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Sample records for genome structure expression

  1. Comparative genomics of the relationship between gene structure and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ren, X.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between the structure of genes and their expression is a relatively new aspect of genome organization and regulation. With more genome sequences and expression data becoming available, bioinformatics approaches can help the further elucidation of the relationships between gene struc

  2. Genomic structure and expression of immunoglobulins in Squamata.

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    Olivieri, David N; Garet, Elina; Estevez, Olivia; Sánchez-Espinel, Christian; Gambón-Deza, Francisco

    2016-04-01

    The Squamata order represents a major evolutionary reptile lineage, yet the structure and expression of immunoglobulins in this order has been scarcely studied in detail. From the genome sequences of four Squamata species (Gekko japonicus, Ophisaurus gracilis, Pogona vitticeps and Ophiophagus hannah) and RNA-seq datasets from 18 other Squamata species, we identified the immunoglobulins present in these animals as well as the tissues in which they are found. All Squamata have at least three immunoglobulin classes; namely, the immunoglobulins M, D, and Y. Unlike mammals, however, we provide evidence that some Squamata lineages possess more than one Cμ gene which is located downstream from the Cδ gene. The existence of two evolutionary lineages of immunoglobulin Y is shown. Additionally, it is demonstrated that while all Squamata species possess the λ light chain, only Iguanidae species possess the κ light chain.

  3. DHPC: a new tool to express genome structural features.

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    Deng, Xuegong; Deng, Xuemei; Rayner, Simon; Liu, Xiangdong; Zhang, Qingling; Yang, Yupu; Li, Ning

    2008-05-01

    The DHPC (DNA Hilbert-Peano curve) is a new tool for visualizing large-scale genome sequences by mapping sequences into a two-dimensional square. It utilizes the space-filling function of Hilbert-Peano mapping. By applying a Gauss smoothing technique and a user-defined color function, a large-scale genome sequence can be mapped into a two-dimensional color image. In the calculated DHPCs, many genome characteristics are revealed. In this article we introduce the method and show how DHPCs may be used to identify regions of different base composition. The power of the method is demonstrated by presenting multiple examples such as repeating sequences, degree of base bias, regions of homogeneity and their boundaries, and mark of annotated segments. We also present several genome curves generated by DHPC to demonstrate how DHPC can be used to find previously unidentified sequence features in these genomes.

  4. Effects of aneuploidy on genome structure, expression, and interphase organization in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Bruno Huettel

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Aneuploidy refers to losses and/or gains of individual chromosomes from the normal chromosome set. The resulting gene dosage imbalance has a noticeable affect on the phenotype, as illustrated by aneuploid syndromes, including Down syndrome in humans, and by human solid tumor cells, which are highly aneuploid. Although the phenotypic manifestations of aneuploidy are usually apparent, information about the underlying alterations in structure, expression, and interphase organization of unbalanced chromosome sets is still sparse. Plants generally tolerate aneuploidy better than animals, and, through colchicine treatment and breeding strategies, it is possible to obtain inbred sibling plants with different numbers of chromosomes. This possibility, combined with the genetic and genomics tools available for Arabidopsis thaliana, provides a powerful means to assess systematically the molecular and cytological consequences of aberrant numbers of specific chromosomes. Here, we report on the generation of Arabidopsis plants in which chromosome 5 is present in triplicate. We compare the global transcript profiles of normal diploids and chromosome 5 trisomics, and assess genome integrity using array comparative genome hybridization. We use live cell imaging to determine the interphase 3D arrangement of transgene-encoded fluorescent tags on chromosome 5 in trisomic and triploid plants. The results indicate that trisomy 5 disrupts gene expression throughout the genome and supports the production and/or retention of truncated copies of chromosome 5. Although trisomy 5 does not grossly distort the interphase arrangement of fluorescent-tagged sites on chromosome 5, it may somewhat enhance associations between transgene alleles. Our analysis reveals the complex genomic changes that can occur in aneuploids and underscores the importance of using multiple experimental approaches to investigate how chromosome numerical changes condition abnormal phenotypes and

  5. Comparative analysis and "expression space" coverage of the production of prokaryotic membrane proteins for structural genomics.

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    Surade, Sachin; Klein, Markus; Stolt-Bergner, Peggy C; Muenke, Cornelia; Roy, Ankita; Michel, Hartmut

    2006-09-01

    Membrane proteins comprise up to one-third of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, but only a very small number of membrane protein structures are known. Membrane proteins are challenging targets for structural biology, primarily due to the difficulty in producing and purifying milligram quantities of these proteins. We are evaluating different methods to produce and purify large numbers of prokaryotic membrane proteins for subsequent structural and functional analysis. Here, we present the comparative expression data for 37 target proteins, all of them secondary transporters, from the mesophilic organism Salmonella typhimurium and the two hyperthermophilic organisms Aquifex aeolicus and Pyrococcus furiosus in three different Escherichia coli expression vectors. In addition, we study the use of Lactococcus lactis as a host for integral membrane protein expression. Overall, 78% of the targets were successfully produced under at least one set of conditions. Analysis of these results allows us to assess the role of different variables in increasing "expression space" coverage for our set of targets. This analysis implies that to maximize the number of nonhomologous targets that are expressed, orthologous targets should be chosen and tested in two vectors with different types of promoters, using C-terminal tags. In addition, E. coli is shown to be a robust host for the expression of prokaryotic transporters, and is superior to L. lactis. These results therefore suggest appropriate strategies for high-throughput heterologous overproduction of membrane proteins.

  6. Genomic structure of the human BCCIP gene and its expression in cancer.

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    Meng, Xiangbing; Liu, Jingmei; Shen, Zhiyuan

    2003-01-02

    Human BCCIPalpha (Tok-1alpha) is a BRCA2 and CDKN1A (Cip1, p21) interacting protein. Our previous studies have showed that overexpression of BCCIPalpha inhibits the growth of certain tumor cells [Oncogene 20 (2001) 336]. In this study, we report the genomic structure of the human BCCIP gene, which contains nine exons. Alternative splicing of the 3'-terminal exons produces two isoforms of BCCIP transcripts, BCCIPalpha and BCCIPbeta. The BCCIP gene is flanked by two genes that are transcribed in the opposite orientation of the BCCIP gene. It lies head-to-head and shares a bi-directional promoter with the uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) gene. The last three exons of BCCIP gene overlap the 3'-terminal seven exons of a DEAD/H helicase-like gene (DDX32). Using a matched normal/tumor cDNA array, we identified a reduced expression of BCCIP in kidney tumor, suggesting a role of BCCIP in cancer etiology.

  7. Genomic structure, promoter analysis, and expression of the porcine (Sus scrofa) Mx1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Anne V; Palm, Melanie; Broers, Aurore D; Zezafoun, Hussein; Desmecht, Daniel J-M

    2006-06-01

    Allelic polymorphisms at the mouse Mx1 locus affect the probability of survival after experimental influenzal disease, raising the possibility that marker-assisted selection using the homologous locus could improve the innate resistance of pigs to natural influenza infections. Several issues need to be resolved before efficient large scale screening of the allelic polymorphism at the porcine (Sus scrofa) Mx1 locus can be implemented. First, the Mx1 genomic structure has to be established and sufficient flanking intronic sequences have to be gathered to enable simple PCR amplification of the coding portions of the gene. Then, a basic knowledge of the promoter region needs to be obtained as an allelic variation there can significantly alter absolute levels and/or tissue-specificity of MX protein expression. The results gathered here show that the porcine Mx1 gene and promoter share the major structural and functional characteristics displayed by their homologs described in cattle, mouse, chicken, and man. The crucial function of the proximal interferon-sensitive response elements motif for gene expression is also demonstrated. The sequence data compiled here will allow an extensive analysis of the polymorphisms present among the widest spectrum possible of porcine breeds with the aim to identify an Mx1 allele providing antiviral resistance.

  8. Alpha tubulin genes from Leishmania braziliensis: genomic organization, gene structure and insights on their expression.

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    Ramírez, César A; Requena, José M; Puerta, Concepción J

    2013-07-06

    Alpha tubulin is a fundamental component of the cytoskeleton which is responsible for cell shape and is involved in cell division, ciliary and flagellar motility and intracellular transport. Alpha tubulin gene expression varies according to the morphological changes suffered by Leishmania in its life cycle. However, the objective of studying the mechanisms responsible for the differential expression has resulted to be a difficult task due to the complex genome organization of tubulin genes and to the non-conventional mechanisms of gene regulation operating in Leishmania. We started this work by analyzing the genomic organization of α-tubulin genes in the Leishmania braziliensis genome database. The genomic organization of L. braziliensis α-tubulin genes differs from that existing in the L. major and L. infantum genomes. Two loci containing α-tubulin genes were found in the chromosomes 13 and 29, even though the existence of sequence gaps does not allow knowing the exact number of genes at each locus. Southern blot assays showed that α-tubulin locus at chromosome 13 contains at least 8 gene copies, which are tandemly organized with a 2.08-kb repetition unit; the locus at chromosome 29 seems to contain a sole α-tubulin gene. In addition, it was found that L. braziliensis α-tubulin locus at chromosome 13 contains two types of α-tubulin genes differing in their 3' UTR, each one presumably containing different regulatory motifs. It was also determined that the mRNA expression levels of these genes are controlled by post-transcriptional mechanisms tightly linked to the growth temperature. Moreover, the decrease in the α-tubulin mRNA abundance observed when promastigotes were cultured at 35°C was accompanied by parasite morphology alterations, similar to that occurring during the promastigote to amastigote differentiation. Information found in the genome databases indicates that α-tubulin genes have been reorganized in a drastic manner along Leishmania

  9. Recombinant expression library of Pyrococcus furiosus constructed by high-throughput cloning: a useful tool for functional and structural genomics

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    Hui eYuan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermophile Pyrococcus furiosus grows optimally near 100°C and is an important resource of many industrial and molecular biological enzymes. To study the structure and function of Pyrococcus furiosus proteins at whole genome level, we constructed expression plasmids of each Pyrococcus furiosus gene using a ligase-independent cloning method, which was based on amplifying target gene and vector by PCR using phosphorothioate-modified primers and digesting PCR products by λ exonuclease. Our cloning method had a positive clone percentage of ≥ 80% in 96-well plate cloning format. Small-scale expression experiment showed that 55 out of 80 genes were efficiently expressed in Escherichia coli Strain Rosetta 2(DE3pLysS. In summary, this recombinant expression library of Pyrococcus furiosus provides a platform for functional and structural studies, as well as developing novel industrial enzymes. Our cloning scheme is adaptable to constructing recombinant expression library of other sequenced organisms.

  10. The genomic structure and developmental expression patterns of the human OPA-containing gene (HOPA).

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    Philibert, R A; Winfield, S L; Damschroder-Williams, P; Tengstrom, C; Martin, B M; Ginns, E I

    1999-01-01

    We determined the genomic organization of the human OPA-containing gene (HOPA) and characterized its developmental expression. The gene encoding HOPA, which contains a rare polymorphism tightly associated with non-specific mental retardation, is 25 kb in length and consists of 44 exons. A promoter scan analysis demonstrates two possible transcription initiation sites without TATA boxes upstream from the putative translation initiation start site. Several informative polymorphisms are evident in the sequence including a large pentanucleotide repeat. Northern blot analysis of the gene transcript and its murine orthologue, MOPA-1, demonstrates that only one transcript is expressed throughout the soma and the CNS, and that the transcript is highly expressed during early fetal development. We conclude that the delineation of the function of the HOPA gene locus merits further study.

  11. Gene expression in chicken reveals correlation with structural genomic features and conserved patterns of transcription in the terrestrial vertebrates.

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    Haisheng Nie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chicken is an important agricultural and avian-model species. A survey of gene expression in a range of different tissues will provide a benchmark for understanding expression levels under normal physiological conditions in birds. With expression data for birds being very scant, this benchmark is of particular interest for comparative expression analysis among various terrestrial vertebrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We carried out a gene expression survey in eight major chicken tissues using whole genome microarrays. A global picture of gene expression is presented for the eight tissues, and tissue specific as well as common gene expression were identified. A Gene Ontology (GO term enrichment analysis showed that tissue-specific genes are enriched with GO terms reflecting the physiological functions of the specific tissue, and housekeeping genes are enriched with GO terms related to essential biological functions. Comparisons of structural genomic features between tissue-specific genes and housekeeping genes show that housekeeping genes are more compact. Specifically, coding sequence and particularly introns are shorter than genes that display more variation in expression between tissues, and in addition intergenic space was also shorter. Meanwhile, housekeeping genes are more likely to co-localize with other abundantly or highly expressed genes on the same chromosomal regions. Furthermore, comparisons of gene expression in a panel of five common tissues between birds, mammals and amphibians showed that the expression patterns across tissues are highly similar for orthologous genes compared to random gene pairs within each pair-wise comparison, indicating a high degree of functional conservation in gene expression among terrestrial vertebrates. CONCLUSIONS: The housekeeping genes identified in this study have shorter gene length, shorter coding sequence length, shorter introns, and shorter intergenic regions, there seems

  12. Core histone genes of Giardia intestinalis: genomic organization, promoter structure, and expression

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    Adam Rodney D

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Giardia intestinalis is a protist found in freshwaters worldwide, and is the most common cause of parasitic diarrhea in humans. The phylogenetic position of this parasite is still much debated. Histones are small, highly conserved proteins that associate tightly with DNA to form chromatin within the nucleus. There are two classes of core histone genes in higher eukaryotes: DNA replication-independent histones and DNA replication-dependent ones. Results We identified two copies each of the core histone H2a, H2b and H3 genes, and three copies of the H4 gene, at separate locations on chromosomes 3, 4 and 5 within the genome of Giardia intestinalis, but no gene encoding a H1 linker histone could be recognized. The copies of each gene share extensive DNA sequence identities throughout their coding and 5' noncoding regions, which suggests these copies have arisen from relatively recent gene duplications or gene conversions. The transcription start sites are at triplet A sequences 1–27 nucleotides upstream of the translation start codon for each gene. We determined that a 50 bp region upstream from the start of the histone H4 coding region is the minimal promoter, and a highly conserved 15 bp sequence called the histone motif (him is essential for its activity. The Giardia core histone genes are constitutively expressed at approximately equivalent levels and their mRNAs are polyadenylated. Competition gel-shift experiments suggest that a factor within the protein complex that binds him may also be a part of the protein complexes that bind other promoter elements described previously in Giardia. Conclusion In contrast to other eukaryotes, the Giardia genome has only a single class of core histone genes that encode replication-independent histones. Our inability to locate a gene encoding the linker histone H1 leads us to speculate that the H1 protein may not be required for the compaction of Giardia's small and gene-rich genome.

  13. Informational laws of genome structures

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    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Manca, Vincenzo

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, the analysis of genomes by means of strings of length k occurring in the genomes, called k-mers, has provided important insights into the basic mechanisms and design principles of genome structures. In the present study, we focus on the proper choice of the value of k for applying information theoretic concepts that express intrinsic aspects of genomes. The value k = lg2(n), where n is the genome length, is determined to be the best choice in the definition of some genomic informational indexes that are studied and computed for seventy genomes. These indexes, which are based on information entropies and on suitable comparisons with random genomes, suggest five informational laws, to which all of the considered genomes obey. Moreover, an informational genome complexity measure is proposed, which is a generalized logistic map that balances entropic and anti-entropic components of genomes and is related to their evolutionary dynamics. Finally, applications to computational synthetic biology are briefly outlined.

  14. Structural analysis of the genome of breast cancer cell line ZR-75-30 identifies twelve expressed fusion genes

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    Schulte Ina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has recently emerged that common epithelial cancers such as breast cancers have fusion genes like those in leukaemias. In a representative breast cancer cell line, ZR-75-30, we searched for fusion genes, by analysing genome rearrangements. Results We first analysed rearrangements of the ZR-75-30 genome, to around 10kb resolution, by molecular cytogenetic approaches, combining array painting and array CGH. We then compared this map with genomic junctions determined by paired-end sequencing. Most of the breakpoints found by array painting and array CGH were identified in the paired end sequencing—55% of the unamplified breakpoints and 97% of the amplified breakpoints (as these are represented by more sequence reads. From this analysis we identified 9 expressed fusion genes: APPBP2-PHF20L1, BCAS3-HOXB9, COL14A1-SKAP1, TAOK1-PCGF2, TIAM1-NRIP1, TIMM23-ARHGAP32, TRPS1-LASP1, USP32-CCDC49 and ZMYM4-OPRD1. We also determined the genomic junctions of a further three expressed fusion genes that had been described by others, BCAS3-ERBB2, DDX5-DEPDC6/DEPTOR and PLEC1-ENPP2. Of this total of 12 expressed fusion genes, 9 were in the coamplification. Due to the sensitivity of the technologies used, we estimate these 12 fusion genes to be around two-thirds of the true total. Many of the fusions seem likely to be driver mutations. For example, PHF20L1, BCAS3, TAOK1, PCGF2, and TRPS1 are fused in other breast cancers. HOXB9 and PHF20L1 are members of gene families that are fused in other neoplasms. Several of the other genes are relevant to cancer—in addition to ERBB2, SKAP1 is an adaptor for Src, DEPTOR regulates the mTOR pathway and NRIP1 is an estrogen-receptor coregulator. Conclusions This is the first structural analysis of a breast cancer genome that combines classical molecular cytogenetic approaches with sequencing. Paired-end sequencing was able to detect almost all breakpoints, where there was adequate read depth. It supports

  15. Genomic survey, gene expression analysis and structural modeling suggest diverse roles of DNA methyltransferases in legumes.

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    Rohini Garg

    Full Text Available DNA methylation plays a crucial role in development through inheritable gene silencing. Plants possess three types of DNA methyltransferases (MTases, namely Methyltransferase (MET, Chromomethylase (CMT and Domains Rearranged Methyltransferase (DRM, which maintain methylation at CG, CHG and CHH sites. DNA MTases have not been studied in legumes so far. Here, we report the identification and analysis of putative DNA MTases in five legumes, including chickpea, soybean, pigeonpea, Medicago and Lotus. MTases in legumes could be classified in known MET, CMT, DRM and DNA nucleotide methyltransferases (DNMT2 subfamilies based on their domain organization. First three MTases represent DNA MTases, whereas DNMT2 represents a transfer RNA (tRNA MTase. Structural comparison of all the MTases in plants with known MTases in mammalian and plant systems have been reported to assign structural features in context of biological functions of these proteins. The structure analysis clearly specified regions crucial for protein-protein interactions and regions important for nucleosome binding in various domains of CMT and MET proteins. In addition, structural model of DRM suggested that circular permutation of motifs does not have any effect on overall structure of DNA methyltransferase domain. These results provide valuable insights into role of various domains in molecular recognition and should facilitate mechanistic understanding of their function in mediating specific methylation patterns. Further, the comprehensive gene expression analyses of MTases in legumes provided evidence of their role in various developmental processes throughout the plant life cycle and response to various abiotic stresses. Overall, our study will be very helpful in establishing the specific functions of DNA MTases in legumes.

  16. Genomic survey, gene expression analysis and structural modeling suggest diverse roles of DNA methyltransferases in legumes.

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    Garg, Rohini; Kumari, Romika; Tiwari, Sneha; Goyal, Shweta

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation plays a crucial role in development through inheritable gene silencing. Plants possess three types of DNA methyltransferases (MTases), namely Methyltransferase (MET), Chromomethylase (CMT) and Domains Rearranged Methyltransferase (DRM), which maintain methylation at CG, CHG and CHH sites. DNA MTases have not been studied in legumes so far. Here, we report the identification and analysis of putative DNA MTases in five legumes, including chickpea, soybean, pigeonpea, Medicago and Lotus. MTases in legumes could be classified in known MET, CMT, DRM and DNA nucleotide methyltransferases (DNMT2) subfamilies based on their domain organization. First three MTases represent DNA MTases, whereas DNMT2 represents a transfer RNA (tRNA) MTase. Structural comparison of all the MTases in plants with known MTases in mammalian and plant systems have been reported to assign structural features in context of biological functions of these proteins. The structure analysis clearly specified regions crucial for protein-protein interactions and regions important for nucleosome binding in various domains of CMT and MET proteins. In addition, structural model of DRM suggested that circular permutation of motifs does not have any effect on overall structure of DNA methyltransferase domain. These results provide valuable insights into role of various domains in molecular recognition and should facilitate mechanistic understanding of their function in mediating specific methylation patterns. Further, the comprehensive gene expression analyses of MTases in legumes provided evidence of their role in various developmental processes throughout the plant life cycle and response to various abiotic stresses. Overall, our study will be very helpful in establishing the specific functions of DNA MTases in legumes.

  17. Structure, sequence and expression of the hepatitis delta (δ) viral genome

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    Wang, Kang-Sheng; Choo, Qui-Lim; Weiner, Amy J.; Ou, Jing-Hsiung; Najarian, Richard C.; Thayer, Richard M.; Mullenbach, Guy T.; Denniston, Katherine J.; Gerin, John L.; Houghton, Michael

    1986-10-01

    Biochemical and electron microscopic data indicate that the human hepatitis δ viral agent contains a covalently closed circular and single-stranded RNA genome that has certain similarities with viroid-like agents from plants. The sequence of the viral genome (1,678 nucleotides) has been determined and an open reading frame within the complementary strand has been shown to encode an antigen that binds specifically to antisera from patients with chronic hepatitis δ viral infections.

  18. Characterization of the genomic structure, chromosomal location, promoter, and development expression of the alpha-globin transcription factor CP2.

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    Swendeman, S L; Spielholz, C; Jenkins, N A; Gilbert, D J; Copeland, N G; Sheffery, M

    1994-04-15

    We recently cloned murine and human cDNAs that encode CP2, a cellular transcription factor that interacts with the alpha-globin promoter as well as with additional cellular and viral promoter elements. We have now characterized the genomic structure, chromosome location, promoter, and expression pattern of the factor. Genes for the murine and human mRNAs contained 16 and 15 exons, respectively. Both genes spanned approximately 30 kilobases of chromosomal DNA, and among coding exons, all exon/intron boundaries were conserved. The human gene for CP2 was found to reside on chromosome 12 while the murine gene mapped to the distal end of chromosome 15, near Gdc-1, Wnt-1, and Rarg, a region syntenic with human chromosome 12. The murine and human promoters initiated mRNAs at multiple start sites in a conserved region that spanned more than 450 nucleotides. Lastly, a study of the pattern of CP2 gene expression showed that the factor was expressed in all adult and fetal murine tissues examined from at least day 9.5 of development.

  19. Complete structure, genomic organization, and expression of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, Rafinesque 1818) matrix metalloproteinase-9 gene.

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    Yeh, Hung-Yueh; Klesius, Phillip H

    2008-03-01

    In this study, the channel catfish (CC) matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene was cloned, sequenced, and characterized at both the cDNA and the genomic DNA levels. The complete sequence of the CC MMP-9 cDNA consisted of 2,551 nucleotides, including one open reading frame and 5'- and 3'-end untranslated regions. The open reading frame potentially encoded a 686-amino-acid peptide with a calculated molecular mass (without glycosylation) of approximately 77.4 kDa, which included a signal peptide and potentially heavy O-glycosylation sites. CC MMP-9 did not have the tripeptide Arg-Gly-Asp motif. The degree of conservation of the CC MMP-9 amino acid sequence to human and mouse counterparts was 55%, while to those of other fish species was 67-74%. The full-length CC MMP-9 genomic DNA comprised 5,663 nucleotides, much shorter than human or mouse counterparts. The exon-intron structure followed the splice acceptor/donor consensus rule, and the sequence contained 13 exons. The MMP-9 transcript was constitutively expressed in restrictive CC tissues. This result should provide fundamental information for further exploration of the role of MMP-9 in fish pathophysiology.

  20. Characterization of porcine ENO3: genomic and cDNA structure, polymorphism and expression

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    Xiong Yuanzhu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this study, a full-length cDNA of the porcine ENO3 gene encoding a 434 amino acid protein was isolated. It contains 12 exons over approximately 5.4 kb. Differential splicing in the 5'-untranslated sequence generates two forms of mRNA that differ from each other in the presence or absence of a 142-nucleotide fragment. Expression analysis showed that transcript 1 of ENO3 is highly expressed in liver and lung, while transcript 2 is highly expressed in skeletal muscle and heart. We provide the first evidence that in skeletal muscle expression of ENO3 is different between Yorkshire and Meishan pig breeds. Furthermore, real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that, in Yorkshire pigs, skeletal muscle expression of transcript 1 is identical at postnatal day-1 and at other stages while that of transcript 2 is higher. Moreover, expression of transcript 1 is lower in skeletal muscle and all other tissue samples than that of transcript 2, with the exception of liver and kidney. Statistical analysis showed the existence of a polymorphism in the ENO3 gene between Chinese indigenous and introduced commercial western pig breeds and that it is associated with fat percentage, average backfat thickness, meat marbling and intramuscular fat in two different populations.

  1. National Academy of Sciences and Academy of Sciences of the USSR workshop on structure of the eucaryotic genome and regulation of its expression. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-12-31

    This report provides a brief overview of the Workshop on Structure of the Eukaryotic Genome and Regulation of its Expression held in Tbilisi, Georgia, USSR. The report describes the presentations made at the meeting but also goes on to describe the state of molecular biology and genetics research in the Soviet Union and makes recommendations on how to improve future such meetings.

  2. National Academy of Sciences and Academy of Sciences of the USSR workshop on structure of the eucaryotic genome and regulation of its expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report provides a brief overview of the Workshop on Structure of the Eukaryotic Genome and Regulation of its Expression held in Tbilisi, Georgia, USSR. The report describes the presentations made at the meeting but also goes on to describe the state of molecular biology and genetics research in the Soviet Union and makes recommendations on how to improve future such meetings.

  3. Genome Structure of the Symbiont Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 and Gene Expression Profiling in Response to Lactulose-Derived Oligosaccharides

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    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Moreno, F. Javier; Sanz, María L.; Sanz, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 was isolated from stools of a breast-fed infant. Although, this strain is generally considered an adult-type bifidobacterial species, it has also been shown to have pre-clinical efficacy in obesity models. In order to understand the molecular basis of its adaptation to complex carbohydrates and improve its potential functionality, we have analyzed its genome and transcriptome, as well as its metabolic output when growing in galacto-oligosaccharides derived from lactulose (GOS-Lu) as carbon source. B. pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 shows strain-specific genome regions, including a great diversity of sugar metabolic-related genes. A preliminary and exploratory transcriptome analysis suggests candidate over-expression of several genes coding for sugar transporters and permeases; furthermore, five out of seven beta-galactosidases identified in the genome could be activated in response to GOS-Lu exposure. Here, we also propose that a specific gene cluster is involved in controlling the import and hydrolysis of certain di- and tri-saccharides, which seemed to be those primarily taken-up by the bifidobacterial strain. This was discerned from mass spectrometry-based quantification of different saccharide fractions of culture supernatants. Our results confirm that the expression of genes involved in sugar transport and metabolism and in the synthesis of leucine, an amino acid with a key role in glucose and energy homeostasis, was up-regulated by GOS-Lu. This was done using qPCR in addition to the exploratory information derived from the single-replicated RNAseq approach, together with the functional annotation of genes predicted to be encoded in the B. pseudocatenulatum CETC 7765 genome. PMID:27199952

  4. Genome Structure of the Symbiont Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 and Gene Expression Profiling in Response to Lactulose-Derived Oligosaccharides

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    Alfonso eBenítez-Páez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 was isolated from stools of a breast-fed infant. Although this strain is generally considered an adult-type bifidobacterial species, it has also been shown to have pre-clinical efficacy in obesity models. In order to understand the molecular basis of its adaptation to complex carbohydrates and improve its potential functionality, we have analyzed its genome and transcriptome, as well as its metabolic output when growing in galacto-oligosaccharides derived from lactulose (GOS-Lu as carbon source. B. pseudocatenulatum CECT 7765 shows strain-specific genome regions, including a great diversity of sugar metabolic-related genes. A preliminary and exploratory transcriptome analysis suggests candidate over-expression of several genes coding for sugar transporters and permeases; furthermore, five out of seven beta-galactosidases identified in the genome could be activated in response to GOS-Lu exposure. Here, we also propose that a specific gene cluster is involved in controlling the import and hydrolysis of certain di- and tri-saccharides, which seemed to be those primarily taken-up by the bifidobacterial strain. This was discerned from mass spectrometry-based quantification of different saccharide fractions of culture supernatants. Our results confirm that the expression of genes involved in sugar transport and metabolism and in the synthesis of leucine, an amino acid with a key role in glucose and energy homeostasis, was up-regulated by GOS-Lu. This was done using qPCR in addition to the exploratory information derived from the single-replicated RNAseq approach, together with the functional annotation of genes predicted to be encoded in the B. pseudocatenulatum CETC 7765 genome.

  5. Genomic structure and expression analysis of the RNase kappa family ortholog gene in the insect Ceratitis capitata.

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    Rampias, Theodoros N; Fragoulis, Emmanuel G; Sideris, Diamantis C

    2008-12-01

    Cc RNase is the founding member of the recently identified RNase kappa family, which is represented by a single ortholog in a wide range of animal taxonomic groups. Although the precise biological role of this protein is still unknown, it has been shown that the recombinant proteins isolated so far from the insect Ceratitis capitata and from human exhibit ribonucleolytic activity. In this work, we report the genomic organization and molecular evolution of the RNase kappa gene from various animal species, as well as expression analysis of the ortholog gene in C. capitata. The high degree of amino acid sequence similarity, in combination with the fact that exon sizes and intronic positions are extremely conserved among RNase kappa orthologs in 15 diverse genomes from sea anemone to human, imply a very significant biological function for this enzyme. In C. capitata, two forms of RNase kappa mRNA (0.9 and 1.5 kb) with various lengths of 3' UTR were identified as alternative products of a single gene, resulting from the use of different polyadenylation signals. Both transcripts are expressed in all insect tissues and developmental stages. Sequence analysis of the extended region of the longer transcript revealed the existence of three mRNA instability motifs (AUUUA) and five poly(U) tracts, whose functional importance in RNase kappa mRNA decay remains to be explored.

  6. Insights into structural variations and genome rearrangements in prokaryotic genomes.

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    Periwal, Vinita; Scaria, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Structural variations (SVs) are genomic rearrangements that affect fairly large fragments of DNA. Most of the SVs such as inversions, deletions and translocations have been largely studied in context of genetic diseases in eukaryotes. However, recent studies demonstrate that genome rearrangements can also have profound impact on prokaryotic genomes, leading to altered cell phenotype. In contrast to single-nucleotide variations, SVs provide a much deeper insight into organization of bacterial genomes at a much better resolution. SVs can confer change in gene copy number, creation of new genes, altered gene expression and many other functional consequences. High-throughput technologies have now made it possible to explore SVs at a much refined resolution in bacterial genomes. Through this review, we aim to highlight the importance of the less explored field of SVs in prokaryotic genomes and their impact. We also discuss its potential applicability in the emerging fields of synthetic biology and genome engineering where targeted SVs could serve to create sophisticated and accurate genome editing.

  7. Structural variations in pig genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paudel, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Paudel, Y. (2015). Structural variations in pig genomes. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, the Netherlands Structural variations are chromosomal rearrangements such as insertions-deletions (INDELs), duplications, inversions, translocations, and copy number variations (CNVs

  8. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis and expression of genome segment 7 (S7) of Antheraea mylitta cypovirus (AmCPV) that encodes a viral structural protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavali, Venkata Ramana Murthy; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2007-10-01

    The Genome segment 7 (S7) of the 11 double stranded RNA genomes from Antheraea mylitta cypovirus (AmCPV) was converted to cDNA, cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence showed that segment 7 consisted of 1789 nucleotides with an ORF of 530 amino acids and could encode a protein of approximately 61 kDa, termed P61. The 5' terminal sequence, AGTAAT and the 3' terminal sequence, AGAGC of the plus strand was found to be the same as genome segment 10 of AmCPV encoding polyhedrin. No sequence similarity was found by searching nucleic acid and protein sequence databases using BLAST. The secondary structure prediction showed the presence of 17 alpha-helices, 18 extended beta-sheets along the entire length of P61. The ORF of segment 7 was expressed in E. coli as His-tagged fusion protein, purified through Ni-NTA chromatography, and polyclonal antibody was raised in rabbit indicating that P61 is immunogenic. Immunoblot analysis using this antibody on viral infected cells as well as purified polyhedra showed that P61 is a viral structural protein. Motif scan search showed some similarity of P61 with Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) domain at the C-terminus and it was hypothesized that by binding to single stranded viral RNA through its CBS domain P61 may help in virus replication or transcription.

  9. Structure, expression profile and phylogenetic inference of chalcone isomerase-like genes from the narrow-leafed lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L. genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łucja ePrzysiecka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lupins, like other legumes, have a unique biosynthesis scheme of 5-deoxy-type flavonoids and isoflavonoids. A key enzyme in this pathway is chalcone isomerase (CHI, a member of CHI-fold protein family, encompassing subfamilies of CHI1, CHI2, CHI-like (CHIL, and fatty acid-binding (FAP proteins. Here, two Lupinus angustifolius (narrow-leafed lupin CHILs, LangCHIL1 and LangCHIL2, were identified and characterized using DNA fingerprinting, cytogenetic and linkage mapping, sequencing and expression profiling. Clones carrying CHIL sequences were assembled into two contigs. Full gene sequences were obtained from these contigs, and mapped in two L. angustifolius linkage groups by gene-specific markers. Bacterial artificial chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization approach confirmed the localization of two LangCHIL genes in distinct chromosomes. The expression profiles of both LangCHIL isoforms were very similar. The highest level of transcription was in the roots of the third week of plant growth; thereafter, expression declined. The expression of both LangCHIL genes in leaves and stems was similar and low. Comparative mapping to reference legume genome sequences revealed strong syntenic links; however, LangCHIL2 contig had a much more conserved structure than LangCHIL1. LangCHIL2 is assumed to be an ancestor gene, whereas LangCHIL1 probably appeared as a result of duplication. As both copies are transcriptionally active, questions arise concerning their hypothetical functional divergence. Screening of the narrow-leafed lupin genome and transcriptome with CHI-fold protein sequences, followed by Bayesian inference of phylogeny and cross-genera synteny survey, identified representatives of all but one (CHI1 main subfamilies. They are as follows: two copies of CHI2, FAPa2 and CHIL, and single copies of FAPb and FAPa1. Duplicated genes are remnants of whole genome duplication which is assumed to have occurred after the divergence of Lupinus, Arachis

  10. Human retina-specific amine oxidase: genomic structure of the gene (AOC2), alternatively spliced variant, and mRNA expression in retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Y; Noda, S; Mashima, Y; Kudoh, J; Oguchi, Y; Shimizu, N

    1998-07-15

    Previously, we reported the isolation of cDNA for human retina-specific amine oxidase (RAO) and the expression of RAO exclusively in retina. Bacterial artificial chromosome clones containing the human RAO gene (AOC2) were mapped to human chromosome 17q21 (Imamura et al., 1997, Genomics 40: 277-283). Here, we report the complete genomic structure of the RAO gene, including 5' flanking sequence, and mRNA expression in retina. The human RAO gene spans 6 kb and is composed of four exons corresponding to the amino acid sequence 1-530, 530-598, 598-641, and 642-729 separated by three introns of 3000, 310, and 351 bp. Screening of a human retina cDNA library revealed the existence of an alternatively spliced cDNA variant with an additional 81 bp at the end of exon 2. The sizes of exons and the locations of exon/intron boundaries in the human RAO gene showed remarkable similarity to those of the human kidney diamine oxidase gene (AOC1). In situ hybridization revealed that mRNA coding for RAO is expressed preferentially in the ganglion cell layer of the mouse retina. We designed four sets of PCR primers to amplify four exons, which will be valuable for analyzing mutations in patients with ocular diseases affecting the retinal ganglion cell layer.

  11. Structural Genomics of Protein Phosphatases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almo,S.; Bonanno, J.; Sauder, J.; Emtage, S.; Dilorenzo, T.; Malashkevich, V.; Wasserman, S.; Swaminathan, S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The New York SGX Research Center for Structural Genomics (NYSGXRC) of the NIGMS Protein Structure Initiative (PSI) has applied its high-throughput X-ray crystallographic structure determination platform to systematic studies of all human protein phosphatases and protein phosphatases from biomedically-relevant pathogens. To date, the NYSGXRC has determined structures of 21 distinct protein phosphatases: 14 from human, 2 from mouse, 2 from the pathogen Toxoplasma gondii, 1 from Trypanosoma brucei, the parasite responsible for African sleeping sickness, and 2 from the principal mosquito vector of malaria in Africa, Anopheles gambiae. These structures provide insights into both normal and pathophysiologic processes, including transcriptional regulation, regulation of major signaling pathways, neural development, and type 1 diabetes. In conjunction with the contributions of other international structural genomics consortia, these efforts promise to provide an unprecedented database and materials repository for structure-guided experimental and computational discovery of inhibitors for all classes of protein phosphatases.

  12. Genome structures and halophyte-specific gene expression of the extremophile thellungiella parvula in comparison with Thellungiella salsuginea (Thellungiella halophila) and arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Dongha

    2010-09-10

    The genome of Thellungiella parvula, a halophytic relative of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is being assembled using Roche-454 sequencing. Analyses of a 10-Mb scaffold revealed synteny with Arabidopsis, with recombination and inversion and an uneven distribution of repeat sequences. T. parvula genome structure and DNA sequences were compared with orthologous regions from Arabidopsis and publicly available bacterial artificial chromosome sequences from Thellungiella salsuginea (previously Thellungiella halophila). The three-way comparison of sequences, from one abiotic stress-sensitive species and two tolerant species, revealed extensive sequence conservation and microcolinearity, but grouping Thellungiella species separately from Arabidopsis. However, the T. parvula segments are distinguished from their T. salsuginea counterparts by a pronounced paucity of repeat sequences, resulting in a 30% shorter DNA segment with essentially the same gene content in T. parvula. Among the genes is SALT OVERLY SENSITIVE1 (SOS1), a sodium/proton antiporter, which represents an essential component of plant salinity stress tolerance. Although the SOS1 coding region is highly conserved among all three species, the promoter regions show conservation only between the two Thellungiella species. Comparative transcript analyses revealed higher levels of basal as well as salt-induced SOS1 expression in both Thellungiella species as compared with Arabidopsis. The Thellungiella species and other halophytes share conserved pyrimidine-rich 5\\' untranslated region proximal regions of SOS1 that are missing in Arabidopsis. Completion of the genome structure of T. parvula is expected to highlight distinctive genetic elements underlying the extremophile lifestyle of this species. © American Society of Plant Biologists.

  13. Brewing yeast genomes and genome-wide expression and proteome profiling during fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Katherine A

    2007-11-01

    The genome structure, ancestry and instability of the brewing yeast strains have received considerable attention. The hybrid nature of brewing lager yeast strains provides adaptive potential but yields genome instability which can adversely affect fermentation performance. The requirement to differentiate between production strains and assess master cultures for genomic instability has led to significant adoption of specialized molecular tool kits by the industry. Furthermore, the development of genome-wide transcriptional and protein expression technologies has generated significant interest from brewers. The opportunity presented to explore, and the concurrent requirement to understand both, the constraints and potential of their strains to generate existing and new products during fermentation is discussed.

  14. Gene Expression in Chicken Reveals Correlation with Structural Genomic Features and Conserved Patterns of Transcription in the Terrestrial Vertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nie, H.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Lammers, A.; Schothorst, van E.M.; Keijer, J.; Neerincx, P.; Leunissen, J.A.M.; Megens, H.J.W.C.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The chicken is an important agricultural and avian-model species. A survey of gene expression in a range of different tissues will provide a benchmark for understanding expression levels under normal physiological conditions in birds. With expression data for birds being very scant, thi

  15. Ligninolytic peroxidase genes in the oyster mushroom genome: heterologous expression, molecular structure, catalytic and stability properties, and lignin-degrading ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The genome of Pleurotus ostreatus, an important edible mushroom and a model ligninolytic organism of interest in lignocellulose biorefineries due to its ability to delignify agricultural wastes, was sequenced with the purpose of identifying and characterizing the enzymes responsible for lignin degradation. Results Heterologous expression of the class II peroxidase genes, followed by kinetic studies, enabled their functional classification. The resulting inventory revealed the absence of lignin peroxidases (LiPs) and the presence of three versatile peroxidases (VPs) and six manganese peroxidases (MnPs), the crystal structures of two of them (VP1 and MnP4) were solved at 1.0 to 1.1 Å showing significant structural differences. Gene expansion supports the importance of both peroxidase types in the white-rot lifestyle of this fungus. Using a lignin model dimer and synthetic lignin, we showed that VP is able to degrade lignin. Moreover, the dual Mn-mediated and Mn-independent activity of P. ostreatus MnPs justifies their inclusion in a new peroxidase subfamily. The availability of the whole POD repertoire enabled investigation, at a biochemical level, of the existence of duplicated genes. Differences between isoenzymes are not limited to their kinetic constants. Surprising differences in their activity T50 and residual activity at both acidic and alkaline pH were observed. Directed mutagenesis and spectroscopic/structural information were combined to explain the catalytic and stability properties of the most interesting isoenzymes, and their evolutionary history was analyzed in the context of over 200 basidiomycete peroxidase sequences. Conclusions The analysis of the P. ostreatus genome shows a lignin-degrading system where the role generally played by LiP has been assumed by VP. Moreover, it enabled the first characterization of the complete set of peroxidase isoenzymes in a basidiomycete, revealing strong differences in stability properties and providing

  16. Stem-loop structures in prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boccia Angelo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of secondary structures in the expressed sequences of bacterial genomes allows to investigate spontaneous folding of the corresponding RNA. This is particularly relevant in untranslated mRNA regions, where base pairing is less affected by interactions with the translation machinery. Relatively large stem-loops significantly contribute to the formation of more complex secondary structures, often important for the activity of sequence elements controlling gene expression. Results Systematic analysis of the distribution of stem-loop structures (SLSs in 40 wholly-sequenced bacterial genomes is presented. SLSs were searched as stems measuring at least 12 bp, bordering loops 5 to 100 nt in length. G-U pairing in the stems was allowed. SLSs found in natural genomes are constantly more numerous and stable than those expected to randomly form in sequences of comparable size and composition. The large majority of SLSs fall within protein-coding regions but enrichment of specific, non random, SLS sub-populations of higher stability was observed within the intergenic regions of the chromosomes of several species. In low-GC firmicutes, most higher stability intergenic SLSs resemble canonical rho-independent transcriptional terminators, but very frequently feature at the 5'-end an additional A-rich stretch complementary to the 3' uridines. In all species, a clearly biased SLS distribution was observed within the intergenic space, with most concentrating at the 3'-end side of flanking CDSs. Some intergenic SLS regions are members of novel repeated sequence families. Conclusion In depth analysis of SLS features and distribution in 40 different bacterial genomes showed the presence of non random populations of such structures in all species. Many of these structures are plausibly transcribed, and might be involved in the control of transcription termination, or might serve as RNA elements which can enhance either the stability or

  17. Stem-loop structures in prokaryotic genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrillo, Mauro; Silvestro, Giustina; Di Nocera, Pier Paolo; Boccia, Angelo; Paolella, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Background Prediction of secondary structures in the expressed sequences of bacterial genomes allows to investigate spontaneous folding of the corresponding RNA. This is particularly relevant in untranslated mRNA regions, where base pairing is less affected by interactions with the translation machinery. Relatively large stem-loops significantly contribute to the formation of more complex secondary structures, often important for the activity of sequence elements controlling gene expression. Results Systematic analysis of the distribution of stem-loop structures (SLSs) in 40 wholly-sequenced bacterial genomes is presented. SLSs were searched as stems measuring at least 12 bp, bordering loops 5 to 100 nt in length. G-U pairing in the stems was allowed. SLSs found in natural genomes are constantly more numerous and stable than those expected to randomly form in sequences of comparable size and composition. The large majority of SLSs fall within protein-coding regions but enrichment of specific, non random, SLS sub-populations of higher stability was observed within the intergenic regions of the chromosomes of several species. In low-GC firmicutes, most higher stability intergenic SLSs resemble canonical rho-independent transcriptional terminators, but very frequently feature at the 5'-end an additional A-rich stretch complementary to the 3' uridines. In all species, a clearly biased SLS distribution was observed within the intergenic space, with most concentrating at the 3'-end side of flanking CDSs. Some intergenic SLS regions are members of novel repeated sequence families. Conclusion In depth analysis of SLS features and distribution in 40 different bacterial genomes showed the presence of non random populations of such structures in all species. Many of these structures are plausibly transcribed, and might be involved in the control of transcription termination, or might serve as RNA elements which can enhance either the stability or the turnover of cotranscribed

  18. 2004 Structural, Function and Evolutionary Genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas L. Brutlag Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    This Gordon conference will cover the areas of structural, functional and evolutionary genomics. It will take a systematic approach to genomics, examining the evolution of proteins, protein functional sites, protein-protein interactions, regulatory networks, and metabolic networks. Emphasis will be placed on what we can learn from comparative genomics and entire genomes and proteomes.

  19. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  20. Regulation of methane genes and genome expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John N. Reeve

    2009-09-09

    At the start of this project, it was known that methanogens were Archaeabacteria (now Archaea) and were therefore predicted to have gene expression and regulatory systems different from Bacteria, but few of the molecular biology details were established. The goals were then to establish the structures and organizations of genes in methanogens, and to develop the genetic technologies needed to investigate and dissect methanogen gene expression and regulation in vivo. By cloning and sequencing, we established the gene and operon structures of all of the “methane” genes that encode the enzymes that catalyze methane biosynthesis from carbon dioxide and hydrogen. This work identified unique sequences in the methane gene that we designated mcrA, that encodes the largest subunit of methyl-coenzyme M reductase, that could be used to identify methanogen DNA and establish methanogen phylogenetic relationships. McrA sequences are now the accepted standard and used extensively as hybridization probes to identify and quantify methanogens in environmental research. With the methane genes in hand, we used northern blot and then later whole-genome microarray hybridization analyses to establish how growth phase and substrate availability regulated methane gene expression in Methanobacterium thermautotrophicus ΔH (now Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus). Isoenzymes or pairs of functionally equivalent enzymes catalyze several steps in the hydrogen-dependent reduction of carbon dioxide to methane. We established that hydrogen availability determine which of these pairs of methane genes is expressed and therefore which of the alternative enzymes is employed to catalyze methane biosynthesis under different environmental conditions. As were unable to establish a reliable genetic system for M. thermautotrophicus, we developed in vitro transcription as an alternative system to investigate methanogen gene expression and regulation. This led to the discovery that an archaeal protein

  1. Genomic structure and expression of Jmjd6 and evolutionary analysis in the context of related JmjC domain containing proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edler Stefanie

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The jumonji C (JmjC domain containing gene 6 (Jmjd6, previously known as phosphatidylserine receptor has misleadingly been annotated to encode a transmembrane receptor for the engulfment of apoptotic cells. Given the importance of JmjC domain containing proteins in controlling a wide range of diverse biological functions, we undertook a comparative genomic analysis to gain further insights in Jmjd6 gene organisation, evolution, and protein function. Results We describe here a semiautomated computational pipeline to identify and annotate JmjC domain containing proteins. Using a sequence segment N-terminal of the Jmjd6 JmjC domain as query for a reciprocal BLAST search, we identified homologous sequences in 62 species across all major phyla. Retrieved Jmjd6 sequences were used to phylogenetically analyse corresponding loci and their genomic neighbourhood. This analysis let to the identification and characterisation of a bi-directional transcriptional unit compromising the Jmjd6 and 1110005A03Rik genes and to the recognition of a new, before overseen Jmjd6 exon in mammals. Using expression studies, two novel Jmjd6 splice variants were identified and validated in vivo. Analysis of the Jmjd6 neighbouring gene 1110005A03Rik revealed an incident deletion of this gene in two out of three earlier reported Jmjd6 knockout mice, which might affect previously described conflicting phenotypes. To determine potentially important residues for Jmjd6 function a structural model of the Jmjd6 protein was calculated based on sequence conservation. This approach identified a conserved double-stranded β-helix (DSBH fold and a HxDxnH facial triad as structural motifs. Moreover, our systematic annotation in nine species identified 313 DSBH fold-containing proteins that split into 25 highly conserved subgroups. Conclusion We give further evidence that Jmjd6 most likely has a function as a nonheme-Fe(II-2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase as

  2. Structural Genomics of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong-Hae; Kim, Rosalind; Adams, Paul; Chandonia, John-Marc

    2007-09-14

    The initial objective of the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center was to obtain a near complete three-dimensional (3D) structural information of all soluble proteins of two minimal organisms, closely related pathogens Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae. The former has fewer than 500 genes and the latter has fewer than 700 genes. A semiautomated structural genomics pipeline was set up from target selection, cloning, expression, purification, and ultimately structural determination. At the time of this writing, structural information of more than 93percent of all soluble proteins of M. genitalium is avail able. This chapter summarizes the approaches taken by the authors' center.

  3. Rapid expression of functional genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodrow, Kim A; Airen, Isoken O; Swartz, James R

    2006-12-01

    Genomic-scale analysis of protein function is currently limited by the ability to rapidly express the enormous diversity of protein targets in their active form. We describe a method to construct transcriptionally active expression templates (ETs) in parallel using a single PCR step wherein the overlap-extension reaction for addition of transcription regulatory elements is separated from the amplification of the full-length product by using a GC-rich single primer. Over 90% of 55 diverse genomic targets were extended with T7 regulatory elements to form ETs in high yield and purity. The unpurified ETs directed protein expression using a cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) system supplemented with cofactors and metal ions to activate a variety of enzymes. Higher activities were obtained in the modified CFPS reactions compared to standard reaction conditions. Protein purification was avoided because the expressed enzyme activity was significantly greater than the background activity associated with the cell extract. These improvements in the parallel synthesis of linear ETs combined with enhanced in vitro enzyme activation help to make CFPS systems more attractive platforms for high-throughput evaluation of protein function.

  4. Genomics technologies to study structural variations in the grapevine genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardone Maria Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Grapevine is one of the most important crop plants in the world. Recently there was great expansion of genomics resources about grapevine genome, thus providing increasing efforts for molecular breeding. Current cultivars display a great level of inter-specific differentiation that needs to be investigated to reach a comprehensive understanding of the genetic basis of phenotypic differences, and to find responsible genes selected by cross breeding programs. While there have been significant advances in resolving the pattern and nature of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs on plant genomes, few data are available on copy number variation (CNV. Furthermore association between structural variations and phenotypes has been described in only a few cases. We combined high throughput biotechnologies and bioinformatics tools, to reveal the first inter-varietal atlas of structural variation (SV for the grapevine genome. We sequenced and compared four table grape cultivars with the Pinot noir inbred line PN40024 genome as the reference. We detected roughly 8% of the grapevine genome affected by genomic variations. Taken into account phenotypic differences existing among the studied varieties we performed comparison of SVs among them and the reference and next we performed an in-depth analysis of gene content of polymorphic regions. This allowed us to identify genes showing differences in copy number as putative functional candidates for important traits in grapevine cultivation.

  5. Genomic Organization and Expression in E. coli of Zebrafish Terra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵知行; 华正春; 孟安明

    2001-01-01

    Zebrafish terra encodes a transcription factor that is specifically expressed in developing somites.Previous studies suggested that this gene is involved in vertebrate somitogenesis. In this study, the genomic DNA of terra locus was isolated and its organization was investigated. The analysis showed that terra locus consists of 3 introns and occupies 3154 bp in the genome of zebrafish. The exon-intron junctions of the second and third introns conform to the GT-AG rule, while the first intron has the unusual junction sequences of GT-AC. An IPTG-inducible expression system was established to produce terra protein in bacterial cells. Overexpression of terra protein leads to the formation of inclusion bodies in the bacterial ceils. The protein will be used to study its structure and function.

  6. Identification of the major structural and nonstructural proteins encoded by human parvovirus B19 and mapping of their genes by procaryotic expression of isolated genomic fragments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotmore, S.F.; McKie, V.C.; Anderson, L.J.; Astell, C.R.; Tattersall, P.

    1986-11-01

    Plasma from a child with homozygous sickle-cell disease, sampled during the early phase of an aplastic crisis, contained human parvovirus B19 virions. Plasma taken 10 days later (during the convalescent phase) contained both immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies directed against two viral polypeptides with apparent molecular weights for 83,000 and 58,000 which were present exclusively in the particulate fraction of the plasma taken during the acute phase. These two protein species comigrated at 110S on neutral sucrose velocity gradients with the B19 viral DNA and thus appear to constitute the viral capsid polypeptides. The B19 genome was molecularly cloned into a bacterial plasmid vector. Two expression constructs containing B19 sequences from different halves of the viral genome were obtained, which directed the synthesis, in bacteria, of segments of virally encoded protein. These polypeptide fragments were then purified and used to immunize rabbits. Antibodies against a protein sequence specified between nucleotides 2897 and 3749 recognized both the 83- and 58-kilodalton capsid polypeptides in aplastic plasma taken during the acute phase and detected similar proteins in the similar proteins in the tissues of a stillborn fetus which had been infected transplacentally with B19. Antibodies against a protein sequence encoded in the other half of the B19 genome (nucleotides 1072 through 2044) did not react specifically with any protein in plasma taken during the acute phase but recognized three nonstructural polypeptides of 71, 63, and 52 kilodaltons present in the liver and, at lower levels, in some other tissues of the transplacentally infected fetus.

  7. Genomic structure of the α-amylase gene in the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata and its expression in response to salinity and food concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guiju; Guo, Yihui; Li, Lu; Fan, Sigang; Yu, Ziniu; Yu, Dahui

    2016-08-01

    Amylase is one of the most important digestive enzymes for phytophagous animals. In this study, the cDNA, genomic DNA, and promoter region of the α-amylase gene of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata were cloned by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), rapid amplification of cDNA ends, and genome-walking methods. The full-length cDNA sequence was 1704bp long and consisted of a 5'-untranslated region of 17bp, a 3'-untranslated region of 118bp, and a 1569-bp open reading frame encoding a 522-aa polypeptide with a 20-aa signal peptide. Sequence alignment revealed that P. fucata α-amylase (Pfamy) shared the highest identity (91.6%) with Pinctada maxima. The phylogenetic tree showed that it was closely related to P. maxima, based on the amino acid sequences. The genomic DNA was 10850bp and contained nine exons, eight introns, and a promoter region of 3932bp. Several transcriptional factors such as GATA-1, AP-1, and SP1 were predicted in the promoter region. Quantitative RT-PCR assay indicated that the relative expression level of Pfamy was significantly higher in the digestive gland than in other tissues (gonad, gills, muscle, and mantle) (Pfood concentration was 16×10(4)cells/mL, which was significantly lower than the level observed at 8×10(4)cells/mL and 20×10(4) cells/mL (P<0.05). Our findings provide a genetic basis for further research on Pfamy activity and will facilitate studies on the growth mechanisms and genetic improvement of the pearl oyster P. fucata. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Structural and functional analysis of rice genome

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Akhilesh K. Tyagi; Jitendra P. Khurana; Paramjit Khurana; Saurabh Raghuvanshi; Anupama Gaur; Anita Kapur; Vikrant Gupta; Dibyendu Kumar; V. Ravi; Shubha Vij; Parul Khurana; Sulabha Sharma

    2004-04-01

    Rice is an excellent system for plant genomics as it represents a modest size genome of 430 Mb. It feeds more than half the population of the world. Draft sequences of the rice genome, derived by whole-genome shotgun approach at relatively low coverage (4–6 X), were published and the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP) declared high quality (>10 X), genetically anchored, phase 2 level sequence in 2002. In addition, phase 3 level finished sequence of chromosomes 1, 4 and 10 (out of 12 chromosomes of rice) has already been reported by scientists from IRGSP consortium. Various estimates of genes in rice place the number at > 50,000. Already, over 28,000 full-length cDNAs have been sequenced, most of which map to genetically anchored genome sequence. Such information is very useful in revealing novel features of macro- and micro-level synteny of rice genome with other cereals. Microarray analysis is unraveling the identity of rice genes expressing in temporal and spatial manner and should help target candidate genes useful for improving traits of agronomic importance. Simultaneously, functional analysis of rice genome has been initiated by marker-based characterization of useful genes and employing functional knock-outs created by mutation or gene tagging. Integration of this enormous information is expected to catalyze tremendous activity on basic and applied aspects of rice genomics.

  9. Structural genomics of eukaryotic targets at a laboratory scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busso, Didier; Poussin-Courmontagne, Pierre; Rosé, David; Ripp, Raymond; Litt, Alain; Thierry, Jean-Claude; Moras, Dino

    2005-01-01

    Structural genomics programs are distributed worldwide and funded by large institutions such as the NIH in United-States, the RIKEN in Japan or the European Commission through the SPINE network in Europe. Such initiatives, essentially managed by large consortia, led to technology and method developments at the different steps required to produce biological samples compatible with structural studies. Besides specific applications, method developments resulted mainly upon miniaturization and parallelization. The challenge that academic laboratories faces to pursue structural genomics programs is to produce, at a higher rate, protein samples. The Structural Biology and Genomics Department (IGBMC - Illkirch - France) is implicated in a structural genomics program of high eukaryotes whose goal is solving crystal structures of proteins and their complexes (including large complexes) related to human health and biotechnology. To achieve such a challenging goal, the Department has established a medium-throughput pipeline for producing protein samples suitable for structural biology studies. Here, we describe the setting up of our initiative from cloning to crystallization and we demonstrate that structural genomics may be manageable by academic laboratories by strategic investments in robotic and by adapting classical bench protocols and new developments, in particular in the field of protein expression, to parallelization.

  10. Genome-wide expression profiling of complex regional pain syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Heui Jin

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a chronic, progressive, and devastating pain syndrome characterized by spontaneous pain, hyperalgesia, allodynia, altered skin temperature, and motor dysfunction. Although previous gene expression profiling studies have been conducted in animal pain models, there genome-wide expression profiling in the whole blood of CRPS patients has not been reported yet. Here, we successfully identified certain pain-related genes through genome-wide expression profiling in the blood from CRPS patients. We found that 80 genes were differentially expressed between 4 CRPS patients (2 CRPS I and 2 CRPS II and 5 controls (cut-off value: 1.5-fold change and p<0.05. Most of those genes were associated with signal transduction, developmental processes, cell structure and motility, and immunity and defense. The expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class I A subtype (HLA-A29.1, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9, alanine aminopeptidase N (ANPEP, l-histidine decarboxylase (HDC, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor 3 receptor (G-CSF3R, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 genes selected from the microarray were confirmed in 24 CRPS patients and 18 controls by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. We focused on the MMP9 gene that, by qRT-PCR, showed a statistically significant difference in expression in CRPS patients compared to controls with the highest relative fold change (4.0±1.23 times and p = 1.4×10(-4. The up-regulation of MMP9 gene in the blood may be related to the pain progression in CRPS patients. Our findings, which offer a valuable contribution to the understanding of the differential gene expression in CRPS may help in the understanding of the pathophysiology of CRPS pain progression.

  11. ProGenExpress: Visualization of quantitative data on prokaryotic genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Michael

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The integration of genomic information with quantitative experimental data is a key component of systems biology. An increasing number of microbial genomes are being sequenced, leading to an increasing amount of data from post-genomics technologies. The genomes of prokaryotes contain many structures of interest, such as operons, pathogenicity islands and prophage sequences, whose behaviour is of interest during infection and disease. There is a need for simple and novel tools to display and analyse data from these integrated datasets, and we have developed ProGenExpress as a tool for visualising arbitrarily complex numerical data in the context of prokaryotic genomes. Results Here we describe ProGenExpress, an R package that allows researchers to easily and quickly visualize quantitative measurements, such as those produced by microarray experiments, in the context of the genome organization of sequenced prokaryotes. Data from microarrays, proteomics or other whole-genome technologies can be accurately displayed on the genome. ProGenExpress can also search for novel regions of interest that consist of groups of adjacent genes that show similar patterns across the experimental data set. We demonstrate ProGenExpress with microarray data from a time-course experiment involving Salmonella typhimurium. Conclusion ProGenExpress can be used to visualize quantitative data from complex experiments in the context of the genome of sequenced prokaryotes, and to find novel regions of interest.

  12. Genomic structure, chromosomal localization and expression profile of a novel melanoma differentiation associated (mda-7) gene with cancer specific growth suppressing and apoptosis inducing properties.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, E. Y.; Madireddi, M. T.; Gopalkrishnan, R. V.; Leszczyniecka, M.; Su, Z. Z.; Lebedeva, I. V.; Kang, D. C.; Jian, H.; Lin, J. J.; Alexandre, D.; Chen, Y.; Vozhilla, N.; Mei, M. X.; Christiansen, K. A.; Sivo, F.; Goldstein, N. I.; Chada, S.; Huberman, E.; Pestka, S.; Fisher, P. B.; Biochip Technology Center; Columbia Univ.; Introgen Therapeutics Inc.; UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School

    2001-10-25

    Abnormalities in cellular differentiation are frequent occurrences in human cancers. Treatment of human melanoma cells with recombinant fibroblast interferon (IFN-beta) and the protein kinase C activator mezerein (MEZ) results in an irreversible loss in growth potential, suppression of tumorigenic properties and induction of terminal cell differentiation. Subtraction hybridization identified melanoma differentiation associated gene-7 (mda-7), as a gene induced during these physiological changes in human melanoma cells. Ectopic expression of mda-7 by means of a replication defective adenovirus results in growth suppression and induction of apoptosis in a broad spectrum of additional cancers, including melanoma, glioblastoma multiforme, osteosarcoma and carcinomas of the breast, cervix, colon, lung, nasopharynx and prostate. In contrast, no apparent harmful effects occur when mda-7 is expressed in normal epithelial or fibroblast cells. Human clones of mda-7 were isolated and its organization resolved in terms of intron/exon structure and chromosomal localization. Hu-mda-7 encompasses seven exons and six introns and encodes a protein with a predicted size of 23.8 kDa, consisting of 206 amino acids. Hu-mda-7 mRNA is stably expressed in the thymus, spleen and peripheral blood leukocytes. De novo mda-7 mRNA expression is also detected in human melanocytes and expression is inducible in cells of melanocyte/melanoma lineage and in certain normal and cancer cell types following treatment with a combination of IFN-beta plus MEZ. Mda-7 expression is also induced during megakaryocyte differentiation induced in human hematopoietic cells by treatment with TPA (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate). In contrast, de novo expression of mda-7 is not detected nor is it inducible by IFN-beta+MEZ in a spectrum of additional normal and cancer cells. No correlation was observed between induction of mda-7 mRNA expression and growth suppression following treatment with IFN-beta+MEZ and

  13. Towards a comprehensive structural coverage of completed genomes: a structural genomics viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orengo Christine A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural genomics initiatives were established with the aim of solving protein structures on a large-scale. For many initiatives, such as the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI, the primary aim of target selection is focussed towards structurally characterising protein families which, so far, lack a structural representative. It is therefore of considerable interest to gain insights into the number and distribution of these families, and what efforts may be required to achieve a comprehensive structural coverage across all protein families. Results In this analysis we have derived a comprehensive domain annotation of the genomes using CATH, Pfam-A and Newfam domain families. We consider what proportions of structurally uncharacterised families are accessible to high-throughput structural genomics pipelines, specifically those targeting families containing multiple prokaryotic orthologues. In measuring the domain coverage of the genomes, we show the benefits of selecting targets from both structurally uncharacterised domain families, whilst in addition, pursuing additional targets from large structurally characterised protein superfamilies. Conclusion This work suggests that such a combined approach to target selection is essential if structural genomics is to achieve a comprehensive structural coverage of the genomes, leading to greater insights into structure and the mechanisms that underlie protein evolution.

  14. The structural biology and genomics platform in strasbourg: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busso, Didier; Thierry, Jean-Claude; Moras, Dino

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes the modules and facilities of the Structural Biology and Genomics Platform (SBGP), Strasbourg, France. The platform consists of three modules (cloning, mini-expression screening; optimization-large scale protein production; characterization, crystallization) with dedicated scientists, and other facilities for purifying recombinant proteins and solving three-dimensional (3D) structures. Strong collaborations have been established with the Integrative Bioinformatics and Genomics group, located in the same institition, for target selection and domains definition. To handle large numbers of samples, classical and new protocols were adapted to automation, increasing reproducibility and reducing error risks as well. Using the platform and its facilities, over 2,000 expression vectors have been constructed and more than 40 novel structures, of mostly human proteins, have been solved.

  15. Phenotypic impact of genomic structural variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Symmons, Orsolya; Spitz, François;

    2013-01-01

    Genomic structural variants have long been implicated in phenotypic diversity and human disease, but dissecting the mechanisms by which they exert their functional impact has proven elusive. Recently however, developments in high-throughput DNA sequencing and chromosomal engineering technology have...... facilitated the analysis of structural variants in human populations and model systems in unprecedented detail. In this Review, we describe how structural variants can affect molecular and cellular processes, leading to complex organismal phenotypes, including human disease. We further present advances...

