; Seppälä, Ilkka; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Konte, Bettina; Lahti, Jari; Lee, Minyoung; Miller, Mike; Nutile, Teresa; Tanaka, Toshiko; Teumer, Alexander; Viktorin, Alexander; Wedenoja, Juho; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Adkins, Daniel E.; Agrawal, Arpana; Allik, Jüri; Appel, Katja; Bigdeli, Timothy B.; Busonero, Fabio; Campbell, Harry; Costa, Paul T.; Smith, George Davey; Davies, Gail; de Wit, Harriet; Ding, Jun; Engelhardt, Barbara E.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Franke, Barbara; Giegling, Ina; Grucza, Richard; Hartmann, Annette M.; Heath, Andrew C.; Heinonen, Kati; Henders, Anjali K.; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Janzing, Joost; Jokela, Markus; Karlsson, Robert; Kemp, John P.; Kirkpatrick, Matthew G.; Latvala, Antti; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C.; Madden, Pamela A.F.; Magri, Chiara; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Marten, Jonathan; Maschio, Andrea; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milaneschi, Yuri; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nauck, Matthias; Ouwens, Klaasjan G.; Palotie, Aarno; Pettersson, Erik; Polasek, Ozren; Qian, Yong; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Raitakari, Olli T.; Realo, Anu; Rose, Richard J.; Ruggiero, Daniela; Schmidt, Carsten O.; Slutske, Wendy S.; Sorice, Rossella; Starr, John M.; Pourcain, Beate St; Sutin, Angelina R.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Trochet, Holly; Vermeulen, Sita; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Widen, Elisabeth; Wouda, Jasper; Wright, Margaret J.; Zgaga, Lina; Scotland, Generation; Porteous, David; Minelli, Alessandra; Palmer, Abraham A.; Rujescu, Dan; Ciullo, Marina; Hayward, Caroline; Rudan, Igor; Metspalu, Andres; Kaprio, Jaakko; Deary, Ian J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Wilson, James F.; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Bierut, Laura J.; Hettema, John M.; Grabe, Hans J.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Evans, David M.; Schlessinger, David; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Terracciano, Antonio; McGue, Matt; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Neuroticism is a personality trait that is briefly defined by emotional instability. It is a robust genetic risk factor for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) and other psychiatric disorders. Hence, neuroticism is an important phenotype for psychiatric genetics. The Genetics of Personality Consortium (GPC) has created a resource for genome-wide association analyses of personality traits in over 63,000 participants (including MDD cases). Objective To identify genetic variants associated with neuroticism by performing a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA) results based on 1000Genomes imputation, to evaluate if common genetic variants as assessed by Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) explain variation in neuroticism by estimating SNP-based heritability, and to examine whether SNPs that predict neuroticism also predict MDD. Setting 30 cohorts with genome-wide genotype, personality and MDD data from the GPC. Participants The study included 63,661 participants from 29 discovery cohorts and 9,786 participants from a replication cohort. Participants came from Europe, the United States or Australia. Main outcome measure(s) Neuroticism scores harmonized across all cohorts by Item Response Theory (IRT) analysis, and clinically assessed MDD case-control status. Results A genome-wide significant SNP was found in the MAGI1 gene (rs35855737; P=9.26 × 10−9 in the discovery meta-analysis, and P=2.38 × 10−8 in the meta-analysis of all 30 cohorts). Common genetic variants explain 15% of the variance in neuroticism. Polygenic scores based on the meta-analysis of neuroticism in 27 of the discovery cohorts significantly predicted neuroticism in 2 independent cohorts. Importantly, polygenic scores also predicted MDD in these cohorts. Conclusions and relevance This study identifies a novel locus for neuroticism. The variant is located in a known gene that has been associated with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in previous studies. In addition, the study

  3. Genome-wide association studies of autoimmune vitiligo identify 23 new risk loci and highlight key pathways and regulatory variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ying; Andersen, Genevieve; Yorgov, Daniel; Ferrara, Tracey M; Ben, Songtao; Brownson, Kelly M; Holland, Paulene J; Birlea, Stanca A; Siebert, Janet; Hartmann, Anke; Lienert, Anne; van Geel, Nanja; Lambert, Jo; Luiten, Rosalie M; Wolkerstorfer, Albert; van der Veen, JP Wietze; Bennett, Dorothy C; Taïeb, Alain; Ezzedine, Khaled; Kemp, E Helen; Gawkrodger, David J; Weetman, Anthony P; Kõks, Sulev; Prans, Ele; Kingo, Külli; Karelson, Maire; Wallace, Margaret R; McCormack, Wayne T; Overbeck, Andreas; Moretti, Silvia; Colucci, Roberta; Picardo, Mauro; Silverberg, Nanette B; Olsson, Mats; Valle, Yan; Korobko, Igor; Böhm, Markus; Lim, Henry W.; Hamzavi, Iltefat; Zhou, Li; Mi, Qing-Sheng; Fain, Pamela R.; Santorico, Stephanie A; Spritz, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease in which depigmented skin results from destruction of melanocytes1, with epidemiologic association with other autoimmune diseases2. In previous linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS1, GWAS2), we identified 27 vitiligo susceptibility loci in patients of European (EUR) ancestry. We carried out a third GWAS (GWAS3) in EUR subjects, with augmented GWAS1 and GWAS2 controls, genome-wide imputation, and meta-analysis of all three GWAS, followed by an independent replication. The combined analyses, with 4,680 cases and 39,586 controls, identified 23 new loci and 7 suggestive loci, most encoding immune and apoptotic regulators, some also associated with other autoimmune diseases, as well as several melanocyte regulators. Bioinformatic analyses indicate a predominance of causal regulatory variation, some corresponding to eQTL at these loci. Together, the identified genes provide a framework for vitiligo genetic architecture and pathobiology, highlight relationships to other autoimmune diseases and melanoma, and offer potential targets for treatment. PMID:27723757

  4. Meta-analysis of five genome-wide association studies identifies multiple new loci associated with testicular germ cell tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoming; McGlynn, Katherine A; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Bishop, D Timothy; Chung, Charles C; Dalgaard, Marlene D; Greene, Mark H; Gupta, Ramneek; Grotmol, Tom; Haugen, Trine B; Karlsson, Robert; Litchfield, Kevin; Mitra, Nandita; Nielsen, Kasper; Pyle, Louise C; Schwartz, Stephen M; Thorsson, Vésteinn; Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Wiklund, Fredrik; Turnbull, Clare; Chanock, Stephen J; Kanetsky, Peter A; Nathanson, Katherine L

    2017-07-01

    The international Testicular Cancer Consortium (TECAC) combined five published genome-wide association studies of testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT; 3,558 cases and 13,970 controls) to identify new susceptibility loci. We conducted a fixed-effects meta-analysis, including, to our knowledge, the first analysis of the X chromosome. Eight new loci mapping to 2q14.2, 3q26.2, 4q35.2, 7q36.3, 10q26.13, 15q21.3, 15q22.31, and Xq28 achieved genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10 -8 ). Most loci harbor biologically plausible candidate genes. We refined previously reported associations at 9p24.3 and 19p12 by identifying one and three additional independent SNPs, respectively. In aggregate, the 39 independent markers identified to date explain 37% of father-to-son familial risk, 8% of which can be attributed to the 12 new signals reported here. Our findings substantially increase the number of known TGCT susceptibility alleles, move the field closer to a comprehensive understanding of the underlying genetic architecture of TGCT, and provide further clues to the etiology of TGCT.

  5. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Susceptibility Loci for Ovarian Cancer at 2q31 and 8q24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Ellen L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Song, Honglin; Ramus, Susan J.; Notaridou, Maria; Lawrenson, Kate; Widschwendter, Martin; Vierkant, Robert A.; Larson, Melissa C.; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Birrer, Michael J.; Berchuck, Andrew; Schildkraut, Joellen; Tomlinson, Ian; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Cook, Linda S.; Gronwald, Jacek; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gore, Martin E.; Campbell, Ian; Whittemore, Alice S.; Sutphen, Rebecca; Phelan, Catherine; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Lambrechts, Diether; Rossing, Mary Anne; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Goodman, Marc T.; Dörk, Thilo; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ness, Roberta B.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Hogdall, Claus; Hogdall, Estrid; Fridley, Brooke L.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Sieh, Weiva; McGuire, Valerie; Godwin, Andrew K.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Hernandez, Dena; Levine, Douglas; Lu, Karen; Iversen, Edwin S.; Palmieri, Rachel T.; Houlston, Richard; van Altena, Anne M.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Kelemen, Linda E.; Le, Nhu D.; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Medrek, Krzysztof; Stafford, Anne; Easton, Douglas F.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Bolton, Kelly L.; Harrington, Patricia; Eccles, Diana; Chen, Ann; Molina, Ashley N.; Davila, Barbara N.; Arango, Hector; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Chen, Zhihua; Risch, Harvey A.; McLaughlin, John; Narod, Steven A.; Ziogas, Argyrios; Brewster, Wendy; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Menon, Usha; Wu, Anna H.; Stram, Daniel O.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Beesley, Jonathan; Webb, Penelope M.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Ekici, Arif B.; Thiel, Falk C.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Yang, Hannah; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Lissowska, Jolanta; Fasching, Peter A.; Despierre, Evelyn; Amant, Frederic; Vergote, Ignace; Doherty, Jennifer; Hein, Rebecca; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Lurie, Galina; Carney, Michael E.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dürst, Matthias; Antonenkova, Natalia; Bogdanova, Natalia; Leminen, Arto; Butzow, Ralf; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Stefansson, Kari; Sulem, Patrick; Besenbacher, Sören; Sellers, Thomas A.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) accounts for more deaths than all other gynecological cancers combined. To identify common low-penetrance OC susceptibility genes, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 507,094 SNPs in 1,768 cases and 2,354 controls, with follow-up of 21,955 SNPs in 4,162 cases and 4,810 controls, leading to the identification of a confirmed susceptibility locus at 9p22 (BNC2)1. Here, we report on nine additional candidate loci (p≤10-4), identified after stratifying cases by histology, genotyped in an additional 4,353 cases and 6,021 controls. Two novel susceptibility loci with p≤5×10-8 were confirmed (8q24, p=8.0×10-15 and 2q31, p=3.8×10-14); two additional loci were also identified that approached genome-wide significance (3q25, p=7.1×10-8 and 17q21, p=1.4×10-7). The associations with serous OC were generally stronger than other subtypes. Analysis of HOXD1, MYC, TiPARP, and SKAP1 at these loci, and BNC2 at 9p22, supports a functional role for these genes in OC development. PMID:20852632

  6. Genome-wide association study for rotator cuff tears identifies two significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashjian, Robert Z; Granger, Erin K; Farnham, James M; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Teerlink, Craig C

    2016-02-01

    The precise etiology of rotator cuff disease is unknown, but prior evidence suggests a role for genetic factors. Limited data exist identifying specific genes associated with rotator cuff tearing. The purpose of this study was to identify specific genes or genetic variants associated with rotator cuff tearing by a genome-wide association study with an independent set of rotator cuff tear cases. A set of 311 full-thickness rotator cuff tear cases genotyped on the Illumina 5M single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) platform were used in a genome-wide association study with 2641 genetically matched white population controls available from the Illumina iControls database. Tests of association were performed with GEMMA software at 257,558 SNPs that compose the intersection of Illumina SNP platforms and that passed general quality control metrics. SNPs were considered significant if P development of rotator cuff tearing. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genome-wide DNA methylation analysis identifies MEGF10 as a novel epigenetically repressed candidate tumor suppressor gene in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlet, Jessica; Tomari, Ayumi; Dallosso, Anthony R; Szemes, Marianna; Kaselova, Martina; Curry, Thomas J; Almutairi, Bader; Etchevers, Heather C; McConville, Carmel; Malik, Karim T A; Brown, Keith W

    2017-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood cancer in which many children still have poor outcomes, emphasising the need to better understand its pathogenesis. Despite recent genome-wide mutation analyses, many primary neuroblastomas do not contain recognizable driver mutations, implicating alternate molecular pathologies such as epigenetic alterations. To discover genes that become epigenetically deregulated during neuroblastoma tumorigenesis, we took the novel approach of comparing neuroblastomas to neural crest precursor cells, using genome-wide DNA methylation analysis. We identified 93 genes that were significantly differentially methylated of which 26 (28%) were hypermethylated and 67 (72%) were hypomethylated. Concentrating on hypermethylated genes to identify candidate tumor suppressor loci, we found the cell engulfment and adhesion factor gene MEGF10 to be epigenetically repressed by DNA hypermethylation or by H3K27/K9 methylation in neuroblastoma cell lines. MEGF10 showed significantly down-regulated expression in neuroblastoma tumor samples; furthermore patients with the lowest-expressing tumors had reduced relapse-free survival. Our functional studies showed that knock-down of MEGF10 expression in neuroblastoma cell lines promoted cell growth, consistent with MEGF10 acting as a clinically relevant, epigenetically deregulated neuroblastoma tumor suppressor gene. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 The Authors. Molecular Carcinogenesis Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okbay, Aysu; Baselmans, Bart M L; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Turley, Patrick; Nivard, Michel G; Fontana, Mark Alan; Meddens, S Fleur W; Linnér, Richard Karlsson; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Derringer, Jaime; Gratten, Jacob; Lee, James J; Liu, Jimmy Z; de Vlaming, Ronald; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Cavadino, Alana; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Garfield, Victoria; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Gonzalez, Juan R; Haitjema, Saskia; Karlsson, Robert; van der Laan, Sander W; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Tian; Matteson, Lindsay; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B; Minica, Camelia C; Nolte, Ilja M; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis; van der Most, Peter J; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rawal, Rajesh; Realo, Anu; Rueedi, Rico; Schmidt, Börge; Smith, Albert V; Stergiakouli, Evie; Tanaka, Toshiko; Taylor, Kent; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Willems, Sara M; Zhao, Wei; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Bergmann, Sven; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boyle, Patricia A; Cherney, Samantha; Cox, Simon R; Davies, Gail; Davis, Oliver S P; Ding, Jun; Direk, Nese; Eibich, Peter; Emeny, Rebecca T; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Faul, Jessica D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forstner, Andreas J; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Richa; Harris, Tamara B; Harris, Juliette M; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; De Jager, Philip L; Kaakinen, Marika A; Kajantie, Eero; Karhunen, Ville; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumari, Meena; Launer, Lenore J; Franke, Lude; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Liewald, David C; Koini, Marisa; Loukola, Anu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Montgomery, Grant W; Mosing, Miriam A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Petrovic, Katja E; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Quaye, Lydia; Räikkönen, Katri; Rudan, Igor; Scott, Rodney J; Smith, Jennifer A; Sutin, Angelina R; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Vinkhuyzen, Anna E; Yu, Lei; Zabaneh, Delilah; Attia, John R; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Boomsma, Dorret I; Snieder, Harold; Chang, Shun-Chiao; Cucca, Francesco; Deary, Ian J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Bültmann, Ute; de Geus, Eco J C; Groenen, Patrick J F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hansen, Torben; Hartman, Catharine A; Haworth, Claire M A; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hinds, David A; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kraft, Peter; Kubzansky, Laura D; Lehtimäki, Terho; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mills, Melinda; de Mutsert, Renée; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Plomin, Robert; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Christine; Rich, Stephen S; Rosendaal, Frits R; den Ruijter, Hester M; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Svento, Rauli; Schmidt, Reinhold; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Starr, John M; Stefansson, Kari; Steptoe, Andrew; Terracciano, Antonio; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Gert G; Weir, David R; Yang, Jian; Conley, Dalton C; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Laibson, David I; Medland, Sarah E; Meyer, Michelle N; Pickrell, Joseph K; Esko, Tõnu; Krueger, Robert F; Beauchamp, Jonathan P; Koellinger, Philipp D; Benjamin, Daniel J; Bartels, Meike; Cesarini, David

    2016-06-01

    Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (n = 298,420), depressive symptoms (n = 161,460), and neuroticism (n = 170,911). We identify 3 variants associated with subjective well-being, 2 variants associated with depressive symptoms, and 11 variants associated with neuroticism, including 2 inversion polymorphisms. The two loci associated with depressive symptoms replicate in an independent depression sample. Joint analyses that exploit the high genetic correlations between the phenotypes (|ρ^| ≈ 0.8) strengthen the overall credibility of the findings and allow us to identify additional variants. Across our phenotypes, loci regulating expression in central nervous system and adrenal or pancreas tissues are strongly enriched for association.

  9. Evaluation of multiple approaches to identify genome-wide polymorphisms in closely related genotypes of sweet cherry (Prunus avium L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seanna Hewitt

    Full Text Available Identification of genetic polymorphisms and subsequent development of molecular markers is important for marker assisted breeding of superior cultivars of economically important species. Sweet cherry (Prunus avium L. is an economically important non-climacteric tree fruit crop in the Rosaceae family and has undergone a genetic bottleneck due to breeding, resulting in limited genetic diversity in the germplasm that is utilized for breeding new cultivars. Therefore, it is critical to recognize the best platforms for identifying genome-wide polymorphisms that can help identify, and consequently preserve, the diversity in a genetically constrained species. For the identification of polymorphisms in five closely related genotypes of sweet cherry, a gel-based approach (TRAP, reduced representation sequencing (TRAPseq, a 6k cherry SNParray, and whole genome sequencing (WGS approaches were evaluated in the identification of genome-wide polymorphisms in sweet cherry cultivars. All platforms facilitated detection of polymorphisms among the genotypes with variable efficiency. In assessing multiple SNP detection platforms, this study has demonstrated that a combination of appropriate approaches is necessary for efficient polymorphism identification, especially between closely related cultivars of a species. The information generated in this study provides a valuable resource for future genetic and genomic studies in sweet cherry, and the insights gained from the evaluation of multiple approaches can be utilized for other closely related species with limited genetic diversity in the breeding germplasm. Keywords: Polymorphisms, Prunus avium, Next-generation sequencing, Target region amplification polymorphism (TRAP, Genetic diversity, SNParray, Reduced representation sequencing, Whole genome sequencing (WGS

  10. Large-scale genome-wide association analysis of bipolar disorder identifies a new susceptibility locus near ODZ4.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sklar, Pamela

    2011-10-01

    We conducted a combined genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 7,481 individuals with bipolar disorder (cases) and 9,250 controls as part of the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium. Our replication study tested 34 SNPs in 4,496 independent cases with bipolar disorder and 42,422 independent controls and found that 18 of 34 SNPs had P < 0.05, with 31 of 34 SNPs having signals with the same direction of effect (P = 3.8 × 10(-7)). An analysis of all 11,974 bipolar disorder cases and 51,792 controls confirmed genome-wide significant evidence of association for CACNA1C and identified a new intronic variant in ODZ4. We identified a pathway comprised of subunits of calcium channels enriched in bipolar disorder association intervals. Finally, a combined GWAS analysis of schizophrenia and bipolar disorder yielded strong association evidence for SNPs in CACNA1C and in the region of NEK4-ITIH1-ITIH3-ITIH4. Our replication results imply that increasing sample sizes in bipolar disorder will confirm many additional loci.

  11. Genome-wide association analysis of young onset stroke identifies a locus on chromosome 10q25 near HABP2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Ching; Stanne, Tara M.; Giese, Anne-Katrin; Ho, Weang Kee; Traylor, Matthew; Amouyel, Philippe; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Malik, Rainer; Xu, Huichun; Kittner, Steven J.; Cole, John W.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Danesh, John; Rasheed, Asif; Zhao, Wei; Engelter, Stefan; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lathrop, Mark; Leys, Didier; Thijs, Vincent; Metso, Tiina M.; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Pezzini, Alessandro; Parati, Eugenio A.; Norrving, Bo; Bevan, Steve; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Slowik, Agnieszka; Lindgren, Arne; Walters, Matthew R; Jannes, Jim; Shen, Jess; Crosslin, David; Doheny, Kimberly; Laurie, Cathy C.; Kanse, Sandip M.; Bis, Joshua C.; Fornage, Myriam; Mosley, Thomas H.; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Strauch, Konstantin; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Gieger, Christian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Peters, Annette; Meisinger, Christine; Ikram, M. Arfan; Longstreth, WT; Meschia, James F.; Seshadri, Sudha; Sharma, Pankaj; Worrall, Bradford; Jern, Christina; Levi, Christopher; Dichgans, Martin; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B.; Markus, Hugh S.; Debette, Stephanie; Rolfs, Arndt; Saleheen, Danish; Mitchell, Braxton D.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although a genetic contribution to ischemic stroke is well recognized, only a handful of stroke loci have been identified by large-scale genetic association studies to date. Hypothesizing that genetic effects might be stronger for early- versus late-onset stroke, we conducted a two-stage meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS), focusing on stroke cases with an age of onset genetic variants at loci with association Pstroke susceptibility locus at 10q25 reached genome-wide significance in the combined analysis of all samples from the Discovery and Follow-up Stages (rs11196288, OR=1.41, P=9.5×10−9). The associated locus is in an intergenic region between TCF7L2 and HABP2. In a further analysis in an independent sample, we found that two SNPs in high linkage disequilibrium with rs11196288 were significantly associated with total plasma factor VII-activating protease levels, a product of HABP2. Conclusions HABP2, which encodes an extracellular serine protease involved in coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammatory pathways, may be a genetic susceptibility locus for early-onset stroke. PMID:26732560

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies genetic risk factors for stroke in African-Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Cara L.; Keene, Keith L.; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Meschia, James F.; Chen, Wei-Min; Nalls, Mike; Bis, Joshua C.; Kittner, Steven J.; Rich, Stephen S.; Tajuddin, Salman; Zonderman, Alan B.; Evans, Michele K.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Gottesman, Rebecca; Mosley, Thomas H.; Shahar, Eyal; Woo, Daniel; Yaffe, Kristine; Liu, YongMei; Sale, Michèle M.; Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; Longstreth, WT; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alexander; Worrall, Bradford B.; Fornage, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of stroke have focused on European-ancestry populations; however, none has been conducted in African-Americans despite the disproportionately high burden of stroke in this population. The Consortium of Minority Population genome-wide Association Studies of Stroke (COMPASS) was established to identify stroke susceptibility loci in minority populations. Methods Using METAL, we conducted meta-analyses of GWAS in 14,746 African-Americans (1,365 ischemic and 1,592 total stroke cases) from COMPASS, and tested SNPs with Pstroke genetic studies in European-ancestry populations. We also evaluated stroke loci previously identified in European-ancestry populations. Results The 15q21.3 locus linked with lipid levels and hypertension was associated with total stroke (rs4471613, P=3.9×10−8) in African-Americans. Nominal associations (Pstroke were observed for 18 variants in or near genes implicated in cell cycle/ mRNA pre-splicing (PTPRG, CDC5L), platelet function (HPS4), blood-brain barrier permeability (CLDN17), immune response (ELTD1, WDFY4, IL1F10-IL1RN), and histone modification (HDAC9). Two of these loci achieved nominal significance in METASTROKE: 5q35.2 (P=0.03), and 1p31.1 (P=0.018). Four of 7 previously reported ischemic stroke loci (PITX2, HDAC9, CDKN2A/CDKN2B and ZFHX3) were nominally associated (Pstroke in COMPASS. Conclusions We identified a novel SNP associated with total stroke in African-Americans and found that ischemic stroke loci identified in European-ancestry populations may also be relevant for African-Americans. Our findings support investigation of diverse populations to identify and characterize genetic risk factors, and the importance of shared genetic risk across populations. PMID:26089329

  13. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Risk Factors for Stroke in African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Cara L; Keene, Keith L; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Meschia, James F; Chen, Wei-Min; Nalls, Mike; Bis, Joshua C; Kittner, Steven J; Rich, Stephen S; Tajuddin, Salman; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Langefeld, Carl D; Gottesman, Rebecca; Mosley, Thomas H; Shahar, Eyal; Woo, Daniel; Yaffe, Kristine; Liu, Yongmei; Sale, Michèle M; Dichgans, Martin; Malik, Rainer; Longstreth, W T; Mitchell, Braxton D; Psaty, Bruce M; Kooperberg, Charles; Reiner, Alexander; Worrall, Bradford B; Fornage, Myriam

    2015-08-01

    The majority of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of stroke have focused on European-ancestry populations; however, none has been conducted in African Americans, despite the disproportionately high burden of stroke in this population. The Consortium of Minority Population Genome-Wide Association Studies of Stroke (COMPASS) was established to identify stroke susceptibility loci in minority populations. Using METAL, we conducted meta-analyses of GWAS in 14 746 African Americans (1365 ischemic and 1592 total stroke cases) from COMPASS, and tested genetic variants with Pstroke genetic studies in European-ancestry populations. We also evaluated stroke loci previously identified in European-ancestry populations. The 15q21.3 locus linked with lipid levels and hypertension was associated with total stroke (rs4471613; P=3.9×10(-8)) in African Americans. Nominal associations (Pstroke were observed for 18 variants in or near genes implicated in cell cycle/mRNA presplicing (PTPRG, CDC5L), platelet function (HPS4), blood-brain barrier permeability (CLDN17), immune response (ELTD1, WDFY4, and IL1F10-IL1RN), and histone modification (HDAC9). Two of these loci achieved nominal significance in METASTROKE: 5q35.2 (P=0.03), and 1p31.1 (P=0.018). Four of 7 previously reported ischemic stroke loci (PITX2, HDAC9, CDKN2A/CDKN2B, and ZFHX3) were nominally associated (Pstroke in COMPASS. We identified a novel genetic variant associated with total stroke in African Americans and found that ischemic stroke loci identified in European-ancestry populations may also be relevant for African Americans. Our findings support investigation of diverse populations to identify and characterize genetic risk factors, and the importance of shared genetic risk across populations. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Thirty new loci for age at menarche identified by a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies

    OpenAIRE

    Elks, Cathy E.; Perry, John R.B.; Sulem, Patrick; Chasman, Daniel I.; Franceschini, Nora; He, Chunyan; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Visser, Jenny A.; Byrne, Enda M.; Cousminer, Diana L.; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F.; Esko, Tõnu; Feenstra, Bjarke; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Koller, Daniel L.

    2010-01-01

    To identify loci for age at menarche, we performed a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies in 87,802 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,731 women. In addition to the known loci at LIN28B (P = 5.4 x 10(-60)) and 9q31.2 (P = 2.2 x 10(-33)), we identified 30 new menarche loci (all P < 5 x 10(-8)) and found suggestive evidence for a further 10 loci (P < 1.9 x 10(-6)). The new loci included four previously associated with body mass index (in or near FTO, SE...

  15. Genome-wide RNAi Screen Identifies SEC61A and VCP as Conserved Regulators of Sindbis Virus Entry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasis Panda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are a large class of insect-borne human pathogens and little is known about the host-factor requirements for infection. To identify such factors, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using model Drosophila cells and validated 94 genes that impacted infection of Sindbis virus (SINV, the prototypical alphavirus. We identified a conserved role for SEC61A and valosin-containing protein (VCP in facilitating SINV entry in insects and mammals. SEC61A and VCP selectively regulate trafficking of the entry receptor NRAMP2, and loss or pharmacological inhibition of these proteins leads to altered NRAMP2 trafficking to lysosomal compartments and proteolytic digestion within lysosomes. NRAMP2 is the major iron transporter in cells, and loss of NRAMP2 attenuates intracellular iron transport. Thus, this study reveals genes and pathways involved in both infection and iron homeostasis that may serve as targets for antiviral therapeutics or for iron-imbalance disorders.

  16. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derringer, Jaime; Gratten, Jacob; Lee, James J; Liu, Jimmy Z; de Vlaming, Ronald; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Cavadino, Alana; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Davies, Gail; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Garfield, Victoria; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Gonzalez, Juan R; Haitjema, Saskia; Karlsson, Robert; van der Laan, Sander W; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J; Miller, Michael B; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Tian; Matteson, Lindsay; Mihailov, Evelin; Minica, Camelia C; Nolte, Ilja M; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; van der Most, Peter J; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rawal, Rajesh; Realo, Anu; Rueedi, Rico; Schmidt, Börge; Smith, Albert V; Stergiakouli, Evie; Tanaka, Toshiko; Taylor, Kent; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Willems, Sara M; Zhao, Wei; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Bergmann, Sven; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Boyle, Patricia A; Cherney, Samantha; Cox, Simon R; Davis, Oliver S P; Ding, Jun; Direk, Nese; Eibich, Peter; Emeny, Rebecca T; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Faul, Jessica D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forstner, Andreas J; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Richa; Harris, Tamara B; Harris, Juliette M; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; De Jager, Philip L; Kaakinen, Marika A; Kajantie, Eero; Karhunen, Ville; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumari, Meena; Launer, Lenore J; Franke, Lude; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Liewald, David C; Koini, Marisa; Loukola, Anu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Montgomery, Grant W; Mosing, Miriam A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Petrovic, Katja E; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Quaye, Lydia; Räikkönen, Katri; Rudan, Igor; Scott, Rodney J; Smith, Jennifer A; Sutin, Angelina R; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Vinkhuyzen, Anna E; Yu, Lei; Zabaneh, Delilah; Attia, John R; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Boomsma, Dorret I; Snieder, Harold; Chang, Shun-Chiao; Cucca, Francesco; Deary, Ian J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Bültmann, Ute; de Geus, Eco J C; Groenen, Patrick J F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hansen, Torben; Hartman, Catharine A; Haworth, Claire M A; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hinds, David A; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kraft, Peter; Kubzansky, Laura D; Lehtimäki, Terho; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mills, Melinda; de Mutsert, Renée; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Plomin, Robert; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Christine; Rich, Stephen S; Rosendaal, Frits R; den Ruijter, Hester M; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Svento, Rauli; Schmidt, Reinhold; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Starr, John M; Stefansson, Kari; Steptoe, Andrew; Terracciano, Antonio; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Gert G; Weir, David R; Yang, Jian; Conley, Dalton C; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Laibson, David I; Medland, Sarah E; Meyer, Michelle N; Pickrell, Joseph K; Esko, Tõnu; Krueger, Robert F; Beauchamp, Jonathan P; Koellinger, Philipp D; Benjamin, Daniel J; Bartels, Meike; Cesarini, David

    2016-01-01

    We conducted genome-wide association studies of three phenotypes: subjective well-being (N = 298,420), depressive symptoms (N = 161,460), and neuroticism (N = 170,910). We identified three variants associated with subjective well-being, two with depressive symptoms, and eleven with neuroticism, including two inversion polymorphisms. The two depressive symptoms loci replicate in an independent depression sample. Joint analyses that exploit the high genetic correlations between the phenotypes (|ρ^| ≈ 0.8) strengthen the overall credibility of the findings, and allow us to identify additional variants. Across our phenotypes, loci regulating expression in central nervous system and adrenal/pancreas tissues are strongly enriched for association. PMID:27089181

  17. Genome-wide analysis identifies 12 loci influencing human reproductive behavior.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barban, N.; Jansen, R.; de Vlaming, Ronald; Vaez, A.; Mandemakers, J.J.; Tropf, F.C.; Shen, X.; Wilson, J.F.; Chasman, D.I.; Nolte, I.M.; Mbarek, H.; Boomsma, D.I.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.; Willemsen, G.; Zondervan, K.T.; Stefansson, K.; Krueger, R.F.; Lee, J.J.; Benjamin, D.J.; Cesarini, D.; Koellinger, P.D.; den Hoed, M.A.H.; Snieder, H.; Mills, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior-age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB)-has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified, and the

  18. Genome-wide analysis identifies 12 loci influencing human reproductive behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barban, Nicola; Jansen, Rick; de Vlaming, Ronald; Vaez, Ahmad; Mandemakers, Jornt J; Tropf, Felix C; Shen, Xia; Wilson, James F; Chasman, Daniel I; Nolte, Ilja M; Tragante, Vinicius; van der Laan, Sander W; Perry, John R B; Kong, Augustine; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Albrecht, Eva; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura; Atzmon, Gil; Auro, Kirsi; Ayers, Kristin; Bakshi, Andrew; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Berger, Klaus; Bergman, Aviv; Bertram, Lars; Bielak, Lawrence F; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Bonder, Marc Jan; Broer, Linda; Bui, Minh; Barbieri, Caterina; Cavadino, Alana; Chavarro, Jorge E; Turman, Constance; Concas, Maria Pina; Cordell, Heather J; Davies, Gail; Eibich, Peter; Eriksson, Nicholas; Esko, Tõnu; Eriksson, Joel; Falahi, Fahimeh; Felix, Janine F; Fontana, Mark Alan; Franke, Lude; Gandin, Ilaria; Gaskins, Audrey J; Gieger, Christian; Gunderson, Erica P; Guo, Xiuqing; Hayward, Caroline; He, Chunyan; Hofer, Edith; Huang, Hongyan; Joshi, Peter K; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karlsson, Robert; Kiechl, Stefan; Kifley, Annette; Kluttig, Alexander; Kraft, Peter; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lahti, Jari; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Tian; Makalic, Enes; Mamasoula, Crysovalanto; Matteson, Lindsay; Mbarek, Hamdi; McArdle, Patrick F; McMahon, George; Meddens, S Fleur W; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Mike; Missmer, Stacey A; Monnereau, Claire; van der Most, Peter J; Myhre, Ronny; Nalls, Mike A; Nutile, Teresa; Kalafati, Ioanna Panagiota; Porcu, Eleonora; Prokopenko, Inga; Rajan, Kumar B; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M; Rueedi, Rico; Ryan, Kathleen A; Saba, Yasaman; Schmidt, Daniel; Smith, Jennifer A; Stolk, Lisette; Streeten, Elizabeth; Tönjes, Anke; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Ulivi, Sheila; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Willeit, Peter; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhernakova, Daria V; Amin, Najaf; Andrews, Howard; Balkau, Beverley; Barzilai, Nir; Bergmann, Sven; Biino, Ginevra; Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boomsma, Dorret I; Buring, Julie E; Campbell, Harry; Cappellani, Stefania; Ciullo, Marina; Cox, Simon R; Cucca, Francesco; Toniolo, Daniela; Davey-Smith, George; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; van Duijn, Cornelia M; de Geus, Eco J C; Eriksson, Johan G; Evans, Denis A; Faul, Jessica D; Sala, Cinzia Felicita; Froguel, Philippe; Gasparini, Paolo; Girotto, Giorgia; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Greiser, Karin Halina; Groenen, Patrick J F; de Haan, Hugoline G; Haerting, Johannes; Harris, Tamara B; Heath, Andrew C; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hopper, John; Hyppönen, Elina; Jacobsson, Bo; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Johannesson, Magnus; Jugessur, Astanand; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keavney, Bernard; Kolcic, Ivana; Koponen, Päivikki; Kovacs, Peter; Kronenberg, Florian; Kutalik, Zoltan; La Bianca, Martina; Lachance, Genevieve; Iacono, William G; Lai, Sandra; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert; Lucht, Michael; Luoto, Riitta; Magnus, Per; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; McQuillan, Ruth; Medland, Sarah E; Meisinger, Christa; Mellström, Dan; Metspalu, Andres; Traglia, Michela; Milani, Lili; Mitchell, Paul; Montgomery, Grant W; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis; de Mutsert, Renée; Nohr, Ellen A; Ohlsson, Claes; Olsen, Jørn; Ong, Ken K; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Perola, Markus; Peyser, Patricia A; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Chris; Kaprio, Jaakko; Raffel, Leslie J; Räikkönen, Katri; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M; Ring, Susan M; Roll, Kathryn; Rudan, Igor; Ruggiero, Daniela; Rujescu, Dan; Salomaa, Veikko; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schupf, Nicole; Smit, Johannes; Sorice, Rossella; Spector, Tim D; Starr, John M; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Swertz, Morris A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tung, Joyce Y; Uitterlinden, André G; Vaccargiu, Simona; Viikari, Jorma; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Vuckovic, Dragana; Waage, Johannes; Wagner, Gert G; Wang, Jie Jin; Wareham, Nicholas J; Weir, David R; Willemsen, Gonneke; Willeit, Johann; Wright, Alan F; Zondervan, Krina T; Stefansson, Kari; Krueger, Robert F; Lee, James J; Benjamin, Daniel J; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D; den Hoed, Marcel; Snieder, Harold; Mills, Melinda C

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB) has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified, and the

