WorldWideScience

Sample records for genome-wide rnai screen

  1. Integrating experimental and analytic approaches to improve data quality in genome-wide RNAi screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas; Espeseth, Amy S; Johnson, Eric N; Chin, Jayne; Gates, Adam; Mitnaul, Lyndon J; Marine, Shane D; Tian, Jenny; Stec, Eric M; Kunapuli, Priya; Holder, Dan J; Heyse, Joseph F; Strulovici, Berta; Ferrer, Marc

    2008-06-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) not only plays an important role in drug discovery but can also be developed directly into drugs. RNAi high-throughput screening (HTS) biotechnology allows us to conduct genome-wide RNAi research. A central challenge in genome-wide RNAi research is to integrate both experimental and computational approaches to obtain high quality RNAi HTS assays. Based on our daily practice in RNAi HTS experiments, we propose the implementation of 3 experimental and analytic processes to improve the quality of data from RNAi HTS biotechnology: (1) select effective biological controls; (2) adopt appropriate plate designs to display and/or adjust for systematic errors of measurement; and (3) use effective analytic metrics to assess data quality. The applications in 5 real RNAi HTS experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of integrating these processes to improve data quality. Due to the effectiveness in improving data quality in RNAi HTS experiments, the methods and guidelines contained in the 3 experimental and analytic processes are likely to have broad utility in genome-wide RNAi research.

  2. Visual genome-wide RNAi screening to identify human host factors required for Trypanosoma cruzi infection

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Genovesio, A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available cellular microarray-based RNAi screening over glass slides method was first described by Erfle and collaborators in 2004 [29] and was further developed for high-throughput scale in genome-wide screens investigating mitosis, cell cycle progression...

  3. A Genome-Wide RNAi Screen for Factors Involved in Neuronal Specification in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Richard J Poole

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the central goals of developmental neurobiology is to describe and understand the multi-tiered molecular events that control the progression of a fertilized egg to a terminally differentiated neuron. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the progression from egg to terminally differentiated neuron has been visually traced by lineage analysis. For example, the two gustatory neurons ASEL and ASER, a bilaterally symmetric neuron pair that is functionally lateralized, are generated from a fertilized egg through an invariant sequence of 11 cellular cleavages that occur stereotypically along specific cleavage planes. Molecular events that occur along this developmental pathway are only superficially understood. We take here an unbiased, genome-wide approach to identify genes that may act at any stage to ensure the correct differentiation of ASEL. Screening a genome-wide RNAi library that knocks-down 18,179 genes (94% of the genome, we identified 245 genes that affect the development of the ASEL neuron, such that the neuron is either not generated, its fate is converted to that of another cell, or cells from other lineage branches now adopt ASEL fate. We analyze in detail two factors that we identify from this screen: (1 the proneural gene hlh-14, which we find to be bilaterally expressed in the ASEL/R lineages despite their asymmetric lineage origins and which we find is required to generate neurons from several lineage branches including the ASE neurons, and (2 the COMPASS histone methyltransferase complex, which we find to be a critical embryonic inducer of ASEL/R asymmetry, acting upstream of the previously identified miRNA lsy-6. Our study represents the first comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of a single neuronal cell fate decision. The results of this analysis provide a starting point for future studies that will eventually lead to a more complete understanding of how individual neuronal cell types are generated from a single

  4. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies broadly-acting host factors that inhibit arbovirus infection.

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    Ari Yasunaga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Vector-borne viruses are an important class of emerging and re-emerging pathogens; thus, an improved understanding of the cellular factors that modulate infection in their respective vertebrate and insect hosts may aid control efforts. In particular, cell-intrinsic antiviral pathways restrict vector-borne viruses including the type I interferon response in vertebrates and the RNA interference (RNAi pathway in insects. However, it is likely that additional cell-intrinsic mechanisms exist to limit these viruses. Since insects rely on innate immune mechanisms to inhibit virus infections, we used Drosophila as a model insect to identify cellular factors that restrict West Nile virus (WNV, a flavivirus with a broad and expanding geographical host range. Our genome-wide RNAi screen identified 50 genes that inhibited WNV infection. Further screening revealed that 17 of these genes were antiviral against additional flaviviruses, and seven of these were antiviral against other vector-borne viruses, expanding our knowledge of invertebrate cell-intrinsic immunity. Investigation of two newly identified factors that restrict diverse viruses, dXPO1 and dRUVBL1, in the Tip60 complex, demonstrated they contributed to antiviral defense at the organismal level in adult flies, in mosquito cells, and in mammalian cells. These data suggest the existence of broadly acting and functionally conserved antiviral genes and pathways that restrict virus infections in evolutionarily divergent hosts.

  5. Visual Genome-Wide RNAi Screening to Identify Human Host Factors Required for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Macedo Dossin, Fernando; Choi, Seo Yeon; Kim, Nam Youl; Kim, Hi Chul; Jung, Sung Yong; Schenkman, Sergio; Almeida, Igor C.; Emans, Neil; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H.

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical infection that affects millions of people in the Americas. Current chemotherapy relies on only two drugs that have limited efficacy and considerable side effects. Therefore, the development of new and more effective drugs is of paramount importance. Although some host cellular factors that play a role in T. cruzi infection have been uncovered, the molecular requirements for intracellular parasite growth and persistence are still not well understood. To further study these host-parasite interactions and identify human host factors required for T. cruzi infection, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using cellular microarrays of a printed siRNA library that spanned the whole human genome. The screening was reproduced 6 times and a customized algorithm was used to select as hits those genes whose silencing visually impaired parasite infection. The 162 strongest hits were subjected to a secondary screening and subsequently validated in two different cell lines. Among the fourteen hits confirmed, we recognized some cellular membrane proteins that might function as cell receptors for parasite entry and others that may be related to calcium release triggered by parasites during cell invasion. In addition, two of the hits are related to the TGF-beta signaling pathway, whose inhibition is already known to diminish levels of T. cruzi infection. This study represents a significant step toward unveiling the key molecular requirements for host cell invasion and revealing new potential targets for antiparasitic therapy. PMID:21625474

  6. Visual genome-wide RNAi screening to identify human host factors required for Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

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    Auguste Genovesio

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, a neglected tropical infection that affects millions of people in the Americas. Current chemotherapy relies on only two drugs that have limited efficacy and considerable side effects. Therefore, the development of new and more effective drugs is of paramount importance. Although some host cellular factors that play a role in T. cruzi infection have been uncovered, the molecular requirements for intracellular parasite growth and persistence are still not well understood. To further study these host-parasite interactions and identify human host factors required for T. cruzi infection, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using cellular microarrays of a printed siRNA library that spanned the whole human genome. The screening was reproduced 6 times and a customized algorithm was used to select as hits those genes whose silencing visually impaired parasite infection. The 162 strongest hits were subjected to a secondary screening and subsequently validated in two different cell lines. Among the fourteen hits confirmed, we recognized some cellular membrane proteins that might function as cell receptors for parasite entry and others that may be related to calcium release triggered by parasites during cell invasion. In addition, two of the hits are related to the TGF-beta signaling pathway, whose inhibition is already known to diminish levels of T. cruzi infection. This study represents a significant step toward unveiling the key molecular requirements for host cell invasion and revealing new potential targets for antiparasitic therapy.

  7. Genome-wide RNAi screen for nuclear actin reveals a network of cofilin regulators.

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    Dopie, Joseph; Rajakylä, Eeva K; Joensuu, Merja S; Huet, Guillaume; Ferrantelli, Evelina; Xie, Tiao; Jäälinoja, Harri; Jokitalo, Eija; Vartiainen, Maria K

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear actin plays an important role in many processes that regulate gene expression. Cytoplasmic actin dynamics are tightly controlled by numerous actin-binding proteins, but regulation of nuclear actin has remained unclear. Here, we performed a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins that influence either nuclear polymerization or import of actin. We validate 19 factors as specific hits, and show that Chinmo (known as Bach2 in mammals), SNF4Aγ (Prkag1 in mammals) and Rab18 play a role in nuclear localization of actin in both fly and mammalian cells. We identify several new regulators of cofilin activity, and characterize modulators of both cofilin kinases and phosphatase. For example, Chinmo/Bach2, which regulates nuclear actin levels also in vivo, maintains active cofilin by repressing the expression of the kinase Cdi (Tesk in mammals). Finally, we show that Nup98 and lamin are candidates for regulating nuclear actin polymerization. Our screen therefore reveals new aspects of actin regulation and links nuclear actin to many cellular processes.

  8. A genome-wide RNAi screen to dissect centriole duplication and centrosome maturation in Drosophila.

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    Jeroen Dobbelaere

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes comprise a pair of centrioles surrounded by an amorphous pericentriolar material (PCM. Here, we have performed a microscopy-based genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen in Drosophila cells to identify proteins required for centriole duplication and mitotic PCM recruitment. We analysed 92% of the Drosophila genome (13,059 genes and identified 32 genes involved in centrosome function. An extensive series of secondary screens classified these genes into four categories: (1 nine are required for centriole duplication, (2 11 are required for centrosome maturation, (3 nine are required for both functions, and (4 three genes regulate centrosome separation. These 32 hits include several new centrosomal components, some of which have human homologs. In addition, we find that the individual depletion of only two proteins, Polo and Centrosomin (Cnn can completely block centrosome maturation. Cnn is phosphorylated during mitosis in a Polo-dependent manner, suggesting that the Polo-dependent phosphorylation of Cnn initiates centrosome maturation in flies.

  9. A genome-wide RNAi screen identifies regulators of cholesterol-modified hedgehog secretion in Drosophila.

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    Reid Aikin

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh proteins are secreted molecules that function as organizers in animal development. In addition to being palmitoylated, Hh is the only metazoan protein known to possess a covalently-linked cholesterol moiety. The absence of either modification severely disrupts the organization of numerous tissues during development. It is currently not known how lipid-modified Hh is secreted and released from producing cells. We have performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila melanogaster cells to identify regulators of Hh secretion. We found that cholesterol-modified Hh secretion is strongly dependent on coat protein complex I (COPI but not COPII vesicles, suggesting that cholesterol modification alters the movement of Hh through the early secretory pathway. We provide evidence that both proteolysis and cholesterol modification are necessary for the efficient trafficking of Hh through the ER and Golgi. Finally, we identified several putative regulators of protein secretion and demonstrate a role for some of these genes in Hh and Wingless (Wg morphogen secretion in vivo. These data open new perspectives for studying how morphogen secretion is regulated, as well as provide insight into regulation of lipid-modified protein secretion.

  10. Drosophila genome-wide RNAi screen identifies multiple regulators of HIF-dependent transcription in hypoxia.

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    Andrés Dekanty

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs are a family of evolutionary conserved alpha-beta heterodimeric transcription factors that induce a wide range of genes in response to low oxygen tension. Molecular mechanisms that mediate oxygen-dependent HIF regulation operate at the level of the alpha subunit, controlling protein stability, subcellular localization, and transcriptional coactivator recruitment. We have conducted an unbiased genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen in Drosophila cells aimed to the identification of genes required for HIF activity. After 3 rounds of selection, 30 genes emerged as critical HIF regulators in hypoxia, most of which had not been previously associated with HIF biology. The list of genes includes components of chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription elongation factors, and translational regulators. One remarkable hit was the argonaute 1 (ago1 gene, a central element of the microRNA (miRNA translational silencing machinery. Further studies confirmed the physiological role of the miRNA machinery in HIF-dependent transcription. This study reveals the occurrence of novel mechanisms of HIF regulation, which might contribute to developing novel strategies for therapeutic intervention of HIF-related pathologies, including heart attack, cancer, and stroke.

  11. Drosophila genome-wide RNAi screen identifies multiple regulators of HIF-dependent transcription in hypoxia.

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    Andrés Dekanty

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs are a family of evolutionary conserved alpha-beta heterodimeric transcription factors that induce a wide range of genes in response to low oxygen tension. Molecular mechanisms that mediate oxygen-dependent HIF regulation operate at the level of the alpha subunit, controlling protein stability, subcellular localization, and transcriptional coactivator recruitment. We have conducted an unbiased genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen in Drosophila cells aimed to the identification of genes required for HIF activity. After 3 rounds of selection, 30 genes emerged as critical HIF regulators in hypoxia, most of which had not been previously associated with HIF biology. The list of genes includes components of chromatin remodeling complexes, transcription elongation factors, and translational regulators. One remarkable hit was the argonaute 1 (ago1 gene, a central element of the microRNA (miRNA translational silencing machinery. Further studies confirmed the physiological role of the miRNA machinery in HIF-dependent transcription. This study reveals the occurrence of novel mechanisms of HIF regulation, which might contribute to developing novel strategies for therapeutic intervention of HIF-related pathologies, including heart attack, cancer, and stroke.

  12. Human Genome-Wide RNAi Screen for Host Factors That Modulate Intracellular Salmonella Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Thornbrough, Joshua M.; Tom Hundley; Raphael Valdivia; Worley, Micah J.

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a bacterial pathogen of humans that can proliferate within epithelial cells as well as professional phagocytes of the immune system. While much has been learned about the microbial genes that influence the infectious process through decades of intensive research, relatively little is known about the host factors that affect infection. We performed a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host genes that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) utilizes to ...

  13. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies novel host proteins required for alphavirus entry.

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    Yaw Shin Ooi

    Full Text Available The enveloped alphaviruses include important and emerging human pathogens such as Chikungunya virus and Eastern equine encephalitis virus. Alphaviruses enter cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and exit by budding from the plasma membrane. While there has been considerable progress in defining the structure and function of the viral proteins, relatively little is known about the host factors involved in alphavirus infection. We used a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host factors that promote or inhibit alphavirus infection in human cells. Fuzzy homologue (FUZ, a protein with reported roles in planar cell polarity and cilia biogenesis, was required for the clathrin-dependent internalization of both alphaviruses and the classical endocytic ligand transferrin. The tetraspanin membrane protein TSPAN9 was critical for the efficient fusion of low pH-triggered virus with the endosome membrane. FUZ and TSPAN9 were broadly required for infection by the alphaviruses Sindbis virus, Semliki Forest virus, and Chikungunya virus, but were not required by the structurally-related flavivirus Dengue virus. Our results highlight the unanticipated functions of FUZ and TSPAN9 in distinct steps of alphavirus entry and suggest novel host proteins that may serve as targets for antiviral therapy.

  14. Human genome-wide RNAi screen for host factors that modulate intracellular Salmonella growth.

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    Thornbrough, Joshua M; Hundley, Tom; Valdivia, Raphael; Worley, Micah J

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a bacterial pathogen of humans that can proliferate within epithelial cells as well as professional phagocytes of the immune system. While much has been learned about the microbial genes that influence the infectious process through decades of intensive research, relatively little is known about the host factors that affect infection. We performed a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify host genes that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium) utilizes to facilitate growth within human epithelial cells. In this screen, with siRNAs targeting every predicted gene in the human genome, we identified 252 new human-host-susceptibility factors (HSFs) for S. typhimurium. We also identified 39 genes whose silencing results in increased intracellular growth of S. typhimurium. The HSFs identified are regulated most centrally by NFκB and associate with each other through an extremely dense network of interactions that center around a group of kinases. Most genes identified were not previously appreciated as playing roles in the intracellular lifecycle of S. enterica. Numerous HSFs identified with interesting characteristics that could play plausible roles in mediating intracellular microbial growth are discussed. Importantly, this study reveals significant overlap between the host network that supports S. typhimurium growth within human epithelial cells and the one that promotes the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within human macrophages. In addition to providing much new information about the molecular mechanisms underlying S. enterica-host cell interplay, all 252 HSFs identified are candidates for new anti-microbial targets for controlling S. enterica infections, and some may provide broad-spectrum anti-microbial activity.

  15. TDP-43 identified from a genome wide RNAi screen for SOD1 regulators.

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    Balajee R Somalinga

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS is a late-onset, progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting motor neurons in the brain stem and spinal cord leading to loss of voluntary muscular function and ultimately, death due to respiratory failure. A subset of ALS cases are familial and associated with mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 that destabilize the protein and predispose it to aggregation. In spite of the fact that sporadic and familial forms of ALS share many common patho-physiological features, the mechanistic relationship between SOD1-associated and sporadic forms of the disease if any, is not well understood. To better understand any molecular connections, a cell-based protein folding assay was employed to screen a whole genome RNAi library for genes that regulate levels of soluble SOD1. Statistically significant hits that modulate SOD1 levels, when analyzed by pathway analysis revealed a highly ranked network containing TAR DNA binging protein (TDP-43, a major component of aggregates characteristic of sporadic ALS. Biochemical experiments confirmed the action of TDP-43 on SOD1. These results highlight an unexpected relationship between TDP-43 and SOD1 which may have implications in disease pathogenesis.

  16. Genome-wide RNAi Screen Identifies SEC61A and VCP as Conserved Regulators of Sindbis Virus Entry

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    Debasis Panda

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Alphaviruses are a large class of insect-borne human pathogens and little is known about the host-factor requirements for infection. To identify such factors, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen using model Drosophila cells and validated 94 genes that impacted infection of Sindbis virus (SINV, the prototypical alphavirus. We identified a conserved role for SEC61A and valosin-containing protein (VCP in facilitating SINV entry in insects and mammals. SEC61A and VCP selectively regulate trafficking of the entry receptor NRAMP2, and loss or pharmacological inhibition of these proteins leads to altered NRAMP2 trafficking to lysosomal compartments and proteolytic digestion within lysosomes. NRAMP2 is the major iron transporter in cells, and loss of NRAMP2 attenuates intracellular iron transport. Thus, this study reveals genes and pathways involved in both infection and iron homeostasis that may serve as targets for antiviral therapeutics or for iron-imbalance disorders.

  17. Genome-wide RNAi screen reveals the E3 SUMO-protein ligase gene SIZ1 as a novel determinant of furfural tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Han; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Background Furfural is a major growth inhibitor in lignocellulosic hydrolysates and improving furfural tolerance of microorganisms is critical for rapid and efficient fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, we used the RNAi-Assisted Genome Evolution (RAGE) method to select for furfural resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and identified a new determinant of furfural tolerance. Results By using a genome-wide RNAi (RNA-interference) screen in S. cerevisiae for genes in...

  18. A bow-tie genetic architecture for morphogenesis suggested by a genome-wide RNAi screen in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Matthew D Nelson

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available During animal development, cellular morphogenesis plays a fundamental role in determining the shape and function of tissues and organs. Identifying the components that regulate and drive morphogenesis is thus a major goal of developmental biology. The four-celled tip of the Caenorhabditis elegans male tail is a simple but powerful model for studying the mechanism of morphogenesis and its spatiotemporal regulation. Here, through a genome-wide post-embryonic RNAi-feeding screen, we identified 212 components that regulate or participate in male tail tip morphogenesis. We constructed a working hypothesis for a gene regulatory network of tail tip morphogenesis. We found regulatory roles for the posterior Hox genes nob-1 and php-3, the TGF-β pathway, nuclear hormone receptors (e.g. nhr-25, the heterochronic gene blmp-1, and the GATA transcription factors egl-18 and elt-6. The majority of the pathways converge at dmd-3 and mab-3. In addition, nhr-25 and dmd-3/mab-3 regulate each others' expression, thus placing these three genes at the center of a complex regulatory network. We also show that dmd-3 and mab-3 negatively regulate other signaling pathways and affect downstream cellular processes such as vesicular trafficking (e.g. arl-1, rme-8 and rearrangement of the cytoskeleton (e.g. cdc-42, nmy-1, and nmy-2. Based on these data, we suggest that male tail tip morphogenesis is governed by a gene regulatory network with a bow-tie architecture.

  19. Human genome-wide RNAi screen identifies an essential role for inositol pyrophosphates in Type-I interferon response.

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    Niyas Kudukkil Pulloor

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The pattern recognition receptor RIG-I is critical for Type-I interferon production. However, the global regulation of RIG-I signaling is only partially understood. Using a human genome-wide RNAi-screen, we identified 226 novel regulatory proteins of RIG-I mediated interferon-β production. Furthermore, the screen identified a metabolic pathway that synthesizes the inositol pyrophosphate 1-IP7 as a previously unrecognized positive regulator of interferon production. Detailed genetic and biochemical experiments demonstrated that the kinase activities of IPPK, PPIP5K1 and PPIP5K2 (which convert IP5 to1-IP7 were critical for both interferon induction, and the control of cellular infection by Sendai and influenza A viruses. Conversely, ectopically expressed inositol pyrophosphate-hydrolases DIPPs attenuated interferon transcription. Mechanistic experiments in intact cells revealed that the expression of IPPK, PPIP5K1 and PPIP5K2 was needed for the phosphorylation and activation of IRF3, a transcription factor for interferon. The addition of purified individual inositol pyrophosphates to a cell free reconstituted RIG-I signaling assay further identified 1-IP7 as an essential component required for IRF3 activation. The inositol pyrophosphate may act by β-phosphoryl transfer, since its action was not recapitulated by a synthetic phosphonoacetate analogue of 1-IP7. This study thus identified several novel regulators of RIG-I, and a new role for inositol pyrophosphates in augmenting innate immune responses to viral infection that may have therapeutic applications.

  20. Reliability analysis of the Ahringer Caenorhabditis elegans RNAi feeding library: a guide for genome-wide screens

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    Lu Yiming

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ahringer C. elegans RNAi feeding library prepared by cloning genomic DNA fragments has been widely used in genome-wide analysis of gene function. However, the library has not been thoroughly validated by direct sequencing, and there are potential errors, including: 1 mis-annotation (the clone with the retired gene name should be remapped to the actual target gene; 2 nonspecific PCR amplification; 3 cross-RNAi; 4 mis-operation such as sample loading error, etc. Results Here we performed a reliability analysis on the Ahringer C. elegans RNAi feeding library, which contains 16,256 bacterial strains, using a bioinformatics approach. Results demonstrated that most (98.3% of the bacterial strains in the library are reliable. However, we also found that 2,851 (17.54% bacterial strains need to be re-annotated even they are reliable. Most of these bacterial strains are the clones having the retired gene names. Besides, 28 strains are grouped into unreliable category and 226 strains are marginal because of probably expressing unrelated double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs. The accuracy of the prediction was further confirmed by direct sequencing analysis of 496 bacterial strains. Finally, a freely accessible database named CelRNAi (http://biocompute.bmi.ac.cn/CelRNAi/ was developed as a valuable complement resource for the feeding RNAi library by providing the predicted information on all bacterial strains. Moreover, submission of the direct sequencing result or any other annotations for the bacterial strains to the database are allowed and will be integrated into the CelRNAi database to improve the accuracy of the library. In addition, we provide five candidate primer sets for each of the unreliable and marginal bacterial strains for users to construct an alternative vector for their own RNAi studies. Conclusions Because of the potential unreliability of the Ahringer C. elegans RNAi feeding library, we strongly suggest the user examine

  1. Automated cell analysis tool for a genome-wide RNAi screen with support vector machine based supervised learning

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    Remmele, Steffen; Ritzerfeld, Julia; Nickel, Walter; Hesser, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    RNAi-based high-throughput microscopy screens have become an important tool in biological sciences in order to decrypt mostly unknown biological functions of human genes. However, manual analysis is impossible for such screens since the amount of image data sets can often be in the hundred thousands. Reliable automated tools are thus required to analyse the fluorescence microscopy image data sets usually containing two or more reaction channels. The herein presented image analysis tool is designed to analyse an RNAi screen investigating the intracellular trafficking and targeting of acylated Src kinases. In this specific screen, a data set consists of three reaction channels and the investigated cells can appear in different phenotypes. The main issue of the image processing task is an automatic cell segmentation which has to be robust and accurate for all different phenotypes and a successive phenotype classification. The cell segmentation is done in two steps by segmenting the cell nuclei first and then using a classifier-enhanced region growing on basis of the cell nuclei to segment the cells. The classification of the cells is realized by a support vector machine which has to be trained manually using supervised learning. Furthermore, the tool is brightness invariant allowing different staining quality and it provides a quality control that copes with typical defects during preparation and acquisition. A first version of the tool has already been successfully applied for an RNAi-screen containing three hundred thousand image data sets and the SVM extended version is designed for additional screens.

  2. Identification of neural outgrowth genes using genome-wide RNAi.

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    Katharine J Sepp

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available While genetic screens have identified many genes essential for neurite outgrowth, they have been limited in their ability to identify neural genes that also have earlier critical roles in the gastrula, or neural genes for which maternally contributed RNA compensates for gene mutations in the zygote. To address this, we developed methods to screen the Drosophila genome using RNA-interference (RNAi on primary neural cells and present the results of the first full-genome RNAi screen in neurons. We used live-cell imaging and quantitative image analysis to characterize the morphological phenotypes of fluorescently labelled primary neurons and glia in response to RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. From the full genome screen, we focused our analysis on 104 evolutionarily conserved genes that when downregulated by RNAi, have morphological defects such as reduced axon extension, excessive branching, loss of fasciculation, and blebbing. To assist in the phenotypic analysis of the large data sets, we generated image analysis algorithms that could assess the statistical significance of the mutant phenotypes. The algorithms were essential for the analysis of the thousands of images generated by the screening process and will become a valuable tool for future genome-wide screens in primary neurons. Our analysis revealed unexpected, essential roles in neurite outgrowth for genes representing a wide range of functional categories including signalling molecules, enzymes, channels, receptors, and cytoskeletal proteins. We also found that genes known to be involved in protein and vesicle trafficking showed similar RNAi phenotypes. We confirmed phenotypes of the protein trafficking genes Sec61alpha and Ran GTPase using Drosophila embryo and mouse embryonic cerebral cortical neurons, respectively. Collectively, our results showed that RNAi phenotypes in primary neural culture can parallel in vivo phenotypes, and the screening technique can be used to identify many new

  3. A genome-wide RNAi screen reveals MAP kinase phosphatases as key ERK pathway regulators during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

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    Shen-Hsi Yang

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells represent potentially important therapeutic agents in regenerative medicine. Complex interlinked transcriptional and signaling networks control the fate of these cells towards maintenance of pluripotency or differentiation. In this study we have focused on how mouse embryonic stem cells begin to differentiate and lose pluripotency and, in particular, the role that the ERK MAP kinase and GSK3 signaling pathways play in this process. Through a genome-wide siRNA screen we have identified more than 400 genes involved in loss of pluripotency and promoting the onset of differentiation. These genes were functionally associated with the ERK and/or GSK3 pathways, providing an important resource for studying the roles of these pathways in controlling escape from the pluripotent ground state. More detailed analysis identified MAP kinase phosphatases as a focal point of regulation and demonstrated an important role for these enzymes in controlling ERK activation kinetics and subsequently determining early embryonic stem cell fate decisions.

  4. Ex vivo genome-wide RNAi screening of the Drosophila Toll signaling pathway elicited by a larva-derived tissue extract.

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    Kanoh, Hirotaka; Kuraishi, Takayuki; Tong, Li-Li; Watanabe, Ryo; Nagata, Shinji; Kurata, Shoichiro

    2015-11-13

    Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), so-called "danger signals," play important roles in host defense and pathophysiology in mammals and insects. In Drosophila, the Toll pathway confers damage responses during bacterial infection and improper cell-fate control. However, the intrinsic ligands and signaling mechanisms that potentiate innate immune responses remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that a Drosophila larva-derived tissue extract strongly elicits Toll pathway activation via the Toll receptor. Using this extract, we performed ex vivo genome-wide RNAi screening in Drosophila cultured cells, and identified several signaling factors that are required for host defense and antimicrobial-peptide expression in Drosophila adults. These results suggest that our larva-derived tissue extract contains active ingredients that mediate Toll pathway activation, and the screening data will shed light on the mechanisms of damage-related Toll pathway signaling in Drosophila.

  5. Isolating genes involved with genotoxic drug response in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans using genome-wide RNAi screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, Lone Vedel; Møller, Tine Hørning; Nørgaard, Steffen;

    2012-01-01

    The soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has become a popular genetic model organism used to study a broad range of complex biological processes, including development, aging, apoptosis, and DNA damage responses. Many genetic tools and tricks have been developed in C. elegans including knock down...... of gene expression via RNA interference (RNAi). In C. elegans RNAi can effectively be administrated via feeding the nematodes bacteria expressing double-stranded RNA targeting the gene of interest. Several commercial C. elegans RNAi libraries are available and hence gene inactivation using RNAi can...

  6. Array-based genome-wide RNAi screening to identify shRNAs that enhance p53-related apoptosis in human cancer cells.

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    Idogawa, Masashi; Ohashi, Tomoko; Sugisaka, Jun; Sasaki, Yasushi; Suzuki, Hiromu; Tokino, Takashi

    2014-09-15

    p53 transduction is a potentially effective cancer therapy but does not result in a good therapeutic response in all human cancers due to resistance to apoptosis. To discover factors that overcome resistance to p53-induced apoptosis, we attempted to identify RNAi sequences that enhance p53-induced apoptosis. We screened a genome-wide lentiviral shRNA library in liver cancer Huh-7 and pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells, both of which resist p53-induced apoptosis. After the infection of adenovirus expressing p53 or LacZ as a control, shRNA-treated populations were analyzed by microarray. We identified shRNAs that were significantly decreased in p53-infected cells compared with control cells. Among these shRNAs, shRNA-58335 was markedly decreased in both cancer cell lines tested. shRNA-58335 enhanced p53-related apoptosis in vitro and augmented the inhibitory effect of adenoviral p53 transduction on tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, the enhanced apoptotic response by shRNA-58335 was also confirmed by treatment with PRIMA-1, which reactivates mutant p53, instead of adenoviral p53 transduction. We found that shRNA-58335 evokes the apoptotic response following p53 transduction or functional restoration of p53 with a small molecule drug in cancer cells resistant to p53-induced apoptosis. The combination of p53 restoration and RNAi-based drugs is expected to be a promising novel cancer therapy.

  7. A genome-wide RNAi screen in Caenorhabditis elegans identifies the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit ACR-7 as an antipsychotic drug target.

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    Taixiang Saur

    Full Text Available We report a genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi screen for Suppressors of Clozapine-induced Larval Arrest (scla genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, the first genetic suppressor screen for antipsychotic drug (APD targets in an animal. The screen identifies 40 suppressors, including the α-like nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR homolog acr-7. We validate the requirement for acr-7 by showing that acr-7 knockout suppresses clozapine-induced larval arrest and that expression of a full-length translational GFP fusion construct rescues this phenotype. nAChR agonists phenocopy the developmental effects of clozapine, while nAChR antagonists partially block these effects. ACR-7 is strongly expressed in the pharynx, and clozapine inhibits pharyngeal pumping. acr-7 knockout and nAChR antagonists suppress clozapine-induced inhibition of pharyngeal pumping. These findings suggest that clozapine activates ACR-7 channels in pharyngeal muscle, leading to tetanus of pharyngeal muscle with consequent larval arrest. No APDs are known to activate nAChRs, but a number of studies indicate that α7-nAChR agonists may prove effective for the treatment of psychosis. α-like nAChR signaling is a mechanism through which clozapine may produce its therapeutic and/or toxic effects in humans, a hypothesis that could be tested following identification of the mammalian ortholog of C. elegans acr-7.

  8. A genome-wide RNAi screen reveals that mRNA decapping restricts bunyaviral replication by limiting the pools of Dcp2-accessible targets for cap-snatching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Kaycie C.; McLane, Laura M.; Maqbool, Tariq; Panda, Debasis; Gordesky-Gold, Beth; Cherry, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are an emerging group of medically important viruses, many of which are transmitted from insects to mammals. To identify host factors that impact infection, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in Drosophila and identified 131 genes that impacted infection of the mosquito-transmitted bunyavirus Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV). Dcp2, the catalytic component of the mRNA decapping machinery, and two decapping activators, DDX6 and LSM7, were antiviral against disparate bunyaviruses in both insect cells and adult flies. Bunyaviruses 5′ cap their mRNAs by “cap-snatching” the 5′ ends of poorly defined host mRNAs. We found that RVFV cap-snatches the 5′ ends of Dcp2 targeted mRNAs, including cell cycle-related genes. Loss of Dcp2 allows increased viral transcription without impacting viral mRNA stability, while ectopic expression of Dcp2 impedes viral transcription. Furthermore, arresting cells in late S/early G2 led to increased Dcp2 mRNA targets and increased RVFV replication. Therefore, RVFV competes for the Dcp2-accessible mRNA pool, which is dynamically regulated and can present a bottleneck for viral replication. PMID:23824541

  9. Next-generation libraries for robust RNA interference-based genome-wide screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmann, Martin; Horlbeck, Max A; Chen, Yuwen; Tsai, Jordan C; Bassik, Michael C; Gilbert, Luke A; Villalta, Jacqueline E; Kwon, S Chul; Chang, Hyeshik; Kim, V Narry; Weissman, Jonathan S

    2015-06-30

    Genetic screening based on loss-of-function phenotypes is a powerful discovery tool in biology. Although the recent development of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-based screening approaches in mammalian cell culture has enormous potential, RNA interference (RNAi)-based screening remains the method of choice in several biological contexts. We previously demonstrated that ultracomplex pooled short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) libraries can largely overcome the problem of RNAi off-target effects in genome-wide screens. Here, we systematically optimize several aspects of our shRNA library, including the promoter and microRNA context for shRNA expression, selection of guide strands, and features relevant for postscreen sample preparation for deep sequencing. We present next-generation high-complexity libraries targeting human and mouse protein-coding genes, which we grouped into 12 sublibraries based on biological function. A pilot screen suggests that our next-generation RNAi library performs comparably to current CRISPR interference (CRISPRi)-based approaches and can yield complementary results with high sensitivity and high specificity.

  10. RNAi screening in primary human hepatocytes of genes implicated in genome-wide association studies for roles in type 2 diabetes identifies roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among others, in hepatic glucose regulation.

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    Steven Haney

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association (GWA studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D. In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway.

  11. RNAi screening in primary human hepatocytes of genes implicated in genome-wide association studies for roles in type 2 diabetes identifies roles for CAMK1D and CDKAL1, among others, in hepatic glucose regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haney, Steven; Zhao, Juan; Tiwari, Shiwani; Eng, Kurt; Guey, Lin T; Tien, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have described a large number of new candidate genes that contribute to of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D). In some cases, small clusters of genes are implicated, rather than a single gene, and in all cases, the genetic contribution is not defined through the effects on a specific organ, such as the pancreas or liver. There is a significant need to develop and use human cell-based models to examine the effects these genes may have on glucose regulation. We describe the development of a primary human hepatocyte model that adjusts glucose disposition according to hormonal signals. This model was used to determine whether candidate genes identified in GWA studies regulate hepatic glucose disposition through siRNAs corresponding to the list of identified genes. We find that several genes affect the storage of glucose as glycogen (glycolytic response) and/or affect the utilization of pyruvate, the critical step in gluconeogenesis. Of the genes that affect both of these processes, CAMK1D, TSPAN8 and KIF11 affect the localization of a mediator of both gluconeogenesis and glycolysis regulation, CRTC2, to the nucleus in response to glucagon. In addition, the gene CDKAL1 was observed to affect glycogen storage, and molecular experiments using mutant forms of CDK5, a putative target of CDKAL1, in HepG2 cells show that this is mediated by coordinate regulation of CDK5 and PKA on MEK, which ultimately regulates the phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6, a critical step in the insulin signaling pathway.

  12. In Vivo RNAi-Based Screens: Studies in Model Organisms

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    Miki Yamamoto-Hino

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a technique widely used for gene silencing in organisms and cultured cells, and depends on sequence homology between double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and target mRNA molecules. Numerous cell-based genome-wide screens have successfully identified novel genes involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction, cell viability/death, and cell morphology. However, cell-based screens cannot address cellular processes such as development, behavior, and immunity. Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans are two model organisms whose whole bodies and individual body parts have been subjected to RNAi-based genome-wide screening. Moreover, Drosophila RNAi allows the manipulation of gene function in a spatiotemporal manner when it is implemented using the Gal4/UAS system. Using this inducible RNAi technique, various large-scale screens have been performed in Drosophila, demonstrating that the method is straightforward and valuable. However, accumulated results reveal that the results of RNAi-based screens have relatively high levels of error, such as false positives and negatives. Here, we review in vivo RNAi screens in Drosophila and the methods that could be used to remove ambiguity from screening results.

  13. RNAi Screening Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules are pieces of RNA that block the activity of genes through a natural process called RNA interference (RNAi). This process has...

  14. Genome-wide screening and identification of antigens for rickettsial vaccine development

    Science.gov (United States)

    The capacity to identify immunogens for vaccine development by genome-wide screening has been markedly enhanced by the availability of complete microbial genome sequences coupled to rapid proteomic and bioinformatic analysis. Critical to this genome-wide screening is in vivo testing in the context o...

  15. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Required for Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Biosynthesis.

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    Yao Rong

    Full Text Available Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI is synthesized and transferred to proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. GPI-anchored proteins are then transported from the ER to the plasma membrane through the Golgi apparatus. To date, at least 17 steps have been identified to be required for the GPI biosynthetic pathway. Here, we aimed to establish a comprehensive screening method to identify genes involved in GPI biosynthesis using mammalian haploid screens. Human haploid cells were mutagenized by the integration of gene trap vectors into the genome. Mutagenized cells were then treated with a bacterial pore-forming toxin, aerolysin, which binds to GPI-anchored proteins for targeting to the cell membrane. Cells that showed low surface expression of CD59, a GPI-anchored protein, were further enriched for. Gene trap insertion sites in the non-selected population and in the enriched population were determined by deep sequencing. This screening enriched 23 gene regions among the 26 known GPI biosynthetic genes, which when mutated are expected to decrease the surface expression of GPI-anchored proteins. Our results indicate that the forward genetic approach using haploid cells is a useful and powerful technique to identify factors involved in phenotypes of interest.

  16. A genome-wide siRNA screen in mammalian cells for regulators of S6 phosphorylation.

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    Angela Papageorgiou

    Full Text Available mTOR complex1, the major regulator of mRNA translation in all eukaryotic cells, is strongly activated in most cancers. We performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in a human cancer cell line, seeking genes that regulate S6 phosphorylation, readout of mTORC1 activity. Applying a stringent selection, we retrieved nearly 600 genes wherein at least two RNAis gave significant reduction in S6-P. This cohort contains known regulators of mTOR complex 1 and is significantly enriched in genes whose depletion affects the proliferation/viability of the large set of cancer cell lines in the Achilles database in a manner paralleling that caused by mTOR depletion. We next examined the effect of RNAi pools directed at 534 of these gene products on S6-P in TSC1 null mouse embryo fibroblasts. 76 RNAis reduced S6 phosphorylation significantly in 2 or 3 replicates. Surprisingly, among this cohort of genes the only elements previously associated with the maintenance of mTORC1 activity are two subunits of the vacuolar ATPase and the CUL4 subunit DDB1. RNAi against a second set of 84 targets reduced S6-P in only one of three replicates. However, an indication that this group also bears attention is the presence of rpS6KB1 itself, Rac1 and MAP4K3, a protein kinase that supports amino acid signaling to rpS6KB1. The finding that S6 phosphorylation requires a previously unidentified, functionally diverse cohort of genes that participate in fundamental cellular processes such as mRNA translation, RNA processing, DNA repair and metabolism suggests the operation of feedback pathways in the regulation of mTORC1 operating through novel mechanisms.

  17. A genome-wide screen and linkage mapping for a large pedigree with episodic ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cader, M Z; Steckley, J L; Dyment, D A; McLachlan, R S; Ebers, G C

    2005-07-12

    Episodic ataxias are ion channel disorders characterized by attacks of incoordination. The authors performed a genome-wide screen in a large pedigree segregating a novel episodic ataxia and found significant linkage on 1q42 with a multipoint lod score of 3.65. Haplotype analysis and fine mapping yielded a peak 2-point lod score of 4.14 and indicated a 4-cM region on 1q42 that is likely to harbor an episodic ataxia gene.

  18. Genome-wide uniparental disomy screen in human discarded morphologically abnormal embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiawei; Zhang, Meixiang; Niu, Wenbin; Yao, Guidong; Sun, Bo; Bao, Xiao; Wang, Linlin; Du, Linqing; Sun, Yingpu

    2015-07-21

    Uniparental disomy (UPD) has been shown to be rare in human normal blastocysts, but its frequency in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos and its relevance to embryonic self-correction of aneuploid remains unknown. The aim of this study was to detect UPD in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos. Both discarded morphologically abnormal embryos, including zero-pronuclear zygotes (0PN), one-pronuclear zygotes (1PN), three-pronuclear zygotes (3PN) and 2PN embryos scored as low development potential were cultured into blastocysts then underwent trophectoderm biopsy. Genome-wide UPD screening of the trophectoderm of 241 discarded morphologically abnormal embryo sourced blastocysts showed that UPD occurred in nine embryos. Five embryos exhibited UPDs with euploid chromosomes, and four displayed UPDs with chromosomal aneuploid. The percentage of UPDs among the morphologically abnormal sourced blastocysts was 3.73%, which is significant higher than the percentage observed in normal blastocysts. The frequency of UPD in 3PN-sourced blastocysts was 7.69%, which is significantly higher than that in normal blastocysts. This study provides the first systematic genome-wide profile of UPD in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos. Our results indicated that UPD may be a common phenomenon in discarded morphologically abnormal embryos and may be relevant to human embryonic self-correction.

  19. Genome-wide association screens for Achilles tendon and ACL tears and tendinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Thomas R.; Roos, Andrew K.; Kleimeyer, John P.; Ahmed, Marwa A.; Goodlin, Gabrielle T.; Fredericson, Michael; Ioannidis, John P. A.; Avins, Andrew L.; Dragoo, Jason L.

    2017-01-01

    Achilles tendinopathy or rupture and anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture are substantial injuries affecting athletes, associated with delayed recovery or inability to return to competition. To identify genetic markers that might be used to predict risk for these injuries, we performed genome-wide association screens for these injuries using data from the Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) cohort consisting of 102,979 individuals. We did not find any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with either of these injuries with a p-value that was genome-wide significant (pAchilles tendon injury and ACL rupture, respectively. We then tested SNPs previously reported to be associated with either Achilles tendon injury or ACL rupture. None showed an association in our cohort with a false discovery rate of less than 5%. We obtained, however, moderate to weak evidence for replication in one case; specifically, rs4919510 in MIR608 had a p-value of 5.1x10-3 for association with Achilles tendon injury, corresponding to a 7% chance of false replication. Finally, we tested 2855 SNPs in 90 candidate genes for musculoskeletal injury, but did not find any that showed a significant association below a false discovery rate of 5%. We provide data containing summary statistics for the entire genome, which will be useful for future genetic studies on these injuries. PMID:28358823

  20. The Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF): portfolio growth and technology development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    The Sheffield RNAi Screening Facility (SRSF) (www.rnai.group.shef.ac.uk) was established in 2008 with Wellcome Trust and University of Sheffield funding, with the task to provide the first UK RNAi screening resource for academic groups interested in identifying genes required in a diverse range of biological processes using Drosophila cell culture. The SRSF has carried out a wide range of screens varying in sizes from bespoke small-scale libraries, targeting a few hundred genes, to high-throughput, genome-wide studies. The SRSF has grown and improved with a dedicated partnership of its academic customers based mainly in the UK. We are part of the UK Academics Functional Genomics Network, participating in organizing an annual meeting in London and are part of the University of Sheffield's D3N (www.d3n.org.uk), connecting academics, biotech and pharmaceutical companies with a multidisciplinary network in Drug Discovery and Development. Recently, the SRSF has been funded by the Yorkshire Cancer Research Fund to perform genome-wide RNAi screens using human cells as part of a core facility for regional Yorkshire Universities and screens are now underway. Overall the SRSF has carried out more than 40 screens from Drosophila and human cell culture experiments.

  1. Functional characterization of bursicon receptor and genome-wide analysis for identification of genes affected by bursicon receptor RNAi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hua; Palli, Subba R.

    2010-01-01

    Bursicon is an insect neuropeptide hormone that is secreted from the central nervous system into the hemolymph and initiates cuticle tanning. The receptor for bursicon is encoded by the rickets (rk) gene and belongs to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily. The bursicon and its receptor regulate cuticle tanning as well as wing expansion after adult eclosion. However, the molecular action of bursicon signaling remains unclear. We utilized RNA interference (RNAi) and microarray to study the function of the bursicon receptor (Tcrk) in the model insect, Tribolium castaneum. The data included here showed that in addition to cuticle tanning and wing expansion reported previously, Tcrk is also required for development and expansion of integumentary structures and adult eclosion. Using custom microarrays, we identified 24 genes that are differentially expressed between Tcrk RNAi and control insects. Knockdown in the expression of one of these genes, TC004091, resulted in the arrest of adult eclosion. Identification of genes that are involved in bursicon receptor mediated biological processes will provide tools for future studies on mechanisms of bursicon action. PMID:20457145

  2. A genome-wide screen for Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutants that affect telomere length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning-Ning Liu; Tian Xu Han; Li-Lin Du; Jin-Qiu Zhou

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, Both the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are popular model organisms, and studies using these models have provided many informative clues for solving fundamental biological questions [1], such as DNA replication,cell cycle regulation and gene transcription. Since the completion of genome sequencing of these fungi [2, 3],systematic genetic modification, e.g. gene deletion, has become possible, and genome-wide phenotypic screening for gene function has been widely carried out. For example, Askree et al. and Gatbonton et al. examined the telomere-length change in about 4 800 non-essential gene deletion mutants of S. cerevisiae, and found that about 250 genes are involved in telomere-length regulation.

  3. Genome-wide screen for differential DNA methylation associated with neural cell differentiation in mouse.

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    Rene Cortese

    Full Text Available Cellular differentiation involves widespread epigenetic reprogramming, including modulation of DNA methylation patterns. Using Differential Methylation Hybridization (DMH in combination with a custom DMH array containing 51,243 features covering more than 16,000 murine genes, we carried out a genome-wide screen for cell- and tissue-specific differentially methylated regions (tDMRs in undifferentiated embryonic stem cells (ESCs, in in-vitro induced neural stem cells (NSCs and 8 differentiated embryonic and adult tissues. Unsupervised clustering of the generated data showed distinct cell- and tissue-specific DNA methylation profiles, revealing 202 significant tDMRs (p1.96 enrichment for genes involved in neural differentiation, including, for example, Jag1 and Tcf4. Our results provide robust evidence for the relevance of DNA methylation in early neural development and identify novel marker candidates for neural cell differentiation.

  4. Integrated, genome-wide screening for hypomethylated oncogenes in salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chunbo; Sun, Wenyue; Tan, Marietta; Glazer, Chad A.; Bhan, Sheetal; Zhong, Xiaoli; Fakhry, Carole; Sharma, Rajni; Westra, William H.; Hoque, Mohammad O.; Moskaluk, Christopher A.; Sidransky, David; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy that is poorly understood. In order to look for relevant oncogene candidates under the control of promoter methylation, an integrated, genome-wide screen was performed. Experimental Design Global demethylation of normal salivary gland cell strains using 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza dC) and Trichostatin A (TSA), followed by expression array analysis was performed. ACC-specific expression profiling was generated using expression microarray analysis of primary ACC and normal samples. Next, the two profiles were integrated to identify a subset of genes for further validation of promoter demethylation in ACC versus normal. Finally, promising candidates were further validated for mRNA, protein, and promoter methylation levels in larger ACC cohorts. Functional validation was then performed in cancer cell lines. Results We found 159 genes that were significantly re-expressed after 5-Aza dC/TSA treatment and overexpressed in ACC. After initial validation, eight candidates showed hypomethylation in ACC: AQP1, CECR1, C1QR1, CTAG2, P53AIP1, TDRD12, BEX1, and DYNLT3. Aquaporin 1 (AQP1) showed the most significant hypomethylation and was further validated. AQP1 hypomethylation in ACC was confirmed with two independent cohorts. Of note, there was significant overexpression of AQP1 in both mRNA and protein in the paraffin-embedded ACC cohort. Furthermore, AQP1 was up-regulated in 5-Aza dC/TSA treated SACC83. Lastly, AQP1 promoted cell proliferation and colony formation in SACC83. Conclusions Our integrated, genome-wide screening method proved to be an effective strategy for detecting novel oncogenes in ACC. AQP1 is a promising oncogene candidate for ACC and is transcriptionally regulated by promoter hypomethylation. PMID:21551254

  5. Genome-wide association study of coronary and aortic calcification in lung cancer screening CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vos, Bob D.; van Setten, Jessica; de Jong, Pim A.; Mali, Willem P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Viergever, Max A.; Išgum, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Arterial calcification has been related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) and osteoporosis. However, little is known about the role of genetics and exact pathways leading to arterial calcification and its relation to bone density changes indicating osteoporosis. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide association study of arterial calcification burden, followed by a look-up of known single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for coronary artery disease (CAD) and myocardial infarction (MI), and bone mineral density (BMD) to test for a shared genetic basis between the traits. The study included a subcohort of the Dutch-Belgian lung cancer screening trial comprised of 2,561 participants. Participants underwent baseline CT screening in one of two hospitals participating in the trial. Low-dose chest CT images were acquired without contrast enhancement and without ECG-synchronization. In these images coronary and aortic calcifications were identified automatically. Subsequently, the detected calcifications were quantified using coronary artery calcium Agatston and volume scores. Genotype data was available for these participants. A genome-wide association study was conducted on 10,220,814 SNPs using a linear regression model. To reduce multiple testing burden, known CAD/MI and BMD SNPs were specifically tested (45 SNPs from the CARDIoGRAMplusC4D consortium and 60 SNPS from the GEFOS consortium). No novel significant SNPs were found. Significant enrichment for CAD/MI SNPs was observed in testing Agatston and coronary artery calcium volume scores. Moreover, a significant enrichment of BMD SNPs was shown in aortic calcium volume scores. This may indicate genetic relation of BMD SNPs and arterial calcification burden.

  6. Genome-wide screen of Pseudomonas aeruginosa In Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies new virulence factors

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    Rafat eZrieq

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a human opportunistic pathogen that causes mortality in cystic fibrosis and immunocompromised patients. While many virulence factors of this pathogen have already been identified, several remain to be discovered. In this respect we set an unprecedented genome-wide screen of a P. aeruginosa expression library based on a yeast growth phenotype. 51 candidates were selected in a three-round screening process. The robustness of the screen was validated by the selection of three well known secreted proteins including one demonstrated virulence factor, the protease LepA. Further in silico sorting of the 51 candidates highlighted three potential new Pseudomonas effector candidates (Pec. By testing the cytotoxicity of wild type P. aeruginosa vs pec mutants towards macrophages and the virulence in the Caenorhabditis elegans model, we demonstrated that the three selected Pecs are novel virulence factors of P. aeruginosa. Additional cellular localization experiments in the host revealed specific localization for Pec1 and Pec2 that could inform about their respective functions.

  7. Negative regulators of insulin signaling revealed in a genome-wide functional screen.

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    Shih-Min A Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes develops due to a combination of insulin resistance and beta-cell failure and current therapeutics aim at both of these underlying causes. Several negative regulators of insulin signaling are known and are the subject of drug discovery efforts. We sought to identify novel contributors to insulin resistance and hence potentially novel targets for therapeutic intervention. METHODOLOGY: An arrayed cDNA library encoding 18,441 human transcripts was screened for inhibitors of insulin signaling and revealed known inhibitors and numerous potential novel regulators. The novel hits included proteins of various functional classes such as kinases, phosphatases, transcription factors, and GTPase associated proteins. A series of secondary assays confirmed the relevance of the primary screen hits to insulin signaling and provided further insight into their modes of action. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Among the novel hits was PALD (KIAA1274, paladin, a previously uncharacterized protein that when overexpressed led to inhibition of insulin's ability to down regulate a FOXO1A-driven reporter gene, reduced upstream insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation, and decreased insulin receptor (IR abundance. Conversely, knockdown of PALD gene expression resulted in increased IR abundance, enhanced insulin-stimulated AKT phosphorylation, and an improvement in insulin's ability to suppress FOXO1A-driven reporter gene activity. The present data demonstrate that the application of arrayed genome-wide screening technologies to insulin signaling is fruitful and is likely to reveal novel drug targets for insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome.

  8. A Genome-wide screen identifies frequently methylated genes in haematological and epithelial cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher Eamonn R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic as well as epigenetic alterations are a hallmark of both epithelial and haematological malignancies. High throughput screens are required to identify epigenetic markers that can be useful for diagnostic and prognostic purposes across malignancies. Results Here we report for the first time the use of the MIRA assay (methylated CpG island recovery assay in combination with genome-wide CpG island arrays to identify epigenetic molecular markers in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL on a genome-wide scale. We identified 30 genes demonstrating methylation frequencies of ≥25% in childhood ALL, nine genes showed significantly different methylation frequencies in B vs T-ALL. For majority of the genes expression could be restored in methylated leukemia lines after treatment with 5-azaDC. Forty-four percent of the genes represent targets of the polycomb complex. In chronic myeloid leukemia (CML two of the genes, (TFAP2A and EBF2, demonstrated increased methylation in blast crisis compared to chronic phase (P ATG16L2 was associated with poorer prognosis in terms of molecular response to Imatinib treatment. Lastly we demonstrated that ten of these genes were also frequently methylated in common epithelial cancers. Conclusion In summary we have identified a large number of genes showing frequent methylation in childhood ALL, methylation status of two of these genes is associated with advanced disease in CML and methylation status of another gene is associated with prognosis. In addition a subset of these genes may act as epigenetic markers across hematological malignancies as well as common epithelial cancers.

  9. Genome-wide functional screen identifies a compendium of genes affecting sensitivity to tamoxifen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Pereira, Ana M; Sims, David; Dexter, Tim; Fenwick, Kerry; Assiotis, Ioannis; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Mitsopoulos, Costas; Hakas, Jarle; Zvelebil, Marketa; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

    2012-02-21

    Therapies that target estrogen signaling have made a very considerable contribution to reducing mortality from breast cancer. However, resistance to tamoxifen remains a major clinical problem. Here we have used a genome-wide functional profiling approach to identify multiple genes that confer resistance or sensitivity to tamoxifen. Combining whole-genome shRNA screening with massively parallel sequencing, we have profiled the impact of more than 56,670 RNA interference reagents targeting 16,487 genes on the cellular response to tamoxifen. This screen, along with subsequent validation experiments, identifies a compendium of genes whose silencing causes tamoxifen resistance (including BAP1, CLPP, GPRC5D, NAE1, NF1, NIPBL, NSD1, RAD21, RARG, SMC3, and UBA3) and also a set of genes whose silencing causes sensitivity to this endocrine agent (C10orf72, C15orf55/NUT, EDF1, ING5, KRAS, NOC3L, PPP1R15B, RRAS2, TMPRSS2, and TPM4). Multiple individual genes, including NF1, a regulator of RAS signaling, also correlate with clinical outcome after tamoxifen treatment.

  10. Genome-wide screening for genes associated with valproic acid sensitivity in fission yeast.

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    Lili Zhang

    Full Text Available We have been studying the action mechanisms of valproic acid (VPA in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe by developing a genetic screen for mutants that show hypersensitivity to VPA. In the present study, we performed a genome-wide screen of 3004 haploid deletion strains and confirmed 148 deletion strains to be VPA sensitive. Of the 148 strains, 93 strains also showed sensitivity to another aliphatic acids HDAC inhibitor, sodium butyrate (SB, and 55 strains showed sensitivity to VPA but not to SB. Interestingly, we found that both VPA and SB treatment induced a marked increase in the transcription activity of Atf1 in wild-type cells. However, in clr6-1, a mutant allele the clr6(+ gene encoding class I HDAC, neither VPA- nor SB induced the activation of Atf1 transcription activity. We also found that VPA, but not SB, caused an increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+ level. We further found that the cytoplasmic Ca(2+ increase was caused by Ca(2+ influx from extracellular medium via Cch1-Yam8 channel complex. Altogether, our present study indicates that VPA and SB play similar but distinct roles in multiple physiological processes in fission yeast.

  11. Generation of Mouse Haploid Somatic Cells by Small Molecules for Genome-wide Genetic Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-Quan He

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The recent success of derivation of mammalian haploid embryonic stem cells (haESCs has provided a powerful tool for large-scale functional analysis of the mammalian genome. However, haESCs rapidly become diploidized after differentiation, posing challenges for genetic analysis. Here, we show that the spontaneous diploidization of haESCs happens in metaphase due to mitotic slippage. Diploidization can be suppressed by small-molecule-mediated inhibition of CDK1 and ROCK. Through ROCK inhibition, we can generate haploid somatic cells of all three germ layers from haESCs, including terminally differentiated neurons. Using piggyBac transposon-based insertional mutagenesis, we generated a haploid neural cell library harboring genome-wide mutations for genetic screening. As a proof of concept, we screened for Mn2+-mediated toxicity and identified the Park2 gene. Our findings expand the applications of mouse haploid cell technology to somatic cell types and may also shed light on the mechanisms of ploidy maintenance.

  12. A genome-wide screen indicates correlation between differentiation and expression of metabolism related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Priti; Kumar, Brijesh; Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation.

  13. A genome-wide screen indicates correlation between differentiation and expression of metabolism related genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Roy

    Full Text Available Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation.

  14. An Integrated Genome-Wide Systems Genetics Screen for Breast Cancer Metastasis Susceptibility Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Bai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis remains the primary cause of patient morbidity and mortality in solid tumors and is due to the action of a large number of tumor-autonomous and non-autonomous factors. Here we report the results of a genome-wide integrated strategy to identify novel metastasis susceptibility candidate genes and molecular pathways in breast cancer metastasis. This analysis implicates a number of transcriptional regulators and suggests cell-mediated immunity is an important determinant. Moreover, the analysis identified novel or FDA-approved drugs as potentially useful for anti-metastatic therapy. Further explorations implementing this strategy may therefore provide a variety of information for clinical applications in the control and treatment of advanced neoplastic disease.

  15. Genome-wide screen of cell-cycle regulators in normal and tumor cells identifies a differential response to nucleosome depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolova, Maria; Turunen, Mikko; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Kivioja, Teemu; Herr, Patrick; Vähärautio, Anna; Björklund, Mikael; Taipale, Minna; Helleday, Thomas; Taipale, Jussi

    2017-01-17

    To identify cell cycle regulators that enable cancer cells to replicate DNA and divide in an unrestricted manner, we performed a parallel genome-wide RNAi screen in normal and cancer cell lines. In addition to many shared regulators, we found that tumor and normal cells are differentially sensitive to loss of the histone genes transcriptional regulator CASP8AP2. In cancer cells, loss of CASP8AP2 leads to a failure to synthesize sufficient amount of histones in the S-phase of the cell cycle, resulting in slowing of individual replication forks. Despite this, DNA replication fails to arrest, and tumor cells progress in an elongated S-phase that lasts several days, finally resulting in death of most of the affected cells. In contrast, depletion of CASP8AP2 in normal cells triggers a response that arrests viable cells in S-phase. The arrest is dependent on p53, and preceded by accumulation of markers of DNA damage, indicating that nucleosome depletion is sensed in normal cells via a DNA-damage -like response that is defective in tumor cells.

  16. Genome-wide genetic screening with chemically mutagenized haploid embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Forment, Josep V.; Herzog, Mareike; Coates, Julia; Konopka, Tomasz; Gapp, Bianca V.; Nijman, Sebastian M.; Adams, David J; Keane, Thomas M.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2016-01-01

    This is the author accepted manuscript. In model organisms, classical genetic screening via random mutagenesis provides key insights into the molecular bases of genetic interactions, helping to define synthetic lethality, synthetic viability and drug-resistance mechanisms. The limited genetic tractability of diploid mammalian cells, however, precludes this approach. Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of classical genetic screening in mammalian systems by using haploid cells, chemical mut...

  17. Genetic screening of new genes responsible for cellular adaptation to hypoxia using a genome-wide shRNA library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Seiko; Hara, Toshiro; Weng, Jane S; Takahashi, Yuka; Seiki, Motoharu; Sakamoto, Takeharu

    2012-01-01

    Oxygen is a vital requirement for multi-cellular organisms to generate energy and cells have developed multiple compensatory mechanisms to adapt to stressful hypoxic conditions. Such adaptive mechanisms are intricately interconnected with other signaling pathways that regulate cellular functions such as cell growth. However, our understanding of the overall system governing the cellular response to the availability of oxygen remains limited. To identify new genes involved in the response to hypoxic stress, we have performed a genome-wide gene knockdown analysis in human lung carcinoma PC8 cells using an shRNA library carried by a lentiviral vector. The knockdown analysis was performed under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions to identify shRNA sequences enriched or lost in the resulting selected cell populations. Consequently, we identified 56 candidate genes that might contribute to the cellular response to hypoxia. Subsequent individual knockdown of each gene demonstrated that 13 of these have a significant effect upon oxygen-sensitive cell growth. The identification of BCL2L1, which encodes a Bcl-2 family protein that plays a role in cell survival by preventing apoptosis, validates the successful design of our screen. The other selected genes have not previously been directly implicated in the cellular response to hypoxia. Interestingly, hypoxia did not directly enhance the expression of any of the identified genes, suggesting that we have identified a new class of genes that have been missed by conventional gene expression analyses to identify hypoxia response genes. Thus, our genetic screening method using a genome-wide shRNA library and the newly-identified genes represent useful tools to analyze the cellular systems that respond to hypoxic stress.

  18. A genome-wide siRNA screen to identify modulators of insulin sensitivity and gluconeogenesis.

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    Ruojing Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hepatic insulin resistance impairs insulin's ability to suppress hepatic glucose production (HGP and contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes (T2D. Although the interests to discover novel genes that modulate insulin sensitivity and HGP are high, it remains challenging to have a human cell based system to identify novel genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify genes that modulate hepatic insulin signaling and HGP, we generated a human cell line stably expressing beta-lactamase under the control of the human glucose-6-phosphatase (G6PC promoter (AH-G6PC cells. Both beta-lactamase activity and endogenous G6PC mRNA were increased in AH-G6PC cells by a combination of dexamethasone and pCPT-cAMP, and reduced by insulin. A 4-gene High-Throughput-Genomics assay was developed to concomitantly measure G6PC and pyruvate-dehydrogenase-kinase-4 (PDK4 mRNA levels. Using this assay, we screened an siRNA library containing pooled siRNA targeting 6650 druggable genes and identified 614 hits that lowered G6PC expression without increasing PDK4 mRNA levels. Pathway analysis indicated that siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD of genes known to positively or negatively affect insulin signaling increased or decreased G6PC mRNA expression, respectively, thus validating our screening platform. A subset of 270 primary screen hits was selected and 149 hits were confirmed by target gene KD by pooled siRNA and 7 single siRNA for each gene to reduce G6PC expression in 4-gene HTG assay. Subsequently, pooled siRNA KD of 113 genes decreased PEPCK and/or PGC1alpha mRNA expression thereby demonstrating their role in regulating key gluconeogenic genes in addition to G6PC. Last, KD of 61 of the above 113 genes potentiated insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that they suppress gluconeogenic gene by enhancing insulin signaling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results support the proposition that the proteins encoded by the genes identified in

  19. Genome-wide screen for Mycobacterium tuberculosis genes that regulate host immunity.

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    Aimee M Beaulieu

    Full Text Available In spite of its highly immunogenic properties, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb establishes persistent infection in otherwise healthy individuals, making it one of the most widespread and deadly human pathogens. Mtb's prolonged survival may reflect production of microbial factors that prevent even more vigorous immunity (quantitative effect or that divert the immune response to a non-sterilizing mode (qualitative effect. Disruption of Mtb genes has produced a list of several dozen candidate immunomodulatory factors. Here we used robotic fluorescence microscopy to screen 10,100 loss-of-function transposon mutants of Mtb for their impact on the expression of promoter-reporter constructs for 12 host immune response genes in a mouse macrophage cell line. The screen identified 364 candidate immunoregulatory genes. To illustrate the utility of the candidate list, we confirmed the impact of 35 Mtb mutant strains on expression of endogenous immune response genes in primary macrophages. Detailed analysis focused on a strain of Mtb in which a transposon disrupts Rv0431, a gene encoding a conserved protein of unknown function. This mutant elicited much more macrophage TNFα, IL-12p40 and IL-6 in vitro than wild type Mtb, and was attenuated in the mouse. The mutant list provides a platform for exploring the immunobiology of tuberculosis, for example, by combining immunoregulatory mutations in a candidate vaccine strain.

  20. Identification of 34 novel proinflammatory proteins in a genome-wide macrophage functional screen.

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    David H Wyllie

    Full Text Available Signal transduction pathways activated by Toll-like Receptors and the IL-1 family of cytokines are fundamental to mounting an innate immune response and thus to clearing pathogens and promoting wound healing. Whilst mechanistic understanding of the regulation of innate signalling pathways has advanced considerably in recent years, there are still a number of critical controllers to be discovered. In order to characterise novel regulators of macrophage inflammation, we have carried out an extensive, cDNA-based forward genetic screen and identified 34 novel activators, based on their ability to induce the expression of cxcl2. Many are physiologically expressed in macrophages, although the majority of genes uncovered in our screen have not previously been linked to innate immunity. We show that expression of particular activators has profound but distinct impacts on LPS-induced inflammatory gene expression, including switch-type, amplifier and sensitiser behaviours. Furthermore, the novel genes identified here interact with the canonical inflammatory signalling network via specific mechanisms, as demonstrated by the use of dominant negative forms of IL1/TLR signalling mediators.

  1. Nickel-resistance determinants in Acidiphilium sp. PM identified by genome-wide functional screening.

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    Patxi San Martin-Uriz

    Full Text Available Acidiphilium spp. are conspicuous dwellers of acidic, metal-rich environments. Indeed, they are among the most metal-resistant organisms; yet little is known about the mechanisms behind the metal tolerance in this genus. Acidiphilium sp. PM is an environmental isolate from Rio Tinto, an acidic, metal-laden river located in southwestern Spain. The characterization of its metal resistance revealed a remarkable ability to tolerate high Ni concentrations. Here we report the screening of a genomic library of Acidiphilium sp. PM to identify genes involved in Ni resistance. This approach revealed seven different genes conferring Ni resistance to E. coli, two of which form an operon encoding the ATP-dependent protease HslVU (ClpQY. This protease was found to enhance resistance to both Ni and Co in E. coli, a function not previously reported. Other Ni-resistance determinants include genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the synthesis of branched amino acids. The diversity of molecular functions of the genes recovered in the screening suggests that Ni resistance in Acidiphilium sp. PM probably relies on different molecular mechanisms.

  2. Genome-Wide Screening of Cytogenetic Abnormalities in Multiple Myeloma Patients Using Array-CGH Technique: A Czech Multicenter Experience

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    Jan Smetana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Characteristic recurrent copy number aberrations (CNAs play a key role in multiple myeloma (MM pathogenesis and have important prognostic significance for MM patients. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH provides a powerful tool for genome-wide classification of CNAs and thus should be implemented into MM routine diagnostics. We demonstrate the possibility of effective utilization of oligonucleotide-based aCGH in 91 MM patients. Chromosomal aberrations associated with effect on the prognosis of MM were initially evaluated by I-FISH and were found in 93.4% (85/91. Incidence of hyperdiploidy was 49.5% (45/91; del(13(q14 was detected in 57.1% (52/91; gain(1(q21 occurred in 58.2% (53/91; del(17(p13 was observed in 15.4% (14/91; and t(4;14(p16;q32 was found in 18.6% (16/86. Genome-wide screening using Agilent 44K aCGH microarrays revealed copy number alterations in 100% (91/91. Most common deletions were found at 13q (58.9%, 1p (39.6%, and 8p (31.1%, whereas gain of whole 1q was the most often duplicated region (50.6%. Furthermore, frequent homozygous deletions of genes playing important role in myeloma biology such as TRAF3, BIRC1/BIRC2, RB1, or CDKN2C were observed. Taken together, we demonstrated the utilization of aCGH technique in clinical diagnostics as powerful tool for identification of unbalanced genomic abnormalities with prognostic significance for MM patients.

  3. A Genome-Wide Screen for Interactions Reveals a New Locus on 4p15 Modifying the Effect of Waist-to-Hip Ratio on Total Cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Surakka, Ida; Isaacs, Aaron; Karssen, Lennart C.; Laurila, Pirkka-Pekka P.; Middelberg, Rita P. S.; Tikkanen, Emmi; Ried, Janina S.; Lamina, Claudia; Mangino, Massimo; Igl, Wilmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Lagou, Vasiliki; van der Harst, Pim; Mateo Leach, Irene; Esko, Tonu; Kutalik, Zoltan; Wainwright, Nicholas W.; Struchalin, Maksim V.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Kangas, Antti J.; Viikari, Jorma S.; Perola, Markus; Rantanen, Taina; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Soininen, Pasi; Johansson, Asa; Soranzo, Nicole; Heath, Andrew C.; Papamarkou, Theodore; Prokopenko, Inga; Toenjes, Anke; Kronenberg, Florian; Doering, Angela; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Montgomery, Grant W.; Whitfield, John B.; Kahonen, Mika; Lehtimaki, Terho; Freimer, Nelson B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Palotie, Aarno; Sandhu, Manj S.; Waterworth, Dawn M.; Metspalu, Andres; Stumvoll, Michael; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Jula, Antti; Navis, Gerjan; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Taskinen, Marja-Riitta; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kyvik, Kirsten O.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Spector, Tim D.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Salomaa, Veikko; Oostra, Ben A.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Wichmann, H. -Erich; Gieger, Christian; Jaervelin, Marjo-Riitta; Martin, Nicholas G.; Hofman, Albert; McCarthy, Mark I.; Peltonen, Leena; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Ripatti, Samuli

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies described 95 loci controlling serum lipid levels. These common variants explain similar to 25% of the heritability of the phenotypes. To date, no unbiased screen for gene-environment interactions for circulating lipids has been reported. We screened for v

  4. A genome-wide screen for interactions reveals a new locus on 4p15 modifying the effect of waist-to-hip ratio on total cholesterol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Surakka (Ida); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); L.C. Karssen (Lennart); P.-P.P. Laurila; R.P.S. Middelberg (Rita); E. Tikkanen (Emmi); J.S. Ried (Janina); C. Lamina (Claudia); M. Mangino (Massimo); W. Igl (Wilmar); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); V. Lagou (Vasiliki); P. van der Harst (Pim); I.M. Leach (Irene Mateo); T. Esko (Tõnu); Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); N.W. Wainwright (Nicholas); M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); A.-P. Sarin; A.J. Kangas (Antti); J. Viikari (Jorma); M. Perola (Markus); T. Rantanen (Taina); A.K. Petersen; P. Soininen (Pasi); A. Johansson (Åsa); N. Soranzo (Nicole); A.C. Heath (Andrew); T. Papamarkou (Theodore); I. Prokopenko (Inga); A. Tönjes (Anke); F. Kronenberg (Florian); A. Döring (Angela); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); G.W. Montgomery (Grant); J.B. Whitfield (John); M. Kähönen (Mika); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); N.B. Freimer (Nelson); G.A.H.M. Willemsen (Gonneke); E.J.C. de Geus (Eco); A. Palotie (Aarno); M.S. Sandhu (Manj); D. Waterworth (Dawn); A. Metspalu (Andres); M. Stumvoll (Michael); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); A. Jula (Antti); G. Navis (Gerjan); C. Wijmenga (Cisca); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce); M.-R. Taskinen; M. Ala-Korpela (Mika); J. Kaprio (Jaakko); K.O. Kyvik (Kirsten Ohm); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); J.F. Wilson (James); I. Rudan (Igor); H. Campbell (Harry); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); T.D. Spector (Timothy); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); J.G. Eriksson (Johan); V. Salomaa (Veikko); B.A. Oostra (Ben); O. Raitakari (Olli); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); C. Gieger (Christian); M.R. Järvelin; N.G. Martin (Nicholas); A. Hofman (Albert); M.I. McCarthy (Mark); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); L. Peltonen (Leena Johanna); P. Tikka-Kleemola (Päivi); S. Ripatti (Samuli)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractRecent genome-wide association (GWA) studies described 95 loci controlling serum lipid levels. These common variants explain ~25% of the heritability of the phenotypes. To date, no unbiased screen for gene-environment interactions for circulating lipids has been reported. We screened for

  5. A Genome-Wide Screen for Interactions Reveals a New Locus on 4p15 Modifying the Effect of Waist-to-Hip Ratio on Total Cholesterol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surakka, I.; Isaacs, A.; Karssen, L. C.;

    2011-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies described 95 loci controlling serum lipid levels. These common variants explain similar to 25% of the heritability of the phenotypes. To date, no unbiased screen for gene-environment interactions for circulating lipids has been reported. We screened fo...