  16. Genome engineering and gene expression control for bacterial strain development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chan Woo; Lee, Joungmin; Lee, Sang Yup

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, a number of techniques and tools have been developed for genome engineering and gene expression control to achieve desired phenotypes of various bacteria. Here we review and discuss the recent advances in bacterial genome manipulation and gene expression control techniques, and their actual uses with accompanying examples. Genome engineering has been commonly performed based on homologous recombination. During such genome manipulation, the counterselection systems employing SacB or nucleases have mainly been used for the efficient selection of desired engineered strains. The recombineering technology enables simple and more rapid manipulation of the bacterial genome. The group II intron-mediated genome engineering technology is another option for some bacteria that are difficult to be engineered by homologous recombination. Due to the increasing demands on high-throughput screening of bacterial strains having the desired phenotypes, several multiplex genome engineering techniques have recently been developed and validated in some bacteria. Another approach to achieve desired bacterial phenotypes is the repression of target gene expression without the modification of genome sequences. This can be performed by expressing antisense RNA, small regulatory RNA, or CRISPR RNA to repress target gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. All of these techniques allow efficient and rapid development and screening of bacterial strains having desired phenotypes, and more advanced techniques are expected to be seen.

  17. Structural biology sheds light on the puzzle of genomic ORFans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siew, Naomi; Fischer, Daniel

    2004-09-10

    Genomic ORFans are orphan open reading frames (ORFs) with no significant sequence similarity to other ORFs. ORFans comprise 20-30% of the ORFs of most completely sequenced genomes. Because nothing can be learnt about ORFans via sequence homology, the functions and evolutionary origins of ORFans remain a mystery. Furthermore, because relatively few ORFans have been experimentally characterized, it has been suggested that most ORFans are not likely to correspond to functional, expressed proteins, but rather to spurious ORFs, pseudo-genes or to rapidly evolving proteins with non-essential roles. As a snapshot view of current ORFan structural studies, we searched for ORFans among proteins whose three-dimensional structures have been recently determined. We find that functional and structural studies of ORFans are not as underemphasized as previously suggested. These recently determined structures correspond to ORFans from all Kingdoms of life, and include proteins that have previously been functionally characterized, as well as structural genomics targets of unknown function labeled as "hypothetical proteins". This suggests that many of the ORFans in the databases are likely to correspond to expressed, functional (and even essential) proteins. Furthermore, the recently determined structures include examples of the various types of ORFans, suggesting that the functions and evolutionary origins of ORFans are diverse. Although this survey sheds some light on the ORFan mystery, further experimental studies are required to gain a better understanding of the role and origins of the tens of thousands of ORFans awaiting characterization.

  18. Using Genomics for Natural Product Structure Elucidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tietz, Jonathan I; Mitchell, Douglas A

    2016-01-01

    Natural products (NPs) are the most historically bountiful source of chemical matter for drug development-especially for anti-infectives. With insights gleaned from genome mining, interest in natural product discovery has been reinvigorated. An essential stage in NP discovery is structural elucidation, which sheds light not only on the chemical composition of a molecule but also its novelty, properties, and derivatization potential. The history of structure elucidation is replete with techniquebased revolutions: combustion analysis, crystallography, UV, IR, MS, and NMR have each provided game-changing advances; the latest such advance is genomics. All natural products have a genetic basis, and the ability to obtain and interpret genomic information for structure elucidation is increasingly available at low cost to non-specialists. In this review, we describe the value of genomics as a structural elucidation technique, especially from the perspective of the natural product chemist approaching an unknown metabolite. Herein we first introduce the databases and programs of interest to the natural products chemist, with an emphasis on those currently most suited for general usability. We describe strategies for linking observed natural product-linked phenotypes to their corresponding gene clusters. We then discuss techniques for extracting structural information from genes, illustrated with numerous case examples. We also provide an analysis of the biases and limitations of the field with recommendations for future development. Our overview is not only aimed at biologically-oriented researchers already at ease with bioinformatic techniques, but also, in particular, at natural product, organic, and/or medicinal chemists not previously familiar with genomic techniques.

  19. A data management system for structural genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Toole Nicholas

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural genomics (SG projects aim to determine thousands of protein structures by the development of high-throughput techniques for all steps of the experimental structure determination pipeline. Crucial to the success of such endeavours is the careful tracking and archiving of experimental and external data on protein targets. Results We have developed a sophisticated data management system for structural genomics. Central to the system is an Oracle-based, SQL-interfaced database. The database schema deals with all facets of the structure determination process, from target selection to data deposition. Users access the database via any web browser. Experimental data is input by users with pre-defined web forms. Data can be displayed according to numerous criteria. A list of all current target proteins can be viewed, with links for each target to associated entries in external databases. To avoid unnecessary work on targets, our data management system matches protein sequences weekly using BLAST to entries in the Protein Data Bank and to targets of other SG centers worldwide. Conclusion Our system is a working, effective and user-friendly data management tool for structural genomics projects. In this report we present a detailed summary of the various capabilities of the system, using real target data as examples, and indicate our plans for future enhancements.

  20. Interrogating the druggable genome with structural informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambly, Kevin; Danzer, Joseph; Muskal, Steven; Debe, Derek A

    2006-08-01

    Structural genomics projects are producing protein structure data at an unprecedented rate. In this paper, we present the Target Informatics Platform (TIP), a novel structural informatics approach for amplifying the rapidly expanding body of experimental protein structure information to enhance the discovery and optimization of small molecule protein modulators on a genomic scale. In TIP, existing experimental structure information is augmented using a homology modeling approach, and binding sites across multiple target families are compared using a clique detection algorithm. We report here a detailed analysis of the structural coverage for the set of druggable human targets, highlighting drug target families where the level of structural knowledge is currently quite high, as well as those areas where structural knowledge is sparse. Furthermore, we demonstrate the utility of TIP's intra- and inter-family binding site similarity analysis using a series of retrospective case studies. Our analysis underscores the utility of a structural informatics infrastructure for extracting drug discovery-relevant information from structural data, aiding researchers in the identification of lead discovery and optimization opportunities as well as potential "off-target" liabilities.

  1. Online resources for genomic structural variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneddon, Tam P; Church, Deanna M

    2012-01-01

    Genomic structural variation (SV) can be thought of on a continuum from a single base pair insertion/deletion (INDEL) to large megabase-scale rearrangements involving insertions, deletions, duplications, inversions, or translocations of whole chromosomes or chromosome arms. These variants can occur in coding or noncoding DNA, they can be inherited or arise sporadically in the germline or somatic cells. Many of these events are segregating in the population and can be considered common alleles while others are new alleles and thus rare events. All species studied to date harbor structural variants and these may be benign, contributing to phenotypes such as sensory perception and immunity, or pathogenic resulting in genomic disorders including DiGeorge/velocardiofacial, Smith-Margenis, Williams-Beuren, and Prader-Willi syndromes. As structural variants are identified, validated, and their significance, origin, and prevalence are elucidated, it is of critical importance that these data be collected and collated in a way that can be easily accessed and analyzed. This chapter describes current structural variation online resources (see Fig. 1 and Table 1), highlights the challenges in capturing, storing, and displaying SV data, and discusses how dbVar and DGVa, the genomic structural variation databases developed at NCBI and EBI, respectively, were designed to address these issues.

  2. Practical applications of structural genomics technologies for mutagen research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemla, Adam; Segelke, Brent W

    2011-06-17

    Here we present a perspective on a range of practical uses of structural genomics for mutagen research. Structural genomics is an overloaded term and requires some definition to bound the discussion; we give a brief description of public and private structural genomics endeavors, along with some of their objectives, their activities, their capabilities, and their limitations. We discuss how structural genomics might impact mutagen research in three different scenarios: at a structural genomics center, at a lab with modest resources that also conducts structural biology research, and at a lab that is conducting mutagen research without in-house experimental structural biology. Applications span functional annotation of single genes or SNP, to constructing gene networks and pathways, to an integrated systems biology approach. Structural genomics centers can take advantage of systems biology models to target high value targets for structure determination and in turn extend systems models to better understand systems biology diseases or phenomenon. Individual investigator run structural biology laboratories can collaborate with structural genomics centers, but can also take advantage of technical advances and tools developed by structural genomics centers and can employ a structural genomics approach to advancing biological understanding. Individual investigator-run non-structural biology laboratories can also collaborate with structural genomics centers, possibly influencing targeting decisions, but can also use structure based annotation tools enabled by the growing coverage of protein fold space provided by structural genomics. Better functional annotation can inform pathway and systems biology models.

  3. Genome-wide gene expression analysis of anguillid herpesvirus 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, van S.J.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Rottier, P.J.M.; Davison, A.A.; Engelsma, M.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Background Whereas temporal gene expression in mammalian herpesviruses has been studied extensively, little is known about gene expression in fish herpesviruses. Here we report a genome-wide transcription analysis of a fish herpesvirus, anguillid herpesvirus 1, in cell culture, studied during the

  4. Comparative genomics: Difference of expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    Evolutionary studies tend to focus on alterations in proteins. But evolutionary change can often occur through modified gene expression, a process that is now under investigation with species-specific microarrays.......Evolutionary studies tend to focus on alterations in proteins. But evolutionary change can often occur through modified gene expression, a process that is now under investigation with species-specific microarrays....

  5. Replication and expression of the tospoviral genome.

    OpenAIRE

    Poelwijk, van, F.; Haan; Kikkert, M.; Prins, M.; Kormelink, R.; Storms, M.; Lent, van, J.W.M.; Peters, D.; Goldbach, R.

    1996-01-01

    Sequence analysis of the complete, tripartite RNA genomes of two tospoviruses, tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and impatients necrotic spot virus (INSV), demonstrated that they possess five genes that specify six functional proteins. The negative-stranded L RNA encodes the putative polymerase (TSWV 331.5 kDa; INSV 330.3 kDa), the ambisense M RNA encodes a common precursor to the two glycoproteins (G1 and G2) and a nonstructural protein (NSm), and the likewise ambisense S RNA encodes the nucl...

  6. Chloroplast genome structure in Ilex (Aquifoliaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin; Tan, Yun-Hong; Liu, Ying-Ying; Song, Yu; Yang, Jun-Bo; Corlett, Richard T

    2016-07-05

    Aquifoliaceae is the largest family in the campanulid order Aquifoliales. It consists of a single genus, Ilex, the hollies, which is the largest woody dioecious genus in the angiosperms. Most species are in East Asia or South America. The taxonomy and evolutionary history remain unclear due to the lack of a robust species-level phylogeny. We produced the first complete chloroplast genomes in this family, including seven Ilex species, by Illumina sequencing of long-range PCR products and subsequent reference-guided de novo assembly. These genomes have a typical bicyclic structure with a conserved genome arrangement and moderate divergence. The total length is 157,741 bp and there is one large single-copy region (LSC) with 87,109 bp, one small single-copy with 18,436 bp, and a pair of inverted repeat regions (IR) with 52,196 bp. A total of 144 genes were identified, including 96 protein-coding genes, 40 tRNA and 8 rRNA. Thirty-four repetitive sequences were identified in Ilex pubescens, with lengths >14 bp and identity >90%, and 11 divergence hotspot regions that could be targeted for phylogenetic markers. This study will contribute to improved resolution of deep branches of the Ilex phylogeny and facilitate identification of Ilex species.

  7. Four genes encode acetylcholinesterases in the nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae. cDNA sequences, genomic structures, mutations and in vivo expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, D; Fedon, Y; Grauso, M; Toutant, J P; Arpagaus, M

    2000-07-21

    We report the full coding sequences and the genomic organization of the four genes encoding acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae, in relation to the properties of the encoded enzymes. ace-1 and ace-2, located on chromosome X and I, respectively, encode two AChEs (ACE-1 and ACE-2) that present 35% identity. The C-terminal end of ACE-1 is homologous to the C terminus of T subunits of vertebrate AChEs. ACE-1 oligomerizes into amphiphilic tetramers. ACE-2 has a hydrophobic C terminus of H type. It associates into glycolipid-anchored dimers. In C. elegans and C. briggsae, ace-3 and ace-4 are organized in tandem on chromosome II, with only 356 nt and 369 nt, respectively, between the stop codon of ace-4 (upstream gene) and the ATG of ace-3. ace-3 produces only 5 % of the total AChE activity. It encodes an H subunit that associates into dimers of glycolipid-anchored catalytic subunits, which are highly resistant to the usual AChE inhibitors, and which hydrolyze butyrylthiocholine faster than acetylthiocholine. ACE-4 is closer to ACE-3 (54 % identity) than to ACE-1 or ACE-2. The usual sequence FGESAG surrounding the active serine residue in cholinesterases is changed to FGQSAG in ace-4. ACE-4 was not detected by our current biochemical methods, although the gene is transcribed in vivo. However the level of ace-4 mRNAs is far lower than those of ace-1, ace-2 and ace-3. The ace-2, ace-3 and ace-4 transcripts were found to be trans-spliced by both SL1 and SL2, although these genes are not included in typical operons. The molecular bases of null mutations g72 (ace-2), p1304 and dc2 (ace-3) have been identified. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  8. Elucidation of operon structures across closely related bacterial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Zhou

    Full Text Available About half of the protein-coding genes in prokaryotic genomes are organized into operons to facilitate co-regulation during transcription. With the evolution of genomes, operon structures are undergoing changes which could coordinate diverse gene expression patterns in response to various stimuli during the life cycle of a bacterial cell. Here we developed a graph-based model to elucidate the diversity of operon structures across a set of closely related bacterial genomes. In the constructed graph, each node represents one orthologous gene group (OGG and a pair of nodes will be connected if any two genes, from the corresponding two OGGs respectively, are located in the same operon as immediate neighbors in any of the considered genomes. Through identifying the connected components in the above graph, we found that genes in a connected component are likely to be functionally related and these identified components tend to form treelike topology, such as paths and stars, corresponding to different biological mechanisms in transcriptional regulation as follows. Specifically, (i a path-structure component integrates genes encoding a protein complex, such as ribosome; and (ii a star-structure component not only groups related genes together, but also reflects the key functional roles of the central node of this component, such as the ABC transporter with a transporter permease and substrate-binding proteins surrounding it. Most interestingly, the genes from organisms with highly diverse living environments, i.e., biomass degraders and animal pathogens of clostridia in our study, can be clearly classified into different topological groups on some connected components.

  9. Elucidation of operon structures across closely related bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Ma, Qin; Li, Guojun

    2014-01-01

    About half of the protein-coding genes in prokaryotic genomes are organized into operons to facilitate co-regulation during transcription. With the evolution of genomes, operon structures are undergoing changes which could coordinate diverse gene expression patterns in response to various stimuli during the life cycle of a bacterial cell. Here we developed a graph-based model to elucidate the diversity of operon structures across a set of closely related bacterial genomes. In the constructed graph, each node represents one orthologous gene group (OGG) and a pair of nodes will be connected if any two genes, from the corresponding two OGGs respectively, are located in the same operon as immediate neighbors in any of the considered genomes. Through identifying the connected components in the above graph, we found that genes in a connected component are likely to be functionally related and these identified components tend to form treelike topology, such as paths and stars, corresponding to different biological mechanisms in transcriptional regulation as follows. Specifically, (i) a path-structure component integrates genes encoding a protein complex, such as ribosome; and (ii) a star-structure component not only groups related genes together, but also reflects the key functional roles of the central node of this component, such as the ABC transporter with a transporter permease and substrate-binding proteins surrounding it. Most interestingly, the genes from organisms with highly diverse living environments, i.e., biomass degraders and animal pathogens of clostridia in our study, can be clearly classified into different topological groups on some connected components.

  10. Structural characterization of genomes by large scale sequence-structure threading: application of reliability analysis in structural genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunham Robert C

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We establish that the occurrence of protein folds among genomes can be accurately described with a Weibull function. Systems which exhibit Weibull character can be interpreted with reliability theory commonly used in engineering analysis. For instance, Weibull distributions are widely used in reliability, maintainability and safety work to model time-to-failure of mechanical devices, mechanisms, building constructions and equipment. Results We have found that the Weibull function describes protein fold distribution within and among genomes more accurately than conventional power functions which have been used in a number of structural genomic studies reported to date. It has also been found that the Weibull reliability parameter β for protein fold distributions varies between genomes and may reflect differences in rates of gene duplication in evolutionary history of organisms. Conclusions The results of this work demonstrate that reliability analysis can provide useful insights and testable predictions in the fields of comparative and structural genomics.

  11. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Godoy, M Angeles; Mauri, Nuria; Juarez, Jose; Marques, M Carmen; Santiago, Julia; Forment, Javier; Gadea, Jose

    2008-07-03

    Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genome-wide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. We have designed and constructed a publicly available genome-wide cDNA microarray that include 21,081 putative unigenes of citrus. As a functional companion to the microarray, a web-browsable database 1 was created and populated with information about the unigenes represented in the microarray, including cDNA libraries, isolated clones, raw and processed nucleotide and protein sequences, and results of all the structural and functional annotation of the unigenes, like general description, BLAST hits, putative Arabidopsis orthologs, microsatellites, putative SNPs, GO classification and PFAM domains. We have performed a Gene Ontology comparison with the full set of Arabidopsis proteins to estimate the genome coverage of the microarray. We have also performed microarray hybridizations to check its usability. This new cDNA microarray replaces the first 7K microarray generated two years ago and allows gene expression analysis at a more global scale. We have followed a rational design to minimize cross-hybridization while maintaining its utility for different citrus species. Furthermore, we also provide access to a website with full structural and functional annotation of the unigenes represented in the microarray, along with the ability to use this site to directly perform gene expression analysis using standard tools at different publicly available servers. Furthermore, we show how this microarray offers a good representation of the citrus genome and present the usefulness of this genomic tool for global studies in citrus by using it to catalogue genes expressed in

  12. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gadea Jose

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genome-wide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. Results We have designed and constructed a publicly available genome-wide cDNA microarray that include 21,081 putative unigenes of citrus. As a functional companion to the microarray, a web-browsable database 1 was created and populated with information about the unigenes represented in the microarray, including cDNA libraries, isolated clones, raw and processed nucleotide and protein sequences, and results of all the structural and functional annotation of the unigenes, like general description, BLAST hits, putative Arabidopsis orthologs, microsatellites, putative SNPs, GO classification and PFAM domains. We have performed a Gene Ontology comparison with the full set of Arabidopsis proteins to estimate the genome coverage of the microarray. We have also performed microarray hybridizations to check its usability. Conclusion This new cDNA microarray replaces the first 7K microarray generated two years ago and allows gene expression analysis at a more global scale. We have followed a rational design to minimize cross-hybridization while maintaining its utility for different citrus species. Furthermore, we also provide access to a website with full structural and functional annotation of the unigenes represented in the microarray, along with the ability to use this site to directly perform gene expression analysis using standard tools at different publicly available servers. Furthermore, we show how this microarray offers a good representation of the citrus genome and present the usefulness of this genomic tool for global

  13. Expression of a transferred nuclear gene in a mitochondrial genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichun Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus, and subsequent gain of regulatory elements for expression, is an ongoing evolutionary process in plants. Many examples have been characterized, which in some cases have revealed sources of mitochondrial targeting sequences and cis-regulatory elements. In contrast, there have been no reports of a nuclear gene that has undergone intracellular transfer to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed. Here we show that the orf164 gene in the mitochondrial genome of several Brassicaceae species, including Arabidopsis, is derived from the nuclear ARF17 gene that codes for an auxin responsive protein and is present across flowering plants. Orf164 corresponds to a portion of ARF17, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences are 79% and 81% identical, respectively. Orf164 is transcribed in several organ types of Arabidopsis thaliana, as detected by RT-PCR. In addition, orf164 is transcribed in five other Brassicaceae within the tribes Camelineae, Erysimeae and Cardamineae, but the gene is not present in Brassica or Raphanus. This study shows that nuclear genes can be transferred to the mitochondrial genome and become expressed, providing a new perspective on the movement of genes between the genomes of subcellular compartments.

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa genomic structure and diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens eKlockgether

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome (G + C content 65-67%, size 5.5 – 7 Mbp is made up of a single circular chromosome and a variable number of plasmids. Sequencing of complete genomes or blocks of the accessory genome has revealed that the genome encodes a large repertoire of transporters, transcriptional regulators and two-component regulatory systems which reflects its metabolic diversity to utilize a broad range of nutrients. The conserved core component of the genome is largely collinear among P. aeruginosa strains and exhibits an interclonal sequence diversity of 0.5 – 0.7%. Only a few loci of the core genome are subject to diversifying selection. Genome diversity is mainly caused by accessory DNA elements located in 79 regions of genome plasticity that are scattered around the genome and show an anomalous usage of mono- to tetradecanucleotides. Genomic islands of the pKLC102/PAGI-2 family that integrate into tRNALys or tRNAGly genes represent hotspots of inter- and intraclonal genomic diversity. The individual islands differ in their repertoire of metabolic genes that make a large contribution to the pangenome. In order to unravel intraclonal diversity of P. aeruginosa, the genomes of two members of the PA14 clonal complex from diverse habitats and geographic origin were compared. The genome sequences differed by less than 0.01% from each other. 198 of the 231 SNPs were non-randomly distributed in the genome. Non-synonymous SNPs were mainly found in an integrated Pf1-like phage and in genes involved in transcriptional regulation, membrane and extracellular constituents, transport and secretion. In summary, P. aeruginosa is endowed with a highly conserved core genome of low sequence diversity and a highly variable accessory genome that communicates with other pseudomonads and genera via horizontal gene transfer.

  15. Genome-wide patterns of Arabidopsis gene expression in nature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Richards

    Full Text Available Organisms in the wild are subject to multiple, fluctuating environmental factors, and it is in complex natural environments that genetic regulatory networks actually function and evolve. We assessed genome-wide gene expression patterns in the wild in two natural accessions of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and examined the nature of transcriptional variation throughout its life cycle and gene expression correlations with natural environmental fluctuations. We grew plants in a natural field environment and measured genome-wide time-series gene expression from the plant shoot every three days, spanning the seedling to reproductive stages. We find that 15,352 genes were expressed in the A. thaliana shoot in the field, and accession and flowering status (vegetative versus flowering were strong components of transcriptional variation in this plant. We identified between ∼110 and 190 time-varying gene expression clusters in the field, many of which were significantly overrepresented by genes regulated by abiotic and biotic environmental stresses. The two main principal components of vegetative shoot gene expression (PC(veg correlate to temperature and precipitation occurrence in the field. The largest PC(veg axes included thermoregulatory genes while the second major PC(veg was associated with precipitation and contained drought-responsive genes. By exposing A. thaliana to natural environments in an open field, we provide a framework for further understanding the genetic networks that are deployed in natural environments, and we connect plant molecular genetics in the laboratory to plant organismal ecology in the wild.

  16. In vitro analysis of integrated global high-resolution DNA methylation profiling with genomic imbalance and gene expression in osteosarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekim Sadikovic

    Full Text Available Genetic and epigenetic changes contribute to deregulation of gene expression and development of human cancer. Changes in DNA methylation are key epigenetic factors regulating gene expression and genomic stability. Recent progress in microarray technologies resulted in developments of high resolution platforms for profiling of genetic, epigenetic and gene expression changes. OS is a pediatric bone tumor with characteristically high level of numerical and structural chromosomal changes. Furthermore, little is known about DNA methylation changes in OS. Our objective was to develop an integrative approach for analysis of high-resolution epigenomic, genomic, and gene expression profiles in order to identify functional epi/genomic differences between OS cell lines and normal human osteoblasts. A combination of Affymetrix Promoter Tilling Arrays for DNA methylation, Agilent array-CGH platform for genomic imbalance and Affymetrix Gene 1.0 platform for gene expression analysis was used. As a result, an integrative high-resolution approach for interrogation of genome-wide tumour-specific changes in DNA methylation was developed. This approach was used to provide the first genomic DNA methylation maps, and to identify and validate genes with aberrant DNA methylation in OS cell lines. This first integrative analysis of global cancer-related changes in DNA methylation, genomic imbalance, and gene expression has provided comprehensive evidence of the cumulative roles of epigenetic and genetic mechanisms in deregulation of gene expression networks.

  17. Bacterial sigma factors: a historical, structural, and genomic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feklístov, Andrey; Sharon, Brian D; Darst, Seth A; Gross, Carol A

    2014-01-01

    Transcription initiation is the crucial focal point of gene expression in prokaryotes. The key players in this process, sigma factors (σs), associate with the catalytic core RNA polymerase to guide it through the essential steps of initiation: promoter recognition and opening, and synthesis of the first few nucleotides of the transcript. Here we recount the key advances in σ biology, from their discovery 45 years ago to the most recent progress in understanding their structure and function at the atomic level. Recent data provide important structural insights into the mechanisms whereby σs initiate promoter opening. We discuss both the housekeeping σs, which govern transcription of the majority of cellular genes, and the alternative σs, which direct RNA polymerase to specialized operons in response to environmental and physiological cues. The review concludes with a genome-scale view of the extracytoplasmic function σs, the most abundant group of alternative σs.

  18. An invertebrate signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) ortholog from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus: Genomic structure, early developmental expression, and immune responses to bacterial and viral stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathige, S D N K; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Park, Hae-Chul; Lee, Jehee

    2016-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) family members are key signaling molecules that transduce cellular responses from the cell membrane to the nucleus upon Janus kinase (JAK) activation. Although seven STAT members have been reported in mammals, very limited information on STAT genes in molluscans is available. In this study, we identified and characterized a STAT paralog that is homologous to STAT5 from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus, and designated as AbSTAT5. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence for AbSTAT5 (790 amino acids) with other counterparts revealed conserved residues important for functions and typical domain regions, including the N-terminal domain, coiled-coil domain, DNA-binding domain, linker domain, and Src homology 2 (SH2) domains as mammalian counterparts. Analysis of STAT phylogeny revealed that AbSTAT5 was clustered with the molluscan subgroup in STAT5 clade with distinct evolution. According to the genomic structure of AbSTAT5, the coding sequence was distributed into 20 exons with 19 introns. Immunologically essential transcription factor-binding sites, such as GATA-1, HNF, SP1, C/EBP, Oct-1, AP1, c-Jun, and Sox-2, were predicted at the 5'-proximal region of AbSTAT5. Expression of AbSTAT5 mRNA was detected in different stages of embryonic development and observed at considerably higher levels in the morula and late veliger stages. Tissue-specific expressional studies revealed that the highest level of AbSTAT5 transcripts was detected in hemocytes, followed by gill tissues. Temporal expressions of AbSTAT5 were analyzed upon live bacterial (Vibrio parahemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes), viral (viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus), and pathogen-associated molecular pattern (lipopolysaccharides and Poly I:C) stimulations, and significant elevations indicated immune modulation. These results suggest that AbSTAT5 may be involved in maintaining innate immune responses from developmental to adult stages in

  19. Toward Elucidating the Structure of Tetraploid Cotton Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Wang-zhen

    2008-01-01

    @@ Upland cotton has the highest yield,and accounts for >95% of world cotton production.Decoding upland cotton genomes will undoubtedly provide the ultimate reference and resource for structural,functional,and evolutionary studies of the species.Here,we employed GeneTrek and BAC tagging information approaches to predict the general composition and structure of the allotetraploid cotton genome.

  20. Child Development and Structural Variation in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Haraksingh, Rajini; Grubert, Fabian; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation of the human genome sequence is the insertion, deletion, or rearrangement of stretches of DNA sequence sized from around 1,000 to millions of base pairs. Over the past few years, structural variation has been shown to be far more common in human genomes than previously thought. Very little is currently known about the effects…

  1. Child Development and Structural Variation in the Human Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Haraksingh, Rajini; Grubert, Fabian; Abyzov, Alexej; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman; Urban, Alexander E.

    2013-01-01

    Structural variation of the human genome sequence is the insertion, deletion, or rearrangement of stretches of DNA sequence sized from around 1,000 to millions of base pairs. Over the past few years, structural variation has been shown to be far more common in human genomes than previously thought. Very little is currently known about the effects…

  2. Genome-Wide Associations of Gene Expression Variation in Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  3. Genome-wide associations of gene expression variation in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E Stranger

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The exploration of quantitative variation in human populations has become one of the major priorities for medical genetics. The successful identification of variants that contribute to complex traits is highly dependent on reliable assays and genetic maps. We have performed a genome-wide quantitative trait analysis of 630 genes in 60 unrelated Utah residents with ancestry from Northern and Western Europe using the publicly available phase I data of the International HapMap project. The genes are located in regions of the human genome with elevated functional annotation and disease interest including the ENCODE regions spanning 1% of the genome, Chromosome 21 and Chromosome 20q12-13.2. We apply three different methods of multiple test correction, including Bonferroni, false discovery rate, and permutations. For the 374 expressed genes, we find many regions with statistically significant association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs with expression variation in lymphoblastoid cell lines after correcting for multiple tests. Based on our analyses, the signal proximal (cis- to the genes of interest is more abundant and more stable than distal and trans across statistical methodologies. Our results suggest that regulatory polymorphism is widespread in the human genome and show that the 5-kb (phase I HapMap has sufficient density to enable linkage disequilibrium mapping in humans. Such studies will significantly enhance our ability to annotate the non-coding part of the genome and interpret functional variation. In addition, we demonstrate that the HapMap cell lines themselves may serve as a useful resource for quantitative measurements at the cellular level.

  4. Development and characterization of genomic and expressed SSRs in citrus by genome-wide analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Rui Liu

    Full Text Available Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs are one of the most popular sources of genetic markers and play a significant role in plant genetics and breeding. In this study, we identified citrus SSRs in the genome of Clementine mandarin and analyzed their frequency and distribution in different genomic regions. A total of 80,708 SSRs were detected in the genome with an overall density of 268 SSRs/Mb. While di-nucleotide repeats were the most frequent microsatellites in genomic DNA sequence, tetra-nucleotides, which had more repeat units than any other SSR types, had the highest cumulative sequence length. We identified 6,834 transcripts as containing 8,989 SSRs in 33,929 Clementine mandarin transcripts, among which, tri-nucleotide motifs (36.0% were the most common, followed by di-nucleotide (26.9% and hexa-nucleotide motifs (15.1%. The motif AG (16.7% was most abundant among these SSRs, while motifs AAG (6.6%, AAT (5.0%, and TAG (2.2% were most common among tri-nucleotides. Functional categorization of transcripts containing SSRs revealed that 5,879 (86.0% of such transcripts had homology with known proteins, GO and KEGG annotation revealed that transcripts containing SSRs were those implicated in diverse biological processes in plants, including binding, development, transcription, and protein degradation. When 27 genomic and 78 randomly selected SSRs were tested on Clementine mandarin, 95 SSRs revealed polymorphism. These 95 SSRs were further deployed on 18 genotypes of the three generas of Rutaceae for the genetic diversity assessment, genomic SSRs generally show low transferability in comparison to SSRs developed from expressed sequences. These transcript-markers identified in our study may provide a valuable genetic and genomic tool for further genetic research and varietal development in citrus, such as diversity study, QTL mapping, molecular breeding, comparative mapping and other genetic analyses.

  5. Development and characterization of genomic and expressed SSRs in citrus by genome-wide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Rui; Li, Wen-Yang; Long, Dang; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellites or simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are one of the most popular sources of genetic markers and play a significant role in plant genetics and breeding. In this study, we identified citrus SSRs in the genome of Clementine mandarin and analyzed their frequency and distribution in different genomic regions. A total of 80,708 SSRs were detected in the genome with an overall density of 268 SSRs/Mb. While di-nucleotide repeats were the most frequent microsatellites in genomic DNA sequence, tetra-nucleotides, which had more repeat units than any other SSR types, had the highest cumulative sequence length. We identified 6,834 transcripts as containing 8,989 SSRs in 33,929 Clementine mandarin transcripts, among which, tri-nucleotide motifs (36.0%) were the most common, followed by di-nucleotide (26.9%) and hexa-nucleotide motifs (15.1%). The motif AG (16.7%) was most abundant among these SSRs, while motifs AAG (6.6%), AAT (5.0%), and TAG (2.2%) were most common among tri-nucleotides. Functional categorization of transcripts containing SSRs revealed that 5,879 (86.0%) of such transcripts had homology with known proteins, GO and KEGG annotation revealed that transcripts containing SSRs were those implicated in diverse biological processes in plants, including binding, development, transcription, and protein degradation. When 27 genomic and 78 randomly selected SSRs were tested on Clementine mandarin, 95 SSRs revealed polymorphism. These 95 SSRs were further deployed on 18 genotypes of the three generas of Rutaceae for the genetic diversity assessment, genomic SSRs generally show low transferability in comparison to SSRs developed from expressed sequences. These transcript-markers identified in our study may provide a valuable genetic and genomic tool for further genetic research and varietal development in citrus, such as diversity study, QTL mapping, molecular breeding, comparative mapping and other genetic analyses.

  6. Learning directed acyclic graphical structures with genetical genomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin; Cui, Yuehua

    2015-12-15

    Large amount of research efforts have been focused on estimating gene networks based on gene expression data to understand the functional basis of a living organism. Such networks are often obtained by considering pairwise correlations between genes, thus may not reflect the true connectivity between genes. By treating gene expressions as quantitative traits while considering genetic markers, genetical genomics analysis has shown its power in enhancing the understanding of gene regulations. Previous works have shown the improved performance on estimating the undirected network graphical structure by incorporating genetic markers as covariates. Knowing that gene expressions are often due to directed regulations, it is more meaningful to estimate the directed graphical network. In this article, we introduce a covariate-adjusted Gaussian graphical model to estimate the Markov equivalence class of the directed acyclic graphs (DAGs) in a genetical genomics analysis framework. We develop a two-stage estimation procedure to first estimate the regression coefficient matrix by [Formula: see text] penalization. The estimated coefficient matrix is then used to estimate the mean values in our multi-response Gaussian model to estimate the regulatory networks of gene expressions using PC-algorithm. The estimation consistency for high dimensional sparse DAGs is established. Simulations are conducted to demonstrate our theoretical results. The method is applied to a human Alzheimer's disease dataset in which differential DAGs are identified between cases and controls. R code for implementing the method can be downloaded at http://www.stt.msu.edu/∼cui. R code for implementing the method is freely available at http://www.stt.msu.edu/∼cui/software.html. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Structure of the germline genome of Tetrahymena thermophila and relationship to the massively rearranged somatic genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Eileen P; Kapusta, Aurélie; Huvos, Piroska E; Bidwell, Shelby L; Zafar, Nikhat; Tang, Haibao; Hadjithomas, Michalis; Krishnakumar, Vivek; Badger, Jonathan H; Caler, Elisabet V; Russ, Carsten; Zeng, Qiandong; Fan, Lin; Levin, Joshua Z; Shea, Terrance; Young, Sarah K; Hegarty, Ryan; Daza, Riza; Gujja, Sharvari; Wortman, Jennifer R; Birren, Bruce W; Nusbaum, Chad; Thomas, Jainy; Carey, Clayton M; Pritham, Ellen J; Feschotte, Cédric; Noto, Tomoko; Mochizuki, Kazufumi; Papazyan, Romeo; Taverna, Sean D; Dear, Paul H; Cassidy-Hanley, Donna M; Xiong, Jie; Miao, Wei; Orias, Eduardo; Coyne, Robert S

    2016-11-28

    The germline genome of the binucleated ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila undergoes programmed chromosome breakage and massive DNA elimination to generate the somatic genome. Here, we present a complete sequence assembly of the germline genome and analyze multiple features of its structure and its relationship to the somatic genome, shedding light on the mechanisms of genome rearrangement as well as the evolutionary history of this remarkable germline/soma differentiation. Our results strengthen the notion that a complex, dynamic, and ongoing interplay between mobile DNA elements and the host genome have shaped Tetrahymena chromosome structure, locally and globally. Non-standard outcomes of rearrangement events, including the generation of short-lived somatic chromosomes and excision of DNA interrupting protein-coding regions, may represent novel forms of developmental gene regulation. We also compare Tetrahymena's germline/soma differentiation to that of other characterized ciliates, illustrating the wide diversity of adaptations that have occurred within this phylum.

  8. Extensive genome heterogeneity leads to preferential allele expression and copy number-dependent expression in cultivated potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Gina M; Newton, Linsey; Wiegert-Rininger, Krystle; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Douches, David S; Buell, C Robin

    2017-09-04

    Relative to homozygous diploids, the presence of multiple homologs or homeologs in polyploids affords greater tolerance to mutations that can impact genome evolution. In this study, we describe sequence and structural variation in the genomes of six accessions of cultivated potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), a vegetatively propagated autotetraploid, and their impact on the transcriptome. Sequence diversity was high with a mean SNP rate of approximately 1 per 50 bases suggestive of high levels of allelic diversity. Additive gene expression was observed in leaves (3,605 genes) and tubers (6,156 genes) that contrasted the preferential allele expression of between 2,180 and 3,502 and 3,367 and 5,270 genes in the leaf and tuber transcriptome, respectively. Preferential allele expression was significantly associated with evolutionarily conserved genes suggesting selection of specific alleles of genes responsible for biological processes common to angiosperms during the breeding selection process. Copy number variation was rampant with between 16,098 and 18,921 genes in each cultivar exhibiting duplication or deletion. Copy number variable genes tended to be evolutionarily recent, lowly expressed, and enriched in genes that show increased expression in response to biotic and abiotic stress treatments suggestive of a role in adaptation. Gene copy number impacts on gene expression were detected with 528 genes having correlations between copy number and gene expression. Collectively, these data suggest that in addition to allelic variation of coding sequence, the heterogenous nature of the tetraploid potato genome contributes to a highly dynamic transcriptome impacted by allele preferential and copy number-dependent expression effects. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. A genome-wide map of aberrantly expressed chromosomal islands in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castanos-Velez Esmeralda

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer development is accompanied by genetic phenomena like deletion and amplification of chromosome parts or alterations of chromatin structure. It is expected that these mechanisms have a strong effect on regional gene expression. Results We investigated genome-wide gene expression in colorectal carcinoma (CRC and normal epithelial tissues from 25 patients using oligonucleotide arrays. This allowed us to identify 81 distinct chromosomal islands with aberrant gene expression. Of these, 38 islands show a gain in expression and 43 a loss of expression. In total, 7.892 genes (25.3% of all human genes are located in aberrantly expressed islands. Many chromosomal regions that are linked to hereditary colorectal cancer show deregulated expression. Also, many known tumor genes localize to chromosomal islands of misregulated expression in CRC. Conclusion An extensive comparison with published CGH data suggests that chromosomal regions known for frequent deletions in colon cancer tend to show reduced expression. In contrast, regions that are often amplified in colorectal tumors exhibit heterogeneous expression patterns: even show a decrease of mRNA expression. Because for several islands of deregulated expression chromosomal aberrations have never been observed, we speculate that additional mechanisms (like abnormal states of regional chromatin also have a substantial impact on the formation of co-expression islands in colorectal carcinoma.

  10. Multiple genome alignment for identifying the core structure among moderately related microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Ikuo

    2008-10-31

    Identifying the set of intrinsically conserved genes, or the genomic core, among related genomes is crucial for understanding prokaryotic genomes where horizontal gene transfers are common. Although core genome identification appears to be obvious among very closely related genomes, it becomes more difficult when more distantly related genomes are compared. Here, we consider the core structure as a set of sufficiently long segments in which gene orders are conserved so that they are likely to have been inherited mainly through vertical transfer, and developed a method for identifying the core structure by finding the order of pre-identified orthologous groups (OGs) that maximally retains the conserved gene orders. The method was applied to genome comparisons of two well-characterized families, Bacillaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, and identified their core structures comprising 1438 and 2125 OGs, respectively. The core sets contained most of the essential genes and their related genes, which were primarily included in the intersection of the two core sets comprising around 700 OGs. The definition of the genomic core based on gene order conservation was demonstrated to be more robust than the simpler approach based only on gene conservation. We also investigated the core structures in terms of G+C content homogeneity and phylogenetic congruence, and found that the core genes primarily exhibited the expected characteristic, i.e., being indigenous and sharing the same history, more than the non-core genes. The results demonstrate that our strategy of genome alignment based on gene order conservation can provide an effective approach to identify the genomic core among moderately related microbial genomes.

  11. Multiple genome alignment for identifying the core structure among moderately related microbial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uchiyama Ikuo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying the set of intrinsically conserved genes, or the genomic core, among related genomes is crucial for understanding prokaryotic genomes where horizontal gene transfers are common. Although core genome identification appears to be obvious among very closely related genomes, it becomes more difficult when more distantly related genomes are compared. Here, we consider the core structure as a set of sufficiently long segments in which gene orders are conserved so that they are likely to have been inherited mainly through vertical transfer, and developed a method for identifying the core structure by finding the order of pre-identified orthologous groups (OGs that maximally retains the conserved gene orders. Results The method was applied to genome comparisons of two well-characterized families, Bacillaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, and identified their core structures comprising 1438 and 2125 OGs, respectively. The core sets contained most of the essential genes and their related genes, which were primarily included in the intersection of the two core sets comprising around 700 OGs. The definition of the genomic core based on gene order conservation was demonstrated to be more robust than the simpler approach based only on gene conservation. We also investigated the core structures in terms of G+C content homogeneity and phylogenetic congruence, and found that the core genes primarily exhibited the expected characteristic, i.e., being indigenous and sharing the same history, more than the non-core genes. Conclusion The results demonstrate that our strategy of genome alignment based on gene order conservation can provide an effective approach to identify the genomic core among moderately related microbial genomes.

  12. The Nephila clavipes genome highlights the diversity of spider silk genes and their complex expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Paul L; Lahens, Nicholas F; Correa-Garhwal, Sandra M; Nicholson, David N; Kim, Eun Ji; Hogenesch, John B; Kuntner, Matjaž; Higgins, Linden; Hayashi, Cheryl Y; Agnarsson, Ingi; Voight, Benjamin F

    2017-06-01

    Spider silks are the toughest known biological materials, yet are lightweight and virtually invisible to the human immune system, and they thus have revolutionary potential for medicine and industry. Spider silks are largely composed of spidroins, a unique family of structural proteins. To investigate spidroin genes systematically, we constructed the first genome of an orb-weaving spider: the golden orb-weaver (Nephila clavipes), which builds large webs using an extensive repertoire of silks with diverse physical properties. We cataloged 28 Nephila spidroins, representing all known orb-weaver spidroin types, and identified 394 repeated coding motif variants and higher-order repetitive cassette structures unique to specific spidroins. Characterization of spidroin expression in distinct silk gland types indicates that glands can express multiple spidroin types. We find evidence of an alternatively spliced spidroin, a spidroin expressed only in venom glands, evolutionary mechanisms for spidroin diversification, and non-spidroin genes with expression patterns that suggest roles in silk production.

  13. Genomic and gene expression signature of the pre-invasive testicular carcinoma in situ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, Kristian; Ottesen, Anne Marie; Sonne, Si Brask

    2005-01-01

    on the pre-invasive CIS and its possible fetal origin by reviewing recent data originating from DNA microarrays and comparative genomic hybridisations. A comparison of gene expression and genomic aberrations reveal chromosomal "hot spots" with mutual clustering of gene expression and genomic amplification...

  14. Visualizing structures of speech expressiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbelin, Bruno; Jensen, Karl Kristoffer; Graugaard, Lars

    2008-01-01

    . The Babel myth speaks about distance created when aspiring to the heaven as the reason for language division. Meanwhile, Locquin states through thorough investigations that only a few phonemes are present throughout history. Our interpretation is that a system able to recognize archetypal phonemes through......Speech is both beautiful and informative. In this work, a conceptual study of the speech, through investigation of the tower of Babel, the archetypal phonemes, and a study of the reasons of uses of language is undertaken in order to create an artistic work investigating the nature of speech...... vowels and consonants, and which converts the speech energy into visual particles that form complex visual structures, provides us with a mean to present the expressiveness of speech into a visual mode. This system is presented in an artwork whose scenario is inspired from the reasons of language...

  15. Genomic structure of metabotropic glutamate receptor 7 and comparison of genomic structures of extracellular domains of mGluR family

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 7, coupled with a chemical neurotransmitter L-glutamate, plays an important role in the development of many psychiatric and neurological disorders. To study the biological and genetic mechanism of the mGluR7-related diseases, a physical map covering the full-length mGluR7 genomic sequence has been constructed through seed clone screening and fingerprinting database searching. These BAC clones in the physical map have been sequenced with shotgun strategy and assembled by Phred-Phrap-Consed software; the error rate of the final genomic sequence is less than 0.01%. mGluR7 spans 880 kb genomic region, the GC content and repeat content of mGluR7 genomic sequence are 38% and 37.5% respectively. mGluR7 has a typical "house-keeping" promoter and consists of 11 exons, with introns ranging from 6 kb to 285 kb. mGluR7a and mGluR7b are two known alternatively splicing variants. Comparing the genomic structures of extracellular domains of mGluR family, their genomic structures can be subdivided into three groups, which are consistent with that of proteins. Although the genomic organization of mGluR7's group is conserved, the majority of introns in the extracellular segments vary dramatically. It is an obvious trend of the increasing intron size inverse proportion to phylogenetic time. Variation of genomic structure is higher than that of protein, which is attributed to the species characteristic regulation of gene expression.

  16. Genome-wide identification, phylogeny and expression profile of vesicle fusion components in Verticillium dahliae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yang

    Full Text Available Vesicular trafficking plays a crucial role in protein localization and movement, signal transduction, and multiple developmental processes in eukaryotic cells. Vesicle fusion is the final and key step in vesicle-mediated trafficking and mainly relies on SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors, the regulators including SM (Sec1/Munc18 family proteins, Rab GTPases and exocyst subunits. Verticillium dahliae is a widespread soil fungus that causes disruptive vascular diseases on a wide range of plants. To date, no genes involved in vesicular fusion process have been identified and characterized in V. dahliae. The recent publication of the draft genome sequence of V. dahliae allowed us to conduct a genome-wide identification, phylogeny and expression profile of genes encoding vesicular fusion components. Using compared genomics and phylogenetic methods, we identified 44 genes encoding vesicle fusion components in the V. dahliae genome. According to the structural features of their encoded proteins, the 44 V. dahliae genes were classified into 22 SNAREs (6 Qa-, 4 Qb-, 6 Qc-, 1 Qbc- and 5 R-types, 4 SM family proteins, 10 Rab GTPases and 8 exocyst proteins. Based on phylogeny and motif constitution analysis, orthologs of vesicle fusion component in filamentous fungi were generally clustered together into the same subclasses with well-supported bootstrap values. Analysis of the expression profiles of these genes indicated that many of them are significantly differentially expressed during vegetative growth and microsclerotia formation in V. dahliae. The analysis show that many components of vesicle fusion are well conserved in filamentous fungi and indicate that vesicle fusion plays a critical role in microsclerotia formation of smoke tree wilt fungus V. dahliae. The genome-wide identification and expression analysis of components involved in vesicle fusion should facilitate research in this gene family and give

  17. CONTIGuator: a bacterial genomes finishing tool for structural insights on draft genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazzicalupo Marco

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent developments in sequencing technologies have given the opportunity to sequence many bacterial genomes with limited cost and labor, compared to previous techniques. However, a limiting step of genome sequencing is the finishing process, needed to infer the relative position of each contig and close sequencing gaps. An additional degree of complexity is given by bacterial species harboring more than one replicon, which are not contemplated by the currently available programs. The availability of a large number of bacterial genomes allows geneticists to use complete genomes (possibly from the same species as templates for contigs mapping. Here we present CONTIGuator, a software tool for contigs mapping over a reference genome which allows the visualization of a map of contigs, underlining loss and/or gain of genetic elements and permitting to finish multipartite genomes. The functionality of CONTIGuator was tested using four genomes, demonstrating its improved performances compared to currently available programs. Our approach appears efficient, with a clear visualization, allowing the user to perform comparative structural genomics analysis on draft genomes. CONTIGuator is a Python script for Linux environments and can be used on normal desktop machines and can be downloaded from http://contiguator.sourceforge.net.

  18. Evolutionary genomics and population structure of Entamoeba histolytica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Koushik; Ganguly, Sandipan

    2014-01-01

    Amoebiasis caused by the gastrointestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica has diverse disease outcomes. Study of genome and evolution of this fascinating parasite will help us to understand the basis of its virulence and explain why, when and how it causes diseases. In this review, we have summarized current knowledge regarding evolutionary genomics of E. histolytica and discussed their association with parasite phenotypes and its differential pathogenic behavior. How genetic diversity reveals parasite population structure has also been discussed. Queries concerning their evolution and population structure which were required to be addressed have also been highlighted. This significantly large amount of genomic data will improve our knowledge about this pathogenic species of Entamoeba. PMID:25505504

  19. In plants, expression breadth and expression level distinctly and non-linearly correlate with gene structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Hangxing

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compactness of highly/broadly expressed genes in human has been explained as selection for efficiency, regional mutation biases or genomic design. However, highly expressed genes in flowering plants were shown to be less compact than lowly expressed ones. On the other hand, opposite facts have also been documented that pollen-expressed Arabidopsis genes tend to contain shorter introns and highly expressed moss genes are compact. This issue is important because it provides a chance to compare the selectionism and the neutralism views about genome evolution. Furthermore, this issue also helps to understand the fates of introns, from the angle of gene expression. Results In this study, I used expression data covering more tissues and employ new analytical methods to reexamine the correlations between gene expression and gene structure for two flowering plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa. It is shown that, different aspects of expression pattern correlate with different parts of gene sequences in distinct ways. In detail, expression level is significantly negatively correlated with gene size, especially the size of non-coding regions, whereas expression breadth correlates with non-coding structural parameters positively and with coding region parameters negatively. Furthermore, the relationships between expression level and structural parameters seem to be non-linear, with the extremes of structural parameters possibly scale as power-laws or logrithmic functions of expression levels. Conclusion In plants, highly expressed genes are compact, especially in the non-coding regions. Broadly expressed genes tend to contain longer non-coding sequences, which may be necessary for complex regulations. In combination with previous studies about other plants and about animals, some common scenarios about the correlation between gene expression and gene structure begin to emerge. Based on the functional relationships between

  20. Alu recombination-mediated structural deletions in the chimpanzee genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyudong Han

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available With more than 1.2 million copies, Alu elements are one of the most important sources of structural variation in primate genomes. Here, we compare the chimpanzee and human genomes to determine the extent of Alu recombination-mediated deletion (ARMD in the chimpanzee genome since the divergence of the chimpanzee and human lineages ( approximately 6 million y ago. Combining computational data analysis and experimental verification, we have identified 663 chimpanzee lineage-specific deletions (involving a total of approximately 771 kb of genomic sequence attributable to this process. The ARMD events essentially counteract the genomic expansion caused by chimpanzee-specific Alu inserts. The RefSeq databases indicate that 13 exons in six genes, annotated as either demonstrably or putatively functional in the human genome, and 299 intronic regions have been deleted through ARMDs in the chimpanzee lineage. Therefore, our data suggest that this process may contribute to the genomic and phenotypic diversity between chimpanzees and humans. In addition, we found four independent ARMD events at orthologous loci in the gorilla or orangutan genomes. This suggests that human orthologs of loci at which ARMD events have already occurred in other nonhuman primate genomes may be "at-risk" motifs for future deletions, which may subsequently contribute to human lineage-specific genetic rearrangements and disorders.

  1. Phylogenetic clusters of rhizobia revealed by genome structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Junfang; LIU Guirong; ZHU Wanfu; ZHOU Yuguang; LIU Shulin

    2004-01-01

    Rhizobia, bacteria that fix atmospheric nitrogen, are important agricultural resources. In order to establish the evolutionary relationships among rhizobia isolated from different geographic regions and different plant hosts for systematic studies, we evaluated the use of physical structure of the rhizobial genomes as a phylogenetic marker to categorize these bacteria. In this work, we analyzed the features of genome structures of 64 rhizobial strains. These rhizobial strains were divided into 21 phylogenetic clusters according to the features of genome structures evaluated by the endonuclease I-CeuI. These clusters were supported by 16S rRNA comparisons and genomic sequences of four rhizobial strains, but they are largely different from those based on the current taxonomic scheme (except 16S rRNA).

  2. Genome-level identification, gene expression, and comparative analysis of porcine ß-defensin genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Min-Kyeung

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-defensins (β-defensins are innate immune peptides with evolutionary conservation across a wide range of species and has been suggested to play important roles in innate immune reactions against pathogens. However, the complete β-defensin repertoire in the pig has not been fully addressed. Result A BLAST analysis was performed against the available pig genomic sequence in the NCBI database to identify β-defensin-related sequences using previously reported β-defensin sequences of pigs, humans, and cattle. The porcine β-defensin gene clusters were mapped to chromosomes 7, 14, 15 and 17. The gene expression analysis of 17 newly annotated porcine β-defensin genes across 15 tissues using semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR showed differences in their tissue distribution, with the kidney and testis having the largest pBD expression repertoire. We also analyzed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the mature peptide region of pBD genes from 35 pigs of 7 breeds. We found 8 cSNPs in 7 pBDs. Conclusion We identified 29 porcine β-defensin (pBD gene-like sequences, including 17 unreported pBDs in the porcine genome. Comparative analysis of β-defensin genes in the pig genome with those in human and cattle genomes showed structural conservation of β-defensin syntenic regions among these species.

  3. Genome-wide patterns of promoter sharing and co-expression in bovine skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalrymple Brian P

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene regulation by transcription factors (TF is species, tissue and time specific. To better understand how the genetic code controls gene expression in bovine muscle we associated gene expression data from developing Longissimus thoracis et lumborum skeletal muscle with bovine promoter sequence information. Results We created a highly conserved genome-wide promoter landscape comprising 87,408 interactions relating 333 TFs with their 9,242 predicted target genes (TGs. We discovered that the complete set of predicted TGs share an average of 2.75 predicted TF binding sites (TFBSs and that the average co-expression between a TF and its predicted TGs is higher than the average co-expression between the same TF and all genes. Conversely, pairs of TFs sharing predicted TGs showed a co-expression correlation higher that pairs of TFs not sharing TGs. Finally, we exploited the co-occurrence of predicted TFBS in the context of muscle-derived functionally-coherent modules including cell cycle, mitochondria, immune system, fat metabolism, muscle/glycolysis, and ribosome. Our findings enabled us to reverse engineer a regulatory network of core processes, and correctly identified the involvement of E2F1, GATA2 and NFKB1 in the regulation of cell cycle, fat, and muscle/glycolysis, respectively. Conclusion The pivotal implication of our research is two-fold: (1 there exists a robust genome-wide expression signal between TFs and their predicted TGs in cattle muscle consistent with the extent of promoter sharing; and (2 this signal can be exploited to recover the cellular mechanisms underpinning transcription regulation of muscle structure and development in bovine. Our study represents the first genome-wide report linking tissue specific co-expression to co-regulation in a non-model vertebrate.

  4. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU XueMei; XIAO HuaSheng

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high.throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome. These variants include copy number variations (CNVs), inversions, insertions, deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences. This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences. Particularly, we highlight the array-based, PCR-based and sequencing-based assays, including array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis (ROMA), multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization (MAPH), multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA), paired-end mapping (PEM), and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  5. Progress in the detection of human genome structural variations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The emerging of high-throughput and high-resolution genomic technologies led to the detection of submicroscopic variants ranging from 1 kb to 3 Mb in the human genome.These variants include copy number variations(CNVs),inversions,insertions,deletions and other complex rearrangements of DNA sequences.This paper briefly reviews the commonly used technologies to discover both genomic structural variants and their potential influences.Particularly,we highlight the array-based,PCR-based and sequencing-based assays,including array-based comparative genomic hybridization(aCGH),representational oligonucleotide microarray analysis(ROMA),multiplex amplifiable probe hybridization(MAPH),multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA),paired-end mapping(PEM),and next-generation DNA sequencing technologies.Furthermore,we discuss the limitations and challenges of current assays and give advices on how to make the database of genomic variations more reliable.

  6. Structural and Operational Complexity of the Geobacter Sulfurreducens Genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Yu; Cho, Byung-Kwan; Park, Young S.; Lovley, Derek R.; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Zengler, Karsten

    2010-06-30

    Prokaryotic genomes can be annotated based on their structural, operational, and functional properties. These annotations provide the pivotal scaffold for understanding cellular functions on a genome-scale, such as metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Here, we describe a systems approach to simultaneously determine the structural and operational annotation of the Geobacter sulfurreducens genome. Integration of proteomics, transcriptomics, RNA polymerase, and sigma factor-binding information with deep-sequencing-based analysis of primary 59-end transcripts allowed for a most precise annotation. The structural annotation is comprised of numerous previously undetected genes, noncoding RNAs, prevalent leaderless mRNA transcripts, and antisense transcripts. When compared with other prokaryotes, we found that the number of antisense transcripts reversely correlated with genome size. The operational annotation consists of 1453 operons, 22% of which have multiple transcription start sites that use different RNA polymerase holoenzymes. Several operons with multiple transcription start sites encoded genes with essential functions, giving insight into the regulatory complexity of the genome. The experimentally determined structural and operational annotations can be combined with functional annotation, yielding a new three-level annotation that greatly expands our understanding of prokaryotic genomes.

  7. Structural dynamics of retroviral genome and the packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki eMiyazaki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Retroviruses can cause diseases such as AIDS, leukemia and tumors, but are also used as vectors for human gene therapy. All retroviruses, except foamy viruses, package two copies of unspliced genomic RNA into their progeny viruses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of retroviral genome packaging will aid the design of new anti-retroviral drugs targeting the packaging process and improve the efficacy of retroviral vectors. Retroviral genomes have to be specifically recognized by the cognate nucleocapsid (NC domain of the Gag polyprotein from among an excess of cellular and spliced viral mRNA. Extensive virological and structural studies have revealed how retroviral genomic RNA is selectively packaged into the viral particles. The genomic area responsible for the packaging is generally located in the 5’ untranslated region (5’ UTR, and contains dimerization site(s. Recent studies have shown that retroviral genome packaging is modulated by structural changes of RNA at the 5’ UTR accompanied by the dimerization. In this review, we focus on three representative retroviruses, Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMLV, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and 2 (HIV-2, and describe the molecular mechanism of retroviral genome packaging.

  8. Structured RNAs and synteny regions in the pig genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthon, Christian; Tafer, Hakim; Havgaard, Jakob Hull;

    2014-01-01

    for Laurasiatheria (pig, cow, dolphin, horse, cat, dog, hedgehog). CONCLUSIONS: We have obtained one of the most comprehensive annotations for structured ncRNAs of a mammalian genome, which is likely to play central roles in both health modelling and production. The core annotation is available in Ensembl 70......BACKGROUND: Annotating mammalian genomes for noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) is nontrivial since far from all ncRNAs are known and the computational models are resource demanding. Currently, the human genome holds the best mammalian ncRNA annotation, a result of numerous efforts by several groups. However...

  9. Modeling Three-Dimensional Chromosome Structures Using Gene Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guanghua; Wang, Xinlei; Khodursky, Arkady B

    2011-03-01

    Recent genomic studies have shown that significant chromosomal spatial correlation exists in gene expression of many organisms. Interestingly, coexpression has been observed among genes separated by a fixed interval in specific regions of a chromosome chain, which is likely caused by three-dimensional (3D) chromosome folding structures. Modeling such spatial correlation explicitly may lead to essential understandings of 3D chromosome structures and their roles in transcriptional regulation. In this paper, we explore chromosomal spatial correlation induced by 3D chromosome structures, and propose a hierarchical Bayesian method based on helical structures to formally model and incorporate the correlation into the analysis of gene expression microarray data. It is the first study to quantify and infer 3D chromosome structures in vivo using expression microarrays. Simulation studies show computing feasibility of the proposed method and that, under the assumption of helical chromosome structures, it can lead to precise estimation of structural parameters and gene expression levels. Real data applications demonstrate an intriguing biological phenomenon that functionally associated genes, which are far apart along the chromosome chain, are brought into physical proximity by chromosomal folding in 3D space to facilitate their coexpression. It leads to important biological insight into relationship between chromosome structure and function.

  10. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gadea Jose; Forment Javier; Santiago Julia; Marques M Carmen; Juarez Jose; Mauri Nuria; Martinez-Godoy M Angeles

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genome-wide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. Results We have designed and constructed a publicly available genome-...

  11. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Godoy, M Angeles; Mauri, Nuria; Juarez, Jose; Marques, M Carmen; Santiago, Julia; Forment, Javier; Gadea, Jose

    2008-01-01

    Background Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genome-wide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. Results We have designed and constructed a publicly available genome-wide cDNA...

  12. The Impact of Structural Genomics: Expectations and Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2005-12-21

    Structural Genomics (SG) projects aim to expand our structural knowledge of biological macromolecules, while lowering the average costs of structure determination. We quantitatively analyzed the novelty, cost, and impact of structures solved by SG centers, and contrast these results with traditional structural biology. The first structure from a protein family is particularly important to reveal the fold and ancient relationships to other proteins. In the last year, approximately half of such structures were solved at a SG center rather than in a traditional laboratory. Furthermore, the cost of solving a structure at the most efficient U.S. center has now dropped to one-quarter the estimated cost of solving a structure by traditional methods. However, top structural biology laboratories are much more efficient than the average, and comparable to SG centers despite working on very challenging structures. Moreover, traditional structural biology papers are cited significantly more often, suggesting greater current impact.

  13. Analyses of the complete genome and gene expression of chloroplast of sweet potato [Ipomoea batata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Lang; Lai, Xianjun; Li, Xuedan; Wei, Changhe; Tan, Xuemei; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam] ranks among the top seven most important food crops cultivated worldwide and is hexaploid plant (2n=6x=90) in the Convolvulaceae family with a genome size between 2,200 to 3,000 Mb. The genomic resources for this crop are deficient due to its complicated genetic structure. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of the chloroplast (cp) genome of sweet potato, which is a circular molecule of 161,303 bp in the typical quadripartite structure with large (LSC) and small (SSC) single-copy regions separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs). The chloroplast DNA contains a total of 145 genes, including 94 protein-encoding genes of which there are 72 single-copy and 11 double-copy genes. The organization and structure of the chloroplast genome (gene content and order, IR expansion/contraction, random repeating sequences, structural rearrangement) of sweet potato were compared with those of Ipomoea (L.) species and some basal important angiosperms, respectively. Some boundary gene-flow and gene gain-and-loss events were identified at intra- and inter-species levels. In addition, by comparing with the transcriptome sequences of sweet potato, the RNA editing events and differential expressions of the chloroplast functional-genes were detected. Moreover, phylogenetic analysis was conducted based on 77 protein-coding genes from 33 taxa and the result may contribute to a better understanding of the evolution progress of the genus Ipomoea (L.), including phylogenetic relationships, intraspecific differentiation and interspecific introgression.

  14. Combing genomic DNA for structural and functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurra, Catherine; Bensimon, Aaron

    2009-01-01

    Molecular combing is a process whereby single DNA molecules bind by their extremities to a silanised surface and are then uniformly stretched and aligned by a receding air/water interface (1). This method, with a high resolution ranging from a few kilobases to megabases, has many applications in the field of molecular cytogenetics, allowing structural and functional analysis at the genome level. Here we describe protocols for preparing DNA for combing and for the use of fluorescent hybridisation (FH) applied to combed DNA to conduct physical mapping or genomic structural analysis. We also present the methodology for visualising and studying DNA replication using combed DNA.

  15. Rapid detection of structural variation in a human genome using nanochannel-based genome mapping technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hastie, Alex R.; Cao, Dandan

    2014-01-01

    mutations; however, none of the current detection methods are comprehensive, and currently available methodologies are incapable of providing sufficient resolution and unambiguous information across complex regions in the human genome. To address these challenges, we applied a high-throughput, cost......BACKGROUND: Structural variants (SVs) are less common than single nucleotide polymorphisms and indels in the population, but collectively account for a significant fraction of genetic polymorphism and diseases. Base pair differences arising from SVs are on a much higher order (>100 fold) than point...... mapping technology as a comprehensive and cost-effective method for detecting structural variation and studying complex regions in the human genome, as well as deciphering viral integration into the host genome....

  16. Benefits of structural genomics for drug discovery research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Marek; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Kirillova, Olga; Minor, Wladek

    2009-11-01

    While three dimensional structures have long been used to search for new drug targets, only a fraction of new drugs coming to the market has been developed with the use of a structure-based drug discovery approach. However, the recent years have brought not only an avalanche of new macromolecular structures, but also significant advances in the protein structure determination methodology only now making their way into structure-based drug discovery. In this paper, we review recent developments resulting from the Structural Genomics (SG) programs, focusing on the methods and results most likely to improve our understanding of the molecular foundation of human diseases. SG programs have been around for almost a decade, and in that time, have contributed a significant part of the structural coverage of both the genomes of pathogens causing infectious diseases and structurally uncharacterized biological processes in general. Perhaps most importantly, SG programs have developed new methodology at all steps of the structure determination process, not only to determine new structures highly efficiently, but also to screen protein/ligand interactions. We describe the methodologies, experience and technologies developed by SG, which range from improvements to cloning protocols to improved procedures for crystallographic structure solution that may be applied in "traditional" structural biology laboratories particularly those performing drug discovery. We also discuss the conditions that must be met to convert the present high-throughput structure determination pipeline into a high-output structure-based drug discovery system.