  19. Genome-wide analysis identifies 12 loci influencing human reproductive behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barban, Nicola; Jansen, Rick; De Vlaming, Ronald; Vaez, Ahmad; Mandemakers, Jornt J.; Tropf, Felix C.; Shen, Xia; Wilson, James F.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Tragante, Vinicius; Van Der Laan, Sander W.; Perry, John R B; Kong, Augustine; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Albrecht, Eva; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura; Atzmon, Gil; Auro, Kirsi; Ayers, Kristin; Bakshi, Andrew; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Berger, Klaus; Bergman, Aviv; Bertram, Lars; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Bonder, Marc Jan; Broer, Linda; Bui, Minh; Barbieri, Caterina; Cavadino, Alana; Chavarro, Jorge E.; Turman, Constance; Concas, Maria Pina; Cordell, Heather J.; Davies, Gail; Eibich, Peter; Eriksson, Nicholas; Esko, Tõnu; Eriksson, Joel; Falahi, Fahimeh; Felix, Janine F.; Fontana, Mark Alan; Franke, Lude; Gandin, Ilaria; Gaskins, Audrey J.; Gieger, Christian; Gunderson, Erica P.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hayward, Caroline; He, Chunyan; Hofer, Edith; Huang, Hongyan; Joshi, Peter K.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karlsson, Robert; Kiechl, Stefan; Kifley, Annette; Kluttig, Alexander; Kraft, Peter; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lahti, Jari; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lind, Penelope A.; Liu, Tian; Makalic, Enes; Mamasoula, Crysovalanto; Matteson, Lindsay; Mbarek, Hamdi; McArdle, Patrick F.; McMahon, George; Meddens, S. Fleur W; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Mike; Missmer, Stacey A.; Monnereau, Claire; Van Der Most, Peter J.; Myhre, Ronny; Nalls, Mike A.; Nutile, Teresa; Kalafati, Ioanna Panagiota; Porcu, Eleonora; Prokopenko, Inga; Rajan, Kumar B.; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Rueedi, Rico; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Saba, Yasaman; Schmidt, Daniel; Smith, Jennifer A.; Stolk, Lisette; Streeten, Elizabeth; Tönjes, Anke; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Ulivi, Sheila; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Willeit, Peter; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Amin, Najaf; Andrews, Howard; Balkau, Beverley; Barzilai, Nir; Bergmann, Sven; Biino, Ginevra; Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Buring, Julie E.; Campbell, Harry; Cappellani, Stefania; Ciullo, Marina; Cox, Simon R.; Cucca, Francesco; Toniolo, Daniela; Davey-Smith, George; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Van Duijn, Cornelia M.; De Geus, Eco J C; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Sala, Cinzia Felicita; Froguel, Philippe; Gasparini, Paolo; Girotto, Giorgia; Grabe, Hans Jörgen; Greiser, Karin Halina; Groenen, Patrick J F; De Haan, Hugoline G.; Haerting, Johannes; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Hopper, John; Hyppönen, Elina; Jacobsson, Bo; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Johannesson, Magnus; Jugessur, Astanand; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keavney, Bernard; Kolcic, Ivana; Koponen, Päivikki; Kovacs, Peter; Kronenberg, Florian; Kutalik, Zoltan; La Bianca, Martina; Lachance, Genevieve; Iacono, William G.; Lai, Sandra; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert; Lucht, Michael; Luoto, Riitta; Magnus, Per; Magnusson, Patrikke; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; McQuillan, Ruth; Medland, Sarah E.; Meisinger, Christa; Mellström, Dan; Metspalu, Andres; Traglia, Michela; Milani, Lili; Mitchell, Paul; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis; De Mutsert, Renée; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ohlsson, Claes; Olsen, Jørn; Ong, Ken K.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Perola, Markus; Peyser, Patricia A.; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Chris; Kaprio, Jaakko; Raffel, Leslie J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M.; Ring, Susan M.; Roll, Kathryn; Rudan, Igor; Ruggiero, Daniela; Rujescu, Dan; Salomaa, Veikko; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schupf, Nicole; Smit, Johannes; Sorice, Rossella; Spector, Tim D.; Starr, John M.; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Swertz, Morris A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Roy Thurik, A.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tung, Joyce Y.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vaccargiu, Simona; Viikari, Jorma; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Vuckovic, Dragana; Waage, Johannes; Wagner, Gert G.; Wang, Jie Jin; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Willeit, Johann; Wright, Alan F.; Zondervan, Krina T.; Stefansson, Kari; Krueger, Robert F.; Lee, James J.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Den Hoed, Marcel; Snieder, Harold; Mills, Melinda C.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior - age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB) - has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified, and the

  20. Genome-wide analysis identifies 12 loci influencing human reproductive behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barban, Nicola; Jansen, Rick; Vlaming, de Ronald; Vaez, Ahmad; Mandemakers, Jornt J.; Tropf, Felix C.; Shen, Xia; Wilson, James F.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Tragante, Vinicius; Laan, van der Sander W.; Perry, John R.B.; Kong, Augustine; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Albrecht, Eva; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura; Atzmon, Gil; Auro, Kirsi; Ayers, Kristin; Bakshi, Andrew; Ben-Avraham, Danny; Berger, Klaus; Bergman, Aviv; Bertram, Lars; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Bonder, Marc Jan; Broer, Linda; Bui, Minh; Barbieri, Caterina; Cavadino, Alana; Chavarro, Jorge E.; Turman, Constance; Concas, Maria Pina; Cordell, Heather J.; Davies, Gail; Eibich, Peter; Eriksson, Nicholas; Esko, Tõnu; Eriksson, Joel; Falahi, Fahimeh; Felix, Janine F.; Fontana, Mark Alan; Franke, Lude; Gandin, Ilaria; Gaskins, Audrey J.; Gieger, Christian; Gunderson, Erica P.; Guo, Xiuqing; Hayward, Caroline; He, Chunyan; Hofer, Edith; Huang, Hongyan; Joshi, Peter K.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karlsson, Robert; Kiechl, Stefan; Kifley, Annette; Kluttig, Alexander; Kraft, Peter; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lahti, Jari; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lind, Penelope A.; Liu, Tian; Makalic, Enes; Mamasoula, Crysovalanto; Matteson, Lindsay; Mbarek, Hamdi; McArdle, Patrick F.; McMahon, George; Meddens, S.F.W.; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Mike; Missmer, Stacey A.; Monnereau, Claire; Most, van der Peter J.; Myhre, Ronny; Nalls, Mike A.; Nutile, Teresa; Kalafati, Ioanna Panagiota; Porcu, Eleonora; Prokopenko, Inga; Rajan, Kumar B.; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Robino, Antonietta; Rose, Lynda M.; Rueedi, Rico; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Saba, Yasaman; Schmidt, Daniel; Smith, Jennifer A.; Stolk, Lisette; Streeten, Elizabeth; Tönjes, Anke; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Ulivi, Sheila; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Willeit, Peter; Yao, Jie; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Amin, Najaf; Andrews, Howard; Balkau, Beverley; Barzilai, Nir; Bergmann, Sven; Biino, Ginevra; Bisgaard, Hans; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Buring, Julie E.; Campbell, Harry; Cappellani, Stefania; Ciullo, Marina; Cox, Simon R.; Cucca, Francesco; Toniolo, Daniela; Davey-Smith, George; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George; Deloukas, Panos; Duijn, van Cornelia M.; Geus, de Eco J.C.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Evans, Denis A.; Faul, Jessica D.; Sala, Cinzia Felicita; Froguel, Philippe; Gasparini, Paolo; Girotto, Giorgia; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Greiser, Karin Halina; Groenen, Patrick J.F.; Haan, de Hugoline G.; Haerting, Johannes; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Heikkilä, Kauko; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Hopper, John; Hyppönen, Elina; Jacobsson, Bo; Jaddoe, Vincent W.V.; Johannesson, Magnus; Jugessur, Astanand; Kähönen, Mika; Kajantie, Eero; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Keavney, Bernard; Kolcic, Ivana; Koponen, Päivikki; Kovacs, Peter; Kronenberg, Florian; Kutalik, Zoltan; Bianca, la Martina; Lachance, Genevieve; Iacono, William G.; Lai, Sandra; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liewald, David C.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Liu, Yongmei; Luben, Robert; Lucht, Michael; Luoto, Riitta; Magnus, Per; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; McQuillan, Ruth; Medland, Sarah E.; Meisinger, Christa; Mellström, Dan; Metspalu, Andres; Traglia, Michela; Milani, Lili; Mitchell, Paul; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis; Mutsert, de Renée; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ohlsson, Claes; Olsen, Jørn; Ong, Ken K.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Penninx, Brenda W.J.H.; Perola, Markus; Peyser, Patricia A.; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Chris; Kaprio, Jaakko; Raffel, Leslie J.; Räikkönen, Katri; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M.; Ring, Susan M.; Roll, Kathryn; Rudan, Igor; Ruggiero, Daniela; Rujescu, Dan; Salomaa, Veikko; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schupf, Nicole; Smit, Johannes; Sorice, Rossella; Spector, Tim D.; Starr, John M.; Stöckl, Doris; Strauch, Konstantin; Stumvoll, Michael; Swertz, Morris A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A.R.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tung, Joyce Y.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Vaccargiu, Simona; Viikari, Jorma; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Vollenweider, Peter; Vuckovic, Dragana; Waage, Johannes; Wagner, Gert G.; Wang, Jie Jin; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Weir, David R.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Willeit, Johann; Wright, Alan F.; Zondervan, Krina T.; Stefansson, Kari; Krueger, Robert F.; Lee, James J.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Hoed, den Marcel; Snieder, Harold; Mills, Melinda C.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior—age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB)—has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified, and the

  1. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Alison P; Wolpin, Brian M; Risch, Harvey A; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Mocci, Evelina; Zhang, Mingfeng; Canzian, Federico; Childs, Erica J; Hoskins, Jason W; Jermusyk, Ashley; Zhong, Jun; Sund, Malin; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Tavano, Francesca; Thornquist, Mark D; Tobias, Geoffrey S; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K; Vashist, Yogesh; Visvanathan, Kala; Vodicka, Pavel; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Chen, Fei; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Kraft, Peter; Li, Donghui; Chanock, Stephen; Albanes, Demetrius; Obazee, Ofure; Petersen, Gloria M; Amundadottir, Laufey T; Andreotti, Gabriella; Arslan, Alan A; Babic, Ana; Bamlet, William R; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Berndt, Sonja I; Blackford, Amanda; Borges, Michael; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M; Brais, Lauren; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Buring, Julie; Campa, Daniele; Capurso, Gabriele; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Chaffee, Kari G; Chung, Charles C; Cleary, Sean; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dijk, Frederike; Duell, Eric J; Foretova, Lenka; Fuchs, Charles; Funel, Niccola; Gallinger, Steven; M Gaziano, J Michael; Gazouli, Maria; Giles, Graham G; Giovannucci, Edward; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Gary E; Goodman, Phyllis J; Hackert, Thilo; Haiman, Christopher; Hartge, Patricia; Hasan, Manal; Hegyi, Peter; Helzlsouer, Kathy J; Herman, Joseph; Holcatova, Ivana; Holly, Elizabeth A; Hoover, Robert; Hung, Rayjean J; Jacobs, Eric J; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Janout, Vladimir; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Klein, Eric A; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kooperberg, Charles; Kulke, Matthew H; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Kurtz, Robert J; Laheru, Daniel; Landi, Stefano; Lawlor, Rita T; Lee, I-Min; LeMarchand, Loic; Lu, Lingeng; Malats, Núria; Mambrini, Andrea; Mannisto, Satu; Milne, Roger L; Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice; Neale, Rachel E; Neoptolemos, John P; Oberg, Ann L; Olson, Sara H; Orlow, Irene; Pasquali, Claudio; Patel, Alpa V; Peters, Ulrike; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Porta, Miquel; Real, Francisco X; Rothman, Nathaniel; Scelo, Ghislaine; Sesso, Howard D; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Silverman, Debra; Smith, Jill P; Soucek, Pavel

    2018-01-01

    In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic

  2. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Alison P.; Wolpin, Brian M.; Risch, Harvey A.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z.; Mocci, Evelina; Zhang, Mingfeng; Canzian, Federico; Childs, Erica J.; Hoskins, Jason W.; Jermusyk, Ashley; Zhong, Jun; Chen, Fei; Albanes, Demetrius; Andreotti, Gabriella; Arslan, Alan A.; Babic, Ana; Bamlet, William R.; Beane-Freeman, Laura; Berndt, Sonja I.; Blackford, Amanda; Borges, Michael; Borgida, Ayelet; Bracci, Paige M.; Brais, Lauren; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Buring, Julie; Campa, Daniele; Capurso, Gabriele; Cavestro, Giulia Martina; Chaffee, Kari G.; Chung, Charles C.; Cleary, Sean; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dijk, Frederike; Duell, Eric J.; Foretova, Lenka; Fuchs, Charles; Funel, Niccola; Gallinger, Steven; M Gaziano, J. Michael; Gazouli, Maria; Giles, Graham G.; Giovannucci, Edward; Goggins, Michael; Goodman, Gary E.; Goodman, Phyllis J.; Hackert, Thilo; Haiman, Christopher; Hartge, Patricia; Hasan, Manal; Hegyi, Peter; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.; Herman, Joseph; Holcatova, Ivana; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Hoover, Robert; Hung, Rayjean J.; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Janout, Vladimir; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Klein, Eric A.; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kooperberg, Charles; Kulke, Matthew H.; Kupcinskas, Juozas; Kurtz, Robert J.; Laheru, Daniel; Landi, Stefano; Lawlor, Rita T.; Lee, I.-Min; Lemarchand, Loic; Lu, Lingeng; Malats, Núria; Mambrini, Andrea; Mannisto, Satu; Milne, Roger L.; Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice; Neale, Rachel E.; Neoptolemos, John P.; Oberg, Ann L.; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Pasquali, Claudio; Patel, Alpa V.; Peters, Ulrike; Pezzilli, Raffaele; Porta, Miquel; Real, Francisco X.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Scelo, Ghislaine; Sesso, Howard D.; Severi, Gianluca; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Silverman, Debra; Smith, Jill P.; Soucek, Pavel; Sund, Malin; Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata; Tavano, Francesca; Thornquist, Mark D.; Tobias, Geoffrey S.; van den Eeden, Stephen K.; Vashist, Yogesh; Visvanathan, Kala; Vodicka, Pavel; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Wang, Zhaoming; Wentzensen, Nicolas; White, Emily; Yu, Herbert; Yu, Kai; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Zheng, Wei; Kraft, Peter; Li, Donghui; Chanock, Stephen; Obazee, Ofure; Petersen, Gloria M.; Amundadottir, Laufey T.

    2018-01-01

    In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study of Blood Pressure Extremes Identifies Variant near UMOD Associated with Hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Melander, Olle; Johnson, Toby; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Lee, Wai K.; Gentilini, Davide; Hastie, Claire E.; Menni, Cristina; Monti, Maria Cristina; Delles, Christian; Laing, Stewart; Corso, Barbara; Navis, Gerjan; Kwakernaak, Arjan J.; van der Harst, Pim; Bochud, Murielle; Maillard, Marc; Burnier, Michel; Hedner, Thomas; Kjeldsen, Sverre; Wahlstrand, Bjorn; Sjogren, Marketa; Fava, Cristiano; Montagnana, Martina; Danese, Elisa; Torffvit, Ole; Hedblad, Bo; Snieder, Harold; Connell, John M. C.; Brown, Morris; Samani, Nilesh J.; Farrall, Martin; Cesana, Giancarlo; Mancia, Giuseppe; Signorini, Stefano; Grassi, Guido; Eyheramendy, Susana; Wichmann, H. Erich; Laan, Maris; Strachan, David P.; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis Colm; Stanton, Alice; Vollenweider, Peter; Teumer, Alexander; Voelzke, Henry; Rettig, Rainer; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Arora, Pankaj; Zhang, Feng; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Lucas, Gavin; Kathiresan, Sekar; Siscovick, David S.; Luan, Jian'an; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Nolte, Ilja M.; McBride, Martin; Miller, William H.; Nicklin, Stuart A.; Baker, Andrew H.; Graham, Delyth; McDonald, Robert A.; Pell, Jill P.; Sattar, Naveed; Welsh, Paul; Munroe, Patricia; Caulfield, Mark J.; Zanchetti, Alberto; Dominiczak, Anna F.

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is a heritable and major contributor to the global burden of disease. The sum of rare and common genetic variants robustly identified so far explain only 1%-2% of the population variation in BP and hypertension. This suggests the existence of more undiscovered common variants. We

  4. Genome-wide scan for bats and dolphin to detect their genetic basis for new locomotive styles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Yi Shen

    Full Text Available For most mammals, running is their major locomotive style, however, cetaceans and bats are two mammalian groups that have independently developed new locomotive styles (swimming and flying from their terrestrial ancestors. In this study, we used a genome-wide comparative analysis in an attempt to identify the selective imprint of the development of new locomotive styles by cetaceans and bats to adapt to their new ecological niches. We found that an elevated proportion of mitochondrion-associated genes show evidence of adaptive evolution in cetaceans and on the common ancestral lineage leading to bats, compared to other terrestrial mammals. This result is consistent with the fact that during the independent developments of swimming and flying in these two groups, the changes of energy metabolism ratios would be among the most important factors to overcome elevated energy demands. Furthermore, genes that show evidence of sequence convergence or parallel evolution in these two lineages were overrepresented in the categories of energy metabolism, muscle contraction, heart, and glucose metabolism, genes that perform functions which are essential for locomotion. In conclusion, our analyses showed that on the dolphin and bat lineages, genes associated with locomotion not only both show a greater propensity to adaptively evolve, but also show evidence of sequence convergence, which likely reflects a response to a common requirement during their development of these two drastic locomotive styles.

  5. Visual genome-wide RNAi screening to identify human host factors required for Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genovesio, A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available and the parasite likely plays key roles in the outcome of the disease, suggesting genetic individuality of parasite clones [13,14]. At least 6 different subgroups of T. cruzi have recently been recognized based on genetic, molecular or immunological markers [12... using individual siRNAs in two different cell lines. Overall, our screening strategy allowed us to identify and validate 14 genes whose silencing impaired T. cruzi infection, providing clues about the molecular mechanisms that guide the infection...

  6. Genome-wide pathway analysis identifies VEGF pathway association with oral ulceration in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aterido, Adrià; Julià, Antonio; Carreira, Patricia; Blanco, Ricardo; López-Longo, José Javier; Venegas, José Javier Pérez; Olivé, Àlex; Andreu, José Luís; Aguirre-Zamorano, Maria Ángeles; Vela, Paloma; Nolla, Joan M; Marenco-de la Fuente, José Luís; Zea, Antonio; Pego, José María; Freire, Mercedes; Díez, Elvira; López-Lasanta, María; López-Corbeto, Mireia; Palau, Núria; Tortosa, Raül; Gelpí, Josep Lluís; Absher, Devin; Myers, Richard M; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Marsal, Sara

    2017-06-15

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a genetically complex rheumatic disease characterized by heterogeneous clinical manifestations of unknown etiology. Recent studies have suggested the existence of a genetic basis for SLE heterogeneity. The objective of the present study was to identify new genetic variation associated with the clinically relevant phenotypes in SLE. A two-stage pathway-based approach was used to identify the genetic variation associated with the main clinical phenotypes in SLE. In the discovery stage, 482 SLE patients were genotyped using Illumina Human Quad610 microarrays. Association between 798 reference genetic pathways from the Molecular Signatures Database and 11 SLE phenotypes was tested using the set-based method implemented in PLINK software. Pathways significantly associated after multiple test correction were subsequently tested for replication in an independent cohort of 425 SLE patients. Using an in silico approach, we analyzed the functional effects of common SLE therapies on the replicated genetic pathways. The association of known SLE risk variants with the development of the clinical phenotypes was also analyzed. In the discovery stage, we found a significant association between the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway and oral ulceration (P value for false discovery rate (P FDR ) oral ulceration. Therapies commonly used to treat mucocutaneous phenotypes in SLE were found to strongly influence VEGF pathway gene expression (P = 4.60e-4 to 5.38e-14). Analysis of known SLE risk loci identified a strong association between PTPN22 and the risk of hematologic disorder and with the development of antinuclear antibodies. The present study has identified VEGF genetic pathway association with the risk of oral ulceration in SLE. New therapies targeting the VEGF pathway could be more effective in reducing the severity of this phenotype. These findings represent a first step towards the understanding of the genetic basis

  7. Genetic networks inducing invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified through systematic genome-wide overexpression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shively, Christian A; Eckwahl, Matthew J; Dobry, Craig J; Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Nesvizhskii, Alexey; Kumar, Anuj

    2013-04-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can respond to nutritional and environmental stress by implementing a morphogenetic program wherein cells elongate and interconnect, forming pseudohyphal filaments. This growth transition has been studied extensively as a model signaling system with similarity to processes of hyphal development that are linked with virulence in related fungal pathogens. Classic studies have identified core pseudohyphal growth signaling modules in yeast; however, the scope of regulatory networks that control yeast filamentation is broad and incompletely defined. Here, we address the genetic basis of yeast pseudohyphal growth by implementing a systematic analysis of 4909 genes for overexpression phenotypes in a filamentous strain of S. cerevisiae. Our results identify 551 genes conferring exaggerated invasive growth upon overexpression under normal vegetative growth conditions. This cohort includes 79 genes lacking previous phenotypic characterization. Pathway enrichment analysis of the gene set identifies networks mediating mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and cell cycle progression. In particular, overexpression screening suggests that nuclear export of the osmoresponsive MAPK Hog1p may enhance pseudohyphal growth. The function of nuclear Hog1p is unclear from previous studies, but our analysis using a nuclear-depleted form of Hog1p is consistent with a role for nuclear Hog1p in repressing pseudohyphal growth. Through epistasis and deletion studies, we also identified genetic relationships with the G2 cyclin Clb2p and phenotypes in filamentation induced by S-phase arrest. In sum, this work presents a unique and informative resource toward understanding the breadth of genes and pathways that collectively constitute the molecular basis of filamentation.

  8. Genome-wide analysis identifies 12 loci influencing human reproductive behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barban, Nicola; Jansen, Rick; de Vlaming, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of human reproductive behavior-age at first birth (AFB) and number of children ever born (NEB)-has a strong relationship with fitness, human development, infertility and risk of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, very few genetic loci have been identified......-wide association study and 4 additional loci associated in a gene-based effort. These loci harbor genes that are likely to have a role, either directly or by affecting non-local gene expression, in human reproduction and infertility, thereby increasing understanding of these complex traits....

  9. Genome-wide association analysis identifies resistance loci for bacterial blight in a diverse collection of indica rice germplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Wu, Zhi-Chao; Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Dingkuhn, Michael; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhou, Yong-Li; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial blight, which is caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. The development and use of disease-resistant cultivars have been the most effective strategy to control bacterial blight. Identifying the genes mediating bacterial blight resistance is a prerequisite for breeding cultivars with broad-spectrum and durable resistance. We herein describe a genome-wide association study involving 172 diverse Oryza sativa ssp. indica accessions to identify loci influencing the resistance to representative strains of six Xoo races. Twelve resistance loci containing 121 significantly associated signals were identified using 317,894 single nucleotide polymorphisms, which explained 13.3-59.9% of the variability in lesion length caused by Xoo races P1, P6, and P9a. Two hotspot regions (L11 and L12) were located within or nearby two cloned R genes (xa25 and Xa26) and one fine-mapped R gene (Xa4). Our results confirmed the relatively high resolution of genome-wide association studies. Moreover, we detected novel significant associations on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6-10. Haplotype analyses of xa25, the Xa26 paralog (MRKc; LOC_Os11g47290), and a Xa4 candidate gene (LOC_11g46870) revealed differences in bacterial blight resistance among indica subgroups. These differences were responsible for the observed variations in lesion lengths resulting from infections by Xoo races P1 and P9a. Our findings may be relevant for future studies involving bacterial blight resistance gene cloning, and provide insights into the genetic basis for bacterial blight resistance in indica rice, which may be useful for knowledge-based crop improvement.

  10. Genome-wide association analysis identifies resistance loci for bacterial blight in a diverse collection of indica rice germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Fan; Dingkuhn, Michael; Xu, Jian-Long; Zhou, Yong-Li; Li, Zhi-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial blight, which is caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), is one of the most devastating rice diseases worldwide. The development and use of disease-resistant cultivars have been the most effective strategy to control bacterial blight. Identifying the genes mediating bacterial blight resistance is a prerequisite for breeding cultivars with broad-spectrum and durable resistance. We herein describe a genome-wide association study involving 172 diverse Oryza sativa ssp. indica accessions to identify loci influencing the resistance to representative strains of six Xoo races. Twelve resistance loci containing 121 significantly associated signals were identified using 317,894 single nucleotide polymorphisms, which explained 13.3–59.9% of the variability in lesion length caused by Xoo races P1, P6, and P9a. Two hotspot regions (L11 and L12) were located within or nearby two cloned R genes (xa25 and Xa26) and one fine-mapped R gene (Xa4). Our results confirmed the relatively high resolution of genome-wide association studies. Moreover, we detected novel significant associations on chromosomes 2, 3, and 6–10. Haplotype analyses of xa25, the Xa26 paralog (MRKc; LOC_Os11g47290), and a Xa4 candidate gene (LOC_11g46870) revealed differences in bacterial blight resistance among indica subgroups. These differences were responsible for the observed variations in lesion lengths resulting from infections by Xoo races P1 and P9a. Our findings may be relevant for future studies involving bacterial blight resistance gene cloning, and provide insights into the genetic basis for bacterial blight resistance in indica rice, which may be useful for knowledge-based crop improvement. PMID:28355306

  11. Genome-wide in vivo screen identifies novel host regulators of metastatic colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weyden, Louise; Arends, Mark J.; Campbell, Andrew D.; Bald, Tobias; Wardle-Jones, Hannah; Griggs, Nicola; Velasco-Herrera, Martin Del Castillo; Tüting, Thomas; Sansom, Owen J.; Karp, Natasha A.; Clare, Simon; Gleeson, Diane; Ryder, Edward; Galli, Antonella; Tuck, Elizabeth; Cambridge, Emma L.; Voet, Thierry; Macaulay, Iain C.; Wong, Kim; Spiegel, Sarah; Speak, Anneliese O.; Adams, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death for cancer patients. This multi-stage process requires tumour cells to survive in the circulation, extravasate at distant sites, then proliferate; it involves contributions from both the tumour cell and tumour microenvironment (‘host’, which includes stromal cells and the immune system1). Studies suggest the early steps of the metastatic process are relatively efficient, with the post-extravasation regulation of tumour growth (‘colonization’) being critical in determining metastatic outcome2. Here we show the results of screening 810 mutant mouse lines using an in vivo assay to identify microenvironmental regulators of metastatic colonization. We identify 23 genes that, when disrupted in mouse, modify the ability of tumour cells to establish metastatic foci, with 19 of these genes not previously demonstrated to play a role in host control of metastasis. The largest reduction in pulmonary metastasis was observed in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) transporter spinster homologue 2 (Spns2)-deficient mice. We demonstrate a novel outcome of S1P-mediated regulation of lymphocyte trafficking, whereby deletion of Spns2, either globally or in a lymphatic endothelial-specific manner, creates a circulating lymphopenia and a higher percentage of effector T cells and natural killer (NK) cells present in the lung. This allows for potent tumour cell killing, and an overall decreased metastatic burden. PMID:28052056

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel genetic markers associated with elite endurance performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmetov, Ii; Kulemin, Na; Popov, Dv

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the association between multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), aerobic performance and elite endurance athlete status in Russians. By using GWAS approach, we examined the association between 1,140,419 SNPs and relative maximal oxygen consumption rate ([Formula: see text]O2......max) in 80 international-level Russian endurance athletes (46 males and 34 females). To validate obtained results, we further performed case-control studies by comparing the frequencies of the most significant SNPs (with P endurance athletes and opposite cohorts (192...... Russian controls, 1367 European controls, and 230 Russian power athletes). Initially, six 'endurance alleles' were identified showing discrete associations with [Formula: see text]O2max both in males and females. Next, case-control studies resulted in remaining three SNPs (NFIA-AS2 rs1572312, TSHR rs...

  13. An Analysis of Two Genome-wide Association Meta-analyses Identifies a New Locus for Broad Depression Phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Direk, Nese; Williams, Stephanie; Smith, Jennifer A.; Ripke, Stephan; Air, Tracy; Amare, Azmeraw T.; Amin, Najaf; Baune, Bernhard T.; Bennett, David A.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Boomsma, Dorret; Breen, Gerome; Buttenschon, Henriette N.; Byrne, Enda M.; Borglum, Anders D.; Castelao, Enrique; Cichon, Sven; Clarke, Toni-Kim; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Dannlowski, Udo; De Jager, Philip L.; Demirkan, Ayse; Domenici, Enrico; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Dunn, Erin C.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Esko, Tonu; Faul, Jessica D.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; de Geus, Eco; Gill, Michael; Gordon, Scott D.; Grabe, Hans Joergen; van Grootheest, Gerard; Hamilton, Steven P.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hek, Karin; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Horn, Carsten; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Kloiber, Stefan; Koenen, Karestan; Kutalik, Zoltan; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Lahti, Jari; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Lewis, Glyn; Li, Qingqin S.; Llewellyn, David J.; Lucae, Susanne; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; MacIntyre, Donald J.; Madden, Pamela; Martin, Nicholas G.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Metspalu, Andres; Milaneschi, Yuri; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mors, Ole; Mosley, Thomas H.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nothen, Markus M.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Perlis, Roy; Potash, James B.; Preisig, Martin; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quiroz, Jorge A.; Raikkonen, Katri; Rice, John P.; Rietschel, Marcella; Rivera, Margarita; Schulze, Thomas G.; Shi, Jianxin; Shyn, Stanley; Sinnamon, Grant C.; Smit, Johannes H.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Snieder, Harold; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tansey, Katherine E.; Teumer, Alexander; Uher, Rudolf; Umbricht, Daniel; Van der Auwera, Sandra; Ware, Erin B.; Weir, David R.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Yang, Jingyun; Zhao, Wei; Tiemeier, Henning; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The genetics of depression has been explored in genome-wide association studies that focused on either major depressive disorder or depressive symptoms with mostly negative findings. A broad depression phenotype including both phenotypes has not been tested previously using a genome-wide

  14. Genome wide transcriptome analysis of dendritic cells identifies genes with altered expression in psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filkor, Kata; Hegedűs, Zoltán; Szász, András; Tubak, Vilmos; Kemény, Lajos; Kondorosi, Éva; Nagy, István

    2013-01-01

    Activation of dendritic cells by different pathogens induces the secretion of proinflammatory mediators resulting in local inflammation. Importantly, innate immunity must be properly controlled, as its continuous activation leads to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PGN) induced tolerance, a phenomenon of transient unresponsiveness of cells to repeated or prolonged stimulation, proved valuable model for the study of chronic inflammation. Thus, the aim of this study was the identification of the transcriptional diversity of primary human immature dendritic cells (iDCs) upon PGN induced tolerance. Using SAGE-Seq approach, a tag-based transcriptome sequencing method, we investigated gene expression changes of primary human iDCs upon stimulation or restimulation with Staphylococcus aureus derived PGN, a widely used TLR2 ligand. Based on the expression pattern of the altered genes, we identified non-tolerizeable and tolerizeable genes. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (Kegg) analysis showed marked enrichment of immune-, cell cycle- and apoptosis related genes. In parallel to the marked induction of proinflammatory mediators, negative feedback regulators of innate immunity, such as TNFAIP3, TNFAIP8, Tyro3 and Mer are markedly downregulated in tolerant cells. We also demonstrate, that the expression pattern of TNFAIP3 and TNFAIP8 is altered in both lesional, and non-lesional skin of psoriatic patients. Finally, we show that pretreatment of immature dendritic cells with anti-TNF-α inhibits the expression of IL-6 and CCL1 in tolerant iDCs and partially releases the suppression of TNFAIP8. Our findings suggest that after PGN stimulation/restimulation the host cell utilizes different mechanisms in order to maintain critical balance between inflammation and tolerance. Importantly, the transcriptome sequencing of stimulated/restimulated iDCs identified numerous genes with

  15. A genome-wide SNP scan reveals novel loci for egg production and quality traits in white leghorn and brown-egg dwarf layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenbo; Li, Dongfeng; Liu, Jianfeng; Chen, Sirui; Qu, Lujiang; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2011-01-01

    Availability of the complete genome sequence as well as high-density SNP genotyping platforms allows genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in chickens. A high-density SNP array containing 57,636 markers was employed herein to identify associated variants underlying egg production and quality traits within two lines of chickens, i.e., White Leghorn and brown-egg dwarf layers. For each individual, age at first egg (AFE), first egg weight (FEW), and number of eggs (EN) from 21 to 56 weeks of age were recorded, and egg quality traits including egg weight (EW), eggshell weight (ESW), yolk weight (YW), eggshell thickness (EST), eggshell strength (ESS), albumen height(AH) and Haugh unit(HU) were measured at 40 and 60 weeks of age. A total of 385 White Leghorn females and 361 brown-egg dwarf dams were selected to be genotyped. The genome-wide scan revealed 8 SNPs showing genome-wise significant (Pegg production and quality traits under the Fisher's combined probability method. Some significant SNPs are located in known genes including GRB14 and GALNT1 that can impact development and function of ovary, but more are located in genes with unclear functions in layers, and need to be studied further. Many chromosome-wise significant SNPs were also detected in this study and some of them are located in previously reported QTL regions. Most of loci detected in this study are novel and the follow-up replication studies may be needed to further confirm the functional significance for these newly identified SNPs.

  16. Genome-wide linkage scan for prostate cancer susceptibility genes in men with aggressive disease: significant evidence for linkage at chromosome 15q12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Ethan M; Ho, Lindsey A; Beebe-Dimmer, Jennifer L; Wang, Yunfei; Gillanders, Elizabeth M; Trent, Jeffrey M; Lange, Leslie A; Wood, David P; Cooney, Kathleen A

    2006-05-01

    Epidemiological and twin studies have consistently demonstrated a strong genetic component to prostate cancer (PCa) susceptibility. To date, numerous linkage studies have been performed to identify chromosomal regions containing PCa susceptibility genes. Unfortunately, results from these studies have failed to form any obvious consensus regarding which regions are most likely to contain genes that may contribute to PCa predisposition. One plausible explanation for the difficulty in mapping susceptibility loci is the existence of considerable heterogeneity in the phenotype of PCa, with significant variation in clinical stage and grade of disease even among family members. To address this issue, we performed a genome-wide linkage scan on 71 informative families with two or more men with aggressive PCa. When only men with aggressive PCa were coded as affected, statistically significant evidence for linkage at chromosome 15q12 was detected (LOD=3.49; genome-wide p=0.005). Furthermore, the evidence for linkage increased when analyses were restricted to Caucasian-American pedigrees (n=65; LOD=4.05) and pedigrees with two confirmed aggressive cases (n=42, LOD=4.76). Interestingly, a 1-LOD support interval about our peak at 15q12 overlaps a region of suggestive linkage, 15q11, identified by a recent linkage study on 1,233 PCa families by the International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics. Using a more rigid definition of PCa in linkage studies will result in a severe reduction in sample sizes available for study, but may ultimately prove to increase statistical power to detect susceptibility genes for this multigenic trait.