  6. Genome-wide CRISPR screens reveal a Wnt-FZD5 signaling circuit as a druggable vulnerability of RNF43-mutant pancreatic tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinhart, Zachary; Pavlovic, Zvezdan; Chandrashekhar, Megha; Hart, Traver; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Robitaille, Mélanie; Brown, Kevin R; Jaksani, Sridevi; Overmeer, René; Boj, Sylvia F; Adams, Jarrett; Pan, James; Clevers, Hans; Sidhu, Sachdev; Moffat, Jason; Angers, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Forward genetic screens with CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing enable high-resolution detection of genetic vulnerabilities in cancer cells. We conducted genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screens in RNF43-mutant pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells, which rely on Wnt signaling for proliferation. Through thes

  7. Genome-wide screening for genetic loci associated with noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Cory H; Ohmen, Jeffrey D; Sheth, Sonal; Zebboudj, Amina F; McHugh, Richard K; Hoffman, Larry F; Lusis, Aldons J; Davis, Richard C; Friedman, Rick A

    2009-04-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) is one of the more common sources of environmentally induced hearing loss in adults. In a mouse model, Castaneous (CAST/Ei) is an inbred strain that is resistant to NIHL, while the C57BL/6J strain is susceptible. We have used the genome-tagged mice (GTM) library of congenic strains, carrying defined segments of the CAST/Ei genome introgressed onto the C57BL/6J background, to search for loci modifying the noise-induced damage seen in the C57BL/6J strain. NIHL was induced by exposing 6-8-week old mice to 108 dB SPL intensity noise. We tested the hearing of each mouse strain up to 23 days after noise exposure using auditory brainstem response (ABR). This study identifies a number of genetic loci that modify the initial response to damaging noise, as well as long-term recovery. The data suggest that multiple alleles within the CAST/Ei genome modify the pathogenesis of NIHL and that screening congenic libraries for loci that underlie traits of interest can be easily carried out in a high-throughput fashion.

  8. Genome-wide screen for modifiers of ataxin-3 neurodegeneration in Drosophila.

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    Julide Bilen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type-3 (SCA3 is among the most common dominantly inherited ataxias, and is one of nine devastating human neurodegenerative diseases caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat encoding glutamine within the gene. The polyglutamine domain confers toxicity on the protein Ataxin-3 leading to neuronal dysfunction and loss. Although modifiers of polyglutamine toxicity have been identified, little is known concerning how the modifiers function mechanistically to affect toxicity. To reveal insight into spinocerebellar ataxia type-3, we performed a genetic screen in Drosophila with pathogenic Ataxin-3-induced neurodegeneration and identified 25 modifiers defining 18 genes. Despite a variety of predicted molecular activities, biological analysis indicated that the modifiers affected protein misfolding. Detailed mechanistic studies revealed that some modifiers affected protein accumulation in a manner dependent on the proteasome, whereas others affected autophagy. Select modifiers of Ataxin-3 also affected tau, revealing common pathways between degeneration due to distinct human neurotoxic proteins. These findings provide new insight into molecular pathways of polyQ toxicity, defining novel targets for promoting neuronal survival in human neurodegenerative disease.

  9. Genome-Wide Overexpression Screen Identifies Genes Able to Bypass p16-Mediated Senescence in Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Jae; Škalamera, Dubravka; Dahmer-Heath, Mareike; Shakhbazov, Konstanin; Ranall, Max V; Fox, Carly; Lambie, Duncan; Stevenson, Alexander J; Yaswen, Paul; Gonda, Thomas J; Gabrielli, Brian

    2017-03-01

    Malignant melanomas often arise from nevi, which result from initial oncogene-induced hyperproliferation of melanocytes that are maintained in a CDKN2A/p16-mediated senescent state. Thus, genes that can bypass this senescence barrier are likely to contribute to melanoma development. We have performed a gain-of-function screen of 17,030 lentivirally expressed human open reading frames (ORFs) in a melanoma cell line containing an inducible p16 construct to identify such genes. Genes known to bypass p16-induced senescence arrest, including the human papilloma virus 18 E7 gene ( HPV18E7), and genes such as the p16-binding CDK6 with expected functions, as well as panel of novel genes, were identified, including high-mobility group box (HMGB) proteins. A number of these were further validated in two other models of p16-induced senescence. Tissue immunohistochemistry demonstrated higher levels of CDK6 in primary melanomas compared with normal skin and nevi. Reduction of CDK6 levels drove melanoma cells expressing functional p16 into senescence, demonstrating its contribution to bypass senescence.

  10. Genome-Wide Screen for Haploinsufficient Cell Size Genes in the Opportunistic Yeast Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Chaillot

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most critical but still poorly understood aspects of eukaryotic cell proliferation is the basis for commitment to cell division in late G1 phase, called Start in yeast and the Restriction Point in metazoans. In all species, a critical cell size threshold coordinates cell growth with cell division and thereby establishes a homeostatic cell size. While a comprehensive survey of cell size genetic determinism has been performed in the saprophytic yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, very little is known in pathogenic fungi. As a number of critical Start regulators are haploinsufficient for cell size, we applied a quantitative analysis of the size phenome, using elutriation-barcode sequencing methodology, to 5639 barcoded heterozygous deletion strains of the opportunistic yeast Candida albicans. Our screen identified conserved known regulators and biological processes required to maintain size homeostasis in the opportunistic yeast C. albicans. We also identified novel C. albicans-specific size genes and provided a conceptual framework for future mechanistic studies. Interestingly, some of the size genes identified were required for fungal pathogenicity suggesting that cell size homeostasis may be elemental to C. albicans fitness or virulence inside the host.

  11. Genome-Wide Screen for Haploinsufficient Cell Size Genes in the Opportunistic Yeast Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillot, Julien; Cook, Michael A.; Corbeil, Jacques; Sellam, Adnane

    2016-01-01

    One of the most critical but still poorly understood aspects of eukaryotic cell proliferation is the basis for commitment to cell division in late G1 phase, called Start in yeast and the Restriction Point in metazoans. In all species, a critical cell size threshold coordinates cell growth with cell division and thereby establishes a homeostatic cell size. While a comprehensive survey of cell size genetic determinism has been performed in the saprophytic yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe, very little is known in pathogenic fungi. As a number of critical Start regulators are haploinsufficient for cell size, we applied a quantitative analysis of the size phenome, using elutriation-barcode sequencing methodology, to 5639 barcoded heterozygous deletion strains of the opportunistic yeast Candida albicans. Our screen identified conserved known regulators and biological processes required to maintain size homeostasis in the opportunistic yeast C. albicans. We also identified novel C. albicans-specific size genes and provided a conceptual framework for future mechanistic studies. Interestingly, some of the size genes identified were required for fungal pathogenicity suggesting that cell size homeostasis may be elemental to C. albicans fitness or virulence inside the host. PMID:28040776

  12. NMD Microarray Analysis for Rapid Genome-Wide Screen of Mutated Genes in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maija Wolf

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene mutations play a critical role in cancer development and progression, and their identification offers possibilities for accurate diagnostics and therapeutic targeting. Finding genes undergoing mutations is challenging and slow, even in the post-genomic era. A new approach was recently developed by Noensie and Dietz to prioritize and focus the search, making use of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD inhibition and microarray analysis (NMD microarrays in the identification of transcripts containing nonsense mutations. We combined NMD microarrays with array-based CGH (comparative genomic hybridization in order to identify inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in cancer. Such a “mutatomics” screening of prostate cancer cell lines led to the identification of inactivating mutations in the EPHB2 gene. Up to 8% of metastatic uncultured prostate cancers also showed mutations of this gene whose loss of function may confer loss of tissue architecture. NMD microarray analysis could turn out to be a powerful research method to identify novel mutated genes in cancer cell lines, providing targets that could then be further investigated for their clinical relevance and therapeutic potential.

  13. A genome-wide deletion mutant screen identifies pathways affected by nickel sulfate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Dai Wei

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The understanding of the biological function, regulation, and cellular interactions of the yeast genome and proteome, along with the high conservation in gene function found between yeast genes and their human homologues, has allowed for Saccharomyces cerevisiae to be used as a model organism to deduce biological processes in human cells. Here, we have completed a systematic screen of the entire set of 4,733 haploid S. cerevisiae gene deletion strains (the entire set of nonessential genes for this organism to identify gene products that modulate cellular toxicity to nickel sulfate (NiSO4. Results We have identified 149 genes whose gene deletion causes sensitivity to NiSO4 and 119 genes whose gene deletion confers resistance. Pathways analysis with proteins whose absence renders cells sensitive and resistant to nickel identified a wide range of cellular processes engaged in the toxicity of S. cerevisiae to NiSO4. Functional categories overrepresented with proteins whose absence renders cells sensitive to NiSO4 include homeostasis of protons, cation transport, transport ATPases, endocytosis, siderophore-iron transport, homeostasis of metal ions, and the diphthamide biosynthesis pathway. Functional categories overrepresented with proteins whose absence renders cells resistant to nickel include functioning and transport of the vacuole and lysosome, protein targeting, sorting, and translocation, intra-Golgi transport, regulation of C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism, transcriptional repression, and chromosome segregation/division. Interactome analysis mapped seven nickel toxicity modulating and ten nickel-resistance networks. Additionally, we studied the degree of sensitivity or resistance of the 111 nickel-sensitive and 72 -resistant strains whose gene deletion product has a similar protein in human cells. Conclusion We have undertaken a whole genome approach in order to further understand the mechanism(s regulating the cell

  14. Genome-Wide Screen Reveals sec21 Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Are Methotrexate-Resistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lai H.; Flibotte, Stephane; Sinha, Sunita; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey

    2017-01-01

    Drug resistance is a consequence of how most modern medicines work. Drugs exert pressure on cells that causes death or the evolution of resistance. Indeed, highly specific drugs are rendered ineffective by a single DNA mutation. In this study, we apply the drug methotrexate, which is widely used in cancer and rheumatoid arthritis, and perform evolution experiments on Baker’s yeast to ask the different ways in which cells become drug resistant. Because of the conserved nature of biological pathways between yeast and man, our results can inform how the same mechanism may operate to render human cells resistant to treatment. Exposure of cells to small molecules and drug therapies imposes a strong selective pressure. As a result, cells rapidly acquire mutations in order to survive. These include resistant variants of the drug target as well as those that modulate drug transport and detoxification. To systematically explore how cells acquire drug resistance in an unbiased manner, rapid cost-effective approaches are required. Methotrexate, as one of the first rationally designed anticancer drugs, has served as a prototypic example of such acquired resistance. Known methotrexate resistance mechanisms include mutations that increase expression of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) target as well as those that maintain function yet reduce the drug’s binding affinity. Recent evidence suggests that target-independent, epistatic mutations can also result in resistance to methotrexate. Currently, however, the relative contribution of such unlinked resistance mutations is not well understood. To address this issue, we took advantage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryotic system that combined with whole-genome sequencing and a rapid screening methodology, allowed the identification of causative mutations that modulate resistance to methotrexate. We found a recurrent missense mutation in SEC21 (orthologous to human COPG1), which we confirmed in 10 de novo

  15. Screening of tissue-specific genes and promoters in tomato by comparing genome wide expression profiles of Arabidopsis orthologues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chan Ju; Lee, Ha Yeon; Kim, Woong Bom; Lee, Bok-Sim; Kim, Jungeun; Ahmad, Raza; Kim, Hyun A; Yi, So Young; Hur, Cheol-Goo; Kwon, Suk-Yoon

    2012-07-01

    Constitutive overexpression of transgenes occasionally interferes with normal growth and developmental processes in plants. Thus, the development of tissue-specific promoters that drive transgene expression has become agriculturally important. To identify tomato tissue-specific promoters, tissue-specific genes were screened using a series of in silico-based and experimental procedures, including genome-wide orthologue searches of tomato and Arabidopsis databases, isolation of tissue-specific candidates using an Arabidopsis microarray database, and validation of tissue specificity by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis and promoter assay. Using these procedures, we found 311 tissue-specific candidate genes and validated 10 tissue-specific genes by RT-PCR. Among these identified genes, histochemical analysis of five isolated promoter::GUS transgenic tomato and Arabidopsis plants revealed that their promoters have different but distinct tissue-specific activities in anther, fruit, and root, respectively. Therefore, it appears these in silico-based screening approaches in addition to the identification of new tissue-specific genes and promoters will be helpful for the further development of tailored crop development.

  16. Genome-wide screening for genes whose deletions confer sensitivity to mutagenic purine base analogs in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozmin Stanislav G

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-hydroxylated base analogs, such as 6-hydroxylaminopurine (HAP and 2-amino-6-hydroxylaminopurine (AHA, are strong mutagens in various organisms due to their ambiguous base-pairing properties. The systems protecting cells from HAP and related noncanonical purines in Escherichia coli include specialized deoxyribonucleoside triphosphatase RdgB, DNA repair endonuclease V, and a molybdenum cofactor-dependent system. Fewer HAP-detoxification systems have been identified in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other eukaryotes. Cellular systems protecting from AHA are unknown. In the present study, we performed a genome-wide search for genes whose deletions confer sensitivity to HAP and AHA in yeast. Results We screened the library of yeast deletion mutants for sensitivity to the toxic and mutagenic action of HAP and AHA. We identified novel genes involved in the genetic control of base analogs sensitivity, including genes controlling purine metabolism, cytoskeleton organization, and amino acid metabolism. Conclusion We developed a method for screening the yeast deletion library for sensitivity to the mutagenic and toxic action of base analogs and identified 16 novel genes controlling pathways of protection from HAP. Three of them also protect from AHA.

  17. Genes required for growth at high hydrostatic pressure in Escherichia coli K-12 identified by genome-wide screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, S Lucas; Dawson, Angela; Ward, F Bruce; Allen, Rosalind J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that much of the global microbial biosphere is believed to exist in high pressure environments, the effects of hydrostatic pressure on microbial physiology remain poorly understood. We use a genome-wide screening approach, combined with a novel high-throughput high-pressure cell culture method, to investigate the effects of hydrostatic pressure on microbial physiology in vivo. The Keio collection of single-gene deletion mutants in Escherichia coli K-12 was screened for growth at a range of pressures from 0.1 MPa to 60 MPa. This led to the identification of 6 genes, rodZ, holC, priA, dnaT, dedD and tatC, whose products were required for growth at 30 MPa and a further 3 genes, tolB, rffT and iscS, whose products were required for growth at 40 MPa. Our results support the view that the effects of pressure on cell physiology are pleiotropic, with DNA replication, cell division, the cytoskeleton and cell envelope physiology all being potential failure points for cell physiology during growth at elevated pressure.

  18. A genome-wide immunodetection screen in S. cerevisiae uncovers novel genes involved in lysosomal vacuole function and morphology.

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    Florante Ricarte

    Full Text Available Vacuoles of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are functionally analogous to mammalian lysosomes. Both are cellular organelles responsible for macromolecular degradation, ion/pH homeostasis, and stress survival. We hypothesized that undefined gene functions remain at post-endosomal stage of vacuolar events and performed a genome-wide screen directed at such functions at the late endosome and vacuole interface - ENV genes. The immunodetection screen was designed to identify mutants that internally accumulate precursor form of the vacuolar hydrolase carboxypeptidase Y (CPY. Here, we report the uncovering and initial characterizations of twelve ENV genes. The small size of the collection and the lack of genes previously identified with vacuolar events are suggestive of the intended exclusive functional interface of the screen. Most notably, the collection includes four novel genes ENV7, ENV9, ENV10, and ENV11, and three genes previously linked to mitochondrial processes - MAM3, PCP1, PPE1. In all env mutants, vesicular trafficking stages were undisturbed in live cells as assessed by invertase and active α-factor secretion, as well as by localization of the endocytic fluorescent marker FM4-64 to the vacuole. Several mutants exhibit defects in stress survival functions associated with vacuoles. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed the collection to be significantly enriched in vacuolar morphologies suggestive of fusion and fission defects. These include the unique phenotype of lumenal vesicles within vacuoles in the novel env9Δ mutant and severely fragmented vacuoles upon deletion of GET4, a gene recently implicated in tail anchored membrane protein insertion. Thus, our results establish new gene functions in vacuolar function and morphology, and suggest a link between vacuolar and mitochondrial events.

  19. Genome-wide siRNA Screening at Biosafety Level 4 Reveals a Crucial Role for Fibrillarin in Henipavirus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Chwan Hong; Rootes, Christina L.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Grusovin, Julian; Monaghan, Paul; Lo, Michael K.; Tompkins, S. Mark; Adams, Timothy E.; Lowenthal, John W.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Stewart, Cameron R.; Bean, Andrew G. D.; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Hendra and Nipah viruses (genus Henipavirus, family Paramyxoviridae) are highly pathogenic bat-borne viruses. The need for high biocontainment when studying henipaviruses has hindered the development of therapeutics and knowledge of the viral infection cycle. We have performed a genome-wide siRNA screen at biosafety level 4 that identified 585 human proteins required for henipavirus infection. The host protein with the largest impact was fibrillarin, a nucleolar methyltransferase that was also required by measles, mumps and respiratory syncytial viruses for infection. While not required for cell entry, henipavirus RNA and protein syntheses were greatly impaired in cells lacking fibrillarin, indicating a crucial role in the RNA replication phase of infection. During infection, the Hendra virus matrix protein co-localized with fibrillarin in cell nucleoli, and co-associated as a complex in pulldown studies, while its nuclear import was unaffected in fibrillarin-depleted cells. Mutagenesis studies showed that the methyltransferase activity of fibrillarin was required for henipavirus infection, suggesting that this enzyme could be targeted therapeutically to combat henipavirus infections. PMID:27010548

  20. Genome-wide siRNA Screening at Biosafety Level 4 Reveals a Crucial Role for Fibrillarin in Henipavirus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Deffrasnes

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hendra and Nipah viruses (genus Henipavirus, family Paramyxoviridae are highly pathogenic bat-borne viruses. The need for high biocontainment when studying henipaviruses has hindered the development of therapeutics and knowledge of the viral infection cycle. We have performed a genome-wide siRNA screen at biosafety level 4 that identified 585 human proteins required for henipavirus infection. The host protein with the largest impact was fibrillarin, a nucleolar methyltransferase that was also required by measles, mumps and respiratory syncytial viruses for infection. While not required for cell entry, henipavirus RNA and protein syntheses were greatly impaired in cells lacking fibrillarin, indicating a crucial role in the RNA replication phase of infection. During infection, the Hendra virus matrix protein co-localized with fibrillarin in cell nucleoli, and co-associated as a complex in pulldown studies, while its nuclear import was unaffected in fibrillarin-depleted cells. Mutagenesis studies showed that the methyltransferase activity of fibrillarin was required for henipavirus infection, suggesting that this enzyme could be targeted therapeutically to combat henipavirus infections.

  1. Genome-wide siRNA screen identifies the retromer as a cellular entry factor for human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipovsky, Alex; Popa, Andreea; Pimienta, Genaro; Wyler, Michael; Bhan, Ashima; Kuruvilla, Leena; Guie, Marie-Aude; Poffenberger, Adrian C; Nelson, Christian D S; Atwood, Walter J; DiMaio, Daniel

    2013-04-30

    Despite major advances in our understanding of many aspects of human papillomavirus (HPV) biology, HPV entry is poorly understood. To identify cellular genes required for HPV entry, we conducted a genome-wide screen for siRNAs that inhibited infection of HeLa cells by HPV16 pseudovirus. Many retrograde transport factors were required for efficient infection, including multiple subunits of the retromer, which initiates retrograde transport from the endosome to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). The retromer has not been previously implicated in virus entry. Furthermore, HPV16 capsid proteins arrive in the TGN/Golgi in a retromer-dependent fashion during entry, and incoming HPV proteins form a stable complex with retromer subunits. We propose that HPV16 directly engages the retromer at the early or late endosome and traffics to the TGN/Golgi via the retrograde pathway during cell entry. These results provide important insights into HPV entry, identify numerous potential antiviral targets, and suggest that the role of the retromer in infection by other viruses should be assessed.

  2. Determination of sample size in genome-scale RNAi screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas; Heyse, Joseph F

    2009-04-01

    For genome-scale RNAi research, it is critical to investigate sample size required for the achievement of reasonably low false negative rate (FNR) and false positive rate. The analysis in this article reveals that current design of sample size contributes to the occurrence of low signal-to-noise ratio in genome-scale RNAi projects. The analysis suggests that (i) an arrangement of 16 wells per plate is acceptable and an arrangement of 20-24 wells per plate is preferable for a negative control to be used for hit selection in a primary screen without replicates; (ii) in a confirmatory screen or a primary screen with replicates, a sample size of 3 is not large enough, and there is a large reduction in FNRs when sample size increases from 3 to 4. To search a tradeoff between benefit and cost, any sample size between 4 and 11 is a reasonable choice. If the main focus is the selection of siRNAs with strong effects, a sample size of 4 or 5 is a good choice. If we want to have enough power to detect siRNAs with moderate effects, sample size needs to be 8, 9, 10 or 11. These discoveries about sample size bring insight to the design of a genome-scale RNAi screen experiment.

  3. A Computational model for compressed sensing RNAi cellular screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) becomes an increasingly important and effective genetic tool to study the function of target genes by suppressing specific genes of interest. This system approach helps identify signaling pathways and cellular phase types by tracking intensity and/or morphological changes of cells. The traditional RNAi screening scheme, in which one siRNA is designed to knockdown one specific mRNA target, needs a large library of siRNAs and turns out to be time-consuming and expensive. Results In this paper, we propose a conceptual model, called compressed sensing RNAi (csRNAi), which employs a unique combination of group of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) to knockdown a much larger size of genes. This strategy is based on the fact that one gene can be partially bound with several small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and conversely, one siRNA can bind to a few genes with distinct binding affinity. This model constructs a multi-to-multi correspondence between siRNAs and their targets, with siRNAs much fewer than mRNA targets, compared with the conventional scheme. Mathematically this problem involves an underdetermined system of equations (linear or nonlinear), which is ill-posed in general. However, the recently developed compressed sensing (CS) theory can solve this problem. We present a mathematical model to describe the csRNAi system based on both CS theory and biological concerns. To build this model, we first search nucleotide motifs in a target gene set. Then we propose a machine learning based method to find the effective siRNAs with novel features, such as image features and speech features to describe an siRNA sequence. Numerical simulations show that we can reduce the siRNA library to one third of that in the conventional scheme. In addition, the features to describe siRNAs outperform the existing ones substantially. Conclusions This csRNAi system is very promising in saving both time and cost for large-scale RNAi screening experiments which

  4. Array-based comparative genomic hybridization for genome-wide screening of DNA copy number in bladder tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, J.A.; Fridlyand, J.; Pejavar, S.; Olshen, A.B.; Korkola, J.E.; Vries, S. de; Carroll, P.; Kuo, W.L.; Pinkel, D.; Albertson, D.; Cordon-Cardo, C.; Jain, A.N.; Waldman, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Genome-wide copy number profiles were characterized in 41 primary bladder tumors using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH). In addition to previously identified alterations in large chromosomal regions, alterations were identified in many small genomic regions, some with high-l

  5. Genome-Wide Synthetic Lethal Screens Identify an Interaction Between the Nuclear Envelope Protein, Apq12p, and the Kinetochore in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Montpetit, Ben; Thorne, Ken; Barrett, Irene; Andrews, Kim; Jadusingh, Ravi; Hieter, Phil; Measday, Vivien

    2005-01-01

    The maintenance of genome stability is a fundamental requirement for normal cell cycle progression. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model to study chromosome maintenance due to its well-defined centromere and kinetochore, the region of the chromosome and associated protein complex, respectively, that link chromosomes to microtubules. To identify genes that are linked to chromosome stability, we performed genome-wide synthetic lethal screens using a series of novel t...

  6. A Genome-wide RNAi Screen for Microtubule Bundle Formation and Lysosome Motility Regulation in Drosophila S2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber L. Jolly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long-distance intracellular transport of organelles, mRNA, and proteins (“cargo” occurs along the microtubule cytoskeleton by the action of kinesin and dynein motor proteins, but the vast network of factors involved in regulating intracellular cargo transport are still unknown. We capitalize on the Drosophila melanogaster S2 model cell system to monitor lysosome transport along microtubule bundles, which require enzymatically active kinesin-1 motor protein for their formation. We use an automated tracking program and a naive Bayesian classifier for the multivariate motility data to analyze 15,683 gene phenotypes and find 98 proteins involved in regulating lysosome motility along microtubules and 48 involved in the formation of microtubule filled processes in S2 cells. We identify innate immunity genes, ion channels, and signaling proteins having a role in lysosome motility regulation and find an unexpected relationship between the dynein motor, Rab7a, and lysosome motility regulation.

  7. Genome-wide RNAi screen for synthetic lethal interactions with the C. elegans kinesin-5 homolog BMK-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maia, André F; Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Galli, Matilde; Lelieveld, Daphne; Egan, David A; Gassmann, Reto; Sunkel, Claudio E; van den Heuvel, Sander; Medema, René H

    2015-01-01

    Kinesins are a superfamily of microtubule-based molecular motors that perform various transport needs and have essential roles in cell division. Among these, the kinesin-5 family has been shown to play a major role in the formation and maintenance of the bipolar mitotic spindle. Moreover, recent wor

  8. A genome-wide screen for interactions reveals a new locus on 4p15 modifying the effect of waist-to-hip ratio on total cholesterol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Surakka

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide association (GWA studies described 95 loci controlling serum lipid levels. These common variants explain ∼25% of the heritability of the phenotypes. To date, no unbiased screen for gene-environment interactions for circulating lipids has been reported. We screened for variants that modify the relationship between known epidemiological risk factors and circulating lipid levels in a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA data from 18 population-based cohorts with European ancestry (maximum N = 32,225. We collected 8 further cohorts (N = 17,102 for replication, and rs6448771 on 4p15 demonstrated genome-wide significant interaction with waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR on total cholesterol (TC with a combined P-value of 4.79×10(-9. There were two potential candidate genes in the region, PCDH7 and CCKAR, with differential expression levels for rs6448771 genotypes in adipose tissue. The effect of WHR on TC was strongest for individuals carrying two copies of G allele, for whom a one standard deviation (sd difference in WHR corresponds to 0.19 sd difference in TC concentration, while for A allele homozygous the difference was 0.12 sd. Our findings may open up possibilities for targeted intervention strategies for people characterized by specific genomic profiles. However, more refined measures of both body-fat distribution and metabolic measures are needed to understand how their joint dynamics are modified by the newly found locus.

  9. Genome Wide Screening of Candidate Genes for Improving Piglet Birth Weight Using High and Low Estimated Breeding Value Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lifan; Zhou, Xiang; Michal, Jennifer J.; Ding, Bo; Li, Rui; Jiang, Zhihua

    2014-01-01

    Birth weight is an economically important trait in pig production because it directly impacts piglet growth and survival rate. In the present study, we performed a genome wide survey of candidate genes and pathways associated with individual birth weight (IBW) using the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip on 24 high (HEBV) and 24 low estimated breeding value (LEBV) animals. These animals were selected from a reference population of 522 individuals produced by three sires and six dam lines, which were crossbreds with multiple breeds. After quality-control, 43,257 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms), including 42,243 autosomal SNPs and 1,014 SNPs on chromosome X, were used in the data analysis. A total of 27 differentially selected regions (DSRs), including 1 on Sus scrofa chromosome 1 (SSC1), 1 on SSC4, 2 on SSC5, 4 on SSC6, 2 on SSC7, 5 on SSC8, 3 on SSC9, 1 on SSC14, 3 on SSC18, and 5 on SSCX, were identified to show the genome wide separations between the HEBV and LEBV groups for IBW in piglets. A DSR with the most number of significant SNPs (including 7 top 0.1% and 31 top 5% SNPs) was located on SSC6, while another DSR with the largest genetic differences in FST was found on SSC18. These regions harbor known functionally important genes involved in growth and development, such as TNFRSF9 (tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily member 9), CA6 (carbonic anhydrase VI) and MDFIC (MyoD family inhibitor domain containing). A DSR rich in imprinting genes appeared on SSC9, which included PEG10 (paternally expressed 10), SGCE (sarcoglycan, epsilon), PPP1R9A (protein phosphatase 1, regulatory subunit 9A) and ASB4 (ankyrin repeat and SOCS box containing 4). More importantly, our present study provided evidence to support six quantitative trait loci (QTL) regions for pig birth weight, six QTL regions for average birth weight (ABW) and three QTL regions for litter birth weight (LBW) reported previously by other groups. Furthermore, gene ontology analysis with 183 genes

  10. Cas-Database: web-based genome-wide guide RNA library design for gene knockout screens using CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeongbin; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bae, Sangsu

    2016-07-01

    CRISPR-derived RNA guided endonucleases (RGENs) have been widely used for both gene knockout and knock-in at the level of single or multiple genes. RGENs are now available for forward genetic screens at genome scale, but single guide RNA (sgRNA) selection at this scale is difficult. We develop an online tool, Cas-Database, a genome-wide gRNA library design tool for Cas9 nucleases from Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9). With an easy-to-use web interface, Cas-Database allows users to select optimal target sequences simply by changing the filtering conditions. Furthermore, it provides a powerful way to select multiple optimal target sequences from thousands of genes at once for the creation of a genome-wide library. Cas-Database also provides a web application programming interface (web API) for advanced bioinformatics users. Free access at http://www.rgenome.net/cas-database/ sangsubae@hanyang.ac.kr or jskim01@snu.ac.kr Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. A genome-wide screen for spatially restricted expression patterns identifies transcription factors that regulate glial development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fu, H.; Cai, J.; Clevers, H.; Fast, E.; Gray, S.; Greenberg, R.; Jain, M.K.; Ma, Q.; Qiu, M.; Rowitch, D.H.; Taylor, C.; Stiles, C.D.

    2009-01-01

    Forward genetic screens in genetically accessible invertebrate organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster have shed light on transcription factors that specify formation of neurons in the vertebrate CNS. However, invertebrate models have, to date, been uninformative with respect to genes that specify

  12. Genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 Screens Reveal Loss of Redundancy between PKMYT1 and WEE1 in Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad M. Toledo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To identify therapeutic targets for glioblastoma (GBM, we performed genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 knockout (KO screens in patient-derived GBM stem-like cells (GSCs and human neural stem/progenitors (NSCs, non-neoplastic stem cell controls, for genes required for their in vitro growth. Surprisingly, the vast majority GSC-lethal hits were found outside of molecular networks commonly altered in GBM and GSCs (e.g., oncogenic drivers. In vitro and in vivo validation of GSC-specific targets revealed several strong hits, including the wee1-like kinase, PKMYT1/Myt1. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that PKMYT1 acts redundantly with WEE1 to inhibit cyclin B-CDK1 activity via CDK1-Y15 phosphorylation and to promote timely completion of mitosis in NSCs. However, in GSCs, this redundancy is lost, most likely as a result of oncogenic signaling, causing GBM-specific lethality.

  13. Genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 Screens Reveal Loss of Redundancy between PKMYT1 and WEE1 in Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Chad M; Ding, Yu; Hoellerbauer, Pia; Davis, Ryan J; Basom, Ryan; Girard, Emily J; Lee, Eunjee; Corrin, Philip; Hart, Traver; Bolouri, Hamid; Davison, Jerry; Zhang, Qing; Hardcastle, Justin; Aronow, Bruce J; Plaisier, Christopher L; Baliga, Nitin S; Moffat, Jason; Lin, Qi; Li, Xiao-Nan; Nam, Do-Hyun; Lee, Jeongwu; Pollard, Steven M; Zhu, Jun; Delrow, Jeffery J; Clurman, Bruce E; Olson, James M; Paddison, Patrick J

    2015-12-22

    To identify therapeutic targets for glioblastoma (GBM), we performed genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 knockout (KO) screens in patient-derived GBM stem-like cells (GSCs) and human neural stem/progenitors (NSCs), non-neoplastic stem cell controls, for genes required for their in vitro growth. Surprisingly, the vast majority GSC-lethal hits were found outside of molecular networks commonly altered in GBM and GSCs (e.g., oncogenic drivers). In vitro and in vivo validation of GSC-specific targets revealed several strong hits, including the wee1-like kinase, PKMYT1/Myt1. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that PKMYT1 acts redundantly with WEE1 to inhibit cyclin B-CDK1 activity via CDK1-Y15 phosphorylation and to promote timely completion of mitosis in NSCs. However, in GSCs, this redundancy is lost, most likely as a result of oncogenic signaling, causing GBM-specific lethality.

  14. A Genome-wide CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats) Screen Identifies NEK7 as an Essential Component of NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Chauhan, Dhruv; Schmidt, Tobias; Ebert, Thomas S; Reinhardt, Julia; Endl, Elmar; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    Inflammasomes are high molecular weight protein complexes that assemble in the cytosol upon pathogen encounter. This results in caspase-1-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine maturation, as well as a special type of cell death, known as pyroptosis. The Nlrp3 inflammasome plays a pivotal role in pathogen defense, but at the same time, its activity has also been implicated in many common sterile inflammatory conditions. To this effect, several studies have identified Nlrp3 inflammasome engagement in a number of common human diseases such as atherosclerosis, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer disease, or gout. Although it has been shown that known Nlrp3 stimuli converge on potassium ion efflux upstream of Nlrp3 activation, the exact molecular mechanism of Nlrp3 activation remains elusive. Here, we describe a genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9 screen in immortalized mouse macrophages aiming at the unbiased identification of gene products involved in Nlrp3 inflammasome activation. We employed a FACS-based screen for Nlrp3-dependent cell death, using the ionophoric compound nigericin as a potassium efflux-inducing stimulus. Using a genome-wide guide RNA (gRNA) library, we found that targeting Nek7 rescued macrophages from nigericin-induced lethality. Subsequent studies revealed that murine macrophages deficient in Nek7 displayed a largely blunted Nlrp3 inflammasome response, whereas Aim2-mediated inflammasome activation proved to be fully intact. Although the mechanism of Nek7 functioning upstream of Nlrp3 yet remains elusive, these studies provide a first genetic handle of a component that specifically functions upstream of Nlrp3. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. A Drosophila Genome-Wide Screen Identifies Regulators of Steroid Hormone Production and Developmental Timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas Danielsen, E.; E. Møller, Morten; Yamanaka, Naoki;

    2016-01-01

    and developmental timing. Here, we use our screen as a resource to identify mechanisms regulating intracellular levels of cholesterol, a substrate for steroidogenesis. We identify a conserved fatty acid elongase that underlies a mechanism that adjusts cholesterol trafficking and steroidogenesis with nutrition...... are regulated by TOR and feedback signaling that couples steroidogenesis with growth and ensures proper maturation timing. These results reveal genes regulating steroidogenesis during development that likely modulate disease mechanisms....

  16. Genome-Wide CRISPR-Cas9 Screen Identifies MicroRNAs That Regulate Myeloid Leukemia Cell Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ruozhen; Mosbruger, Timothy L.; Dahlem, Timothy J.; Stephens, W. Zac; Rao, Dinesh S.; Round, June L.; O’Connell, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian microRNA expression is dysregulated in human cancer. However, the functional relevance of many microRNAs in the context of tumor biology remains unclear. Using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, we performed a global loss-of-function screen to simultaneously test the functions of individual microRNAs and protein-coding genes during the growth of a myeloid leukemia cell line. This approach identified evolutionarily conserved human microRNAs that suppress or promote cell growth, revealing that m...

  17. Quantitative genome-wide genetic interaction screens reveal global epistatic relationships of protein complexes in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Babu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale proteomic analyses in Escherichia coli have documented the composition and physical relationships of multiprotein complexes, but not their functional organization into biological pathways and processes. Conversely, genetic interaction (GI screens can provide insights into the biological role(s of individual gene and higher order associations. Combining the information from both approaches should elucidate how complexes and pathways intersect functionally at a systems level. However, such integrative analysis has been hindered due to the lack of relevant GI data. Here we present a systematic, unbiased, and quantitative synthetic genetic array screen in E. coli describing the genetic dependencies and functional cross-talk among over 600,000 digenic mutant combinations. Combining this epistasis information with putative functional modules derived from previous proteomic data and genomic context-based methods revealed unexpected associations, including new components required for the biogenesis of iron-sulphur and ribosome integrity, and the interplay between molecular chaperones and proteases. We find that functionally-linked genes co-conserved among γ-proteobacteria are far more likely to have correlated GI profiles than genes with divergent patterns of evolution. Overall, examining bacterial GIs in the context of protein complexes provides avenues for a deeper mechanistic understanding of core microbial systems.

  18. Genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required to foster tolerance towards industrial wheat straw hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Francisco B; Teixeira, Miguel C; Mira, Nuno P; Sá-Correia, Isabel; Domingues, Lucília

    2014-12-01

    The presence of toxic compounds derived from biomass pre-treatment in fermentation media represents an important drawback in second-generation bio-ethanol production technology and overcoming this inhibitory effect is one of the fundamental challenges to its industrial production. The aim of this study was to systematically identify, in industrial medium and at a genomic scale, the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required for simultaneous and maximal tolerance to key inhibitors of lignocellulosic fermentations. Based on the screening of EUROSCARF haploid mutant collection, 242 and 216 determinants of tolerance to inhibitory compounds present in industrial wheat straw hydrolysate (WSH) and in inhibitor-supplemented synthetic hydrolysate were identified, respectively. Genes associated to vitamin metabolism, mitochondrial and peroxisomal functions, ribosome biogenesis and microtubule biogenesis and dynamics are among the newly found determinants of WSH resistance. Moreover, PRS3, VMA8, ERG2, RAV1 and RPB4 were confirmed as key genes on yeast tolerance and fermentation of industrial WSH.

  19. A genome-wide screen for promoter methylation in lung cancer identifies novel methylation markers for multiple malignancies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Shames

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Promoter hypermethylation coupled with loss of heterozygosity at the same locus results in loss of gene function in many tumor cells. The "rules" governing which genes are methylated during the pathogenesis of individual cancers, how specific methylation profiles are initially established, or what determines tumor type-specific methylation are unknown. However, DNA methylation markers that are highly specific and sensitive for common tumors would be useful for the early detection of cancer, and those required for the malignant phenotype would identify pathways important as therapeutic targets. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In an effort to identify new cancer-specific methylation markers, we employed a high-throughput global expression profiling approach in lung cancer cells. We identified 132 genes that have 5' CpG islands, are induced from undetectable levels by 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine in multiple non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, and are expressed in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. As expected, these genes were also expressed in normal lung, but often not in companion primary lung cancers. Methylation analysis of a subset (45/132 of these promoter regions in primary lung cancer (n = 20 and adjacent nonmalignant tissue (n = 20 showed that 31 genes had acquired methylation in the tumors, but did not show methylation in normal lung or peripheral blood cells. We studied the eight most frequently and specifically methylated genes from our lung cancer dataset in breast cancer (n = 37, colon cancer (n = 24, and prostate cancer (n = 24 along with counterpart nonmalignant tissues. We found that seven loci were frequently methylated in both breast and lung cancers, with four showing extensive methylation in all four epithelial tumors. CONCLUSIONS: By using a systematic biological screen we identified multiple genes that are methylated with high penetrance in primary lung, breast, colon, and prostate cancers. The cross

  20. Genome-wide screening reveals the emergence and divergence of RTK homologues in basal Metazoan Hydra magnipapillata

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P C Reddy; Salil S Bidaye; Surendra Ghaskadbi

    2011-06-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are key components of cell–cell signalling required for growth and development of multicellular organisms. It is therefore likely that the divergence of RTKs and associated components played a significant role in the evolution of multicellular organisms. We have carried out the present study in hydra, a diploblast, to investigate the divergence of RTKs after parazoa and before emergence of triploblast phyla. The domain-based screening using Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) for RTKs in Genomescan predicted gene models of the Hydra magnipapillata genome resulted in identification of 15 RTKs. These RTKs have been classified into eight families based on domain architecture and homology. Only 5 of these RTKs have been previously reported and a few of these have been partially characterized. A phylogeny-based analysis of these predicted RTKs revealed that seven subtype duplications occurred between `parazoan–eumetazoan split’ and `diploblast–triploblast split’ in animal phyla. These results suggest that most of the RTKs evolved before the radiata–bilateria divergence during animal evolution.

  1. Genome-Wide CRISPR-Cas9 Screen Identifies MicroRNAs That Regulate Myeloid Leukemia Cell Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Jared; Hu, Ruozhen; Mosbruger, Timothy L; Dahlem, Timothy J; Stephens, W Zac; Rao, Dinesh S; Round, June L; O'Connell, Ryan M

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian microRNA expression is dysregulated in human cancer. However, the functional relevance of many microRNAs in the context of tumor biology remains unclear. Using CRISPR-Cas9 technology, we performed a global loss-of-function screen to simultaneously test the functions of individual microRNAs and protein-coding genes during the growth of a myeloid leukemia cell line. This approach identified evolutionarily conserved human microRNAs that suppress or promote cell growth, revealing that microRNAs are extensively integrated into the molecular networks that control tumor cell physiology. miR-155 was identified as a top microRNA candidate promoting cellular fitness, which we confirmed with two distinct miR-155-targeting CRISPR-Cas9 lentiviral constructs. Further, we performed anti-correlation functional profiling to predict relevant microRNA-tumor suppressor gene or microRNA-oncogene interactions in these cells. This analysis identified miR-150 targeting of p53, a connection that was experimentally validated. Taken together, our study describes a powerful genetic approach by which the function of individual microRNAs can be assessed on a global level, and its use will rapidly advance our understanding of how microRNAs contribute to human disease.

  2. An epigenetic genome-wide screen identifies SPINT2 as a novel tumor suppressor gene in pediatric medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongkham, Paul N; Northcott, Paul A; Ra, Young Shin; Nakahara, Yukiko; Mainprize, Todd G; Croul, Sidney E; Smith, Christian A; Taylor, Michael D; Rutka, James T

    2008-12-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is a malignant cerebellar tumor that occurs primarily in children. The hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/MET pathway has an established role in both normal cerebellar development as well as the development and progression of human brain tumors, including MB. To identify novel tumor suppressor genes involved in MB pathogenesis, we performed an epigenome-wide screen in MB cell lines, using 5-aza-2'deoxycytidine to identify genes aberrantly silenced by promoter hypermethylation. Using this technique, we identified an inhibitor of HGF/MET signaling, serine protease inhibitor kunitz-type 2 (SPINT2/HAI-2), as a putative tumor suppressor silenced by promoter methylation in MB. In addition, based on single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis in primary MB samples, we identified hemizygous deletions targeting the SPINT2 locus in addition to gains on chromosome 7 encompassing the HGF and MET loci. SPINT2 gene expression was down-regulated and MET expression was up-regulated in 73.2% and 45.5% of tumors, respectively, by quantitative real-time PCR. SPINT2 promoter methylation was detected in 34.3% of primary MBs examined by methylation-specific PCR. SPINT2 reexpression in MB cell lines reduced proliferative capacity, anchorage independent growth, cell motility in vitro, and increased overall survival times in vivo in a xenograft model (P<0.0001). Taken together, these data support the role of SPINT2 as a putative tumor suppressor gene in MB, and further implicate dysregulation of the HGF/MET signaling pathway in the pathogenesis of MB.

  3. Genome-wide screening and identification of new Trypanosoma cruzi antigens with potential application for chronic Chagas disease diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Luís Reis-Cunha

    Full Text Available The protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiologic agent of Chagas disease, an infection that afflicts approximately 8 million people in Latin America. Diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease is currently based on serological tests because this condition is usually characterized by high anti-T. cruzi IgG titers and low parasitemia. The antigens used in these assays may have low specificity due to cross reactivity with antigens from related parasite infections, such as leishmaniasis, and low sensitivity caused by the high polymorphism among T. cruzi strains. Therefore, the identification of new T. cruzi-specific antigens that are conserved among the various parasite discrete typing units (DTUs is still required. In the present study, we have explored the hybrid nature of the T. cruzi CL Brener strain using a broad genome screening approach to select new T. cruzi antigens that are conserved among the different parasite DTUs and that are absent in other trypanosomatid species. Peptide arrays containing the conserved antigens with the highest epitope prediction scores were synthesized, and the reactivity of the peptides were tested by immunoblot using sera from C57BL/6 mice chronically infected with T. cruzi strains from the TcI, TcII or TcVI DTU. The two T. cruzi proteins that contained the most promising peptides were expressed as recombinant proteins and tested in ELISA experiments with sera from chagasic patients with distinct clinical manifestations: those infected with T. cruzi from different DTUs and those with cutaneous or visceral leishmaniasis. These proteins, named rTc_11623.20 and rTc_N_10421.310, exhibited 94.83 and 89.66% sensitivity, 98.2 and 94.6% specificity, respectively, and a pool of these 2 proteins exhibited 96.55% sensitivity and 98.18% specificity. This work led to the identification of two new antigens with great potential application in the diagnosis of chronic Chagas disease.

  4. Genome-Wide Screening Identifies Six Genes That Are Associated with Susceptibility to Escherichia coli Microcin PDI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhe; Eberhart, Lauren J; Orfe, Lisa H; Lu, Shao-Yeh; Besser, Thomas E; Call, Douglas R

    2015-10-01

    The microcin PDI inhibits a diverse group of pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. Coculture of a single-gene knockout library (BW25113; n=3,985 mutants) against a microcin PDI-producing strain (E. coli 25) identified six mutants that were not susceptible (ΔatpA, ΔatpF, ΔdsbA, ΔdsbB, ΔompF, and ΔompR). Complementation of these genes restored susceptibility in all cases, and the loss of susceptibility was confirmed through independent gene knockouts in E. coli O157:H7 Sakai. Heterologous expression of E. coli ompF conferred susceptibility to Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica strains that are normally unaffected by microcin PDI. The expression of chimeric OmpF and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the K47G48N49 region within the first extracellular loop of E. coli OmpF is a putative binding site for microcin PDI. OmpR is a transcriptional regulator for ompF, and consequently loss of susceptibility by the ΔompR strain most likely is related to this function. Deletion of AtpA and AtpF, as well as AtpE and AtpH (missed in the original library screen), resulted in the loss of susceptibility to microcin PDI and the loss of ATP synthase function. Coculture of a susceptible strain in the presence of an ATP synthase inhibitor resulted in a loss of susceptibility, confirming that a functional ATP synthase complex is required for microcin PDI activity. In trans expression of ompF in the ΔdsbA and ΔdsbB strains did not restore a susceptible phenotype, indicating that these proteins are probably involved with the formation of disulfide bonds for OmpF or microcin PDI.

  5. Genome-wide screen for salmonella genes required for long-term systemic infection of the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available A microarray-based negative selection screen was performed to identify Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (serovar Typhimurium genes that contribute to long-term systemic infection in 129X1/SvJ (Nramp1(r mice. A high-complexity transposon-mutagenized library was used to infect mice intraperitoneally, and the selective disappearance of mutants was monitored after 7, 14, 21, and 28 d postinfection. One hundred and eighteen genes were identified to contribute to serovar Typhimurium infection of the spleens of mice by 28 d postinfection. The negatively selected mutants represent many known aspects of Salmonella physiology and pathogenesis, although the majority of the identified genes are of putative or unknown function. Approximately 30% of the negatively selected genes correspond to horizontally acquired regions such as those within Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI 1-5, prophages (Gifsy-1 and -2 and remnant, and the pSLT virulence plasmid. In addition, mutations in genes responsible for outer membrane structure and remodeling, such as LPS- and PhoP-regulated and fimbrial genes, were also selected against. Competitive index experiments demonstrated that the secreted SPI2 effectors SseK2 and SseJ as well as the SPI4 locus are attenuated relative to wild-type bacteria during systemic infection. Interestingly, several SPI1-encoded type III secretion system effectors/translocases are required by serovar Typhimurium to establish and, unexpectedly, to persist systemically, challenging the present description of Salmonella pathogenesis. Moreover, we observed a progressive selection against serovar Typhimurium mutants based upon the duration of the infection, suggesting that different classes of genes may be required at distinct stages of infection. Overall, these data indicate that Salmonella long-term systemic infection in the mouse requires a diverse repertoire of virulence factors. This diversity of genes presumably reflects the fact that

  6. Using genome-wide CRISPR library screening with library resistant DCK to find new sources of Ara-C drug resistance in AML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Morito; Rathe, Susan K; Bailey, Natashay J; Aumann, Natalie K; Jones, Justine M; Veldhuijzen, G Willemijn; Moriarity, Branden S; Largaespada, David A

    2016-11-03

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can display de novo or acquired resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a primary component of induction chemotherapy. To identify genes capable of independently imposing Ara-C resistance, we applied a genome-wide CRISPR library to human U937 cells and exposed to them to Ara-C. Interestingly, all drug resistant clones contained guide RNAs for DCK. To avoid DCK gene modification, gRNA resistant DCK cDNA was created by the introduction of silent mutations. The CRISPR screening was repeated using the gRNA resistant DCK, and loss of SLC29A was identified as also being capable of conveying Ara-C drug resistance. To determine if loss of Dck results in increased sensitivity to other drugs, we conducted a screen of 446 FDA approved drugs using two Dck-defective BXH-2 derived murine AML cell lines and their Ara-C sensitive parental lines. Both cell lines showed an increase in sensitivity to prednisolone. Guide RNA resistant cDNA rescue was a legitimate strategy and multiple DCK or SLC29A deficient human cell clones were established with one clone becoming prednisolone sensitive. Dck-defective leukemic cells may become prednisolone sensitive indicating prednisolone may be an effective adjuvant therapy in some cases of DCK-negative AML.

  7. Using genome-wide CRISPR library screening with library resistant DCK to find new sources of Ara-C drug resistance in AML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurata, Morito; Rathe, Susan K.; Bailey, Natashay J.; Aumann, Natalie K.; Jones, Justine M.; Veldhuijzen, G. Willemijn; Moriarity, Branden S.; Largaespada, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) can display de novo or acquired resistance to cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C), a primary component of induction chemotherapy. To identify genes capable of independently imposing Ara-C resistance, we applied a genome-wide CRISPR library to human U937 cells and exposed to them to Ara-C. Interestingly, all drug resistant clones contained guide RNAs for DCK. To avoid DCK gene modification, gRNA resistant DCK cDNA was created by the introduction of silent mutations. The CRISPR screening was repeated using the gRNA resistant DCK, and loss of SLC29A was identified as also being capable of conveying Ara-C drug resistance. To determine if loss of Dck results in increased sensitivity to other drugs, we conducted a screen of 446 FDA approved drugs using two Dck-defective BXH-2 derived murine AML cell lines and their Ara-C sensitive parental lines. Both cell lines showed an increase in sensitivity to prednisolone. Guide RNA resistant cDNA rescue was a legitimate strategy and multiple DCK or SLC29A deficient human cell clones were established with one clone becoming prednisolone sensitive. Dck-defective leukemic cells may become prednisolone sensitive indicating prednisolone may be an effective adjuvant therapy in some cases of DCK-negative AML. PMID:27808171

  8. A genome-wide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals altered transport as a mechanism of resistance to the anticancer drug bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouida, Mustapha; Pagé, Nicolas; Leduc, Anick; Peter, Matthias; Ramotar, Dindial

    2004-02-01

    The potent DNA damaging agent bleomycin (BLM) is highly effective for treating various cancers, although, in certain individuals, the development of cellular resistance to the drug can severely diminish its antineoplastic properties. We performed two independent genome-wide screens using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant collection to isolate variants exhibiting either sensitivity or resistance to BLM. This procedure reproducibly identified a relatively large collection of 231 BLM-hypersensitive mutants, representing genes belonging to diverse functional groups. In contrast, only five BLM-resistant mutants could be recovered by our screens. Among these latter mutants, three were deleted for genes involved in plasma membrane transport, including the L-carnitine transporter Agp2, as well as the kinases Ptk2 and Sky1, which are involved in regulating polyamine transport. We further showed that Agp2 acts as a transporter of BLM and that overexpression of this transporter significantly enhances BLM-induced cell killing. Our data strongly implicate membrane transport as a key determinant in BLM resistance in yeast. This finding is critical, given that very little is known about BLM transport in human cells. Indeed, characterization of analogous mechanisms in humans may ultimately lead to enhancement of the antitumor properties of BLM.

  9. Formation of hydrogen sulfide from cysteine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4742: genome wide screen reveals a central role of the vacuole.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gal Winter

    Full Text Available Discoveries on the toxic effects of cysteine accumulation and, particularly, recent findings on the many physiological roles of one of the products of cysteine catabolism, hydrogen sulfide (H2S, are highlighting the importance of this amino acid and sulfur metabolism in a range of cellular activities. It is also highlighting how little we know about this critical part of cellular metabolism. In the work described here, a genome-wide screen using a deletion collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed a surprising set of genes associated with this process. In addition, the yeast vacuole, not previously associated with cysteine catabolism, emerged as an important compartment for cysteine degradation. Most prominent among the vacuole-related mutants were those involved in vacuole acidification; we identified each of the eight subunits of a vacuole acidification sub-complex (V1 of the yeast V-ATPase as essential for cysteine degradation. Other functions identified included translation, RNA processing, folate-derived one-carbon metabolism, and mitochondrial iron-sulfur homeostasis. This work identified for the first time cellular factors affecting the fundamental process of cysteine catabolism. Results obtained significantly contribute to the understanding of this process and may provide insight into the underlying cause of cysteine accumulation and H2S generation in eukaryotes.

  10. Identification of striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) as a novel calmodulin target by a newly developed genome-wide screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Yusui; Denda, Miwako; Sakane, Kyohei; Ogusu, Tomoko; Takahashi, Sumio; Magari, Masaki; Kanayama, Naoki; Morishita, Ryo; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    To search for novel target(s) of the Ca(2+)-signaling transducer, calmodulin (CaM), we performed a newly developed genome-wide CaM interaction screening of 19,676 GST-fused proteins expressed in human. We identified striated muscle activator of Rho signaling (STARS) as a novel CaM target and characterized its CaM binding ability and found that the Ca(2+)/CaM complex interacted stoichiometrically with the N-terminal region (Ala13-Gln35) of STARS in vitro as well as in living cells. Mutagenesis studies identified Ile20 and Trp33 as the essential hydrophobic residues in CaM anchoring. Furthermore, the CaM binding deficient mutant (Ile20Ala, Trp33Ala) of STARS further enhanced its stimulatory effect on SRF-dependent transcriptional activation. These results suggest a connection between Ca(2+)-signaling via excitation-contraction coupling and the regulation of STARS-mediated gene expression in muscles.

  11. Genome-Wide Approaches to Drosophila Heart Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Frasch

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of the dorsal vessel in Drosophila is one of the first systems in which key mechanisms regulating cardiogenesis have been defined in great detail at the genetic and molecular level. Due to evolutionary conservation, these findings have also provided major inputs into studies of cardiogenesis in vertebrates. Many of the major components that control Drosophila cardiogenesis were discovered based on candidate gene approaches and their functions were defined by employing the outstanding genetic tools and molecular techniques available in this system. More recently, approaches have been taken that aim to interrogate the entire genome in order to identify novel components and describe genomic features that are pertinent to the regulation of heart development. Apart from classical forward genetic screens, the availability of the thoroughly annotated Drosophila genome sequence made new genome-wide approaches possible, which include the generation of massive numbers of RNA interference (RNAi reagents that were used in forward genetic screens, as well as studies of the transcriptomes and proteomes of the developing heart under normal and experimentally manipulated conditions. Moreover, genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments have been performed with the aim to define the full set of genomic binding sites of the major cardiogenic transcription factors, their relevant target genes, and a more complete picture of the regulatory network that drives cardiogenesis. This review will give an overview on these genome-wide approaches to Drosophila heart development and on computational analyses of the obtained information that ultimately aim to provide a description of this process at the systems level.

  12. Genome-wide functional genetic screen with the anticancer agent AMPI-109 identifies PRL-3 as an oncogenic driver in triple-negative breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gari, Hamid H; Gearheart, Christy M; Fosmire, Susan; DeGala, Gregory D; Fan, Zeying; Torkko, Kathleen C; Edgerton, Susan M; Lucia, M Scott; Ray, Rahul; Thor, Ann D; Porter, Christopher C; Lambert, James R

    2016-03-29

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) are among the most aggressive and heterogeneous cancers with a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. Here, we demonstrate that the anticancer compound, AMPI-109, is selectively efficacious in inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of multiple TNBC subtype cell lines as assessed by activation of pro-apoptotic caspases-3 and 7, PARP cleavage and nucleosomal DNA fragmentation. AMPI-109 had little to no effect on growth in the majority of non-TNBC cell lines examined. We therefore utilized AMPI-109 in a genome-wide shRNA screen in the TNBC cell line, BT-20, to investigate the utility of AMPI-109 as a tool in helping to identify molecular alterations unique to TNBC. Our screen identified the oncogenic phosphatase, PRL-3, as a potentially important driver of TNBC growth, migration and invasion. Through stable lentiviral knock downs and transfection with catalytically impaired PRL-3 in TNBC cells, loss of PRL-3 expression, or functionality, led to substantial growth inhibition. Moreover, AMPI-109 treatment, downregulation of PRL-3 expression or impairment of PRL-3 activity reduced TNBC cell migration and invasion. Histological evaluation of human breast cancers revealed PRL-3 was significantly, though not exclusively, associated with the TNBC subtype and correlated positively with regional and distant metastases, as well as 1 and 3 year relapse free survival. Collectively, our study is proof-of-concept that AMPI-109, a selectively active agent against TNBC cell lines, can be used as a molecular tool to uncover unique drivers of disease progression, such as PRL-3, which we show promotes oncogenic phenotypes in TNBC cells.

  13. The conditional nature of genetic interactions: the consequences of wild-type backgrounds on mutational interactions in a genome-wide modifier screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudarshan Chari

    Full Text Available The phenotypic outcome of a mutation cannot be simply mapped onto the underlying DNA variant. Instead, the phenotype is a function of the allele, the genetic background in which it occurs and the environment where the mutational effects are expressed. While the influence of genetic background on the expressivity of individual mutations is recognized, its consequences on the interactions between genes, or the genetic network they form, is largely unknown. The description of genetic networks is essential for much of biology; yet if, and how, the topologies of such networks are influenced by background is unknown. Furthermore, a comprehensive examination of the background dependent nature of genetic interactions may lead to identification of novel modifiers of biological processes. Previous work in Drosophila melanogaster demonstrated that wild-type genetic background influences the effects of an allele of scalloped (sd, with respect to both its principal consequence on wing development and its interactions with a mutation in optomotor blind. In this study we address whether the background dependence of mutational interactions is a general property of genetic systems by performing a genome wide dominant modifier screen of the sd(E3 allele in two wild-type genetic backgrounds using molecularly defined deletions. We demonstrate that ~74% of all modifiers of the sd(E3 phenotype are background-dependent due in part to differential sensitivity to genetic perturbation. These background dependent interactions include some with qualitative differences in the phenotypic outcome, as well as instances of sign epistasis. This suggests that genetic interactions are often contingent on genetic background, with flexibility in genetic networks due to segregating variation in populations. Such background dependent effects can substantially alter conclusions about how genes influence biological processes, the potential for genetic screens in alternative wild

  14. Possible roles of vacuolar H+-ATPase and mitochondrial function in tolerance to air-drying stress revealed by genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Jun; Ando, Akira; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2008-03-01

    Yeasts used in bread making are exposed to air-drying stress during dried yeast production processes. To clarify the genes required for air-drying tolerance, we performed genome-wide screening using the complete deletion strain collection of diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screening identified 278 gene deletions responsible for air-drying sensitivity. These genes were classified based on their cellular function and on the localization of their gene products. The results showed that the genes required for air-drying tolerance were frequently involved in mitochondrial functions and in connection with vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, which plays a role in vacuolar acidification. To determine the role of vacuolar acidification in air-drying stress tolerance, we monitored intracellular pH. The results showed that intracellular acidification was induced during air-drying and that this acidification was amplified in a deletion mutant of the VMA2 gene encoding a component of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, suggesting that vacuolar H(+)-ATPase helps maintain intracellular pH homeostasis, which is affected by air-drying stress. To determine the effects of air-drying stress on mitochondria, we analysed the mitochondrial membrane potential under air-drying stress conditions using MitoTracker. The results showed that mitochondria were extremely sensitive to air-drying stress, suggesting that a mitochondrial function is required for tolerance to air-drying stress. We also analysed the correlation between oxidative-stress sensitivity and air-drying-stress sensitivity. The results suggested that oxidative stress is a critical determinant of sensitivity to air-drying stress, although ROS-scavenging systems are not necessary for air-drying stress tolerance. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. A genome-wide screen in yeast identifies specific oxidative stress genes required for the maintenance of sub-cellular redox homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Ayer

    Full Text Available Maintenance of an optimal redox environment is critical for appropriate functioning of cellular processes and cell survival. Despite the importance of maintaining redox homeostasis, it is not clear how the optimal redox potential is sensed and set, and the processes that impact redox on a cellular/organellar level are poorly understood. The genetic bases of cellular redox homeostasis were investigated using a green fluorescent protein (GFP based redox probe, roGFP2 and a pH sensitive GFP-based probe, pHluorin. The use of roGFP2, in conjunction with pHluorin, enabled determination of pH-adjusted sub-cellular redox potential in a non-invasive and real-time manner. A genome-wide screen using both the non-essential and essential gene collections was carried out in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using cytosolic-roGFP2 to identify factors essential for maintenance of cytosolic redox state under steady-state conditions. 102 genes of diverse function were identified that are required for maintenance of cytosolic redox state. Mutations in these genes led to shifts in the half-cell glutathione redox potential by 75-10 mV. Interestingly, some specific oxidative stress-response processes were identified as over-represented in the data set. Further investigation of the role of oxidative stress-responsive systems in sub-cellular redox homeostasis was conducted using roGFP2 constructs targeted to the mitochondrial matrix and peroxisome and E(GSH was measured in cells in exponential and stationary phase. Analyses allowed for the identification of key redox systems on a sub-cellular level and the identification of novel genes involved in the regulation of cellular redox homeostasis.

  16. A forward genetic screen reveals essential and non-essential RNAi factors in Paramecium tetraurelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Simone; Carradec, Quentin; Tanty, Véronique; Arnaiz, Olivier; Meyer, Eric

    2014-06-01

    In most eukaryotes, small RNA-mediated gene silencing pathways form complex interacting networks. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, at least two RNA interference (RNAi) mechanisms coexist, involving distinct but overlapping sets of protein factors and producing different types of short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). One is specifically triggered by high-copy transgenes, and the other by feeding cells with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA)-producing bacteria. In this study, we designed a forward genetic screen for mutants deficient in dsRNA-induced silencing, and a powerful method to identify the relevant mutations by whole-genome sequencing. We present a set of 47 mutant alleles for five genes, revealing two previously unknown RNAi factors: a novel Paramecium-specific protein (Pds1) and a Cid1-like nucleotidyl transferase. Analyses of allelic diversity distinguish non-essential and essential genes and suggest that the screen is saturated for non-essential, single-copy genes. We show that non-essential genes are specifically involved in dsRNA-induced RNAi while essential ones are also involved in transgene-induced RNAi. One of the latter, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RDR2, is further shown to be required for all known types of siRNAs, as well as for sexual reproduction. These results open the way for the dissection of the genetic complexity, interconnection, mechanisms and natural functions of RNAi pathways in P. tetraurelia.

  17. Tribolium castaneum as a model for high-throughput RNAi screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knorr, Eileen; Bingsohn, Linda; Kanost, Michael R; Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Coleopteran insects are a highly diverse and successful order, and many beetle species are significant agricultural pests. New biorational strategies for managing populations of beetles and other insect species are needed as pests develop resistance to chemical insecticides and Bt toxins. There is now an opportunity to use genome sequence data to identify genes that are essential for insect growth, development, or survival as new targets for designing control technology. This goal requires a method for high-throughput in vivo screening of thousands of genes to identify candidate genes that, when their expression is disrupted, have a phenotype that may be useful in insect pest control. Tribolium castaneum, the red flour beetle, is a model organism that offers considerable advantages for such screening, including ease of rearing in large numbers, a sequenced genome, and a strong, systemic RNAi response for specific depletion of gene transcripts. The RNAi effect in T. castaneum can be elicited in any tissue and any stage by the injection of dsRNA into the hemocoel, and injection of dsRNA into adult females can even be used to identify phenotypes in offspring. A pilot RNAi screen (iBeetle) is underway. Several T. castaneum genes with promising RNAi phenotypes for further development as mechanisms for plant protection have been identified. These include heat shock protein 90, chitin synthase, the segmentation gene hairy, and a matrix metalloprotease. Candidate genes identified in T. castaneum screens can then be tested in agricultural pest species (in which screening is not feasible), to evaluate their effectiveness for use in potential plant-based RNAi control strategies. Delivery of dsRNA expressed by genetically modified crops to the midgut of phytophagous insects is under investigation as a new tool for very specific protection of plants from insect pest species. The T. castaneum screening platform offers a system for discovery of candidate genes with high potential

  18. Single-cell analysis of population context advances RNAi screening at multiple levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snijder, Berend; Sacher, Raphael; Rämö, Pauli; Liberali, Prisca; Mench, Karin; Wolfrum, Nina; Burleigh, Laura; Scott, Cameron C; Verheije, Monique H; Mercer, Jason; Moese, Stefan; Heger, Thomas; Theusner, Kristina; Jurgeit, Andreas; Lamparter, David; Balistreri, Giuseppe; Schelhaas, Mario; De Haan, Cornelis A M; Marjomäki, Varpu; Hyypiä, Timo; Rottier, Peter J M; Sodeik, Beate; Marsh, Mark; Gruenberg, Jean; Amara, Ali; Greber, Urs; Helenius, Ari; Pelkmans, Lucas

    2012-01-01

    Isogenic cells in culture show strong variability, which arises from dynamic adaptations to the microenvironment of individual cells. Here we study the influence of the cell population context, which determines a single cell's microenvironment, in image-based RNAi screens. We developed a comprehensi

  19. Z' factor including siRNA design quality parameter in RNAi screening experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Sławomir; Kozak, Karol

    2012-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) high-content screening (HCS) enables massive parallel gene silencing and is increasingly being used to reveal novel connections between genes and disease-relevant phenotypes. The application of genome-scale RNAi relies on the development of high quality HCS assays. The Z' factor statistic provides a way to evaluate whether or not screening run conditions (reagents, protocols, instrumentation, kinetics, and other conditions not directly related to the test compounds) are optimized. Z' factor, introduced by Zhang et al., ( 1) is a dimensionless value that represents both the variability and the dynamic range between two sets of sample control data. This paper describe a new extension of the Z' factor, which integrates bioinformatics RNAi non-target compounds for screening quality assessment. Currently presented Z' factor is based on positive and negative control, which may not be sufficient for RNAi experiments including oligonucleotides (oligo) with lack of knock-down. This paper proposes an algorithm which extends existing algorithm by using additional controls generetaed from on-target analysis.

  20. A Multivariate Computational Method to Analyze High-Content RNAi Screening Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameseder, Jonathan; Krismer, Konstantin; Dayma, Yogesh; Ehrenberger, Tobias; Hwang, Mun Kyung; Airoldi, Edoardo M; Floyd, Scott R; Yaffe, Michael B

    2015-09-01

    High-content screening (HCS) using RNA interference (RNAi) in combination with automated microscopy is a powerful investigative tool to explore complex biological processes. However, despite the plethora of data generated from these screens, little progress has been made in analyzing HC data using multivariate methods that exploit the full richness of multidimensional data. We developed a novel multivariate method for HCS, multivariate robust analysis method (M-RAM), integrating image feature selection with ranking of perturbations for hit identification, and applied this method to an HC RNAi screen to discover novel components of the DNA damage response in an osteosarcoma cell line. M-RAM automatically selects the most informative phenotypic readouts and time points to facilitate the more efficient design of follow-up experiments and enhance biological understanding. Our method outperforms univariate hit identification and identifies relevant genes that these approaches would have missed. We found that statistical cell-to-cell variation in phenotypic responses is an important predictor of hits in RNAi-directed image-based screens. Genes that we identified as modulators of DNA damage signaling in U2OS cells include B-Raf, a cancer driver gene in multiple tumor types, whose role in DNA damage signaling we confirm experimentally, and multiple subunits of protein kinase A. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  1. A Perspective on the Future of High-Throughput RNAi Screening: Will CRISPR Cut Out the Competition or Can RNAi Help Guide the Way?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jessica; Woodcock, Simon

    2015-09-01

    For more than a decade, RNA interference (RNAi) has brought about an entirely new approach to functional genomics screening. Enabling high-throughput loss-of-function (LOF) screens against the human genome, identifying new drug targets, and significantly advancing experimental biology, RNAi is a fast, flexible technology that is compatible with existing high-throughput systems and processes; however, the recent advent of clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas, a powerful new precise genome-editing (PGE) technology, has opened up vast possibilities for functional genomics. CRISPR-Cas is novel in its simplicity: one piece of easily engineered guide RNA (gRNA) is used to target a gene sequence, and Cas9 expression is required in the cells. The targeted double-strand break introduced by the gRNA-Cas9 complex is highly effective at removing gene expression compared to RNAi. Together with the reduced cost and complexity of CRISPR-Cas, there is the realistic opportunity to use PGE to screen for phenotypic effects in a total gene knockout background. This review summarizes the exciting development of CRISPR-Cas as a high-throughput screening tool, comparing its future potential to that of well-established RNAi screening techniques, and highlighting future challenges and opportunities within these disciplines. We conclude that the two technologies actually complement rather than compete with each other, enabling greater understanding of the genome in relation to drug discovery.

  2. A novel multiplex cell viability assay for high-throughput RNAi screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Daniel F; Erdmann, Gerrit; Zhang, Xian; Fritzsche, Anja; Demir, Kubilay; Jaedicke, Andreas; Muehlenberg, Katja; Wanker, Erich E; Boutros, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based high-throughput RNAi screening has become a powerful research tool in addressing a variety of biological questions. In RNAi screening, one of the most commonly applied assay system is measuring the fitness of cells that is usually quantified using fluorescence, luminescence and absorption-based readouts. These methods, typically implemented and scaled to large-scale screening format, however often only yield limited information on the cell fitness phenotype due to evaluation of a single and indirect physiological indicator. To address this problem, we have established a cell fitness multiplexing assay which combines a biochemical approach and two fluorescence-based assaying methods. We applied this assay in a large-scale RNAi screening experiment with siRNA pools targeting the human kinome in different modified HEK293 cell lines. Subsequent analysis of ranked fitness phenotypes assessed by the different assaying methods revealed average phenotype intersections of 50.7±2.3%-58.7±14.4% when two indicators were combined and 40-48% when a third indicator was taken into account. From these observations we conclude that combination of multiple fitness measures may decrease false-positive rates and increases confidence for hit selection. Our robust experimental and analytical method improves the classical approach in terms of time, data comprehensiveness and cost.

  3. A novel multiplex cell viability assay for high-throughput RNAi screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F Gilbert

    Full Text Available Cell-based high-throughput RNAi screening has become a powerful research tool in addressing a variety of biological questions. In RNAi screening, one of the most commonly applied assay system is measuring the fitness of cells that is usually quantified using fluorescence, luminescence and absorption-based readouts. These methods, typically implemented and scaled to large-scale screening format, however often only yield limited information on the cell fitness phenotype due to evaluation of a single and indirect physiological indicator. To address this problem, we have established a cell fitness multiplexing assay which combines a biochemical approach and two fluorescence-based assaying methods. We applied this assay in a large-scale RNAi screening experiment with siRNA pools targeting the human kinome in different modified HEK293 cell lines. Subsequent analysis of ranked fitness phenotypes assessed by the different assaying methods revealed average phenotype intersections of 50.7±2.3%-58.7±14.4% when two indicators were combined and 40-48% when a third indicator was taken into account. From these observations we conclude that combination of multiple fitness measures may decrease false-positive rates and increases confidence for hit selection. Our robust experimental and analytical method improves the classical approach in terms of time, data comprehensiveness and cost.