  17. Benefits of Structural Genomics for Drug Discovery Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabowski, M.; Chruszcz, M; Zimmerman, M; Kirillova, O; Minor, W

    2009-01-01

    While three dimensional structures have long been used to search for new drug targets, only a fraction of new drugs coming to the market has been developed with the use of a structure-based drug discovery approach. However, the recent years have brought not only an avalanche of new macromolecular structures, but also significant advances in the protein structure determination methodology only now making their way into structure-based drug discovery. In this paper, we review recent developments resulting from the Structural Genomics (SG) programs, focusing on the methods and results most likely to improve our understanding of the molecular foundation of human diseases. SG programs have been around for almost a decade, and in that time, have contributed a significant part of the structural coverage of both the genomes of pathogens causing infectious diseases and structurally uncharacterized biological processes in general. Perhaps most importantly, SG programs have developed new methodology at all steps of the structure determination process, not only to determine new structures highly efficiently, but also to screen protein/ligand interactions. We describe the methodologies, experience and technologies developed by SG, which range from improvements to cloning protocols to improved procedures for crystallographic structure solution that may be applied in 'traditional' structural biology laboratories particularly those performing drug discovery. We also discuss the conditions that must be met to convert the present high-throughput structure determination pipeline into a high-output structure-based drug discovery system.

  18. Thousands of corresponding human and mouse genomic regions unalignable in primary sequence contain common RNA structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torarinsson, Elfar; Sawera, Milena; Havgaard, Jakob Hull

    2006-01-01

    been investigated. Owing to the limitations in computational methods, comparative genomics has been lacking the ability to compare such nonconserved sequence regions for conserved structural RNA elements. We have investigated the presence of structural RNA elements by conducting a local structural...... alignment, using FOLDALIGN, on a subset of these 100,000 corresponding regions and estimate that 1800 contain common RNA structures. Comparing our results with the recent mapping of transcribed fragments (transfrags) in human, we find that high-scoring candidates are twice as likely to be found in regions...... expressed non-coding RNA sequences not alignable in primary sequence....

  19. Genome-wide profiling of structural genomic variations in Korean HapMap individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Seol Bae

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Structural genomic variation study, along with microarray technology development has provided many genomic resources related with architecture of human genome, and led to the fact that human genome structure is a lot more complicated than previously thought. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the case of International HapMap Project, Epstein-Barr various immortalized cell lines were preferably used over blood in order to get a larger number of genomic DNA. However, genomic aberration stemming from immortalization process, biased representation of the donor tissue, and culture process may influence the accuracy of SNP genotypes. In order to identify chromosome aberrations including loss of heterozygosity (LOH, large-scale and small-scale copy number variations, we used Illumina HumanHap500 BeadChip (555,352 markers on Korean HapMap individuals (n = 90 to obtain Log R ratio and B allele frequency information, and then utilized the data with various programs including Illumina ChromoZone, cnvParition and PennCNV. As a result, we identified 28 LOHs (>3 mb and 35 large-scale CNVs (>1 mb, with 4 samples having completely duplicated chromosome. In addition, after checking the sample quality (standard deviation of log R ratio <0.30, we selected 79 samples and used both signal intensity and B allele frequency simultaneously for identification of small-scale CNVs (<1 mb to discover 4,989 small-scale CNVs. Identified CNVs in this study were successfully validated using visual examination of the genoplot images, overlapping analysis with previously reported CNVs in DGV, and quantitative PCR. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In this study, we describe the result of the identified chromosome aberrations in Korean HapMap individuals, and expect that these findings will provide more meaningful information on the human genome.

  20. Data structures of genome and protein sequences indexing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeleh asadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Data structure is a tool for storage and retrieval of information which is named logic and mathematic way of specific data organization. various sequences of genes and proteins in various creatures increases the amount of data in genome databases, and finding appropriate data structure and indexing are subject for many studies. String data structures are general data structure for genome indexing, and this article would review the many used three types of string data structure, suffix tree, suffix array, and Directed Acyclic Word Graphs. This paper is a review of the literature related to three types of data, including genome databases indexing field, tree, postfix, postfix and graphs spiral array directly introduces the word. Findings of this research show that suffix tree and Directed Acyclic Word Graph (DAWG structures need much space however suffix array need less space. Against the Directed Acyclic Word Graph, suffix array can be stored on Memory Stick. Suffix tree and Directed Acyclic Word Graph are a dynamic structures but as suffix array is a Sorted out structure, it could hardly be changed.

  1. Evolutionary genomics and population structure of Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koushik Das

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Amoebiasis caused by the gastrointestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica has diverse disease outcomes. Study of genome and evolution of this fascinating parasite will help us to understand the basis of its virulence and explain why, when and how it causes diseases. In this review, we have summarized current knowledge regarding evolutionary genomics of E. histolytica and discussed their association with parasite phenotypes and its differential pathogenic behavior. How genetic diversity reveals parasite population structure has also been discussed. Queries concerning their evolution and population structure which were required to be addressed have also been highlighted. This significantly large amount of genomic data will improve our knowledge about this pathogenic species of Entamoeba.

  2. Current challenges in genome annotation through structural biology and bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnham, Nicholas; de Beer, Tjaart A P; Thornton, Janet M

    2012-10-01

    With the huge volume in genomic sequences being generated from high-throughout sequencing projects the requirement for providing accurate and detailed annotations of gene products has never been greater. It is proving to be a huge challenge for computational biologists to use as much information as possible from experimental data to provide annotations for genome data of unknown function. A central component to this process is to use experimentally determined structures, which provide a means to detect homology that is not discernable from just the sequence and permit the consequences of genomic variation to be realized at the molecular level. In particular, structures also form the basis of many bioinformatics methods for improving the detailed functional annotations of enzymes in combination with similarities in sequence and chemistry. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Structural Genomics of Bacterial Virulence Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    structure of pXO1-118 shown in its 2fo-fc electron density map. Arginine 74 and the two visible conformations of Phenylalanine 19 are shown. B...the methane monooxygenase hydroxylase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath): implications for substrate gating and component interac- tions. Proteins

  4. Genome-wide gene expression regulation as a function of genotype and age in C. elegans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Viñuela Rodriguez, A.; Snoek, L.B.; Riksen, J.A.G.; Kammenga, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Gene expression becomes more variable with age, and it is widely assumed that this is due to a decrease in expression regulation. But currently there is no understanding how gene expression regulatory patterns progress with age. Here we explored genome-wide gene expression variation and regulatory l

  5. Physarum nitric oxide synthases: genomic structures and enzymology of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Simon; Leitner, Stephan; Bommassar, Christian; Golderer, Georg; Gröbner, Peter; Werner, Ernst R.; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    Physarum polycephalum expresses two closely related, calcium-independent NOSs (nitric oxide synthases). In our previous work, we showed that both NOSs are induced during starvation and apparently play a functional role in sporulation. In the present study, we characterized the genomic structures of both Physarum NOSs, expressed both enzymes recombinantly in bacteria and characterized their biochemical properties. Whereas the overall genomic organization of Physarum NOS genes is comparable with various animal NOSs, none of the exon–intron boundaries are conserved. Recombinant expression of clones with various N-termini identified N-terminal amino acids essential for enzyme activity, but not required for haem binding or dimerization, and suggests the usage of non-AUG start codons for Physarum NOSs. Biochemical characterization of the two Physarum isoenzymes revealed different affinities for L-arginine, FMN and 6R-5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-L-biopterin. PMID:19046139

  6. Structural variation in two human genomes mapped at single-nucleotide resolution by whole genome de novo assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zheng, Hancheng; Luo, Ruibang

    2011-01-01

    Here we use whole-genome de novo assembly of second-generation sequencing reads to map structural variation (SV) in an Asian genome and an African genome. Our approach identifies small- and intermediate-size homozygous variants (1-50 kb) including insertions, deletions, inversions and their precise...

  7. Toward Elucidating the Structure of Tetraploid Cotton Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Upland cotton has the highest yield,and accounts for >95% of world cotton production.Decoding upland cotton genomes will undoubtedly provide the ultimate reference and resource for structural,functional,and evolutionary studies of the species.Here,we employed GeneTrek and BAC

  8. Structured RNAs and synteny regions in the pig genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthon, Christian; Tafer, Hakim; Havgaard, Jakob H

    2014-01-01

    for Laurasiatheria (pig, cow, dolphin, horse, cat, dog, hedgehog). CONCLUSIONS: We have obtained one of the most comprehensive annotations for structured ncRNAs of a mammalian genome, which is likely to play central roles in both health modelling and production. The core annotation is available in Ensembl 70...

  9. Symbolic extensions applied to multiscale structure of genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downarowicz, Tomasz; Travisany, Dante; Montecino, Martin; Maass, Alejandro

    2014-06-01

    A genome of a living organism consists of a long string of symbols over a finite alphabet carrying critical information for the organism. This includes its ability to control post natal growth, homeostasis, adaptation to changes in the surrounding environment, or to biochemically respond at the cellular level to various specific regulatory signals. In this sense, a genome represents a symbolic encoding of a highly organized system of information whose functioning may be revealed as a natural multilayer structure in terms of complexity and prominence. In this paper we use the mathematical theory of symbolic extensions as a framework to shed light onto how this multilayer organization is reflected in the symbolic coding of the genome. The distribution of data in an element of a standard symbolic extension of a dynamical system has a specific form: the symbolic sequence is divided into several subsequences (which we call layers) encoding the dynamics on various "scales". We propose that a similar structure resides within the genomes, building our analogy on some of the most recent findings in the field of regulation of genomic DNA functioning.

  10. Structured RNAs and synteny regions in the pig genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthon, Christian; Tafer, Hakim; Havgaard, Jakob Hull

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Annotating mammalian genomes for noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) is nontrivial since far from all ncRNAs are known and the computational models are resource demanding. Currently, the human genome holds the best mammalian ncRNA annotation, a result of numerous efforts by several groups. However......, a more direct strategy is desired for the increasing number of sequenced mammalian genomes of which some, such as the pig, are relevant as disease models and production animals. RESULTS: We present a comprehensive annotation of structured RNAs in the pig genome. Combining sequence and structure...... lncRNA loci, 11 conflicts of annotation, and 3,183 ncRNA genes. The ncRNA genes comprise 359 miRNAs, 8 ribozymes, 185 rRNAs, 638 snoRNAs, 1,030 snRNAs, 810 tRNAs and 153 ncRNA genes not belonging to the here fore mentioned classes. When running the pipeline on a local shuffled version of the genome...

  11. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary, and Expression Analyses of Histone H3 Variants in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinteng Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Histone variants alter the nucleosome structure and play important roles in chromosome segregation, transcription, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Histone H3 is encoded by many genes in most eukaryotic species and is the histone that contains the largest variety of posttranslational modifications. Compared with the metazoan H3 variants, little is known about the complex evolutionary history of H3 variants proteins in plants. Here, we study the identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants from genomes in major branches in the plant tree of life. Firstly we identified all the histone three related (HTR genes from the examined genomes, then we classified the four groups variants: centromeric H3, H3.1, H3.3 and H3-like, by phylogenetic analysis, intron information, and alignment. We further demonstrated that the H3 variants have evolved under strong purifying selection, indicating the conservation of HTR proteins. Expression analysis revealed that the HTR has a wide expression profile in maize and rice development and plays important roles in development.

  12. TOPSAN: a dynamic web database for structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellrott, Kyle; Zmasek, Christian M; Weekes, Dana; Sri Krishna, S; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Godzik, Adam; Wooley, John

    2011-01-01

    The Open Protein Structure Annotation Network (TOPSAN) is a web-based collaboration platform for exploring and annotating structures determined by structural genomics efforts. Characterization of those structures presents a challenge since the majority of the proteins themselves have not yet been characterized. Responding to this challenge, the TOPSAN platform facilitates collaborative annotation and investigation via a user-friendly web-based interface pre-populated with automatically generated information. Semantic web technologies expand and enrich TOPSAN's content through links to larger sets of related databases, and thus, enable data integration from disparate sources and data mining via conventional query languages. TOPSAN can be found at http://www.topsan.org.

  13. Genomic mid-range inhomogeneity correlates with an abundance of RNA secondary structures

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    Song Jun

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes possess different levels of non-randomness, in particular, an inhomogeneity in their nucleotide composition. Inhomogeneity is manifest from the short-range where neighboring nucleotides influence the choice of base at a site, to the long-range, commonly known as isochores, where a particular base composition can span millions of nucleotides. A separate genomic issue that has yet to be thoroughly elucidated is the role that RNA secondary structure (SS plays in gene expression. Results We present novel data and approaches that show that a mid-range inhomogeneity (~30 to 1000 nt not only exists in mammalian genomes but is also significantly associated with strong RNA SS. A whole-genome bioinformatics investigation of local SS in a set of 11,315 non-redundant human pre-mRNA sequences has been carried out. Four distinct components of these molecules (5'-UTRs, exons, introns and 3'-UTRs were considered separately, since they differ in overall nucleotide composition, sequence motifs and periodicities. For each pre-mRNA component, the abundance of strong local SS ( Conclusion We demonstrate that the excess of strong local SS in pre-mRNAs is linked to the little explored phenomenon of genomic mid-range inhomogeneity (MRI. MRI is an interdependence between nucleotide choice and base composition over a distance of 20–1000 nt. Additionally, we have created a public computational resource to support further study of genomic MRI.

  14. On the expression strategy of the tospoviral genome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelwijk, van F.

    1996-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was aimed at the unravelling of the molecular biology of tospoviruses, with special emphasis on the process of replication of the tripartite RNA genome.At the onset of the research the complete genome sequence of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), type species of the

  15. Global transcript structure resolution of high gene density genomes through multi-platform data integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Tina; Wang, Xia; Höner Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Baddoo, Melody; Concha, Monica; Flemington, Erik K

    2016-10-14

    Annotation of herpesvirus genomes has traditionally been undertaken through the detection of open reading frames and other genomic motifs, supplemented with sequencing of individual cDNAs. Second generation sequencing and high-density microarray studies have revealed vastly greater herpesvirus transcriptome complexity than is captured by existing annotation. The pervasive nature of overlapping transcription throughout herpesvirus genomes, however, poses substantial problems in resolving transcript structures using these methods alone. We present an approach that combines the unique attributes of Pacific Biosciences Iso-Seq long-read, Illumina short-read and deepCAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) sequencing to globally resolve polyadenylated isoform structures in replicating Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Our method, Transcriptome Resolution through Integration of Multi-platform Data (TRIMD), identifies nearly 300 novel EBV transcripts, quadrupling the size of the annotated viral transcriptome. These findings illustrate an array of mechanisms through which EBV achieves functional diversity in its relatively small, compact genome including programmed alternative splicing (e.g. across the IR1 repeats), alternative promoter usage by LMP2 and other latency-associated transcripts, intergenic splicing at the BZLF2 locus, and antisense transcription and pervasive readthrough transcription throughout the genome.

  16. Structural features of conopeptide genes inferred from partial sequences of the Conus tribblei genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghi, Neda; Concepcion, Gisela P; Olivera, Baldomero M; Lluisma, Arturo O

    2016-02-01

    The evolvability of venom components (in particular, the gene-encoded peptide toxins) in venomous species serves as an adaptive strategy allowing them to target new prey types or respond to changes in the prey field. The structure, organization, and expression of the venom peptide genes may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms that drive the evolution of such genes. Conus is a particularly interesting group given the high chemical diversity of their venom peptides, and the rapid evolution of the conopeptide-encoding genes. Conus genomes, however, are large and characterized by a high proportion of repetitive sequences. As a result, the structure and organization of conopeptide genes have remained poorly known. In this study, a survey of the genome of Conus tribblei was undertaken to address this gap. A partial assembly of C. tribblei genome was generated; the assembly, though consisting of a large number of fragments, accounted for 2160.5 Mb of sequence. A large number of repetitive genomic elements consisting of 642.6 Mb of retrotransposable elements, simple repeats, and novel interspersed repeats were observed. We characterized the structural organization and distribution of conotoxin genes in the genome. A significant number of conopeptide genes (estimated to be between 148 and 193) belonging to different superfamilies with complete or nearly complete exon regions were observed, ~60 % of which were expressed. The unexpressed conopeptide genes represent hidden but significant conotoxin diversity. The conotoxin genes also differed in the frequency and length of the introns. The interruption of exons by long introns in the conopeptide genes and the presence of repeats in the introns may indicate the importance of introns in facilitating recombination, evolution and diversification of conotoxins. These findings advance our understanding of the structural framework that promotes the gene-level molecular evolution of venom peptides.

  17. Genetic linkage map of a wild genome: genomic structure, recombination and sexual dimorphism in bighorn sheep

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    Miller Joshua M

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The construction of genetic linkage maps in free-living populations is a promising tool for the study of evolution. However, such maps are rare because it is difficult to develop both wild pedigrees and corresponding sets of molecular markers that are sufficiently large. We took advantage of two long-term field studies of pedigreed individuals and genomic resources originally developed for domestic sheep (Ovis aries to construct a linkage map for bighorn sheep, Ovis canadensis. We then assessed variability in genomic structure and recombination rates between bighorn sheep populations and sheep species. Results Bighorn sheep population-specific maps differed slightly in contiguity but were otherwise very similar in terms of genomic structure and recombination rates. The joint analysis of the two pedigrees resulted in a highly contiguous map composed of 247 microsatellite markers distributed along all 26 autosomes and the X chromosome. The map is estimated to cover about 84% of the bighorn sheep genome and contains 240 unique positions spanning a sex-averaged distance of 3051 cM with an average inter-marker distance of 14.3 cM. Marker synteny, order, sex-averaged interval lengths and sex-averaged total map lengths were all very similar between sheep species. However, in contrast to domestic sheep, but consistent with the usual pattern for a placental mammal, recombination rates in bighorn sheep were significantly greater in females than in males (~12% difference, resulting in an autosomal female map of 3166 cM and an autosomal male map of 2831 cM. Despite differing genome-wide patterns of heterochiasmy between the sheep species, sexual dimorphism in recombination rates was correlated between orthologous intervals. Conclusions We have developed a first-generation bighorn sheep linkage map that will facilitate future studies of the genetic architecture of trait variation in this species. While domestication has been hypothesized

  18. Expression of the Epigenetic factor BORIS (CTCFL in the Human Genome

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    de Necochea-Campion Rosalia

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract BORIS, or CTCFL, the so called Brother of the Regulator of Imprinted Sites because of the extensive homology in the central DNA binding region of the protein to the related regulator, CTCF, is expressed in early gametogenesis and in multiple cancers but not in differentiated somatic cells. Thus it is a member of the cancer testes antigen group (CTAs. Since BORIS and CTCF target common DNA binding sites, these proteins function on two levels, the first level is their regulation via the methylation context of the DNA target site and the second level is their distinct and different epigenetic associations due to differences in the non-homologous termini of the proteins. The regulation on both of these levels is extensive and complex and the sphere of influence of each of these proteins is associated with vastly different cellular signaling processes. On the level of gene expression, BORIS has three known promoters and multiple spliced mRNAs which adds another level of complexity to this intriguing regulator. BORIS expression is observed in the majority of cancer tissues and cell lines analyzed up to today. The expression profile and essential role of BORIS in cancer make this molecule very attractive target for cancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes what is known about BORIS regarding its expression, structure, and function and then presents some theoretical considerations with respect to its genome wide influence and its potential for use as a vaccine for cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Expression of heterologous sigma factors enables functional screening of metagenomic and heterologous genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, Stefan M; Sandoval, Nicholas R; Nicolaou, Sergios A; Chen, Yili; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T

    2015-05-06

    A key limitation in using heterologous genomic or metagenomic libraries in functional genomics and genome engineering is the low expression of heterologous genes in screening hosts, such as Escherichia coli. To overcome this limitation, here we generate E. coli strains capable of recognizing heterologous promoters by expressing heterologous sigma factors. Among seven sigma factors tested, RpoD from Lactobacillus plantarum (Lpl) appears to be able of initiating transcription from all sources of DNA. Using the promoter GFP-trap concept, we successfully screen several heterologous and metagenomic DNA libraries, thus enlarging the genomic space that can be functionally sampled in E. coli. For an application, we show that screening fosmid-based Lpl genomic libraries in an E. coli strain with a chromosomally integrated Lpl rpoD enables the identification of Lpl genetic determinants imparting strong ethanol tolerance in E. coli. Transcriptome analysis confirms increased expression of heterologous genes in the engineered strain.

  20. Chromatin structure and evolution in the human genome

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    Dunlop Malcolm G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary rates are not constant across the human genome but genes in close proximity have been shown to experience similar levels of divergence and selection. The higher-order organisation of chromosomes has often been invoked to explain such phenomena but previously there has been insufficient data on chromosome structure to investigate this rigorously. Using the results of a recent genome-wide analysis of open and closed human chromatin structures we have investigated the global association between divergence, selection and chromatin structure for the first time. Results In this study we have shown that, paradoxically, synonymous site divergence (dS at non-CpG sites is highest in regions of open chromatin, primarily as a result of an increased number of transitions, while the rates of other traditional measures of mutation (intergenic, intronic and ancient repeat divergence as well as SNP density are highest in closed regions of the genome. Analysis of human-chimpanzee divergence across intron-exon boundaries indicates that although genes in relatively open chromatin generally display little selection at their synonymous sites, those in closed regions show markedly lower divergence at their fourfold degenerate sites than in neighbouring introns and intergenic regions. Exclusion of known Exonic Splice Enhancer hexamers has little affect on the divergence observed at fourfold degenerate sites across chromatin categories; however, we show that closed chromatin is enriched with certain classes of ncRNA genes whose RNA secondary structure may be particularly important. Conclusion We conclude that, overall, non-CpG mutation rates are lowest in open regions of the genome and that regions of the genome with a closed chromatin structure have the highest background mutation rate. This might reflect lower rates of DNA damage or enhanced DNA repair processes in regions of open chromatin. Our results also indicate that dS is a poor

  1. Target selection and determination of function in structural genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James D; Todd, Annabel E; Bray, James; Laskowski, Roman A; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Orengo, Christine A; Thornton, Janet M

    2003-01-01

    The first crucial step in any structural genomics project is the selection and prioritization of target proteins for structure determination. There may be a number of selection criteria to be satisfied, including that the proteins have novel folds, that they be representatives of large families for which no structure is known, and so on. The better the selection at this stage, the greater is the value of the structures obtained at the end of the experimental process. This value can be further enhanced once the protein structures have been solved if the functions of the given proteins can also be determined. Here we describe the methods used at either end of the experimental process: firstly, sensitive sequence comparison techniques for selecting a high-quality list of target proteins, and secondly the various computational methods that can be applied to the eventual 3D structures to determine the most likely biochemical function of the proteins in question.

  2. Complete nucleotide sequence of the Cryptomeria japonica D. Don. chloroplast genome and comparative chloroplast genomics: diversified genomic structure of coniferous species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirao, Tomonori; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kurita, Manabu; Kondo, Teiji; Takata, Katsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    Background The recent determination of complete chloroplast (cp) genomic sequences of various plant species has enabled numerous comparative analyses as well as advances in plant and genome evolutionary studies. In angiosperms, the complete cp genome sequences of about 70 species have been determined, whereas those of only three gymnosperm species, Cycas taitungensis, Pinus thunbergii, and Pinus koraiensis have been established. The lack of information regarding the gene content and genomic structure of gymnosperm cp genomes may severely hamper further progress of plant and cp genome evolutionary studies. To address this need, we report here the complete nucleotide sequence of the cp genome of Cryptomeria japonica, the first in the Cupressaceae sensu lato of gymnosperms, and provide a comparative analysis of their gene content and genomic structure that illustrates the unique genomic features of gymnosperms. Results The C. japonica cp genome is 131,810 bp in length, with 112 single copy genes and two duplicated (trnI-CAU, trnQ-UUG) genes that give a total of 116 genes. Compared to other land plant cp genomes, the C. japonica cp has lost one of the relevant large inverted repeats (IRs) found in angiosperms, fern, liverwort, and gymnosperms, such as Cycas and Gingko, and additionally has completely lost its trnR-CCG, partially lost its trnT-GGU, and shows diversification of accD. The genomic structure of the C. japonica cp genome also differs significantly from those of other plant species. For example, we estimate that a minimum of 15 inversions would be required to transform the gene organization of the Pinus thunbergii cp genome into that of C. japonica. In the C. japonica cp genome, direct repeat and inverted repeat sequences are observed at the inversion and translocation endpoints, and these sequences may be associated with the genomic rearrangements. Conclusion The observed differences in genomic structure between C. japonica and other land plants, including

  3. The construction of genomic libraries of Cowdria ruminantium in an expression vector, lambda gt11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, R E; Du Plessis, J L; Bezuidenhout, J D

    1987-09-01

    Genomic libraries of the Welgevonden and Kwanyanga isolates of Cowdria ruminantium have been constructed in an expression vector. These libraries contain approximately 4 x 10(5) and 3 x 10(5) recombinants respectively.

  4. Implications of structural genomics target selection strategies: Pfam5000, whole genome, and random approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Brenner, Steven E.

    2004-07-14

    The structural genomics project is an international effort to determine the three-dimensional shapes of all important biological macromolecules, with a primary focus on proteins. Target proteins should be selected according to a strategy which is medically and biologically relevant, of good value, and tractable. As an option to consider, we present the Pfam5000 strategy, which involves selecting the 5000 most important families from the Pfam database as sources for targets. We compare the Pfam5000 strategy to several other proposed strategies that would require similar numbers of targets. These include including complete solution of several small to moderately sized bacterial proteomes, partial coverage of the human proteome, and random selection of approximately 5000 targets from sequenced genomes. We measure the impact that successful implementation of these strategies would have upon structural interpretation of the proteins in Swiss-Prot, TrEMBL, and 131 complete proteomes (including 10 of eukaryotes) from the Proteome Analysis database at EBI. Solving the structures of proteins from the 5000 largest Pfam families would allow accurate fold assignment for approximately 68 percent of all prokaryotic proteins (covering 59 percent of residues) and 61 percent of eukaryotic proteins (40 percent of residues). More fine-grained coverage which would allow accurate modeling of these proteins would require an order of magnitude more targets. The Pfam5000 strategy may be modified in several ways, for example to focus on larger families, bacterial sequences, or eukaryotic sequences; as long as secondary consideration is given to large families within Pfam, coverage results vary only slightly. In contrast, focusing structural genomics on a single tractable genome would have only a limited impact in structural knowledge of other proteomes: a significant fraction (about 30-40 percent of the proteins, and 40-60 percent of the residues) of each proteome is classified in small

  5. Impact of chromatin structures on DNA processing for genomic analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid Teytelman

    Full Text Available Chromatin has an impact on recombination, repair, replication, and evolution of DNA. Here we report that chromatin structure also affects laboratory DNA manipulation in ways that distort the results of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP experiments. We initially discovered this effect at the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMR locus, where we found that silenced chromatin was refractory to shearing, relative to euchromatin. Using input samples from ChIP-Seq studies, we detected a similar bias throughout the heterochromatic portions of the yeast genome. We also observed significant chromatin-related effects at telomeres, protein binding sites, and genes, reflected in the variation of input-Seq coverage. Experimental tests of candidate regions showed that chromatin influenced shearing at some loci, and that chromatin could also lead to enriched or depleted DNA levels in prepared samples, independently of shearing effects. Our results suggested that assays relying on immunoprecipitation of chromatin will be biased by intrinsic differences between regions packaged into different chromatin structures - biases which have been largely ignored to date. These results established the pervasiveness of this bias genome-wide, and suggested that this bias can be used to detect differences in chromatin structures across the genome.

  6. Genomic and expression array profiling of chromosome 20q amplicon in human colon cancer cells

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    Carter Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gain of the q arm of chromosome 20 in human colorectal cancer has been associated with poorer survival time and has been reported to increase in frequency from adenomas to metastasis. The increasing frequency of chromosome 20q amplification during colorectal cancer progression and the presence of this amplification in carcinomas of other tissue origin has lead us to hypothesize that 20q11-13 harbors one or more genes which, when over expressed promote tumor invasion and metastasis. Aims: Generate genomic and expression profiles of the 20q amplicon in human cancer cell lines in order to identify genes with increased copy number and expression. Materials and Methods: Utilizing genomic sequencing clones and amplification mapping data from our lab and other previous studies, BAC/ PAC tiling paths spanning the 20q amplicon and genomic microarrays were generated. Array-CGH on the custom array with human cancer cell line DNAs was performed to generate genomic profiles of the amplicon. Expression array analysis with RNA from these cell lines using commercial oligo microarrays generated expression profiles of the amplicon. The data were then combined in order to identify genes with increased copy number and expression. Results: Over expressed genes in regions of increased copy number were identified and a list of potential novel genetic tumor markers was assembled based on biological functions of these genes Conclusions: Performing high-resolution genomic microarray profiling in conjunction with expression analysis is an effective approach to identify potential tumor markers.

  7. Structure and sequence of the saimiriine herpesvirus 1 genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Shaun; Severini, Alberto; Black, Darla; Walker, Matthew; Eberle, R

    2011-02-05

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the squirrel monkey α-herpesvirus saimiriine herpesvirus 1 (HVS1). Unlike the simplexviruses of other primate species, only the unique short region of the HVS1 genome is bounded by inverted repeats. While all Old World simian simplexviruses characterized to date lack the herpes simplex virus RL1 (γ34.5) gene, HVS1 has an RL1 gene. HVS1 lacks several genes that are present in other primate simplexviruses (US8.5, US10-12, UL43/43.5 and UL49A). Although the overall genome structure appears more like that of varicelloviruses, the encoded HVS1 proteins are most closely related to homologous proteins of the primate simplexviruses. Phylogenetic analyses confirm that HVS1 is a simplexvirus. Limited comparison of two HVS1 strains revealed a very low degree of sequence variation more typical of varicelloviruses. HVS1 is thus unique among the primate α-herpesviruses in that its genome has properties of both simplexviruses and varicelloviruses.

  8. Ectopic expression of cancer/testis antigen SSX2 induces DNA damage and promotes genomic instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Lindgreen, Jonas; Terp, Mikkel Green

    2015-01-01

    replication stress translates into mitotic defects and genomic instability. Arrest of cell growth and induction of DNA double-strand breaks was also observed in MCF7 breast cancer cells in response to SSX2 expression. Additionally, MCF7 cells with ectopic SSX2 expression demonstrated typical signs...... of SSX2 expression in melanoma cell lines demonstrated that SSX2 supports the growth of melanoma cells. Our results reveal two important phenotypes of ectopic SSX2 expression that may drive/support tumorigenesis: First, immediate induction of genomic instability, and second, long-term support of tumor...

  9. Comparative analysis of whole genome structure of Streptococcus suis using whole genome PCR scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An outbreak associated with Streptococcus suis infection in humans emerged in Sichuan province, China in 2005. The outbreak is atypical for the apparent large number of human cases, high fatality rate and geographical spread. To determine whether the bacterium has changed, we compared both human and animal isolates from the Sichuan outbreak with those collected previously within China and in other countries using whole genome PCR scanning (WGPScaning) comparative sequencing of several known virulence factor genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. WGPScanning analysis showed that all primer pairs yielded PCR products of the expected sizes in all four strains tested. The nucleotide sequences of all the detected virulence factor genes are identical in the four strains and MLST results showed that the four isolates studied and reference strain all belonged to the ST1 complex. No new genetic changes were found in the genome structure of the isolates from this Sichuan outbreak.

  10. Comparative analysis of whole genome structure of Streptococcus suis using whole genome PCR scanning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    An outbreak associated with Streptococcus suis infection in humans emerged in Sichuan province, China in 2005. The outbreak is atypical for the apparent large number of human cases, high fatality rate and geographical spread. To determine whether the bacterium has changed, we compared both human and animal isolates from the Sichuan outbreak with those collected previously within China and in other countries using whole genome PCR scanning (WGPScaning) comparative sequencing of several known virulence factor genes and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) analysis. WGPScanning analysis showed that all primer pairs yielded PCR products of the expected sizes in all four strains tested. The nucleotide sequences of all the detected virulence factor genes are identical in the four strains and MLST results showed that the four isolates studied and reference strain all belonged to the ST1 com-plex. No new genetic changes were found in the genome structure of the isolates from this Sichuan outbreak.

  11. Bidirectional promoters of insects: genome-wide comparison, evolutionary implication and influence on gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behura, Susanta K; Severson, David W

    2015-01-30

    Bidirectional promoters are widespread in insect genomes. By analyzing 23 insect genomes we show that the frequency of bidirectional gene pairs varies according to genome compactness and density of genes among the species. The density of bidirectional genes expected based on number of genes per megabase of genome explains the observed density suggesting that bidirectional pairing of genes may be due to random event. We identified specific transcription factor binding motifs that are enriched in bidirectional promoters across insect species. Furthermore, we observed that bidirectional promoters may act as transcriptional hotspots in insect genomes where protein coding genes tend to aggregate in significantly biased (p promoters. Natural selection seems to have an association with the extent of bidirectionality of genes among the species. The rate of non-synonymous-to-synonymous changes (dN/dS) shows a second-order polynomial distribution with bidirectionality between species indicating that bidirectionality is dependent upon evolutionary pressure acting on the genomes. Analysis of genome-wide microarray expression data of multiple insect species suggested that bidirectionality has a similar association with transcriptome variation across species. Furthermore, bidirectional promoters show significant association with correlated expression of the divergent gene pairs depending upon their motif composition. Analysis of gene ontology showed that bidirectional genes tend to have a common association with functions related to "binding" (including ion binding, nucleotide binding and protein binding) across genomes. Such functional constraint of bidirectional genes may explain their widespread persistence in genome of diverse insect species.

  12. Ancient Duplications and Expression Divergence in the Globin Gene Superfamily of Vertebrates: Insights from the Elephant Shark Genome and Transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opazo, Juan C; Lee, Alison P; Hoffmann, Federico G; Toloza-Villalobos, Jessica; Burmester, Thorsten; Venkatesh, Byrappa; Storz, Jay F

    2015-07-01

    Comparative analyses of vertebrate genomes continue to uncover a surprising diversity of genes in the globin gene superfamily, some of which have very restricted phyletic distributions despite their antiquity. Genomic analysis of the globin gene repertoire of cartilaginous fish (Chondrichthyes) should be especially informative about the duplicative origins and ancestral functions of vertebrate globins, as divergence between Chondrichthyes and bony vertebrates represents the most basal split within the jawed vertebrates. Here, we report a comparative genomic analysis of the vertebrate globin gene family that includes the complete globin gene repertoire of the elephant shark (Callorhinchus milii). Using genomic sequence data from representatives of all major vertebrate classes, integrated analyses of conserved synteny and phylogenetic relationships revealed that the last common ancestor of vertebrates possessed a repertoire of at least seven globin genes: single copies of androglobin and neuroglobin, four paralogous copies of globin X, and the single-copy progenitor of the entire set of vertebrate-specific globins. Combined with expression data, the genomic inventory of elephant shark globins yielded four especially surprising findings: 1) there is no trace of the neuroglobin gene (a highly conserved gene that is present in all other jawed vertebrates that have been examined to date), 2) myoglobin is highly expressed in heart, but not in skeletal muscle (reflecting a possible ancestral condition in vertebrates with single-circuit circulatory systems), 3) elephant shark possesses two highly divergent globin X paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in gonads, and 4) elephant shark possesses two structurally distinct α-globin paralogs, one of which is preferentially expressed in the brain. Expression profiles of elephant shark globin genes reveal distinct specializations of function relative to orthologs in bony vertebrates and suggest hypotheses about

  13. Comparative evaluation of genome-wide gene expression profiles in ruptured and unruptured human intracranial aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchese, Enrico; Vignati, A; Albanese, A; Nucci, C G; Sabatino, G; Tirpakova, B; Lofrese, G; Zelano, G; Maira, G

    2010-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the over or the underexpression of genes directly in samples of aneurysmal wall and extracranial pericranial vascular tissue to investigate the genetic influence in formation and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. We present the results obtained using the DNA microarray technique analysis on sample tissues collected during surgery. We collected and analyzed 12 aneurismal and 9 peripheral arteries (superficial temporal (STA) and middle meningeal artery (MMA) specimens from ruptured aneurysm group patients (13 cases), 10 aneurismal and 12 STA and MMA samples from unruptured aneurysm group patients (14 cases) and 5 STA and MMA artery specimens from control group patients (4 cases). Total RNA was isolated from samples and subjected to cDNA microarray analysis with the use of the human genome U133A GeneChip oligonucleotide microarray (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA), which allows to analyze a total number of 14,500 genes in the same time. For genes of interest, real-time RT-PCR was performed to confirm their expression level. Total RNA was isolated from samples and subjected to DNA microarray analysis with the use of the human genome U133A GeneChip oligonucleotide microarray, which allows to analyze a total number of 14,500 genes at the same time. For genes of interest, real-time RT-PCR was performed to confirm their expression level. Regarding ruptured aneurysms, genes were identified showing differential expressions (overexpressed or downregulated) pertaining to specific pathways, particularly those for the structural proteins of the extracellular matrix, members of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family (which resulted as being overexpressed) and genes involved in apoptotic phenomena. Particularly, real-time RT-PCR analysis confirmed the upregulation of MMP-2, MMP-9 and pro-apoptotic genes, such as Fas, Bax and Bid, and the downregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, such as Bcl-X(L) and Bcl-2. In a compared analyses of ruptured vs unruptured

  14. RNA structures, genomic organization and selection of recombinant HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Rossolillo, Paola; Negroni, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    Recombination is an evolutionary mechanism intrinsic to the evolution of many RNA viruses. In retroviruses and notably in the case of HIV, recombination is so frequent that it can be considered as part of its mode of replication. This process not only plays a central role in shaping HIV genetic diversity worldwide, but has also been involved in immune escape and development of resistance to antiviral treatments. Recombination does not create new mutations in the existing genetic repertoire of the virus, but creates new combinations of pre-existing polymorphisms. The simultaneous insertion of multiple substitutions in a single replication cycle leaves little room for the progressive coevolution of regions of proteins, RNA or, more in general, genomes, to accommodate these drastic sequence changes. Therefore, recombination, while allowing the virus to rapidly explore larger sequence space than the slow accumulation of point mutations, also runs the risk of generating non functional viruses. Recombination is the consequence of a switch in the template used during reverse transcription and is promoted by the presence of structured regions in the genomic RNA template. In this review, we discuss new observations suggesting that the distribution of RNA structures along the HIV genome may enhance recombination rates in regions where the resultant progeny is less likely to be impaired, and could therefore maximize the evolutionary value of this source of genetic diversity.

  15. Evaluation of the utility of gene expression and metabolic information for genomic prediction in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhigang; Magwire, Michael M; Basten, Christopher J; Xu, Zhanyou; Wang, Daolong

    2016-12-01

    Predictive ability derived from gene expression and metabolic information was evaluated using genomic prediction methods based on datasets from a public maize panel. With the rapid development of high throughput biological technologies, information from gene expression and metabolites has received growing attention in plant genetics and breeding. In this study, we evaluated the utility of gene expression and metabolic information for genomic prediction using data obtained from a maize diversity panel. Our results show that, when used as predictor variables, gene expression levels and metabolite abundances provided reasonable predictive abilities relative to those based on genetic markers, although these values were not as large as those with genetic markers. Integrating gene expression levels and metabolite abundances with genetic markers significantly improved predictive abilities in comparison to the benchmark genomic best linear unbiased prediction model using genome-wide markers only. Predictive abilities based on gene expression and metabolites were trait-specific and were affected by the time of measurement and tissue samples as well as the number of genes and metabolites included in the model. In general, our results suggest that, rather than being conventionally used as intermediate phenotypes, gene expression and metabolic information can be used as predictors for genomic prediction and help improve genetic gains for complex traits in breeding programs.

  16. A comprehensive evaluation of rodent malaria parasite genomes and gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Otto, Thomas D

    2014-10-30

    Background: Rodent malaria parasites (RMP) are used extensively as models of human malaria. Draft RMP genomes have been published for Plasmodium yoelii, P. berghei ANKA (PbA) and P. chabaudi AS (PcAS). Although availability of these genomes made a significant impact on recent malaria research, these genomes were highly fragmented and were annotated with little manual curation. The fragmented nature of the genomes has hampered genome wide analysis of Plasmodium gene regulation and function. Results: We have greatly improved the genome assemblies of PbA and PcAS, newly sequenced the virulent parasite P. yoelii YM genome, sequenced additional RMP isolates/lines and have characterized genotypic diversity within RMP species. We have produced RNA-seq data and utilized it to improve gene-model prediction and to provide quantitative, genome-wide, data on gene expression. Comparison of the RMP genomes with the genome of the human malaria parasite P. falciparum and RNA-seq mapping permitted gene annotation at base-pair resolution. Full-length chromosomal annotation permitted a comprehensive classification of all subtelomeric multigene families including the `Plasmodium interspersed repeat genes\\' (pir). Phylogenetic classification of the pir family, combined with pir expression patterns, indicates functional diversification within this family. Conclusions: Complete RMP genomes, RNA-seq and genotypic diversity data are excellent and important resources for gene-function and post-genomic analyses and to better interrogate Plasmodium biology. Genotypic diversity between P. chabaudi isolates makes this species an excellent parasite to study genotype-phenotype relationships. The improved classification of multigene families will enhance studies on the role of (variant) exported proteins in virulence and immune evasion/modulation.

  17. Genome-Wide Association between Transcription Factor Expression and Chromatin Accessibility Reveals Regulators of Chromatin Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueedi, Rico

    2017-01-01

    To better understand genome regulation, it is important to uncover the role of transcription factors in the process of chromatin structure establishment and maintenance. Here we present a data-driven approach to systematically characterise transcription factors that are relevant for this process. Our method uses a linear mixed modelling approach to combine datasets of transcription factor binding motif enrichments in open chromatin and gene expression across the same set of cell lines. Applying this approach to the ENCODE dataset, we confirm already known and imply numerous novel transcription factors that play a role in the establishment or maintenance of open chromatin. In particular, our approach rediscovers many factors that have been annotated as pioneer factors. PMID:28118358

  18. Structural and Expressional Variations of the Mitochondrial Genome Conferring the Wild Abortive Type of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Lan Liu; Hong Xu; Jing-Xin Guo; Yao-Guang Liu

    2007-01-01

    The so-called "wild abortive" (WA) type of cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) derived from a wild rice species Oryza rufipogon has been extensively used for hybrid rice breeding. However, extensive analysis of the structure of the related mitochondrial genome has not been reported, and the CMS-associated gene(s) remain unknown. In this study, we exploited a mitochondrial genome-wide strategy to examine the structural and expressional variations in the mitochondrial genome conferring the CMS. The entire mitochondrial genomes of a CMS-WA line and two normal fertile rice lines were amplified by Long-polymerase chain reaction into tilling fragments of up to 15.2 kb. Restriction and DNA blotting analyses of these fragments revealed that structural variations occurred in several regions in the WA mitochondrial genome, as compared to those of the fertile lines. All of the amplified fragments covering the entire mitochondrial genome were used as RNA blot probes to examine the mitochondrial expression profile among the CMS-WA and fertile lines. As a result, only two mRNAs were found to be differentially expressed between the CMS-WA and the fertile lines, which were detected by a probe containing the nadS and orf153 genes and the other having the ribosomal protein gene rp15, respectively. These mRNAs are proposed to be the candidates for further identification and functional studies of the CMS gene.

  19. Genome mining of the Streptomyces avermitilis genome and development of genome-minimized hosts for heterologous expression of biosynthetic gene clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Haruo; Kazuo, Shin-ya; Omura, Satoshi

    2014-02-01

    To date, several actinomycete genomes have been completed and annotated. Among them, Streptomyces microorganisms are of major pharmaceutical interest because they are a rich source of numerous secondary metabolites. S. avermitilis is an industrial microorganism used for the production of an anthelmintic agent, avermectin, which is a commercially important antiparasitic agent in human and veterinary medicine, and agricultural pesticides. Genome analysis of S. avermitilis provides significant information for not only industrial applications but also understanding the features of this genus. On genome mining of S. avermitilis, the microorganism has been found to harbor at least 38 secondary metabolic gene clusters and 46 insertion sequence (IS)-like sequences on the genome, which have not been searched so far. A significant use of the genome data of Streptomyces microorganisms is the construction of a versatile host for heterologous expression of exogenous biosynthetic gene clusters by genetic engineering. Since S. avermitilis is used as an industrial microorganism, the microorganism is already optimized for the efficient supply of primary metabolic precursors and biochemical energy to support multistep biosynthesis. The feasibility of large-deletion mutants of S. avermitilis has been confirmed by heterologous expression of more than 20 exogenous biosynthetic gene clusters.

  20. SINEs, evolution and genome structure in the opossum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wanjun; Ray, David A; Walker, Jerilyn A; Barnes, Erin W; Gentles, Andrew J; Samollow, Paul B; Jurka, Jerzy; Batzer, Mark A; Pollock, David D

    2007-07-01

    Short INterspersed Elements (SINEs) are non-autonomous retrotransposons, usually between 100 and 500 base pairs (bp) in length, which are ubiquitous components of eukaryotic genomes. Their activity, distribution, and evolution can be highly informative on genomic structure and evolutionary processes. To determine recent activity, we amplified more than one hundred SINE1 loci in a panel of 43 M. domestica individuals derived from five diverse geographic locations. The SINE1 family has expanded recently enough that many loci were polymorphic, and the SINE1 insertion-based genetic distances among populations reflected geographic distance. Genome-wide comparisons of SINE1 densities and GC content revealed that high SINE1 density is associated with high GC content in a few long and many short spans. Young SINE1s, whether fixed or polymorphic, showed an unbiased GC content preference for insertion, indicating that the GC preference accumulates over long time periods, possibly in periodic bursts. SINE1 evolution is thus broadly similar to human Alu evolution, although it has an independent origin. High GC content adjacent to SINE1s is strongly correlated with bias towards higher AT to GC substitutions and lower GC to AT substitutions. This is consistent with biased gene conversion, and also indicates that like chickens, but unlike eutherian mammals, GC content heterogeneity (isochore structure) is reinforced by substitution processes in the M. domestica genome. Nevertheless, both high and low GC content regions are apparently headed towards lower GC content equilibria, possibly due to a relative shift to lower recombination rates in the recent Monodelphis ancestral lineage. Like eutherians, metatherian (marsupial) mammals have evolved high CpG substitution rates, but this is apparently a convergence in process rather than a shared ancestral state.

  1. The evolution of chloroplast genome structure in ferns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Paul G; Roper, Jessie M; Duffy, Aaron M

    2010-09-01

    The plastid genome (plastome) is a rich source of phylogenetic and other comparative data in plants. Most land plants possess a plastome of similar structure. However, in a major group of plants, the ferns, a unique plastome structure has evolved. The gene order in ferns has been explained by a series of genomic inversions relative to the plastome organization of seed plants. Here, we examine for the first time the structure of the plastome across fern phylogeny. We used a PCR-based strategy to map and partially sequence plastomes. We found that a pair of partially overlapping inversions in the region of the inverted repeat occurred in the common ancestor of most ferns. However, the ancestral (seed plant) structure is still found in early diverging branches leading to the osmundoid and filmy fern lineages. We found that a second pair of overlapping inversions occurred on a branch leading to the core leptosporangiates. We also found that the unique placement of the gene matK in ferns (lacking a flanking intron) is not a result of a large-scale inversion, as previously thought. This is because the intron loss maps to an earlier point on the phylogeny than the nearby inversion. We speculate on why inversions may occur in pairs and what this may mean for the dynamics of plastome evolution.

  2. Ectopic expression of cancer/testis antigen SSX2 induces DNA damage and promotes genomic instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Katrine Buch Vidén; Lindgreen, Jonas; Terp, Mikkel Green

    2015-01-01

    replication stress translates into mitotic defects and genomic instability. Arrest of cell growth and induction of DNA double-strand breaks was also observed in MCF7 breast cancer cells in response to SSX2 expression. Additionally, MCF7 cells with ectopic SSX2 expression demonstrated typical signs......SSX cancer/testis antigens are frequently expressed in melanoma tumors and represent attractive targets for immunotherapy, but their role in melanoma tumorigenesis has remained elusive. Here, we investigated the cellular effects of SSX2 expression. In A375 melanoma cells, SSX2 expression resulted...... of SSX2 expression in melanoma cell lines demonstrated that SSX2 supports the growth of melanoma cells. Our results reveal two important phenotypes of ectopic SSX2 expression that may drive/support tumorigenesis: First, immediate induction of genomic instability, and second, long-term support of tumor...

  3. Evidence-based gene models for structural and functional annotations of the oil palm genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kuang-Lim; Tatarinova, Tatiana V; Rosli, Rozana; Amiruddin, Nadzirah; Azizi, Norazah; Halim, Mohd Amin Ab; Sanusi, Nik Shazana Nik Mohd; Jayanthi, Nagappan; Ponomarenko, Petr; Triska, Martin; Solovyev, Victor; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi; Murphy, Denis; Low, Eng-Ti Leslie

    2017-09-08

    Oil palm is an important source of edible oil. The importance of the crop, as well as its long breeding cycle (10-12 years) has led to the sequencing of its genome in 2013 to pave the way for genomics-guided breeding. Nevertheless, the first set of gene predictions, although useful, had many fragmented genes. Classification and characterization of genes associated with traits of interest, such as those for fatty acid biosynthesis and disease resistance, were also limited. Lipid-, especially fatty acid (FA)-related genes are of particular interest for the oil palm as they specify oil yields and quality. This paper presents the characterization of the oil palm genome using different gene prediction methods and comparative genomics analysis, identification of FA biosynthesis and disease resistance genes, and the development of an annotation database and bioinformatics tools. Using two independent gene-prediction pipelines, Fgenesh++ and Seqping, 26,059 oil palm genes with transcriptome and RefSeq support were identified from the oil palm genome. These coding regions of the genome have a characteristic broad distribution of GC3 (fraction of cytosine and guanine in the third position of a codon) with over half the GC3-rich genes (GC3 ≥ 0.75286) being intronless. In comparison, only one-seventh of the oil palm genes identified are intronless. Using comparative genomics analysis, characterization of conserved domains and active sites, and expression analysis, 42 key genes involved in FA biosynthesis in oil palm were identified. For three of them, namely EgFABF, EgFABH and EgFAD3, segmental duplication events were detected. Our analysis also identified 210 candidate resistance genes in six classes, grouped by their protein domain structures. We present an accurate and comprehensive annotation of the oil palm genome, focusing on analysis of important categories of genes (GC3-rich and intronless), as well as those associated with important functions, such as FA

  4. MADS-box gene family in rice: genome-wide identification, organization and expression profiling during reproductive development and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Rita; Agarwal, Pinky; Ray, Swatismita; Singh, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Vijay Pal; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Kapoor, Sanjay

    2007-07-18

    MADS-box transcription factors, besides being involved in floral organ specification, have also been implicated in several aspects of plant growth and development. In recent years, there have been reports on genomic localization, protein motif structure, phylogenetic relationships, gene structure and expression of the entire MADS-box family in the model plant system, Arabidopsis. Though there have been some studies in rice as well, an analysis of the complete MADS-box family along with a comprehensive expression profiling was still awaited after the completion of rice genome sequencing. Furthermore, owing to the role of MADS-box family in flower development, an analysis involving structure, expression and functional aspects of MADS-box genes in rice and Arabidopsis was required to understand the role of this gene family in reproductive development. A genome-wide molecular characterization and microarray-based expression profiling of the genes encoding MADS-box transcription factor family in rice is presented. Using a thorough annotation exercise, 75 MADS-box genes have been identified in rice and categorized into MIKCc, MIKC*, Malpha, Mbeta and Mgamma groups based on phylogeny. Chromosomal localization of these genes reveals that 16 MADS-box genes, mostly MIKCc-type, are located within the duplicated segments of the rice genome, whereas most of the M-type genes, 20 in all, seem to have resulted from tandem duplications. Nine members belonging to the Mbeta group, which was considered absent in monocots, have also been identified. The expression profiles of all the MADS-box genes have been analyzed under 11 temporal stages of panicle and seed development, three abiotic stress conditions, along with three stages of vegetative development. Transcripts for 31 genes accumulate preferentially in the reproductive phase, of which, 12 genes are specifically expressed in seeds, and six genes show expression specific to panicle development. Differential expression of seven

  5. MADS-box gene family in rice: genome-wide identification, organization and expression profiling during reproductive development and stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyagi Akhilesh K

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MADS-box transcription factors, besides being involved in floral organ specification, have also been implicated in several aspects of plant growth and development. In recent years, there have been reports on genomic localization, protein motif structure, phylogenetic relationships, gene structure and expression of the entire MADS-box family in the model plant system, Arabidopsis. Though there have been some studies in rice as well, an analysis of the complete MADS-box family along with a comprehensive expression profiling was still awaited after the completion of rice genome sequencing. Furthermore, owing to the role of MADS-box family in flower development, an analysis involving structure, expression and functional aspects of MADS-box genes in rice and Arabidopsis was required to understand the role of this gene family in reproductive development. Results A genome-wide molecular characterization and microarray-based expression profiling of the genes encoding MADS-box transcription factor family in rice is presented. Using a thorough annotation exercise, 75 MADS-box genes have been identified in rice and categorized into MIKCc, MIKC*, Mα, Mβ and Mγ groups based on phylogeny. Chromosomal localization of these genes reveals that 16 MADS-box genes, mostly MIKCc-type, are located within the duplicated segments of the rice genome, whereas most of the M-type genes, 20 in all, seem to have resulted from tandem duplications. Nine members belonging to the Mβ group, which was considered absent in monocots, have also been identified. The expression profiles of all the MADS-box genes have been analyzed under 11 temporal stages of panicle and seed development, three abiotic stress conditions, along with three stages of vegetative development. Transcripts for 31 genes accumulate preferentially in the reproductive phase, of which, 12 genes are specifically expressed in seeds, and six genes show expression specific to panicle development

  6. The impact of structural genomics: the first quindecennial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Marek; Niedzialkowska, Ewa; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Minor, Wladek

    2016-03-01

    The period 2000-2015 brought the advent of high-throughput approaches to protein structure determination. With the overall funding on the order of $2 billion (in 2010 dollars), the structural genomics (SG) consortia established worldwide have developed pipelines for target selection, protein production, sample preparation, crystallization, and structure determination by X-ray crystallography and NMR. These efforts resulted in the determination of over 13,500 protein structures, mostly from unique protein families, and increased the structural coverage of the expanding protein universe. SG programs contributed over 4400 publications to the scientific literature. The NIH-funded Protein Structure Initiatives alone have produced over 2000 scientific publications, which to date have attracted more than 93,000 citations. Software and database developments that were necessary to handle high-throughput structure determination workflows have led to structures of better quality and improved integrity of the associated data. Organized and accessible data have a positive impact on the reproducibility of scientific experiments. Most of the experimental data generated by the SG centers are freely available to the community and has been utilized by scientists in various fields of research. SG projects have created, improved, streamlined, and validated many protocols for protein production and crystallization, data collection, and functional analysis, significantly benefiting biological and biomedical research.

  7. Genome-wide identification, phylogeny, and expression analysis of the SWEET gene family in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Chao-Yang; Han, Jia-Xuan; Han, Xiao-Xue; Jiang, Jing

    2015-12-01

    The SWEET (Sugars Will Eventually Be Exported Transporters) gene family encodes membrane-embedded sugar transporters containing seven transmembrane helices harboring two MtN3 and saliva domain. SWEETs play important roles in diverse biological processes, including plant growth, development, and response to environmental stimuli. Here, we conducted an exhaustive search of the tomato genome, leading to the identification of 29 SWEET genes. We analyzed the structures, conserved domains, and phylogenetic relationships of these protein-coding genes in detail. We also analyzed the transcript levels of SWEET genes in various tissues, organs, and developmental stages to obtain information about their functions. Furthermore, we investigated the expression patterns of the SWEET genes in response to exogenous sugar and adverse environmental stress (high and low temperatures). Some family members exhibited tissue-specific expression, whereas others were more ubiquitously expressed. Numerous stress-responsive candidate genes were obtained. The results of this study provide insights into the characteristics of the SWEET genes in tomato and may serve as a basis for further functional studies of such genes.

  8. A hidden Markov model approach for determining expression from genomic tiling micro arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Gardner, P. P.; Arctander, Peter;

    2006-01-01

    HMM, that adaptively models tiling data prior to predicting expression on genomic sequence. A hidden Markov model (HMM) is used to model the distributions of tiling array probe scores in expressed and non-expressed regions. The HMM is trained on sets of probes mapped to regions of annotated expression and non......]. Results can be downloaded and viewed from our web site [2]. Conclusion The value of adaptive modelling of fluorescence scores prior to categorisation into expressed and non-expressed probes is demonstrated. Our results indicate that our adaptive approach is superior to the previous analysis in terms...

  9. Analysis of slender structures using mechanics of structure genome and open source codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin

    Structural genome (SG) is the smallest mathematical building block that contains all constitutive information of a structure. SG is a bridge connecting the material microstructures and the macroscopic structural analysis, so mechanics of structure genome (MSG) is an approach that unifies micromechanics and structural mechanics. There are three types of SG: 1D SG, 2D SG and 3D SG depending on the heterogeneity of the original structure. Once the SG of a structure is identified, the effective properties for corresponding structures including beams, plates/shells, or 3D solids can be obtained by the homogenization analysis of the SG. These effective properties can be used for the macroscopic structural analysis. After macroscopic structural analysis, the global structural responses can be the input parameters to get the local displacements/stress/strain using dehomogenization analysis of the SG. The mechanics of structure genome is implemented in a general purpose composites software called SwiftComp(TM). Slender structures are widely used in various industries, such as civil, aerospace and structural engineering. Using MSG, a new structural analysis approach is used to study the slender structures. In order to let users easily get the access to the software using this approach, several open source codes have been modified and upgraded. Graphical user interface is built on Gmsh, and CalculiX is chosen as the structural solver. New beam elements have been added to CalculiX to make the better use of the capability of SwiftComp(TM). Both linear and quadratic beam elements for Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko beam models are derived. Several numerical models show that the results using MSG and its companion code SwiftComp(TM) agree well with the 3D finite element analysis. The MSG approach greatly simplified the modeling process while maintaining accuracy. Therefore, the MSG approach provides an alternative way to analyze structures, especially when the structures are

  10. Genome-Wide Characterization and Expression Profiles of the Superoxide Dismutase Gene Family in Gossypium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingbo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase (SOD as a group of significant and ubiquitous enzymes plays a critical function in plant growth and development. Previously this gene family has been investigated in Arabidopsis and rice; it has not yet been characterized in cotton. In our study, it was the first time for us to perform a genome-wide analysis of SOD gene family in cotton. Our results showed that 10 genes of SOD gene family were identified in Gossypium arboreum and Gossypium raimondii, including 6 Cu-Zn-SODs, 2 Fe-SODs, and 2 Mn-SODs. The chromosomal distribution analysis revealed that SOD genes are distributed across 7 chromosomes in Gossypium arboreum and 8 chromosomes in Gossypium raimondii. Segmental duplication is predominant duplication event and major contributor for expansion of SOD gene family. Gene structure and protein structure analysis showed that SOD genes have conserved exon/intron arrangement and motif composition. Microarray-based expression analysis revealed that SOD genes have important function in abiotic stress. Moreover, the tissue-specific expression profile reveals the functional divergence of SOD genes in different organs development of cotton. Taken together, this study has imparted new insights into the putative functions of SOD gene family in cotton. Findings of the present investigation could help in understanding the role of SOD gene family in various aspects of the life cycle of cotton.

  11. Phylogeny, genomic organization and expression of lambda and kappa immunoglobulin light chain genes in a reptile, Anolis carolinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian; Wei, Zhiguo; Yang, Zhi; Wang, Tao; Ren, Liming; Hu, Xiaoxiang; Meng, Qingyong; Guo, Ying; Zhu, Qinghong; Robert, Jacques; Hammarström, Lennart; Li, Ning; Zhao, Yaofeng

    2010-05-01

    The reptiles are the last major taxon of jawed vertebrates in which immunoglobulin light chain isotypes have not been well characterized. Using the recently released genome sequencing data, we show in this study that the reptile Anolis carolinensis expresses both lambda and kappa light chain genes. The genomic organization of both gene loci is structurally similar to their respective counterparts in mammals. The identified lambda locus contains three constant region genes each preceded by a joining gene segment, and a total of 37 variable gene segments. In contrast, the kappa locus contains only a single constant region gene, and two joining gene segments with a single family of 14 variable gene segments located upstream. Analysis of junctions of the recombined VJ transcripts reveals a paucity of N and P nucleotides in both expressed lambda and kappa sequences. These results help us to understand the generation of the immunoglobulin repertoire in reptiles and immunoglobulin evolution in vertebrates.

  12. The nuclear matrix: a structural milieu for genomic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezney, R; Mortillaro, M J; Ma, H; Wei, X; Samarabandu, J

    1995-01-01

    While significant progress has been made in elucidating molecular properties of specific genes and their regulation, our understanding of how the whole genome is coordinated has lagged behind. To understand how the genome functions as a coordinated whole, we must understand how the nucleus is put together and functions as a whole. An important step in that direction occurred with the isolation and characterization of the nuclear matrix. Aside from the plethora of functional properties associated with these isolated nuclear structures, they have enabled the first direct examination and molecular cloning of specific nuclear matrix proteins. The isolated nuclear matrix can be used for providing an in vitro model for understanding nuclear matrix organization in whole cells. Recent development of high-resolution and three-dimensional approaches for visualizing domains of genomic organization and function in situ has provided corroborative evidence for the nuclear matrix as the site of organization for replication, transcription, and post-transcriptional processing. As more is learned about these in situ functional sites, appropriate experiments could be designed to test molecular mechanisms with the in vitro nuclear matrix systems. This is illustrated in this chapter by the studies of nuclear matrix-associated DNA replication which have evolved from biochemical studies of in vitro nuclear matrix systems toward three-dimensional computer image analysis of replication sites for individual genes.

  13. Macromolecular structure determination in the post-genome era

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhn, P

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in genetics, molecular biology and crystallographic instrumentation and methodology have led to a revolution in the field of Structural Molecular Biology (SMB). These combined advances have paved the way to a more complete and detailed understanding of the biological macromolecules that make up an organism, both in terms of their individual functions and also the interactions between them. In this paper we describe a large-scale, genomic approach to the three-dimensional structure determination of macromolecules and their complexes, using high-throughput methodology to streamline all aspects of the process. This task requires the development of automated high-intensity synchrotron beam lines for X-ray diffraction data collection from single crystal samples. Furthermore, these beam lines must be operated within a sophisticated software and hardware environment, which is capable of delivering a completely automated structure determination pipeline. The SMB resource at SSRL is developing a system...

  14. Corynebacterium diphtheriae: genome diversity, population structure and genotyping perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrousov, Igor

    2009-01-01

    The epidemic re-emergence of diphtheria in Russia and the Newly Independent States (NIS) of the former Soviet Union in the 1990s demonstrated the continued threat of this thought to be rare disease. The bacteriophage encoded toxin is a main virulence factor of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, however, an analysis of the first complete genome sequence of C. diphtheriae revealed a recent acquisition of other pathogenicity factors including iron-uptake systems, adhesins and fimbrial proteins as indeed this extracellular pathogen has more possibilities for lateral gene transfer than, e.g., its close relative, mainly intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis. C. diphtheriae appears to have a phylogeographical structure mainly represented by area-specific variants whose circulation is under strong influence of human host factors, including health control measures, first of all, vaccination, and social economic conditions. This framework core population structure may be challenged by importation of the endemic and eventually toxigenic strains from new areas thus leading to localized or large epidemics caused directly by imported strains or by bacteriophage-lysogenized indigenous strains converted into toxin production. A feature of C. diphtheriae co-existence with humans is its periodicity: following large epidemic in the 1990s, the present period is marked by increasing heterogeneity of the circulating populations whereas re-emergence of new toxigenic variants along with persistent circulation of invasive non-toxigenic strains appear alarming. To identify and rapidly monitor subtle changes in the genome structure at an infraclonal level during and between epidemics, portable and discriminatory typing methods of C. diphtheriae are still needed. In this view, CRISPRs and minisatellites are promising genomic markers for development of high-resolution typing schemes and databasing of C. diphtheriae.

  15. A hidden Markov model approach for determining expression from genomic tiling micro arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krogh Anders

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic tiling micro arrays have great potential for identifying previously undiscovered coding as well as non-coding transcription. To-date, however, analyses of these data have been performed in an ad hoc fashion. Results We present a probabilistic procedure, ExpressHMM, that adaptively models tiling data prior to predicting expression on genomic sequence. A hidden Markov model (HMM is used to model the distributions of tiling array probe scores in expressed and non-expressed regions. The HMM is trained on sets of probes mapped to regions of annotated expression and non-expression. Subsequently, prediction of transcribed fragments is made on tiled genomic sequence. The prediction is accompanied by an expression probability curve for visual inspection of the supporting evidence. We test ExpressHMM on data from the Cheng et al. (2005 tiling array experiments on ten Human chromosomes 1. Results can be downloaded and viewed from our web site 2. Conclusion The value of adaptive modelling of fluorescence scores prior to categorisation into expressed and non-expressed probes is demonstrated. Our results indicate that our adaptive approach is superior to the previous analysis in terms of nucleotide sensitivity and transfrag specificity.