  17. Genome-wide association and large scale follow-up identifies 16 new loci influencing lung function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artigas, María Soler; Loth, Daan W; Wain, Louise V; Gharib, Sina A; Obeidat, Ma’en; Tang, Wenbo; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing Hua; Smith, Albert Vernon; Huffman, Jennifer E; Albrecht, Eva; Jackson, Catherine M; Evans, David M; Cadby, Gemma; Fornage, Myriam; Manichaikul, Ani; Lopez, Lorna M; Johnson, Toby; Aldrich, Melinda C; Aspelund, Thor; Barroso, Inês; Campbell, Harry; Cassano, Patricia A; Couper, David J; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Franceschini, Nora; Garcia, Melissa; Gieger, Christian; Gislason, Gauti Kjartan; Grkovic, Ivica; Hammond, Christopher J; Hancock, Dana B; Harris, Tamara B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Heckbert, Susan R; Heliövaara, Markku; Homuth, Georg; Hysi, Pirro G; James, Alan L; Jankovic, Stipan; Joubert, Bonnie R; Karrasch, Stefan; Klopp, Norman; Koch, Beate; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Launer, Lenore J; Liu, Yongmei; Loehr, Laura R; Lohman, Kurt; Loos, Ruth JF; Lumley, Thomas; Al Balushi, Khalid A; Ang, Wei Q; Barr, R Graham; Beilby, John; Blakey, John D; Boban, Mladen; Boraska, Vesna; Brisman, Jonas; Britton, John R; Brusselle, Guy G; Cooper, Cyrus; Curjuric, Ivan; Dahgam, Santosh; Deary, Ian J; Ebrahim, Shah; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Francks, Clyde; Gaysina, Darya; Granell, Raquel; Gu, Xiangjun; Hankinson, John L; Hardy, Rebecca; Harris, Sarah E; Henderson, John; Henry, Amanda; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Holt, Patrick G; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, Michael L; Imboden, Medea; Jameson, Karen A; Kerr, Shona M; Kolcic, Ivana; Kronenberg, Florian; Liu, Jason Z; Marchini, Jonathan; McKeever, Tricia; Morris, Andrew D; Olin, Anna-Carin; Porteous, David J; Postma, Dirkje S; Rich, Stephen S; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rochat, Thierry; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Sayers, Ian; Sly, Peter D; Smith, George Davey; Sood, Akshay; Starr, John M; Uitterlinden, André G; Vonk, Judith M; Wannamethee, S Goya; Whincup, Peter H; Wijmenga, Cisca; Williams, O Dale; Wong, Andrew; Mangino, Massimo; Marciante, Kristin D; McArdle, Wendy L; Meibohm, Bernd; Morrison, Alanna C; North, Kari E; Omenaas, Ernst; Palmer, Lyle J; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Pin, Isabelle; Polašek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Psaty, Bruce M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Rantanen, Taina; Ripatti, Samuli; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Schulz, Holger; Shin, So-Youn; Spector, Tim D; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J; Warrington, Nicole M; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wild, Sarah H; Wilk, Jemma B; Wjst, Matthias; Wright, Alan F; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Pennell, Craig E; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Holloway, John W; Boezen, H Marike; Lawlor, Debbie A; Morris, Richard W; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wilson, James F; Hayward, Caroline; Kähönen, Mika; Heinrich, Joachim; Musk, Arthur W; Jarvis, Deborah L; Gläser, Sven; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Stricker, Bruno H Ch; Elliott, Paul; O’Connor, George T; Strachan, David P; London, Stephanie J; Hall, Ian P; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tobin, Martin D

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function measures reflect respiratory health and predict mortality, and are used in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We tested genome-wide association with the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and the ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC) in 48,201 individuals of European ancestry, with follow-up of top associations in up to an additional 46,411 individuals. We identified new regions showing association (combined P<5×10−8) with pulmonary function, in or near MFAP2, TGFB2, HDAC4, RARB, MECOM (EVI1), SPATA9, ARMC2, NCR3, ZKSCAN3, CDC123, C10orf11, LRP1, CCDC38, MMP15, CFDP1, and KCNE2. Identification of these 16 new loci may provide insight into the molecular mechanisms regulating pulmonary function and into molecular targets for future therapy to alleviate reduced lung function. PMID:21946350

  18. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F.; Justice, Anne E.; Monda, Keri L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U.; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Wood, Andrew R.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; König, Inke R.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M.; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Cookson, William; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V.; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S.; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimaki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Mateo Leach, Irene; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J.; Theodoraki, Eirini V.; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Amouyel, Philippe; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George V.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gieger, Christian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levinson, Douglas F.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew D.; Nieminen, Markku S.; Njølstad, Inger; Ohlsson, Claes; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Penninx, Brenda; Power, Chris; Province, Michael A.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Qi, Lu; Rauramaa, Rainer; Ridker, Paul M.; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J.; Snieder, Harold; Sørensen, Thorkild I.A.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stefansson, Kari; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Uitterlinden, André G.; Uusitupa, Matti; van der Harst, Pim; Vollenweider, Peter; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Watkins, Hugh; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wilson, James F.; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Deloukas, Panos; Fox, Caroline S.; Frayling, Timothy; Groop, Leif C.; Haritunian, Talin; Heid, Iris M.; Hunter, David; Kaplan, Robert C.; Karpe, Fredrik; Moffatt, Miriam; Mohlke, Karen L.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Pawitan, Yudi; Schadt, Eric E.; Schlessinger, David; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Strachan, David P.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Visscher, Peter M.; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Morris, Andrew P.; Meyre, David; Scherag, André; McCarthy, Mark I.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; North, Kari E.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Ingelsson, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Approaches exploiting extremes of the trait distribution may reveal novel loci for common traits, but it is unknown whether such loci are generalizable to the general population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with upper vs. lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity including up to 263,407 European individuals, we identified four new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1, PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the tails and seven new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3, ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we show that there is large overlap in terms of genetic structure and distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiologic heterogeneity between obesity subgroups. PMID:23563607

  19. Genome wide transcriptome analysis of dendritic cells identifies genes with altered expression in psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kata Filkor

    Full Text Available Activation of dendritic cells by different pathogens induces the secretion of proinflammatory mediators resulting in local inflammation. Importantly, innate immunity must be properly controlled, as its continuous activation leads to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS or peptidoglycan (PGN induced tolerance, a phenomenon of transient unresponsiveness of cells to repeated or prolonged stimulation, proved valuable model for the study of chronic inflammation. Thus, the aim of this study was the identification of the transcriptional diversity of primary human immature dendritic cells (iDCs upon PGN induced tolerance. Using SAGE-Seq approach, a tag-based transcriptome sequencing method, we investigated gene expression changes of primary human iDCs upon stimulation or restimulation with Staphylococcus aureus derived PGN, a widely used TLR2 ligand. Based on the expression pattern of the altered genes, we identified non-tolerizeable and tolerizeable genes. Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (Kegg analysis showed marked enrichment of immune-, cell cycle- and apoptosis related genes. In parallel to the marked induction of proinflammatory mediators, negative feedback regulators of innate immunity, such as TNFAIP3, TNFAIP8, Tyro3 and Mer are markedly downregulated in tolerant cells. We also demonstrate, that the expression pattern of TNFAIP3 and TNFAIP8 is altered in both lesional, and non-lesional skin of psoriatic patients. Finally, we show that pretreatment of immature dendritic cells with anti-TNF-α inhibits the expression of IL-6 and CCL1 in tolerant iDCs and partially releases the suppression of TNFAIP8. Our findings suggest that after PGN stimulation/restimulation the host cell utilizes different mechanisms in order to maintain critical balance between inflammation and tolerance. Importantly, the transcriptome sequencing of stimulated/restimulated iDCs identified

  20. Nickel-resistance determinants in Acidiphilium sp. PM identified by genome-wide functional screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patxi San Martin-Uriz

    Full Text Available Acidiphilium spp. are conspicuous dwellers of acidic, metal-rich environments. Indeed, they are among the most metal-resistant organisms; yet little is known about the mechanisms behind the metal tolerance in this genus. Acidiphilium sp. PM is an environmental isolate from Rio Tinto, an acidic, metal-laden river located in southwestern Spain. The characterization of its metal resistance revealed a remarkable ability to tolerate high Ni concentrations. Here we report the screening of a genomic library of Acidiphilium sp. PM to identify genes involved in Ni resistance. This approach revealed seven different genes conferring Ni resistance to E. coli, two of which form an operon encoding the ATP-dependent protease HslVU (ClpQY. This protease was found to enhance resistance to both Ni and Co in E. coli, a function not previously reported. Other Ni-resistance determinants include genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the synthesis of branched amino acids. The diversity of molecular functions of the genes recovered in the screening suggests that Ni resistance in Acidiphilium sp. PM probably relies on different molecular mechanisms.

  1. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Five Mouse Models Identifies Similarities and Differences with Human Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindell, William R.; Johnston, Andrew; Carbajal, Steve; Han, Gangwen; Wohn, Christian; Lu, Jun; Xing, Xianying; Nair, Rajan P.; Voorhees, John J.; Elder, James T.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Sano, Shigetoshi; Prens, Errol P.; DiGiovanni, John; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Ward, Nicole L.; Gudjonsson, Johann E.

    2011-01-01

    Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the human disease, and standardized validation criteria for psoriasis mouse models have not been widely applied. In this study, whole-genome transcriptional profiling is used to compare gene expression patterns manifested by human psoriatic skin lesions with those that occur in five psoriasis mouse models (K5-Tie2, imiquimod, K14-AREG, K5-Stat3C and K5-TGFbeta1). While the cutaneous gene expression profiles associated with each mouse phenotype exhibited statistically significant similarity to the expression profile of psoriasis in humans, each model displayed distinctive sets of similarities and differences in comparison to human psoriasis. For all five models, correspondence to the human disease was strong with respect to genes involved in epidermal development and keratinization. Immune and inflammation-associated gene expression, in contrast, was more variable between models as compared to the human disease. These findings support the value of all five models as research tools, each with identifiable areas of convergence to and divergence from the human disease. Additionally, the approach used in this paper provides an objective and quantitative method for evaluation of proposed mouse models of psoriasis, which can be strategically applied in future studies to score strengths of mouse phenotypes relative to specific aspects of human psoriasis. PMID:21483750

  2. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in > 80 000 Subjects Identifies Multiple Loci for C-Reactive Protein Levels

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josee; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F.

    2011-01-01

    Background-C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels.Methods and Results-We performed a genome-wide association analysis of CRP in 66 185 participants from 15 population-based studies. We sought replication for the genome-wide significant and suggestive loci in a replication panel comprising 16 540 individuals from 10 independent stud...

  3. Genome-wide scan for signatures of human population differentiation and their relationship with natural selection, functional pathways and diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Amato

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Genetic differences both between individuals and populations are studied for their evolutionary relevance and for their potential medical applications. Most of the genetic differentiation among populations are caused by random drift that should affect all loci across the genome in a similar manner. When a locus shows extraordinary high or low levels of population differentiation, this may be interpreted as evidence for natural selection. The most used measure of population differentiation was devised by Wright and is known as fixation index, or F(ST. We performed a genome-wide estimation of F(ST on about 4 millions of SNPs from HapMap project data. We demonstrated a heterogeneous distribution of F(ST values between autosomes and heterochromosomes. When we compared the F(ST values obtained in this study with another evolutionary measure obtained by comparative interspecific approach, we found that genes under positive selection appeared to show low levels of population differentiation. We applied a gene set approach, widely used for microarray data analysis, to detect functional pathways under selection. We found that one pathway related to antigen processing and presentation showed low levels of F(ST, while several pathways related to cell signalling, growth and morphogenesis showed high F(ST values. Finally, we detected a signature of selection within genes associated with human complex diseases. These results can help to identify which process occurred during human evolution and adaptation to different environments. They also support the hypothesis that common diseases could have a genetic background shaped by human evolution.

  4. Genome-wide association analysis of more than 120,000 individuals identifies 15 new susceptibility loci for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michailidou, Kyriaki; Beesley, Jonathan; Lindstrom, Sara; Canisius, Sander; Dennis, Joe; Lush, Michael J; Maranian, Mel J; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Shah, Mitul; Perkins, Barbara J; Czene, Kamila; Eriksson, Mikael; Darabi, Hatef; Brand, Judith S; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Flyger, Henrik; Nielsen, Sune F; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Fletcher, Olivia; Peto, Julian; Gibson, Lorna; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Rudolph, Anja; Eilber, Ursula; Behrens, Sabine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Khan, Sofia; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Ahsan, Habibul; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Whittemore, Alice S; John, Esther M; Malone, Kathleen E; Gammon, Marilie D; Santella, Regina M; Ursin, Giske; Makalic, Enes; Schmidt, Daniel F; Casey, Graham; Hunter, David J; Gapstur, Susan M; Gaudet, Mia M; Diver, W Ryan; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Henderson, Brian E; Le Marchand, Loic; Berg, Christine D; Chanock, Stephen J; Figueroa, Jonine; Hoover, Robert N; Lambrechts, Diether; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; van Limbergen, Erik; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Broeks, Annegien; Verhoef, Senno; Cornelissen, Sten; Couch, Fergus J; Olson, Janet E; Hallberg, Emily; Vachon, Celine; Waisfisz, Quinten; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Adank, Muriel A; van der Luijt, Rob B; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K; Yoo, Keun-Young; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Tajima, Kazuo; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Mulot, Claire; Sanchez, Marie; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Surowy, Harald; Sohn, Christof; Wu, Anna H; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O; González-Neira, Anna; Benitez, Javier; Zamora, M Pilar; Perez, Jose Ignacio Arias; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Reed, Malcolm W R; Andrulis, Irene L; Knight, Julia A; Glendon, Gord; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J; Miller, Nicola; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Teo, Soo Hwang; Yip, Cheng Har; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Tan, Gie-Hooi; Hooning, Maartje J; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Martens, John W M; Collée, J Margriet; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B; Cai, Qiuyin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Kristensen, Vessela N; Nord, Silje; Alnaes, Grethe I Grenaker; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; McLean, Catriona; Canzian, Federico; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Peeters, Petra; Lund, Eiliv; Sund, Malin; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Gunter, Marc J; Palli, Domenico; Mortensen, Lotte Maxild; Dossus, Laure; Huerta, Jose-Maria; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Sutter, Christian; Yang, Rongxi; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Hartman, Mikael; Miao, Hui; Chia, Kee Seng; Chan, Ching Wan; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Haeberle, Lothar; Brenner, Hermann; Dieffenbach, Aida Karina; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Brinton, Louise; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Zheng, Wei; Halverson, Sandra L; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Goldberg, Mark S; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Brauch, Hiltrud; Hamann, Ute; Brüning, Thomas; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Bernard, Loris; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Dörk, Thilo; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A E M; Seynaeve, Caroline; Van Asperen, Christi J; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Slager, Susan; Toland, Amanda E; Ambrosone, Christine B; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Kabisch, Maria; Torres, Diana; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Luccarini, Craig; Baynes, Caroline; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Tessier, Daniel C; Vincent, Daniel; Bacot, Francois; Pita, Guillermo; Alonso, M Rosario; Álvarez, Nuria; Herrero, Daniel; Simard, Jacques; Pharoah, Paul P D P; Kraft, Peter; Dunning, Alison M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F

    2015-04-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and large-scale replication studies have identified common variants in 79 loci associated with breast cancer, explaining ∼14% of the familial risk of the disease. To identify new susceptibility loci, we performed a meta-analysis of 11 GWAS, comprising 15,748 breast cancer cases and 18,084 controls together with 46,785 cases and 42,892 controls from 41 studies genotyped on a 211,155-marker custom array (iCOGS). Analyses were restricted to women of European ancestry. We generated genotypes for more than 11 million SNPs by imputation using the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel, and we identified 15 new loci associated with breast cancer at P < 5 × 10(-8). Combining association analysis with ChIP-seq chromatin binding data in mammary cell lines and ChIA-PET chromatin interaction data from ENCODE, we identified likely target genes in two regions: SETBP1 at 18q12.3 and RNF115 and PDZK1 at 1q21.1. One association appears to be driven by an amino acid substitution encoded in EXO1.

  5. Haplotype-based genome-wide association study identifies loci and candidate genes for milk yield in Holsteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenliang Chen

    Full Text Available Since milk yield is a highly important economic trait in dairy cattle, the genome-wide association study (GWAS is vital to explain the genetic architecture underlying milk yield and to perform marker-assisted selection (MAS. In this study, we adopted a haplotype-based empirical Bayesian GWAS to identify the loci and candidate genes for milk yield. A total of 1 092 Holstein cows were sequenced by using the genotyping by genome reducing and sequencing (GGRS method. After filtering, 164 312 high-confidence SNPs and 13 476 haplotype blocks were identified to use for GWAS. The results indicated that 17 blocks were significantly associated with milk yield. We further identified the nearest gene of each haplotype block and annotated the genes with milk-associated quantitative trait locus (QTL intervals and ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA networks. Our analysis showed that four genes, DLGAP1, AP2B1, ITPR2 and THBS4, have relationships with milk yield, while another three, ARHGEF4, TDRD1 and KIF19, were inferred to have potential relationships. Additionally, a network derived from the IPA containing one inferred (ARHGEF4 and all four confirmed genes likely regulates milk yield. Our findings add to the understanding of identifying the causal genes underlying milk production traits and could guide follow up studies for further confirmation of the associated genes, pathways and biological networks.

  6. Pathway analysis of bladder cancer genome-wide association study identifies novel pathways involved in bladder cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng; Rothman, Nathaniel; Ye, Yuanqing; Gu, Jian; Scheet, Paul A; Huang, Maosheng; Chang, David W; Dinney, Colin P; Silverman, Debra T; Figueroa, Jonine D; Chanock, Stephen J; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are designed to identify individual regions associated with cancer risk, but only explain a small fraction of the inherited variability. Alternative approach analyzing genetic variants within biological pathways has been proposed to discover networks of susceptibility genes with additional effects. The gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) may complement and expand traditional GWAS analysis to identify novel genes and pathways associated with bladder cancer risk. We selected three GSEA methods: Gen-Gen, Aligator, and the SNP Ratio Test to evaluate cellular signaling pathways involved in bladder cancer susceptibility in a Texas GWAS population. The candidate genetic polymorphisms from the significant pathway selected by GSEA were validated in an independent NCI GWAS. We identified 18 novel pathways ( P CACNA1S, COL4A2, SRC , and CACNA1C were associated with bladder cancer risk. Two CCNE1 variants, rs8102137 and rs997669, from cell cycle pathways showed the strongest associations; the CCNE1 signal at 19q12 has already been reported in previous GWAS. These findings offer additional etiologic insights highlighting the specific genes and pathways associated with bladder cancer development. GSEA may be a complementary tool to GWAS to identify additional loci of cancer susceptibility.

  7. Genome-wide association analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia, Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma identifies pleiotropic risk loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Philip J.; Sud, Amit; Mitchell, Jonathan S.; Henrion, Marc; Orlando, Giulia; Lenive, Oleg; Broderick, Peter; Speedy, Helen E.; Johnson, David C.; Kaiser, Martin; Weinhold, Niels; Cooke, Rosie; Sunter, Nicola J.; Jackson, Graham H.; Summerfield, Geoffrey; Harris, Robert J.; Pettitt, Andrew R.; Allsup, David J.; Carmichael, Jonathan; Bailey, James R.; Pratt, Guy; Rahman, Thahira; Pepper, Chris; Fegan, Chris; von Strandmann, Elke Pogge; Engert, Andreas; Försti, Asta; Chen, Bowang; Filho, Miguel Inacio Da Silva; Thomsen, Hauke; Hoffmann, Per; Noethen, Markus M.; Eisele, Lewin; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Allan, James M.; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Catovsky, Daniel; Morgan, Gareth J.; Hemminki, Kari; Houlston, Richard S.

    2017-01-01

    B-cell malignancies (BCM) originate from the same cell of origin, but at different maturation stages and have distinct clinical phenotypes. Although genetic risk variants for individual BCMs have been identified, an agnostic, genome-wide search for shared genetic susceptibility has not been performed. We explored genome-wide association studies of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL, N = 1,842), Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, N = 1,465) and multiple myeloma (MM, N = 3,790). We identified a novel pleiotropic risk locus at 3q22.2 (NCK1, rs11715604, P = 1.60 × 10-9) with opposing effects between CLL (P = 1.97 × 10-8) and HL (P = 3.31 × 10-3). Eight established non-HLA risk loci showed pleiotropic associations. Within the HLA region, Ser37 + Phe37 in HLA-DRB1 (P = 1.84 × 10-12) was associated with increased CLL and HL risk (P = 4.68 × 10-12), and reduced MM risk (P = 1.12 × 10-2), and Gly70 in HLA-DQB1 (P = 3.15 × 10-10) showed opposing effects between CLL (P = 3.52 × 10-3) and HL (P = 3.41 × 10-9). By integrating eQTL, Hi-C and ChIP-seq data, we show that the pleiotropic risk loci are enriched for B-cell regulatory elements, as well as an over-representation of binding of key B-cell transcription factors. These data identify shared biological pathways influencing the development of CLL, HL and MM. The identification of these risk loci furthers our understanding of the aetiological basis of BCMs.

  8. Genome-Wide Association Study of Golden Retrievers Identifies Germ-Line Risk Factors Predisposing to Mast Cell Tumours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja L Arendt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Canine mast cell tumours (CMCT are one of the most common skin tumours in dogs with a major impact on canine health. Certain breeds have a higher risk of developing mast cell tumours, suggesting that underlying predisposing germ-line genetic factors play a role in the development of this disease. The genetic risk factors are largely unknown, although somatic mutations in the oncogene C-KIT have been detected in a proportion of CMCT, making CMCT a comparative model for mastocytosis in humans where C-KIT mutations are frequent. We have performed a genome wide association study in golden retrievers from two continents and identified separate regions in the genome associated with risk of CMCT in the two populations. Sequence capture of associated regions and subsequent fine mapping in a larger cohort of dogs identified a SNP associated with development of CMCT in the GNAI2 gene (p = 2.2x10-16, introducing an alternative splice form of this gene resulting in a truncated protein. In addition, disease associated haplotypes harbouring the hyaluronidase genes HYAL1, HYAL2 and HYAL3 on cfa20 and HYAL4, SPAM1 and HYALP1 on cfa14 were identified as separate risk factors in European and US golden retrievers, respectively, suggesting that turnover of hyaluronan plays an important role in the development of CMCT.

  9. Genome-wide significant localization for working and spatial memory: Identifying genes for psychosis using models of cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Emma E M; Carless, Melanie A; de Almeida, Marcio A A; Curran, Joanne E; McKay, D Reese; Sprooten, Emma; Dyer, Thomas D; Göring, Harald H; Olvera, Rene; Fox, Peter; Almasy, Laura; Duggirala, Ravi; Kent, Jack W; Blangero, John; Glahn, David C

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that risk for developing psychosis is largely mediated by the influence of genes, but identifying precisely which genes underlie that risk has been problematic. Focusing on endophenotypes, rather than illness risk, is one solution to this problem. Impaired cognition is a well-established endophenotype of psychosis. Here we aimed to characterize the genetic architecture of cognition using phenotypically detailed models as opposed to relying on general IQ or individual neuropsychological measures. In so doing we hoped to identify genes that mediate cognitive ability, which might also contribute to psychosis risk. Hierarchical factor models of genetically clustered cognitive traits were subjected to linkage analysis followed by QTL region-specific association analyses in a sample of 1,269 Mexican American individuals from extended pedigrees. We identified four genome wide significant QTLs, two for working and two for spatial memory, and a number of plausible and interesting candidate genes. The creation of detailed models of cognition seemingly enhanced the power to detect genetic effects on cognition and provided a number of possible candidate genes for psychosis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A genome-wide association study identifies novel single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with dermal shank pigmentation in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqi; Li, Dongfeng; Yang, Ning; Qu, Lujiang; Hou, Zhuocheng; Zheng, Jiangxia; Xu, Guiyun; Chen, Sirui

    2014-12-01

    Shank color of domestic chickens varies from black to blue, green, yellow, or white, which is controlled by the combination of melanin and xanthophylls in dermis and epidermis. Dermal shank pigmentation of chickens is determined by sex-linked inhibitor of dermal melanin (Id), which is located on the distal end of the long arm of Z chromosome, through controlling dermal melanin pigmentation. Although previous studies have focused on the identification of Id and the linear relationship with barring and recessive white skin, no causal mutations have yet been identified in relation to the mutant dermal pigment inhibiting allele at the Id locus. In this study, we first used the 600K Affymetrix Axiom HD genotyping array, which includes ~580,961 SNP of which 26,642 SNP were on the Z chromosome to perform a genome-wide association study on pure lines of 19 Tibetan hens with dermal pigmentation shank and 21 Tibetan hens with yellow shank to refine the Id location. Association analysis was conducted by the PLINK software using the standard chi-squared test, and then Bonferroni correction was used to adjust multiple testing. The genome-wide study revealed that 3 SNP located at 78.5 to 79.2 Mb on the Z chromosome in the current assembly of chicken genome (galGal4) were significantly associated with dermal shank pigmentation of chickens, but none of them were located in known genes. The interval we refined was partly converged with previous results, suggesting that the Id gene is in or near our refined genome region. However, the genomic context of this region was complex. There were only 15 SNP markers developed by the genotyping array within the interval region, in which only 1 SNP marker passed quality control. Additionally, there were about 5.8-Mb gaps on both sides of the refined interval. The follow-up replication studies may be needed to further confirm the functional significance for these newly identified SNP. ©2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Genome-wide association study identifies vitamin B5 biosynthesis as a host specificity factor in Campylobacter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Samuel K; Didelot, Xavier; Meric, Guillaume; Torralbo, Alicia; Jolley, Keith A; Kelly, David J; Bentley, Stephen D; Maiden, Martin C J; Parkhill, Julian; Falush, Daniel

    2013-07-16

    Genome-wide association studies have the potential to identify causal genetic factors underlying important phenotypes but have rarely been performed in bacteria. We present an association mapping method that takes into account the clonal population structure of bacteria and is applicable to both core and accessory genome variation. Campylobacter is a common cause of human gastroenteritis as a consequence of its proliferation in multiple farm animal species and its transmission via contaminated meat and poultry. We applied our association mapping method to identify the factors responsible for adaptation to cattle and chickens among 192 Campylobacter isolates from these and other host sources. Phylogenetic analysis implied frequent host switching but also showed that some lineages were strongly associated with particular hosts. A seven-gene region with a host association signal was found. Genes in this region were almost universally present in cattle but were frequently absent in isolates from chickens and wild birds. Three of the seven genes encoded vitamin B5 biosynthesis. We found that isolates from cattle were better able to grow in vitamin B5-depleted media and propose that this difference may be an adaptation to host diet.

  12. Genome-wide functional profiling identifies genes and processes important for zinc-limited growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Matthew; Steffen, Janet; Loguinov, Alex V; Zimmerman, Ginelle R; Vulpe, Chris D; Eide, David J

    2012-01-01

    Zinc is an essential nutrient because it is a required cofactor for many enzymes and transcription factors. To discover genes and processes in yeast that are required for growth when zinc is limiting, we used genome-wide functional profiling. Mixed pools of ∼4,600 deletion mutants were inoculated into zinc-replete and zinc-limiting media. These cells were grown for several generations, and the prevalence of each mutant in the pool was then determined by microarray analysis. As a result, we identified more than 400 different genes required for optimal growth under zinc-limiting conditions. Among these were several targets of the Zap1 zinc-responsive transcription factor. Their importance is consistent with their up-regulation by Zap1 in low zinc. We also identified genes that implicate Zap1-independent processes as important. These include endoplasmic reticulum function, oxidative stress resistance, vesicular trafficking, peroxisome biogenesis, and chromatin modification. Our studies also indicated the critical role of macroautophagy in low zinc growth. Finally, as a result of our analysis, we discovered a previously unknown role for the ICE2 gene in maintaining ER zinc homeostasis. Thus, functional profiling has provided many new insights into genes and processes that are needed for cells to thrive under the stress of zinc deficiency.

  13. A genome-wide association study identifies susceptibility loci for ovarian cancer at 2q31 and 8q24

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goode, Ellen L; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Song, Honglin

    2010-01-01

    up of 21,955 SNPs in 4,162 cases and 4,810 controls, leading to the identification of a confirmed susceptibility locus at 9p22 (in BNC2). Here, we report on nine additional candidate loci (defined as having P ≤ 10⁻⁴) identified after stratifying cases by histology, which we genotyped in an additional...... 4,353 cases and 6,021 controls. We confirmed two new susceptibility loci with P ≤ 5 × 10⁻⁸ (8q24, P = 8.0 × 10⁻¹⁵ and 2q31, P = 3.8 × 10⁻¹⁴) and identified two additional loci that approached genome-wide significance (3q25, P = 7.1 × 10⁻⁸ and 17q21, P = 1.4 × 10⁻⁷). The associations of these loci...... with serous ovarian cancer were generally stronger than with other cancer subtypes. Analysis of HOXD1, MYC, TIPARP and SKAP1 at these loci and of BNC2 at 9p22 supports a functional role for these genes in ovarian cancer development....

  14. A genome-wide screen identifies conserved protein hubs required for cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toret, Christopher P.; D’Ambrosio, Michael V.; Vale, Ronald D.; Simon, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Cadherins and associated catenins provide an important structural interface between neighboring cells, the actin cytoskeleton, and intracellular signaling pathways in a variety of cell types throughout the Metazoa. However, the full inventory of the proteins and pathways required for cadherin-mediated adhesion has not been established. To this end, we completed a genome-wide (∼14,000 genes) ribonucleic acid interference (RNAi) screen that targeted Ca2+-dependent adhesion in DE-cadherin–expressing Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells in suspension culture. This novel screen eliminated Ca2+-independent cell–cell adhesion, integrin-based adhesion, cell spreading, and cell migration. We identified 17 interconnected regulatory hubs, based on protein functions and protein–protein interactions that regulate the levels of the core cadherin–catenin complex and coordinate cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion. Representative proteins from these hubs were analyzed further in Drosophila oogenesis, using targeted germline RNAi, and adhesion was analyzed in Madin–Darby canine kidney mammalian epithelial cell–cell adhesion. These experiments reveal roles for a diversity of cellular pathways that are required for cadherin function in Metazoa, including cytoskeleton organization, cell–substrate interactions, and nuclear and cytoplasmic signaling. PMID:24446484

  15. Heritability and Genome-Wide Linkage in US and Australian Twins Identify Novel Genomic Regions Controlling Chromogranin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Connor, Daniel T.; Zhu, Gu; Rao, Fangwen; Taupenot, Laurent; Fung, Maple M.; Das, Madhusudan; Mahata, Sushil K.; Mahata, Manjula; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Kuixing; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Shih, Pei-an Betty; Cockburn, Myles G.; Ziegler, Michael G.; Stridsberg, Mats; Martin, Nicholas G.; Whitfield, John B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chromogranin A (CHGA) triggers catecholamine secretory granule biogenesis, and its catestatin fragment inhibits catecholamine release. We approached catestatin heritability using twin pairs, coupled with genome-wide linkage, in a series of twin and sibling pairs from 2 continents. Methods and Results Hypertensive patients had elevated CHGA coupled with reduction in catestatin, suggesting diminished conversion of precursor to catestatin. Heritability for catestatin in twins was 44% to 60%. Six hundred fifteen nuclear families yielded 870 sib pairs for linkage, with significant logarithm of odds peaks on chromosomes 4p, 4q, and 17q. Because acidification of catecholamine secretory vesicles determines CHGA trafficking and processing to catestatin, we genotyped at positional candidate ATP6N1, bracketed by peak linkage markers on chromosome 17q, encoding a subunit of vesicular H+-translocating ATPase. The minor allele diminished CHGA secretion and processing to catestatin. The ATP6N1 variant also influenced blood pressure in 1178 individuals with the most extreme blood pressure values in the population. In chromaffin cells, inhibition of H+-ATPase diverted CHGA from regulated to constitutive secretory pathways. Conclusions We established heritability of catestatin in twins from 2 continents. Linkage identified 3 regions contributing to catestatin, likely novel determinants of sympathochromaffin exocytosis. At 1 such positional candidate (ATP6N1), variation influenced CHGA secretion and processing to catestatin, confirming the mechanism of a novel trans-QTL for sympathochromaffin activity and blood pressure. PMID:18591442

  16. Genome-wide analysis of Epstein-Barr virus identifies variants and genes associated with gastric carcinoma and population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youyuan; Xu, Miao; Liang, Liming; Zhang, Haojiong; Xu, Ruihua; Feng, Qisheng; Feng, Lin; Luo, Bing; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2017-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is a ubiquitous virus and is associated with several human malignances, including the significant subset of gastric carcinoma, Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma. Some Epstein-Barr virus-associated diseases are uniquely prevalent in populations with different geographic origins. However, the features of the disease and geographically associated Epstein-Barr virus genetic variation as well as the roles that the variation plays in carcinogenesis and evolution remain unclear. Therefore, in this study, we sequenced 95 geographically distinct Epstein-Barr virus isolates from Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma biopsies and saliva of healthy donors to detect variants and genes associated with gastric carcinoma and population structure from a genome-wide spectrum. We demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus revealed the population structure between North China and South China. In addition, we observed population stratification between Epstein-Barr virus strains from gastric carcinoma and healthy controls, indicating that certain Epstein-Barr virus subtypes are associated with different gastric carcinoma risks. We identified that the BRLF1, BBRF3, and BBLF2/BBLF3 genes had significant associations with gastric carcinoma. LMP1 and BNLF2a genes were strongly geographically associated genes in Epstein-Barr virus. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus for gastric carcinoma, and the genetic variants associated with gastric carcinoma can serve as biomarkers for oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus.

  17. Genome-wide meta-analysis of five Asian cohorts identifies PDGFRA as a susceptibility locus for corneal astigmatism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Fan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Corneal astigmatism refers to refractive abnormalities and irregularities in the curvature of the cornea, and this interferes with light being accurately focused at a single point in the eye. This ametropic condition is highly prevalent, influences visual acuity, and is a highly heritable trait. There is currently a paucity of research in the genetic etiology of corneal astigmatism. Here we report the results from five genome-wide association studies of corneal astigmatism across three Asian populations, with an initial discovery set of 4,254 Chinese and Malay individuals consisting of 2,249 cases and 2,005 controls. Replication was obtained from three surveys comprising of 2,139 Indians, an additional 929 Chinese children, and an independent 397 Chinese family trios. Variants in PDGFRA on chromosome 4q12 (lead SNP: rs7677751, allelic odds ratio = 1.26 (95% CI: 1.16-1.36, P(meta = 7.87×10(-9 were identified to be significantly associated with corneal astigmatism, exhibiting consistent effect sizes across all five cohorts. This highlights the potential role of variants in PDGFRA in the genetic etiology of corneal astigmatism across diverse Asian populations.

  18. Genome-wide association study to identify candidate loci and genes for Mn toxicity tolerance in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asis Shrestha

    Full Text Available Manganese (Mn is an essential micro-nutrient for plants, but flooded rice fields can accumulate high levels of Mn2+ leading to Mn toxicity. Here, we present a genome-wide association study (GWAS to identify candidate loci conferring Mn toxicity tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.. A diversity panel of 288 genotypes was grown in hydroponic solutions in a greenhouse under optimal and toxic Mn concentrations. We applied a Mn toxicity treatment (5 ppm Mn2+, 3 weeks at twelve days after transplanting. Mn toxicity caused moderate damage in rice in terms of biomass loss and symptom formation despite extremely high shoot Mn concentrations ranging from 2.4 to 17.4 mg g-1. The tropical japonica subpopulation was more sensitive to Mn toxicity than other subpopulations. Leaf damage symptoms were significantly correlated with Mn uptake into shoots. Association mapping was conducted for seven traits using 416741 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers using a mixed linear model, and detected six significant associations for the traits shoot manganese concentration and relative shoot length. Candidate regions contained genes coding for a heavy metal transporter, peroxidase precursor and Mn2+ ion binding proteins. The significant marker SNP-2.22465867 caused an amino acid change in a gene (LOC_Os02g37170 with unknown function. This study demonstrated significant natural variation in rice for Mn toxicity tolerance and the possibility of using GWAS to unravel genetic factors responsible for such complex traits.

  19. Fine mapping of breast cancer genome-wide association studies loci in women of African ancestry identifies novel susceptibility markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yonglan; Ogundiran, Temidayo O; Falusi, Adeyinka G; Nathanson, Katherine L; John, Esther M; Hennis, Anselm J M; Ambs, Stefan; Domchek, Susan M; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Simon, Michael S; Nemesure, Barbara; Wu, Suh-Yuh; Leske, Maria Cristina; Odetunde, Abayomi; Niu, Qun; Zhang, Jing; Afolabi, Chibuzor; Gamazon, Eric R; Cox, Nancy J; Olopade, Christopher O; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Huo, Dezheng

    2013-07-01

    Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with breast cancer susceptibility have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, these SNPs were primarily discovered and validated in women of European and Asian ancestry. Because linkage disequilibrium is ancestry-dependent and heterogeneous among racial/ethnic populations, we evaluated common genetic variants at 22 GWAS-identified breast cancer susceptibility loci in a pooled sample of 1502 breast cancer cases and 1378 controls of African ancestry. None of the 22 GWAS index SNPs could be validated, challenging the direct generalizability of breast cancer risk variants identified in Caucasians or Asians to other populations. Novel breast cancer risk variants for women of African ancestry were identified in regions including 5p12 (odds ratio [OR] = 1.40, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11-1.76; P = 0.004), 5q11.2 (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.09-1.36; P = 0.00053) and 10p15.1 (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.08-1.38; P = 0.0015). We also found positive association signals in three regions (6q25.1, 10q26.13 and 16q12.1-q12.2) previously confirmed by fine mapping in women of African ancestry. In addition, polygenic model indicated that eight best markers in this study, compared with 22 GWAS-identified SNPs, could better predict breast cancer risk in women of African ancestry (per-allele OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 1.16-1.27; P = 9.7 × 10(-16)). Our results demonstrate that fine mapping is a powerful approach to better characterize the breast cancer risk alleles in diverse populations. Future studies and new GWAS in women of African ancestry hold promise to discover additional variants for breast cancer susceptibility with clinical implications throughout the African diaspora.

  20. Meta-analysis of Genome Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Markers of Late Toxicity Following Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah L. Kerns

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 50% of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy. Late radiotherapy toxicity affects quality-of-life in long-term cancer survivors and risk of side-effects in a minority limits doses prescribed to the majority of patients. Development of a test predicting risk of toxicity could benefit many cancer patients. We aimed to meta-analyze individual level data from four genome-wide association studies from prostate cancer radiotherapy cohorts including 1564 men to identify genetic markers of toxicity. Prospectively assessed two-year toxicity endpoints (urinary frequency, decreased urine stream, rectal bleeding, overall toxicity and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP associations were tested using multivariable regression, adjusting for clinical and patient-related risk factors. A fixed-effects meta-analysis identified two SNPs: rs17599026 on 5q31.2 with urinary frequency (odds ratio [OR] 3.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.08–4.69, p-value 4.16 × 10−8 and rs7720298 on 5p15.2 with decreased urine stream (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.90–3.86, p-value = 3.21 × 10−8. These SNPs lie within genes that are expressed in tissues adversely affected by pelvic radiotherapy including bladder, kidney, rectum and small intestine. The results show that heterogeneous radiotherapy cohorts can be combined to identify new moderate-penetrance genetic variants associated with radiotherapy toxicity. The work provides a basis for larger collaborative efforts to identify enough variants for a future test involving polygenic risk profiling.

  1. Identifying and exploiting trait-relevant tissues with multiple functional annotations in genome-wide association studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingjie Hao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWASs have identified many disease associated loci, the majority of which have unknown biological functions. Understanding the mechanism underlying trait associations requires identifying trait-relevant tissues and investigating associations in a trait-specific fashion. Here, we extend the widely used linear mixed model to incorporate multiple SNP functional annotations from omics studies with GWAS summary statistics to facilitate the identification of trait-relevant tissues, with which to further construct powerful association tests. Specifically, we rely on a generalized estimating equation based algorithm for parameter inference, a mixture modeling framework for trait-tissue relevance classification, and a weighted sequence kernel association test constructed based on the identified trait-relevant tissues for powerful association analysis. We refer to our analytic procedure as the Scalable Multiple Annotation integration for trait-Relevant Tissue identification and usage (SMART. With extensive simulations, we show how our method can make use of multiple complementary annotations to improve the accuracy for identifying trait-relevant tissues. In addition, our procedure allows us to make use of the inferred trait-relevant tissues, for the first time, to construct more powerful SNP set tests. We apply our method for an in-depth analysis of 43 traits from 28 GWASs using tissue-specific annotations in 105 tissues derived from ENCODE and Roadmap. Our results reveal new trait-tissue relevance, pinpoint important annotations that are informative of trait-tissue relationship, and illustrate how we can use the inferred trait-relevant tissues to construct more powerful association tests in the Wellcome trust case control consortium study.