  4. A genome-wide screening and SNPs-to-genes approach to identify novel genetic risk factors associated with frontotemporal dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Grassi, Mario; Salvi, Erika; Borroni, Barbara; Palluzzi, Fernando; Pepe, Daniele; D'Avila, Francesca; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Serpente, Maria; Rossi, Giacomina; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Nacmias, Benedetta; Piaceri, Irene; Bagnoli, Silvia; Bruni, Amalia C.; Maletta, Raffaele G.; Bernardi, Livia; Postiglione, Alfredo; Milan, Graziella; Franceschi, Massimo; Puca, Annibale A.; Novelli, Valeria; Barlassina, Cristina; Glorioso, Nicola; Manunta, Paolo; Singleton, Andrew; Cusi, Daniele; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most prevalent form of early onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD). We performed a case-control association study in an Italian FTD cohort (n = 530) followed by the novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)-to-genes approach and functional annotation analysis. We identified 2 novel potential loci for FTD. Suggestive SNPs reached p-values ∼10−7 and odds ratio > 2.5 (2p16.3) and 1.5 (17q25.3). Suggestive alleles at 17q25.3 identified a disease-associated haplotype causing decreased expression of –cis genes such as RFNG and AATK involved in neuronal genesis and differentiation and axon outgrowth, respectively. We replicated this locus through the SNPs-to-genes approach. Our functional annotation analysis indicated significant enrichment for functions of the brain (neuronal genesis, differentiation, and maturation), the synapse (neurotransmission and synapse plasticity), and elements of the immune system, the latter supporting our recent international FTD–genome-wide association study. This is the largest genome-wide study in Italian FTD to date. Although our results are not conclusive, we set the basis for future replication studies and identification of susceptible molecular mechanisms involved in FTD pathogenesis. PMID:26154020

  5. Identification of putative insulin-like peptides and components of insulin signaling pathways in parasitic platyhelminths by the use of genome-wide screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Luo, Xuenong; Zhang, Shaohua; Yin, Cai; Dou, Yongxi; Cai, Xuepeng

    2014-02-01

    No endogenous insulin-like peptides in parasitic flatworms have been reported. Insulin receptors from flukes and tapeworms have been shown to interact directly with the host-derived insulin molecule, which suggests the exploitation of host-derived insulin. In this study, a strategy of genome-wide searches followed by comprehensive analyses of strictly conserved features of the insulin family was used to demonstrate the presence of putative insulin-like peptides in the genomes of six tapeworms and two flukes. In addition, whole insulin signaling pathways were annotated on a genome-wide scale. Two putative insulin-like peptide genes in each genome of tapeworms and one insulin-like peptide gene in each genome of flukes were identified. The comprehensive analyses revealed that all of these peptides showed the common features shared by other members of the insulin family, and the phylogenetic analysis implied a putative gene duplication event in the Cestoda during the evolution of insulin-like peptide genes. The quantitative expression analysis and immunolocalization results suggested a putative role of these peptides in reproduction. Entire sets of major components of the classic insulin signaling pathway were successfully identified, suggesting that this pathway in parasitic flatworms might also regulate many other important biological activities. We believe that the identification of the insulin-like peptides gives us a better understanding of the insulin signaling pathway in these parasites, as well as host-parasite interactions.

  6. A genome-wide screening and SNPs-to-genes approach to identify novel genetic risk factors associated with frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Grassi, Mario; Salvi, Erika; Borroni, Barbara; Palluzzi, Fernando; Pepe, Daniele; D'Avila, Francesca; Padovani, Alessandro; Archetti, Silvana; Rainero, Innocenzo; Rubino, Elisa; Pinessi, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luisa; Binetti, Giuliano; Ghidoni, Roberta; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Serpente, Maria; Rossi, Giacomina; Giaccone, Giorgio; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Nacmias, Benedetta; Piaceri, Irene; Bagnoli, Silvia; Bruni, Amalia C; Maletta, Raffaele G; Bernardi, Livia; Postiglione, Alfredo; Milan, Graziella; Franceschi, Massimo; Puca, Annibale A; Novelli, Valeria; Barlassina, Cristina; Glorioso, Nicola; Manunta, Paolo; Singleton, Andrew; Cusi, Daniele; Hardy, John; Momeni, Parastoo

    2015-10-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is the second most prevalent form of early onset dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD). We performed a case-control association study in an Italian FTD cohort (n = 530) followed by the novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)-to-genes approach and functional annotation analysis. We identified 2 novel potential loci for FTD. Suggestive SNPs reached p-values ∼10(-7) and odds ratio > 2.5 (2p16.3) and 1.5 (17q25.3). Suggestive alleles at 17q25.3 identified a disease-associated haplotype causing decreased expression of -cis genes such as RFNG and AATK involved in neuronal genesis and differentiation and axon outgrowth, respectively. We replicated this locus through the SNPs-to-genes approach. Our functional annotation analysis indicated significant enrichment for functions of the brain (neuronal genesis, differentiation, and maturation), the synapse (neurotransmission and synapse plasticity), and elements of the immune system, the latter supporting our recent international FTD-genome-wide association study. This is the largest genome-wide study in Italian FTD to date. Although our results are not conclusive, we set the basis for future replication studies and identification of susceptible molecular mechanisms involved in FTD pathogenesis.

  7. A whole genome RNAi screen identifies replication stress response genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanaugh, Gina; Ye, Fei; Mohni, Kareem N; Luzwick, Jessica W; Glick, Gloria; Cortez, David

    2015-11-01

    Proper DNA replication is critical to maintain genome stability. When the DNA replication machinery encounters obstacles to replication, replication forks stall and the replication stress response is activated. This response includes activation of cell cycle checkpoints, stabilization of the replication fork, and DNA damage repair and tolerance mechanisms. Defects in the replication stress response can result in alterations to the DNA sequence causing changes in protein function and expression, ultimately leading to disease states such as cancer. To identify additional genes that control the replication stress response, we performed a three-parameter, high content, whole genome siRNA screen measuring DNA replication before and after a challenge with replication stress as well as a marker of checkpoint kinase signalling. We identified over 200 replication stress response genes and subsequently analyzed how they influence cellular viability in response to replication stress. These data will serve as a useful resource for understanding the replication stress response.

  8. Genome-Wide Screening of Genes Showing Altered Expression in Liver Metastases of Human Colorectal Cancers by cDNA Microarray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempei Yanagawa

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of intensive and increasingly successful attempts to determine the multiple steps involved in colorectal carcinogenesis, the mechanisms responsible for metastasis of colorectal tumors to the liver remain to be clarified. To identify genes that are candidates for involvement in the metastatic process, we analyzed genome-wide expression profiles of 10 primary colorectal cancers and their corresponding metastatic lesions by means of a cDNA microarray consisting of 9121 human genes. This analysis identified 40 genes whose expression was commonly upregulated in metastatic lesions, and 7 that were commonly downregulated. The upregulated genes encoded proteins involved in cell adhesion, or remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton. Investigation of the functions of more of the altered genes should improve our understanding of metastasis and may identify diagnostic markers and/or novel molecular targets for prevention or therapy of metastatic lesions.

  9. RNAi screening for characterisation of ER-associated degradation pathways in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Mats David Joakim

    It is estimated that one third of all synthesized proteins in mammalian cells traverse the secretory pathway. Folding of proteins in the ER on their way to secretion is highly regulated. Proteins that are unable to achieve their native conformation are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system...... fluorescence-based RNAi screens in mammalian cells on TCR-α-GFP and HANSκLC, for identification of ERAD pathways. By validating the obtained screening hits we concluded that UBE2J2 is involved in TCR-α-GFP degradation, possibly by ubiquitination of C-terminal serine residues in TCR-α-GFP. Additionally, we also...

  10. An essential signal peptide peptidase identified in an RNAi screen of serine peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei.

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    Catherine X Moss

    Full Text Available The serine peptidases of Trypanosoma brucei have been viewed as potential drug targets. In particular, the S9 prolyl oligopeptidase subfamily is thought to be a good avenue for drug discovery. This is based on the finding that some S9 peptidases are secreted and active in the mammalian bloodstream, and that they are a class of enzyme against which drugs have successfully been developed. We collated a list of all serine peptidases in T. brucei, identifying 20 serine peptidase genes, of which nine are S9 peptidases. We screened all 20 serine peptidases by RNAi to determine which, if any, are essential for bloodstream form T. brucei survival. All S9 serine peptidases were dispensable for parasite survival in vitro, even when pairs of similar genes, coding for oligopeptidase B or prolyl oligopeptidase, were targeted simultaneously. We also found no effect on parasite survival in an animal host when the S9 peptidases oligopeptidase B, prolyl oligopeptidase or dipeptidyl peptidase 8 were targeted. The only serine peptidase to emerge from the RNAi screen as essential was a putative type-I signal peptide peptidase (SPP1. This gene was essential for parasite survival both in vitro and in vivo. The growth defect conferred by RNAi depletion of SPP1 was rescued by expression of a functional peptidase from an RNAi resistant SPP1 gene. However, expression of catalytically inactive SPP1 was unable to rescue cells from the SPP1 depleted phenotype, demonstrating that SPP1 serine peptidase activity is necessary for T. brucei survival.

  11. A genome-wide screen in human embryonic stem cells reveals novel sites of allele-specific histone modification associated with known disease loci

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prendergast, James G D

    2012-05-19

    AbstractBackgroundChromatin structure at a given site can differ between chromosome copies in a cell, and such imbalances in chromatin structure have been shown to be important in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling several disease loci. Human genetic variation, DNA methylation, and disease have been intensely studied, uncovering many sites of allele-specific DNA methylation (ASM). However, little is known about the genome-wide occurrence of sites of allele-specific histone modification (ASHM) and their relationship to human disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the extent and characteristics of sites of ASHM in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs).ResultsUsing a statistically rigorous protocol, we investigated the genomic distribution of ASHM in hESCs, and their relationship to sites of allele-specific expression (ASE) and DNA methylation. We found that, although they were rare, sites of ASHM were substantially enriched at loci displaying ASE. Many were also found at known imprinted regions, hence sites of ASHM are likely to be better markers of imprinted regions than sites of ASM. We also found that sites of ASHM and ASE in hESCs colocalize at risk loci for developmental syndromes mediated by deletions, providing insights into the etiology of these disorders.ConclusionThese results demonstrate the potential importance of ASHM patterns in the interpretation of disease loci, and the protocol described provides a basis for similar studies of ASHM in other cell types to further our understanding of human disease susceptibility.

  12. Synthetic lethal RNAi screening identifies sensitizing targets for gemcitabine therapy in pancreatic cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azorsa David O

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer retains a poor prognosis among the gastrointestinal cancers. It affects 230,000 individuals worldwide, has a very high mortality rate, and remains one of the most challenging malignancies to treat successfully. Treatment with gemcitabine, the most widely used chemotherapeutic against pancreatic cancer, is not curative and resistance may occur. Combinations of gemcitabine with other chemotherapeutic drugs or biological agents have resulted in limited improvement. Methods In order to improve gemcitabine response in pancreatic cancer cells, we utilized a synthetic lethal RNAi screen targeting 572 known kinases to identify genes that when silenced would sensitize pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Results Results from the RNAi screens identified several genes that, when silenced, potentiated the growth inhibitory effects of gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer cells. The greatest potentiation was shown by siRNA targeting checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1. Validation of the screening results was performed in MIA PaCa-2 and BxPC3 pancreatic cancer cells by examining the dose response of gemcitabine treatment in the presence of either CHK1 or CHK2 siRNA. These results showed a three to ten-fold decrease in the EC50 for CHK1 siRNA-treated cells versus control siRNA-treated cells while treatment with CHK2 siRNA resulted in no change compared to controls. CHK1 was further targeted with specific small molecule inhibitors SB 218078 and PD 407824 in combination with gemcitabine. Results showed that treatment of MIA PaCa-2 cells with either of the CHK1 inhibitors SB 218078 or PD 407824 led to sensitization of the pancreatic cancer cells to gemcitabine. Conclusion These findings demonstrate the effectiveness of synthetic lethal RNAi screening as a tool for identifying sensitizing targets to chemotherapeutic agents. These results also indicate that CHK1 could serve as a putative therapeutic target for sensitizing pancreatic cancer

  13. Genome-wide screen for metabolic syndrome susceptibility Loci reveals strong lipid gene contribution but no evidence for common genetic basis for clustering of metabolic syndrome traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansson, Kati; Perola, Markus; Tikkanen, Emmi; Kettunen, Johannes; Surakka, Ida; Havulinna, Aki S; Stancáková, Alena; Barnes, Chris; Widen, Elisabeth; Kajantie, Eero; Eriksson, Johan G; Viikari, Jorma; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Raitakari, Olli T; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Ruokonen, Aimo; Pouta, Anneli; Jula, Antti; Kangas, Antti J; Soininen, Pasi; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Männistö, Satu; Jousilahti, Pekka; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kuusisto, Johanna; Collins, Francis S; Laakso, Markku; Hurles, Matthew E; Palotie, Aarno; Peltonen, Leena; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko

    2012-04-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified several susceptibility loci for metabolic syndrome (MetS) component traits, but have had variable success in identifying susceptibility loci to the syndrome as an entity. We conducted a GWA study on MetS and its component traits in 4 Finnish cohorts consisting of 2637 MetS cases and 7927 controls, both free of diabetes, and followed the top loci in an independent sample with transcriptome and nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics data. Furthermore, we tested for loci associated with multiple MetS component traits using factor analysis, and built a genetic risk score for MetS. A previously known lipid locus, APOA1/C3/A4/A5 gene cluster region (SNP rs964184), was associated with MetS in all 4 study samples (P=7.23×10(-9) in meta-analysis). The association was further supported by serum metabolite analysis, where rs964184 was associated with various very low density lipoprotein, triglyceride, and high-density lipoprotein metabolites (P=0.024-1.88×10(-5)). Twenty-two previously identified susceptibility loci for individual MetS component traits were replicated in our GWA and factor analysis. Most of these were associated with lipid phenotypes, and none with 2 or more uncorrelated MetS components. A genetic risk score, calculated as the number of risk alleles in loci associated with individual MetS traits, was strongly associated with MetS status. Our findings suggest that genes from lipid metabolism pathways have the key role in the genetic background of MetS. We found little evidence for pleiotropy linking dyslipidemia and obesity to the other MetS component traits, such as hypertension and glucose intolerance.

  14. Genome-wide screening for genetic alterations in esophageal cancer by aCGH identifies 11q13 amplification oncogenes associated with nodal metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Ying

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is highly prevalent in China and other Asian countries, as a major cause of cancer-related mortality. ESCC displays complex chromosomal abnormalities, including multiple structural and numerical aberrations. Chromosomal abnormalities, such as recurrent amplifications and homozygous deletions, directly contribute to tumorigenesis through altering the expression of key oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: To understand the role of genetic alterations in ESCC pathogenesis and identify critical amplification/deletion targets, we performed genome-wide 1-Mb array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH analysis for 10 commonly used ESCC cell lines. Recurrent chromosomal gains were frequently detected on 3q26-27, 5p15-14, 8p12, 8p22-24, 11q13, 13q21-31, 18p11 and 20q11-13, with frequent losses also found on 8p23-22, 11q22, 14q32 and 18q11-23. Gain of 11q13.3-13.4 was the most frequent alteration in ESCC. Within this region, CCND1 oncogene was identified with high level of amplification and overexpression in ESCC, while FGF19 and SHANK2 was also remarkably over-expressed. Moreover, a high concordance (91.5% of gene amplification and protein overexpression of CCND1 was observed in primary ESCC tumors. CCND1 amplification/overexpression was also significantly correlated with the lymph node metastasis of ESCC. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that genomic gain of 11q13 is the major mechanism contributing to the amplification. Novel oncogenes identified within the 11q13 amplicon including FGF19 and SHANK2 may play important roles in ESCC tumorigenesis.

  15. A Genome-Wide siRNA Screen Implicates Spire1/2 in SipA-Driven Salmonella Typhimurium Host Cell Invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andritschke, Daniel; Dilling, Sabrina; Emmenlauer, Mario; Welz, Tobias; Schmich, Fabian; Misselwitz, Benjamin; Rämö, Pauli; Rottner, Klemens; Kerkhoff, Eugen; Wada, Teiji; Penninger, Josef M.; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Horvath, Peter; Dehio, Christoph; Hardt, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Tm) is a leading cause of diarrhea. The disease is triggered by pathogen invasion into the gut epithelium. Invasion is attributed to the SPI-1 type 3 secretion system (T1). T1 injects effector proteins into epithelial cells and thereby elicits rearrangements of the host cellular actin cytoskeleton and pathogen invasion. The T1 effector proteins SopE, SopB, SopE2 and SipA are contributing to this. However, the host cell factors contributing to invasion are still not completely understood. To address this question comprehensively, we used Hela tissue culture cells, a genome-wide siRNA library, a modified gentamicin protection assay and S. TmSipA, a sopBsopE2sopE mutant which strongly relies on the T1 effector protein SipA to invade host cells. We found that S. TmSipA invasion does not elicit membrane ruffles, nor promote the entry of non-invasive bacteria "in trans". However, SipA-mediated infection involved the SPIRE family of actin nucleators, besides well-established host cell factors (WRC, ARP2/3, RhoGTPases, COPI). Stage-specific follow-up assays and knockout fibroblasts indicated that SPIRE1 and SPIRE2 are involved in different steps of the S. Tm infection process. Whereas SPIRE1 interferes with bacterial binding, SPIRE2 influences intracellular replication of S. Tm. Hence, these two proteins might fulfill non-redundant functions in the pathogen-host interaction. The lack of co-localization hints to a short, direct interaction between S. Tm and SPIRE proteins or to an indirect effect. PMID:27627128

  16. An RNAi Screen To Identify Protein Phosphatases That Function Within the Drosophila Circadian Clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Parul; Hardin, Paul E

    2016-12-07

    Circadian clocks in eukaryotes keep time via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. A well-characterized example of such a transcriptional feedback loop is in Drosophila, where CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) complexes activate transcription of period (per) and timeless (tim) genes, rising levels of PER-TIM complexes feed-back to repress CLK-CYC activity, and degradation of PER and TIM permits the next cycle of CLK-CYC transcription. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated posttranslationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Previous behavioral screens identified several kinases that control CLK, PER, and TIM levels, subcellular localization, and/or activity, but two phosphatases that function within the clock were identified through the analysis of candidate genes from other pathways or model systems. To identify phosphatases that play a role in the clock, we screened clock cell-specific RNA interference (RNAi) knockdowns of all annotated protein phosphatases and protein phosphatase regulators in Drosophila for altered activity rhythms. This screen identified 19 protein phosphatases that lengthened or shortened the circadian period by ≥1 hr (p ≤ 0.05 compared to controls) or were arrhythmic. Additional RNAi lines, transposon inserts, overexpression, and loss-of-function mutants were tested to independently confirm these RNAi phenotypes. Based on genetic validation and molecular analysis, 15 viable protein phosphatases remain for future studies. These candidates are expected to reveal novel features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in Drosophila that are likely to be conserved in all animals including humans.

  17. An RNAi Screen To Identify Protein Phosphatases That Function Within the Drosophila Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parul Agrawal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks in eukaryotes keep time via cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops. A well-characterized example of such a transcriptional feedback loop is in Drosophila, where CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC complexes activate transcription of period (per and timeless (tim genes, rising levels of PER-TIM complexes feed-back to repress CLK-CYC activity, and degradation of PER and TIM permits the next cycle of CLK-CYC transcription. The timing of CLK-CYC activation and PER-TIM repression is regulated posttranslationally, in part through rhythmic phosphorylation of CLK, PER, and TIM. Previous behavioral screens identified several kinases that control CLK, PER, and TIM levels, subcellular localization, and/or activity, but two phosphatases that function within the clock were identified through the analysis of candidate genes from other pathways or model systems. To identify phosphatases that play a role in the clock, we screened clock cell-specific RNA interference (RNAi knockdowns of all annotated protein phosphatases and protein phosphatase regulators in Drosophila for altered activity rhythms. This screen identified 19 protein phosphatases that lengthened or shortened the circadian period by ≥1 hr (p ≤ 0.05 compared to controls or were arrhythmic. Additional RNAi lines, transposon inserts, overexpression, and loss-of-function mutants were tested to independently confirm these RNAi phenotypes. Based on genetic validation and molecular analysis, 15 viable protein phosphatases remain for future studies. These candidates are expected to reveal novel features of the circadian timekeeping mechanism in Drosophila that are likely to be conserved in all animals including humans.

  18. An effective method for controlling false discovery and false nondiscovery rates in genome-scale RNAi screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2010-10-01

    In most genome-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screens, the ultimate goal is to select siRNAs with a large inhibition or activation effect. The selection of hits typically requires statistical control of 2 errors: false positives and false negatives. Traditional methods of controlling false positives and false negatives do not take into account the important feature in RNAi screens: many small-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) may have very small but real nonzero average effects on the measured response and thus cannot allow us to effectively control false positives and false negatives. To address for deficiencies in the application of traditional approaches in RNAi screening, the author proposes a new method for controlling false positives and false negatives in RNAi high-throughput screens. The false negatives are statistically controlled through a false-negative rate (FNR) or false nondiscovery rate (FNDR). FNR is the proportion of false negatives among all siRNAs examined, whereas FNDR is the proportion of false negatives among declared nonhits. The author also proposes new concepts, q*-value and p*-value, to control FNR and FNDR, respectively. The proposed method should have broad utility for hit selection in which one needs to control both false discovery and false nondiscovery rates in genome-scale RNAi screens in a robust manner.

  19. Phenotypic screen for RNAi effects in the codling moth Cydia pomonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinda; Gu, Liuqi; Ireland, Stephen; Garczynski, Stephen F; Knipple, Douglas C

    2015-11-10

    RNAi-based technologies have the potential to augment, or replace existing pest management strategies. However, some insect taxa are less susceptible to the induction of the post-transcriptional gene silencing effect than others, such as the Lepidoptera. Here we describe experiments to investigate the induction of RNAi in the codling moth, Cydia pomonella, a major lepidopteran pest of apple, pear, and walnut. Prior to a knockdown screen, fluorescently labeled small interfering RNA (siRNA) and double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) derived from green fluorescent protein (GFP) coding sequence were delivered to the surface of artificial diet to which neonate larvae were introduced and subsequently examined for the distribution of fluorescence in their tissues. Fluorescence was highly concentrated in the midgut but its presence in other tissues was equivocal. Next, dsRNAs were made for C. pomonella genes orthologous to those that have well defined deleterious phenotypes in Drosophila melanogaster. A screen was conducted using dsRNAs encoding cullin-1 (Cpcul1), maleless (Cpmle), musashi (Cpmsi), a homeobox gene (CpHbx), and pumilio (Cppum). The dsRNAs designed from these target genes were administered to neonate larvae by delivery to the surface of the growth medium. None of the dsRNA treatments affected larval viability, however Cpcul1-dsRNA had a significant effect on larval growth, with the average length of larvae about 3mm, compared to about 4mm in the control groups. Measurement of Cpcul1 transcript levels by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) revealed a dose-dependent RNAi effect in response to increasing amount of Cpcul1-dsRNA. Despite their reduced size, Cpcul1-dsRNA-treated larvae molted normally and matured to adulthood in a manner similar to controls. In an additional experiment, Cpcul1-siRNA was found to induce similar stunting effect as that induced by Cpcul1-dsRNA.

  20. Expanding the Diversity of Imaging-Based RNAi Screen Applications Using Cell Spot Microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Juha K; Kwon, Sunjong; Korkola, James; Gray, Joe W

    2013-04-11

    Over the past decade, great strides have been made in identifying gene aberrations and deregulated pathways that are associated with specific disease states. These association studies guide experimental studies aimed at identifying the aberrant genes and networks that cause the disease states. This requires functional manipulation of these genes and networks in laboratory models of normal and diseased cells. One approach is to assess molecular and biological responses to high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi)-induced gene knockdown. These responses can be revealed by immunofluorescent staining for a molecular or cellular process of interest and quantified using fluorescence image analysis. These applications are typically performed in multiwell format, but are limited by high reagent costs and long plate processing times. These limitations can be mitigated by analyzing cells grown in cell spot microarray (CSMA) format. CSMAs are produced by growing cells on small (~200 mm diameter) spots with each spot carrying an siRNA with transfection reagent. The spacing between spots is only a few hundred micrometers, thus thousands of cell spots can be arranged on a single cell culture surface. These high-density cell cultures can be immunofluorescently stained with minimal reagent consumption and analyzed quickly using automated fluorescence microscopy platforms. This review covers basic aspects of imaging-based CSMA technology, describes a wide range of immunofluorescence assays that have already been implemented successfully for CSMA screening and suggests future directions for advanced RNAi screening experiments.

  1. The iBeetle large-scale RNAi screen reveals gene functions for insect development and physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schultheis, Dorothea; Schwirz, Jonas; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Majumdar, Upalparna; Dao, Van Anh; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Tech, Maike; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Theis, Mirko; Schild, Inga; Trauner, Jochen; Koniszewski, Nikolaus D B; Küster, Elke; Kittelmann, Sebastian; Hu, Yonggang; Lehmann, Sabrina; Siemanowski, Janna; Ulrich, Julia; Panfilio, Kristen A; Schröder, Reinhard; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario; Buchhholz, Frank; Frasch, Manfred; Roth, Siegfried; Wimmer, Ernst A; Schoppmeier, Michael; Klingler, Martin; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-07-28

    Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the functional studies predominantly focus on candidate genes previously identified in Drosophila, which is biasing research towards conserved gene functions. RNAi screens in other organisms promise to reduce this bias. Here we present the results of the iBeetle screen, a large-scale, unbiased RNAi screen in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which identifies gene functions in embryonic and postembryonic development, physiology and cell biology. The utility of Tribolium as a screening platform is demonstrated by the identification of genes involved in insect epithelial adhesion. This work transcends the restrictions of the candidate gene approach and opens fields of research not accessible in Drosophila.

  2. Development of RNAi method for screening candidate genes to control emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis.

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    Rodrigues, Thais B; Rieske, Lynne K; J Duan, Jian; Mogilicherla, Kanakachari; Palli, Subba R

    2017-08-07

    The ingestion of double-strand RNAs (dsRNA) targeting essential genes in an insect could cause mortality. Based on this principle, a new generation of insect control methods using RNA interference (RNAi) are being developed. In this work, we developed a bioassay for oral delivery of dsRNA to an invasive forest and urban tree pest, the emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis). EAB feeds and develops beneath the bark, killing trees rapidly. This behavior, coupled with the lack of a reliable artificial diet for rearing larvae and adults, make them difficult to study. We found that dsRNA is transported and processed to siRNAs by EAB larvae within 72 h after ingestion. Also, feeding neonate larvae with IAP (inhibitor of apoptosis) or COP (COPI coatomer, β subunit) dsRNA silenced their target genes and caused mortality. Both an increase in the concentration of dsRNA fed and sequential feeding of two different dsRNAs increased mortality. Here we provide evidence for successful RNAi in EAB, and demonstrate the development of a rapid and effective bioassay for oral delivery of dsRNA to screen additional genes.

  3. RNAi screen reveals an Abl kinase-dependent host cell pathway involved in Pseudomonas aeruginosa internalization.

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    Julia F Pielage

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Internalization of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa by non-phagocytic cells is promoted by rearrangements of the actin cytoskeleton, but the host pathways usurped by this bacterium are not clearly understood. We used RNAi-mediated gene inactivation of approximately 80 genes known to regulate the actin cytoskeleton in Drosophila S2 cells to identify host molecules essential for entry of P. aeruginosa. This work revealed Abl tyrosine kinase, the adaptor protein Crk, the small GTPases Rac1 and Cdc42, and p21-activated kinase as components of a host signaling pathway that leads to internalization of P. aeruginosa. Using a variety of complementary approaches, we validated the role of this pathway in mammalian cells. Remarkably, ExoS and ExoT, type III secreted toxins of P. aeruginosa, target this pathway by interfering with GTPase function and, in the case of ExoT, by abrogating P. aeruginosa-induced Abl-dependent Crk phosphorylation. Altogether, this work reveals that P. aeruginosa utilizes the Abl pathway for entering host cells and reveals unexpected complexity by which the P. aeruginosa type III secretion system modulates this internalization pathway. Our results furthermore demonstrate the applicability of using RNAi screens to identify host signaling cascades usurped by microbial pathogens that may be potential targets for novel therapies directed against treatment of antibiotic-resistant infections.

  4. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

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    Pradeepkiran JA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Jangampalli Adi Pradeepkiran,1* Sri Bhashyam Sainath,2,3* Konidala Kranthi Kumar,1 Matcha Bhaskar1 1Division of Animal Biotechnology, Department of Zoology, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati, India; 2CIMAR/CIIMAR, Centro Interdisciplinar de Investigação Marinha e Ambiental, Universidade do Porto, Rua dos Bragas, Porto, Portugal, 3Department of Biotechnology, Vikrama Simhapuri University, Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, India *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50% to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3. A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the

  5. Genome-wide screening of the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, which is a potential inhibitor of bioethanol fermentation, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Tokuyasu Ken

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lignocellulosic materials are abundant and among the most important potential sources for bioethanol production. Although the pretreatment of lignocellulose is necessary for efficient saccharification and fermentation, numerous by-products, including furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds, are generated in the pretreatment step. Many of these components inhibit the growth and fermentation of yeast. In particular, vanillin is one of the most effective inhibitors in lignocellulose hydrolysates because it inhibits fermentation at very low concentrations. To identify the genes required for tolerance to vanillin, we screened a set of diploid yeast deletion mutants, which are powerful tools for clarifying the function of particular genes. Results Seventy-six deletion mutants were identified as vanillin-sensitive mutants. The numerous deleted genes in the vanillin-sensitive mutants were classified under the functional categories for 'chromatin remodeling' and 'vesicle transport', suggesting that these functions are important for vanillin tolerance. The cross-sensitivity of the vanillin-sensitive mutants to furan derivatives, weak acids, and phenolic compounds was also examined. Genes for ergosterol biosynthesis were required for tolerance to all inhibitory compounds tested, suggesting that ergosterol is a key component of tolerance to various inhibitors. Conclusion Our analysis predicts that vanillin tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is affected by various complicated processes that take place on both the molecular and the cellular level. In addition, the ergosterol biosynthetic process is important for achieving a tolerance to various inhibitors. Our findings provide a biotechnological basis for the molecular engineering as well as for screening of more robust yeast strains that may potentially be useful in bioethanol fermentation.

  6. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis.

  7. Complete genome-wide screening and subtractive genomic approach revealed new virulence factors, potential drug targets against bio-war pathogen Brucella melitensis 16M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeepkiran, Jangampalli Adi; Sainath, Sri Bhashyam; Kumar, Konidala Kranthi; Bhaskar, Matcha

    2015-01-01

    Brucella melitensis 16M is a Gram-negative coccobacillus that infects both animals and humans. It causes a disease known as brucellosis, which is characterized by acute febrile illness in humans and causes abortions in livestock. To prevent and control brucellosis, identification of putative drug targets is crucial. The present study aimed to identify drug targets in B. melitensis 16M by using a subtractive genomic approach. We used available database repositories (Database of Essential Genes, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes Automatic Annotation Server, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) to identify putative genes that are nonhomologous to humans and essential for pathogen B. melitensis 16M. The results revealed that among 3 Mb genome size of pathogen, 53 putative characterized and 13 uncharacterized hypothetical genes were identified; further, from Basic Local Alignment Search Tool protein analysis, one hypothetical protein showed a close resemblance (50%) to Silicibacter pomeroyi DUF1285 family protein (2RE3). A further homology model of the target was constructed using MODELLER 9.12 and optimized through variable target function method by molecular dynamics optimization with simulating annealing. The stereochemical quality of the restrained model was evaluated by PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D, ERRAT, and WHATIF servers. Furthermore, structure-based virtual screening was carried out against the predicted active site of the respective protein using the glycerol structural analogs from the PubChem database. We identified five best inhibitors with strong affinities, stable interactions, and also with reliable drug-like properties. Hence, these leads might be used as the most effective inhibitors of modeled protein. The outcome of the present work of virtual screening of putative gene targets might facilitate design of potential drugs for better treatment against brucellosis. PMID:25834405

  8. A genome-wide screen for regulators of TORC1 in response to amino acid starvation reveals a conserved Npr2/3 complex.

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    Taavi K Neklesa

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available TORC1 is a central regulator of cell growth in response to amino acid availability, yet little is known about how it is regulated. Here, we performed a reverse genetic screen in yeast for genes necessary to inactivate TORC1. The screen consisted of monitoring the expression of a TORC1 sensitive GFP-based transcriptional reporter in all yeast deletion strains using flow cytometry. We find that in response to amino acid starvation, but not to carbon starvation or rapamycin treatment, cells lacking NPR2 and NPR3 fail to fully (1 activate transcription factors Gln3/Gat1, (2 dephosphorylate TORC1 effector Npr1, and (3 repress ribosomal protein gene expression. Both mutants show proliferation defects only in media containing a low quality nitrogen source, such as proline or ammonia, whereas no defects are evident when cells are grown in the presence of glutamine or peptone mixture. Proliferation defects in npr2Delta and npr3Delta cells can be completely rescued by artificially inhibiting TORC1 by rapamycin, demonstrating that overactive TORC1 in both strains prevents their ability to adapt to an environment containing a low quality nitrogen source. A biochemical purification of each demonstrates that Npr2 and Npr3 form a heterodimer, and this interaction is evolutionarily conserved since the human homologs of NPR2 and NPR3 (NPRL2 and NPRL3, respectively also co-immunoprecipitate. We conclude that, in yeast, the Npr2/3 complex mediates an amino acid starvation signal to TORC1.

  9. Genome-wide Screening of Regulators of Catalase Expression: ROLE OF A TRANSCRIPTION COMPLEX AND HISTONE AND tRNA MODIFICATION COMPLEXES ON ADAPTATION TO STRESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Patricia; Encinar Del Dedo, Javier; Ayté, José; Hidalgo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    In response to environmental cues, the mitogen-activated protein kinase Sty1-driven signaling cascade activates hundreds of genes to induce a robust anti-stress cellular response in fission yeast. Thus, upon stress imposition Sty1 transiently accumulates in the nucleus where it up-regulates transcription through the Atf1 transcription factor. Several regulators of transcription and translation have been identified as important to mount an integral response to oxidative stress, such as the Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyl transferase or Elongator complexes, respectively. With the aim of identifying new regulators of this massive gene expression program, we have used a GFP-based protein reporter and screened a fission yeast deletion collection using flow cytometry. We find that the levels of catalase fused to GFP, both before and after a threat of peroxides, are altered in hundreds of strains lacking components of chromatin modifiers, transcription complexes, and modulators of translation. Thus, the transcription elongation complex Paf1, the histone methylase Set1-COMPASS, and the translation-related Trm112 dimers are all involved in full expression of Ctt1-GFP and in wild-type tolerance to peroxides.

  10. Functional genomics down under: RNAi screening in the Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Daniel W; Gould, Cathryn M; Handoko, Yanny; Simpson, Kaylene J

    2014-05-01

    The Victorian Centre for Functional Genomics (VCFG) is an RNAi screening facility housed at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne, Australia. The Peter Mac is Australia's largest dedicated Cancer Research Institute, home to a team of over 520 scientists that focus on understanding the genetic risk of cancer, the molecular events regulating cancer growth and dissemination and improving detection through new diagnostic tools (www.petermac.org). Peter Mac is a well recognised technology leader and established the VCFG with a view to enabling researchers Australia and New Zealand-wide access to cutting edge functional genomics technology, infrastructure and expertise. This review documents the technology platforms operated within the VCFG and provides insight into the workflows and analysis pipelines currently in operation.

  11. RNAi screening reveals a large signaling network controlling the Golgi apparatus in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Joanne; Goh, Germaine; Racine, Victor; Ng, Susanne; Kumar, Pankaj; Bard, Frederic

    2012-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus has many important physiological functions, including sorting of secretory cargo and biosynthesis of complex glycans. These functions depend on the intricate and compartmentalized organization of the Golgi apparatus. To investigate the mechanisms that regulate Golgi architecture, we developed a quantitative morphological assay using three different Golgi compartment markers and quantitative image analysis, and performed a kinome- and phosphatome-wide RNAi screen in HeLa cells. Depletion of 159 signaling genes, nearly 20% of genes assayed, induced strong and varied perturbations in Golgi morphology. Using bioinformatics data, a large regulatory network could be constructed. Specific subnetworks are involved in phosphoinositides regulation, acto-myosin dynamics and mitogen activated protein kinase signaling. Most gene depletion also affected Golgi functions, in particular glycan biosynthesis, suggesting that signaling cascades can control glycosylation directly at the Golgi level. Our results provide a genetic overview of the signaling pathways that control the Golgi apparatus in human cells.

  12. A genome-wide screen identifies a single β-defensin gene cluster in the chicken: implications for the origin and evolution of mammalian defensins

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    Xiao Yanjing

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Defensins comprise a large family of cationic antimicrobial peptides that are characterized by the presence of a conserved cysteine-rich defensin motif. Based on the spacing pattern of cysteines, these defensins are broadly divided into five groups, namely plant, invertebrate, α-, β-, and θ-defensins, with the last three groups being mostly found in mammalian species. However, the evolutionary relationships among these five groups of defensins remain controversial. Results Following a comprehensive screen, here we report that the chicken genome encodes a total of 13 different β-defensins but with no other groups of defensins being discovered. These chicken β-defensin genes, designated as Gallinacin 1–13, are clustered densely within a 86-Kb distance on the chromosome 3q3.5-q3.7. The deduced peptides vary from 63 to 104 amino acid residues in length sharing the characteristic defensin motif. Based on the tissue expression pattern, 13 β-defensin genes can be divided into two subgroups with Gallinacin 1–7 being predominantly expressed in bone marrow and the respiratory tract and the remaining genes being restricted to liver and the urogenital tract. Comparative analysis of the defensin clusters among chicken, mouse, and human suggested that vertebrate defensins have evolved from a single β-defensin-like gene, which has undergone rapid duplication, diversification, and translocation in various vertebrate lineages during evolution. Conclusions We conclude that the chicken genome encodes only β-defensin sequences and that all mammalian defensins are evolved from a common β-defensin-like ancestor. The α-defensins arose from β-defensins by gene duplication, which may have occurred after the divergence of mammals from other vertebrates, and θ-defensins have arisen from α-defensins specific to the primate lineage. Further analysis of these defensins in different vertebrate lineages will shed light on the mechanisms of

  13. RNAi screen in Drosophila cells reveals the involvement of the Tom complex in Chlamydia infection.

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    Isabelle Derré

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia spp. are intracellular obligate bacterial pathogens that infect a wide range of host cells. Here, we show that C. caviae enters, replicates, and performs a complete developmental cycle in Drosophila SL2 cells. Using this model system, we have performed a genome-wide RNA interference screen and identified 54 factors that, when depleted, inhibit C. caviae infection. By testing the effect of each candidate's knock down on L. monocytogenes infection, we have identified 31 candidates presumably specific of C. caviae infection. We found factors expected to have an effect on Chlamydia infection, such as heparansulfate glycosaminoglycans and actin and microtubule remodeling factors. We also identified factors that were not previously described as involved in Chlamydia infection. For instance, we identified members of the Tim-Tom complex, a multiprotein complex involved in the recognition and import of nuclear-encoded proteins to the mitochondria, as required for C. caviae infection of Drosophila cells. Finally, we confirmed that depletion of either Tom40 or Tom22 also reduced C. caviae infection in mammalian cells. However, C. trachomatis infection was not affected, suggesting that the mechanism involved is C. caviae specific.

  14. Limited agreement of independent RNAi screens for virus-required host genes owes more to false-negative than false-positive factors.

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    Linhui Hao

    Full Text Available Systematic, genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi analysis is a powerful approach to identify gene functions that support or modulate selected biological processes. An emerging challenge shared with some other genome-wide approaches is that independent RNAi studies often show limited agreement in their lists of implicated genes. To better understand this, we analyzed four genome-wide RNAi studies that identified host genes involved in influenza virus replication. These studies collectively identified and validated the roles of 614 cell genes, but pair-wise overlap among the four gene lists was only 3% to 15% (average 6.7%. However, a number of functional categories were overrepresented in multiple studies. The pair-wise overlap of these enriched-category lists was high, ∼19%, implying more agreement among studies than apparent at the gene level. Probing this further, we found that the gene lists implicated by independent studies were highly connected in interacting networks by independent functional measures such as protein-protein interactions, at rates significantly higher than predicted by chance. We also developed a general, model-based approach to gauge the effects of false-positive and false-negative factors and to estimate, from a limited number of studies, the total number of genes involved in a process. For influenza virus replication, this novel statistical approach estimates the total number of cell genes involved to be ∼2,800. This and multiple other aspects of our experimental and computational results imply that, when following good quality control practices, the low overlap between studies is primarily due to false negatives rather than false-positive gene identifications. These results and methods have implications for and applications to multiple forms of genome-wide analysis.

  15. RNAi screen identifies Jarid1b as a major regulator of mouse HSC activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellot, Sonia; Hope, Kristin J.; Chagraoui, Jalila; Sauvageau, Martin; Deneault, Éric; MacRae, Tara; Mayotte, Nadine; Wilhelm, Brian T.; Landry, Josette R.; Ting, Stephen B.; Krosl, Jana; Humphries, Keith; Thompson, Alexander; Sauvageau, Guy

    2017-01-01

    Histone methylation is a dynamic and reversible process proposed to directly impact on stem cell fate. The Jumonji (JmjC) domain–containing family of demethylases comprises 27 members that target mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysine residues of histone (or nonhistone) proteins. To evaluate their role in regulation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) behavior, we performed an in vivo RNAi-based functional screen and demonstrated that Jarid1b and Jhdm1f play opposing roles in regulation of HSC activity. Decrease in Jarid1b levels correlated with an in vitro expansion of HSCs with preserved long-term in vivo lymphomyeloid differentiation potential. Through RNA sequencing analysis, Jarid1b knockdown was associated with increased expression levels of several HSC regulators (Hoxa7, Hoxa9, Hoxa10, Hes1, Gata2) and reduced levels of differentiation-associated genes. shRNA against Jhdmlf, in contrast, impaired hematopoietic reconstitution of bone marrow cells. Together, our studies identified Jarid1b as a negative regulator of HSC activity and Jhdmlf as a positive regulator of HSC activity. PMID:23777767

  16. In vivo RNAi screen reveals neddylation genes as novel regulators of Hedgehog signaling.

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    Juan Du

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling is highly conserved in all metazoan animals and plays critical roles in many developmental processes. Dysregulation of the Hh signaling cascade has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer. Although key components of the Hh pathway have been identified, significant gaps remain in our understanding of the regulation of individual Hh signaling molecules. Here, we report the identification of novel regulators of the Hh pathway, obtained from an in vivo RNA interference (RNAi screen in Drosophila. By selectively targeting critical genes functioning in post-translational modification systems utilizing ubiquitin (Ub and Ub-like proteins, we identify two novel genes (dUba3 and dUbc12 that negatively regulate Hh signaling activity. We provide in vivo and in vitro evidence illustrating that dUba3 and dUbc12 are essential components of the neddylation pathway; they function in an enzyme cascade to conjugate the ubiquitin-like NEDD8 modifier to Cullin proteins. Neddylation activates the Cullin-containing ubiquitin ligase complex, which in turn promotes the degradation of Cubitus interruptus (Ci, the downstream transcription factor of the Hh pathway. Our study reveals a conserved molecular mechanism of the neddylation pathway in Drosophila and sheds light on the complex post-translational regulations in Hh signaling.

  17. Using Multiple Phenotype Assays and Epistasis Testing to Enhance the Reliability of RNAi Screening and Identify Regulators of Muscle Protein Degradation

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    Nathaniel J. Szewczyk

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available RNAi is a convenient, widely used tool for screening for genes of interest. We have recently used this technology to screen roughly 750 candidate genes, in C. elegans, for potential roles in regulating muscle protein degradation in vivo. To maximize confidence and assess reproducibility, we have only used previously validated RNAi constructs and have included time courses and replicates. To maximize mechanistic understanding, we have examined multiple sub-cellular phenotypes in multiple compartments in muscle. We have also tested knockdowns of putative regulators of degradation in the context of mutations or drugs that were previously shown to inhibit protein degradation by diverse mechanisms. Here we discuss how assaying multiple phenotypes, multiplexing RNAi screens with use of mutations and drugs, and use of bioinformatics can provide more data on rates of potential false positives and negatives as well as more mechanistic insight than simple RNAi screening.

  18. A genetic screen for components of the mammalian RNA interference pathway in Bloom-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Genetic screens performed in model organisms have helped identify key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Recessive genetic screens have recently become feasible through the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that are Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm) deficient. Here, we developed and performed a recessive genetic screen to identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway in Blm-deficient ES cells. Genome-wide mutagenesis using a retroviral gene trap strategy resulted in the ...

  19. A genome-wide siRNA screen for regulators of tumor suppressor p53 activity in human non-small lung cancer cells identifies components of the RNA splicing machinery as targets for anticancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebring-van Olst, Ellen; Blijlevens, Maxime; de Menezes, Renee X; van der Meulen-Muileman, Ida H; Smit, Egbert F; van Beusechem, Victor W

    2017-03-13

    Reinstating wild-type tumor suppressor p53 activity could be a valuable option for the treatment of cancer. To contribute to development of new treatment options for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), we performed genome-wide siRNA screens for determinants of p53 activity in NSCLC cells. We identified many genes not previously known to be involved in regulating p53 activity. Silencing p53 pathway inhibitor genes was associated with loss of cell viability. The largest functional gene cluster influencing p53 activity was mRNA splicing. Prominent p53 activation was observed upon silencing of specific spliceosome components, rather than by general inhibition of the spliceosome. Ten genes were validated as inhibitors of p53 activity in multiple NSCLC cell lines: genes encoding the Ras-pathway activator SOS1, the zinc finger protein TSHZ3, the mitochondrial membrane protein COX16 and the spliceosome components SNRPD3, SF3A3, SF3B1, SF3B6, XAB2, CWC22 and HNRNPL. Silencing these genes generally increased p53 levels, with distinct effects on CDKN1A expression, induction of cell cycle arrest and cell death. Silencing spliceosome components was associated with alternative splicing of MDM4 mRNA, which could contribute to activation of p53. In addition, silencing splice factors was particularly effective in killing NSCLC cells, albeit in a p53-independent manner. Interestingly, silencing SNRPD3 and SF3A3 exerted much stronger cytotoxicity to NSCLC cells than to lung fibroblasts, suggesting that these genes could represent useful therapeutic targets. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Genome-wide analysis correlates Ayurveda Prakriti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, Periyasamy; Nizamuddin, Sheikh; Sharath, Anugula; Jyothi, Vuskamalla; Rotti, Harish; Raval, Ritu; Nayak, Jayakrishna; Bhat, Balakrishna K; Prasanna, B V; Shintre, Pooja; Sule, Mayura; Joshi, Kalpana S; Dedge, Amrish P; Bharadwaj, Ramachandra; Gangadharan, G G; Nair, Sreekumaran; Gopinath, Puthiya M; Patwardhan, Bhushan; Kondaiah, Paturu; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Valiathan, Marthanda Varma Sankaran; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy

    2015-10-29

    The practice of Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India, is based on the concept of three major constitutional types (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) defined as "Prakriti". To the best of our knowledge, no study has convincingly correlated genomic variations with the classification of Prakriti. In the present study, we performed genome-wide SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) analysis (Affymetrix, 6.0) of 262 well-classified male individuals (after screening 3416 subjects) belonging to three Prakritis. We found 52 SNPs (p ≤ 1 × 10(-5)) were significantly different between Prakritis, without any confounding effect of stratification, after 10(6) permutations. Principal component analysis (PCA) of these SNPs classified 262 individuals into their respective groups (Vata, Pitta and Kapha) irrespective of their ancestry, which represent its power in categorization. We further validated our finding with 297 Indian population samples with known ancestry. Subsequently, we found that PGM1 correlates with phenotype of Pitta as described in the ancient text of Caraka Samhita, suggesting that the phenotypic classification of India's traditional medicine has a genetic basis; and its Prakriti-based practice in vogue for many centuries resonates with personalized medicine.

  1. Genome-wide dissection of the quorum sensing signalling pathway in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mony, Binny M; MacGregor, Paula; Ivens, Alasdair; Rojas, Federico; Cowton, Andrew; Young, Julie; Horn, David; Matthews, Keith

    2014-01-30

    The protozoan parasites Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause important human and livestock diseases in sub-Saharan Africa. In mammalian blood, two developmental forms of the parasite exist: proliferative 'slender' forms and arrested 'stumpy' forms that are responsible for transmission to tsetse flies. The slender to stumpy differentiation is a density-dependent response that resembles quorum sensing in microbial systems and is crucial for the parasite life cycle, ensuring both infection chronicity and disease transmission. This response is triggered by an elusive 'stumpy induction factor' (SIF) whose intracellular signalling pathway is also uncharacterized. Laboratory-adapted (monomorphic) trypanosome strains respond inefficiently to SIF but can generate forms with stumpy characteristics when exposed to cell-permeable cAMP and AMP analogues. Exploiting this, we have used a genome-wide RNA interference library screen to identify the signalling components driving stumpy formation. In separate screens, monomorphic parasites were exposed to 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-cAMP (pCPT-cAMP) or 8-pCPT-2'-O-methyl-5'-AMP to select cells that were unresponsive to these signals and hence remained proliferative. Genome-wide Ion Torrent based RNAi target sequencing identified cohorts of genes implicated in each step of the signalling pathway, from purine metabolism, through signal transducers (kinases, phosphatases) to gene expression regulators. Genes at each step were independently validated in cells naturally capable of stumpy formation, confirming their role in density sensing in vivo. The putative RNA-binding protein, RBP7, was required for normal quorum sensing and promoted cell-cycle arrest and transmission competence when overexpressed. This study reveals that quorum sensing signalling in trypanosomes shares similarities to fundamental quiescence pathways in eukaryotic cells, its components providing targets for quorum-sensing interference-based therapeutics.

  2. An RNAi Screen for Genes Involved in Nanoscale Protrusion Formation on Corneal Lens in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Ryunosuke; Sato, Chiaki; Yamahama, Yumi; Kubo, Hideo; Hariyama, Takahiko; Kimura, Ken-Ichi

    2016-12-01

    The "moth-eye" structure, which is observed on the surface of corneal lens in several insects, supports anti-reflective and self-cleaning functions due to nanoscale protrusions known as corneal nipples. Although the morphology and function of the "moth-eye" structure, are relatively well studied, the mechanism of protrusion formation from cell-secreted substances is unknown. In Drosophila melanogaster, a compound eye consists of approximately 800 facets, the surface of which is formed by the corneal lens with nanoscale protrusions. In the present study, we sought to identify genes involved in "moth-eye" structure, formation in order to elucidate the developmental mechanism of the protrusions in Drosophila. We re-examined the aberrant patterns in classical glossy-eye mutants by scanning electron microscope and classified the aberrant patterns into groups. Next, we screened genes encoding putative structural cuticular proteins and genes involved in cuticular formation using eye specific RNAi silencing methods combined with the Gal4/UAS expression system. We identified 12 of 100 candidate genes, such as cuticular proteins family genes (Cuticular protein 23B and Cuticular protein 49Ah), cuticle secretion-related genes (Syntaxin 1A and Sec61 ββ subunit), ecdysone signaling and biosynthesis-related genes (Ecdysone receptor, Blimp-1, and shroud), and genes involved in cell polarity/cell architecture (Actin 5C, shotgun, armadillo, discs large1, and coracle). Although some of the genes we identified may affect corneal protrusion formation indirectly through general patterning defects in eye formation, these initial findings have encouraged us to more systematically explore the precise mechanisms underlying the formation of nanoscale protrusions in Drosophila.

  3. RNAi Screen Identifies Novel Regulators of RNP Granules in the Caenorhabditis elegans Germ Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Megan P.; Hollis, Angela; Severance, Ashley L.; Karrick, Megan L.; Schisa, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Complexes of RNA and RNA binding proteins form large-scale supramolecular structures under many cellular contexts. In Caenorhabditis elegans, small germ granules are present in the germ line that share characteristics with liquid droplets that undergo phase transitions. In meiotically-arrested oocytes of middle-aged hermaphrodites, the germ granules appear to aggregate or condense into large assemblies of RNA-binding proteins and maternal mRNAs. Prior characterization of the assembly of large-scale RNP structures via candidate approaches has identified a small number of regulators of phase transitions in the C. elegans germ line; however, the assembly, function, and regulation of these large RNP assemblies remain incompletely understood. To identify genes that promote remodeling and assembly of large RNP granules in meiotically-arrested oocytes, we performed a targeted, functional RNAi screen and identified over 300 genes that regulate the assembly of the RNA-binding protein MEX-3 into large granules. Among the most common GO classes are several categories related to RNA biology, as well as novel categories such as cell cortex, ER, and chromosome segregation. We found that arrested oocytes that fail to localize MEX-3 into cortical granules display reduced oocyte quality, consistent with the idea that the larger RNP assemblies promote oocyte quality when fertilization is delayed. Interestingly, a relatively small number of genes overlap with the regulators of germ granule assembly during normal development, or with the regulators of solid RNP granules in cgh-1 oocytes, suggesting fundamental differences in the regulation of RNP granule phase transitions during meiotic arrest. PMID:27317775

  4. Genome-wide screening for components of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro-RNA (miRNA) pathways in the brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens (Hemiptera: Delphacidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H-J; Chen, T; Ma, X-F; Xue, J; Pan, P-L; Zhang, X-C; Cheng, J-A; Zhang, C-X

    2013-12-01

    The brown planthopper (BPH), Nilaparvata lugens, is a major rice pest in Asia, and accumulated evidence indicates that this species is susceptible to RNA interference (RNAi); however, the mechanism underlying RNAi and parental RNAi has not yet been determined. We comprehensively investigated the repertoire of core genes involved in small interfering RNA (siRNA) and micro-RNA (miRNA) pathways in the BPH by comparing its newly assembled transcriptome and genome with those of Drosophila melanogaster, Tribolium castaneum and Caenorhabditis elegans. Our analysis showed that the BPH possesses one drosha and two Dicer (dcr) genes, three dsRNA-binding motif protein genes, two Argonaute (ago) genes, two Eri-1-like genes (eri-1), and a Sid-1-like gene (sid-1). Additionally, we report for first time that parental RNAi might occur in this species, and siRNA pathway and Sid-1 were required for high efficiency of systemic RNAi triggered by exogenous dsRNA. Furthermore, our results also demonstrated that the miRNA pathway was involved in BPH metamorphosis as depletion of the ago1 or dcr1 gene severely impaired ecdysis. The BPH might be a good model system to study the molecular mechanism of systemic RNAi in hemimetabolous insects, and RNAi has potential to be developed to control this pest in agricultural settings. © 2013 Royal Entomological Society.

  5. Regulators of Trypanosoma brucei cell cycle progression and differentiation identified using a kinome-wide RNAi screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel G Jones

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The African trypanosome, Trypanosoma brucei, maintains an integral link between cell cycle regulation and differentiation during its intricate life cycle. Whilst extensive changes in phosphorylation have been documented between the mammalian bloodstream form and the insect procyclic form, relatively little is known about the parasite's protein kinases (PKs involved in the control of cellular proliferation and differentiation. To address this, a T. brucei kinome-wide RNAi cell line library was generated, allowing independent inducible knockdown of each of the parasite's 190 predicted protein kinases. Screening of this library using a cell viability assay identified ≥42 PKs that are required for normal bloodstream form proliferation in culture. A secondary screen identified 24 PKs whose RNAi-mediated depletion resulted in a variety of cell cycle defects including in G1/S, kinetoplast replication/segregation, mitosis and cytokinesis, 15 of which are novel cell cycle regulators. A further screen identified for the first time two PKs, named repressor of differentiation kinase (RDK1 and RDK2, depletion of which promoted bloodstream to procyclic form differentiation. RDK1 is a membrane-associated STE11-like PK, whilst RDK2 is a NEK PK that is essential for parasite proliferation. RDK1 acts in conjunction with the PTP1/PIP39 phosphatase cascade to block uncontrolled bloodstream to procyclic form differentiation, whilst RDK2 is a PK whose depletion efficiently induces differentiation in the absence of known triggers. Thus, the RNAi kinome library provides a valuable asset for functional analysis of cell signalling pathways in African trypanosomes as well as drug target identification and validation.

  6. Investigating ER-Associated Degradation with RNAi Screening - and Searching for Model Proteins to Do It with

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Njal Winther

    is a sophisticated pathway that recognizes misfolded proteins and targets them for degradation by the 26S proteasome residing in the cytosol. More than 60 diseases including Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease and Parkinson’s disease have been linked to the ERAD pathway underscoring its crucial role...... for cellular homeostasis. The aim of this thesis has been to gain insight into ERAD. The experimental approach was RNAi screening, which is a fast and efficient method for initial evaluation of a large pool of genes. Since relatively few proteins routinely are used as ERAD substrates, the first goal...

  7. A primer on using pooled shRNA libraries for functional genomic screens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang Hu; Ji Luo

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of RNA interference (RNAi) has revolutionized genetic analysis in mammalian cells.Loss-of-function RNAi screens enable rapid,functional annotation of the genome.Of the various RNAi approaches,pooled shRNA libraries have received considerable attention because of their versatility.A number of genome-wide shRNA libraries have been constructed against the human and mouse genomes,and these libraries can be readily applied to a variety of screens to interrogate the function of human and mouse genes in an unbiased fashion.We provide an introduction to the technical aspects of using pooled shRNA libraries for genetic screens.

  8. Inbreeding in genome-wide selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daetwyler, H.D.; Villanueva, B.; Bijma, P.; Woolliams, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Traditional selection methods, such as sib and best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) selection, which increased genetic gain by increasing accuracy of evaluation have also led to an increased rate of inbreeding per generation (¿FG). This is not necessarily the case with genome-wide selection, which

  9. Genome-wide identification of phospho-regulators of Wnt signaling in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Sharan; Pradhan-Sundd, Tirthadipa; Verheyen, Esther M

    2015-04-15

    Evolutionarily conserved intercellular signaling pathways regulate embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis in metazoans. The precise control of the state and amplitude of signaling pathways is achieved in part through the kinase- and phosphatase-mediated reversible phosphorylation of proteins. In this study, we performed a genome-wide in vivo RNAi screen for kinases and phosphatases that regulate the Wnt pathway under physiological conditions in the Drosophila wing disc. Our analyses have identified 54 high-confidence kinases and phosphatases capable of modulating the Wnt pathway, including 22 novel regulators. These candidates were also assayed for a role in the Notch pathway, and numerous phospho-regulators were identified. Additionally, each regulator of the Wnt pathway was evaluated in the wing disc for its ability to affect the mechanistically similar Hedgehog pathway. We identified 29 dual regulators that have the same effect on the Wnt and Hedgehog pathways. As proof of principle, we established that Cdc37 and Gilgamesh/CK1γ inhibit and promote signaling, respectively, by functioning at analogous levels of these pathways in both Drosophila and mammalian cells. The Wnt and Hedgehog pathways function in tandem in multiple developmental contexts, and the identification of several shared phospho-regulators serve as potential nodes of control under conditions of aberrant signaling and disease.

  10. Genome-wide association study of relative telomere length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Jennifer; Kraft, Peter; Chasman, Daniel I; Savage, Sharon A; Mirabello, Lisa; Berndt, Sonja I; Weissfeld, Joel L; Han, Jiali; Hayes, Richard B; Chanock, Stephen J; Hunter, David J; De Vivo, Immaculata

    2011-05-10

    Telomere function is essential to maintaining the physical integrity of linear chromosomes and healthy human aging. The probability of forming proper telomere structures depends on the length of the telomeric DNA tract. We attempted to identify common genetic variants associated with log relative telomere length using genome-wide genotyping data on 3,554 individuals from the Nurses' Health Study and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial that took part in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility initiative for breast and prostate cancer. After genotyping 64 independent SNPs selected for replication in additional Nurses' Health Study and Women's Genome Health Study participants, we did not identify genome-wide significant loci; however, we replicated the inverse association of log relative telomere length with the minor allele variant [C] of rs16847897 at the TERC locus (per allele β = -0.03, P = 0.003) identified by a previous genome-wide association study. We did not find evidence for an association with variants at the OBFC1 locus or other loci reported to be associated with telomere length. With this sample size we had >80% power to detect β estimates as small as ±0.10 for SNPs with minor allele frequencies of ≥0.15 at genome-wide significance. However, power is greatly reduced for β estimates smaller than ±0.10, such as those for variants at the TERC locus. In general, common genetic variants associated with telomere length homeostasis have been difficult to detect. Potential biological and technical issues are discussed.

  11. Genome-wide association study of relative telomere length.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Prescott

    Full Text Available Telomere function is essential to maintaining the physical integrity of linear chromosomes and healthy human aging. The probability of forming proper telomere structures depends on the length of the telomeric DNA tract. We attempted to identify common genetic variants associated with log relative telomere length using genome-wide genotyping data on 3,554 individuals from the Nurses' Health Study and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial that took part in the National Cancer Institute Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility initiative for breast and prostate cancer. After genotyping 64 independent SNPs selected for replication in additional Nurses' Health Study and Women's Genome Health Study participants, we did not identify genome-wide significant loci; however, we replicated the inverse association of log relative telomere length with the minor allele variant [C] of rs16847897 at the TERC locus (per allele β = -0.03, P = 0.003 identified by a previous genome-wide association study. We did not find evidence for an association with variants at the OBFC1 locus or other loci reported to be associated with telomere length. With this sample size we had >80% power to detect β estimates as small as ±0.10 for SNPs with minor allele frequencies of ≥0.15 at genome-wide significance. However, power is greatly reduced for β estimates smaller than ±0.10, such as those for variants at the TERC locus. In general, common genetic variants associated with telomere length homeostasis have been difficult to detect. Potential biological and technical issues are discussed.

  12. Comparative genomics reveals two novel RNAi factors in Trypanosoma brucei and provides insight into the core machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca L Barnes

    Full Text Available The introduction ten years ago of RNA interference (RNAi as a tool for molecular exploration in Trypanosoma brucei has led to a surge in our understanding of the pathogenesis and biology of this human parasite. In particular, a genome-wide RNAi screen has recently been combined with next-generation Illumina sequencing to expose catalogues of genes associated with loss of fitness in distinct developmental stages. At present, this technology is restricted to RNAi-positive protozoan parasites, which excludes T. cruzi, Leishmania major, and Plasmodium falciparum. Therefore, elucidating the mechanism of RNAi and identifying the essential components of the pathway is fundamental for improving RNAi efficiency in T. brucei and for transferring the RNAi tool to RNAi-deficient pathogens. Here we used comparative genomics of RNAi-positive and -negative trypanosomatid protozoans to identify the repertoire of factors in T. brucei. In addition to the previously characterized Argonaute 1 (AGO1 protein and the cytoplasmic and nuclear Dicers, TbDCL1 and TbDCL2, respectively, we identified the RNA Interference Factors 4 and 5 (TbRIF4 and TbRIF5. TbRIF4 is a 3'-5' exonuclease of the DnaQ superfamily and plays a critical role in the conversion of duplex siRNAs to the single-stranded form, thus generating a TbAGO1-siRNA complex required for target-specific cleavage. TbRIF5 is essential for cytoplasmic RNAi and appears to act as a TbDCL1 cofactor. The availability of the core RNAi machinery in T. brucei provides a platform to gain mechanistic insights in this ancient eukaryote and to identify the minimal set of components required to reconstitute RNAi in RNAi-deficient parasites.

  13. A Systematic Phenotypic Screen of F-box Genes Through a Tissue-specific RNAi-based Approach in Drosophila

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen Dui; Wei Lu; Jun Ma; Renjie Jiao

    2012-01-01

    F-box proteins are components of the SCF (SkpA-Cullin 1-F-box) E3 ligase complexes,acting as the specificity-determinants in targeting substrate proteins for ubiquitination and degradation.In humans,at least 22 out of 75 F-box proteins have experimentally documented substrates,whereas in Drosophila 12 F-box proteins have been characterized with known substrates.To systematically investigate the genetic and molecular functions of F-box proteins in Drosophila,we performed a survey of the literature and databases.We identified 45 Drosophila genes that encode proteins containing at least one F-box domain.We collected publically available RNAi lines against these genes and used them in a tissue-specific RNAi-based phenotypic screen.Here,we present our systematic phenotypic dataset from the eye,the wing and the notum.This dataset is the first of its kind and represents a useful resource for future studies of the molecular and genetic functions of F-box genes in Drosophila.Our results show that,as expected,F-box genes in Drosophila have regulatory roles in a diverse array of processes including cell proliferation,cell growth,signal transduction,and cellular and animal survival.

  14. A global in vivo Drosophila RNAi screen identifies a key role of ceramide phosphoethanolamine for glial ensheathment of axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniket Ghosh

    Full Text Available Glia are of vital importance for all complex nervous system. One of the many functions of glia is to insulate and provide trophic and metabolic support to axons. Here, using glial-specific RNAi knockdown in Drosophila, we silenced 6930 conserved genes in adult flies to identify essential genes and pathways. Among our screening hits, metabolic processes were highly represented, and genes involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolic pathways appeared to be essential in glia. One critical pathway identified was de novo ceramide synthesis. Glial knockdown of lace, a subunit of the serine palmitoyltransferase associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies in humans, resulted in ensheathment defects of peripheral nerves in Drosophila. A genetic dissection study combined with shotgun high-resolution mass spectrometry of lipids showed that levels of ceramide phosphoethanolamine are crucial for axonal ensheathment by glia. A detailed morphological and functional analysis demonstrated that the depletion of ceramide phosphoethanolamine resulted in axonal defasciculation, slowed spike propagation, and failure of wrapping glia to enwrap peripheral axons. Supplementing sphingosine into the diet rescued the neuropathy in flies. Thus, our RNAi study in Drosophila identifies a key role of ceramide phosphoethanolamine in wrapping of axons by glia.

  15. ScreenBEAM: a novel meta-analysis algorithm for functional genomics screens via Bayesian hierarchical modeling | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Functional genomics (FG) screens, using RNAi or CRISPR technology, have become a standard tool for systematic, genome-wide loss-of-function studies for therapeutic target discovery. As in many large-scale assays, however, off-target effects, variable reagents' potency and experimental noise must be accounted for appropriately control for false positives.

  16. Genome-wide approaches to understanding human ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaeberlein Matt

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of genomic technologies in biogerontology has the potential to greatly enhance our understanding of human ageing. High-throughput screens for alleles correlated with survival in long-lived people have uncovered novel genes involved in age-associated disease. Genome-wide longevity studies in simple eukaryotes are identifying evolutionarily conserved pathways that determine longevity. It is hoped that validation of these 'public' aspects of ageing in mice, along with analyses of variation in candidate human ageing genes, will provide targets for future interventions to slow the ageing process and retard the onset of age-associated pathologies.

  17. Second-generation sequencing supply an effective way to screen RNAi targets in large scale for potential application in pest insect control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yubing; Zhang, Hao; Li, Haichao; Miao, Xuexia

    2011-04-11

    The key of RNAi approach success for potential insect pest control is mainly dependent on careful target selection and a convenient delivery system. We adopted second-generation sequencing technology to screen RNAi targets. Illumina's RNA-seq and digital gene expression tag profile (DGE-tag) technologies were used to screen optimal RNAi targets from Ostrinia furnalalis. Total 14690 stage specific genes were obtained which can be considered as potential targets, and 47 were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Ten larval stage specific expression genes were selected for RNAi test. When 50 ng/µl dsRNAs of the genes DS10 and DS28 were directly sprayed on the newly hatched larvae which placed on the filter paper, the larval mortalities were around 40∼50%, while the dsRNAs of ten genes were sprayed on the larvae along with artificial diet, the mortalities reached 73% to 100% at 5 d after treatment. The qRT-PCR analysis verified the correlation between larval mortality and the down-regulation of the target gene expression. Topically applied fluorescent dsRNA confirmed that dsRNA did penetrate the body wall and circulate in the body cavity. It seems likely that the combination of DGE-tag with RNA-seq is a rapid, high-throughput, cost less and an easy way to select the candidate target genes for RNAi. More importantly, it demonstrated that dsRNAs are able to penetrate the integument and cause larval developmental stunt and/or death in a lepidopteron insect. This finding largely broadens the target selection for RNAi from just gut-specific genes to the targets in whole insects and may lead to new strategies for designing RNAi-based technology against insect damage.

  18. Profiling genome-wide DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Wai-Shin; Hsu, Fei-Man; Chen, Pao-Yang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays an important role in regulating gene expression and therefore a broad range of biological processes and diseases. DNA methylation is tissue-specific, dynamic, sequence-context-dependent and trans-generationally heritable, and these complex patterns of methylation highlight the significance of profiling DNA methylation to answer biological questions. In this review, we surveyed major methylation assays, along with comparisons and biological examples, to provide an overview of DNA methylation profiling techniques. The advances in microarray and sequencing technologies make genome-wide profiling possible at a single-nucleotide or even a single-cell resolution. These profiling approaches vary in many aspects, such as DNA input, resolution, genomic region coverage, and bioinformatics analysis, and selecting a feasible method requires knowledge of these methods. We first introduce the biological background of DNA methylation and its pattern in plants, animals and fungi. We present an overview of major experimental approaches to profiling genome-wide DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation and then extend to the single-cell methylome. To evaluate these methods, we outline their strengths and weaknesses and perform comparisons across the different platforms. Due to the increasing need to compute high-throughput epigenomic data, we interrogate the computational pipeline for bisulfite sequencing data and also discuss the concept of identifying differentially methylated regions (DMRs). This review summarizes the experimental and computational concepts for profiling genome-wide DNA methylation, followed by biological examples. Overall, this review provides researchers useful guidance for the selection of a profiling method suited to specific research questions.

  19. Systematic comparison of CRISPR/Cas9 and RNAi screens for essential genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgens, David W; Deans, Richard M; Li, Amy; Bassik, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    We compared the ability of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and CRISPR/Cas9 screens to identify essential genes in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. We found that the precision of the two libraries in detecting essential genes was similar and that combining data from both screens improved performance. Notably, results from the two screens showed little correlation, which can be partially explained by the identification of distinct essential biological processes with each technology.

  20. Systematic comparison of CRISPR-Cas9 and RNAi screens for essential genes

    OpenAIRE

    Morgens, David W; Deans, Richard M.; Li, Amy; Bassik, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    We compare the ability of shRNA and CRISPR/Cas9 screens to identify essential genes in the human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell line K562. We find that the precision of the two libraries in detecting essential genes is similar and that combining data from both screens improves performance. Notably, results from the two screens show little correlation, which can be partially explained by identification of distinct essential biological processes with each technology.

  1. Genome-wide identification of enhancer elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulin, Sarah; Barsi, Julius C; Bocconcelli, Carlo; Smith, Joel

    2016-01-01

    We present a prospective genome-wide regulatory element database for the sea urchin embryo and the modified chromosome capture-related methodology used to create it. The method we developed is termed GRIP-seq for genome-wide regulatory element immunoprecipitation and combines features of chromosome conformation capture, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and paired-end next-generation sequencing with molecular steps that enrich for active cis-regulatory elements associated with basal transcriptional machinery. The first GRIP-seq database, available to the community, comes from S. purpuratus 24 hpf embryos and takes advantage of the extremely well-characterized cis-regulatory elements in this system for validation. In addition, using the GRIP-seq database, we identify and experimentally validate a novel, intronic cis-regulatory element at the onecut locus. We find GRIP-seq signal sensitively identifies active cis-regulatory elements with a high signal-to-noise ratio for both distal and intronic elements. This promising GRIP-seq protocol has the potential to address a rate-limiting step in resolving comprehensive, predictive network models in all systems.

  2. Intelligent Interfaces for Mining Large-Scale RNAi-HCS Image Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chen; Mak, Wayne; Hong, Pengyu; Sepp, Katharine; Perrimon, Norbert

    2007-11-05

    Recently, High-content screening (HCS) has been combined with RNA interference (RNAi) to become an essential image-based high-throughput method for studying genes and biological networks through RNAi-induced cellular phenotype analyses. However, a genome-wide RNAi-HCS screen typically generates tens of thousands of images, most of which remain uncategorized due to the inadequacies of existing HCS image analysis tools. Until now, it still requires highly trained scientists to browse a prohibitively large RNAi-HCS image database and produce only a handful of qualitative results regarding cellular morphological phenotypes. For this reason we have developed intelligent interfaces to facilitate the application of the HCS technology in biomedical research. Our new interfaces empower biologists with computational power not only to effectively and efficiently explore large-scale RNAi-HCS image databases, but also to apply their knowledge and experience to interactive mining of cellular phenotypes using Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) with Relevance Feedback (RF) techniques.