  16. Genome-wide and expression analysis of protein phosphatase 2C in rice and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakab Stephen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protein phosphatase 2Cs (PP2Cs from various organisms have been implicated to act as negative modulators of protein kinase pathways involved in diverse environmental stress responses and developmental processes. A genome-wide overview of the PP2C gene family in plants is not yet available. Results A comprehensive computational analysis identified 80 and 78 PP2C genes in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPP2Cs and Oryza sativa (OsPP2Cs, respectively, which denotes the PP2C gene family as one of the largest families identified in plants. Phylogenic analysis divided PP2Cs in Arabidopsis and rice into 13 and 11 subfamilies, respectively, which are supported by the analyses of gene structures and protein motifs. Comparative analysis between the PP2C genes in Arabidopsis and rice identified common and lineage-specific subfamilies and potential 'gene birth-and-death' events. Gene duplication analysis reveals that whole genome and chromosomal segment duplications mainly contributed to the expansion of both OsPP2Cs and AtPP2Cs, but tandem or local duplication occurred less frequently in Arabidopsis than rice. Some protein motifs are widespread among the PP2C proteins, whereas some other motifs are specific to only one or two subfamilies. Expression pattern analysis suggests that 1 most PP2C genes play functional roles in multiple tissues in both species, 2 the induced expression of most genes in subfamily A by diverse stimuli indicates their primary role in stress tolerance, especially ABA response, and 3 the expression pattern of subfamily D members suggests that they may constitute positive regulators in ABA-mediated signaling pathways. The analyses of putative upstream regulatory elements by two approaches further support the functions of subfamily A in ABA signaling, and provide insights into the shared and different transcriptional regulation machineries in dicots and monocots. Conclusion This comparative genome-wide overview of the PP

  17. Expression and Genomic Profiling of Minute Breast Cancer Samples. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    better indicator of poor prognosis than protein over-expression in operable breast-cancer patients. Int. J. Cancer, 95, 266±270. 29. Stoecklein,N.H...Alteration of gene expression profiles of peripheral mononuclear blood cells by tobacco smoke: implications for periodontal diseases. Oral Microbiol

  18. Expression and Genomic Profiling of Minute Breast Cancer Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-01

    better indicator of poor prognosis than protein over-expression in operable breast-cancer patients. Int. J. Cancer, 95, 266±270. 29. Stoecklein,N.H...Alteration of gene expression profiles of peripheral mononuclear blood cells by tobacco smoke: implications for periodontal diseases. Oral

  19. Genome organization and expression of the rat ACBP gene family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, S; Andreasen, P H; Knudsen, J

    1993-01-01

    pool former. We have molecularly cloned and characterized the rat ACBP gene family which comprises one expressed and four processed pseudogenes. One of these was shown to exist in two allelic forms. A comprehensive computer-aided analysis of the promoter region of the expressed ACBP gene revealed...

  20. Genome-wide identification and expression profiling of auxin response factor (ARF gene family in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yirong

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Auxin signaling is vital for plant growth and development, and plays important role in apical dominance, tropic response, lateral root formation, vascular differentiation, embryo patterning and shoot elongation. Auxin Response Factors (ARFs are the transcription factors that regulate the expression of auxin responsive genes. The ARF genes are represented by a large multigene family in plants. The first draft of full maize genome assembly has recently been released, however, to our knowledge, the ARF gene family from maize (ZmARF genes has not been characterized in detail. Results In this study, 31 maize (Zea mays L. genes that encode ARF proteins were identified in maize genome. It was shown that maize ARF genes fall into related sister pairs and chromosomal mapping revealed that duplication of ZmARFs was associated with the chromosomal block duplications. As expected, duplication of some ZmARFs showed a conserved intron/exon structure, whereas some others were more divergent, suggesting the possibility of functional diversification for these genes. Out of these 31 ZmARF genes, 14 possess auxin-responsive element in their promoter region, among which 7 appear to show small or negligible response to exogenous auxin. The 18 ZmARF genes were predicted to be the potential targets of small RNAs. Transgenic analysis revealed that increased miR167 level could cause degradation of transcripts of six potential targets (ZmARF3, 9, 16, 18, 22 and 30. The expressions of maize ARF genes are responsive to exogenous auxin treatment. Dynamic expression patterns of ZmARF genes were observed in different stages of embryo development. Conclusions Maize ARF gene family is expanded (31 genes as compared to Arabidopsis (23 genes and rice (25 genes. The expression of these genes in maize is regulated by auxin and small RNAs. Dynamic expression patterns of ZmARF genes in embryo at different stages were detected which suggest that maize ARF genes may

  1. Regulation of gene expression in Mycoplasmas: contribution from Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma synoviae genome sequences

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    Humberto Maciel França Madeira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the transcription apparatus of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (strains J and 7448 and Mycoplasma synoviae, using a comparative genomics approach to summarize the main features related to transcription and control of gene expression in mycoplasmas. Most of the transcription-related genes present in the three strains are well conserved among mycoplasmas. Some unique aspects of transcription in mycoplasmas and the scarcity of regulatory proteins in mycoplasma genomes are discussed.

  2. A genome-wide 20 K citrus microarray for gene expression analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Godoy, M. Ángeles; Mauri, Nuria; Juárez, José; Marqués, M. Carmen; Santiago, Julia; Forment, Javier; Gadea Vacas, José

    2008-01-01

    Background: Understanding of genetic elements that contribute to key aspects of citrus biology will impact future improvements in this economically important crop. Global gene expression analysis demands microarray platforms with a high genome coverage. In the last years, genomewide EST collections have been generated in citrus, opening the possibility to create new tools for functional genomics in this crop plant. Results: We have designed and constructed a publicly available ...

  3. The complete chloroplast genome sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: genome structure, evolutionary aspects, gene content and SSR detection.

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    Leila do Nascimento Vieira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR. It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU, which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara. Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. CONCLUSION: The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of

  4. The Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Podocarpus lambertii: Genome Structure, Evolutionary Aspects, Gene Content and SSR Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Leila do Nascimento; Faoro, Helisson; Rogalski, Marcelo; Fraga, Hugo Pacheco de Freitas; Cardoso, Rodrigo Luis Alves; de Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; de Oliveira Pedrosa, Fábio; Nodari, Rubens Onofre; Guerra, Miguel Pedro

    2014-01-01

    Background Podocarpus lambertii (Podocarpaceae) is a native conifer from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Biome, which is considered one of the 25 biodiversity hotspots in the world. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies has enabled the rapid acquisition of whole chloroplast (cp) genome sequences at low cost. Several studies have proven the potential of cp genomes as tools to understand enigmatic and basal phylogenetic relationships at different taxonomic levels, as well as further probe the structural and functional evolution of plants. In this work, we present the complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii. Methodology/Principal Findings The P. lambertii cp genome is 133,734 bp in length, and similar to other sequenced cupressophytes, it lacks one of the large inverted repeat regions (IR). It contains 118 unique genes and one duplicated tRNA (trnN-GUU), which occurs as an inverted repeat sequence. The rps16 gene was not found, which was previously reported for the plastid genome of another Podocarpaceae (Nageia nagi) and Araucariaceae (Agathis dammara). Structurally, P. lambertii shows 4 inversions of a large DNA fragment ∼20,000 bp compared to the Podocarpus totara cp genome. These unexpected characteristics may be attributed to geographical distance and different adaptive needs. The P. lambertii cp genome presents a total of 28 tandem repeats and 156 SSRs, with homo- and dipolymers being the most common and tri-, tetra-, penta-, and hexapolymers occurring with less frequency. Conclusion The complete cp genome sequence of P. lambertii revealed significant structural changes, even in species from the same genus. These results reinforce the apparently loss of rps16 gene in Podocarpaceae cp genome. In addition, several SSRs in the P. lambertii cp genome are likely intraspecific polymorphism sites, which may allow highly sensitive phylogeographic and population structure studies, as well as phylogenetic studies of species of this genus. PMID

  5. Ectopic Expression of Testis Germ Cell Proteins in Cancer and Its Potential Role in Genomic Instability

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    Aaraby Yoheswaran Nielsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genomic instability is a hallmark of human cancer and an enabling factor for the genetic alterations that drive cancer development. The processes involved in genomic instability resemble those of meiosis, where genetic material is interchanged between homologous chromosomes. In most types of human cancer, epigenetic changes, including hypomethylation of gene promoters, lead to the ectopic expression of a large number of proteins normally restricted to the germ cells of the testis. Due to the similarities between meiosis and genomic instability, it has been proposed that activation of meiotic programs may drive genomic instability in cancer cells. Some germ cell proteins with ectopic expression in cancer cells indeed seem to promote genomic instability, while others reduce polyploidy and maintain mitotic fidelity. Furthermore, oncogenic germ cell proteins may indirectly contribute to genomic instability through induction of replication stress, similar to classic oncogenes. Thus, current evidence suggests that testis germ cell proteins are implicated in cancer development by regulating genomic instability during tumorigenesis, and these proteins therefore represent promising targets for novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Structural constraints in the packaging of bluetongue virus genomic segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, Christiane; Sung, Po-Yu; Celma, Cristina C; Roy, Polly

    2014-10-01

    The mechanism used by bluetongue virus (BTV) to ensure the sorting and packaging of its 10 genomic segments is still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the packaging constraints for two BTV genomic segments from two different serotypes. Segment 4 (S4) of BTV serotype 9 was mutated sequentially and packaging of mutant ssRNAs was investigated by two newly developed RNA packaging assay systems, one in vivo and the other in vitro. Modelling of the mutated ssRNA followed by biochemical data analysis suggested that a conformational motif formed by interaction of the 5' and 3' ends of the molecule was necessary and sufficient for packaging. A similar structural signal was also identified in S8 of BTV serotype 1. Furthermore, the same conformational analysis of secondary structures for positive-sense ssRNAs was used to generate a chimeric segment that maintained the putative packaging motif but contained unrelated internal sequences. This chimeric segment was packaged successfully, confirming that the motif identified directs the correct packaging of the segment.

  7. Recognizing genes and other components of genomic structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, C. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Myers, E. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Computer Science); Stormo, G.D. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (USA). Dept. of Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology)

    1991-01-01

    The Aspen Center for Physics (ACP) sponsored a three-week workshop, with 26 scientists participating, from 28 May to 15 June, 1990. The workshop, entitled Recognizing Genes and Other Components of Genomic Structure, focussed on discussion of current needs and future strategies for developing the ability to identify and predict the presence of complex functional units on sequenced, but otherwise uncharacterized, genomic DNA. We addressed the need for computationally-based, automatic tools for synthesizing available data about individual consensus sequences and local compositional patterns into the composite objects (e.g., genes) that are -- as composite entities -- the true object of interest when scanning DNA sequences. The workshop was structured to promote sustained informal contact and exchange of expertise between molecular biologists, computer scientists, and mathematicians. No participant stayed for less than one week, and most attended for two or three weeks. Computers, software, and databases were available for use as electronic blackboards'' and as the basis for collaborative exploration of ideas being discussed and developed at the workshop. 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  8. Identification of genomic indels and structural variations using split reads

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    Urban Alexander E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies have demonstrated the genetic significance of insertions, deletions, and other more complex structural variants (SVs in the human population. With the development of the next-generation sequencing technologies, high-throughput surveys of SVs on the whole-genome level have become possible. Here we present split-read identification, calibrated (SRiC, a sequence-based method for SV detection. Results We start by mapping each read to the reference genome in standard fashion using gapped alignment. Then to identify SVs, we score each of the many initial mappings with an assessment strategy designed to take into account both sequencing and alignment errors (e.g. scoring more highly events gapped in the center of a read. All current SV calling methods have multilevel biases in their identifications due to both experimental and computational limitations (e.g. calling more deletions than insertions. A key aspect of our approach is that we calibrate all our calls against synthetic data sets generated from simulations of high-throughput sequencing (with realistic error models. This allows us to calculate sensitivity and the positive predictive value under different parameter-value scenarios and for different classes of events (e.g. long deletions vs. short insertions. We run our calculations on representative data from the 1000 Genomes Project. Coupling the observed numbers of events on chromosome 1 with the calibrations gleaned from the simulations (for different length events allows us to construct a relatively unbiased estimate for the total number of SVs in the human genome across a wide range of length scales. We estimate in particular that an individual genome contains ~670,000 indels/SVs. Conclusions Compared with the existing read-depth and read-pair approaches for SV identification, our method can pinpoint the exact breakpoints of SV events, reveal the actual sequence content of insertions, and cover the whole

  9. Combining functional and structural genomics to sample the essential Burkholderia structome.

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    Loren Baugh

    Full Text Available The genus Burkholderia includes pathogenic gram-negative bacteria that cause melioidosis, glanders, and pulmonary infections of patients with cancer and cystic fibrosis. Drug resistance has made development of new antimicrobials critical. Many approaches to discovering new antimicrobials, such as structure-based drug design and whole cell phenotypic screens followed by lead refinement, require high-resolution structures of proteins essential to the parasite.We experimentally identified 406 putative essential genes in B. thailandensis, a low-virulence species phylogenetically similar to B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, using saturation-level transposon mutagenesis and next-generation sequencing (Tn-seq. We selected 315 protein products of these genes based on structure-determination criteria, such as excluding very large and/or integral membrane proteins, and entered them into the Seattle Structural Genomics Center for Infection Disease (SSGCID structure determination pipeline. To maximize structural coverage of these targets, we applied an "ortholog rescue" strategy for those producing insoluble or difficult to crystallize proteins, resulting in the addition of 387 orthologs (or paralogs from seven other Burkholderia species into the SSGCID pipeline. This structural genomics approach yielded structures from 31 putative essential targets from B. thailandensis, and 25 orthologs from other Burkholderia species, yielding an overall structural coverage for 49 of the 406 essential gene families, with a total of 88 depositions into the Protein Data Bank. Of these, 25 proteins have properties of a potential antimicrobial drug target i.e., no close human homolog, part of an essential metabolic pathway, and a deep binding pocket. We describe the structures of several potential drug targets in detail.This collection of structures, solubility and experimental essentiality data provides a resource for development of drugs against

  10. Opsin Repertoire and Expression Patterns in Horseshoe Crabs: Evidence from the Genome of Limulus polyphemus (Arthropoda: Chelicerata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battelle, Barbara-Anne; Ryan, Joseph F; Kempler, Karen E; Saraf, Spencer R; Marten, Catherine E; Warren, Wesley C; Minx, Patrick J; Montague, Michael J; Green, Pamela J; Schmidt, Skye A; Fulton, Lucinda; Patel, Nipam H; Protas, Meredith E; Wilson, Richard K; Porter, Megan L

    2016-06-03

    Horseshoe crabs are xiphosuran chelicerates, the sister group to arachnids. As such, they are important for understanding the most recent common ancestor of Euchelicerata and the evolution and diversification of Arthropoda. Limulus polyphemus is the most investigated of the four extant species of horseshoe crabs, and the structure and function of its visual system have long been a major focus of studies critical for understanding the evolution of visual systems in arthropods. Likewise, studies of genes encoding Limulus opsins, the protein component of the visual pigments, are critical for understanding opsin evolution and diversification among chelicerates, where knowledge of opsins is limited, and more broadly among arthropods. In the present study, we sequenced and assembled a high quality nuclear genomic sequence of L. polyphemus and used these data to annotate the full repertoire of Limulus opsins. We conducted a detailed phylogenetic analysis of Limulus opsins, including using gene structure and synteny information to identify relationships among different opsin classes. We used our phylogeny to identify significant genomic events that shaped opsin evolution and therefore the visual system of Limulus We also describe the tissue expression patterns of the 18 opsins identified and show that transcripts encoding a number, including a peropsin, are present throughout the central nervous system. In addition to significantly extending our understanding of photosensitivity in Limulus and providing critical insight into the genomic evolution of horseshoe crab opsins, this work provides a valuable genomic resource for addressing myriad questions related to xiphosuran physiology and arthropod evolution.

  11. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Expression Analysis of the TCP Gene Family in Prunus mume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuzhen; Xu, Zongda; Zhao, Kai; Yang, Weiru; Cheng, Tangren; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Qixiang

    2016-01-01

    TCP proteins, belonging to a plant-specific transcription factors family, are known to have great functions in plant development, especially flower and leaf development. However, there is little information about this gene family in Prunus mume, which is widely cultivated in China as an ornamental and fruit tree. Here a genome-wide analysis of TCP genes was performed to explore their evolution in P. mume. Nineteen PmTCPs were identified and three of them contained putative miR319 target sites. Phylogenetic and comprehensive bioinformatics analyses of these genes revealed that different types of TCP genes had undergone different evolutionary processes and the genes in the same clade had similar chromosomal location, gene structure, and conserved domains. Expression analysis of these PmTCPs indicated that there were diverse expression patterns among different clades. Most TCP genes were predominantly expressed in flower, leaf, and stem, and showed high expression levels in the different stages of flower bud differentiation, especially in petal formation stage and gametophyte development. Genes in TCP-P subfamily had main roles in both flower development and gametophyte development. The CIN genes in double petal cultivars might have key roles in the formation of petal, while they were correlated with gametophyte development in the single petal cultivar. The CYC/TB1 type genes were highly detected in the formation of petal and pistil. The less-complex flower types of P. mume might result from the fact that there were only two CYC type genes present in P. mume and a lack of CYC2 genes to control the identity of flower types. These results lay the foundation for further study on the functions of TCP genes during flower development.

  12. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Expression Analysis of the TCP Gene Family in Prunus mume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuzhen; Xu, Zongda; Zhao, Kai; Yang, Weiru; Cheng, Tangren; Wang, Jia; Zhang, Qixiang

    2016-01-01

    TCP proteins, belonging to a plant-specific transcription factors family, are known to have great functions in plant development, especially flower and leaf development. However, there is little information about this gene family in Prunus mume, which is widely cultivated in China as an ornamental and fruit tree. Here a genome-wide analysis of TCP genes was performed to explore their evolution in P. mume. Nineteen PmTCPs were identified and three of them contained putative miR319 target sites. Phylogenetic and comprehensive bioinformatics analyses of these genes revealed that different types of TCP genes had undergone different evolutionary processes and the genes in the same clade had similar chromosomal location, gene structure, and conserved domains. Expression analysis of these PmTCPs indicated that there were diverse expression patterns among different clades. Most TCP genes were predominantly expressed in flower, leaf, and stem, and showed high expression levels in the different stages of flower bud differentiation, especially in petal formation stage and gametophyte development. Genes in TCP-P subfamily had main roles in both flower development and gametophyte development. The CIN genes in double petal cultivars might have key roles in the formation of petal, while they were correlated with gametophyte development in the single petal cultivar. The CYC/TB1 type genes were highly detected in the formation of petal and pistil. The less-complex flower types of P. mume might result from the fact that there were only two CYC type genes present in P. mume and a lack of CYC2 genes to control the identity of flower types. These results lay the foundation for further study on the functions of TCP genes during flower development. PMID:27630648

  13. Co-Expression of Neighboring Genes in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio Genome

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    Daryi Wang

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Neighboring genes in the eukaryotic genome have a tendency to express concurrently, and the proximity of two adjacent genes is often considered a possible explanation for their co-expression behavior. However, the actual contribution of the physical distance between two genes to their co-expression behavior has yet to be defined. To further investigate this issue, we studied the co-expression of neighboring genes in zebrafish, which has a compact genome and has experienced a whole genome duplication event. Our analysis shows that the proportion of highly co-expressed neighboring pairs (Pearson’s correlation coefficient R>0.7 is low (0.24% ~ 0.67%; however, it is still significantly higher than that of random pairs. In particular, the statistical result implies that the co-expression tendency of neighboring pairs is negatively correlated with their physical distance. Our findings therefore suggest that physical distance may play an important role in the co-expression of neighboring genes. Possible mechanisms related to the neighboring genes’ co-expression are also discussed.

  14. A gene expression map for the euchromatic genome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor; Gauhar, Zareen; Mason, Christopher; Halasz, Gabor; van Batenburg, Marinus F; Rifkin, Scott A; Hua, Sujun; Herreman, Tine; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Barbano, Paolo Emilio; Bussemaker, Harmen J; White, Kevin P

    2004-10-22

    We used a maskless photolithography method to produce DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences tiled throughout the genome of Drosophila melanogaster and across predicted splice junctions. RNA expression of protein coding and nonprotein coding sequences was determined for each major stage of the life cycle, including adult males and females. We detected transcriptional activity for 93% of annotated genes and RNA expression for 41% of the probes in intronic and intergenic sequences. Comparison to genome-wide RNA interference data and to gene annotations revealed distinguishable levels of expression for different classes of genes and higher levels of expression for genes with essential cellular functions. Differential splicing was observed in about 40% of predicted genes, and 5440 previously unknown splice forms were detected. Genes within conserved regions of synteny with D. pseudoobscura had highly correlated expression; these regions ranged in length from 10 to 900 kilobase pairs. The expressed intergenic and intronic sequences are more likely to be evolutionarily conserved than nonexpressed ones, and about 15% of them appear to be developmentally regulated. Our results provide a draft expression map for the entire nonrepetitive genome, which reveals a much more extensive and diverse set of expressed sequences than was previously predicted.

  15. Analytical expressions for electrostatics of graphene structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgantzinos, S. K.; Giannopoulos, G. I.; Fatsis, A.; Vlachakis, N. V.

    2016-10-01

    This study focuses on electrostatics of various graphene structures as graphene monolayer, graphene nanoribbons, as well as multi-layer graphene or graphene flakes. An atomistic moment method based on classical electrostatics is utilized in order to evaluate the charge distribution in each nanostructure. Assuming a freestanding graphene structure in an infinite or in a semi-infinite space limited by a grounded infinite plane, the effect of the length, width, number of layers and position of the nanostructure on its electrostatic charge distributions and total charge and capacitance is examined through a parametric analysis. The results of the present show good agreement with corresponding available data in the literature, obtained from different theoretical approaches. Performing nonlinear regression analysis on the numerical results, where it is possible, simple analytical expressions are proposed for the total charge and charge distribution prediction based on structure geometry.

  16. A structural genomics analysis of histidine kinase sensor domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Jonah

    2005-11-01

    Histidine kinase sensors are a part of a two-component system of protein signaling in prokaryotes and lower eukaryotes that relay an external environmental signal to an adaptive internal cellular response. Signal transduction occurs via phosphotransfer between a sensor protein and a response regulator which interact in tandem. The sensor is usually a transmembrane protein that contains a conserved cytoplasmic histidine kinase transmitter domain and a modular periplasmic sensor domain. The response regulator is cytoplasmic protein that contains a receiver domain that interacts with the histidine kinase, and an output domain that interacts with regulators of transcription or chemotaxis. My work focuses on the X-ray structure determination of a variety of bacterial sensor domains, based on a structural genomics analysis of the entire sensor domain family. Structures of the NarX, DcuS, LisK, and DctB sensor domains have been solved to atomic resolution, some in both ligand-bound and ligand-free states. Two distinct structural folds have been revealed---all-alpha helical and mixed alpha-beta. An analysis of the structures reveals a possible mechanism of transmembrane signaling in histidine kinase sensors as a sliding-piston motion between transmembrane helices. Although there is great diversity in ligand binding, there appears to be a small number of distinct sensor domain folds for which structural representatives of two have been solved. A final synthesis of the structural information with a comprehensive bio-informatics analysis of all histidine kinase sensor domain sequences allows fold prediction for over 400 sensor domains, in a step towards mapping the entire structural landscape of this protein family.

  17. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of TCP transcription factors in Gossypium raimondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Wang, Qinglian; Sun, Runrun; Xie, Fuliang; Jones, Don C; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-10-16

    Plant-specific TEOSINTE-BRANCHED1/CYCLOIDEA/PCF (TCP) transcription factors play versatile functions in multiple aspects of plant growth and development. However, no systematical study has been performed in cotton. In this study, we performed for the first time the genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the TCP transcription factor family in Gossypium raimondii. A total of 38 non-redundant cotton TCP encoding genes were identified. The TCP transcription factors were divided into eleven subgroups based on phylogenetic analysis. Most TCP genes within the same subfamily demonstrated similar exon and intron organization and the motif structures were highly conserved among the subfamilies. Additionally, the chromosomal distribution pattern revealed that TCP genes were unevenly distributed across 11 out of the 13 chromosomes; segmental duplication is a predominant duplication event for TCP genes and the major contributor to the expansion of TCP gene family in G. raimondii. Moreover, the expression profiles of TCP genes shed light on their functional divergence.

  18. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of aquaporins in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuscher, Stefan; Akiyama, Masahito; Mori, Chiharu; Aoki, Koh; Shibata, Daisuke; Shiratake, Katsuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The family of aquaporins, also called water channels or major intrinsic proteins, is characterized by six transmembrane domains that together facilitate the transport of water and a variety of low molecular weight solutes. They are found in all domains of life, but show their highest diversity in plants. Numerous studies identified aquaporins as important targets for improving plant performance under drought stress. The phylogeny of aquaporins is well established based on model species like Arabidopsis thaliana, which can be used as a template to investigate aquaporins in other species. In this study we comprehensively identified aquaporin encoding genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), which is an important vegetable crop and also serves as a model for fleshy fruit development. We found 47 aquaporin genes in the tomato genome and analyzed their structural features. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences the aquaporin genes were assigned to five subfamilies (PIPs, TIPs, NIPs, SIPs and XIPs) and their substrate specificity was assessed on the basis of key amino acid residues. As ESTs were available for 32 genes, expression of these genes was analyzed in 13 different tissues and developmental stages of tomato. We detected tissue-specific and development-specific expression of tomato aquaporin genes, which is a first step towards revealing the contribution of aquaporins to water and solute transport in leaves and during fruit development.

  19. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of aquaporins in tomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Reuscher

    Full Text Available The family of aquaporins, also called water channels or major intrinsic proteins, is characterized by six transmembrane domains that together facilitate the transport of water and a variety of low molecular weight solutes. They are found in all domains of life, but show their highest diversity in plants. Numerous studies identified aquaporins as important targets for improving plant performance under drought stress. The phylogeny of aquaporins is well established based on model species like Arabidopsis thaliana, which can be used as a template to investigate aquaporins in other species. In this study we comprehensively identified aquaporin encoding genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum, which is an important vegetable crop and also serves as a model for fleshy fruit development. We found 47 aquaporin genes in the tomato genome and analyzed their structural features. Based on a phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences the aquaporin genes were assigned to five subfamilies (PIPs, TIPs, NIPs, SIPs and XIPs and their substrate specificity was assessed on the basis of key amino acid residues. As ESTs were available for 32 genes, expression of these genes was analyzed in 13 different tissues and developmental stages of tomato. We detected tissue-specific and development-specific expression of tomato aquaporin genes, which is a first step towards revealing the contribution of aquaporins to water and solute transport in leaves and during fruit development.

  20. Genome Wide Identification and Expression Profiling of Ethylene Receptor Genes during Soybean Nodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Youning; Yuan, Jinhong; Yang, Wei; Zhu, Lin; Su, Chao; Wang, Xiaodi; Wu, Haiyan; Sun, Zhengxi; Li, Xia

    2017-01-01

    It has long been known that the gaseous plant hormone ethylene plays a key role in nodulation in legumes. The perception of ethylene by a family of five membrane-localized receptors is necessary to trigger the ethylene signaling pathway, which regulates various biological responses in Arabidopsis. However, a systematic analysis of the ethylene receptors in leguminous plants and their roles in nodule development is lacking. In this study, we performed a characterization of ethylene receptor genes based on the latest Glycine max genome sequence and a public microarray database. Eleven ethylene receptor family genes were identified in soybean through homology searches, and they were divided into two subgroups. Exon-intron analysis showed that the gene structures are highly conserved within each group. Further analysis of their expression patterns showed that these ethylene receptor genes are differentially expressed in various soybean tissues and organs, including functional nodules. Notably, the ethylene receptor genes showed different responses to rhizobial infection and Nod factors, suggesting a possible role for ethylene receptors and ethylene signaling in rhizobia-host cell interactions and nodulation in soybean. Together, these data indicate the functional divergence of ethylene receptor genes in soybean, and that some of these receptors mediate nodulation, including rhizobial infection, nodule development, and nodule functionality. These findings provide a foundation for further elucidation of the molecular mechanism by which the ethylene signaling pathway regulates nodulation in soybean, as well as other legumes.

  1. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Expression Analysis of the Chalcone Synthase Family in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yahui; Ding, Ting; Su, Bo; Jiang, Haiyang

    2016-01-27

    Members of the chalcone synthase (CHS) family participate in the synthesis of a series of secondary metabolites in plants, fungi and bacteria. The metabolites play important roles in protecting land plants against various environmental stresses during the evolutionary process. Our research was conducted on comprehensive investigation of CHS genes in maize (Zea mays L.), including their phylogenetic relationships, gene structures, chromosomal locations and expression analysis. Fourteen CHS genes (ZmCHS01-14) were identified in the genome of maize, representing one of the largest numbers of CHS family members identified in one organism to date. The gene family was classified into four major classes (classes I-IV) based on their phylogenetic relationships. Most of them contained two exons and one intron. The 14 genes were unevenly located on six chromosomes. Two segmental duplication events were identified, which might contribute to the expansion of the maize CHS gene family to some extent. In addition, quantitative real-time PCR and microarray data analyses suggested that ZmCHS genes exhibited various expression patterns, indicating functional diversification of the ZmCHS genes. Our results will contribute to future studies of the complexity of the CHS gene family in maize and provide valuable information for the systematic analysis of the functions of the CHS gene family.

  2. Genomic expression profiling of mature soybean (Glycine max pollen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Mohan B

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pollen, the male partner in the reproduction of flowering plants, comprises either two or three cells at maturity. The current knowledge of the pollen transcriptome is limited to the model plant systems Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa which have tri-cellular pollen grains at maturity. Comparative studies on pollen of other genera, particularly crop plants, are needed to understand the pollen gene networks that are subject to functional and evolutionary conservation. In this study, we used the Affymetrix Soybean GeneChip® to perform transcriptional profiling on mature bi-cellular soybean pollen. Results Compared to the sporophyte transcriptome, the soybean pollen transcriptome revealed a restricted and unique repertoire of genes, with a significantly greater proportion of specifically expressed genes than is found in the sporophyte tissue. Comparative analysis shows that, among the 37,500 soybean transcripts addressed in this study, 10,299 transcripts (27.46% are expressed in pollen. Of the pollen-expressed sequences, about 9,489 (92.13% are also expressed in sporophytic tissues, and 810 (7.87% are selectively expressed in pollen. Overall, the soybean pollen transcriptome shows an enrichment of transcription factors (mostly zinc finger family proteins, signal recognition receptors, transporters, heat shock-related proteins and members of the ubiquitin proteasome proteolytic pathway. Conclusion This is the first report of a soybean pollen transcriptional profile. These data extend our current knowledge regarding regulatory pathways that govern the gene regulation and development of pollen. A comparison between transcription factors up-regulated in soybean and those in Arabidopsis revealed some divergence in the numbers and kinds of regulatory proteins expressed in both species.

  3. High-resolution haplotype block structure in the cattle genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Jungwoo

    2009-04-01

    similarities in haplotype block structure between dairy and beef breeds make them non-differentiable. Finally, our findings suggest that ~30,000 uniformly distributed SNPs would be necessary to construct a complete genome LD map in Bos taurus breeds, and ~580,000 SNPs would be necessary to characterize the haplotype block structure across the complete cattle genome.

  4. Genomic structure, characterization, and identification of the promotor of the human IL-8 receptor A gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprenger, H.; Lloyd, A.R.; Meyer, R.G.; Johnston, J.A.; Kelvin, D.J. [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MA (United States)

    1994-09-15

    Two unique but homologous receptors for the neutrophil chemoattractant IL-8 have been cloned (designated IL-8RA and IL-8RB), each of which binds IL-8 with high affinity. IL-8RA mRNA expression was found to be regulated by granulocyte-CSF and LPS. In an attempt to understand the tissue-specific expression and to identify transcriptional regulatory elements, the authors have cloned, sequenced, and characterized the human IL-8RA gene. A {lambda}-DASH clone encoding the entire human IL-8RA gene was isolated by screening a genomic library with a PCR-generated cDNA. After mapping, subcloning, and sequencing several restriction fragments, a 9.2-kb continuous DNA sequence was obtained. As the sizes of the published cDNA (1.9 kb) and the mRNA determined by Northern blot analysis (2.1 kb) were not in agreement, a full-length cDNA was cloned by using a modified rapid amplification of cDNA ends technique. They identified a 5{prime}-untranslated region of 119 bp. After comparison with the genomic sequence, they found the gene consisted of two exons interrupted by an intron of 1.7 kb. A 1050-bp ORF was encoded entirely in the second exon together with a 834-bp 3{prime}-untranslated region. The immediate GC-rich 5{prime}-flanking region upstream of exon 1 could serve as a constitutively active promoter in chloramphenicolacetyl-transferase-expression assays. Expression analysis of additional upstream regions suggested the presence of silencer elements between positions -841 and -280. In conclusion, cloning a full-length cDNA permitted cloning of the human IL-8RA gene, identification of the genomic structure, and characterization of the promoter region. 45 refs., 6 figs.

  5. The rice B-box zinc finger gene family: genomic identification, characterization, expression profiling and diurnal analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyan Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The B-box (BBX -containing proteins are a class of zinc finger proteins that contain one or two B-box domains and play important roles in plant growth and development. The Arabidopsis BBX gene family has recently been re-identified and renamed. However, there has not been a genome-wide survey of the rice BBX (OsBBX gene family until now. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we identified 30 rice BBX genes through a comprehensive bioinformatics analysis. Each gene was assigned a uniform nomenclature. We described the chromosome localizations, gene structures, protein domains, phylogenetic relationship, whole life-cycle expression profile and diurnal expression patterns of the OsBBX family members. Based on the phylogeny and domain constitution, the OsBBX gene family was classified into five subfamilies. The gene duplication analysis revealed that only chromosomal segmental duplication contributed to the expansion of the OsBBX gene family. The expression profile of the OsBBX genes was analyzed by Affymetrix GeneChip microarrays throughout the entire life-cycle of rice cultivar Zhenshan 97 (ZS97. In addition, microarray analysis was performed to obtain the expression patterns of these genes under light/dark conditions and after three phytohormone treatments. This analysis revealed that the expression patterns of the OsBBX genes could be classified into eight groups. Eight genes were regulated under the light/dark treatments, and eleven genes showed differential expression under at least one phytohormone treatment. Moreover, we verified the diurnal expression of the OsBBX genes using the data obtained from the Diurnal Project and qPCR analysis, and the results indicated that many of these genes had a diurnal expression pattern. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The combination of the genome-wide identification and the expression and diurnal analysis of the OsBBX gene family should facilitate additional functional studies of the Os

  6. Multi-scale coding of genomic information: From DNA sequence to genome structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arneodo, Alain, E-mail: alain.arneodo@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Vaillant, Cedric, E-mail: cedric.vaillant@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Audit, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.audit@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Argoul, Francoise, E-mail: francoise.argoul@ens-lyon.f [Universite de Lyon, F-69000 Lyon (France); Laboratoire Joliot-Curie and Laboratoire de Physique, CNRS, Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); D' Aubenton-Carafa, Yves, E-mail: daubenton@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Thermes, Claude, E-mail: claude.thermes@cgm.cnrs-gif.f [Centre de Genetique Moleculaire, CNRS, Allee de la Terrasse, 91198 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2011-02-15

    Understanding how chromatin is spatially and dynamically organized in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells and how this affects genome functions is one of the main challenges of cell biology. Since the different orders of packaging in the hierarchical organization of DNA condition the accessibility of DNA sequence elements to trans-acting factors that control the transcription and replication processes, there is actually a wealth of structural and dynamical information to learn in the primary DNA sequence. In this review, we show that when using concepts, methodologies, numerical and experimental techniques coming from statistical mechanics and nonlinear physics combined with wavelet-based multi-scale signal processing, we are able to decipher the multi-scale sequence encoding of chromatin condensation-decondensation mechanisms that play a fundamental role in regulating many molecular processes involved in nuclear functions.

  7. Central genomic regulation of the expression of oestrous behaviour in dairy cows: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelders, H; van der Lende, T; Kommadath, A; te Pas, M F W; Smits, M A; Kaal, L M T E

    2014-05-01

    The expression of oestrous behaviour in Holstein Friesian dairy cows has progressively decreased over the past 50 years. Reduced oestrus expression is one of the factors contributing to the current suboptimal reproductive efficiency in dairy farming. Variation between and within cows in the expression of oestrous behaviour is associated with variation in peripheral blood oestradiol concentrations during oestrus. In addition, there is evidence for a priming role of progesterone for the full display of oestrous behaviour. A higher rate of metabolic clearance of ovarian steroids could be one of the factors leading to lower peripheral blood concentrations of oestradiol and progesterone in high-producing dairy cows. Oestradiol acts on the brain by genomic, non-genomic and growth factor-dependent mechanisms. A firm base of understanding of the ovarian steroid-driven central genomic regulation of female sexual behaviour has been obtained from studies on rodents. These studies have resulted in the definition of five modules of oestradiol-activated genes in the brain, referred to as the GAPPS modules. In a recent series of studies, gene expression in the anterior pituitary and four brain areas (amygdala, hippocampus, dorsal hypothalamus and ventral hypothalamus) in oestrous and luteal phase cows, respectively, has been measured, and the relation with oestrous behaviour of these cows was analysed. These studies identified a number of genes of which the expression was associated with the intensity of oestrous behaviour. These genes could be grouped according to the GAPPS modules, suggesting close similarity of the regulation of oestrous behaviour in cows and female sexual behaviour in rodents. A better understanding of the central genomic regulation of the expression of oestrous behaviour in dairy cows may in due time contribute to improved (genomic) selection strategies for appropriate oestrus expression in high-producing dairy cows.

  8. Development and characterization of genomic and expressed SSRs for levant cotton (Gossypium herbaceum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Satya Narayan; Srivastava, Anukool; Rai, Krishan Mohan; Ranjan, Alok; Singh, Sunil K; Nisar, Tarannum; Srivastava, Meenal; Bag, Sumit K; Mantri, Shrikant; Asif, Mehar Hasan; Yadav, Hemant Kumar; Tuli, Rakesh; Sawant, Samir V

    2012-02-01

    Four microsatellite-enriched genomic libraries for CA(15), GA(15), AAG(8) and ATG(8) repeats and transcriptome sequences of five cDNA libraries of Gossypium herbaceum were explored to develop simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. A total of 428 unique clones from repeat enriched genomic libraries were mined for 584 genomic SSRs (gSSRs). In addition, 99,780 unigenes from transcriptome sequencing were explored for 8,900 SSR containing sequences with 12,471 expressed SSRs. The present study adds 1,970 expressed SSRs and 263 gSSRs to the public domain for the use of genetic studies of cotton. When 150 gSSRs and 50 expressed SSRs were tested on a panel of four species of cotton, 68 gSSRs and 12 expressed SSRs revealed polymorphism. These 200 SSRs were further deployed on 15 genotypes of levant cotton for the genetic diversity assessment. This is the first report on the successful use of repeat enriched genomic library and expressed sequence database for microsatellite markers development in G. herbaceum.

  9. Genome-wide screens for expressed hypothetical proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Durhuus, Jon Ambæk; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2012-01-01

    A hypothetical protein (HP) is defined as a protein that is predicted to be expressed from an open reading frame, but for which there is no experimental evidence of translation. HPs constitute a substantial fraction of proteomes of human as well as of other organisms. With the general belief...

  10. Porcine UCHL1: genomic organization, chromosome localization and expression analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Bendixen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    to and protection from Parkinson’s disease. Here we report cloning, characterization, expression analysis and mapping of porcine UCHL1. The UCHL1 cDNA was amplified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using oligonucleotide primers derived from in silico sequences. The porcine cDNA codes...

  11. Genome polymorphism markers and stress genes expression for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAM

    2014-06-11

    Jun 11, 2014 ... environmental stress through investigating SOD and PAL gene expression and also the genetic relationship .... obtained from the gene bank (www.ncbi.gov) under accession number ... stored at -20°C for further work. Primers ...

  12. Genome-Wide Study of Structural Variants in Bovine Holstein, Montbéliarde and Normande Dairy Breeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussaha, Mekki; Esquerré, Diane; Barbieri, Johanna; Djari, Anis; Pinton, Alain; Letaief, Rabia; Salin, Gérald; Escudié, Frédéric; Roulet, Alain; Fritz, Sébastien; Samson, Franck; Grohs, Cécile; Bernard, Maria; Klopp, Christophe; Boichard, Didier; Rocha, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing technologies have offered in recent years new opportunities to study genome variations. These studies have mostly focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms, small insertions or deletions and on copy number variants. Other structural variants, such as large insertions or deletions, tandem duplications, translocations, and inversions are less well-studied, despite that some have an important impact on phenotypes. In the present study, we performed a large-scale survey of structural variants in cattle. We report the identification of 6,426 putative structural variants in cattle extracted from whole-genome sequence data of 62 bulls representing the three major French dairy breeds. These genomic variants affect DNA segments greater than 50 base pairs and correspond to deletions, inversions and tandem duplications. Out of these, we identified a total of 547 deletions and 410 tandem duplications which could potentially code for CNVs. Experimental validation was carried out on 331 structural variants using a novel high-throughput genotyping method. Out of these, 255 structural variants (77%) generated good quality genotypes and 191 (75%) of them were validated. Gene content analyses in structural variant regions revealed 941 large deletions removing completely one or several genes, including 10 single-copy genes. In addition, some of the structural variants are located within quantitative trait loci for dairy traits. This study is a pan-genome assessment of genomic variations in cattle and may provide a new glimpse into the bovine genome architecture. Our results may also help to study the effects of structural variants on gene expression and consequently their effect on certain phenotypes of interest. PMID:26317361

  13. Gene expression levels as endophenotypes in genome-wide association studies of Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, F.; Carrasquillo, M. M.; Pankratz, V. S.; Belbin, O.; Morgan, K.; Allen, M.; Wilcox, S. L.; Ma, L.; Walker, L. P.; Kouri, N.; Burgess, J. D.; Younkin, L. H.; Younkin, Samuel G.; Younkin, C. S.; Bisceglio, G. D.; Crook, J. E.; Dickson, D. W.; Petersen, R. C.; Graff-Radford, N.; Younkin, Steven G.; Ertekin-Taner, N.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) is a common disorder with a substantial genetic component. We postulate that many disease susceptibility variants act by altering gene expression levels. Methods: We measured messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels of 12 LOAD candidate genes in the cerebella of 200 subjects with LOAD. Using the genotypes from our LOAD genome-wide association study for the cis-single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (n = 619) of these 12 LOAD candidate genes, we tested for associations with expression levels as endophenotypes. The strongest expression cis-SNP was tested for AD association in 7 independent case-control series (2,280 AD and 2,396 controls). Results: We identified 3 SNPs that associated significantly with IDE (insulin degrading enzyme) expression levels. A single copy of the minor allele for each significant SNP was associated with ∼twofold higher IDE expression levels. The most significant SNP, rs7910977, is 4.2 kb beyond the 3′ end of IDE. The association observed with this SNP was significant even at the genome-wide level (p = 2.7 × 10−8). Furthermore, the minor allele of rs7910977 associated significantly (p = 0.0046) with reduced LOAD risk (OR = 0.81 with a 95% CI of 0.70-0.94), as expected biologically from its association with elevated IDE expression. Conclusions: These results provide strong evidence that IDE is a late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) gene with variants that modify risk of LOAD by influencing IDE expression. They also suggest that the use of expression levels as endophenotypes in genome-wide association studies may provide a powerful approach for the identification of disease susceptibility alleles. GLOSSARY AD = Alzheimer disease; CI = confidence interval; GWAS = genome-wide association study; LOAD = late-onset Alzheimer disease; mRNA = messenger RNA; OR = odds ratio; SNP = single nucleotide polymorphism. PMID:20142614

  14. Chromosome structuring limits genome plasticity in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Esnault

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome organizations of related bacterial genera are well conserved despite a very long divergence period. We have assessed the forces limiting bacterial genome plasticity in Escherichia coli by measuring the respective effect of altering different parameters, including DNA replication, compositional skew of replichores, coordination of gene expression with DNA replication, replication-associated gene dosage, and chromosome organization into macrodomains. Chromosomes were rearranged by large inversions. Changes in the compositional skew of replichores, in the coordination of gene expression with DNA replication or in the replication-associated gene dosage have only a moderate effect on cell physiology because large rearrangements inverting the orientation of several hundred genes inside a replichore are only slightly detrimental. By contrast, changing the balance between the two replication arms has a more drastic effect, and the recombinational rescue of replication forks is required for cell viability when one of the chromosome arms is less than half than the other one. Macrodomain organization also appears to be a major factor restricting chromosome plasticity, and two types of inverted configurations severely affect the cell cycle. First, the disruption of the Ter macrodomain with replication forks merging far from the normal replichore junction provoked chromosome segregation defects. The second major problematic configurations resulted from inversions between Ori and Right macrodomains, which perturb nucleoid distribution and early steps of cytokinesis. Consequences for the control of the bacterial cell cycle and for the evolution of bacterial chromosome configuration are discussed.

  15. Genome-wide classification and expression analysis of MYB transcription factor families in rice and Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiyar Amit

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The MYB gene family comprises one of the richest groups of transcription factors in plants. Plant MYB proteins are characterized by a highly conserved MYB DNA-binding domain. MYB proteins are classified into four major groups namely, 1R-MYB, 2R-MYB, 3R-MYB and 4R-MYB based on the number and position of MYB repeats. MYB transcription factors are involved in plant development, secondary metabolism, hormone signal transduction, disease resistance and abiotic stress tolerance. A comparative analysis of MYB family genes in rice and Arabidopsis will help reveal the evolution and function of MYB genes in plants. Results A genome-wide analysis identified at least 155 and 197 MYB genes in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. Gene structure analysis revealed that MYB family genes possess relatively more number of introns in the middle as compared with C- and N-terminal regions of the predicted genes. Intronless MYB-genes are highly conserved both in rice and Arabidopsis. MYB genes encoding R2R3 repeat MYB proteins retained conserved gene structure with three exons and two introns, whereas genes encoding R1R2R3 repeat containing proteins consist of six exons and five introns. The splicing pattern is similar among R1R2R3 MYB genes in Arabidopsis. In contrast, variation in splicing pattern was observed among R1R2R3 MYB members of rice. Consensus motif analysis of 1kb upstream region (5′ to translation initiation codon of MYB gene ORFs led to the identification of conserved and over-represented cis-motifs in both rice and Arabidopsis. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that several members of MYBs are up-regulated by various abiotic stresses both in rice and Arabidopsis. Conclusion A comprehensive genome-wide analysis of chromosomal distribution, tandem repeats and phylogenetic relationship of MYB family genes in rice and Arabidopsis suggested their evolution via duplication. Genome-wide comparative analysis of MYB genes and

  16. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Seemann, Ernst Stefan;

    2015-01-01

    of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping...

  17. Expression, tandem repeat copy number variation and stability of four macrosatellite arrays in the human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick Brian P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrosatellites are some of the largest variable number tandem repeats in the human genome, but what role these unusual sequences perform is unknown. Their importance to human health is clearly demonstrated by the 4q35 macrosatellite D4Z4 that is associated with the onset of the muscle degenerative disease facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Nevertheless, many other macrosatellite arrays in the human genome remain poorly characterized. Results Here we describe the organization, tandem repeat copy number variation, transmission stability and expression of four macrosatellite arrays in the human genome: the TAF11-Like array located on chromosomes 5p15.1, the SST1 arrays on 4q28.3 and 19q13.12, the PRR20 array located on chromosome 13q21.1, and the ZAV array at 9q32. All are polymorphic macrosatellite arrays that at least for TAF11-Like and SST1 show evidence of meiotic instability. With the exception of the SST1 array that is ubiquitously expressed, all are expressed at high levels in the testis and to a lesser extent in the brain. Conclusions Our results extend the number of characterized macrosatellite arrays in the human genome and provide the foundation for formulation of hypotheses to begin assessing their functional role in the human genome.

  18. A physical map for the Amborella trichopoda genome sheds light on the evolution of angiosperm genome structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccolo, Andrea; Bowers, John E; Estill, James C; Xiong, Zhiyong; Luo, Meizhong; Sebastian, Aswathy; Goicoechea, José Luis; Collura, Kristi; Yu, Yeisoo; Jiao, Yuannian; Duarte, Jill; Tang, Haibao; Ayyampalayam, Saravanaraj; Rounsley, Steve; Kudrna, Dave; Paterson, Andrew H; Pires, J Chris; Chanderbali, Andre; Soltis, Douglas E; Chamala, Srikar; Barbazuk, Brad; Soltis, Pamela S; Albert, Victor A; Ma, Hong; Mandoli, Dina; Banks, Jody; Carlson, John E; Tomkins, Jeffrey; dePamphilis, Claude W; Wing, Rod A; Leebens-Mack, Jim

    2011-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses have identified Amborella trichopoda, an understory tree species endemic to the forests of New Caledonia, as sister to a clade including all other known flowering plant species. The Amborella genome is a unique reference for understanding the evolution of angiosperm genomes because it can serve as an outgroup to root comparative analyses. A physical map, BAC end sequences and sample shotgun sequences provide a first view of the 870 Mbp Amborella genome. Analysis of Amborella BAC ends sequenced from each contig suggests that the density of long terminal repeat retrotransposons is negatively correlated with that of protein coding genes. Syntenic, presumably ancestral, gene blocks were identified in comparisons of the Amborella BAC contigs and the sequenced Arabidopsis thaliana, Populus trichocarpa, Vitis vinifera and Oryza sativa genomes. Parsimony mapping of the loss of synteny corroborates previous analyses suggesting that the rate of structural change has been more rapid on lineages leading to Arabidopsis and Oryza compared with lineages leading to Populus and Vitis. The gamma paleohexiploidy event identified in the Arabidopsis, Populus and Vitis genomes is shown to have occurred after the divergence of all other known angiosperms from the lineage leading to Amborella. When placed in the context of a physical map, BAC end sequences representing just 5.4% of the Amborella genome have facilitated reconstruction of gene blocks that existed in the last common ancestor of all flowering plants. The Amborella genome is an invaluable reference for inferences concerning the ancestral angiosperm and subsequent genome evolution.

  19. What history tells us XXXX. The success story of the expressiongenome editing”

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    International audience; The expression « genome editing » designates the possibilities opened by the CRISPR-Cas9 enzyme to cut and modify genemes at precise positions. This expression has been rapidly adopted by biologists, but also journalists and laymen. I descibe steps in the recent emergence of this expression, as well as the reasons of its success.; L’expression « édition du génome » désigne la possibilité ouverte par l’enzyme CRISPR-Cas9 de couper et de modifier le génome à des sites pr...

  20. The Symbiodinium kawagutii genome illuminates dinoflagellate gene expression and coral symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Senjie; Cheng, Shifeng; Song, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are important components of marine ecosystems and essential coral symbionts, yet little is known about their genomes. We report here on the analysis of a high-quality assembly from the 1180-megabase genome of Symbiodinium kawagutii. We annotated protein-coding genes and identified...... Symbiodinium-specific gene families. No whole-genome duplication was observed, but instead we found active (retro) transposition and gene family expansion, especially in processes important for successful symbiosis with corals. We also documented genes potentially governing sexual reproduction and cyst...... formation, novel promoter elements, and a microRNA system potentially regulating gene expression in both symbiont and coral.We found biochemical complementarity between genomes of S. kawagutii and the anthozoan Acropora, indicative of host-symbiont coevolution, providing a resource for studying...

  1. Genome-wide expression of non-coding RNA and global chromatin modification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rukui Zhang; Lan Zhang; Wenqiang Yu

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally,we know that genomic DNA will produce transcripts named messenger RNA and then translate into protein following the instruction of genetic central dogma,and RNA works here as a pass-by messenger.Now increasing evidence shows that RNA is a key regulator as well as a message transmitter.It is discovered by next-generation sequencing techniques that most genomic DNA are generally transcribed to non-coding RNA,highly beyond the percentage of coding mRNA.These non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs),belonging to several groups,have critical roles in many cellular processes,expanding our understanding of the RNA world.We review here the different categories of ncRNA according to genome location and how ncRNAs guide and recruit chromatin modification complex to specific loci of genome to modulate gene expression by affecting chromatin state.

  2. Comprehensive genomic analysis and expression profiling of phospholipase C gene family during abiotic stresses and development in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Amarjeet; Kanwar, Poonam; Pandey, Amita; Tyagi, Akhilesh K; Sopory, Sudhir K; Kapoor, Sanjay; Pandey, Girdhar K

    2013-01-01

    Phospholipase C (PLC) is one of the major lipid hydrolysing enzymes, implicated in lipid mediated signaling. PLCs have been found to play a significant role in abiotic stress triggered signaling and developmental processes in various plant species. Genome wide identification and expression analysis have been carried out for this gene family in Arabidopsis, yet not much has been accomplished in crop plant rice. An exhaustive in-silico exploration of rice genome using various online databases and tools resulted in the identification of nine PLC encoding genes. Based on sequence, motif and phylogenetic analysis rice PLC gene family could be divided into phosphatidylinositol-specific PLCs (PI-PLCs) and phosphatidylcholine- PLCs (PC-PLC or NPC) classes with four and five members, respectively. A comparative analysis revealed that PLCs are conserved in Arabidopsis (dicots) and rice (monocot) at gene structure and protein level but they might have evolved through a separate evolutionary path. Transcript profiling using gene chip microarray and quantitative RT-PCR showed that most of the PLC members expressed significantly and differentially under abiotic stresses (salt, cold and drought) and during various developmental stages with condition/stage specific and overlapping expression. This finding suggested an important role of different rice PLC members in abiotic stress triggered signaling and plant development, which was also supported by the presence of relevant cis-regulatory elements in their promoters. Sub-cellular localization of few selected PLC members in Nicotiana benthamiana and onion epidermal cells has provided a clue about their site of action and functional behaviour. The genome wide identification, structural and expression analysis and knowledge of sub-cellular localization of PLC gene family envisage the functional characterization of these genes in crop plants in near future.

  3. Comprehensive genomic analysis and expression profiling of phospholipase C gene family during abiotic stresses and development in rice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarjeet Singh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phospholipase C (PLC is one of the major lipid hydrolysing enzymes, implicated in lipid mediated signaling. PLCs have been found to play a significant role in abiotic stress triggered signaling and developmental processes in various plant species. Genome wide identification and expression analysis have been carried out for this gene family in Arabidopsis, yet not much has been accomplished in crop plant rice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An exhaustive in-silico exploration of rice genome using various online databases and tools resulted in the identification of nine PLC encoding genes. Based on sequence, motif and phylogenetic analysis rice PLC gene family could be divided into phosphatidylinositol-specific PLCs (PI-PLCs and phosphatidylcholine- PLCs (PC-PLC or NPC classes with four and five members, respectively. A comparative analysis revealed that PLCs are conserved in Arabidopsis (dicots and rice (monocot at gene structure and protein level but they might have evolved through a separate evolutionary path. Transcript profiling using gene chip microarray and quantitative RT-PCR showed that most of the PLC members expressed significantly and differentially under abiotic stresses (salt, cold and drought and during various developmental stages with condition/stage specific and overlapping expression. This finding suggested an important role of different rice PLC members in abiotic stress triggered signaling and plant development, which was also supported by the presence of relevant cis-regulatory elements in their promoters. Sub-cellular localization of few selected PLC members in Nicotiana benthamiana and onion epidermal cells has provided a clue about their site of action and functional behaviour. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The genome wide identification, structural and expression analysis and knowledge of sub-cellular localization of PLC gene family envisage the functional characterization of these genes in crop plants in near

  4. An improved method for detecting and delineating genomic regions with altered gene expression in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Genomic regions with altered gene expression are a characteristic feature of cancer cells. We present a novel method for identifying such regions in gene expression maps. This method is based on total variation minimization, a classical signal restoration technique. In systematic evaluations, we show that our method combines top-notch detection performance with an ability to delineate relevant regions without excessive over-segmentation, making it a significant advance over existing methods. ...

  5. Genome-wide expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in maize

    OpenAIRE

    Beatty Mary; Luck Stanley; Holloway Beth; Rafalski J-Antoni; Li Bailin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Expression QTL analyses have shed light on transcriptional regulation in numerous species of plants, animals, and yeasts. These microarray-based analyses identify regulators of gene expression as either cis-acting factors that regulate proximal genes, or trans-acting factors that function through a variety of mechanisms to affect transcript abundance of unlinked genes. Results A hydroponics-based genetical genomics study in roots of a Zea mays IBM2 Syn10 double haploid pop...

  6. Genome-wide expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis in maize

    OpenAIRE

    Holloway, Beth; Luck, Stanley; Beatty, Mary; Rafalski, J-Antoni; Li, Bailin

    2011-01-01

    Background Expression QTL analyses have shed light on transcriptional regulation in numerous species of plants, animals, and yeasts. These microarray-based analyses identify regulators of gene expression as either cis-acting factors that regulate proximal genes, or trans-acting factors that function through a variety of mechanisms to affect transcript abundance of unlinked genes. Results A hydroponics-based genetical genomics study in roots of a Zea mays IBM2 Syn10 double haploid population i...

  7. Predicting effects of structural stress in a genome-reduced model bacterial metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güell, Oriol; Sagués, Francesc; Serrano, M. Ángeles

    2012-08-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen recently proposed as a genome-reduced model for bacterial systems biology. Here, we study the response of its metabolic network to different forms of structural stress, including removal of individual and pairs of reactions and knockout of genes and clusters of co-expressed genes. Our results reveal a network architecture as robust as that of other model bacteria regarding multiple failures, although less robust against individual reaction inactivation. Interestingly, metabolite motifs associated to reactions can predict the propagation of inactivation cascades and damage amplification effects arising in double knockouts. We also detect a significant correlation between gene essentiality and damages produced by single gene knockouts, and find that genes controlling high-damage reactions tend to be expressed independently of each other, a functional switch mechanism that, simultaneously, acts as a genetic firewall to protect metabolism. Prediction of failure propagation is crucial for metabolic engineering or disease treatment.

  8. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of testicular carcinoma in situ progression into overt tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almstrup, K; Hoei-Hansen, C E; Nielsen, J E

    2005-01-01

    into CIS occurs early during foetal life. Progression into an overt tumour, however, typically first happens after puberty, where CIS cells transform into either a seminoma (SEM) or a nonseminoma (N-SEM). Here, we have compared the genome-wide gene expression of CIS cells to that of testicular SEM...

  9. Natural variation of histone modification and its impact on gene expression in the rat genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rintisch, Carola; Heinig, Matthias; Bauerfeind, Anja; Schafer, Sebastian; Mieth, Christin; Patone, Giannino; Hummel, Oliver; Chen, Wei; Cook, Stuart; Cuppen, Edwin; Colomé Tatché, Maria; Johannes, Frank; Jansen, Ritsert C; Neil, Helen; Werner, Michel; Pravenec, Michal; Vingron, Martin; Hubner, Norbert

    Histone modifications are epigenetic marks that play fundamental roles in many biological processes including the control of chromatin-mediated regulation of gene expression. Little is known about interindividual variability of histone modification levels across the genome and to what extent they

  10. Reliable and efficient solution of genome-scale models of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ding; Yang, Laurence; Fleming, Ronan M. T.

    2017-01-01

    Constraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) is currently the only methodology that permits integrated modeling of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression (ME) at genome-scale. Linear optimization computes steady-state flux solutions to ME models, but flux values are spread over many...

  11. Regulatory Network Construction in Arabidopsis using genome-wide gene expression QTLs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keurentjes, J.J.B.; Fu, J.J.; Terpstra, I.R.; Garcia, J.M.; van den Ackerveken, G.; Snoek, L.B.; Peeters, A.J.M.; Vreugdenhil, D.; Koornreef, M.; Jansen, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    Regulatory network construction in Arabidopsis by using genome-wide gene expression quantitative trait loci.Keurentjes JJ, Fu J, Terpstra IR, Garcia JM, van den Ackerveken G, Snoek LB, Peeters AJ, Vreugdenhil D, Koornneef M, Jansen RC. Laboratory of Genetics, Wageningen University, Arboretumlaan 4,

  12. Regulatory network construction in Arabidopsis by using genome-wide gene expression quantitative trait loci

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keurentjes, Joost J.B.; Fu, Jingyuan; Terpstra, Inez R.; Garcia, Juan M.; Ackerveken, Guido van den; Snoek, L. Basten; Peeters, Anton J.M.; Vreugdenhil, Dick; Koornneef, Maarten; Jansen, Ritsert C.

    2007-01-01

    Accessions of a plant species can show considerable genetic differences that are analyzed effectively by using recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations. Here we describe the results of genome-wide expression variation analysis in an RIL population of Arabidopsis thaliana. For many genes, variation

  13. Integrating multiple genome annotation databases improves the interpretation of microarray gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kennedy Breandan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Affymetrix GeneChip is a widely used gene expression profiling platform. Since the chips were originally designed, the genome databases and gene definitions have been considerably updated. Thus, more accurate interpretation of microarray data requires parallel updating of the specificity of GeneChip probes. We propose a new probe remapping protocol, using the zebrafish GeneChips as an example, by removing nonspecific probes, and grouping the probes into transcript level probe sets using an integrated zebrafish genome annotation. This genome annotation is based on combining transcript information from multiple databases. This new remapping protocol, especially the new genome annotation, is shown here to be an important factor in improving the interpretation of gene expression microarray data. Results Transcript data from the RefSeq, GenBank and Ensembl databases were downloaded from the UCSC genome browser, and integrated to generate a combined zebrafish genome annotation. Affymetrix probes were filtered and remapped according to the new annotation. The influence of transcript collection and gene definition methods was tested using two microarray data sets. Compared to remapping using a single database, this new remapping protocol results in up to 20% more probes being retained in the remapping, leading to approximately 1,000 more genes being detected. The differentially expressed gene lists are consequently increased by up to 30%. We are also able to detect up to three times more alternative splicing events. A small number of the bioinformatics predictions were confirmed using real-time PCR validation. Conclusions By combining gene definitions from multiple databases, it is possible to greatly increase the numbers of genes and splice variants that can be detected in microarray gene expression experiments.

  14. Insights into a dinoflagellate genome through expressed sequence tag analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonaldo Maria F

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dinoflagellates are important marine primary producers and grazers and cause toxic "red tides". These taxa are characterized by many unique features such as immense genomes, the absence of nucleosomes, and photosynthetic organelles (plastids that have been gained and lost multiple times. We generated EST sequences from non-normalized and normalized cDNA libraries from a culture of the toxic species Alexandrium tamarense to elucidate dinoflagellate evolution. Previous analyses of these data have clarified plastid origin and here we study the gene content, annotate the ESTs, and analyze the genes that are putatively involved in DNA packaging. Results Approximately 20% of the 6,723 unique (11,171 total 3'-reads ESTs data could be annotated using Blast searches against GenBank. Several putative dinoflagellate-specific mRNAs were identified, including one novel plastid protein. Dinoflagellate genes, similar to other eukaryotes, have a high GC-content that is reflected in the amino acid codon usage. Highly represented transcripts include histone-like (HLP and luciferin binding proteins and several genes occur in families that encode nearly identical proteins. We also identified rare transcripts encoding a predicted protein highly similar to histone H2A.X. We speculate this histone may be retained for its role in DNA double-strand break repair. Conclusion This is the most extensive collection to date of ESTs from a toxic dinoflagellate. These data will be instrumental to future research to understand the unique and complex cell biology of these organisms and for potentially identifying the genes involved in toxin production.

  15. Regulation of human genome expression and RNA splicing by human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauson, Elaine J; Windle, Brad; Donaldson, Mary M; Caffarel, Maria M; Dornan, Edward S; Coleman, Nicholas; Herzyk, Pawel; Henderson, Scott C; Wang, Xu; Morgan, Iain M

    2014-11-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is causative in human cancer. The E2 protein regulates transcription from and replication of the viral genome; the role of E2 in regulating the host genome has been less well studied. We have expressed HPV16 E2 (E2) stably in U2OS cells; these cells tolerate E2 expression well and gene expression analysis identified 74 genes showing differential expression specific to E2. Analysis of published gene expression data sets during cervical cancer progression identified 20 of the genes as being altered in a similar direction as the E2 specific genes. In addition, E2 altered the splicing of many genes implicated in cancer and cell motility. The E2 expressing cells showed no alteration in cell growth but were altered in cell motility, consistent with the E2 induced altered splicing predicted to affect this cellular function. The results present a model system for investigating E2 regulation of the host genome.