  2. Pooled analysis of genome-wide association studies of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3) identifies a new susceptibility locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Enroth, Stefan; Liu, Han; Sun, Yang; Wang, Huibo; Yu, Min; Deng, Lian; Xu, Shuhua; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) in subjects of European descent have identified associations between cervical cancer risk and three independent loci as well as multiple classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles at 6p21.3. To search for novel loci associated with development of cervical cancer, we performed a pooled analysis of data from two GWASs by imputing over 10 million genetic variants and 424 classical HLA alleles, for 1,553 intraepithelial neoplasia 3 (CIN3), 81 cervical cancer and 4,442 controls from the Swedish population. Notable findings were validated in an independent study of 961 patients (827 with CIN3 and 123 with cervical cancer) and 1,725 controls. Our data provided increased support for previously identified loci at 6p21.3 (rs9271898, P = 1.2 × 10−24; rs2516448, 1.1 × 10−15; and rs3130196, 2.3 × 10−9, respectively) and also confirmed associations with reported classical HLA alleles including HLA-B*07:02, -B*15:01, -DRB1*13:01, -DRB1*15:01, -DQA1*01:03, -DQB1*06:03 and -DQB1*06:02. In addition, we identified and subsequently replicated an independent signal at rs73730372 at 6p21.3 (odds ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval = 0.54–0.67, P = 3.0 × 10−19), which was found to be an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) of both HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1. This is one of the strongest common genetic protective variants identified so far for CIN3. We also found HLA-C*07:02 to be associated with risk of CIN3. The present study provides new insights into pathogenesis of CIN3. PMID:27285765

  3. Mouse genome-wide association and systems genetics identify Asxl2 as a regulator of bone mineral density and osteoclastogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles R Farber

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in the discovery of genes affecting bone mineral density (BMD; however, our understanding of its genetic basis remains incomplete. In the current study, genome-wide association (GWA and co-expression network analysis were used in the recently described Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP to identify and functionally characterize novel BMD genes. In the HMDP, a GWA of total body, spinal, and femoral BMD revealed four significant associations (-log10P>5.39 affecting at least one BMD trait on chromosomes (Chrs. 7, 11, 12, and 17. The associations implicated a total of 163 genes with each association harboring between 14 and 112 genes. This list was reduced to 26 functional candidates by identifying those genes that were regulated by local eQTL in bone or harbored potentially functional non-synonymous (NS SNPs. This analysis revealed that the most significant BMD SNP on Chr. 12 was a NS SNP in the additional sex combs like-2 (Asxl2 gene that was predicted to be functional. The involvement of Asxl2 in the regulation of bone mass was confirmed by the observation that Asxl2 knockout mice had reduced BMD. To begin to unravel the mechanism through which Asxl2 influenced BMD, a gene co-expression network was created using cortical bone gene expression microarray data from the HMDP strains. Asxl2 was identified as a member of a co-expression module enriched for genes involved in the differentiation of myeloid cells. In bone, osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells of myeloid origin, suggesting that Asxl2 may play a role in osteoclast differentiation. In agreement, the knockdown of Asxl2 in bone marrow macrophages impaired their ability to form osteoclasts. This study identifies a new regulator of BMD and osteoclastogenesis and highlights the power of GWA and systems genetics in the mouse for dissecting complex genetic traits.

  4. Meta-analysis of Genome Wide Association Studies Identifies Genetic Markers of Late Toxicity Following Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Sarah L; Dorling, Leila; Fachal, Laura; Bentzen, Søren; Pharoah, Paul D P; Barnes, Daniel R; Gómez-Caamaño, Antonio; Carballo, Ana M; Dearnaley, David P; Peleteiro, Paula; Gulliford, Sarah L; Hall, Emma; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carracedo, Ángel; Sia, Michael; Stock, Richard; Stone, Nelson N; Sydes, Matthew R; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Ahmed, Shahana; Parliament, Matthew; Ostrer, Harry; Rosenstein, Barry S; Vega, Ana; Burnet, Neil G; Dunning, Alison M; Barnett, Gillian C; West, Catharine M L

    2016-08-01

    Nearly 50% of cancer patients undergo radiotherapy. Late radiotherapy toxicity affects quality-of-life in long-term cancer survivors and risk of side-effects in a minority limits doses prescribed to the majority of patients. Development of a test predicting risk of toxicity could benefit many cancer patients. We aimed to meta-analyze individual level data from four genome-wide association studies from prostate cancer radiotherapy cohorts including 1564 men to identify genetic markers of toxicity. Prospectively assessed two-year toxicity endpoints (urinary frequency, decreased urine stream, rectal bleeding, overall toxicity) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) associations were tested using multivariable regression, adjusting for clinical and patient-related risk factors. A fixed-effects meta-analysis identified two SNPs: rs17599026 on 5q31.2 with urinary frequency (odds ratio [OR] 3.12, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.08-4.69, p-value 4.16×10(-8)) and rs7720298 on 5p15.2 with decreased urine stream (OR 2.71, 95% CI 1.90-3.86, p-value=3.21×10(-8)). These SNPs lie within genes that are expressed in tissues adversely affected by pelvic radiotherapy including bladder, kidney, rectum and small intestine. The results show that heterogeneous radiotherapy cohorts can be combined to identify new moderate-penetrance genetic variants associated with radiotherapy toxicity. The work provides a basis for larger collaborative efforts to identify enough variants for a future test involving polygenic risk profiling. Copyright © 2016 The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chromosomes 4 and 8 Implicated in a Genome Wide SNP Linkage Scan of 762 Prostate Cancer Families Collected by the ICPCG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lingyi; Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine; Valeri, Antoine; Cussenot, Olivier; Lange, Ethan M.; Cooney, Kathleen A.; Farnham, James M.; Camp, Nicola J.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Tammela, Teuvo L.J.; Schleutker, Johanna; Hoegel, Josef; Herkommer, Kathleen; Maier, Christiane; Vogel, Walther; Wiklund, Fredrik; Emanuelsson, Monica; Grönberg, Henrik; Wiley, Kathleen E.; Isaacs, Sarah D.; Walsh, Patrick C.; Helfand, Brian T.; Kan, Donghui; Catalona, William J.; Stanford, Janet L.; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Johanneson, Bo; Deutsch, Kerry; McIntosh, Laura; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Hebbring, Scott; Schaid, Daniel J.; Whittemore, Alice S.; Oakley-Girvan, Ingrid; Hsieh, Chih-Lin; Powell, Isaac; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Carpten, John D.; Seminara, Daniela; Zheng, S. Lilly; Xu, Jianfeng; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Hopper, John L.; English, Dallas R.; Foulkes, William D.; Maehle, Lovise; Moller, Pal; Badzioch, Michael D.; Edwards, Steve; Guy, Michelle; Eeles, Ros; Easton, Douglas; Isaacs, William B.

    2012-01-01

    Background In spite of intensive efforts, understanding of the genetic aspects of familial prostate cancer remains largely incomplete. In a previous microsatellite-based linkage scan of 1233 prostate cancer (PC) families, we identified suggestive evidence for linkage (i.e. LOD≥1.86) at 5q12, 15q11, 17q21, 22q12, and two loci on 8p, with additional regions implicated in subsets of families defined by age at diagnosis, disease aggressiveness, or number of affected members. Methods In an attempt to replicate these findings and increase linkage resolution, we used the Illumina 6000 SNP linkage panel to perform a genome-wide linkage scan of an independent set of 762 multiplex PC families, collected by 11 ICPCG groups. Results Of the regions identified previously, modest evidence of replication was observed only on the short arm of chromosome 8, where HLOD scores of 1.63 and 3.60 were observed in the complete set of families and families with young average age at diagnosis, respectively. The most significant linkage signals found in the complete set of families were observed across a broad, 37 cM interval on 4q13-25, with LOD scores ranging from 2.02 to 2.62, increasing to 4.50 in families with older average age at diagnosis. In families with multiple cases presenting with more aggressive disease, LOD scores over 3.0 were observed at 8q24 in the vicinity of previously identified common PC risk variants, as well as MYC, an important gene in PC biology. Conclusions These results will be useful in prioritizing future susceptibility gene discovery efforts in this common cancer. PMID:21748754

  6. A genome-wide association study of the maize hypersensitive defense response identifies genes that cluster in related pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bode A Olukolu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Much remains unknown of molecular events controlling the plant hypersensitive defense response (HR, a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R- genes. Genetic control of the HR is hard to quantify due to its microscopic and rapid nature. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21, were mapped in a population of 3,381 recombinant inbred lines from the maize nested association mapping population. Joint linkage analysis was conducted to identify 32 additive but no epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL using a linkage map based on more than 7000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. Genome-wide association (GWA analysis of 26.5 million SNPs was conducted after adjusting for background QTL. GWA identified associated SNPs that colocalized with 44 candidate genes. Thirty-six of these genes colocalized within 23 of the 32 QTL identified by joint linkage analysis. The candidate genes included genes predicted to be in involved programmed cell death, defense response, ubiquitination, redox homeostasis, autophagy, calcium signalling, lignin biosynthesis and cell wall modification. Twelve of the candidate genes showed significant differential expression between isogenic lines differing for the presence of Rp1-D21. Low but significant correlations between HR-related traits and several previously-measured disease resistance traits suggested that the genetic control of these traits was substantially, though not entirely, independent. This study provides the first system-wide analysis of natural variation that modulates the HR response in plants.

  7. A genome wide association study of alcohol dependence symptom counts in extended pedigrees identifies C15orf53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jen-Chyong; Foroud, Tatiana; Hinrichs, Anthony L; Le, Nhung XH; Bertelsen, Sarah; Budde, John P; Harari, Oscar; Koller, Daniel L; Wetherill, Leah; Agrawal, Arpana; Almasy, Laura; Brooks, Andrew I; Bucholz, Kathleen; Dick, Danielle; Hesselbrock, Victor; Johnson, Eric O; Kang, Sun; Kapoor, Manav; Kramer, John; Kuperman, Samuel; Madden, Pamela AF; Manz, Niklas; Martin, Nicholas G; McClintick, Jeanette N; Montgomery, Grant W; Nurnberger, John I; Rangaswamy, Madhavi; Rice, John; Schuckit, Marc; Tischfield, Jay A; Whitfield, John B; Xuei, Xiaoling; Porjesz, Bernice; Heath, Andrew C; Edenberg, Howard J; Bierut, Laura J; Goate, Alison M

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have identified genes associated with alcohol use disorders, but the variation in each of these genes explains only a small portion of the genetic vulnerability. The goal of the present study was to perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in extended families from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA) to identify novel genes affecting risk for alcohol dependence. To maximize the power of the extended family design we used a quantitative endophenotype, measured in all individuals: number of alcohol dependence symptoms endorsed (symptom count). Secondary analyses were performed to determine if the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with symptom count were also associated with the dichotomous phenotype, DSM-IV alcohol dependence. This family-based GWAS identified SNPs in C15orf53 that are strongly associated with DSM-IV alcohol (p=4.5×10−8, inflation corrected p=9.4×10−7). Results with DSM-IV alcohol dependence in the regions of interest support our findings with symptom count, though the associations were less significant. Attempted replications of the most promising association results were conducted in two independent samples: non-overlapping subjects from the Study of Addiction: Genes and Environment (SAGE) and the Australian twin-family study of alcohol use disorders (OZALC). Nominal association of C15orf53 with symptom count was observed in SAGE. The variant that showed strongest association with symptom count, rs12912251 and its highly correlated variants (D′=1, r2≥ 0.95), has previously been associated with risk for bipolar disorder. PMID:23089632

  8. A genome-wide association study of alcohol-dependence symptom counts in extended pedigrees identifies C15orf53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J-C; Foroud, T; Hinrichs, A L; Le, N X H; Bertelsen, S; Budde, J P; Harari, O; Koller, D L; Wetherill, L; Agrawal, A; Almasy, L; Brooks, A I; Bucholz, K; Dick, D; Hesselbrock, V; Johnson, E O; Kang, S; Kapoor, M; Kramer, J; Kuperman, S; Madden, P A F; Manz, N; Martin, N G; McClintick, J N; Montgomery, G W; Nurnberger, J I; Rangaswamy, M; Rice, J; Schuckit, M; Tischfield, J A; Whitfield, J B; Xuei, X; Porjesz, B; Heath, A C; Edenberg, H J; Bierut, L J; Goate, A M

    2013-11-01

    Several studies have identified genes associated with alcohol-use disorders (AUDs), but the variation in each of these genes explains only a small portion of the genetic vulnerability. The goal of the present study was to perform a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in extended families from the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism to identify novel genes affecting risk for alcohol dependence (AD). To maximize the power of the extended family design, we used a quantitative endophenotype, measured in all individuals: number of alcohol-dependence symptoms endorsed (symptom count (SC)). Secondary analyses were performed to determine if the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with SC were also associated with the dichotomous phenotype, DSM-IV AD. This family-based GWAS identified SNPs in C15orf53 that are strongly associated with DSM-IV alcohol-dependence symptom counts (P=4.5 × 10(-8), inflation-corrected P=9.4 × 10(-7)). Results with DSM-IV AD in the regions of interest support our findings with SC, although the associations were less significant. Attempted replications of the most promising association results were conducted in two independent samples: nonoverlapping subjects from the Study of Addiction: Genes and Environment (SAGE) and the Australian Twin Family Study of AUDs (OZALC). Nominal association of C15orf53 with SC was observed in SAGE. The variant that showed strongest association with SC, rs12912251 and its highly correlated variants (D'=1, r(2) 0.95), have previously been associated with risk for bipolar disorder.

  9. A Genome-Wide Association Study of the Maize Hypersensitive Defense Response Identifies Genes That Cluster in Related Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkata, Bala P.; Marla, Sandeep; Ji, Jiabing; Gachomo, Emma; Chu, Kevin; Negeri, Adisu; Benson, Jacqueline; Nelson, Rebecca; Bradbury, Peter; Nielsen, Dahlia; Holland, James B.; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.; Johal, Gurmukh

    2014-01-01

    Much remains unknown of molecular events controlling the plant hypersensitive defense response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Genetic control of the HR is hard to quantify due to its microscopic and rapid nature. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mapped in a population of 3,381 recombinant inbred lines from the maize nested association mapping population. Joint linkage analysis was conducted to identify 32 additive but no epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) using a linkage map based on more than 7000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of 26.5 million SNPs was conducted after adjusting for background QTL. GWA identified associated SNPs that colocalized with 44 candidate genes. Thirty-six of these genes colocalized within 23 of the 32 QTL identified by joint linkage analysis. The candidate genes included genes predicted to be in involved programmed cell death, defense response, ubiquitination, redox homeostasis, autophagy, calcium signalling, lignin biosynthesis and cell wall modification. Twelve of the candidate genes showed significant differential expression between isogenic lines differing for the presence of Rp1-D21. Low but significant correlations between HR-related traits and several previously-measured disease resistance traits suggested that the genetic control of these traits was substantially, though not entirely, independent. This study provides the first system-wide analysis of natural variation that modulates the HR response in plants. PMID:25166276

  10. Genome wide association identifies common variants at the SERPINA6/SERPINA1 locus influencing plasma cortisol and corticosteroid binding globulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Bolton

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Variation in plasma levels of cortisol, an essential hormone in the stress response, is associated in population-based studies with cardio-metabolic, inflammatory and neuro-cognitive traits and diseases. Heritability of plasma cortisol is estimated at 30-60% but no common genetic contribution has been identified. The CORtisol NETwork (CORNET consortium undertook genome wide association meta-analysis for plasma cortisol in 12,597 Caucasian participants, replicated in 2,795 participants. The results indicate that <1% of variance in plasma cortisol is accounted for by genetic variation in a single region of chromosome 14. This locus spans SERPINA6, encoding corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG, the major cortisol-binding protein in plasma, and SERPINA1, encoding α1-antitrypsin (which inhibits cleavage of the reactive centre loop that releases cortisol from CBG. Three partially independent signals were identified within the region, represented by common SNPs; detailed biochemical investigation in a nested sub-cohort showed all these SNPs were associated with variation in total cortisol binding activity in plasma, but some variants influenced total CBG concentrations while the top hit (rs12589136 influenced the immunoreactivity of the reactive centre loop of CBG. Exome chip and 1000 Genomes imputation analysis of this locus in the CROATIA-Korcula cohort identified missense mutations in SERPINA6 and SERPINA1 that did not account for the effects of common variants. These findings reveal a novel common genetic source of variation in binding of cortisol by CBG, and reinforce the key role of CBG in determining plasma cortisol levels. In turn this genetic variation may contribute to cortisol-associated degenerative diseases.

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Risk Variants for Lichen Planus in Patients With Hepatitis C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagao, Yumiko; Nishida, Nao; Toyo-Oka, Licht; Kawaguchi, Atsushi; Amoroso, Antonio; Carrozzo, Marco; Sata, Michio; Mizokami, Masashi; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-06-01

    There is a close relationship between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and lichen planus, a chronic inflammatory mucocutaneous disease. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genetic variants associated with HCV-related lichen planus. We conducted a GWAS of 261 patients with HCV infection treated at a tertiary medical center in Japan from October 2007 through January 2013; a total of 71 had lichen planus and 190 had normal oral mucosa. We validated our findings in a GWAS of 38 patients with HCV-associated lichen planus and 7 HCV-infected patients with normal oral mucosa treated at a medical center in Italy. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in NRP2 (rs884000) and IGFBP4 (rs538399) were associated with risk of HCV-associated lichen planus (P lichen planus. The odds ratios for the minor alleles of rs884000, rs538399, and rs9461799 were 3.25 (95% confidence interval, 1.95-5.41), 0.40 (95% confidence interval, 0.25-0.63), and 2.15 (95% confidence interval, 1.41-3.28), respectively. In a GWAS of Japanese patients with HCV infection, we replicated associations between previously reported polymorphisms in HLA class II genes and risk for lichen planus. We also identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms in NRP2 and IGFBP4 loci that increase and reduce risk of lichen planus, respectively. These genetic variants might be used to identify patients with HCV infection who are at risk for lichen planus. Copyright © 2017 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A genome-wide association study for colorectal cancer identifies a risk locus in 14q23.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Lenora W.M.; Zaidi, Syed H.E.; Wang, Hansong; Berndt, Sonja I.; Bézieau, Stéphane; Brenner, Hermann; Campbell, Peter T.; Chan, Andrew T.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Du, Mengmeng; Edlund, Christopher K.; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hou, Lifang; Hsu, Li; Jacobs, Eric J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Jeon, Jihyoun; Küry, Sébastien; Li, Li; Lindor, Noralane M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Potter, John D.; Rennert, Gad; Rudolph, Anja; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Severi, Gianluca; Slattery, Martha L.; White, Emily; Woods, Michael O.; Cotterchio, Michelle; Marchand, Loic Le; Casey, Graham; Gruber, Steven B.; Peters, Ulrike; Hudson, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Over 50 loci associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) have been uncovered by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Identifying additional loci has the potential to help elucidate aspects of the underlying biological processes leading to better understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease. We re-evaluated a GWAS by excluding controls that have family history of CRC or personal history of CR polyps, as we hypothesized that their inclusion reduces power to detect associations. This is supported empirically and through simulations. Two-phase GWAS analysis was performed in a total of 16,517 cases and 14,487 controls. We identified rs17094983, a SNP associated with risk of CRC (p=2.5×10−10; odds ratio estimated by re-including all controls (OR)=0.87, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.83–0.91; minor allele frequency (MAF)=13%). Results were replicated in samples of African descent (1,894 cases and 4,703 controls; p=0.01; OR=0.86, 95% CI: 0.77–0.97; MAF=16%). Gene expression data in 195 colon adenocarcinomas and 59 normal colon tissues from two different studies revealed that this locus has genotypes that are associated with RTN1 (Reticulon 1) expression (p=0.001), a protein-coding gene involved in survival and proliferation of cancer cells that is highly expressed in normal colon tissues but has significantly reduced expression in tumor cells (p=1.3×10−8). PMID:26404086

  13. Anion-sensitive fluorophore identifies the Drosophila swell-activated chloride channel in a genome-wide RNA interference screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Stotz

    Full Text Available When cells swell in hypo-osmotic solutions, chloride-selective ion channels (Cl(swell activate to reduce intracellular osmolality and prevent catastrophic cell rupture. Despite intensive efforts to assign a molecular identity to the mammalian Cl(swell channel, it remains unknown. In an unbiased genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen of Drosophila cells stably expressing an anion-sensitive fluorescent indicator, we identify Bestrophin 1 (dBest1 as the Drosophila Cl(swell channel. Of the 23 screen hits with mammalian homologs and predicted transmembrane domains, only RNAi specifically targeting dBest1 eliminated the Cl(swell current (I(Clswell. We further demonstrate the essential contribution of dBest1 to Drosophila I(Clswell with the introduction of a human Bestrophin disease-associated mutation (W94C. Overexpression of the W94C construct in Drosophila cells significantly reduced the endogenous I(Clswell. We confirm that exogenous expression of dBest1 alone in human embryonic kidney (HEK293 cells creates a clearly identifiable Drosophila-like I(Clswell. In contrast, activation of mouse Bestrophin 2 (mBest2, the closest mammalian ortholog of dBest1, is swell-insensitive. The first 64 residues of dBest1 conferred swell activation to mBest2. The chimera, however, maintains mBest2-like pore properties, strongly indicating that the Bestrophin protein forms the Cl(swell channel itself rather than functioning as an essential auxiliary subunit. dBest1 is an anion channel clearly responsive to swell; this activation depends upon its N-terminus.

  14. Genome-Wide DNA Copy Number Analysis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Identifies New Genetic Markers Associated with Clinical Outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribel Forero-Castro

    Full Text Available Identifying additional genetic alterations associated with poor prognosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is still a challenge.To characterize the presence of additional DNA copy number alterations (CNAs in children and adults with ALL by whole-genome oligonucleotide array (aCGH analysis, and to identify their associations with clinical features and outcome. Array-CGH was carried out in 265 newly diagnosed ALLs (142 children and 123 adults. The NimbleGen CGH 12x135K array (Roche was used to analyze genetic gains and losses. CNAs were analyzed with GISTIC and aCGHweb software. Clinical and biological variables were analyzed. Three of the patients showed chromothripsis (cth6, cth14q and cth15q. CNAs were associated with age, phenotype, genetic subtype and overall survival (OS. In the whole cohort of children, the losses on 14q32.33 (p = 0.019 and 15q13.2 (p = 0.04 were related to shorter OS. In the group of children without good- or poor-risk cytogenetics, the gain on 1p36.11 was a prognostic marker independently associated with shorter OS. In adults, the gains on 19q13.2 (p = 0.001 and Xp21.1 (p = 0.029, and the loss of 17p (p = 0.014 were independent markers of poor prognosis with respect to OS. In summary, CNAs are frequent in ALL and are associated with clinical parameters and survival. Genome-wide DNA copy number analysis allows the identification of genetic markers that predict clinical outcome, suggesting that detection of these genetic lesions will be useful in the management of patients newly diagnosed with ALL.

  15. Genome-wide association study of glioma subtypes identifies specific differences in genetic susceptibility to glioblastoma and non-glioblastoma tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melin, Beatrice S; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Wrensch, Margaret R.

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have transformed our understanding of glioma susceptibility, but individual studies have had limited power to identify risk loci. We performed a meta-analysis of existing GWAS and two new GWAS, which totaled 12,496 cases and 18,190 controls. We identified fi...

  16. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies to identify prostate cancer susceptibility loci associated with aggressive and non-aggressive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin Al Olama, Ali; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Schumacher, Fredrick R

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common genetic variants associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer (PrCa), but these explain less than one-third of the heritability. To identify further susceptibility alleles, we conducted a meta-analysis of four GWAS inc...

  17. A genome-wide association study identifies a novel locus for bortezomib-induced peripheral neuropathy in European patients with multiple myeloma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Magrangeas (Florence); R. Kuiper (Ruud); H. Avet-Loiseau (Hervé); Gouraud, W. (Wilfried); Guerin-Charbonnel, C. (Catherine); Ferrer, L. (Ludovic); Aussem, A. (Alexandre); Elghazel, H. (Haytham); Suhard, J. (Jérôme); Sakissian, H.D. (Henri Der); M. Attal (Michel); Munshi, N.C. (Nikhil C.); P. Sonneveld (Pieter); Dumontet, C. (Charles); P. Moreau; M. van Duin (Mark); Campion, L. (Löôc); S. Minvielle (S)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Painful peripheral neuropathy is a frequent toxicity associated with bortezomib therapy. This study aimed to identify loci that affect susceptibility to this toxicity. Experimental Design: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of 370,605 SNPs was performed to identify risk

  18. Replication and meta-analysis of common variants identifies a genome-wide significant locus in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Esserlind, A-L; Christensen, A F; Le, H

    2013-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute to the aetiology of the prevalent form of migraine without aura (MO) and migraine with typical aura (MTA). Due to the complex inheritance of MO and MTA, the genetic background is still not fully established. In a population-based genome-wide association study by Chasman...

  19. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Springelkamp (Henriët); R. Höhn (René); A. Mishra (Aniket); P.G. Hysi (Pirro); C.C. Khor; S.J. Loomis (Stephanie J.); J.N.C. Bailey (Jessica N. Cooke); J. Gibson (Jane); G. Thorleifsson (Gudmar); S.F. Janssen (Sarah); X. Luo (Xiaoyan); W.D. Ramdas (Wishal); E.N. Vithana (Eranga); M.E. Nongpiur (Monisha E.); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); L. Xu (Liang); J.E. Mountain (Jenny E.); P. Gharahkhani (Puya); Y. Lu (Yi); N. Amin (Najaf); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); K.S. Sim; E.M. van Leeuwen (Elisa); A.I. Iglesias González (Adriana); V.J.M. Verhoeven (Virginie); M.A. Hauser (Michael); S.-C. Loon (Seng-Chee); D.D.G. Despriet (Dominique); A. Nag (Abhishek); C. Venturini (Cristina); P.G. Sanfilippo (Paul G.); A. Schillert (Arne); J.H. Kang (Jae H.); J. Landers (John); F. Jonasson (Fridbert); A.J. Cree (Angela); L.M.E. van Koolwijk (Leonieke); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); E. Souzeau (Emmanuelle); V. Jonsson (Vesteinn); G. Menon (Geeta); P. Mitchell (Paul); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); E. Rochtchina (Elena); J. Attia (John); R. Scott (Rodney); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); P.N. Baird (Paul); J. Xie (Jing); M. Inouye (Michael); A.C. Viswanathan (Ananth); X. Sim (Xueling); R.N. Weinreb (Robert N.); P.T.V.M. de Jong (Paulus); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Hofman (Albert); S. Ennis (Sarah); U. Thorsteinsdottir (Unnur); K.P. Burdon (Kathryn); T.D. Spector (Timothy); A. Mirshahi (Alireza); S-M. Saw (Seang-Mei); J.R. Vingerling (Hans); Y.Y. Teo (Yik Ying); R.C.W. Wolfs (Roger); H.G. Lemij (Hans); E.S. Tai (Shyong); N.M. Jansonius (Nomdo); J.B. Jonas (Jost B.); C-Y. Cheng (Ching-Yu); T. Aung (Tin); C.C.W. Klaver (Caroline); J.E. Craig (Jamie); S. MacGregor (Stuart); D.A. Mackey (David); A.J. Lotery (Andrew); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur); T.L. Young (Terri); J.L. Wiggs (Janey); A.F.H. Pfeiffer (Andreas); T.Y. Wong (Tien Yin); L.R. Pasquale (Louis); A.W. Hewit (Alex); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); C.J. Hammond (Christopher)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractGlaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an

  20. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springelkamp, Henriet; Hoehn, Rene; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G.; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Loomis, Stephanie J.; Bailey, Jessica N. Cooke; Gibson, Jane; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Janssen, Sarah F.; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Vithana, Eranga; Nongpiur, Monisha E.; Montgomery, GrantW.; Xu, Liang; Mountain, Jenny E.; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lu, Yi; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C.; Sim, Kar-Seng; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Iglesias, Adriana I.; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Hauser, Michael A.; Loon, Seng-Chee; Despriet, Dominiek D. G.; Nag, Abhishek; Venturini, Cristina; Sanfilippo, Paul G.; Schillert, Arne; Kang, Jae H.; Landers, John; Jonasson, Fridbert; Cree, Angela J.; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M. E.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Menon, Geeta; Weinreb, Robert N.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Ennis, Sarah; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Spector, Timothy D.; Mirshahi, Alireza; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Haines, Jonathan L.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; Lemij, Hans G.; Tai, E-Shyong; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Jonas, Jost B.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Aung, Tin; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Craig, Jamie E.; Macgregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A.; Lotery, Andrew J.; Stefansson, Kari; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Young, Terri L.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Pasquale, Louis R.; Hewitt, Alex W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    Glaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an important

  1. Genome-wide meta-analyses of multiancestry cohorts identify multiple new susceptibility loci for refractive error and myopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Fan, Qiao; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Höhn, René; Macgregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W.; Nag, Abhishek; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Zhou, Xin; Ikram, M. Kamran; Buitendijk, Gabriëlle H. S.; McMahon, George; Kemp, John P.; Pourcain, Beate St; Simpson, Claire L.; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kähönen, Mika; Paterson, Andrew D.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Wong, Hoi Suen; Xu, Liang; Jonas, Jost B.; Pärssinen, Olavi; Wedenoja, Juho; Yip, Shea Ping; Ho, Daniel W. H.; Pang, Chi Pui; Chen, Li Jia; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Haller, Toomas; Metspalu, Andres; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Tai, E.-Shyong; Aung, Tin; Vithana, Eranga; Tay, Wan-Ting; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Liao, Jiemin; Zheng, Yingfeng; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Chen, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Refractive error is the most common eye disorder worldwide and is a prominent cause of blindness. Myopia affects over 30% of Western populations and up to 80% of Asians. The CREAM consortium conducted genome-wide meta-analyses, including 37,382 individuals from 27 studies of European ancestry and

  2. Genome-wide association and large-scale follow up identifies 16 new loci influencing lung function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soler Artigas, María; Loth, Daan W; Wain, Louise V; Gharib, Sina A; Obeidat, Ma'en; Tang, Wenbo; Zhai, Guangju; Zhao, Jing Hua; Smith, Albert Vernon; Huffman, Jennifer E; Albrecht, Eva; Jackson, Catherine M; Evans, David M; Cadby, Gemma; Fornage, Myriam; Manichaikul, Ani; Lopez, Lorna M; Johnson, Toby; Aldrich, Melinda C; Aspelund, Thor; Barroso, Inês; Campbell, Harry; Cassano, Patricia A; Couper, David J; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Franceschini, Nora; Garcia, Melissa; Gieger, Christian; Gislason, Gauti Kjartan; Grkovic, Ivica; Hammond, Christopher J; Hancock, Dana B; Harris, Tamara B; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Heckbert, Susan R; Heliövaara, Markku; Homuth, Georg; Hysi, Pirro G; James, Alan L; Jankovic, Stipan; Joubert, Bonnie R; Karrasch, Stefan; Klopp, Norman; Koch, Beate; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Launer, Lenore J; Liu, Yongmei; Loehr, Laura R; Lohman, Kurt; Loos, Ruth J F; Lumley, Thomas; Al Balushi, Khalid A; Ang, Wei Q; Barr, R Graham; Beilby, John; Blakey, John D; Boban, Mladen; Boraska, Vesna; Brisman, Jonas; Britton, John R; Brusselle, Guy G; Cooper, Cyrus; Curjuric, Ivan; Dahgam, Santosh; Deary, Ian J; Ebrahim, Shah; Eijgelsheim, Mark; Francks, Clyde; Gaysina, Darya; Granell, Raquel; Gu, Xiangjun; Hankinson, John L; Hardy, Rebecca; Harris, Sarah E; Henderson, John; Henry, Amanda; Hingorani, Aroon D; Hofman, Albert; Holt, Patrick G; Hui, Jennie; Hunter, Michael L; Imboden, Medea; Jameson, Karen A; Kerr, Shona M; Kolcic, Ivana; Kronenberg, Florian; Liu, Jason Z; Marchini, Jonathan; McKeever, Tricia; Morris, Andrew D; Olin, Anna-Carin; Porteous, David J; Postma, Dirkje S; Rich, Stephen S; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rochat, Thierry; Sayer, Avan Aihie; Sayers, Ian; Sly, Peter D; Smith, George Davey; Sood, Akshay; Starr, John M; Uitterlinden, André G; Vonk, Judith M; Wannamethee, S Goya; Whincup, Peter H; Wijmenga, Cisca; Williams, O Dale; Wong, Andrew; Mangino, Massimo; Marciante, Kristin D; McArdle, Wendy L; Meibohm, Bernd; Morrison, Alanna C; North, Kari E; Omenaas, Ernst; Palmer, Lyle J; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Pin, Isabelle; Pola Sbreve Ek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Psaty, Bruce M; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Rantanen, Taina; Ripatti, Samuli; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Rudnicka, Alicja R; Schulz, Holger; Shin, So-Youn; Spector, Tim D; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Wareham, Nicholas J; Warrington, Nicole M; Wichmann, H-Erich; Wild, Sarah H; Wilk, Jemma B; Wjst, Matthias; Wright, Alan F; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Pennell, Craig E; Nyberg, Fredrik; Kuh, Diana; Holloway, John W; Boezen, Hendrika; Lawlor, Debbie A; Morris, Richard W; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Kaprio, Jaakko; Wilson, James F; Hayward, Caroline; Kähönen, Mika; Heinrich, Joachim; Musk, Arthur W; Jarvis, Deborah L; Gläser, Sven; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Ch Stricker, Bruno H; Elliott, Paul; O'Connor, George T; Strachan, David P; London, Stephanie J; Hall, Ian P; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tobin, Martin D

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function measures reflect respiratory health and are used in the diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We tested genome-wide association with forced expiratory volume in 1 second and the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity in 48,201

  3. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manning, Alisa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and β-cell dysfunction but have contributed little to the understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathw...

  4. Genome-wide association analyses for lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease identify new loci and potential druggable targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wain, Louise V.; Shrine, Nick R. G.; Artigas, Maria Soler; Erzurumluoglu, A Mesut; Noyvert, Boris; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Obeidat, Ma'en; Henrys, Amanda P.; Portelli, Michael A.; Hall, Robert J; Billington, Charlotte K.; Rimington, Tracy L; Fenech, Anthony G; John, Catherine; Blake, Tineka; Jackson, Victoria E.; Allen, Richard J; Prins, Bram P.; Campbell, Archie; Porteous, David J.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wielscher, Matthias; Jamess, Alan L.; Hui, Jennie; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Wilson, James F.; Joshi, Peter K.; Stubbe, Beate; Rawal, Rajesh; Schulz, Holger; Imboden, Medea; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Karrasch, Stefan; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J.; Harris, Sarah E.; Marten, Jonathan; Rudan, Igor; Enroth, Stefan; Gyllensten, Ulf; Kerr, Shona M.; Polasek, Ozren; Kahonen, Mika; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Lehtimaki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T.; Evans, David M.; Henderson, A. John; Pennell, Craig E.; Wang, Carol A.; Sly, Peter D.; Wan, Emily S; Busch, Robert; Hobbs, Brian D; Litonjua, Augusto; Sparrow, David W; Gulsvik, Amund; Bakke, Per S.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hansel, Nadia N.; Mathias, Rasika A.; Ruczinski, Ingo; Barnes, Kathleen C.; Bosse, Yohan; Joubert, Philippe; van den Berge, Maarten; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Pare, Peter D.; Sin, Don; Nickle, David C.; Hao, Ke; Gottesman, Omri; Dewey, Frederick E; Bruse, Shannon E; Carey, David J.; Kirchner, H Lester; Jonsson, Stefan; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Gislason, Thorarinn; Stefansson, Kari; Schurmann, Claudia; Nadkarni, Girish N; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Walters, Robin G.; Chen, Zhengming; Millwood, Iona Y; Vaucher, Julien; Kurmi, Om P; Li, Liming; Hansell, Anna L.; Brightling, Chris; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Cho, Michael H.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Sayers, Ian; Trynka, Gosia; Morris, Andrew P.; Strachan, David P.; Halls, Ian P.; Tobin, Martin D.

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by reduced lung function and is the third leading cause of death globally. Through genome-wide association discovery in 48,943 individuals, selected from extremes of the lung function distribution in UK Biobank, and follow-up in 95,375

  5. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies three new risk loci for atopic dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Standl, Marie; Chen, Chih-Mei

    2011-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a commonly occurring chronic skin disease with high heritability. Apart from filaggrin (FLG), the genes influencing atopic dermatitis are largely unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 5,606 affected individuals and 20,565 controls from 16 popul...