  3. 1Click1View: Interactive Visualization Methodology for RNAi Cell-Based Microscopic Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Zwolinski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Technological advancements are constantly increasing the size and complexity of data resulting from large-scale RNA interference screens. This fact has led biologists to ask complex questions, which the existing, fully automated analyses are often not adequate to answer. We present a concept of 1Click1View (1C1V as a methodology for interactive analytic software tools. 1C1V can be applied for two-dimensional visualization of image-based screening data sets from High Content Screening (HCS. Through an easy-to-use interface, one-click, one-view concept, and workflow based architecture, visualization method facilitates the linking of image data with numeric data. Such method utilizes state-of-the-art interactive visualization tools optimized for fast visualization of large scale image data sets. We demonstrate our method on an HCS dataset consisting of multiple cell features from two screening assays.

  4. Project DRIVE: A Compendium of Cancer Dependencies and Synthetic Lethal Relationships Uncovered by Large-Scale, Deep RNAi Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, E Robert; de Weck, Antoine; Schlabach, Michael R; Billy, Eric; Mavrakis, Konstantinos J; Hoffman, Gregory R; Belur, Dhiren; Castelletti, Deborah; Frias, Elizabeth; Gampa, Kalyani; Golji, Javad; Kao, Iris; Li, Li; Megel, Philippe; Perkins, Thomas A; Ramadan, Nadire; Ruddy, David A; Silver, Serena J; Sovath, Sosathya; Stump, Mark; Weber, Odile; Widmer, Roland; Yu, Jianjun; Yu, Kristine; Yue, Yingzi; Abramowski, Dorothee; Ackley, Elizabeth; Barrett, Rosemary; Berger, Joel; Bernard, Julie L; Billig, Rebecca; Brachmann, Saskia M; Buxton, Frank; Caothien, Roger; Caushi, Justina X; Chung, Franklin S; Cortés-Cros, Marta; deBeaumont, Rosalie S; Delaunay, Clara; Desplat, Aurore; Duong, William; Dwoske, Donald A; Eldridge, Richard S; Farsidjani, Ali; Feng, Fei; Feng, JiaJia; Flemming, Daisy; Forrester, William; Galli, Giorgio G; Gao, Zhenhai; Gauter, François; Gibaja, Veronica; Haas, Kristy; Hattenberger, Marc; Hood, Tami; Hurov, Kristen E; Jagani, Zainab; Jenal, Mathias; Johnson, Jennifer A; Jones, Michael D; Kapoor, Avnish; Korn, Joshua; Liu, Jilin; Liu, Qiumei; Liu, Shumei; Liu, Yue; Loo, Alice T; Macchi, Kaitlin J; Martin, Typhaine; McAllister, Gregory; Meyer, Amandine; Mollé, Sandra; Pagliarini, Raymond A; Phadke, Tanushree; Repko, Brian; Schouwey, Tanja; Shanahan, Frances; Shen, Qiong; Stamm, Christelle; Stephan, Christine; Stucke, Volker M; Tiedt, Ralph; Varadarajan, Malini; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Vitari, Alberto C; Wallroth, Marco; Weiler, Jan; Zhang, Jing; Mickanin, Craig; Myer, Vic E; Porter, Jeffery A; Lai, Albert; Bitter, Hans; Lees, Emma; Keen, Nicholas; Kauffmann, Audrey; Stegmeier, Frank; Hofmann, Francesco; Schmelzle, Tobias; Sellers, William R

    2017-07-27

    Elucidation of the mutational landscape of human cancer has progressed rapidly and been accompanied by the development of therapeutics targeting mutant oncogenes. However, a comprehensive mapping of cancer dependencies has lagged behind and the discovery of therapeutic targets for counteracting tumor suppressor gene loss is needed. To identify vulnerabilities relevant to specific cancer subtypes, we conducted a large-scale RNAi screen in which viability effects of mRNA knockdown were assessed for 7,837 genes using an average of 20 shRNAs per gene in 398 cancer cell lines. We describe findings of this screen, outlining the classes of cancer dependency genes and their relationships to genetic, expression, and lineage features. In addition, we describe robust gene-interaction networks recapitulating both protein complexes and functional cooperation among complexes and pathways. This dataset along with a web portal is provided to the community to assist in the discovery and translation of new therapeutic approaches for cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Environmental RNAi in herbivorous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivashuta, Sergey; Zhang, Yuanji; Wiggins, B Elizabeth; Ramaseshadri, Partha; Segers, Gerrit C; Johnson, Steven; Meyer, Steve E; Kerstetter, Randy A; McNulty, Brian C; Bolognesi, Renata; Heck, Gregory R

    2015-05-01

    Environmental RNAi (eRNAi) is a sequence-specific regulation of endogenous gene expression in a receptive organism by exogenous double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). Although demonstrated under artificial dietary conditions and via transgenic plant presentations in several herbivorous insects, the magnitude and consequence of exogenous dsRNA uptake and the role of eRNAi remains unknown under natural insect living conditions. Our analysis of coleopteran insects sensitive to eRNAi fed on wild-type plants revealed uptake of plant endogenous long dsRNAs, but not small RNAs. Subsequently, the dsRNAs were processed into 21 nt siRNAs by insects and accumulated in high quantities in insect cells. No accumulation of host plant-derived siRNAs was observed in lepidopteran larvae that are recalcitrant to eRNAi. Stability of ingested dsRNA in coleopteran larval gut followed by uptake and transport from the gut to distal tissues appeared to be enabling factors for eRNAi. Although a relatively large number of distinct coleopteran insect-processed plant-derived siRNAs had sequence complementarity to insect transcripts, the vast majority of the siRNAs were present in relatively low abundance, and RNA-seq analysis did not detect a significant effect of plant-derived siRNAs on insect transcriptome. In summary, we observed a broad genome-wide uptake of plant endogenous dsRNA and subsequent processing of ingested dsRNA into 21 nt siRNAs in eRNAi-sensitive insects under natural feeding conditions. In addition to dsRNA stability in gut lumen and uptake, dosage of siRNAs targeting a given insect transcript is likely an important factor in order to achieve measurable eRNAi-based regulation in eRNAi-competent insects that lack an apparent silencing amplification mechanism.

  6. Genome-wide mapping of DNA strand breaks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Leduc

    Full Text Available Determination of cellular DNA damage has so far been limited to global assessment of genome integrity whereas nucleotide-level mapping has been restricted to specific loci by the use of specific primers. Therefore, only limited DNA sequences can be studied and novel regions of genomic instability can hardly be discovered. Using a well-characterized yeast model, we describe a straightforward strategy to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks without compromising nucleotide-level resolution. This technique, termed "damaged DNA immunoprecipitation" (dDIP, uses immunoprecipitation and the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin end-labeling (TUNEL to capture DNA at break sites. When used in combination with microarray or next-generation sequencing technologies, dDIP will allow researchers to map genome-wide DNA strand breaks as well as other types of DNA damage and to establish a clear profiling of altered genes and/or intergenic sequences in various experimental conditions. This mapping technique could find several applications for instance in the study of aging, genotoxic drug screening, cancer, meiosis, radiation and oxidative DNA damage.

  7. Genome-wide Analysis of Gene Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yun

    cells are capable of regulating their gene expression, so that each cell can only express a particular set of genes yielding limited numbers of proteins with specialized functions. Therefore a rigid control of differential gene expression is necessary for cellular diversity. On the other hand, aberrant...... gene regulation will disrupt the cell’s fundamental processes, which in turn can cause disease. Hence, understanding gene regulation is essential for deciphering the code of life. Along with the development of high throughput sequencing (HTS) technology and the subsequent large-scale data analysis......, genome-wide assays have increased our understanding of gene regulation significantly. This thesis describes the integration and analysis of HTS data across different important aspects of gene regulation. Gene expression can be regulated at different stages when the genetic information is passed from gene...

  8. Genome-wide screening identifies Plasmodium chabaudi-induced modifications of DNA methylation status of Tlr1 and Tlr6 gene promoters in liver, but not spleen, of female C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Quraishy, Saleh; Dkhil, Mohamed A; Abdel-Baki, Abdel Azeem S; Delic, Denis; Santourlidis, Simeon; Wunderlich, Frank

    2013-11-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming of host genes via DNA methylation is increasingly recognized as critical for the outcome of diverse infectious diseases, but information for malaria is not yet available. Here, we investigate the effect of blood-stage malaria of Plasmodium chabaudi on the DNA methylation status of host gene promoters on a genome-wide scale using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation and Nimblegen microarrays containing 2,000 bp oligonucleotide features that were split into -1,500 to -500 bp Ups promoters and -500 to +500 bp Cor promoters, relative to the transcription site, for evaluation of differential DNA methylation. Gene expression was analyzed by Agilent and Affymetrix microarray technology. Challenging of female C57BL/6 mice with 10(6) P. chabaudi-infected erythrocytes resulted in a self-healing outcome of infections with peak parasitemia on day 8 p.i. These infections induced organ-specific modifications of DNA methylation of gene promoters. Among the 17,354 features on Nimblegen arrays, only seven gene promoters were identified to be hypermethylated in the spleen, whereas the liver exhibited 109 hyper- and 67 hypomethylated promoters at peak parasitemia in comparison with non-infected mice. Among the identified genes with differentially methylated Cor-promoters, only the 7 genes Pigr, Ncf1, Klkb1, Emr1, Ndufb11, and Tlr6 in the liver and Apol6 in the spleen were detected to have significantly changed their expression. Remarkably, the Cor promoter of the toll-like receptor Tlr6 became hypomethylated and Tlr6 expression increased by 3.4-fold during infection. Concomitantly, the Ups promoter of the Tlr1 was hypermethylated, but Tlr1 expression also increased by 11.3-fold. TLR6 and TLR1 are known as auxillary receptors to form heterodimers with TLR2 in plasma membranes of macrophages, which recognize different pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), as, e.g., intact 3-acyl and sn-2-lyso-acyl glycosylphosphatidylinositols of P. falciparum

  9. Live imaging RNAi screen reveals genes essential for meiosis in mammalian oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfender, Sybille; Kuznetsov, Vitaliy; Pasternak, Michał; Tischer, Thomas; Santhanam, Balaji; Schuh, Melina

    2015-08-13

    During fertilization, an egg and a sperm fuse to form a new embryo. Eggs develop from oocytes in a process called meiosis. Meiosis in human oocytes is highly error-prone, and defective eggs are the leading cause of pregnancy loss and several genetic disorders such as Down's syndrome. Which genes safeguard accurate progression through meiosis is largely unclear. Here we develop high-content phenotypic screening methods for the systematic identification of mammalian meiotic genes. We targeted 774 genes by RNA interference within follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes to block protein expression from an early stage of oocyte development onwards. We then analysed the function of several genes simultaneously by high-resolution imaging of chromosomes and microtubules in live oocytes and scored each oocyte quantitatively for 50 phenotypes, generating a comprehensive resource of meiotic gene function. The screen generated an unprecedented annotated data set of meiotic progression in 2,241 mammalian oocytes, which allowed us to analyse systematically which defects are linked to abnormal chromosome segregation during meiosis, identifying progression into anaphase with misaligned chromosomes as well as defects in spindle organization as risk factors. This study demonstrates how high-content screens can be performed in oocytes, and allows systematic studies of meiosis in mammals.

  10. New Genes Tied to Endocrine, Metabolic, and Dietary Regulation of Lifespan from a Caenorhabditis elegans Genomic RNAi Screen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Most of our knowledge about the regulation of aging comes from mutants originally isolated for other phenotypes. To ask whether our current view of aging has been affected by selection bias, and to deepen our understanding of known longevity pathways, we screened a genomic Caenorhabditis elegans RNAi library for clones that extend lifespan. We identified 23 new longevity genes affecting signal transduction, the stress response, gene expression, and metabolism and assigned these genes to specific longevity pathways. Our most important findings are (i that dietary restriction extends C. elegans' lifespan by down-regulating expression of key genes, including a gene required for methylation of many macromolecules, (ii that integrin signaling is likely to play a general, evolutionarily conserved role in lifespan regulation, and (iii that specific lipophilic hormones may influence lifespan in a DAF-16/FOXO-dependent fashion. Surprisingly, of the new genes that have conserved sequence domains, only one could not be associated with a known longevity pathway. Thus, our current view of the genetics of aging has probably not been distorted substantially by selection bias.

  11. A genomewide RNAi screen for genes that affect the stability, distribution and function of P granules in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Updike, Dustin L; Strome, Susan

    2009-12-01

    P granules are non-membrane-bound organelles found in the germ-line cytoplasm throughout Caenorhabditis elegans development. Like their "germ granule" counterparts in other animals, P granules are thought to act as determinants of the identity and special properties of germ cells, properties that include the unique ability to give rise to all tissues of future generations of an organism. Therefore, understanding how P granules work is critical to understanding how cellular immortality and totipotency are retained, gained, and lost. Here we report on a genomewide RNAi screen in C. elegans, which identified 173 genes that affect the stability, localization, and function of P granules. Many of these genes fall into specific classes with shared P-granule phenotypes, allowing us to better understand how cellular processes such as protein degradation, translation, splicing, nuclear transport, and mRNA homeostasis converge on P-granule assembly and function. One of the more striking phenotypes is caused by the depletion of CSR-1, an Argonaute associated with an endogenous siRNA pathway that functions in the germ line. We show that CSR-1 and two other endo-siRNA pathway members, the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase EGO-1 and the helicase DRH-3, act to antagonize RNA and P-granule accumulation in the germ line. Our findings strengthen the emerging view that germ granules are involved in numerous aspects of RNA metabolism, including an endo-siRNA pathway in germ cells.

  12. RNAi screens for Rho GTPase regulators of cell shape and YAP/TAZ localisation in triple negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Vargas, Patricia; Cooper, Samuel; Sero, Julia; Bousgouni, Vicky; Arias-Garcia, Mar; Bakal, Chris

    2017-03-01

    In order to metastasise, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) must make dynamic changes in cell shape. The shape of all eukaryotic cells is regulated by Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs), which activate Rho-family GTPases in response to mechanical and informational cues. In contrast, Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) inhibit Rho GTPases. However, which RhoGEFs and RhoGAPS couple TNBC cell shape to changes in their environment is very poorly understood. Moreover, whether the activity of particular RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs become dysregulated as cells evolve the ability to metastasise is not clear. Towards the ultimate goal of identifying RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that are essential for TNBC metastasis, we performed an RNAi screen to isolate RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that contribute to the morphogenesis of the highly metastatic TNBC cell line LM2, and its less-metastatic parental cell line MDA-MB-231. For ~6 million cells from each cell line, we measured 127 different features following the depletion of 142 genes. Using a linear classifier scheme we also describe the morphological heterogeneity of each gene-depleted population.

  13. RNAi screens for Rho GTPase regulators of cell shape and YAP/TAZ localisation in triple negative breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Vargas, Patricia; Cooper, Samuel; Sero, Julia; Bousgouni, Vicky; Arias-Garcia, Mar; Bakal, Chris

    2017-01-01

    In order to metastasise, triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) must make dynamic changes in cell shape. The shape of all eukaryotic cells is regulated by Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors (RhoGEFs), which activate Rho-family GTPases in response to mechanical and informational cues. In contrast, Rho GTPase-activating proteins (RhoGAPs) inhibit Rho GTPases. However, which RhoGEFs and RhoGAPS couple TNBC cell shape to changes in their environment is very poorly understood. Moreover, whether the activity of particular RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs become dysregulated as cells evolve the ability to metastasise is not clear. Towards the ultimate goal of identifying RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that are essential for TNBC metastasis, we performed an RNAi screen to isolate RhoGEFs and RhoGAPs that contribute to the morphogenesis of the highly metastatic TNBC cell line LM2, and its less-metastatic parental cell line MDA-MB-231. For ~6 million cells from each cell line, we measured 127 different features following the depletion of 142 genes. Using a linear classifier scheme we also describe the morphological heterogeneity of each gene-depleted population. PMID:28248929

  14. Multiplex image-based autophagy RNAi screening identifies SMCR8 as ULK1 kinase activity and gene expression regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jennifer; Nayak, Arnab; Schaeffer, Véronique; Starzetz, Tatjana; Kirsch, Achim K; Müller, Stefan; Dikic, Ivan; Mittelbronn, Michel; Behrends, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular recycling and degradation pathway that depends on membrane trafficking. Rab GTPases are central for autophagy but their regulation especially through the activity of Rab GEFs remains largely elusive. We employed a RNAi screen simultaneously monitoring different populations of autophagosomes and identified 34 out of 186 Rab GTPase, GAP and GEF family members as potential autophagy regulators, amongst them SMCR8. SMCR8 uses overlapping binding regions to associate with C9ORF72 or with a C9ORF72-ULK1 kinase complex holo-assembly, which function in maturation and formation of autophagosomes, respectively. While focusing on the role of SMCR8 during autophagy initiation, we found that kinase activity and gene expression of ULK1 are increased upon SMCR8 depletion. The latter phenotype involved association of SMCR8 with the ULK1 gene locus. Global mRNA expression analysis revealed that SMCR8 regulates transcription of several other autophagy genes including WIPI2. Collectively, we established SMCR8 as multifaceted negative autophagy regulator. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23063.001 PMID:28195531

  15. Transcriptome Analysis and Screening for Potential Target Genes for RNAi-Mediated Pest Control of the Beet Armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hang; Jiang, Weihua; Zhang, Zan; Xing, Yanru; Li, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), is a serious pest worldwide that causes significant losses in crops. Unfortunately, genetic resources for the beet armyworm is extremely scarce. To improve these resources we sequenced the transcriptome of S. exigua representing all stages including eggs, 1(st) to 5(th) instar larvae, pupae, male and female adults using the Illumina Solexa platform. We assembled the transcriptome with Trinity that yielded 31,414 contigs. Of these contigs, 18,592 were annotated as protein coding genes by Blast searches against the NCBI nr database. It has been shown that knockdown of important insect genes by dsRNAs or siRNAs is a feasible mechanism to control insect pests. The first key step towards developing an efficient RNAi-mediated pest control technique is to find suitable target genes. To screen for effective target genes in the beet armyworm, we selected nine candidate genes. The sequences of these genes were amplified using the RACE strategy. Then, siRNAs were designed and chemically synthesized. We injected 2 µl siRNA (2 µg/µl) into the 4(th) instar larvae to knock down the respective target genes. The mRNA abundance of target genes decreased to different levels (∼20-94.3%) after injection of siRNAs. Knockdown of eight genes including chitinase7, PGCP, chitinase1, ATPase, tubulin1, arf2, tubulin2 and arf1 caused a significantly high level of mortality compared to the negative control (Ppest control.

  16. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Jayanta; Kanetsky, Peter A; Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna; Schaefer, Franz; Wong, Craig S

    2016-08-01

    The genome-wide association study (GWAS) has become an established scientific method that provides an unbiased screen for genetic loci potentially associated with phenotypes of clinical interest, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). Thus, GWAS provides opportunities to gain new perspectives regarding the genetic architecture of CKD progression by identifying new candidate genes and targets for intervention. As such, it has become an important arm of translational science providing a complementary line of investigation to identify novel therapeutics to treat CKD. In this review, we describe the method and the challenges of performing GWAS in the pediatric CKD population. We also provide an overview of successful GWAS for kidney disease, and we discuss the established pediatric CKD cohorts in North America and Europe that are poised to identify genetic risk variants associated with CKD progression.

  17. Genome-wide association study of serum selenium concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gong, Jian; Hsu, Li; Harrison, Tabitha

    2013-01-01

    Selenium is an essential trace element and circulating selenium concentrations have been associated with a wide range of diseases. Candidate gene studies suggest that circulating selenium concentrations may be impacted by genetic variation; however, no study has comprehensively investigated...... this hypothesis. Therefore, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with serum selenium concentrations in 1203 European descents from two cohorts: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI). We...... tested association between 2,474,333 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and serum selenium concentrations using linear regression models. In the first stage (PLCO) 41 SNPs clustered in 15 regions had p

  18. Transcriptome Analysis and Screening for Potential Target Genes for RNAi-Mediated Pest Control of the Beet Armyworm, Spodoptera exigua.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang Li

    Full Text Available The beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner, is a serious pest worldwide that causes significant losses in crops. Unfortunately, genetic resources for the beet armyworm is extremely scarce. To improve these resources we sequenced the transcriptome of S. exigua representing all stages including eggs, 1(st to 5(th instar larvae, pupae, male and female adults using the Illumina Solexa platform. We assembled the transcriptome with Trinity that yielded 31,414 contigs. Of these contigs, 18,592 were annotated as protein coding genes by Blast searches against the NCBI nr database. It has been shown that knockdown of important insect genes by dsRNAs or siRNAs is a feasible mechanism to control insect pests. The first key step towards developing an efficient RNAi-mediated pest control technique is to find suitable target genes. To screen for effective target genes in the beet armyworm, we selected nine candidate genes. The sequences of these genes were amplified using the RACE strategy. Then, siRNAs were designed and chemically synthesized. We injected 2 µl siRNA (2 µg/µl into the 4(th instar larvae to knock down the respective target genes. The mRNA abundance of target genes decreased to different levels (∼20-94.3% after injection of siRNAs. Knockdown of eight genes including chitinase7, PGCP, chitinase1, ATPase, tubulin1, arf2, tubulin2 and arf1 caused a significantly high level of mortality compared to the negative control (P<0.05. About 80% of the surviving insects in the siRNA-treated group of five genes (PGCP, chitinase1, tubulin1, tubulin2 and helicase showed retarded development. In chitinase1-siRNA and chitinase7-siRNA administered groups, 12.5% survivors exhibited "half-ecdysis". In arf1-siRNA and arf2-siRNA groups, the body color of 15% became black 48 h after injections. In summary, the transcriptome could be a valuable genetic resource for identification of genes in S. exigua and this study provided putative targets for RNAi pest

  19. A kinome RNAi screen identified AMPK as promoting poxvirus entry through the control of actin dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa S Moser

    Full Text Available Poxviruses include medically important human pathogens, yet little is known about the specific cellular factors essential for their replication. To identify genes essential for poxvirus infection, we used high-throughput RNA interference to screen the Drosophila kinome for factors required for vaccinia infection. We identified seven genes including the three subunits of AMPK as promoting vaccinia infection. AMPK not only facilitated infection in insect cells, but also in mammalian cells. Moreover, we found that AMPK is required for macropinocytosis, a major endocytic entry pathway for vaccinia. Furthermore, we show that AMPK contributes to other virus-independent actin-dependent processes including lamellipodia formation and wound healing, independent of the known AMPK activators LKB1 and CaMKK. Therefore, AMPK plays a highly conserved role in poxvirus infection and actin dynamics independent of its role as an energy regulator.

  20. In vivo RNAi screening for the identification of oncogenes and tumor suppressors in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Ying

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy characterized by uncontrolled expansion of immature myeloid cells in the hematopoietic tissues. Alternative splicing and epigenetic regulation are two mechanisms implicated in the pathogenesis of AML. In order to identify the essential...... splicing factors or epigenetic regulators for AML maintenance, we used a pool-based shRNA in vivo screens in a mouse model of human CEBPA mutated AML. Through these approaches, we found the splicing factor RBM25, and the histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 are of functional importance in AML progression....... Characterization of RBM25 indicates that low expression of RBM25 promotes expansion of both murine and human leukemic cells. Mechanistic studies show that RBM25 regulate splicing dysregulation of several crucial genes in AML. In particular, we demonstrate that RBM25 knockdown leads to the accumulation of the anti...

  1. Deciphering Seed Sequence Based Off-Target Effects in a Large-Scale RNAi Reporter Screen for E-Cadherin Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Adams

    Full Text Available Functional RNAi based screening is affected by large numbers of false positive and negative hits due to prevalent sequence based off-target effects. We performed a druggable genome targeting siRNA screen intended to identify novel regulators of E-cadherin (CDH1 expression, a known key player in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT. Analysis of primary screening results indicated a large number of false-positive hits. To address these crucial difficulties we developed an analysis method, SENSORS, which, similar to published methods, is a seed enrichment strategy for analyzing siRNA off-targets in RNAi screens. Using our approach, we were able to demonstrate that accounting for seed based off-target effects stratifies primary screening results and enables the discovery of additional screening hits. While traditional hit detection methods are prone to false positive results which are undetected, we were able to identify false positive hits robustly. Transcription factor MYBL1 was identified as a putative novel target required for CDH1 expression and verified experimentally. No siRNA pool targeting MYBL1 was present in the used siRNA library. Instead, MYBL1 was identified as a putative CDH1 regulating target solely based on the SENSORS off-target score, i.e. as a gene that is a cause for off-target effects down regulating E-cadherin expression.

  2. Genome wide selection in Citrus breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gois, I B; Borém, A; Cristofani-Yaly, M; de Resende, M D V; Azevedo, C F; Bastianel, M; Novelli, V M; Machado, M A

    2016-10-17

    Genome wide selection (GWS) is essential for the genetic improvement of perennial species such as Citrus because of its ability to increase gain per unit time and to enable the efficient selection of characteristics with low heritability. This study assessed GWS efficiency in a population of Citrus and compared it with selection based on phenotypic data. A total of 180 individual trees from a cross between Pera sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) and Murcott tangor (Citrus sinensis Osbeck x Citrus reticulata Blanco) were evaluated for 10 characteristics related to fruit quality. The hybrids were genotyped using 5287 DArT_seq(TM) (diversity arrays technology) molecular markers and their effects on phenotypes were predicted using the random regression - best linear unbiased predictor (rr-BLUP) method. The predictive ability, prediction bias, and accuracy of GWS were estimated to verify its effectiveness for phenotype prediction. The proportion of genetic variance explained by the markers was also computed. The heritability of the traits, as determined by markers, was 16-28%. The predictive ability of these markers ranged from 0.53 to 0.64, and the regression coefficients between predicted and observed phenotypes were close to unity. Over 35% of the genetic variance was accounted for by the markers. Accuracy estimates with GWS were lower than those obtained by phenotypic analysis; however, GWS was superior in terms of genetic gain per unit time. Thus, GWS may be useful for Citrus breeding as it can predict phenotypes early and accurately, and reduce the length of the selection cycle. This study demonstrates the feasibility of genomic selection in Citrus.

  3. A whole-genome RNAi screen uncovers a novel role for human potassium channels in cell killing by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Chelsea; Verkerke, Hans P; Theodorescu, Dan; Petri, William A

    2015-09-08

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills human cells resulting in ulceration, inflammation and invasion of the colonic epithelium. We used the cytotoxic properties of ameba to select a genome-wide RNAi library to reveal novel host factors that control susceptibility to amebic killing. We identified 281 candidate susceptibility genes and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ion transporters were significantly enriched among susceptibility genes. Potassium (K(+)) channels were the most common transporter identified. Their importance was further supported by colon biopsy of humans with amebiasis that demonstrated suppressed K(+) channel expression. Inhibition of human K(+) channels by genetic silencing, pharmacologic inhibitors and with excess K(+) protected diverse cell types from E. histolytica-induced death. Contact with E. histolytica parasites triggered K(+) channel activation and K(+) efflux by intestinal epithelial cells, which preceded cell killing. Specific inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels was highly effective in preventing amebic cytotoxicity in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Blockade of K(+) efflux also inhibited caspase-1 activation, IL-1β secretion and pyroptotic death in THP-1 macrophages. We concluded that K(+) channels are host mediators of amebic cytotoxicity in multiple cells types and of inflammasome activation in macrophages.

  4. A genome-wide screen identifies Salmonella Enteritidis lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the HtrA heat shock protein as crucial factors involved in egg white persistence at chicken body temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raspoet, R; Shearer, N; Appia-Ayme, C; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Thompson, A; Van Immerseel, F

    2014-05-01

    Eggs contaminated with Salmonella Enteritidis are an important source of human foodborne Salmonella infections. Salmonella Enteritidis is able to contaminate egg white during formation of the egg within the chicken oviduct, and it has developed strategies to withstand the antimicrobial properties of egg white to survive in this hostile environment. The mechanisms involved in the persistence of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white are likely to be complex. To address this issue, a microarray-based transposon library screen was performed to identify genes necessary for survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white at chicken body temperature. The majority of identified genes belonged to the lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis pathway. Additionally, we provide evidence that the serine protease/heat shock protein (HtrA) appears essential for the survival of Salmonella Enteritidis in egg white at chicken body temperature.

  5. Robustness of genome-wide scanning using archived dried blood spot samples as a DNA source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Børglum Anders D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search to identify disease-susceptible genes requires access to biological material from numerous well-characterized subjects. Archived residual dried blood spot (DBS samples, also known as Guthrie cards, from national newborn screening programs may provide a DNA source for entire populations. Combined with clinical information from medical registries, DBS samples could provide a rich source for productive research. However, the amounts of DNA which can be extracted from these precious samples are minute and may be prohibitive for numerous genotypings. Previously, we demonstrated that DBS DNA can be whole-genome amplified and used for reliable genetic analysis on different platforms, including genome-wide scanning arrays. However, it remains unclear whether this approach is workable on a large sample scale. We examined the robustness of using DBS samples for whole-genome amplification following genome-wide scanning, using arrays from Illumina and Affymetrix. Results This study is based on 4,641 DBS samples from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank, extracted for three separate genome-wide association studies. The amount of amplified DNA was significantly (P Conclusion Our study indicates that archived DBS samples from the Danish Newborn Screening Biobank represent a reliable resource of DNA for whole-genome amplification and subsequent genome-wide association studies. With call-rates equivalent to high quality DNA samples, our results point to new opportunities for using the neonatal biobanks available worldwide in the hunt for genetic components of disease.

  6. Genome-wide analyses of small noncoding RNAs in streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja ePatenge

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococci represent a diverse group of Gram-positive bacteria, which colonize a wide range of hosts among animals and humans. Streptococcal species occur as commensal as well as pathogenic organisms. Many of the pathogenic species can cause severe, invasive infections in their hosts leading to a high morbidity and mortality. The consequence is a tremendous suffering on the part of men and livestock besides the significant financial burden in the agricultural and healthcare sectors. An environmentally stimulated and tightly controlled expression of virulence factor genes is of fundamental importance for streptococcal pathogenicity. Bacterial small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs modulate the expression of genes involved in stress response, sugar metabolism, surface composition, and other properties that are related to bacterial virulence. Even though the regulatory character is shared by this class of RNAs, variation on the molecular level results in a high diversity of functional mechanisms. The knowledge about the role of sRNAs in streptococci is still limited, but in recent years, genome-wide screens for sRNAs have been conducted in an increasing number of species. Bioinformatics prediction approaches have been employed as well as expression analyses by classical array techniques or next generation sequencing. This review will give an overview of whole genome screens for sRNAs in streptococci with a focus on describing the different methods and comparing their outcome considering sRNA conservation among species, functional similarities, and relevance for streptococcal infection.

  7. Genome-wide gene expression profiling and a forward genetic screen show that differential expression of the sodium ion transporter Ena21 contributes to the differential tolerance of Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis to osmotic stress.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Enjalbert, Brice

    2009-04-01

    Candida albicans is more pathogenic than Candida dubliniensis. However, this disparity in virulence is surprising given the high level of sequence conservation and the wide range of phenotypic traits shared by these two species. Increased sensitivity to environmental stresses has been suggested to be a possible contributory factor to the lower virulence of C. dubliniensis. In this study, we investigated, in the first comparison of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by transcriptional profiling, global gene expression in each species when grown under conditions in which the two species exhibit differential stress tolerance. The profiles revealed similar core responses to stresses in both species, but differences in the amplitude of the general transcriptional responses to thermal, salt and oxidative stress. Differences in the regulation of specific stress genes were observed between the two species. In particular, ENA21, encoding a sodium ion transporter, was strongly induced in C. albicans but not in C. dubliniensis. In addition, ENA21 was identified in a forward genetic screen for C. albicans genomic sequences that increase salt tolerance in C. dubliniensis. Introduction of a single copy of CaENA21 was subsequently shown to be sufficient to confer salt tolerance upon C. dubliniensis.

  8. Systematic analysis of off-target effects in an RNAi screen reveals microRNAs affecting sensitivity to TRAIL-induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enright Anton J

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA inhibition by siRNAs is a frequently used approach to identify genes required for specific biological processes. However RNAi screening using siRNAs is hampered by non-specific or off target effects of the siRNAs, making it difficult to separate genuine hits from false positives. It is thought that many of the off-target effects seen in RNAi experiments are due to siRNAs acting as microRNAs (miRNAs, causing a reduction in gene expression of unintended targets via matches to the 6 or 7 nt 'seed' sequence. We have conducted a careful examination of off-target effects during an siRNA screen for novel regulators of the TRAIL apoptosis induction pathway(s. Results We identified 3 hexamers and 3 heptamer seed sequences that appeared multiple times in the top twenty siRNAs in the TRAIL apoptosis screen. Using a novel statistical enrichment approach, we systematically identified a further 17 hexamer and 13 heptamer seed sequences enriched in high scoring siRNAs. The presence of one of these seeds sequences (which could explain 6 of 8 confirmed off-target effects is sufficient to elicit a phenotype. Three of these seed sequences appear in the human miRNAs miR-26a, miR-145 and miR-384. Transfection of mimics of these miRNAs protects several cell types from TRAIL-induced cell death. Conclusions We have demonstrated a role for miR-26a, miR-145 and miR-26a in TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Further these results show that RNAi screening enriches for siRNAs with relevant off-target effects. Some of these effects can be identified by the over-representation of certain seed sequences in high-scoring siRNAs and we demonstrate the usefulness of such systematic analysis of enriched seed sequences.

  9. Genome-wide association study and premature ovarian failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christin-Maitre, S; Tachdjian, G

    2010-05-01

    Premature ovarian failure (POF) is defined as an amenorrhea for more than 4months, associated with elevated gonadotropins, usually higher than 20mIU/ml, occurring in a woman before the age of 40. Some candidate genes have been identified in the past 15years, such as FOXL2, FSHR, BMP15, GDF9, Xfra premutation. However, POF etiology remains unknown in more than 90% of cases. The first strategy to identify candidate gene, apart from studying genes involved in ovarian failure in animal models, relies on the study of X chromosome deletions and X;autosome translocations in patients. The second strategy is based on linkage analysis, the third one on Comparative Genomic Hybridization (CGH) array. The latest strategy relies on Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS). This technique consists in screening single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in patients and controls. So far, three studies have been performed and have identified different loci potentially linked to POF, such as PTHB1 and ADAMTS19. However, replications in independent cohorts need to be performed. GWAS studies on large cohorts of women with POF should find new candidate genes in the near future.

  10. Genome-Wide Association Study of Serum Selenium Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Peters

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element and circulating selenium concentrations have been associated with a wide range of diseases. Candidate gene studies suggest that circulating selenium concentrations may be impacted by genetic variation; however, no study has comprehensively investigated this hypothesis. Therefore, we conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to identify genetic variants associated with serum selenium concentrations in 1203 European descents from two cohorts: the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO Cancer Screening and the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI. We tested association between 2,474,333 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and serum selenium concentrations using linear regression models. In the first stage (PLCO 41 SNPs clustered in 15 regions had p < 1 × 10−5. None of these 41 SNPs reached the significant threshold (p = 0.05/15 regions = 0.003 in the second stage (WHI. Three SNPs had p < 0.05 in the second stage (rs1395479 and rs1506807 in 4q34.3/AGA-NEIL3; and rs891684 in 17q24.3/SLC39A11 and had p between 2.62 × 10−7 and 4.04 × 10−7 in the combined analysis (PLCO + WHI. Additional studies are needed to replicate these findings. Identification of genetic variation that impacts selenium concentrations may contribute to a better understanding of which genes regulate circulating selenium concentrations.

  11. Genome-wide association study of circulating retinol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondul, Alison M; Yu, Kai; Wheeler, William; Zhang, Hong; Weinstein, Stephanie J; Major, Jacqueline M; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Männistö, Satu; Hazra, Aditi; Hsing, Ann W; Jacobs, Kevin B; Eliassen, Heather; Tanaka, Toshiko; Reding, Douglas J; Hendrickson, Sara; Ferrucci, Luigi; Virtamo, Jarmo; Hunter, David J; Chanock, Stephen J; Kraft, Peter; Albanes, Demetrius

    2011-12-01

    Retinol is one of the most biologically active forms of vitamin A and is hypothesized to influence a wide range of human diseases including asthma, cardiovascular disease, infectious diseases and cancer. We conducted a genome-wide association study of 5006 Caucasian individuals drawn from two cohorts of men: the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study and the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial. We identified two independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with circulating retinol levels, which are located near the transthyretin (TTR) and retinol binding protein 4 (RBP4) genes which encode major carrier proteins of retinol: rs1667255 (P =2.30× 10(-17)) and rs10882272 (P =6.04× 10(-12)). We replicated the association with rs10882272 in RBP4 in independent samples from the Nurses' Health Study and the Invecchiare in Chianti Study (InCHIANTI) that included 3792 women and 504 men (P =9.49× 10(-5)), but found no association for retinol with rs1667255 in TTR among women, thus suggesting evidence for gender dimorphism (P-interaction=1.31× 10(-5)). Discovery of common genetic variants associated with serum retinol levels may provide further insight into the contribution of retinol and other vitamin A compounds to the development of cancer and other complex diseases.

  12. Genome-wide studies of telomere biology in budding yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Harari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Telomeres are specialized DNA-protein structures at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres are essential for chromosomal stability and integrity, as they prevent chromosome ends from being recognized as double strand breaks. In rapidly proliferating cells, telomeric DNA is synthesized by the enzyme telomerase, which copies a short template sequence within its own RNA moiety, thus helping to solve the “end-replication problem”, in which information is lost at the ends of chromosomes with each DNA replication cycle. The basic mechanisms of telomere length, structure and function maintenance are conserved among eukaryotes. Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been instrumental in deciphering the basic aspects of telomere biology. In the last decade, technical advances, such as the availability of mutant collections, have allowed carrying out systematic genome-wide screens for mutants affecting various aspects of telomere biology. In this review we summarize these efforts, and the insights that this Systems Biology approach has produced so far.

  13. Genome-wide screens for expressed hypothetical proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Durhuus, Jon Ambæk; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2012-01-01

    A hypothetical protein (HP) is defined as a protein that is predicted to be expressed from an open reading frame, but for which there is no experimental evidence of translation. HPs constitute a substantial fraction of proteomes of human as well as of other organisms. With the general belief...

  14. Genome-wide association study of clinical dimensions of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanous, Ayman H; Zhou, Baiyu; Aggen, Steven H;

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sources of evidence suggest that genetic factors influence variation in clinical features of schizophrenia. The authors present the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of dimensional symptom scores among individuals with schizophrenia....

  15. Cancer genetic association studies in the genome-wide age

    OpenAIRE

    Savage, Sharon A

    2008-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies of hundreds of thousands of SNPs have led to a deluge of studies of genetic variation in cancer and other common diseases. Large case–control and cohort studies have identified novel SNPs as markers of cancer risk. Genome-wide association study SNP data have also advanced understanding of population-specific genetic variation. While studies of risk profiles, combinations of SNPs that may increase cancer risk, are not yet clinically applicable, future, large-sca...

  16. Genome-wide polymorphisms show unexpected targets of natural selection

    OpenAIRE

    Pespeni, Melissa H.; Garfield, David A.; Manier, Mollie K; Palumbi, Stephen R.

    2011-01-01

    Natural selection can act on all the expressed genes of an individual, leaving signatures of genetic differentiation or diversity at many loci across the genome. New power to assay these genome-wide effects of selection comes from associating multi-locus patterns of polymorphism with gene expression and function. Here, we performed one of the first genome-wide surveys in a marine species, comparing purple sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus, from two distant locations along the species...

  17. Genome-wide association study of multiplex schizophrenia pedigrees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinson, Douglas F; Shi, Jianxin; Wang, Kai

    2012-01-01

    The authors used a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of multiply affected families to investigate the association of schizophrenia to common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and rare copy number variants (CNVs).......The authors used a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of multiply affected families to investigate the association of schizophrenia to common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and rare copy number variants (CNVs)....

  18. Using iterative cluster merging with improved gap statistics to perform online phenotype discovery in the context of high-throughput RNAi screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Youxian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent emergence of high-throughput automated image acquisition technologies has forever changed how cell biologists collect and analyze data. Historically, the interpretation of cellular phenotypes in different experimental conditions has been dependent upon the expert opinions of well-trained biologists. Such qualitative analysis is particularly effective in detecting subtle, but important, deviations in phenotypes. However, while the rapid and continuing development of automated microscope-based technologies now facilitates the acquisition of trillions of cells in thousands of diverse experimental conditions, such as in the context of RNA interference (RNAi or small-molecule screens, the massive size of these datasets precludes human analysis. Thus, the development of automated methods which aim to identify novel and biological relevant phenotypes online is one of the major challenges in high-throughput image-based screening. Ideally, phenotype discovery methods should be designed to utilize prior/existing information and tackle three challenging tasks, i.e. restoring pre-defined biological meaningful phenotypes, differentiating novel phenotypes from known ones and clarifying novel phenotypes from each other. Arbitrarily extracted information causes biased analysis, while combining the complete existing datasets with each new image is intractable in high-throughput screens. Results Here we present the design and implementation of a novel and robust online phenotype discovery method with broad applicability that can be used in diverse experimental contexts, especially high-throughput RNAi screens. This method features phenotype modelling and iterative cluster merging using improved gap statistics. A Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM is employed to estimate the distribution of each existing phenotype, and then used as reference distribution in gap statistics. This method is broadly applicable to a number of different types of

  19. Off-Target Effects of Psychoactive Drugs Revealed by Genome-Wide Assays in Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 comp...

  20. Genome-wide siRNA-based functional genomics of pigmentation identifies novel genes and pathways that impact melanogenesis in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand K Ganesan

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Melanin protects the skin and eyes from the harmful effects of UV irradiation, protects neural cells from toxic insults, and is required for sound conduction in the inner ear. Aberrant regulation of melanogenesis underlies skin disorders (melasma and vitiligo, neurologic disorders (Parkinson's disease, auditory disorders (Waardenburg's syndrome, and opthalmologic disorders (age related macular degeneration. Much of the core synthetic machinery driving melanin production has been identified; however, the spectrum of gene products participating in melanogenesis in different physiological niches is poorly understood. Functional genomics based on RNA-mediated interference (RNAi provides the opportunity to derive unbiased comprehensive collections of pharmaceutically tractable single gene targets supporting melanin production. In this study, we have combined a high-throughput, cell-based, one-well/one-gene screening platform with a genome-wide arrayed synthetic library of chemically synthesized, small interfering RNAs to identify novel biological pathways that govern melanin biogenesis in human melanocytes. Ninety-two novel genes that support pigment production were identified with a low false discovery rate. Secondary validation and preliminary mechanistic studies identified a large panel of targets that converge on tyrosinase expression and stability. Small molecule inhibition of a family of gene products in this class was sufficient to impair chronic tyrosinase expression in pigmented melanoma cells and UV-induced tyrosinase expression in primary melanocytes. Isolation of molecular machinery known to support autophagosome biosynthesis from this screen, together with in vitro and in vivo validation, exposed a close functional relationship between melanogenesis and autophagy. In summary, these studies illustrate the power of RNAi-based functional genomics to identify novel genes, pathways, and pharmacologic agents that impact a biological phenotype

  1. Genome-wide and functional annotation of human E3 ubiquitin ligases identifies MULAN, a mitochondrial E3 that regulates the organelle's dynamics and signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Li

    Full Text Available Specificity of protein ubiquitylation is conferred by E3 ubiquitin (Ub ligases. We have annotated approximately 617 putative E3s and substrate-recognition subunits of E3 complexes encoded in the human genome. The limited knowledge of the function of members of the large E3 superfamily prompted us to generate genome-wide E3 cDNA and RNAi expression libraries designed for functional screening. An imaging-based screen using these libraries to identify E3s that regulate mitochondrial dynamics uncovered MULAN/FLJ12875, a RING finger protein whose ectopic expression and knockdown both interfered with mitochondrial trafficking and morphology. We found that MULAN is a mitochondrial protein - two transmembrane domains mediate its localization to the organelle's outer membrane. MULAN is oriented such that its E3-active, C-terminal RING finger is exposed to the cytosol, where it has access to other components of the Ub system. Both an intact RING finger and the correct subcellular localization were required for regulation of mitochondrial dynamics, suggesting that MULAN's downstream effectors are proteins that are either integral to, or associated with, mitochondria and that become modified with Ub. Interestingly, MULAN had previously been identified as an activator of NF-kappaB, thus providing a link between mitochondrial dynamics and mitochondria-to-nucleus signaling. These findings suggest the existence of a new, Ub-mediated mechanism responsible for integration of mitochondria into the cellular environment.

  2. Genome-wide examination of myoblast cell cycle withdrawal duringdifferentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Xun; Collier, John Michael; Hlaing, Myint; Zhang, Leanne; Delshad, Elizabeth H.; Bristow, James; Bernstein, Harold S.

    2002-12-02

    Skeletal and cardiac myocytes cease division within weeks of birth. Although skeletal muscle retains limited capacity for regeneration through recruitment of satellite cells, resident populations of adult myocardial stem cells have not been identified. Because cell cycle withdrawal accompanies myocyte differentiation, we hypothesized that C2C12 cells, a mouse myoblast cell line previously used to characterize myocyte differentiation, also would provide a model for studying cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. C2C12 cells were differentiated in culture medium containing horse serum and harvested at various time points to characterize the expression profiles of known cell cycle and myogenic regulatory factors by immunoblot analysis. BrdU incorporation decreased dramatically in confluent cultures 48 hr after addition of horse serum, as cells started to form myotubes. This finding was preceded by up-regulation of MyoD, followed by myogenin, and activation of Bcl-2. Cyclin D1 was expressed in proliferating cultures and became undetectable in cultures containing 40 percent fused myotubes, as levels of p21(WAF1/Cip1) increased and alpha-actin became detectable. Because C2C12 myoblasts withdraw from the cell cycle during myocyte differentiation following a course that recapitulates this process in vivo, we performed a genome-wide screen to identify other gene products involved in this process. Using microarrays containing approximately 10,000 minimally redundant mouse sequences that map to the UniGene database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information, we compared gene expression profiles between proliferating, differentiating, and differentiated C2C12 cells and verified candidate genes demonstrating differential expression by RT-PCR. Cluster analysis of differentially expressed genes revealed groups of gene products involved in cell cycle withdrawal, muscle differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, we identified several genes, including DDAH2 and Ly

  3. Probabilistic protein function prediction from heterogeneous genome-wide data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Nariai

    Full Text Available Dramatic improvements in high throughput sequencing technologies have led to a staggering growth in the number of predicted genes. However, a large fraction of these newly discovered genes do not have a functional assignment. Fortunately, a variety of novel high-throughput genome-wide functional screening technologies provide important clues that shed light on gene function. The integration of heterogeneous data to predict protein function has been shown to improve the accuracy of automated gene annotation systems. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a probabilistic approach for protein function prediction that integrates protein-protein interaction (PPI data, gene expression data, protein motif information, mutant phenotype data, and protein localization data. First, functional linkage graphs are constructed from PPI data and gene expression data, in which an edge between nodes (proteins represents evidence for functional similarity. The assumption here is that graph neighbors are more likely to share protein function, compared to proteins that are not neighbors. The functional linkage graph model is then used in concert with protein domain, mutant phenotype and protein localization data to produce a functional prediction. Our method is applied to the functional prediction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, using Gene Ontology (GO terms as the basis of our annotation. In a cross validation study we show that the integrated model increases recall by 18%, compared to using PPI data alone at the 50% precision. We also show that the integrated predictor is significantly better than each individual predictor. However, the observed improvement vs. PPI depends on both the new source of data and the functional category to be predicted. Surprisingly, in some contexts integration hurts overall prediction accuracy. Lastly, we provide a comprehensive assignment of putative GO terms to 463 proteins that currently have no assigned function.

  4. A novel statistic for genome-wide interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuesen; Dong, Hua; Luo, Li; Zhu, Yun; Peng, Gang; Reveille, John D; Xiong, Momiao

    2010-09-23

    Although great progress in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) has been made, the significant SNP associations identified by GWAS account for only a few percent of the genetic variance, leading many to question where and how we can find the missing heritability. There is increasing interest in genome-wide interaction analysis as a possible source of finding heritability unexplained by current GWAS. However, the existing statistics for testing interaction have low power for genome-wide interaction analysis. To meet challenges raised by genome-wide interactional analysis, we have developed a novel statistic for testing interaction between two loci (either linked or unlinked). The null distribution and the type I error rates of the new statistic for testing interaction are validated using simulations. Extensive power studies show that the developed statistic has much higher power to detect interaction than classical logistic regression. The results identified 44 and 211 pairs of SNPs showing significant evidence of interactions with FDRanalysis is a valuable tool for finding remaining missing heritability unexplained by the current GWAS, and the developed novel statistic is able to search significant interaction between SNPs across the genome. Real data analysis showed that the results of genome-wide interaction analysis can be replicated in two independent studies.

  5. Mosaicism for genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy with features of multiple imprinting disorders: diagnostic and management issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inbar-Feigenberg, Michal; Choufani, Sanaa; Cytrynbaum, Cheryl; Chen, Yi-An; Steele, Leslie; Shuman, Cheryl; Ray, Peter N; Weksberg, Rosanna

    2013-01-01

    Mosaicism for genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) has been reported in only seven live born individuals to date. Clinical presentation includes manifestations of multiple paternal UPD syndromes with high variability, likely due to the variable levels of mosaicism in different somatic tissues. We report an eighth case in a female patient with mosaicism for genome-wide paternal UPD which highlights the complex clinical presentation. Our patient had features of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), Angelman syndrome, and congenital hyperinsulinism. The clinical findings included prematurity, organomegaly, hemihyperplasia, developmental delay, benign tumors, and cystic lesions. The diagnosis in our patient was established utilizing microarray-based genome-wide DNA methylation analysis performed on leukocyte DNA. Targeted multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis of chromosome regions 11p15 and 15q13 confirmed mosaicism for paternal UPD at these genomic regions. This case represents the first report of microarray-based genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in the diagnosis of genome-wide paternal UPD. The application of microarray-based genome-wide DNA methylation analysis on selected individuals with complex clinical presentations could be a valuable diagnostic tool to improve the detection rate of mosaic genome-wide paternal UPD. This approach, which screens many loci simultaneously, is more cost-effective and less labor-intensive than performing multiple targeted DNA methylation-based assays. Identification of individuals with mosaicism for genome-wide paternal UPD is an important goal as it confers a low recurrence risk for the family and identifies individuals who require surveillance due to increased tumor risk.

  6. Screening and Identification of Mouse Biccl RNAi%小鼠Biccl基因RNAi序列的筛选与鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周亮; 杨君兴

    2010-01-01

    通过网上提供的生物信息学分析软件进行搜索和比对,初步筛选到3个较好的针对小鼠双尾-C(Biccl)基因的RNA干扰(RNAi)序列.合成这3个干涉序列片段后克隆到pRS-Hush shRNA载体中.构建Biccl基因的真核表达载体pEGFP-C3-Biccl,将绿色荧光蛋白(GFP)标签标记在Biccl蛋白上.利用细胞转染技术将pEGFP-C3-Biccl与3个干涉序列载体共转染至体外培养的HEK-293细胞中,最后通过细胞荧光强度、半定量PCR和Western blotting鉴定出其中两个序列(pRS-Hush-RNAi-Biccl-N/-C)能明显降低Biccl蛋白在HEK-293细胞中的表达水平,为下一步建立起低表达Biccl的稳定细胞株和研究小鼠Biccl的功能提供了良好的材料.

  7. Power analysis for genome-wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Robert J

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide association studies are a promising new tool for deciphering the genetics of complex diseases. To choose the proper sample size and genotyping platform for such studies, power calculations that take into account genetic model, tag SNP selection, and the population of interest are required. Results The power of genome-wide association studies can be computed using a set of tag SNPs and a large number of genotyped SNPs in a representative population, such as available through the HapMap project. As expected, power increases with increasing sample size and effect size. Power also depends on the tag SNPs selected. In some cases, more power is obtained by genotyping more individuals at fewer SNPs than fewer individuals at more SNPs. Conclusion Genome-wide association studies should be designed thoughtfully, with the choice of genotyping platform and sample size being determined from careful power calculations.

  8. A novel statistic for genome-wide interaction analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuesen Wu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Although great progress in genome-wide association studies (GWAS has been made, the significant SNP associations identified by GWAS account for only a few percent of the genetic variance, leading many to question where and how we can find the missing heritability. There is increasing interest in genome-wide interaction analysis as a possible source of finding heritability unexplained by current GWAS. However, the existing statistics for testing interaction have low power for genome-wide interaction analysis. To meet challenges raised by genome-wide interactional analysis, we have developed a novel statistic for testing interaction between two loci (either linked or unlinked. The null distribution and the type I error rates of the new statistic for testing interaction are validated using simulations. Extensive power studies show that the developed statistic has much higher power to detect interaction than classical logistic regression. The results identified 44 and 211 pairs of SNPs showing significant evidence of interactions with FDR<0.001 and 0.001genome-wide interaction analysis is a valuable tool for finding remaining missing heritability unexplained by the current GWAS, and the developed novel statistic is able to search significant interaction between SNPs across the genome. Real data analysis showed that the results of genome-wide interaction analysis can be replicated in two independent studies.

  9. SiRNA sequence model: redesign algorithm based on available genome-wide libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Karol

    2013-12-01

    The evolution of RNA interference (RNAi) and the development of technologies exploiting its biology have enabled scientists to rapidly examine the consequences of depleting a particular gene product in cells. Design tools have been developed based on experimental data to increase the knockdown efficiency of siRNAs. Not all siRNAs that are developed to a given target mRNA are equally effective. Currently available design algorithms take an accession, identify conserved regions among their transcript space, find accessible regions within the mRNA, design all possible siRNAs for these regions, filter them based on multi-scores thresholds, and then perform off-target filtration. These different criteria are used by commercial suppliers to produce siRNA genome-wide libraries for different organisms. In this article, we analyze existing siRNA design algorithms and evaluate weight of design parameters for libraries produced in the last decade. We proved that not all essential parameters are currently applied by siRNA vendors. Based on our evaluation results, we were able to suggest an siRNA sequence pattern. The findings in our study can be useful for commercial vendors improving the design of RNAi constructs, by addressing both the issue of potency and the issue of specificity.

  10. Genome-wide search for gene-gene interactions in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuo Jiao

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have successfully identified a number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with colorectal cancer (CRC risk. However, these susceptibility loci known today explain only a small fraction of the genetic risk. Gene-gene interaction (GxG is considered to be one source of the missing heritability. To address this, we performed a genome-wide search for pair-wise GxG associated with CRC risk using 8,380 cases and 10,558 controls in the discovery phase and 2,527 cases and 2,658 controls in the replication phase. We developed a simple, but powerful method for testing interaction, which we term the Average Risk Due to Interaction (ARDI. With this method, we conducted a genome-wide search to identify SNPs showing evidence for GxG with previously identified CRC susceptibility loci from 14 independent regions. We also conducted a genome-wide search for GxG using the marginal association screening and examining interaction among SNPs that pass the screening threshold (p<10(-4. For the known locus rs10795668 (10p14, we found an interacting SNP rs367615 (5q21 with replication p = 0.01 and combined p = 4.19×10(-8. Among the top marginal SNPs after LD pruning (n = 163, we identified an interaction between rs1571218 (20p12.3 and rs10879357 (12q21.1 (nominal combined p = 2.51×10(-6; Bonferroni adjusted p = 0.03. Our study represents the first comprehensive search for GxG in CRC, and our results may provide new insight into the genetic etiology of CRC.

  11. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of anguillid herpesvirus 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, van S.J.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Davison, A.A.; Engelsma, M.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Whereas temporal gene expression in mammalian herpesviruses has been studied extensively, little is known about gene expression in fish herpesviruses. Here we report a genome-wide transcription analysis of a fish herpesvirus, anguillid herpesvirus 1, in cell culture, studied during the

  12. Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Q R S T U V W X Y Z We want to hear from you You are here: News & Events 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 July 2012 (historical) Genome-Wide Scan Reveals Mutation Associated with Melanoma A team of ...

  13. A genome-wide scan for preeclampsia in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lachmeijer, AMA; Arngrimsson, R; Bastiaans, EJ; Frigge, ML; Pals, G; Sigurdardottir, S; Stefansson, H; Palsson, B; Nicolae, D; Kong, A; Aarnoudse, JG; Gulcher, [No Value; Dekker, GA; ten Kate, LP; Stefansson, K

    2001-01-01

    Preeclampsia, hallmarked by de novo hypertension and proteinuria in pregnancy, has a familial tendency. Recently, a large Icelandic genome-wide scan provided evidence for a maternal susceptibility locus for preeclampsia on chromosome 2p13 which was confirmed by a genome scan from Australia and New

  14. Genome-wide RNA Tomography in the Zebrafish Embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junker, Jan Philipp; Noël, Emily S; Guryev, Victor; Peterson, Kevin A; Shah, Gopi; Huisken, Jan; McMahon, Andrew P; Berezikov, Eugene; Bakkers, Jeroen; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Advancing our understanding of embryonic development is heavily dependent on identification of novel pathways or regulators. Although genome-wide techniques such as RNA sequencing are ideally suited for discovering novel candidate genes, they are unable to yield spatially resolved information in

  15. Genome-wide RNA Tomography in the zebrafish embryo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Junker, Jan Philipp; Noël, Emily S; Guryev, Victor; Peterson, Kevin A; Shah, Gopi; Huisken, Jan; McMahon, Andrew P; Berezikov, Eugene; Bakkers, Jeroen; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Advancing our understanding of embryonic development is heavily dependent on identification of novel pathways or regulators. Although genome-wide techniques such as RNA sequencing are ideally suited for discovering novel candidate genes, they are unable to yield spatially resolved information in

  16. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripke, Stephan; Sanders, Alan R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Sklar, Pamela; Holmans, Peter A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Duan, Jubao; Ophoff, Roel A.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Scolnick, Edward; Cichon, Sven; Clair, David St.; Corvin, Aiden; Gurling, Hugh; Werge, Thomas; Rujescu, Dan; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Pato, Carlos N.; Malhotra, Anil K.; Purcell, Shaun; Dudbridge, Frank; Neale, Benjamin M.; Rossin, Lizzy; Visscher, Peter M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Fanous, Ayman; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Mowry, Bryan J.; Golimbet, Vera; De Hert, Marc; Jonsson, Erik G.; Bitter, Istvan; Pietilainen, Olli P. H.; Collier, David A.; Tosato, Sarah; Agartz, Ingrid; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amdur, Richard L.; Amin, Farooq; Bass, Nicholas; Bergen, Sarah E.; Black, Donald W.; Borglum, Anders D.; Brown, Matthew A.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Byerley, William F.; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Catts, Stanley V.; Choudhury, Khalid; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nicholas; Danoy, Patrick A.; Datta, Susmita; De Haan, Lieuwe; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donnelly, Peter; Donohoe, Gary; Duong, Linh; Dwyer, Sarah; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Glenthoj, Birte; Godard, Stephanie; Hamshere, Marian; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Hougaard, David M.; Hultman, Christina M.; Ingason, Andres; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jakobsen, Klaus D.; Jay, Maurice; Juergens, Gesche; Kahn, Renes; Keller, Matthew C.; Kenis, Gunter; Kenny, Elaine; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Konnerth, Heike; Konte, Bettina; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Lasseter, Virginia K.; Laurent, Claudine; Lawrence, Jacob; Lencz, Todd; Lerer, F. Bernard; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Linszen, Don H.; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Loughland, Carmel M.; Maclean, Alan W.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Malloy, Pat; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGrath, John J.; McIntosh, Andrew; McLean, Duncan E.; McQuillin, Andrew; Melle, Ingrid; Michie, Patricia T.; Milanova, Vihra; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Moskvina, Valentina; Muglia, Pierandrea; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nielsen, Jimmi; Nikolov, Ivan; Nordentoft, Merete; Norton, Nadine; Noethen, Markus M.; O'Dushlaine, Colm T.; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Orntoft, Torben F.; Owen, Michael J.; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George; Pato, Michele T.; Peltonen, Leena; Petursson, Hannes; Pickard, Ben; Pimm, Jonathan; Pulver, Ann E.; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby; Quinn, Emma M.; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Rethelyi, Janos M.; Ribble, Robert; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Ruggeri, Mirella; Schall, Ulrich; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scott, Rodney J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefansson, Kari; Strange, Amy; Strengman, Eric; Stroup, T. Scott; Suvisaari, Jaana; Terenius, Lars; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thygesen, Johan H.; Timm, Sally; Toncheva, Draga; van den Oord, Edwin; van Os, Jim; van Winkel, Ruud; Veldink, Jan; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, August G.; Wiersma, Durk; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Hywel J.; Williams, Nigel M.; Wormley, Brandon; Zammit, Stan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Daly, Mark J.; Gejman, Pablo V.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded

  17. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, Annemarie; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countri

  18. Genome-Wide Association Analysis in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.H. Karlsen; A. Franke; E. Melum; A.. Kaser; J.R. Hov; T. Balschun; B.A. Lie; A. Bergquist; C. Schramm; T.J. Weismüller; D. Gotthardt; C. Rust; E.E.R. Philipp; T. Fritz; L. Henckaerts; R. Weersma; P. Stokkers; C.Y. Ponsioen; C. Wijmenga; M. Sterneck; M. Nothnagel; J. Hampe; A. Teufel; H. Runz; P. Rosenstiel; A. Stiehl; S. Vermeire; U. Beuers; M. Manns; E. Schrumpf; K.M. Boberg; S. Schreiber

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We aimed to characterize the genetic susceptibility to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) by means of a genome-wide association analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. METHODS: A total of 443,816 SNPs on the Affymetrix SNP Array 5.0 (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA

  19. Genome-wide association study of Tourette's syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharf, J. M.; Yu, D.; Mathews, C. A.; Neale, B. M.; Stewart, S. E.; Fagerness, J. A.; Evans, P.; Gamazon, E.; Edlund, C. K.; Service, S. K.; Tikhomirov, A.; Osiecki, L.; Illmann, C.; Pluzhnikov, A.; Konkashbaev, A.; Davis, L. K.; Han, B.; Crane, J.; Moorjani, P.; Crenshaw, A. T.; Parkin, M. A.; Reus, V. I.; Lowe, T. L.; Rangel-Lugo, M.; Chouinard, S.; Dion, Y.; Girard, S.; Cath, D. C.; Smit, J. H.; King, R. A.; Fernandez, T. V.; Leckman, J. F.; Kidd, K. K.; Kidd, J. R.; Pakstis, A. J.; State, M. W.; Herrera, L. D.; Romero, R.; Fournier, E.; Sandor, P.; Barr, C. L.; Phan, N.; Gross-Tsur, V.; Benarroch, F.; Pollak, Y.; Budman, C. L.; Bruun, R. D.; Erenberg, G.; Naarden, A. L.; Lee, P. C.; Weiss, N.; Kremeyer, B.; Berrio, G. B.; Campbell, D. D.; Cardona Silgado, J. C.; Ochoa, W. C.; Mesa Restrepo, S. C.; Muller, H.; Valencia Duarte, A. V.; Lyon, G. J.; Leppert, M.; Morgan, J.; Weiss, R.; Grados, M. A.; Anderson, K.; Davarya, S.; Singer, H.; Walkup, J.; Jankovic, J.; Tischfield, J. A.; Heiman, G. A.; Gilbert, D. L.; Hoekstra, P. J.; Robertson, M. M.; Kurlan, R.; Liu, C.; Gibbs, J. R.; Singleton, A.; Hardy, J.; Strengman, E.; Ophoff, R. A.; Wagner, M.; Moessner, R.; Mirel, D. B.; Posthuma, D.; Sabatti, C.; Eskin, E.; Conti, D. V.; Knowles, J. A.; Ruiz-Linares, A.; Rouleau, G. A.; Purcell, S.; Heutink, P.; Oostra, B. A.; McMahon, W. M.; Freimer, N. B.; Cox, N. J.; Pauls, D. L.

    2013-01-01

    Tourette's syndrome (TS) is a developmental disorder that has one of the highest familial recurrence rates among neuropsychiatric diseases with complex inheritance. However, the identification of definitive TS susceptibility genes remains elusive. Here, we report the first genome-wide association

  20. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ripke, Stephan; Sanders, Alan R.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Sklar, Pamela; Holmans, Peter A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Duan, Jubao; Ophoff, Roel A.; Andreassen, Ole A.; Scolnick, Edward; Cichon, Sven; Clair, David St.; Corvin, Aiden; Gurling, Hugh; Werge, Thomas; Rujescu, Dan; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Pato, Carlos N.; Malhotra, Anil K.; Purcell, Shaun; Dudbridge, Frank; Neale, Benjamin M.; Rossin, Lizzy; Visscher, Peter M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Fanous, Ayman; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Mowry, Bryan J.; Golimbet, Vera; De Hert, Marc; Jonsson, Erik G.; Bitter, Istvan; Pietilainen, Olli P. H.; Collier, David A.; Tosato, Sarah; Agartz, Ingrid; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amdur, Richard L.; Amin, Farooq; Bass, Nicholas; Bergen, Sarah E.; Black, Donald W.; Borglum, Anders D.; Brown, Matthew A.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Byerley, William F.; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Catts, Stanley V.; Choudhury, Khalid; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nicholas; Danoy, Patrick A.; Datta, Susmita; De Haan, Lieuwe; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donnelly, Peter; Donohoe, Gary; Duong, Linh; Dwyer, Sarah; Fink-Jensen, Anders; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Glenthoj, Birte; Godard, Stephanie; Hamshere, Marian; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Hougaard, David M.; Hultman, Christina M.; Ingason, Andres; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jakobsen, Klaus D.; Jay, Maurice; Juergens, Gesche; Kahn, Renes; Keller, Matthew C.; Kenis, Gunter; Kenny, Elaine; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Konnerth, Heike; Konte, Bettina; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Lasseter, Virginia K.; Laurent, Claudine; Lawrence, Jacob; Lencz, Todd; Lerer, F. Bernard; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Linszen, Don H.; Lonnqvist, Jouko; Loughland, Carmel M.; Maclean, Alan W.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Malloy, Pat; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGrath, John J.; McIntosh, Andrew; McLean, Duncan E.; McQuillin, Andrew; Melle, Ingrid; Michie, Patricia T.; Milanova, Vihra; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Moskvina, Valentina; Muglia, Pierandrea; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nielsen, Jimmi; Nikolov, Ivan; Nordentoft, Merete; Norton, Nadine; Noethen, Markus M.; O'Dushlaine, Colm T.; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; O'Neill, F. Anthony; Orntoft, Torben F.; Owen, Michael J.; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George; Pato, Michele T.; Peltonen, Leena; Petursson, Hannes; Pickard, Ben; Pimm, Jonathan; Pulver, Ann E.; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby; Quinn, Emma M.; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Rethelyi, Janos M.; Ribble, Robert; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Ruggeri, Mirella; Schall, Ulrich; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scott, Rodney J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Spencer, Chris C. A.; Stefansson, Kari; Strange, Amy; Strengman, Eric; Stroup, T. Scott; Suvisaari, Jaana; Terenius, Lars; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thygesen, Johan H.; Timm, Sally; Toncheva, Draga; van den Oord, Edwin; van Os, Jim; van Winkel, Ruud; Veldink, Jan; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, August G.; Wiersma, Durk; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Hywel J.; Williams, Nigel M.; Wormley, Brandon; Zammit, Stan; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Daly, Mark J.; Gejman, Pablo V.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ripke, Stephan

    2011-10-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yielded genome-wide significant associations with schizophrenia for seven loci, five of which are new (1p21.3, 2q32.3, 8p23.2, 8q21.3 and 10q24.32-q24.33) and two of which have been previously implicated (6p21.32-p22.1 and 18q21.2). The strongest new finding (P = 1.6 × 10(-11)) was with rs1625579 within an intron of a putative primary transcript for MIR137 (microRNA 137), a known regulator of neuronal development. Four other schizophrenia loci achieving genome-wide significance contain predicted targets of MIR137, suggesting MIR137-mediated dysregulation as a previously unknown etiologic mechanism in schizophrenia. In a joint analysis with a bipolar disorder sample (16,374 affected individuals and 14,044 controls), three loci reached genome-wide significance: CACNA1C (rs4765905, P = 7.0 × 10(-9)), ANK3 (rs10994359, P = 2.5 × 10(-8)) and the ITIH3-ITIH4 region (rs2239547, P = 7.8 × 10(-9)).

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies five new schizophrenia loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ripke, Stephan; Sanders, Alan R; Kendler, Kenneth S

    2011-01-01

    We examined the role of common genetic variation in schizophrenia in a genome-wide association study of substantial size: a stage 1 discovery sample of 21,856 individuals of European ancestry and a stage 2 replication sample of 29,839 independent subjects. The combined stage 1 and 2 analysis yiel...

  3. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelemen, Linda E; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan;

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOCs). Our analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls with imputation identified 3 new risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10(-8)), rs711830 at...

  4. A genome-wide association study identifies CDHR3 as a susceptibility locus for early childhood asthma with severe exacerbations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønnelykke, Klaus; Sleiman, Patrick; Nielsen, Kasper

    2014-01-01

    years of age in a total of 1,173 cases and 2,522 controls. Cases were identified from national health registries of hospitalization, and DNA was obtained from the Danish Neonatal Screening Biobank. We identified five loci with genome-wide significant association. Four of these, GSDMB, IL33, RAD50 and IL...

  5. A comparison in association and linkage genome-wide scans for alcoholism susceptibility genes using single-nucleotide polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yen-Feng; Liu, Su-Yun; Tsai, Ya-Yu

    2005-12-30

    We conducted genome-wide linkage scans using both microsatellite and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. Regions showing the strongest evidence of linkage to alcoholism susceptibility genes were identified. Haplotype analyses using a sliding-window approach for SNPs in these regions were performed. In addition, we performed a genome-wide association scan using SNP data. SNPs in these regions with evidence of association (P alcoholism (the most significant SNP had a p-value of 0.030) as those identified from association genomic screening (the most significant SNP had a p-value of 2.0 x 10(-8)).

  6. A genetic screen for components of the mammalian RNA interference pathway in Bloom-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombly, Melanie I; Su, Hong; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2009-03-01

    Genetic screens performed in model organisms have helped identify key components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Recessive genetic screens have recently become feasible through the use of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells that are Bloom's syndrome protein (Blm) deficient. Here, we developed and performed a recessive genetic screen to identify components of the mammalian RNAi pathway in Blm-deficient ES cells. Genome-wide mutagenesis using a retroviral gene trap strategy resulted in the isolation of putative homozygous RNAi mutant cells. Candidate clones were confirmed by an independent RNAi-based reporter assay and the causative gene trap integration site was identified using molecular techniques. Our screen identified multiple mutant cell lines of Argonaute 2 (Ago2), a known essential component of the RNAi pathway. This result demonstrates that true RNAi components can be isolated by this screening strategy. Furthermore, Ago2 homozygous mutant ES cells provide a null genetic background to perform mutational analyses of the Ago2 protein. Using genetic rescue, we resolve an important controversy regarding the role of two phenylalanine residues in Ago2 activity.

  7. Genome-wide association studies and resting heart rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oskari Kilpeläinen, Tuomas

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have revolutionized the search for genetic variants regulating resting heart rate. In the last 10 years, GWASs have led to the identification of at least 21 novel heart rate loci. These discoveries have provided valuable insights into the mechanisms...... and pathways that regulate heart rate and link heart rate to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. GWASs capture majority of genetic variation in a population sample by utilizing high-throughput genotyping chips measuring genotypes for up to several millions of SNPs across the genome in thousands...... of individuals. This allows the identification of the strongest heart rate associated signals at genome-wide level. While GWASs provide robust statistical evidence of the association of a given genetic locus with heart rate, they are only the starting point for detailed follow-up studies to locate the causal...