  16. Abnormal expression of DNA methyltransferases and genomic imprinting in cloned goat fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yongjie; Deng, Mingtian; Zhang, Guomin; Ren, Caifang; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Yanli; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a useful way to produce cloned animals. However, SCNT animals exhibit DNA methylation and genomic imprinting abnormalities. These abnormalities may be due to the faulty epigenetic reprogramming of donor cells. To investigate the consequence of SCNT on the genomic imprinting and global methylation in the donor cells, growth patterns and apoptosis of cloned goat fibroblast cells (CGFCs) at passage 7 were determined. Growth patterns in CGFCs were similar to the controls; however, the growth rate in log phase was lower and apoptosis in CGFCs were significantly higher (P < 0.01). In addition, quantitative expression analysis of three DNA methyltransferases (Dnmt) and two imprinted genes (H19, IGF2R) was conducted in CGFCs: Dnmt1 and Dnmt3b expression was significantly reduced (P < 0.01), and H19 expression was decreased sixfold (P < 0.01); however, the expression of Dnmt3a was unaltered and IGF2R expression was significantly increased (P < 0.05). Finally, we used bisulfite sequencing PCR to compare the DNA methylation patterns in differentially methylated regions (DMRs) of H19 and IGF2R. The DMRs of H19 (P < 0.01) and IGF2R (P < 0.01) were both highly methylated in CGFCs. These results indicate that the global genome might be hypomethylated. Moreover, there is an aberrant expression of imprinted genes and DMR methylation in CGFCs.

  17. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doorbar, John, E-mail: jdoorba@nimr.mrc.ac.uk

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1{sup ∧}E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein′s flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1{sup ∧}E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1{sup ∧}E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1{sup

  18. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analysis of the 14-3-3 Family Genes in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng eQin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The 14-3-3 gene family, which is conserved in eukaryotes, is involved in protein-protein interactions and mediates signal transduction. However, detailed investigations of the 14-3-3 gene family in Medicago truncatula are largely unknown. In this study, the identification and study of M. truncatula 14-3-3-family genes were performed based on the latest M. truncatula genome. In the M. truncatula genome, 10 14-3-3 family genes were identified, and they can be grouped into ε and non-ε groups. An exon-intron analysis showed that the gene structures are conserved in the same group. The protein structure analysis showed that 14-3-3 proteins in M. truncatula are composed of nine typical antiparallel α-helices. The expression patterns of Mt14-3-3 genes indicated that they are expressed in all tissues. Furthermore, the gene expression levels of Mt14-3-3 under hormone treatment and Sinorhizobium meliloti infection showed that the Mt14-3-3 genes were involve in nodule formation. Our findings lay a solid foundation for further functional studies of 14-3-3 in M. truncatula.

  19. Mutational and structural analysis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma using whole genome sequencing | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a genetically heterogeneous cancer comprising at least two molecular subtypes that differ in gene expression and distribution of mutations. Recently, application of genome/exome sequencing and RNA-seq to DLBCL has revealed numerous genes that are recurrent targets of somatic point mutation in this disease.

  20. Comparative analysis of codon usage patterns and identification of predicted highly expressed genes in five Salmonella genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal U

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To anlyse codon usage patterns of five complete genomes of Salmonella , predict highly expressed genes, examine horizontally transferred pathogenicity-related genes to detect their presence in the strains, and scrutinize the nature of highly expressed genes to infer upon their lifestyle. Methods: Protein coding genes, ribosomal protein genes, and pathogenicity-related genes were analysed with Codon W and CAI (codon adaptation index Calculator. Results: Translational efficiency plays a role in codon usage variation in Salmonella genes. Low bias was noticed in most of the genes. GC3 (guanine cytosine at third position composition does not influence codon usage variation in the genes of these Salmonella strains. Among the cluster of orthologous groups (COGs, translation, ribosomal structure biogenesis [J], and energy production and conversion [C] contained the highest number of potentially highly expressed (PHX genes. Correspondence analysis reveals the conserved nature of the genes. Highly expressed genes were detected. Conclusions: Selection for translational efficiency is the major source of variation of codon usage in the genes of Salmonella . Evolution of pathogenicity-related genes as a unit suggests their ability to infect and exist as a pathogen. Presence of a lot of PHX genes in the information and storage-processing category of COGs indicated their lifestyle and revealed that they were not subjected to genome reduction.

  1. Transcriptional activity, chromosomal distribution and expression effects of transposable elements in Coffea genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício R Lopes

    Full Text Available Plant genomes are massively invaded by transposable elements (TEs, many of which are located near host genes and can thus impact gene expression. In flowering plants, TE expression can be activated (de-repressed under certain stressful conditions, both biotic and abiotic, as well as by genome stress caused by hybridization. In this study, we examined the effects of these stress agents on TE expression in two diploid species of coffee, Coffea canephora and C. eugenioides, and their allotetraploid hybrid C. arabica. We also explored the relationship of TE repression mechanisms to host gene regulation via the effects of exonized TE sequences. Similar to what has been seen for other plants, overall TE expression levels are low in Coffea plant cultivars, consistent with the existence of effective TE repression mechanisms. TE expression patterns are highly dynamic across the species and conditions assayed here are unrelated to their classification at the level of TE class or family. In contrast to previous results, cell culture conditions per se do not lead to the de-repression of TE expression in C. arabica. Results obtained here indicate that differing plant drought stress levels relate strongly to TE repression mechanisms. TEs tend to be expressed at significantly higher levels in non-irrigated samples for the drought tolerant cultivars but in drought sensitive cultivars the opposite pattern was shown with irrigated samples showing significantly higher TE expression. Thus, TE genome repression mechanisms may be finely tuned to the ideal growth and/or regulatory conditions of the specific plant cultivars in which they are active. Analysis of TE expression levels in cell culture conditions underscored the importance of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD pathways in the repression of Coffea TEs. These same NMD mechanisms can also regulate plant host gene expression via the repression of genes that bear exonized TE sequences.

  2. Qualitative, quantitative and structural analysis of non- coding regions of classical swine fever virus genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is the pathogen of the swine fever. Understanding of the replication and expression of its genome is the basis for research of the pathogenicity for CSFV and development of antiviral drug. The noncoding regions (NCRs) of CSFV are the main regulatory regions for replication and expression. Qualitative, quantitative and structural analysis of 3′ NCRs and 5′ NCRs was done in order to locate the regulatory region in the NCRs and to character the NCRs. The sites, conserved sequences and structural elements related to the initiation of replication and expression were extracted from 17 3′ NCRs and 56 5′ NCRs. Those cis-elements may be initial recognition sites for replication, binding sites for transcription factors of host cell and interacting sites for initiation of protein synthesis, based on which a mechanism for the replication and expression of CSFV was brought forth. This research offers the direction for further experiment and lays down a basis for the research on hepatitis C virus (HCV), other pestiviruses and plus-strand RNA viruses.

  3. The Genomic Pattern of tDNA Operon Expression in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available In fast-growing microorganisms, a tRNA concentration profile enriched in major isoacceptors selects for the biased usage of cognate codons. This optimizes translational rate for the least mass invested in the translational apparatus. Such translational streamlining is thought to be growth-regulated, but its genetic basis is poorly understood. First, we found in reanalysis of the E. coli tRNA profile that the degree to which it is translationally streamlined is nearly invariant with growth rate. Then, using least squares multiple regression, we partitioned tRNA isoacceptor pools to predicted tDNA operons from the E. coli K12 genome. Co-expression of tDNAs in operons explains the tRNA profile significantly better than tDNA gene dosage alone. Also, operon expression increases significantly with proximity to the origin of replication, oriC, at all growth rates. Genome location explains about 15% of expression variation in a form, at a given growth rate, that is consistent with replication-dependent gene concentration effects. Yet the change in the tRNA profile with growth rate is less than would be expected from such effects. We estimated per-copy expression rates for all tDNA operons that were consistent with independent estimates for rDNA operons. We also found that tDNA operon location, and the location dependence of expression, were significantly different in the leading and lagging strands. The operonic organization and genomic location of tDNA operons are significant factors influencing their expression. Nonrandom patterns of location and strandedness shown by tDNA operons in E. coli suggest that their genomic architecture may be under selection to satisfy physiological demand for tRNA expression at high growth rates.

  4. From structure prediction to genomic screens for novel non-coding RNAs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2011-01-01

    . This and the increased amount of available genomes have made it possible to employ structure-based methods for genomic screens. The field has moved from folding prediction of single sequences to computational screens for ncRNAs in genomic sequence using the RNA structure as the main characteristic feature. Whereas early...... methods focused on energy-directed folding of single sequences, comparative analysis based on structure preserving changes of base pairs has been efficient in improving accuracy, and today this constitutes a key component in genomic screens. Here, we cover the basic principles of RNA folding and touch...

  5. TIGER: Toolbox for integrating genome-scale metabolic models, expression data, and transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Paul A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several methods have been developed for analyzing genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Many of these methods, such as Flux Balance Analysis, use constrained optimization to predict relationships between metabolic flux and the genes that encode and regulate enzyme activity. Recently, mixed integer programming has been used to encode these gene-protein-reaction (GPR relationships into a single optimization problem, but these techniques are often of limited generality and lack a tool for automating the conversion of rules to a coupled regulatory/metabolic model. Results We present TIGER, a Toolbox for Integrating Genome-scale Metabolism, Expression, and Regulation. TIGER converts a series of generalized, Boolean or multilevel rules into a set of mixed integer inequalities. The package also includes implementations of existing algorithms to integrate high-throughput expression data with genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. We demonstrate how TIGER automates the coupling of a genome-scale metabolic model with GPR logic and models of transcriptional regulation, thereby serving as a platform for algorithm development and large-scale metabolic analysis. Additionally, we demonstrate how TIGER's algorithms can be used to identify inconsistencies and improve existing models of transcriptional regulation with examples from the reconstructed transcriptional regulatory network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion The TIGER package provides a consistent platform for algorithm development and extending existing genome-scale metabolic models with regulatory networks and high-throughput data.

  6. Gene Identification and Expression Analysis of 86,136 Expressed Sequence Tags (EST) from the Rice Genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Zhou; Lin Ye; Li Lin; Jun Li; Xuegang Wang; Hao Xu; Yibin Pan; Wei Lin; Wei Tian; Jing Liu; Liping Wei; Jiabin Tang; Siqi Liu; Huanming Yang; Jun Yu; Jian Wang; Michael G. Walker; Xiuqing Zhang; Jun Wang; Songnian Hu; Huayong Xu; Yajun Deng; Jianhai Dong

    2003-01-01

    Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) analysis has pioneered genome-wide gene discovery and expression profiling. In order to establish a gene expression index in the rice cultivar indica, we sequenced and analyzed 86,136 ESTs from nine rice cDNA libraries from the super hybrid cultivar LYP9 and its parental cultivars. We assembled these ESTs into 13,232 contigs and leave 8,976 singletons. Overall, 7,497 sequences were found similar to the existing sequences in GenBank and 14,711 are novel. These sequences are classified by molecular function, biological process and pathways according to the Gene Ontology. We compared our sequenced ESTs with the publicly available 95,000 ESTs from japonica, and found little sequence variation, despite the large difference between genome sequences. We then assembled the combined 173,000 rice ESTs for further analysis. Using the pooled ESTs, we compared gene expression in metabolism pathway between rice and Avabidopsis according to KEGG. We further profiled gene expression patterns in different tis sues, developmental stages, and in a conditional sterile mutant, after checking the libraries are comparable by means of sequence coverage. We also identified some possible library specific genes and a number of enzymes and transcription factors that contribute to rice development.

  7. Systematic determination of the mosaic structure of bacterial genomes: species backbone versus strain-specific loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gendrault-Jacquemard A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public databases now contain multitude of complete bacterial genomes, including several genomes of the same species. The available data offers new opportunities to address questions about bacterial genome evolution, a task that requires reliable fine comparison data of closely related genomes. Recent analyses have shown, using pairwise whole genome alignments, that it is possible to segment bacterial genomes into a common conserved backbone and strain-specific sequences called loops. Results Here, we generalize this approach and propose a strategy that allows systematic and non-biased genome segmentation based on multiple genome alignments. Segmentation analyses, as applied to 13 different bacterial species, confirmed the feasibility of our approach to discern the 'mosaic' organization of bacterial genomes. Segmentation results are available through a Web interface permitting functional analysis, extraction and visualization of the backbone/loops structure of documented genomes. To illustrate the potential of this approach, we performed a precise analysis of the mosaic organization of three E. coli strains and functional characterization of the loops. Conclusion The segmentation results including the backbone/loops structure of 13 bacterial species genomes are new and available for use by the scientific community at the URL: http://genome.jouy.inra.fr/mosaic.

  8. Structural variation of the human genome: mechanisms, assays, and role in male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Claudia M B; Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R

    2011-02-01

    Genomic disorders are defined as diseases caused by rearrangements of the genome incited by a genomic architecture that conveys instability. Y-chromosome related dysfunctions such as male infertility are frequently associated with gross DNA rearrangements resulting from its peculiar genomic architecture. The Y-chromosome has evolved into a highly specialized chromosome to perform male functions, mainly spermatogenesis. Direct and inverted repeats, some of them palindromes with highly identical nucleotide sequences that can form DNA cruciform structures, characterize the genomic structure of the Y-chromosome long arm. Some particular Y chromosome genomic deletions can cause spermatogenic failure likely because of removal of one or more transcriptional units with a potential role in spermatogenesis. We describe mechanisms underlying the formation of human genomic rearrangements on autosomes and review Y-chromosome deletions associated with male infertility.

  9. Correlation of genomic and expression alterations of AS3 with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Zhang; Xiaoping Huang; Jun Qi; Cai Yan; Xin Xu; Yaling Han; Mingrong Wang

    2008-01-01

    Androgen-induced proliferation shutoff gene AS3, also known as APRIN, is a growth inhibitory gene that is in itially implicated inprostate cancer. This gene is required for androgen-dependent growth arrest and is a primary target for 1,25(OH)2D3 and androgens. Alle-lic loss at AS3 locus has been linked to a variety of cancers. However, the correlation of genomic and expression alterations of AS3 with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is not well established. In this study, the genomic and expression alterations of AS3 in ESCC and their clinical significance are evaluated. Loss of beterozygosity (LOH) analysis using an AS3 intragenic mierosatellite marker D13S171 revealed 72% allelic loss at AS3 locus in ESCC, which is significantly correlated with higher pathological grade (P=0.042).RT-PCR examination showed that AS3 mRNA obviously decreased in 44% tumors and its down-regulation was correlated with the sex of patients (P=0.03). Furthermore, the correlation between genomic and expression alterations of AS3 gene was analyzed in 18 ESCC specimens, which indicated that the consistency between allelic loss and decreased mRNA expression of AS3 was relatively poor. The results of this study indicate that the aberrant expression of AS3 may be involved in the tumorigenesis of esophagus and is responsible for the male predominance of ESCC.

  10. Genome-wide analysis of homeobox gene family in legumes: identification, gene duplication and expression profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Annapurna; Ghangal, Rajesh; Garg, Rohini; Jain, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Homeobox genes encode transcription factors that are known to play a major role in different aspects of plant growth and development. In the present study, we identified homeobox genes belonging to 14 different classes in five legume species, including chickpea, soybean, Medicago, Lotus and pigeonpea. The characteristic differences within homeodomain sequences among various classes of homeobox gene family were quite evident. Genome-wide expression analysis using publicly available datasets (RNA-seq and microarray) indicated that homeobox genes are differentially expressed in various tissues/developmental stages and under stress conditions in different legumes. We validated the differential expression of selected chickpea homeobox genes via quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Genome duplication analysis in soybean indicated that segmental duplication has significantly contributed in the expansion of homeobox gene family. The Ka/Ks ratio of duplicated homeobox genes in soybean showed that several members of this family have undergone purifying selection. Moreover, expression profiling indicated that duplicated genes might have been retained due to sub-functionalization. The genome-wide identification and comprehensive gene expression profiling of homeobox gene family members in legumes will provide opportunities for functional analysis to unravel their exact role in plant growth and development.

  11. Morphological, Genome and Gene Expression Changes in Newly Induced Autopolyploid Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium (Fisch. ex Trautv.) Makino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ri; Wang, Haibin; Dong, Bin; Yang, Xiaodong; Chen, Sumei; Jiang, Jiafu; Zhang, Zhaohe; Liu, Chen; Zhao, Nan; Chen, Fadi

    2016-01-01

    Autopolyploidy is widespread in higher plants and plays an important role in the process of evolution. The present study successfully induced autotetraploidys from Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium by colchicine. The plant morphology, genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenetic changes between tetraploid and diploid plants were investigated. Ligulate flower, tubular flower and leaves of tetraploid plants were greater than those of the diploid plants. Compared with diploid plants, the genome changed as a consequence of polyploidization in tetraploid plants, namely, 1.1% lost fragments and 1.6% novel fragments occurred. In addition, DNA methylation increased after genome doubling in tetraploid plants. Among 485 common transcript-derived fragments (TDFs), which existed in tetraploid and diploid progenitors, 62 fragments were detected as differentially expressed TDFs, 6.8% of TDFs exhibited up-regulated gene expression in the tetraploid plants and 6.0% exhibited down-regulation. The present study provides a reference for further studying the autopolyploidization role in the evolution of C. lavandulifolium. In conclusion, the autopolyploid C. lavandulifolium showed a global change in morphology, genome and gene expression compared with corresponding diploid. PMID:27735845

  12. Morphological, Genome and Gene Expression Changes in Newly Induced Autopolyploid Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium (Fisch. ex Trautv. Makino

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ri Gao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Autopolyploidy is widespread in higher plants and plays an important role in the process of evolution. The present study successfully induced autotetraploidys from Chrysanthemum lavandulifolium by colchicine. The plant morphology, genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenetic changes between tetraploid and diploid plants were investigated. Ligulate flower, tubular flower and leaves of tetraploid plants were greater than those of the diploid plants. Compared with diploid plants, the genome changed as a consequence of polyploidization in tetraploid plants, namely, 1.1% lost fragments and 1.6% novel fragments occurred. In addition, DNA methylation increased after genome doubling in tetraploid plants. Among 485 common transcript-derived fragments (TDFs, which existed in tetraploid and diploid progenitors, 62 fragments were detected as differentially expressed TDFs, 6.8% of TDFs exhibited up-regulated gene expression in the tetraploid plants and 6.0% exhibited down-regulation. The present study provides a reference for further studying the autopolyploidization role in the evolution of C. lavandulifolium. In conclusion, the autopolyploid C. lavandulifolium showed a global change in morphology, genome and gene expression compared with corresponding diploid.

  13. Computational analysis of whole-genome differential allelic expression data in human.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, James R; Ge, Bing; Pokholok, Dmitry; Gunderson, Kevin L; Pastinen, Tomi; Blanchette, Mathieu

    2010-07-08

    Allelic imbalance (AI) is a phenomenon where the two alleles of a given gene are expressed at different levels in a given cell, either because of epigenetic inactivation of one of the two alleles, or because of genetic variation in regulatory regions. Recently, Bing et al. have described the use of genotyping arrays to assay AI at a high resolution (approximately 750,000 SNPs across the autosomes). In this paper, we investigate computational approaches to analyze this data and identify genomic regions with AI in an unbiased and robust statistical manner. We propose two families of approaches: (i) a statistical approach based on z-score computations, and (ii) a family of machine learning approaches based on Hidden Markov Models. Each method is evaluated using previously published experimental data sets as well as with permutation testing. When applied to whole genome data from 53 HapMap samples, our approaches reveal that allelic imbalance is widespread (most expressed genes show evidence of AI in at least one of our 53 samples) and that most AI regions in a given individual are also found in at least a few other individuals. While many AI regions identified in the genome correspond to known protein-coding transcripts, others overlap with recently discovered long non-coding RNAs. We also observe that genomic regions with AI not only include complete transcripts with consistent differential expression levels, but also more complex patterns of allelic expression such as alternative promoters and alternative 3' end. The approaches developed not only shed light on the incidence and mechanisms of allelic expression, but will also help towards mapping the genetic causes of allelic expression and identify cases where this variation may be linked to diseases.

  14. Expressed Peptide Tags: An additional layer of data for genome annotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savidor, Alon [ORNL; Donahoo, Ryan S [ORNL; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Lamour, Kurt H [ORNL; McDonald, W Hayes [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    While genome sequencing is becoming ever more routine, genome annotation remains a challenging process. Identification of the coding sequences within the genomic milieu presents a tremendous challenge, especially for eukaryotes with their complex gene architectures. Here we present a method to assist the annotation process through the use of proteomic data and bioinformatics. Mass spectra of digested protein preparations of the organism of interest were acquired and searched against a protein database created by a six frame translation of the genome. The identified peptides were mapped back to the genome, compared to the current annotation, and then categorized as supporting or extending the current genome annotation. We named the classified peptides Expressed Peptide Tags (EPTs). The well annotated bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris was used as a control for the method and showed high degree of correlation between EPT mapping and the current annotation, with 86% of the EPTs confirming existing gene calls and less than 1% of the EPTs expanding on the current annotation. The eukaryotic plant pathogens Phytophthora ramorum and Phytophthora sojae, whose genomes have been recently sequenced and are much less well annotated, were also subjected to this method. A series of algorithmic steps were taken to increase the confidence of EPT identification for these organisms, including generation of smaller sub-databases to be searched against, and definition of EPT criteria that accommodates the more complex eukaryotic gene architecture. As expected, the analysis of the Phytophthora species showed less correlation between EPT mapping and their current annotation. While ~77% of Phytophthora EPTs supported the current annotation, a portion of them (7.2% and 12.6% for P. ramorum and P. sojae, respectively) suggested modification to current gene calls or identified novel genes that were missed by the current genome annotation of these organisms.

  15. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated doma

  16. DNA secondary structures and epigenetic determinants of cancer genome evolution

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    An unstable genome is a hallmark of many cancers. It is unclear, however, whether some mutagenic features driving somatic alterations in cancer are encoded in the genome sequence and whether they can operate in a tissue-specific manner. We performed a genome-wide analysis of 663,446 DNA breakpoints associated with somatic copy-number alterations (SCNAs) from 2,792 cancer samples classified into 26 cancer types. Many SCNA breakpoints are spatially clustered in cancer genomes. We observed a sig...

  17. Fast identification of folded human protein domains expressed in E. coli suitable for structural analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlegel Brigitte

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-throughput protein structure analysis of individual protein domains requires analysis of large numbers of expression clones to identify suitable constructs for structure determination. For this purpose, methods need to be implemented for fast and reliable screening of the expressed proteins as early as possible in the overall process from cloning to structure determination. Results 88 different E. coli expression constructs for 17 human protein domains were analysed using high-throughput cloning, purification and folding analysis to obtain candidates suitable for structural analysis. After 96 deep-well microplate expression and automated protein purification, protein domains were directly analysed using 1D 1H-NMR spectroscopy. In addition, analytical hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC was used to detect natively folded protein. With these two analytical methods, six constructs (representing two domains were quickly identified as being well folded and suitable for structural analysis. Conclusion The described approach facilitates high-throughput structural analysis. Clones expressing natively folded proteins suitable for NMR structure determination were quickly identified upon small scale expression screening using 1D 1H-NMR and/or analytical HIC. This procedure is especially effective as a fast and inexpensive screen for the 'low hanging fruits' in structural genomics.

  18. Structure, expression and functions of MTA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rakesh; Wang, Rui-An

    2016-05-15

    Metastatic associated proteins (MTA) are integrators of upstream regulatory signals with the ability to act as master coregulators for modifying gene transcriptional activity. The MTA family includes three genes and multiple alternatively spliced variants. The MTA proteins neither have their own enzymatic activity nor have been shown to directly interact with DNA. However, MTA proteins interact with a variety of chromatin remodeling factors and complexes with enzymatic activities for modulating the plasticity of nucleosomes, leading to the repression or derepression of target genes or other extra-nuclear and nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD)-complex independent activities. The functions of MTA family members are driven by the steady state levels and subcellular localization of MTA proteins, the dynamic nature of modifying signals and enzymes, the structural features and post-translational modification of protein domains, interactions with binding proteins, and the nature of the engaged and resulting features of nucleosomes in the proximity of target genes. In general, MTA1 and MTA2 are the most upregulated genes in human cancer and correlate well with aggressive phenotypes, therapeutic resistance, poor prognosis and ultimately, unfavorable survival of cancer patients. Here we will discuss the structure, expression and functions of the MTA family of genes in the context of cancer cells.

  19. Towards fully automated structure-based function prediction in structural genomics: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James D; Sanderson, Steve; Ezersky, Alexandra; Savchenko, Alexei; Edwards, Aled; Orengo, Christine; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Laskowski, Roman A; Thornton, Janet M

    2007-04-13

    As the global Structural Genomics projects have picked up pace, the number of structures annotated in the Protein Data Bank as hypothetical protein or unknown function has grown significantly. A major challenge now involves the development of computational methods to assign functions to these proteins accurately and automatically. As part of the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG) we have developed a fully automated functional analysis server, ProFunc, which performs a battery of analyses on a submitted structure. The analyses combine a number of sequence-based and structure-based methods to identify functional clues. After the first stage of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI), we review the success of the pipeline and the importance of structure-based function prediction. As a dataset, we have chosen all structures solved by the MCSG during the 5 years of the first PSI. Our analysis suggests that two of the structure-based methods are particularly successful and provide examples of local similarity that is difficult to identify using current sequence-based methods. No one method is successful in all cases, so, through the use of a number of complementary sequence and structural approaches, the ProFunc server increases the chances that at least one method will find a significant hit that can help elucidate function. Manual assessment of the results is a time-consuming process and subject to individual interpretation and human error. We present a method based on the Gene Ontology (GO) schema using GO-slims that can allow the automated assessment of hits with a success rate approaching that of expert manual assessment.

  20. Rapid Identification of Potential Drugs for Diabetic Nephropathy Using Whole-Genome Expression Profiles of Glomeruli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingsong Shi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate potential drugs for diabetic nephropathy (DN using whole-genome expression profiles and the Connectivity Map (CMAP. Methodology. Eighteen Chinese Han DN patients and six normal controls were included in this study. Whole-genome expression profiles of microdissected glomeruli were measured using the Affymetrix human U133 plus 2.0 chip. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs between late stage and early stage DN samples and the CMAP database were used to identify potential drugs for DN using bioinformatics methods. Results. (1 A total of 1065 DEGs (FDR 1.5 were found in late stage DN patients compared with early stage DN patients. (2 Piperlongumine, 15d-PGJ2 (15-delta prostaglandin J2, vorinostat, and trichostatin A were predicted to be the most promising potential drugs for DN, acting as NF-κB inhibitors, histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs, PI3K pathway inhibitors, or PPARγ agonists, respectively. Conclusion. Using whole-genome expression profiles and the CMAP database, we rapidly predicted potential DN drugs, and therapeutic potential was confirmed by previously published studies. Animal experiments and clinical trials are needed to confirm both the safety and efficacy of these drugs in the treatment of DN.

  1. Cassava (Manihot esculenta Krantz) genome harbors KNOX genes differentially expressed during storage root development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, D; Li, H L; Tang, X; Peng, S Q

    2014-12-18

    In plants, homeodomain proteins play a critical role in regulating various aspects of plant growth and development. KNOX proteins are members of the homeodomain protein family. The KNOX transcription factors have been reported from Arabidopsis, rice, and other higher plants. The recent publication of the draft genome sequence of cassava (Manihot esculenta Krantz) has allowed a genome-wide search for M. esculenta KNOX (MeKNOX) transcription factors and the comparison of these positively identified proteins with their homologs in model plants. In the present study, we identified 12 MeKNOX genes in the cassava genome and grouped them into two distinct subfamilies based on their domain composition and phylogenetic analysis. Furthermore, semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to elucidate the expression profiles of these genes in different tissues and during various stages of root development. The analysis of MeKNOX expression profiles of indicated that 12 MeKNOX genes display differential expressions either in their transcript abundance or expression patterns.

  2. Genomic analysis of the hierarchical structure of regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Haiyuan; Gerstein, Mark

    2006-01-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how the cell uses transcription factors (TFs) to coordinate the expression of thousands of genes in response to various stimuli. The relationships between TFs and their target genes can be modeled in terms of directed regulatory networks. These relationships, in turn, can be readily compared with commonplace “chain-of-command” structures in social networks, which have characteristic hierarchical layouts. Here, we develop algorithms for identifying generalized hierarchies (allowing for various loop structures) and use these approaches to illuminate extensive pyramid-shaped hierarchical structures existing in the regulatory networks of representative prokaryotes (Escherichia coli) and eukaryotes (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), with most TFs at the bottom levels and only a few master TFs on top. These masters are situated near the center of the protein–protein interaction network, a different type of network from the regulatory one, and they receive most of the input for the whole regulatory hierarchy through protein interactions. Moreover, they have maximal influence over other genes, in terms of affecting expression-level changes. Surprisingly, however, TFs at the bottom of the regulatory hierarchy are more essential to the viability of the cell. Finally, one might think master TFs achieve their wide influence through directly regulating many targets, but TFs with most direct targets are in the middle of the hierarchy. We find, in fact, that these midlevel TFs are “control bottlenecks” in the hierarchy, and this great degree of control for “middle managers” has parallels in efficient social structures in various corporate and governmental settings. PMID:17003135

  3. Genomic surveys and expression analysis of bZIP gene family in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhengwei; Xu, Wei; Liu, Aizhong

    2014-02-01

    The basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factors comprise a family of transcriptional regulators present extensively in plants, involved in regulating diverse biological processes such as flower and vascular development, seed maturation, stress signaling and pathogen defense. Castor bean (Ricinus communis L. Euphorbiaceae) is one of the most important non-edible oilseed crops and its seed oil is broadly used for industrial applications. We performed a comprehensive genome-wide identification and analysis of the bZIP transcription factors that exist in the castor bean genome in this study. In total, 49 RcbZIP transcription factors were identified, characterized and categorized into 11 groups (I-XI) based on their gene structure, DNA-binding sites, conserved motifs, and phylogenetic relationships. The dimerization properties of 49 RcbZIP proteins were predicted on the basis of the characteristic features in the leucine zipper. Global expression profiles of 49 RcbZIP genes among different tissues were examined using high-throughput sequencing of digital gene expression profiles, and resulted in diverse expression patterns that may provide basic information to further reveal the function of the 49 RcbZIP genes in castor bean. The results obtained from this study would provide valuable information in understanding the molecular basis of the RcbZIP transcription factor family and their potential function in regulating the growth and development, particularly in seed filling of castor bean.

  4. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  5. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-01

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  6. Structure, expression pattern and chromosomal localization of the rice Osgrp-2 gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Zongzhi; (刘宗旨); WANG; Jianlong; (王建龙); WANG; Qun; (王群); HUANG; Xun; (黄勋); XU; Weihui; (徐卫辉); ZHU; Lihuang; (朱立煌); HE; Ping; (何平); FANG; Rongxiang; (方荣祥)

    2003-01-01

    Glycine-rich proteins (GRPs) belong to a kind of important structural proteins of plant cell walls. The expression of GRP genes is regulated spatially and developmentally as well as by various environmental stresses, thus providing a good model for the study of plant gene expression. We obtained the genomic sequence of a new GRP gene (Osgrp-2) from a rice genomic library. The transcription start site of Osgrp-2 was determined by 5'-rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) and a 2.4-kb promoter sequence was thus delimited. The spatial and developmental expression pattern as well as the wound-inducible character of Osgrp-2 in rice plants was analyzed in detail. Furthermore, the gene was mapped onto rice chromosome 10 by analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP).

  7. Rapid detection of structural variation in a human genome using nanochannel-based genome mapping technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Hongzhi; Hastie, Alex R.; Cao, Dandan;

    2014-01-01

    than 1 kb. Excluding the 59 SVs (54 insertions/deletions, 5 inversions) that overlap with N-base gaps in the reference assembly hg19, 666 non-gap SVs remained, and 396 of them (60%) were verified by paired-end data from whole-genome sequencing-based re-sequencing or de novo assembly sequence from...... fosmid data. Of the remaining 270 SVs, 260 are insertions and 213 overlap known SVs in the Database of Genomic Variants. Overall, 609 out of 666 (90%) variants were supported by experimental orthogonal methods or historical evidence in public databases. At the same time, genome mapping also provides...

  8. Integrated analysis of copy number variation and genome-wide expression profiling in colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali Hassan, Nur Zarina; Mokhtar, Norfilza Mohd; Kok Sin, Teow; Mohamed Rose, Isa; Sagap, Ismail; Harun, Roslan; Jamal, Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Integrative analyses of multiple genomic datasets for selected samples can provide better insight into the overall data and can enhance our knowledge of cancer. The objective of this study was to elucidate the association between copy number variation (CNV) and gene expression in colorectal cancer (CRC) samples and their corresponding non-cancerous tissues. Sixty-four paired CRC samples from the same patients were subjected to CNV profiling using the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad assay, and validation was performed using multiplex ligation probe amplification method. Genome-wide expression profiling was performed on 15 paired samples from the same group of patients using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Significant genes obtained from both array results were then overlapped. To identify molecular pathways, the data were mapped to the KEGG database. Whole genome CNV analysis that compared primary tumor and non-cancerous epithelium revealed gains in 1638 genes and losses in 36 genes. Significant gains were mostly found in chromosome 20 at position 20q12 with a frequency of 45.31% in tumor samples. Examples of genes that were associated at this cytoband were PTPRT, EMILIN3 and CHD6. The highest number of losses was detected at chromosome 8, position 8p23.2 with 17.19% occurrence in all tumor samples. Among the genes found at this cytoband were CSMD1 and DLC1. Genome-wide expression profiling showed 709 genes to be up-regulated and 699 genes to be down-regulated in CRC compared to non-cancerous samples. Integration of these two datasets identified 56 overlapping genes, which were located in chromosomes 8, 20 and 22. MLPA confirmed that the CRC samples had the highest gains in chromosome 20 compared to the reference samples. Interpretation of the CNV data in the context of the transcriptome via integrative analyses may provide more in-depth knowledge of the genomic landscape of CRC.

  9. Integrated analysis of copy number variation and genome-wide expression profiling in colorectal cancer tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Zarina Ali Hassan

    Full Text Available Integrative analyses of multiple genomic datasets for selected samples can provide better insight into the overall data and can enhance our knowledge of cancer. The objective of this study was to elucidate the association between copy number variation (CNV and gene expression in colorectal cancer (CRC samples and their corresponding non-cancerous tissues. Sixty-four paired CRC samples from the same patients were subjected to CNV profiling using the Illumina HumanOmni1-Quad assay, and validation was performed using multiplex ligation probe amplification method. Genome-wide expression profiling was performed on 15 paired samples from the same group of patients using the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Significant genes obtained from both array results were then overlapped. To identify molecular pathways, the data were mapped to the KEGG database. Whole genome CNV analysis that compared primary tumor and non-cancerous epithelium revealed gains in 1638 genes and losses in 36 genes. Significant gains were mostly found in chromosome 20 at position 20q12 with a frequency of 45.31% in tumor samples. Examples of genes that were associated at this cytoband were PTPRT, EMILIN3 and CHD6. The highest number of losses was detected at chromosome 8, position 8p23.2 with 17.19% occurrence in all tumor samples. Among the genes found at this cytoband were CSMD1 and DLC1. Genome-wide expression profiling showed 709 genes to be up-regulated and 699 genes to be down-regulated in CRC compared to non-cancerous samples. Integration of these two datasets identified 56 overlapping genes, which were located in chromosomes 8, 20 and 22. MLPA confirmed that the CRC samples had the highest gains in chromosome 20 compared to the reference samples. Interpretation of the CNV data in the context of the transcriptome via integrative analyses may provide more in-depth knowledge of the genomic landscape of CRC.

  10. Leveraging human genomic information to identify nonhuman primate sequences for expression array development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyle Nicholas F

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonhuman primates (NHPs are essential for biomedical research due to their similarities to humans. The utility of NHPs will be greatly increased by the application of genomics-based approaches such as gene expression profiling. Sequence information from the 3' end of genes is the key resource needed to create oligonucleotide expression arrays. Results We have developed the algorithms and procedures necessary to quickly acquire sequence information from the 3' end of nonhuman primate orthologs of human genes. To accomplish this, we identified terminal exons of over 15,000 human genes by aligning mRNA sequences with genomic sequence. We found the mean length of complete last exons to be approximately 1,400 bp, significantly longer than previous estimates. We designed primers to amplify genomic DNA, which included at least 300 bp of the terminal exon. We cloned and sequenced the PCR products representing over 5,500 Macaca mulatta (rhesus monkey orthologs of human genes. This sequence information has been used to select probes for rhesus gene expression profiling. We have also tested 10 sets of primers with genomic DNA from Macaca fascicularis (Cynomolgus monkey, Papio hamadryas (Baboon, and Chlorocebus aethiops (African green monkey, vervet. The results indicate that the primers developed for this study will be useful for acquiring sequence from the 3' end of genes for other nonhuman primate species. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human genomic DNA sequence can be leveraged to obtain sequence from the 3' end of NHP orthologs and that this sequence can then be used to generate NHP oligonucleotide microarrays. Affymetrix and Agilent used sequences obtained with this approach in the design of their rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarrays.

  11. Genome-wide microarray expression and genomic alterations by array-CGH analysis in neuroblastoma stem-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Ordóñez

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma has a very diverse clinical behaviour: from spontaneous regression to a very aggressive malignant progression and resistance to chemotherapy. This heterogeneous clinical behaviour might be due to the existence of Cancer Stem Cells (CSC, a subpopulation within the tumor with stem-like cell properties: a significant proliferation capacity, a unique self-renewal capacity, and therefore, a higher ability to form new tumors. We enriched the CSC-like cell population content of two commercial neuroblastoma cell lines by the use of conditioned cell culture media for neurospheres, and compared genomic gains and losses and genome expression by array-CGH and microarray analysis, respectively (in CSC-like versus standard tumor cells culture. Despite the array-CGH did not show significant differences between standard and CSC-like in both analyzed cell lines, the microarray expression analysis highlighted some of the most relevant biological processes and molecular functions that might be responsible for the CSC-like phenotype. Some signalling pathways detected seem to be involved in self-renewal of normal tissues (Wnt, Notch, Hh and TGF-β and contribute to CSC phenotype. We focused on the aberrant activation of TGF-β and Hh signalling pathways, confirming the inhibition of repressors of TGF-β pathway, as SMAD6 and SMAD7 by RT-qPCR. The analysis of the Sonic Hedgehog pathway showed overexpression of PTCH1, GLI1 and SMO. We found overexpression of CD133 and CD15 in SIMA neurospheres, confirming that this cell line was particularly enriched in stem-like cells. This work shows a cross-talk among different pathways in neuroblastoma and its importance in CSC-like cells.

  12. Zygotic Genome Activation Revisited: Looking Through the Expression and Function of Zscan4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, M S H

    2016-01-01

    Zygotic genome activation (ZGA, a.k.a. zygotic gene activation) is a critical event in development, when the paternally derived genome and maternally derived genome begin to be activated and transcribed after fertilization. Major ZGA occurs at the two-cell stage in mice and the four- to eight-cell stage in human preimplantation embryos. It has been thought that ZGA exists to provide RNAs and proteins supporting embryonic development after supplies stored in oocytes are used up; however, this paradigm does not seem to explain recent findings. For example, many ZGA genes-once activated-are quickly turned off, and thus ZGA forms a transient wave of transcriptional activation. In addition, ZGA genes are not evolutionarily conserved. In this review, we address these issues by focusing on Zscan4 (zinc finger and SCAN domain-containing 4), which was identified for its specific expression in preimplantation embryos during ZGA. Detailed molecular analyses of Zscan4 expression and function have revealed common features of Zscan4-associated events (Z4 events) in mouse embryonic stem cells and ZGA in preimplantation embryos. One feature is a rapid derepression and rerepression of constitutive heterochromatin, which includes pericentromeric major satellites and telomeres, and facultative heterochromatin, which includes retrotransposons and Z4 event-associated genes. We propose that the Z4 event superimposed on ZGA plays a critical role in the maintenance of genome and chromosome integrity in preimplantation embryos by promoting correction of DNA damage and chromosome abnormalities.

  13. Complex interplay among DNA modification, noncoding RNA expression and protein-coding RNA expression in Salvia miltiorrhiza chloroplast genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haimei Chen

    Full Text Available Salvia miltiorrhiza is one of the most widely used medicinal plants. As a first step to develop a chloroplast-based genetic engineering method for the over-production of active components from S. miltiorrhiza, we have analyzed the genome, transcriptome, and base modifications of the S. miltiorrhiza chloroplast. Total genomic DNA and RNA were extracted from fresh leaves and then subjected to strand-specific RNA-Seq and Single-Molecule Real-Time (SMRT sequencing analyses. Mapping the RNA-Seq reads to the genome assembly allowed us to determine the relative expression levels of 80 protein-coding genes. In addition, we identified 19 polycistronic transcription units and 136 putative antisense and intergenic noncoding RNA (ncRNA genes. Comparison of the abundance of protein-coding transcripts (cRNA with and without overlapping antisense ncRNAs (asRNA suggest that the presence of asRNA is associated with increased cRNA abundance (p<0.05. Using the SMRT Portal software (v1.3.2, 2687 potential DNA modification sites and two potential DNA modification motifs were predicted. The two motifs include a TATA box-like motif (CPGDMM1, "TATANNNATNA", and an unknown motif (CPGDMM2 "WNYANTGAW". Specifically, 35 of the 97 CPGDMM1 motifs (36.1% and 91 of the 369 CPGDMM2 motifs (24.7% were found to be significantly modified (p<0.01. Analysis of genes downstream of the CPGDMM1 motif revealed the significantly increased abundance of ncRNA genes that are less than 400 bp away from the significantly modified CPGDMM1motif (p<0.01. Taking together, the present study revealed a complex interplay among DNA modifications, ncRNA and cRNA expression in chloroplast genome.

  14. Integrating genome-wide genetic variations and monocyte expression data reveals trans-regulated gene modules in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Rotival

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available One major expectation from the transcriptome in humans is to characterize the biological basis of associations identified by genome-wide association studies. So far, few cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs have been reliably related to disease susceptibility. Trans-regulating mechanisms may play a more prominent role in disease susceptibility. We analyzed 12,808 genes detected in at least 5% of circulating monocyte samples from a population-based sample of 1,490 European unrelated subjects. We applied a method of extraction of expression patterns-independent component analysis-to identify sets of co-regulated genes. These patterns were then related to 675,350 SNPs to identify major trans-acting regulators. We detected three genomic regions significantly associated with co-regulated gene modules. Association of these loci with multiple expression traits was replicated in Cardiogenics, an independent study in which expression profiles of monocytes were available in 758 subjects. The locus 12q13 (lead SNP rs11171739, previously identified as a type 1 diabetes locus, was associated with a pattern including two cis eQTLs, RPS26 and SUOX, and 5 trans eQTLs, one of which (MADCAM1 is a potential candidate for mediating T1D susceptibility. The locus 12q24 (lead SNP rs653178, which has demonstrated extensive disease pleiotropy, including type 1 diabetes, hypertension, and celiac disease, was associated to a pattern strongly correlating to blood pressure level. The strongest trans eQTL in this pattern was CRIP1, a known marker of cellular proliferation in cancer. The locus 12q15 (lead SNP rs11177644 was associated with a pattern driven by two cis eQTLs, LYZ and YEATS4, and including 34 trans eQTLs, several of them tumor-related genes. This study shows that a method exploiting the structure of co-expressions among genes can help identify genomic regions involved in trans regulation of sets of genes and can provide clues for understanding the

  15. Development of genomic resources for a thraustochytrid pathogen and investigation of temperature influences on gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Elisa Garcia-Vedrenne

    Full Text Available Understanding how environmental changes influence the pathogenicity and virulence of infectious agents is critical for predicting epidemiological patterns of disease. Thraustochytrids, part of the larger taxonomic class Labyrinthulomycetes, contain several highly pathogenic species, including the hard clam pathogen quahog parasite unknown (QPX. QPX has been associated with large-scale mortality events along the northeastern coast of North America. Growth and physiology of QPX is temperature-dependent, and changes in local temperature profiles influence pathogenicity. In this study we characterize the partial genome of QPX and examine the influence of temperature on gene expression. Genes involved in several biological processes are differentially expressed upon temperature change, including those associated with altered growth and metabolism and virulence. The genomic and transcriptomic resources developed in this study provide a foundation for better understanding virulence, pathogenicity and life history of thraustochytrid pathogens.

  16. Advances in plant cell type-specific genome-wide studies of gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying WANG; Yuling JIAO

    2011-01-01

    Cell is the functional unit of life.To study the complex interactions of systems of biological molecules,it is crucial to dissect these molecules at the cell level.In recent years,major progresses have been made by plant biologists to profile gene expression in specific cell types at the genome-wide level.Approaches based on the isolation of cells,polysomes or nuclei have been developed and successfully used for studying the cell types from distinct organs of several plant species.These cell-level data sets revealed previously unrecognized cellular properties,such as cell-specific gene expression modules and hormone response centers,and should serve as essential resources for functional genomic analyses.Newly developed technologies are more affordable to many laboratories and should help to provide new insights at the cellular resolution in the near future.

  17. Ultra high-resolution gene centric genomic structural analysis of a non-syndromic congenital heart defect, Tetralogy of Fallot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas C Bittel

    Full Text Available Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF is one of the most common severe congenital heart malformations. Great progress has been made in identifying key genes that regulate heart development, yet approximately 70% of TOF cases are sporadic and nonsyndromic with no known genetic cause. We created an ultra high-resolution gene centric comparative genomic hybridization (gcCGH microarray based on 591 genes with a validated association with cardiovascular development or function. We used our gcCGH array to analyze the genomic structure of 34 infants with sporadic TOF without a deletion on chromosome 22q11.2 (n male = 20; n female = 14; age range of 2 to 10 months. Using our custom-made gcCGH microarray platform, we identified a total of 613 copy number variations (CNVs ranging in size from 78 base pairs to 19.5 Mb. We identified 16 subjects with 33 CNVs that contained 13 different genes which are known to be directly associated with heart development. Additionally, there were 79 genes from the broader list of genes that were partially or completely contained in a CNV. All 34 individuals examined had at least one CNV involving these 79 genes. Furthermore, we had available whole genome exon arrays from right ventricular tissue in 13 of our subjects. We analyzed these for correlations between copy number and gene expression level. Surprisingly, we could detect only one clear association between CNVs and expression (GSTT1 for any of the 591 focal genes on the gcCGH array. The expression levels of GSTT1 were correlated with copy number in all cases examined (r = 0.95, p = 0.001. We identified a large number of small CNVs in genes with varying associations with heart development. Our results illustrate the complexity of human genome structural variation and underscore the need for multifactorial assessment of potential genetic/genomic factors that contribute to congenital heart defects.

  18. Initiation of genome instability and preneoplastic processes through loss of Fhit expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C Saldivar

    Full Text Available Genomic instability drives tumorigenesis, but how it is initiated in sporadic neoplasias is unknown. In early preneoplasias, alterations at chromosome fragile sites arise due to DNA replication stress. A frequent, perhaps earliest, genetic alteration in preneoplasias is deletion within the fragile FRA3B/FHIT locus, leading to loss of Fhit protein expression. Because common chromosome fragile sites are exquisitely sensitive to replication stress, it has been proposed that their clonal alterations in cancer cells are due to stress sensitivity rather than to a selective advantage imparted by loss of expression of fragile gene products. Here, we show in normal, transformed, and cancer-derived cell lines that Fhit-depletion causes replication stress-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Using DNA combing, we observed a defect in replication fork progression in Fhit-deficient cells that stemmed primarily from fork stalling and collapse. The likely mechanism for the role of Fhit in replication fork progression is through regulation of Thymidine kinase 1 expression and thymidine triphosphate pool levels; notably, restoration of nucleotide balance rescued DNA replication defects and suppressed DNA breakage in Fhit-deficient cells. Depletion of Fhit did not activate the DNA damage response nor cause cell cycle arrest, allowing continued cell proliferation and ongoing chromosomal instability. This finding was in accord with in vivo studies, as Fhit knockout mouse tissue showed no evidence of cell cycle arrest or senescence yet exhibited numerous somatic DNA copy number aberrations at replication stress-sensitive loci. Furthermore, cells established from Fhit knockout tissue showed rapid immortalization and selection of DNA deletions and amplifications, including amplification of the Mdm2 gene, suggesting that Fhit loss-induced genome instability facilitates transformation. We propose that loss of Fhit expression in precancerous lesions is the first step in the

  19. Initiation of genome instability and preneoplastic processes through loss of Fhit expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua C Saldivar

    Full Text Available Genomic instability drives tumorigenesis, but how it is initiated in sporadic neoplasias is unknown. In early preneoplasias, alterations at chromosome fragile sites arise due to DNA replication stress. A frequent, perhaps earliest, genetic alteration in preneoplasias is deletion within the fragile FRA3B/FHIT locus, leading to loss of Fhit protein expression. Because common chromosome fragile sites are exquisitely sensitive to replication stress, it has been proposed that their clonal alterations in cancer cells are due to stress sensitivity rather than to a selective advantage imparted by loss of expression of fragile gene products. Here, we show in normal, transformed, and cancer-derived cell lines that Fhit-depletion causes replication stress-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Using DNA combing, we observed a defect in replication fork progression in Fhit-deficient cells that stemmed primarily from fork stalling and collapse. The likely mechanism for the role of Fhit in replication fork progression is through regulation of Thymidine kinase 1 expression and thymidine triphosphate pool levels; notably, restoration of nucleotide balance rescued DNA replication defects and suppressed DNA breakage in Fhit-deficient cells. Depletion of Fhit did not activate the DNA damage response nor cause cell cycle arrest, allowing continued cell proliferation and ongoing chromosomal instability. This finding was in accord with in vivo studies, as Fhit knockout mouse tissue showed no evidence of cell cycle arrest or senescence yet exhibited numerous somatic DNA copy number aberrations at replication stress-sensitive loci. Furthermore, cells established from Fhit knockout tissue showed rapid immortalization and selection of DNA deletions and amplifications, including amplification of the Mdm2 gene, suggesting that Fhit loss-induced genome instability facilitates transformation. We propose that loss of Fhit expression in precancerous lesions is the first step in the

  20. Genome-wide transcriptome and expression profile analysis of Phalaenopsis during explant browning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanjun Xu

    Full Text Available Explant browning presents a major problem for in vitro culture, and can lead to the death of the explant and failure of regeneration. Considerable work has examined the physiological mechanisms underlying Phalaenopsis leaf explant browning, but the molecular mechanisms of browning remain elusive. In this study, we used whole genome RNA sequencing to examine Phalaenopsis leaf explant browning at genome-wide level.We first used Illumina high-throughput technology to sequence the transcriptome of Phalaenopsis and then performed de novo transcriptome assembly. We assembled 79,434,350 clean reads into 31,708 isogenes and generated 26,565 annotated unigenes. We assigned Gene Ontology (GO terms, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG annotations, and potential Pfam domains to each transcript. Using the transcriptome data as a reference, we next analyzed the differential gene expression of explants cultured for 0, 3, and 6 d, respectively. We then identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs before and after Phalaenopsis explant browning. We also performed GO, KEGG functional enrichment and Pfam analysis of all DEGs. Finally, we selected 11 genes for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR analysis to confirm the expression profile analysis.Here, we report the first comprehensive analysis of transcriptome and expression profiles during Phalaenopsis explant browning. Our results suggest that Phalaenopsis explant browning may be due in part to gene expression changes that affect the secondary metabolism, such as: phenylpropanoid pathway and flavonoid biosynthesis. Genes involved in photosynthesis and ATPase activity have been found to be changed at transcription level; these changes may perturb energy metabolism and thus lead to the decay of plant cells and tissues. This study provides comprehensive gene expression data for Phalaenopsis browning. Our data constitute an important resource for further functional studies to prevent explant browning.

  1. Genome-wide transcriptome and expression profile analysis of Phalaenopsis during explant browning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chuanjun; Zeng, Biyu; Huang, Junmei; Huang, Wen; Liu, Yumei

    2015-01-01

    Explant browning presents a major problem for in vitro culture, and can lead to the death of the explant and failure of regeneration. Considerable work has examined the physiological mechanisms underlying Phalaenopsis leaf explant browning, but the molecular mechanisms of browning remain elusive. In this study, we used whole genome RNA sequencing to examine Phalaenopsis leaf explant browning at genome-wide level. We first used Illumina high-throughput technology to sequence the transcriptome of Phalaenopsis and then performed de novo transcriptome assembly. We assembled 79,434,350 clean reads into 31,708 isogenes and generated 26,565 annotated unigenes. We assigned Gene Ontology (GO) terms, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) annotations, and potential Pfam domains to each transcript. Using the transcriptome data as a reference, we next analyzed the differential gene expression of explants cultured for 0, 3, and 6 d, respectively. We then identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) before and after Phalaenopsis explant browning. We also performed GO, KEGG functional enrichment and Pfam analysis of all DEGs. Finally, we selected 11 genes for quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis to confirm the expression profile analysis. Here, we report the first comprehensive analysis of transcriptome and expression profiles during Phalaenopsis explant browning. Our results suggest that Phalaenopsis explant browning may be due in part to gene expression changes that affect the secondary metabolism, such as: phenylpropanoid pathway and flavonoid biosynthesis. Genes involved in photosynthesis and ATPase activity have been found to be changed at transcription level; these changes may perturb energy metabolism and thus lead to the decay of plant cells and tissues. This study provides comprehensive gene expression data for Phalaenopsis browning. Our data constitute an important resource for further functional studies to prevent explant browning.

  2. The Fanconi anemia/BRCA gene network in zebrafish: Embryonic expression and comparative genomics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titus, Tom A.; Yan Yilin; Wilson, Catherine; Starks, Amber M.; Frohnmayer, Jonathan D.; Bremiller, Ruth A.; Canestro, Cristian; Rodriguez-Mari, Adriana; He Xinjun [Institute of Neuroscience, University of Oregon, 1425 E. 13th Avenue, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States); Postlethwait, John H., E-mail: jpostle@uoneuro.uoregon.edu [Institute of Neuroscience, University of Oregon, 1425 E. 13th Avenue, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States)

    2009-07-31

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genetic disease resulting in bone marrow failure, high cancer risks, and infertility, and developmental anomalies including microphthalmia, microcephaly, hypoplastic radius and thumb. Here we present cDNA sequences, genetic mapping, and genomic analyses for the four previously undescribed zebrafish FA genes (fanci, fancj, fancm, and fancn), and show that they reverted to single copy after the teleost genome duplication. We tested the hypothesis that FA genes are expressed during embryonic development in tissues that are disrupted in human patients by investigating fanc gene expression patterns. We found fanc gene maternal message, which can provide Fanc proteins to repair DNA damage encountered in rapid cleavage divisions. Zygotic expression was broad but especially strong in eyes, central nervous system and hematopoietic tissues. In the pectoral fin bud at hatching, fanc genes were expressed specifically in the apical ectodermal ridge, a signaling center for fin/limb development that may be relevant to the radius/thumb anomaly of FA patients. Hatching embryos expressed fanc genes strongly in the oral epithelium, a site of squamous cell carcinomas in FA patients. Larval and adult zebrafish expressed fanc genes in proliferative regions of the brain, which may be related to microcephaly in FA. Mature ovaries and testes expressed fanc genes in specific stages of oocyte and spermatocyte development, which may be related to DNA repair during homologous recombination in meiosis and to infertility in human patients. The intestine strongly expressed some fanc genes specifically in proliferative zones. Our results show that zebrafish has a complete complement of fanc genes in single copy and that these genes are expressed in zebrafish embryos and adults in proliferative tissues that are often affected in FA patients. These results support the notion that zebrafish offers an attractive experimental system to help unravel mechanisms relevant not only

  3. Exploring functional elements and genomic variation in the noncoding genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heesch, S.A.A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression regulation is a delicate process that depends on multiple aspects including genome structure and transcription factor binding to DNA elements. The majority of our genome consists of noncoding DNA, which was shown to be crucial in providing the correct context for genome function. Alt

  4. Exploring functional elements and genomic variation in the noncoding genome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heesch, S.A.A.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/336463286

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression regulation is a delicate process that depends on multiple aspects including genome structure and transcription factor binding to DNA elements. The majority of our genome consists of noncoding DNA, which was shown to be crucial in providing the correct context for genome function. Alt

  5. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Reduce the Number of Herpes Simplex Virus-1 Genomes Initiating Expression in Individual Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapira, Lev; Ralph, Maya; Tomer, Enosh; Cohen, Shai; Kobiler, Oren

    2016-01-01

    Although many viral particles can enter a single cell, the number of viral genomes per cell that establish infection is limited. However, mechanisms underlying this restriction were not explored in depth. For herpesviruses, one of the possible mechanisms suggested is chromatinization and silencing of the incoming genomes. To test this hypothesis, we followed infection with three herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) fluorescence expressing recombinants in the presence or absence of histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi’s). Unexpectedly, a lower number of viral genomes initiated expression in the presence of these inhibitors. This phenomenon was observed using several HDACi: Trichostatin A (TSA), Suberohydroxamic Acid, Valporic Acid, and Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid. We found that HDACi presence did not change the progeny outcome from the infected cells but did alter the kinetic of the gene expression from the viral genomes. Different cell types (HFF, Vero, and U2OS), which vary in their capability to activate intrinsic and innate immunity, show a cell specific basal average number of viral genomes establishing infection. Importantly, in all cell types, treatment with TSA reduced the number of viral genomes. ND10 nuclear bodies are known to interact with the incoming herpes genomes and repress viral replication. The viral immediate early protein, ICP0, is known to disassemble the ND10 bodies and to induce degradation of some of the host proteins in these domains. HDACi treated cells expressed higher levels of some of the host ND10 proteins (promyelocytic leukemia and ATRX), which may explain the lower number of viral genomes initiating expression per cell. Corroborating this hypothesis, infection with three HSV-1 recombinants carrying a deletion in the gene coding for ICP0, show a reduction in the number of genomes being expressed in U2OS cells. We suggest that alterations in the levels of host proteins involved in intrinsic antiviral defense may result in

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibitors reduce the number of herpes simplex virus-1 genomes initiating expression in individual cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Shapira

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Although many viral particles can enter a single cell, the number of viral genomes per cell that establish infection is limited. However, mechanisms underlying this restriction were not explored in depth. For herpesviruses, one of the possible mechanisms suggested is chromatinization and silencing of the incoming genomes. To test this hypothesis, we followed infection with three herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 fluorescence-expressing recombinants in the presence or absence of histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi’s. Unexpectedly, a lower number of viral genomes initiated expression in the presence of these inhibitors. This phenomenon was observed using several HDACi: Trichostatin A (TSA, Suberohydroxamic Acid (SBX, Valporic Acid (VPA and Suberoylanilide Hydoxamic Acid (SAHA. We found that HDACi presence did not change the progeny outcome from the infected cells but did alter the kinetic of the gene expression from the viral genomes. Different cell types (HFF, Vero and U2OS, which vary in their capability to activate intrinsic and innate immunity, show a cell specific basal average number of viral genomes establishing infection. Importantly, in all cell types, treatment with TSA reduced the number of viral genomes. ND10 nuclear bodies are known to interact with the incoming herpes genomes and repress viral replication. The viral immediate early protein, ICP0, is known to disassemble the ND10 bodies and to induce degradation of some of the host proteins in these domains. HDACi treated cells expressed higher levels of some of the host ND10 proteins (PML and ATRX, which may explain the lower number of viral genomes initiating expression per cell. Corroborating this hypothesis, infection with three HSV-1 recombinants carrying a deletion in the gene coding for ICP0, show a reduction in the number of genomes being expressed in U2OS cells. We suggest that alterations in the levels of host proteins involved in intrinsic antiviral defense may result in

  7. Genome-wide analysis of the Hsp20 gene family in soybean: comprehensive sequence, genomic organization and expression profile analysis under abiotic and biotic stresses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Caitar, Valéria S; de Carvalho, Mayra C C G; Darben, Luana M; Kuwahara, Marcia K; Nepomuceno, Alexandre L; Dias, Waldir P; Abdelnoor, Ricardo V; Marcelino-Guimarães, Francismar C

    2013-08-28

    The Hsp20 genes are associated with stress caused by HS and other abiotic factors, but have recently been found to be associated with the response to biotic stresses. These genes represent the most abundant class among the HSPs in plants, but little is known about this gene family in soybean. Because of their apparent multifunctionality, these proteins are promising targets for developing crop varieties that are better adapted to biotic and abiotic stresses. Thus, in the present study an in silico identification of GmHsp20 gene family members was performed, and the genes were characterized and subjected to in vivo expression analysis under biotic and abiotic stresses. A search of the available soybean genome databases revealed 51 gene models as potential GmHsp20 candidates. The 51 GmHsp20 genes were distributed across a total of 15 subfamilies where a specific predicted secondary structure was identified. Based on in vivo analysis, only 47 soybean Hsp20 genes were responsive to heat shock stress. Among the GmHsp20 genes that were potentials HSR, five were also cold-induced, and another five, in addition to one GmAcd gene, were responsive to Meloidogyne javanica infection. Furthermore, one predicted GmHsp20 was shown to be responsive only to nematode infection; no expression change was detected under other stress conditions. Some of the biotic stress-responsive GmHsp20 genes exhibited a divergent expression pattern between resistant and susceptible soybean genotypes under M. javanica infection. The putative regulatory elements presenting some conservation level in the GmHsp20 promoters included HSE, W-box, CAAT box, and TA-rich elements. Some of these putative elements showed a unique occurrence pattern among genes responsive to nematode infection. The evolution of Hsp20 family in soybean genome has most likely involved a total of 23 gene duplications. The obtained expression profiles revealed that the majority of the 51 GmHsp20 candidates are induced under HT, but

  8. CREST maps somatic structural variation in cancer genomes with base-pair resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianmin; Mullighan, Charles G; Easton, John; Roberts, Stefan; Heatley, Sue L; Ma, Jing; Rusch, Michael C; Chen, Ken; Harris, Christopher C; Ding, Li; Holmfeldt, Linda; Payne-Turner, Debbie; Fan, Xian; Wei, Lei; Zhao, David; Obenauer, John C; Naeve, Clayton; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Downing, James R; Zhang, Jinghui

    2011-06-12

    We developed 'clipping reveals structure' (CREST), an algorithm that uses next-generation sequencing reads with partial alignments to a reference genome to directly map structural variations at the nucleotide level of resolution. Application of CREST to whole-genome sequencing data from five pediatric T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) and a human melanoma cell line, COLO-829, identified 160 somatic structural variations. Experimental validation exceeded 80%, demonstrating that CREST had a high predictive accuracy.

  9. CREST maps somatic structural variation in cancer genomes with base-pair resolution

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    We developed CREST (Clipping REveals STructure), an algorithm that uses next-generation sequencing reads with partial alignments to a reference genome to directly map structural variations at the nucleotide level of resolution. Application of CREST to whole-genome sequencing data from five pediatric T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs) and a human melanoma cell line, COLO-829, identified 160 somatic structural variations. Experimental validation exceeded 80% demonstrating that CRE...

  10. Disturbance of gene expression in primary human hepatocytes by hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids: A whole genome transcriptome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckert, Claudia; Hessel, Stefanie; Lenze, Dido; Lampen, Alfonso

    2015-10-01

    1,2-unsaturated pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PA) are plant metabolites predominantly occurring in the plant families Asteraceae and Boraginaceae. Acute and chronic PA poisoning causes severe hepatotoxicity. So far, the molecular mechanisms of PA toxicity are not well understood. To analyze its mode of action, primary human hepatocytes were exposed to a non-cytotoxic dose of 100 μM of four structurally different PA: echimidine, heliotrine, senecionine, senkirkine. Changes in mRNA expression were analyzed by a whole genome microarray. Employing cut-off values with a |fold change| of 2 and a q-value of 0.01, data analysis revealed numerous changes in gene expression. In total, 4556, 1806, 3406 and 8623 genes were regulated by echimidine, heliotrine, senecione and senkirkine, respectively. 1304 genes were identified as commonly regulated. PA affected pathways related to cell cycle regulation, cell death and cancer development. The transcription factors TP53, MYC, NFκB and NUPR1 were predicted to be activated upon PA treatment. Furthermore, gene expression data showed a considerable interference with lipid metabolism and bile acid flow. The associated transcription factors FXR, LXR, SREBF1/2, and PPARα/γ/δ were predicted to be inhibited. In conclusion, though structurally different, all four PA significantly regulated a great number of genes in common. This proposes similar molecular mechanisms, although the extent seems to differ between the analyzed PA as reflected by the potential hepatotoxicity and individual PA structure.