  6. Large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies five loci for lean body mass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zillikens, M.C.; Demissie, Serkalem; Hsu, Yi Hsiang; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M.; Chou, Wen Chi; Stolk, Lisette; Livshits, Gregory; Broer, Linda; Johnson, Toby; Koller, Daniel L.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, J.A.; Malkin, Ida; Ried, Janina S.; Smith, Albert V.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Weihua; Aghdassi, Ali; Åkesson, Kristina; Amin, Najaf; Baier, Leslie J.; Barroso, Inês; Bennett, David A.; Bertram, Lars; Biffar, Rainer; Bochud, Murielle; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Buchman, Aron S.; Byberg, Liisa; Campbell, Harry; Campos Obanda, Natalia; Cauley, Jane A.; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Cederberg, Henna; Chen, Zhao; Cho, Nam H.; Jin Choi, Hyung; Claussnitzer, Melina; Collins, Francis; Cummings, Steven R.; Jager, De Philip L.; Demuth, Ilja; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A.M.; DIatchenko, Luda; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Enneman, Anke W.; Erdos, Mike; Eriksson, Johan G.; Eriksson, Joel; Estrada, Karol; Evans, Daniel S.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Fu, Mao; Garcia, Melissa; Gieger, Christian; Girke, Thomas; Glazer, Nicole L.; Grallert, Harald; Grewal, Jagvir; Han, Bok Ghee; Hanson, Robert L.; Hayward, Caroline; Hofman, Albert; Hoffman, Eric P.; Homuth, Georg; Hsueh, Wen Chi; Hubal, Monica J.; Hubbard, Alan; Huffman, Kim M.; Husted, Lise B.; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Ittermann, Till; Jansson, John Olov; Jordan, Joanne M.; Jula, Antti; Karlsson, Magnus; Khaw, Kay Tee; Kilpelaïnen, Tuomas O.; Klopp, Norman; Kloth, Jacqueline S.L.; Koistinen, Heikki A.; Kraus, William E.; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lahti, Jari; Lang, Thomas; Langdahl, Bente L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Lee, Jong Young; Lerch, Markus M.; Lewis, Joshua R.; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Tian; Liu, Youfang; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N.; Maixner, William; McGuigan, Fiona E.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Meitinger, Thomas; Melhus, Håkan; Mellström, Dan; Melov, Simon; Michaëlsson, Karl; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Morris, Andrew P.; Mosekilde, Leif; Newman, Anne; Nielson, Carrie M.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Oostra, Ben A.; Orwoll, Eric S.; Palotie, Aarno; Parker, Stephan; Peacock, Munro; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Prince, Richard L.; Raïkkönen, Katri; Ralston, Stuart H.; Ripatti, Samuli; Robbins, John A.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Satterfield, Suzanne; Schadt, Eric E.; Schipf, Sabine; Scott, Laura; Sehmi, Joban; Shen, Jian; Soo Shin, Chan; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Smith, Shad; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Streeten, Elizabeth A.; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Swart, Karin M.A.; Tan, Sian Tsung; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Thompson, Patricia; Thomson, Cynthia A.; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tranah, Gregory J.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Schoor, van Natasja M.; Verma, Arjun; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Walker, Mark; Weedon, Michael N.; Welch, Ryan; Wichman, H.E.; Widen, Elisabeth; Williams, Frances M.K.; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Nicole C.; Xie, Weijia; Yu, Lei; Zhou, Yanhua; Chambers, John C.; Döring, Angela; Duijn, Van Cornelia M.; Econs, Michael J.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Spector, Timothy D.; Stefansson, Kari; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Ossowski, Vicky; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Karasik, David; Harris, Tamara B.; Ohlsson, Claes; Kiel, Douglas P.

    2017-01-01

    Lean body mass, consisting mostly of skeletal muscle, is important for healthy aging. We performed a genome-wide association study for whole body (20 cohorts of European ancestry with n = 38,292) and appendicular (arms and legs) lean body mass (n = 28,330) measured using dual energy X-ray

  7. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okbay, Aysu; Baselmans, Bart M L; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Turley, Patrick; Nivard, Michel G; Fontana, Mark Alan; Meddens, S Fleur W; Linnér, Richard Karlsson; Rietveld, Cornelius A; Derringer, Jaime; Gratten, Jacob; Lee, James J; Liu, Jimmy Z; de Vlaming, Ronald; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Buchwald, Jadwiga; Cavadino, Alana; Frazier-Wood, Alexis C; Furlotte, Nicholas A; Garfield, Victoria; Geisel, Marie Henrike; Gonzalez, Juan R; Haitjema, Saskia; Karlsson, Robert; van der Laan, Sander W; Ladwig, Karl-Heinz; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Tian; Matteson, Lindsay; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B; Minica, Camelia C; Nolte, Ilja M; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis; van der Most, Peter J; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rawal, Rajesh; Realo, Anu; Rueedi, Rico; Schmidt, Börge; Smith, Albert V; Stergiakouli, Evie; Tanaka, Toshiko; Taylor, Kent; Wedenoja, Juho; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Willems, Sara M; Zhao, Wei; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Boyle, Patricia A; Cherney, Samantha; Cox, Simon R; Davies, Gail; Davis, Oliver S P; Ding, Jun; Direk, Nese; Eibich, Peter; Emeny, Rebecca T; Fatemifar, Ghazaleh; Faul, Jessica D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forstner, Andreas; Gieger, Christian; Gupta, Richa; Harris, Tamara B; Harris, Juliette M; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; De Jager, Philip L; Kaakinen, Marika A; Kajantie, Eero; Karhunen, Ville; Kolcic, Ivana; Kumari, Meena; Launer, Lenore J; Franke, Lude; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Koini, Marisa; Loukola, Anu; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Montgomery, Grant W; Mosing, Miriam A; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pattie, Alison; Petrovic, Katja E; Pulkki-Råback, Laura; Quaye, Lydia; Räikkönen, Katri; Rudan, Igor; Scott, Rodney J; Smith, Jennifer A; Sutin, Angelina R; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Vinkhuyzen, Anna E; Yu, Lei; Zabaneh, Delilah; Attia, John R; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Boomsma, Dorret I; Snieder, Harold; Chang, Shun-Chiao; Cucca, Francesco; Deary, Ian J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eriksson, Johan G; Bültmann, Ute; de Geus, Eco J C; Groenen, Patrick J F; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hansen, Torben; Hartman, Catharine A; Haworth, Claire M A; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hinds, David A; Hyppönen, Elina; Iacono, William G; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keltikangas-Järvinen, Liisa; Kraft, Peter; Kubzansky, Laura D; Lehtimäki, Terho; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mills, Melinda; de Mutsert, Renée; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Pedersen, Nancy L; Plomin, Robert; Polasek, Ozren; Power, Christine; Rich, Stephen S; Rosendaal, Frits R; den Ruijter, Hester M; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Helena; Svento, Rauli; Schmidt, Reinhold; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Spector, Tim D; Steptoe, Andrew; Terracciano, Antonio; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tiemeier, Henning; Uitterlinden, André G; Vollenweider, Peter; Wagner, Gert G; Weir, David R; Yang, Jian; Conley, Dalton C; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Laibson, David I; Medland, Sarah E; Meyer, Michelle N; Pickrell, Joseph K; Esko, Tõnu; Krueger, Robert F; Beauchamp, Jonathan P; Koellinger, Philipp D; Benjamin, Daniel J; Bartels, Meike; Cesarini, David

    Very few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data. We conducted

  8. Genetic variants associated with subjective well-being, depressive symptoms, and neuroticism identified through genome-wide analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Okbay (Aysu); Baselmans, B.M.L. (Bart M.L.); J.E. de Neve (Jan-Emmanuel); P. Turley (Patrick); M. Nivard (Michel); Fontana, M.A. (Mark Alan); Meddens, S.F.W. (S. Fleur W.); Linnér, R.K. (Richard Karlsson); Rietveld, C.A. (Cornelius A); J. Derringer; J. Gratten (Jacob); J.J. Lee (James J.); Liu, J.Z. (Jimmy Z); R. de Vlaming (Ronald); SAhluwalia, T. (Tarunveer); Buchwald, J. (Jadwiga); A. Cavadino (Alana); A.C. Frazier-Wood (Alexis C.); Furlotte, N.A. (Nicholas A); Garfield, V. (Victoria); Geisel, M.H. (Marie Henrike); J.R. Gonzalez (Juan R.); Haitjema, S. (Saskia); R. Karlsson (Robert); Der Laan, S.W. (Sander Wvan); K.-H. Ladwig (Karl-Heinz); J. Lahti (Jari); S.J. van der Lee (Sven); P.A. Lind (Penelope); Liu, T. (Tian); Matteson, L. (Lindsay); E. Mihailov (Evelin); M. Miller (Mike); CMinica, C. (Camelia); MNolte, I. (Ilja); D.O. Mook-Kanamori (Dennis); P.J. van der Most (Peter); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); Y. Qian (Yong); O. Raitakari (Olli); R. Rawal (R.); A. Realo; Rueedi, R. (Rico); Schmidt, B. (Börge); A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); E. Stergiakouli (Evangelia); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); K.D. Taylor (Kent); Wedenoja, J. (Juho); Wellmann, J. (Juergen); H.J. Westra (Harm-Jan); MWillems, S. (Sara); Zhao, W. (Wei); L.C. Study (LifeLines Cohort); N. Amin (Najaf); Bakshi, A. (Andrew); P.A. Boyle (Patricia); Cherney, S. (Samantha); Cox, S.R. (Simon R); G. Davies (Gail); O.S.P. Davis (Oliver S.); J. Ding (Jun); N. Direk (Nese); Eibich, P. (Peter); R. Emeny (Rebecca); Fatemifar, G. (Ghazaleh); J.D. Faul; L. Ferrucci (Luigi); A.J. Forstner (Andreas); C. Gieger (Christian); Gupta, R. (Richa); T.B. Harris (Tamara); J.M. Harris (Juliette); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); P.L. de Jager (Philip); M. Kaakinen (Marika); E. Kajantie (Eero); Karhunen, V. (Ville); I. Kolcic (Ivana); M. Kumari (Meena); L.J. Launer (Lenore); L. Franke (Lude); Li-Gao, R. (Ruifang); Koini, M. (Marisa); A. Loukola (Anu); P. Marques-Vidal; G.W. Montgomery (Grant); M. Mosing (Miriam); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); A. Pattie (Alison); K. Petrovic (Katja); Pulkki-R'back, L. (Laura); L. Quaye (Lydia); R'ikkönen, K. (Katri); I. Rudan (Igor); R. Scott (Rodney); J.A. Smith (Jennifer A); A.R. Sutin; Trzaskowski, M. (Maciej); Vinkhuyze, A.E. (Anna E.); L. Yu (Lei); D. Zabaneh (Delilah); J. Attia (John); D.A. Bennett (David A.); Berger, K. (Klaus); L. Bertram (Lars); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); H. Snieder (Harold); Chang, S.-C. (Shun-Chiao); F. Cucca (Francesco); I.J. Deary (Ian J.); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); K. Hagen (Knut); U. Bültmann (Ute); E.J. Geus (Eeco); P.J.F. Groenen (Patrick); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); T. Hansen (T.); Hartman, C.A. (Catharine A); C.M.A. Haworth (Claire M.); C. Hayward (Caroline); A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); D.A. Hinds (David A.); E. Hypponen (Elina); W.G. Iacono (William); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); K.-H. JöCkel (Karl-Heinz); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); Keltikangas-J'rvinen, L. (Liisa); P. Kraft (Peter); Kubzansky, L.D. (Laura D.); Lehtim'ki, T. (Terho); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. McGue (Matt); A. Metspalu (Andres); M. Mills (Melinda); R. de Mutsert (Reneé); A.J. Oldehinkel (Albertine); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); R. Plomin (Robert); O. Polasek (Ozren); C. Power (Christopher); S.S. Rich (Stephen); F.R. Rosendaal (Frits); H.M. den Ruijter (Hester ); Schlessinger, D. (David); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); R. Svento (Rauli); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); B.Z. Alizadeh (Behrooz); T.I.A. Sørensen (Thorkild); DSpector, T. (Tim); Steptoe, A. (Andrew); A. Terracciano; A.R. Thurik (Roy); N.J. Timpson (Nicholas); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); P. Vollenweider (Peter); Wagner, G.G. (Gert G.); D.R. Weir (David); J. Yang (Joanna); Conley, D.C. (Dalton C.); G.D. Smith; Hofman, A. (Albert); M. Johannesson (Magnus); D. Laibson (David); S.E. Medland (Sarah Elizabeth); M.N. Meyer (Michelle N.); Pickrell, J.K. (Joseph K.); Esko, T. (T'nu); R.F. Krueger; J.P. Beauchamp (Jonathan); Ph.D. Koellinger (Philipp); D.J. Benjamin (Daniel J.); M. Bartels (Meike); D. Cesarini (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractVery few genetic variants have been associated with depression and neuroticism, likely because of limitations on sample size in previous studies. Subjective well-being, a phenotype that is genetically correlated with both of these traits, has not yet been studied with genome-wide data.

  9. Genome-wide analysis of multi-ancestry cohorts identifies new loci influencing intraocular pressure and susceptibility to glaucoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hysi, Pirro G.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Springelkamp, Henriet; Macgregor, Stuart; Bailey, Jessica N. Cooke; Wojciechowski, Robert; Vitart, Veronique; Nag, Abhishek; Hewitt, Alex W.; Hohn, Rene; Venturini, Cristina; Mirshahi, Alireza; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Vithana, Eranga; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Stefansson, Arni B.; Liao, Jiemin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Amin, Najaf; Wang, Ya Xing; Wild, Philipp S.; Ozel, Ayse B.; Li, Jun Z.; Fleck, Brian W.; Zeller, Tanja; Staffieri, Sandra E.; Teo, Yik-Ying; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Luo, Xiaoyan; Allingham, R. Rand; Richards, Julia E.; Senft, Andrea; Karssen, Lennart C.; Zheng, Yingfeng; Bellenguez, Celine; Xu, Liang; Iglesias, Adriana I.; Wilson, James F.; Kang, Jae H.; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Despriet, Dominiek D. G.; Ennis, Sarah; Moroi, Sayoko E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Yazar, Seyhan; Tai, E-Shyong

    2014-01-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is an important risk factor in developing glaucoma, and variability in IOP might herald glaucomatous development or progression. We report the results of a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of 18 population cohorts from the International Glaucoma

  10. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies novel loci that influence cupping and the glaucomatous process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Springelkamp, Henriët; Höhn, René; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Loomis, Stephanie J; Bailey, Jessica N Cooke; Gibson, Jane; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Janssen, Sarah F; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D; Vithana, Eranga; Nongpiur, Monisha E; Montgomery, Grant W; Xu, Liang; Mountain, Jenny E; Gharahkhani, Puya; Lu, Yi; Amin, Najaf; Karssen, Lennart C; Sim, Kar-Seng; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Iglesias, Adriana I; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; Hauser, Michael A; Loon, Seng-Chee; Despriet, Dominiek D G; Nag, Abhishek; Venturini, Cristina; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Schillert, Arne; Kang, Jae H; Landers, John; Jonasson, Fridbert; Cree, Angela J; van Koolwijk, Leonieke M E; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Souzeau, Emmanuelle; Jonsson, Vesteinn; Menon, Geeta; Weinreb, Robert N; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Oostra, Ben A; Uitterlinden, André G; Hofman, Albert; Ennis, Sarah; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Burdon, Kathryn P; Spector, Timothy D; Mirshahi, Alireza; Saw, Seang-Mei; Vingerling, Johannes R; Teo, Yik-Ying; Haines, Jonathan L; Wolfs, Roger C W; Lemij, Hans G; Tai, E-Shyong; Jansonius, Nomdo M; Jonas, Jost B; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Aung, Tin; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Klaver, Caroline C W; Craig, Jamie E; Macgregor, Stuart; Mackey, David A; Lotery, Andrew J; Stefansson, Kari; Bergen, Arthur A B; Young, Terri L; Wiggs, Janey L; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Wong, Tien-Yin; Pasquale, Louis R; Hewitt, Alex W; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Hammond, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by irreversible optic nerve degeneration and is the most frequent cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. Here, the International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducts a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR), an important

  11. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies GRK5 and RASGRP1 as Type 2 Diabetes Loci in Chinese Hans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Huaixing; Gan, Wei; Lu, Ling; Dong, Xiao; Han, Xueyao; Hu, Cheng; Yang, Zhen; Sun, Liang; Bao, Wei; Li, Pengtao; He, Meian; Sun, Liangdan; Wang, Yiqin; Zhu, Jingwen; Ning, Qianqian; Tang, Yong; Zhang, Rong; Wen, Jie; Wang, Di; Zhu, Xilin; Guo, Kunquan; Zuo, Xianbo; Guo, Xiaohui; Yang, Handong; Zhou, Xianghai; Zhang, Xuejun; Qi, Lu; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Hu, Frank B.; Wu, Tangchun; Liu, Ying; Liu, Liegang; Yang, Ze; Hu, Renming; Jia, Weiping; Ji, Linong; Li, Yixue; Lin, Xu; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana

    Substantial progress has been made in identification of type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk loci in the past few years, but our understanding of the genetic basis of T2D in ethnically diverse populations remains limited. We performed a genome-wide association study and a replication study in Chinese Hans

  12. A genome-wide association study identifies susceptibility loci for nonsyndromic sagittal craniosynostosis near BMP2 and within BBS9

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Justice, C.M.; Yagnik, G.; Kim, Y.; Peter, I.; Jabs, E.W.; Erazo, M.; Ye, X.; Ainehsazan, E.; Shi, L.; Cunningham, M.L.; Kimonis, V.; Roscioli, T.; Wall, S.A.; Wilkie, A.O.; Stoler, J.; Richtsmeier, J.T.; Heuze, Y.; Sanchez-Lara, P.A.; Buckley, M.F.; Druschel, C.M.; Mills, J.L.; Caggana, M.; Romitti, P.A.; Kay, D.M.; Senders, C.; Taub, P.J.; Klein, O.D.; Boggan, J.; Zwienenberg-Lee, M.; Naydenov, C.; Kim, J.; Wilson, A.F.; Boyadjiev, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Sagittal craniosynostosis is the most common form of craniosynostosis, affecting approximately one in 5,000 newborns. We conducted, to our knowledge, the first genome-wide association study for nonsyndromic sagittal craniosynostosis (sNSC) using 130 non-Hispanic case-parent trios of European

  13. Large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies five loci for lean body mass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zillikens, M Carola; Demissie, Serkalem; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-01-01

    Lean body mass, consisting mostly of skeletal muscle, is important for healthy aging. We performed a genome-wide association study for whole body (20 cohorts of European ancestry with n = 38,292) and appendicular (arms and legs) lean body mass (n = 28,330) measured using dual energy X-ray absorpt...

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies a common variant in RAD51B associated with male breast cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orr, Nick; Lemnrau, Alina; Cooke, Rosie

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study of male breast cancer comprising 823 cases and 2,795 controls of European ancestry, with validation in independent sample sets totaling 438 cases and 474 controls. A SNP in RAD51B at 14q24.1 was significantly associated with male breast cancer risk (P ...

  15. Nine Loci for Ocular Axial Length Identified through Genome-wide Association Studies, Including Shared Loci with Refractive Error

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Ching-Yu; Schache, Maria; Ikram, M. Kamran; Young, Terri L.; Guggenheim, Jeremy A.; Vitart, Veronique; Macgregor, Stuart; Verhoeven, Virginie J. M.; Barathi, Veluchamy A.; Liao, Jiemin; Hysi, Pirro G.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; St Pourcain, Beate; Kemp, John P.; McMahon, George; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Evans, David M.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mishra, Aniket; Wang, Ya Xing; Wang, Jie Jin; Rochtchina, Elena; Polasek, Ozren; Wright, Alan F.; Amin, Najaf; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Wilson, James F.; Pennell, Craig E.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Zhou, Xin; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Tay, Wan-Ting; Zheng, Yingfeng; Chew, Merwyn; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Craig, Jamie E.; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Igo, Robert P.; Lass, Jonathan H.; Chew, Emily Y.; Haller, Toomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Metspalu, Andres; Wedenoja, Juho; Simpson, Claire L.; Wojciechowski, Robert; Höhn, René; Mirshahi, Alireza; Zeller, Tanja; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Lackner, Karl J.; Bettecken, Thomas; Meitinger, Thomas; Oexle, Konrad; Pirastu, Mario; Portas, Laura; Nag, Abhishek; Williams, Katie M.; Yonova-Doing, Ekaterina; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara E.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Paterson, Andrew D.; Makela, Kari-Matti; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kahonen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Yoshimura, Nagahisa; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Chen, Li Jia; Pang, Chi Pui; Yip, Shea Ping; Yap, Maurice K. H.; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Foster, Paul J.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Vithana, Eranga; Tai, E.-Shyong; Fan, Qiao; Xu, Liang; Campbell, Harry; Fleck, Brian; Rudan, Igor; Aung, Tin; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Bencic, Goran; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Forward, Hannah; Pärssinen, Olavi; Mitchell, Paul; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hewitt, Alex W.; Williams, Cathy; Oostra, Ben A.; teo, Yik-Ying; Hammond, Christopher J.; Stambolian, Dwight; Mackey, David A.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; Wong, Tien-Yin; Saw, Seang-Mei; Baird, Paul N.; Rahi, Jugnoo S.; Yamashiro, Kenji; Miyake, Masahiro; Delcourt, Cécile; Maubaret, Cecilia; Northstone, Kate; Ring, Susan M.; Davey-Smith, George; Fogarty, Rhys D.; Chew, Emily; Janmahasathian, Sarayut; Bailey Wilson, Joan E.; Lu, Yi; Jonas, Jost B.; Nangia, Vinay; Hayward, Caroline; Vatavuk, Zoran; Mohsen Hosseini, S.; Fondran, Jeremy R.; Feng, Sheng; Klaver, Caroline C.; Wegner, Aharon; Ho, Daniel W. H.; Murgia, Federico; Biino, Genevra; Ang, Wei; Kamran Ikram, M.; Deangelis, Margaret M.; Morrison, Margaux; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Wei; D Paterson, Andrew; Lehtimäki, Terho; Mäkelä, Kari-Matti; Kähönen, Mika; Reinhart, William; Belin, Michael W.; Schultze, Robert L.; Morason, Todd; Sugar, Alan; Mian, Shahzad; Soong, Hunson Kaz; Colby, Kathryn; Jurkunas, Ula; Yee, Richard; Vital, Mark; Alfonso, Eduardo; Karp, Carol; Lee, Yunhee; Yoo, Sonia; Hammersmith, Kristin; Cohen, Elisabeth; Laibson, Peter; Rapuano, Christopher; Ayres, Brandon; Croasdale, Christopher; Caudill, James; Patel, Sanjay; Baratz, Keith; Bourne, William; Maguire, Leo; Sugar, Joel; Tu, Elmer; Djalilian, Ali; Mootha, Vinod; McCulley, James; Bowman, Wayne; Cavanaugh, H. Dwight; Verity, Steven; Verdier, David; Renucci, Ann; Oliva, Matt; Rotkis, Walter; Hardten, David R.; Fahmy, Ahmad; Brown, Marlene; Reeves, Sherman; Davis, Elizabeth A.; Lindstrom, Richard; Hauswirth, Scott; Hamilton, Stephen; Lee, W. Barry; Price, Francis; Price, Marianne; Kelly, Kathleen; Peters, Faye; Shaughnessy, Michael; Steinemann, Thomas; Dupps, B. J.; Meisler, David M.; Mifflin, Mark; Olson, Randal; Aldave, Anthony; Holland, Gary; Mondino, Bartly J.; Rosenwasser, George; Gorovoy, Mark; Dunn, Steven P.; Heidemann, David G.; Terry, Mark; Shamie, Neda; Rosenfeld, Steven I.; Suedekum, Brandon; Hwang, David; Stone, Donald; Chodosh, James; Galentine, Paul G.; Bardenstein, David; Goddard, Katrina; Chin, Hemin; Mannis, Mark; Varma, Rohit; Borecki, Ingrid; Donnelly, Peter; Barroso, Ines; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Bramon, Elvira; Brown, Matthew A.; Casas, Juan P.; Corvin, Aiden; Deloukas, Panos; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz; Markus, Hugh S.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J.; Trembath, Richard C.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Band, Gavin; Bellenguez, Céline; Freeman, Colin; Hellenthal, Garrett; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Pirinen, Matti; Pearson, Richard; Strange, Amy; Su, Zhan; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gwilliam, Rhian; Blackburn, Hannah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Dronov, Serge; Gillman, Matthew; Gray, Emma; Hammond, Naomi; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; McCann, Owen T.; Liddle, Jennifer; Potter, Simon C.; Ravindrarajah, Radhi; Ricketts, Michelle; Waller, Matthew; Weston, Paul; Widaa, Sara; Whittaker, Pamela; Genuth, S.; Nathan, D. M.; Zinman, B.; Crofford, O.; Crandall, J.; Reid, M.; Brown-Friday, J.; Engel, S.; Sheindlin, J.; Martinez, H.; Shamoon, H.; Engel, H.; Phillips, M.; Gubitosi-Klug, R.; Mayer, L.; Pendegast, S.; Zegarra, H.; Miller, D.; Singerman, L.; Smith-Brewer, S.; Novak, M.; Quin, J.; Dahms, W.; Genuth, Saul; Palmert, M.; Brillon, D.; Lackaye, M. E.; Kiss, S.; Chan, R.; Reppucci, V.; Lee, T.; Heinemann, M.; Whitehouse, F.; Kruger, D.; Jones, J. K.; McLellan, M.; Carey, J. D.; Angus, E.; Thomas, A.; Galprin, A.; Bergenstal, R.; Johnson, M.; Spencer, M.; Morgan, K.; Etzwiler, D.; Kendall, D.; Aiello, Lloyd Paul; Golden, E.; Jacobson, A.; Beaser, R.; Ganda, O.; Hamdy, O.; Wolpert, H.; Sharuk, G.; Arrigg, P.; Schlossman, D.; Rosenzwieg, J.; Rand, L.; Larkin, M.; Ong, M.; Godine, J.; Cagliero, E.; Lou, P.; Folino, K.; Fritz, S.; Crowell, S.; Hansen, K.; Gauthier-Kelly, C.; Service, J.; Ziegler, G.; Luttrell, L.; Caulder, S.; Lopes-Virella, M.; Colwell, J.; Soule, J.; Fernandes, J.; Hermayer, K.; Kwon, S.; Brabham, M.; Blevins, A.; Parker, J.; Lee, D.; Patel, N.; Pittman, C.; Lindsey, P.; Bracey, M.; Lee, K.; Nutaitis, M.; Farr, A.; Elsing, S.; Thompson, T.; Selby, J.; Lyons, T.; Yacoub-Wasef, S.; Szpiech, M.; Wood, D.; Mayfield, R.; Molitch, M.; Schaefer, B.; Jampol, L.; Lyon, A.; Gill, M.; Strugula, Z.; Kaminski, L.; Mirza, R.; Simjanoski, E.; Ryan, D.; Kolterman, O.; Lorenzi, G.; Goldbaum, M.; Sivitz, W.; Bayless, M.; Counts, D.; Johnsonbaugh, S.; Hebdon, M.; Salemi, P.; Liss, R.; Donner, T.; Gordon, J.; Hemady, R.; Kowarski, A.; Ostrowski, D.; Steidl, S.; Jones, B.; Herman, W. H.; Martin, C. L.; Pop-Busui, R.; Sarma, A.; Albers, J.; Feldman, E.; Kim, K.; Elner, S.; Comer, G.; Gardner, T.; Hackel, R.; Prusak, R.; Goings, L.; Smith, A.; Gothrup, J.; Titus, P.; Lee, J.; Brandle, M.; Prosser, L.; Greene, D. A.; Stevens, M. J.; Vine, A. K.; Bantle, J.; Wimmergren, N.; Cochrane, A.; Olsen, T.; Steuer, E.; Rath, P.; Rogness, B.; Hainsworth, D.; Goldstein, D.; Hitt, S.; Giangiacomo, J.; Schade, D. S.; Canady, J. L.; Chapin, J. E.; Ketai C, L. H.; Braunstein, S.; Bourne, P. A.; Schwartz, S.; Brucker, A.; Maschak-Carey, B. J.; Baker, L.; Orchard, T.; Silvers, N.; Ryan, C.; Songer, T.; Doft, B.; Olson, S.; Bergren, R. L.; Lobes, L.; Paczan Rath, P.; Becker, D.; Rubinstein, D.; Conrad, P. W.; Yalamanchi, S.; Drash, A.; Morrison, A.; Bernal, M. L.; Vaccaro-Kish, J.; Malone, J.; Pavan, P. R.; Grove, N.; Iyer, M. N.; Burrows, A. F.; Tanaka, E. A.; Gstalder, R.; Dagogo-Jack, S.; Wigley, C.; Ricks, H.; Kitabchi, A.; Murphy, M. B.; Moser, S.; Meyer, D.; Iannacone, A.; Chaum, E.; Yoser, S.; Bryer-Ash, M.; Schussler, S.; Lambeth, H.; Raskin, P.; Strowig, S.; Barnie, A.; Devenyi, R.; Mandelcorn, M.; Brent, M.; Rogers, S.; Gordon, A.; Palmer, J.; Catton, S.; Brunzell, J.; Wessells, H.; de Boer, I. H.; Hokanson, J.; Purnell, J.; Ginsberg, J.; Kinyoun, J.; Deeb, S.; Weiss, M.; Meekins, G.; Distad, J.; van Ottingham, L.; Dupre, J.; Harth, J.; Nicolle, D.; Driscoll, M.; Mahon, J.; Canny, C.; May, M.; Lipps, J.; Agarwal, A.; Adkins, T.; Survant, L.; Pate, R. L.; Munn, G. E.; Lorenz, R.; Feman, S.; White, N.; Levandoski, L.; Boniuk, I.; Grand, G.; Thomas, M.; Joseph, D. D.; Blinder, K.; Shah, G.; Burgess, I.; Santiago, J.; Tamborlane, W.; Gatcomb, P.; Stoessel, K.; Taylor, K.; Goldstein, J.; Novella, S.; Mojibian, H.; Cornfeld, D.; Lima, J.; Bluemke, D.; Turkbey, E.; van der Geest, R. J.; Liu, C.; Malayeri, A.; Jain, A.; Miao, C.; Chahal, H.; Jarboe, R.; Maynard, J.; Gaston, P.; Trail, R.; Lachin, J.; Cleary, P.; Backlund, J.; Sun, W.; Braffett, B.; Klumpp, K.; Chan, K.; Diminick, L.; Rosenberg, D.; Petty, B.; Determan, A.; Kenny, D.; Rutledge, B.; Younes, Naji; Dews, L.; Hawkins, M.; Cowie, C.; Fradkin, J.; Siebert, C.; Eastman, R.; Danis, R.; Gangaputra, S.; Neill, S.; Davis, M.; Hubbard, L.; Wabers, H.; Burger, M.; Dingledine, J.; Gama, V.; Sussman, R.; Steffes, M.; Bucksa, J.; Nowicki, M.; Chavers, B.; O'Leary, D.; Polak, J.; Harrington, A.; Funk, L.; Crow, R.; Gloeb, B.; Thomas, S.; O'Donnell, C.; Soliman, E.; Zhang, Z. M.; Prineas, R.; Campbell, C.; Sandstrom, D.; Williams, T.; Geckle, M.; Cupelli, E.; Thoma, F.; Burzuk, B.; Woodfill, T.; Low, P.; Sommer, C.; Nickander, K.; Budoff, M.; Detrano, R.; Wong, N.; Fox, M.; Kim, L.; Oudiz, R.; Weir, G.; Espeland, M.; Manolio, T.; Singer, D.; Stern, M.; Boulton, A. E.; Clark, C.; D'Agostino, R.; Garvey, W. T.; Lyons, T. J.; Jenkins, A.; Virella, G.; Jaffa, A.; Carter, Rickey; Lackland, D.; McGee, D.; Zheng, D.; Mayfield, R. K.; Boright, A.; Bull, S.; Sun, L.; Scherer, S.; Natarajan, R.; Miao, F.; Zhang, L.; Chen, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Refractive errors are common eye disorders of public health importance worldwide. Ocular axial length (AL) is the major determinant of refraction and thus of myopia and hyperopia. We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for AL, combining 12,531 Europeans and 8,216 Asians. We

  16. Genome Wide Association Study to Identify the Genetic Base of Smallholder Farmer Preferences of Durum Wheat Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef G. Kidane

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Smallholder agriculture involves millions of farmers worldwide. A methodical utilization of their traditional knowledge in modern breeding efforts may help the production of locally adapted varieties better addressing their needs. In this study, a combination of participatory approaches, genomics, and quantitative genetics is used to trace the genetic basis of smallholder farmer preferences of durum wheat traits. Two smallholder communities evaluated 400 Ethiopian wheat varieties, mostly landraces, for traits of local interest in two locations in the Ethiopian highlands. For each wheat variety, farmers provided quantitative evaluations of their preference for flowering time, spike morphology, tillering capacity, and overall quality. Ten agronomic and phenology traits were simultaneously measured on the same varieties, providing the means to compare them with farmer traits. The analysis of farmer traits showed that they were partially influenced by gender and location but were repeatable and heritable, in some cases more than metric traits. The durum wheat varieties were genotyped for more than 80,000 SNP markers, and the resulting data was used in a genome wide association (GWA study providing the molecular dissection of smallholder farmers' choice criteria. We found 124 putative quantitative trait loci (QTL controlling farmer traits and 30 putative QTL controlling metric traits. Twenty of such QTL were jointly identified by farmer and metric traits. QTL derived from farmer traits were in some cases dependent on gender and location, but were consistent throughout. The results of the GWA study show that smallholder farmers' traditional knowledge can yield QTL eluding metric measurements of phenotypes. We discuss the potential of including farmer evaluations based on traditional knowledge in crop breeding, arguing for the utilization of this untapped resource to develop better adapted genetic materials for local agriculture.

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies nox3 as a critical gene for susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Lavinsky

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In the United States, roughly 10% of the population is exposed daily to hazardous levels of noise in the workplace. Twin studies estimate heritability for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL of approximately 36%, and strain specific variation in sensitivity has been demonstrated in mice. Based upon the difficulties inherent to the study of NIHL in humans, we have turned to the study of this complex trait in mice. We exposed 5 week-old mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP to a 10 kHz octave band noise at 108 dB for 2 hours and assessed the permanent threshold shift 2 weeks post exposure using frequency specific stimuli. These data were then used in a genome-wide association study (GWAS using the Efficient Mixed Model Analysis (EMMA to control for population structure. In this manuscript we describe our GWAS, with an emphasis on a significant peak for susceptibility to NIHL on chromosome 17 within a haplotype block containing NADPH oxidase-3 (Nox3. Our peak was detected after an 8 kHz tone burst stimulus. Nox3 mutants and heterozygotes were then tested to validate our GWAS. The mutants and heterozygotes demonstrated a greater susceptibility to NIHL specifically at 8 kHz both on measures of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE and on auditory brainstem response (ABR. We demonstrate that this sensitivity resides within the synaptic ribbons of the cochlea in the mutant animals specifically at 8 kHz. Our work is the first GWAS for NIHL in mice and elucidates the power of our approach to identify tonotopic genetic susceptibility to NIHL.