  8. Genome-wide patterns of selection in 230 ancient Eurasians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Iain; Lazaridis, Iosif; Rohland, Nadin; Mallick, Swapan; Patterson, Nick; Roodenberg, Songül Alpaslan; Harney, Eadaoin; Stewardson, Kristin; Fernandes, Daniel; Novak, Mario; Sirak, Kendra; Gamba, Cristina; Jones, Eppie R.; Llamas, Bastien; Dryomov, Stanislav; Pickrel, Joseph; Arsuaga, Juan Luís; de Castro, José María Bermúdez; Carbonell, Eudald; Gerritsen, Fokke; Khokhlov, Aleksandr; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Lozano, Marina; Meller, Harald; Mochalov, Oleg; Moiseyev, Vayacheslav; Rojo Guerra, Manuel A.; Roodenberg, Jacob; Vergès, Josep Maria; Krause, Johannes; Cooper, Alan; Alt, Kurt W.; Brown, Dorcas; Anthony, David; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; Haak, Wolfgang; Pinhasi, Ron; Reich, David

    2016-01-01

    Ancient DNA makes it possible to directly witness natural selection by analyzing samples from populations before, during and after adaptation events. Here we report the first scan for selection using ancient DNA, capitalizing on the largest genome-wide dataset yet assembled: 230 West Eurasians dating to between 6500 and 1000 BCE, including 163 with newly reported data. The new samples include the first genome-wide data from the Anatolian Neolithic culture whose genetic material we extracted from the DNA-rich petrous bone and who we show were members of the population that was the source of Europe’s first farmers. We also report a complete transect of the steppe region in Samara between 5500 and 1200 BCE that allows us to recognize admixture from at least two external sources into steppe populations during this period. We detect selection at loci associated with diet, pigmentation and immunity, and two independent episodes of selection on height. PMID:26595274

  9. Genome wide copy number analysis of single cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baslan, Timour; Kendall, Jude; Rodgers, Linda; Cox, Hilary; Riggs, Mike; Stepansky, Asya; Troge, Jennifer; Ravi, Kandasamy; Esposito, Diane; Lakshmi, B.; Wigler, Michael; Navin, Nicholas; Hicks, James

    2016-01-01

    Summary Copy number variation (CNV) is increasingly recognized as an important contributor to phenotypic variation in health and disease. Most methods for determining CNV rely on admixtures of cells, where information regarding genetic heterogeneity is lost. Here, we present a protocol that allows for the genome wide copy number analysis of single nuclei isolated from mixed populations of cells. Single nucleus sequencing (SNS), combines flow sorting of single nuclei based on DNA content, whole genome amplification (WGA), followed by next generation sequencing to quantize genomic intervals in a genome wide manner. Multiplexing of single cells is discussed. Additionally, we outline informatic approaches that correct for biases inherent in the WGA procedure and allow for accurate determination of copy number profiles. All together, the protocol takes ~3 days from flow cytometry to sequence-ready DNA libraries. PMID:22555242

  10. Genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism in domesticated rice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caicedo, Ana L; Williamson, Scott H; Hernandez, Ryan D

    2007-01-01

    Domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa) is one of the oldest domesticated crop species in the world, having fed more people than any other plant in human history. We report the patterns of DNA sequence variation in rice and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, across 111 randomly chosen gene fragments......, and use these to infer the evolutionary dynamics that led to the origins of rice. There is a genome-wide excess of high-frequency derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in O. sativa varieties, a pattern that has not been reported for other crop species. We developed several alternative models...... explanations for patterns of variation in domesticated rice varieties. If selective sweeps are indeed the explanation for the observed nucleotide data of domesticated rice, it suggests that strong selection can leave its imprint on genome-wide polymorphism patterns, contrary to expectations that selection...

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study of Polymorphisms Predisposing to Bronchiolitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasanen, Anu; Karjalainen, Minna K.; Bont, Louis; Piippo-Savolainen, Eija; Ruotsalainen, Marja; Goksör, Emma; Kumawat, Kuldeep; Hodemaekers, Hennie; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Jartti, Tuomas; Wennergren, Göran; Hallman, Mikko; Rämet, Mika; Korppi, Matti

    2017-01-01

    Bronchiolitis is a major cause of hospitalization among infants. Severe bronchiolitis is associated with later asthma, suggesting a common genetic predisposition. Genetic background of bronchiolitis is not well characterized. To identify polymorphisms associated with bronchiolitis, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in which 5,300,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association in a Finnish–Swedish population of 217 children hospitalized for bronchiolitis and 778 controls. The most promising SNPs (n = 77) were genotyped in a Dutch replication population of 416 cases and 432 controls. Finally, we used a set of 202 Finnish bronchiolitis cases to further investigate candidate SNPs. We did not detect genome-wide significant associations, but several suggestive association signals (p bronchiolitis. These preliminary findings require further validation in a larger sample size. PMID:28139761

  12. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  13. Genome-Wide Prediction of C. elegans Genetic Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Weiwei; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2006-01-01

    To obtain a global view of functional interactions among genes in a metazoan genome, we computationally integrated interactome data, gene expression data, phenotype data, and functional annotation data from three model organisms—Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster—and predicted genome-wide genetic interactions in C. elegans. The resulting genetic interaction network (consisting of 18,183 interactions) provides a framework for system-level understandin...

  14. Genome-wide association studies in pediatric endocrinology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauber, Andrew; Hirschhorn, Joel N

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies are a powerful tool for understanding the genetic underpinnings of human disease. In this article, we briefly review the role and findings of GWA studies in type 1 diabetes, stature, pubertal timing, obesity, and vitamin D deficiency. We then discuss the present and future implications of these findings with regards to disease prediction, uncovering basic biology, and the development of novel therapeutic agents.

  15. Statistical Approaches in Genome-Wide Association Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yazdani, Akram

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies, GWAS, typically contain hundreds of thousands single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs, genotyped for few numbers of samples. The aim of these studies is to identify regions harboring SNPs or to predict the outcomes of interest. Since the number of predictors in the GWAS far exceeds the number of samples, it is impossible to analyze the data with classical statistical methods. In the current GWAS, the widely applied methods are based on single marker analysis th...

  16. Integrative genome-wide approaches in embryonic stem cell research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinyue; Huang, Jing

    2010-10-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from blastocysts. They can differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers and essentially any type of somatic cells. They therefore hold great potential in tissue regeneration therapy. The ethical issues associated with the use of human embryonic stem cells are resolved by the technical break-through of generating induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from various types of somatic cells. However, how ES and iPS cells self-renew and maintain their pluripotency is still largely unknown in spite of the great progress that has been made in the last two decades. Integrative genome-wide approaches, such as the gene expression microarray, chromatin immunoprecipitation based microarray (ChIP-chip) and chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) offer unprecedented opportunities to elucidate the mechanism of the pluripotency, reprogramming and DNA damage response of ES and iPS cells. This frontier article summarizes the fundamental biological questions about ES and iPS cells and reviews the recent advances in ES and iPS cell research using genome-wide technologies. To this end, we offer our perspectives on the future of genome-wide studies on stem cells.

  17. Genome-Wide Detection and Analysis of Multifunctional Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritykin, Yuri; Ghersi, Dario; Singh, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Many genes can play a role in multiple biological processes or molecular functions. Identifying multifunctional genes at the genome-wide level and studying their properties can shed light upon the complexity of molecular events that underpin cellular functioning, thereby leading to a better understanding of the functional landscape of the cell. However, to date, genome-wide analysis of multifunctional genes (and the proteins they encode) has been limited. Here we introduce a computational approach that uses known functional annotations to extract genes playing a role in at least two distinct biological processes. We leverage functional genomics data sets for three organisms—H. sapiens, D. melanogaster, and S. cerevisiae—and show that, as compared to other annotated genes, genes involved in multiple biological processes possess distinct physicochemical properties, are more broadly expressed, tend to be more central in protein interaction networks, tend to be more evolutionarily conserved, and are more likely to be essential. We also find that multifunctional genes are significantly more likely to be involved in human disorders. These same features also hold when multifunctionality is defined with respect to molecular functions instead of biological processes. Our analysis uncovers key features about multifunctional genes, and is a step towards a better genome-wide understanding of gene multifunctionality. PMID:26436655

  18. Genome-wide meta-analyses identify three loci associated with primary biliary cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangdong; Invernizzi, Pietro; Lu, Yue; Kosoy, Roman; Lu, Yan; Bianchi, Ilaria; Podda, Mauro; Xu, Chun; Xie, Gang; Macciardi, Fabio; Selmi, Carlo; Lupoli, Sara; Shigeta, Russell; Ransom, Michael; Lleo, Ana; Lee, Annette T; Mason, Andrew L; Myers, Robert P; Peltekian, Kevork M; Ghent, Cameron N; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Zuin, Massimo; Rosina, Floriano; Borghesio, Elisabetta; Floreani, Annarosa; Lazzari, Roberta; Niro, Grazia; Andriulli, Angelo; Muratori, Luigi; Muratori, Paolo; Almasio, Piero L; Andreone, Pietro; Margotti, Marzia; Brunetto, Maurizia; Coco, Barbara; Alvaro, Domenico; Bragazzi, Maria C; Marra, Fabio; Pisano, Alessandro; Rigamonti, Cristina; Colombo, Massimo; Marzioni, Marco; Benedetti, Antonio; Fabris, Luca; Strazzabosco, Mario; Portincasa, Piero; Palmieri, Vincenzo O; Tiribelli, Claudio; Croce, Lory; Bruno, Savino; Rossi, Sonia; Vinci, Maria; Prisco, Cleofe; Mattalia, Alberto; Toniutto, Pierluigi; Picciotto, Antonio; Galli, Andrea; Ferrari, Carlo; Colombo, Silvia; Casella, Giovanni; Morini, Lorenzo; Caporaso, Nicola; Colli, Agostino; Spinzi, Giancarlo; Montanari, Renzo; Gregersen, Peter K; Heathcote, E Jenny; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Amos, Christopher I; Gershwin, M Eric; Seldin, Michael F

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association screen for primary biliary cirrhosis risk alleles was performed in an Italian cohort. The results from the Italian cohort replicated IL12A and IL12RB associations, and a combined meta-analysis using a Canadian dataset identified newly associated loci at SPIB (P = 7.9 × 10–11, odds ratio (OR) = 1.46), IRF5-TNPO3 (P = 2.8 × 10–10, OR = 1.63) and 17q12-21 (P = 1.7 × 10–10, OR = 1.38). PMID:20639880

  19. Large-Scale Functional RNAi Screen in C. elegans Identifies TGF-β and Notch Signaling Pathways as Modifiers of CACNA1A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Conceição Pereira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Variants in CACNA1A that encodes the pore-forming α1-subunit of human voltage-gated Cav2.1 (P/Q-type Ca2+ channels cause several autosomal-dominant neurologic disorders, including familial hemiplegic migraine type 1, episodic ataxia type 2, and spinocerebellar ataxia type 6. To identify modifiers of incoordination in movement disorders, we performed a large-scale functional RNAi screen, using the Caenorhabditis elegans strain CB55, which carries a truncating mutation in the unc-2 gene, the worm ortholog for the human CACNA1A. The screen was carried out by the feeding method in 96-well liquid culture format, using the ORFeome v1.1 feeding library, and time-lapse imaging of worms in liquid culture was used to assess changes in thrashing behavior. We looked for genes that, when silenced, either ameliorated the slow and uncoordinated phenotype of unc-2, or interacted to produce a more severe phenotype. Of the 350 putative hits from the primary screen, 37 genes consistently showed reproducible results. At least 75% of these are specifically expressed in the C. elegans neurons. Functional network analysis and gene ontology revealed overrepresentation of genes involved in development, growth, locomotion, signal transduction, and vesicle-mediated transport. We have expanded the functional network of genes involved in neurodegeneration leading to cerebellar ataxia related to unc-2/CACNA1A, further confirming the involvement of the transforming growth factor β pathway and adding a novel signaling cascade, the Notch pathway.

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-sgRNA全基因组文库筛选人单核细胞白血病功能性促癌/抑癌基因体系的建立与优化%Establishment and optimization of genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-sgRNA screening system in THP1 cell line for functional oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晨; 郝莎; 白杨; 张健萍; 张孝兵; 程涛

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-sgRNA screen is a powerful tool for systematic genetic analysis in mammalian cells.In this study,we optimized the lentivirus-based CRISPR/Cas9-sgRNA system in the THP1 cell line and established the nude mouse tumor model for functional gene screen.Through the optimization of the sequencing library construction,we performed the next generation sequencing on the tumor cells and obtained the screening results by bioinformatics analyses.The mouse tumor model showed decreased tumorigenic ability of sgRNA transduced cells,which may be due to knock out of some oncogenes.We confirmed some candidate genes through the sequencing analysis.Therefore,the genome-wide CRISPR/Cas9-sgRNA screening system in THP1 cell line is feasible.This work sets the stage for our extended screen for functional genes in other leukemia cell lines or primary cells.%CRISPR/Cas9-sgRNA(single guide RNA)全基因组文库筛选技术是在哺乳动物中进行系统基因组分析的有力工具.本文通过在人急性单核白血病细胞系THP1上优化CRISPR/Cas9-sgRNA人类全基因组慢病毒文库感染体系,构建裸鼠皮下移植肿瘤模型,并通过优化测序建库方法,对肿瘤组织进行二代测序以及利用生物信息学分析获得筛选结果.裸鼠肿瘤模型表明,感染sgRNA文库后的THP1细胞成瘤能力下降,推测可能与某些促癌基因的敲除有关;通过对二代测序数据进行生物信息学分析得到了一些候选基因.实验结果表明,在人单核细胞白血病细胞系上进行CRISPR/Cas9-sgRNA全基因组文库筛选是可行的,这项工作为在其他白血病细胞系或原代细胞上的筛选应用奠定了一定基础.

  1. Large-scale RNAi screen of G protein-coupled receptors involved in larval growth, molting and metamorphosis in the red flour beetle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shah Kapil

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs belong to the largest superfamily of integral cell membrane proteins and play crucial roles in physiological processes including behavior, development and reproduction. Because of their broad and diverse roles in cellular signaling, GPCRs are the therapeutic targets for many prescription drugs. However, there is no commercial pesticide targeting insect GPCRs. In this study, we employed functional genomics methods and used the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, as a model system to study the physiological roles of GPCRs during the larval growth, molting and metamorphosis. Results A total of 111 non-sensory GPCRs were identified in the T. castaneum genome. Thirty-nine of them were not reported previously. Large-scale RNA interference (RNAi screen was used to study the function of all these GPCRs during immature stages. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA-mediated knockdown in the expression of genes coding for eight GPCRs caused severe developmental arrest and ecdysis failure (with more than 90% mortality after dsRNA injection. These GPCRs include dopamine-2 like receptor (TC007490/D2R and latrophilin receptor (TC001872/Cirl. The majority of larvae injected with TC007490/D2R dsRNA died during larval stage prior to entering pupal stage, suggesting that this GPCR is essential for larval growth and development. Conclusions The results from our study revealed the physiological roles of some GPCRs in T. castaneum. These findings could help in development of novel pesticides targeting these GPCRs.

  2. Genome-wide Association Study of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, S Evelyn; Yu, Dongmei; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Neale, Benjamin M; Fagerness, Jesen A; Mathews, Carol A; Arnold, Paul D; Evans, Patrick D; Gamazon, Eric R; Osiecki, Lisa; McGrath, Lauren; Haddad, Stephen; Crane, Jacquelyn; Hezel, Dianne; Illman, Cornelia; Mayerfeld, Catherine; Konkashbaev, Anuar; Liu, Chunyu; Pluzhnikov, Anna; Tikhomirov, Anna; Edlund, Christopher K; Rauch, Scott L; Moessner, Rainald; Falkai, Peter; Maier, Wolfgang; Ruhrmann, Stephan; Grabe, Hans-Jörgen; Lennertz, Leonard; Wagner, Michael; Bellodi, Laura; Cavallini, Maria Cristina; Richter, Margaret A; Cook, Edwin H; Kennedy, James L; Rosenberg, David; Stein, Dan J; Hemmings, Sian MJ; Lochner, Christine; Azzam, Amin; Chavira, Denise A; Fournier, Eduardo; Garrido, Helena; Sheppard, Brooke; Umaña, Paul; Murphy, Dennis L; Wendland, Jens R; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy; Denys, Damiaan; Blom, Rianne; Deforce, Dieter; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Westenberg, Herman GM; Walitza, Susanne; Egberts, Karin; Renner, Tobias; Miguel, Euripedes Constantino; Cappi, Carolina; Hounie, Ana G; Conceição do Rosário, Maria; Sampaio, Aline S; Vallada, Homero; Nicolini, Humberto; Lanzagorta, Nuria; Camarena, Beatriz; Delorme, Richard; Leboyer, Marion; Pato, Carlos N; Pato, Michele T; Voyiaziakis, Emanuel; Heutink, Peter; Cath, Danielle C; Posthuma, Danielle; Smit, Jan H; Samuels, Jack; Bienvenu, O Joseph; Cullen, Bernadette; Fyer, Abby J; Grados, Marco A; Greenberg, Benjamin D; McCracken, James T; Riddle, Mark A; Wang, Ying; Coric, Vladimir; Leckman, James F; Bloch, Michael; Pittenger, Christopher; Eapen, Valsamma; Black, Donald W; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; Cusi, Daniele; Turiel, Maurizio; Frau, Francesca; Macciardi, Fabio; Gibbs, J Raphael; Cookson, Mark R; Singleton, Andrew; Hardy, John; Crenshaw, Andrew T; Parkin, Melissa A; Mirel, Daniel B; Conti, David V; Purcell, Shaun; Nestadt, Gerald; Hanna, Gregory L; Jenike, Michael A; Knowles, James A; Cox, Nancy; Pauls, David L

    2014-01-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a common, debilitating neuropsychiatric illness with complex genetic etiology. The International OCD Foundation Genetics Collaborative (IOCDF-GC) is a multi-national collaboration established to discover the genetic variation predisposing to OCD. A set of individuals affected with DSM-IV OCD, a subset of their parents, and unselected controls, were genotyped with several different Illumina SNP microarrays. After extensive data cleaning, 1,465 cases, 5,557 ancestry-matched controls and 400 complete trios remained, with a common set of 469,410 autosomal and 9,657 X-chromosome SNPs. Ancestry-stratified case-control association analyses were conducted for three genetically-defined subpopulations and combined in two meta-analyses, with and without the trio-based analysis. In the case-control analysis, the lowest two p-values were located within DLGAP1 (p=2.49×10-6 and p=3.44×10-6), a member of the neuronal postsynaptic density complex. In the trio analysis, rs6131295, near BTBD3, exceeded the genome-wide significance threshold with a p-value=3.84 × 10-8. However, when trios were meta-analyzed with the combined case-control samples, the p-value for this variant was 3.62×10-5, losing genome-wide significance. Although no SNPs were identified to be associated with OCD at a genome-wide significant level in the combined trio-case-control sample, a significant enrichment of methylation-QTLs (p<0.001) and frontal lobe eQTLs (p=0.001) was observed within the top-ranked SNPs (p<0.01) from the trio-case-control analysis, suggesting these top signals may have a broad role in gene expression in the brain, and possibly in the etiology of OCD. PMID:22889921

  3. Genome-wide landscapes of human local adaptation in Asia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Qian

    Full Text Available Genetic studies of human local adaptation have been facilitated greatly by recent advances in high-throughput genotyping and sequencing technologies. However, few studies have investigated local adaptation in Asian populations on a genome-wide scale and with a high geographic resolution. In this study, taking advantage of the dense population coverage in Southeast Asia, which is the part of the world least studied in term of natural selection, we depicted genome-wide landscapes of local adaptations in 63 Asian populations representing the majority of linguistic and ethnic groups in Asia. Using genome-wide data analysis, we discovered many genes showing signs of local adaptation or natural selection. Notable examples, such as FOXQ1, MAST2, and CDH4, were found to play a role in hair follicle development and human cancer, signal transduction, and tumor repression, respectively. These showed strong indications of natural selection in Philippine Negritos, a group of aboriginal hunter-gatherers living in the Philippines. MTTP, which has associations with metabolic syndrome, body mass index, and insulin regulation, showed a strong signature of selection in Southeast Asians, including Indonesians. Functional annotation analysis revealed that genes and genetic variants underlying natural selections were generally enriched in the functional category of alternative splicing. Specifically, many genes showing significant difference with respect to allele frequency between northern and southern Asian populations were found to be associated with human height and growth and various immune pathways. In summary, this study contributes to the overall understanding of human local adaptation in Asia and has identified both known and novel signatures of natural selection in the human genome.

  4. Illustration of SSMD, z score, SSMD*, z* score, and t statistic for hit selection in RNAi high-throughput screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohua Douglas

    2011-08-01

    Hit selection is the ultimate goal in many high-throughput screens. Various analytic methods are available for this purpose. Some commonly used ones are z score, z* score, strictly standardized mean difference (SSMD), SSMD*, and t statistic. It is critical to know how to use them correctly because the misusage of them can readily produce misleading results. Here, the author presents basic concepts, elaborates their commonality and difference, describes some common misusage that people should avoid, and uses simulated simple examples to illustrate how to use them correctly.

  5. Genome-wide prediction of C. elegans genetic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Weiwei; Sternberg, Paul W

    2006-03-10

    To obtain a global view of functional interactions among genes in a metazoan genome, we computationally integrated interactome data, gene expression data, phenotype data, and functional annotation data from three model organisms-Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila melanogaster-and predicted genome-wide genetic interactions in C. elegans. The resulting genetic interaction network (consisting of 18,183 interactions) provides a framework for system-level understanding of gene functions. We experimentally tested the predicted interactions for two human disease-related genes and identified 14 new modifiers.

  6. Genome-wide association studies and contribution to cardiovascular physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munroe, Patricia B; Tinker, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    The study of family pedigrees with rare monogenic cardiovascular disorders has revealed new molecular players in physiological processes. Genome-wide association studies of complex traits with a heritable component may afford a similar and potentially intellectually richer opportunity. In this review we focus on the interpretation of genetic associations and the issue of causality in relation to known and potentially new physiology. We mainly discuss cardiometabolic traits as it reflects our personal interests, but the issues pertain broadly in many other disciplines. We also describe some of the resources that are now available that may expedite follow up of genetic association signals into observations on causal mechanisms and pathophysiology.

  7. [Genome-wide association study for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Yoji; Kou, Ikuyo; Scoliosis, Japan; Matsumoto, Morio; Watanabe, Kota; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2016-04-01

    Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis(AIS)is a polygenic disease. Genome-wide association studies(GWASs)have been performed for a lot of polygenic diseases. For AIS, we conducted GWAS and identified the first AIS locus near LBX1. After the discovery, we have extended our study by increasing the numbers of subjects and SNPs. In total, our Japanese GWAS has identified four susceptibility genes. GWASs for AIS have also been performed in the USA and China, which identified one and three susceptibility genes, respectively. Here we review GWASs in Japan and abroad and functional analysis to clarify the pathomechanism of AIS.

  8. Genome-wide approaches to understanding behaviour in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Megan; Goodwin, Stephen F

    2012-09-01

    Understanding how an organism exhibits specific behaviours remains a major and important biological question. Studying behaviour in a simple model organism like the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has the advantages of advanced molecular genetics approaches along with well-defined anatomy and physiology. With advancements in functional genomic technologies, researchers are now attempting to uncover genes and pathways involved in complex behaviours on a genome-wide scale. A systems-level network approach, which will include genomic approaches, to study behaviour will be key to understanding the regulation and modulation of behaviours and the importance of context in regulating them.

  9. Arabidopsis transcription factors: genome-wide comparative analysis among eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechmann, J L; Heard, J; Martin, G; Reuber, L; Jiang, C; Keddie, J; Adam, L; Pineda, O; Ratcliffe, O J; Samaha, R R; Creelman, R; Pilgrim, M; Broun, P; Zhang, J Z; Ghandehari, D; Sherman, B K; Yu, G

    2000-12-15

    The completion of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comparative analysis of transcriptional regulators across the three eukaryotic kingdoms. Arabidopsis dedicates over 5% of its genome to code for more than 1500 transcription factors, about 45% of which are from families specific to plants. Arabidopsis transcription factors that belong to families common to all eukaryotes do not share significant similarity with those of the other kingdoms beyond the conserved DNA binding domains, many of which have been arranged in combinations specific to each lineage. The genome-wide comparison reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the regulation of transcription.

  10. A quantitative RNAi screen for JNK modifiers identifies Pvr as a novel regulator of Drosophila immune signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bond

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster responds to gram-negative bacterial challenges through the IMD pathway, a signal transduction cassette that is driven by the coordinated activities of JNK, NF-kappaB and caspase modules. While many modifiers of NF-kappaB activity were identified in cell culture and in vivo assays, the regulatory apparatus that determines JNK inputs into the IMD pathway is relatively unexplored. In this manuscript, we present the first quantitative screen of the entire genome of Drosophila for novel regulators of JNK activity in the IMD pathway. We identified a large number of gene products that negatively or positively impact on JNK activation in the IMD pathway. In particular, we identified the Pvr receptor tyrosine kinase as a potent inhibitor of JNK activation. In a series of in vivo and cell culture assays, we demonstrated that activation of the IMD pathway drives JNK-dependent expression of the Pvr ligands, Pvf2 and Pvf3, which in turn act through the Pvr/ERK MAP kinase pathway to attenuate the JNK and NF-kappaB arms of the IMD pathway. Our data illuminate a poorly understood arm of a critical and evolutionarily conserved innate immune response. Furthermore, given the pleiotropic involvement of JNK in eukaryotic cell biology, we believe that many of the novel regulators identified in this screen are of interest beyond immune signaling.

  11. A genome-wide association study of female sexual dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Burri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Female sexual dysfunction (FSD is an important but controversial problem with serious negative impact on women's quality of life. Data from twin studies have shown a genetic contribution to the development and maintenance of FSD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS on 2.5 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 1,104 female twins (25-81 years of age in a population-based register and phenotypic data on lifelong sexual functioning. Although none reached conventional genome-wide level of significance (10 × -8, we found strongly suggestive associations with the phenotypic dimension of arousal (rs13202860, P = 1.2 × 10(-7; rs1876525, P = 1.2 × 10(-7; and rs13209281 P = 8.3 × 10(-7 on chromosome 6, around 500 kb upstream of the locus HTR1E (5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1E locus, related to the serotonin brain pathways. We could not replicate previously reported candidate SNPs associated with FSD in the DRD4, 5HT2A and IL-1B loci. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report the first GWAS of FSD symptoms in humans. This has pointed to several "risk alleles" and the implication of the serotonin and GABA pathways. Ultimately, understanding key mechanisms via this research may lead to new FSD treatments and inform clinical practice and developments in psychiatric nosology.

  12. A genome-wide association study of aging.

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    Walter, Stefan; Atzmon, Gil; Demerath, Ellen W; Garcia, Melissa E; Kaplan, Robert C; Kumari, Meena; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Milaneschi, Yuri; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tranah, Gregory J; Völker, Uwe; Yu, Lei; Arnold, Alice; Benjamin, Emelia J; Biffar, Reiner; Buchman, Aron S; Boerwinkle, Eric; Couper, David; De Jager, Philip L; Evans, Denis A; Harris, Tamara B; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Albert; Karasik, David; Kiel, Douglas P; Kocher, Thomas; Kuningas, Maris; Launer, Lenore J; Lohman, Kurt K; Lutsey, Pamela L; Mackenbach, Johan; Marciante, Kristin; Psaty, Bruce M; Reiman, Eric M; Rotter, Jerome I; Seshadri, Sudha; Shardell, Michelle D; Smith, Albert V; van Duijn, Cornelia; Walston, Jeremy; Zillikens, M Carola; Bandinelli, Stefania; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Bennett, David A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Liu, Yongmei; Murabito, Joanne M; Newman, Anne B; Tiemeier, Henning; Franceschini, Nora

    2011-11-01

    Human longevity and healthy aging show moderate heritability (20%-50%). We conducted a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies from 9 studies from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology Consortium for 2 outcomes: (1) all-cause mortality, and (2) survival free of major disease or death. No single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was a genome-wide significant predictor of either outcome (p < 5 × 10(-8)). We found 14 independent SNPs that predicted risk of death, and 8 SNPs that predicted event-free survival (p < 10(-5)). These SNPs are in or near genes that are highly expressed in the brain (HECW2, HIP1, BIN2, GRIA1), genes involved in neural development and function (KCNQ4, LMO4, GRIA1, NETO1) and autophagy (ATG4C), and genes that are associated with risk of various diseases including cancer and Alzheimer's disease. In addition to considerable overlap between the traits, pathway and network analysis corroborated these findings. These findings indicate that variation in genes involved in neurological processes may be an important factor in regulating aging free of major disease and achieving longevity.

  13. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome.

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    Varun Warrier

    Full Text Available Asperger Syndrome (AS is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC, which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448 were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448 lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision.

  14. Genome-wide association studies of obesity and metabolic syndrome.

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    Fall, Tove; Ingelsson, Erik

    2014-01-25

    Until just a few years ago, the genetic determinants of obesity and metabolic syndrome were largely unknown, with the exception of a few forms of monogenic extreme obesity. Since genome-wide association studies (GWAS) became available, large advances have been made. The first single nucleotide polymorphism robustly associated with increased body mass index (BMI) was in 2007 mapped to a gene with for the time unknown function. This gene, now known as fat mass and obesity associated (FTO) has been repeatedly replicated in several ethnicities and is affecting obesity by regulating appetite. Since the first report from a GWAS of obesity, an increasing number of markers have been shown to be associated with BMI, other measures of obesity or fat distribution and metabolic syndrome. This systematic review of obesity GWAS will summarize genome-wide significant findings for obesity and metabolic syndrome and briefly give a few suggestions of what is to be expected in the next few years. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A Pooled Genome-Wide Association Study of Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental condition characterized by impairments in social interaction and communication, alongside the presence of unusually repetitive, restricted interests and stereotyped behaviour. Individuals with AS have no delay in cognitive and language development. It is a subset of Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC), which are highly heritable and has a population prevalence of approximately 1%. Few studies have investigated the genetic basis of AS. To address this gap in the literature, we performed a genome-wide pooled DNA association study to identify candidate loci in 612 individuals (294 cases and 318 controls) of Caucasian ancestry, using the Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping version 6.0 array. We identified 11 SNPs that had a p-value below 1x10-5. These SNPs were independently genotyped in the same sample. Three of the SNPs (rs1268055, rs7785891 and rs2782448) were nominally significant, though none remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Two of our top three SNPs (rs7785891 and rs2782448) lie in loci previously implicated in ASC. However, investigation of the three SNPs in the ASC genome-wide association dataset from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium indicated that these three SNPs were not significantly associated with ASC. The effect sizes of the variants were modest, indicating that our study was not sufficiently powered to identify causal variants with precision.

  16. Genome-wide patterns of Arabidopsis gene expression in nature.

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    Christina L Richards

    Full Text Available Organisms in the wild are subject to multiple, fluctuating environmental factors, and it is in complex natural environments that genetic regulatory networks actually function and evolve. We assessed genome-wide gene expression patterns in the wild in two natural accessions of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and examined the nature of transcriptional variation throughout its life cycle and gene expression correlations with natural environmental fluctuations. We grew plants in a natural field environment and measured genome-wide time-series gene expression from the plant shoot every three days, spanning the seedling to reproductive stages. We find that 15,352 genes were expressed in the A. thaliana shoot in the field, and accession and flowering status (vegetative versus flowering were strong components of transcriptional variation in this plant. We identified between ∼110 and 190 time-varying gene expression clusters in the field, many of which were significantly overrepresented by genes regulated by abiotic and biotic environmental stresses. The two main principal components of vegetative shoot gene expression (PC(veg correlate to temperature and precipitation occurrence in the field. The largest PC(veg axes included thermoregulatory genes while the second major PC(veg was associated with precipitation and contained drought-responsive genes. By exposing A. thaliana to natural environments in an open field, we provide a framework for further understanding the genetic networks that are deployed in natural environments, and we connect plant molecular genetics in the laboratory to plant organismal ecology in the wild.

  17. Planning and executing a genome wide association study (GWAS).

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    Sale, Michèle M; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C; Chen, Wei-Min

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, genome-wide association approaches have proven a powerful and successful strategy to identify genetic contributors to complex traits, including a number of endocrine disorders. Their success has meant that genome wide association studies (GWAS) are fast becoming the default study design for discovery of new genetic variants that influence a clinical trait or phenotype. This chapter focuses on a number of key elements that require consideration for the successful conduct of a GWAS. Although many of the considerations are common to any genetic study, the greater cost, extreme multiple testing, and greater openness to data sharing require specific awareness and planning by investigators. In the section on designing a GWAS, we reflect on ethical considerations, study design, selection of phenotype/s, power considerations, sample tracking and storage issues, and genotyping product selection. During execution, important considerations include DNA quantity and preparation, genotyping methods, quality control checks of genotype data, in silico genotyping (imputation), tests of association, and replication of association signals. Although the field of human genetics is rapidly evolving, recent experiences can help guide an investigator in making practical and methodological choices that will eventually determine the overall quality of GWAS results. Given the investment to recruit patient populations or cohorts that are powered for a GWAS, and the still substantial costs associated with genotyping, it is helpful to be aware of these aspects to maximize the likelihood of success, especially where there is an opportunity for implementing them prospectively.

  18. Genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism in domesticated rice.

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    Ana L Caicedo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Domesticated Asian rice (Oryza sativa is one of the oldest domesticated crop species in the world, having fed more people than any other plant in human history. We report the patterns of DNA sequence variation in rice and its wild ancestor, O. rufipogon, across 111 randomly chosen gene fragments, and use these to infer the evolutionary dynamics that led to the origins of rice. There is a genome-wide excess of high-frequency derived single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in O. sativa varieties, a pattern that has not been reported for other crop species. We developed several alternative models to explain contemporary patterns of polymorphisms in rice, including a (i selectively neutral population bottleneck model, (ii bottleneck plus migration model, (iii multiple selective sweeps model, and (iv bottleneck plus selective sweeps model. We find that a simple bottleneck model, which has been the dominant demographic model for domesticated species, cannot explain the derived nucleotide polymorphism site frequency spectrum in rice. Instead, a bottleneck model that incorporates selective sweeps, or a more complex demographic model that includes subdivision and gene flow, are more plausible explanations for patterns of variation in domesticated rice varieties. If selective sweeps are indeed the explanation for the observed nucleotide data of domesticated rice, it suggests that strong selection can leave its imprint on genome-wide polymorphism patterns, contrary to expectations that selection results only in a local signature of variation.

  19. Genome-wide mapping of DNA methylation in chicken.

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    Qinghe Li

    Full Text Available Cytosine DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification termed as the fifth base that functions in diverse processes. Till now, the genome-wide DNA methylation maps of many organisms has been reported, such as human, Arabidopsis, rice and silkworm, but the methylation pattern of bird remains rarely studied. Here we show the genome-wide DNA methylation map of bird, using the chicken as a model organism and an immunocapturing approach followed by high-throughput sequencing. In both of the red jungle fowl and the avian broiler, DNA methylation was described separately for the liver and muscle tissue. Generally, chicken displays analogous methylation pattern with that of animals and plants. DNA methylation is enriched in the gene body regions and the repetitive sequences, and depleted in the transcription start site (TSS and the transcription termination site (TTS. Most of the CpG islands in the chicken genome are kept in unmethylated state. Promoter methylation is negatively correlated with the gene expression level, indicating its suppressive role in regulating gene transcription. This work contributes to our understanding of epigenetics in birds.

  20. Genome-Wide Scan for Methylation Profiles in Keloids

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    Lamont R. Jones

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keloids are benign fibroproliferative tumors of the skin which commonly occur after injury mainly in darker skinned patients. Medical treatment is fraught with high recurrence rates mainly because of an incomplete understanding of the biological mechanisms that lead to keloids. The purpose of this project was to examine keloid pathogenesis from the epigenome perspective of DNA methylation. Genome-wide profiling used the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip to interrogate DNA from 6 fresh keloid and 6 normal skin samples from 12 anonymous donors. A 3-tiered approach was used to call out genes most differentially methylated between keloid and normal. When compared to normal, of the 685 differentially methylated CpGs at Tier 3, 510 were hypomethylated and 175 were hypermethylated with 190 CpGs in promoter and 495 in nonpromoter regions. The 190 promoter region CpGs corresponded to 152 genes: 96 (63% were hypomethylated and 56 (37% hypermethylated. This exploratory genome-wide scan of the keloid methylome highlights a predominance of hypomethylated genomic landscapes, favoring nonpromoter regions. DNA methylation, as an additional mechanism for gene regulation in keloid pathogenesis, holds potential for novel treatments that reverse deleterious epigenetic changes. As an alternative mechanism for regulating genes, epigenetics may explain why gene mutations alone do not provide definitive mechanisms for keloid formation.

  1. An RNAi screen for Aire cofactors reveals a role for Hnrnpl in polymerase release and Aire-activated ectopic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Matthieu; Jmari, Nada; Du, Lina; Carallis, Floriane; Nieland, Thomas J F; Perez-Campo, Flor M; Bensaude, Olivier; Root, David E; Hacohen, Nir; Mathis, Diane; Benoist, Christophe

    2014-01-28

    Aire induces the expression of a large set of autoantigen genes in the thymus, driving immunological tolerance in maturing T cells. To determine the full spectrum of molecular mechanisms underlying the Aire transactivation function, we screened an AIRE-dependent gene-expression system with a genome-scale lentiviral shRNA library, targeting factors associated with chromatin architecture/function, transcription, and mRNA processing. Fifty-one functional allies were identified, with a preponderance of factors that impact transcriptional elongation compared with initiation, in particular members of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) involved in the release of "paused" RNA polymerases (CCNT2 and HEXIM1); mRNA processing and polyadenylation factors were also highlighted (HNRNPL/F, SFRS1, SFRS3, and CLP1). Aire's functional allies were validated on transfected and endogenous target genes, including the generation of lentigenic knockdown (KD) mice. We uncovered the effect of the splicing factor Hnrnpl on Aire-induced transcription. Transcripts sensitive to the P-TEFb inhibitor flavopiridol were reduced by Hnrnpl knockdown in thymic epithelial cells, independently of their dependence on Aire, therefore indicating a general effect of Hnrnpl on RNA elongation. This conclusion was substantiated by demonstration of HNRNPL interactions with P-TEFb components (CDK9, CCNT2, HEXIM1, and the small 7SK RNA). Aire-containing complexes include 7SK RNA, the latter interaction disrupted by HNRNPL knockdown, suggesting that HNRNPL may partake in delivering inactive P-TEFb to Aire. Thus, these results indicate that mRNA processing factors cooperate with Aire to release stalled polymerases and to activate ectopic expression of autoantigen genes in the thymus.

  2. RNAi screening of developmental toolkit genes: a search for novel wing genes in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linz, David M; Tomoyasu, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    The amazing array of diversity among insect wings offers a powerful opportunity to study the mechanisms guiding morphological evolution. Studies in Drosophila (the fruit fly) have identified dozens of genes important for wing development. These genes are often called candidate genes, serving as an ideal starting point to study wing development in other insects. However, we also need to explore beyond the candidate genes to gain a more comprehensive view of insect wing evolution. As a first step away from the traditional candidate genes, we utilized Tribolium (the red flour beetle) as a model and assessed the potential involvement of a group of developmental toolkit genes (embryonic patterning genes) in beetle wing development. We hypothesized that the highly pleiotropic nature of these developmental genes would increase the likelihood of finding novel wing genes in Tribolium. Through the RNA interference screening, we found that Tc-cactus has a less characterized (but potentially evolutionarily conserved) role in wing development. We also found that the odd-skipped family genes are essential for the formation of the thoracic pleural plates, including the recently discovered wing serial homologs in Tribolium. In addition, we obtained several novel insights into the function of these developmental genes, such as the involvement of mille-pattes and Tc-odd-paired in metamorphosis. Despite these findings, no gene we examined was found to have novel wing-related roles unique in Tribolium. These results suggest a relatively conserved nature of developmental toolkit genes and highlight the limited degree to which these genes are co-opted during insect wing evolution.

  3. Layers of epistasis: genome-wide regulatory networks and network approaches to genome-wide association studies

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    Cowper-Sal·lari, Richard; Cole, Michael D.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Lupien, Mathieu; Moore, Jason H.

    2010-01-01

    The conceptual foundation of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) has advanced unchecked since its conception. A revision might seem premature as the potential of GWAS has not been fully realized. Multiple technical and practical limitations need to be overcome before GWAS can be fairly criticized. But with the completion of hundreds of studies and a deeper understanding of the genetic architecture of disease, warnings are being raised. The results compiled to date indicate that risk-associated variants lie predominantly in non-coding regions of the genome. Additionally, alternative methodologies are uncovering large and heterogeneous sets of rare variants underlying disease. The fear is that, even in its fulfilment, the current GWAS paradigm might be incapable of dissecting all kinds of phenotypes. In the following text we review several initiatives that aim to overcome these limitations. The overarching theme of these studies is the inclusion of biological knowledge to both the analysis and interpretation of genotyping data. GWAS is uninformed of biology by design and although there is some virtue in its simplicity it is also its most conspicuous deficiency. We propose a framework in which to integrate these novel approaches, both empirical and theoretical, in the form of a genome-wide regulatory network (GWRN). By processing experimental data into networks, emerging data types based on chromatin-immunoprecipitation are made computationally tractable. This will give GWAS re-analysis efforts the most current and relevant substrates, and root them firmly on our knowledge of human disease. PMID:21197657

  4. A genome-wide association study of optic disc parameters.

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    Wishal D Ramdas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve head is involved in many ophthalmic disorders, including common diseases such as myopia and open-angle glaucoma. Two of the most important parameters are the size of the optic disc area and the vertical cup-disc ratio (VCDR. Both are highly heritable but genetically largely undetermined. We performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association (GWA data to identify genetic variants associated with optic disc area and VCDR. The gene discovery included 7,360 unrelated individuals from the population-based Rotterdam Study I and Rotterdam Study II cohorts. These cohorts revealed two genome-wide significant loci for optic disc area, rs1192415 on chromosome 1p22 (p = 6.72x10(-19 within 117 kb of the CDC7 gene and rs1900004 on chromosome 10q21.3-q22.1 (p = 2.67x10(-33 within 10 kb of the ATOH7 gene. They revealed two genome-wide significant loci for VCDR, rs1063192 on chromosome 9p21 (p = 6.15x10(-11 in the CDKN2B gene and rs10483727 on chromosome 14q22.3-q23 (p = 2.93x10(-10 within 40 kbp of the SIX1 gene. Findings were replicated in two independent Dutch cohorts (Rotterdam Study III and Erasmus Rucphen Family study; N = 3,612, and the TwinsUK cohort (N = 843. Meta-analysis with the replication cohorts confirmed the four loci and revealed a third locus at 16q12.1 associated with optic disc area, and four other loci at 11q13, 13q13, 17q23 (borderline significant, and 22q12.1 for VCDR. ATOH7 was also associated with VCDR independent of optic disc area. Three of the loci were marginally associated with open-angle glaucoma. The protein pathways in which the loci of optic disc area are involved overlap with those identified for VCDR, suggesting a common genetic origin.

  5. Genome-wide Pleiotropy Between Parkinson Disease and Autoimmune Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witoelar, Aree; Jansen, Iris E; Wang, Yunpeng; Desikan, Rahul S; Gibbs, J Raphael; Blauwendraat, Cornelis; Thompson, Wesley K; Hernandez, Dena G; Djurovic, Srdjan; Schork, Andrew J; Bettella, Francesco; Ellinghaus, David; Franke, Andre; Lie, Benedicte A; McEvoy, Linda K; Karlsen, Tom H; Lesage, Suzanne; Morris, Huw R; Brice, Alexis; Wood, Nicholas W; Heutink, Peter; Hardy, John; Singleton, Andrew B; Dale, Anders M; Gasser, Thomas; Andreassen, Ole A; Sharma, Manu

    2017-07-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and pathway analyses supported long-standing observations of an association between immune-mediated diseases and Parkinson disease (PD). The post-GWAS era provides an opportunity for cross-phenotype analyses between different complex phenotypes. To test the hypothesis that there are common genetic risk variants conveying risk of both PD and autoimmune diseases (ie, pleiotropy) and to identify new shared genetic variants and their pathways by applying a novel statistical framework in a genome-wide approach. Using the conjunction false discovery rate method, this study analyzed GWAS data from a selection of archetypal autoimmune diseases among 138 511 individuals of European ancestry and systemically investigated pleiotropy between PD and type 1 diabetes, Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, psoriasis, and multiple sclerosis. NeuroX data (6927 PD cases and 6108 controls) were used for replication. The study investigated the biological correlation between the top loci through protein-protein interaction and changes in the gene expression and methylation levels. The dates of the analysis were June 10, 2015, to March 4, 2017. The primary outcome was a list of novel loci and their pathways involved in PD and autoimmune diseases. Genome-wide conjunctional analysis identified 17 novel loci at false discovery rate less than 0.05 with overlap between PD and autoimmune diseases, including known PD loci adjacent to GAK, HLA-DRB5, LRRK2, and MAPT for rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis and Crohn disease. Replication confirmed the involvement of HLA, LRRK2, MAPT, TRIM10, and SETD1A in PD. Among the novel genes discovered, WNT3, KANSL1, CRHR1, BOLA2, and GUCY1A3 are within a protein-protein interaction network with known PD genes. A subset of novel loci was significantly associated with changes in methylation or expression levels of adjacent genes. The study findings provide novel mechanistic

  6. Genome-wide association study of antisocial personality disorder

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    Rautiainen, M-R; Paunio, T; Repo-Tiihonen, E; Virkkunen, M; Ollila, H M; Sulkava, S; Jolanki, O; Palotie, A; Tiihonen, J

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) remains unclear. Although the most consistent biological finding is reduced grey matter volume in the frontal cortex, about 50% of the total liability to developing ASPD has been attributed to genetic factors. The contributing genes remain largely unknown. Therefore, we sought to study the genetic background of ASPD. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) and a replication analysis of Finnish criminal offenders fulfilling DSM-IV criteria for ASPD (N=370, N=5850 for controls, GWAS; N=173, N=3766 for controls and replication sample). The GWAS resulted in suggestive associations of two clusters of single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 6p21.2 and at 6p21.32 at the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region. Imputation of HLA alleles revealed an independent association with DRB1*01:01 (odds ratio (OR)=2.19 (1.53–3.14), P=1.9 × 10-5). Two polymorphisms at 6p21.2 LINC00951–LRFN2 gene region were replicated in a separate data set, and rs4714329 reached genome-wide significance (OR=1.59 (1.37–1.85), P=1.6 × 10−9) in the meta-analysis. The risk allele also associated with antisocial features in the general population conditioned for severe problems in childhood family (β=0.68, P=0.012). Functional analysis in brain tissue in open access GTEx and Braineac databases revealed eQTL associations of rs4714329 with LINC00951 and LRFN2 in cerebellum. In humans, LINC00951 and LRFN2 are both expressed in the brain, especially in the frontal cortex, which is intriguing considering the role of the frontal cortex in behavior and the neuroanatomical findings of reduced gray matter volume in ASPD. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing genome-wide significant and replicable findings on genetic variants associated with any personality disorder. PMID:27598967

  7. Genome-wide association study of a quantitative disordered gambling trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Penelope A; Zhu, Gu; Montgomery, Grant W; Madden, Pamela A F; Heath, Andrew C; Martin, Nicholas G; Slutske, Wendy S

    2013-05-01

    Disordered gambling is a moderately heritable trait, but the underlying genetic basis is largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for disordered gambling using a quantitative factor score in 1312 twins from 894 Australian families. Association was conducted for 2 381 914 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the family-based association test in Merlin followed by gene and pathway enrichment analyses. Although no SNP reached genome-wide significance, six achieved P-values Secondary case-control analyses found two SNPs on chromosome 9 (rs1106076 and rs12305135 near VLDLR) and rs10812227 near FZD10 on chromosome 12 to be significantly associated with lifetime Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition pathological gambling and South Oaks Gambling Screen classified probable pathological gambling status. Furthermore, several addiction-related pathways were enriched for SNPs associated with disordered gambling. Finally, gene-based analysis of 24 candidate genes for dopamine agonist-induced gambling in individuals with Parkinson's disease suggested an enrichment of SNPs associated with disordered gambling. We report the first GWAS of disordered gambling. While further replication is required, the identification of susceptibility loci and biological pathways will be important in characterizing the biological mechanisms that underpin disordered gambling.

  8. A genome-wide survey of transgenerational genetic effects in autism.

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    Kathryn M Tsang

    Full Text Available Effects of parental genotype or parent-offspring genetic interaction are well established in model organisms for a variety of traits. However, these transgenerational genetic models are rarely studied in humans. We have utilized an autism case-control study with 735 mother-child pairs to perform genome-wide screening for maternal genetic effects and maternal-offspring genetic interaction. We used simple models of single locus parent-child interaction and identified suggestive results (P<10(-4 that cannot be explained by main effects, but no genome-wide significant signals. Some of these maternal and maternal-child associations were in or adjacent to autism candidate genes including: PCDH9, FOXP1, GABRB3, NRXN1, RELN, MACROD2, FHIT, RORA, CNTN4, CNTNAP2, FAM135B, LAMA1, NFIA, NLGN4X, RAPGEF4, and SDK1. We attempted validation of potential autism association under maternal-specific models using maternal-paternal comparison in family-based GWAS datasets. Our results suggest that further study of parental genetic effects and parent-child interaction in autism is warranted.

  9. Genome-wide scans using archived neonatal dried blood spot samples

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    Wiuf Carsten

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of disease susceptible genes requires access to DNA from numerous well-characterised subjects. Archived residual dried blood spot samples from national newborn screening programs may provide DNA from entire populations and medical registries the corresponding clinical information. The amount of DNA available in these samples is however rarely sufficient for reliable genome-wide scans, and whole-genome amplification may thus be necessary. This study assess the quality of DNA obtained from different amplification protocols by evaluating fidelity and robustness of the genotyping of 610,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms, using the Illumina Infinium HD Human610-Quad BeadChip. Whole-genome amplified DNA from 24 neonatal dried blood spot samples stored between 15 to 25 years was tested, and high-quality genomic DNA from 8 of the same individuals was used as reference. Results Using 3.2 mm disks from dried blood spot samples the optimal DNA-extraction and amplification protocol resulted in call-rates between 99.15% – 99.73% (mean 99.56%, N = 16, and conflicts with reference DNA in only three per 10,000 genotype calls. Conclusion Whole-genome amplified DNA from archived neonatal dried blood spot samples can be used for reliable genome-wide scans and is a cost-efficient alternative to collecting new samples.

  10. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation in Mixed Ancestry Individuals with Diabetes and Prediabetes from South Africa

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    Tandi E. Matsha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To conduct a genome-wide DNA methylation in individuals with type 2 diabetes, individuals with prediabetes, and control mixed ancestry individuals from South Africa. Methods. We used peripheral blood to perform genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in 3 individuals with screen detected diabetes, 3 individuals with prediabetes, and 3 individuals with normoglycaemia from the Bellville South Community, Cape Town, South Africa, who were age-, gender-, body mass index-, and duration of residency-matched. Methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP was performed by Arraystar Inc. (Rockville, MD, USA. Results. Hypermethylated DMRs were 1160 (81.97% and 124 (43.20%, respectively, in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes when both were compared to subjects with normoglycaemia. Our data shows that genes related to the immune system, signal transduction, glucose transport, and pancreas development have altered DNA methylation in subjects with prediabetes and diabetes. Pathway analysis based on the functional analysis mapping of genes to KEGG pathways suggested that the linoleic acid metabolism and arachidonic acid metabolism pathways are hypomethylated in prediabetes and diabetes. Conclusions. Our study suggests that epigenetic changes are likely to be an early process that occurs before the onset of overt diabetes. Detailed analysis of DMRs that shows gradual methylation differences from control versus prediabetes to prediabetes versus diabetes in a larger sample size is required to confirm these findings.

  11. Genome-Wide Expression of MicroRNAs Is Regulated by DNA Methylation in Hepatocarcinogenesis

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    Jing Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies, including ours, have examined the regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs by DNA methylation, but whether this regulation occurs at a genome-wide level in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is unclear. Subjects/Methods. Using a two-phase study design, we conducted genome-wide screening for DNA methylation and miRNA expression to explore the potential role of methylation alterations in miRNAs regulation. Results. We found that expressions of 25 miRNAs were statistically significantly different between tumor and nontumor tissues and perfectly differentiated HCC tumor from nontumor. Six miRNAs were overexpressed, and 19 were repressed in tumors. Among 133 miRNAs with inverse correlations between methylation and expression, 8 miRNAs (6% showed statistically significant differences in expression between tumor and nontumor tissues. Six miRNAs were validated in 56 additional paired HCC tissues, and significant inverse correlations were observed for miR-125b and miR-199a, which is consistent with the inactive chromatin pattern found in HepG2 cells. Conclusion. These data suggest that the expressions of miR-125b and miR-199a are dramatically regulated by DNA hypermethylation that plays a key role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  12. Genome-wide characterization of microsatellites in Triticeae species: abundance, distribution and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Pingchuan; Wang, Meng; Feng, Kewei; Cui, Licao; Tong, Wei; Song, Weining; Nie, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Microsatellites are an important constituent of plant genome and distributed across entire genome. In this study, genome-wide analysis of microsatellites in 8 Triticeae species and 9 model plants revealed that microsatellite characteristics were similar among the Triticeae species. Furthermore, genome-wide microsatellite markers were designed in wheat and then used to analyze the evolutionary relationship of wheat and other Triticeae species. Results displayed that Aegilops tauschii was found to be the closest species to Triticum aestivum, followed by Triticum urartu, Triticum turgidum and Aegilops speltoides, while Triticum monococcum, Aegilops sharonensis and Hordeum vulgare showed a relatively lower PCR amplification effectivity. Additionally, a significantly higher PCR amplification effectivity was found in chromosomes at the same subgenome than its homoeologous when these markers were subjected to search against different chromosomes in wheat. After a rigorous screening process, a total of 20,666 markers showed high amplification and polymorphic potential in wheat and its relatives, which were integrated with the public available wheat markers and then anchored to the genome of wheat (CS). This study not only provided the useful resource for SSR markers development in Triticeae species, but also shed light on the evolution of polyploid wheat from the perspective of microsatellites. PMID:27561724

  13. High-resolution genome-wide mapping of histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Tae-young; Ngau, Wing Chi; Cui, Kairong; Landsman, David; Zhao, Keji

    2004-08-01

    The expression patterns of eukaryotic genomes are controlled by their chromatin structure, consisting of nucleosome subunits in which DNA of approximately 146 bp is wrapped around a core of 8 histone molecules. Post-translational histone modifications play an essential role in modifying chromatin structure. Here we apply a combination of SAGE and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols to determine the distribution of hyperacetylated histones H3 and H4 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. We call this approach genome-wide mapping technique (GMAT). Using GMAT, we find that the highest acetylation levels are detected in the 5' end of a gene's coding region, but not in the promoter. Furthermore, we show that the histone acetyltransferase, GCN5p, regulates H3 acetylation in the promoter and 5' end of the coding regions. These findings indicate that GMAT should find valuable applications in mapping target sites of chromatin-modifying enzymes.

  14. Genome-wide association studies in pharmacogenomics of antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Eugene; Lane, Hsien-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is one of the most common psychiatric disorders worldwide. Doctors must prescribe antidepressants based on educated guesses due to the fact that it is unmanageable to predict the effectiveness of any particular antidepressant in an individual patient. With the recent advent of scientific research, the genome-wide association study (GWAS) is extensively employed to analyze hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms by high-throughput genotyping technologies. In addition to the candidate-gene approach, the GWAS approach has recently been utilized to investigate the determinants of antidepressant response to therapy. In this study, we reviewed GWAS studies, their limitations and future directions with respect to the pharmacogenomics of antidepressants in MDD.

  15. Chapter 10: Mining genome-wide genetic markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association study (GWAS aims to discover genetic factors underlying phenotypic traits. The large number of genetic factors poses both computational and statistical challenges. Various computational approaches have been developed for large scale GWAS. In this chapter, we will discuss several widely used computational approaches in GWAS. The following topics will be covered: (1 An introduction to the background of GWAS. (2 The existing computational approaches that are widely used in GWAS. This will cover single-locus, epistasis detection, and machine learning methods that have been recently developed in biology, statistic, and computer science communities. This part will be the main focus of this chapter. (3 The limitations of current approaches and future directions.

  16. Genome-wide genetic changes during modern breeding of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yinping; Zhao, Hainan; Ren, Longhui; Song, Weibin; Zeng, Biao; Guo, Jinjie; Wang, Baobao; Liu, Zhipeng; Chen, Jing; Li, Wei; Zhang, Mei; Xie, Shaojun; Lai, Jinsheng

    2012-06-03

    The success of modern maize breeding has been demonstrated by remarkable increases in productivity over the last four decades. However, the underlying genetic changes correlated with these gains remain largely unknown. We report here the sequencing of 278 temperate maize inbred lines from different stages of breeding history, including deep resequencing of 4 lines with known pedigree information. The results show that modern breeding has introduced highly dynamic genetic changes into the maize genome. Artificial selection has affected thousands of targets, including genes and non-genic regions, leading to a reduction in nucleotide diversity and an increase in the proportion of rare alleles. Genetic changes during breeding happen rapidly, with extensive variation (SNPs, indels and copy-number variants (CNVs)) occurring, even within identity-by-descent regions. Our genome-wide assessment of genetic changes during modern maize breeding provides new strategies as well as practical targets for future crop breeding and biotechnology.

  17. AID/APOBEC cytosine deaminase induces genome-wide kataegis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lada Artem G

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Clusters of localized hypermutation in human breast cancer genomes, named “kataegis” (from the Greek for thunderstorm, are hypothesized to result from multiple cytosine deaminations catalyzed by AID/APOBEC proteins. However, a direct link between APOBECs and kataegis is still lacking. We have sequenced the genomes of yeast mutants induced in diploids by expression of the gene for PmCDA1, a hypermutagenic deaminase from sea lamprey. Analysis of the distribution of 5,138 induced mutations revealed localized clusters very similar to those found in tumors. Our data provide evidence that unleashed cytosine deaminase activity is an evolutionary conserved, prominent source of genome-wide kataegis events. Reviewers This article was reviewed by: Professor Sandor Pongor, Professor Shamil R. Sunyaev, and Dr Vladimir Kuznetsov.

  18. DNA Break Mapping Reveals Topoisomerase II Activity Genome-Wide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Baranello

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Genomic DNA is under constant assault by endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. DNA breakage can represent a major threat to genome integrity but can also be necessary for genome function. Here we present approaches to map DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs and single-strand breaks (SSBs at the genome-wide scale by two methods called DSB- and SSB-Seq, respectively. We tested these methods in human colon cancer cells and validated the results using the Topoisomerase II (Top2-poisoning agent etoposide (ETO. Our results show that the combination of ETO treatment with break-mapping techniques is a powerful method to elaborate the pattern of Top2 enzymatic activity across the genome.

  19. Genome-wide measurement of RNA folding energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yue; Qu, Kun; Ouyang, Zhengqing; Kertesz, Michael; Li, Jun; Tibshirani, Robert; Makino, Debora L; Nutter, Robert C; Segal, Eran; Chang, Howard Y

    2012-10-26

    RNA structural transitions are important in the function and regulation of RNAs. Here, we reveal a layer of transcriptome organization in the form of RNA folding energies. By probing yeast RNA structures at different temperatures, we obtained relative melting temperatures (Tm) for RNA structures in over 4000 transcripts. Specific signatures of RNA Tm demarcated the polarity of mRNA open reading frames and highlighted numerous candidate regulatory RNA motifs in 3' untranslated regions. RNA Tm distinguished noncoding versus coding RNAs and identified mRNAs with distinct cellular functions. We identified thousands of putative RNA thermometers, and their presence is predictive of the pattern of RNA decay in vivo during heat shock. The exosome complex recognizes unpaired bases during heat shock to degrade these RNAs, coupling intrinsic structural stabilities to gene regulation. Thus, genome-wide structural dynamics of RNA can parse functional elements of the transcriptome and reveal diverse biological insights.

  20. Genome-wide transcriptional reprogramming under drought stress

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Soil water deficit is one of the major factors limiting plant productivity. Plants cope with this adverse environmental condition by coordinating the up- or downregulation of an array of stress responsive genes. Reprogramming the expression of these genes leads to rebalanced development and growth that are in concert with the reduced water availability and that ultimately confer enhanced stress tolerance. Currently, several techniques have been employed to monitor genome-wide transcriptional reprogramming under drought stress. The results from these high throughput studies indicate that drought stress-induced transcriptional reprogramming is dynamic, has temporal and spatial specificity, and is coupled with the circadian clock and phytohormone signaling pathways. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg. All rights are reserved.

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study of Coronary Artery Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Ogawa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is a multifactorial disease with environmental and genetic determinants. The genetic determinants of CAD have previously been explored by the candidate gene approach. Recently, the data from the International HapMap Project and the development of dense genotyping chips have enabled us to perform genome-wide association studies (GWAS on a large number of subjects without bias towards any particular candidate genes. In 2007, three chip-based GWAS simultaneously revealed the significant association between common variants on chromosome 9p21 and CAD. This association was replicated among other ethnic groups and also in a meta-analysis. Further investigations have detected several other candidate loci associated with CAD. The chip-based GWAS approach has identified novel and unbiased genetic determinants of CAD and these insights provide the important direction to better understand the pathogenesis of CAD and to develop new and improved preventive measures and treatments for CAD.

  2. A comparison of multivariate genome-wide association methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galesloot, Tessel E; Van Steen, Kristel; Kiemeney, Lambertus A L M

    2014-01-01

    Joint association analysis of multiple traits in a genome-wide association study (GWAS), i.e. a multivariate GWAS, offers several advantages over analyzing each trait in a separate GWAS. In this study we directly compared a number of multivariate GWAS methods using simulated data. We focused on six...... methods that are implemented in the software packages PLINK, SNPTEST, MultiPhen, BIMBAM, PCHAT and TATES, and also compared them to standard univariate GWAS, analysis of the first principal component of the traits, and meta-analysis of univariate results. We simulated data (N = 1000) for three...... correlation. We compared the power of the methods using empirically fixed significance thresholds (α = 0.05). Our results showed that the multivariate methods implemented in PLINK, SNPTEST, MultiPhen and BIMBAM performed best for the majority of the tested scenarios, with a notable increase in power...

  3. Genome-Wide Association Study of Meiotic Recombination Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Ferdouse; Chowdhury, Reshmi; Cheung, Vivian G.; Sherman, Stephanie L.; Feingold, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination is an essential step in gametogenesis, and is one that also generates genetic diversity. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and molecular studies have identified genes that influence of human meiotic recombination. RNF212 is associated with total or average number of recombination events, and PRDM9 is associated with the locations of hotspots, or sequences where crossing over appears to cluster. In addition, a common inversion on chromosome 17 is strongly associated with recombination. Other genes have been identified by GWAS, but those results have not been replicated. In this study, using new datasets, we characterized additional recombination phenotypes to uncover novel candidates and further dissect the role of already known loci. We used three datasets totaling 1562 two-generation families, including 3108 parents with 4304 children. We estimated five different recombination phenotypes including two novel phenotypes (average recombination counts within recombination hotspots and outside of hotspots) using dense SNP array genotype data. We then performed gender-specific and combined-sex genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analyses. We replicated associations for several previously reported recombination genes, including RNF212 and PRDM9. By looking specifically at recombination events outside of hotspots, we showed for the first time that PRDM9 has different effects in males and females. We identified several new candidate loci, particularly for recombination events outside of hotspots. These include regions near the genes SPINK6, EVC2, ARHGAP25, and DLGAP2. This study expands our understanding of human meiotic recombination by characterizing additional features that vary across individuals, and identifying regulatory variants influencing the numbers and locations of recombination events. PMID:27733454

  4. Genome-wide association and genomic selection in animal breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Ben; Goddard, Mike

    2010-11-01

    Results from genome-wide association studies in livestock, and humans, has lead to the conclusion that the effect of individual quantitative trait loci (QTL) on complex traits, such as yield, are likely to be small; therefore, a large number of QTL are necessary to explain genetic variation in these traits. Given this genetic architecture, gains from marker-assisted selection (MAS) programs using only a small number of DNA markers to trace a limited number of QTL is likely to be small. This has lead to the development of alternative technology for using the available dense single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) information, called genomic selection. Genomic selection uses a genome-wide panel of dense markers so that all QTL are likely to be in linkage disequilibrium with at least one SNP. The genomic breeding values are predicted to be the sum of the effect of these SNPs across the entire genome. In dairy cattle breeding, the accuracy of genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) that can be achieved and the fact that these are available early in life have lead to rapid adoption of the technology. Here, we discuss the design of experiments necessary to achieve accurate prediction of GEBV in future generations in terms of the number of markers necessary and the size of the reference population where marker effects are estimated. We also present a simple method for implementing genomic selection using a genomic relationship matrix. Future challenges discussed include using whole genome sequence data to improve the accuracy of genomic selection and management of inbreeding through genomic relationships.

  5. Genome-wide significant loci for addiction and anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, K.; Almasy, L.; Knowles, E.E.M.; Kent, J.W.; Curran, J.E.; Dyer, T.D.; Göring, H.H.H.; Olvera, R.L.; Fox, P.T.; Pearlson, G.D.; Krystal, J.H.; Duggirala, R.; Blangero, J.; Glahn, D.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background Psychiatric comorbidity is common among individuals with addictive disorders, with patients frequently suffering from anxiety disorders. While the genetic architecture of comorbid addictive and anxiety disorders remains unclear, elucidating the genes involved could provide important insights into the underlying etiology. Methods Here we examine a sample of 1284 Mexican-Americans from randomly selected extended pedigrees. Variance decomposition methods were used to examine the role of genetics in addiction phenotypes (lifetime history of alcohol dependence, drug dependence or chronic smoking) and various forms of clinically relevant anxiety. Genome-wide univariate and bivariate linkage scans were conducted to localize the chromosomal regions influencing these traits. Results Addiction phenotypes and anxiety were shown to be heritable and univariate genome-wide linkage scans revealed significant quantitative trait loci for drug dependence (14q13.2–q21.2, LOD = 3.322) and a broad anxiety phenotype (12q24.32–q24.33, LOD = 2.918). Significant positive genetic correlations were observed between anxiety and each of the addiction subtypes (ρg = 0.550–0.655) and further investigation with bivariate linkage analyses identified significant pleiotropic signals for alcohol dependence-anxiety (9q33.1–q33.2, LOD = 3.054) and drug dependence-anxiety (18p11.23–p11.22, LOD = 3.425). Conclusions This study confirms the shared genetic underpinnings of addiction and anxiety and identifies genomic loci involved in the etiology of these comorbid disorders. The linkage signal for anxiety on 12q24 spans the location of TMEM132D, an emerging gene of interest from previous GWAS of anxiety traits, whilst the bivariate linkage signal identified for anxiety-alcohol on 9q33 peak coincides with a region where rare CNVs have been associated with psychiatric disorders. Other signals identified implicate novel regions of the genome in addiction genetics. PMID:27318301

  6. A genome-wide methylation study on obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojing; Su, Shaoyong; Barnes, Vernon A.; De Miguel, Carmen; Pollock, Jennifer; Ownby, Dennis; Shi, Huidong; Zhu, Haidong; Snieder, Harold; Wang, Xiaoling

    2013-01-01

    Besides differential methylation, DNA methylation variation has recently been proposed and demonstrated to be a potential contributing factor to cancer risk. Here we aim to examine whether differential variability in methylation is also an important feature of obesity, a typical non-malignant common complex disease. We analyzed genome-wide methylation profiles of over 470,000 CpGs in peripheral blood samples from 48 obese and 48 lean African-American youth aged 14–20 y old. A substantial number of differentially variable CpG sites (DVCs), using statistics based on variances, as well as a substantial number of differentially methylated CpG sites (DMCs), using statistics based on means, were identified. Similar to the findings in cancers, DVCs generally exhibited an outlier structure and were more variable in cases than in controls. By randomly splitting the current sample into a discovery and validation set, we observed that both the DVCs and DMCs identified from the first set could independently predict obesity status in the second set. Furthermore, both the genes harboring DMCs and the genes harboring DVCs showed significant enrichment of genes identified by genome-wide association studies on obesity and related diseases, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancers, supporting their roles in the etiology and pathogenesis of obesity. We generalized the recent finding on methylation variability in cancer research to obesity and demonstrated that differential variability is also an important feature of obesity-related methylation changes. Future studies on the epigenetics of obesity will benefit from both statistics based on means and statistics based on variances. PMID:23644594

  7. Genome-wide association studies in asthma: progress and pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    March ME

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Michael E March,1 Patrick MA Sleiman,1,2 Hakon Hakonarson1,2 1Center for Applied Genomics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, 2Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Genetic studies of asthma have revealed that there is considerable heritability to the phenotype. An extensive history of candidate-gene studies has identified a long list of genes associated with immune function that are potentially involved in asthma pathogenesis. However, many of the results of candidate-gene studies have failed to be replicated, leaving in question the true impact of the implicated biological pathways on asthma. With the advent of genome-wide association studies, geneticists are able to examine the association of hundreds of thousands of genetic markers with a phenotype, allowing the hypothesis-free identification of variants associated with disease. Many such studies examining asthma or related phenotypes have been published, and several themes have begun to emerge regarding the biological pathways underpinning asthma. The results of many genome-wide association studies have currently not been replicated, and the large sample sizes required for this experimental strategy invoke difficulties with sample stratification and phenotypic heterogeneity. Recently, large collaborative groups of researchers have formed consortia focused on asthma, with the goals of sharing material and data and standardizing diagnosis and experimental methods. Additionally, research has begun to focus on genetic variants that affect the response to asthma medications and on the biology that generates the heterogeneity in the asthma phenotype. As this work progresses, it will move asthma patients closer to more specific, personalized medicine. Keywords: asthma, genetics, GWAS, pharmacogenetics, biomarkers

  8. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraska, Vesna; Franklin, Christopher S; Floyd, James AB; Thornton, Laura M; Huckins, Laura M; Southam, Lorraine; Rayner, N William; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Klump, Kelly L; Treasure, Janet; Lewis, Cathryn M; Schmidt, Ulrike; Tozzi, Federica; Kiezebrink, Kirsty; Hebebrand, Johannes; Gorwood, Philip; Adan, Roger AH; Kas, Martien JH; Favaro, Angela; Santonastaso, Paolo; Fernández-Aranda, Fernando; Gratacos, Monica; Rybakowski, Filip; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, Monika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Keski-Rahkonen, Anna; Raevuori, Anu; Van Furth, Eric F; Landt, Margarita CT Slof-Op t; Hudson, James I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, Ted; Knudsen, Gun Peggy S; Monteleone, Palmiero; Kaplan, Allan S; Karwautz, Andreas; Hakonarson, Hakon; Berrettini, Wade H; Guo, Yiran; Li, Dong; Schork, Nicholas J.; Komaki, Gen; Ando, Tetsuya; Inoko, Hidetoshi; Esko, Tõnu; Fischer, Krista; Männik, Katrin; Metspalu, Andres; Baker, Jessica H; Cone, Roger D; Dackor, Jennifer; DeSocio, Janiece E; Hilliard, Christopher E; O'Toole, Julie K; Pantel, Jacques; Szatkiewicz, Jin P; Taico, Chrysecolla; Zerwas, Stephanie; Trace, Sara E; Davis, Oliver SP; Helder, Sietske; Bühren, Katharina; Burghardt, Roland; de Zwaan, Martina; Egberts, Karin; Ehrlich, Stefan; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Herzog, Wolfgang; Imgart, Hartmut; Scherag, André; Scherag, Susann; Zipfel, Stephan; Boni, Claudette; Ramoz, Nicolas; Versini, Audrey; Brandys, Marek K; Danner, Unna N; de Kovel, Carolien; Hendriks, Judith; Koeleman, Bobby PC; Ophoff, Roel A; Strengman, Eric; van Elburg, Annemarie A; Bruson, Alice; Clementi, Maurizio; Degortes, Daniela; Forzan, Monica; Tenconi, Elena; Docampo, Elisa; Escaramís, Geòrgia; Jiménez-Murcia, Susana; Lissowska, Jolanta; Rajewski, Andrzej; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Slopien, Agnieszka; Hauser, Joanna; Karhunen, Leila; Meulenbelt, Ingrid; Slagboom, P Eline; Tortorella, Alfonso; Maj, Mario; Dedoussis, George; Dikeos, Dimitris; Gonidakis, Fragiskos; Tziouvas, Konstantinos; Tsitsika, Artemis; Papezova, Hana; Slachtova, Lenka; Martaskova, Debora; Kennedy, James L.; Levitan, Robert D.; Yilmaz, Zeynep; Huemer, Julia; Koubek, Doris; Merl, Elisabeth; Wagner, Gudrun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Breen, Gerome; Cohen-Woods, Sarah; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Cichon, Sven; Giegling, Ina; Herms, Stefan; Rujescu, Dan; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H-Erich; Dina, Christian; Sladek, Rob; Gambaro, Giovanni; Soranzo, Nicole; Julia, Antonio; Marsal, Sara; Rabionet, Raquel; Gaborieau, Valerie; Dick, Danielle M; Palotie, Aarno; Ripatti, Samuli; Widén, Elisabeth; Andreassen, Ole A; Espeseth, Thomas; Lundervold, Astri; Reinvang, Ivar; Steen, Vidar M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Mattingsdal, Morten; Ntalla, Ioanna; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Navratilova, Marie; Gallinger, Steven; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen; Aschauer, Harald; Carlberg, Laura; Schosser, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Lars; Ding, Bo; Klareskog, Lars; Padyukov, Leonid; Finan, Chris; Kalsi, Gursharan; Roberts, Marion; Logan, Darren W; Peltonen, Leena; Ritchie, Graham RS; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Estivill, Xavier; Hinney, Anke; Sullivan, Patrick F; Collier, David A; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Bulik, Cynthia M

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2,907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14,860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery datasets. Seventy-six (72 independent) SNPs were taken forward for in silico (two datasets) or de novo (13 datasets) replication genotyping in 2,677 independent AN cases and 8,629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication datasets comprised 5,551 AN cases and 21,080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1,606 AN restricting; 1,445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01×10-7) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84×10-6) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76×10-6) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05×10-6) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery to replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4×10-6), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but that our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field. PMID:24514567

  9. A genome-wide association study of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boraska, V; Franklin, C S; Floyd, J A B; Thornton, L M; Huckins, L M; Southam, L; Rayner, N W; Tachmazidou, I; Klump, K L; Treasure, J; Lewis, C M; Schmidt, U; Tozzi, F; Kiezebrink, K; Hebebrand, J; Gorwood, P; Adan, R A H; Kas, M J H; Favaro, A; Santonastaso, P; Fernández-Aranda, F; Gratacos, M; Rybakowski, F; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Kaprio, J; Keski-Rahkonen, A; Raevuori, A; Van Furth, E F; Slof-Op 't Landt, M C T; Hudson, J I; Reichborn-Kjennerud, T; Knudsen, G P S; Monteleone, P; Kaplan, A S; Karwautz, A; Hakonarson, H; Berrettini, W H; Guo, Y; Li, D; Schork, N J; Komaki, G; Ando, T; Inoko, H; Esko, T; Fischer, K; Männik, K; Metspalu, A; Baker, J H; Cone, R D; Dackor, J; DeSocio, J E; Hilliard, C E; O'Toole, J K; Pantel, J; Szatkiewicz, J P; Taico, C; Zerwas, S; Trace, S E; Davis, O S P; Helder, S; Bühren, K; Burghardt, R; de Zwaan, M; Egberts, K; Ehrlich, S; Herpertz-Dahlmann, B; Herzog, W; Imgart, H; Scherag, A; Scherag, S; Zipfel, S; Boni, C; Ramoz, N; Versini, A; Brandys, M K; Danner, U N; de Kovel, C; Hendriks, J; Koeleman, B P C; Ophoff, R A; Strengman, E; van Elburg, A A; Bruson, A; Clementi, M; Degortes, D; Forzan, M; Tenconi, E; Docampo, E; Escaramís, G; Jiménez-Murcia, S; Lissowska, J; Rajewski, A; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, N; Slopien, A; Hauser, J; Karhunen, L; Meulenbelt, I; Slagboom, P E; Tortorella, A; Maj, M; Dedoussis, G; Dikeos, D; Gonidakis, F; Tziouvas, K; Tsitsika, A; Papezova, H; Slachtova, L; Martaskova, D; Kennedy, J L; Levitan, R D; Yilmaz, Z; Huemer, J; Koubek, D; Merl, E; Wagner, G; Lichtenstein, P; Breen, G; Cohen-Woods, S; Farmer, A; McGuffin, P; Cichon, S; Giegling, I; Herms, S; Rujescu, D; Schreiber, S; Wichmann, H-E; Dina, C; Sladek, R; Gambaro, G; Soranzo, N; Julia, A; Marsal, S; Rabionet, R; Gaborieau, V; Dick, D M; Palotie, A; Ripatti, S; Widén, E; Andreassen, O A; Espeseth, T; Lundervold, A; Reinvang, I; Steen, V M; Le Hellard, S; Mattingsdal, M; Ntalla, I; Bencko, V; Foretova, L; Janout, V; Navratilova, M; Gallinger, S; Pinto, D; Scherer, S W; Aschauer, H; Carlberg, L; Schosser, A; Alfredsson, L; Ding, B; Klareskog, L; Padyukov, L; Courtet, P; Guillaume, S; Jaussent, I; Finan, C; Kalsi, G; Roberts, M; Logan, D W; Peltonen, L; Ritchie, G R S; Barrett, J C; Estivill, X; Hinney, A; Sullivan, P F; Collier, D A; Zeggini, E; Bulik, C M

    2014-10-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a complex and heritable eating disorder characterized by dangerously low body weight. Neither candidate gene studies nor an initial genome-wide association study (GWAS) have yielded significant and replicated results. We performed a GWAS in 2907 cases with AN from 14 countries (15 sites) and 14 860 ancestrally matched controls as part of the Genetic Consortium for AN (GCAN) and the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 3 (WTCCC3). Individual association analyses were conducted in each stratum and meta-analyzed across all 15 discovery data sets. Seventy-six (72 independent) single nucleotide polymorphisms were taken forward for in silico (two data sets) or de novo (13 data sets) replication genotyping in 2677 independent AN cases and 8629 European ancestry controls along with 458 AN cases and 421 controls from Japan. The final global meta-analysis across discovery and replication data sets comprised 5551 AN cases and 21 080 controls. AN subtype analyses (1606 AN restricting; 1445 AN binge-purge) were performed. No findings reached genome-wide significance. Two intronic variants were suggestively associated: rs9839776 (P=3.01 × 10(-7)) in SOX2OT and rs17030795 (P=5.84 × 10(-6)) in PPP3CA. Two additional signals were specific to Europeans: rs1523921 (P=5.76 × 10(-)(6)) between CUL3 and FAM124B and rs1886797 (P=8.05 × 10(-)(6)) near SPATA13. Comparing discovery with replication results, 76% of the effects were in the same direction, an observation highly unlikely to be due to chance (P=4 × 10(-6)), strongly suggesting that true findings exist but our sample, the largest yet reported, was underpowered for their detection. The accrual of large genotyped AN case-control samples should be an immediate priority for the field.