  11. Genome-Wide Expression of MicroRNAs Is Regulated by DNA Methylation in Hepatocarcinogenesis

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    Jing Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies, including ours, have examined the regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs by DNA methylation, but whether this regulation occurs at a genome-wide level in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is unclear. Subjects/Methods. Using a two-phase study design, we conducted genome-wide screening for DNA methylation and miRNA expression to explore the potential role of methylation alterations in miRNAs regulation. Results. We found that expressions of 25 miRNAs were statistically significantly different between tumor and nontumor tissues and perfectly differentiated HCC tumor from nontumor. Six miRNAs were overexpressed, and 19 were repressed in tumors. Among 133 miRNAs with inverse correlations between methylation and expression, 8 miRNAs (6% showed statistically significant differences in expression between tumor and nontumor tissues. Six miRNAs were validated in 56 additional paired HCC tissues, and significant inverse correlations were observed for miR-125b and miR-199a, which is consistent with the inactive chromatin pattern found in HepG2 cells. Conclusion. These data suggest that the expressions of miR-125b and miR-199a are dramatically regulated by DNA hypermethylation that plays a key role in hepatocarcinogenesis.

  12. Integration of gene expression data into genome-scale metabolic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åkesson, M.; Förster, Jochen; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-01-01

    of gene expression from chemostat and batch cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were combined with a recently developed genome-scale model, and the computed metabolic flux distributions were compared to experimental values from carbon labeling experiments and metabolic network analysis. The integration......A framework for integration of transcriptome data into stoichiometric metabolic models to obtain improved flux predictions is presented. The key idea is to exploit the regulatory information in the expression data to give additional constraints on the metabolic fluxes in the model. Measurements...... of expression data resulted in improved predictions of metabolic behavior in batch cultures, enabling quantitative predictions of exchange fluxes as well as qualitative estimations of changes in intracellular fluxes. A critical discussion of correlation between gene expression and metabolic fluxes is given....

  13. Expression of Active Subunit of Nitrogenase via Integration into Plant Organelle Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groat, Jeanna; Staub, Jeffrey M.; Stephens, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen availability is crucial for crop yield with nitrogen fertilizer accounting for a large percentage of farmers’ expenses. However, an untimely or excessive application of fertilizer can increase risks of negative environmental effects. These factors, along with the environmental and energy costs of synthesizing nitrogen fertilizer, led us to seek out novel biotechnology-driven approaches to supply nitrogen to plants. The strategy we focused on involves transgenic expression of nitrogenase, a bacterial multi-subunit enzyme that can capture atmospheric nitrogen. Here we report expression of the active Fe subunit of nitrogenase via integration into the tobacco plastid genome of bacterial gene sequences modified for expression in plastid. Our study suggests that it will be possible to engineer plants that are able to produce their own nitrogen fertilizer by expressing nitrogenase genes in plant plastids. PMID:27529475

  14. Micro and nanofluidic structures for cell sorting and genomic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Keith J.

    Microfluidic systems promise rapid analysis of small samples in a compact and inexpensive format. But direct scaling of lab bench protocols on-chip is challenging because laminar flows in typical microfluidic devices are characterized by non-mixing streamlines. Common microfluidic mixers and sorters work by diffusion, limiting application to objects that diffuse slowly such as cells and DNA. Recently Huang et.al. developed a passive microfluidic element to continuously separate bio-particles deterministically. In Deterministic Lateral Displacement (DLD), objects are sorted by size as they transit an asymmetric array of microfabricated posts. This thesis further develops DLD arrays with applications in three broad new areas. First the arrays are used, not simply to sort particles, but to move streams of cells through functional flows for chemical treatment---such as on-chip immunofluorescent labeling of blood cells with washing, and on-chip E.coli cell lysis with simultaneous chromosome extraction. Secondly, modular tiling of the basic DLD element is used to construct complex particle handling modes that include beam steering for jets of cells and beads. Thirdly, nanostructured DLD arrays are built using Nanoimprint Lithography (NIL) and continuous-flow separation of 100 nm and 200 nm size particles is demonstrated. Finally a number of ancillary nanofabrication techniques were developed in support of these overall goals, including methods to interface nanofluidic structures with standard microfluidic components such as inlet channels and reservoirs, precision etching of ultra-high aspect ratio (>50:1) silicon nanostructures, and fabrication of narrow (˜ 35 nm) channels used to stretch genomic length DNA.

  15. Genomic structure and alternative splicing of chicken angiopoietin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezquita, J; Mezquita, P; Montserrat, P; Mezquita, B; Francone, V; Vilagrasa, X; Mezquita, C

    2000-08-28

    Angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) prevents endothelial cell apoptosis and promotes blood vessel stability, while angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2), a natural antagonist of Ang-1, disrupts blood vessel structure and induces apoptosis. We have sequenced the chicken angiopoietin-2 gene that spans about 46 kb of DNA and is split in 9 exons by 8 introns. Alternative splicing of the gene gives rise to three different species of Ang-2 mRNAs: Ang-2A, Ang-2B, and Ang-2C. The three mRNA isoforms, also present in humans, codify for proteins with an identical fibrinogen-like C-terminal domain and a different coiled-coil N-terminal domain. Ang-2A and particularly Ang-2C are expressed in immature testis and regressed adult testis undergoing vascular remodeling, while their expression is barely detectable in quiescent adult testis. Conversely, Ang-2B is only detectable in adult testis. The new isoforms with truncated amino-terminal domains may modulate the Tie2 receptor during vascular angiogenesis and regression. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  16. Epigenetic changes of Arabidopsis genome associated with altered DNA methyltransferase and demethylase expressions after gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Eun; Cho, Eun Ju; Kim, Ji Hong; Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jin Hong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    DNA methylation at carbon 5 of cytosines is a hall mark of epigenetic inactivation and heterochromatin in both plants and mammals. In Arabidopsis, DNA methylation has two roles that protect the genome from selfish DNA elements and regulate gene expression. Plant genome has three types of DNA methyltransferase, METHYLTRANSFERASE 1 (MET1), DOMAINREARRANGED METHYLASE (DRM) and CHROMOMETHYLASE 3 (CMT3) that are capable of methylating CG, CHG (where H is A, T, or C) and CHH sites, respectively. MET1 is a maintenance DNA methyltransferase that controls CG methylation. Two members of the DRM family, DRM1 and DRM2, are responsible for de novo methylation of CG, CHG, and CHH sites but show a preference for CHH sites. Finally, CMT3 principally carries out CHG methylation and is involved in both de novo methylation and maintenance. Alternatively, active DNA demethylation may occur through the glycosylase activity by removing the methylcytosines from DNA. It may have essential roles in preventing transcriptional silencing of transgenes and endogenous genes and in activating the expression of imprinted genes. DNA demetylation in Arabidopsis is mediated by the DEMETER (DME) family of bifunctional DNA glycosylase. Three targets of DME are MEA (MEDEA), FWA (FLOWERING WAGENINGEN), and FIS2 (FERTILIZATION INDEPENDENT SEED 2). The DME family contains DEMETER-LIKE 2 (DML2), DML3, and REPRESSOR OF SILENING 1 (ROS1). DNA demetylation by ROS1, DML2, and DML3 protect the hypermethylation of specific genome loci. ROS1 is necessary to suppress the promoter methylation and the silencing of endogenous genes. In contrast, the function of DML2 and DML3 has not been reported. Several recent studies have suggested that epigenetic alterations such as change in DNA methylation and histone modification should be caused in plant genomes upon exposure to ionizing radiation. However, there is a lack of data exploring the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, the present study aims to characterize and

  17. Effects of in ovo electroporation on endogenous gene expression: genome-wide analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chambers David

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In ovo electroporation is a widely used technique to study gene function in developmental biology. Despite the widespread acceptance of this technique, no genome-wide analysis of the effects of in ovo electroporation, principally the current applied across the tissue and exogenous vector DNA introduced, on endogenous gene expression has been undertaken. Here, the effects of electric current and expression of a GFP-containing construct, via electroporation into the midbrain of Hamburger-Hamilton stage 10 chicken embryos, are analysed by microarray. Results Both current alone and in combination with exogenous DNA expression have a small but reproducible effect on endogenous gene expression, changing the expression of the genes represented on the array by less than 0.1% (current and less than 0.5% (current + DNA, respectively. The subset of genes regulated by electric current and exogenous DNA span a disparate set of cellular functions. However, no genes involved in the regional identity were affected. In sharp contrast to this, electroporation of a known transcription factor, Dmrt5, caused a much greater change in gene expression. Conclusions These findings represent the first systematic genome-wide analysis of the effects of in ovo electroporation on gene expression during embryonic development. The analysis reveals that this process has minimal impact on the genetic basis of cell fate specification. Thus, the study demonstrates the validity of the in ovo electroporation technique to study gene function and expression during development. Furthermore, the data presented here can be used as a resource to refine the set of transcriptional responders in future in ovo electroporation studies of specific gene function.

  18. Regulation of disease-associated gene expression in the 3D genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; de Laat, Wouter

    2016-12-01

    Genetic variation associated with disease often appears in non-coding parts of the genome. Understanding the mechanisms by which this phenomenon leads to disease is necessary to translate results from genetic association studies to the clinic. Assigning function to this type of variation is notoriously difficult because the human genome harbours a complex regulatory landscape with a dizzying array of transcriptional regulatory sequences, such as enhancers that have unpredictable, promiscuous and context-dependent behaviour. In this Review, we discuss how technological advances have provided increasingly detailed information on genome folding; for example, genome folding forms loops that bring enhancers and target genes into close proximity. We also now know that enhancers function within topologically associated domains, which are structural and functional units of chromosomes. Studying disease-associated mutations and chromosomal rearrangements in the context of the 3D genome will enable the identification of dysregulated target genes and aid the progression from descriptive genetic association results to discovering molecular mechanisms underlying disease.

  19. Genome-wide analysis of the expansin gene superfamily reveals grapevine-specific structural and functional characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Dal Santo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Expansins are proteins that loosen plant cell walls in a pH-dependent manner, probably by increasing the relative movement among polymers thus causing irreversible expansion. The expansin superfamily (EXP comprises four distinct families: expansin A (EXPA, expansin B (EXPB, expansin-like A (EXLA and expansin-like B (EXLB. There is experimental evidence that EXPA and EXPB proteins are required for cell expansion and developmental processes involving cell wall modification, whereas the exact functions of EXLA and EXLB remain unclear. The complete grapevine (Vitis vinifera genome sequence has allowed the characterization of many gene families, but an exhaustive genome-wide analysis of expansin gene expression has not been attempted thus far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified 29 EXP superfamily genes in the grapevine genome, representing all four EXP families. Members of the same EXP family shared the same exon-intron structure, and phylogenetic analysis confirmed a closer relationship between EXP genes from woody species, i.e. grapevine and poplar (Populus trichocarpa, compared to those from Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa. We also identified grapevine-specific duplication events involving the EXLB family. Global gene expression analysis confirmed a strong correlation among EXP genes expressed in mature and green/vegetative samples, respectively, as reported for other gene families in the recently-published grapevine gene expression atlas. We also observed the specific co-expression of EXLB genes in woody organs, and the involvement of certain grapevine EXP genes in berry development and post-harvest withering. CONCLUSION: Our comprehensive analysis of the grapevine EXP superfamily confirmed and extended current knowledge about the structural and functional characteristics of this gene family, and also identified properties that are currently unique to grapevine expansin genes. Our data provide a model for the

  20. Characterization of gene expression on genomic segment 7 of infectious salmon anaemia virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Biao

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious salmon anaemia (ISA virus (ISAV, an important pathogen of fish that causes disease accompanied by high mortality in marine-farmed Atlantic salmon, is the only species in the genus Isavirus, one of the five genera of the Orthomyxoviridae family. The Isavirus genome consists of eight single-stranded RNA species, and the virions have two surface glycoproteins; haemagglutinin-esterase (HE protein encoded on segment 6 and fusion (F protein encoded on segment 5. Based on the initial demonstration of two 5'-coterminal mRNA transcripts by RT-PCR, ISAV genomic segment 7 was suggested to share a similar coding strategy with segment 7 of influenza A virus, encoding two proteins. However, there appears to be confusion as to the protein sizes predicted from the two open reading frames (ORFs of ISAV segment 7 which has in turn led to confusion of the predicted protein functions. The primary goal of the present work was to clone and express these two ORFs in order to assess whether the predicted protein sizes match those of the expressed proteins so as to clarify the coding assignments, and thereby identify any additional structural proteins of ISAV. Results In the present study we show that ISAV segment 7 encodes 3 proteins with estimated molecular masses of 32, 18, and 9.5 kDa. The 18-kDa and 9.5-kDa products are based on removal of an intron each from the primary transcript (7-ORF1 so that the translation continues in the +2 and +3 reading frames, respectively. The segment 7-ORF1/3 product is variably truncated in the sequence of ISAV isolates of the European genotype. All three proteins are recognized by rabbit antiserum against the 32-kDa product of the primary transcript, as they all share the N-terminal 22 amino acids. This antiserum detected a single 35-kDa protein in Western blots of purified virus, and immunoprecipitated a 32-kDa protein in ISAV-infected TO cells. Immunofluorescence staining of infected cells with the

  1. Genome-Wide Gene Expressions Respond Differently to A-subgenome Origins in Brassica napus Synthetic Hybrids and Natural Allotetraploid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dawei; Pan, Qi; Tan, Chen; Zhu, Bin; Ge, Xianhong; Shao, Yujiao; Li, Zaiyun

    2016-01-01

    The young allotetraploid Brassica napus (2n = 38, AACC) is one of models to study genomic responses to allopolyploidization. The extraction of AA component from natural B. napus and then restitution of progenitor B. rapa should provide a unique opportunity to reveal the genome interplay for gene expressions during the evolution. Herein, B. napus hybrids (2n = 19, AC) between the extracted and extant B. rapa (2n = 20, AA) and the same B. oleracea genotype (2n = 18, CC) were studied by RNA-seq and compared with natural B. napus donor, to reveal the gene expression changes from hybridization and domestication and the effects of A genome with different origins. Upon the initial merger of two diploid genomes, additive gene expression was prevalent in these two hybrids, for non-additively expressed genes only represented a small portion of total expressed genes. A high proportion of genes exhibited expression level dominance, with no preference to either of the parental genomes. Comparison of homoeolog expressions also showed no bias toward any genomes and the parental expression patterns were often maintained in the hybrids and natural allotetraploids. Although, the overall patterns of gene expression were highly conserved between two hybrids, the extracted B. rapa responded less and appeared more compatible for hybridization than the extant B. rapa. Our results suggested that expression level dominance and homoeolog expressions bias were balanced at the initial stage of genome merger, and such balance were largely maintained during the domestication of B. napus, despite the increased extent over time. PMID:27790227

  2. Gene finding with a hidden Markov model of genome structure and evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Hein, Jotun

    2003-01-01

    annotation. The modelling of evolution by the existing comparative gene finders leaves room for improvement. Results: A probabilistic model of both genome structure and evolution is designed. This type of model is called an Evolutionary Hidden Markov Model (EHMM), being composed of an HMM and a set of region......Motivation: A growing number of genomes are sequenced. The differences in evolutionary pattern between functional regions can thus be observed genome-wide in a whole set of organisms. The diverse evolutionary pattern of different functional regions can be exploited in the process of genomic...

  3. Genome3D: exploiting structure to help users understand their sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Tony E.; Sillitoe, Ian; Andreeva, Antonina; Blundell, Tom L.; Buchan, Daniel W. A.; Chothia, Cyrus; Cozzetto, Domenico; Dana, José M.; Filippis, Ioannis; Gough, Julian; Jones, David T.; Kelley, Lawrence A; Kleywegt, Gerard J.; Minneci, Federico; Mistry, Jaina

    2014-01-01

    Genome3D (http://www.genome3d.eu) is a collaborative resource that provides predicted domain annotations and structural models for key sequences. Since introducing Genome3D in a previous NAR paper, we have substantially extended and improved the resource. We have annotated representatives from Pfam families to improve coverage of diverse sequences and added a fast sequence search to the website to allow users to find Genome3D-annotated sequences similar to their own. We have improved and exte...

  4. Genome-wide identification, isolation and expression analysis of auxin response factor (ARF) gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Si-Bei; OuYang, Wei-Zhi; Hou, Xiao-Jin; Xie, Liang-Liang; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) are an important family of proteins in auxin-mediated response, with key roles in various physiological and biochemical processes. To date, a genome-wide overview of the ARF gene family in citrus was not available. A systematic analysis of this gene family in citrus was begun by carrying out a genome-wide search for the homologs of ARFs. A total of 19 nonredundant ARF genes (CiARF) were found and validated from the sweet orange. A comprehensive overview of the CiARFs was undertaken, including the gene structures, phylogenetic analysis, chromosome locations, conserved motifs of proteins, and cis-elements in promoters of CiARF. Furthermore, expression profiling using real-time PCR revealed many CiARF genes, albeit with different patterns depending on types of tissues and/or developmental stages. Comprehensive expression analysis of these genes was also performed under two hormone treatments using real-time PCR. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and N-1-napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) treatment experiments revealed differential up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively, of the 19 citrus ARF genes in the callus of sweet orange. Our comprehensive analysis of ARF genes further elucidates the roles of CiARF family members during citrus growth and development process.

  5. Structure and genome organization of AFV2, a novel archaeal lipothrixvirus with unusual terminal and core structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Häring, Monika; Vestergaard, Gisle Alberg; Brügger, Kim;

    2005-01-01

    A novel filamentous virus, AFV2, from the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Acidianus shows structural similarity to lipothrixviruses but differs from them in its unusual terminal and core structures. The double-stranded DNA genome contains 31,787 bp and carries eight open reading frames homologou...... to those of other lipothrixviruses, a single tRNA(Lys) gene containing a 12-bp archaeal intron, and a 1,008-bp repeat-rich region near the center of the genome....

  6. Replication, gene expression and particle production by a consensus Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike Neumann

    Full Text Available Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV genomes are clonally integrated in tumor tissues of approximately 85% of all Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC cases, a highly aggressive tumor of the skin which predominantly afflicts elderly and immunosuppressed patients. All integrated viral genomes recovered from MCC tissue or MCC cell lines harbor signature mutations in the early gene transcript encoding for the large T-Antigen (LT-Ag. These mutations selectively abrogate the ability of LT-Ag to support viral replication while still maintaining its Rb-binding activity, suggesting a continuous requirement for LT-Ag mediated cell cycle deregulation during MCC pathogenesis. To gain a better understanding of MCPyV biology, in vitro MCPyV replication systems are required. We have generated a synthetic MCPyV genomic clone (MCVSyn based on the consensus sequence of MCC-derived sequences deposited in the NCBI database. Here, we demonstrate that transfection of recircularized MCVSyn DNA into some human cell lines recapitulates efficient replication of the viral genome, early and late gene expression together with virus particle formation. However, serial transmission of infectious virus was not observed. This in vitro culturing system allows the study of viral replication and will facilitate the molecular dissection of important aspects of the MCPyV lifecycle.

  7. A sequence-based survey of the complex structural organization of tumor genomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Colin; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Volik, Stanislav; Yu, Peng; Wu, Chunxiao; Huang, Guiqing; Linardopoulou, Elena V.; Trask, Barbara J.; Waldman, Frederic; Costello, Joseph; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Mills, Gordon B.; Bajsarowicz, Krystyna; Kobayashi, Yasuko; Sridharan, Shivaranjani; Paris, Pamela; Tao, Quanzhou; Aerni, Sarah J.; Brown, Raymond P.; Bashir, Ali; Gray, Joe W.; Cheng, Jan-Fang; de Jong, Pieter; Nefedov, Mikhail; Ried, Thomas; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M.; Collins, Colin C.

    2008-04-03

    The genomes of many epithelial tumors exhibit extensive chromosomal rearrangements. All classes of genome rearrangements can be identified using End Sequencing Profiling (ESP), which relies on paired-end sequencing of cloned tumor genomes. In this study, brain, breast, ovary and prostate tumors along with three breast cancer cell lines were surveyed with ESP yielding the largest available collection of sequence-ready tumor genome breakpoints and providing evidence that some rearrangements may be recurrent. Sequencing and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed translocations and complex tumor genome structures that include coamplification and packaging of disparate genomic loci with associated molecular heterogeneity. Comparison of the tumor genomes suggests recurrent rearrangements. Some are likely to be novel structural polymorphisms, whereas others may be bona fide somatic rearrangements. A recurrent fusion transcript in breast tumors and a constitutional fusion transcript resulting from a segmental duplication were identified. Analysis of end sequences for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) revealed candidate somatic mutations and an elevated rate of novel SNPs in an ovarian tumor. These results suggest that the genomes of many epithelial tumors may be far more dynamic and complex than previously appreciated and that genomic fusions including fusion transcripts and proteins may be common, possibly yielding tumor-specific biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  8. Local chromatin structure of heterochromatin regulates repeated DNA stability, nucleolus structure, and genome integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Jamy C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Heterochromatin constitutes a significant portion of the genome in higher eukaryotes; approximately 30% in Drosophila and human. Heterochromatin contains a high repeat DNA content and a low density of protein-encoding genes. In contrast, euchromatin is composed mostly of unique sequences and contains the majority of single-copy genes. Genetic and cytological studies demonstrated that heterochromatin exhibits regulatory roles in chromosome organization, centromere function and telomere protection. As an epigenetically regulated structure, heterochromatin formation is not defined by any DNA sequence consensus. Heterochromatin is characterized by its association with nucleosomes containing methylated-lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me), heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) that binds H3K9me, and Su(var)3-9, which methylates H3K9 and binds HP1. Heterochromatin formation and functions are influenced by HP1, Su(var)3-9, and the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. My thesis project investigates how heterochromatin formation and function impact nuclear architecture, repeated DNA organization, and genome stability in Drosophila melanogaster. H3K9me-based chromatin reduces extrachromosomal DNA formation; most likely by restricting the access of repair machineries to repeated DNAs. Reducing extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA stabilizes rDNA repeats and the nucleolus structure. H3K9me-based chromatin also inhibits DNA damage in heterochromatin. Cells with compromised heterochromatin structure, due to Su(var)3-9 or dcr-2 (a component of the RNAi pathway) mutations, display severe DNA damage in heterochromatin compared to wild type. In these mutant cells, accumulated DNA damage leads to chromosomal defects such as translocations, defective DNA repair response, and activation of the G2-M DNA repair and mitotic checkpoints that ensure cellular and animal viability. My thesis research suggests that DNA replication, repair, and recombination mechanisms in heterochromatin differ from those in

  9. Characterization of soybean genomic features by analysis of its expressed sequence tags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Ai-Guo; Wang, Jun; Cui, Peng

    2004-01-01

    We analyzed 314,254 soybean expressed sequence tags (ESTs), including 29,540 from our laboratory and 284,714 from GenBank. These ESTs were assembled into 56,147 unigenes. About 76.92% of the unigenes were homologous to genes from Arabidopsis thaliana ( Arabidopsis). The putative products of these......We analyzed 314,254 soybean expressed sequence tags (ESTs), including 29,540 from our laboratory and 284,714 from GenBank. These ESTs were assembled into 56,147 unigenes. About 76.92% of the unigenes were homologous to genes from Arabidopsis thaliana ( Arabidopsis). The putative products...... to be fast-evolving. Soybean unigenes with no match to genes within the Arabidopsis genome were identified as soybean-specific genes. These genes were mainly involved in nodule development and the synthesis of seed storage proteins. In addition, we also identified 61 genes regulated by salicylic acid, 1......,322 transcription factor genes and 326 disease resistance-like genes from soybean unigenes. SSR analysis showed that the soybean genome was more complex than the Arabidopsis and the Medicago truncatula genomes. GC content in soybean unigene sequences is similar to that in Arabidopsis and M. truncatula. Furthermore...

  10. Gene discovery and transcript analyses in the corn smut pathogen Ustilago maydis: expressed sequence tag and genome sequence comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saville Barry J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ustilago maydis is the basidiomycete fungus responsible for common smut of corn and is a model organism for the study of fungal phytopathogenesis. To aid in the annotation of the genome sequence of this organism, several expressed sequence tag (EST libraries were generated from a variety of U. maydis cell types. In addition to utility in the context of gene identification and structure annotation, the ESTs were analyzed to identify differentially abundant transcripts and to detect evidence of alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription. Results Four cDNA libraries were constructed using RNA isolated from U. maydis diploid teliospores (U. maydis strains 518 × 521 and haploid cells of strain 521 grown under nutrient rich, carbon starved, and nitrogen starved conditions. Using the genome sequence as a scaffold, the 15,901 ESTs were assembled into 6,101 contiguous expressed sequences (contigs; among these, 5,482 corresponded to predicted genes in the MUMDB (MIPS Ustilago maydis database, while 619 aligned to regions of the genome not yet designated as genes in MUMDB. A comparison of EST abundance identified numerous genes that may be regulated in a cell type or starvation-specific manner. The transcriptional response to nitrogen starvation was assessed using RT-qPCR. The results of this suggest that there may be cross-talk between the nitrogen and carbon signalling pathways in U. maydis. Bioinformatic analysis identified numerous examples of alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription. While intron retention was the predominant form of alternative splicing in U. maydis, other varieties were also evident (e.g. exon skipping. Selected instances of both alternative splicing and anti-sense transcription were independently confirmed using RT-PCR. Conclusion Through this work: 1 substantial sequence information has been provided for U. maydis genome annotation; 2 new genes were identified through the discovery of 619

  11. A gene expression resource generated by genome-wide lacZ profiling in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Tuck

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the expression profile of a gene is a critical piece of information required to build an understanding of the normal and essential functions of that gene and any role it may play in the development or progression of disease. High-throughput, large-scale efforts are on-going internationally to characterise reporter-tagged knockout mouse lines. As part of that effort, we report an open access adult mouse expression resource, in which the expression profile of 424 genes has been assessed in up to 47 different organs, tissues and sub-structures using a lacZ reporter gene. Many specific and informative expression patterns were noted. Expression was most commonly observed in the testis and brain and was most restricted in white adipose tissue and mammary gland. Over half of the assessed genes presented with an absent or localised expression pattern (categorised as 0-10 positive structures. A link between complexity of expression profile and viability of homozygous null animals was observed; inactivation of genes expressed in ≥21 structures was more likely to result in reduced viability by postnatal day 14 compared with more restricted expression profiles. For validation purposes, this mouse expression resource was compared with Bgee, a federated composite of RNA-based expression data sets. Strong agreement was observed, indicating a high degree of specificity in our data. Furthermore, there were 1207 observations of expression of a particular gene in an anatomical structure where Bgee had no data, indicating a large amount of novelty in our data set. Examples of expression data corroborating and extending genotype-phenotype associations and supporting disease gene candidacy are presented to demonstrate the potential of this powerful resource.

  12. Comparative genomics of 274 Vibrio cholerae genomes reveals mobile functions structuring three niche dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutilh, Bas E; Thompson, Cristiane C; Vicente, Ana C P; Marin, Michel A; Lee, Clarence; Silva, Genivaldo G Z; Schmieder, Robert; Andrade, Bruno G N; Chimetto, Luciane; Cuevas, Daniel; Garza, Daniel R; Okeke, Iruka N; Aboderin, Aaron Oladipo; Spangler, Jessica; Ross, Tristen; Dinsdale, Elizabeth A; Thompson, Fabiano L; Harkins, Timothy T; Edwards, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vibrio cholerae is a globally dispersed pathogen that has evolved with humans for centuries, but also includes non-pathogenic environmental strains. Here, we identify the genomic variability underlying this remarkable persistence across the three major niche dimensions space, time, and h

  13. Comparative genomics of 274 Vibrio cholerae genomes reveals mobile functions structuring three niche dimensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dutilh, B.E.; Thompson, C.C.; Vicente, A.C.; Marin, M.A.; Lee, C.; Silva, G.G.; Schmieder, R.; Andrade, B.G.; Chimetto, L.; Cuevas, D.; Garza, D.R.; Okeke, I.N.; Aboderin, A.O.; Spangler, J.; Ross, T.; Dinsdale, E.A.; Thompson, F.L.; Harkins, T.T.; Edwards, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vibrio cholerae is a globally dispersed pathogen that has evolved with humans for centuries, but also includes non-pathogenic environmental strains. Here, we identify the genomic variability underlying this remarkable persistence across the three major niche dimensions space, time, and

  14. A new chicken genome assembly provides insight into avian genome structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The importance of the Gallus gallus (chicken) as a model organism and agricultural animal merits a continuation of sequence assembly improvement efforts. We present a new version of the chicken genome assembly (Gallus_gallus-5.0; GCA_000002315.3) built from combined long single molecule sequencing t...

  15. Structural genomic variation as risk factor for idiopathic recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagirnaja, Liina; Palta, Priit; Kasak, Laura;

    2014-01-01

    within RM study group revealed significant enrichment of loci related to innate immunity and immunoregulatory pathways essential for immune tolerance at fetomaternal interface. As a major finding, we report a multicopy duplication (61.6 kb) at 5p13.3 conferring increased maternal risk to RM in Estonia...... and identify common rearrangements modulating risk to RM. Genome-wide screening of Estonian RM patients and fertile controls identified excessive cumulative burden of CNVs (5.4 and 6.1 Mb per genome) in two RM cases possibly increasing their individual disease risk. Functional profiling of all rearranged genes...... and Denmark (meta-analysis, n = 309/205, odds ratio = 4.82, P = 0.012). Comparison to Estonian population-based cohort (total, n = 1000) confirmed the risk for Estonian female cases (P = 7.9 × 10(-4) ). Datasets of four cohorts from the Database of Genomic Variants (total, n = 5,846 subjects) exhibited...

  16. MYB Transcription Factors in Chinese Pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd.: Genome-Wide Identification, Classification and Expression Profiling during Fruit Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Peng eCao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The MYB family is one of the largest families of transcription factors in plants. Although some MYBs have been reported to play roles in secondary metabolism, no comprehensive study of the MYB family in Chinese pear (Pyrus bretschneideri Rehd. has been reported. In the present study, we performed genome-wide analysis of MYB genes in Chinese pear, designated as PbMYBs, including analyses of their phylogenic relationships, structures, chromosomal locations, promoter regions, GO annotations and collinearity. A total of 129 PbMYB genes were identified in the pear genome and were divided into 31 subgroups based on phylogenetic analysis. These PbMYBs were unevenly distributed among 16 chromosomes (total of 17 chromosomes. The occurrence of gene duplication events indicated that whole-genome duplication and segmental duplication likely played key roles in expansion of the PbMYB gene family. Ka/Ks analysis suggested that the duplicated PbMYBs mainly experienced purifying selection with restrictive functional divergence after the duplication events. Interspecies microsynteny analysis revealed maximum orthology between pear and peach, followed by plum and strawberry. Subsequently, the expression patterns of 20 PbMYB genes that may be involved in lignin biosynthesis according to their phylogenetic relationships were examined throughout fruit development. Among the twenty genes examined, PbMYB25 and PbMYB52 exhibited expression patterns consistent with the typical variations in the lignin content previously reported. Moreover, sub-cellular localization analysis revealed that two proteins PbMYB25 and PbMYB52 were localized to the nucleus. All together, PbMYB25 and PbMYB52 were inferred to be candidate genes involved in the regulation of lignin biosynthesis during the development of pear fruit. This study provides useful information for further functional analysis of the MYB gene family in pear.

  17. Science Letters: A robust statistical procedure to discover expression biomarkers using microarray genomic expression data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU Yang-yun; YANG Jian; ZHU Jun

    2006-01-01

    Microarray has become increasingly popular biotechnology in biological and medical researches, and has been widely applied in classification of treatment subtypes using expression patterns of biomarkers. We developed a statistical procedure to identify expression biomarkers for treatment subtype classification by constructing an F-statistic based on Henderson method Ⅲ.Monte Carlo simulations were conducted to examine the robustness and efficiency of the proposed method. Simulation results showed that our method could provide satisfying power of identifying differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with false discovery rate (FDR) lower than the given type Ⅰ error rate. In addition, we analyzed a leukemia dataset collected from 38 leukemia patients with 27 samples diagnosed as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 11 samples as acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We compared our results with those from the methods of significance analysis of microarray (SAM) and microarray analysis of variance (MAANOVA). Among these three methods, only expression biomarkers identified by our method can precisely identify the three human acute leukemia subtypes.

  18. Genomic Imprinting of IGF2 Is Maintained in Infantile Hemangioma despite its High Level of Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ying; Wylie-Sears, Jill; Boscolo, Elisa; Mulliken, John B; Bischoff, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    Hemangioma, the most common tumor of infancy, is characterized by rapid growth and slow regression. Increased mRNA expression of insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) has been detected in the proliferating phase by cDNA microarray analysis, but the underlying mechanism causing the increase remains unknown. Here, using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry, we show that IGF2 is highly expressed in both proliferating and involuting phase hemangioma, but is not detectable in other vascular lesions such as pyogenic granuloma, venous malformation, lymphatic malformation, or in normal infant skin. Loss of imprinting of the Igf2 gene has been associated with IGF2 overexpression in a variety of childhood tumors. To determine if loss of imprinting and consequent bi-allelic expression might contribute to the increased expression of IGF2, we examined the genomic imprinting status of Igf2 in 48 individual hemangiomas. We determined allele-specific Igf2 expression using reverse transcriptase–PCR combined with analysis of an Apa I–sensitive restriction fragment length polymorphism. Similar to heterozygous normal skin controls, all 15 informative hemangiomas showed uniform mono-allelic expression of Igf2. Therefore, loss of imprinting is not involved in the increased expression of IGF2 in infantile hemangioma. PMID:15706404

  19. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression during early Arabidopsis flower development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Wellmer

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Detailed information about stage-specific changes in gene expression is crucial for the understanding of the gene regulatory networks underlying development. Here, we describe the global gene expression dynamics during early flower development, a key process in the life cycle of a plant, during which floral patterning and the specification of floral organs is established. We used a novel floral induction system in Arabidopsis, which allows the isolation of a large number of synchronized floral buds, in conjunction with whole-genome microarray analysis to identify genes with differential expression at distinct stages of flower development. We found that the onset of flower formation is characterized by a massive downregulation of genes in incipient floral primordia, which is followed by a predominance of gene activation during the differentiation of floral organs. Among the genes we identified as differentially expressed in the experiment, we detected a significant enrichment of closely related members of gene families. The expression profiles of these related genes were often highly correlated, indicating similar temporal expression patterns. Moreover, we found that the majority of these genes is specifically up-regulated during certain developmental stages. Because co-expressed members of gene families in Arabidopsis frequently act in a redundant manner, these results suggest a high degree of functional redundancy during early flower development, but also that its extent may vary in a stage-specific manner.

  20. Genome-wide analysis, expression dynamics and varietal comparison of NAC gene family at various developmental stages in Morus notabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranwal, Vinay Kumar; Khurana, Paramjit

    2016-06-01

    NAC genes are important transcription factors and forms a large family in plants. They have shown to play an important role in growth and development and have also been shown to involve in regulation of stress-responsive genes. In the present study, a repertoire of NAC genes in recently published mulberry genome has been identified which consists of a total of 79 members. Structural analysis revealed that most of the NAC genes in mulberry contain two introns. The proteins encoded by them show a wide range of isoelectric points suggestive of their varied roles in varying microcellular environment. Phylogenetic and conserved motif analysis elucidate the presence of 15 sub-groups of these genes along with two novel sub-groups having distinct conserved motifs which are not present in Arabidopsis. Gene ontology term enrichment analysis and cis-element identification from their putative 1 K upstream regulatory region indicates their possible role in important biological processes like organ formation, meristem establishment, senescence, and various biotic and abiotic stresses. Expression analysis across various developmental stages led to identification of their preferential expression in diverse tissues. Taken together, this work provides a solid background information related to structure, function, expression and evolution of NAC gene family in mulberry.

  1. New statistical Methods of Genome-Scale Data Analysis in Life Science - Applications to enterobacterial Diagnostics, Meta-Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Gene Expression and functional Sequence Annotation

    OpenAIRE

    Friedrich, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Recent progresses and developments in molecular biology provide a wealth of new but insufficiently characterised data. This fund comprises amongst others biological data of genomic DNA, protein sequences, 3-dimensional protein structures as well as profiles of gene expression. In the present work, this information is used to develop new methods for the characterisation and classification of organisms and whole groups of organisms as well as to enhance the automated gain and transfer of inform...

  2. Systematic drug safety evaluation based on public genomic expression (Connectivity Map) data: Myocardial and infectious adverse reactions as application cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Kejian, E-mail: kejian.wang.bio@gmail.com [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Weng, Zuquan [Japan National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Kawasaki (Japan); Sun, Liya [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Sun, Jiazhi; Zhou, Shu-Feng [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); He, Lin, E-mail: helin@Bio-X.com [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-02-13

    Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is of great importance to both regulatory agencies and the pharmaceutical industry. Various techniques, such as quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR) and animal toxicology, are widely used to identify potential risks during the preclinical stage of drug development. Despite these efforts, drugs with safety liabilities can still pass through safety checkpoints and enter the market. This situation raises the concern that conventional chemical structure analysis and phenotypic screening are not sufficient to avoid all clinical adverse events. Genomic expression data following in vitro drug treatments characterize drug actions and thus have become widely used in drug repositioning. In the present study, we explored prediction of ADRs based on the drug-induced gene-expression profiles from cultured human cells in the Connectivity Map (CMap) database. The results showed that drugs inducing comparable ADRs generally lead to similar CMap expression profiles. Based on such ADR-gene expression association, we established prediction models for various ADRs, including severe myocardial and infectious events. Drugs with FDA boxed warnings of safety liability were effectively identified. We therefore suggest that drug-induced gene expression change, in combination with effective computational methods, may provide a new dimension of information to facilitate systematic drug safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Drugs causing common toxicity lead to similar in vitro gene expression changes. • We built a model to predict drug toxicity with drug-specific expression profiles. • Drugs with FDA black box warnings were effectively identified by our model. • In vitro assay can detect severe toxicity in the early stage of drug development.

  3. Integration of expression data in genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S. Blazier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advent of high-throughput technologies, the field of systems biology has amassed an abundance of omics data, quantifying thousands of cellular components across a variety of scales, ranging from mRNA transcript levels to metabolite quantities. Methods are needed to not only integrate this omics data but to also use this data to heighten the predictive capabilities of computational models. Several recent studies have successfully demonstrated how flux balance analysis (FBA, a constraint-based modeling approach, can be used to integrate transcriptomic data into genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions to generate predictive computational models. In this review, we summarize such FBA-based methods for integrating expression data into genome-scale metabolic network reconstructions, highlighting their advantages as well as their limitations.

  4. Genome-wide gene expression changes in an industrial clavulanic acid overproduction strain of Streptomyces clavuligerus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medema, Marnix H; Alam, Mohammad T; Heijne, Wilbert H M; van den Berg, Marco A; Müller, Ulrike; Trefzer, Axel; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2011-03-01

    To increase production of the important pharmaceutical compound clavulanic acid, a β-lactamase inhibitor, both random mutagenesis approaches and rational engineering of Streptomyces clavuligerus strains have been extensively applied. Here, for the first time, we compared genome-wide gene expression of an industrial S. clavuligerus strain, obtained through iterative mutagenesis, with that of the wild-type strain. Intriguingly, we found that the majority of the changes contributed not to a complex rewiring of primary metabolism but consisted of a simple upregulation of various antibiotic biosynthesis gene clusters. A few additional transcriptional changes in primary metabolism at key points seem to divert metabolic fluxes to the biosynthetic precursors for clavulanic acid. In general, the observed changes largely coincide with genes that have been targeted by rational engineering in recent years, yet the presence of a number of previously unexplored genes clearly demonstrates that functional genomic analysis can provide new leads for strain improvement in biotechnology.

  5. Population Structure Analysis of Bull Genomes of European and Western Ancestry

    OpenAIRE

    Neo Christopher Chung; Joanna Szyda; Magdalena Frąszczak

    2017-01-01

    Since domestication, population bottlenecks, breed formation, and selective breeding have radically shaped the genealogy and genetics of Bos taurus. In turn, characterization of population structure among diverse bull (males of Bos taurus) genomes enables detailed assessment of genetic resources and origins. By analyzing 432 unrelated bull genomes from 13 breeds and 16 countries, we demonstrate genetic diversity and structural complexity among the European/Western cattle population. Important...

  6. Structure-infectivity analysis of the human rhinovirus genomic RNA 3' non-coding region.

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The specific recognition of genomic positive strand RNAS as templates for the synthesis of intermediate negative strands by the picornavirus replication machinery is presumably mediated by cis-acting sequences within the genomic RNA 3' non-coding region (NCR). A structure-infectivity analysis was conducted on the 44 nt human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14) 3' NCR to identify the primary sequence and/or secondary structure determinants required for viral replication. Using biochemical RNA secondary stru...

  7. Genome-wide analysis of gene expression in primate taste buds reveals links to diverse processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Hevezi

    Full Text Available Efforts to unravel the mechanisms underlying taste sensation (gustation have largely focused on rodents. Here we present the first comprehensive characterization of gene expression in primate taste buds. Our findings reveal unique new insights into the biology of taste buds. We generated a taste bud gene expression database using laser capture microdissection (LCM procured fungiform (FG and circumvallate (CV taste buds from primates. We also used LCM to collect the top and bottom portions of CV taste buds. Affymetrix genome wide arrays were used to analyze gene expression in all samples. Known taste receptors are preferentially expressed in the top portion of taste buds. Genes associated with the cell cycle and stem cells are preferentially expressed in the bottom portion of taste buds, suggesting that precursor cells are located there. Several chemokines including CXCL14 and CXCL8 are among the highest expressed genes in taste buds, indicating that immune system related processes are active in taste buds. Several genes expressed specifically in endocrine glands including growth hormone releasing hormone and its receptor are also strongly expressed in taste buds, suggesting a link between metabolism and taste. Cell type-specific expression of transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in cell fate, including KIT, reveals the taste bud as an active site of cell regeneration, differentiation, and development. IKBKAP, a gene mutated in familial dysautonomia, a disease that results in loss of taste buds, is expressed in taste cells that communicate with afferent nerve fibers via synaptic transmission. This database highlights the power of LCM coupled with transcriptional profiling to dissect the molecular composition of normal tissues, represents the most comprehensive molecular analysis of primate taste buds to date, and provides a foundation for further studies in diverse aspects of taste biology.

  8. Nongenetic functions of the genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustin, Michael; Misteli, Tom

    2016-05-01

    The primary function of the genome is to store, propagate, and express the genetic information that gives rise to a cell's architectural and functional machinery. However, the genome is also a major structural component of the cell. Besides its genetic roles, the genome affects cellular functions by nongenetic means through its physical and structural properties, particularly by exerting mechanical forces and by serving as a scaffold for binding of cellular components. Major cellular processes affected by nongenetic functions of the genome include establishment of nuclear structure, signal transduction, mechanoresponses, cell migration, and vision in nocturnal animals. We discuss the concept, mechanisms, and implications of nongenetic functions of the genome.

  9. Multigene expression of protein complexes by iterative modification of genomic Bacmid DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celma Cristina C

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many cellular multi-protein complexes are naturally present in cells at low abundance. Baculovirus expression offers one approach to produce milligram quantities of correctly folded and processed eukaryotic protein complexes. However, current strategies suffer from the need to produce large transfer vectors, and the use of repeated promoter sequences in baculovirus, which itself produces proteins that promote homologous recombination. One possible solution to these problems is to construct baculovirus genomes that express each protein in a complex from a separate locus within the viral DNA. However current methods for selecting such recombinant genomes are too inefficient to routinely modify the virus in this way. Results This paper reports a method which combines the lambda red and bacteriophage P1 Cre-recombinase systems to efficiently generate baculoviruses in which protein complexes are expressed from multiple, single-locus insertions of foreign genes. This method is based on an 88 fold improvement in the selection of recombinant viruses generated by red recombination techniques through use of a bipartite selection cassette. Using this system, seven new genetic loci were identified in the AcMNPV genome suitable for the high level expression of recombinant proteins. These loci were used to allow the recovery two recombinant virus-like particles with potential biotechnological applications (influenza A virus HA/M1 particles and bluetongue virus VP2/VP3/VP5/VP7 particles and the mammalian chaperone and cancer drug target CCT (16 subunits formed from 8 proteins. Conclusion 1. Use of bipartite selections can significantly improve selection of modified bacterial artificial chromosomes carrying baculovirus DNA. Furthermore this approach is sufficiently robust to allow routine modification of the virus genome. 2. In addition to the commonly used p10 and polyhedrin loci, the ctx, egt, 39k, orf51, gp37, iap2 and odv-e56 loci in Ac

  10. Genome wide identification, phylogeny and expression of zinc transporter genes in common carp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanliang Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Zinc is an essential trace element in organisms, which serves as a cofactor for hundreds of enzymes that are involved in many pivotal biological processes including growth, development, reproduction and immunity. Therefore, the homeostasis of zinc in the cell is fundamental. The zinc transporter gene family is a large gene family that encodes proteins which regulate the movement of zinc across cellular and intracellular membranes. However, studies on teleost zinc transporters are mainly limited to model species. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified a set of 37 zinc transporters in common carp genome, including 17 from SLC30 family (ZnT, and 20 from SLC39 family (ZIP. Phylogenetic and syntenic analysis revealed that most of the zinc transporters are highly conserved, though recent gene duplication and gene losses do exist. Through examining the copy number of zinc transporter genes across several vertebrate genomes, thirteen zinc transporters in common carp are found to have undergone the gene duplications, including SLC30A1, SLC30A2, SLC30A5, SLC30A7, SLC30A9, SLC30A10, SLC39A1, SLC39A3, SLC39A4, SLC39A5, SLC39A6, SLC39A7 and SLC39A9. The expression patterns of all zinc transporters were established in various tissues, including blood, brain, gill, heart, intestine, liver, muscle, skin, spleen and kidney, and showed that most of the zinc transporters were ubiquitously expressed, indicating the critical role of zinc transporters in common carp. CONCLUSIONS: To some extent, examination of gene families with detailed phylogenetic or orthology analysis could verify the authenticity and accuracy of assembly and annotation of the recently published common carp whole genome sequences. The gene families are also considered as a unique source for evolutionary studies. Moreover, the whole set of common carp zinc transporters provides an important genomic resource for future biochemical, toxicological and physiological studies of zinc

  11. Genome-wide identification and structure-function studies of proteases and protease inhibitors in Cicer arietinum (chickpea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ranu; Suresh, C G

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are a family of enzymes present in almost all living organisms. In plants they are involved in many biological processes requiring stress response in situations such as water deficiency, pathogen attack, maintaining protein content of the cell, programmed cell death, senescence, reproduction and many more. Similarly, protease inhibitors (PIs) are involved in various important functions like suppression of invasion by pathogenic nematodes, inhibition of spores-germination and mycelium growth of Alternaria alternata and response to wounding and fungal attack. As much as we know, no genome-wide study of proteases together with proteinaceous PIs is reported in any of the sequenced genomes till now. Phylogenetic studies and domain analysis of proteases were carried out to understand the molecular evolution as well as gene and protein features. Structural analysis was carried out to explore the binding mode and affinity of PIs for cognate proteases and prolyl oligopeptidase protease with inhibitor ligand. In the study reported here, a significant number of proteases and PIs were identified in chickpea genome. The gene expression profiles of proteases and PIs in five different plant tissues revealed a differential expression pattern in more than one plant tissue. Molecular dynamics studies revealed the formation of stable complex owing to increased number of protein-ligand and inter and intramolecular protein-protein hydrogen bonds. The genome-wide identification, characterization, evolutionary understanding, gene expression, and structural analysis of proteases and PIs provide a framework for future analysis when defining their roles in stress response and developing a more stress tolerant variety of chickpea. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Phylogenetically clustering of rhizobia by genome structure: application to unclassified Rhizobium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Jun-fang; LIU Gui-rong; LIU Shu-lin

    2006-01-01

    Previous research reveals that the genome structures of rhizobial type strains and reference strains can reflect their phylogenetic relationships. In order to further explore the potential application of genome structure as a phylogenetic marker in rhizobial natural taxonomy, this study analyzed the genome structures of 29 unclassified nodule bacteria isolated from the root nodules of leguminous trees, Robinia sp., Dalbergia spp., and A lbizia spp. and 7 rhizobial reference strains by I-CeuI cleavage, then clustered these bacteria phylogenetically based on their genome structures and compared these clusters with those based on numerical taxonomy and 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP. Eleven phylogenetic clusters were obtained. The clusters were in large part consistent with those based on numerical taxonomy and 16S rDNA PCR-RFLP. Also there are inconsistent clusters based on the above three methods. But results are completely consistent with 16S rRNA clusters. This suggested that the genome structure clustering method can be used to fastly identify root nodule isolates and detect their phylogenetic relationships. The credibility and repeatability of the results, together with the simplicity and possibility to analyze a large number of strains in a short time of the method, indicates the broad potential application of genome structure as phylogenetic marker to categorize rhizobial isolates and should in the future facilitate biodiversity studies.

  13. Structural genomic variation as risk factor for idiopathic recurrent miscarriage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagirnaja, Liina; Palta, Priit; Kasak, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent miscarriage (RM) is a multifactorial disorder with acknowledged genetic heritability that affects ∼3% of couples aiming at childbirth. As copy number variants (CNVs) have been shown to contribute to reproductive disease susceptibility, we aimed to describe genome-wide profile of CNVs...

  14. Genomic and expression analysis of multiple Sry loci from a single Rattus norvegicus Y chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Joel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sry is a gene known to be essential for testis determination but is also transcribed in adult male tissues. The laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus, has multiple Y chromosome copies of Sry while most mammals have only a single copy. DNA sequence comparisons with other rodents with multiple Sry copies are inconsistent in divergence patterns and functionality of the multiple copies. To address hypotheses of divergence, gene conversion and functional constraints, we sequenced Sry loci from a single R. norvegicus Y chromosome from the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat strain (SHR and analyzed DNA sequences for homology among copies. Next, to determine whether all copies of Sry are expressed, we developed a modification of the fluorescent marked capillary electrophoresis method to generate three different sized amplification products to identify Sry copies. We applied this fragment analysis method to both genomic DNA and cDNA prepared from mRNA from testis and adrenal gland of adult male rats. Results Y chromosome fragments were amplified and sequenced using primers that included the entire Sry coding region and flanking sequences. The analysis of these sequences identified six Sry loci on the Y chromosome. These are paralogous copies consistent with a single phylogeny and the divergence between any two copies is less than 2%. All copies have a conserved reading frame and amino acid sequence consistent with function. Fragment analysis of genomic DNA showed close approximations of experimental with predicted values, validating the use of this method to identify proportions of each copy. Using the fragment analysis procedure with cDNA samples showed the Sry copies expressed were significantly different from the genomic distribution (testis p Sry transcript expression, analyzed by real-time PCR, showed significantly higher levels of Sry in testis than adrenal gland (p, 0.001. Conclusion The SHR Y chromosome contains at least 6 full length

  15. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorbar, John

    2013-10-01

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1^E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein's flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1^E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1^E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1^E4, these kinases regulate one of

  16. RNA structural constraints in the evolution of the influenza A virus genome NP segment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.P. Gultyaev (Alexander); A. Tsyganov-Bodounov (Anton); M.I. Spronken (Monique); S. Van Der Kooij (Sander); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); R.C.L. Olsthoorn (René)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractConserved RNA secondary structures were predicted in the nucleoprotein (NP) segment of the influenza A virus genome using comparative sequence and structure analysis. A number of structural elements exhibiting nucleotide covariations were identified over the whole segment length, includi

  17. High-Resolution Genomic and Expression Profiling Reveals 105 Putative Amplification Target Genes in Pancreatic Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eija H. Mahlamaki

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH studies have provided a wealth of information on common copy number aberrations in pancreatic cancer, but the genes affected by these aberrations are largely unknown. To identify putative amplification target genes in pancreatic cancer, we performed a parallel copy number and expression survey in 13 pancreatic cancer cell lines using a 12,232-clone cDNA microarray, providing an average resolution of 300 kb throughout the human genome. CGH on cDNA microarray allowed highly accurate mapping of copy number increases and resulted in identification of 24 independent amplicons, ranging in size from 130 kb to 11 Mb. Statistical evaluation of gene copy number and expression data across all 13 cell lines revealed a set of 105 genes whose elevated expression levels were directly attributable to increased copy number. These included genes previously reported to be amplified in cancer as well as several novel targets for copy number alterations, such as p21-activated kinase 4 (PAK4, which was previously shown to be involved in cell migration, cell adhesion, and anchorage-independent growth. In conclusion, our results implicate a set of 105 genes that is likely to be actively involved in the development and progression of pancreatic cancer.

  18. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Expression Profiling of ADF Family Genes in Solanum lycopersicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadiza Khatun

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF proteins have growth, development, defense-related and growth regulatory functions in plants. The present study used genome-wide analysis to investigate ADF family genes in tomato. Eleven tomato ADF genes were identified and differential expression patterns were found in different organs. SlADF6 was preferentially expressed in roots, suggesting its function in root development. SlADF1, SlADF3 and SlADF10 were predominately expressed in the flowers compared to the other organs and specifically in the stamen compared to other flower parts, indicating their potential roles in pollen development. The comparatively higher expression of SlADF3 and SlADF11 at early fruit developmental stages might implicate them in determining final fruit size. SlADF5 and SlADF8 had relatively higher levels of expression five days after the breaker stage of fruit development, suggesting their possible role in fruit ripening. Notably, six genes were induced by cold and heat, seven by drought, five by NaCl, and four each by abscisic acid (ABA, jasmonic acid (JA and wounding treatments. The differential expression patterns of the SlADF genes under different types of stresses suggested their function in stress tolerance in tomato plants. Our results will be helpful for the functional characterization of ADF genes during organ and fruit development of tomato under different stresses.

  19. Genome-wide expression patterns of calcium-dependent protein kinases in Toxoplasma gondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-Lei; Huang, Si-Yang; Zhang, Nian-Zhang; Chen, Jia; Zhu, Xing-Quan

    2015-06-04

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) are found in plants and some Apicomplexan parasites but not in animals or fungi. CDPKs have been shown to play important roles in various calcium-signaling pathways such as host cell invasion, egress and protein secretion in Toxoplasma gondii. The objectives of the present study were to examine the T. gondii CDPK genes expression patterns during different development stages and stress responses. We carried out a comprehensive expression analysis of CDPK genes based on previously published microarray datasets, and we also used real time quantitative RT-PCR to study ten T. gondii CDPK genes expression patterns under acid, alkali, high temperature and low temperature conditions. Microarrays analysis indicated that some TgCDPK genes exhibited different expression levels in IFN-γ stimuli conditions or at different developmental stages, suggesting that CDPK genes may play different roles in these processes. Expression profiles under low temperature, high temperature, acid and alkaline indicated that most CDPK may be involved in regulating high temperature, acid and alkaline signaling pathways. We present a genome-wide expression analysis of CDPK genes in T. gondii for the first time, and the mRNA levels change with abiotic and biotic stresses, suggesting their functional roles in these processes. These results will provide a solid basis for future functional studies of the CDPK gene family in T. gondii.

  20. Genome-Wide Identification, Characterization and Expression Profiling of ADF Family Genes in Solanum lycopersicum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Khadiza; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Park, Jong-In; Kim, Chang Kil; Lim, Ki-Byung; Kim, Min-Bae; Lee, Do-Jin; Nou, Ill Sup; Chung, Mi-Young

    2016-09-29

    The actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) proteins have growth, development, defense-related and growth regulatory functions in plants. The present study used genome-wide analysis to investigate ADF family genes in tomato. Eleven tomato ADF genes were identified and differential expression patterns were found in different organs. SlADF6 was preferentially expressed in roots, suggesting its function in root development. SlADF1, SlADF3 and SlADF10 were predominately expressed in the flowers compared to the other organs and specifically in the stamen compared to other flower parts, indicating their potential roles in pollen development. The comparatively higher expression of SlADF3 and SlADF11 at early fruit developmental stages might implicate them in determining final fruit size. SlADF5 and SlADF8 had relatively higher levels of expression five days after the breaker stage of fruit development, suggesting their possible role in fruit ripening. Notably, six genes were induced by cold and heat, seven by drought, five by NaCl, and four each by abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA) and wounding treatments. The differential expression patterns of the SlADF genes under different types of stresses suggested their function in stress tolerance in tomato plants. Our results will be helpful for the functional characterization of ADF genes during organ and fruit development of tomato under different stresses.

  1. Use of whole genome expression analysis in the toxicity screening of nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fröhlich, Eleonore, E-mail: eleonore.froehlich@medunigraz.at [Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, Stiftingtalstr. 24, 8010 Graz (Austria); Meindl, Claudia; Wagner, Karin [Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, Stiftingtalstr. 24, 8010 Graz (Austria); Leitinger, Gerd [Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, Stiftingtalstr. 24, 8010 Graz (Austria); Institute for Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Medical University of Graz, Harrachgasse 21, 8010 Graz (Austria); Roblegg, Eva [Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Karl-Franzens-University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 1, 8010 Graz (Austria)

    2014-10-15

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) offers exciting new options in technical and medical applications provided they do not cause adverse cellular effects. Cellular effects of NPs depend on particle parameters and exposure conditions. In this study, whole genome expression arrays were employed to identify the influence of particle size, cytotoxicity, protein coating, and surface functionalization of polystyrene particles as model particles and for short carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as particles with potential interest in medical treatment. Another aim of the study was to find out whether screening by microarray would identify other or additional targets than commonly used cell-based assays for NP action. Whole genome expression analysis and assays for cell viability, interleukin secretion, oxidative stress, and apoptosis were employed. Similar to conventional assays, microarray data identified inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis as affected by NP treatment. Application of lower particle doses and presence of protein decreased the total number of regulated genes but did not markedly influence the top regulated genes. Cellular effects of CNTs were small; only carboxyl-functionalized single-walled CNTs caused appreciable regulation of genes. It can be concluded that regulated functions correlated well with results in cell-based assays. Presence of protein mitigated cytotoxicity but did not cause a different pattern of regulated processes. - Highlights: • Regulated functions were screened using whole genome expression assays. • Polystyrene particles regulated more genes than short carbon nanotubes. • Protein coating of polystyrene particles did not change regulation pattern. • Functions regulated by microarray were confirmed by cell-based assay.

  2. Genome-wide selection of superior reference genes for expression studies in Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhichao; Xu, Jiang; Ji, Aijia; Zhu, Yingjie; Zhang, Xin; Hu, Yuanlei; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2015-12-15

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is widely used for the accurate analysis of gene expression. However, high homology among gene families might result in unsuitability of reference genes, which leads to the inaccuracy of qRT-PCR analysis. The release of the Ganoderma lucidum genome has triggered numerous studies to be done on the homology among gene families with the purpose of selecting reliable reference genes. Based on the G. lucdum genome and transcriptome database, 38 candidate reference genes including 28 novel genes were systematically selected and evaluated for qRT-PCR normalization. The result indicated that commonly used polyubiquitin (PUB), beta-actin (BAT), and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were unsuitable reference genes because of the high sequence similarity and low primer specificity. According to the evaluation of RefFinder, cyclophilin 5 (CYP5) was ranked as the most stable reference gene for 27 tested samples under all experimental conditions and eighteen mycelial samples. Based on sequence analysis and expression analysis, our study suggested that gene characteristic, primer specificity of high homologous genes, allele-specificity expression of candidate genes and under-evaluation of reference genes influenced the accuracy and sensitivity of qRT-PCR analysis. This investigation not only revealed potential factors influencing the unsuitability of reference genes but also selected the superior reference genes from more candidate genes and testing samples than those used in the previous study. Furthermore, our study established a model for reference gene analysis by using the genomic sequence.

  3. Genome-wide age-related changes in DNA methylation and gene expression in human PBMCs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steegenga, Wilma T; Boekschoten, Mark V; Lute, Carolien; Hooiveld, Guido J; de Groot, Philip J; Morris, Tiffany J; Teschendorff, Andrew E; Butcher, Lee M; Beck, Stephan; Müller, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Aging is a progressive process that results in the accumulation of intra- and extracellular alterations that in turn contribute to a reduction in health. Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been reported before and may be responsible for aging-induced changes in gene expression, although a causal relationship has yet to be shown. Using genome-wide assays, we analyzed age-induced changes in DNA methylation and their effect on gene expression with and without transient induction with the synthetic transcription modulating agent WY14,643. To demonstrate feasibility of the approach, we isolated peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMCs) from five young and five old healthy male volunteers and cultured them with or without WY14,643. Infinium 450K BeadChip and Affymetrix Human Gene 1.1 ST expression array analysis revealed significant differential methylation of at least 5 % (ΔYO > 5 %) at 10,625 CpG sites between young and old subjects, but only a subset of the associated genes were also differentially expressed. Age-related differential methylation of previously reported epigenetic biomarkers of aging including ELOVL2, FHL2, PENK, and KLF14 was confirmed in our study, but these genes did not display an age-related change in gene expression in PBMCs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that differentially methylated genes that lack an age-related expression change predominantly represent genes involved in carcinogenesis and developmental processes, and expression of most of these genes were silenced in PBMCs. No changes in DNA methylation were found in genes displaying transiently induced changes in gene expression. In conclusion, aging-induced differential methylation often targets developmental genes and occurs mostly without change in gene expression.

  4. Using Genome-Referenced Expressed Sequence Tag Assembly to Analyze the Origin and Expression Patterns of Gossypium hirsutum Transcripts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Jin; Qin Li; Guanghui Xiao; Yu-Xian Zhu

    2013-01-01

    We assembled a total of 297,239 Gossypium hirsutum (Gh,a tetraploid cotton,AADD) expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences that were available in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database,with reference to the recently published G.raimondii (Gr,a diploid cotton,DD) genome,and obtained 49,125 UniGenes.The average lengths of the UniGenes were increased from 804 and 791 bp in two previous EST assemblies to 1,019 bp in the current analysis.The number of putative cotton UniGenes with lengths of 3 kb or more increased from 25 or 34 to 1,223.As a result,thousands of originally independent G.hirsutum ESTs were aligned to produce large contigs encoding transcripts with very long open reading frames,indicating that the G.raimondii genome sequence provided remarkable advantages to assemble the tetraploid cotton transcriptome.Significant different distribution patterns within several GO terms,including transcription factor activity,were observed between D-and A-derived assemblies.Transcriptome analysis showed that,in a tetraploid cotton cell,29,547 UniGenes were possibly derived from the D subgenome while another 19,578 may come from the A subgenome.Finally,some of the in silico data were confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments to show the changes in transcript levels for several gene families known to play key role in cotton fiber development.We believe that our work provides a useful platform for functional and evolutionary genomic studies in cotton.

  5. Functional Associations by Response Overlap (FARO), a functional genomics approach matching gene expression phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Mundy, J.; Willenbrock, Hanni

    2007-01-01

    The systematic comparison of transcriptional responses of organisms is a powerful tool in functional genomics. For example, mutants may be characterized by comparing their transcript profiles to those obtained in other experiments querying the effects on gene expression of many experimental factors...... including treatments, mutations and pathogen infections. Similarly, drugs may be discovered by the relationship between the transcript profiles effectuated or impacted by a candidate drug and by the target disease. The integration of such data enables systems biology to predict the interplay between...

  6. RNA 3D modules in genome-wide predictions of RNA 2D structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theis, Corinna; Zirbel, Craig L; Zu Siederdissen, Christian Höner

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational progress has revealed a large potential for RNA structure in the genome. This has been driven by computational strategies that exploit multiple genomes of related organisms to identify common sequences and secondary structures. However, these computational...... approaches have two main challenges: they are computationally expensive and they have a relatively high false discovery rate (FDR). Simultaneously, RNA 3D structure analysis has revealed modules composed of non-canonical base pairs which occur in non-homologous positions, apparently by independent evolution....... These modules can, for example, occur inside structural elements which in RNA 2D predictions appear as internal loops. Hence one question is if the use of such RNA 3D information can improve the prediction accuracy of RNA secondary structure at a genome-wide level. Here, we use RNAz in combination with 3D...

  7. CRISPR-based genome editing and expression control systems in Clostridium acetobutylicum and Clostridium beijerinckii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qi; Chen, Jun; Minton, Nigel P; Zhang, Ying; Wen, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jinle; Yang, Haifeng; Zeng, Zhe; Ren, Xiaodan; Yang, Junjie; Gu, Yang; Jiang, Weihong; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Solventogenic clostridia are important industrial microorganisms that produce various chemicals and fuels. Effective genetic tools would facilitate physiological studies aimed both at improving our understanding of metabolism and optimizing solvent productivity through metabolic engineering. Here we have developed an all-in-one, CRISPR-based genome editing plasmid, pNICKclos, that can be used to achieve successive rounds of gene editing in Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 and Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 with efficiencies varying from 6.7% to 100% and 18.8% to 100%, respectively. The plasmid specifies the requisite target-specific guide RNA, the gene encoding the Streptococcus pyogenes Cas9 nickase and the genome editing template encompassing the gene-specific homology arms. It can be used to create single target mutants within three days, with a further two days required for the curing of the pNICKclos plasmid ready for a second round of mutagenesis. A S. pyogenes dCas9-mediated gene regulation control system, pdCASclos, was also developed and used in a CRISPRi strategy to successfully repress the expression of spo0A in C. acetobutylicum and C. beijerinckii. The combined application of the established high efficiency CRISPR-Cas9 based genome editing and regulation control systems will greatly accelerate future progress in the understanding and manipulation of metabolism in solventogenic clostridia. Copyright © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. The cloning, genomic organization and tissue expression profile of the human DLG5 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibbs Richard A

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Familial atrial fibrillation, an autosomal dominant disease, was previously mapped to chromosome 10q22. One of the genes mapped to the 10q22 region is DLG5, a member of the MAGUKs (Membrane Associated Gyanylate Kinase family which mediates intracellular signaling. Only a partial cDNA was available for DLG5. To exclude potential disease inducing mutations, it was necessary to obtain a complete cDNA and genomic sequence of the gene. Methods The Northern Blot analysis performed using 3' UTR of this gene indicated the transcript size to be about 7.2 KB. Using race technique and library screening the entire cDNA was cloned. This gene was evaluated by sequencing the coding region and splice functions in normal and affected family members with familial atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, haploid cell lines from affected patients were generated and analyzed for deletions that may have been missed by PCR. Results We identified two distinct alternately spliced transcripts of this gene. The genomic sequence of the DLG5 gene spanned 79 KB with 32 exons and was shown to have ubiquitous human tissue expression including placenta, heart, skeletal muscle, liver and pancreas. Conclusions The entire cDNA of DLG5 was identified, sequenced and its genomic organization determined.