  18. Genome-wide DNA methylation study in human placenta identifies novel loci associated with maternal smoking during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Eva; Vilahur, Nadia; Salas, Lucas A; Motta, Valeria; Fernandez, Mariana F; Murcia, Mario; Llop, Sabrina; Tardon, Adonina; Fernandez-Tardon, Guillermo; Santa-Marina, Loreto; Gallastegui, Mara; Bollati, Valentina; Estivill, Xavier; Olea, Nicolas; Sunyer, Jordi; Bustamante, Mariona

    2016-10-01

    We conducted an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) of DNA methylation in placenta in relation to maternal tobacco smoking during pregnancy and examined whether smoking-induced changes lead to low birthweight. DNA methylation in placenta was measured using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip in 179 participants from the INfancia y Medio Ambiente (INMA) birth cohort. Methylation levels across 431 311 CpGs were tested for differential methylation between smokers and non-smokers in pregnancy. We took forward three top-ranking loci for further validation and replication by bisulfite pyrosequencing using data of 248 additional participants of the INMA cohort. We examined the association of methylation at smoking-associated loci with birthweight by applying a mediation analysis and a two-sample Mendelian randomization approach. Fifty CpGs were differentially methylated in placenta between smokers and non-smokers during pregnancy [false discovery rate (FDR) < 0.05]. We validated and replicated differential methylation at three top-ranking loci: cg27402634 located between LINC00086 and LEKR1, a gene previously related to birthweight in genome-wide association studies; cg20340720 (WBP1L); and cg25585967 and cg12294026 (TRIO). Dose-response relationships with maternal urine cotinine concentration during pregnancy were confirmed. Differential methylation at cg27402634 explained up to 36% of the lower birthweight in the offspring of smokers (Sobel P-value < 0.05). A two-sample Mendelian randomization analysis provided evidence that decreases in methylation levels at cg27402634 lead to decreases in birthweight. We identified novel loci differentially methylated in placenta in relation to maternal smoking during pregnancy. Adverse effects of maternal smoking on birthweight of the offspring may be mediated by alterations in the placental methylome. © The Author 2016; all rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International

  19. Genome-wide association study identifies a novel susceptibility gene for serum TSH levels in Chinese populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ming; Chen, Gang; Pan, Chun-Ming; Gu, Zhao-Hui; Zhao, Shuang-Xia; Liu, Wei; Wang, Hai-Ning; Ye, Xiao-Ping; Xie, Hui-Jun; Yu, Sha-Sha; Liang, Jun; Gao, Guan-Qi; Yuan, Guo-Yue; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Zuo, Chun-Lin; Su, Bin; Huang, Wei; Ning, Guang; Chen, Sai-Juan; Chen, Jia-Lun; Song, Huai-Dong

    2014-10-15

    Thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) is a sensitive indicator of thyroid function. High and low TSH levels reflect hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism, respectively. Even within the normal range, small differences in TSH levels, on the order of 0.5-1.0 mU/l, are associated with significant differences in blood pressure, BMI, dyslipidemia, risk of atrial fibrillation and atherosclerosis. Most of the variance in TSH levels is thought to be genetically influenced. We conducted a genome-wide association study of TSH levels in 1346 Chinese Han individuals. In the replication study, we genotyped four candidate SNPs with the top association signals in an independent isolated Chinese She cohort (n = 3235). We identified a novel serum TSH susceptibility locus within XKR4 at 8q12.1 (rs2622590, Pcombined = 2.21 × 10(-10)), and we confirmed two previously reported TSH susceptibility loci near FOXE1 at 9q22.33 and near CAPZB at 1p36.13, respectively. The rs2622590_T allele at XKR4 and the rs925489_C allele near FOXE1 were correlated with low TSH levels and were found to be nominally associated to patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) (OR = 1.41, P= 0.014 for rs2622590_T, and OR = 1.61, P= 0.030 for rs925489_C). The rs2622590 and rs925489 genotypes were also correlated with the expression levels of FOXE1 and XKR4, respectively, in PTC tissues (P = 2.41 × 10(-4) and P= 0.02). Our findings suggest that the SNPs in XKR4 and near FOXE1 are involved in the regulation of TSH levels. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Genome-wide association study of telomere length among South Asians identifies a second RTEL1 association signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Dayana A; Zhang, Chenan; Chen, Lin S; Gao, Jianjun; Roy, Shantanu; Shinkle, Justin; Sabarinathan, Mekala; Argos, Maria; Tong, Lin; Ahmed, Alauddin; Islam, Tariqul; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Sarwar, Golam; Shahriar, Hasan; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Yunus, Mohammad; Jasmine, Farzana; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L

    2018-01-01

    Leucocyte telomere length (TL) is a potential biomarker of ageing and risk for age-related disease. Leucocyte TL is heritable and shows substantial differences by race/ethnicity. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) report ~10 loci harbouring SNPs associated with leucocyte TL, but these studies focus primarily on populations of European ancestry. This study aims to enhance our understanding of genetic determinants of TL across populations. We performed a GWAS of TL using data on 5075 Bangladeshi adults. We measured TL using one of two technologies (qPCR or a Luminex-based method) and used standardised variables as TL phenotypes. Our results replicate previously reported associations in the TERC and TERT regions (P=2.2×10 -8 and P=6.4×10 -6 , respectively). We observed a novel association signal in the RTEL1 gene (intronic SNP rs2297439; P=2.82×10 -7 ) that is independent of previously reported TL-associated SNPs in this region. The minor allele for rs2297439 is common in South Asian populations (≥0.25) but at lower frequencies in other populations (eg, 0.07 in Northern Europeans). Among the eight other previously reported association signals, all were directionally consistent with our study, but only rs8105767 ( ZNF208 ) was nominally significant (P=0.003). SNP-based heritability estimates were as high as 44% when analysing close relatives but much lower when analysing distant relatives only. In this first GWAS of TL in a South Asian population, we replicate some, but not all, of the loci reported in prior GWAS of individuals of European ancestry, and we identify a novel second association signal at the RTEL1 locus. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. A genome-wide association analysis of a broad psychosis phenotype identifies three loci for further investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramon, Elvira; Pirinen, Matti; Strange, Amy; Lin, Kuang; Freeman, Colin; Bellenguez, Céline; Su, Zhan; Band, Gavin; Pearson, Richard; Vukcevic, Damjan; Langford, Cordelia; Deloukas, Panos; Hunt, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Dronov, Serge; Potter, Simon C; Tashakkori-Ghanbaria, Avazeh; Edkins, Sarah; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Arranz, Maria J; Bakker, Steven; Bender, Stephan; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; Chandler, David; Collier, David A; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dazzan, Paola; de Haan, Lieuwe; Di Forti, Marta; Dragović, Milan; Giegling, Ina; Hall, Jeremy; Iyegbe, Conrad; Jablensky, Assen; Kahn, René S; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Kravariti, Eugenia; Lawrie, Stephen; Linszen, Don H; Mata, Ignacio; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Ophoff, Roel A; Pariante, Carmine M; Paunio, Tiina; Picchioni, Marco; Ripke, Stephan; Rujescu, Dan; Sauer, Heinrich; Shaikh, Madiha; Sussmann, Jessika; Suvisaari, Jaana; Tosato, Sarah; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Van Os, Jim; Walshe, Muriel; Weisbrod, Matthias; Whalley, Heather; Wiersma, Durk; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Brown, Matthew A; Casas, Juan P; Corvin, Aiden; Duncanson, Audrey; Jankowski, Janusz A Z; Markus, Hugh S; Mathew, Christopher G; Palmer, Colin N A; Plomin, Robert; Rautanen, Anna; Sawcer, Stephen J; Trembath, Richard C; Wood, Nicholas W; Barroso, Ines; Peltonen, Leena; Lewis, Cathryn M; Murray, Robin M; Donnelly, Peter; Powell, John; Spencer, Chris C A

    2014-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several loci associated with schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder. We performed a GWAS of psychosis as a broad syndrome rather than within specific diagnostic categories. 1239 cases with schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, or psychotic bipolar disorder; 857 of their unaffected relatives, and 2739 healthy controls were genotyped with the Affymetrix 6.0 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Analyses of 695,193 SNPs were conducted using UNPHASED, which combines information across families and unrelated individuals. We attempted to replicate signals found in 23 genomic regions using existing data on nonoverlapping samples from the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium and Schizophrenia-GENE-plus cohorts (10,352 schizophrenia patients and 24,474 controls). No individual SNP showed compelling evidence for association with psychosis in our data. However, we observed a trend for association with same risk alleles at loci previously associated with schizophrenia (one-sided p = .003). A polygenic score analysis found that the Psychiatric GWAS Consortium's panel of SNPs associated with schizophrenia significantly predicted disease status in our sample (p = 5 × 10(-14)) and explained approximately 2% of the phenotypic variance. Although narrowly defined phenotypes have their advantages, we believe new loci may also be discovered through meta-analysis across broad phenotypes. The novel statistical methodology we introduced to model effect size heterogeneity between studies should help future GWAS that combine association evidence from related phenotypes. Applying these approaches, we highlight three loci that warrant further investigation. We found that SNPs conveying risk for schizophrenia are also predictive of disease status in our data. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genome-wide association analysis identifies new candidate risk loci for familial intracranial aneurysm in the French-Canadian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Sirui; Gan-Or, Ziv; Ambalavanan, Amirthagowri; Lai, Dongbing; Xie, Pingxing; Bourassa, Cynthia V; Strong, Stephanie; Ross, Jay P; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Spiegelman, Dan; Dupré, Nicolas; Foroud, Tatiana M; Xiong, Lan; Dion, Patrick A; Rouleau, Guy A

    2018-03-12

    Intracranial Aneurysm (IA) is a common disease with a worldwide prevalence of 1-3%. In the French-Canadian (FC) population, where there is an important founder effect, the incidence of IA is higher and is frequently seen in families. In this study, we genotyped a cohort of 257 mostly familial FC IA patients and 1,992 FC controls using the Illumina NeuroX SNP-chip. The most strongly associated loci were tested in 34 Inuit IA families and in 32 FC IA patients and 106 FC controls that had been exome sequenced (WES). After imputation, one locus at 3p14.2 (FHIT, rs1554600, p = 4.66 × 10 -9 ) reached a genome-wide significant level of association and a subsequent validation in Nunavik Inuit cohort further confirmed the significance of the FHIT variant association (rs780365, FBAT-O, p = 0.002839). Additionally, among the other promising loci (p < 5 × 10 -6 ), the one at 3q13.2 (rs78125721, p = 4.77 × 10 -7 ), which encompasses CCDC80, also showed an increased mutation burden in the WES data (CCDC80, SKAT-O, p = 0.0005). In this study, we identified two new potential IA loci in the FC population: FHIT, which is significantly associated with hypertensive IA, and CCDC80, which has potential genetic and functional relevance to IA pathogenesis, providing evidence on the additional risk loci for familial IA. We also replicated the previous IA GWAS risk locus 18q11.2, and suggested a potential locus at 8p23.1 that warrants further study.

  3. Genome-wide association studies identified novel loci for non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and its postprandial lipemic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ping; Straka, Robert J.; Pollin, Toni I.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Wojczynski, Mary K.; Daw, E. Warwick; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Gibson, Quince; Ryan, Kathleen A.; Hopkins, Paul N.; Tsai, Michael Y.; Lai, Chao-Qiang; Province, Michael A.; Ordovas, Jose M.; Shuldiner, Alan R; Arnett, Donna K.; Borecki, Ingrid B.

    2014-01-01

    Non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (NHDL) is an independent and superior predictor of CVD risk as compared to LDL alone. It represents a spectrum of atherogenic lipid fractions with possibly a distinct genomic signature. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify loci influencing baseline NHDL and its postprandial lipemic (PPL) response. We carried out GWAS in 4,241 participants of European descent. Our discovery cohort included 928 subjects from the Genetics of Lipid-Lowering Drugs and Diet Network (GOLDN) Study. Our replication cohorts included 3,313 subjects from the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention (HAPI) Heart Study and Family Heart Study (FamHS). A linear mixed model using the kinship matrix was used for association tests. The best association signal was found in a tri-genic region at RHOQ-PIGF-CRIPT for baseline NHDL (lead SNP rs6544903, discovery p = 7e-7, MAF = 2%; validation p = 6e-4 at 0.1 kb upstream neighboring SNP rs3768725, and 5e-4 at 0.7 kb downstream neighboring SNP rs6733143, MAF = 10%). The lead and neighboring SNPs were not perfect surrogate proxies to each other (D′ = 1, r2 = 0.003) but they seemed to be partially dependent (likelihood ration test p = 0.04). Other suggestive loci (discovery p 0.01). The current and first GWAS of NHDL yielded an interesting common variant in RHOQ-PIGF-CRIPT influencing baseline NHDL levels. Another common variant in CDH13 for NHDL response to dietary high fat intake challenge was also suggested. Further validations for both loci from large independent studies, especially interventional studies, are warranted. PMID:24604477

  4. Genome-wide Association Study to Identify Quantitative Trait Loci for Meat and Carcass Quality Traits in Berkshire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif Iqbal

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Meat and carcass quality attributes are of crucial importance influencing consumer preference and profitability in the pork industry. A set of 400 Berkshire pigs were collected from Dasan breeding farm, Namwon, Chonbuk province, Korea that were born between 2012 and 2013. To perform genome wide association studies (GWAS, eleven meat and carcass quality traits were considered, including carcass weight, backfat thickness, pH value after 24 hours (pH24, Commission Internationale de l’Eclairage lightness in meat color (CIE L, redness in meat color (CIE a, yellowness in meat color (CIE b, filtering, drip loss, heat loss, shear force and marbling score. All of the 400 animals were genotyped with the Porcine 62K SNP BeadChips (Illumina Inc., USA. A SAS general linear model procedure (SAS version 9.2 was used to pre-adjust the animal phenotypes before GWAS with sire and sex effects as fixed effects and slaughter age as a covariate. After fitting the fixed and covariate factors in the model, the residuals of the phenotype regressed on additive effects of each single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP under a linear regression model (PLINK version 1.07. The significant SNPs after permutation testing at a chromosome-wise level were subjected to stepwise regression analysis to determine the best set of SNP markers. A total of 55 significant (p<0.05 SNPs or quantitative trait loci (QTL were detected on various chromosomes. The QTLs explained from 5.06% to 8.28% of the total phenotypic variation of the traits. Some QTLs with pleiotropic effect were also identified. A pair of significant QTL for pH24 was also found to affect both CIE L and drip loss percentage. The significant QTL after characterization of the functional candidate genes on the QTL or around the QTL region may be effectively and efficiently used in marker assisted selection to achieve enhanced genetic improvement of the trait considered.

  5. Understanding PRRSV infection in porcine lung based on genome-wide transcriptome response identified by deep sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuqi Xiao

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS has been one of the most economically important diseases affecting swine industry worldwide and causes great economic losses each year. PRRS virus (PRRSV replicates mainly in porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs and dendritic cells (DCs and develops persistent infections, antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE, interstitial pneumonia and immunosuppression. But the molecular mechanisms of PRRSV infection still are poorly understood. Here we report on the first genome-wide host transcriptional responses to classical North American type PRRSV (N-PRRSV strain CH 1a infection using Solexa/Illumina's digital gene expression (DGE system, a tag-based high-throughput transcriptome sequencing method, and analyse systematically the relationship between pulmonary gene expression profiles after N-PRRSV infection and infection pathology. Our results suggest that N-PRRSV appeared to utilize multiple strategies for its replication and spread in infected pigs, including subverting host innate immune response, inducing an anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory state as well as developing ADE. Upregulation expression of virus-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules and inflammatory enzymes and inflammatory cells, antibodies, complement activation were likely to result in the development of inflammatory responses during N-PRRSV infection processes. N-PRRSV-induced immunosuppression might be mediated by apoptosis of infected cells, which caused depletion of immune cells and induced an anti-inflammatory cytokine response in which they were unable to eradicate the primary infection. Our systems analysis will benefit for better understanding the molecular pathogenesis of N-PRRSV infection, developing novel antiviral therapies and identifying genetic components for swine resistance/susceptibility to PRRS.

  6. Comparative Genome-Wide-Association Mapping Identifies Common Loci Controlling Root System Architecture and Resistance toAphanomyces euteichesin Pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgroux, Aurore; Baudais, Valentin N; Aubert, Véronique; Le Roy, Gwenola; de Larambergue, Henri; Miteul, Henri; Aubert, Grégoire; Boutet, Gilles; Duc, Gérard; Baranger, Alain; Burstin, Judith; Manzanares-Dauleux, Maria; Pilet-Nayel, Marie-Laure; Bourion, Virginie

    2017-01-01

    Combining plant genetic resistance with architectural traits that are unfavorable to disease development is a promising strategy for reducing epidemics. However, few studies have identified root system architecture (RSA) traits with the potential to limit root disease development. Pea is a major cultivated legume worldwide and has a wide level of natural genetic variability for plant architecture. The root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches is a major limiting factor of pea crop yield. This study aimed to increase the knowledge on the diversity of loci and candidate genes controlling RSA traits in pea and identify RSA genetic loci associated with resistance to A. euteiches which could be combined with resistance QTL in breeding. A comparative genome wide association (GWA) study of plant architecture and resistance to A. euteiches was conducted at the young plant stage in a collection of 266 pea lines contrasted for both traits. The collection was genotyped using 14,157 SNP markers from recent pea genomic resources. It was phenotyped for ten root, shoot and overall plant architecture traits, as well as three disease resistance traits in controlled conditions, using image analysis. We identified a total of 75 short-size genomic intervals significantly associated with plant architecture and overlapping with 46 previously detected QTL. The major consistent intervals included plant shoot architecture or flowering genes ( PsLE, PsTFL1 ) with putative pleiotropic effects on root architecture. A total of 11 genomic intervals were significantly associated with resistance to A. euteiches confirming several consistent previously identified major QTL. One significant SNP, mapped to the major QTL Ae-Ps7.6 , was associated with both resistance and RSA traits. At this marker, the resistance-enhancing allele was associated with an increased total root projected area, in accordance with the correlation observed between resistance and larger root systems in the collection. Seven

  7. Comparative Genome-Wide-Association Mapping Identifies Common Loci Controlling Root System Architecture and Resistance to Aphanomyces euteiches in Pea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurore Desgroux

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining plant genetic resistance with architectural traits that are unfavorable to disease development is a promising strategy for reducing epidemics. However, few studies have identified root system architecture (RSA traits with the potential to limit root disease development. Pea is a major cultivated legume worldwide and has a wide level of natural genetic variability for plant architecture. The root pathogen Aphanomyces euteiches is a major limiting factor of pea crop yield. This study aimed to increase the knowledge on the diversity of loci and candidate genes controlling RSA traits in pea and identify RSA genetic loci associated with resistance to A. euteiches which could be combined with resistance QTL in breeding. A comparative genome wide association (GWA study of plant architecture and resistance to A. euteiches was conducted at the young plant stage in a collection of 266 pea lines contrasted for both traits. The collection was genotyped using 14,157 SNP markers from recent pea genomic resources. It was phenotyped for ten root, shoot and overall plant architecture traits, as well as three disease resistance traits in controlled conditions, using image analysis. We identified a total of 75 short-size genomic intervals significantly associated with plant architecture and overlapping with 46 previously detected QTL. The major consistent intervals included plant shoot architecture or flowering genes (PsLE, PsTFL1 with putative pleiotropic effects on root architecture. A total of 11 genomic intervals were significantly associated with resistance to A. euteiches confirming several consistent previously identified major QTL. One significant SNP, mapped to the major QTL Ae-Ps7.6, was associated with both resistance and RSA traits. At this marker, the resistance-enhancing allele was associated with an increased total root projected area, in accordance with the correlation observed between resistance and larger root systems in the collection

  8. Genome-wide gene-environment study identifies glutamate receptor gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's disease modifier gene via interaction with coffee.

    OpenAIRE

    Taye H Hamza; Honglei Chen; Erin M Hill-Burns; Shannon L Rhodes; Jennifer Montimurro; Denise M Kay; Albert Tenesa; Victoria I Kusel; Patricia Sheehan; Muthukrishnan Eaaswarkhanth; Dora Yearout; Ali Samii; John W Roberts; Pinky Agarwal; Yvette Bordelon

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal compo...

  9. Four Susceptibility Loci for Gallstone Disease Identified in a Meta-analysis of Genome-wide Association Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Amit D.; Andersson, Charlotte; Buch, Stephan; Stender, Stefan; Noordam, Raymond; Weng, Lu-Chen; Weeke, Peter E.; Auer, Paul L.; Boehm, Bernhard; Chen, Constance; Choi, Hyon; Curhan, Gary; Denny, Joshua C.; De Vivo, Immaculata; Eicher, John D.; Ellinghaus, David; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fuchs, Charles; Gala, Manish; Haessler, Jeffrey; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank; Hunter, David J.; Janssen, Harry L.A.; Kang, Jae H.; Kooperberg, Charles; Kraft, Peter; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lutsey, Pamela L.; Murad, Sarwa Darwish; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Reiner, Alex P.; Ridker, Paul M; Rimm, Eric; Rose, Lynda M.; Shaffer, Christian M.; Schafmayer, Clemens; Tamimi, Rulla M.; Uitterlinden, André G; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Wakabayashi, Yoshiyuki; Wiggs, Janey L.; Zhu, Jun; Roden, Dan M.; Stricker, Bruno H.; Tang, Weihong; Teumer, Alexander; Hampe, Jochen; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chan, Andrew T.; Johnson, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims A genome wide association study (GWAS) of 280 cases identified the hepatic cholesterol transporter ABCG8 as a locus associated with risk for gallstone disease, but findings have not been reported from any other GWAS of this phenotype. We performed a large-scale meta-analysis of GWASs of individuals of European ancestry with available prior genotype data, to identify additional genetic risk factors for gallstone disease. Methods We obtained per-allele odds ratio (OR) and standard error estimates using age- and sex-adjusted logistic regression models within each of the 10 discovery studies (8720 cases and 55,152 controls). We performed an inverse variance weighted, fixed-effects meta-analysis of study specific estimates to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that were independently associated with gallstone disease. Associations were replicated in 6489 cases and 62,797 controls. Results We observed independent associations for 2 SNPs at the ABCG8 locus: rs11887534 (OR = 1.69; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.54–1.86; P=2.44×10−60) and rs4245791 (OR=1.27; P=1.90×10−34). We also identified and/or replicated associations for rs9843304 in TM4SF4 (OR=1.12; 95% CI, 1.08–1.16; P=6.09×10−11), rs2547231 in SULT2A1 (encodes a sulfo-conjugation enzyme that acts on hydroxysteroids and cholesterol-derived sterol bile acids), (OR=1.17, 95% CI, 1.12– 1.21;P=2.24×10−10), rs1260326 in GCKR (encodes a glucokinase regulator) (OR=1.12; 95% CI, 1.07–1.17; P=2.55×10−10), and rs6471717 near CYP7A1 (encodes an enzyme that catalyzes conversion of cholesterol to primary bile acids) (OR=1.11; 95% CI, 1.08–1.15; P=8.84×10−9). Among individuals of African American and Hispanic American ancestry, rs11887534 and rs4245791 were positively associated with gallstone disease risk, while the association for the rs1260326 variant was inverse. Conclusions In this large-scale GWAS of gallstone disease, we identified 4 loci in genes that have

  10. Genome-wide association study identified genetic variations and candidate genes for plant architecture component traits in Chinese upland cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Junji; Li, Libei; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Caixiang; Gu, Lijiao; Wang, Hantao; Wei, Hengling; Liu, Qibao; Huang, Long; Yu, Shuxun

    2018-03-01

    Thirty significant associations between 22 SNPs and five plant architecture component traits in Chinese upland cotton were identified via GWAS. Four peak SNP loci located on chromosome D03 were simultaneously associated with more plant architecture component traits. A candidate gene, Gh_D03G0922, might be responsible for plant height in upland cotton. A compact plant architecture is increasingly required for mechanized harvesting processes in China. Therefore, cotton plant architecture is an important trait, and its components, such as plant height, fruit branch length and fruit branch angle, affect the suitability of a cultivar for mechanized harvesting. To determine the genetic basis of cotton plant architecture, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using a panel composed of 355 accessions and 93,250 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified using the specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing method. Thirty significant associations between 22 SNPs and five plant architecture component traits were identified via GWAS. Most importantly, four peak SNP loci located on chromosome D03 were simultaneously associated with more plant architecture component traits, and these SNPs were harbored in one linkage disequilibrium block. Furthermore, 21 candidate genes for plant architecture were predicted in a 0.95-Mb region including the four peak SNPs. One of these genes (Gh_D03G0922) was near the significant SNP D03_31584163 (8.40 kb), and its Arabidopsis homologs contain MADS-box domains that might be involved in plant growth and development. qRT-PCR showed that the expression of Gh_D03G0922 was upregulated in the apical buds and young leaves of the short and compact cotton varieties, and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) proved that the silenced plants exhibited increased PH. These results indicate that Gh_D03G0922 is likely the candidate gene for PH in cotton. The genetic variations and candidate genes identified in this study lay a foundation

  11. A Large-Scale Multi-ancestry Genome-wide Study Accounting for Smoking Behavior Identifies Multiple Significant Loci for Blood Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sung, Yun J; Winkler, Thomas W; de Las Fuentes, Lisa

    2018-01-01

    Genome-wide association analysis advanced understanding of blood pressure (BP), a major risk factor for vascular conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke. Accounting for smoking behavior may help identify BP loci and extend our knowledge of its genetic architecture. We performed genome...

  12. Gene interactions in the DNA damage-response pathway identified by genome-wide RNA-interference analysis of synthetic lethality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Haaften, Gijs; Vastenhouw, Nadine L; Nollen, Ellen A A; Plasterk, Ronald H A; Tijsterman, Marcel

    2004-01-01

    Here, we describe a systematic search for synthetic gene interactions in a multicellular organism, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We established a high-throughput method to determine synthetic gene interactions by genome-wide RNA interference and identified genes that are required to protect

  13. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J; Saxena, Richa

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published ...

  14. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies in > 80 000 Subjects Identifies Multiple Loci for C-Reactive Protein Levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dehghan, Abbas; Dupuis, Josee; Barbalic, Maja; Bis, Joshua C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Lu, Chen; Pellikka, Niina; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kettunen, Johannes; Henneman, Peter; Baumert, Jens; Strachan, David P.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Vitart, Veronique; Wilson, James F.; Pare, Guillaume; Naitza, Silvia; Rudock, Megan E.; Surakka, Ida; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Guralnik, Jack; Shuldiner, Alan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Zee, Robert Y. L.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Nambi, Vijay; Kavousi, Maryam; Ripatti, Samuli; Nauck, Matthias; Smith, Nicholas L.; Smith, Albert V.; Sundvall, Jouko; Scheet, Paul; Liu, Yongmei; Ruokonen, Aimo; Rose, Lynda M.; Larson, Martin G.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Teumer, Alexander; Tracy, Russell P.; Launer, Lenore J.; Buring, Julie E.; Yamamoto, Jennifer F.; Folsom, Aaron R.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Pankow, James; Elliott, Paul; Keaney, John F.; Sun, Wei; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Fontes, Joao D.; Badola, Sunita; Astor, Brad C.; Hofman, Albert; Pouta, Anneli; Werdan, Karl; Greiser, Karin H.; Kuss, Oliver; Schwabedissen, Henriette E. Meyer Zu; Thiery, Joachim; Jamshidi, Yalda; Nolte, Ilja M.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spector, Timothy D.; Voelzke, Henry; Parker, Alexander N.; Aspelund, Thor; Bates, David; Young, Lauren; Tsui, Kim; Siscovick, David S.; Guo, Xiuqing; Rotter, Jerome I.; Uda, Manuela; Schlessinger, David; Rudan, Igor; Hicks, Andrew A.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Thorand, Barbara; Gieger, Christian; Coresh, Joe; Willemsen, Gonneke; Harris, Tamara B.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Jaervelin, Marjo-Riitta; Rice, Kenneth; Radke, Doerte; Salomaa, Veikko; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gibson, Quince D.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Snieder, Harold; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Xiao, Xiangjun; Campbell, Harry; Hayward, Caroline; Pramstaller, Peter P.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Peltonen, Leena; Psaty, Bruce M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Ridker, Paul M.; Homuth, Georg; Koenig, Wolfgang; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Perola, Markus; Chasman, Daniel I.

    2011-01-01

    Background-C-reactive protein (CRP) is a heritable marker of chronic inflammation that is strongly associated with cardiovascular disease. We sought to identify genetic variants that are associated with CRP levels. Methods and Results-We performed a genome-wide association analysis of CRP in 66 185

  15. Association Between Chromosome 9p21 Variants and the Ankle-Brachial Index Identified by a Meta-Analysis of 21 Genome-Wide Association Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murabito, Joanne M.; White, Charles C.; Kavousi, Maryam; Sun, Yan V.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Nambi, Vijay; Lamina, Claudia; Schillert, Arne; Coassin, Stefan; Bis, Joshua C.; Broer, Linda; Crawford, Dana C.; Franceschini, Nora; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Haun, Margot; Holewijn, Suzanne; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Kiechl, Stefan; Kollerits, Barbara; Montasser, May E.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rudock, Megan E.; Senft, Andrea; Teumer, Alexander; van der Harst, Pim; Vitart, Veronique; Waite, Lindsay L.; Wood, Andrew R.; Wassel, Christina L.; Absher, Devin M.; Allison, Matthew A.; Amin, Najaf; Arnold, Alice; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Aulchenko, Yurii; Bandinelli, Stefania; Barbalic, Maja; Boban, Mladen; Brown-Gentry, Kristin; Couper, David J.; Criqui, Michael H.; Dehghan, Abbas; den Heijer, Martin; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Ding, Jingzhong; Doerr, Marcus; Espinola-Klein, Christine; Felix, Stephan B.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Folsom, Aaron R.; Fraedrich, Gustav; Gibson, Quince; Goodloe, Robert; Gunjaca, Grgo; Haltmayer, Meinhard; Heiss, Gerardo; Hofman, Albert; Kieback, Arne; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kolcic, Ivana; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Kritchevsky, Stephen B.; Lackner, Karl J.; Li, Xiaohui; Lieb, Wolfgang; Lohman, Kurt; Meisinger, Christa; Melzer, David; Mohler, Emile R.; Mudnic, Ivana; Mueller, Thomas; Navis, Gerjan; Oberhollenzer, Friedrich; Olin, Jeffrey W.; O'Connell, Jeff; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Petersmann, Astrid; Polasek, Ozren; Psaty, Bruce M.; Rantner, Barbara; Rice, Ken; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Seldenrijk, Adrie; Stadler, Marietta; Summerer, Monika; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Wild, Sarah H.; Wild, Philipp S.; Willeit, Johann; Zeller, Tanja; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Campbell, Harry; Boerwinkle, Eric; Cooke, John P.; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Herrington, David; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Anna; Muenzel, Thomas; Newman, Anne B.; Oostra, Ben A.; Rudan, Igor; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Snieder, Harold; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Voelker, Uwe; Wright, Alan F.; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Liu, Yongmei; Hayward, Caroline; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Ziegler, Andreas; North, Kari E.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Kronenberg, Florian; Dorr, M.; Munzel, T.; Volker, U.

    Background-Genetic determinants of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) remain largely unknown. To identify genetic variants associated with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), a noninvasive measure of PAD, we conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association study data from 21 population-based cohorts.

  16. A Large-Scale Multi-ancestry Genome-wide Study Accounting for Smoking Behavior Identifies Multiple Significant Loci for Blood Pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sung, Yun J; Winkler, Thomas W; de Las Fuentes, Lisa; Bentley, Amy R; Brown, Michael R; Kraja, Aldi T; Schwander, Karen; Ntalla, Ioanna; Guo, Xiuqing; Franceschini, Nora; Lu, Yingchang; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Sim, Xueling; Vojinovic, Dina; Marten, Jonathan; Musani, Solomon K; Li, Changwei; Feitosa, Mary F; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Richard, Melissa A; Noordam, Raymond; Aslibekyan, Stella; Aschard, Hugues; Bartz, Traci M; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Liu, Yongmei; Manning, Alisa K; Rankinen, Tuomo; Smith, Albert Vernon; Tajuddin, Salman M; Tayo, Bamidele O; Warren, Helen R; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Yanhua; Matoba, Nana; Sofer, Tamar; Alver, Maris; Amini, Marzyeh; Boissel, Mathilde; Chai, Jin Fang; Chen, Xu; Divers, Jasmin; Gandin, Ilaria; Gao, Chuan; Giulianini, Franco; Goel, Anuj; Harris, Sarah E; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Horimoto, Andrea R V R; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Jackson, Anne U; Kähönen, Mika; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Kühnel, Brigitte; Leander, Karin; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lin, Keng-Hung; 'an Luan, Jian; McKenzie, Colin A; Meian, He; Nelson, Christopher P; Rauramaa, Rainer; Schupf, Nicole; Scott, Robert A; Sheu, Wayne H H; Stančáková, Alena; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; van der Most, Peter J; Varga, Tibor V; Wang, Heming; Wang, Yajuan; Ware, Erin B; Weiss, Stefan; Wen, Wanqing; Yanek, Lisa R; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Afaq, Saima; Alfred, Tamuno; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan; Aung, Tin; Barr, R Graham; Bielak, Lawrence F; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P; Braund, Peter S; Brody, Jennifer A; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cabrera, Claudia P; Cade, Brian; Caizheng, Yu; Campbell, Archie; Canouil, Mickaël; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Christensen, Kaare; Cocca, Massimiliano; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John M; de Mutsert, Renée; de Silva, H Janaka; Debette, Stephanie; Dörr, Marcus; Duan, Qing; Eaton, Charles B; Ehret, Georg; Evangelou, Evangelos; Faul, Jessica D; Fisher, Virginia A; Forouhi, Nita G; Franco, Oscar H; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gao, He; Gigante, Bruna; Graff, Misa; Gu, C Charles; Gu, Dongfeng; Gupta, Preeti; Hagenaars, Saskia P; Harris, Tamara B; He, Jiang; Heikkinen, Sami; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hirata, Makoto; Hofman, Albert; Howard, Barbara V; Hunt, Steven; Irvin, Marguerite R; Jia, Yucheng; Joehanes, Roby; Justice, Anne E; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Kaufman, Joel; Kerrison, Nicola D; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Koh, Woon-Puay; Koistinen, Heikki A; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kooperberg, Charles; Krieger, Jose E; Kubo, Michiaki; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langefeld, Carl D; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J; Lehne, Benjamin; Lewis, Cora E; Li, Yize; Lim, Sing Hui; Lin, Shiow; Liu, Ching-Ti; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Jingmin; Liu, Kiang; Liu, Yeheng; Loh, Marie; Lohman, Kurt K; Long, Jirong; Louie, Tin; Mägi, Reedik; Mahajan, Anubha; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Momozawa, Yukihide; Morris, Andrew P; Mosley, Thomas H; Munson, Peter; Murray, Alison D; Nalls, Mike A; Nasri, Ubaydah; Norris, Jill M; North, Kari; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmas, Walter R; Palmer, Nicholette D; Pankow, James S; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peters, Annette; Peyser, Patricia A; Polasek, Ozren; Raitakari, Olli T; Renström, Frida; Rice, Treva K; Ridker, Paul M; Robino, Antonietta; Robinson, Jennifer G; Rose, Lynda M; Rudan, Igor; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Salako, Babatunde L; Sandow, Kevin; Schmidt, Carsten O; Schreiner, Pamela J; Scott, William R; Seshadri, Sudha; Sever, Peter; Sitlani, Colleen M; Smith, Jennifer A; Snieder, Harold; Starr, John M; Strauch, Konstantin; Tang, Hua; Taylor, Kent D; Teo, Yik Ying; Tham, Yih Chung; Uitterlinden, André G; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Ya X; Wei, Wen Bin; Williams, Christine; Wilson, Gregory; Wojczynski, Mary K; Yao, Jie; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zonderman, Alan B; Becker, Diane M; Boehnke, Michael; Bowden, Donald W; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; de Faire, Ulf; Deary, Ian J; Esko, Tõnu; Farrall, Martin; Forrester, Terrence; Franks, Paul W; Freedman, Barry I; Froguel, Philippe; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Hung, Yi-Jen; Jonas, Jost B; Kato, Norihiro; Kooner, Jaspal S; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liang, Kae-Woei; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Newman, Anne B; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pereira, Alexandre C; Redline, Susan; Rettig, Rainer; Samani, Nilesh J; Scott, James; Shu, Xiao-Ou; van der Harst, Pim; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Weir, David R; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R; Wu, Tangchun; Zheng, Wei; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Laurie, Cathy C; Bouchard, Claude; Cooper, Richard S; Evans, Michele K; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Levy, Daniel; O'Connell, Jeff R; Psaty, Bruce M; van Dam, Rob M; Sims, Mario; Arnett, Donna K; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Kelly, Tanika N; Fox, Ervin R; Hayward, Caroline; Fornage, Myriam; Rotimi, Charles N; Province, Michael A; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Tai, E Shyong; Wong, Tien Yin; Loos, Ruth J F; Reiner, Alex P; Rotter, Jerome I; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Bierut, Laura J; Gauderman, W James; Caulfield, Mark J; Elliott, Paul; Rice, Kenneth; Munroe, Patricia B; Morrison, Alanna C; Cupples, L Adrienne; Rao, Dabeeru C; Chasman, Daniel I

    2018-01-01

    Genome-wide association analysis advanced understanding of blood pressure (BP), a major risk factor for vascular conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke. Accounting for smoking behavior may help identify BP loci and extend our knowledge of its genetic architecture. We performed

  17. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of diarrhoeal disease in young children identifies FUT2 locus and provides plausible biological pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bustamante, Mariona; Standl, Marie; Bassat, Quique

    2016-01-01

    questionnaires, doctor interviews or medical records. Standard quality control and statistical tests were applied to the 1000 Genomes imputed genotypic data. The meta-analysis (N = 5758) followed by replication (N = 3784) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8111874 and diarrhoea at age 1...

  18. Genome-wide association study of primary sclerosing cholangitis identifies new risk loci and quantifies the genetic relationship with inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Sun-Gou; Juran, Brian D.; Mucha, Soeren; Folseraas, Trine; Jostins, Luke; Melum, Espen; Kumasaka, Natsuhiko; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Schlicht, Erik M; Liu, Jimmy Z.; Shah, Tejas; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Boberg, Kirsten M.; Bergquist, Annika; Vermeire, Severine; Eksteen, Bertus; Durie, Peter R.; Farkkila, Martti; Mueller, Tobias; Schramm, Christoph; Sterneck, Martina; Weismueller, Tobias J.; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Ellinghaus, David; Braun, Felix; Teufel, Andreas; Laudes, Mattias; Lieb, Wolfgang; Jacobs, Gunnar; Beuers, Ulrich; Weersma, Rinse K.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Pares, Albert; Kontula, Kimmo; Chazouilleres, Olivier; Invernizzi, Pietro; Goode, Elizabeth; Spiess, Kelly; Moore, Carmel; Sambrook, Jennifer; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Roberts, David J; Danesh, John; Floreani, Annarosa; Gulamhusein, Aliya F; Eaton, John E; Schreiber, Stefan; Coltescu, Catalina; Bowlus, Christopher L.; Luketic, Velimir A.; Odin, Joseph A; Chopra, Kapil B; Kowdley, Kris V; Chalasani, Naga; Manns, Michael P.; Srivastava, Brijesh; Mells, George; Sandford, Richard N.; Alexander, Graeme; Gaffney, Daniel J; Chapman, Roger W.; Hirschfield, Gideon M.; de Andrade, Mariza; Rushbrook, Simon M.; Franke, Andre; Karlsen, Tom H.; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Anderson, Carl A.