  10. Genome-wide expression profiling of complex regional pain syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Heui Jin

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a chronic, progressive, and devastating pain syndrome characterized by spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, allodynia, altered skin temperature, and motor dysfunction. Although previous gene expression profiling studies have been conducted in animal pain models, there genome-wide expression profiling in the whole blood of CRPS patients has not been reported yet. Here, we successfully identified certain pain-related genes through genome-wide expression profiling in the blood from CRPS patients. We found that 80 genes were differentially expressed between 4 CRPS patients (2 CRPS I and 2 CRPS II and 5 controls (cut-off value: 1.5-fold change and p<0.05. Most of those genes were associated with signal transduction, developmental processes, cell structure and motility, and immunity and defense. The expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class I A subtype (HLA-A29.1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, alanine aminopeptidase N (ANPEP, l-histidine decarboxylase (HDC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (G-CSF3R, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 genes selected from the microarray were confirmed in 24 CRPS patients and 18 controls by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. We focused on the MMP9 gene that, by qRT-PCR, showed a statistically significant difference in expression in CRPS patients compared to controls with the highest relative fold change (4.0±1.23 times and p = 1.4×10(-4. The up-regulation of MMP9 gene in the blood may be related to the pain progression in CRPS patients. Our findings, which offer a valuable contribution to the understanding of the differential gene expression in CRPS may help in the understanding of the pathophysiology of CRPS pain progression.

  11. Comparative analysis of genome-wide divergence, domestication footprints and genome-wide association study of root traits for Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of 10,129 singleton SNPs of known genomic location in tetraploid cotton provided unique opportunities to characterize genome-wide diversity among 440 Gossypium hirsutum and 219 G. barbadense cultivars and landrace accessions of widespread origin. Using genome-wide distributed SNPs, we examined ...

  12. Infection and inflammation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a genome wide study for interactions with genetic variation.

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    Dimitrios Avramopoulos

    Full Text Available Inflammation and maternal or fetal infections have been suggested as risk factors for schizophrenia (SZ and bipolar disorder (BP. It is likely that such environmental effects are contingent on genetic background. Here, in a genome-wide approach, we test the hypothesis that such exposures increase the risk for SZ and BP and that the increase is dependent on genetic variants. We use genome-wide genotype data, plasma IgG antibody measurements against Toxoplasma gondii, Herpes simplex virus type 1, Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpes Virus 6 and the food antigen gliadin as well as measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP, a peripheral marker of inflammation. The subjects are SZ cases, BP cases, parents of cases and screened controls. We look for higher levels of our immunity/infection variables and interactions between them and common genetic variation genome-wide. We find many of the antibody measurements higher in both disorders. While individual tests do not withstand correction for multiple comparisons, the number of nominally significant tests and the comparisons showing the expected direction are in significant excess (permutation p=0.019 and 0.004 respectively. We also find CRP levels highly elevated in SZ, BP and the mothers of BP cases, in agreement with existing literature, but possibly confounded by our inability to correct for smoking or body mass index. In our genome-wide interaction analysis no signal reached genome-wide significance, yet many plausible candidate genes emerged. In a hypothesis driven test, we found multiple interactions among SZ-associated SNPs in the HLA region on chromosome 6 and replicated an interaction between CMV infection and genotypes near the CTNNA3 gene reported by a recent GWAS. Our results support that inflammatory processes and infection may modify the risk for psychosis and suggest that the genotype at SZ-associated HLA loci modifies the effect of these variables on the risk to develop SZ.

  13. Infection and inflammation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: a genome wide study for interactions with genetic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Pearce, Brad D; McGrath, John; Wolyniec, Paula; Wang, Ruihua; Eckart, Nicole; Hatzimanolis, Alexandros; Goes, Fernando S; Nestadt, Gerald; Mulle, Jennifer; Coneely, Karen; Hopkins, Myfanwy; Ruczinski, Ingo; Yolken, Robert; Pulver, Ann E

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation and maternal or fetal infections have been suggested as risk factors for schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BP). It is likely that such environmental effects are contingent on genetic background. Here, in a genome-wide approach, we test the hypothesis that such exposures increase the risk for SZ and BP and that the increase is dependent on genetic variants. We use genome-wide genotype data, plasma IgG antibody measurements against Toxoplasma gondii, Herpes simplex virus type 1, Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpes Virus 6 and the food antigen gliadin as well as measurements of C-reactive protein (CRP), a peripheral marker of inflammation. The subjects are SZ cases, BP cases, parents of cases and screened controls. We look for higher levels of our immunity/infection variables and interactions between them and common genetic variation genome-wide. We find many of the antibody measurements higher in both disorders. While individual tests do not withstand correction for multiple comparisons, the number of nominally significant tests and the comparisons showing the expected direction are in significant excess (permutation p=0.019 and 0.004 respectively). We also find CRP levels highly elevated in SZ, BP and the mothers of BP cases, in agreement with existing literature, but possibly confounded by our inability to correct for smoking or body mass index. In our genome-wide interaction analysis no signal reached genome-wide significance, yet many plausible candidate genes emerged. In a hypothesis driven test, we found multiple interactions among SZ-associated SNPs in the HLA region on chromosome 6 and replicated an interaction between CMV infection and genotypes near the CTNNA3 gene reported by a recent GWAS. Our results support that inflammatory processes and infection may modify the risk for psychosis and suggest that the genotype at SZ-associated HLA loci modifies the effect of these variables on the risk to develop SZ.

  14. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of cell-free serum DNA in esophageal adenocarcinoma and Barrett esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Rihong; Zhao, Yang; Su, Li; Cassidy, Lauren; Liu, Geoffrey; Christiani, David C

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation (DNAm) is a feature of most types of cancers. Genome-wide DNAm profiling has been performed successfully on tumor tissue DNA samples. However, the invasive procedure limits the utility of tumor tissue for epidemiological studies. While recent data indicate that cell-free circulating DNAm (cfDNAm) profiles reflect DNAm status in corresponding tumor tissues, no studies have examined the association of cfDNAm with cancer or precursors on a genome-wide scale. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the putative significance of genome-wide cfDNAm profiles in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA) and Barrett esophagus (BE, EA precursor). We performed genome-wide DNAm profiling in EA tissue DNA (n = 8) and matched serum DNA (n = 8), in serum DNA of BE (n = 10), and in healthy controls (n = 10) using the Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip that covers 27,578 CpG loci in 14,495 genes. We found that cfDNAm profiles were highly correlated to DNAm profiles in matched tumor tissue DNA (r = 0.92) in patients with EA. We selected the most differentially methylated loci to perform hierarchical clustering analysis. We found that 911 loci can discriminate perfectly between EA and control samples, 554 loci can separate EA from BE samples, and 46 loci can distinguish BE from control samples. These results suggest that genome-wide cfDNAm profiles are highly consistent with DNAm profiles detected in corresponding tumor tissues. Differential cfDNAm profiling may be a useful approach for the noninvasive screening of EA and EA premalignant lesions.

  15. Genome-wide DNA Methylation Profiling of Cell-Free Serum DNA in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma and Barrett Esophagus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rihong Zhai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aberrant DNA methylation (DNAm is a feature of most types of cancers. Genome-wide DNAm profiling has been performed successfully on tumor tissue DNA samples. However, the invasive procedure limits the utility of tumor tissue for epidemiological studies. While recent data indicate that cell-free circulating DNAm (cfDNAm profiles reflect DNAm status in corresponding tumor tissues, no studies have examined the association of cfDNAm with cancer or precursors on a genome-wide scale. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the putative significance of genome-wide cfDNAm profiles in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA and Barrett esophagus (BE, EA precursor. We performed genome-wide DNAm profiling in EA tissue DNA (n = 8 and matched serum DNA (n = 8, in serum DNA of BE (n = 10, and in healthy controls (n = 10 using the Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip that covers 27,578 CpG loci in 14,495 genes. We found that cfDNAm profiles were highly correlated to DNAm profiles in matched tumor tissue DNA (r = 0.92 in patients with EA. We selected the most differentially methylated loci to perform hierarchical clustering analysis. We found that 911 loci can discriminate perfectly between EA and control samples, 554 loci can separate EA from BE samples, and 46 loci can distinguish BE from control samples. These results suggest that genome-wide cfDNAm profiles are highly consistent with DNAm profiles detected in corresponding tumor tissues. Differential cfDNAm profiling may be a useful approach for the noninvasive screening of EA and EA premalignant lesions.

  16. Genome-wide DNA methylation profiling with MeDIP-seq using archived dried blood spots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Nicklas H; Starnawska, Anna; Nyegaard, Mette

    2016-01-01

    . The enrichment profile, sequence quality and distribution of reads across genetic regions were comparable between samples archived 16 years, 4 years and a freshly prepared control sample. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, we show that high-quality MeDIP-seq data is achievable from neonatal screening filter cards stored....... RESULTS: Here we demonstrate, as a proof of principle, that genome-wide interrogation of the methylome based on methylated DNA immunoprecipitation coupled with next-generation sequencing (MeDIP-seq) is feasible using a single 3.2 mm DBS punch (60 ng DNA) from filter cards archived for up to 16 years...... at room temperature, thereby providing information on annotated as well as on non-RefSeq genes and repetitive elements. Moreover, the quantity of DNA from one DBS punch proved sufficient allowing for multiple epigenome studies using one single DBS....

  17. Genome-wide Escherichia coli stress response and improved tolerance towards industrially relevant chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rau, Martin Holm; Calero Valdayo, Patricia; Lennen, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    of transcription changes within and between chemical groups, with functions such as energy metabolism, stress response, membrane modification, transporters and iron metabolism being affected. Regulon enrichment analysis identified key regulators likely mediating the transcriptional response, including CRP, Rpo...... approach was employed to understand the chemical stress response of Escherichia coli, including a genome-wide screen for mutants with increased fitness during chemical stress. Twelve chemicals with significant production potential were selected, consisting of organic solvent-like chemicals (butanol...... stress identified 294 enriched and 336 depleted mutants and experimental validation revealed up to 60 % increase in mutant growth rates. Mutants enriched in several conditions contained, among others, insertions in genes of the Mar-Sox-Rob regulon as well as transcription and translation related gene...

  18. Semantically enabling a genome-wide association study database

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    Beck Tim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amount of data generated from genome-wide association studies (GWAS has grown rapidly, but considerations for GWAS phenotype data reuse and interchange have not kept pace. This impacts on the work of GWAS Central – a free and open access resource for the advanced querying and comparison of summary-level genetic association data. The benefits of employing ontologies for standardising and structuring data are widely accepted. The complex spectrum of observed human phenotypes (and traits, and the requirement for cross-species phenotype comparisons, calls for reflection on the most appropriate solution for the organisation of human phenotype data. The Semantic Web provides standards for the possibility of further integration of GWAS data and the ability to contribute to the web of Linked Data. Results A pragmatic consideration when applying phenotype ontologies to GWAS data is the ability to retrieve all data, at the most granular level possible, from querying a single ontology graph. We found the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terminology suitable for describing all traits (diseases and medical signs and symptoms at various levels of granularity and the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO most suitable for describing phenotypic abnormalities (medical signs and symptoms at the most granular level. Diseases within MeSH are mapped to HPO to infer the phenotypic abnormalities associated with diseases. Building on the rich semantic phenotype annotation layer, we are able to make cross-species phenotype comparisons and publish a core subset of GWAS data as RDF nanopublications. Conclusions We present a methodology for applying phenotype annotations to a comprehensive genome-wide association dataset and for ensuring compatibility with the Semantic Web. The annotations are used to assist with cross-species genotype and phenotype comparisons. However, further processing and deconstructions of terms may be required to facilitate automatic

  19. Genome-wide significant risk associations for mucinous ovarian carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Linda E.; Lawrenson, Kate; Tyrer, Jonathan; Li, Qiyuan; M. Lee, Janet; Seo, Ji-Heui; Phelan, Catherine M.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqin; Spindler, Tassja J.; Aben, Katja K.H.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia; Baker, Helen; Bandera, Elisa V.; Bean, Yukie; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bisogna, Maria; Bjorge, Line; Bogdanova, Natalia; Brinton, Louise A.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Bruinsma, Fiona; Butzow, Ralf; Campbell, Ian G.; Carty, Karen; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chen, Y. Ann; Chen, Zhihua; Cook, Linda S.; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Cybulski, Cezary; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Dennis, Joe; Dicks, Ed; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Dörk, Thilo; du Bois, Andreas; Dürst, Matthias; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas T.; Edwards, Robert P.; Eilber, Ursula; Ekici, Arif B.; Engelholm, Svend Aage; Fasching, Peter A.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Gao, Yu-Tang; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Giles, Graham G.; Glasspool, Rosalind; Goode, Ellen L.; Goodman, Marc T.; Grownwald, Jacek; Harrington, Patricia; Harter, Philipp; Hasmad, Hanis Nazihah; Hein, Alexander; Heitz, Florian; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Hillemanns, Peter; Hogdall, Estrid; Hogdall, Claus; Hosono, Satoyo; Iversen, Edwin S.; Jakubowska, Anna; Jensen, Allan; Ji, Bu-Tian; Karlan, Beth Y; Kellar, Melissa; Kelley, Joseph L.; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Krakstad, Camilla; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Lambrechts, Diether; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Le, Nhu D.; Lee, Alice W.; Lele, Shashi; Leminen, Arto; Lester, Jenny; Levine, Douglas A.; Liang, Dong; Lissowska, Jolanta; Lu, Karen; Lubinski, Jan; Lundvall, Lene; Massuger, Leon F.A.G.; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuire, Valerie; McLaughlin, John R.; McNeish, Iain; Menon, Usha; Modugno, Francesmary; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nedergaard, Lotte; Ness, Roberta B.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Azmi, Mat Adenan Noor; Odunsi, Kunle; Olson, Sara H.; Orlow, Irene; Orsulic, Sandra; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Paul, James; Pearce, Celeste Leigh; Pejovic, Tanja; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Permuth-Wey, Jennifer; Pike, Malcolm C.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Risch, Harvey A.; Rosen, Barry; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rothstein, Joseph H.; Rudolph, Anja; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Salvesen, Helga B.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Schwaab, Ira; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Sieh, Weiva; Song, Honglin; Southey, Melissa C.; Sucheston, Lara; Tangen, Ingvild L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Terry, Kathryn L.; Thompson, Pamela J; Tworoger, Shelley S.; van Altena, Anne M.; Van Nieuwenhuysen, Els; Vergote, Ignace; Vierkant, Robert A.; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Walsh, Christine; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wicklund, Kristine G.; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Wlodzimierz, Sawicki; Woo, Yin-Ling; Wu, Xifeng; Wu, Anna H.; Yang, Hannah; Zheng, Wei; Ziogas, Argyrios; Sellers, Thomas A.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Pharoah, Paul D.; Gayther, Simon A.; Berchuck, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several risk associations for ovarian carcinomas (OC) but not for mucinous ovarian carcinomas (MOC). Genotypes from OC cases and controls were imputed into the 1000 Genomes Project reference panel. Analysis of 1,644 MOC cases and 21,693 controls identified three novel risk associations: rs752590 at 2q13 (P = 3.3 × 10−8), rs711830 at 2q31.1 (P = 7.5 × 10−12) and rs688187 at 19q13.2 (P = 6.8 × 10−13). Expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) analysis in ovarian and colorectal tumors (which are histologically similar to MOC) identified significant eQTL associations for HOXD9 at 2q31.1 in ovarian (P = 4.95 × 10−4, FDR = 0.003) and colorectal (P = 0.01, FDR = 0.09) tumors, and for PAX8 at 2q13 in colorectal tumors (P = 0.03, FDR = 0.09). Chromosome conformation capture analysis identified interactions between the HOXD9 promoter and risk SNPs at 2q31.1. Overexpressing HOXD9 in MOC cells augmented the neoplastic phenotype. These findings provide the first evidence for MOC susceptibility variants and insights into the underlying biology of the disease. PMID:26075790

  20. Genome-Wide Analysis of Human MicroRNA Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing studies have shown that microRNA (miRNA stability plays important roles in physiology. However, the global picture of miRNA stability remains largely unknown. Here, we had analyzed genome-wide miRNA stability across 10 diverse cell types using miRNA arrays. We found that miRNA stability shows high dynamics and diversity both within individual cells and across cell types. Strikingly, we observed a negative correlation between miRNA stability and miRNA expression level, which is different from current findings on other biological molecules such as proteins and mRNAs that show positive and not negative correlations between stability and expression level. This finding indicates that miRNA has a distinct action mode, which we called “rapid production, rapid turnover; slow production, slow turnover.” This mode further suggests that high expression miRNAs normally degrade fast and may endow the cell with special properties that facilitate cellular status-transition. Moreover, we revealed that the stability of miRNAs is affected by cohorts of factors that include miRNA targets, transcription factors, nucleotide content, evolution, associated disease, and environmental factors. Together, our results provided an extensive description of the global landscape, dynamics, and distinct mode of human miRNA stability, which provide help in investigating their functions in physiology and pathophysiology.

  1. Reconstructing Roma history from genome-wide data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Moorjani

    Full Text Available The Roma people, living throughout Europe and West Asia, are a diverse population linked by the Romani language and culture. Previous linguistic and genetic studies have suggested that the Roma migrated into Europe from South Asia about 1,000-1,500 years ago. Genetic inferences about Roma history have mostly focused on the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. To explore what additional information can be learned from genome-wide data, we analyzed data from six Roma groups that we genotyped at hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. We estimate that the Roma harbor about 80% West Eurasian ancestry-derived from a combination of European and South Asian sources-and that the date of admixture of South Asian and European ancestry was about 850 years before present. We provide evidence for Eastern Europe being a major source of European ancestry, and North-west India being a major source of the South Asian ancestry in the Roma. By computing allele sharing as a measure of linkage disequilibrium, we estimate that the migration of Roma out of the Indian subcontinent was accompanied by a severe founder event, which appears to have been followed by a major demographic expansion after the arrival in Europe.

  2. Insights into kidney diseases from genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, Matthias; Köttgen, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have considerably improved our understanding of the genetic basis of kidney function and disease. Population-based studies, used to investigate traits that define chronic kidney disease (CKD), have identified >50 genomic regions in which common genetic variants associate with estimated glomerular filtration rate or urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio. Case-control studies, used to study specific CKD aetiologies, have yielded risk loci for specific kidney diseases such as IgA nephropathy and membranous nephropathy. In this Review, we summarize important findings from GWAS and clinical and experimental follow-up studies. We also compare risk allele frequency, effect sizes, and specificity in GWAS of CKD-defining traits and GWAS of specific CKD aetiologies and the implications for study design. Genomic regions identified in GWAS of CKD-defining traits can contain causal genes for monogenic kidney diseases. Population-based research on kidney function traits can therefore generate insights into more severe forms of kidney diseases. Experimental follow-up studies have begun to identify causal genes and variants, which are potential therapeutic targets, and suggest mechanisms underlying the high allele frequency of causal variants. GWAS are thus a useful approach to advance knowledge in nephrology.

  3. Genome-wide search for strabismus susceptibility loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujiwara H

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to search for chromosomal susceptibility loci for comitant strabismus. Genomic DNA was isolated from 10mL blood taken from each member of 30 nuclear families in which 2 or more siblings are affected by either esotropia or exotropia. A genome-wide search was performed with amplification by polymerase chain reaction of 400 markers in microsatellite regions with approximately 10 cM resolution. For each locus, non-parametric affected sib-pair analysis and non-parametric linkage analysis for multiple pedigrees (Genehunter software, http://linkage.rockefeller.edu/soft/ were used to calculate multipoint lod scores and non-parametric linkage (NPL scores, respectively. In sib-pair analysis, lod scores showed basically flat lines with several peaks of 0.25 on all chromosomes. In non-parametric linkage analysis for multiple pedigrees, NPL scores showed one peak as high as 1.34 on chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 7, 10, 15, and 16, while 2 such peaks were found on chromosomes 3, 9, 11, 12, 18, and 20. Non-parametric linkage analysis for multiple pedigrees of 30 families with comitant strabismus suggested a number of chromosomal susceptibility loci. Our ongoing study involving a larger number of families will refine the accuracy of statistical analysis to pinpoint susceptibility loci for comitant strabismus.

  4. Genome-wide identification of KANADI1 target genes.

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    Paz Merelo

    Full Text Available Plant organ development and polarity establishment is mediated by the action of several transcription factors. Among these, the KANADI (KAN subclade of the GARP protein family plays important roles in polarity-associated processes during embryo, shoot and root patterning. In this study, we have identified a set of potential direct target genes of KAN1 through a combination of chromatin immunoprecipitation/DNA sequencing (ChIP-Seq and genome-wide transcriptional profiling using tiling arrays. Target genes are over-represented for genes involved in the regulation of organ development as well as in the response to auxin. KAN1 affects directly the expression of several genes previously shown to be important in the establishment of polarity during lateral organ and vascular tissue development. We also show that KAN1 controls through its target genes auxin effects on organ development at different levels: transport and its regulation, and signaling. In addition, KAN1 regulates genes involved in the response to abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, brassinosteroids, ethylene, cytokinins and gibberellins. The role of KAN1 in organ polarity is antagonized by HD-ZIPIII transcription factors, including REVOLUTA (REV. A comparison of their target genes reveals that the REV/KAN1 module acts in organ patterning through opposite regulation of shared targets. Evidence of mutual repression between closely related family members is also shown.

  5. Natural selection on functional modules, a genome-wide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, François; Arbiza, Leonardo; Dopazo, Joaquín; Dopazo, Hernán

    2011-03-01

    Classically, the functional consequences of natural selection over genomes have been analyzed as the compound effects of individual genes. The current paradigm for large-scale analysis of adaptation is based on the observed significant deviations of rates of individual genes from neutral evolutionary expectation. This approach, which assumed independence among genes, has not been able to identify biological functions significantly enriched in positively selected genes in individual species. Alternatively, pooling related species has enhanced the search for signatures of selection. However, grouping signatures does not allow testing for adaptive differences between species. Here we introduce the Gene-Set Selection Analysis (GSSA), a new genome-wide approach to test for evidences of natural selection on functional modules. GSSA is able to detect lineage specific evolutionary rate changes in a notable number of functional modules. For example, in nine mammal and Drosophilae genomes GSSA identifies hundreds of functional modules with significant associations to high and low rates of evolution. Many of the detected functional modules with high evolutionary rates have been previously identified as biological functions under positive selection. Notably, GSSA identifies conserved functional modules with many positively selected genes, which questions whether they are exclusively selected for fitting genomes to environmental changes. Our results agree with previous studies suggesting that adaptation requires positive selection, but not every mutation under positive selection contributes to the adaptive dynamical process of the evolution of species.

  6. Natural selection on functional modules, a genome-wide analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Serra

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Classically, the functional consequences of natural selection over genomes have been analyzed as the compound effects of individual genes. The current paradigm for large-scale analysis of adaptation is based on the observed significant deviations of rates of individual genes from neutral evolutionary expectation. This approach, which assumed independence among genes, has not been able to identify biological functions significantly enriched in positively selected genes in individual species. Alternatively, pooling related species has enhanced the search for signatures of selection. However, grouping signatures does not allow testing for adaptive differences between species. Here we introduce the Gene-Set Selection Analysis (GSSA, a new genome-wide approach to test for evidences of natural selection on functional modules. GSSA is able to detect lineage specific evolutionary rate changes in a notable number of functional modules. For example, in nine mammal and Drosophilae genomes GSSA identifies hundreds of functional modules with significant associations to high and low rates of evolution. Many of the detected functional modules with high evolutionary rates have been previously identified as biological functions under positive selection. Notably, GSSA identifies conserved functional modules with many positively selected genes, which questions whether they are exclusively selected for fitting genomes to environmental changes. Our results agree with previous studies suggesting that adaptation requires positive selection, but not every mutation under positive selection contributes to the adaptive dynamical process of the evolution of species.

  7. Identification of differential translation in genome wide studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Ola; Sonenberg, Nahum; Nadon, Robert

    2010-12-14

    Regulation of gene expression through translational control is a fundamental mechanism implicated in many biological processes ranging from memory formation to innate immunity and whose dysregulation contributes to human diseases. Genome wide analyses of translational control strive to identify differential translation independent of cytosolic mRNA levels. For this reason, most studies measure genes' translation levels as log ratios (translation levels divided by corresponding cytosolic mRNA levels obtained in parallel). Counterintuitively, arising from a mathematical necessity, these log ratios tend to be highly correlated with the cytosolic mRNA levels. Accordingly, they do not effectively correct for cytosolic mRNA level and generate substantial numbers of biological false positives and false negatives. We show that analysis of partial variance, which produces estimates of translational activity that are independent of cytosolic mRNA levels, is a superior alternative. When combined with a variance shrinkage method for estimating error variance, analysis of partial variance has the additional benefit of having greater statistical power and identifying fewer genes as translationally regulated resulting merely from unrealistically low variance estimates rather than from large changes in translational activity. In contrast to log ratios, this formal analytical approach estimates translation effects in a statistically rigorous manner, eliminates the need for inefficient and error-prone heuristics, and produces results that agree with biological function. The method is applicable to datasets obtained from both the commonly used polysome microarray method and the sequencing-based ribosome profiling method.

  8. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Human Amnion

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    Jinsil Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The amnion is a specialized tissue in contact with the amniotic fluid, which is in a constantly changing state. To investigate the importance of epigenetic events in this tissue in the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of human amnion from term (with and without labor and preterm deliveries. Using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, we identified genes exhibiting differential methylation associated with normal labor and preterm birth. Functional analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed biologically relevant enriched gene sets. Bisulfite sequencing analysis of the promoter region of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR gene detected two CpG dinucleotides showing significant methylation differences among the three groups of samples. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the solute carrier family 30 member 3 (SLC30A3 gene in preterm amnion was confirmed by methylation-specific PCR. This work provides preliminary evidence that DNA methylation changes in the amnion may be at least partially involved in the physiological process of labor and the etiology of preterm birth and suggests that DNA methylation profiles, in combination with other biological data, may provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying normal and pathological pregnancies.

  9. Psoriasis prediction from genome-wide SNP profiles

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    Fang Xiangzhong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the availability of large-scale genome-wide association study (GWAS data, choosing an optimal set of SNPs for disease susceptibility prediction is a challenging task. This study aimed to use single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs to predict psoriasis from searching GWAS data. Methods Totally we had 2,798 samples and 451,724 SNPs. Process for searching a set of SNPs to predict susceptibility for psoriasis consisted of two steps. The first one was to search top 1,000 SNPs with high accuracy for prediction of psoriasis from GWAS dataset. The second one was to search for an optimal SNP subset for predicting psoriasis. The sequential information bottleneck (sIB method was compared with classical linear discriminant analysis(LDA for classification performance. Results The best test harmonic mean of sensitivity and specificity for predicting psoriasis by sIB was 0.674(95% CI: 0.650-0.698, while only 0.520(95% CI: 0.472-0.524 was reported for predicting disease by LDA. Our results indicate that the new classifier sIB performs better than LDA in the study. Conclusions The fact that a small set of SNPs can predict disease status with average accuracy of 68% makes it possible to use SNP data for psoriasis prediction.

  10. Reducing dimensionality for prediction of genome-wide breeding values

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    Woolliams John A

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Partial least square regression (PLSR and principal component regression (PCR are methods designed for situations where the number of predictors is larger than the number of records. The aim was to compare the accuracy of genome-wide breeding values (EBV produced using PLSR and PCR with a Bayesian method, 'BayesB'. Marker densities of 1, 2, 4 and 8 Ne markers/Morgan were evaluated when the effective population size (Ne was 100. The correlation between true breeding value and estimated breeding value increased with density from 0.611 to 0.681 and 0.604 to 0.658 using PLSR and PCR respectively, with an overall advantage to PLSR of 0.016 (s.e = 0.008. Both methods gave a lower accuracy compared to the 'BayesB', for which accuracy increased from 0.690 to 0.860. PLSR and PCR appeared less responsive to increased marker density with the advantage of 'BayesB' increasing by 17% from a marker density of 1 to 8Ne/M. PCR and PLSR showed greater bias than 'BayesB' in predicting breeding values at all densities. Although, the PLSR and PCR were computationally faster and simpler, these advantages do not outweigh the reduction in accuracy, and there is a benefit in obtaining relevant prior information from the distribution of gene effects.

  11. A genome wide dosage suppressor network reveals genomic robustness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Biranchi; Kon, Yoshiko; Yadav, Gitanjali; Sevold, Anthony W.; Frumkin, Jesse P.; Vallabhajosyula, Ravishankar R.; Hintze, Arend; Østman, Bjørn; Schossau, Jory; Bhan, Ashish; Marzolf, Bruz; Tamashiro, Jenna K.; Kaur, Amardeep; Baliga, Nitin S.; Grayhack, Elizabeth J.; Adami, Christoph; Galas, David J.; Raval, Alpan; Phizicky, Eric M.; Ray, Animesh

    2017-01-01

    Genomic robustness is the extent to which an organism has evolved to withstand the effects of deleterious mutations. We explored the extent of genomic robustness in budding yeast by genome wide dosage suppressor analysis of 53 conditional lethal mutations in cell division cycle and RNA synthesis related genes, revealing 660 suppressor interactions of which 642 are novel. This collection has several distinctive features, including high co-occurrence of mutant-suppressor pairs within protein modules, highly correlated functions between the pairs and higher diversity of functions among the co-suppressors than previously observed. Dosage suppression of essential genes encoding RNA polymerase subunits and chromosome cohesion complex suggests a surprising degree of functional plasticity of macromolecular complexes, and the existence of numerous degenerate pathways for circumventing the effects of potentially lethal mutations. These results imply that organisms and cancer are likely able to exploit the genomic robustness properties, due the persistence of cryptic gene and pathway functions, to generate variation and adapt to selective pressures. PMID:27899637

  12. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of 150 cell samples†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russom, Aman; Xiao, Wenzhong; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wang, Shenglong; Heath, Joe Don; Kurn, Nurith; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Davis, Ronald W.; Toner, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in molecular biology is interrogating the human transcriptome on a genome wide scale when only a limited amount of biological sample is available for analysis. Current methodologies using microarray technologies for simultaneously monitoring mRNA transcription levels require nanogram amounts of total RNA. To overcome the sample size limitation of current technologies, we have developed a method to probe the global gene expression in biological samples as small as 150 cells, or the equivalent of approximately 300 pg total RNA. The new method employs microfluidic devices for the purification of total RNA from mammalian cells and ultra-sensitive whole transcriptome amplification techniques. We verified that the RNA integrity is preserved through the isolation process, accomplished highly reproducible whole transcriptome analysis, and established high correlation between repeated isolations of 150 cells and the same cell culture sample. We validated the technology by demonstrating that the combined microfluidic and amplification protocol is capable of identifying biological pathways perturbed by stimulation, which are consistent with the information recognized in bulk-isolated samples. PMID:20023796

  13. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis of 150 cell samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irimia, Daniel; Mindrinos, Michael; Russom, Aman; Xiao, Wenzhong; Wilhelmy, Julie; Wang, Shenglong; Heath, Joe Don; Kurn, Nurith; Tompkins, Ronald G; Davis, Ronald W; Toner, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    A major challenge in molecular biology is interrogating the human transcriptome on a genome wide scale when only a limited amount of biological sample is available for analysis. Current methodologies using microarray technologies for simultaneously monitoring mRNA transcription levels require nanogram amounts of total RNA. To overcome the sample size limitation of current technologies, we have developed a method to probe the global gene expression in biological samples as small as 150 cells, or the equivalent of approximately 300 pg total RNA. The new method employs microfluidic devices for the purification of total RNA from mammalian cells and ultra-sensitive whole transcriptome amplification techniques. We verified that the RNA integrity is preserved through the isolation process, accomplished highly reproducible whole transcriptome analysis, and established high correlation between repeated isolations of 150 cells and the same cell culture sample. We validated the technology by demonstrating that the combined microfluidic and amplification protocol is capable of identifying biological pathways perturbed by stimulation, which are consistent with the information recognized in bulk-isolated samples.

  14. Genome-Wide Association Studies of the Human Gut Microbiota.

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    Emily R Davenport

    Full Text Available The bacterial composition of the human fecal microbiome is influenced by many lifestyle factors, notably diet. It is less clear, however, what role host genetics plays in dictating the composition of bacteria living in the gut. In this study, we examined the association of ~200K host genotypes with the relative abundance of fecal bacterial taxa in a founder population, the Hutterites, during two seasons (n = 91 summer, n = 93 winter, n = 57 individuals collected in both. These individuals live and eat communally, minimizing variation due to environmental exposures, including diet, which could potentially mask small genetic effects. Using a GWAS approach that takes into account the relatedness between subjects, we identified at least 8 bacterial taxa whose abundances were associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms in the host genome in each season (at genome-wide FDR of 20%. For example, we identified an association between a taxon known to affect obesity (genus Akkermansia and a variant near PLD1, a gene previously associated with body mass index. Moreover, we replicate a previously reported association from a quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping study of fecal microbiome abundance in mice (genus Lactococcus, rs3747113, P = 3.13 x 10-7. Finally, based on the significance distribution of the associated microbiome QTLs in our study with respect to chromatin accessibility profiles, we identified tissues in which host genetic variation may be acting to influence bacterial abundance in the gut.

  15. Reconstructing Roma History from Genome-Wide Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorjani, Priya; Patterson, Nick; Loh, Po-Ru; Lipson, Mark; Kisfali, Péter; Melegh, Bela I.; Bonin, Michael; Kádaši, Ľudevít; Rieß, Olaf; Berger, Bonnie; Reich, David; Melegh, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The Roma people, living throughout Europe and West Asia, are a diverse population linked by the Romani language and culture. Previous linguistic and genetic studies have suggested that the Roma migrated into Europe from South Asia about 1,000–1,500 years ago. Genetic inferences about Roma history have mostly focused on the Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA. To explore what additional information can be learned from genome-wide data, we analyzed data from six Roma groups that we genotyped at hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We estimate that the Roma harbor about 80% West Eurasian ancestry–derived from a combination of European and South Asian sources–and that the date of admixture of South Asian and European ancestry was about 850 years before present. We provide evidence for Eastern Europe being a major source of European ancestry, and North-west India being a major source of the South Asian ancestry in the Roma. By computing allele sharing as a measure of linkage disequilibrium, we estimate that the migration of Roma out of the Indian subcontinent was accompanied by a severe founder event, which appears to have been followed by a major demographic expansion after the arrival in Europe. PMID:23516520

  16. Genome-wide association study of proneness to anger.

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    Eric Mick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Community samples suggest that approximately 1 in 20 children and adults exhibit clinically significant anger, hostility, and aggression. Individuals with dysregulated emotional control have a greater lifetime burden of psychiatric morbidity, severe impairment in role functioning, and premature mortality due to cardiovascular disease. METHODS: With publically available data secured from dbGaP, we conducted a genome-wide association study of proneness to anger using the Spielberger State-Trait Anger Scale in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study (n = 8,747. RESULTS: Subjects were, on average, 54 (range 45-64 years old at baseline enrollment, 47% (n = 4,117 were male, and all were of European descent by self-report. The mean Angry Temperament and Angry Reaction scores were 5.8 ± 1.8 and 7.6 ± 2.2. We observed a nominally significant finding (p = 2.9E-08, λ = 1.027 - corrected pgc = 2.2E-07, λ = 1.0015 on chromosome 6q21 in the gene coding for the non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinase, Fyn. CONCLUSIONS: Fyn interacts with NDMA receptors and inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3-gated channels to regulate calcium influx and intracellular release in the post-synaptic density. These results suggest that signaling pathways regulating intracellular calcium homeostasis, which are relevant to memory, learning, and neuronal survival, may in part underlie the expression of Angry Temperament.

  17. A genome-wide association study in multiple system atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Anna; Nalls, Michael A.; Schulte, Claudia; Federoff, Monica; Price, T. Ryan; Lees, Andrew; Ross, Owen A.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Mok, Kin; Mencacci, Niccolo E.; Schottlaender, Lucia; Chelban, Viorica; Ling, Helen; O'Sullivan, Sean S.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Federoff, Howard J.; Mhyre, Timothy R.; Morris, Huw R.; Deuschl, Günther; Quinn, Niall; Widner, Hakan; Albanese, Alberto; Infante, Jon; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Poewe, Werner; Oertel, Wolfgang; Höglinger, Günter U.; Wüllner, Ullrich; Goldwurm, Stefano; Pellecchia, Maria Teresa; Ferreira, Joaquim; Tolosa, Eduardo; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; Rascol, Olivier; Meissner, Wassilios G.; Hardy, John A.; Revesz, Tamas; Holton, Janice L.; Gasser, Thomas; Wenning, Gregor K.; Singleton, Andrew B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify genetic variants that play a role in the pathogenesis of multiple system atrophy (MSA), we undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS). Methods: We performed a GWAS with >5 million genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 918 patients with MSA of European ancestry and 3,864 controls. MSA cases were collected from North American and European centers, one third of which were neuropathologically confirmed. Results: We found no significant loci after stringent multiple testing correction. A number of regions emerged as potentially interesting for follow-up at p < 1 × 10−6, including SNPs in the genes FBXO47, ELOVL7, EDN1, and MAPT. Contrary to previous reports, we found no association of the genes SNCA and COQ2 with MSA. Conclusions: We present a GWAS in MSA. We have identified several potentially interesting gene loci, including the MAPT locus, whose significance will have to be evaluated in a larger sample set. Common genetic variation in SNCA and COQ2 does not seem to be associated with MSA. In the future, additional samples of well-characterized patients with MSA will need to be collected to perform a larger MSA GWAS, but this initial study forms the basis for these next steps. PMID:27629089

  18. Comparative analysis of methods for genome-wide nucleosome cartography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintales, Luis; Vázquez, Enrique; Antequera, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    Nucleosomes contribute to compacting the genome into the nucleus and regulate the physical access of regulatory proteins to DNA either directly or through the epigenetic modifications of the histone tails. Precise mapping of nucleosome positioning across the genome is, therefore, essential to understanding the genome regulation. In recent years, several experimental protocols have been developed for this purpose that include the enzymatic digestion, chemical cleavage or immunoprecipitation of chromatin followed by next-generation sequencing of the resulting DNA fragments. Here, we compare the performance and resolution of these methods from the initial biochemical steps through the alignment of the millions of short-sequence reads to a reference genome to the final computational analysis to generate genome-wide maps of nucleosome occupancy. Because of the lack of a unified protocol to process data sets obtained through the different approaches, we have developed a new computational tool (NUCwave), which facilitates their analysis, comparison and assessment and will enable researchers to choose the most suitable method for any particular purpose. NUCwave is freely available at http://nucleosome.usal.es/nucwave along with a step-by-step protocol for its use. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Genome-Wide Analysis of DNA Methylation in Human Amnion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsil; Pitlick, Mitchell M.; Christine, Paul J.; Schaefer, Amanda R.; Saleme, Cesar; Comas, Belén; Cosentino, Viviana; Gadow, Enrique; Murray, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    The amnion is a specialized tissue in contact with the amniotic fluid, which is in a constantly changing state. To investigate the importance of epigenetic events in this tissue in the physiology and pathophysiology of pregnancy, we performed genome-wide DNA methylation profiling of human amnion from term (with and without labor) and preterm deliveries. Using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27 BeadChip, we identified genes exhibiting differential methylation associated with normal labor and preterm birth. Functional analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed biologically relevant enriched gene sets. Bisulfite sequencing analysis of the promoter region of the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene detected two CpG dinucleotides showing significant methylation differences among the three groups of samples. Hypermethylation of the CpG island of the solute carrier family 30 member 3 (SLC30A3) gene in preterm amnion was confirmed by methylation-specific PCR. This work provides preliminary evidence that DNA methylation changes in the amnion may be at least partially involved in the physiological process of labor and the etiology of preterm birth and suggests that DNA methylation profiles, in combination with other biological data, may provide valuable insight into the mechanisms underlying normal and pathological pregnancies. PMID:23533356

  20. Mosaic paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy with down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Diana; Atwal, Paldeep Singh; Angell, Cathy; Gadi, Inder; Wallerstein, Robert

    2015-10-01

    We report on a 6-month-old girl with two apparent cell lines; one with trisomy 21, and the other with paternal genome-wide uniparental isodisomy (GWUPiD), identified using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based microarray and microsatellite analysis of polymorphic loci. The patient has Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) due to paternal uniparental disomy (UPD) at chromosome location 11p15 (UPD 11p15), which was confirmed through methylation analysis. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is present, which is associated with paternal UPD 11p15.5; and she likely has medullary nephrocalcinosis, which is associated with paternal UPD 20, although this was not biochemically confirmed. Angelman syndrome (AS) analysis was negative but this testing is not completely informative; she has no specific features of AS. Clinical features of this patient include: dysmorphic features consistent with trisomy 21, tetralogy of Fallot, hemihypertrophy, swirled skin hyperpigmentation, hepatoblastoma, and Wilms tumor. Her karyotype is 47,XX,+21[19]/46,XX[4], and microarray results suggest that the cell line with trisomy 21 is biparentally inherited and represents 40-50% of the genomic material in the tested specimen. The difference in the level of cytogenetically detected mosaicism versus the level of mosaicism observed via microarray analysis is likely caused by differences in the test methodologies. While a handful of cases of mosaic paternal GWUPiD have been reported, this patient is the only reported case that also involves trisomy 21. Other GWUPiD patients have presented with features associated with multiple imprinted regions, as does our patient. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-10-08

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Christopoulou et al.

  2. Genome-wide inference of regulatory networks in Streptomyces coelicolor

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    Takano Eriko

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The onset of antibiotics production in Streptomyces species is co-ordinated with differentiation events. An understanding of the genetic circuits that regulate these coupled biological phenomena is essential to discover and engineer the pharmacologically important natural products made by these species. The availability of genomic tools and access to a large warehouse of transcriptome data for the model organism, Streptomyces coelicolor, provides incentive to decipher the intricacies of the regulatory cascades and develop biologically meaningful hypotheses. Results In this study, more than 500 samples of genome-wide temporal transcriptome data, comprising wild-type and more than 25 regulatory gene mutants of Streptomyces coelicolor probed across multiple stress and medium conditions, were investigated. Information based on transcript and functional similarity was used to update a previously-predicted whole-genome operon map and further applied to predict transcriptional networks constituting modules enriched in diverse functions such as secondary metabolism, and sigma factor. The predicted network displays a scale-free architecture with a small-world property observed in many biological networks. The networks were further investigated to identify functionally-relevant modules that exhibit functional coherence and a consensus motif in the promoter elements indicative of DNA-binding elements. Conclusions Despite the enormous experimental as well as computational challenges, a systems approach for integrating diverse genome-scale datasets to elucidate complex regulatory networks is beginning to emerge. We present an integrated analysis of transcriptome data and genomic features to refine a whole-genome operon map and to construct regulatory networks at the cistron level in Streptomyces coelicolor. The functionally-relevant modules identified in this study pose as potential targets for further studies and verification.

  3. Susceptibility to Chronic Mucus Hypersecretion, a Genome Wide Association Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Akkelies E.; Smolonska, Joanna; van den Berge, Maarten; Wijmenga, Ciska; Zanen, Pieter; Luinge, Marjan A.; Platteel, Mathieu; Lammers, Jan-Willem; Dahlback, Magnus; Tosh, Kerrie; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Sterk, Peter J.; Spira, Avi; Vestbo, Jorgen; Nordestgaard, Borge G.; Benn, Marianne; Nielsen, Sune F.; Dahl, Morten; Verschuren, W. Monique; Picavet, H. Susan J.; Smit, Henriette A.; Owsijewitsch, Michael; Kauczor, Hans U.; de Koning, Harry J.; Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, Eva; Mejza, Filip; Nastalek, Pawel; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Cho, Michael H.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Lomas, David A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Bossé, Yohan; Obeidat, M. A.; Loth, Daan W.; Lahousse, Lies; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Andre; Stricker, Bruno H.; Brusselle, Guy G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Brouwer, Uilke; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Vonk, Judith M.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Timens, Wim; Boezen, H. Marike; Postma, Dirkje S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH) is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a minority of smokers develops CMH. A plausible explanation for this phenomenon is a predisposing genetic constitution. Therefore, we performed a genome wide association (GWA) study of CMH in Caucasian populations. Methods GWA analysis was performed in the NELSON-study using the Illumina 610 array, followed by replication and meta-analysis in 11 additional cohorts. In total 2,704 subjects with, and 7,624 subjects without CMH were included, all current or former heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years). Additional studies were performed to test the functional relevance of the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Results A strong association with CMH, consistent across all cohorts, was observed with rs6577641 (p = 4.25×10−6, OR = 1.17), located in intron 9 of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 locus (SATB1) on chromosome 3. The risk allele (G) was associated with higher mRNA expression of SATB1 (4.3×10−9) in lung tissue. Presence of CMH was associated with increased SATB1 mRNA expression in bronchial biopsies from COPD patients. SATB1 expression was induced during differentiation of primary human bronchial epithelial cells in culture. Conclusions Our findings, that SNP rs6577641 is associated with CMH in multiple cohorts and is a cis-eQTL for SATB1, together with our additional observation that SATB1 expression increases during epithelial differentiation provide suggestive evidence that SATB1 is a gene that affects CMH. PMID:24714607

  4. Genome-wide promoter methylome of small renal masses.

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    Ilsiya Ibragimova

    Full Text Available The majority of renal cell carcinoma (RCC is now incidentally detected and presents as small renal masses (SRMs defined as ≤ 4 cm in size. SRMs are heterogeneous comprising several histological types of RCC each with different biology and behavior, and benign tumors mainly oncocytoma. The varied prognosis of the different types of renal tumor has implications for management options. A key epigenetic alteration involved in the initiation and progression of cancer is aberrant methylation in the promoter region of a gene. The hypermethylation is associated with transcriptional repression and is an important mechanism of inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in neoplastic cells. We have determined the genome-wide promoter methylation profiles of 47 pT1a and 2 pT1b clear cell, papillary or chromophobe RCC, 25 benign renal oncocytoma ≤ 4 cm and 4 normal renal parenchyma specimens by Infinium HumanMethylation27 beadchip technology. We identify gene promoter hypermethylation signatures that distinguish clear cell and papillary from each other, from chromophobe and oncocytoma, and from normal renal cells. Pairwise comparisons revealed genes aberrantly hypermethylated in a tumor type but unmethylated in normal, and often unmethylated in the other renal tumor types. About 0.4% to 1.7% of genes comprised the promoter methylome in SRMs. The Infinium methylation score for representative genes was verified by gold standard technologies. The genes identified as differentially methylated implicate pathways involved in metabolism, tissue response to injury, epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT, signal transduction and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs, cancer, and stem cell regulation in the biology of RCC. Our findings contribute towards an improved understanding of the development of RCC, the different biology and behavior of histological types, and discovery of molecular subtypes. The differential methylation signatures may have utility in early

  5. Susceptibility to chronic mucus hypersecretion, a genome wide association study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akkelies E Dijkstra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic mucus hypersecretion (CMH is associated with an increased frequency of respiratory infections, excess lung function decline, and increased hospitalisation and mortality rates in the general population. It is associated with smoking, but it is unknown why only a minority of smokers develops CMH. A plausible explanation for this phenomenon is a predisposing genetic constitution. Therefore, we performed a genome wide association (GWA study of CMH in Caucasian populations. METHODS: GWA analysis was performed in the NELSON-study using the Illumina 610 array, followed by replication and meta-analysis in 11 additional cohorts. In total 2,704 subjects with, and 7,624 subjects without CMH were included, all current or former heavy smokers (≥20 pack-years. Additional studies were performed to test the functional relevance of the most significant single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP. RESULTS: A strong association with CMH, consistent across all cohorts, was observed with rs6577641 (p = 4.25×10(-6, OR = 1.17, located in intron 9 of the special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 locus (SATB1 on chromosome 3. The risk allele (G was associated with higher mRNA expression of SATB1 (4.3×10(-9 in lung tissue. Presence of CMH was associated with increased SATB1 mRNA expression in bronchial biopsies from COPD patients. SATB1 expression was induced during differentiation of primary human bronchial epithelial cells in culture. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings, that SNP rs6577641 is associated with CMH in multiple cohorts and is a cis-eQTL for SATB1, together with our additional observation that SATB1 expression increases during epithelial differentiation provide suggestive evidence that SATB1 is a gene that affects CMH.

  6. Genephony: a knowledge management tool for genome-wide research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Angelo; Riva, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    Background One of the consequences of the rapid and widespread adoption of high-throughput experimental technologies is an exponential increase of the amount of data produced by genome-wide experiments. Researchers increasingly need to handle very large volumes of heterogeneous data, including both the data generated by their own experiments and the data retrieved from publicly available repositories of genomic knowledge. Integration, exploration, manipulation and interpretation of data and information therefore need to become as automated as possible, since their scale and breadth are, in general, beyond the limits of what individual researchers and the basic data management tools in normal use can handle. This paper describes Genephony, a tool we are developing to address these challenges. Results We describe how Genephony can be used to manage large datesets of genomic information, integrating them with existing knowledge repositories. We illustrate its functionalities with an example of a complex annotation task, in which a set of SNPs coming from a genotyping experiment is annotated with genes known to be associated to a phenotype of interest. We show how, thanks to the modular architecture of Genephony and its user-friendly interface, this task can be performed in a few simple steps. Conclusion Genephony is an online tool for the manipulation of large datasets of genomic information. It can be used as a browser for genomic data, as a high-throughput annotation tool, and as a knowledge discovery tool. It is designed to be easy to use, flexible and extensible. Its knowledge management engine provides fine-grained control over individual data elements, as well as efficient operations on large datasets. PMID:19728881

  7. Genome-Wide Association Study of Schizophrenia in Japanese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Hattori, Eiji; Iwamoto, Kazuya; Toyota, Tomoko; Ohnishi, Tetsuo; Ohba, Hisako; Maekawa, Motoko; Kato, Tadafumi; Yoshikawa, Takeo

    2011-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neuropsychiatric disorder with genetically complex traits. Genetic variants should explain a considerable portion of the risk for schizophrenia, and genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a potentially powerful tool for identifying the risk variants that underlie the disease. Here, we report the results of a three-stage analysis of three independent cohorts consisting of a total of 2,535 samples from Japanese and Chinese populations for searching schizophrenia susceptibility genes using a GWAS approach. Firstly, we examined 115,770 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 120 patient-parents trio samples from Japanese schizophrenia pedigrees. In stage II, we evaluated 1,632 SNPs (1,159 SNPs of p<0.01 and 473 SNPs of p<0.05 that located in previously reported linkage regions). The second sample consisted of 1,012 case-control samples of Japanese origin. The most significant p value was obtained for the SNP in the ELAVL2 [(embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, Drosophila)-like 2] gene located on 9p21.3 (p = 0.00087). In stage III, we scrutinized the ELAVL2 gene by genotyping gene-centric tagSNPs in the third sample set of 293 family samples (1,163 individuals) of Chinese descent and the SNP in the gene showed a nominal association with schizophrenia in Chinese population (p = 0.026). The current data in Asian population would be helpful for deciphering ethnic diversity of schizophrenia etiology. PMID:21674006

  8. Genome-wide survey for biologically functional pseudogenes.

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    Orjan Svensson

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available According to current estimates there exist about 20,000 pseudogenes in a mammalian genome. The vast majority of these are disabled and nonfunctional copies of protein-coding genes which, therefore, evolve neutrally. Recent findings that a Makorin1 pseudogene, residing on mouse Chromosome 5, is, indeed, in vivo vital and also evolutionarily preserved, encouraged us to conduct a genome-wide survey for other functional pseudogenes in human, mouse, and chimpanzee. We identify to our knowledge the first examples of conserved pseudogenes common to human and mouse, originating from one duplication predating the human-mouse species split and having evolved as pseudogenes since the species split. Functionality is one possible way to explain the apparently contradictory properties of such pseudogene pairs, i.e., high conservation and ancient origin. The hypothesis of functionality is tested by comparing expression evidence and synteny of the candidates with proper test sets. The tests suggest potential biological function. Our candidate set includes a small set of long-lived pseudogenes whose unknown potential function is retained since before the human-mouse species split, and also a larger group of primate-specific ones found from human-chimpanzee searches. Two processed sequences are notable, their conservation since the human-mouse split being as high as most protein-coding genes; one is derived from the protein Ataxin 7-like 3 (ATX7NL3, and one from the Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 protein (ATX1. Our approach is comparative and can be applied to any pair of species. It is implemented by a semi-automated pipeline based on cross-species BLAST comparisons and maximum-likelihood phylogeny estimations. To separate pseudogenes from protein-coding genes, we use standard methods, utilizing in-frame disablements, as well as a probabilistic filter based on Ka/Ks ratios.

  9. Genome-wide identification of direct HBx genomic targets

    KAUST Repository

    Guerrieri, Francesca

    2017-02-17

    Background The Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) HBx regulatory protein is required for HBV replication and involved in HBV-related carcinogenesis. HBx interacts with chromatin modifying enzymes and transcription factors to modulate histone post-translational modifications and to regulate viral cccDNA transcription and cellular gene expression. Aiming to identify genes and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) directly targeted by HBx, we performed a chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) to analyse HBV recruitment on host cell chromatin in cells replicating HBV. Results ChIP-Seq high throughput sequencing of HBx-bound fragments was used to obtain a high-resolution, unbiased, mapping of HBx binding sites across the genome in HBV replicating cells. Protein-coding genes and ncRNAs involved in cell metabolism, chromatin dynamics and cancer were enriched among HBx targets together with genes/ncRNAs known to modulate HBV replication. The direct transcriptional activation of genes/miRNAs that potentiate endocytosis (Ras-related in brain (RAB) GTPase family) and autophagy (autophagy related (ATG) genes, beclin-1, miR-33a) and the transcriptional repression of microRNAs (miR-138, miR-224, miR-576, miR-596) that directly target the HBV pgRNA and would inhibit HBV replication, contribute to HBx-mediated increase of HBV replication. Conclusions Our ChIP-Seq analysis of HBx genome wide chromatin recruitment defined the repertoire of genes and ncRNAs directly targeted by HBx and led to the identification of new mechanisms by which HBx positively regulates cccDNA transcription and HBV replication.

  10. Genome-wide methylation analyses in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose K Lai

    Full Text Available Few studies had investigated genome-wide methylation in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. Our goals were to study differential methylation across the genome in gene promoters using an array-based method, as well as repetitive elements using surrogate global methylation markers. The discovery sample set for this study consisted of 54 GBM from Columbia University and Case Western Reserve University, and 24 brain controls from the New York Brain Bank. We assembled a validation dataset using methylation data of 162 TCGA GBM and 140 brain controls from dbGAP. HumanMethylation27 Analysis Bead-Chips (Illumina were used to interrogate 26,486 informative CpG sites in both the discovery and validation datasets. Global methylation levels were assessed by analysis of L1 retrotransposon (LINE1, 5 methyl-deoxycytidine (5m-dC and 5 hydroxylmethyl-deoxycytidine (5hm-dC in the discovery dataset. We validated a total of 1548 CpG sites (1307 genes that were differentially methylated in GBM compared to controls. There were more than twice as many hypomethylated genes as hypermethylated ones. Both the discovery and validation datasets found 5 tumor methylation classes. Pathway analyses showed that the top ten pathways in hypomethylated genes were all related to functions of innate and acquired immunities. Among hypermethylated pathways, transcriptional regulatory network in embryonic stem cells was the most significant. In the study of global methylation markers, 5m-dC level was the best discriminant among methylation classes, whereas in survival analyses, high level of LINE1 methylation was an independent, favorable prognostic factor in the discovery dataset. Based on a pathway approach, hypermethylation in genes that control stem cell differentiation were significant, poor prognostic factors of overall survival in both the discovery and validation datasets. Approaches that targeted these methylated genes may be a future therapeutic goal.

  11. Improved statistics for genome-wide interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueki, Masao; Cordell, Heather J

    2012-01-01

    Recently, Wu and colleagues [1] proposed two novel statistics for genome-wide interaction analysis using case/control or case-only data. In computer simulations, their proposed case/control statistic outperformed competing approaches, including the fast-epistasis option in PLINK and logistic regression analysis under the correct model; however, reasons for its superior performance were not fully explored. Here we investigate the theoretical properties and performance of Wu et al.'s proposed statistics and explain why, in some circumstances, they outperform competing approaches. Unfortunately, we find minor errors in the formulae for their statistics, resulting in tests that have higher than nominal type 1 error. We also find minor errors in PLINK's fast-epistasis and case-only statistics, although theory and simulations suggest that these errors have only negligible effect on type 1 error. We propose adjusted versions of all four statistics that, both theoretically and in computer simulations, maintain correct type 1 error rates under the null hypothesis. We also investigate statistics based on correlation coefficients that maintain similar control of type 1 error. Although designed to test specifically for interaction, we show that some of these previously-proposed statistics can, in fact, be sensitive to main effects at one or both loci, particularly in the presence of linkage disequilibrium. We propose two new "joint effects" statistics that, provided the disease is rare, are sensitive only to genuine interaction effects. In computer simulations we find, in most situations considered, that highest power is achieved by analysis under the correct genetic model. Such an analysis is unachievable in practice, as we do not know this model. However, generally high power over a wide range of scenarios is exhibited by our joint effects and adjusted Wu statistics. We recommend use of these alternative or adjusted statistics and urge caution when using Wu et al

  12. Genome-Wide Associations of Gene Expression Variation in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  13. Genome-wide associations of gene expression variation in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E Stranger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  14. Genome-wide signatures of convergent evolution in echolocating mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Joe; Tsagkogeorga, Georgia; Cotton, James A; Liu, Yuan; Provero, Paolo; Stupka, Elia; Rossiter, Stephen J

    2013-10-10

    Evolution is typically thought to proceed through divergence of genes, proteins and ultimately phenotypes. However, similar traits might also evolve convergently in unrelated taxa owing to similar selection pressures. Adaptive phenotypic convergence is widespread in nature, and recent results from several genes have suggested that this phenomenon is powerful enough to also drive recurrent evolution at the sequence level. Where homoplasious substitutions do occur these have long been considered the result of neutral processes. However, recent studies have demonstrated that adaptive convergent sequence evolution can be detected in vertebrates using statistical methods that model parallel evolution, although the extent to which sequence convergence between genera occurs across genomes is unknown. Here we analyse genomic sequence data in mammals that have independently evolved echolocation and show that convergence is not a rare process restricted to several loci but is instead widespread, continuously distributed and commonly driven by natural selection acting on a small number of sites per locus. Systematic analyses of convergent sequence evolution in 805,053 amino acids within 2,326 orthologous coding gene sequences compared across 22 mammals (including four newly sequenced bat genomes) revealed signatures consistent with convergence in nearly 200 loci. Strong and significant support for convergence among bats and the bottlenose dolphin was seen in numerous genes linked to hearing or deafness, consistent with an involvement in echolocation. Unexpectedly, we also found convergence in many genes linked to vision: the convergent signal of many sensory genes was robustly correlated with the strength of natural selection. This first attempt to detect genome-wide convergent sequence evolution across divergent taxa reveals the phenomenon to be much more pervasive than previously recognized.

  15. Genome-wide association study of schizophrenia in Japanese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Yamada

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a devastating neuropsychiatric disorder with genetically complex traits. Genetic variants should explain a considerable portion of the risk for schizophrenia, and genome-wide association study (GWAS is a potentially powerful tool for identifying the risk variants that underlie the disease. Here, we report the results of a three-stage analysis of three independent cohorts consisting of a total of 2,535 samples from Japanese and Chinese populations for searching schizophrenia susceptibility genes using a GWAS approach. Firstly, we examined 115,770 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 120 patient-parents trio samples from Japanese schizophrenia pedigrees. In stage II, we evaluated 1,632 SNPs (1,159 SNPs of p<0.01 and 473 SNPs of p<0.05 that located in previously reported linkage regions. The second sample consisted of 1,012 case-control samples of Japanese origin. The most significant p value was obtained for the SNP in the ELAVL2 [(embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, Drosophila-like 2] gene located on 9p21.3 (p = 0.00087. In stage III, we scrutinized the ELAVL2 gene by genotyping gene-centric tagSNPs in the third sample set of 293 family samples (1,163 individuals of Chinese descent and the SNP in the gene showed a nominal association with schizophrenia in Chinese population (p = 0.026. The current data in Asian population would be helpful for deciphering ethnic diversity of schizophrenia etiology.

  16. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Intelligence in Military Working Dogs: Development of Advanced Classification Algorithm for Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    al. (2007) “Efficient mapping of mendelian traits in dogs through genome-wide association.” Nat Genet 39:1321-1328. 12 Distribution A...collected data to genetically map superior intelligence in the military working dog. A behavioral testing regimen was developed by canine cognitive expert Dr...TERMS Military working dog genome-wide association study genetic marker intelligence 16

  17. Genome-wide identification of genes essential for the survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae in human saliva.

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    Lilly M Verhagen

    Full Text Available Since Streptococcus pneumoniae transmits through droplet spread, this respiratory tract pathogen may be able to survive in saliva. Here, we show that saliva supports survival of clinically relevant S. pneumoniae strains for more than 24 h in a capsule-independent manner. Moreover, saliva induced growth of S. pneumoniae in growth-permissive conditions, suggesting that S. pneumoniae is well adapted for uptake of nutrients from this bodily fluid. By using Tn-seq, a method for genome-wide negative selection screening, we identified 147 genes potentially required for growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva, among which genes predicted to be involved in cell envelope biosynthesis, cell transport, amino acid metabolism, and stress response predominated. The Tn-seq findings were validated by testing a panel of directed gene deletion mutants for their ability to survive in saliva under two testing conditions: at room temperature without CO2, representing transmission, and at 37 °C with CO2, representing in-host carriage. These validation experiments confirmed that the plsX gene and the amiACDEF and aroDEBC operons, involved in respectively fatty acid metabolism, oligopeptide transport, and biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids play an important role in the growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva at 37 °C. In conclusion, this study shows that S. pneumoniae is well-adapted for growth and survival in human saliva and provides a genome-wide list of genes potentially involved in adaptation. This notion supports earlier evidence that S. pneumoniae can use human saliva as a vector for transmission.

  18. Genome-Wide Identification of Genes Essential for the Survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae in Human Saliva

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhagen, Lilly M.; de Jonge, Marien I.; Burghout, Peter; Schraa, Kiki; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Mennens, Svenja; Eleveld, Marc J.; van der Gaast-de Jongh, Christa E.; Zomer, Aldert; Hermans, Peter W. M.; Bootsma, Hester J.

    2014-01-01

    Since Streptococcus pneumoniae transmits through droplet spread, this respiratory tract pathogen may be able to survive in saliva. Here, we show that saliva supports survival of clinically relevant S. pneumoniae strains for more than 24 h in a capsule-independent manner. Moreover, saliva induced growth of S. pneumoniae in growth-permissive conditions, suggesting that S. pneumoniae is well adapted for uptake of nutrients from this bodily fluid. By using Tn-seq, a method for genome-wide negative selection screening, we identified 147 genes potentially required for growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva, among which genes predicted to be involved in cell envelope biosynthesis, cell transport, amino acid metabolism, and stress response predominated. The Tn-seq findings were validated by testing a panel of directed gene deletion mutants for their ability to survive in saliva under two testing conditions: at room temperature without CO2, representing transmission, and at 37°C with CO2, representing in-host carriage. These validation experiments confirmed that the plsX gene and the amiACDEF and aroDEBC operons, involved in respectively fatty acid metabolism, oligopeptide transport, and biosynthesis of aromatic amino acids play an important role in the growth and survival of S. pneumoniae in saliva at 37°C. In conclusion, this study shows that S. pneumoniae is well-adapted for growth and survival in human saliva and provides a genome-wide list of genes potentially involved in adaptation. This notion supports earlier evidence that S. pneumoniae can use human saliva as a vector for transmission. PMID:24586856

  19. Genome-wide analysis reveals novel genes essential for heme homeostasis in Caenorhabditis elegans.

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    Scott Severance

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Heme is a cofactor in proteins that function in almost all sub-cellular compartments and in many diverse biological processes. Heme is produced by a conserved biosynthetic pathway that is highly regulated to prevent the accumulation of heme--a cytotoxic, hydrophobic tetrapyrrole. Caenorhabditis elegans and related parasitic nematodes do not synthesize heme, but instead require environmental heme to grow and develop. Heme homeostasis in these auxotrophs is, therefore, regulated in accordance with available dietary heme. We have capitalized on this auxotrophy in C. elegans to study gene expression changes associated with precisely controlled dietary heme concentrations. RNA was isolated from cultures containing 4, 20, or 500 microM heme; derived cDNA probes were hybridized to Affymetrix C. elegans expression arrays. We identified 288 heme-responsive genes (hrgs that were differentially expressed under these conditions. Of these genes, 42% had putative homologs in humans, while genomes of medically relevant heme auxotrophs revealed homologs for 12% in both Trypanosoma and Leishmania and 24% in parasitic nematodes. Depletion of each of the 288 hrgs by RNA-mediated interference (RNAi in a transgenic heme-sensor worm strain identified six genes that regulated heme homeostasis. In addition, seven membrane-spanning transporters involved in heme uptake were identified by RNAi knockdown studies using a toxic heme analog. Comparison of genes that were positive in both of the RNAi screens resulted in the identification of three genes in common that were vital for organismal heme homeostasis in C. elegans. Collectively, our results provide a catalog of genes that are essential for metazoan heme homeostasis and demonstrate the power of C. elegans as a genetic animal model to dissect the regulatory circuits which mediate heme trafficking in both vertebrate hosts and their parasites, which depend on environmental heme for survival.