  9. The MI bundle: enabling network and structural biology in genome visualization tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céol, Arnaud; Müller, Heiko

    2015-11-15

    Prioritization of candidate genes emanating from large-scale screens requires integrated analyses at the genomics, molecular, network and structural biology levels. We have extended the Integrated Genome Browser (IGB) to facilitate these tasks. The graphical user interface greatly simplifies building disease networks and zooming in at atomic resolution to identify variations in molecular complexes that may affect molecular interactions in the context of genomic data. All results are summarized in genome tracks and can be visualized and analyzed at the transcript level. The MI Bundle is a plugin for the IGB. The plugin, help, video and tutorial are available at http://cru.genomics.iit.it/igbmibundle/ and https://github.com/CRUiit/igb-mi-bundle/wiki. The source code is released under the Apache License, Version 2. arnaud.ceol@iit.it Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Genome sequence, comparative analysis and haplotype structure of the domestic dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Wade, Claire M; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S; Karlsson, Elinor K; Jaffe, David B; Kamal, Michael; Clamp, Michele; Chang, Jean L; Kulbokas, Edward J; Zody, Michael C; Mauceli, Evan; Xie, Xiaohui; Breen, Matthew; Wayne, Robert K; Ostrander, Elaine A; Ponting, Chris P; Galibert, Francis; Smith, Douglas R; DeJong, Pieter J; Kirkness, Ewen; Alvarez, Pablo; Biagi, Tara; Brockman, William; Butler, Jonathan; Chin, Chee-Wye; Cook, April; Cuff, James; Daly, Mark J; DeCaprio, David; Gnerre, Sante; Grabherr, Manfred; Kellis, Manolis; Kleber, Michael; Bardeleben, Carolyne; Goodstadt, Leo; Heger, Andreas; Hitte, Christophe; Kim, Lisa; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Parker, Heidi G; Pollinger, John P; Searle, Stephen M J; Sutter, Nathan B; Thomas, Rachael; Webber, Caleb; Baldwin, Jennifer; Abebe, Adal; Abouelleil, Amr; Aftuck, Lynne; Ait-Zahra, Mostafa; Aldredge, Tyler; Allen, Nicole; An, Peter; Anderson, Scott; Antoine, Claudel; Arachchi, Harindra; Aslam, Ali; Ayotte, Laura; Bachantsang, Pasang; Barry, Andrew; Bayul, Tashi; Benamara, Mostafa; Berlin, Aaron; Bessette, Daniel; Blitshteyn, Berta; Bloom, Toby; Blye, Jason; Boguslavskiy, Leonid; Bonnet, Claude; Boukhgalter, Boris; Brown, Adam; Cahill, Patrick; Calixte, Nadia; Camarata, Jody; Cheshatsang, Yama; Chu, Jeffrey; Citroen, Mieke; Collymore, Alville; Cooke, Patrick; Dawoe, Tenzin; Daza, Riza; Decktor, Karin; DeGray, Stuart; Dhargay, Norbu; Dooley, Kimberly; Dooley, Kathleen; Dorje, Passang; Dorjee, Kunsang; Dorris, Lester; Duffey, Noah; Dupes, Alan; Egbiremolen, Osebhajajeme; Elong, Richard; Falk, Jill; Farina, Abderrahim; Faro, Susan; Ferguson, Diallo; Ferreira, Patricia; Fisher, Sheila; FitzGerald, Mike; Foley, Karen; Foley, Chelsea; Franke, Alicia; Friedrich, Dennis; Gage, Diane; Garber, Manuel; Gearin, Gary; Giannoukos, Georgia; Goode, Tina; Goyette, Audra; Graham, Joseph; Grandbois, Edward; Gyaltsen, Kunsang; Hafez, Nabil; Hagopian, Daniel; Hagos, Birhane; Hall, Jennifer; Healy, Claire; Hegarty, Ryan; Honan, Tracey; Horn, Andrea; Houde, Nathan; Hughes, Leanne; Hunnicutt, Leigh; Husby, M; Jester, Benjamin; Jones, Charlien; Kamat, Asha; Kanga, Ben; Kells, Cristyn; Khazanovich, Dmitry; Kieu, Alix Chinh; Kisner, Peter; Kumar, Mayank; Lance, Krista; Landers, Thomas; Lara, Marcia; Lee, William; Leger, Jean-Pierre; Lennon, Niall; Leuper, Lisa; LeVine, Sarah; Liu, Jinlei; Liu, Xiaohong; Lokyitsang, Yeshi; Lokyitsang, Tashi; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, Jan; Major, John; Marabella, Richard; Maru, Kebede; Matthews, Charles; McDonough, Susan; Mehta, Teena; Meldrim, James; Melnikov, Alexandre; Meneus, Louis; Mihalev, Atanas; Mihova, Tanya; Miller, Karen; Mittelman, Rachel; Mlenga, Valentine; Mulrain, Leonidas; Munson, Glen; Navidi, Adam; Naylor, Jerome; Nguyen, Tuyen; Nguyen, Nga; Nguyen, Cindy; Nguyen, Thu; Nicol, Robert; Norbu, Nyima; Norbu, Choe; Novod, Nathaniel; Nyima, Tenchoe; Olandt, Peter; O'Neill, Barry; O'Neill, Keith; Osman, Sahal; Oyono, Lucien; Patti, Christopher; Perrin, Danielle; Phunkhang, Pema; Pierre, Fritz; Priest, Margaret; Rachupka, Anthony; Raghuraman, Sujaa; Rameau, Rayale; Ray, Verneda; Raymond, Christina; Rege, Filip; Rise, Cecil; Rogers, Julie; Rogov, Peter; Sahalie, Julie; Settipalli, Sampath; Sharpe, Theodore; Shea, Terrance; Sheehan, Mechele; Sherpa, Ngawang; Shi, Jianying; Shih, Diana; Sloan, Jessie; Smith, Cherylyn; Sparrow, Todd; Stalker, John; Stange-Thomann, Nicole; Stavropoulos, Sharon; Stone, Catherine; Stone, Sabrina; Sykes, Sean; Tchuinga, Pierre; Tenzing, Pema; Tesfaye, Senait; Thoulutsang, Dawa; Thoulutsang, Yama; Topham, Kerri; Topping, Ira; Tsamla, Tsamla; Vassiliev, Helen; Venkataraman, Vijay; Vo, Andy; Wangchuk, Tsering; Wangdi, Tsering; Weiand, Michael; Wilkinson, Jane; Wilson, Adam; Yadav, Shailendra; Yang, Shuli; Yang, Xiaoping; Young, Geneva; Yu, Qing; Zainoun, Joanne; Zembek, Lisa; Zimmer, Andrew; Lander, Eric S

    2005-12-08

    Here we report a high-quality draft genome sequence of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris), together with a dense map of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across breeds. The dog is of particular interest because it provides important evolutionary information and because existing breeds show great phenotypic diversity for morphological, physiological and behavioural traits. We use sequence comparison with the primate and rodent lineages to shed light on the structure and evolution of genomes and genes. Notably, the majority of the most highly conserved non-coding sequences in mammalian genomes are clustered near a small subset of genes with important roles in development. Analysis of SNPs reveals long-range haplotypes across the entire dog genome, and defines the nature of genetic diversity within and across breeds. The current SNP map now makes it possible for genome-wide association studies to identify genes responsible for diseases and traits, with important consequences for human and companion animal health.

  11. A New Chicken Genome Assembly Provides Insight into Avian Genome Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley C. Warren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of the Gallus gallus (chicken as a model organism and agricultural animal merits a continuation of sequence assembly improvement efforts. We present a new version of the chicken genome assembly (Gallus_gallus-5.0; GCA_000002315.3, built from combined long single molecule sequencing technology, finished BACs, and improved physical maps. In overall assembled bases, we see a gain of 183 Mb, including 16.4 Mb in placed chromosomes with a corresponding gain in the percentage of intact repeat elements characterized. Of the 1.21 Gb genome, we include three previously missing autosomes, GGA30, 31, and 33, and improve sequence contig length 10-fold over the previous Gallus_gallus-4.0. Despite the significant base representation improvements made, 138 Mb of sequence is not yet located to chromosomes. When annotated for gene content, Gallus_gallus-5.0 shows an increase of 4679 annotated genes (2768 noncoding and 1911 protein-coding over those in Gallus_gallus-4.0. We also revisited the question of what genes are missing in the avian lineage, as assessed by the highest quality avian genome assembly to date, and found that a large fraction of the original set of missing genes are still absent in sequenced bird species. Finally, our new data support a detailed map of MHC-B, encompassing two segments: one with a highly stable gene copy number and another in which the gene copy number is highly variable. The chicken model has been a critical resource for many other fields of study, and this new reference assembly will substantially further these efforts.

  12. Practical aspects in expression and purification of membrane proteins for structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinothkumar, Kutti R; Edwards, Patricia C; Standfuss, Joerg

    2013-01-01

    A surge of membrane protein structures in the last few years can be attributed to advances in technologies starting at the level of genomes, to highly efficient expression systems, stabilizing conformational flexibility, automation of crystallization and data collection for screening large numbers of crystals and the microfocus beam lines at synchrotrons. The substantial medical importance of many membrane proteins provides a strong incentive to understand them at the molecular level. It is becoming obvious that the major bottleneck in many of the membrane projects is obtaining sufficient amount of stable functional proteins in a detergent micelle for structural studies. Naturally, large effort has been spent on optimizing and advancing multiple expression systems and purification strategies that have started to yield sufficient protein and structures. We describe in this chapter protocols to refold membrane proteins from inclusion bodies, purification from inner membranes of Escherichia coli and from mammalian cell lines.

  13. Whole Genome Expression Profiling and Signal Pathway Screening of MSCs in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuxi Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of dysfunctional immunoregulation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in ankylosing spondylitis (AS is thought to be a complex process that involves multiple genetic alterations. In this study, MSCs derived from both healthy donors and AS patients were cultured in normal media or media mimicking an inflammatory environment. Whole genome expression profiling analysis of 33,351 genes was performed and differentially expressed genes related to AS were analyzed by GO term analysis and KEGG pathway analysis. Our results showed that in normal media 676 genes were differentially expressed in AS, 354 upregulated and 322 downregulated, while in an inflammatory environment 1767 genes were differentially expressed in AS, 1230 upregulated and 537 downregulated. GO analysis showed that these genes were mainly related to cellular processes, physiological processes, biological regulation, regulation of biological processes, and binding. In addition, by KEGG pathway analysis, 14 key genes from the MAPK signaling and 8 key genes from the TLR signaling pathway were identified as differentially regulated. The results of qRT-PCR verified the expression variation of the 9 genes mentioned above. Our study found that in an inflammatory environment ankylosing spondylitis pathogenesis may be related to activation of the MAPK and TLR signaling pathways.

  14. Kynurenine signaling increases DNA polymerase kappa expression and promotes genomic instability in glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostian, April C.L.; Maddukuri, Leena; Reed, Megan R.; Savenka, Tatsiana; Hartman, Jessica H.; Davis, Lauren; Pouncey, Dakota L.; Miller, Grover P.; Eoff, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Over-expression of the translesion synthesis polymerase (TLS pol) hpol κ in glioblastomas has been linked to a poor patient prognosis; however, the mechanism promoting higher expression in these tumors remains unknown. We determined that activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) pathway in glioblastoma cells leads to increased hpol κ mRNA and protein levels. We blocked nuclear translocation and DNA binding by the AhR in glioblastoma cells using a small-molecule and observed decreased hpol κ expression. Pharmacological inhibition of tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), the enzyme largely responsible for activating the AhR in glioblastomas, led to a decrease in the endogenous AhR agonist kynurenine (Kyn) and a corresponding decrease in hpol κ protein levels. Importantly, we discovered that inhibiting TDO activity, AhR signaling, or suppressing hpol κ expression with RNA interference led to decreased chromosomal damage in glioblastoma cells. Epistasis assays further supported the idea that TDO activity, activation of AhR signaling and the resulting over-expression of hpol κ function primarily in the same pathway to increase endogenous DNA damage. These findings indicate that up-regulation of hpol κ through glioblastoma-specific TDO activity and activation of AhR signaling likely contributes to the high levels of replication stress and genomic instability observed in these tumors. PMID:26651356

  15. A genome-wide screen indicates correlation between differentiation and expression of metabolism related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Priti; Kumar, Brijesh; Shende, Akhilesh; Singh, Anupama; Meena, Anil; Ghosal, Ritika; Ranganathan, Madhav; Bandyopadhyay, Amitabha

    2013-01-01

    Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus) embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation.

  16. A genome-wide screen indicates correlation between differentiation and expression of metabolism related genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priti Roy

    Full Text Available Differentiated tissues may be considered as materials with distinct properties. The differentiation program of a given tissue ensures that it acquires material properties commensurate with its function. It may be hypothesized that some of these properties are acquired through production of tissue-specific metabolites synthesized by metabolic enzymes. To establish correlation between metabolism and organogenesis we have carried out a genome-wide expression study of metabolism related genes by RNA in-situ hybridization. 23% of the metabolism related genes studied are expressed in a tissue-restricted but not tissue-exclusive manner. We have conducted the screen on whole mount chicken (Gallus gallus embryos from four distinct developmental stages to correlate dynamic changes in expression patterns of metabolic enzymes with spatio-temporally unique developmental events. Our data strongly suggests that unique combinations of metabolism related genes, and not specific metabolic pathways, are upregulated during differentiation. Further, expression of metabolism related genes in well established signaling centers that regulate different aspects of morphogenesis indicates developmental roles of some of the metabolism related genes. The database of tissue-restricted expression patterns of metabolism related genes, generated in this study, should serve as a resource for systematic identification of these genes with tissue-specific functions during development. Finally, comprehensive understanding of differentiation is not possible unless the downstream genes of a differentiation cascade are identified. We propose, metabolic enzymes constitute a significant portion of these downstream target genes. Thus our study should help elucidate different aspects of tissue differentiation.

  17. Genome-wide differential gene expression in children exposed to air pollution in the Czech Republic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Leeuwen, D M; van Herwijnen, M H M; Pedersen, Marie

    2006-01-01

    The Teplice area in the Czech Republic is a mining district where elevated levels of air pollution including airborne carcinogens, have been demonstrated, especially during winter time. This environmental exposure can impact human health; in particular children may be more vulnerable. To study....... This suggests an effect of air pollution on the primary structural unit of the condensed DNA. In addition, several other pathways were modulated. Based on the results of this study, we suggest that transcriptomic analysis represents a promising biomarker for environmental carcinogenesis....... the impact of air pollution in children at the transcriptional level, peripheral blood cells were subjected to whole genome response analysis, in order to identify significantly modulated biological pathways and processes as a result of exposure. Using genome-wide oligonucleotide microarrays, we investigated...

  18. Computational biology of genome expression and regulation--a review of microarray bioinformatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junbai

    2008-01-01

    Microarray technology is being used widely in various biomedical research areas; the corresponding microarray data analysis is an essential step toward the best utilizing of array technologies. Here we review two components of the microarray data analysis: a low level of microarray data analysis that emphasizes the designing, the quality control, and the preprocessing of microarray experiments, then a high level of microarray data analysis that focuses on the domain-specific microarray applications such as tumor classification, biomarker prediction, analyzing array CGH experiments, and reverse engineering of gene expression networks. Additionally, we will review the recent development of building a predictive model in genome expression and regulation studies. This review may help biologists grasp a basic knowledge of microarray bioinformatics as well as its potential impact on the future evolvement of biomedical research fields.

  19. Genome-wide identification of expression quantitative trait loci for human telomerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanseol; Ryu, Jihye; Lee, Chaeyoung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A genome-wide association study was conducted to identify expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) for human telomerase. We tested the genetic associations of nucleotide variants with expression of the genes encoding human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) and telomerase RNA components (TERC) in lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from 373 Europeans. Our results revealed 6 eQTLs associated with hTERT (P planar cell polarity protein 2 (PRICKLE2) gene important for the Wnt signaling pathway. This concurs with previous studies in which significant expressional relationships between hTERT and some genes (β-catenin and Wnt-3a) in the Wnt signaling pathway have been observed. This study suggested 6 novel eQTLs for hTERT and the association of hTERT with the Wnt signaling pathway. Further studies are needed to understand their underlying mechanisms to improve our understanding of the role of hTERT in cancer. PMID:27759658

  20. In silico method for modelling metabolism and gene product expression at genome scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerman, Joshua A.; Hyduke, Daniel R.; Latif, Haythem; Portnoy, Vasiliy A.; Lewis, Nathan E.; Orth, Jeffrey D.; Rutledge, Alexandra C.; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Zengler, Karsten; Palsson, Bernard O.

    2012-07-03

    Transcription and translation use raw materials and energy generated metabolically to create the macromolecular machinery responsible for all cellular functions, including metabolism. A biochemically accurate model of molecular biology and metabolism will facilitate comprehensive and quantitative computations of an organism's molecular constitution as a function of genetic and environmental parameters. Here we formulate a model of metabolism and macromolecular expression. Prototyping it using the simple microorganism Thermotoga maritima, we show our model accurately simulates variations in cellular composition and gene expression. Moreover, through in silico comparative transcriptomics, the model allows the discovery of new regulons and improving the genome and transcription unit annotations. Our method presents a framework for investigating molecular biology and cellular physiology in silico and may allow quantitative interpretation of multi-omics data sets in the context of an integrated biochemical description of an organism.

  1. Robust Yet Fragile: Expression Noise, Protein Misfolding, and Gene Dosage in the Evolution of Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, J Chris; Conant, Gavin C

    2016-11-23

    The complex manner in which organisms respond to changes in their gene dosage has long fascinated geneticists. Oddly, although the existence of dominance implies that dosage reductions often have mild phenotypes, extra copies of whole chromosomes (aneuploidy) are generally strongly deleterious. Even more paradoxically, an extra copy of the genome is better tolerated than is aneuploidy. We review the resolution of this paradox, highlighting the roles of biochemistry, protein aggregation, and disruption of cellular microstructure in that explanation. Returning to life's curious combination of robustness and sensitivity to dosage changes, we argue that understanding how biological robustness evolved makes these observations less inexplicable. We propose that noise in gene expression and evolutionary strategies for its suppression play a role in generating dosage phenotypes. Finally, we outline an unappreciated mechanism for the preservation of duplicate genes, namely preservation to limit expression noise, arguing that it is particularly relevant in polyploid organisms.

  2. Genome expression profile analysis of the maize sheath in response to inoculation to R. solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jian; Chen, Zhe; Luo, Mao; Peng, Hua; Lin, Haijian; Qin, Cheng; Yuan, Guangsheng; Shen, Yaou; Ding, Haiping; Zhao, Maojun; Pan, Guangtang; Zhang, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    Currently, the molecular regulation mechanisms of disease-resistant involved in maize leaf sheaths infected by banded leaf and sheath blight (BLSB) are poorly known. To gain insight into the transcriptome dynamics that are associated with their disease-resistant, genome-wide gene expression profiling was conducted by Solexa sequencing. More than four million tags were generated from sheath tissues without any leaf or development leaf, including 193,222 and 204,824 clean tags in the two libraries, respectively. Of these, 82,864 (55.4 %) and 91,678 (51.5 %) tags were matched to the reference genes. The most differentially expressed tags with log2 ratio >2 or maize sheath infected by BLSB and provide a comprehensive set of data that are essential for understanding its molecular regulation mechanism.

  3. Associations between inverted repeats and the structural evolution of bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achaz, Guillaume; Coissac, Eric; Netter, Pierre; Rocha, Eduardo P C

    2003-08-01

    The stability of the structure of bacterial genomes is challenged by recombination events. Since major rearrangements (i.e., inversions) are thought to frequently operate by homologous recombination between inverted repeats, we analyzed the presence and distribution of such repeats in bacterial genomes and their relation to the conservation of chromosomal structure. First, we show that there is a strong under-representation of inverted repeats, relative to direct repeats, in most chromosomes, especially among the ones regarded as most stable. Second, we show that the avoidance of repeats is frequently associated with the stability of the genomes. Closely related genomes reported to differ in terms of stability are also found to differ in the number of inverted repeats. Third, when using replication strand bias as a proxy for genome stability, we find a significant negative correlation between this strand bias and the abundance of inverted repeats. Fourth, when measuring the recombining potential of inverted repeats and their eventual impact on different features of the chromosomal structure, we observe a tendency of repeats to be located in the chromosome in such a way that rearrangements produce a smaller strand switch and smaller asymmetries than expected by chance. Finally, we discuss the limitations of our analysis and the influence of factors such as the nature of repeats, e.g., transposases, or the differences in the recombination machinery among bacteria. These results shed light on the challenges imposed on the genome structure by the presence of inverted repeats.

  4. Distributed probing of chromatin structure in vivo reveals pervasive chromatin accessibility for expressed and non-expressed genes during tissue differentiation in C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha Ky

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tissue differentiation is accompanied by genome-wide changes in the underlying chromatin structure and dynamics, or epigenome. By controlling when, where, and what regulatory factors have access to the underlying genomic DNA, the epigenome influences the cell's transcriptome and ultimately its function. Existing genomic methods for analyzing cell-type-specific changes in chromatin generally involve two elements: (i a source for purified cells (or nuclei of distinct types, and (ii a specific treatment that partitions or degrades chromatin by activity or structural features. For many cell types of great interest, such assays are limited by our inability to isolate the relevant cell populations in an organism or complex tissue containing an intertwined mixture of other cells. This limitation has confined available knowledge of chromatin dynamics to a narrow range of biological systems (cell types that can be sorted/separated/dissected in large numbers and tissue culture models or to amalgamations of diverse cell types (tissue chunks, whole organisms. Results Transgene-driven expression of DNA/chromatin modifying enzymes provides one opportunity to query chromatin structures in expression-defined cell subsets. In this work we combine in vivo expression of a bacterial DNA adenine methyltransferase (DAM with high throughput sequencing to sample tissue-specific chromatin accessibility on a genome-wide scale. We have applied the method (DALEC: Direct Asymmetric Ligation End Capture towards mapping a cell-type-specific view of genome accessibility as a function of differentiated state. Taking advantage of C. elegans strains expressing the DAM enzyme in diverse tissues (body wall muscle, gut, and hypodermis, our efforts yield a genome-wide dataset measuring chromatin accessibility at each of 538,000 DAM target sites in the C. elegans (diploid genome. Conclusions Validating the DALEC mapping results, we observe a strong association

  5. Whole-genome gene expression profiling of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig April

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have developed a gene expression assay (Whole-Genome DASL, capable of generating whole-genome gene expression profiles from degraded samples such as formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE specimens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrated a similar level of sensitivity in gene detection between matched fresh-frozen (FF and FFPE samples, with the number and overlap of probes detected in the FFPE samples being approximately 88% and 95% of that in the corresponding FF samples, respectively; 74% of the differentially expressed probes overlapped between the FF and FFPE pairs. The WG-DASL assay is also able to detect 1.3-1.5 and 1.5-2 -fold changes in intact and FFPE samples, respectively. The dynamic range for the assay is approximately 3 logs. Comparing the WG-DASL assay with an in vitro transcription-based labeling method yielded fold-change correlations of R(2 approximately 0.83, while fold-change comparisons with quantitative RT-PCR assays yielded R(2 approximately 0.86 and R(2 approximately 0.55 for intact and FFPE samples, respectively. Additionally, the WG-DASL assay yielded high self-correlations (R(2>0.98 with low intact RNA inputs ranging from 1 ng to 100 ng; reproducible expression profiles were also obtained with 250 pg total RNA (R(2 approximately 0.92, with approximately 71% of the probes detected in 100 ng total RNA also detected at the 250 pg level. When FFPE samples were assayed, 1 ng total RNA yielded self-correlations of R(2 approximately 0.80, while still maintaining a correlation of R(2 approximately 0.75 with standard FFPE inputs (200 ng. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results show that WG-DASL assay provides a reliable platform for genome-wide expression profiling in archived materials. It also possesses utility within clinical settings where only limited quantities of samples may be available (e.g. microdissected material or when minimally invasive procedures are performed (e

  6. The structure of a rigorously conserved RNA element within the SARS virus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Robertson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We have solved the three-dimensional crystal structure of the stem-loop II motif (s2m RNA element of the SARS virus genome to 2.7-A resolution. SARS and related coronaviruses and astroviruses all possess a motif at the 3' end of their RNA genomes, called the s2m, whose pathogenic importance is inferred from its rigorous sequence conservation in an otherwise rapidly mutable RNA genome. We find that this extreme conservation is clearly explained by the requirement to form a highly structured RNA whose unique tertiary structure includes a sharp 90 degrees kink of the helix axis and several novel longer-range tertiary interactions. The tertiary base interactions create a tunnel that runs perpendicular to the main helical axis whose interior is negatively charged and binds two magnesium ions. These unusual features likely form interaction surfaces with conserved host cell components or other reactive sites required for virus function. Based on its conservation in viral pathogen genomes and its absence in the human genome, we suggest that these unusual structural features in the s2m RNA element are attractive targets for the design of anti-viral therapeutic agents. Structural genomics has sought to deduce protein function based on three-dimensional homology. Here we have extended this approach to RNA by proposing potential functions for a rigorously conserved set of RNA tertiary structural interactions that occur within the SARS RNA genome itself. Based on tertiary structural comparisons, we propose the s2m RNA binds one or more proteins possessing an oligomer-binding-like fold, and we suggest a possible mechanism for SARS viral RNA hijacking of host protein synthesis, both based upon observed s2m RNA macromolecular mimicry of a relevant ribosomal RNA fold.

  7. Genome-Wide Identification, Classification, and Expression Analysis of Amino Acid Transporter Gene Family in Glycine Max.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lin; Yuan, Hong-Yu; Ren, Ren; Zhao, Shi-Qi; Han, Ya-Peng; Zhou, Qi-Ying; Ke, Dan-Xia; Wang, Ying-Xiang; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Amino acid transporters (AATs) play important roles in transporting amino acid across cellular membranes and are essential for plant growth and development. To date, the AAT gene family in soybean (Glycine max L.) has not been characterized. In this study, we identified 189 AAT genes from the entire soybean genomic sequence, and classified them into 12 distinct subfamilies based upon their sequence composition and phylogenetic positions. To further investigate the functions of these genes, we analyzed the chromosome distributions, gene structures, duplication patterns, phylogenetic tree, tissue expression patterns of the 189 AAT genes in soybean. We found that a large number of AAT genes in soybean were expanded via gene duplication, 46 and 36 GmAAT genes were WGD/segmental and tandemly duplicated, respectively. Further comprehensive analyses of the expression profiles of GmAAT genes in various stages of vegetative and reproductive development showed that soybean AAT genes exhibited preferential or distinct expression patterns among different tissues. Overall, our study provides a framework for further analysis of the biological functions of AAT genes in either soybean or other crops.

  8. Heat shock transcription factors in banana: genome-wide characterization and expression profile analysis during development and stress response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunxie; Hu, Wei; Xia, Feiyu; Zeng, Hongqiu; Li, Xiaolin; Yan, Yu; He, Chaozu; Shi, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Banana (Musa acuminata) is one of the most popular fresh fruits. However, the rapid spread of fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc) in tropical areas severely affected banana growth and production. Thus, it is very important to identify candidate genes involved in banana response to abiotic stress and pathogen infection, as well as the molecular mechanism and possible utilization for genetic breeding. Heat stress transcription factors (Hsfs) are widely known for their common involvement in various abiotic stresses and plant-pathogen interaction. However, no MaHsf has been identified in banana, as well as its possible role. In this study, genome-wide identification and further analyses of evolution, gene structure and conserved motifs showed closer relationship of them in every subgroup. The comprehensive expression profiles of MaHsfs revealed the tissue- and developmental stage-specific or dependent, as well as abiotic and biotic stress-responsive expressions of them. The common regulation of several MaHsfs by abiotic and biotic stress indicated the possible roles of them in plant stress responses. Taken together, this study extended our understanding of MaHsf gene family and identified some candidate MaHsfs with specific expression profiles, which may be used as potential candidates for genetic breeding in banana. PMID:27857174

  9. Maintenance and expression of the S. cerevisiae mitochondrial genome--from genetics to evolution and systems biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipinski, Kamil A; Kaniak-Golik, Aneta; Golik, Pawel

    2010-01-01

    As a legacy of their endosymbiotic eubacterial origin, mitochondria possess a residual genome, encoding only a few proteins and dependent on a variety of factors encoded by the nuclear genome for its maintenance and expression. As a facultative anaerobe with well understood genetics and molecular biology, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the model system of choice for studying nucleo-mitochondrial genetic interactions. Maintenance of the mitochondrial genome is controlled by a set of nuclear-coded factors forming intricately interconnected circuits responsible for replication, recombination, repair and transmission to buds. Expression of the yeast mitochondrial genome is regulated mostly at the post-transcriptional level, and involves many general and gene-specific factors regulating splicing, RNA processing and stability and translation. A very interesting aspect of the yeast mitochondrial system is the relationship between genome maintenance and gene expression. Deletions of genes involved in many different aspects of mitochondrial gene expression, notably translation, result in an irreversible loss of functional mtDNA. The mitochondrial genetic system viewed from the systems biology perspective is therefore very fragile and lacks robustness compared to the remaining systems of the cell. This lack of robustness could be a legacy of the reductive evolution of the mitochondrial genome, but explanations involving selective advantages of increased evolvability have also been postulated. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Roles of Mutation, Selection, and Expression in Determining Relative Rates of Evolution in Mitochondrial versus Nuclear Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havird, Justin C; Sloan, Daniel B

    2016-12-01

    Eukaryotes rely on proteins encoded by the nuclear and mitochondrial (mt) genomes, which interact within multisubunit complexes such as oxidative-phosphorylation enzymes. Although selection is thought to be less efficient on the asexual mt genome, in bilaterian animals the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitutions (ω) is lower in mt- compared with nuclear-encoded OXPHOS subunits, suggesting stronger effects of purifying selection in the mt genome. Because high levels of gene expression constrain protein sequence evolution, one proposed resolution to this paradox is that mt genes are expressed more highly than nuclear genes. To test this hypothesis, we investigated expression and sequence evolution of mt and nuclear genes from 84 diverse eukaryotes that vary in mt gene content and mutation rate. We found that the relationship between mt and nuclear ω values varied dramatically across eukaryotes. In contrast, transcript abundance is consistently higher for mt genes than nuclear genes, regardless of which genes happen to be in the mt genome. Consequently, expression levels cannot be responsible for the differences in ω Rather, 84% of the variance in the ratio of ω values between mt and nuclear genes could be explained by differences in mutation rate between the two genomes. We relate these findings to the hypothesis that high rates of mt mutation select for compensatory changes in the nuclear genome. We also propose an explanation for why mt transcripts consistently outnumber their nuclear counterparts, with implications for mitonuclear protein imbalance and aging.

  11. Prediction of drug-target interactions for drug repositioning only based on genomic expression similarity.

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    Kejian Wang

    Full Text Available Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI. However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore developed to predict DTI with high throughput biological and clinical data. Here, we initiatively demonstrate that the on-target and off-target effects could be characterized by drug-induced in vitro genomic expression changes, e.g. the data in Connectivity Map (CMap. Thus, unknown ligands of a certain target can be found from the compounds showing high gene-expression similarity to the known ligands. Then to clarify the detailed practice of CMap based DTI prediction, we objectively evaluate how well each target is characterized by CMap. The results suggest that (1 some targets are better characterized than others, so the prediction models specific to these well characterized targets would be more accurate and reliable; (2 in some cases, a family of ligands for the same target tend to interact with common off-targets, which may help increase the efficiency of DTI discovery and explain the mechanisms of complicated drug actions. In the present study, CMap expression similarity is proposed as a novel indicator of drug-target interactions. The detailed strategies of improving data quality by decreasing the batch effect and building prediction models are also effectively established. We believe the success in CMap can be further translated into other public and commercial data of genomic expression, thus increasing research productivity towards valid drug repositioning and minimal side effects.

  12. Genome-wide identification, characterization and expression analysis of calmodulin-like (CML) proteins in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

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    Munir, Shoaib; Khan, Muhammad Rehman Gul; Song, Jianwen; Munir, Sadia; Zhang, Yuyang; Ye, Zhibiao; Wang, Taotao

    2016-05-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) has emerged as a significant secondary messenger that regulates the activities of hormonal and environmental signals that are associated with biotic and abiotic stresses. Ca(2+) binding proteins typically contain a Ca(2+) binding EF-hand (a helix-loop-helix structure) motif. In this study, tomato genes encoding calmodulin-like (CML) proteins that possess EF-hand motifs and no other identifiable functional domains were analyzed. Using genome analysis and BLAST searches in database, 52 CML genes were identified in tomato. Comprehensive analyses, including evolutionary relationships, gene structures, chromosomal locations, functional annotations, and gene duplications, were performed. Distribution mapping exhibited that 52 SlCML proteins containing different intron/exon patterns were unevenly distributed among ten chromosomes. In addition, 24 SlCML proteins were predicted as segmentally duplicated. Conserved motifs, promoter cis-regulatory elements, organ-based expression patterns and expression analyses indicated the potential responsiveness of SlCML proteins to abiotic stresses and phytohormones. These results illustrate the complexity of the CML gene family and indicate a potential vital role for these molecules in tomato growth and development as Ca(2+) signal transducers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. A new experimental approach for studying bacterial genomic island evolution identifies island genes with bacterial host-specific expression patterns

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    Nickerson Cheryl A

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic islands are regions of bacterial genomes that have been acquired by horizontal transfer and often contain blocks of genes that function together for specific processes. Recently, it has become clear that the impact of genomic islands on the evolution of different bacterial species is significant and represents a major force in establishing bacterial genomic variation. However, the study of genomic island evolution has been mostly performed at the sequence level using computer software or hybridization analysis to compare different bacterial genomic sequences. We describe here a novel experimental approach to study the evolution of species-specific bacterial genomic islands that identifies island genes that have evolved in such a way that they are differentially-expressed depending on the bacterial host background into which they are transferred. Results We demonstrate this approach by using a "test" genomic island that we have cloned from the Salmonella typhimurium genome (island 4305 and transferred to a range of Gram negative bacterial hosts of differing evolutionary relationships to S. typhimurium. Systematic analysis of the expression of the island genes in the different hosts compared to proper controls allowed identification of genes with genera-specific expression patterns. The data from the analysis can be arranged in a matrix to give an expression "array" of the island genes in the different bacterial backgrounds. A conserved 19-bp DNA site was found upstream of at least two of the differentially-expressed island genes. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic analysis of horizontally-transferred genomic island gene expression in a broad range of Gram negative hosts. We also present evidence in this study that the IS200 element found in island 4305 in S. typhimurium strain LT2 was inserted after the island had already been acquired by the S. typhimurium lineage and that this element is likely not

  14. Genome-wide identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs in human heart.

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    Tamara T Koopmann

    Full Text Available In recent years genome-wide association studies (GWAS have uncovered numerous chromosomal loci associated with various electrocardiographic traits and cardiac arrhythmia predisposition. A considerable fraction of these loci lie within inter-genic regions. The underlying trait-associated variants likely reside in regulatory regions and exert their effect by modulating gene expression. Hence, the key to unraveling the molecular mechanisms underlying these cardiac traits is to interrogate variants for association with differential transcript abundance by expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL analysis. In this study we conducted an eQTL analysis of human heart. For a total of 129 left ventricular samples that were collected from non-diseased human donor hearts, genome-wide transcript abundance and genotyping was determined using microarrays. Each of the 18,402 transcripts and 897,683 SNP genotypes that remained after pre-processing and stringent quality control were tested for eQTL effects. We identified 771 eQTLs, regulating 429 unique transcripts. Overlaying these eQTLs with cardiac GWAS loci identified novel candidates for studies aimed at elucidating the functional and transcriptional impact of these loci. Thus, this work provides for the first time a comprehensive eQTL map of human heart: a powerful and unique resource that enables systems genetics approaches for the study of cardiac traits.

  15. Genome-wide expression analysis of soybean MADS genes showing potential function in the seed development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Ming Fan

    Full Text Available The MADS family is an ancient and best-studied transcription factor and plays fundamental roles in almost every developmental process in plants. In the plant evolutionary history, the whole genome duplication (WGD events are important not only to the plant species evolution, but to expansion of members of the gene families. Soybean as a model legume crop has experience three rounds of WGD events. Members of some MIKC(C subfamilies, such as SOC, AGL6, SQUA, SVP, AGL17 and DEF/GLO, were expanded after soybean three rounds of WGD events. And some MIKC(C subfamilies, MIKC* and type I MADS families had experienced faster birth-and-death evolution and their traces before the Glycine WGD event were not found. Transposed duplication played important roles in tandem arrangements among the members of different subfamilies. According to the expression profiles of type I and MIKC paralog pair genes, the fates of MIKC paralog gene pairs were subfunctionalization, and the fates of type I MADS paralog gene pairs were nonfunctionalization. 137 out of 163 MADS genes were close to 186 loci within 2 Mb genomic regions associated with seed-relative QTLs, among which 115 genes expressed during the seed development. Although MIKC(C genes kept the important and conserved functions of the flower development, most MIKC(C genes showed potentially essential roles in the seed development as well as the type I MADS.

  16. The genome of tolypocladium inflatum: evolution, organization, and expression of the cyclosporin biosynthetic gene cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushley, Kathryn E; Raja, Rajani; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Cumbie, Jason S; Nonogaki, Mariko; Boyd, Alexander E; Owensby, C Alisha; Knaus, Brian J; Elser, Justin; Miller, Daniel; Di, Yanming; McPhail, Kerry L; Spatafora, Joseph W

    2013-06-01

    The ascomycete fungus Tolypocladium inflatum, a pathogen of beetle larvae, is best known as the producer of the immunosuppressant drug cyclosporin. The draft genome of T. inflatum strain NRRL 8044 (ATCC 34921), the isolate from which cyclosporin was first isolated, is presented along with comparative analyses of the biosynthesis of cyclosporin and other secondary metabolites in T. inflatum and related taxa. Phylogenomic analyses reveal previously undetected and complex patterns of homology between the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) that encodes for cyclosporin synthetase (simA) and those of other secondary metabolites with activities against insects (e.g., beauvericin, destruxins, etc.), and demonstrate the roles of module duplication and gene fusion in diversification of NRPSs. The secondary metabolite gene cluster responsible for cyclosporin biosynthesis is described. In addition to genes necessary for cyclosporin biosynthesis, it harbors a gene for a cyclophilin, which is a member of a family of immunophilins known to bind cyclosporin. Comparative analyses support a lineage specific origin of the cyclosporin gene cluster rather than horizontal gene transfer from bacteria or other fungi. RNA-Seq transcriptome analyses in a cyclosporin-inducing medium delineate the boundaries of the cyclosporin cluster and reveal high levels of expression of the gene cluster cyclophilin. In medium containing insect hemolymph, weaker but significant upregulation of several genes within the cyclosporin cluster, including the highly expressed cyclophilin gene, was observed. T. inflatum also represents the first reference draft genome of Ophiocordycipitaceae, a third family of insect pathogenic fungi within the fungal order Hypocreales, and supports parallel and qualitatively distinct radiations of insect pathogens. The T. inflatum genome provides additional insight into the evolution and biosynthesis of cyclosporin and lays a foundation for further investigations of the role

  17. Complex principal component and correlation structure of 16 yeast genomic variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, Fabian J; Latif, Nadia; Wong, Philip; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2011-09-01

    A quickly growing number of characteristics reflecting various aspects of gene function and evolution can be either measured experimentally or computed from DNA and protein sequences. The study of pairwise correlations between such quantitative genomic variables as well as collective analysis of their interrelations by multidimensional methods have delivered crucial insights into the processes of molecular evolution. Here, we present a principal component analysis (PCA) of 16 genomic variables from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the largest data set analyzed so far. Because many missing values and potential outliers hinder the direct calculation of principal components, we introduce the application of Bayesian PCA. We confirm some of the previously established correlations, such as evolutionary rate versus protein expression, and reveal new correlations such as those between translational efficiency, phosphorylation density, and protein age. Although the first principal component primarily contrasts genomic change and protein expression, the second component separates variables related to gene existence and expressed protein functions. Enrichment analysis on genes affecting variable correlations unveils classes of influential genes. For example, although ribosomal and nuclear transport genes make important contributions to the correlation between protein isoelectric point and molecular weight, protein synthesis and amino acid metabolism genes help cause the lack of significant correlation between propensity for gene loss and protein age. We present the novel Quagmire database (Quantitative Genomics Resource) which allows exploring relationships between more genomic variables in three model organisms-Escherichia coli, S. cerevisiae, and Homo sapiens (http://webclu.bio.wzw.tum.de:18080/quagmire).

  18. Three-dimensional Structure of a Viral Genome-delivery Portal Vertex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A Olia; P Prevelige Jr.; J Johnson; G Cingolani

    2011-12-31

    DNA viruses such as bacteriophages and herpesviruses deliver their genome into and out of the capsid through large proteinaceous assemblies, known as portal proteins. Here, we report two snapshots of the dodecameric portal protein of bacteriophage P22. The 3.25-{angstrom}-resolution structure of the portal-protein core bound to 12 copies of gene product 4 (gp4) reveals a {approx}1.1-MDa assembly formed by 24 proteins. Unexpectedly, a lower-resolution structure of the full-length portal protein unveils the unique topology of the C-terminal domain, which forms a {approx}200-{angstrom}-long {alpha}-helical barrel. This domain inserts deeply into the virion and is highly conserved in the Podoviridae family. We propose that the barrel domain facilitates genome spooling onto the interior surface of the capsid during genome packaging and, in analogy to a rifle barrel, increases the accuracy of genome ejection into the host cell.

  19. The Plasmodium apicoplast genome: conserved structure and close relationship of P. ovale to rodent malaria parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisue, Nobuko; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Mitsui, Hideya; Palacpac, Nirianne M Q; Kaneko, Akira; Kawai, Satoru; Hasegawa, Masami; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Horii, Toshihiro

    2012-09-01

    Apicoplast, a nonphotosynthetic plastid derived from secondary symbiotic origin, is essential for the survival of malaria parasites of the genus Plasmodium. Elucidation of the evolution of the apicoplast genome in Plasmodium species is important to better understand the functions of the organelle. However, the complete apicoplast genome is available for only the most virulent human malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Here, we obtained the near-complete apicoplast genome sequences from eight Plasmodium species that infect a wide variety of vertebrate hosts and performed structural and phylogenetic analyses. We found that gene repertoire, gene arrangement, and other structural attributes were highly conserved. Phylogenetic reconstruction using 30 protein-coding genes of the apicoplast genome inferred, for the first time, a close relationship between P. ovale and rodent parasites. This close relatedness was robustly supported using multiple evolutionary assumptions and models. The finding suggests that an ancestral host switch occurred between rodent and human Plasmodium parasites.

  20. Invisible cities: segregated domains in the yeast genome with distinct structural and functional attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Christoforos

    2017-08-05

    Recent advances in our understanding of the three-dimensional organization of the eukaryotic nucleus have rendered the spatial distribution of genes increasingly relevant. In a recent work (Tsochatzidou et al., Nucleic Acids Res 45:5818-5828, 2017), we proposed the existence of a functional compartmentalization of the yeast genome according to which, genes occupying the chromosomal regions at the nuclear periphery have distinct structural, functional and evolutionary characteristics compared to their centromeric-proximal counterparts. Around the same time, it was also shown that the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is organized in topologically associated domains (TADs), which are largely associated with the replication timing. In this work, we proceed to investigate whether such units of three-dimensional genomic organization can be linked to transcriptional activity as a driving force for the shaping of genomic architecture. Through the application of a simple boundary-calling criterion in genome-wide 3C data, we define ~100 TAD-like domains which can be clustered in six different classes with radically different nucleosomal organizations, significant variations in transcription factor binding and uneven chromosomal distribution. Approximately ~20% of the genome is found to be confined in regions with "closed" chromatin structure around gene promoters. Most interestingly, we find both "open" and "closed" regions to be segregated, in the sense that they tend to avoid inter-chromosomal interactions. Our data further enforce the notion of a marked compartmentalization of the yeast genome in isolated territories, with implications in its function and evolution.

  1. A combined analysis of genome-wide expression profiling of bipolar disorder in human prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinglu; Qu, Susu; Wang, Weixiao; Guo, Liyuan; Zhang, Kunlin; Chang, Suhua; Wang, Jing

    2016-11-01

    Numbers of gene expression profiling studies of bipolar disorder have been published. Besides different array chips and tissues, variety of the data processes in different cohorts aggravated the inconsistency of results of these genome-wide gene expression profiling studies. By searching the gene expression databases, we obtained six data sets for prefrontal cortex (PFC) of bipolar disorder with raw data and combinable platforms. We used standardized pre-processing and quality control procedures to analyze each data set separately and then combined them into a large gene expression matrix with 101 bipolar disorder subjects and 106 controls. A standard linear mixed-effects model was used to calculate the differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Multiple levels of sensitivity analyses and cross validation with genetic data were conducted. Functional and network analyses were carried out on basis of the DEGs. In the result, we identified 198 unique differentially expressed genes in the PFC of bipolar disorder and control. Among them, 115 DEGs were robust to at least three leave-one-out tests or different pre-processing methods; 51 DEGs were validated with genetic association signals. Pathway enrichment analysis showed these DEGs were related with regulation of neurological system, cell death and apoptosis, and several basic binding processes. Protein-protein interaction network further identified one key hub gene. We have contributed the most comprehensive integrated analysis of bipolar disorder expression profiling studies in PFC to date. The DEGs, especially those with multiple validations, may denote a common signature of bipolar disorder and contribute to the pathogenesis of disease.

  2. Organization of the genome and gene expression in a nuclear environment lacking histones and nucleosomes: the amazing dinoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Díaz de la Espina, Susana; Alverca, Elsa; Cuadrado, Angeles; Franca, Susana

    2005-03-01

    Dinoflagellates are fascinating protists that have attracted researchers from different fields. The free-living species are major primary producers and the cause of harmful algal blooms sometimes associated with red tides. Dinoflagellates lack histones and nucleosomes and present a unique genome and chromosome organization, being considered the only living knockouts of histones. Their plastids contain genes organized in unigenic minicircles. Basic cell structure, biochemistry and molecular phylogeny place the dinoflagellates firmly among the eukaryotes. They have G1-S-G2-M cell cycles, repetitive sequences, ribosomal genes in tandem, nuclear matrix, snRNAs, and eukaryotic cytoplasm, whereas their nuclear DNA is different, from base composition to chromosome organization. They have a high G + C content, highly methylated and rare bases such as 5-hydroxymethyluracil (HOMeU), no TATA boxes, and form distinct interphasic dinochromosomes with a liquid crystalline organization of DNA, stabilized by metal cations and structural RNA. Without histones and with a protein:DNA mass ratio (1:10) lower than prokaryotes, they need a different way of packing their huge amounts of DNA into a functional chromatin. In spite of the high interest in the dinoflagellate system in genetics, molecular and cellular biology, their analysis until now has been very restricted. We review here the main achievements in the characterization of the genome, nucleus and chromosomes in this diversified phylum. The recent discovery of a eukaryotic structural and functional differentiation in the dinochromosomes and of the organization of gene expression in them, demonstrate that in spite of the secondary loss of histones, that produce a lack of nucleosomal and supranucleosomal chromatin organization, they keep a functional nuclear organization closer to eukaryotes than to prokaryotes.

  3. Structure-preserving sparse decomposition for facial expression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Sima; Qiang Qiu; Chellappa, Rama

    2014-08-01

    Although facial expressions can be decomposed in terms of action units (AUs) as suggested by the facial action coding system, there have been only a few attempts that recognize expression using AUs and their composition rules. In this paper, we propose a dictionary-based approach for facial expression analysis by decomposing expressions in terms of AUs. First, we construct an AU-dictionary using domain experts' knowledge of AUs. To incorporate the high-level knowledge regarding expression decomposition and AUs, we then perform structure-preserving sparse coding by imposing two layers of grouping over AU-dictionary atoms as well as over the test image matrix columns. We use the computed sparse code matrix for each expressive face to perform expression decomposition and recognition. Since domain experts' knowledge may not always be available for constructing an AU-dictionary, we also propose a structure-preserving dictionary learning algorithm, which we use to learn a structured dictionary as well as divide expressive faces into several semantic regions. Experimental results on publicly available expression data sets demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach for facial expression analysis.

  4. Efficient and transgene-free genome editing in wheat through transient expression of CRISPR/Cas9 DNA or RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Liang, Zhen; Zong, Yuan; Wang, Yanpeng; Liu, Jinxing; Chen, Kunling; Qiu, Jin-Long; Gao, Caixia

    2016-08-25

    Editing plant genomes is technically challenging in hard-to-transform plants and usually involves transgenic intermediates, which causes regulatory concerns. Here we report two simple and efficient genome-editing methods in which plants are regenerated from callus cells transiently expressing CRISPR/Cas9 introduced as DNA or RNA. This transient expression-based genome-editing system is highly efficient and specific for producing transgene-free and homozygous wheat mutants in the T0 generation. We demonstrate our protocol to edit genes in hexaploid bread wheat and tetraploid durum wheat, and show that we are able to generate mutants with no detectable transgenes. Our methods may be applicable to other plant species, thus offering the potential to accelerate basic and applied plant genome-engineering research.

  5. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukosd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S.; Seemann, Stefan E.

    2015-01-01

    protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential...

  6. Genome-wide identification of structural variants in genes encoding drug targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Berg; Dahmcke, Christina Mackeprang

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify structural variants of drug target-encoding genes on a genome-wide scale. We also aimed at identifying drugs that are potentially amenable for individualization of treatments based on knowledge about structural variation in the genes encoding the...

  7. The Isochores as a Fundamental Level of Genome Structure and Organization: A General Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Maria; Musto, Héctor

    2017-03-01

    The recent availability of a number of fully sequenced genomes (including marine organisms) allowed to map very precisely the isochores, based on DNA sequences, confirming the results obtained before genome sequencing by the ultracentrifugation in CsCl. In fact, the analytical profile of human DNA showed that the vertebrate genome is a mosaic of isochores, typically megabase-size DNA segments that belong to a small number of families characterized by different GC levels. In this review, we will concentrate on some general genome features regarding the compositional organization from different organisms and their evolution, ranging from vertebrates to invertebrates until unicellular organisms. Since isochores are tightly linked to biological properties such as gene density, replication timing, and recombination, the new level of detail provided by the isochore map helped the understanding of genome structure, function, and evolution. All the findings reported here confirm the idea that the isochores can be considered as a "fundamental level of genome structure and organization." We stress that we do not discuss in this review the origin of isochores, which is still a matter of controversy, but we focus on well established structural and physiological aspects.

  8. Genome-wide expression profiling of five mouse models identifies similarities and differences with human psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Swindell

    Full Text Available Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the human disease, and standardized validation criteria for psoriasis mouse models have not been widely applied. In this study, whole-genome transcriptional profiling is used to compare gene expression patterns manifested by human psoriatic skin lesions with those that occur in five psoriasis mouse models (K5-Tie2, imiquimod, K14-AREG, K5-Stat3C and K5-TGFbeta1. While the cutaneous gene expression profiles associated with each mouse phenotype exhibited statistically significant similarity to the expression profile of psoriasis in humans, each model displayed distinctive sets of similarities and differences in comparison to human psoriasis. For all five models, correspondence to the human disease was strong with respect to genes involved in epidermal development and keratinization. Immune and inflammation-associated gene expression, in contrast, was more variable between models as compared to the human disease. These findings support the value of all five models as research tools, each with identifiable areas of convergence to and divergence from the human disease. Additionally, the approach used in this paper provides an objective and quantitative method for evaluation of proposed mouse models of psoriasis, which can be strategically applied in future studies to score strengths of mouse phenotypes relative to specific aspects of human psoriasis.

  9. Genome-wide expression analysis in fibroblast cell lines from probands with Pallister Killian syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Maninder; Izumi, Kosuke; Wilkens, Alisha B; Chatfield, Kathryn C; Spinner, Nancy B; Conlin, Laura K; Zhang, Zhe; Krantz, Ian D

    2014-01-01

    Pallister Killian syndrome (OMIM: # 601803) is a rare multisystem disorder typically caused by tissue limited mosaic tetrasomy of chromosome 12p (isochromosome 12p). The clinical manifestations of Pallister Killian syndrome are variable with the most common findings including craniofacial dysmorphia, hypotonia, cognitive impairment, hearing loss, skin pigmentary differences and epilepsy. Isochromosome 12p is identified primarily in skin fibroblast cultures and in chorionic villus and amniotic fluid cell samples and may be identified in blood lymphocytes during the neonatal and early childhood period. We performed genomic expression profiling correlated with interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization and single nucleotide polymorphism array quantification of degree of mosaicism in fibroblasts from 17 Caucasian probands with Pallister Killian syndrome and 9 healthy age, gender and ethnicity matched controls. We identified a characteristic profile of 354 (180 up- and 174 down-regulated) differentially expressed genes in Pallister Killian syndrome probands and supportive evidence for a Pallister Killian syndrome critical region on 12p13.31. The differentially expressed genes were enriched for developmentally important genes such as homeobox genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, we identified several genes whose misexpression may be associated with the clinical phenotype of Pallister Killian syndrome such as downregulation of ZFPM2, GATA6 and SOX9, and overexpression of IGFBP2.

  10. Genome-wide expression analysis in fibroblast cell lines from probands with Pallister Killian syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maninder Kaur

    Full Text Available Pallister Killian syndrome (OMIM: # 601803 is a rare multisystem disorder typically caused by tissue limited mosaic tetrasomy of chromosome 12p (isochromosome 12p. The clinical manifestations of Pallister Killian syndrome are variable with the most common findings including craniofacial dysmorphia, hypotonia, cognitive impairment, hearing loss, skin pigmentary differences and epilepsy. Isochromosome 12p is identified primarily in skin fibroblast cultures and in chorionic villus and amniotic fluid cell samples and may be identified in blood lymphocytes during the neonatal and early childhood period. We performed genomic expression profiling correlated with interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization and single nucleotide polymorphism array quantification of degree of mosaicism in fibroblasts from 17 Caucasian probands with Pallister Killian syndrome and 9 healthy age, gender and ethnicity matched controls. We identified a characteristic profile of 354 (180 up- and 174 down-regulated differentially expressed genes in Pallister Killian syndrome probands and supportive evidence for a Pallister Killian syndrome critical region on 12p13.31. The differentially expressed genes were enriched for developmentally important genes such as homeobox genes. Among the differentially expressed genes, we identified several genes whose misexpression may be associated with the clinical phenotype of Pallister Killian syndrome such as downregulation of ZFPM2, GATA6 and SOX9, and overexpression of IGFBP2.

  11. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of the Angelman syndrome mice with Ube3a mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Daren; Chen, Ken-Shiung

    2010-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a human neurological disorder caused by lack of maternal UBE3A expression in the brain. UBE3A is known to function as both an ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3) and a coactivator for steroid receptors. Many ubiquitin targets, as well as interacting partners, of UBE3A have been identified. However, the pathogenesis of AS, and how deficiency of maternal UBE3A can upset cellular homeostasis, remains vague. In this study, we performed a genome-wide microarray analysis on the maternal Ube3a-deficient (Ube3a(m-/p+)) AS mouse to search for genes affected in the absence of Ube3a. We observed 64 differentially expressed transcripts (7 upregulated and 57 downregulated) showing more than 1.5-fold differences in expression (Pphenotype. We also show that the protein level of melanocortin 1 receptor (Mc1r) and nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 2 (Nr4a2) in the AS mice cerebellum is decreased relative to that of the wild-type mice. Consistent with this finding, expression of small-interfering RNA that targets Ube3a in P19 cells caused downregulation of Mc1r and Nr4a2, whereas overexpression of Ube3a results in the upregulation of Mc1r and Nr4a2. These observation help in providing insights into the genesis of neurodevelopmental phenotype of AS and highlight specific area for future research.

  12. Genome-wide disruption of gene expression in allopolyploids but not hybrids of rice subspecies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunming; Bai, Yan; Lin, Xiuyun; Zhao, Na; Hu, Lanjuan; Gong, Zhiyun; Wendel, Jonathan F; Liu, Bao

    2014-05-01

    Hybridization and polyploidization are prominent processes in plant evolution. Hybrids and allopolyploids typically exhibit radically altered gene expression patterns relative to their parents, a phenomenon termed "transcriptomic shock." To distinguish the effects of hybridization from polyploidization on coregulation of divergent alleles, we analyzed expression of parental copies (homoeologs) of 11,608 genes using RNA-seq-based transcriptome profiling in reciprocal hybrids and tetraploids constructed from subspecies japonica and indica of Asian rice (Oryza sativa L.). The diploid hybrids and their derived allopolyploids differ dramatically in morphology, despite having the same suite of genes and genic proportions. Allelic and homoeolog-specific transcripts were unequivocally diagnosed in the hybrids and tetraploids based on parent-specific SNPs. Compared with the in silico hybrid (parental mix), the range of progenitor expression divergence was significantly reduced in both reciprocally generated F1 hybrids, presumably due to the ameliorating effects of a common trans environment on divergent cis-factors. In contrast, parental expression differences were greatly elaborated at the polyploid level, which we propose is a consequence of stoichiometric disruptions associated with the numerous chromosomal packaging and volumetric changes accompanying nascent polyploidy. We speculate that the emergent property of "whole genome doubling" has repercussions that reverberate throughout the transcriptome and downstream, ultimately generating altered phenotypes. This perspective may yield insight into the nature of adaptation and the origin of evolutionary novelty accompanying polyploidy.

  13. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of auxin response factor gene family in Medicago truncatula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjia eShen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Auxin response factors (ARFs bind specifically to auxin response elements (AuxREs in the promoters of down-stream target genes and play roles in plant responses to diverse environmental factors. Using the latest updated Medicago truncatula reference genome sequence, a comprehensive characterization and analysis of 24 MtARF genes were performed. To uncover the basic information and functions of MtARF genes during symbiosis, we analyze the expression patterns of MtARF genes during the early phase of Sinorhizobium meliloti infection. The systematic analysis indicated that MtARF gene expressions were involved in the symbiosis processes. Furthermore, the roles of MtARF-mediated auxin signaling in symbiosis were tested in the infection resistant mutant (dmi3. The expression responses of MtARFs to S. meliloti infection were attenuated in the mutant compared to wild-type A17. In summary, our results shed that the MtARF gene expressions was involved in responses to S. meliloti infection, which may play an essential role in the regulation of nodule formation.

  14. Complex organizational structure of the genome revealed by genome-wide analysis of single and alternative promoters in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Qianqian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The promoter is a critical necessary transcriptional cis-regulatory element. In addition to its role as an assembly site for the basal transcriptional apparatus, the promoter plays a key part in mediating temporal and spatial aspects of gene expression through differential binding of transcription factors and selective interaction with distal enhancers. Although many genes have multiple promoters, little attention has been focused on how these relate to one another; nor has much study been directed at relationships between promoters of adjacent genes. Results We have undertaken a systematic investigation of Drosophila promoters. We divided promoters into three groups: unique promoters, first alternative promoters (the most 5' of a gene's multiple promoters, and downstream alternative promoters (the remaining alternative promoters 3' to the first. We observed distinct nucleotide distribution and sequence motif preferences among these three classes. We also investigated the promoters of neighboring genes and found that a greater than expected number of adjacent genes have similar sequence motif profiles, which may allow the genes to be regulated in a coordinated fashion. Consistent with this, there is a positive correlation between similar promoter motifs and related gene expression profiles for these genes. Conclusions Our results suggest that different regulatory mechanisms may apply to each of the three promoter classes, and provide a mechanism for "gene expression neighborhoods," local clusters of co-expressed genes. As a whole, our data reveal an unexpected complexity of genomic organization at the promoter level with respect to both alternative and neighboring promoters.

  15. The Csr system regulates genome-wide mRNA stability and transcription and thus gene expression in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Esquerré; Marie Bouvier; Catherine Turlan; Carpousis, Agamemnon J.; Laurence Girbal; Muriel Cocaign-Bousquet

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial adaptation requires large-scale regulation of gene expression. We have performed a genome-wide analysis of the Csr system, which regulates many important cellular functions. The Csr system is involved in post-transcriptional regulation, but a role in transcriptional regulation has also been suggested. Two proteins, an RNA-binding protein CsrA and an atypical signaling protein CsrD, participate in the Csr system. Genome-wide transcript stabilities and levels were compared in wildtype...

  16. Integrating sequencing technologies in personal genomics: optimal low cost reconstruction of structural variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Du

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The goal of human genome re-sequencing is obtaining an accurate assembly of an individual's genome. Recently, there has been great excitement in the development of many technologies for this (e.g. medium and short read sequencing from companies such as 454 and SOLiD, and high-density oligo-arrays from Affymetrix and NimbelGen, with even more expected to appear. The costs and sensitivities of these technologies differ considerably from each other. As an important goal of personal genomics is to reduce the cost of re-sequencing to an affordable point, it is worthwhile to consider optimally integrating technologies. Here, we build a simulation toolbox that will help us optimally combine different technologies for genome re-sequencing, especially in reconstructing large structural variants (SVs. SV reconstruction is considered the most challenging step in human genome re-sequencing. (It is sometimes even harder than de novo assembly of small genomes because of the duplications and repetitive sequences in the human genome. To this end, we formulate canonical problems that are representative of issues in reconstruction and are of small enough scale to be computationally tractable and simulatable. Using semi-realistic simulations, we show how we can combine different technologies to optimally solve the assembly at low cost. With mapability maps, our simulations efficiently handle the inhomogeneous repeat-containing structure of the human genome and the computational complexity of practical assembly algorithms. They quantitatively show how combining different read lengths is more cost-effective than using one length, how an optimal mixed sequencing strategy for reconstructing large novel SVs usually also gives accurate detection of SNPs/indels, how paired-end reads can improve reconstruction efficiency, and how adding in arrays is more efficient than just sequencing for disentangling some complex SVs. Our strategy should facilitate the sequencing of

  17. Meta-analysis of genome-wide expression patterns associated with behavioral maturation in honey bees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Southey Bruce R

    2008-10-01

    -analyses confirmed previously reported genes and helped identify genes (e.g. Tomosyn, Chitinase 5, Adar, Innexin 2, Transferrin 1, Sick, Oatp26F and Gene Ontology categories (e.g. purine nucleotide binding not previously associated with maturation in honey bees. Conclusion This study demonstrated that a combination of meta-analytical approaches best addresses the highly dimensional nature of genome-wide microarray studies. As expected, the integration of gene expression information from microarray studies using meta-analysis enhanced the characterization of the transcriptome of complex biological processes.

  18. Structural Expression of Exo-Anomeric Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, E. R.; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L.

    2016-06-01

    Structural signatures for exo--anomeric effect have been extracted from the archetypal methyl--β--D--xyloside using broadband Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy combined with laser ablation. Spectrum analysis allows the determination of a set of rotational constants, which has been unequivocally attributed to conformer cc--β-4C1 g-, corresponding to the global minimum of the potential energy surface, where the aglycon residue (CH3) orientation contributes towards maximization of the exo-anomeric effect. Further analysis allowed the determination of the rs structure, based on the detection of eleven isotopologues - derived from the presence of six 13C and five 18O atoms - observed in their natural abundances. The observed glycosidic C1-O1 bond length decrease (1.38 Å) can be interpreted in terms of the exo--anomeric effect. As such, the exo--anomeric effect presents itself as one of the main driving forces controlling the shape of many biologically important oligosaccharides.