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a rare progressive disorder leading to bile duct destruction; similar to 75% of patients have comorbid inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We undertook the largest genome-wide association study of PSC (4,796 cases and 19,955 population controls) and identified

  19. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of breast cancer identifies two novel susceptibility loci at 6q14 and 20q11

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddiq, Afshan; Couch, Fergus J.; Chen, Gary K.; Lindström, Sara; Eccles, Diana; Millikan, Robert C.; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Stram, Daniel O.; Beckmann, Lars; Rhie, Suhn Kyong; Ambrosone, Christine B.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Amiano, Pilar; Apicella, Carmel; Baglietto, Laura; Bandera, Elisa V.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Berg, Christine D.; Bernstein, Leslie; Blomqvist, Carl; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brinton, Louise; Bui, Quang M.; Buring, Julie E.; Buys, Saundra S.; Campa, Daniele; Carpenter, Jane E.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Constance; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Czene, Kamila; Deming, Sandra L.; Diasio, Robert B.; Diver, W. Ryan; Dunning, Alison M.; Durcan, Lorraine; Ekici, Arif B.; Fasching, Peter A.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Fejerman, Laura; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Fletcher, Olivia; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gerty, Susan M.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Giles, Graham G.; van Gils, Carla H.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Graham, Nikki; Greco, Dario; Hall, Per; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Rebecca; Heinz, Judith; Hoover, Robert N.; Hopper, John L.; Hu, Jennifer J.; Huntsman, Scott; Ingles, Sue A.; Irwanto, Astrid; Isaacs, Claudine; Jacobs, Kevin B.; John, Esther M.; Justenhoven, Christina; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Coetzee, Gerhard A.; Lathrop, Mark; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Adam M.; Lee, I.-Min; Lesnick, Timothy; Lichtner, Peter; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Martin, Nicholas G.; McLean, Catriona A.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Meindl, Alfons; Miron, Penelope; Monroe, Kristine R.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nickels, Stefan; Nyante, Sarah J.; Olswold, Curtis; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Park, Daniel J.; Palmer, Julie R.; Pathak, Harsh; Peto, Julian; Pharoah, Paul; Rahman, Nazneen; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Slager, Susan; Southey, Melissa C.; Stevens, Kristen N.; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Press, Michael F.; Ross, Eric; Riboli, Elio; Ridker, Paul M.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Severi, Gianluca; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Stone, Jennifer; Sund, Malin; Tapper, William J.; Thun, Michael J.; Travis, Ruth C.; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang, Xianshu; Wang, Zhaoming; Weaver, Joellen; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Wilkens, Lynne R.; van den Berg, David; Zheng, Wei; Ziegler, Regina G.; Ziv, Elad; Nevanlinna, Heli; Easton, Douglas F.; Hunter, David J.; Henderson, Brian E.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Kraft, Peter; Haiman, Christopher A.; Vachon, Celine M.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status have revealed loci contributing to susceptibility of estrogen receptor (ER)-negative subtypes. To identify additional genetic variants for ER-negative breast cancer, we conducted the largest meta-analysis of

  20. Genome-wide association meta-analysis of human longevity identifies a novel locus conferring survival beyond 90 years of age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Deelen (Joris); M. Beekman (Marian); H.-W. Uh (Hae-Won); L. Broer (Linda); K.L. Ayers (Kristin); Q. Tan (Qihua); Y. Kamatani (Yoichiro); A.M. Bennet (Anna Michaela); R. Tamm (Riin); S. Trompet (Stella); D.F. Guobjartsson (Daníel); F. Flachsbart (Friederike); G. Rose (Giuseppina); A. Viktorin (Alexander); K. Fischer (Krista); M. Nygaard (Marianne); H.J. Cordell (Heather); P. Crocco (Paolina); E.B. van den Akker (Erik); S. Böhringer (Stefan); Q. Helmer (Quinta); C.P. Nelson (Christopher P.); G.I. Saunders (Gary); M. Alver (Maris); K. Andersen-Ranberg (Karen); G. Breen (Gerome); R. van der Breggen (Ruud); A. Caliebe (Amke); Y. Capri (Yline); E. Cevenini (Elisa); J.C. Collerton (Joanna); S. Dato (Serena); K. Davies (Karen); I. Ford (Ian); J. Gampe (Jutta); P. Garagnani (Paolo); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); J. Harrow (Jennifer); D. van Heemst (Diana); B.T. Heijmans (Bastiaan); F.-A. Heinsen (Femke-Anouska); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); A. Hofman (Albert); B. Jeune (Bernard); P.V. Jonsson (Palmi); M. Lathrop (Mark); D. Lechner (Doris); C. Martin-Ruiz (Carmen); S.E. Mcnerlan (Susan); E. Mihailov (Evelin); A. Montesanto (Alberto); S.P. Mooijaart (Simon); A. Murphy (Anne); C. Nohr (Christian); L. Paternoster (Lavinia); D. Postmus (Douwe); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); O.A. Ross (Owen); S. Salvioli (Stefano); N. Sattar (Naveed); S. Schreiber (Stefan); H. Stefansson (Hreinn); D.J. Stott (David. J.); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); R.G.J. Westendorp (Rudi); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); N.J. Samani (Nilesh); P. Galan (Pilar); H.G. Sorensen; D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); D. Rea (Dan); G. Passarino (Giuseppe); A.J. de Craen (Anton); K. Christensen (Kaare); A. Nebel (Almut); J-A. Zwart (John-Anker); A. Metspalu (Andres); P.K. Magnusson (Patrik); H. Blanché (Hélène); L. Christiansen (Lene); J.M. Kirkwood (John); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); C. Franceschi (Claudio); J.J. Houwing-Duistermaat (Jeanine); P.E. Slagboom (Eline)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe genetic contribution to the variation in human lifespan is ~25%. Despite the large number of identified disease-susceptibility loci, it is not known which loci influence population mortality. We performed a genome-wide association meta-analysis of 7729 long-lived individuals of

  1. Genome-Wide Association Studies Identify Two Novel BMP15 Mutations Responsible for an Atypical Hyperprolificacy Phenotype in Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demars, Julie; Fabre, Stéphane; Sarry, Julien; Rossetti, Raffaella; Gilbert, Hélène; Persani, Luca; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Mulsant, Philippe; Nowak, Zuzanna; Drobik, Wioleta; Martyniuk, Elzbieta; Bodin, Loys

    2013-01-01

    Some sheep breeds are naturally prolific, and they are very informative for the studies of reproductive genetics and physiology. Major genes increasing litter size (LS) and ovulation rate (OR) were suspected in the French Grivette and the Polish Olkuska sheep populations, respectively. To identify genetic variants responsible for the highly prolific phenotype in these two breeds, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) followed by complementary genetic and functional analyses were performed. Highly prolific ewes (cases) and normal prolific ewes (controls) from each breed were genotyped using the Illumina OvineSNP50 Genotyping Beadchip. In both populations, an X chromosome region, close to the BMP15 gene, harbored clusters of markers with suggestive evidence of association at significance levels between 1E−05 and 1E−07. The BMP15 candidate gene was then sequenced, and two novel non-conservative mutations called FecXGr and FecXO were identified in the Grivette and Olkuska breeds, respectively. The two mutations were associated with the highly prolific phenotype (pFecXGr = 5.98E−06 and pFecXO = 2.55E−08). Homozygous ewes for the mutated allele showed a significantly increased prolificacy (FecXGr/FecXGr, LS = 2.50±0.65 versus FecX+/FecXGr, LS = 1.93±0.42, p<1E−03 and FecXO/FecXO, OR = 3.28±0.85 versus FecX+/FecXO, OR = 2.02±0.47, p<1E−03). Both mutations are located in very well conserved motifs of the protein and altered the BMP15 signaling activity in vitro using a BMP-responsive luciferase test in COV434 granulosa cells. Thus, we have identified two novel mutations in the BMP15 gene associated with increased LS and OR. Notably, homozygous FecXGr/FecXGr Grivette and homozygous FecXO/FecXO Olkuska ewes are hyperprolific in striking contrast with the sterility exhibited by all other known homozygous BMP15 mutations. Our results bring new insights into the key role played by the BMP15 protein in ovarian function and could

  2. Evaluating genome-wide association study-identified breast cancer risk variants in African-American women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jirong Long

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS, conducted mostly in European or Asian descendants, have identified approximately 67 genetic susceptibility loci for breast cancer. Given the large differences in genetic architecture between the African-ancestry genome and genomes of Asians and Europeans, it is important to investigate these loci in African-ancestry populations. We evaluated index SNPs in all 67 breast cancer susceptibility loci identified to date in our study including up to 3,300 African-American women (1,231 cases and 2,069 controls, recruited in the Southern Community Cohort Study (SCCS and the Nashville Breast Health Study (NBHS. Seven SNPs were statistically significant (P ≤ 0.05 with the risk of overall breast cancer in the same direction as previously reported: rs10069690 (5p15/TERT, rs999737 (14q24/RAD51L1, rs13387042 (2q35/TNP1, rs1219648 (10q26/FGFR2, rs8170 (19p13/BABAM1, rs17817449 (16q12/FTO, and rs13329835 (16q23/DYL2. A marginally significant association (P<0.10 was found for three additional SNPs: rs1045485 (2q33/CASP8, rs4849887 (2q14/INHBB, and rs4808801 (19p13/ELL. Three additional SNPs, including rs1011970 (9p21/CDKN2A/2B, rs941764 (14q32/CCDC88C, and rs17529111 (6q14/FAM46A, showed a significant association in analyses conducted by breast cancer subtype. The risk of breast cancer was elevated with an increasing number of risk variants, as measured by quintile of the genetic risk score, from 1.00 (reference, to 1.75 (1.30-2.37, 1.56 (1.15-2.11, 2.02 (1.50-2.74 and 2.63 (1.96-3.52, respectively, (P = 7.8 × 10(-10. Results from this study highlight the need for large genetic studies in AAs to identify risk variants impacting this population.

  3. Genome-wide association identifies multiple genomic regions associated with susceptibility to and control of ovine lentivirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen N White

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Like human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, ovine lentivirus (OvLV is macrophage-tropic and causes lifelong infection. OvLV infects one quarter of U.S. sheep and induces pneumonia and body condition wasting. There is no vaccine to prevent OvLV infection and no cost-effective treatment for infected animals. However, breed differences in prevalence and proviral concentration have indicated a genetic basis for susceptibility to OvLV. A recent study identified TMEM154 variants in OvLV susceptibility. The objective here was to identify additional loci associated with odds and/or control of OvLV infection. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This genome-wide association study (GWAS included 964 sheep from Rambouillet, Polypay, and Columbia breeds with serological status and proviral concentration phenotypes. Analytic models accounted for breed and age, as well as genotype. This approach identified TMEM154 (nominal P=9.2×10(-7; empirical P=0.13, provided 12 additional genomic regions associated with odds of infection, and provided 13 regions associated with control of infection (all nominal P<1 × 10(-5. Rapid decline of linkage disequilibrium with distance suggested many regions included few genes each. Genes in regions associated with odds of infection included DPPA2/DPPA4 (empirical P=0.006, and SYTL3 (P=0.051. Genes in regions associated with control of infection included a zinc finger cluster (ZNF192, ZSCAN16, ZNF389, and ZNF165; P=0.001, C19orf42/TMEM38A (P=0.047, and DLGAP1 (P=0.092. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These associations provide targets for mutation discovery in sheep susceptibility to OvLV. Aside from TMEM154, these genes have not been associated previously with lentiviral infection in any species, to our knowledge. Further, data from other species suggest functional hypotheses for future testing of these genes in OvLV and other lentiviral infections. Specifically, SYTL3 binds and may regulate RAB27A, which is required for enveloped

  4. Genome-wide analysis of the nucleus accumbens identifies DNA methylation signals differentiating low/binge from heavy alcohol drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera-Juanes, Rita; Wilhelm, Larry J; Park, Byung; Grant, Kathleen A; Ferguson, Betsy

    2017-05-01

    Alcohol-use disorders encompass a range of drinking levels and behaviors, including low, binge, and heavy drinking. In this regard, investigating the neural state of individuals who chronically self-administer lower doses of alcohol may provide insight into mechanisms that prevent the escalation of alcohol use. DNA methylation is one of the epigenetic mechanisms that stabilizes adaptations in gene expression and has been associated with alcohol use. Thus, we investigated DNA methylation, gene expression, and the predicted neural effects in the nucleus accumbens core (NAcc) of male rhesus macaques categorized as "low" or "binge" drinkers, compared to "alcohol-naïve" and "heavy" drinkers based on drinking patterns during a 12-month alcohol self-administration protocol. Using genome-wide CpG-rich region enrichment and bisulfite sequencing, the methylation levels of 2.6 million CpGs were compared between alcohol-naïve (AN), low/binge (L/BD), and heavy/very heavy (H/VHD) drinking subjects (n = 24). Through regional clustering analysis, we identified nine significant differential methylation regions (DMRs) that specifically distinguished ANs and L/BDs, and then compared those DMRs among H/VHDs. The DMRs mapped to genes encoding ion channels, receptors, cell adhesion molecules, and cAMP, NF-κβ and Wnt signaling pathway proteins. Two of the DMRs, linked to PDE10A and PKD2L2, were also differentially methylated in H/VHDs, suggesting an alcohol-dose independent effect. However, two other DMRs, linked to the CCBE1 and FZD5 genes, had L/BD methylation levels that significantly differed from both ANs and H/VHDs. The remaining five DMRs also differentiated L/BDs and ANs. However, H/VHDs methylation levels were not distinguishable from either of the two groups. Functional validation of two DMRs, linked to FZD5 and PDE10A, support their role in regulating gene expression and exon usage, respectively. In summary, the findings demonstrate that L/BD is associated with unique

  5. Genome-wide peripheral blood leukocyte DNA methylation microarrays identified a single association with inflammatory bowel diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, R Alan; Nagy-Szakal, Dorottya; Pedersen, Natalia

    2012-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are common forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Monozygotic (MZ) twin discordance rates and epidemiologic data implicate that environmental changes and epigenetic factors may play a pathogenic role in IBD. DNA methylation (the methylation of ...... of cytosines within CpG dinucleotides) is an epigenetic modification, which can respond to environmental influences. We investigated whether DNA methylation might be connected with IBD in peripheral blood leukocyte (PBL) DNA by utilizing genome-wide microarrays....

  6. Meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies Identifies Novel Loci Associated With Optic Disc Morphology

    OpenAIRE

    Springelkamp, Henriët; Mishra, Aniket; Hysi, Pirro G.; Gharahkhani, Puya; Höhn, René; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N.; Luo, Xiaoyan; Ramdas, Wishal D.; Vithana, Eranga; Koh, Victor; Yazar, Seyhan; Xu, Liang; Forward, Hannah; Kearns, Lisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Primary open-angle glaucoma is the most common optic neuropathy and an important cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. The optic nerve head or optic disc is divided in two parts: a central cup (without nerve fibers) surrounded by the neuroretinal rim (containing axons of the retinal ganglion cells). The International Glaucoma Genetics Consortium conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies consisting of 17,248 individuals of European ancestry and 6,841 individuals of Asia...

  7. Large meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies five loci for lean body mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zillikens, M Carola; Demissie, Serkalem; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Chou, Wen-Chi; Stolk, Lisette; Livshits, Gregory; Broer, Linda; Johnson, Toby; Koller, Daniel L; Kutalik, Zoltán; Luan, Jian'an; Malkin, Ida; Ried, Janina S; Smith, Albert V; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Hua Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Weihua; Aghdassi, Ali; Åkesson, Kristina; Amin, Najaf; Baier, Leslie J; Barroso, Inês; Bennett, David A; Bertram, Lars; Biffar, Rainer; Bochud, Murielle; Boehnke, Michael; Borecki, Ingrid B; Buchman, Aron S; Byberg, Liisa; Campbell, Harry; Campos Obanda, Natalia; Cauley, Jane A; Cawthon, Peggy M; Cederberg, Henna; Chen, Zhao; Cho, Nam H; Jin Choi, Hyung; Claussnitzer, Melina; Collins, Francis; Cummings, Steven R; De Jager, Philip L; Demuth, Ilja; Dhonukshe-Rutten, Rosalie A M; Diatchenko, Luda; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Enneman, Anke W; Erdos, Mike; Eriksson, Johan G; Eriksson, Joel; Estrada, Karol; Evans, Daniel S; Feitosa, Mary F; Fu, Mao; Garcia, Melissa; Gieger, Christian; Girke, Thomas; Glazer, Nicole L; Grallert, Harald; Grewal, Jagvir; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hanson, Robert L; Hayward, Caroline; Hofman, Albert; Hoffman, Eric P; Homuth, Georg; Hsueh, Wen-Chi; Hubal, Monica J; Hubbard, Alan; Huffman, Kim M; Husted, Lise B; Illig, Thomas; Ingelsson, Erik; Ittermann, Till; Jansson, John-Olov; Jordan, Joanne M; Jula, Antti; Karlsson, Magnus; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Klopp, Norman; Kloth, Jacqueline S L; Koistinen, Heikki A; Kraus, William E; Kritchevsky, Stephen; Kuulasmaa, Teemu; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lahti, Jari; Lang, Thomas; Langdahl, Bente L; Launer, Lenore J; Lee, Jong-Young; Lerch, Markus M; Lewis, Joshua R; Lind, Lars; Lindgren, Cecilia; Liu, Yongmei; Liu, Tian; Liu, Youfang; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorentzon, Mattias; Luben, Robert N; Maixner, William; McGuigan, Fiona E; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Meitinger, Thomas; Melhus, Håkan; Mellström, Dan; Melov, Simon; Michaëlsson, Karl; Mitchell, Braxton D; Morris, Andrew P; Mosekilde, Leif; Newman, Anne; Nielson, Carrie M; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Oostra, Ben A; Orwoll, Eric S; Palotie, Aarno; Parker, Stephen C J; Peacock, Munro; Perola, Markus; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Prince, Richard L; Räikkönen, Katri; Ralston, Stuart H; Ripatti, Samuli; Robbins, John A; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Salomaa, Veikko; Satterfield, Suzanne; Schadt, Eric E; Schipf, Sabine; Scott, Laura; Sehmi, Joban; Shen, Jian; Soo Shin, Chan; Sigurdsson, Gunnar; Smith, Shad; Soranzo, Nicole; Stančáková, Alena; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Swart, Karin M A; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Thompson, Patricia; Thomson, Cynthia A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Tikkanen, Emmi; Tranah, Gregory J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van Schoor, Natasja M; Verma, Arjun; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Walker, Mark; Weedon, Michael N; Welch, Ryan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Williams, Frances M K; Wilson, James F; Wright, Nicole C; Xie, Weijia; Yu, Lei; Zhou, Yanhua; Chambers, John C; Döring, Angela; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Econs, Michael J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kooner, Jaspal S; Psaty, Bruce M; Spector, Timothy D; Stefansson, Kari; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André G; Wareham, Nicholas J; Ossowski, Vicky; Waterworth, Dawn; Loos, Ruth J F; Karasik, David; Harris, Tamara B; Ohlsson, Claes; Kiel, Douglas P

    2017-07-19

    Lean body mass, consisting mostly of skeletal muscle, is important for healthy aging. We performed a genome-wide association study for whole body (20 cohorts of European ancestry with n = 38,292) and appendicular (arms and legs) lean body mass (n = 28,330) measured using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry or bioelectrical impedance analysis, adjusted for sex, age, height, and fat mass. Twenty-one single-nucleotide polymorphisms were significantly associated with lean body mass either genome wide (p lean body mass and in 45,090 (42,360 of European ancestry) subjects from 25 cohorts for appendicular lean body mass was successful for five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in/near HSD17B11, VCAN, ADAMTSL3, IRS1, and FTO for total lean body mass and for three single-nucleotide polymorphisms in/near VCAN, ADAMTSL3, and IRS1 for appendicular lean body mass. Our findings provide new insight into the genetics of lean body mass.Lean body mass is a highly heritable trait and is associated with various health conditions. Here, Kiel and colleagues perform a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for whole body lean body mass and find five novel genetic loci to be significantly associated.

  8. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association data and large-scale replication identifies additional susceptibility loci for type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeggini, Eleftheria; Scott, Laura J.; Saxena, Richa; Voight, Benjamin F.; Marchini, Jonathan L; Hu, Tainle; de Bakker, Paul IW; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Almgren, Peter; Andersen, Gitte; Ardlie, Kristin; Boström, Kristina Bengtsson; Bergman, Richard N; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Borch-Johnsen, Knut; Burtt, Noël P; Chen, Hong; Chines, Peter S; Daly, Mark J; Deodhar, Parimal; Ding, Charles; Doney, Alex S F; Duren, William L; Elliott, Katherine S; Erdos, Michael R; Frayling, Timothy M; Freathy, Rachel M; Gianniny, Lauren; Grallert, Harald; Grarup, Niels; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hansen, Torben; Herder, Christian; Hitman, Graham A; Hughes, Thomas E; Isomaa, Bo; Jackson, Anne U; Jørgensen, Torben; Kong, Augustine; Kubalanza, Kari; Kuruvilla, Finny G; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Lango, Hana; Lauritzen, Torsten; Li, Yun; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Marvelle, Amanda F; Meisinger, Christa; Midthjell, Kristian; Mohlke, Karen L; Morken, Mario A; Morris, Andrew D; Narisu, Narisu; Nilsson, Peter; Owen, Katharine R; Palmer, Colin NA; Payne, Felicity; Perry, John RB; Pettersen, Elin; Platou, Carl; Prokopenko, Inga; Qi, Lu; Qin, Li; Rayner, Nigel W; Rees, Matthew; Roix, Jeffrey J; Sandbæk, Anelli; Shields, Beverley; Sjögren, Marketa; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Timpson, Nicholas J; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Walker, Mark; Watanabe, Richard M; Weedon, Michael N; Willer, Cristen J; Illig, Thomas; Hveem, Kristian; Hu, Frank B; Laakso, Markku; Stefansson, Kari; Pedersen, Oluf; Wareham, Nicholas J; Barroso, Inês; Hattersley, Andrew T; Collins, Francis S; Groop, Leif; McCarthy, Mark I; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David

    2009-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified multiple new genomic loci at which common variants modestly but reproducibly influence risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D)1-11. Established associations to common and rare variants explain only a small proportion of the heritability of T2D. As previously published analyses had limited power to discover loci at which common alleles have modest effects, we performed meta-analysis of three T2D GWA scans encompassing 10,128 individuals of European-descent and ~2.2 million SNPs (directly genotyped and imputed). Replication testing was performed in an independent sample with an effective sample size of up to 53,975. At least six new loci with robust evidence for association were detected, including the JAZF1 (p=5.0×10−14), CDC123/CAMK1D (p=1.2×10−10), TSPAN8/LGR5 (p=1.1×10−9), THADA (p=1.1×10−9), ADAMTS9 (p=1.2×10−8), and NOTCH2 (p=4.1×10−8) gene regions. The large number of loci with relatively small effects indicates the value of large discovery and follow-up samples in identifying additional clues about the inherited basis of T2D. PMID:18372903

  9. Genome-wide scan of gastrointestinal nematode resistance in closed Angus population selected for minimized influence of MHC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eui-Soo Kim

    Full Text Available Genetic markers associated with parasite indicator traits are ideal targets for study of marker assisted selection aimed at controlling infections that reduce herd use of anthelminthics. For this study, we collected gastrointestinal (GI nematode fecal egg count (FEC data from post-weaning animals of an Angus resource population challenged to a 26 week natural exposure on pasture. In all, data from 487 animals was collected over a 16 year period between 1992 and 2007, most of which were selected for a specific DRB1 allele to reduce the influence of potential allelic variant effects of the MHC locus. A genome-wide association study (GWAS based on BovineSNP50 genotypes revealed six genomic regions located on bovine Chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 15 and 27; which were significantly associated (-log10 p=4.3 with Box-Cox transformed mean FEC (BC-MFEC. DAVID analysis of the genes within the significant genomic regions suggested a correlation between our results and annotation for genes involved in inflammatory response to infection. Furthermore, ROH and selection signature analyses provided strong evidence that the genomic regions associated BC-MFEC have not been affected by local autozygosity or recent experimental selection. These findings provide useful information for parasite resistance prediction for young grazing cattle and suggest new candidate gene targets for development of disease-modifying therapies or future studies of host response to GI parasite infection.

  10. A genome-wide linkage and association study of musical aptitude identifies loci containing genes related to inner ear development and neurocognitive functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikkonen, J.; Huang, Y.; Onkamo, P.; Ukkola-Vuoti, L.; Raijas, P.; Karma, K.; Vieland, V. J.; Järvelä, I.

    2014-01-01

    Humans have developed the perception, production and processing of sounds into the art of music. A genetic contribution to these skills of musical aptitude has long been suggested. We performed a genome-wide scan in 76 pedigrees (767 individuals) characterized for the ability to discriminate pitch (SP), duration (ST) and sound patterns (KMT), which are primary capacities for music perception. Using the Bayesian linkage and association approach implemented in program package KELVIN, especially designed for complex pedigrees, several SNPs near genes affecting the functions of the auditory pathway and neurocognitive processes were identified. The strongest association was found at 3q21.3 (rs9854612) with combined SP, ST and KMT test scores (COMB). This region is located a few dozen kilobases upstream of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene. GATA2 regulates the development of cochlear hair cells and the inferior colliculus (IC), which are important in tonotopic mapping. The highest probability of linkage was obtained for phenotype SP at 4p14, located next to the region harboring the protocadherin 7 gene, PCDH7. Two SNPs rs13146789 and rs13109270 of PCDH7 showed strong association. PCDH7 has been suggested to play a role in cochlear and amygdaloid complexes. Functional class analysis showed that inner ear and schizophrenia related genes were enriched inside the linked regions. This study is the first to show the importance of auditory pathway genes in musical aptitude. PMID:24614497

  11. A genome-wide linkage and association study of musical aptitude identifies loci containing genes related to inner ear development and neurocognitive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikkonen, J; Huang, Y; Onkamo, P; Ukkola-Vuoti, L; Raijas, P; Karma, K; Vieland, V J; Järvelä, I

    2015-02-01

    Humans have developed the perception, production and processing of sounds into the art of music. A genetic contribution to these skills of musical aptitude has long been suggested. We performed a genome-wide scan in 76 pedigrees (767 individuals) characterized for the ability to discriminate pitch (SP), duration (ST) and sound patterns (KMT), which are primary capacities for music perception. Using the Bayesian linkage and association approach implemented in program package KELVIN, especially designed for complex pedigrees, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near genes affecting the functions of the auditory pathway and neurocognitive processes were identified. The strongest association was found at 3q21.3 (rs9854612) with combined SP, ST and KMT test scores (COMB). This region is located a few dozen kilobases upstream of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene. GATA2 regulates the development of cochlear hair cells and the inferior colliculus (IC), which are important in tonotopic mapping. The highest probability of linkage was obtained for phenotype SP at 4p14, located next to the region harboring the protocadherin 7 gene, PCDH7. Two SNPs rs13146789 and rs13109270 of PCDH7 showed strong association. PCDH7 has been suggested to play a role in cochlear and amygdaloid complexes. Functional class analysis showed that inner ear and schizophrenia-related genes were enriched inside the linked regions. This study is the first to show the importance of auditory pathway genes in musical aptitude.

  12. Three genome-wide association studies and a linkage analysis identify HERC2 as a human iris color gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Manfred; Liu, Fan; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Lao, Oscar; van Duijn, Kate; Vermeulen, Mark; Arp, Pascal; Jhamai, Mila M; van Ijcken, Wilfred F J; den Dunnen, Johan T; Heath, Simon; Zelenika, Diana; Despriet, Dominiek D G; Klaver, Caroline C W; Vingerling, Johannes R; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Hofman, Albert; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Oostra, Ben A; van Duijn, Cornelia M

    2008-02-01

    Human iris color was one of the first traits for which Mendelian segregation was established. To date, the genetics of iris color is still not fully understood and is of interest, particularly in view of forensic applications. In three independent genome-wide association (GWA) studies of a total of 1406 persons and a genome-wide linkage study of 1292 relatives, all from the Netherlands, we found that the 15q13.1 region is the predominant region involved in human iris color. There were no other regions showing consistent genome-wide evidence for association and linkage to iris color. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the HERC2 gene and, to a lesser extent, in the neighboring OCA2 gene were independently associated to iris color variation. OCA2 has been implicated in iris color previously. A replication study within two populations confirmed that the HERC2 gene is a new and significant determinant of human iris color variation, in addition to OCA2. Furthermore, HERC2 rs916977 showed a clinal allele distribution across 23 European populations, which was significantly correlated to iris color variation. We suggest that genetic variants regulating expression of the OCA2 gene exist in the HERC2 gene or, alternatively, within the 11.7 kb of sequence between OCA2 and HERC2, and that most iris color variation in Europeans is explained by those two genes. Testing markers in the HERC2-OCA2 region may be useful in forensic applications to predict eye color phenotypes of unknown persons of European genetic origin.

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel susceptibility loci for systemic lupus erythematosus in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Zuo, X; Zhu, Z; Wen, L; Yang, C; Zhu, C; Tang, L; Cheng, Y; Chen, M; Zhou, F; Zheng, X; Wang, W; Yin, X; Tang, H; Sun, L; Yang, S; Sheng, Y; Cui, Y; Zhang, X

    2018-03-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a common prototypic autoimmune disease with substantial genetic predispositions. It is more prevalent in Asians than in Caucasians. Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have discovered more than 80 genetic loci for the risk of SLE 1 , which improve the understanding of SLE etiology and provide potential therapeutic targets. However, each GWAS finding only confers a relatively small effect, and they in total cannot fully explain SLE heritability, suggesting more genetic variants are yet to be discovered. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies a common variant in RAD51B associated with male breast cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Nick; Lemnrau, Alina; Cooke, Rosie; Fletcher, Olivia; Tomczyk, Katarzyna; Jones, Michael; Johnson, Nichola; Lord, Christopher J; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Zvelebil, Marketa; McDade, Simon S; Buck, Gemma; Blancher, Christine; Trainer, Alison H; James, Paul A; Bojesen, Stig E; Bokmand, Susanne; Nevanlinna, Heli; Mattson, Johanna; Friedman, Eitan; Laitman, Yael; Palli, Domenico; Masala, Giovanna; Zanna, Ines; Ottini, Laura; Giannini, Giuseppe; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Ouweland, Ans M W van den; Novaković, Srdjan; Krajc, Mateja; Gago-Dominguez, Manuela; Castelao, Jose Esteban; Olsson, Håkan; Hedenfalk, Ingrid; Easton, Douglas F; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Bishop, D Timothy; Neuhausen, Susan L; Steele, Linda; Houlston, Richard S; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony J

    2012-11-01

    We conducted a genome-wide association study of male breast cancer comprising 823 cases and 2,795 controls of European ancestry, with validation in independent sample sets totaling 438 cases and 474 controls. A SNP in RAD51B at 14q24.1 was significantly associated with male breast cancer risk (P = 3.02 × 10(-13); odds ratio (OR) = 1.57). We also refine association at 16q12.1 to a SNP within TOX3 (P = 3.87 × 10(-15); OR = 1.50).

  15. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies That the ABO Blood Group System Influences Interleukin-10 Levels and the Risk of Clinical Events in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, ?sa; Alfredsson, Jenny; Eriksson, Niclas; Wallentin, Lars; Siegbahn, Agneta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is a major cause of mortality worldwide. We have previously shown that increased interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels are associated with poor outcome in ACS patients. Method We performed a genome-wide association study in 2864 ACS patients and 408 healthy controls, to identify genetic variants associated with IL-10 levels. Then haplotype analyses of the identified loci were done and comparisons to levels of IL-10 and other known ACS related biomarkers. Res...

  16. A Large-Scale Multi-ancestry Genome-wide Study Accounting for Smoking Behavior Identifies Multiple Significant Loci for Blood Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Yun J; Winkler, Thomas W; de Las Fuentes, Lisa; Bentley, Amy R; Brown, Michael R; Kraja, Aldi T; Schwander, Karen; Ntalla, Ioanna; Guo, Xiuqing; Franceschini, Nora; Lu, Yingchang; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Sim, Xueling; Vojinovic, Dina; Marten, Jonathan; Musani, Solomon K; Li, Changwei; Feitosa, Mary F; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Richard, Melissa A; Noordam, Raymond; Aslibekyan, Stella; Aschard, Hugues; Bartz, Traci M; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Liu, Yongmei; Manning, Alisa K; Rankinen, Tuomo; Smith, Albert Vernon; Tajuddin, Salman M; Tayo, Bamidele O; Warren, Helen R; Zhao, Wei; Zhou, Yanhua; Matoba, Nana; Sofer, Tamar; Alver, Maris; Amini, Marzyeh; Boissel, Mathilde; Chai, Jin Fang; Chen, Xu; Divers, Jasmin; Gandin, Ilaria; Gao, Chuan; Giulianini, Franco; Goel, Anuj; Harris, Sarah E; Hartwig, Fernando Pires; Horimoto, Andrea R V R; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Jackson, Anne U; Kähönen, Mika; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Kühnel, Brigitte; Leander, Karin; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lin, Keng-Hung; 'an Luan, Jian; McKenzie, Colin A; Meian, He; Nelson, Christopher P; Rauramaa, Rainer; Schupf, Nicole; Scott, Robert A; Sheu, Wayne H H; Stančáková, Alena; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; van der Most, Peter J; Varga, Tibor V; Wang, Heming; Wang, Yajuan; Ware, Erin B; Weiss, Stefan; Wen, Wanqing; Yanek, Lisa R; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Afaq, Saima; Alfred, Tamuno; Amin, Najaf; Arking, Dan; Aung, Tin; Barr, R Graham; Bielak, Lawrence F; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bottinger, Erwin P; Braund, Peter S; Brody, Jennifer A; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cabrera, Claudia P; Cade, Brian; Caizheng, Yu; Campbell, Archie; Canouil, Mickaël; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chauhan, Ganesh; Christensen, Kaare; Cocca, Massimiliano; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John M; de Mutsert, Renée; de Silva, H Janaka; Debette, Stephanie; Dörr, Marcus; Duan, Qing; Eaton, Charles B; Ehret, Georg; Evangelou, Evangelos; Faul, Jessica D; Fisher, Virginia A; Forouhi, Nita G; Franco, Oscar H; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gao, He; Gigante, Bruna; Graff, Misa; Gu, C Charles; Gu, Dongfeng; Gupta, Preeti; Hagenaars, Saskia P; Harris, Tamara B; He, Jiang; Heikkinen, Sami; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hirata, Makoto; Hofman, Albert; Howard, Barbara V; Hunt, Steven; Irvin, Marguerite R; Jia, Yucheng; Joehanes, Roby; Justice, Anne E; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Kaufman, Joel; Kerrison, Nicola D; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Koh, Woon-Puay; Koistinen, Heikki A; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kooperberg, Charles; Krieger, Jose E; Kubo, Michiaki; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langefeld, Carl D; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J; Lehne, Benjamin; Lewis, Cora E; Li, Yize; Lim, Sing Hui; Lin, Shiow; Liu, Ching-Ti; Liu, Jianjun; Liu, Jingmin; Liu, Kiang; Liu, Yeheng; Loh, Marie; Lohman, Kurt K; Long, Jirong; Louie, Tin; Mägi, Reedik; Mahajan, Anubha; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Milani, Lili; Momozawa, Yukihide; Morris, Andrew P; Mosley, Thomas H; Munson, Peter; Murray, Alison D; Nalls, Mike A; Nasri, Ubaydah; Norris, Jill M; North, Kari; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmas, Walter R; Palmer, Nicholette D; Pankow, James S; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peters, Annette; Peyser, Patricia A; Polasek, Ozren; Raitakari, Olli T; Renström, Frida; Rice, Treva K; Ridker, Paul M; Robino, Antonietta; Robinson, Jennifer G; Rose, Lynda M; Rudan, Igor; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Salako, Babatunde L; Sandow, Kevin; Schmidt, Carsten O; Schreiner, Pamela J; Scott, William R; Seshadri, Sudha; Sever, Peter; Sitlani, Colleen M; Smith, Jennifer A; Snieder, Harold; Starr, John M; Strauch, Konstantin; Tang, Hua; Taylor, Kent D; Teo, Yik Ying; Tham, Yih Chung; Uitterlinden, André G; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Ya X; Wei, Wen Bin; Williams, Christine; Wilson, Gregory; Wojczynski, Mary K; Yao, Jie; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zonderman, Alan B; Becker, Diane M; Boehnke, Michael; Bowden, Donald W; Chambers, John C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; de Faire, Ulf; Deary, Ian J; Esko, Tõnu; Farrall, Martin; Forrester, Terrence; Franks, Paul W; Freedman, Barry I; Froguel, Philippe; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Hung, Yi-Jen; Jonas, Jost B; Kato, Norihiro; Kooner, Jaspal S; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Liang, Kae-Woei; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Newman, Anne B; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pereira, Alexandre C; Redline, Susan; Rettig, Rainer; Samani, Nilesh J; Scott, James; Shu, Xiao-Ou; van der Harst, Pim; Wagenknecht, Lynne E; Wareham, Nicholas J; Watkins, Hugh; Weir, David R; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R; Wu, Tangchun; Zheng, Wei; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Laurie, Cathy C; Bouchard, Claude; Cooper, Richard S; Evans, Michele K; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kardia, Sharon L R; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Levy, Daniel; O'Connell, Jeff R; Psaty, Bruce M

    2018-03-01

    Genome-wide association analysis advanced understanding of blood pressure (BP), a major risk factor for vascular conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke. Accounting for smoking behavior may help identify BP loci and extend our knowledge of its genetic architecture. We performed genome-wide association meta-analyses of systolic and diastolic BP incorporating gene-smoking interactions in 610,091 individuals. Stage 1 analysis examined ∼18.8 million SNPs and small insertion/deletion variants in 129,913 individuals from four ancestries (European, African, Asian, and Hispanic) with follow-up analysis of promising variants in 480,178 additional individuals from five ancestries. We identified 15 loci that were genome-wide significant (p < 5 × 10 -8 ) in stage 1 and formally replicated in stage 2. A combined stage 1 and 2 meta-analysis identified 66 additional genome-wide significant loci (13, 35, and 18 loci in European, African, and trans-ancestry, respectively). A total of 56 known BP loci were also identified by our results (p < 5 × 10 -8 ). Of the newly identified loci, ten showed significant interaction with smoking status, but none of them were replicated in stage 2. Several loci were identified in African ancestry, highlighting the importance of genetic studies in diverse populations. The identified loci show strong evidence for regulatory features and support shared pathophysiology with cardiometabolic and addiction traits. They also highlight a role in BP regulation for biological candidates such as modulators of vascular structure and function (CDKN1B, BCAR1-CFDP1, PXDN, EEA1), ciliopathies (SDCCAG8, RPGRIP1L), telomere maintenance (TNKS, PINX1, AKTIP), and central dopaminergic signaling (MSRA, EBF2). Copyright © 2018 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  17. Genome-Wide Scan of the Gene Expression Kinetics of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi during Hyperosmotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Ezaki

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is a human enteroinvasive pathogen that canovercome the stress caused by the high osmolarity of the human small intestine and causesystemic infection. To investigate the global transcriptional regulations of S. entericaserovar Typhi exposed to a hyperosmotic environment, a genomic oligo-DNA microarraycontaining 4474 Salmonella genes was prepared. A wild strain of S. enterica serovar TyphiGIFU10007 was grown in LB medium containing 50 mM NaCl to simulate a low osmoticenvironment. The hyperosmotic stress was simulated by an osmotic up-shift, whichincreased the concentration of NaCl in the LB from 50 mM to 300 mM. Genome-wide geneexpressions of S. enterica serovar Typhi at 15 min, 30 min, 60 min, and 120 min after theosmotic up-shift were investigated by the microarray analysis. Gene expression profiles insomewhat later stage (60 ~120 min of the stress were quite different from those in the earlystage (0 ~ 30 min of the stress. At 120 min after the osmotic stress, the expression levels of889 genes were obviously changed. However, expression levels of only 382 genes weresignificantly changed at 15 min after the osmotic stress. The expression levels of most SPI-1genes associated with invasion of the pathogen were increased at 120 min after the osmoticup-shift, but were not obviously changed at 15 min or 30 min after the osmotic stress.Expressions of a central regulatory gene, phoP, and sigma factor genes rpoE, rpoD, andrpoS were also changed with different profiles during the osmotic stress. These resultsindicated that the invasive ability of the pathogen is significantly increased after 2 h of hyperosmotic stress, and regulator PhoP and sigma factors RpoE, RpoD appear to participate in the network regulatory mechanisms that benefit the pathogen to adapt hyperosmotic environmental conditions. The later increased invasive ability of S. enterica serovar Typhi after hyperosmotic stress may be one reason why the pathogen

  18. Single-trait and multi-trait genome-wide association analyses identify novel loci for blood pressure in African-ancestry populations

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Jingjing; Le, Thu H.; Edwards, Digna R. Velez; Tayo, Bamidele O.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Lu, Yingchang; Jensen, Richard A.; Chen, Guanjie; Yanek, Lisa R.; Schwander, Karen; Tajuddin, Salman M.; Sofer, Tamar; Kim, Wonji; Kayima, James

    2017-01-01

    © 2017 Public Library of Science. All Rights Reserved. Hypertension is a leading cause of global disease, mortality, and disability. While individuals of African descent suffer a disproportionate burden of hypertension and its complications, they have been underrepresented in genetic studies. To identify novel susceptibility loci for blood pressure and hypertension in people of African ancestry, we performed both single and multiple-trait genome-wide association analyses. We analyzed 21 genom...