  20. Genome-wide identification of significant aberrations in cancer genome

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    Yuan Xiguo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatic Copy Number Alterations (CNAs in human genomes are present in almost all human cancers. Systematic efforts to characterize such structural variants must effectively distinguish significant consensus events from random background aberrations. Here we introduce Significant Aberration in Cancer (SAIC, a new method for characterizing and assessing the statistical significance of recurrent CNA units. Three main features of SAIC include: (1 exploiting the intrinsic correlation among consecutive probes to assign a score to each CNA unit instead of single probes; (2 performing permutations on CNA units that preserve correlations inherent in the copy number data; and (3 iteratively detecting Significant Copy Number Aberrations (SCAs and estimating an unbiased null distribution by applying an SCA-exclusive permutation scheme. Results We test and compare the performance of SAIC against four peer methods (GISTIC, STAC, KC-SMART, CMDS on a large number of simulation datasets. Experimental results show that SAIC outperforms peer methods in terms of larger area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics curve and increased detection power. We then apply SAIC to analyze structural genomic aberrations acquired in four real cancer genome-wide copy number data sets (ovarian cancer, metastatic prostate cancer, lung adenocarcinoma, glioblastoma. When compared with previously reported results, SAIC successfully identifies most SCAs known to be of biological significance and associated with oncogenes (e.g., KRAS, CCNE1, and MYC or tumor suppressor genes (e.g., CDKN2A/B. Furthermore, SAIC identifies a number of novel SCAs in these copy number data that encompass tumor related genes and may warrant further studies. Conclusions Supported by a well-grounded theoretical framework, SAIC has been developed and used to identify SCAs in various cancer copy number data sets, providing useful information to study the landscape of cancer genomes

  1. Genome-wide analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

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    Thomas Julie

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide computational analysis of alternative splicing (AS in several flowering plants has revealed that pre-mRNAs from about 30% of genes undergo AS. Chlamydomonas, a simple unicellular green alga, is part of the lineage that includes land plants. However, it diverged from land plants about one billion years ago. Hence, it serves as a good model system to study alternative splicing in early photosynthetic eukaryotes, to obtain insights into the evolution of this process in plants, and to compare splicing in simple unicellular photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic eukaryotes. We performed a global analysis of alternative splicing in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using its recently completed genome sequence and all available ESTs and cDNAs. Results Our analysis of AS using BLAT and a modified version of the Sircah tool revealed AS of 498 transcriptional units with 611 events, representing about 3% of the total number of genes. As in land plants, intron retention is the most prevalent form of AS. Retained introns and skipped exons tend to be shorter than their counterparts in constitutively spliced genes. The splice site signals in all types of AS events are weaker than those in constitutively spliced genes. Furthermore, in alternatively spliced genes, the prevalent splice form has a stronger splice site signal than the non-prevalent form. Analysis of constitutively spliced introns revealed an over-abundance of motifs with simple repetitive elements in comparison to introns involved in intron retention. In almost all cases, AS results in a truncated ORF, leading to a coding sequence that is around 50% shorter than the prevalent splice form. Using RT-PCR we verified AS of two genes and show that they produce more isoforms than indicated by EST data. All cDNA/EST alignments and splice graphs are provided in a website at http://combi.cs.colostate.edu/as/chlamy. Conclusions The extent of AS in Chlamydomonas that we observed is much

  2. A Genome-wide Pleiotropy Scan for Prostate Cancer Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotou, Orestis A; Travis, Ruth C; Campa, Daniele; Berndt, Sonja I.; Lindstrom, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Siddiq, Afshan; Papatheodorou, Stefania I.; Stanford, Janet L.; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Diver, W. Ryan; Gapstur, Susan M.; Stevens, Victoria L.; Boeing, Heiner; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas; Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte; Kaaks, Rudolf; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Krogh, Vittorio; Overvad, Kim; Riboli, Elio; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Giovannucci, Edward; Stampfer, Meir; Haiman, Christopher; Henderson, Brian; Le Marchand, Loic; Gaziano, J. Michael; Hunter, DavidJ.; Koutros, Stella; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wacholder, Sholom; Key, Timothy J.; Tsilidis, Konstantinos K

    2014-01-01

    Background No single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) specific for aggressive prostate cancer have been identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Objective To test if SNPs associated with other traits may also affect the risk of aggressive prostate cancer. Design, setting, and participants SNPs implicated in any phenotype other than prostate cancer (p ≤ 10−7) were identified through the catalog of published GWAS and tested in 2891 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 4592 controls from the Breast and Prostate Cancer Cohort Consortium (BPC3). The 40 most significant SNPs were followed up in 4872 aggressive prostate cancer cases and 24 534 controls from the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) consortium. Outcome measurements and statistical analysis Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for aggressive prostate cancer were estimated. Results and limitations A total of 4666 SNPs were evaluated by the BPC3. Two signals were seen in regions already reported for prostate cancer risk. rs7014346 at 8q24.21 was marginally associated with aggressive prostate cancer in the BPC3 trial (p = 1.6 × 10-6), whereas after meta-analysis by PRACTICAL the summary OR was 1.21 (95%CI 1.16–1.27; p = 3.22 × 10−18). rs9900242 at 17q24.3 was also marginally associated with aggressive disease in the meta-analysis (OR 0.90, 95% CI 0.86–0.94; p = 2.5 × 10−6). Neither of these SNPs remained statistically significant when conditioning on correlated known prostate cancer SNPs. The meta-analysis by BPC3 and PRACTICAL identified a third promising signal, marked by rs16844874 at 2q34, independent of known prostate cancer loci (OR 1.12,95% CI 1.06–1.19; p = 4.67 × 10−5); it has been shown that SNPs correlated with this signal affect glycine concentrations. The main limitation is the heterogeneity in the definition of aggressive prostate cancer between BPC3 and PRACTICAL. Conclusions We did

  3. Genome-wide association study of colorectal cancer in Hispanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Stephanie L.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Edlund, Christopher K.; Conti, David V.; Ihenacho, Ugonna; Wan, Peggy; Van Den Berg, David; Casey, Graham; Fortini, Barbara K.; Lenz, Heinz-Josef; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Ordóñez-Sánchez, María Luisa; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Muñóz-Hernández, Linda Liliana; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Gómez, Donají; Alvirde, Ulices; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; González-Villalpando, María Elena; Le Marchand, Loic; Haiman, Christopher A.; Figueiredo, Jane C.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 58 susceptibility alleles across 37 regions associated with the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) with P < 5×10−8. Most studies have been conducted in non-Hispanic whites and East Asians; however, the generalizability of these findings and the potential for ethnic-specific risk variation in Hispanic and Latino (HL) individuals have been largely understudied. We describe the first GWAS of common genetic variation contributing to CRC risk in HL (1611 CRC cases and 4330 controls). We also examine known susceptibility alleles and implement imputation-based fine-mapping to identify potential ethnicity-specific association signals in known risk regions. We discovered 17 variants across 4 independent regions that merit further investigation due to suggestive CRC associations (P < 1×10−6) at 1p34.3 (rs7528276; Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.86 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.47–2.36); P = 2.5×10−7], 2q23.3 (rs1367374; OR = 1.37 (95% CI: 1.21–1.55); P = 4.0×10−7), 14q24.2 (rs143046984; OR = 1.65 (95% CI: 1.36–2.01); P = 4.1×10−7) and 16q12.2 [rs142319636; OR = 1.69 (95% CI: 1.37–2.08); P=7.8×10−7]. Among the 57 previously published CRC susceptibility alleles with minor allele frequency ≥1%, 76.5% of SNPs had a consistent direction of effect and 19 (33.3%) were nominally statistically significant (P < 0.05). Further, rs185423955 and rs60892987 were identified as novel secondary susceptibility variants at 3q26.2 (P = 5.3×10–5) and 11q12.2 (P = 6.8×10−5), respectively. Our findings demonstrate the importance of fine mapping in HL. These results are informative for variant prioritization in functional studies and future risk prediction modeling in minority populations. PMID:27207650

  4. Asian citrus psyllid RNAi pathway : RNAi evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Taning, Clauvis N. T.; Andrade, Eduardo C.; Hunter, Wayne B.; Olivier Christiaens; Guy Smagghe

    2016-01-01

    Diaphorina citri, known as the Asian citrus psyllid, is an important pest of citrus because it transmits a phloem-limited bacteria strongly implicated in huanglongbing (citrus greening disease). Emerging biotechnologies, such as RNA interference, could provide a new sustainable and environmentally friendly strategy for the management of this pest. In this study, genome and functional analysis were performed to verify whether the RNAi core genes are present in the Asian psyllid genome and if t...

  5. A comprehensive platform for highly multiplexed mammalian functional genetic screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheung-Ong Kahlin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide screening in human and mouse cells using RNA interference and open reading frame over-expression libraries is rapidly becoming a viable experimental approach for many research labs. There are a variety of gene expression modulation libraries commercially available, however, detailed and validated protocols as well as the reagents necessary for deconvolving genome-scale gene screens using these libraries are lacking. As a solution, we designed a comprehensive platform for highly multiplexed functional genetic screens in human, mouse and yeast cells using popular, commercially available gene modulation libraries. The Gene Modulation Array Platform (GMAP is a single microarray-based detection solution for deconvolution of loss and gain-of-function pooled screens. Results Experiments with specially constructed lentiviral-based plasmid pools containing ~78,000 shRNAs demonstrated that the GMAP is capable of deconvolving genome-wide shRNA "dropout" screens. Further experiments with a larger, ~90,000 shRNA pool demonstrate that equivalent results are obtained from plasmid pools and from genomic DNA derived from lentivirus infected cells. Parallel testing of large shRNA pools using GMAP and next-generation sequencing methods revealed that the two methods provide valid and complementary approaches to deconvolution of genome-wide shRNA screens. Additional experiments demonstrated that GMAP is equivalent to similar microarray-based products when used for deconvolution of open reading frame over-expression screens. Conclusion Herein, we demonstrate four major applications for the GMAP resource, including deconvolution of pooled RNAi screens in cells with at least 90,000 distinct shRNAs. We also provide detailed methodologies for pooled shRNA screen readout using GMAP and compare next-generation sequencing to GMAP (i.e. microarray based deconvolution methods.

  6. Dating the age of admixture via wavelet transform analysis of genome-wide data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Pugach (Irina); R. Matveyev (Rostislav); A. Wollstein (Andreas); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); M. Stoneking (Mark)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe describe a PCA-based genome scan approach to analyze genome-wide admixture structure, and introduce wavelet transform analysis as a method for estimating the time of admixture. We test the wavelet transform method with simulations and apply it to genome-wide SNP data from eight admixe

  7. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method: We used case-control analyses of 896 cases…

  8. Family-Based Genome-Wide Association Scan of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mick, Eric; Todorov, Alexandre; Smalley, Susan; Hu, Xiaolan; Loo, Sandra; Todd, Richard D.; Biederman, Joseph; Byrne, Deirdre; Dechairo, Bryan; Guiney, Allan; McCracken, James; McGough, James; Nelson, Stanley F.; Reiersen, Angela M.; Wilens, Timothy E.; Wozniak, Janet; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Genes likely play a substantial role in the etiology of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the genetic architecture of the disorder is unknown, and prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not identified a genome-wide significant association. We have conducted a third, independent, multisite GWAS of…

  9. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  10. A Genome-Wide Association Search for Type 2 Diabetes Genes in African Americans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmer, Nicholette D.; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Roh, Bong H.; Wing, Maria R.; An, S. Sandy; Hester, Jessica M.; Cooke, Jessica N.; Bostrom, Meredith A.; Rudock, Megan E.; Talbert, Matthew E.; Lewis, Joshua P.; Ferrara, Assiamira; Lu, Lingyi; Ziegler, Julie T.; Sale, Michele M.; Divers, Jasmin; Shriner, Daniel; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Rotimi, Charles N.; Ng, Maggie C. Y.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Freedman, Barry I.; Bowden, Donald W.

    2012-01-01

    African Americans are disproportionately affected by type 2 diabetes (T2DM) yet few studies have examined T2DM using genome-wide association approaches in this ethnicity. The aim of this study was to identify genes associated with T2DM in the African American population. We performed a Genome Wide A

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study and Linkage Analysis of the Healthy Aging Index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minster, Ryan L; Sanders, Jason L; Singh, Jatinder;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Healthy Aging Index (HAI) is a tool for measuring the extent of health and disease across multiple systems. METHODS: We conducted a genome-wide association study and a genome-wide linkage analysis to map quantitative trait loci associated with the HAI and a modified HAI weighted...

  12. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neale, B.M.; Medland, S.E.; Ripke, S.; Asherson, P.; Franke, B.; Lesch, K.P.; Faraone, S.V.; Nguyen, T.T.; Schafer, H.; Holmans, P.; Daly, M.; Steinhausen, H.C.; Freitag, C.; Reif, A.; Renner, T.J.; Romanos, M.; Romanos, J.; Walitza, S.; Warnke, A.; Meyer, J.; Palmason, H.; Buitelaar, J.K.; Vasquez, A.A.; Lambregts-Rommelse, N.N.J.; Gill, M.; Anney, R.J.; Langely, K.; O'Donovan, M.; Williams, N.; Owen, M.; Thapar, A.; Kent, L.; Sergeant, J.A.; Roeyers, H.; Mick, E.; Biederman, J.; Doyle, A.; Smalley, S.; Loo, S.; Hakonarson, H.; Elia, J.; Todorov, A.; Miranda, A.; Mulas, F.; Ebstein, R.P.; Rothenberger, A.; Banaschewski, T.; Oades, R.D.; Sonuga-Barke, E.; McGough, J.; Nisenbaum, L.; Middleton, F.; Hu, X.; Nelson, S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded signifi

  13. Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah E.; Ripke, Stephan; Asherson, Philip; Franke, Barbara; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Holmans, Peter; Daly, Mark; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Freitag, Christine; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Walitza, Susanne; Warnke, Andreas; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Buitelaar, Jan; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Lambregts-Rommelse, Nanda; Gill, Michael; Anney, Richard J. L.; Langely, Kate; O'Donovan, Michael; Williams, Nigel; Owen, Michael; Thapar, Anita; Kent, Lindsey; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph; Doyle, Alysa; Smalley, Susan; Loo, Sandra; Hakonarson, Hakon; Elia, Josephine; Todorov, Alexandre; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Ebstein, Richard P.; Rothenberger, Aribert; Banaschewski, Tobias; Oades, Robert D.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund; McGough, James; Nisenbaum, Laura; Middleton, Frank; Hu, Xiaolan; Nelson, Stan

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. As prior genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have not yielded significant results, we conducted a meta-analysis of…

  14. Elastic-net regularization approaches for genome-wide association studies of rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seoae; Kim, Haseong; Oh, Sohee; Kim, Kyunga; Park, Taesung

    2009-12-15

    The current trend in genome-wide association studies is to identify regions where the true disease-causing genes may lie by evaluating thousands of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the whole genome. However, many challenges exist in detecting disease-causing genes among the thousands of SNPs. Examples include multicollinearity and multiple testing issues, especially when a large number of correlated SNPs are simultaneously tested. Multicollinearity can often occur when predictor variables in a multiple regression model are highly correlated, and can cause imprecise estimation of association. In this study, we propose a simple stepwise procedure that identifies disease-causing SNPs simultaneously by employing elastic-net regularization, a variable selection method that allows one to address multicollinearity. At Step 1, the single-marker association analysis was conducted to screen SNPs. At Step 2, the multiple-marker association was scanned based on the elastic-net regularization. The proposed approach was applied to the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) case-control data set of Genetic Analysis Workshop 16. While the selected SNPs at the screening step are located mostly on chromosome 6, the elastic-net approach identified putative RA-related SNPs on other chromosomes in an increased proportion. For some of those putative RA-related SNPs, we identified the interactions with sex, a well known factor affecting RA susceptibility.

  15. VIGoR: Variational Bayesian Inference for Genome-Wide Regression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Onogi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide regression using a number of genome-wide markers as predictors is now widely used for genome-wide association mapping and genomic prediction. We developed novel software for genome-wide regression which we named VIGoR (variational Bayesian inference for genome-wide regression. Variational Bayesian inference is computationally much faster than widely used Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms. VIGoR implements seven regression methods, and is provided as a command line program package for Linux/Mac, and as a cross-platform R package. In addition to model fitting, cross-validation and hyperparameter tuning using cross-validation can be automatically performed by modifying a single argument. VIGoR is available at https://github.com/Onogi/VIGoR. The R package is also available at https://cran.r-project.org/web/packages/VIGoR/index.html.

  16. More heritability probably captured by psoriasis genome-wide association study in Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Long; Liu, Lu; Cheng, Yuyan; Lin, Yan; Shen, Changbing; Zhu, Caihong; Yang, Sen; Yin, Xianyong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2015-11-15

    Missing heritability is a common problem in genome-wide association studies in complex diseases/traits. To quantify the unbiased heritability estimate, we applied the phenotype correlation-genotype correlation regression in psoriasis genome-wide association data in Han Chinese which comprises 1139 cases and 1132 controls. We estimated that 45.7% heritability of psoriasis in Han Chinese were captured by common variants (s.e.=12.5%), which reinforced that the majority of psoriasis heritability can be covered by common variants in genome-wide association data (68.2%). The results provided evidence that the heritability covered by psoriasis genome-wide genotyping data was probably underestimated in previous restricted maximum likelihood method. Our study highlights the broad role of common variants in the etiology of psoriasis and sheds light on the possibility to identify more common variants of small effect by increasing the sample size in psoriasis genome-wide association studies.

  17. Genome-wide association study identifies genetic loci associated with iron deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine E McLaren

    Full Text Available The existence of multiple inherited disorders of iron metabolism in man, rodents and other vertebrates suggests genetic contributions to iron deficiency. To identify new genomic locations associated with iron deficiency, a genome-wide association study (GWAS was performed using DNA collected from white men aged≥25 y and women≥50 y in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS Study with serum ferritin (SF≤12 µg/L (cases and iron replete controls (SF>100 µg/L in men, SF>50 µg/L in women. Regression analysis was used to examine the association between case-control status (336 cases, 343 controls and quantitative serum iron measures and 331,060 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotypes, with replication analyses performed in a sample of 71 cases and 161 controls from a population of white male and female veterans screened at a US Veterans Affairs (VA medical center. Five SNPs identified in the GWAS met genome-wide statistical significance for association with at least one iron measure, rs2698530 on chr. 2p14; rs3811647 on chr. 3q22, a known SNP in the transferrin (TF gene region; rs1800562 on chr. 6p22, the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene; rs7787204 on chr. 7p21; and rs987710 on chr. 22q11 (GWAS observed P<1.51×10(-7 for all. An association between total iron binding capacity and SNP rs3811647 in the TF gene (GWAS observed P=7.0×10(-9, corrected P=0.012 was replicated within the VA samples (observed P=0.012. Associations with the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene also were replicated. The joint analysis of the HEIRS and VA samples revealed strong associations between rs2698530 on chr. 2p14 and iron status outcomes. These results confirm a previously-described TF polymorphism and implicate one potential new locus as a target for gene identification.

  18. Genome-Wide Association Mapping for Intelligence in Military Working Dogs: Canine Cohort, Canine Intelligence Assessment Regimen, Genome-Wide Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Typing, and Unsupervised Classification Algorithm for Genome-Wide Association Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Almasy, L, Blangero, J. (2009) Human QTL linkage mapping. Genetica 136:333-340. Amos, CI. (2007) Successful design and conduct of genome-wide...quantitative trait loci. Genetica 136:237-243. Skol AD, Scott LJ, Abecasis GR, Boehnke M. (2006) Joint analysis is more efficient than replication

  19. Caveat of RNAi in plants: the off-target effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil-Kumar, Muthappa; Mysore, Kirankumar S

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi), mediated by short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), is one of the widely used functional genomics method for suppressing the gene expression in plants. Initially, gene silencing by RNAi mechanism was believed to be specific requiring sequence homology between siRNA and target mRNA. However, several recent reports have showed that non-specific effects often referred as off-target gene silencing can occur during RNAi. This unintended gene silencing can lead to false conclusions in RNAi experiments that are aimed to study the functional role of a particular target gene in plants. This especially is a major problem in large-scale RNAi-based screens aiming for gene discovery. Hence, understanding the off-target effects is crucial for minimizing such effects to better conclude gene function analyzed by RNAi. We discuss here potential problems of off-target gene silencing and focus on possibilities that favor this effect during post-transcriptional gene silencing. Suggestions to overcome the off-target effects during RNAi studies are also presented. We believe that information available in present-day plant science literature about specificity of siRNA actions is inadequate. In-depth systematic studies to understand their molecular basis are necessary to enable improved design of more specific RNAi vectors. In the meantime, gene function and phenotype results from present-day RNAi studies need to be interpreted with caution.

  20. Systematic Identification and Assessment of Therapeutic Targets for Breast Cancer Based on Genome-Wide RNA Interference Transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available With accumulating public omics data, great efforts have been made to characterize the genetic heterogeneity of breast cancer. However, identifying novel targets and selecting the best from the sizeable lists of candidate targets is still a key challenge for targeted therapy, largely owing to the lack of economical, efficient and systematic discovery and assessment to prioritize potential therapeutic targets. Here, we describe an approach that combines the computational evaluation and objective, multifaceted assessment to systematically identify and prioritize targets for biological validation and therapeutic exploration. We first establish the reference gene expression profiles from breast cancer cell line MCF7 upon genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi of a total of 3689 genes, and the breast cancer query signatures using RNA-seq data generated from tissue samples of clinical breast cancer patients in the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA. Based on gene set enrichment analysis, we identified a set of 510 genes that when knocked down could significantly reverse the transcriptome of breast cancer state. We then perform multifaceted assessment to analyze the gene set to prioritize potential targets for gene therapy. We also propose drug repurposing opportunities and identify potentially druggable proteins that have been poorly explored with regard to the discovery of small-molecule modulators. Finally, we obtained a small list of candidate therapeutic targets for four major breast cancer subtypes, i.e., luminal A, luminal B, HER2+ and triple negative breast cancer. This RNAi transcriptome-based approach can be a helpful paradigm for relevant researches to identify and prioritize candidate targets for experimental validation.

  1. A genome-wide scan identifies variants in NFIB associated with metastasis in patients with osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabello, Lisa; Koster, Roelof; Moriarity, Branden S.; Spector, Logan G.; Meltzer, Paul S.; Gary, Joy; Machiela, Mitchell J.; Pankratz, Nathan; Panagiotou, Orestis A.; Largaespada, David; Wang, Zhaoming; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Gorlick, Richard; Khanna, Chand; de Toledo, Silvia Regina Caminada; Petrilli, Antonio S.; Patiño-Garcia, Ana; Sierrasesúmaga, Luis; Lecanda, Fernando; Andrulis, Irene L.; Wunder, Jay S.; Gokgoz, Nalan; Serra, Massimo; Hattinger, Claudia; Picci, Piero; Scotlandi, Katia; Flanagan, Adrienne M.; Tirabosco, Roberto; Amary, Maria Fernanda; Halai, Dina; Ballinger, Mandy L.; Thomas, David M.; Davis, Sean; Barkauskas, Donald A.; Marina, Neyssa; Helman, Lee; Otto, George M.; Becklin, Kelsie L.; Wolf, Natalie K.; Weg, Madison T.; Tucker, Margaret; Wacholder, Sholom; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Boland, Joseph F.; Hicks, Belynda D.; Vogt, Aurelie; Burdett, Laurie; Yeager, Meredith; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Savage, Sharon A.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of death in osteosarcoma patients, the most common pediatric bone malignancy. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study of osteosarcoma metastasis at diagnosis in 935 osteosarcoma patients to determine whether germline genetic variation contributes to risk of metastasis. We identified a SNP, rs7034162, in NFIB significantly associated with metastasis in European osteosarcoma cases, as well as in cases of African and Brazilian ancestry (meta-analysis of all cases: P=1.2×10−9, OR 2.43, 95% CI 1.83–3.24). The risk allele was significantly associated with lowered NFIB expression, which led to increased osteosarcoma cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, a transposon screen in mice identified a significant proportion of osteosarcomas harboring inactivating insertions in Nfib, and had lowered Nfib expression. These data suggest that germline genetic variation at rs7034162 is important in osteosarcoma metastasis, and that NFIB is an osteosarcoma metastasis susceptibility gene. PMID:26084801

  2. Candidate essential genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 identified by genome-wide TraDIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yee-Chin Wong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  3. P-value based analysis for shared controls design in genome-wide association studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaykin, Dmitri V; Kozbur, Damian O

    2010-11-01

    An appealing genome-wide association study design compares one large control group against several disease samples. A pioneering study by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium that employed such a design has identified multiple susceptibility regions, many of which have been independently replicated. While reusing a control sample provides effective utilization of data, it also creates correlation between association statistics across diseases. An observation of a large association statistic for one of the diseases may greatly increase chances of observing a spuriously large association for a different disease. Accounting for the correlation is also particularly important when screening for SNPs that might be involved in a set of diseases with overlapping etiology. We describe methods that correct association statistics for dependency due to shared controls, and we describe ways to obtain a measure of overall evidence and to combine association signals across multiple diseases. The methods we describe require no access to individual subject data, instead, they efficiently utilize information contained in P-values for association reported for individual diseases. P-value based combined tests for association are flexible and essentially as powerful as the approach based on aggregating the individual subject data.

  4. Allelic association studies of genome wide association data can reveal errors in marker position assignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis David

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome wide association (GWA studies provide the opportunity to develop new kinds of analysis. Analysing pairs of markers from separate regions might lead to the detection of allelic association which might indicate an interaction between nearby genes. Methods 396,591 markers typed in 541 subjects were studied. 7.8*1010 pairs of markers were screened and those showing initial evidence for allelic association were subjected to more thorough investigation along with 10 flanking markers on either side. Results No evidence was detected for interaction. However 6 markers appeared to have an incorrect map position according to NCBI Build 35. One of these was corrected in Build 36 and 2 were dropped. The remaining 3 were left with map positions inconsistent with their allelic association relationships. Discussion Although no interaction effects were detected the method was successful in identifying markers with probably incorrect map positions. Conclusion The study of allelic association can supplement other methods for assigning markers to particular map positions. Analyses of this type may usefully be applied to data from future GWA studies.

  5. Candidate Essential Genes in Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315 Identified by Genome-Wide TraDIS

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Yee-Chin

    2016-08-22

    Burkholderia cenocepacia infection often leads to fatal cepacia syndrome in cystic fibrosis patients. However, antibiotic therapy rarely results in complete eradication of the pathogen due to its intrinsic resistance to many clinically available antibiotics. Recent attention has turned to the identification of essential genes as the proteins encoded by these genes may serve as potential targets for development of novel antimicrobials. In this study, we utilized TraDIS (Transposon Directed Insertion-site Sequencing) as a genome-wide screening tool to facilitate the identification of B. cenocepacia genes essential for its growth and viability. A transposon mutant pool consisting of approximately 500,000 mutants was successfully constructed, with more than 400,000 unique transposon insertion sites identified by computational analysis of TraDIS datasets. The saturated library allowed for the identification of 383 genes that were predicted to be essential in B. cenocepacia. We extended the application of TraDIS to identify conditionally essential genes required for in vitro growth and revealed an additional repertoire of 439 genes to be crucial for B. cenocepacia growth under nutrient-depleted conditions. The library of B. cenocepacia mutants can subsequently be subjected to various biologically related conditions to facilitate the discovery of genes involved in niche adaptation as well as pathogenicity and virulence.

  6. Replication of the Wellcome Trust genome-wide association study of essential hypertension: the Family Blood Pressure Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehret, Georg B; Morrison, Alanna C; O'Connor, Ashley A; Grove, Megan L; Baird, Lisa; Schwander, Karen; Weder, Alan; Cooper, Richard S; Rao, D C; Hunt, Steven C; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chakravarti, Aravinda

    2008-12-01

    Essential hypertension is a principal cardiovascular risk factor whose origin remains unknown. Classical genetic studies have shown that blood pressure is at least partially heritable, opening a window to understanding the pathophysiology of essential hypertension in the human using modern genetic tools. The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium has recently published the results of screening the genomes of 2000 essential hypertension cases and 3000 controls using 500 000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). None of the variants proved to be genome-wide significant after correction for multiple tests but the most significantly associated SNPs (PFamily Blood Pressure Program comprising 11 433 individuals recruited by hypertensive families. The results suggest that only one of the six SNPs might be associated with essential hypertension in Americans of European origin. This SNP shows a significant but opposite effect in Americans of Hispanic origin and no association in African Americans. The significance of the opposing effect estimates is unclear. No replication could be shown for hypertension status, but there are differences in study design. This attempted replication highlights that essential hypertension studies will require more comprehensive and larger genetic screens.

  7. Genome-wide meta-analysis of systolic blood pressure in children with sickle cell disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallav Bhatnagar

    Full Text Available In pediatric sickle cell disease (SCD patients, it has been reported that higher systolic blood pressure (SBP is associated with increased risk of a silent cerebral infarction (SCI. SCI is a major cause of neurologic morbidity in children with SCD, and blood pressure is a potential modulator of clinical manifestations of SCD; however, the risk factors underlying these complications are not well characterized. The aim of this study was to identify genetic variants that influence SBP in an African American population in the setting of SCD, and explore the use of SBP as an endo-phenotype for SCI. We conducted a genome-wide meta-analysis for SBP using two SCD cohorts, as well as a candidate screen based on published SBP loci. A total of 1,617 patients were analyzed, and while no SNP reached genome-wide significance (P-value<5.0 x 10(-8, a number of suggestive candidate loci were identified. The most significant SNP, rs7952106 (P-value=8.57 x 10(-7, was in the DRD2 locus on chromosome 11. In a gene-based association analysis, MIR4301 (micro-RNA4301, which resides in an intron of DRD2, was the most significant gene (P-value=5.2 x 10(-5. Examining 27 of the previously reported SBP associated SNPs, 4 SNPs were nominally significant. A genetic risk score was constructed to assess the aggregated genetic effect of the published SBP variants, demonstrating a significant association (P=0.05. In addition, we also assessed whether these variants are associated with SCI, validating the use of SBP as an endo-phenotype for SCI. Three SNPs were nominally associated, and only rs2357790 (5' CACNB2 was significant for both SBP and SCI. None of these SNPs retained significance after Bonferroni correction. Taken together, our results suggest the importance of DRD2 genetic variation in the modulation of SBP, and extend the aggregated importance of previously reported SNPs in the modulation of SBP in an African American cohort, more specifically in children with SCD.

  8. BioMet Toolbox: genome-wide analysis of metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cvijovic, M.; Olivares Hernandez, Roberto; Agren, R.

    2010-01-01

    models. Systematic analysis of biological processes by means of modelling and simulations has made the identification of metabolic networks and prediction of metabolic capabilities under different conditions possible. For facilitating such systemic analysis, we have developed the BioMet Toolbox, a web......-based resource for stoichiometric analysis and for integration of transcriptome and interactome data, thereby exploiting the capabilities of genome-scale metabolic models. The BioMet Toolbox provides an effective user-friendly way to perform linear programming simulations towards maximized or minimized growth...... rates, substrate uptake rates and metabolic production rates by detecting relevant fluxes, simulate single and double gene deletions or detect metabolites around which major transcriptional changes are concentrated. These tools can be used for high-throughput in silico screening and allows fully...

  9. Genome-wide association studies of female reproduction in tropically adapted beef cattle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hawken, R J; Zhang, Y D; Fortes, M R S; Collis, E; Barris, W C; Corbet, N J; Williams, P J; Fordyce, G; Holroyd, R G; Walkley, J R W; Barendse, W; Johnston, D J; Prayaga, K C; Tier, B; Reverter, A; Lehnert, S A

    2012-01-01

    .... To elucidate the genetics underlying reproduction in beef cattle, we performed a genome-wide association study using the bovine SNP50 chip in 2 tropically adapted beef cattle breeds, Brahman and Tropical Composite...

  10. Mammalian RNA polymerase II core promoters: insights from genome-wide studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandelin, Albin; Carninci, Piero; Lenhard, Boris

    2007-01-01

    The identification and characterization of mammalian core promoters and transcription start sites is a prerequisite to understanding how RNA polymerase II transcription is controlled. New experimental technologies have enabled genome-wide discovery and characterization of core promoters, revealin...

  11. Genome-wide association study of smoking initiation and current smoking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vink, Jacqueline M; Smit, August B; de Geus, Eco J C;

    2009-01-01

    For the identification of genes associated with smoking initiation and current smoking, genome-wide association analyses were carried out in 3497 subjects. Significant genes that replicated in three independent samples (n = 405, 5810, and 1648) were visualized into a biologically meaningful network......) and cell-adhesion molecules (e.g., CDH23). We conclude that a network-based genome-wide association approach can identify genes influencing smoking behavior....

  12. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies seven new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci

    OpenAIRE

    Stahl, Eli A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F.; Xie, Gang; Eyre, Stephen; Thomson, Brian P.; Li, Yonghong; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hinks, Anne; Guiducci, Candace; Chen, Robert; Alfredsson, Lars; Amos, Christopher I.; Ardlie, Kristin G.

    2010-01-01

    To identify novel genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 5,539 autoantibody positive RA cases and 20,169 controls of European descent, followed by replication in an independent set of 6,768 RA cases and 8,806 controls. Of 34 SNPs selected for replication, 7 novel RA risk alleles were identified at genome-wide significance (P

  13. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Godoy, M Angeles; Mauri, Nuria; Juarez, Jose; Marques, M Carmen; Santiago, Julia; Forment, Javier; Gadea, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genome-wide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. Results We have designed and constructed a publicly available genome-wide cDNA...

  14. Genome-Wide Analysis of Salicylate and Dibenzofuran Metabolism in Sphingomonas wittichii RW1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith eCoronado

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Sphingomonas wittichii RW1 is a bacterium isolated for its ability to degrade the xenobiotic compounds dibenzodioxin and dibenzofuran (DBF. A number of genes involved in DBF degradation have been previously characterized, such as the dxn cluster, dbfB, and the electron transfer components fdx1, fdx3 and redA2. Here we use a combination of whole genome transcriptome analysis and transposon library screening to characterize RW1 catabolic and other genes implicated in the reaction to or degradation of DBF. To detect differentially expressed genes upon exposure to DBF, we applied three different growth exposure experiments, using either short DBF exposures to actively growing cells or growing them with DBF as sole carbon and energy source. Genome-wide gene expression was examined using a custom-made microarray. In addition, proportional abundance determination of transposon insertions in RW1 libraries grown on salicylate or DBF by ultra-high throughput sequencing was used to infer genes whose interruption caused a fitness loss for growth on DBF. Expression patterns showed that batch and chemostat growth conditions, and short or long exposure of cells to DBF produced very different responses. Numerous other uncharacterized catabolic gene clusters putatively involved in aromatic compound metabolism increased expression in response to DBF. In addition, only very few transposon insertions completely abolished growth on DBF. Some of those (e.g., in dxnA1 were expected, whereas others (in a gene cluster for phenylacetate degradation were not. Both transcriptomic data and transposon screening suggest operation of multiple redundant and parallel aromatic pathways, depending on DBF exposure. In addition, increased expression of other non-catabolic genes suggests that during initial exposure, S. wittichii RW1 perceives DBF as a stressor, whereas after longer exposure, the compound is recognized as a carbon source and metabolized using several pathways in

  15. Genome-wide BAC-end sequencing of Cucumis melo using two BAC libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puigdomènech Pere

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although melon (Cucumis melo L. is an economically important fruit crop, no genome-wide sequence information is openly available at the current time. We therefore sequenced BAC-ends representing a total of 33,024 clones, half of them from a previously described melon BAC library generated with restriction endonucleases and the remainder from a new random-shear BAC library. Results We generated a total of 47,140 high-quality BAC-end sequences (BES, 91.7% of which were paired-BES. Both libraries were assembled independently and then cross-assembled to obtain a final set of 33,372 non-redundant, high-quality sequences. These were grouped into 6,411 contigs (4.5 Mb and 26,961 non-assembled BES (14.4 Mb, representing ~4.2% of the melon genome. The sequences were used to screen genomic databases, identifying 7,198 simple sequence repeats (corresponding to one microsatellite every 2.6 kb and 2,484 additional repeats of which 95.9% represented transposable elements. The sequences were also used to screen expressed sequence tag (EST databases, revealing 11,372 BES that were homologous to ESTs. This suggests that ~30% of the melon genome consists of coding DNA. We observed regions of microsynteny between melon paired-BES and six other dicotyledonous plant genomes. Conclusion The analysis of nearly 50,000 BES from two complementary genomic libraries covered ~4.2% of the melon genome, providing insight into properties such as microsatellite and transposable element distribution, and the percentage of coding DNA. The observed synteny between melon paired-BES and six other plant genomes showed that useful comparative genomic data can be derived through large scale BAC-end sequencing by anchoring a small proportion of the melon genome to other sequenced genomes.

  16. Promising Loci and Genes for Yolk and Ovary Weight in Chickens Revealed by a Genome-Wide Association Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congjiao Sun

    Full Text Available Because it serves as the cytoplasm of the oocyte and provides a large amount of reserves, the egg yolk has biological significance for developing embryos. The ovary and its hierarchy of follicles are the main reproductive organs responsible for yolk deposition in chickens. However, the genetic architecture underlying the yolk and ovarian follicle weights remains elusive. Here, we measured the yolk weight (YW at 11 age points from onset of egg laying to 72 weeks of age and measured the follicle weight (FW and ovary weight (OW at 73 weeks as part of a comprehensive genome-wide association study (GWAS in 1,534 F2 hens derived from reciprocal crosses between White Leghorn (WL and Dongxiang chickens (DX. For all ages, YWs exhibited moderate single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP-based heritability estimates (0.25-0.38, while the estimates for FW (0.16 and OW (0.20 were relatively low. Independent univariate genome-wide screens for each trait identified 12, 3, and 31 novel significant associations with YW, FW, and OW, respectively. A list of candidate genes such as ZAR1, STARD13, ACER1b, ACSBG2, and DHRS12 were identified for having a plausible function in yolk and follicle development. These genes are important to the initiation of embryogenesis, lipid transport, lipoprotein synthesis, lipid droplet promotion, and steroid hormone metabolism, respectively. Our study provides for the first time a genome-wide association (GWA analysis for follicle and ovary weight. Identification of the promising loci as well as potential candidate genes will greatly advance our understanding of the genetic basis underlying dynamic yolk weight and ovarian follicle development and has practical significance in breeding programs for the alteration of yolk weight at different age points.

  17. Genome-wide association study of circulating estradiol, testosterone, and sex hormone-binding globulin in postmenopausal women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Prescott

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have successfully identified common genetic variants that contribute to breast cancer risk. Discovering additional variants has become difficult, as power to detect variants of weaker effect with present sample sizes is limited. An alternative approach is to look for variants associated with quantitative traits that in turn affect disease risk. As exposure to high circulating estradiol and testosterone, and low sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG levels is implicated in breast cancer etiology, we conducted GWAS analyses of plasma estradiol, testosterone, and SHBG to identify new susceptibility alleles. Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS data from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, and Sisters in Breast Cancer Screening data were used to carry out primary meta-analyses among ~1600 postmenopausal women who were not taking postmenopausal hormones at blood draw. We observed a genome-wide significant association between SHBG levels and rs727428 (joint β = -0.126; joint P = 2.09 × 10(-16, downstream of the SHBG gene. No genome-wide significant associations were observed with estradiol or testosterone levels. Among variants that were suggestively associated with estradiol (P<10(-5, several were located at the CYP19A1 gene locus. Overall results were similar in secondary meta-analyses that included ~900 NHS current postmenopausal hormone users. No variant associated with estradiol, testosterone, or SHBG at P<10(-5 was associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk among CGEMS participants. Our results suggest that the small magnitude of difference in hormone levels associated with common genetic variants is likely insufficient to detectably contribute to breast cancer risk.

  18. Research progress of RNAi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邹建

    2014-01-01

    the double stranded RNA into cell could cause homologous gene silencing, a phenomenon called RNA interference (RNA interference, RNAi). Research progress of RNA interference characteristics, in this paper, the mechanism of RNA interference technology, RNA interference and existing problems are summarized.

  19. Genome-wide association analysis of imputed rare variants: application to seven common complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mägi, Reedik; Asimit, Jennifer L; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Morris, Andrew P

    2012-12-01

    Genome-wide association studies have been successful in identifying loci contributing effects to a range of complex human traits. The majority of reproducible associations within these loci are with common variants, each of modest effect, which together explain only a small proportion of heritability. It has been suggested that much of the unexplained genetic component of complex traits can thus be attributed to rare variation. However, genome-wide association study genotyping chips have been designed primarily to capture common variation, and thus are underpowered to detect the effects of rare variants. Nevertheless, we demonstrate here, by simulation, that imputation from an existing scaffold of genome-wide genotype data up to high-density reference panels has the potential to identify rare variant associations with complex traits, without the need for costly re-sequencing experiments. By application of this approach to genome-wide association studies of seven common complex diseases, imputed up to publicly available reference panels, we identify genome-wide significant evidence of rare variant association in PRDM10 with coronary artery disease and multiple genes in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) with type 1 diabetes. The results of our analyses highlight that genome-wide association studies have the potential to offer an exciting opportunity for gene discovery through association with rare variants, conceivably leading to substantial advancements in our understanding of the genetic architecture underlying complex human traits.

  20. Family based genome-wide copy number scan identifies complex rearrangements at 17q21.31 in dyslexics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerappa, Avinash M; Saldanha, Marita; Padakannaya, Prakash; Ramachandra, Nallur B

    2014-10-01

    Developmental dyslexia (DD) is a complex heritable disorder with unexpected difficulty in learning to read and spell despite adequate intelligence, education, environment, and normal senses. We performed genome-wide screening for copy number variations (CNVs) in 10 large Indian dyslexic families using Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0. Results revealed the complex genomic rearrangements due to one non-contiguous deletion and five contiguous micro duplications and micro deletions at 17q21.31 region in three dyslexic families. CNVs in this region harbor the genes KIAA1267, LRRC37A, ARL17A/B, NSFP1, and NSF. The CNVs in case 1 and case 2 at this locus were found to be in homozygous state and case 3 was a de novo CNV. These CNVs were found with at least one CNV having a common break and end points in the parents. This cluster of genes containing NSF is implicated in learning, cognition, and memory, though not formally associated with dyslexia. Molecular network analysis of these and other dyslexia related module genes suggests NSF and other genes to be associated with cellular/vesicular membrane fusion and synaptic transmission. Thus, we suggest that NSF in this cluster would be the nearest gene responsible for the learning disability phenotype.

  1. Genome-wide association study of prostate-specific antigen levels identifies novel loci independent of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Thomas J.; Passarelli, Michael N.; Graff, Rebecca E.; Emami, Nima C.; Sakoda, Lori C.; Jorgenson, Eric; Habel, Laurel A.; Shan, Jun; Ranatunga, Dilrini K.; Quesenberry, Charles P.; Chao, Chun R.; Ghai, Nirupa R.; Aaronson, David; Presti, Joseph; Nordström, Tobias; Wang, Zhaoming; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Mosley, Jonathan D.; Klein, Robert J.; Middha, Mridu; Lilja, Hans; Melander, Olle; Kvale, Mark N.; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Schaefer, Catherine; Risch, Neil; Van Den Eeden, Stephen K.; Witte, John S.

    2017-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels have been used for detection and surveillance of prostate cancer (PCa). However, factors other than PCa—such as genetics—can impact PSA. Here we present findings from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of PSA in 28,503 Kaiser Permanente whites and 17,428 men from replication cohorts. We detect 40 genome-wide significant (P<5 × 10−8) single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs): 19 novel, 15 previously identified for PSA (14 of which were also PCa-associated), and 6 previously identified for PCa only. Further analysis incorporating PCa cases suggests that at least half of the 40 SNPs are PSA-associated independent of PCa. The 40 SNPs explain 9.5% of PSA variation in non-Hispanic whites, and the remaining GWAS SNPs explain an additional 31.7%; this percentage is higher in younger men, supporting the genetic basis of PSA levels. These findings provide important information about genetic markers for PSA that may improve PCa screening, thereby reducing over-diagnosis and over-treatment. PMID:28139693

  2. Genome-Wide Analysis of Seed Acid Detergent Lignin (ADL) and Hull Content in Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lijuan; Qu, Cunmin; Xu, Xinfu; Lu, Kun; Qian, Wei; Li, Jiana; Li, Maoteng; Liu, Liezhao

    2015-01-01

    A stable yellow-seeded variety is the breeding goal for obtaining the ideal rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) plant, and the amount of acid detergent lignin (ADL) in the seeds and the hull content (HC) are often used as yellow-seeded rapeseed screening indices. In this study, a genome-wide association analysis of 520 accessions was performed using the Q + K model with a total of 31,839 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) sites. As a result, three significant associations on the B. napus chromosomes A05, A09, and C05 were detected for seed ADL content. The peak SNPs were within 9.27, 14.22, and 20.86 kb of the key genes BnaA.PAL4, BnaA.CAD2/BnaA.CAD3, and BnaC.CCR1, respectively. Further analyses were performed on the major locus of A05, which was also detected in the seed HC examination. A comparison of our genome-wide association study (GWAS) results and previous linkage mappings revealed a common chromosomal region on A09, which indicates that GWAS can be used as a powerful complementary strategy for dissecting complex traits in B. napus. Genomic selection (GS) utilizing the significant SNP markers based on the GWAS results exhibited increased predictive ability, indicating that the predictive ability of a given model can be substantially improved by using GWAS and GS. PMID:26673885

  3. Epigenetics: heterochromatin meets RNAi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ingela Djupedal; Karl Ekwall

    2009-01-01

    The term epigenetics refers to heritable changes not encoded by DNA. The organization of DNA into chromatin fibers affects gene expression in a heritable manner and is therefore one mechanism of epigenetic inheritance. Large parts of eukaryotic genomes consist of constitutively highly condensed heterochromatin, important for maintaining genome integrity but also for silencing of genes within. Small RNA, together with factors typically associated with RNA interference (RNAi) targets homologous DNA sequences and recruits factors that modify the chromatin, com-monly resulting in formation of heterochromatin and silencing of target genes. The scope of this review is to provide an overview of the roles of small RNA and the RNAi components, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA dependent polymeras-es in epigenetic inheritance via heterochromatin formation, exemplified with pathways from unicellular eukaryotes, plants and animals.

  4. Recombinant fungal entomopathogen RNAi target insect gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiongbo; Wu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) technology is considered as an alternative for control of pests. However, RNAi has not been used in field conditions yet, since delivering exogenous ds/siRNA to target pests is very difficult. The laboratory methods of introducing the ds/siRNA into insects through feeding, micro feeding / dripping and injecting cannot be used in fields. Transgenic crop is perhaps the most effective application of RNAi for pest control, but it needs long-time basic researches in order to reduce the cost and evaluate the safety. Therefore, transgenic microbe is maybe a better choice. Entomopathogenic fungi generally invade the host insects through cuticle like chemical insecticides contact insect to control sucking sap pests. Isaria fumosorosea is a common fungal entomopathogen in whitefly, Bemisia tabaci. We constructed a recombinant strain of I. fumosorosea expressing specific dsRNA of whitefly's TLR7 gene. It could silence the TLR7 gene and improve the virulence against whitefly. Transgenic fungal entomopathogen has shown great potential to attain the application of RNAi technology for pests control in fields. In the future, the research interests should be focused on the selection of susceptible target pests and their vital genes, and optimizing the methods for screening genes and recombinants as well.

  5. Genome-wide identification of genetic determinants for the cytotoxicity of perifosine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Wei

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Perifosine belongs to the class of alkylphospholipid analogues, which act primarily at the cell membrane, thereby targeting signal transduction pathways. In phase I/II clinical trials, perifosine has induced tumour regression and caused disease stabilisation in a variety of tumour types. The genetic determinants responsible for its cytotoxicity have not been comprehensively studied, however. We performed a genome-wide analysis to identify genes whose expression levels or genotypic variation were correlated with the cytotoxicity of perifosine, using public databases on the US National Cancer Institute (NCI-60 human cancer cell lines. For demonstrating drug specificity, the NCI Standard Agent Database (including 171 drugs acting through a variety of mechanisms was used as a control. We identified agents with similar cytotoxicity profiles to that of perifosine in compounds used in the NCI drug screen. Furthermore, Gene Ontology and pathway analyses were carried out on genes more likely to be perifosine specific. The results suggested that genes correlated with perifosine cytotoxicity are connected by certain known pathways that lead to the mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathway and apoptosis. Biological processes such as 'response to stress', 'inflammatory response' and 'ubiquitin cycle' were enriched among these genes. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs located in CACNA2DI and EXOC4 were found to be correlated with perifosine cytotoxicity. Our results provided a manageable list of genes whose expression levels or genotypic variation were strongly correlated with the cytotoxcity of perifosine. These genes could be targets for further studies using candidate-gene approaches. The results also provided insights into the pharmacodynamics of perifosine.

  6. Genome-wide analysis reveals the vacuolar pH-stat of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Brett

    Full Text Available Protons, the smallest and most ubiquitous of ions, are central to physiological processes. Transmembrane proton gradients drive ATP synthesis, metabolite transport, receptor recycling and vesicle trafficking, while compartmental pH controls enzyme function. Despite this fundamental importance, the mechanisms underlying pH homeostasis are not entirely accounted for in any organelle or organism. We undertook a genome-wide survey of vacuole pH (pH(v in 4,606 single-gene deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under control, acid and alkali stress conditions to reveal the vacuolar pH-stat. Median pH(v (5.27±0.13 was resistant to acid stress (5.28±0.14 but shifted significantly in response to alkali stress (5.83±0.13. Of 107 mutants that displayed aberrant pH(v under more than one external pH condition, functional categories of transporters, membrane biogenesis and trafficking machinery were significantly enriched. Phospholipid flippases, encoded by the family of P4-type ATPases, emerged as pH regulators, as did the yeast ortholog of Niemann Pick Type C protein, implicated in sterol trafficking. An independent genetic screen revealed that correction of pH(v dysregulation in a neo1(ts mutant restored viability whereas cholesterol accumulation in human NPC1(-/- fibroblasts diminished upon treatment with a proton ionophore. Furthermore, while it is established that lumenal pH affects trafficking, this study revealed a reciprocal link with many mutants defective in anterograde pathways being hyperacidic and retrograde pathway mutants with alkaline vacuoles. In these and other examples, pH perturbations emerge as a hitherto unrecognized phenotype that may contribute to the cellular basis of disease and offer potential therapeutic intervention through pH modulation.

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies a novel canine glaucoma locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahonen, Saija J; Pietilä, Elina; Mellersh, Cathryn S; Tiira, Katriina; Hansen, Liz; Johnson, Gary S; Lohi, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy and one of the leading causes of blindness. Its hereditary forms are classified into primary closed-angle (PCAG), primary open-angle (POAG) and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG). Although many loci have been mapped in human, only a few genes have been identified that are associated with the development of glaucoma and the genetic basis of the disease remains poorly understood. Glaucoma has also been described in many dog breeds, including Dandie Dinmont Terriers (DDT) in which it is a late-onset (>7 years) disease. We designed clinical and genetic studies to better define the clinical features of glaucoma in the DDT and to identify the genetic cause. Clinical diagnosis was based on ophthalmic examinations of the affected dogs and 18 additionally investigated unaffected DDTs. We collected DNA from over 400 DTTs and a genome wide association study was performed in a cohort of 23 affected and 23 controls, followed by a fine mapping, a replication study and candidate gene sequencing. The clinical study suggested that ocular abnormalities including abnormal iridocorneal angles and pectinate ligament dysplasia are common (50% and 72%, respectively) in the breed and the disease resembles human PCAG. The genetic study identified a novel 9.5 Mb locus on canine chromosome 8 including the 1.6 Mb best associated region (p = 1.63 × 10(-10), OR = 32 for homozygosity). Mutation screening in five candidate genes did not reveal any causative variants. This study indicates that although ocular abnormalities are common in DDTs, the genetic risk for glaucoma is conferred by a novel locus on CFA8. The canine locus shares synteny to a region in human chromosome 14q, which harbors several loci associated with POAG and PCG. Our study reveals a new locus for canine glaucoma and ongoing molecular studies will likely help to understand the genetic etiology of the disease.

  8. INNOVATIVE STRATEGIES TO IDENTIFY M. TUBERCULOSIS ANTIGENS AND EPITOPES USING GENOME-WIDE ANALYSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemieke eGeluk

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In view of the fact that only a small part of the Mtb expressome has been explored for identification of antigens capable of activating human T-cell responses, which is critically required for the design of better TB vaccination strategies, more emphasis should be placed on innovative ways to discover new Mtb antigens and explore their function at the several stages of infection. Better protective antigens for TB vaccines are urgently needed, also in view of the disappointing results of the MVA85 vaccine which failed to induce additional protection in BCG vaccinated infants [54]. Moreover, immune responses to relevant antigens may be useful to identify TB-specific biomarker signatures. Here we describe the potency of novel tools and strategies to reveal such Mtb antigens. Using proteins specific for different Mtb infection phases, many new antigens of the latency-associated Mtb DosR regulon as well as Rpf proteins, associated with resuscitating TB, were discovered that were recognized by CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. Furthermore, by employing MHC binding algorithms and bioinformatics combined with high throughput human T-cell screens and tetramers, HLA-class Ia restricted poly-functional CD8+ T-cells were identified in TB patients. Comparable methods, led to the identification of HLA-E-restricted Mtb epitopes recognized by CD8+ T-cells. A genome-wide unbiased antigen discovery approach was applied to analyse the in vivo Mtb gene expression profiles in the lungs of mice, resulting in the identification of IVE-TB antigens, which are expressed during infection in the lung, the main target organ of Mtb. IVE-TB antigens induce strong T cell responses in long-term latently Mtb infected individuals, and represent an interesting new group of TB antigens for vaccination. In summary, new tools have helped expand our view on the Mtb antigenome involved in human cellular immunity and provided new candidates for TB vaccination.

  9. Genome-wide association study identifies a novel canine glaucoma locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saija J Ahonen

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy and one of the leading causes of blindness. Its hereditary forms are classified into primary closed-angle (PCAG, primary open-angle (POAG and primary congenital glaucoma (PCG. Although many loci have been mapped in human, only a few genes have been identified that are associated with the development of glaucoma and the genetic basis of the disease remains poorly understood. Glaucoma has also been described in many dog breeds, including Dandie Dinmont Terriers (DDT in which it is a late-onset (>7 years disease. We designed clinical and genetic studies to better define the clinical features of glaucoma in the DDT and to identify the genetic cause. Clinical diagnosis was based on ophthalmic examinations of the affected dogs and 18 additionally investigated unaffected DDTs. We collected DNA from over 400 DTTs and a genome wide association study was performed in a cohort of 23 affected and 23 controls, followed by a fine mapping, a replication study and candidate gene sequencing. The clinical study suggested that ocular abnormalities including abnormal iridocorneal angles and pectinate ligament dysplasia are common (50% and 72%, respectively in the breed and the disease resembles human PCAG. The genetic study identified a novel 9.5 Mb locus on canine chromosome 8 including the 1.6 Mb best associated region (p = 1.63 × 10(-10, OR = 32 for homozygosity. Mutation screening in five candidate genes did not reveal any causative variants. This study indicates that although ocular abnormalities are common in DDTs, the genetic risk for glaucoma is conferred by a novel locus on CFA8. The canine locus shares synteny to a region in human chromosome 14q, which harbors several loci associated with POAG and PCG. Our study reveals a new locus for canine glaucoma and ongoing molecular studies will likely help to understand the genetic etiology of the disease.

  10. First WNK4-hypokalemia animal model identified by genome-wide association in Burmese cats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Gandolfi

    Full Text Available Burmese is an old and popular cat breed, however, several health concerns, such as hypokalemia and a craniofacial defect, are prevalent, endangering the general health of the breed. Hypokalemia, a subnormal serum potassium ion concentration ([K(+], most often occurs as a secondary problem but can occur as a primary problem, such as hypokalaemic periodic paralysis in humans, and as feline hypokalaemic periodic polymyopathy primarily in Burmese. The most characteristic clinical sign of hypokalemia in Burmese is a skeletal muscle weakness that is frequently episodic in nature, either generalized, or sometimes localized to the cervical and thoracic limb girdle muscles. Burmese hypokalemia is suspected to be a single locus autosomal recessive trait. A genome wide case-control study using the illumina Infinium Feline 63K iSelect DNA array was performed using 35 cases and 25 controls from the Burmese breed that identified a locus on chromosome E1 associated with hypokalemia. Within approximately 1.2 Mb of the highest associated SNP, two candidate genes were identified, KCNH4 and WNK4. Direct sequencing of the genes revealed a nonsense mutation, producing a premature stop codon within WNK4 (c.2899C>T, leading to a truncated protein that lacks the C-terminal coiled-coil domain and the highly conserved Akt1/SGK phosphorylation site. All cases were homozygous for the mutation. Although the exact mechanism causing hypokalemia has not been determined, extrapolation from the homologous human and mouse genes suggests the mechanism may involve a potassium-losing nephropathy. A genetic test to screen for the genetic defect within the active breeding population has been developed, which should lead to eradication of the mutation and improved general health within the breed. Moreover, the identified mutation may help clarify the role of the protein in K⁺ regulation and the cat represents the first animal model for WNK4-associated hypokalemia.

  11. Genome-wide identification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required for maximal tolerance to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Miguel C; Raposo, Luís R; Mira, Nuno P; Lourenço, Artur B; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2009-09-01

    The understanding of the molecular basis of yeast resistance to ethanol may guide the design of rational strategies to increase process performance in industrial alcoholic fermentations. In this study, the yeast disruptome was screened for mutants with differential susceptibility to stress induced by high ethanol concentrations in minimal growth medium. Over 250 determinants of resistance to ethanol were identified. The most significant gene ontology terms enriched in this data set are those associated with intracellular organization, biogenesis, and transport, in particular, regarding the vacuole, the peroxisome, the endosome, and the cytoskeleton, and those associated with the transcriptional machinery. Clustering the proteins encoded by the identified determinants of ethanol resistance by their known physical and genetic interactions highlighted the importance of the vacuolar protein sorting machinery, the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase complex, and the peroxisome protein import machinery. Evidence showing that vacuolar acidification and increased resistance to the cell wall lytic enzyme beta-glucanase occur in response to ethanol-induced stress was obtained. Based on the genome-wide results, the particular role of the FPS1 gene, encoding a plasma membrane aquaglyceroporin which mediates controlled glycerol efflux, in ethanol stress resistance was further investigated. FPS1 expression contributes to decreased [(3)H]ethanol accumulation in yeast cells, suggesting that Fps1p may also play a role in maintaining the intracellular ethanol level during active fermentation. The increased expression of FPS1 confirmed the important role of this gene in alcoholic fermentation, leading to increased final ethanol concentration under conditions that lead to high ethanol production.

  12. First WNK4-hypokalemia animal model identified by genome-wide association in Burmese cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Barbara; Gruffydd-Jones, Timothy J; Malik, Richard; Cortes, Alejandro; Jones, Boyd R; Helps, Chris R; Prinzenberg, Eva M; Erhardt, George; Lyons, Leslie A

    2012-01-01

    Burmese is an old and popular cat breed, however, several health concerns, such as hypokalemia and a craniofacial defect, are prevalent, endangering the general health of the breed. Hypokalemia, a subnormal serum potassium ion concentration ([K(+)]), most often occurs as a secondary problem but can occur as a primary problem, such as hypokalaemic periodic paralysis in humans, and as feline hypokalaemic periodic polymyopathy primarily in Burmese. The most characteristic clinical sign of hypokalemia in Burmese is a skeletal muscle weakness that is frequently episodic in nature, either generalized, or sometimes localized to the cervical and thoracic limb girdle muscles. Burmese hypokalemia is suspected to be a single locus autosomal recessive trait. A genome wide case-control study using the illumina Infinium Feline 63K iSelect DNA array was performed using 35 cases and 25 controls from the Burmese breed that identified a locus on chromosome E1 associated with hypokalemia. Within approximately 1.2 Mb of the highest associated SNP, two candidate genes were identified, KCNH4 and WNK4. Direct sequencing of the genes revealed a nonsense mutation, producing a premature stop codon within WNK4 (c.2899C>T), leading to a truncated protein that lacks the C-terminal coiled-coil domain and the highly conserved Akt1/SGK phosphorylation site. All cases were homozygous for the mutation. Although the exact mechanism causing hypokalemia has not been determined, extrapolation from the homologous human and mouse genes suggests the mechanism may involve a potassium-losing nephropathy. A genetic test to screen for the genetic defect within the active breeding population has been developed, which should lead to eradication of the mutation and improved general health within the breed. Moreover, the identified mutation may help clarify the role of the protein in K⁺ regulation and the cat represents the first animal model for WNK4-associated hypokalemia.

  13. Genome-Wide Association Study of Anthracnose Resistance in Andean Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiderveen, Grady H; Padder, Bilal A; Kamfwa, Kelvin; Song, Qijian; Kelly, James D

    2016-01-01

    Anthracnose is a seed-borne disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and the pathogen is cosmopolitan in distribution. The objectives of this study were to identify new sources of anthracnose resistance in a diverse panel of 230 Andean beans comprised of multiple seed types and market classes from the Americas, Africa, and Europe, and explore the genetic basis of this resistance using genome-wide association mapping analysis (GWAS). Twenty-eight of the 230 lines tested were resistant to six out of the eight races screened, but only one cultivar Uyole98 was resistant to all eight races (7, 39, 55, 65, 73, 109, 2047, and 3481) included in the study. Outputs from the GWAS indicated major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for resistance on chromosomes, Pv01, Pv02, and Pv04 and two minor QTL on Pv10 and Pv11. Candidate genes associated with the significant SNPs were detected on all five chromosomes. An independent QTL study was conducted to confirm the physical location of the Co-1 locus identified on Pv01 in an F4:6 recombinant inbred line (RIL) population. Resistance was determined to be conditioned by the single dominant gene Co-1 that mapped between 50.16 and 50.30 Mb on Pv01, and an InDel marker (NDSU_IND_1_50.2219) tightly linked to the gene was developed. The information reported will provide breeders with new and diverse sources of resistance and genomic regions to target in the development of anthracnose resistance in Andean beans.

  14. Genome-Wide Association Study of Anthracnose Resistance in Andean Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grady H Zuiderveen

    Full Text Available Anthracnose is a seed-borne disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and the pathogen is cosmopolitan in distribution. The objectives of this study were to identify new sources of anthracnose resistance in a diverse panel of 230 Andean beans comprised of multiple seed types and market classes from the Americas, Africa, and Europe, and explore the genetic basis of this resistance using genome-wide association mapping analysis (GWAS. Twenty-eight of the 230 lines tested were resistant to six out of the eight races screened, but only one cultivar Uyole98 was resistant to all eight races (7, 39, 55, 65, 73, 109, 2047, and 3481 included in the study. Outputs from the GWAS indicated major quantitative trait loci (QTL for resistance on chromosomes, Pv01, Pv02, and Pv04 and two minor QTL on Pv10 and Pv11. Candidate genes associated with the significant SNPs were detected on all five chromosomes. An independent QTL study was conducted to confirm the physical location of the Co-1 locus identified on Pv01 in an F4:6 recombinant inbred line (RIL population. Resistance was determined to be conditioned by the single dominant gene Co-1 that mapped between 50.16 and 50.30 Mb on Pv01, and an InDel marker (NDSU_IND_1_50.2219 tightly linked to the gene was developed. The information reported will provide breeders with new and diverse sources of resistance and genomic regions to target in the development of anthracnose resistance in Andean beans.

  15. Genome-wide survey of artificial mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate and gamma rays in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki; Nunome, Tsukasa; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and gamma irradiation in the tomato Micro-Tom genome were identified by a whole-genome shotgun sequencing analysis to estimate the spectrum and distribution of whole-genome DNA mutations and the frequency of deleterious mutations. A total of ~370 Gb of paired-end reads for four EMS-induced mutants and three gamma-ray-irradiated lines as well as a wild-type line were obtained by next-generation sequencing technology. Using bioinformatics analyses, we identified 5920 induced single nucleotide variations and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. The predominant mutations in the EMS mutants were C/G to T/A transitions, while in the gamma-ray mutants, C/G to T/A transitions, A/T to T/A transversions, A/T to G/C transitions and deletion mutations were equally common. Biases in the base composition flanking mutations differed between the mutagenesis types. Regarding the effects of the mutations on gene function, >90% of the mutations were located in intergenic regions, and only 0.2% were deleterious. In addition, we detected 1,140,687 spontaneous single nucleotide polymorphisms and indel polymorphisms in wild-type Micro-Tom lines. We also found copy number variation, deletions and insertions of chromosomal segments in both the mutant and wild-type lines. The results provide helpful information not only for mutation research, but also for mutant screening methodology with reverse-genetic approaches.

  16. Genome wide association studies for body conformation traits in the Chinese Holstein cattle population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaoping; Fang, Ming; Liu, Lin;

    2013-01-01

    Background: Genome-wide association study (GWAS) is a powerful tool for revealing the genetic basis of quantitative traits. However, studies using GWAS for conformation traits of cattle is comparatively less. This study aims to use GWAS to find the candidates genes for body conformation traits.......Results: The Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip was used to identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with body conformation traits. A least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) was applied to detect multiple SNPs simultaneously for 29 body conformation traits with 1,314 Chinese...... Holstein cattle and 52,166 SNPs. Totally, 59 genome-wide significant SNPs associated with 26 conformation traits were detected by genome-wide association analysis; five SNPs were within previously reported QTL regions (Animal Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) database) and 11 were very close to the reported...

  17. Genetic link between family socioeconomic status and children's educational achievement estimated from genome-wide SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapohl, E; Plomin, R

    2016-03-01

    One of the best predictors of children's educational achievement is their family's socioeconomic status (SES), but the degree to which this association is genetically mediated remains unclear. For 3000 UK-representative unrelated children we found that genome-wide single-nucleotide polymorphisms could explain a third of the variance of scores on an age-16 UK national examination of educational achievement and half of the correlation between their scores and family SES. Moreover, genome-wide polygenic scores based on a previously published genome-wide association meta-analysis of total number of years in education accounted for ~3.0% variance in educational achievement and ~2.5% in family SES. This study provides the first molecular evidence for substantial genetic influence on differences in children's educational achievement and its association with family SES.

  18. Genome-wide analyses of aggressiveness in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Erlend J; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; Weber, Heike; Sánchez-Mora, Cristina; Jacob, Christian; Rivero, Olga; Kittel-Schneider, Sarah; Garcia-Martínez, Iris; Aebi, Marcel; van Hulzen, Kimm; Cormand, Bru; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep A; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Reif, Andreas; Ribasés, Marta; Franke, Barbara; Posserud, Maj-Britt; Johansson, Stefan; Lundervold, Astri J; Haavik, Jan; Zayats, Tetyana

    2016-07-01

    Aggressiveness is a behavioral trait that has the potential to be harmful to individuals and society. With an estimated heritability of about 40%, genetics is important in its development. We performed an exploratory genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of childhood aggressiveness in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to gain insight into the underlying biological processes associated with this trait. Our primary sample consisted of 1,060 adult ADHD patients (aADHD). To further explore the genetic architecture of childhood aggressiveness, we performed enrichment analyses of suggestive genome-wide associations observed in aADHD among GWA signals of dimensions of oppositionality (defiant/vindictive and irritable dimensions) in childhood ADHD (cADHD). No single polymorphism reached genome-wide significance (P aggressiveness and provide targets for further genetic exploration of aggressiveness across psychiatric disorders. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Meta-Analysis in Genome-Wide Association Datasets: Strategies and Application in Parkinson Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; Ioannidis, John P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies hold substantial promise for identifying common genetic variants that regulate susceptibility to complex diseases. However, for the detection of small genetic effects, single studies may be underpowered. Power may be improved by combining genome-wide datasets with meta-analytic techniques. Methodology/Principal Findings Both single and two-stage genome-wide data may be combined and there are several possible strategies. In the two-stage framework, we considered the options of (1) enhancement of replication data and (2) enhancement of first-stage data, and then, we also considered (3) joint meta-analyses including all first-stage and second-stage data. These strategies were examined empirically using data from two genome-wide association studies (three datasets) on Parkinson disease. In the three strategies, we derived 12, 5, and 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms that show significant associations at conventional levels of statistical significance. None of these remained significant after conservative adjustment for the number of performed analyses in each strategy. However, some may warrant further consideration: 6 SNPs were identified with at least 2 of the 3 strategies and 3 SNPs [rs1000291 on chromosome 3, rs2241743 on chromosome 4 and rs3018626 on chromosome 11] were identified with all 3 strategies and had no or minimal between-dataset heterogeneity (I2 = 0, 0 and 15%, respectively). Analyses were primarily limited by the suboptimal overlap of tested polymorphisms across different datasets (e.g., only 31,192 shared polymorphisms between the two tier 1 datasets). Conclusions/Significance Meta-analysis may be used to improve the power and examine the between-dataset heterogeneity of genome-wide association studies. Prospective designs may be most efficient, if they try to maximize the overlap of genotyping platforms and anticipate the combination of data across many genome-wide association studies. PMID:17332845

  20. Meta-analysis in genome-wide association datasets: strategies and application in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelou, Evangelos; Maraganore, Demetrius M; Ioannidis, John P A

    2007-02-07

    Genome-wide association studies hold substantial promise for identifying common genetic variants that regulate susceptibility to complex diseases. However, for the detection of small genetic effects, single studies may be underpowered. Power may be improved by combining genome-wide datasets with meta-analytic techniques. Both single and two-stage genome-wide data may be combined and there are several possible strategies. In the two-stage framework, we considered the options of (1) enhancement of replication data and (2) enhancement of first-stage data, and then, we also considered (3) joint meta-analyses including all first-stage and second-stage data. These strategies were examined empirically using data from two genome-wide association studies (three datasets) on Parkinson disease. In the three strategies, we derived 12, 5, and 49 single nucleotide polymorphisms that show significant associations at conventional levels of statistical significance. None of these remained significant after conservative adjustment for the number of performed analyses in each strategy. However, some may warrant further consideration: 6 SNPs were identified with at least 2 of the 3 strategies and 3 SNPs [rs1000291 on chromosome 3, rs2241743 on chromosome 4 and rs3018626 on chromosome 11] were identified with all 3 strategies and had no or minimal between-dataset heterogeneity (I(2) = 0, 0 and 15%, respectively). Analyses were primarily limited by the suboptimal overlap of tested polymorphisms across different datasets (e.g., only 31,192 shared polymorphisms between the two tier 1 datasets). Meta-analysis may be used to improve the power and examine the between-dataset heterogeneity of genome-wide association studies. Prospective designs may be most efficient, if they try to maximize the overlap of genotyping platforms and anticipate the combination of data across many genome-wide association studies.

  1. Constitutional mosaic genome-wide uniparental disomy due to diploidisation: an unusual cancer-predisposing mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Valeria; Nevado, Julián; Fraga, Mario; Trujillo, Alex Martín; Mori, Maria Ángeles; Fernández, Luis; Pérez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Martínez-Glez, Víctor; Pita, Guillermo; Meneses, Heloisa; Gracia, Ricardo; García-Miñaur, Sixto; García de Miguel, Purificación; Lecumberri, Beatriz; Rodríguez, José Ignacio; González Neira, Anna; Monk, David; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2011-03-01

    Molecular studies in a patient with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome phenotype who developed two different tumours revealed an unexpected observation of almost complete loss of heterozygosity of all chromosomes. It is shown, by means of numerous molecular methods, that the absence of maternal contribution in somatic cells is due to high-degree (∼ 85%) genome-wide paternal uniparental disomy (UPD). The observations indicate that the genome-wide UPD results from diploidisation, and have important implications for genetic counselling and tumour surveillance for the growing number of UPD associated imprinting disorders.

  2. Genome-wide mapping of Polycomb target genes unravels their roles in cell fate transitions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bracken, Adrian P; Dietrich, Nikolaj; Pasini, Diego;

    2006-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form chromatin-modifying complexes that are essential for embryonic development and stem cell renewal and are commonly deregulated in cancer. Here, we identify their target genes using genome-wide location analysis in human embryonic fibroblasts. We find that Pol......The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins form chromatin-modifying complexes that are essential for embryonic development and stem cell renewal and are commonly deregulated in cancer. Here, we identify their target genes using genome-wide location analysis in human embryonic fibroblasts. We find...