  19. Expression and genomic integration of transgenes after Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of mature barley embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uçarlı, C; Tufan, F; Gürel, F

    2015-02-06

    Mature embryos in tissue cultures are advantageous because of their abundance and rapid germination, which reduces genomic instability problems. In this study, 2-day-old isolated mature barley embryos were infected with 2 Agrobacterium hypervirulent strains (AGL1 and EHA105), followed by a 3-day period of co-cultivation in the presence of L-cystein amino acid. Chimeric expression of the b-glucuronidase gene (gusA) directed by a viral promoter of strawberry vein banding virus was observed in coleoptile epidermal cells and seminal roots in 5-day-old germinated seedlings. In addition to varying infectivity patterns in different strains, there was a higher ratio of transient b-glucuronidase expression in developing coleoptiles than in embryonic roots, indicating the high competency of shoot apical meristem cells in the mature embryo. A total of 548 explants were transformed and 156 plants developed to maturity on G418 media after 18-25 days. We detected transgenes in 74% of the screened plant leaves by polymerase chain reaction, and 49% of these expressed neomycin phosphotransferase II gene following AGL1 transformation. Ten randomly selected T0 transformants were analyzed using thermal asymmetric interlaced polymerase chain reaction and 24 fragments ranged between 200-600 base pairs were sequenced. Three of the sequences flanked with transferred-DNA showed high similarity to coding regions of the barley genome, including alpha tubulin5, homeobox 1, and mitochondrial 16S genes. We observed 70-200-base pair filler sequences only in the coding regions of barley in this study.

  20. Sampling Daphnia's expressed genes: preservation, expansion and invention of crustacean genes with reference to insect genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bauer Darren J

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional and comparative studies of insect genomes have shed light on the complement of genes, which in part, account for shared morphologies, developmental programs and life-histories. Contrasting the gene inventories of insects to those of the nematodes provides insight into the genomic changes responsible for their diversification. However, nematodes have weak relationships to insects, as each belongs to separate animal phyla. A better outgroup to distinguish lineage specific novelties would include other members of Arthropoda. For example, crustaceans are close allies to the insects (together forming Pancrustacea and their fascinating aquatic lifestyle provides an important comparison for understanding the genetic basis of adaptations to life on land versus life in water. Results This study reports on the first characterization of cDNA libraries and sequences for the model crustacean Daphnia pulex. We analyzed 1,546 ESTs of which 1,414 represent approximately 787 nuclear genes, by measuring their sequence similarities with insect and nematode proteomes. The provisional annotation of genes is supported by expression data from microarray studies described in companion papers. Loci expected to be shared between crustaceans and insects because of their mutual biological features are identified, including genes for reproduction, regulation and cellular processes. We identify genes that are likely derived within Pancrustacea or lost within the nematodes. Moreover, lineage specific gene family expansions are identified, which suggest certain biological demands associated with their ecological setting. In particular, up to seven distinct ferritin loci are found in Daphnia compared to three in most insects. Finally, a substantial fraction of the sampled gene transcripts shares no sequence similarity with those from other arthropods. Genes functioning during development and reproduction are comparatively well conserved between

  1. Genome-wide identification, characterization and expression profiling of LIM family genes in Solanum lycopersicum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Khadiza; Robin, Arif Hasan Khan; Park, Jong-In; Ahmed, Nasar Uddin; Kim, Chang Kil; Lim, Ki-Byung; Kim, Min-Bae; Lee, Do-Jin; Nou, Ill Sup; Chung, Mi-Young

    2016-11-01

    LIM domain proteins, some of which have been shown to be actin binding proteins, are involved in various developmental activities and cellular processes in plants. To date, the molecular defense-related functions of LIM family genes have not been investigated in any solanaceous vegetable crop species. In this study, we identified 15 LIM family genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) through genome-wide analysis and performed expression profiling in different organs of tomato, including fruits at six different developmental stages. We also performed expression profiling of selected tomato LIM genes in plants under ABA, drought, cold, NaCl and heat stress treatment. The encoded proteins of the 15 tomato LIM genes were classified into two main groups, i.e., proteins similar to cysteine-rich proteins and plant-specific DAR proteins, based on differences in functional domains and variability in their C-terminal regions. The DAR proteins contain a so far poorly characterized zinc-finger-like motif that we propose to call DAR-ZF. Six of the 15 LIM genes were expressed only in flowers, indicating that they play flower-specific roles in plants. The other nine genes were expressed in all organs and at various stages of fruit development. SlβLIM1b was expressed relatively highly at the later stage of fruit development, but three other genes, SlWLIM2a, SlDAR2 and SlDAR4, were expressed at the early stage of fruit development. Seven genes were induced by ABA, five by cold, seven by drought, eight by NaCl and seven by heat treatment respectively, indicating their possible roles in abiotic stress tolerance. Our results will be useful for functional analysis of LIM genes during fruit development in tomato plants under different abiotic stresses. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Genomics and transcriptomics characterization of genes expressed during postharvest at 4°C by the edible basidiomycete Pleurotus ostreatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Lucía; Oguiza, José Antonio; Pérez, Gúmer; Lavín, José Luis; Omarini, Alejandra; Santoyo, Francisco; Alfaro, Manuel; Castanera, Raúl; Parenti, Alejandra; Muguerza, Elaia; Pisabarro, Antonio G

    2011-06-01

    Pleurotus ostreatus is an industrially cultivated basidiomycete with nutritional and environmental applications. Its genome, which was sequenced by the Joint Genome Institute, has become a model for lignin degradation and for fungal genomics and transcriptomics studies. The complete P. ostreatus genome contains 35 Mbp organized in 11 chromosomes, and two different haploid genomes have been individually sequenced. In this work, genomics and transcriptomics approaches were employed in the study of P. ostreatus under different physiological conditions. Specifically, we analyzed a collection of expressed sequence tags (EST) obtained from cut fruit bodies that had been stored at 4°C for 7 days (postharvest conditions). Studies of the 253 expressed clones that had been automatically and manually annotated provided a detailed picture of the life characteristics of the self-sustained fruit bodies. The results suggested a complex metabolism in which autophagy, RNA metabolism, and protein and carbohydrate turnover are increased. Genes involved in environment sensing and morphogenesis were expressed under these conditions. The data improve our understanding of the decay process in postharvest mushrooms and highlight the use of high-throughput techniques to construct models of living organisms subjected to different environmental conditions.

  3. From structure prediction to genomic screens for novel non-coding RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Gorodkin

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs are receiving more and more attention not only as an abundant class of genes, but also as regulatory structural elements (some located in mRNAs. A key feature of RNA function is its structure. Computational methods were developed early for folding and prediction of RNA structure with the aim of assisting in functional analysis. With the discovery of more and more ncRNAs, it has become clear that a large fraction of these are highly structured. Interestingly, a large part of the structure is comprised of regular Watson-Crick and GU wobble base pairs. This and the increased amount of available genomes have made it possible to employ structure-based methods for genomic screens. The field has moved from folding prediction of single sequences to computational screens for ncRNAs in genomic sequence using the RNA structure as the main characteristic feature. Whereas early methods focused on energy-directed folding of single sequences, comparative analysis based on structure preserving changes of base pairs has been efficient in improving accuracy, and today this constitutes a key component in genomic screens. Here, we cover the basic principles of RNA folding and touch upon some of the concepts in current methods that have been applied in genomic screens for de novo RNA structures in searches for novel ncRNA genes and regulatory RNA structure on mRNAs. We discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different strategies and how they can complement each other.

  4. Genome-wide tissue-specific gene expression, co-expression and regulation of co-expressed genes in adult nematode Ascaris suum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce A Rosa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caenorhabditis elegans has traditionally been used as a model for studying nematode biology, but its small size limits the ability for researchers to perform some experiments such as high-throughput tissue-specific gene expression studies. However, the dissection of individual tissues is possible in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum due to its relatively large size. Here, we take advantage of the recent genome sequencing of Ascaris suum and the ability to physically dissect its separate tissues to produce a wide-scale tissue-specific nematode RNA-seq datasets, including data on three non-reproductive tissues (head, pharynx, and intestine in both male and female worms, as well as four reproductive tissues (testis, seminal vesicle, ovary, and uterus. We obtained fundamental information about the biology of diverse cell types and potential interactions among tissues within this multicellular organism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overexpression and functional enrichment analyses identified many putative biological functions enriched in each tissue studied, including functions which have not been previously studied in detail in nematodes. Putative tissue-specific transcriptional factors and corresponding binding motifs that regulate expression in each tissue were identified, including the intestine-enriched ELT-2 motif/transcription factor previously described in nematode intestines. Constitutively expressed and novel genes were also characterized, with the largest number of novel genes found to be overexpressed in the testis. Finally, a putative acetylcholine-mediated transcriptional network connecting biological activity in the head to the male reproductive system is described using co-expression networks, along with a similar ecdysone-mediated system in the female. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The expression profiles, co-expression networks and co-expression regulation of the 10 tissues studied and the tissue-specific analysis

  5. Genome-wide discovery and verification of novel structured RNAs in Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mourier, Tobias; Carret, Celine; Kyes, Sue;

    2008-01-01

    We undertook a genome-wide search for novel noncoding RNAs (ncRNA) in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. We used the RNAz program to predict structures in the noncoding regions of the P. falciparum 3D7 genome that were conserved with at least one of seven other Plasmodium spp. genome seq...

  6. Highly Conserved Elements and Chromosome Structure Evolution in Mitochondrial Genomes in Ciliates

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    Roman A. Gershgorin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent phylogenetic analyses are incorporating ultraconserved elements (UCEs and highly conserved elements (HCEs. Models of evolution of the genome structure and HCEs initially faced considerable algorithmic challenges, which gave rise to (often unnatural constraints on these models, even for conceptually simple tasks such as the calculation of distance between two structures or the identification of UCEs. In our recent works, these constraints have been addressed with fast and efficient solutions with no constraints on the underlying models. These approaches have led us to an unexpected result: for some organelles and taxa, the genome structure and HCE set, despite themselves containing relatively little information, still adequately resolve the evolution of species. We also used the HCE identification to search for promoters and regulatory elements that characterize the functional evolution of the genome.

  7. Comparative Genome Structure, Secondary Metabolite, and Effector Coding Capacity across Cochliobolus Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condon, Bradford J.; Leng, Yueqiang; Wu, Dongliang; Bushley, Kathryn E.; Ohm, Robin A.; Otillar, Robert; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Grimwood, Jane; MohdZainudin, NurAinlzzati; Xue, Chunsheng; Wang, Rui; Manning, Viola A.; Dhillon, Braham; Tu, Zheng Jin; Steffenson, Brian J.; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lowry, Steve; LaButti, Kurt; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Schmutz, Jeremy; Baker, Scott E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Zhong, Shaobin; Turgeon, B. Gillian

    2013-01-24

    The genomes of five Cochliobolus heterostrophus strains, two Cochliobolus sativus strains, three additional Cochliobolus species (Cochliobolus victoriae, Cochliobolus carbonum, Cochliobolus miyabeanus), and closely related Setosphaeria turcica were sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The datasets were used to identify SNPs between strains and species, unique genomic regions, core secondary metabolism genes, and small secreted protein (SSP) candidate effector encoding genes with a view towards pinpointing structural elements and gene content associated with specificity of these closely related fungi to different cereal hosts. Whole-genome alignment shows that three to five of each genome differs between strains of the same species, while a quarter of each genome differs between species. On average, SNP counts among field isolates of the same C. heterostrophus species are more than 25 higher than those between inbred lines and 50 lower than SNPs between Cochliobolus species. The suites of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), polyketide synthase (PKS), and SSP encoding genes are astoundingly diverse among species but remarkably conserved among isolates of the same species, whether inbred or field strains, except for defining examples that map to unique genomic regions. Functional analysis of several strain-unique PKSs and NRPSs reveal a strong correlation with a role in virulence.

  8. G23D: Online tool for mapping and visualization of genomic variants on 3D protein structures

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Oz; Kunik, Vered; Simon, Amos; Kol, Nitzan; Barel, Ortal; Lev, Atar; Amariglio, Ninette; Somech, Raz; Rechavi, Gidi; Eyal, Eran

    2016-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the possible implications of genomic variants is an increasingly important task in the current high throughput sequencing era. Structural information however is still not routinely exploited during this evaluation process. The main reasons can be attributed to the partial structural coverage of the human proteome and the lack of tools which conveniently convert genomic positions, which are the frequent output of genomic pipelines, to proteins and structure coordinates...

  9. Structural Expression of Exo-Anomeric Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Elena R; Peña, Isabel; Cabezas, Carlos; Alonso, José L

    2016-03-03

    Structural signatures for exo-anomeric effect have been extracted from the archetypal methyl-β-D-xyloside using broadband Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy combined with laser ablation. Spectrum analysis allows the determination of a set of rotational constants, which has been unequivocally attributed to conformer cc-β-(4)C1 g-, corresponding to the global minimum of the potential energy surface, where the aglycon residue (CH3) orientation contributes to maximization of the exo-anomeric effect. Further analysis allowed the determination of the rs structure, based on the detection of 11 isotopologues--derived from the presence of six (13)C and five (18)O atoms--observed in their natural abundances. The observed glycosidic C1-O1 bond length decrease (1.38 Å) can be interpreted in terms of the exo-anomeric effect. As such, the exo-anomeric effect presents itself as one of the main driving forces controlling the shape of many biologically important oligosaccharides.

  10. Genome-wide classification and evolutionary and expression analyses of citrus MYB transcription factor families in sweet orange.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jin Hou

    Full Text Available MYB family genes are widely distributed in plants and comprise one of the largest transcription factors involved in various developmental processes and defense responses of plants. To date, few MYB genes and little expression profiling have been reported for citrus. Here, we describe and classify 177 members of the sweet orange MYB gene (CsMYB family in terms of their genomic gene structures and similarity to their putative Arabidopsis orthologs. According to these analyses, these CsMYBs were categorized into four groups (4R-MYB, 3R-MYB, 2R-MYB and 1R-MYB. Gene structure analysis revealed that 1R-MYB genes possess relatively more introns as compared with 2R-MYB genes. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that these CsMYBs are distributed across nine chromosomes. Sweet orange includes a relatively small number of MYB genes compared with the 198 members in Arabidopsis, presumably due to a paralog reduction related to repetitive sequence insertion into promoter and non-coding transcribed region of the genes. Comparative studies of CsMYBs and Arabidopsis showed that CsMYBs had fewer gene duplication events. Expression analysis revealed that the MYB gene family has a wide expression profile in sweet orange development and plays important roles in development and stress responses. In addition, 337 new putative microsatellites with flanking sequences sufficient for primer design were also identified from the 177 CsMYBs. These results provide a useful reference for the selection of candidate MYB genes for cloning and further functional analysis forcitrus.

  11. Genome-wide classification and evolutionary and expression analyses of citrus MYB transcription factor families in sweet orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiao-Jin; Li, Si-Bei; Liu, Sheng-Rui; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2014-01-01

    MYB family genes are widely distributed in plants and comprise one of the largest transcription factors involved in various developmental processes and defense responses of plants. To date, few MYB genes and little expression profiling have been reported for citrus. Here, we describe and classify 177 members of the sweet orange MYB gene (CsMYB) family in terms of their genomic gene structures and similarity to their putative Arabidopsis orthologs. According to these analyses, these CsMYBs were categorized into four groups (4R-MYB, 3R-MYB, 2R-MYB and 1R-MYB). Gene structure analysis revealed that 1R-MYB genes possess relatively more introns as compared with 2R-MYB genes. Investigation of their chromosomal localizations revealed that these CsMYBs are distributed across nine chromosomes. Sweet orange includes a relatively small number of MYB genes compared with the 198 members in Arabidopsis, presumably due to a paralog reduction related to repetitive sequence insertion into promoter and non-coding transcribed region of the genes. Comparative studies of CsMYBs and Arabidopsis showed that CsMYBs had fewer gene duplication events. Expression analysis revealed that the MYB gene family has a wide expression profile in sweet orange development and plays important roles in development and stress responses. In addition, 337 new putative microsatellites with flanking sequences sufficient for primer design were also identified from the 177 CsMYBs. These results provide a useful reference for the selection of candidate MYB genes for cloning and further functional analysis forcitrus.

  12. Expression and genomic analysis of midasin, a novel and highly conserved AAA protein distantly related to dynein

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    Gibbons I R

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The largest open reading frame in the Saccharomyces genome encodes midasin (MDN1p, YLR106p, an AAA ATPase of 560 kDa that is essential for cell viability. Orthologs of midasin have been identified in the genome projects for Drosophila, Arabidopsis, and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Results Midasin is present as a single-copy gene encoding a well-conserved protein of ~600 kDa in all eukaryotes for which data are available. In humans, the gene maps to 6q15 and encodes a predicted protein of 5596 residues (632 kDa. Sequence alignments of midasin from humans, yeast, Giardia and Encephalitozoon indicate that its domain structure comprises an N-terminal domain (35 kDa, followed by an AAA domain containing six tandem AAA protomers (~30 kDa each, a linker domain (260 kDa, an acidic domain (~70 kDa containing 35–40% aspartate and glutamate, and a carboxy-terminal M-domain (30 kDa that possesses MIDAS sequence motifs and is homologous to the I-domain of integrins. Expression of hemagglutamin-tagged midasin in yeast demonstrates a polypeptide of the anticipated size that is localized principally in the nucleus. Conclusions The highly conserved structure of midasin in eukaryotes, taken in conjunction with its nuclear localization in yeast, suggests that midasin may function as a nuclear chaperone and be involved in the assembly/disassembly of macromolecular complexes in the nucleus. The AAA domain of midasin is evolutionarily related to that of dynein, but it appears to lack a microtubule-binding site.

  13. Whole genome expression profiling shows that BRG1 transcriptionally regulates UV inducible genes and other novel targets in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Nemzow, Leah; Chen, Hua; Hu, Jennifer J; Gong, Feng

    2014-01-01

    UV irradiation is known to cause cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6-4PPs), and plays a large role in the development of cancer. Tumor suppression, through DNA repair and proper cell cycle regulation, is an integral factor in maintaining healthy cells and preventing development of cancer. Transcriptional regulation of the genes involved in the various tumor suppression pathways is essential for them to be expressed when needed and to function properly. BRG1, an ATPase catalytic subunit of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, has been identified as a tumor suppressor protein, as it has been shown to play a role in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) of CPDs, suppress apoptosis, and restore checkpoint deficiency, in response to UV exposure. Although BRG1 has been shown to regulate transcription of some genes that are instrumental in proper DNA damage repair and cell cycle maintenance in response to UV, its role in transcriptional regulation of the whole genome in response to UV has not yet been elucidated. With whole genome expression profiling in SW13 cells, we show that upon UV induction, BRG1 regulates transcriptional expression of many genes involved in cell stress response. Additionally, our results also highlight BRG1's general role as a master regulator of the genome, as it transcriptionally regulates approximately 4.8% of the human genome, including expression of genes involved in many pathways. RT-PCR and ChIP were used to validate our genome expression analysis. Importantly, our study identifies several novel transcriptional targets of BRG1, such as ATF3. Thus, BRG1 has a larger impact on human genome expression than previously thought, and our studies will provide inroads for future analysis of BRG1's role in gene regulation.

  14. Structure and Genome Release Mechanism of the Human Cardiovirus Saffold Virus 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullapudi, Edukondalu; Nováček, Jiří; Pálková, Lenka; Kulich, Pavel; Lindberg, A Michael; van Kuppeveld, Frank J M; Plevka, Pavel

    2016-09-01

    In order to initiate an infection, viruses need to deliver their genomes into cells. This involves uncoating the genome and transporting it to the cytoplasm. The process of genome delivery is not well understood for nonenveloped viruses. We address this gap in our current knowledge by studying the uncoating of the nonenveloped human cardiovirus Saffold virus 3 (SAFV-3) of the family Picornaviridae SAFVs cause diseases ranging from gastrointestinal disorders to meningitis. We present a structure of a native SAFV-3 virion determined to 2.5 Å by X-ray crystallography and an 11-Å-resolution cryo-electron microscopy reconstruction of an "altered" particle that is primed for genome release. The altered particles are expanded relative to the native virus and contain pores in the capsid that might serve as channels for the release of VP4 subunits, N termini of VP1, and the RNA genome. Unlike in the related enteroviruses, pores in SAFV-3 are located roughly between the icosahedral 3- and 5-fold axes at an interface formed by two VP1 and one VP3 subunit. Furthermore, in native conditions many cardioviruses contain a disulfide bond formed by cysteines that are separated by just one residue. The disulfide bond is located in a surface loop of VP3. We determined the structure of the SAFV-3 virion in which the disulfide bonds are reduced. Disruption of the bond had minimal effect on the structure of the loop, but it increased the stability and decreased the infectivity of the virus. Therefore, compounds specifically disrupting or binding to the disulfide bond might limit SAFV infection. A capsid assembled from viral proteins protects the virus genome during transmission from one cell to another. However, when a virus enters a cell the virus genome has to be released from the capsid in order to initiate infection. This process is not well understood for nonenveloped viruses. We address this gap in our current knowledge by studying the genome release of Human Saffold virus 3

  15. Network Structure and Dynamics, and Emergence of Robustness by Stabilizing Selection in an Artificial Genome

    CERN Document Server

    Rohlf, Thimo

    2008-01-01

    Genetic regulation is a key component in development, but a clear understanding of the structure and dynamics of genetic networks is not yet at hand. In this work we investigate these properties within an artificial genome model originally introduced by Reil. We analyze statistical properties of randomly generated genomes both on the sequence- and network level, and show that this model correctly predicts the frequency of genes in genomes as found in experimental data. Using an evolutionary algorithm based on stabilizing selection for a phenotype, we show that robustness against single base mutations, as well as against random changes in initial network states that mimic stochastic fluctuations in environmental conditions, can emerge in parallel. Evolved genomes exhibit characteristic patterns on both sequence and network level.

  16. Population Structure Analysis of Bull Genomes of European and Western Ancestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Neo Christopher; Szyda, Joanna; Frąszczak, Magdalena; Fries, Hans Rudolf; SandøLund, Mogens; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Boichard, Didier; Stothard, Paul; Veerkamp, Roel; Goddard, Michael; Van Tassell, Curtis P.; Hayes, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Since domestication, population bottlenecks, breed formation, and selective breeding have radically shaped the genealogy and genetics of Bos taurus. In turn, characterization of population structure among diverse bull (males of Bos taurus) genomes enables detailed assessment of genetic resources and origins. By analyzing 432 unrelated bull genomes from 13 breeds and 16 countries, we demonstrate genetic diversity and structural complexity among the European/Western cattle population. Importantly, we relaxed a strong assumption of discrete or admixed population, by adapting latent variable models for individual-specific allele frequencies that directly capture a wide range of complex structure from genome-wide genotypes. As measured by magnitude of differentiation, selection pressure on SNPs within genes is substantially greater than that on intergenic regions. Additionally, broad regions of chromosome 6 harboring largest genetic differentiation suggest positive selection underlying population structure. We carried out gene set analysis using SNP annotations to identify enriched functional categories such as energy-related processes and multiple development stages. Our population structure analysis of bull genomes can support genetic management strategies that capture structural complexity and promote sustainable genetic breadth. PMID:28084449

  17. Genomic characterization, expression analysis, and antimicrobial function of a glyrichin homologue from rock bream, Oplegnathus fasciatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthuri, Saranya Revathy; Wan, Qiang; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Bathige, S D N K; Lim, Bong-Soo; Jung, Hyung-Bok; Lee, Jehee; Whang, Ilson

    2013-11-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are important innate effector molecules, playing a vital role in antimicrobial immunity in all species. Glyrichin is a transmembrane protein and an antibacterial peptide, exerting its functions against a wide range of pathogenic bacteria. In this study, cDNA and a BAC clone harboring the glyrichin gene were identified from rock bream and characterized. Genomic characterization showed that the OfGlyrichin gene exhibited a 3 exon-2 intron structure. OfGlyrichin is a 79-amino-acid protein with a transmembrane domain at (22)GFMMGFAVGMAAGAMFGTFSCLR(44). Pairwise and multiple sequence alignments showed high identity and conservation with mammalian orthologues. Phylogenetic analysis showed a close relationship with fish species. Higher levels of OfGlyrichin transcripts were detected in the liver from healthy rock bream which were induced by immunogens like lipopolysaccharide, poly I:C, rock bream irido virus, Edwardsiella tarda and Streptococcus iniae. The synthetic peptide (pOf19) showed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, E. tarda, and S. iniae. Analysis of the bacterial morphological features after pOf19 peptide treatment showed breakage of the cell membrane, affirming that antibacterial function is accomplished through membrane lysis. The pOf19 peptide also showed antiviral activity against RBIV infection. The high conservation of the genomic structure and protein, together with the antimicrobial roles of OfGlyrichin, provide evidence for the evolutionary existence of this protein playing a vital role in innate immune defense in rock bream.

  18. Valproate administration to mice increases hippocampal p21 expression by altering genomic DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Shu; Yamamuro, Yutaka

    2015-10-21

    Although valproate (VPA) is used widely in the treatment of bipolar mood disorder and epilepsy, the precise mechanism of action in the brain remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the effects of subchronic VPA administrations on the expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (Cdkn) family in the hippocampus of adult mice. The administration of VPA specifically increased hippocampal p21 expression involving both mRNA and protein levels, but other members of the Cdkn family were not affected. We identified two CpG islands in the p21 gene regulatory region, located distal and proximal to the transcription start site. VPA altered genomic DNA methylation patterns in the distal region, but not in the proximal promoter region. However, no change was found in DNA methyltransferase (Dnmt) 1 or Dnmt3a protein levels, suggesting an involvement in active demethylation mechanisms. These findings suggest that VPA alters the gene expression of cell cycle regulators by modulating promoter DNA methylation, and this resulted in altered hippocampal cell proliferation. These findings promote understanding of the actions of VPA in the brain.

  19. Expression of lysozymes from Erwinia amylovora phages and Erwinia genomes and inhibition by a bacterial protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ina; Gernold, Marina; Schneider, Bernd; Geider, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Genes coding for lysozyme-inhibiting proteins (Ivy) were cloned from the chromosomes of the plant pathogens Erwinia amylovora and Erwinia pyrifoliae. The product interfered not only with activity of hen egg white lysozyme, but also with an enzyme from E. amylovora phage ΦEa1h. We have expressed lysozyme genes from the genomes of three Erwinia species in Escherichia coli. The lysozymes expressed from genes of the E. amylovora phages ΦEa104 and ΦEa116, Erwinia chromosomes and Arabidopsis thaliana were not affected by Ivy. The enzyme from bacteriophage ΦEa1h was fused at the N- or C-terminus to other peptides. Compared to the intact lysozyme, a His-tag reduced its lytic activity about 10-fold and larger fusion proteins abolished activity completely. Specific protease cleavage restored lysozyme activity of a GST-fusion. The bacteriophage-encoded lysozymes were more active than the enzymes from bacterial chromosomes. Viral lyz genes were inserted into a broad-host range vector, and transfer to E. amylovora inhibited cell growth. Inserted in the yeast Pichia pastoris, the ΦEa1h-lysozyme was secreted and also inhibited by Ivy. Here we describe expression of unrelated cloned 'silent' lyz genes from Erwinia chromosomes and a novel interference of bacterial Ivy proteins with a viral lysozyme.

  20. Whitefly genome expression reveals host-symbiont interaction in amino acid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Sharma, Shailesh; Singh, Harpal; Dixit, Sameer; Kumar, Jitesh; Verma, Praveen C; Chandrashekar, K

    2015-01-01

    Whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) complex is a serious insect pest of several crop plants worldwide. It comprises several morphologically indistinguishable species, however very little is known about their genetic divergence and biosynthetic pathways. In the present study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of Asia 1 species of B. tabaci complex and analyzed the interaction of host-symbiont genes in amino acid biosynthetic pathways. We obtained about 83 million reads using Illumina sequencing that assembled into 72716 unitigs. A total of 21129 unitigs were annotated at stringent parameters. Annotated unitigs were mapped to 52847 gene ontology (GO) terms and 131 Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathways. Expression analysis of the genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis pathways revealed the complementation between whitefly and its symbiont partner Candidatus Portiera aleyrodidarum. Most of the non-essential amino acids and intermediates of essential amino acid pathways were supplied by the host insect to its symbiont. The symbiont expressed the pathways for the essential amino acids arginine, threonine and tryptophan and the immediate precursors of valine, leucine, isoleucine and phenyl-alanine. High level expression of the amino acid transporters in the whitefly suggested the molecular mechanisms for the exchange of amino acids between the host and the symbiont. Our study provides a comprehensive transcriptome data for Asia 1 species of B. tabaci complex that focusses light on integration of host and symbiont genes in amino acid biosynthesis pathways.

  1. Genome-wide expression analysis in Down syndrome: insight into immunodeficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong Li

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is caused by triplication of Human chromosome 21 (Hsa21 and associated with an array of deleterious phenotypes, including mental retardation, heart defects and immunodeficiency. Genome-wide expression patterns of uncultured peripheral blood cells are useful to understanding of DS-associated immune dysfunction. We used a Human Exon microarray to characterize gene expression in uncultured peripheral blood cells derived from DS individuals and age-matched controls from two age groups: neonate (N and child (C. A total of 174 transcript clusters (gene-level with eight located on Hsa21 in N group and 383 transcript clusters including 56 on Hsa21 in C group were significantly dysregulated in DS individuals. Microarray data were validated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Functional analysis revealed that the dysregulated genes in DS were significantly enriched in two and six KEGG pathways in N and C group, respectively. These pathways included leukocyte trans-endothelial migration, B cell receptor signaling pathway and primary immunodeficiency, etc., which causally implicated dysfunctional immunity in DS. Our results provided a comprehensive picture of gene expression patterns in DS at the two developmental stages and pointed towards candidate genes and molecular pathways potentially associated with the immune dysfunction in DS.

  2. Genomic survey and gene expression analysis of the VDAC gene family in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X; Tan, Y P; Cheng, G; Liu, X Q; Xia, C J; Luo, F Y; Wang, C T

    2015-12-02

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), also known as a mitochondrial porin, plays an important role in the regulation of metabolic and energetic functions of mitochondria, as well as in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is of major economic importance for commercial hybrid production and a research model for the interaction be-tween nuclear and cytoplasmic genomes. Recent research has revealed that CMS is associated with programmed cell death. Here, we used the Honglian (HL)-CMS line of rice (Oryza sativa) as material to investigate the association of O. sativa VDAC (OsVDAC) expression to CMS. Eight VDACs were extracted from rice in this study. Bioinformatic analysis of the rice VDACs was conducted at the DNA, cDNA, and protein level. Expression patterns of OsVDACs were analyzed in different organs and during different stages of pollen development using sterile line YuetaiA (YTA), and its maintainer line YuetaiB (YTB). Differential expression of OsVDACs between YTA and YTB was observed, suggesting that VDACs may be involved in the formation of HL-CMS.

  3. Marek’s disease virus-encoded microRNAs: genomics, expression and function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the recently discovered small non-coding RNA molecules that have post-transcriptional regulatory functions in many important biological processes. A large number of miRNAs have been found to be encoded by viral genomes, especially in herpesviruses. Previous research regarding miRNAs encoded by herpesviruses, including Marek’s disease virus (MDV), has demonstrated their involvement in lytic replication, latent infection, T-lymphocyte transformation and tumorigenesis. MDV is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus, with the ability to induce tumors in natural hosts; however, formation of these tumors can be prevented by immunization with attenuated or nonpathogenic forms of the virus. Marek’s disease is considered to be a good biomedical model for investigating the biology, genetics, and immunology of tumorigenesis. In this paper, we review the discovery and identification of MDV-encoded miRNAs, along with their genomics, expression profiles, and currently known functions. We also discuss the prospects and techniques possibly applicable to the further investigation of the biological roles of MDV-encoded miRNAs.

  4. Reframed Genome-Scale Metabolic Model to Facilitate Genetic Design and Integration with Expression Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Deqing; Jian, Xingxing; Zhang, Cheng; Hua, Qiang

    2016-06-08

    Genome-scale metabolic network models (GEMs) have played important roles in the design of genetically engineered strains and helped biologists to decipher metabolism. However, due to the complex gene-reaction relationships that exist in model systems, most algorithms have limited capabilities with respect to directly predicting accurate genetic design for metabolic engineering. In particular, methods that predict reaction knockout strategies leading to overproduction are often impractical in terms of gene manipulations. Recently, we proposed a method named LTM (logical transformation of model) to simplify the gene-reaction associations by introducing intermediate pseudo reactions, which makes it possible to generate genetic design. Here, we propose an alternative method to relieve researchers from deciphering complex gene-reactions by adding pseudo gene controlling reactions. In comparison to LTM, this new method introduces fewer pseudo reactions and generates a much smaller model system named as gModel. We showed that gModel allows two seldom reported applications: identification of minimal genomes and design of minimal cell factories within a modified OptKnock framework. In addition, gModel could be used to integrate expression data directly and improve the performance of the E-Fmin method for predicting fluxes. In conclusion, the model transformation procedure will facilitate genetic research based on GEMs, extending their applications.

  5. Multi-scaling hierarchical structure analysis on the sequence of E. coli complete genome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We have applied the newly developed hierarchical structure theory for complex systems to analyze the multi-scaling structures of the nucleotide density distribution along a linear DNA sequence from the complete Escherichia coli genome. The hierarchical symmetry in the nucleotide density distribution was demonstrated. In particular, we have shown that the G, C density distribution that represents a strong H-bonding between the two DNA chains is more coherent with smaller similarity parameter compared to that of A, T density distribution, indicating a better organized multi-scaling fluctuation field for G, C density distribution along the genome sequence. The biological significance of these findings is under investigation.

  6. Genome-wide identification and expression profile of homeodomain-leucine zipper Class I gene family in Cucumis sativus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Fu, Rao; Li, Qiang; Li, Jing; Wang, Lina; Ren, Zhonghai

    2013-12-01

    The HD-Zip proteins comprise one of the largest families of transcription factors in plants. HD-Zip genes have been grouped into four different classes: HD-Zip I to IV. In this study, we described the identification and structural characterization of Class I HD-Zip genes in cucumber. A complete set of 13 HD-Zip I genes were identified in the cucumber genome using Blast search tools and phylogeny. The cucumber HD-Zip I family contained a smaller number of identified genes compared to other higher plants such as Arabidopsis and maize due to the absence of recent gene duplication events. Chromosomal location of these genes revealed that they are distributed unevenly across 5 of 7 chromosomes. Tissue-specific expression profiles showed that 13 cucumber HD-Zip I genes were expressed in at least one of the tissues, which suggested that cucumber HD-Zip I genes took part in many cellular processes. The transcript abundance level analysis during abiotic stress conditions (NaCl, ABA and low temperature treatments) identified a group of HD-Zip I genes that responded to one or more treatments.

  7. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analyses of Aquaporin Gene Family during Development and Abiotic Stress in Banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Hou, Xiaowan; Huang, Chao; Yan, Yan; Tie, Weiwei; Ding, Zehong; Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Juhua; Miao, Hongxia; Lu, Zhiwei; Li, Meiying; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-08-20

    Aquaporins (AQPs) function to selectively control the flow of water and other small molecules through biological membranes, playing crucial roles in various biological processes. However, little information is available on the AQP gene family in bananas. In this study, we identified 47 banana AQP genes based on the banana genome sequence. Evolutionary analysis of AQPs from banana, Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice indicated that banana AQPs (MaAQPs) were clustered into four subfamilies. Conserved motif analysis showed that all banana AQPs contained the typical AQP-like or major intrinsic protein (MIP) domain. Gene structure analysis suggested the majority of MaAQPs had two to four introns with a highly specific number and length for each subfamily. Expression analysis of MaAQP genes during fruit development and postharvest ripening showed that some MaAQP genes exhibited high expression levels during these stages, indicating the involvement of MaAQP genes in banana fruit development and ripening. Additionally, some MaAQP genes showed strong induction after stress treatment and therefore, may represent potential candidates for improving banana resistance to abiotic stress. Taken together, this study identified some excellent tissue-specific, fruit development- and ripening-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MaAQP genes, which could lay a solid foundation for genetic improvement of banana cultivars.

  8. Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analyses of Aquaporin Gene Family during Development and Abiotic Stress in Banana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins (AQPs function to selectively control the flow of water and other small molecules through biological membranes, playing crucial roles in various biological processes. However, little information is available on the AQP gene family in bananas. In this study, we identified 47 banana AQP genes based on the banana genome sequence. Evolutionary analysis of AQPs from banana, Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice indicated that banana AQPs (MaAQPs were clustered into four subfamilies. Conserved motif analysis showed that all banana AQPs contained the typical AQP-like or major intrinsic protein (MIP domain. Gene structure analysis suggested the majority of MaAQPs had two to four introns with a highly specific number and length for each subfamily. Expression analysis of MaAQP genes during fruit development and postharvest ripening showed that some MaAQP genes exhibited high expression levels during these stages, indicating the involvement of MaAQP genes in banana fruit development and ripening. Additionally, some MaAQP genes showed strong induction after stress treatment and therefore, may represent potential candidates for improving banana resistance to abiotic stress. Taken together, this study identified some excellent tissue-specific, fruit development- and ripening-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MaAQP genes, which could lay a solid foundation for genetic improvement of banana cultivars.

  9. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of the ClTCP transcription factors in Citrullus lanatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Pibiao; Guy, Kateta Malangisha; Wu, Weifang; Fang, Bingsheng; Yang, Jinghua; Zhang, Mingfang; Hu, Zhongyuan

    2016-04-12

    The plant-specific TCP transcription factor family, which is involved in the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, performs diverse functions in multiple aspects of plant growth and development. However, no comprehensive analysis of the TCP family in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) has been undertaken previously. A total of 27 watermelon TCP encoding genes distributed on nine chromosomes were identified. Phylogenetic analysis clustered the genes into 11 distinct subgroups. Furthermore, phylogenetic and structural analyses distinguished two homology classes within the ClTCP family, designated Class I and Class II. The Class II genes were differentiated into two subclasses, the CIN subclass and the CYC/TB1 subclass. The expression patterns of all members were determined by semi-quantitative PCR. The functions of two ClTCP genes, ClTCP14a and ClTCP15, in regulating plant height were confirmed by ectopic expression in Arabidopsis wild-type and ortholog mutants. This study represents the first genome-wide analysis of the watermelon TCP gene family, which provides valuable information for understanding the classification and functions of the TCP genes in watermelon.

  10. Poorly conserved ORFs in the genome of the archaea Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 correspond to expressed proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmuely, H; Dinitz, E; Dahan, I; Eichler, J; Fischer, D; Shaanan, B

    2004-05-22

    A large fraction of open reading frames (ORFs) identified as 'hypothetical' proteins correspond to either 'conserved hypothetical' proteins, representing sequences homologous to ORFs of unknown function from other organisms, or to hypothetical proteins lacking any significant sequence similarity to other ORFs in the databases. Elucidating the functions and three-dimensional structures of such orphan ORFs, termed ORFans or poorly conserved ORFs (PCOs), is essential for understanding biodiversity. However, it has been claimed that many ORFans may not encode for expressed proteins. A genome-wide experimental study of 'paralogous PCOs' in the halophilic archaea Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 was conducted. Paralogous PCOs are ORFs with at least one homolog in the same organism, but with no clear homologs in other organisms. The results reveal that mRNA is synthesized for a majority of the Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 paralogous PCO families, including those comprising relatively short proteins, strongly suggesting that these Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 paralogous PCOs correspond to true, expressed proteins. Hence, further computational and experimental studies aimed at characterizing PCOs in this and other organisms are merited. Such efforts could shed light on PCOs' functions and origins, thereby serving to elucidate the vast diversity observed in the genetic material.

  11. Genome-wide characterisation and expression profile of the grapevine ATL ubiquitin ligase family reveal biotic and abiotic stress-responsive and development-related members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Pietro; Regaiolo, Alice; Lovato, Arianna; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Porceddu, Andrea; Camiolo, Salvatore; Wong, Darren; Castellarin, Simone; Vandelle, Elodie; Polverari, Annalisa

    2016-12-02

    The Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) protein family is a class of E3 ubiquitin ligases with a characteristic RING-H2 Zn-finger structure that mediates diverse physiological processes and stress responses in plants. We carried out a genome-wide survey of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) ATL genes and retrieved 96 sequences containing the canonical ATL RING-H2 domain. We analysed their genomic organisation, gene structure and evolution, protein domains and phylogenetic relationships. Clustering revealed several clades, as already reported in Arabidopsis thaliana and rice (Oryza sativa), with an expanded subgroup of grapevine-specific genes. Most of the grapevine ATL genes lacked introns and were scattered among the 19 chromosomes, with a high level of duplication retention. Expression profiling revealed that some ATL genes are expressed specifically during early or late development and may participate in the juvenile to mature plant transition, whereas others may play a role in pathogen and/or abiotic stress responses, making them key candidates for further functional analysis. Our data offer the first genome-wide overview and annotation of the grapevine ATL family, and provide a basis for investigating the roles of specific family members in grapevine physiology and stress responses, as well as potential biotechnological applications.

  12. Genomic organization, evolution, and expression of photoprotein and opsin genes in Mnemiopsis leidyi: a new view of ctenophore photocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schnitzler Christine E

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcium-activated photoproteins are luciferase variants found in photocyte cells of bioluminescent jellyfish (Phylum Cnidaria and comb jellies (Phylum Ctenophora. The complete genomic sequence from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, a representative of the earliest branch of animals that emit light, provided an opportunity to examine the genome of an organism that uses this class of luciferase for bioluminescence and to look for genes involved in light reception. To determine when photoprotein genes first arose, we examined the genomic sequence from other early-branching taxa. We combined our genomic survey with gene trees, developmental expression patterns, and functional protein assays of photoproteins and opsins to provide a comprehensive view of light production and light reception in Mnemiopsis. Results The Mnemiopsis genome has 10 full-length photoprotein genes situated within two genomic clusters with high sequence conservation that are maintained due to strong purifying selection and concerted evolution. Photoprotein-like genes were also identified in the genomes of the non-luminescent sponge Amphimedon queenslandica and the non-luminescent cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, and phylogenomic analysis demonstrated that photoprotein genes arose at the base of all animals. Photoprotein gene expression in Mnemiopsis embryos begins during gastrulation in migrating precursors to photocytes and persists throughout development in the canals where photocytes reside. We identified three putative opsin genes in the Mnemiopsis genome and show that they do not group with well-known bilaterian opsin subfamilies. Interestingly, photoprotein transcripts are co-expressed with two of the putative opsins in developing photocytes. Opsin expression is also seen in the apical sensory organ. We present evidence that one opsin functions as a photopigment in vitro, absorbing light at wavelengths that overlap with peak photoprotein light

  13. Genomic organization, evolution, and expression of photoprotein and opsin genes in Mnemiopsis leidyi: a new view of ctenophore photocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Christine E; Pang, Kevin; Powers, Meghan L; Reitzel, Adam M; Ryan, Joseph F; Simmons, David; Tada, Takashi; Park, Morgan; Gupta, Jyoti; Brooks, Shelise Y; Blakesley, Robert W; Yokoyama, Shozo; Haddock, Steven Hd; Martindale, Mark Q; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2012-12-21

    Calcium-activated photoproteins are luciferase variants found in photocyte cells of bioluminescent jellyfish (Phylum Cnidaria) and comb jellies (Phylum Ctenophora). The complete genomic sequence from the ctenophore Mnemiopsis leidyi, a representative of the earliest branch of animals that emit light, provided an opportunity to examine the genome of an organism that uses this class of luciferase for bioluminescence and to look for genes involved in light reception. To determine when photoprotein genes first arose, we examined the genomic sequence from other early-branching taxa. We combined our genomic survey with gene trees, developmental expression patterns, and functional protein assays of photoproteins and opsins to provide a comprehensive view of light production and light reception in Mnemiopsis. The Mnemiopsis genome has 10 full-length photoprotein genes situated within two genomic clusters with high sequence conservation that are maintained due to strong purifying selection and concerted evolution. Photoprotein-like genes were also identified in the genomes of the non-luminescent sponge Amphimedon queenslandica and the non-luminescent cnidarian Nematostella vectensis, and phylogenomic analysis demonstrated that photoprotein genes arose at the base of all animals. Photoprotein gene expression in Mnemiopsis embryos begins during gastrulation in migrating precursors to photocytes and persists throughout development in the canals where photocytes reside. We identified three putative opsin genes in the Mnemiopsis genome and show that they do not group with well-known bilaterian opsin subfamilies. Interestingly, photoprotein transcripts are co-expressed with two of the putative opsins in developing photocytes. Opsin expression is also seen in the apical sensory organ. We present evidence that one opsin functions as a photopigment in vitro, absorbing light at wavelengths that overlap with peak photoprotein light emission, raising the hypothesis that light

  14. GeneViTo: Visualizing gene-product functional and structural features in genomic datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Promponas Vasilis J

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The availability of increasing amounts of sequence data from completely sequenced genomes boosts the development of new computational methods for automated genome annotation and comparative genomics. Therefore, there is a need for tools that facilitate the visualization of raw data and results produced by bioinformatics analysis, providing new means for interactive genome exploration. Visual inspection can be used as a basis to assess the quality of various analysis algorithms and to aid in-depth genomic studies. Results GeneViTo is a JAVA-based computer application that serves as a workbench for genome-wide analysis through visual interaction. The application deals with various experimental information concerning both DNA and protein sequences (derived from public sequence databases or proprietary data sources and meta-data obtained by various prediction algorithms, classification schemes or user-defined features. Interaction with a Graphical User Interface (GUI allows easy extraction of genomic and proteomic data referring to the sequence itself, sequence features, or general structural and functional features. Emphasis is laid on the potential comparison between annotation and prediction data in order to offer a supplement to the provided information, especially in cases of "poor" annotation, or an evaluation of available predictions. Moreover, desired information can be output in high quality JPEG image files for further elaboration and scientific use. A compilation of properly formatted GeneViTo input data for demonstration is available to interested readers for two completely sequenced prokaryotes, Chlamydia trachomatis and Methanococcus jannaschii. Conclusions GeneViTo offers an inspectional view of genomic functional elements, concerning data stemming both from database annotation and analysis tools for an overall analysis of existing genomes. The application is compatible with Linux or Windows ME-2000-XP operating

  15. Reliable and efficient solution of genome-scale models of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ding; Yang, Laurence; Fleming, Ronan M. T.; Thiele, Ines; Palsson, Bernhard O.; Saunders, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    Constraint-Based Reconstruction and Analysis (COBRA) is currently the only methodology that permits integrated modeling of Metabolism and macromolecular Expression (ME) at genome-scale. Linear optimization computes steady-state flux solutions to ME models, but flux values are spread over many orders of magnitude. Data values also have greatly varying magnitudes. Standard double-precision solvers may return inaccurate solutions or report that no solution exists. Exact simplex solvers based on rational arithmetic require a near-optimal warm start to be practical on large problems (current ME models have 70,000 constraints and variables and will grow larger). We have developed a quadruple-precision version of our linear and nonlinear optimizer MINOS, and a solution procedure (DQQ) involving Double and Quad MINOS that achieves reliability and efficiency for ME models and other challenging problems tested here. DQQ will enable extensive use of large linear and nonlinear models in systems biology and other applications involving multiscale data.

  16. The Cancer Genome Atlas expression profiles of low-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, David D; Cheung, Vincent J; Muller, Karra A; Goyal, Amit; Carter, Bob S; Chen, Clark C

    2014-04-01

    Differentiating between low-grade gliomas (LGGs) of astrocytic and oligodendroglial origin remains a major challenge in neurooncology. Here the authors analyzed The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) profiles of LGGs with the goal of identifying distinct molecular characteristics that would afford accurate and reliable discrimination of astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors. They found that 1) oligodendrogliomas are more likely to exhibit the glioma-CpG island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), relative to low-grade astrocytomas; 2) relative to oligodendrogliomas, low-grade astrocytomas exhibit a higher expression of genes related to mitosis, replication, and inflammation; and 3) low-grade astrocytic tumors harbor microRNA profiles similar to those previously described for glioblastoma tumors. Orthogonal intersection of these molecular characteristics with existing molecular markers, such as IDH1 mutation, TP53 mutation, and 1p19q status, should facilitate accurate and reliable pathological diagnosis of LGGs.

  17. Genomic and expression profiling of human spermatocytic seminomas: primary spermatocyte as tumorigenic precursor and DMRT1 as candidate chromosome 9 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looijenga, Leendert H J; Hersmus, Remko; Gillis, Ad J M; Pfundt, Rolph; Stoop, Hans J; van Gurp, Ruud J H L M; Veltman, Joris; Beverloo, H Berna; van Drunen, Ellen; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Pera, Renee Reijo; Schneider, Dominik T; Summersgill, Brenda; Shipley, Janet; McIntyre, Alan; van der Spek, Peter; Schoenmakers, Eric; Oosterhuis, J Wolter

    2006-01-01

    Spermatocytic seminomas are solid tumors found solely in the testis of predominantly elderly individuals. We investigated these tumors using a genome-wide analysis for structural and numerical chromosomal changes through conventional karyotyping, spectral karyotyping, and array comparative genomic hybridization using a 32 K genomic tiling-path resolution BAC platform (confirmed by in situ hybridization). Our panel of five spermatocytic seminomas showed a specific pattern of chromosomal imbalances, mainly numerical in nature (range, 3-24 per tumor). Gain of chromosome 9 was the only consistent anomaly, which in one case also involved amplification of the 9p21.3-pter region. Parallel chromosome level expression profiling as well as microarray expression analyses (Affymetrix U133 plus 2.0) was also done. Unsupervised cluster analysis showed that a profile containing transcriptional data on 373 genes (difference of > or = 3.0-fold) is suitable for distinguishing these tumors from seminomas/dysgerminomas. The diagnostic markers SSX2-4 and POU5F1 (OCT3/OCT4), previously identified by us, were among the top discriminatory genes, thereby validating the experimental set-up. In addition, novel discriminatory markers suitable for diagnostic purposes were identified, including Deleted in Azospermia (DAZ). Although the seminomas/dysgerminomas were characterized by expression of stem cell-specific genes (e.g., POU5F1, PROM1/CD133, and ZFP42), spermatocytic seminomas expressed multiple cancer testis antigens, including TSP50 and CTCFL (BORIS), as well as genes known to be expressed specifically during prophase meiosis I (TCFL5, CLGN, and LDHc). This is consistent with different cells of origin, the primordial germ cell and primary spermatocyte, respectively. Based on the region of amplification defined on 9p and the associated expression plus confirmatory immunohistochemistry, DMRT1 (a male-specific transcriptional regulator) was identified as a likely candidate gene for

  18. The genomic structure of the human UFO receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, A S; Schleithoff, L; Faust, M; Bartram, C R; Janssen, J W

    1993-02-01

    Using a DNA transfection-tumorigenicity assay we have recently identified the UFO oncogene. It encodes a tyrosine kinase receptor characterized by the juxtaposition of two immunoglobulin-like and two fibronectin type III repeats in its extracellular domain. Here we describe the genomic organization of the human UFO locus. The UFO receptor is encoded by 20 exons that are distributed over a region of 44 kb. Different isoforms of UFO mRNA are generated by alternative splicing of exon 10 and differential usage of two imperfect polyadenylation sites resulting in the presence or absence of 1.5-kb 3' untranslated sequences. Primer extension and S1 nuclease analyses revealed multiple transcriptional initiation sites including a major site 169 bp upstream of the translation start site. The promoter region is GC rich, lacks TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains potential recognition sites for a variety of trans-acting factors, including Sp1, AP-2 and the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein. Proto-UFO and its oncogenic counterpart exhibit identical cDNA and promoter regions sequences. Possible modes of UFO activation are discussed.

  19. Mitochondrial genome structure and evolution in the living fossil vampire squid, Vampyroteuthis infernalis, and extant cephalopods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokobori, Shin-ichi; Lindsay, Dhugal J; Yoshida, Mari; Tsuchiya, Kotaro; Yamagishi, Akihiko; Maruyama, Tadashi; Oshima, Tairo

    2007-08-01

    Complete nucleotide sequences of mitochondrial (mt) genomes of the "living fossil" cephalopod Vampyroteuthis infernalis (Vampyromorpha) and the cuttlefish Sepia esculenta (Sepiida) were determined. The V. infernalis mt genome structure is identical to the incirrate octopod Octopus vulgaris mt genome structure, and is therefore more similar to that of the polyplacophoran Katharina tunicata, than to that of the other "living fossil" cephalopod Nautilus macromphalus. The mt genome structure of S. esculenta is identical to that of Sepia officinalis. Molecular phylogenetic analyses based on the mt protein genes from the completely sequenced cephalopod mt genomes suggested the monophyletic relationship of two myopsid squids Loligo bleekeri and Sepiotheuthis lessoniana, and the monophyletic relationship of two oegopsid squids Watasenia scintillans, and Todarodes pacificus. Sepiida appeared as the sister group of Teuthida (Myopsida + Oegopsida). The phylogenetic position of Vampyromorpha appeared as the sister group of Octopoda, although the monophyly of Vampyromorpha and Decapodiformes cannot be rejected outright by our phylogenetic analyses. The hypothesis that Vampyromorpha is basal among the coleoid cephalopods can be rejected because of low statistical support. Therefore, it is reasonable to recognize three major groups in Coleoidea--Vampyromorpha, Octopoda, and Decapodiformes.

  20. Gene order data from a model amphibian (Ambystoma: new perspectives on vertebrate genome structure and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voss S Randal

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because amphibians arise from a branch of the vertebrate evolutionary tree that is juxtaposed between fishes and amniotes, they provide important comparative perspective for reconstructing character changes that have occurred during vertebrate evolution. Here, we report the first comparative study of vertebrate genome structure that includes a representative amphibian. We used 491 transcribed sequences from a salamander (Ambystoma genetic map and whole genome assemblies for human, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, zebrafish, and the freshwater pufferfish Tetraodon nigroviridis to compare gene orders and rearrangement rates. Results Ambystoma has experienced a rate of genome rearrangement that is substantially lower than mammalian species but similar to that of chicken and fish. Overall, we found greater conservation of genome structure between Ambystoma and tetrapod vertebrates, nevertheless, 57% of Ambystoma-fish orthologs are found in conserved syntenies of four or more genes. Comparisons between Ambystoma and amniotes reveal extensive conservation of segmental homology for 57% of the presumptive Ambystoma-amniote orthologs. Conclusion Our analyses suggest relatively constant interchromosomal rearrangement rates from the euteleost ancestor to the origin of mammals and illustrate the utility of amphibian mapping data in establishing ancestral amniote and tetrapod gene orders. Comparisons between Ambystoma and amniotes reveal some of the key events that have structured the human genome since diversification of the ancestral amniote lineage.

  1. Detecting Heterogeneity in Population Structure Across the Genome in Admixed Populations.

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    McHugh, Caitlin; Brown, Lisa; Thornton, Timothy A

    2016-09-01

    The genetic structure of human populations is often characterized by aggregating measures of ancestry across the autosomal chromosomes. While it may be reasonable to assume that population structure patterns are similar genome-wide in relatively homogeneous populations, this assumption may not be appropriate for admixed populations, such as Hispanics and African-Americans, with recent ancestry from two or more continents. Recent studies have suggested that systematic ancestry differences can arise at genomic locations in admixed populations as a result of selection and nonrandom mating. Here, we propose a method, which we refer to as the chromosomal ancestry differences (CAnD) test, for detecting heterogeneity in population structure across the genome. CAnD can incorporate either local or chromosome-wide ancestry inferred from SNP genotype data to identify chromosomes harboring genomic regions with ancestry contributions that are significantly different than expected. In simulation studies with real genotype data from phase III of the HapMap Project, we demonstrate the validity and power of CAnD. We apply CAnD to the HapMap Mexican-American (MXL) and African-American (ASW) population samples; in this analysis the software RFMix is used to infer local ancestry at genomic regions, assuming admixing from Europeans, West Africans, and Native Americans. The CAnD test provides strong evidence of heterogeneity in population structure across the genome in the MXL sample ([Formula: see text]), which is largely driven by elevated Native American ancestry and deficit of European ancestry on the X chromosomes. Among the ASW, all chromosomes are largely African derived and no heterogeneity in population structure is detected in this sample.

  2. Gene expression profiles in squamous cell cervical carcinoma using array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis.

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    Choi, Y-W; Bae, S M; Kim, Y-W; Lee, H N; Kim, Y W; Park, T C; Ro, D Y; Shin, J C; Shin, S J; Seo, J-S; Ahn, W S

    2007-01-01

    Our aim was to identify novel genomic regions of interest and provide highly dynamic range information on correlation between squamous cell cervical carcinoma and its related gene expression patterns by a genome-wide array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). We analyzed 15 cases of cervical cancer from KangNam St Mary's Hospital of the Catholic University of Korea. Microdissection assay was performed to obtain DNA samples from paraffin-embedded cervical tissues of cancer as well as of the adjacent normal tissues. The bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) array used in this study consisted of 1440 human BACs and the space among the clones was 2.08 Mb. All the 15 cases of cervical cancer showed the differential changes of the cervical cancer-associated genetic alterations. The analysis limit of average gains and losses was 53%. A significant positive correlation was found in 8q24.3, 1p36.32, 3q27.1, 7p21.1, 11q13.1, and 3p14.2 changes through the cervical carcinogenesis. The regions of high level of gain were 1p36.33-1p36.32, 8q24.3, 16p13.3, 1p36.33, 3q27.1, and 7p21.1. And the regions of homozygous loss were 2q12.1, 22q11.21, 3p14.2, 6q24.3, 7p15.2, and 11q25. In the high level of gain regions, GSDMDC1, RECQL4, TP73, ABCF3, ALG3, HDAC9, ESRRA, and RPS6KA4 were significantly correlated with cervical cancer. The genes encoded by frequently lost clones were PTPRG, GRM7, ZDHHC3, EXOSC7, LRP1B, and NR3C2. Therefore, array-CGH analyses showed that specific genomic alterations were maintained in cervical cancer that were critical to the malignant phenotype and may give a chance to find out possible target genes present in the gained or lost clones.

  3. Protein structure similarity clustering (PSSC) and natural product structure as inspiration sources for drug development and chemical genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J; Koch, Marcus A; Waldmann, Herbert; Dekker, Frans

    Finding small molecules that modulate protein function is of primary importance in drug development and in the emerging field of chemical genomics. To facilitate the identification of such molecules, we developed a novel strategy making use of structural conservatism found in protein domain

  4. Protein structure similarity clustering (PSSC) and natural product structure as inspiration sources for drug development and chemical genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Frank J; Koch, Marcus A; Waldmann, Herbert; Dekker, Frans

    2005-01-01

    Finding small molecules that modulate protein function is of primary importance in drug development and in the emerging field of chemical genomics. To facilitate the identification of such molecules, we developed a novel strategy making use of structural conservatism found in protein domain architec

  5. 3D-GNOME: an integrated web service for structural modeling of the 3D genome.

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    Szalaj, Przemyslaw; Michalski, Paul J; Wróblewski, Przemysław; Tang, Zhonghui; Kadlof, Michal; Mazzocco, Giovanni; Ruan, Yijun; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-07-08

    Recent advances in high-throughput chromosome conformation capture (3C) technology, such as Hi-C and ChIA-PET, have demonstrated the importance of 3D genome organization in development, cell differentiation and transcriptional regulation. There is now a widespread need for computational tools to generate and analyze 3D structural models from 3C data. Here we introduce our 3D GeNOme Modeling Engine (3D-GNOME), a web service which generates 3D structures from 3C data and provides tools to visually inspect and annotate the resulting structures, in addition to a variety of statistical plots and heatmaps which characterize the selected genomic region. Users submit a bedpe (paired-end BED format) file containing the locations and strengths of long range contact points, and 3D-GNOME simulates the structure and provides a convenient user interface for further analysis. Alternatively, a user may generate structures using published ChIA-PET data for the GM12878 cell line by simply specifying a genomic region of interest. 3D-GNOME is freely available at http://3dgnome.cent.uw.edu.pl/.

  6. Brain expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS identifies human disease-associated variants.

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    Fanggeng Zou

    Full Text Available Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n=197, temporal cortex n=202 and with other brain pathologies (non-AD, cerebellar n=177, temporal cortex n=197. We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS using 213,528 cisSNPs within ± 100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs significant in both ADs and non-ADs (q<0.05, p=7.70 × 10(-5-1.67 × 10(-82. Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p=1.85 × 10(-5-1.70 × 10(-141. The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10(-6. We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9-3.3 fold enrichment (p<10(-6 of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD-risk association (p<10(-3 in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS and non-CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with functional implications. Our findings

  7. Structure and organization of Marchantia polymorpha chloroplast genome. I. Cloning and gene identification.

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    Ohyama, K; Fukuzawa, H; Kohchi, T; Sano, T; Sano, S; Shirai, H; Umesono, K; Shiki, Y; Takeuchi, M; Chang, Z

    1988-09-20

    We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of chloroplast DNA from a liverwort, Marchantia polymorpha, using a clone bank of chloroplast DNA fragments. The circular genome consists of 121,024 base-pairs and includes two large inverted repeats (IRA and IRB, each 10,058 base-pairs), a large single-copy region (LSC, 81,095 base-pairs), and a small single-copy region (SSC, 19,813 base-pairs). The nucleotide sequence was analysed with a computer to deduce the entire gene organization, assuming the universal genetic code and the presence of introns in the coding sequences. We detected 136 possible genes. 103 gene products of which are related to known stable RNA or protein molecules. Stable RNA genes for four species of ribosomal RNA and 32 species of tRNA were located, although one of the tRNA genes may be defective. Twenty genes encoding polypeptides involved in photosynthesis and electron transport were identified by comparison with known chloroplast genes. Twenty-five open reading frames (ORFs) show structural similarities to Escherichia coli RNA polymerase subunits, 19 ribosomal proteins and two related proteins. Seven ORFs are comparable with human mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase genes. A computer-aided homology search predicted possible chloroplast homologues of bacterial proteins; two ORFs for bacterial 4Fe-4S-type ferredoxin, two for distinct subunits of a protein-dependent transport system, one ORF for a component of nitrogenase, and one for an antenna protein of a light-harvesting complex. The other 33 ORFs, consisting of 29 to 2136 codons, remain to be identified, but some of them seem to be conserved in evolution. Detailed information on gene identification is presented in the accompanying papers. We postulated that there were 22 introns in 20 genes (8 tRNA genes and 12 ORFs), which may be classified into the groups I and II found in fungal mitochondrial genes. The structural gene for ribosomal protein S12 is trans-split on the opposite DNA strand

  8. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals unsuspected molecular alterations in pemphigus foliaceus

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    Malheiros, Danielle; Panepucci, Rodrigo A; Roselino, Ana M; Araújo, Amélia G; Zago, Marco A; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza

    2014-01-01

    Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by bullous skin lesions and the presence of antibodies against desmoglein 1. In this study we sought to contribute to a better understanding of the molecular processes in endemic PF, as the identification of factors that participate in the pathogenesis is a prerequisite for understanding its biological basis and may lead to novel therapeutic interventions. CD4+ T lymphocytes are central to the development of the disease. Therefore, we compared genome-wide gene expression profiles of peripheral CD4+ T cells of various PF patient subgroups with each other and with that of healthy individuals. The patient sample was subdivided into three groups: untreated patients with the generalized form of the disease, patients submitted to immunosuppressive treatment, and patients with the localized form of the disease. Comparisons between different subgroups resulted in 135, 54 and 64 genes differentially expressed. These genes are mainly related to lymphocyte adhesion and migration, apoptosis, cellular proliferation, cytotoxicity and antigen presentation. Several of these genes were differentially expressed when comparing lesional and uninvolved skin from the same patient. The chromosomal regions 19q13 and 12p13 concentrate differentially expressed genes and are candidate regions for PF susceptibility genes and disease markers. Our results reveal genes involved in disease severity, potential therapeutic targets and previously unsuspected processes involved in the pathogenesis. Besides, this study adds original information that will contribute to the understanding of PF's pathogenesis and of the still poorly defined in vivo functions of most of these genes. PMID:24813052

  9. Impact of high predation risk on genome-wide hippocampal gene expression in snowshoe hares.

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    Lavergne, Sophia G; McGowan, Patrick O; Krebs, Charles J; Boonstra, Rudy

    2014-11-01

    The population dynamics of snowshoe hares (Lepus americanus) are fundamental to the ecosystem dynamics of Canada's boreal forest. During the 8- to 11-year population cycle, hare densities can fluctuate up to 40-fold. Predators in this system (lynx, coyotes, great-horned owls) affect population numbers not only through direct mortality but also through sublethal effects. The chronic stress hypothesis posits that high predation risk during the decline severely stresses hares, leading to greater stress responses, heightened ability to mobilize cortisol and energy, and a poorer body condition. These effects may result in, or be mediated by, differential gene expression. We used an oligonucleotide microarray designed for a closely-related species, the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), to characterize differences in genome-wide hippocampal RNA transcript abundance in wild hares from the Yukon during peak and decline phases of a single cycle. A total of 106 genes were differentially regulated between phases. Array results were validated with quantitative real-time PCR, and mammalian protein sequence similarity was used to infer gene function. In comparison to hares from the peak, decline phase hares showed increased expression of genes involved in metabolic processes and hormone response, and decreased expression of immune response and blood cell formation genes. We found evidence for predation risk eff