  19. Bivariate genome-wide association analyses identified genetic pleiotropic effects for bone mineral density and alcohol drinking in Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shan; Zhao, Lan-Juan; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Papasian, Christopher J; Wu, Ke-Hao; Tan, Li-Jun; Wang, Zhuo-Er; Pei, Yu-Fang; Tian, Qing; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2017-11-01

    Several studies indicated bone mineral density (BMD) and alcohol intake might share common genetic factors. The study aimed to explore potential SNPs/genes related to both phenotypes in US Caucasians at the genome-wide level. A bivariate genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed in 2069 unrelated participants. Regular drinking was graded as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6, representing drinking alcohol never, less than once, once or twice, three to six times, seven to ten times, or more than ten times per week respectively. Hip, spine, and whole body BMDs were measured. The bivariate GWAS was conducted on the basis of a bivariate linear regression model. Sex-stratified association analyses were performed in the male and female subgroups. In males, the most significant association signal was detected in SNP rs685395 in DYNC2H1 with bivariate spine BMD and alcohol drinking (P = 1.94 × 10 -8 ). SNP rs685395 and five other SNPs, rs657752, rs614902, rs682851, rs626330, and rs689295, located in the same haplotype block in DYNC2H1 were the top ten most significant SNPs in the bivariate GWAS in males. Additionally, two SNPs in GRIK4 in males and three SNPs in OPRM1 in females were suggestively associated with BMDs (of the hip, spine, and whole body) and alcohol drinking. Nine SNPs in IL1RN were only suggestively associated with female whole body BMD and alcohol drinking. Our study indicated that DYNC2H1 may contribute to the genetic mechanisms of both spine BMD and alcohol drinking in male Caucasians. Moreover, our study suggested potential pleiotropic roles of OPRM1 and IL1RN in females and GRIK4 in males underlying variation of both BMD and alcohol drinking.

  20. A Genome-Wide mQTL Analysis in Human Adipose Tissue Identifies Genetic Variants Associated with DNA Methylation, Gene Expression and Metabolic Traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volkov, Petr; Olsson, Anders H; Gillberg, Linn

    2016-01-01

    mediate their effects on metabolic traits (e.g. BMI, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)) via altered DNA methylation in human adipose tissue. This study identifies genome-wide interactions between genetic......Little is known about the extent to which interactions between genetics and epigenetics may affect the risk of complex metabolic diseases and/or their intermediary phenotypes. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation quantitative trait locus (mQTL) analysis in human adipose tissue of 119 men...... CHRNA5, G6PC2, GPX7, RPL27A, THNSL2 and ZFP57. SNPs in significant mQTLs were also associated with body mass index (BMI), lipid traits and glucose and insulin levels in our study cohort and public available consortia data. Importantly, the Causal Inference Test (CIT) demonstrates how genetic variants...

  1. Prediction for Intravenous Immunoglobulin Resistance by Using Weighted Genetic Risk Score Identified From Genome-Wide Association Study in Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Wong, Henry Sung-Ching; Chang, Wei-Pin; Chen, Ben-Kuen; Wu, Mei-Shin; Yang, Kuender D; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Hsu, Yu-Wen; Liu, Shih-Feng; Liu, Xiao; Chang, Wei-Chiao

    2017-10-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is the treatment of choice in Kawasaki disease (KD). IVIG is used to prevent cardiovascular complications related to KD. However, a proportion of KD patients have persistent fever after IVIG treatment and are defined as IVIG resistant. To develop a risk scoring system based on genetic markers to predict IVIG responsiveness in KD patients, a total of 150 KD patients (126 IVIG responders and 24 IVIG nonresponders) were recruited for this study. A genome-wide association analysis was performed to compare the 2 groups and identified risk alleles for IVIG resistance. A weighted genetic risk score was calculated by the natural log of the odds ratio multiplied by the number of risk alleles. Eleven single-nucleotide polymorphisms were identified by genome-wide association study. The KD patients were categorized into 3 groups based on their calculated weighted genetic risk score. Results indicated a significant association between weighted genetic risk score (groups 3 and 4 versus group 1) and the response to IVIG (Fisher's exact P value 4.518×10 - 03 and 8.224×10 - 10 , respectively). This is the first weighted genetic risk score study based on a genome-wide association study in KD. The predictive model integrated the additive effects of all 11 single-nucleotide polymorphisms to provide a prediction of the responsiveness to IVIG. © 2017 The Authors.

  2. Genome-Wide Scan Informed by Age-Related Disease Identifies Loci for Exceptional Human Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    Fortney, Kristen; Dobriban, Edgar; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Monti, Daniela; Mari, Daniela; Atzmon, Gil; Barzilai, Nir; Franceschi, Claudio; Owen, Art B.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new statistical framework to find genetic variants associated with extreme longevity. The method, informed GWAS (iGWAS), takes advantage of knowledge from large studies of age-related disease in order to narrow the search for SNPs associated with longevity. To gain support for our approach, we first show there is an overlap between loci involved in disease and loci associated with extreme longevity. These results indicate that several disease variants may be depleted in centena...

  3. Genome-wide association study identifies a single major locus contributing to survival into old age; the APOE locus revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Uh, Hae-Won

    2011-01-01

    (LLS) and 1670 younger population controls. The strongest candidate SNPs from this GWAS have been analyzed in a meta-analysis of nonagenarian cases from the Rotterdam Study, Leiden 85-plus study and Danish 1905 cohort. Only one of the 62 prioritized SNPs from the GWAS analysis (P ... genome-wide significance with survival into old age in the meta-analysis of 4149 nonagenarian cases and 7582 younger controls (OR = 0.71 (95% CI 0.65-0.77), P = 3.39 x 10(-17) ). This SNP, rs2075650, is located in TOMM40 at chromosome 19q13.32 close to the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene. Although...... of the nonagenarian cases from the LLS and their partners. In addition, we observed a novel association between this locus and serum levels of IGF-1 in females (P = 0.005). In conclusion, the major locus determining familial longevity up to high age as detected by GWAS was marked by rs2075650, which tags...

  4. A Genome-Wide Association Study and Complex Network Identify Four Core Hub Genes in Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zengyan; Yang, Xianyan; Deng, Xiaoya; Ma, Mingyue; Shu, Kunxian

    2017-12-19

    Bipolar disorder is a common and severe mental illness with unsolved pathophysiology. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been used to find a number of risk genes, but it is difficult for a GWAS to find genes indirectly associated with a disease. To find core hub genes, we introduce a network analysis after the GWAS was conducted. Six thousand four hundred fifty eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with p sifted out from Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC) dataset and mapped to 2045 genes, which are then compared with the protein-protein network. One hundred twelve genes with a degree >17 were chosen as hub genes from which five significant modules and four core hub genes ( FBXL13 , WDFY2 , bFGF , and MTHFD1L ) were found. These core hub genes have not been reported to be directly associated with BD but may function by interacting with genes directly related to BD. Our method engenders new thoughts on finding genes indirectly associated with, but important for, complex diseases.

  5. A Genome-Wide Association Study and Complex Network Identify Four Core Hub Genes in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengyan Xie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder is a common and severe mental illness with unsolved pathophysiology. A genome-wide association study (GWAS has been used to find a number of risk genes, but it is difficult for a GWAS to find genes indirectly associated with a disease. To find core hub genes, we introduce a network analysis after the GWAS was conducted. Six thousand four hundred fifty eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with p < 0.01 were sifted out from Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC dataset and mapped to 2045 genes, which are then compared with the protein–protein network. One hundred twelve genes with a degree >17 were chosen as hub genes from which five significant modules and four core hub genes (FBXL13, WDFY2, bFGF, and MTHFD1L were found. These core hub genes have not been reported to be directly associated with BD but may function by interacting with genes directly related to BD. Our method engenders new thoughts on finding genes indirectly associated with, but important for, complex diseases.

  6. USH1G with unique retinal findings caused by a novel truncating mutation identified by genome-wide linkage analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taibah, Khalid; Bin-Khamis, Ghada; Kennedy, Shelley; Hemidan, Amal; Al-Qahtani, Faisal; Tabbara, Khalid; Mubarak, Bashayer Al; Ramzan, Khushnooda; Meyer, Brian F.; Al-Owain, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disorder divided into three distinct clinical subtypes based on the severity of the hearing loss, manifestation of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of retinitis pigmentosa and visual symptoms. To date, mutations in seven different genes have been reported to cause USH type 1 (USH1), the most severe form. Patients diagnosed with USH1 are known to be ideal candidates to benefit from cochlear implantation. Methods Genome-wide linkage analysis using Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 10K arrays were performed in three cochlear implanted Saudi siblings born from a consanguineous marriage, clinically diagnosed with USH1 by comprehensive clinical, audiological, and ophthalmological examinations. From the linkage results, the USH1G gene was screened for mutations by direct sequencing of the coding exons. Results We report the identification of a novel p.S243X truncating mutation in USH1G that segregated with the disease phenotype and was not present in 300 ethnically matched normal controls. We also report on the novel retinal findings and the outcome of cochlear implantation in the affected individuals. Conclusions In addition to reporting a novel truncating mutation, this report expands the retinal phenotype in USH1G and presents the first report of successful cochlear implants in this disease. PMID:22876113

  7. Genome-wide bisulfite sequencing in zygotes identifies demethylation targets and maps the contribution of TET3 oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Julian R; Dean, Wendy; Clark, Stephen J; Krueger, Felix; Smallwood, Sébastien A; Ficz, Gabriella; Kim, Jong Kyoung; Marioni, John C; Hore, Timothy A; Reik, Wolf

    2014-12-24

    Fertilization triggers global erasure of paternal 5-methylcytosine as part of epigenetic reprogramming during the transition from gametic specialization to totipotency. This involves oxidation by TET3, but our understanding of its targets and the wider context of demethylation is limited to a small fraction of the genome. We employed an optimized bisulfite strategy to generate genome-wide methylation profiles of control and TET3-deficient zygotes, using SNPs to access paternal alleles. This revealed that in addition to pervasive removal from intergenic sequences and most retrotransposons, gene bodies constitute a major target of zygotic demethylation. Methylation loss is associated with zygotic genome activation and at gene bodies is also linked to increased transcriptional noise in early development. Our data map the primary contribution of oxidative demethylation to a subset of gene bodies and intergenic sequences and implicate redundant pathways at many loci. Unexpectedly, we demonstrate that TET3 activity also protects certain CpG islands against methylation buildup. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome-wide Bisulfite Sequencing in Zygotes Identifies Demethylation Targets and Maps the Contribution of TET3 Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R. Peat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fertilization triggers global erasure of paternal 5-methylcytosine as part of epigenetic reprogramming during the transition from gametic specialization to totipotency. This involves oxidation by TET3, but our understanding of its targets and the wider context of demethylation is limited to a small fraction of the genome. We employed an optimized bisulfite strategy to generate genome-wide methylation profiles of control and TET3-deficient zygotes, using SNPs to access paternal alleles. This revealed that in addition to pervasive removal from intergenic sequences and most retrotransposons, gene bodies constitute a major target of zygotic demethylation. Methylation loss is associated with zygotic genome activation and at gene bodies is also linked to increased transcriptional noise in early development. Our data map the primary contribution of oxidative demethylation to a subset of gene bodies and intergenic sequences and implicate redundant pathways at many loci. Unexpectedly, we demonstrate that TET3 activity also protects certain CpG islands against methylation buildup.

  9. Genome-wide association analyses for lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease identify new loci and potential druggable targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wain, Louise V; Shrine, Nick; Soler Artigas, María; Erzurumluoglu, A Mesut; Noyvert, Boris; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Obeidat, Ma’en; Henry, Amanda P; Portelli, Michael A; Hall, Robert J; Billington, Charlotte K; Rimington, Tracy L; Fenech, Anthony G; John, Catherine; Blake, Tineka; Jackson, Victoria E; Allen, Richard J; Prins, Bram P; Campbell, Archie; Porteous, David J; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wielscher, Matthias; James, Alan L; Hui, Jennie; Wareham, Nicholas J; Zhao, Jing Hua; Wilson, James F; Joshi, Peter K; Stubbe, Beate; Rawal, Rajesh; Schulz, Holger; Imboden, Medea; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Karrasch, Stefan; Gieger, Christian; Deary, Ian J; Harris, Sarah E; Marten, Jonathan; Rudan, Igor; Enroth, Stefan; Gyllensten, Ulf; Kerr, Shona M; Polasek, Ozren; Kähönen, Mika; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T; Evans, David M; Henderson, A John; Pennell, Craig E; Wang, Carol A; Sly, Peter D; Wan, Emily S; Busch, Robert; Hobbs, Brian D; Litonjua, Augusto A; Sparrow, David W; Gulsvik, Amund; Bakke, Per S; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Hansel, Nadia N; Mathias, Rasika A; Ruczinski, Ingo; Barnes, Kathleen C; Bossé, Yohan; Joubert, Philippe; van den Berge, Maarten; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Paré, Peter D; Sin, Don D; Nickle, David C; Hao, Ke; Gottesman, Omri; Dewey, Frederick E; Bruse, Shannon E; Carey, David J; Kirchner, H Lester; Jonsson, Stefan; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Gislason, Thorarinn; Stefansson, Kari; Schurmann, Claudia; Nadkarni, Girish; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth JF; Walters, Robin G; Chen, Zhengming; Millwood, Iona Y; Vaucher, Julien; Kurmi, Om P; Li, Liming; Hansell, Anna L; Brightling, Chris; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Cho, Michael H; Silverman, Edwin K; Sayers, Ian; Trynka, Gosia; Morris, Andrew P; Strachan, David P; Hall, Ian P; Tobin, Martin D

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is characterised by reduced lung function and is the third leading cause of death globally. Through genome-wide association discovery in 48,943 individuals, selected from extremes of the lung function distribution in UK Biobank, and follow-up in 95,375 individuals, we increased the yield of independent signals for lung function from 54 to 97. A genetic risk score was associated with COPD susceptibility (odds ratios per standard deviation of the risk score (~6 alleles) (95% confidence interval) 1.24 (1.20-1.27), P=5.05x10-49) and we observed a 3.7 fold difference in COPD risk between highest and lowest genetic risk score deciles in UK Biobank. The 97 signals show enrichment in development, elastic fibres and epigenetic regulation pathways. We highlight targets for drugs and compounds in development for COPD and asthma (genes in the inositol phosphate metabolism pathway and CHRM3) and describe targets for potential drug repositioning from other clinical indications. PMID:28166213

  10. Asymmetric introgression in the horticultural living fossil cycas sect. Asiorientales using a genome-wide scanning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Yu-Chung; Huang, Bing-Hong; Chang, Chun-Wen; Wan, Yu-Ting; Lai, Shih-Jie; Huang, Shong; Liao, Pei-Chun

    2013-04-15

    The Asian cycads are mostly allopatric, distributed in small population sizes. Hybridization between allopatric species provides clues in determining the mechanism of species divergence. Horticultural introduction provides the chance of interspecific gene flow between allopatric species. Two allopatrically eastern Asian Cycas sect. Asiorientales species, C. revoluta and C. taitungensis, which are widely distributed in Ryukyus and Fujian Province and endemic to Taiwan, respectively, were planted in eastern Taiwan for horticultural reason. Higher degrees of genetic admixture in cultivated samples than wild populations in both cycad species were detected based on multilocus scans by neutral AFLP markers. Furthermore, bidirectional but asymmetric introgression by horticultural introduction of C. revoluta is evidenced by the reanalyses of species associated loci, which are assumed to be diverged after species divergence. Partial loci introgressed from native cycad to the invaders were also detected at the loci of strong species association. Consistent results tested by all neutral loci, and the species-associated loci, specify the recent introgression from the paradox of sharing of ancestral polymorphisms. Phenomenon of introgression of cultivated cycads implies niche conservation among two geographic-isolated cycads, even though the habitats of the extant wild populations of two species are distinct.

  11. A Genome-Wide Scan for Loci Influencing Adolescent Cannabis Dependence Symptoms: Evidence for Linkage on Chromosomes 3 and 9

    OpenAIRE

    Hopfer, Christian J.; Lessem, Jeffrey M.; Hartman, Christie A.; Stallings, Michael C.; Cherny, Stacey S.; Corley, Robin P.; Hewitt, John K.; Krauter, Kenneth S.; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K.; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Smolen, Andrew; Young, Susan E.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Cannabis is the most frequently abused illicit substance among adolescents and young adults. Genetic risk factors account for part of the variation in the development of cannabis dependence symptoms; however, no linkage studies have been performed for cannabis dependence symptoms. This study aimed to identify such loci. Method: Three hundred and twenty-four sibling pairs from 192 families were assessed for cannabis dependence symptoms. Probands (13-19 years of age) were recruited f...

  12. A childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia genome-wide association study identifies novel sex-specific risk variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandeep K; Lupo, Philip J; Scheurer, Michael E; Saxena, Anshul; Kennedy, Amy E; Ibrahimou, Boubakari; Barbieri, Manuel Alejandro; Mills, Ken I; McCauley, Jacob L; Okcu, Mehmet Fatih; Dorak, Mehmet Tevfik

    2016-11-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) occurs more frequently in males. Reasons behind sex differences in childhood ALL risk are unknown. In the present genome-wide association study (GWAS), we explored the genetic basis of sex differences by comparing genotype frequencies between male and female cases in a case-only study to assess effect-modification by sex.The case-only design included 236 incident cases of childhood ALL consecutively recruited at the Texas Children's Cancer Center in Houston, Texas from 2007 to 2012. All cases were non-Hispanic whites, aged 1 to 10 years, and diagnosed with confirmed B-cell precursor ALL. Genotyping was performed using the Illumina HumanCoreExome BeadChip on the Illumina Infinium platform. Besides the top 100 statistically most significant results, results were also analyzed by the top 100 highest effect size with a nominal statistical significance (P HLA-DQA1 gene yielded the highest effect sizes (odds ratio [OR] ∼ 14; P HLA-DQA1 SNPs belong to DQA1*01 and confirmed the previously reported male-specific association with DQA1*01. This finding supports the proposed infection-related etiology in childhood ALL risk for males. Further analyses revealed that most SNPs (either direct effect or through linkage disequilibrium) were within active enhancers or active promoter regions and had regulatory effects on gene expression levels.Cumulative data suggested that RASSF2 rs4813720, which correlates with increased RASSF2 expression, may counteract the suppressor effect of estrogen-regulated miR-17-92 on RASSF2 resulting in protection in males. Given the amount of sex hormone-related mechanisms suggested by our findings, future studies should examine prenatal or early postnatal programming by sex hormones when hormone levels show a large variation.

  13. Single-trait and multi-trait genome-wide association analyses identify novel loci for blood pressure in African-ancestry populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Liang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a leading cause of global disease, mortality, and disability. While individuals of African descent suffer a disproportionate burden of hypertension and its complications, they have been underrepresented in genetic studies. To identify novel susceptibility loci for blood pressure and hypertension in people of African ancestry, we performed both single and multiple-trait genome-wide association analyses. We analyzed 21 genome-wide association studies comprised of 31,968 individuals of African ancestry, and validated our results with additional 54,395 individuals from multi-ethnic studies. These analyses identified nine loci with eleven independent variants which reached genome-wide significance (P < 1.25×10-8 for either systolic and diastolic blood pressure, hypertension, or for combined traits. Single-trait analyses identified two loci (TARID/TCF21 and LLPH/TMBIM4 and multiple-trait analyses identified one novel locus (FRMD3 for blood pressure. At these three loci, as well as at GRP20/CDH17, associated variants had alleles common only in African-ancestry populations. Functional annotation showed enrichment for genes expressed in immune and kidney cells, as well as in heart and vascular cells/tissues. Experiments driven by these findings and using angiotensin-II induced hypertension in mice showed altered kidney mRNA expression of six genes, suggesting their potential role in hypertension. Our study provides new evidence for genes related to hypertension susceptibility, and the need to study African-ancestry populations in order to identify biologic factors contributing to hypertension.

  14. Revealing the selection history of adaptive loci using genome-wide scans for selection: an example from domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochus, Christina Marie; Tortereau, Flavie; Plisson-Petit, Florence; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreno-Romieux, Carole; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Servin, Bertrand

    2018-01-23

    One of the approaches to detect genetics variants affecting fitness traits is to identify their surrounding genomic signatures of past selection. With established methods for detecting selection signatures and the current and future availability of large datasets, such studies should have the power to not only detect these signatures but also to infer their selective histories. Domesticated animals offer a powerful model for these approaches as they adapted rapidly to environmental and human-mediated constraints in a relatively short time. We investigated this question by studying a large dataset of 542 individuals from 27 domestic sheep populations raised in France, genotyped for more than 500,000 SNPs. Population structure analysis revealed that this set of populations harbour a large part of European sheep diversity in a small geographical area, offering a powerful model for the study of adaptation. Identification of extreme SNP and haplotype frequency differences between populations listed 126 genomic regions likely affected by selection. These signatures revealed selection at loci commonly identified as selection targets in many species ("selection hotspots") including ABCG2, LCORL/NCAPG, MSTN, and coat colour genes such as ASIP, MC1R, MITF, and TYRP1. For one of these regions (ABCG2, LCORL/NCAPG), we could propose a historical scenario leading to the introgression of an adaptive allele into a new genetic background. Among selection signatures, we found clear evidence for parallel selection events in different genetic backgrounds, most likely for different mutations. We confirmed this allelic heterogeneity in one case by resequencing the MC1R gene in three black-faced breeds. Our study illustrates how dense genetic data in multiple populations allows the deciphering of evolutionary history of populations and of their adaptive mutations.

  15. Genome-wide linkage analysis for human longevity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekman, Marian; Blanché, Hélène; Perola, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Clear evidence exists for heritability of human longevity, and much interest is focused on identifying genes associated with longer lives. To identify such longevity alleles, we performed the largest genome-wide linkage scan thus far reported. Linkage analyses included 2118 nonagenarian Caucasian...

  16. A genome-wide association study using international breeding-evaluation data identifies major loci affecting production traits and stature in the Brown Swiss cattle breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Jiazhong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genome-wide association study (GWAS is a useful approach to identify genes affecting economically important traits in dairy cattle. Here, we report the results from a GWAS based on high-density SNP genotype data and estimated breeding values for nine production, fertility, body conformation, udder health and workability traits in the Brown Swiss cattle population that is part of the international genomic evaluation program. Result GWASs were performed using 50 k SNP chip data and deregressed estimated breeding values (DEBVs for nine traits from between 2061 and 5043 bulls that were part of the international genomic evaluation program coordinated by Interbull Center. The nine traits were milk yield (MY, fat yield (FY, protein yield (PY, lactating cow’s ability to recycle after calving (CRC, angularity (ANG, body depth (BDE, stature (STA, milk somatic cell score (SCS and milk speed (MSP. Analyses were performed using a linear mixed model correcting for population confounding. A total of 74 SNPs were detected to be genome-wide significantly associated with one or several of the nine analyzed traits. The strongest signal was identified on chromosome 25 for milk production traits, stature and body depth. Other signals were on chromosome 11 for angularity, chromosome 24 for somatic cell score, and chromosome 6 for milking speed. Some signals overlapped with earlier reported QTL for similar traits in other cattle populations and were located close to interesting candidate genes worthy of further investigations. Conclusions Our study shows that international genetic evaluation data is a useful resource for identifying genetic factors influencing complex traits in livestock. Several genome wide significant association signals could be identified in the Brown Swiss population, including a major signal on BTA25. Our findings report several associations and plausible candidate genes that deserve further exploration in other

  17. Multiple Genes Related to Muscle Identified through a Joint Analysis of a Two-stage Genome-wide Association Study for Racing Performance of 1,156 Thoroughbreds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Hyun Shin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Thoroughbred, a relatively recent horse breed, is best known for its use in horse racing. Although myostatin (MSTN variants have been reported to be highly associated with horse racing performance, the trait is more likely to be polygenic in nature. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants strongly associated with racing performance by using estimated breeding value (EBV for race time as a phenotype. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to search for genetic variants associated with the EBV. In the first stage of genome-wide association study, a relatively large number of markers (~54,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs were evaluated in a small number of samples (240 horses. In the second stage, a relatively small number of markers identified to have large effects (170 SNPs were evaluated in a much larger number of samples (1,156 horses. We also validated the SNPs related to MSTN known to have large effects on racing performance and found significant associations in the stage two analysis, but not in stage one. We identified 28 significant SNPs related to 17 genes. Among these, six genes have a function related to myogenesis and five genes are involved in muscle maintenance. To our knowledge, these genes are newly reported for the genetic association with racing performance of Thoroughbreds. It complements a recent horse genome-wide association studies of racing performance that identified other SNPs and genes as the most significant variants. These results will help to expand our knowledge of the polygenic nature of racing performance in Thoroughbreds.

  18. A genome-wide scan for loci influencing adolescent cannabis dependence symptoms: evidence for linkage on chromosomes 3 and 9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopfer, Christian J; Lessem, Jeffrey M; Hartman, Christie A; Stallings, Michael C; Cherny, Stacey S; Corley, Robin P; Hewitt, John K; Krauter, Kenneth S; Mikulich-Gilbertson, Susan K; Rhee, Soo Hyun; Smolen, Andrew; Young, Susan E; Crowley, Thomas J

    2007-06-15

    Cannabis is the most frequently abused illicit substance among adolescents and young adults. Genetic risk factors account for part of the variation in the development of cannabis dependence symptoms; however, no linkage studies have been performed for cannabis dependence symptoms. This study aimed to identify such loci. Three hundred and twenty-four sibling pairs from 192 families were assessed for cannabis dependence symptoms. Probands (13-19 years of age) were recruited from consecutive admissions to substance abuse treatment facilities. The siblings of the probands ranged in age from 12 to 25 years. A community-based sample of 4843 adolescents and young adults was utilized to define an age- and sex-corrected index of cannabis dependence vulnerability. DSM-IV cannabis dependence symptoms were assessed in youth and their family members with the Composite International Diagnostic Instrument-Substance Abuse Module. Siblings and parents were genotyped for 374 microsatellite markers distributed across the 22 autosomes (average inter-marker distance=9.2cM). Cannabis dependence symptoms were analyzed using Merlin-regress, a regression-based method that is robust to sample selection. Evidence for suggestive linkage was found on chromosome 3q21 near marker D3S1267 (LOD=2.61), and on chromosome 9q34 near marker D9S1826 (LOD=2.57). This is the first reported linkage study of cannabis dependence symptoms. Other reports of linkage regions for illicit substance dependence have been reported near 3q21, suggesting that this region may contain a quantitative trait loci influencing cannabis dependence and other substance use disorders.

  19. Genome-Wide Association Meta-Analyses to Identify Common Genetic Variants Associated with Hallux Valgus in Caucasian and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Liu, Youfang; Hannan, Marian T.; Maixner, William; Smith, Shad B.; Diatchenko, Luda; Golightly, Yvonne M.; Menz, Hylton B.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Doherty, Michael; Wilson, A.G.; Jordan, Joanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hallux valgus (HV) affects ~36% of Caucasian adults. Although considered highly heritable, the underlying genetic determinants are unclear. We conducted the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) aimed to identify genetic variants associated with HV. Methods HV was assessed in 3 Caucasian cohorts (n=2,263, n=915, and n=1,231 participants, respectively). In each cohort, a GWAS was conducted using 2.5M imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Mixed-effect regression with the additive genetic model adjusted for age, sex, weight and within-family correlations was used for both sex-specific and combined analyses. To combine GWAS results across cohorts, fixed-effect inverse-variance meta-analyses were used. Following meta-analyses, top-associated findings were also examined in an African American cohort (n=327). Results The proportion of HV variance explained by genome-wide genotyped SNPs was 50% in men and 48% in women. A higher proportion of genetic determinants of HV was sex-specific. The most significantly associated SNP in men was rs9675316 located on chr17q23-a24 near the AXIN2 gene (p=5.46×10−7); the most significantly associated SNP in women was rs7996797 located on chr13q14.1-q14.2 near the ESD gene (p=7.21×10−7). Genome-wide significant SNP-by-sex interaction was found for SNP rs1563374 located on chr11p15.1 near the MRGPRX3 gene (interaction p-value =4.1×10−9). The association signals diminished when combining men and women. Conclusion Findings suggest that the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of HV are complex and strongly underlined by sex-specific interactions. The identified genetic variants imply contribution of biological pathways observed in osteoarthritis as well as new pathways, influencing skeletal development and inflammation. PMID:26337638

  20. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies for Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Identifies Four New Disease-Specific Risk Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Baas, Annette F.; Giusti, Betti; Strauss, Ewa; van‘t Hof, Femke N.G.; Webb, Thomas R.; Erdman, Robert; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Elmore, James R.; Verma, Anurag; Pendergrass, Sarah; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Ye, Zi; Peissig, Peggy L.; Gottesman, Omri; Verma, Shefali S.; Malinowski, Jennifer; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Borthwick, Kenneth M.; Smelser, Diane T.; Crosslin, David R.; de Andrade, Mariza; Ryer, Evan J.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Böttinger, Erwin P.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Crawford, Dana C.; Carrell, David S.; Gerhard, Glenn S.; Franklin, David P.; Carey, David J.; Phillips, Victoria L.; Williams, Michael J.A.; Wei, Wenhua; Blair, Ross; Hill, Andrew A.; Vasudevan, Thodor M.; Lewis, David R.; Thomson, Ian A.; Krysa, Jo; Hill, Geraldine B.; Roake, Justin; Merriman, Tony R.; Oszkinis, Grzegorz; Galora, Silvia; Saracini, Claudia; Abbate, Rosanna; Pulli, Raffaele; Pratesi, Carlo; Saratzis, Athanasios; Verissimo, Ana R.; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Badger, Stephen A.; Clough, Rachel E.; Cockerill, Gillian; Hafez, Hany; Scott, D. Julian A.; Futers, T. Simon; Romaine, Simon P.R.; Bridge, Katherine; Griffin, Kathryn J.; Bailey, Marc A.; Smith, Alberto; Thompson, Matthew M.; van Bockxmeer, Frank M.; Matthiasson, Stefan E.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Blankensteijn, Jan D.; Teijink, Joep A.W.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Graaf, Jacqueline; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Lindholt, Jes S.; Hughes, Anne; Bradley, Declan T.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Golledge, Jonathan; Norman, Paul E.; Powell, Janet T.; Humphries, Steve E.; Hamby, Stephen E.; Goodall, Alison H.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Sakalihasan, Natzi; Courtois, Audrey; Ferrell, Robert E.; Eriksson, Per; Folkersen, Lasse; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Eicher, John D.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Schadt, Eric E.; Björkegren, Johan L.M.; Lipovich, Leonard; Drolet, Anne M.; Verhoeven, Eric L.; Zeebregts, Clark J.; Geelkerken, Robert H.; van Sambeek, Marc R.; van Sterkenburg, Steven M.; de Vries, Jean-Paul; Stefansson, Kari; Thompson, John R.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Deloukas, Panos; Sayers, Robert D.; Harrison, Seamus C.; van Rij, Andre M.; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2017-01-01

    Rationale: Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is a complex disease with both genetic and environmental risk factors. Together, 6 previously identified risk loci only explain a small proportion of the heritability of AAA. Objective: To identify additional AAA risk loci using data from all available genome-wide association studies. Methods and Results: Through a meta-analysis of 6 genome-wide association study data sets and a validation study totaling 10 204 cases and 107 766 controls, we identified 4 new AAA risk loci: 1q32.3 (SMYD2), 13q12.11 (LINC00540), 20q13.12 (near PCIF1/MMP9/ZNF335), and 21q22.2 (ERG). In various database searches, we observed no new associations between the lead AAA single nucleotide polymorphisms and coronary artery disease, blood pressure, lipids, or diabetes mellitus. Network analyses identified ERG, IL6R, and LDLR as modifiers of MMP9, with a direct interaction between ERG and MMP9. Conclusions: The 4 new risk loci for AAA seem to be specific for AAA compared with other cardiovascular diseases and related traits suggesting that traditional cardiovascular risk factor management may only have limited value in preventing the progression of aneurysmal disease. PMID:27899403

  1. A genome-wide association meta-analysis of diarrhoeal disease in young children identifies FUT2 locus and provides plausible biological pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, Mariona; Standl, Marie; Bassat, Quique; Vilor-Tejedor, Natalia; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Bonilla, Carolina; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bacelis, Jonas; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Tiesler, Carla M T; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Ring, Susan; Vissing, Nadja H; Fink, Nadia R; Jugessur, Astanand; Mentch, Frank D; Ballester, Ferran; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kiefte-de Jong, Jessica C; Wolsk, Helene M; Llop, Sabrina; Thiering, Elisabeth; Beth, Systke A; Timpson, Nicholas J; Andersen, Josefine; Schulz, Holger; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Evans, David M; Waage, Johannes; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F A; Jacobsson, Bo; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans; Davey Smith, George; Moll, Henriette A; Heinrich, Joachim; Estivill, Xavier; Sunyer, Jordi

    2016-09-15

    More than a million childhood diarrhoeal episodes occur worldwide each year, and in developed countries a considerable part of them are caused by viral infections. In this study, we aimed to search for genetic variants associated with diarrhoeal disease in young children by meta-analyzing genome-wide association studies, and to elucidate plausible biological mechanisms. The study was conducted in the context of the Early Genetics and Lifecourse Epidemiology (EAGLE) consortium. Data about diarrhoeal disease in two time windows (around 1 year of age and around 2 years of age) was obtained via parental questionnaires, doctor interviews or medical records. Standard quality control and statistical tests were applied to the 1000 Genomes imputed genotypic data. The meta-analysis (N = 5758) followed by replication (N = 3784) identified a genome-wide significant association between rs8111874 and diarrhoea at age 1 year. Conditional analysis suggested that the causal variant could be rs601338 (W154X) in the FUT2 gene. Children with the A allele, which results in a truncated FUT2 protein, had lower risk of diarrhoea. FUT2 participates in the production of histo-blood group antigens and has previously been implicated in the susceptibility to infections, including Rotavirus and Norovirus Gene-set enrichment analysis suggested pathways related to the histo-blood group antigen production, and the regulation of ion transport and blood pressure. Among others, the gastrointestinal tract, and the immune and neuro-secretory systems were detected as relevant organs. In summary, this genome-wide association meta-analysis suggests the implication of the FUT2 gene in diarrhoeal disease in young children from the general population. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. A genome-wide aberrant RNA splicing in patients with acute myeloid leukemia identifies novel potential disease markers and therapeutic targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamia, Sophia; Haibe-Kains, Benjamin; Pilarski, Patrick M; Bar-Natan, Michal; Pevzner, Samuel; Avet-Loiseau, Herve; Lode, Laurence; Verselis, Sigitas; Fox, Edward A; Burke, John; Galinsky, Ilene; Dagogo-Jack, Ibiayi; Wadleigh, Martha; Steensma, David P; Motyckova, Gabriela; Deangelo, Daniel J; Quackenbush, John; Stone, Richard; Griffin, James D

    2014-03-01

    Despite new treatments, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains an incurable disease. More effective drug design requires an expanded view of the molecular complexity that underlies AML. Alternative splicing of RNA is used by normal cells to generate protein diversity. Growing evidence indicates that aberrant splicing of genes plays a key role in cancer. We investigated genome-wide splicing abnormalities in AML and based on these abnormalities, we aimed to identify novel potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. We used genome-wide alternative splicing screening to investigate alternative splicing abnormalities in two independent AML patient cohorts [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) (Boston, MA) and University Hospital de Nantes (UHN) (Nantes, France)] and normal donors. Selected splicing events were confirmed through cloning and sequencing analysis, and than validated in 193 patients with AML. Our results show that approximately 29% of expressed genes genome-wide were differentially and recurrently spliced in patients with AML compared with normal donors bone marrow CD34(+) cells. Results were reproducible in two independent AML cohorts. In both cohorts, annotation analyses indicated similar proportions of differentially spliced genes encoding several oncogenes, tumor suppressor proteins, splicing factors, and heterogeneous-nuclear-ribonucleoproteins, proteins involved in apoptosis, cell pro