  3. Generation of meiomaps of genome-wide recombination and chromosome segregation in human oocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottolini, Christian S; Capalbo, Antonio; Newnham, Louise

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a protocol for the generation of genome-wide maps (meiomaps) of recombination and chromosome segregation for the three products of human female meiosis: the first and second polar bodies (PB1 and PB2) and the corresponding oocyte. PB1 is biopsied and the oocyte is artificially......-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) genome-wide by microarray. Informative maternal heterozygous SNPs are phased using a haploid PB2 or oocyte as a reference. A simple algorithm is then used to identify the maternal haplotypes for each chromosome, in all of the products of meiosis for each oocyte. This allows mapping...

  4. Quality control and conduct of genome-wide association meta-analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkler, Thomas W; Day, Felix R; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous organization and quality control (QC) are necessary to facilitate successful genome-wide association meta-analyses (GWAMAs) of statistics aggregated across multiple genome-wide association studies. This protocol provides guidelines for (i) organizational aspects of GWAMAs, and for (ii) QC...... at the study file level, the meta-level across studies and the meta-analysis output level. Real-world examples highlight issues experienced and solutions developed by the GIANT Consortium that has conducted meta-analyses including data from 125 studies comprising more than 330,000 individuals. We provide...

  5. Genome-wide analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in patients with atrophic age-related macular degeneration in oldest old Han Chinese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, T Q; Guan, H J; Hu, J Y

    2015-12-21

    The aim of this study was to identify disease-associated loci in oldest old Han Chinese with atrophic age-related macular degeneration (AMD). This genome-wide association study (GWAS) only included oldest old (≥95 years old) subjects in Rugao County, China. Thirty atrophic AMD patients and 47 age-matched non-AMD controls were enrolled. The study subjects underwent a complete ophthalmic examination. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were scanned by Genome-Wide Human Mapping SNP 6.0 Arrays and GeneChip Scanner 3000 7G. The results were read and analyzed by the Affymetrix Genotyping Console software. We filtered out the SNPs with a no-call rate ≥10%, MAF P old Han Chinese population. This finding may lead to new strategies for screening of atrophic AMD for Han Chinese.

  6. Parallel In Vivo and In Vitro Melanoma RNAi Dropout Screens Reveal Synthetic Lethality between Hypoxia and DNA Damage Response Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A. Possik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available To identify factors preferentially necessary for driving tumor expansion, we performed parallel in vitro and in vivo negative-selection short hairpin RNA (shRNA screens. Melanoma cells harboring shRNAs targeting several DNA damage response (DDR kinases had a greater selective disadvantage in vivo than in vitro, indicating an essential contribution of these factors during tumor expansion. In growing tumors, DDR kinases were activated following hypoxia. Correspondingly, depletion or pharmacologic inhibition of DDR kinases was toxic to melanoma cells, including those that were resistant to BRAF inhibitor, and this could be enhanced by angiogenesis blockade. These results reveal that hypoxia sensitizes melanomas to targeted inhibition of the DDR and illustrate the utility of in vivo shRNA dropout screens for the identification of pharmacologically tractable targets.

  7. Genome-wide linkage screen for testicular germ cell tumour susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crockford, GP; Linger, R; Hockley, S; Dudakia, D; Johnson, L; Huddart, R; Tucker, K; Friedlander, M; Phillips, KA; Hogg, D; Jewett, MAS; Lohynska, R; Daugaard, G; Richard, S; Chompret, A; Bonaiti-Pellie, C; Heidenreich, A; Albers, P; Olah, E; Geczi, L; Bodrogi, [No Value; Ormiston, WJ; Daly, PA; Guilford, P; Fossa, SD; Heimdal, K; Tjulandin, SA; Liubchenko, L; Stoll, H; Weber, W; Forman, D; Oliver, T; Einhorn, L; McMaster, M; Kramer, J; Greene, MH; Weber, BL; Nathanson, KL; Cortessis, [No Value; Easton, DF; Bishop, DT; Stratton, MR; Rapley, EA

    2006-01-01

    A family history of disease is a strong risk factor for testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT). In order to identify the location of putative TGCT susceptibility gene(s) we conducted a linkage search in 237 pedigrees with two or more cases of TGCT. One hundred and seventy-nine pedigrees were evaluated g

  8. Genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes regulated by vanillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2015-01-01

    During pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass, a variety of fermentation inhibitors, including acetic acid and vanillin, are released. Using DNA microarray analysis, this study explored genes of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that respond to vanillin-induced stress. The expression of 273 genes was upregulated and that of 205 genes was downregulated under vanillin stress. Significantly induced genes included MCH2, SNG1, GPH1, and TMA10, whereas NOP2, UTP18, FUR1, and SPR1 were down regulated. Sequence analysis of the 5'-flanking region of upregulated genes suggested that vanillin might regulate gene expression in a stress response element (STRE)-dependent manner, in addition to a pathway that involved the transcription factor Yap1p. Retardation in the cell growth of mutant strains indicated that MCH2, SNG1, and GPH1 are intimately involved in vanillin stress response. Deletion of the genes whose expression levels were decreased under vanillin stress did not result in a notable change in S. cerevisiae growth under vanillin stress. This study will provide the basis for a better understanding of the stress response of the yeast S. cerevisiae to fermentation inhibitors.

  9. A genome-wide screen for acrophobia susceptibility loci in a Finnish isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiewicz, Zuzanna; Hiekkalinna, Tero; Paunio, Tiina; Varilo, Teppo; Terwilliger, Joseph D; Partonen, Timo; Hovatta, Iiris

    2016-12-20

    Acrophobia, an abnormal fear of heights, is a specific phobia characterized as apprehension cued by the occurrence or anticipation of elevated spaces. It is considered a complex trait with onset influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Identification of genetic risk variants would provide novel insight into the genetic basis of the fear of heights phenotype and contribute to the molecular-level understanding of its aetiology. Genetic isolates may facilitate identification of susceptibility alleles due to reduced genetic heterogeneity. We took advantage of an internal genetic isolate in Finland in which a distinct acrophobia phenotype appears to be segregating in pedigrees originally ascertained for schizophrenia. We conducted parametric, nonparametric, joint linkage and linkage disequilibrium analyses using a microsatellite marker panel, genotyped in families to search for chromosomal regions correlated with acrophobia. Our results implicated a few regions with suggestive evidence for linkage on chromosomes 4q28 (LOD = 2.17), 8q24 (LOD = 2.09) and 13q21-q22 (LOD = 2.22). We observed no risk haplotypes shared between different families. These results suggest that genetic predisposition to acrophobia in this genetic isolate is unlikely to be mediated by a small number of shared high-risk alleles, but rather has a complex genetic architecture.

  10. A Genome-Wide Knockout Screen to Identify Genes Involved in Acquired Carboplatin Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    cell lines are more difficult to infect in general. We first tested the infectability of 5 ovarian cancer cell lines, COV318, CAVO3, UCI-107, OVCAR-8...assistance of the Gene Transfer and Targeting core laboratory at the Salk Institute tested the lentiviral preparation on HEK-293T cells and used primers...resistance in ovarian cancers. J Bioinform Comput Biol 2007;5(2a):383-405. 16. Fridley BL, Abo R, Tan XL, Jenkins GD, Batzler A, Moyer AM, et al

  11. Genome-wide RNA interference screen identifies previously undescribed regulators of polyglutamine aggregation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nollen, Ellen A A; Garcia, Susana M; van Haaften, Gijs; Kim, Soojin; Chavez, Alejandro; Morimoto, Richard I; Plasterk, Ronald H A

    2004-01-01

    Protein misfolding and the formation of aggregates are increasingly recognized components of the pathology of human genetic disease and hallmarks of many neurodegenerative disorders. As exemplified by polyglutamine diseases, the propensity for protein misfolding is associated with the length of poly

  12. Dissecting mitosis by RNAi in Drosophila tissue culture cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiato Helder

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we describe a detailed methodology to study the function of genes whose products function during mitosis by dsRNA-mediated interference (RNAi in cultured cells of Drosophila melanogaster. This procedure is particularly useful for the analysis of genes for which genetic mutations are not available or for the dissection of complicated phenotypes derived from the analysis of such mutants. With the advent of whole genome sequencing it is expected that RNAi-based screenings will be one method of choice for the identification and study of novel genes involved in particular cellular processes. In this paper we focused particularly on the procedures for the proper phenotypic analysis of cells after RNAi-mediated depletion of proteins required for mitosis, the process by which the genetic information is segregated equally between daughter cells. We use RNAi of the microtubule-associated protein MAST/Orbit as an example for the usefulness of the technique.

  13. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies ten loci influencing allergic sensitization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonnelykke, Klaus; Matheson, Melanie C.; Pers, Tune H.; Granell, Raquel; Strachan, David P.; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Linneberg, Allan; Curtin, John A.; Warrington, Nicole M.; Standl, Marie; Kerkhof, Marjan; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Bukvic, Blazenka K.; Kaakinen, Marika; Sleimann, Patrick; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schramm, Katharina; Baltic, Svetlana; Kreiner-Moller, Eskil; Simpson, Angela; St Pourcain, Beate; Coin, Lachlan; Hui, Jennie; Walters, Eugene H.; Tiesler, Carla M. T.; Duffy, David L.; Jones, Graham; Ring, Susan M.; McArdle, Wendy L.; Price, Loren; Robertson, Colin F.; Pekkanen, Juha; Tang, Clara S.; Thiering, Elisabeth; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Dharmage, Shyamali C.; Husemoen, Lise L.; Herder, Christian; Kemp, John P.; Elliot, Paul; James, Alan; Waldenberger, Melanie; Abramson, Michael J.; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Knight, Julian C.; Gupta, Ramneek; Thompson, Philip J.; Holt, Patrick; Sly, Peter; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Blekic, Mario; Weidinger, Stephan; Hakonarsson, Hakon; Stefansson, Kari; Heinrich, Joachim; Postma, Dirkje S.; Custovic, Adnan; Pennell, Craig E.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Timpson, Nicholas; Ferreira, Manuel A.; Bisgaard, Hans; Henderson, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (present in allergic sensitization) has a central role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. We performed the first large-scale genome-wide association study (GWAS) of allergic sensitization in 5,789 affected individuals and 10,056 controls and followed up the t

  14. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghoussaini, M.; Fletcher, O.; Michailidou, K.; Turnbull, C.; Schmidt, M.K.; Dicks, E.; Dennis, J.; Wang, Q.; Humphreys, M.K.; Luccarini, C.; Baynes, C.; Conroy, D.; Maranian, M.; Ahmed, S.; Driver, K.; Johnson, N.; Orr, N.; dos Santos Silva, I.; Waisfisz, Q.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Rivadeneira, F.; Hall, P.; Czene, K.; Irwanto, A.; Liu, J.; Nevanlinna, H.; Aittomaki, K.; Blomqvist, C.; Meindl, A.; Schmutzler, R.K.; Muller-Myhsok, B.; Lichtner, P.; Chang-Claude, J.; Hein, R.; Nickels, S.; Flesch-Janys, D.; Tsimiklis, H.; Makalic, E.; Schmidt, D.; Bui, M.; Hopper, J.L.; Apicella, C.; Park, D.J.; Southey, M.; Hunter, D.J.; Chanock, S.J.; Broeks, A.; Verhoef, S.; Hogervorst, F.B.; Fasching, P.A.; Lux, M.P.; Beckmann, M.W.; Ekici, A.B.; Sawyer, E.; Tomlinson, I.; Kerin, M.; Marme, F.; Schneeweiss, A.; Sohn, C.; Burwinkel, B.; Guenel, P.; Truong, T.; Cordina-Duverger, E.; Menegaux, F.; Bojesen, S.E.; Nordestgaard, B.G.; Nielsen, S.F.; Flyger, H.; Milne, R.L.; Alonso, M.R.; Gonzalez-Neira, A.; Benitez, J.; Anton-Culver, H.; Ziogas, A.; Bernstein, L.; Dur, C.C.; Brenner, H.; Muller, H.; Arndt, V.; Stegmaier, C.; Justenhoven, C.; Brauch, H.; Bruning, T.; Wang-Gohrke, S.; Eilber, U.; Dork, T.; Schurmann, P.; Bremer, M.; Hillemanns, P.; Bogdanova, N.V.; Antonenkova, N.N.; Rogov, Y.I.; Karstens, J.H.; Bermisheva, M.; Prokofieva, D.; Ligtenberg, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for approximately 8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies

  15. Genome-wide association analysis identifies three new breast cancer susceptibility loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghoussaini, Maya; Fletcher, Olivia; Michailidou, Kyriaki

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women. To date, 22 common breast cancer susceptibility loci have been identified accounting for ∼8% of the heritability of the disease. We attempted to replicate 72 promising associations from two independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in ...

  16. Genome-wide association study identifies loci influencing concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Sehmi, Joban; Li, Xinzhong; Wass, Mark N; Van der Harst, Pim; Holm, Hilma; Sanna, Serena; Kavousi, Maryam; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Coin, Lachlan J; Deng, Guohong; Gieger, Christian; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kühnel, Brigitte; Kumar, Vinod; Lagou, Vasiliki; Liang, Liming; Luan, Jian'an; Vidal, Pedro Marques; Mateo Leach, Irene; O'Reilly, Paul F; Peden, John F; Rahmioglu, Nilufer; Soininen, Pasi; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Yuan, Xin; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Atwood, Larry D; Borecki, Ingrid B; Brown, Morris J; Charoen, Pimphen; Cucca, Francesco; Das, Debashish; de Geus, Eco J C; Dixon, Anna L; Döring, Angela; Ehret, Georg; Eyjolfsson, Gudmundur I; Farrall, Martin; Forouhi, Nita G; Friedrich, Nele; Goessling, Wolfram; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Harris, Tamara B; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Heath, Simon; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Hofman, Albert; Homuth, Georg; Hyppönen, Elina; Janssen, Harry L A; Johnson, Toby; Kangas, Antti J; Kema, Ido P; Kühn, Jens P; Lai, Sandra; Lathrop, Mark; Lerch, Markus M; Li, Yun; Liang, T Jake; Lin, Jing-Ping; Loos, Ruth J F; Martin, Nicholas G; Moffatt, Miriam F; Montgomery, Grant W; Munroe, Patricia B; Musunuru, Kiran; Nakamura, Yusuke; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Olafsson, Isleifur; Penninx, Brenda W; Pouta, Anneli; Prins, Bram P; Prokopenko, Inga; Puls, Ralf; Ruokonen, Aimo; Savolainen, Markku J; Schlessinger, David; Schouten, Jeoffrey N L; Seedorf, Udo; Sen-Chowdhry, Srijita; Siminovitch, Katherine A; Smit, Johannes H; Spector, Timothy D; Tan, Wenting; Teslovich, Tanya M; Tukiainen, Taru; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Van der Klauw, Melanie M; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Wallace, Chris; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wichmann, H-Erich; Willemsen, Gonneke; Würtz, Peter; Xu, Chun; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Ahmadi, Kourosh R; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark; Cookson, William O; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Froguel, Philippe; Matsuda, Koichi; McCarthy, Mark I; Meisinger, Christa; Mooser, Vincent; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Schumann, Gunter; Snieder, Harold; Sternberg, Michael J E; Stolk, Ronald P; Thomas, Howard C; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uda, Manuela; Waeber, Gérard; Wareham, Nicholas J; Waterworth, Dawn M; Watkins, Hugh; Whitfield, John B; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Fox, Caroline S; Ala-Korpela, Mika; Stefansson, Kari; Vollenweider, Peter; Völzke, Henry; Schadt, Eric E; Scott, James; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Elliott, Paul; Kooner, Jaspal S

    2011-01-01

    Concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma are widely used as indicators of liver disease. We carried out a genome-wide association study in 61,089 individuals, identifying 42 loci associated with concentrations of liver enzymes in plasma, of which 32 are new associations (P = 10(-8) to P = 10(-190))

  17. Enhancing genomic prediction with genome-wide association studies in multiparental maize populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome-wide association mapping using dense marker sets has identified some nucleotide variants affecting complex traits which have been validated with fine-mapping and functional analysis. Many sequence variants associated with complex traits in maize have small effects and low repeatability, howev...

  18. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Dushlaine, Colm; Rossin, Lizzy; Lee, Phil H.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from ...

  19. Psychiatric genome-wide association study analyses implicate neuronal, immune and histone pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Dushlaine, Colm; Rossin, Lizzy; Lee, Phil H.; Duncan, Laramie; Parikshak, Neelroop N.; Newhouse, Stephen; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Posthuma, Danielle; Nurnberger, John I.; Lee, S. Hong; Faraone, Stephen V.; Perlis, Roy H.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Thapar, Anita; Goddard, Michael E.; Witte, John S.; Absher, Devin; Agartz, Ingrid; Akil, Huda; Amin, Farooq; Andreassen, Ole A.; Anjorin, Adebayo; Anney, Richard; Anttila, Verneri; Arking, Dan E.; Asherson, Philip; Azevedo, Maria H.; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A.; Bailey, Anthony J.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barchas, Jack D.; Barnes, Michael R.; Barrett, Thomas B.; Bass, Nicholas; Battaglia, Agatino; Bauer, Michael; Bayes, Monica; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E.; Berrettini, Wade; Betancur, Catalina; Bettecken, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Black, Donald W.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Breuer, Rene; Bruggeman, Richard; Cormican, Paul; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bunney, William E.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Byerley, William F.; Byrne, Enda M.; Caesar, Sian; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Casas, Miguel; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambert, Kimberly; Choudhury, Khalid; Cichon, Sven; Mattheisen, Manuel; Cloninger, C. Robert; Collier, David A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cormand, Bru; Corvin, Aiden; Coryell, William H.; Craig, David W.; Craig, Ian W.; Crosbie, Jennifer; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Curtis, David; Czamara, Darina; Datta, Susmita; Dawson, Geraldine; Day, Richard; De Geus, Eco J.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary J.; Doyle, Alysa E.; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Duketis, Eftichia; Ebstein, Richard P.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Elia, Josephine; Ennis, Sean; Etain, Bruno; Fanous, Ayman; Farmer, Anne E.; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Flicldnger, Matthew; Fombonne, Eric; Foroud, Tatiana; Frank, Josef; Franke, Barbara; Fraser, Christine; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Freitag, Christine M.; Friedl, Marion; Frisen, Louise; Gailagher, Louise; Gejman, Pablo V.; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Gordon, Scott D.; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Green, Elaine K.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Gross, Magdalena; Grozeva, Detelina; Guan, Weihua; Gurling, Hugh; De Haan, Lieuwe; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hallmayer, Joachim; Hamilton, Steven P.; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Thomas F.; Hartmann, Annette M.; Hautzinger, Martin; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Herms, Stefan; Hickie, Ian B.; Hipolito, Maria; Hoefels, Susanne; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogendijk, Witte J.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hultman, Christina M.; Hus, Vanessa; Ingason, Andres; Ising, Marcus; Jamain, Stephane; Jones, Edward G.; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Tzeng, Jung-Ying; Kaehler, Anna K.; Kahn, Rene S.; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Keller, Matthew C.; Kennedy, James L.; Kenny, Elaine; Kent, Lindsey; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Klauck, Sabine M.; Klei, Lambertus; Knowles, James A.; Kohli, Martin A.; Koller, Daniel L.; Konte, Bettina; Korszun, Ania; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Kuntsi, Jonna; Kwan, Phoenix; Landen, Mikael; Laengstroem, Niklas; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Jacob; Lawson, William B.; Leboyer, Marion; Ledbetter, David H.; Lencz, Todd; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Li, Jun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Linszen, Don H.; Liu, Chunyu; Lohoff, Falk W.; Loo, Sandra K.; Lord, Catherine; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Lucae, Susanne; MacIntyre, Donald J.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Maestrini, Elena; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahon, Pamela B.; Maier, Wolfgang; Malhotra, Anil K.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Christa L.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Matthews, Keith; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarroll, Steven A.; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGough, James J.; McGrath, Patrick J.; McGuffin, Peter; McInnis, Melvin G.; McIntosh, Andrew; McKinney, Rebecca; McLean, Alan W.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, William M.; McQuillin, Andrew; Medeiros, Helena; Medland, Sarah E.; Meier, Sandra; Melle, Ingrid; Meng, Fan; Meyer, Jobst; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Middleton, Lefkos; Milanova, Vihra; Miranda, Ana; Monaco, Anthony P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Morken, Gunnar; Morris, Derek W.; Morrow, Eric M.; Moskvina, Valentina; Muglia, Pierandrea; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Muir, Walter J.; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murtha, Michael; Myers, Richard M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Neale, Michael C.; Nelson, Stan F.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Nikolov, Ivan; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Nolen, Willem A.; Noethen, Markus M.; Nwulia, Evaristus A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Oades, Robert D.; Olincy, Ann; Oliveira, Guiomar; Olsen, Line; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osby, Urban; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Parr, Jeremy R.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Pickard, Benjamin S.; Pimm, Jonathan; Piven, Joseph; Potash, James B.; Poustka, Fritz; Propping, Peter; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby J.; Quinn, Emma M.; Ramos-Quiroga, Josep Antoni; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rehnstroem, Karola; Reif, Andreas; Ribases, Marta; Rice, John P.; Rietschel, Marcella; Roeder, Kathryn; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Rouleau, Guy; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Santangelo, Susan L.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Schachar, Russell; Schalling, Martin; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Scheftner, William A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schumacher, Johannes; Schwarz, Markus; Scolnick, Edward; Scott, Laura J.; Shi, Jianxin; Shilling, Paul D.; Shyn, Stanley I.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Slager, Susan L.; Smalley, Susan L.; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Erin N.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; Cair, David St.; State, Matthew; Steffens, Michael; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Strauss, John S.; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Sutdiffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Szelinger, Szabocls; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thompson, Robert C.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Uhr, Manfred; Van den Oord, Edwin J. C. G.; Van Grootheest, Gerard; Van Os, Jim; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Vincent, John B.; Visscher, Peter M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Watson, Stanley J.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Werge, Thomas; Wienker, Thomas F.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Williams, Nigel; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Witt, Stephanie H.; Xu, Wei; Young, Allan H.; Yu, Timothy W.; Zammit, Stanley; Zandi, Peter P.; Zhang, Peng; Zitman, Frans G.; Zoellner, Sebastian; Devlin, Bernie; Kelsoe, John R.; Sklar, Pamela; Daly, Mark J.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nicholas; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Weiss, Lauren A.; Wray, Naomi R.; Zhao, Zhaoming; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Holmans, Peter A.; Breen, Gerome

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of psychiatric disorders have identified multiple genetic associations with such disorders, but better methods are needed to derive the underlying biological mechanisms that these signals indicate. We sought to identify biological pathways in GWAS data from ove

  20. Genetic relationship between five psychiatric disorders estimated from genome-wide SNPs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S. Hong; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Perlis, Roy H.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Thapar, Anita; Goddard, Michael E.; Witte, John S.; Absher, Devin; Agartz, Ingrid; Akil, Huda; Amin, Farooq; Andreassen, Ole A.; Anjorin, Adebayo; Anney, Richard; Anttila, Verneri; Arking, Dan E.; Asherson, Philip; Azevedo, Maria H.; Backlund, Lena; Badner, Judith A.; Bailey, Anthony J.; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barchas, Jack D.; Barnes, Michael R.; Barrett, Thomas B.; Bass, Nicholas; Battaglia, Agatino; Bauer, Michael; Bayes, Monica; Bellivier, Frank; Bergen, Sarah E.; Berrettini, Wade; Betancur, Catalina; Bettecken, Thomas; Biederman, Joseph; Binder, Elisabeth B.; Black, Donald W.; Blackwood, Douglas H. R.; Bloss, Cinnamon S.; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Breen, Gerome; Breuer, Rene; Bruggeman, Richard; Cormican, Paul; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Bunney, William E.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Byerley, William F.; Byrne, Enda M.; Caesar, Sian; Cahn, Wiepke; Cantor, Rita M.; Casas, Miguel; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chambert, Kimberly; Choudhury, Khalid; Cichon, Sven; Cloninger, C. Robert; Collier, David A.; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cormand, Bru; Corvin, Aiden; Coryell, William H.; Craig, David W.; Craig, Ian W.; Crosbie, Jennifer; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Curtis, David; Czamara, Darina; Datta, Susmita; Dawson, Geraldine; Day, Richard; De Geus, Eco J.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary J.; Doyle, Alysa E.; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Duketis, Eftichia; Ebstein, Richard P.; Edenberg, Howard J.; Elia, Josephine; Ennis, Sean; Etain, Bruno; Fanous, Ayman; Farmer, Anne E.; Ferrier, I. Nicol; Flickinger, Matthew; Fombonne, Eric; Foroud, Tatiana; Frank, Josef; Franke, Barbara; Fraser, Christine; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Freitag, Christine M.; Friedl, Marion; Frisen, Louise; Gallagher, Louise; Gejman, Pablo V.; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Giegling, Ina; Gill, Michael; Gordon, Scott D.; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Green, Elaine K.; Greenwood, Tiffany A.; Grice, Dorothy E.; Gross, Magdalena; Grozeva, Detelina; Guan, Weihua; Gurling, Hugh; De Haan, Lieuwe; Haines, Jonathan L.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hallmayer, Joachim; Hamilton, Steven P.; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Thomas F.; Hartmann, Annette M.; Hautzinger, Martin; Heath, Andrew C.; Henders, Anjali K.; Herms, Stefan; Hickie, Ian B.; Hipolito, Maria; Hoefels, Susanne; Holmans, Peter A.; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogendijk, Witte J.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hultman, Christina M.; Hus, Vanessa; Ingason, Andres; Ising, Marcus; Jamain, Stephane; Jones, Edward G.; Jones, Ian; Jones, Lisa; Tzeng, Jung-Ying; Kaehler, Anna K.; Kahn, Rene S.; Kandaswamy, Radhika; Keller, Matthew C.; Kennedy, James L.; Kenny, Elaine; Kent, Lindsey; Kim, Yunjung; Kirov, George K.; Klauck, Sabine M.; Klei, Lambertus; Knowles, James A.; Kohli, Martin A.; Koller, Daniel L.; Konte, Bettina; Korszun, Ania; Krabbendam, Lydia; Krasucki, Robert; Kuntsi, Jonna; Kwan, Phoenix; Landen, Mikael; Langstrom, Niklas; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Jacob; Lawson, William B.; Leboyer, Marion; Ledbetter, David H.; Lee, Phil H.; Lencz, Todd; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Li, Jun; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lieberman, Jeffrey A.; Lin, Dan-Yu; Linszen, Don H.; Liu, Chunyu; Lohoff, Falk W.; Loo, Sandra K.; Lord, Catherine; Lowe, Jennifer K.; Lucae, Susanne; MacIntyre, Donald J.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Maestrini, Elena; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Mahon, Pamela B.; Maier, Wolfgang; Malhotra, Anil K.; Mane, Shrikant M.; Martin, Christa L.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Matthews, Keith; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarroll, Steven A.; McGhee, Kevin A.; McGough, James J.; McGrath, Patrick J.; McGuffin, Peter; McInnis, Melvin G.; McIntosh, Andrew; McKinney, Rebecca; McLean, Alan W.; McMahon, Francis J.; McMahon, William M.; McQuillin, Andrew; Medeiros, Helena; Medland, Sarah E.; Meier, Sandra; Melle, Ingrid; Meng, Fan; Meyer, Jobst; Middeldorp, Christel M.; Middleton, Lefkos; Milanova, Vihra; Miranda, Ana; Monaco, Anthony P.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Moreno-De-Luca, Daniel; Morken, Gunnar; Morris, Derek W.; Morrow, Eric M.; Moskvina, Valentina; Muglia, Pierandrea; Muehleisen, Thomas W.; Muir, Walter J.; Mueller-Myhsok, Bertram; Murtha, Michael; Myers, Richard M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Neale, Michael C.; Nelson, Stan F.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Nikolov, Ivan; Nimgaonkar, Vishwajit; Nolen, Willem A.; Noethen, Markus M.; Nurnberger, John I.; Nwulia, Evaristus A.; Nyholt, Dale R.; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Oades, Robert D.; Olincy, Ann; Oliveira, Guiomar; Olsen, Line; Ophoff, Roel A.; Osby, Urban; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Parr, Jeremy R.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Pato, Carlos N.; Pato, Michele T.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pergadia, Michele L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Pickard, Benjamin S.; Pimm, Jonathan; Piven, Joseph; Posthuma, Danielle; Potash, James B.; Poustka, Fritz; Propping, Peter; Puri, Vinay; Quested, Digby J.; Quinn, Emma M.; Antoni Ramos-Quiroga, Josep; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Rehnstroem, Karola; Reif, Andreas; Ribases, Marta; Rice, John P.; Rietschel, Marcella; Roeder, Kathryn; Roeyers, Herbert; Rossin, Lizzy; Rothenberger, Aribert; Rouleau, Guy; Ruderfer, Douglas; Rujescu, Dan; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanders, Stephan J.; Santangelo, Susan L.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Schachar, Russell; Schalling, Martin; Schatzberg, Alan F.; Scheftner, William A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Schork, Nicholas J.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schumacher, Johannes; Schwarz, Markus; Scolnick, Edward; Scott, Laura J.; Shi, Jianxin; Shilling, Paul D.; Shyn, Stanley I.; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Slager, Susan L.; Smalley, Susan L.; Smit, Johannes H.; Smith, Erin N.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J. S.; St Clair, David; State, Matthew; Steffens, Michael; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Strauss, John S.; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Sutcliffe, James S.; Szatmari, Peter; Szelinger, Szabocls; Thirumalai, Srinivasa; Thompson, Robert C.; Todorov, Alexandre A.; Tozzi, Federica; Treutlein, Jens; Uhr, Manfred; van den Oord, Edwin J. C. G.; Van Grootheest, Gerard; Van Os, Jim; Vicente, Astrid M.; Vieland, Veronica J.; Vincent, John B.; Visscher, Peter M.; Walsh, Christopher A.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Watson, Stanley J.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Werge, Thomas; Wienker, Thomas F.; Wijsman, Ellen M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Williams, Nigel; Willsey, A. Jeremy; Witt, Stephanie H.; Xu, Wei; Young, Allan H.; Yu, Timothy W.; Zammit, Stanley; Zandi, Peter P.; Zhang, Peng; Zitman, Frans G.; Zoellner, Sebastian; Devlin, Bernie; Kelsoe, John R.; Sklar, Pamela; Daly, Mark J.; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nicholas; Sullivan, Patrick F.; Smoller, Jordan W.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Wray, Naomi R.

    2013-01-01

    Most psychiatric disorders are moderately to highly heritable. The degree to which genetic variation is unique to individual disorders or shared across disorders is unclear. To examine shared genetic etiology, we use genome-wide genotype data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC) for cases

  1. Genome-wide association study meta-analysis identifies seven new rheumatoid arthritis risk loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, Eli A.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Remmers, Elaine F.; Xie, Gang; Eyre, Stephen; Thomson, Brian P.; Li, Yonghong; Kurreeman, Fina A. S.; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Hinks, Anne; Guiducci, Candace; Chen, Robert; Alfredsson, Lars; Amos, Christopher I.; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Barton, Anne; Bowes, John; Brouwer, Elisabeth; Burtt, Noel P.; Catanese, Joseph J.; Coblyn, Jonathan; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Costenbader, Karen H.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Crusius, J. Bart A.; Cui, Jing; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; De Jager, Philip L.; Ding, Bo; Emery, Paul; Flynn, Edward; Harrison, Pille; Hocking, Lynne J.; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Ke, Xiayi; Lee, Annette T.; Liu, Xiangdong; Martin, Paul; Morgan, Ann W.; Padyukov, Leonid; Posthumus, Marcel D.; Radstake, Timothy R. D. J.; Reid, David M.; Seielstad, Mark; Seldin, Michael F.; Shadick, Nancy A.; Steer, Sophia; Tak, Paul P.; Thomson, Wendy; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H. M.; van der Horst-Bruinsma, Irene E.; van der Schoot, C. Ellen; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Weinblatt, Michael E.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Wolbink, Gert Jan; Wordsworth, B. Paul; Wijmenga, Cisca; Karlson, Elizabeth W.; Toes, Rene E. M.; de Vries, Niek; Begovich, Ann B.; Worthington, Jane; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Klareskog, Lars; Plenge, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    To identify new genetic risk factors for rheumatoid arthritis, we conducted a genome-wide association study meta-analysis of 5,539 autoantibody-positive individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) and 20,169 controls of European descent, followed by replication in an independent set of 6,768 rheum

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies 74 loci associated with educational attainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okbay, Aysu; Beauchamp, Jonathan P.; Fontana, Mark Alan; Lee, James J.; Pers, Tune H.; Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Turley, Patrick; Chen, Guo-Bo; Emilsson, Valur; Meddens, S. Fleur W.; Oskarsson, Sven; Pickrell, Joseph K.; Thom, Kevin; Timshel, Pascal; de Vlaming, Ronald; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S.; Bacelis, Jonas; Baumbach, Clemens; Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Brandsma, Johannes H.; Concas, Maria Pina; Derringer, Jaime; Furlotte, Nicholas A.; Galesloot, Tessel E.; Girotto, Giorgia; Gupta, Richa; Hall, Leanne M.; Harris, Sarah E.; Hofer, Edith; Horikoshi, Momoko; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Kaasik, Kadri; Kalafati, Ioanna P.; Karlsson, Robert; Kong, Augustine; Lahti, Jari; van der Lee, Sven J.; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Lind, Penelope A.; Lindgren, Karl-Oskar; Liu, Tian; Mangino, Massimo; Marten, Jonathan; Mihailov, Evelin; Miller, Michael B.; van der Most, Peter J.; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Payton, Antony; Pervjakova, Natalia; Peyrot, Wouter J.; Qian, Yong; Raitakari, Olli; Rueedi, Rico; Salvi, Erika; Schmidt, Brge; Schraut, Katharina E.; Shi, Jianxin; Smith, Albert V.; Poot, Raymond A.; St Pourcain, Beate; Teumer, Alexander; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Verweij, Niek; Vuckovic, Dragana; Wellmann, Juergen; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yang, Jingyun; Zhao, Wei; Zhu, Zhihong; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Amin, Najaf; Bakshi, Andrew; Baumeister, Sebastian E.; Biino, Ginevra; Bonnelykke, Klaus; Boyle, Patricia A.; Campbell, Harry; Cappuccio, Francesco P.; Davies, Gail; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deloukas, Panos; Demuth, Ilja; Ding, Jun; Eibich, Peter; Eisele, Lewin; Eklund, Niina; Evans, David M.; Faul, Jessica D.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Forstner, Andreas J.; Gandin, Ilaria; Gunnarsson, Bjarni; Halldorsson, Bjarni V.; Harris, Tamara B.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Homuth, Georg; Horan, Michael A.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; de Jager, Philip L.; Joshi, Peter K.; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika A.; Kahonen, Mika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Keltigangas-Jarvinen, Liisa; Kiemeney, Lambertus A. L. M.; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kroh, Martin; Kutalik, Zoltan; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J.; Lebreton, Mael P.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C. M.; Loukola, Anu; Madden, Pamela A.; Magi, Reedik; Maki-Opas, Tomi; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Meddens, Gerardus A.; McMahon, George; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Milaneschi, Yusplitri; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Myhre, Ronny; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Ollier, William E. R.; Palotie, Aarno; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Petrovic, Katja E.; Porteous, David J.; Raikkonen, Katri; Ring, Susan M.; Robino, Antonietta; Rostapshova, Olga; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schmidt, Helena; Scott, Rodney J.; Smith, Blair H.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Staessen, Jan A.; Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth; Strauch, Konstantin; Terracciano, Antonio; Tobin, Martin D.; Ulivi, Sheila; Vaccargiu, Simona; Quaye, Lydia; van Rooij, Frank J. A.; Venturini, Cristina; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Volker, Uwe; Volzke, Henry; Vonk, Judith M.; Waage, Johannes; Ware, Erin B.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Attia, John R.; Bennett, David A.; Berger, Klaus; Bertram, Lars; Bisgaard, Hans; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Bultmann, Ute; Chabris, Christopher F.; Cucca, Francesco; Cusi, Daniele; Deary, Ian J.; Dedoussis, George V.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franke, Barbara; Franke, Lude; Gasparini, Paolo; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gieger, Christian; Grabe, Hans-Jorgen; Gratten, Jacob; Groenen, Patrick J. F.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van der Harst, Pim; Hayward, Caroline; Hinds, David A.; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hyppnen, Elina; Iacono, William G.; Jacobsson, Bo; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jockel, Karl-Heinz; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Lehtimaki, Terho; Lehrer, Steven F.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Pendleton, Neil; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Perola, Markus; Pirastu, Nicola; Pirastu, Mario; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Power, Christine; Province, Michael A.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Schlessinger, David; Schmidt, Reinhold; Sorensen, Thorkild I. A.; Spector, Tim D.; Stefansson, Kari; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thurik, A. Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Tiemeier, Henning; Tung, Joyce Y.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Vitart, Veronique; Vollenweider, Peter; Weir, David R.; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan F.; Conley, Dalton C.; Krueger, Robert F.; Smith, George Davey; Hofman, Albert; Laibson, David I.; Medland, Sarah E.; Meyer, Michelle N.; Yang, Jian; Johannesson, Magnus; Visscher, Peter M.; Esko, Tonu; Koellinger, Philipp D.; Cesarini, David; Benjamin, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Educational attainment is strongly influenced by social and other environmental factors, but genetic factors are estimated to account for at least 20% of the variation across individuals(1). Here we report the results of a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for educational attainment that extends

  3. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies new susceptibility loci for migraine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anttila, Verneri; Winsvold, Bendik S.; Gormley, Padhraig; Kurth, Tobias; Bettella, Francesco; McMahon, George; Kallela, Mikko; Malik, Rainer; de Vries, Boukje; Terwindt, Gisela; Medland, Sarah E.; Todt, Unda; McArdle, Wendy L.; Quaye, Lydia; Koiranen, Markku; Ikram, M. Arfan; Lehtimaki, Terho; Stam, Anine H.; Ligthart, Lannie; Wedenoja, Juho; Dunham, Ian; Neale, Benjamin M.; Palta, Priit; Hamalainen, Eija; Schuerks, Markus; Rose, Lynda M.; Buring, Julie E.; Ridker, Paul M.; Steinberg, Stacy; Stefansson, Hreinn; Jakobsson, Finnbogi; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Evans, David M.; Ring, Susan M.; Farkkila, Markus; Artto, Ville; Kaunisto, Mari A.; Freilinger, Tobias; Schoenen, Jean; Frants, Rune R.; Pelzer, Nadine; Weller, Claudia M.; Zielman, Ronald; Heath, Andrew C.; Madden, Pamela A. F.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Borck, Guntram; Goebel, Hartmut; Heinze, Axel; Heinze-Kuhn, Katja; Williams, Frances M. K.; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Pouta, Anneli; van den Ende, Joyce; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hofman, Albert; Amin, Najaf; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vink, Jacqueline M.; Heikkila, Kauko; Alexander, Michael; Muller-Myhsok, Bertram; Schreiber, Stefan; Meitinger, Thomas; Wichmann, Heinz Erich; Aromaa, Arpo; Eriksson, Johan G.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Trabzuni, Daniah; Rossin, Elizabeth; Lage, Kasper; Jacobs, Suzanne B. R.; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Birney, Ewan; Kaprio, Jaakko; Penninx, Brenda W.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; van Duijn, Cornelia; Raitakari, Olli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Zwart, John-Anker; Cherkas, Lynn; Strachan, David P.; Kubisch, Christian; Ferrari, Michel D.; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M. J. M.; Dichgans, Martin; Wessman, Maija; Smith, George Davey; Stefansson, Kari; Daly, Mark J.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Palotie, Aarno

    2013-01-01

    Migraine is the most common brain disorder, affecting approximately 14% of the adult population, but its molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the results of a meta-analysis across 29 genome-wide association studies, including a total of 23,285 individuals with migraine (cases) and 9

  4. Genome-wide association analyses identify 18 new loci associated with serum urate concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köttgen, Anna; Albrecht, Eva; Teumer, Alexander; Vitart, Veronique; Krumsiek, Jan; Hundertmark, Claudia; Pistis, Giorgio; Ruggiero, Daniela; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Haller, Toomas; Yang, Qiong; Tanaka, Toshiko; Johnson, Andrew D; Kutalik, Zoltán; Smith, Albert V; Shi, Julia; Struchalin, Maksim; Middelberg, Rita P S; Brown, Morris J; Gaffo, Angelo L; Pirastu, Nicola; Li, Guo; Hayward, Caroline; Zemunik, Tatijana; Huffman, Jennifer; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Jing Hua; Demirkan, Ayse; Feitosa, Mary F; Liu, Xuan; Malerba, Giovanni; Lopez, Lorna M; van der Harst, Pim; Li, Xinzhong; Kleber, Marcus E; Hicks, Andrew A; Nolte, Ilja M; Johansson, Asa; Murgia, Federico; Wild, Sarah H; Bakker, Stephan J L; Peden, John F; Dehghan, Abbas; Steri, Maristella; Tenesa, Albert; Lagou, Vasiliki; Salo, Perttu; Mangino, Massimo; Rose, Lynda M; Lehtimäki, Terho; Woodward, Owen M; Okada, Yukinori; Tin, Adrienne; Müller, Christian; Oldmeadow, Christopher; Putku, Margus; Czamara, Darina; Kraft, Peter; Frogheri, Laura; Thun, Gian Andri; Grotevendt, Anne; Gislason, Gauti Kjartan; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; McArdle, Patrick; Shuldiner, Alan R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Helena; Schallert, Michael; Martin, Nicholas G; Montgomery, Grant W; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Munroe, Patricia B; Samani, Nilesh J; Jacobs, David R; Liu, Kiang; D'Adamo, Pio; Ulivi, Sheila; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Campbell, Susan; Devuyst, Olivier; Navarro, Pau; Kolcic, Ivana; Hastie, Nicholas; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Esko, Tõnu; Salumets, Andres; Khaw, Kay Tee; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J; Isaacs, Aaron; Kraja, Aldi; Zhang, Qunyuan; Wild, Philipp S; Scott, Rodney J; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Org, Elin; Viigimaa, Margus; Bandinelli, Stefania; Metter, Jeffrey E; Lupo, Antonio; Trabetti, Elisabetta; Sorice, Rossella; Döring, Angela; Lattka, Eva; Strauch, Konstantin; Theis, Fabian; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wichmann, H-Erich; Davies, Gail; Gow, Alan J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Stolk, Ronald P; Kooner, Jaspal S; Zhang, Weihua; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Boehm, Bernhard O; Lucae, Susanne; Penninx, Brenda W; Smit, Johannes H; Curhan, Gary; Mudgal, Poorva; Plenge, Robert M; Portas, Laura; Persico, Ivana; Kirin, Mirna; Wilson, James F; Mateo Leach, Irene; van Gilst, Wiek H; Goel, Anuj; Ongen, Halit; Hofman, Albert; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Imboden, Medea; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Cucca, Francesco; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Piras, Maria Grazia; Nauck, Matthias; Schurmann, Claudia; Budde, Kathrin; Ernst, Florian; Farrington, Susan M; Theodoratou, Evropi; Prokopenko, Inga; Stumvoll, Michael; Jula, Antti; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko; Shin, So-Youn; Spector, Tim D; Sala, Cinzia; Ridker, Paul M; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Hengstenberg, Christian; Nelson, Christopher P; Meschia, James F; Nalls, Michael A; Sharma, Pankaj; Singleton, Andrew B; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Zeller, Tanja; Burnier, Michel; Attia, John; Laan, Maris; Klopp, Norman; Hillege, Hans L; Kloiber, Stefan; Choi, Hyon; Pirastu, Mario; Tore, Silvia; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Völzke, Henry; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Parsa, Afshin; Schmidt, Reinhold; Whitfield, John B; Fornage, Myriam; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David S; Polašek, Ozren; Campbell, Harry; Rudan, Igor; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Metspalu, Andres; Loos, Ruth J F; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid B; Ferrucci, Luigi; Gambaro, Giovanni; Deary, Ian J; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Chambers, John C; März, Winfried; Pramstaller, Peter P; Snieder, Harold; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wright, Alan F; Navis, Gerjan; Watkins, Hugh; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Sanna, Serena; Schipf, Sabine; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Tönjes, Anke; Ripatti, Samuli; Soranzo, Nicole; Toniolo, Daniela; Chasman, Daniel I; Raitakari, Olli; Kao, W H Linda; Ciullo, Marina; Fox, Caroline S; Caulfield, Mark; Bochud, Murielle; Gieger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Elevated serum urate concentrations can cause gout, a prevalent and painful inflammatory arthritis. By combining data from >140,000 individuals of European ancestry within the Global Urate Genetics Consortium (GUGC), we identified and replicated 28 genome-wide significant loci in association with se

  5. Novel loci associated with usual sleep duration: The CHARGE Consortium Genome-Wide Association Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gottlieb, D.J.; Hek, K.; Chen, T.H.; Watson, N.F.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Byrne, E.M.; Cornelis, M.; Warby, S.C.; Bandinelli, S.; Cherkas, L.; Evans, D.S.; Grabe, H.J.; Lahti, J.; Li, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Lumley, T.; Marciante, K.D.; Pérusse, L.; Psaty, B.M.; Robbins, J.; Tranah, G.J.; Vink, J.M.; Wilk, J.B.; Stafford, J.M.; Bellis, C.; Biffar, R.; Bouchard, C.; Cade, B.; Curhan, G.C.; Eriksson, J.G.; Ewert, R.; Ferrucci, L.; Fulop, T.; Gehrman, P.R.; Goodloe, R.; Harris, T.B.; Heath, A.C.; Hernandez, D.G.; Hofman, A.; Hottenga, J.J.; Hunter, D.J.; Jensen, M.K.; Johnson, A.D.; Kahonen, M.; Kao, L.; Kraft, P.; Larkin, E.K.; Lauderdale, D.S.; Luik, A.I.; Medici, M.; Montgomery, G.W.; Palotie, A.; Patel, S.R.; Pistis, G.; Porcu, E.; Quaye, L.; Raitakari, O.; Redline, S.; Rimm, E.B.; Rotter, J.I.; Smith, A.V.; Spector, T.D.; Teumer, A.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Vohl, M.C.; Widen, E.; Willemsen, G.; Young, T.; Zhang, X.; Liu, Y.; Blangero, J.; Boomsma, D.I.; Gudnason, V.; Hu, F.; Mangino, M.; Martin, N.G.; O'Connor, G.T.; Stone, K.L.; Tanaka, T.; Viikari, J.; Gharib, S.A.; Punjabi, N.M.; Raikkonen, K.; Völzke, H.; Mignot, E.; Tiemeier, H.

    2015-01-01

    Usual sleep duration is a heritable trait correlated with psychiatric morbidity, cardiometabolic disease and mortality, although little is known about the genetic variants influencing this trait. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of usual sleep duration was conducted using 18 population-based

  6. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies discovers multiple loci for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berndt, Sonja I; Camp, Nicola J; Skibola, Christine F; Vijai, Joseph; Wang, Zhaoming; Gu, Jian; Nieters, Alexandra; Kelly, Rachel S; Smedby, Karin E; Monnereau, Alain; Cozen, Wendy; Cox, Angela; Wang, Sophia S; Lan, Qing; Teras, Lauren R; Machado, Moara; Yeager, Meredith; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R; Hartge, Patricia; Purdue, Mark P; Birmann, Brenda M; Vajdic, Claire M; Cocco, Pierluigi; Zhang, Yawei; Giles, Graham G; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Montalvan, Rebecca; Burdett, Laurie; Hutchinson, Amy; Ye, Yuanqing; Call, Timothy G; Shanafelt, Tait D; Novak, Anne J; Kay, Neil E; Liebow, Mark; Cunningham, Julie M; Allmer, Cristine; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Adami, Hans-Olov; Melbye, Mads; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T; Glenn, Martha; Curtin, Karen; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A; Diver, W Ryan; Link, Brian K; Weiner, George J; Conde, Lucia; Bracci, Paige M; Riby, Jacques; Arnett, Donna K; Zhi, Degui; Leach, Justin M; Holly, Elizabeth A; Jackson, Rebecca D; Tinker, Lesley F; Benavente, Yolanda; Sala, Núria; Casabonne, Delphine; Becker, Nikolaus; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; McKay, James; Staines, Anthony; Chaffee, Kari G; Achenbach, Sara J; Vachon, Celine M; Goldin, Lynn R; Strom, Sara S; Leis, Jose F; Weinberg, J Brice; Caporaso, Neil E; Norman, Aaron D; De Roos, Anneclaire J; Morton, Lindsay M; Severson, Richard K; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Masala, Giovanna; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Chirlaque, María-Dolores; Vermeulen, Roel C H|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/216532620; Travis, Ruth C; Southey, Melissa C; Milne, Roger L; Albanes, Demetrius; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Clavel, Jacqueline; Zheng, Tongzhang; Holford, Theodore R; Villano, Danylo J; Maria, Ann; Spinelli, John J; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Bertrand, Kimberly A; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Ferri, Giovanni M; Miligi, Lucia; Liang, Liming; Ma, Baoshan; Huang, Jinyan; Crouch, Simon; Park, Ju-Hyun; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; North, Kari E; Snowden, John A; Wright, Josh; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Offit, Kenneth; Wu, Xifeng; de Sanjose, Silvia; Cerhan, James R; Chanock, Stephen J; Rothman, Nathaniel; Slager, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a common lymphoid malignancy with strong heritability. To further understand the genetic susceptibility for CLL and identify common loci associated with risk, we conducted a meta-analysis of four genome-wide association studies (GWAS) composed of 3,100 cases and

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies six new loci influencing pulse pressure and mean arterial pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wain, Louise V.; Verwoert, Germaine C.; O'Reilly, Paul F.; Shi, Gang; Johnson, Toby; Johnson, Andrew D.; Bochud, Murielle; Rice, Kenneth M.; Henneman, Peter; Smith, Albert V.; Ehret, Georg B.; Amin, Najaf; Larson, Martin G.; Mooser, Vincent; Hadley, David; Doerr, Marcus; Bis, Joshua C.; Aspelund, Thor; Esko, Tonu; Janssens, A. Cecile J. W.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heath, Simon; Laan, Maris; Fu, Jingyuan; Pistis, Giorgio; Luan, Jian'an; Arora, Pankaj; Lucas, Gavin; Pirastu, Nicola; Pichler, Irene; Jackson, Anne U.; Webster, Rebecca J.; Zhang, Feng; Peden, John F.; Schmidt, Helena; Tanaka, Toshiko; Campbell, Harry; Igl, Wilmar; Milaneschi, Yuri; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Vitart, Veronique; Chasman, Daniel I.; Trompet, Stella; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Chambers, John C.; Guo, Xiuqing; Lehtimaki, Terho; Kuehnel, Brigitte; Lopez, Lorna M.; Polasek, Ozren; Boban, Mladen; Nelson, Christopher P.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Pihur, Vasyl; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Hofman, Albert; Kundu, Suman; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.; Bergmann, Sven; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Laitinen, Jaana; Pouta, Anneli; Zitting, Paavo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Voelker, Uwe; Voelzke, Henry; Glazer, Nicole L.; Taylor, Kent D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Alavere, Helene; Haller, Toomas; Keis, Aime; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Aulchenko, Yurii; Barroso, Ines; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Lathrop, Mark; Eyheramendy, Susana; Org, Elin; Sober, Siim; Lu, Xiaowen; Nolte, Ilja M.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Corre, Tanguy; Masciullo, Corrado; Sala, Cinzia; Groop, Leif; Voight, Benjamin F.; Melander, Olle; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Salomaa, Veikko; d'Adamo, Adamo Pio; Fabretto, Antonella; Faletra, Flavio; Ulivi, Sheila; Del Greco, Fabiola M.; Facheris, Maurizio; Collins, Francis S.; Bergman, Richard N.; Beilby, John P.; Hung, Joseph; Musk, A. William; Mangino, Massimo; Shin, So-Youn; Soranzo, Nicole; Watkins, Hugh; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Gider, Pierre; Loitfelder, Marisa; Zeginigg, Marion; Hernandez, Dena; Najjar, Samer S.; Navarro, Pau; Wild, Sarah H.; Corsi, Anna Maria; Singleton, Andrew; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Parker, Alex N.; Rose, Lynda M.; Buckley, Brendan; Stott, David; Orru, Marco; Uda, Manuela; van der Klauw, Melanie M.; Zhang, Weihua; Li, Xinzhong; Scott, James; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Burke, Gregory L.; Kahonen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Doering, Angela; Meitinger, Thomas; Davies, Gail; Starr, John M.; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew; Lindeman, Jan H.; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; Koenig, Inke R.; Felix, Janine F.; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C.; Ongen, Halit; Breteler, Monique; Debette, Stephanie; DeStefano, Anita L.; Fornage, Myriam; Mitchell, Gary F.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Holm, Hilma; Stefansson, Kari; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Samani, Nilesh J.; Preuss, Michael; Rudan, Igor; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Raitakari, Olli T.; Palmas, Walter; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Wright, Alan F.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bandinelli, Stefania; Gyllensten, Ulf B.; Wilson, James F.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Schmidt, Reinhold; Farrall, Martin; Spector, Tim D.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Pfeufer, Arne; Gasparini, Paolo; Siscovick, David; Altshuler, David; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Toniolo, Daniela; Snieder, Harold; Gieger, Christian; Meneton, Pierre; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Oostra, Ben A.; Metspalu, Andres; Launer, Lenore; Rettig, Rainer; Strachan, David P.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Erdmann, Jeanette; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehnke, Michael; Ridker, Paul M.; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Abecasis, Goncalo R.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Levy, Daniel; Munroe, Patricia B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Rao, Dabeeru C.; Tobin, Martin D.; Elliott, Paul; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous genetic loci have been associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) in Europeans(1-3). We now report genome-wide association studies of pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP). In discovery (N = 74,064) and follow-up studies (N = 48,607), we

  8. Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerhan, James R.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Vijai, Joseph; Ghesquières, Hervé; McKay, James; Wang, Sophia S.; Wang, Zhaoming; Yeager, Meredith; Conde, Lucia; De Bakker, Paul I W; Nieters, Alexandra; Cox, David; Burdett, Laurie; Monnereau, Alain; Flowers, Christopher R.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela R.; Lan, Qing; Severi, Gianluca; Melbye, Mads; Gu, Jian; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Kane, Eleanor; Teras, Lauren R.; Purdue, Mark P.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Spinelli, John J.; Giles, Graham G.; Albanes, Demetrius; Kelly, Rachel S.; Zucca, Mariagrazia; Bertrand, Kimberly A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Lawrence, Charles; Hutchinson, Amy; Zhi, Degui; Habermann, Thomas M.; Link, Brian K.; Novak, Anne J.; Dogan, Ahmet; Asmann, Yan W.; Liebow, Mark; Thompson, Carrie A.; Ansell, Stephen M.; Witzig, Thomas E.; Weiner, George J.; Veron, Amelie S.; Zelenika, Diana; Tilly, Hervé; Haioun, Corinne; Molina, Thierry Jo; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Glimelius, Bengt; Adami, Hans Olov; Bracci, Paige M.; Riby, Jacques; Smith, Martyn T.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Morton, Lindsay M.; Severson, Richard K.; Tinker, Lesley F.; North, Kari E.; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadie, Marc; Staines, Anthony; Lightfoot, Tracy; Crouch, Simon; Smith, Alex; Roman, Eve; Diver, W. Ryan; Offit, Kenneth; Zelenetz, Andrew; Klein, Robert J.; Villano, Danylo J.; Zheng, Tongzhang; Zhang, Yawei; Holford, Theodore R.; Kricker, Anne; Turner, Jenny; Southey, Melissa C.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Virtamo, Jarmo; Weinstein, Stephanie; Riboli, Elio; Vineis, Paolo; Kaaks, Rudolph; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Boeing, Heiner; Tjonneland, Anne; Angelucci, Emanuele; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Rais, Marco; Birmann, Brenda M.; Laden, Francine; Giovannucci, Edward; Kraft, Peter; Huang, Jinyan; Ma, Baoshan; Ye, Yuanqing; Chiu, Brian C H; Sampson, Joshua; Liang, Liming; Park, Ju Hyun; Chung, Charles C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Slager, Susan L.; Wu, Xifeng; De Sanjose, Silvia; Smedby, Karin E.; Salles, Gilles; Skibola, Christine F.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Chanock, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common lymphoma subtype and is clinically aggressive. To identify genetic susceptibility loci for DLBCL, we conducted a meta-analysis of 3 new genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and 1 previous scan, totaling 3,857 cases and 7,666 controls of Euro

  9. Genome-Wide Association Study of Receptive Language Ability of 12-Year-Olds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlaar, Nicole; Meaburn, Emma L.; Hayiou-Thomas, Marianna E.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Docherty, Sophia; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Price, Thomas S.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Researchers have previously shown that individual differences in measures of receptive language ability at age 12 are highly heritable. In the current study, the authors attempted to identify some of the genes responsible for the heritability of receptive language ability using a "genome-wide association" approach. Method: The…

  10. Genome wide association analysis for residual feed intake in Danish Duroc boars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do, Duy Ngoc; Ostersen, Tage; Strathe, Anders Bjerring;

    2013-01-01

    gain (30-100 kg). RFI2 was the same as RFI1 except that it was also regressed on backfat (BF). A total of 868 boars had phenotypic and genotype (i.e. Illumina Porcine SNP60 BeadChip) records. A total of 33945 SNPs were available for genome wide association studies (GWAS) after quality control...

  11. A Genome-Wide Scan for Breast Cancer Risk Haplotypes among African American Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chi; Chen, Gary K.; Millikan, Robert C.; Ambrosone, Christine B.; John, Esther M.; Bernstein, Leslie; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Jennifer J.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Nyante, Sarah; Bandera, Elisa V.; Ingles, Sue A.; Press, Michael F.; Deming, Sandra L.; Rodriguez-Gil, Jorge L.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wan, Peggy; Sheng, Xin; Pooler, Loreall C.; Van Den Berg, David J.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Henderson, Brian E.; Haiman, Chris A.; Stram, Daniel O.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) simultaneously investigating hundreds of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) have become a powerful tool in the investigation of new disease susceptibility loci. Haplotypes are sometimes thought to be superior to SNPs and are promising in genetic association analyses. The application of genome-wide haplotype analysis, however, is hindered by the complexity of haplotypes themselves and sophistication in computation. We systematically analyzed the haplotype effects for breast cancer risk among 5,761 African American women (3,016 cases and 2,745 controls) using a sliding window approach on the genome-wide scale. Three regions on chromosomes 1, 4 and 18 exhibited moderate haplotype effects. Furthermore, among 21 breast cancer susceptibility loci previously established in European populations, 10p15 and 14q24 are likely to harbor novel haplotype effects. We also proposed a heuristic of determining the significance level and the effective number of independent tests by the permutation analysis on chromosome 22 data. It suggests that the effective number was approximately half of the total (7,794 out of 15,645), thus the half number could serve as a quick reference to evaluating genome-wide significance if a similar sliding window approach of haplotype analysis is adopted in similar populations using similar genotype density. PMID:23468962

  12. Seven prostate cancer susceptibility loci identified by a multi-stage genome-wide association study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Olama, Ali Amin Al; Giles, Graham G

    2011-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PrCa) is the most frequently diagnosed male cancer in developed countries. We conducted a multi-stage genome-wide association study for PrCa and previously reported the results of the first two stages, which identified 16 PrCa susceptibility loci. We report here the results of st...

  13. Identification of six Loci associated with pelvic organ prolapse using genome-wide association analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen-Brady, K.; Cannon-Albright, L.; Farnham, J.M.; Teerlink, C.; Vierhout, M.E.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van; Kluivers, K.B.; Norton, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: : There is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors contribute to pelvic organ prolapse. We conducted a genome-wide association study to investigate whether common genetic variants modify the risk of pelvic organ prolapse. METHODS: : We recruited women who had been evaluated

  14. Genome-wide association analysis in primary sclerosing cholangitis identifies two non-HLA susceptibility loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melum, Espen; Franke, Andre; Schramm, Christoph; Weismueller, Tobias J.; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Offner, Felix A.; Juran, Brian D.; Laerdahl, Jon K.; Labi, Verena; Bjoernsson, Einar; Weersma, Rinse K.; Henckaerts, Liesbet; Teufel, Andreas; Rust, Christian; Ellinghaus, Eva; Balschun, Tobias; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Ellinghaus, David; Bergquist, Annika; Sauer, Peter; Ryu, Euijung; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Wedemeyer, Jochen; Lindkvist, Bjoern; Wittig, Michael; Porte, Robert J.; Holm, Kristian; Gieger, Christian; Wichmann, H-Erich; Stokkers, Pieter; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Runz, Heiko; Stiehl, Adolf; Wijmenga, Cisca; Sterneck, Martina; Vermeire, Severine; Beuers, Ulrich; Villunger, Andreas; Schrumpf, Erik; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N.; Manns, Michael P.; Schreiber, Stefan; Karlsen, Tom H.

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic bile duct disease affecting 2.4-7.5% of individuals with inflammatory bowel disease. We performed a genome-wide association analysis of 2,466,182 SNPs in 715 individuals with PSC and 2,962 controls, followed by replication in 1,025 PSC cases and

  15. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelis, M. C.; Byrne, E. M.; Esko, T.; Nalls, M. A.; Ganna, A.; Paynter, N.; Monda, K. L.; Amin, N.; Fischer, K.; Renstrom, F.; Ngwa, J. S.; Huikari, V.; Cavadino, A.; Nolte, I. M.; Teumer, A.; Yu, K.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Rawal, R.; Manichaikul, A.; Wojczynski, M. K.; Vink, J. M.; Zhao, J. H.; Burlutsky, G.; Lahti, J.; Mikkila, V.; Lemaitre, R. N.; Eriksson, J.; Musani, S. K.; Tanaka, T.; Geller, F.; Luan, J.; Hui, J.; Maegi, R.; Dimitriou, M.; Garcia, M. E.; Ho, W-K; Wright, M. J.; Rose, L. M.; Magnusson, P. K. E.; Pedersen, N. L.; Couper, D.; Oostra, B. A.; Hofman, A.; Ikram, M. A.; Tiemeier, H. W.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; van Rooij, F. J. A.; Barroso, I.; Johansson, I.; Xue, L.; Kaakinen, M.; Milani, L.; Power, C.; Snieder, H.; Stolk, R. P.; Baumeister, S. E.; Biffar, R.; Gu, F.; Bastardot, F.; Kutalik, Z.; Jacobs, D. R.; Forouhi, N. G.; Mihailov, E.; Lind, L.; Lindgren, C.; Michaelsson, K.; Morris, A.; Jensen, M.; Khaw, K-T; Luben, R. N.; Wang, J. J.; Mannisto, S.; Perala, M-M; Kahonen, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Viikari, J.; Mozaffarian, D.; Mukamal, K.; Psaty, B. M.; Doering, A.; Heath, A. C.; Montgomery, G. W.; Dahmen, N.; Carithers, T.; Tucker, K. L.; Ferrucci, L.; Boyd, H. A.; Melbye, M.; Treur, J. L.; Mellstrom, D.; Hottenga, J. J.; Prokopenko, I.; Toenjes, A.; Deloukas, P.; Kanoni, S.; Lorentzon, M.; Houston, D. K.; Liu, Y.; Danesh, J.; Rasheed, A.; Mason, M. A.; Zonderman, A. B.; Franke, L.; Kristal, B. S.; Karjalainen, J.; Reed, D. R.; Westra, H-J; Evans, M. K.; Saleheen, D.; Harris, T. B.; Dedoussis, G.; Curhan, G.; Stumvoll, M.; Beilby, J.; Pasquale, L. R.; Feenstra, B.; Bandinelli, S.; Ordovas, J. M.; Chan, A. T.; Peters, U.; Ohlsson, C.; Gieger, C.; Martin, N. G.; Waldenberger, M.; Siscovick, D. S.; Raitakari, O.; Eriksson, J. G.; Mitchell, P.; Hunter, D. J.; Kraft, P.; Rimm, E. B.; Boomsma, D. I.; Borecki, I. B.; Loos, R. J. F.; Wareham, N. J.; Vollenweider, P.; Caporaso, N.; Grabe, H. J.; Neuhouser, M. L.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.; Hu, F. B.; Hyppoenen, E.; Jarvelin, M-R; Cupples, L. A.; Franks, P. W.; Ridker, P. M.; van Duijn, C. M.; Heiss, G.; Metspalu, A.; North, K. E.; Ingelsson, E.; Nettleton, J. A.; van Dam, R. M.; Chasman, D. I.

    Coffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day) among up to

  16. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Cornelis (Marilyn); E.M. Byrne; T. Esko (Tõnu); M.A. Nalls (Michael); A. Ganna (Andrea); N.P. Paynter (Nina); K.L. Monda (Keri); N. Amin; K. Fischer (Krista); F. Renström (Frida); J.S. Ngwa; V. Huikari (Ville); A. Cavadino (Alana); I.M. Nolte (Ilja M.); A. Teumer (Alexander); K. Yu; P. Marques-Vidal; R. Rawal; A. Manichaikul (Ani); M.K. Wojczynski (Mary ); J.M. Vink; J.H. Zhao; G. Burlutsky (George); J. Lahti (Jari); V. Mikkilä (Vera); R.N. Lemaitre (Rozenn ); J. Eriksson; S. Musani (Solomon); T. Tanaka; F. Geller (Frank); J. Luan; J. Hui; R. Mägi (Reedik); M. Dimitriou (Maria); M. Garcia (Melissa); W.-K. Ho; M.J. Wright (Margaret); L.M. Rose (Lynda M.); P.K.E. Magnusson (Patrik K. E.); N.L. Pedersen (Nancy L.); D.J. Couper (David); B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Hofman (Albert); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F.J.A. van Rooij (Frank); I. Barroso; I. Johansson (Ingegerd); L. Xue (Luting); M. Kaakinen (Marika); L. Milani (Lili); C. Power (Christine); H. Snieder (Harold); R.P. Stolk; S.E. Baumeister (Sebastian); R. Biffar; F. Gu; F. Bastardot (Francois); Z. Kutalik; D.R. Jacobs (David); N.G. Forouhi (Nita G.); E. Mihailov (Evelin); L. Lind (Lars); C. Lindgren; K. Michaëlsson; A.P. Morris (Andrew); M.K. Jensen (Majken K.); K.T. Khaw; R.N. Luben (Robert); J.J. Wang; S. Männistö (Satu); M.-M. Perälä; M. Kähönen (Mika); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); J. Viikari (Jorma); D. Mozaffarian; K. Mukamal (Kenneth); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); A. Döring; A.C. Heath (Andrew C.); G.W. Montgomery (Grant W.); N. Dahmen (N.); T. Carithers; K.L. Tucker; L. Ferrucci (Luigi); H.A. Boyd; M. Melbye (Mads); J.L. Treur; D. Mellström (Dan); J.J. Hottenga (Jouke Jan); I. Prokopenko (Inga); A. Tönjes (Anke); P. Deloukas (Panagiotis); S. Kanoni (Stavroula); M. Lorentzon (Mattias); D.K. Houston; Y. Liu; J. Danesh (John); A. Rasheed; M.A. Mason; A.B. Zonderman; L. Franke (Lude); B.S. Kristal; J. Karjalainen (Juha); D.R. Reed; H.-J. Westra; M.K. Evans; D. Saleheen; T.B. Harris (Tamara B.); G.V. Dedoussis (George V.); G.C. Curhan (Gary); M. Stumvoll (Michael); J. Beilby (John); L.R. Pasquale; B. Feenstra; S. Bandinelli; J.M. Ordovas; A.T. Chan; U. Peters (Ulrike); C. Ohlsson (Claes); C. Gieger (Christian); N.G. Martin (Nicholas); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); D.S. Siscovick (David); O. Raitakari (Olli); J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); P. Mitchell (Paul); D. Hunter (David); P. Kraft (Peter); E.B. Rimm (Eric B.); D.I. Boomsma (Dorret); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); R.J.F. Loos (Ruth); N.J. Wareham (Nick); P.K. Vollenweider (Peter K.); N. Caporaso; H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); M.L. Neuhouser (Marian L.); B.H.R. Wolffenbuttel (Bruce H. R.); F.B. Hu (Frank); E. Hypponen (Elina); M.-R. Jarvelin (Marjo-Riitta); L.A. Cupples (Adrienne); P.W. Franks; P.M. Ridker (Paul); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); G. Heiss (Gerardo); A. Metspalu (Andres); K.E. North (Kari); E. Ingelsson (Erik); J.A. Nettleton; R.M. van Dam (Rob); D.I. Chasman (Daniel)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCoffee, a major dietary source of caffeine, is among the most widely consumed beverages in the world and has received considerable attention regarding health risks and benefits. We conducted a genome-wide (GW) meta-analysis of predominately regular-type coffee consumption (cups per day)

  17. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies six novel loci associated with habitual coffee consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelis, M.C.; Byrne, E.M.; Esko, T.; Nalls, M.A.; Ganna, A.; Paynter, N.; Monda, K.L.; Amin, N.; Fischer, K.; Renstrom, F.; Ngwa, J.S.; Huikari, V.; Cavadino, A.; Nolte, I.M.; Teumer, A.; Yu, K.; Marques-Vidal, P.; Rawal, R.; Manichaikul, A.; Wojczynski, M.K.; Vink, J.M.; Zhao, J.H.; Burlutsky, G.; Lahti, J.; Mikkila, V.; Lemaitre, R.N.; Eriksson, J.; Musani, S.K.; Tanaka, T.; Geller, F.; Luan, J.; Hui, J.; Magi, R.; Dimitriou, M.; Garcia, M.E.; Ho, W.K.; Wright, M.J.; Rose, L.M.; Magnusson, P.K.E.; Pedersen, N.L.; Couper, D.; Oostra, B.A.; Hofman, A.; Ikram, M.A.; Tiemeier, H.W.; Uitterlinden, A.G.; Rooij, F.J. van; Barroso, I.; Johansson, I.; Xue, L.; Kaakinen, M.; Milani, L.; Power, C.; Snieder, H.; Stolk, R.P.; Baumeister, S.E.; Biffar, R.; Gu, F.; Bastardot, F.; Kutalik, Z.; Jacobs, D.R., Jr.; Forouhi, N.G.; Mihailov, E.; Lind, L.; Lindgren, C.; Michaelsson, K.; Morris, A.; Jensen, M.; Khaw, K.T.; Luben, R.N.; Wang, J.J.; Mannisto, S.; Perala, M.M.; Kahonen, M.; Lehtimaki, T.; Viikari, J.; Mozaffarian, D.; Mukamal, K.; Psaty, B.M.; Doring, A.; Heath, A.C.; Montgomery, G.W.; Dahmen, N.; Carithers, T.; Tucker, K.L.; Ferrucci, L.; Boyd, H.A.; Melbye, M.; Treur, J.L.; Mellstrom, D.; Hottenga, J.J.; Prokopenko, I.; Tonjes, A.; Deloukas, P.; Kanoni, S.; Lorentzon, M.; Houston, D.K.; Liu, Y.; Danesh, J.; Rasheed, A.; Mason, M.A.; Zonderman, A.B.; Franke, L.; Kristal, B.S.; Karjalainen, J.; Reed, D.R.; Westra, H.J.; Evans, M.K.; Saleheen, D.; Harris, T.B.; Dedoussis, G.; Curhan, G.; Stumvoll, M.; Beilby, J.; Pasquale, L.R.; Feenstra, B.; Bandinelli, S.; Ordovas, J.M.; Chan, A.T.; Peters, U.; Ohlsson, C.; Gieger, C.; Martin, N.G.; Waldenberger, M.; Siscovick, D.S.; Raitakari, O.; Eriksson, J.G.; Mitchell, P.; Hunter, D.J.; Kraft, P.; Rimm, E.B.; Boomsma, D.I.; Borecki, I.B.; Loos, R.J.F.; Wareham, N.J.; Vollenweider, P.; Caporaso, N.; Grabe, H.J.; Neuhouser, M.L.; Wolffenbuttel, B.H.R.; Hu, F.B.; Hypponen, E.; Jarvelin, M.R.; Cupples, L.A.; Franks, P.W.; Ridker, P.M.; Duijn, C.M. van; Heiss, G.; Metspalu, A.; North, K.E.; Ingelsson, E.; Nettleton, J.A.